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Sample records for acetyl xylan esterases

  1. Characterization of Heterologously Expressed Acetyl Xylan Esterase1 Isolated from the Anaerobic Rumen Fungus Neocallimastix frontalis PMA02

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Mi; Song, Jaeyong; Park, Hong-Seog; Park, Hyunjin; Chang, Jongsoo

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl xylan esterase (AXE), which hydrolyzes the ester linkages of the naturally acetylated xylan and thus known to have an important role for hemicellulose degradation, was isolated from the anaerobic rumen fungus Neocallimastix frontatlis PMA02, heterologously expressed in Escherichi coli (E.coli) and characterized. The full-length cDNA encoding NfAXE1 was 1,494 bp, of which 978 bp constituted an open reading frame. The estimated molecular weight of NfAXE1 was 36.5 kDa with 326 amino acid residues, and the calculated isoelectric point was 4.54. The secondary protein structure was predicted to consist of nine α-helixes and 12 β-strands. The enzyme expressed in E.coli had the highest activity at 40°C and pH 8. The purified recombinant NfAXE1 had a specific activity of 100.1 U/mg when p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NA) was used as a substrate at 40°C, optimum temperature. The amount of liberated acetic acids were the highest and the lowest when p-NA and acetylated birchwood xylan were used as substrates, respectively. The amount of xylose released from acetylated birchwod xylan was increased by 1.4 fold when NfAXE1 was mixed with xylanase in a reaction cocktail, implying a synergistic effect of NfAXE1 with xylanase on hemicellulose degradation. PMID:27383808

  2. Enhancement of acetyl xylan esterase activity on cellulose acetate through fusion to a family 3 cellulose binding module.

    PubMed

    Mai-Gisondi, Galina; Turunen, Ossi; Pastinen, Ossi; Pahimanolis, Nikolaos; Master, Emma R

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigates the potential to increase the activity of a family 1 carbohydrate esterase on cellulose acetate through fusion to a family 3 carbohydrate binding module (CBM). Specifically, CtCBM3 from Clostridium thermocellum was fused to the carboxyl terminus of the acetyl xylan esterase (AnAXE) from Aspergillus nidulans, and active forms of both AnAXE and AnAXE-CtCBM3 were produced in Pichia pastoris. CtCBM3 fusion had negligible impact on the thermostability or regioselectivity of AnAXE; activities towards acetylated corncob xylan, 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate, p-nitrophenyl acetate, and cellobiose octaacetate were also unchanged. By contrast, the activity of AnAXE-CtCBM3 on cellulose acetate increased by two to four times over 24 h, with greater differences observed at earlier time points. Binding studies using microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) and a commercial source of cellulose acetate confirmed functional production of the CtCBM3 domain; affinity gel electrophoresis using acetylated xylan also verified the selectivity of CtCBM3 binding to cellulose. Notably, gains in enzyme activity on cellulose acetate appeared to exceed gains in substrate binding, suggesting that fusion to CtCBM3 increases functional associations between the enzyme and insoluble, high molecular weight cellulosic substrates.

  3. Extracellular production of Streptomyces lividans acetyl xylan esterase A in Escherichia coli for rapid detection of activity.

    PubMed

    Nisole, Audrey; Lussier, François-Xavier; Morley, Krista L; Shareck, François; Kazlauskas, Romas J; Dupont, Claude; Pelletier, Joelle N

    2006-04-01

    Acetyl xylan esterase A (AxeA) from Streptomyces lividans belongs to a large family of industrially relevant polysaccharide esterases. AxeA and its truncated form containing only the catalytically competent domain, AxeA(tr), catalyze both the deacetylation of xylan and the N-deacetylation of chitosan. This broad substrate specificity lends additional interest to their characterization and production. Here, we report three systems for extracellular production of AxeA(tr): secretion from the native host S. lividans with the native signal peptide, extracellular production in Escherichia coli with the native signal peptide, and in E. coli with the OmpA signal peptide. Over five to seven days of a shake flask culture, the native host S. lividans with the native signal peptide secreted AxeA(tr) into the extracellular medium in high yield (388 mg/L) with specific activity of 19 U/mg corresponding to a total of 7000 U/L. Over one day of shake flask culture, E. coli with the native secretion signal peptide produced 84-fold less in the extracellular medium (4.6 mg/L), but the specific activity was higher (100 U/mg) corresponding to a total of 460 U/L. A similar E. coli culture using the OmpA signal peptide, produced 10mg/L with a specific activity of 68 U/mg, corresponding to a total of 680 U/L. In 96-well microtiter plates, extracellular production with E. coli gave approximately 30 and approximately 86 microg/mL in S. lividans. Expression in S. lividans with the native signal peptide is best for high level production, while expression in E. coli using the OmpA secretion signal peptide is best for high-throughput expression and screening of variants in microtiter plate format.

  4. Cloning, Purification and Characterization of Acetyl Xylane Esterase from Anoxybacillus flavithermus DSM 2641(T) with Activity on Low Molecular-Weight Acetates.

    PubMed

    Eminoğlu, Ayşenur; Ülker, Serdar; Sandallı, Cemal

    2015-08-01

    Family 4 carbohydrate esterases (CE-4) have deacetylate different forms of acetylated poly/oligosaccharides in nature. This family is recognized with a specific polysaccharide deacetylase domain assigned as NodB homology domain in their secondary structure. Most family 4 carbohydrate esterases have been structurally and biochemically characterized. However, this is the first study about the enzymological function of pdaB-like CE4s from thermophilic bacterium Anoxybacillus flavithermus DSM 2641(T). A. flavithermus WK1 genome harbors five putative CE4 family genes. One of them is 762 bp long and encodes a protein of 253 amino acids in length and it was used as reference sequence in this study. It was described as acetyl xylane esterase (AXE) in genome project and this AfAXE gene was amplified without signal sequence and cloned. The recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3), purified by nickel affinity chromatography and its purity was visualized on SDS-PAGE. The activity of the recombinant enzyme was shown by zymogram analysis with α-naphtyl acetate as a substrate. The enzyme was characterized spectrophotometrically using chromogenic p-nitrophenyl acetate. Optimum temperature and pH were determined as 50 °C and 7.5, respectively. Km and Vmax were determined as 0.43 mM and 3333.33 U/mg, respectively under optimum conditions. To our knowledge this is the first enzymological characterization of a pdaB-like family 4 carbohydrate esterase from the members of Anoxybacillus genus.

  5. Roles of Arabidopsis TBL34 and TBL35 in xylan acetylation and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Youxi; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2016-02-01

    Xylan is one of the major polymers in lignocellulosic biomass and about 60% of its xylosyl residues are acetylated at O-2 and/or O-3. Because acetylation of cell wall polymers contributes to biomass recalcitrance for biofuel production, it is important to investigate the biochemical mechanism underlying xylan acetylation, the knowledge of which could be applied to custom-design biomass composition tailored for biofuel production. In this report, we investigated the functions of Arabidopsis TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE 34 (TBL34) and TBL35, two DUF231-containing proteins, in xylan acetylation. The TBL34 gene was found to be specifically expressed in xylem cells in stems and root-hypocotyls, and both TBL34 and TBL35 were shown to be localized in the Golgi, where xylan biosynthesis occurs. Chemical analysis revealed that simultaneous mutations of TBL34 and TBL35 caused a mild decrease in xylan acetyl content and a specific reduction in xylan 3-O-monoacetylation and 2,3-di-O-acetylation. Furthermore, simultaneous mutations of TBL34, TBL35 and ESKIMO1 (ESK1) resulted in severely collapsed xylem vessels with altered secondary wall structure, and an extremely retarded plant growth. These findings indicate that TBL34 and TBL35 are putative acetyltransferases required for xylan 3-O-monoacetylation and 2,3-di-O-acetylation and that xylan acetylation is essential for normal secondary wall deposition and plant growth. PMID:26795157

  6. Mutations of Arabidopsis TBL32 and TBL33 affect xylan acetylation and secondary wall deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Youxi; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Haghighat, Marziyeh; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Ye, Zheng -Hua; Zhang, Jin -Song

    2016-01-08

    Xylan is a major acetylated polymer in plant lignocellulosic biomass and it can be monoand di-acetylated at O-2 and O-3 as well as mono-acetylated at O-3 of xylosyl residues that is substituted with glucuronic acid (GlcA) at O-2. Based on the finding that ESK1, an Arabidopsis thaliana DUF231 protein, specifically mediates xylan 2-O- and 3-O-monoacetylation, we previously proposed that different acetyltransferase activities are required for regiospecific acetyl substitutions of xylan. Here, we demonstrate the functional roles of TBL32 and TBL33, two ESK1 close homologs, in acetyl substitutions of xylan. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32 and TBL33 resulted in a significant reductionmore » in xylan acetyl content and endoxylanase digestion of the mutant xylan released GlcA-substituted xylooligomers without acetyl groups. Structural analysis of xylan revealed that the tbl32 tbl33 mutant had a nearly complete loss of 3-O-acetylated, 2-O-GlcA-substituted xylosyl residues. A reduction in 3-Omonoacetylated and 2,3-di-O-acetylated xylosyl residues was also observed. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32, TBL33 and ESK1 resulted in a severe reduction in xylan acetyl level down to 15% of that of the wild type, and concomitantly, severely collapsed vessels and stunted plant growth. In particular, the S2 layer of secondary walls in xylem vessels of tbl33 esk1 and tbl32 tbl33 esk1 exhibited an altered structure, indicating abnormal assembly of secondary wall polymers. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that TBL32 and TBL33 play an important role in xylan acetylation and normal deposition of secondary walls.« less

  7. Mutations of Arabidopsis TBL32 and TBL33 Affect Xylan Acetylation and Secondary Wall Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Youxi; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Haghighat, Marziyeh; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Xylan is a major acetylated polymer in plant lignocellulosic biomass and it can be mono- and di-acetylated at O-2 and O-3 as well as mono-acetylated at O-3 of xylosyl residues that is substituted with glucuronic acid (GlcA) at O-2. Based on the finding that ESK1, an Arabidopsis thaliana DUF231 protein, specifically mediates xylan 2-O- and 3-O-monoacetylation, we previously proposed that different acetyltransferase activities are required for regiospecific acetyl substitutions of xylan. Here, we demonstrate the functional roles of TBL32 and TBL33, two ESK1 close homologs, in acetyl substitutions of xylan. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32 and TBL33 resulted in a significant reduction in xylan acetyl content and endoxylanase digestion of the mutant xylan released GlcA-substituted xylooligomers without acetyl groups. Structural analysis of xylan revealed that the tbl32 tbl33 mutant had a nearly complete loss of 3-O-acetylated, 2-O-GlcA-substituted xylosyl residues. A reduction in 3-O-monoacetylated and 2,3-di-O-acetylated xylosyl residues was also observed. Simultaneous mutations of TBL32, TBL33 and ESK1 resulted in a severe reduction in xylan acetyl level down to 15% of that of the wild type, and concomitantly, severely collapsed vessels and stunted plant growth. In particular, the S2 layer of secondary walls in xylem vessels of tbl33 esk1 and tbl32 tbl33 esk1 exhibited an altered structure, indicating abnormal assembly of secondary wall polymers. These results demonstrate that TBL32 and TBL33 play an important role in xylan acetylation and normal deposition of secondary walls. PMID:26745802

  8. Polypeptide having acetyl xylan esterase activity and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Schoonneveld-Bergmans, Margot Elisabeth Francoise; Heijne, Wilbert Herman Marie; Los, Alrik Pieter

    2015-10-20

    The invention relates to a polypeptide comprising the amino acid sequence set out in SEQ ID NO: 2 or an amino acid sequence encoded by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 1, or a variant polypeptide or variant polynucleotide thereof, wherein the variant polypeptide has at least 82% sequence identity with the sequence set out in SEQ ID NO: 2 or the variant polynucleotide encodes a polypeptide that has at least 82% sequence identity with the sequence set out in SEQ ID NO: 2. The invention features the full length coding sequence of the novel gene as well as the amino acid sequence of the full-length functional polypeptide and functional equivalents of the gene or the amino acid sequence. The invention also relates to methods for using the polypeptide in industrial processes. Also included in the invention are cells transformed with a polynucleotide according to the invention suitable for producing these proteins.

  9. The pattern of xylan acetylation suggests xylan may interact with cellulose microfibrils as a twofold helical screw in the secondary plant cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Busse-Wicher, Marta; Gomes, Thiago C F; Tryfona, Theodora; Nikolovski, Nino; Stott, Katherine; Grantham, Nicholas J; Bolam, David N; Skaf, Munir S; Dupree, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between xylan and cellulose microfibrils is important for secondary cell wall properties in vascular plants; however, the molecular arrangement of xylan in the cell wall and the nature of the molecular bonding between the polysaccharides are unknown. In dicots, the xylan backbone of β-(1,4)-linked xylosyl residues is decorated by occasional glucuronic acid, and approximately one-half of the xylosyl residues are O-acetylated at C-2 or C-3. We recently proposed that the even, periodic spacing of GlcA residues in the major domain of dicot xylan might allow the xylan backbone to fold as a twofold helical screw to facilitate alignment along, and stable interaction with, cellulose fibrils; however, such an interaction might be adversely impacted by random acetylation of the xylan backbone. Here, we investigated the arrangement of acetyl residues in Arabidopsis xylan using mass spectrometry and NMR. Alternate xylosyl residues along the backbone are acetylated. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we found that a twofold helical screw conformation of xylan is stable in interactions with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose faces. Tight docking of xylan on the hydrophilic faces is feasible only for xylan decorated on alternate residues and folded as a twofold helical screw. The findings suggest an explanation for the importance of acetylation for xylan–cellulose interactions, and also have implications for our understanding of cell wall molecular architecture and properties, and biological degradation by pathogens and fungi. They will also impact strategies to improve lignocellulose processing for biorefining and bioenergy. PMID:24889696

  10. Isolation of acetyl esterase mutants of Bacillus subtilis 168.

    PubMed Central

    Higerd, T B

    1977-01-01

    Five mutants of Bacillus subtilis 168 defective in an intracellular esterase activity were identified. By polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, four of the mutants were shown to lack esterase B activity, and the fifth lacked esterase A activity. All of the back-crossed esterase mutants were able to sporulate at wild-type frequency and produce exoprotease(s) and antibiotic(s). No difference in motility could be attributed to the esterase mutation. PBS1 transduction analysis showed all the esterase B mutations to be linked to the hisA marker. Images PMID:402361

  11. Expression of mung bean pectin acetyl esterase in potato tubers: effect on acetylation of cell wall polymers and tuber mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Orfila, Caroline; Dal Degan, Florence; Jørgensen, Bodil; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Ray, Peter M; Ulvskov, Peter

    2012-07-01

    A mung bean (Vigna radiata) pectin acetyl esterase (CAA67728) was heterologously expressed in tubers of potato (Solanum tuberosum) under the control of the granule-bound starch synthase promoter or the patatin promoter in order to probe the significance of O-acetylation on cell wall and tissue properties. The recombinant tubers showed no apparent macroscopic phenotype. The enzyme was recovered from transgenic tubers using a high ionic strength buffer and the extract was active against a range of pectic substrates. Partial in vivo de-acetylation of cell wall polysaccharides occurred in the transformants, as shown by a 39% decrease in the degree of acetylation (DA) of tuber cell wall material (CWM). Treatment of CWM using a combination of endo-polygalacturonase and pectin methyl esterase extracted more pectin polymers from the transformed tissue compared to wild type. The largest effect of the pectin acetyl esterase (68% decrease in DA) was seen in the residue from this extraction, suggesting that the enzyme is preferentially active on acetylated pectin that is tightly bound to the cell wall. The effects of acetylation on tuber mechanical properties were investigated by tests of failure under compression and by determination of viscoelastic relaxation spectra. These tests suggested that de-acetylation resulted in a stiffer tuber tissue and a stronger cell wall matrix, as a result of changes to a rapidly relaxing viscoelastic component. These results are discussed in relation to the role of pectin acetylation in primary cell walls and its implications for industrial uses of potato fibres.

  12. Chemotactic activity from rabbit peritoneal neutrophils. Lack of identity with N-acetyl-DL-phenylalanine beta-napthyl esterase.

    PubMed

    Tsung, P K; Showell, H J; Kegeles, S W; Becker, E L

    1976-08-12

    The chemotactic and N-acetyl-DL-phenylalanine beta-naphthyl esterase activities of rabbit peritoneal neutrophils are separable from each other by both DEAE cellulose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. Partially purified esterase obtained from DEAE-cellulose chromatography had molecular weight of 70 000. However, the partially purified fraction contained chemotactic activities with major activity in molecular weight of 28000 and minor activities in the molecular weights of 45000, 21900, 14500 and 10500. Esterase activity is inhibited by 10(-7) M p-nitrophenylethyl-5-chloropentylphosphonate but chemotactic activity is not.

  13. Identification of a bacterial pectin acetyl esterase in Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937.

    PubMed

    Shevchik, V E; Hugouvieux-Cotte-Pattat, N

    1997-06-01

    Erwinia chrysanthemi causes soft-rot diseases of various plants by enzymatic degradation of the pectin in plant cell walls. The structural complexity of pectin requires the combined action of several pectinases for its efficient breakdown. Three types of pectinases have so far been identified in E. chrysanthemi: two pectin methyl esterases (PemA, PemB), a polygalacturonase (PehX), and eight pectate lyases (PelA, PelB, PelC, PelD, PelE, PelL, PelZ, PelX). We report in this paper the analysis of a novel enzyme, the pectin acetyl esterase encoded by the paeY gene. No bacterial form of pectin acetyl esterases has been described previously, while plant tissues and some pectinolytic fungi were found to produce similar enzymes. The paeY gene is present in a cluster of five pectinase-encoding genes, pelA-pelE-pelD-paeY-pemA. The paeY open reading frame is 1650 bases long and encodes a 551-residue precursor protein of 60704Da, including a 25-amino-acid signal peptide. PaeY shares one region of homology with a rhamnogalacturonan acetyl esterase of Aspergillus aculeatus. To characterize the enzyme, the paeY gene was overexpressed and its protein product was purified. PaeY releases acetate from sugar-beet pectin and from various synthetic substrates. Moreover, the enzyme was shown to act in synergy with other pectinases. The de-esterification rate by PaeY increased after previous demethylation of the pectins by PemA and after depolymerization of the pectin by pectate lyases. In addition, the degradation of sugar-beet pectin by pectate lyases is favoured after the removal of methyl and acetyl groups by PemA and PaeY, respectively. The paeY gene was first identified on the basis of its regulation, which shares several characteristics with that of other pectinases. Analysis of the paeY transcription, using gene fusions, revealed that it is induced by pectic catabolic products and is affected by growth phase, oxygen limitation and catabolite repression. Regulation of pae

  14. The effect of acetylated xylan and sugar beet pulp on the expression and secretion of enzymes by Penicillium purpurogenum.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Mario; Callegari, Eduardo; Eyzaguirre, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    Sugar beet pulp is a natural carbon source composed mainly of pectin and cellulose, which is utilized and degraded by the ascomycete Penicillium purpurogenum. The fungus also grows on and degrades acetylated xylan which lacks cellulose and pectin. Both carbon sources have been used in our laboratory to grow the fungus and to purify different enzymes secreted to the medium. The enzymes involved in the complex process of degradation of these carbon sources by the fungus have been explored previously under non-denaturing conditions; multienzyme complexes were separated and some subunits identified by Western blots and mass spectrometry. In this work, proteomic profiles show that the secretome is composed of numerous proteins varying in pI and molecular weight. Some enzymes are common to both growth conditions, while others are specific for each carbon source. The results show that the carbon sources utilized exert strong regulatory control over the proteins secreted. This is the first secretome study from a lignocellulolytic Penicillium.

  15. The Four Arabidopsis Reduced Wall Acetylation Genes are Expressed in Secondary Wall-Containing Cells and Required for the Acetylation of Xylan

    EPA Science Inventory

    Xylan is one of the major polysaccharides in cellulosic biomass, and understanding the mechanisms underlying xylan biosynthesis will potentially help us design strategies to produce cellulosic biomass better suited for biofuel production. Although a number of genes have been show...

  16. A New Family of Carbohydrate Esterases Is Represented by a GDSL Hydrolase/Acetylxylan Esterase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus*

    PubMed Central

    Alalouf, Onit; Balazs, Yael; Volkinshtein, Margarita; Grimpel, Yael; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2011-01-01

    Acetylxylan esterases hydrolyze the ester linkages of acetyl groups at positions 2 and/or 3 of the xylose moieties in xylan and play an important role in enhancing the accessibility of xylanases to the xylan backbone. The hemicellulolytic system of the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 comprises a putative acetylxylan esterase gene, axe2. The gene product belongs to the GDSL hydrolase family and does not share sequence homology with any of the carbohydrate esterases in the CAZy Database. The axe2 gene is induced by xylose, and the purified gene product completely deacetylates xylobiose peracetate (fully acetylated) and hydrolyzes the synthetic substrates 2-naphthyl acetate, 4-nitrophenyl acetate, 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate, and phenyl acetate. The pH profiles for kcat and kcat/Km suggest the existence of two ionizable groups affecting the binding of the substrate to the enzyme. Using NMR spectroscopy, the regioselectivity of Axe2 was directly determined with the aid of one-dimensional selective total correlation spectroscopy. Methyl 2,3,4-tri-O-acetyl-β-d-xylopyranoside was rapidly deacetylated at position 2 or at positions 3 and 4 to give either diacetyl or monoacetyl intermediates, respectively; methyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-β-d-glucopyranoside was initially deacetylated at position 6. In both cases, the complete hydrolysis of the intermediates occurred at a much slower rate, suggesting that the preferred substrate is the peracetate sugar form. Site-directed mutagenesis of Ser-15, His-194, and Asp-191 resulted in complete inactivation of the enzyme, consistent with their role as the catalytic triad. Overall, our results show that Axe2 is a serine acetylxylan esterase representing a new carbohydrate esterase family. PMID:21994937

  17. Improved production of Pseudomonas sp. ECU1011 acetyl esterase by medium design and fed-batch fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xin; Yu, Hui-Lei; Pan, Jiang; Xu, Jian-He

    2012-03-01

    We optimized culture medium and batch-fed fermentation conditions to enhance production of an acetyl esterase from Pseudomonas sp. ECU1011 (PSAE). This enzyme enantioselectively deacetylates α-acetoxyphenylacetic acid. The medium was redesigned by single-factor and statistical optimization. The addition of ZnSO(4) enhanced enzyme production by 37%. Yeast extract concentration was directly associated with the enzyme production. The fermentation was scaled up in a 5-l fermenter with the optimized medium, and the correlations between enzyme production and dissolved oxygen, pH, and feeding strategy were investigated. The fermentation process was highly oxygen-demanding, pH sensitive and mandelic acid-inducible. The fermentation pH was controlled at 7.5 by a pH and dissolved oxygen feedback strategy. Feeding mandelic acid as both a pH regulator and an enzyme inducer increased the enzyme production by 23%. The results of the medium redesign experiments were confirmed and explained in fed-batch culture experiments. Mathematical models describing the fermentation processes indicated that the enzyme production was strongly associated with cell growth. The optimized pH and dissolved oxygen stat fed-batch process resulted high volumetric production of PSAE (4166 U/l, 7.2-fold higher than the initial) without enantioselectivity decline. This process has potential applications for industrial production of chiral mandelic acid or its derivatives. PMID:21792565

  18. Acetylation of woody lignocellulose: significance and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Koutaniemi, Sanna; Tenkanen, Maija; Mellerowicz, Ewa J.

    2013-01-01

    Non-cellulosic cell wall polysaccharides constitute approximately one quarter of usable biomass for human exploitation. In contrast to cellulose, these components are usually substituted by O-acetyl groups, which affect their properties and interactions with other polymers, thus affecting their solubility and extractability. However, details of these interactions are still largely obscure. Moreover, polysaccharide hydrolysis to constituent monosaccharides is hampered by the presence of O-acetyl groups, necessitating either enzymatic (esterase) or chemical de-acetylation, increasing the costs and chemical consumption. Reduction of polysaccharide acetyl content in planta is a way to modify lignocellulose toward improved saccharification. In this review we: (1) summarize literature on lignocellulose acetylation in different tree species, (2) present data and current hypotheses concerning the role of O-acetylation in determining woody lignocellulose properties, (3) describe plant proteins involved in lignocellulose O-acetylation, (4) give examples of microbial enzymes capable to de-acetylate lignocellulose, and (5) discuss prospects for exploiting these enzymes in planta to modify xylan acetylation. PMID:23734153

  19. Evolution of Xylan Substitution Patterns in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms: Implications for Xylan Interaction with Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Busse-Wicher, Marta; Li, An; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Pereira, Caroline S; Tryfona, Theodora; Gomes, Thiago C F; Skaf, Munir S; Dupree, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between cellulose and xylan is important for the load-bearing secondary cell wall of flowering plants. Based on the precise, evenly spaced pattern of acetyl and glucuronosyl (MeGlcA) xylan substitutions in eudicots, we recently proposed that an unsubstituted face of xylan in a 2-fold helical screw can hydrogen bond to the hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose microfibrils. In gymnosperm cell walls, any role for xylan is unclear, and glucomannan is thought to be the important cellulose-binding polysaccharide. Here, we analyzed xylan from the secondary cell walls of the four gymnosperm lineages (Conifer, Gingko, Cycad, and Gnetophyta). Conifer, Gingko, and Cycad xylan lacks acetylation but is modified by arabinose and MeGlcA. Interestingly, the arabinosyl substitutions are located two xylosyl residues from MeGlcA, which is itself placed precisely on every sixth xylosyl residue. Notably, the Gnetophyta xylan is more akin to early-branching angiosperms and eudicot xylan, lacking arabinose but possessing acetylation on alternate xylosyl residues. All these precise substitution patterns are compatible with gymnosperm xylan binding to hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose. Molecular dynamics simulations support the stable binding of 2-fold screw conifer xylan to the hydrophilic face of cellulose microfibrils. Moreover, the binding of multiple xylan chains to adjacent planes of the cellulose fibril stabilizes the interaction further. Our results show that the type of xylan substitution varies, but an even pattern of xylan substitution is maintained among vascular plants. This suggests that 2-fold screw xylan binds hydrophilic faces of cellulose in eudicots, early-branching angiosperm, and gymnosperm cell walls.

  20. Evolution of Xylan Substitution Patterns in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms: Implications for Xylan Interaction with Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Busse-Wicher, Marta; Li, An; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Pereira, Caroline S; Tryfona, Theodora; Gomes, Thiago C F; Skaf, Munir S; Dupree, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between cellulose and xylan is important for the load-bearing secondary cell wall of flowering plants. Based on the precise, evenly spaced pattern of acetyl and glucuronosyl (MeGlcA) xylan substitutions in eudicots, we recently proposed that an unsubstituted face of xylan in a 2-fold helical screw can hydrogen bond to the hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose microfibrils. In gymnosperm cell walls, any role for xylan is unclear, and glucomannan is thought to be the important cellulose-binding polysaccharide. Here, we analyzed xylan from the secondary cell walls of the four gymnosperm lineages (Conifer, Gingko, Cycad, and Gnetophyta). Conifer, Gingko, and Cycad xylan lacks acetylation but is modified by arabinose and MeGlcA. Interestingly, the arabinosyl substitutions are located two xylosyl residues from MeGlcA, which is itself placed precisely on every sixth xylosyl residue. Notably, the Gnetophyta xylan is more akin to early-branching angiosperms and eudicot xylan, lacking arabinose but possessing acetylation on alternate xylosyl residues. All these precise substitution patterns are compatible with gymnosperm xylan binding to hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose. Molecular dynamics simulations support the stable binding of 2-fold screw conifer xylan to the hydrophilic face of cellulose microfibrils. Moreover, the binding of multiple xylan chains to adjacent planes of the cellulose fibril stabilizes the interaction further. Our results show that the type of xylan substitution varies, but an even pattern of xylan substitution is maintained among vascular plants. This suggests that 2-fold screw xylan binds hydrophilic faces of cellulose in eudicots, early-branching angiosperm, and gymnosperm cell walls. PMID:27325663

  1. Synergistic Enhancement of Cellobiohydrolase Performance on Pretreated Corn Stover by Addition of Xylanase and Esterase Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, M. J.; Knoshaug E. P.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

    2007-11-01

    Significant increases in the depolymerization of corn stover cellulose by cellobiohydrolase I (Cel7A) from Trichoderma reesei were observed using small quantities of non-cellulolytic cell wall-degrading enzymes. Purified endoxylanase (XynA), ferulic acid esterase (FaeA), and acetyl xylan esterase (Axe1) all enhanced Cel7A performance on corn stover subjected to hot water pretreatment. In all cases, the addition of these activities improved the effectiveness of the enzymatic hydrolysis in terms of the quantity of cellulose converted per milligram of total protein. Improvement in cellobiose release by the addition of the non-cellulolytic enzymes ranged from a 13-84% increase over Cel7A alone. The most effective combinations included the addition of both XynA and Axe1, which synergistically enhance xylan conversions resulting in additional synergistic improvements in glucan conversion. Additionally, we note a direct relationship between enzymatic xylan removal in the presence of XynA and the enhancement of cellulose hydrolysis by Cel7A.

  2. Evolution of Xylan Substitution Patterns in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms: Implications for Xylan Interaction with Cellulose1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, An; Gomes, Thiago C.F.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between cellulose and xylan is important for the load-bearing secondary cell wall of flowering plants. Based on the precise, evenly spaced pattern of acetyl and glucuronosyl (MeGlcA) xylan substitutions in eudicots, we recently proposed that an unsubstituted face of xylan in a 2-fold helical screw can hydrogen bond to the hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose microfibrils. In gymnosperm cell walls, any role for xylan is unclear, and glucomannan is thought to be the important cellulose-binding polysaccharide. Here, we analyzed xylan from the secondary cell walls of the four gymnosperm lineages (Conifer, Gingko, Cycad, and Gnetophyta). Conifer, Gingko, and Cycad xylan lacks acetylation but is modified by arabinose and MeGlcA. Interestingly, the arabinosyl substitutions are located two xylosyl residues from MeGlcA, which is itself placed precisely on every sixth xylosyl residue. Notably, the Gnetophyta xylan is more akin to early-branching angiosperms and eudicot xylan, lacking arabinose but possessing acetylation on alternate xylosyl residues. All these precise substitution patterns are compatible with gymnosperm xylan binding to hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose. Molecular dynamics simulations support the stable binding of 2-fold screw conifer xylan to the hydrophilic face of cellulose microfibrils. Moreover, the binding of multiple xylan chains to adjacent planes of the cellulose fibril stabilizes the interaction further. Our results show that the type of xylan substitution varies, but an even pattern of xylan substitution is maintained among vascular plants. This suggests that 2-fold screw xylan binds hydrophilic faces of cellulose in eudicots, early-branching angiosperm, and gymnosperm cell walls. PMID:27325663

  3. Molecular Docking and Pharmacological Investigations of Rivastigmine-Fluoxetine and Coumarin–Tacrine hybrids against Acetyl Choline Esterase

    PubMed Central

    Babitha, Pallikkara Pulikkal; Sahila, Mohammed Marunnan; Bandaru, Srinivas; Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Sureshkumar, Sivanpillai

    2015-01-01

    The present AChE inhibitors have been successful in the treatment of Alzheimer׳s Diseases however suffers serious side effects. Therefore in this view, the present study was sought to identify compounds with appreciable pharmacological profile targeting AChE. Analogue of Rivastigmine and Fluoxetine hybrid synthesized by Toda et al, 2003 (dataset1), and Coumarin−Tacrine hybrids synthesized by Qi Sun et al (dataset2) formed the test compounds for the present pharmacological evaluation. p-cholorophenyl substituted Rivastigmine and Fluoxetine hybrid compound (26d) from dataset 1 and −OCH3 substitute Coumarin−Tacrine hybrids (1h) from dataset 2 demonstrated superior pharmacological profile. 26 d showed superior pharmacological profile comparison to the entire compounds in either dataset owing to its better electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding patterns. In order to identify still better compound with pharmacological profile than 26 d and 1h, virtual screening was performed. The best docked compound (PubCId: PubCid: 68874404) showed better affinity than its parent 26 d, however showed poor ADME profile and AMES toxicity. CHEMBL2391475 (PubCid: 71699632) similar to 1h had reduced affinity in comparison to its parent compound 1h. From, our extensive analysis involving binding affinity analysis, ADMET properties predictions and pharmacophoric mappings, we report p-cholorophenyl substituted rivastigmine and fluoxetine hybrid (26d) to be a potential candidate for AcHE inhibition which in addition can overcome narrow therapeutic window of present AChE inhibitors in clinical treatment of Alzheimer׳s disease. Abbreviations AD - Alzheimer׳s Disease, AChE - Acetyl Choline Estarase, OPLS - Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations, PDB - Protein Data Bank. PMID:26420918

  4. Biochemical Characterization and Relative Expression Levels of Multiple Carbohydrate Esterases of the Xylanolytic Rumen Bacterium Prevotella ruminicola 23 Grown on an Ester-Enriched Substrate ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kabel, Mirjam A.; Yeoman, Carl J.; Han, Yejun; Dodd, Dylan; Abbas, Charles A.; de Bont, Jan A. M.; Morrison, Mark; Cann, Isaac K. O.; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2011-01-01

    We measured expression and used biochemical characterization of multiple carbohydrate esterases by the xylanolytic rumen bacterium Prevotella ruminicola 23 grown on an ester-enriched substrate to gain insight into the carbohydrate esterase activities of this hemicellulolytic rumen bacterium. The P. ruminicola 23 genome contains 16 genes predicted to encode carbohydrate esterase activity, and based on microarray data, four of these were upregulated >2-fold at the transcriptional level during growth on an ester-enriched oligosaccharide (XOSFA,Ac) from corn relative to a nonesterified fraction of corn oligosaccharides (AXOS). Four of the 16 esterases (Xyn10D-Fae1A, Axe1-6A, AxeA1, and Axe7A), including the two most highly induced esterases (Xyn10D-Fae1A and Axe1-6A), were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and biochemically characterized. All four enzymes showed the highest activity at physiologically relevant pH (6 to 7) and temperature (30 to 40°C) ranges. The P. ruminicola 23 Xyn10D-Fae1A (a carbohydrate esterase [CE] family 1 enzyme) released ferulic acid from methylferulate, wheat bran, corn fiber, and XOSFA,Ac, a corn fiber-derived substrate enriched in O-acetyl and ferulic acid esters, but exhibited negligible activity on sugar acetates. As expected, the P. ruminicola Axe1-6A enzyme, which was predicted to possess two distinct esterase family domains (CE1 and CE6), released ferulic acid from the same substrates as Xyn10D-Fae1 and was also able to cleave O-acetyl ester bonds from various acetylated oligosaccharides (AcXOS). The P. ruminicola 23 AxeA1, which is not assigned to a CE family, and Axe7A (CE7) were found to be acetyl esterases that had activity toward a broad range of mostly nonpolymeric acetylated substrates along with AcXOS. All enzymes were inhibited by the proximal location of other side groups like 4-O-methylglucuronic acid, ferulic acid, or acetyl groups. The unique diversity of carbohydrate esterases in P. ruminicola 23

  5. Structural and Enzymatic Characterization of NanS (YjhS) a 9-O-Acetyl N-acetylneuraminic Acid Esterase from Escherichia coli O157:H7

    SciTech Connect

    E Rangarajan; K Ruane; A Proteau; J Schrag; R Valladares; C Gonzalez; M Gilbert; A Yakunin; M Cygler

    2011-12-31

    There is a high prevalence of sialic acid in a number of different organisms, resulting in there being a myriad of different enzymes that can exploit it as a fermentable carbon source. One such enzyme is NanS, a carbohydrate esterase that we show here deacetylates the 9 position of 9-O-sialic acid so that it can be readily transported into the cell for catabolism. Through structural studies, we show that NanS adopts a SGNH hydrolase fold. Although the backbone of the structure is similar to previously characterized family members, sequence comparisons indicate that this family can be further subdivided into two subfamilies with somewhat different fingerprints. NanS is the founding member of group II. Its catalytic center contains Ser19 and His301 but no Asp/Glu is present to form the classical catalytic triad. The contribution of Ser19 and His301 to catalysis was confirmed by mutagenesis. In addition to structural characterization, we have mapped the specificity of NanS using a battery of substrates.

  6. Populus GT43 family members group into distinct sets required for primary and secondary wall xylan biosynthesis and include useful promoters for wood modification.

    PubMed

    Ratke, Christine; Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Balasubramanian, Vimal K; Naumann, Marcel; Duncranz, Mathilda Lönnäs; Derba-Maceluch, Marta; Gorzsás, András; Endo, Satoshi; Ezcurra, Ines; Mellerowicz, Ewa J

    2015-01-01

    The plant GT43 protein family includes xylosyltransferases that are known to be required for xylan backbone biosynthesis, but have incompletely understood specificities. RT-qPCR and histochemical (GUS) analyses of expression patterns of GT43 members in hybrid aspen, reported here, revealed that three clades of the family have markedly differing specificity towards secondary wall-forming cells (wood and extraxylary fibres). Intriguingly, GT43A and B genes (corresponding to the Arabidopsis IRX9 clade) showed higher specificity for secondary-walled cells than GT43C and D genes (IRX14 clade), although both IRX9 and IRX14 are required for xylosyltransferase activity. The remaining genes, GT43E, F and G (IRX9-L clade), showed broad expression patterns. Transient transactivation analyses of GT43A and B reporters demonstrated that they are activated by PtxtMYB021 and PNAC085 (master secondary wall switches), mediated in PtxtMYB021 activation by an AC element. The high observed secondary cell wall specificity of GT43B expression prompted tests of the efficiency of its promoter (pGT43B), relative to the CaMV 35S (35S) promoter, for overexpressing a xylan acetyl esterase (CE5) or downregulating REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION (RWA) family genes and thus engineering wood acetylation. CE5 expression was weaker when driven by pGT43B, but it reduced wood acetyl content substantially more efficiently than the 35S promoter. RNAi silencing of the RWA family, which was ineffective using 35S, was achieved when using GT43B promoter. These results show the utility of the GT43B promoter for genetically engineering properties of wood and fibres.

  7. Delignification outperforms alkaline extraction for xylan fingerprinting of oil palm empty fruit bunch.

    PubMed

    Murciano Martínez, Patricia; Kabel, Mirjam A; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-11-20

    Enzyme hydrolysed (hemi-)celluloses from oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFBs) are a source for production of bio-fuels or chemicals. In this study, after either peracetic acid delignification or alkaline extraction, EFB hemicellulose structures were described, aided by xylanase hydrolysis. Delignification of EFB facilitated the hydrolysis of EFB-xylan by a pure endo-β-1,4-xylanase. Up to 91% (w/w) of the non-extracted xylan in the delignified EFB was hydrolysed compared to less than 4% (w/w) of that in untreated EFB. Alkaline extraction of EFB, without prior delignification, yielded only 50% of the xylan. The xylan obtained was hydrolysed only for 40% by the endo-xylanase used. Hence, delignification alone outperformed alkaline extraction as pretreatment for enzymatic fingerprinting of EFB xylans. From the analysis of the oligosaccharide-fingerprint of the delignified endo-xylanase hydrolysed EFB xylan, the structure was proposed as acetylated 4-O-methylglucuronoarabinoxylan.

  8. Human Coronavirus HKU1 Spike Protein Uses O-Acetylated Sialic Acid as an Attachment Receptor Determinant and Employs Hemagglutinin-Esterase Protein as a Receptor-Destroying Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xingchuan; Dong, Wenjuan; Milewska, Aleksandra; Golda, Anna; Qi, Yonghe; Zhu, Quan K.; Marasco, Wayne A.; Baric, Ralph S.; Sims, Amy C.; Pyrc, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human coronavirus (hCoV) HKU1 is one of six hCoVs identified to date and the only one with an unidentified cellular receptor. hCoV-HKU1 encodes a hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) protein that is unique to the group a betacoronaviruses (group 2a). The function of HKU1-HE remains largely undetermined. In this study, we examined binding of the S1 domain of hCoV-HKU1 spike to a panel of cells and found that the S1 could specifically bind on the cell surface of a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line, RD. Pretreatment of RD cells with neuraminidase (NA) and trypsin greatly reduced the binding, suggesting that the binding was mediated by sialic acids on glycoproteins. However, unlike other group 2a CoVs, e.g., hCoV-OC43, for which 9-O-acetylated sialic acid (9-O-Ac-Sia) serves as a receptor determinant, HKU1-S1 bound with neither 9-O-Ac-Sia-containing glycoprotein(s) nor rat and mouse erythrocytes. Nonetheless, the HKU1-HE was similar to OC43-HE, also possessed sialate-O-acetylesterase activity, and acted as a receptor-destroying enzyme (RDE) capable of eliminating the binding of HKU1-S1 to RD cells, whereas the O-acetylesterase-inactive HKU1-HE mutant lost this capacity. Using primary human ciliated airway epithelial (HAE) cell cultures, the only in vitro replication model for hCoV-HKU1 infection, we confirmed that pretreatment of HAE cells with HE but not the enzymatically inactive mutant blocked hCoV-HKU1 infection. These results demonstrate that hCoV-HKU1 exploits O-Ac-Sia as a cellular attachment receptor determinant to initiate the infection of host cells and that its HE protein possesses the corresponding sialate-O-acetylesterase RDE activity. IMPORTANCE Human coronaviruses (hCoV) are important human respiratory pathogens. Among the six hCoVs identified to date, only hCoV-HKU1 has no defined cellular receptor. It is also unclear whether hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) protein plays a role in viral entry. In this study, we found that, similarly to other members of the

  9. Evolutionary Conservation of Xylan Biosynthetic Genes in Selaginella moellendorffii and Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Haghighat, Marziyeh; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Xylan is a major cross-linking hemicellulose in secondary walls of vascular tissues, and the recruitment of xylan as a secondary wall component was suggested to be a pivotal event for the evolution of vascular tissues. To decipher the evolution of xylan structure and xylan biosynthetic genes, we analyzed xylan substitution patterns and characterized genes mediating methylation of glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains in xylan of the model seedless vascular plant, Selaginella moellendorffii, and investigated GT43 genes from S. moellendorffii and the model non-vascular plant, Physcomitrella patens, for their roles in xylan biosynthesis. Using nuclear magentic resonance spectroscopy, we have demonstrated that S. moellendorffii xylan consists of β-1,4-linked xylosyl residues subsituted solely with methylated GlcA residues and that xylans from both S. moellendorffii and P. patens are acetylated at O-2 and O-3. To investigate genes responsible for GlcA methylation of xylan, we identified two DUF579 genes in the S. moellendorffii genome and showed that one of them, SmGXM, encodes a glucuronoxylan methyltransferase capable of adding the methyl group onto the GlcA side chain of xylooligomers. Furthermore, we revealed that the two GT43 genes in S. moellendorffii, SmGT43A and SmGT43B, are functional orthologs of the Arabidopsis xylan backbone biosynthetic genes IRX9 and IRX14, respectively, indicating the evolutionary conservation of the involvement of two functionally non-redundant groups of GT43 genes in xylan backbone biosynthesis between seedless and seed vascular plants. Among the five GT43 genes in P. patens, PpGT43A was found to be a functional ortholog of Arabidopsis IRX9, suggesting that the recruitment of GT43 genes in xylan backbone biosynthesis occurred when non-vascular plants appeared on land. PMID:27345025

  10. Cloning, overexpression in Escherichia coli, and characterization of a thermostable fungal acetylxylan esterase from Talaromyces emersonii.

    PubMed

    Waters, Deborah M; Murray, Patrick G; Miki, Yuta; Martínez, Angel T; Tuohy, Maria G; Faulds, Craig B

    2012-05-01

    The gene encoding an acetylxylan esterase (AXE1) from the thermophilic ascomycete Talaromyces emersonii was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and characterized. This form of AXE1, rTeAXE1, exhibits increased thermostability and activity at a higher temperature than other known fungal acetyl esterases, thus having huge potential application in biomass bioconversion to high value chemicals or biofuels. PMID:22407679

  11. Spatial and temporal variability of xylan distribution in differentiating secondary xylem of hybrid aspen.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Sik; Sandquist, David; Sundberg, Björn; Daniel, Geoffrey

    2012-06-01

    Xylans occupy approximately one-third of the cell wall components in hardwoods and their chemical structures are well understood. However, the microdistribution of xylans (O-acetyl-4-O-methylglucuronoxylans, AcGXs) in the cell wall and their correlation with functional properties of cells in hardwood xylem is poorly understood. We demonstrate here the spatial and temporal distribution of xylans in secondary xylem cells of hybrid aspen using immunolocalization with LM10 and LM11 antibodies. Xylan labeling was detected earliest in fibers at the cell corner of the S₁ layer, and then later in vessels and ray cells respectively. Fibers showed a heterogeneous labeling pattern in the mature cell wall with stronger labeling of low substituted xylans (lsAcGXs) in the outer than inner cell wall. In contrast, vessels showed uniform labeling in the mature cell wall with stronger labeling of lsAcGXs than fibers. Xylan labeling in ray cells was detected much later than that in fibers and vessels, but was also detected at the beginning of secondary cell wall formation as in fibers and vessels with uniform labeling in the cell wall regardless of developmental stage. Interestingly, pit membranes including fiber-, vessel- and ray-vessel pits showed strong labeling of highly substituted xylans (hsAcGXs) during differentiation, although this labeling gradually disappeared during pit maturation. Together our observations indicate that there are temporal and spatial variations of xylan deposition and chemical structure of xylans between cells in aspen xylem. Differences in xylan localization between aspen (hardwood) and cedar (softwood) are also discussed.

  12. Delignification outperforms alkaline extraction for xylan fingerprinting of oil palm empty fruit bunch.

    PubMed

    Murciano Martínez, Patricia; Kabel, Mirjam A; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-11-20

    Enzyme hydrolysed (hemi-)celluloses from oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFBs) are a source for production of bio-fuels or chemicals. In this study, after either peracetic acid delignification or alkaline extraction, EFB hemicellulose structures were described, aided by xylanase hydrolysis. Delignification of EFB facilitated the hydrolysis of EFB-xylan by a pure endo-β-1,4-xylanase. Up to 91% (w/w) of the non-extracted xylan in the delignified EFB was hydrolysed compared to less than 4% (w/w) of that in untreated EFB. Alkaline extraction of EFB, without prior delignification, yielded only 50% of the xylan. The xylan obtained was hydrolysed only for 40% by the endo-xylanase used. Hence, delignification alone outperformed alkaline extraction as pretreatment for enzymatic fingerprinting of EFB xylans. From the analysis of the oligosaccharide-fingerprint of the delignified endo-xylanase hydrolysed EFB xylan, the structure was proposed as acetylated 4-O-methylglucuronoarabinoxylan. PMID:27561506

  13. Reducing the heterogeneity of xylan through processing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Johnson, Amanda M; Barone, Justin R; Renneckar, Scott

    2016-10-01

    Glycerol thermal processing (GTP) of hardwood biomass at temperatures between 200 and 240°C facilitated stepwise biopolymer fractionation, while limiting significant degradation of the major hemicellulose, glucuronoxylan, into water-extractable oligosaccharides. After GTP pretreatment and sequential water and organic solvent extraction, up to 80% of the initial xylan remained in the pretreated biomass. The majority of the xylan from GTP pretreated and water/solvent extracted biomass was removed using a mild alkali extraction and the composition was compared to xylan directly isolated from untreated hardwood. The precipitated xylan from the neutralized alkaline filtrate was isolated as a water insoluble xylan portion (WIX). The residual xylan dissolved in the neutralized filtrate was precipitated in cold methanol and recovered as the water soluble xylan portion (WSX). Results showed that xylan in WIX was in a polymeric form with a number average degree of polymerization (DP) over 100, whereas the WSX had a much lower average DP of 27 (ca) and contained more substitution. As the processing severity increased during GTP pretreatment, the proportion of WIX increased and the purity of the xylan within the WIX sample reached 84% based on compositional analysis. FT-IR analysis of WIX revealed that xylan isolated after GTP contained peaks related to a reduced carbonyl signal compared to the control. Furthermore, crude WSX contained less xylan with more lignin contamination at severe GTP conditions. The recovery of the xylan in two portions facilitated a preferential purification strategy resulting in WIX with an extremely narrow polydispersity index between 1.1 and 1.25, dependent upon the GTP severity. This study provided insight into fractionating higher molecular weight xylan that may serve value-added applications such as healthcare materials and advanced packaging. PMID:27312636

  14. Mechanism of action of Neisseria gonorrhoeae O-acetylpeptidoglycan esterase, an SGNH serine esterase.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, John M; Weadge, Joel T; Clarke, Anthony J

    2013-01-25

    O-Acetylpeptidoglycan esterase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae functions to release O-acetyl groups from the C-6 position of muramoyl residues in O-acetylated peptidoglycan, thereby permitting the continued metabolism of this essential cell wall heteropolymer. It has been demonstrated to be a serine esterase with sequence similarity to the family CE-3 carbohydrate esterases of the CAZy classification system. In the absence of a three-dimensional structure for any Ape, further knowledge of its structure and function relationship is dependent on modeling and kinetic studies. In this study, we predicted Neisseria gonorrhoeae Ape1a to be an SGNH hydrolase with an adopted α/β-hydrolase fold containing a central twisted four-stranded parallel β-sheet flanked by six α-helices with the putative catalytic triad, Asp-366, His-369, and Ser-80 appropriately aligned within a pocket. The role of eight invariant and highly conserved residues localized to the active site was investigated by site-directed replacements coupled with kinetic characterization and binding studies of the resultant engineered enzymes. Based on these data and theoretical considerations, Gly-236 and Asn-268 were identified as participating at the oxyanion hole to stabilize the tetrahedral species in the reaction mechanism, whereas Gly-78, Asp-79, His-81, Asn-235, Thr-267, and Val-368 are proposed to position appropriately the catalytic residues and participate in substrate binding. PMID:23209280

  15. Mapping sugar beet pectin acetylation pattern.

    PubMed

    Ralet, Marie-Christine; Cabrera, Juan Carlos; Bonnin, Estelle; Quéméner, Bernard; Hellìn, Pilar; Thibault, Jean-François

    2005-08-01

    Homogalacturonan-derived partly methylated and/or acetylated oligogalacturonates were recovered after enzymatic hydrolysis (endo-polygalacturonase+pectin methyl esterase+side-chain degrading enzymes) of sugar beet pectin followed by anion-exchange and size exclusion chromatography. Around 90% of the GalA and 75% of the acetyl groups present in the initial sugar beet pectin were recovered as homogalacturonan-derived oligogalacturonates, the remaining GalA and acetyl belonging to rhamnogalacturonic regions. Around 50% of the acetyl groups present in sugar beet homogalacturonans were recovered as partly methylated and/or acetylated oligogalacturonates of degree of polymerisation 5 whose structures were determined by electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (ESI-IT-MSn). 2-O-acetyl- and 3-O-acetyl-GalA were detected in roughly similar amounts but 2,3-di-O-acetylation was absent. Methyl-esterified GalA residues occurred mainly upstream 2-O-acetyl GalA. Oligogalacturonates containing GalA residues that are at once methyl- and acetyl-esterified were recovered in very limited amounts. A tentative mapping of the distribution of acetyl and methyl esters within sugar beet homogalacturonans is proposed. Unsubstituted GalA residues are likely to be present in limited amounts (approximately 10% of total GalA residues), due to the fact that methyl and acetyl groups are assumed to be most often not carried by the same residues.

  16. Probing Xylan-Specific Raman Bands for Label-Free Imaging Xylan in Plant Cell Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Yining; Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Tucker, Melvin P.; Vinzant, Todd; Himmel, Michael E.

    2015-06-15

    Xylan constitutes a significant portion of biomass (e.g. 22% in corn stover used in this study). Xylan is also an important source of carbohydrates, besides cellulose, for renewable and sustainable energy applications. Currently used method for the localization of xylan in biomass is to use fluorescence confocal microscope to image the fluorescent dye labeled monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to xylan. With the rapid adoption of the Raman-based label-free chemical imaging techniques in biology, identifying Raman bands that are unique to xylan would be critical for the implementation of the above label-free techniques for in situ xylan imaging. Unlike lignin and cellulose that have long be assigned fingerprint Raman bands, specific Raman bands for xylan remain unclear. The major challenge is the cellulose in plant cell wall, which has chemical units highly similar to that of xylan. Here we report using xylanase to specifically remove xylan from feedstock. Under various degree of xylan removal, with minimum impact to other major cell wall components, i.e. lignin and cellulose, we have identified Raman bands that could be further tested for chemical imaging of xylan in biomass in situ.

  17. Chemical divisions in the medial geniculate body and surrounding paralaminar nuclei of the rat: quantitative comparison of cell density, NADPH diaphorase, acetyl cholin esterase and basal expression of c-fos.

    PubMed

    Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E; Pérez-Villalba, Ana; Teruel-Martí, Vicent; Ruiz-Torner, Amparo

    2004-11-01

    Quantitative methods of cell density, the intensities of both acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) and NADPH diaphorase (NADPHd), as well as the basal expression of c-fos, have been carried out in order to study the anatomical divisions of the medial geniculate body (MGB) and the group of nuclei located ventromedially to the MGB called the paralaminar complex (PL). The MGB was composed of the dorsal (MGd), and the ventral (MGv) divisions. We included the medial, or the magnocellular division (MGm), in the PL complex. MGd was composed of a dorsolateral (DL) core and a belt. The belt was composed of the suprageniculate (SG), the deep dorsal (DD), the caudo-medial (CM) and the caudo-dorsal (CD) nuclei. In the MGv, the basal expression of c-fos was the only way to trace a clear boundary between the ovoid (Ov) and the ventrolateral (VL) divisions. However, the marginal zone (MZ) was clearly and contrastingly different. The PL was considered to be composed of: the MGm, the posterior intralaminar nucleus (PIN), the peripeduncular nucleus (PP) and the nucleus subparafascicularis lateralis (SPFL). The MGm and the PIN share most of the chemical features, meanwhile both SPFL and PP displayed different patterns of NADPHd reactivity. The study of cell density on Giemsa stained sections confirmed main divisions of the area. AChE and NADPHd methods allowed the main MGB divisions to be discriminated. The differences between subdivisions were emphasized when cell density and c-fos activity were quantified in each nucleus. Each MGB division displayed a different pattern of c-fos activity under basal conditions. Thus, c-fos basal expression was a particular feature in each MGB or PL nucleus.

  18. Comparison of fungal carbohydrate esterases of family CE16 on artificial and natural substrates.

    PubMed

    Puchart, Vladimír; Agger, Jane W; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Várnai, Anikó; Westereng, Bjørge; Biely, Peter

    2016-09-10

    The enzymatic conversion of acetylated hardwood glucuronoxylan to functional food oligomers, biochemicals or fermentable monomers requires besides glycoside hydrolases enzymes liberating acetic acid esterifying position 2 and/or 3 in xylopyranosyl (Xylp) residues. The 3-O-acetyl group at internal Xylp residues substituted by MeGlcA is the only acetyl group of hardwood acetylglucuronoxylan and its fragments not attacked by acetylxylan esterases of carbohydrate esterase (CE) families 1, 4, 5 and 6 and by hemicellulolytic acetyl esterases classified in CE family 16. Monoacetylated aldotetraouronic acid 3″-Ac(3)MeGlcA(3)Xyl3, generated from the polysaccharide by GH10 endoxylanases, appears to be one of the most resistant fragments. The presence of the two substituents on the non-reducing-end Xylp residue prevents liberation of MeGlcA by α-glucuronidase of family GH67 and blocks the action of acetylxylan esterases. The Ac(3)MeGlcA(3)Xyl3 was isolated from an enzymatic hydrolysate of birchwood acetylglucuronoxylan and characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopy as a mixture of two positional isomers, 3″-Ac(3)MeGlcA(3)Xyl3 and 4″-Ac(3)MeGlcA(3)Xyl3, the latter being the result of acetyl group migration. The mixture was used as a substrate for three members of CE16 family of fungal origin. Trichoderma reesei CE16 esterase, inactive on polymeric substrate, deacetylated both isomers. Podospora anserina and Aspergillus niger esterases, active on acetylglucuronoxylan, deesterified effectively only the 4″-isomer. The results indicate catalytic diversity among CE16 enzymes, but also their common and unifying catalytic ability to exo-deacetylate positions 3 and 4 on non-reducing-end Xylp residues, which is an important step in plant hemicellulose saccharification. PMID:27439201

  19. β-Glucuronidase-coupled assays of glucuronoyl esterases.

    PubMed

    Fraňová, Lucia; Puchart, Vladimír; Biely, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Glucuronoyl esterases (GEs) are microbial enzymes with potential to cleave the ester bonds between lignin alcohols and xylan-bound 4-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid in plant cell walls. This activity renders GEs attractive research targets for biotechnological applications. One of the factors impeding the progress in GE research is the lack of suitable substrates. In this work, we report a facile preparation of methyl esters of chromogenic 4-nitrophenyl and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl β-D-glucuronides for qualitative and quantitative GE assay coupled with β-glucuronidase as the auxiliary enzyme. The indolyl derivative affording a blue indigo-type product is suitable for rapid and sensitive assay of GE in commercial preparations as well as for high throughput screening of microorganisms and genomic and metagenomic libraries. PMID:27452816

  20. A glucuronoyl esterase from Acremonium alcalophilum cleaves native lignin-carbohydrate ester bonds.

    PubMed

    Arnling Bååth, Jenny; Giummarella, Nicola; Klaubauf, Sylvia; Lawoko, Martin; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2016-08-01

    The Glucuronoyl esterases (GE) have been proposed to target lignin-carbohydrate (LC) ester bonds between lignin moieties and glucuronic acid side groups of xylan, but to date, no direct observations of enzymatic cleavage on native LC ester bonds have been demonstrated. In the present investigation, LCC fractions from spruce and birch were treated with a recombinantly produced GE originating from Acremonium alcalophilum (AaGE1). A combination of size exclusion chromatography and (31) P NMR analyses of phosphitylated LCC samples, before and after AaGE1 treatment provided the first evidence for cleavage of the LC ester linkages existing in wood. PMID:27397104

  1. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  2. Improved biomass degradation using fungal glucuronoyl-esterases-hydrolysis of natural corn fiber substrate.

    PubMed

    d'Errico, Clotilde; Börjesson, Johan; Ding, Hanshu; Krogh, Kristian B R M; Spodsberg, Nikolaj; Madsen, Robert; Monrad, Rune Nygaard

    2016-02-10

    Lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCCs) are in part responsible for the recalcitrance of lignocellulosics in relation to industrial utilization of biomass for biofuels. Glucuronoyl esterases (GEs) belonging to the carbohydrate esterase family 15 have been proposed to be able to degrade ester LCCs between glucuronic acids in xylans and lignin alcohols. By means of synthesized complex LCC model substrates we provide kinetic data suggesting a preference of fungal GEs for esters of bulky arylalkyl alcohols such as ester LCCs. Furthermore, using natural corn fiber substrate we report the first examples of improved degradation of lignocellulosic biomass by the use of GEs. Improved C5 sugar, glucose and glucuronic acid release was observed when heat pretreated corn fiber was incubated in the presence of GEs from Cerrena unicolor and Trichoderma reesei on top of different commercial cellulase/hemicellulase preparations. These results emphasize the potential of GEs for delignification of biomass thereby improving the overall yield of fermentable sugars for biofuel production. PMID:26712478

  3. Improved biomass degradation using fungal glucuronoyl-esterases-hydrolysis of natural corn fiber substrate.

    PubMed

    d'Errico, Clotilde; Börjesson, Johan; Ding, Hanshu; Krogh, Kristian B R M; Spodsberg, Nikolaj; Madsen, Robert; Monrad, Rune Nygaard

    2016-02-10

    Lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCCs) are in part responsible for the recalcitrance of lignocellulosics in relation to industrial utilization of biomass for biofuels. Glucuronoyl esterases (GEs) belonging to the carbohydrate esterase family 15 have been proposed to be able to degrade ester LCCs between glucuronic acids in xylans and lignin alcohols. By means of synthesized complex LCC model substrates we provide kinetic data suggesting a preference of fungal GEs for esters of bulky arylalkyl alcohols such as ester LCCs. Furthermore, using natural corn fiber substrate we report the first examples of improved degradation of lignocellulosic biomass by the use of GEs. Improved C5 sugar, glucose and glucuronic acid release was observed when heat pretreated corn fiber was incubated in the presence of GEs from Cerrena unicolor and Trichoderma reesei on top of different commercial cellulase/hemicellulase preparations. These results emphasize the potential of GEs for delignification of biomass thereby improving the overall yield of fermentable sugars for biofuel production.

  4. Degradation mechanism of monosaccharides and xylan under pyrolytic conditions with theoretic modeling on the energy profiles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shurong; Ru, Bin; Lin, Haizhou; Luo, Zhongyang

    2013-09-01

    Xylan and three monosaccharides (mannose, galactose, and arabinose) were selected as model compounds to investigate the mechanism of hemicellulose pyrolysis. The evolution of several typical pyrolysis products were observed by thermogravimetric analysis coupled to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Monosaccharides underwent similar pyrolysis routes involving ring opening and secondary decomposition. Breakage of the O-acetyl groups and 4-O-methylglucuronic acid units in xylan branches resulted in its different pyrolysis behavior for the formation of acetic acid, CO2, and CO. The detailed reaction pathways of the monosaccharides were studied using density functional theory calculations. Furfural formation was more favorable than the formation of 1-hydroxy-2-propanone and 4-hydroxydihydrofuran-2(3H)-one during xylose degradation. However, in the pyrolysis of mannose and galactose, formation of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde was preferred because of the high energy barrier of the dissociation of the hydroxymethyl group. Meanwhile, the breakage of O-acetyl groups leading to acetic acid formation easily occurred because of its lower energy barrier. PMID:23819973

  5. Mannich reaction of polysaccharides: Xylan functionalization in aqueous basic medium.

    PubMed

    Ünlü, Cüneyt H; Kutlu, Meltem; Atıcı, Oya Galioğlu

    2015-01-01

    In this study modification of xylan via Mannich reaction in aqueous basic solution to obtain dimethylaminomethylated products and characterization of modified xylan were examined. Components were xylan (obtained from corn cob and used without modification) as active hydrogen containing compound, formaldehyde as carbonyl compound having no α-hydrogen and dimethylamine. Mannich reaction was used with different parameters such as component concentration, reaction temperature, and time. The highest modification was observed about 35°C with a nitrogen content of 4.6% by weight indicating successive modification. Both 1D and 2D NMR measurements displayed new signals related with aminomethyl groups. Spectral characterizations indicated that aminomethylation took place on oxygen sites. Moreover modified xylan could form film while xylan could not without an auxiliary agent. Antimicrobial activity tests indicated that modified xylan acted as a bacteriostatic material. PMID:25965452

  6. Xylan--a possible filler and disintegrant for tablets.

    PubMed

    Juslin, M; Paronen, P

    1984-04-01

    Xylan, a novel possible adjuvant for tablets was tested and compared with modified starch, Sta-Rx 1500, for weight variation, strength and disintegration of tablets. There was no remarkable difference in weight variation between the tablets of the corresponding compositions. The tablets containing xylan were stronger and disintegrated more rapidly than those containing modified starch. PMID:6144774

  7. Hydrolysis kinetics of tulip tree xylan in hot compressed water.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Junho; Lee, Hun Wook; Sim, Seungjae; Myint, Aye Aye; Park, Hee Jeong; Lee, Youn-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass, a promising renewable resource, can be converted into numerous valuable chemicals post enzymatic saccharification. However, the efficacy of enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass is low; therefore, pretreatment is necessary to improve the efficiency. Here, a kinetic analysis was carried out on xylan hydrolysis, after hot compressed water pretreatment of the lignocellulosic biomass conducted at 180-220°C for 5-30min, and on subsequent xylooligosaccharide hydrolysis. The weight ratio of fast-reacting xylan to slow-reacting xylan was 5.25 in tulip tree. Our kinetic results were applied to three different reaction systems to improve the pretreatment efficiency. We found that semi-continuous reactor is promising. Lower reaction temperatures and shorter space times in semi-continuous reactor are recommended for improving xylan conversion and xylooligosaccharide yield. In the theoretical calculation, 95% of xylooligosaccharide yield and xylan conversion were achieved simultaneously with high selectivity (desired product/undesired product) of 100 or more.

  8. Xylan-cellulose films: improvement of hydrophobicity, thermal and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Gordobil, Oihana; Egüés, Itziar; Urruzola, Iñaki; Labidi, Jalel

    2014-11-01

    Xylan-rich hemicellulose from corn cob has been used for new material elaboration. Commercial cellulose was used as reinforcement in different percentages to improve properties of the films. Two types of composites were elaborated by solvent casting. Hydrophilic films, composed by bleached hemicellulose (BH), unmodified cellulose and glycerol as plasticizer, and hydrophobic films formed by acetylated bleached hemicellulose (BAH) and acetylated cellulose. The degree of substitution of BAH was 1.8 and acetylated cellulose presented a degree of substitution of 0.54. Thermal and mechanical properties of films were analyzed. A significant improvement was observed in the thermal behavior of hydrophobic films (Tmax ∼ 368 °C) respect to hydrophilic films (Tmax ∼ 300 °C). Although the addition of cellulose clearly increase the properties of both type of films, hydrophobic films (Young's modulus ∼ 2300 MPa, strength ∼ 44.1MPa, strain at break ∼ 5.7%) showed better mechanical properties than hydrophilic films (Young's modulus ∼ 3 MPa, strength ∼ 3.3 MPa, strain at break ∼ 5.3%). PMID:25129716

  9. Assembly of debranched xylan from solution and on nanocellulosic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Toon J; Stépán, Agnes M; Toriz, Guillermo; Renneckar, Scott; Karabulut, Erdem; Wågberg, Lars; Gatenholm, Paul

    2014-03-10

    This study focused on the assembly characteristics of debranched xylan onto cellulose surfaces. A rye arabinoxylan polymer with an initial arabinose/xylose ratio of 0.53 was debranched with an oxalic acid treatment as a function of time. The resulting samples contained reduced arabinose/xylose ratios significantly affecting the molecular architecture and solution behavior of the biopolymer. With this treatment, an almost linear xylan with arabinose DS of only 0.04 was obtained. The removal of arabinose units resulted in the self-assembly of the debranched polymer in water into stable nanoparticle aggregates with a size around 300 nm with a gradual increase in crystallinity of the isolated xylan. Using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, the adsorption of xylan onto model cellulose surfaces was quantified. Compared to the nonmodified xylan, the adsorption of debranched xylan increased from 0.6 to 5.5 mg m(-2). Additionally, adsorption kinetics suggest that the nanoparticles rapidly adsorbed to the cellulose surfaces compared to the arabinoxylan. In summary, a control of the molecular structure of xylan influences its ability to form a new class of polysaccharide nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions and its interaction with nanocellulose surfaces. PMID:24495173

  10. 2-Hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium xylan adsorption onto rod-like cellulose nanocrystal.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jae Hyun; Dong, Shuping; Röemhild, Katrin; Kaya, Abdulaziz; Sohn, Daewon; Tanaka, Keiji; Roman, Maren; Heinze, Thomas; Esker, Alan R

    2015-02-15

    Chemical incompatibility and relatively weak interaction between lignocellulosic fibers and synthetic polymers have made studies of wood fiber-thermoplastic composite more challenging. In this study, adsorption of 2-hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium xylans onto rod-like cellulose nanocrystals are investigated by zeta-potential measurements, and polarized and depolarized dynamic light scattering as a factor for better understanding of lignocellulosic fibers and cellulose nanocrystals. Zeta-potential measurements show xylan derivative adsorption onto cellulose nanocrystals. Decay time distributions of the ternary system and binary system from dynamic light scattering show that aggregates exist in the binary system and they disappear in the ternary system. At low 2-hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium xylan concentrations relative to that of cellulose nanocrystal, xylan derivatives adsorbed onto some of the cellulose nanocrystal. Hence, more xylan derivatives adsorbed onto cellulose nanocrystal increased with increasing xylan derivative concentration. Also, the concentration dependence of the ratio of the rotational diffusion coefficient to the translational diffusion coefficient revealed a strong adsorptive interaction between xylan derivatives and the cellulose nanocrystals.

  11. Xylan - A potential contaminant for lunar samples and Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I. P.; Russell, S. S.; Boyd, S. R.; Meyer, C.; Pillinger, C. T.

    The possibility that lunar samples have been contaminated by the proprietary lubricant paint known as Xylan, which has been applied to screw threads in dry-N sample processing cabinets at NASA JSC, is considered. From a sample analysis using sealed-tube and stepped combustion, it is argued that the unexpectedly high concentration of organic materials found in EET A79001 is not due to Xylan contamination. It is considered unlikely that previous C and N analyses of lunar samples have been affected by the introduction of Xylan.

  12. Hydrolysis of xylan by an immobilized xylanase from Aureobasidium pullulans

    SciTech Connect

    Allenza, P.; Scherl, D.S.; Detroy, R.W.; Leathers, T.D.; Scott, C.D. .

    1986-01-01

    The beta-(1,4)-linked xylose residues that comprise the backbone of the abundant plant polymer xylan can be released by enzymic hydrolysis. Xylanase, which is produced in exceptionally high levels by the color-variant strain Y-2311-1 of A. pullulans, was immobilized onto a macroporous ceramic carrier. Despite a low coupling efficiency, it was possible to run the reactor under a wide range of conditions with flow rates of 3-10 bed volumes/minute of 1% soluble xylan with no detectable leaching of enzyme. The size distribution of products and rate of xylan hydrolysis were very similar for the immobilized and soluble enzymes. (Refs. 13).

  13. Hydrolysis of xylan by an immobilized xylanase from Aureobasidium pullanans

    SciTech Connect

    Allenza, P.; Scherl, D.S.; Detroy, R.W.; Leathers, T.D.; Scott, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    The beta-(1,4)-linked xylose residues that comprise the backbone of the abundant plant polymer xylan can be released by enzymic hydrolysis. Xylanase, which is produced in exceptionally high levels by the color-variant strain of A. pullulans, was immobilized onto a macroporous ceramic carrier. Despite a low coupling efficiency, it was possible to run the reactor under a wide range of conditions with flow rates of 3-10 bed volumes/minute of 1% soluble xylan with no detectable leaching of enzyme. The size distribution of products and rate of xylan hydrolysis were very similar for the immobilized and soluble enzymes. (Refs. 13).

  14. Characterization of two metagenome-derived esterases that reactivate chloramphenicol by counteracting chloramphenicol acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weixin; Lee, Myung Hwan; Yoon, Mi-Young; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Malhotra, Shweta; Wu, Jing; Hwang, Eul Chul; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2011-12-01

    Function-driven metagenomic analysis is a powerful approach to screening for novel biocatalysts. In this study, we investigated lipolytic enzymes selected from an alluvial soil metagenomic library, and identified two novel esterases, EstDL26 and EstDL136. EstDL26 and EstDL136 reactivated chloramphenicol from its acetyl derivates by counteracting the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity in Escherichia coli. These two enzymes showed only 27% identity in amino acid sequence to each other; however both preferentially hydrolyzed short-chain p-nitrophenyl esters (< or =C5) and showed mesophilic properties. In vitro, EstDL136 catalyzed the deacetylation of 1- and 3- acetyl and 1,3-diacetyl derivates; in contrast, EstDL26 was not capable of the deacetylation at C1, indicating a potential regioselectivity. EstDL26 and EstDL136 were similar to microbial hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), and since chloramphenicol acetate esterase (CAE) activity was detected from two other soil esterases in the HSL family, this suggests a distribution of CAE among the soil microorganisms. The isolation and characterization of EstDL26 and EstDL136 in this study may be helpful in understanding the diversity of CAE enzymes and their potential role in releasing active chloramphenicol in the producing bacteria. PMID:22210605

  15. Lignin profiling in extracted xylans by size-exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hutterer, Christian; Schild, Gabriele; Kliba, Gerhard; Potthast, Antje

    2016-10-20

    Utilization of the polymeric parts of lignocellulose is expected to gain increasing importance in future biorefinery scenarios. In that respect, a particular focus is placed on hemicelluloses from different wood species gained from an industrially feasible upgrading step in the production of dissolving pulps from paper pulps. During alkaline post-extractions for hemicellulose removal, residual lignins are extracted as well. They are either covalently linked to the extracted hardwood xylans or simply co-dissolved in the alkaline lye. In order to better describe the lignin in xylan containing lyes, a method for lignin profiling was set up by hyphenating size-exclusion chromatography of xylans with UV detection which facilitates visualization of the residual lignin distribution. Simultaneous lignin quantification was achieved with lignin standards prepared from Kraft cooking liquors. The setup presented may serve as advanced characterization for novel xylan products. PMID:27474629

  16. Laccase catalysed grafting of phenolic onto xylan to improve its applicability in films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Jicheng; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Fangdong; Li, Zhongyang; Yin, Yunbei; Zhang, Dongxu

    2015-07-01

    Xylan can be tailored for various value-added applications. However, its use in aqueous systems is hampered by its complex structure, and small molecular weight. This research aimed at improving the xylan molecular weight and changing its structure. Laccase-catalysed oxidation of 4-coumaric acid (PCA), ferulic acid (FA), syringaldehyde (SD), and vanillin (VA) onto xylan was grafted to study the changes in its structure, tensile properties, and antibacterial activities. A Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum analyser was used to observe the changes in functional groups of xylan. The results showed a band at 1635 cm-1 corresponding to the stretching vibration of conjugated carbonyl carboxy hemoglobin and a benzene ring structure were strengthened; the appearance of a new band between 1200 cm-1 and 1270 cm-1 corresponding to alkyl ethers on the aryl C-O stretching vibration was due to the fact that during the grafting process, the number of benzene ring structures increased and covalent connections occurred between phenols and xylan. The reaction mechanism for the laccase-catalysed oxidation of phenol compounds onto xylan was preliminary explored by 13C-NMR. The results showed that PCA-xylan, FA-xylan graft poly onto xylan by Cγ ester bond, SD-xylan graft poly onto xylan by ether bond and an ester bond, and VD-xylan graft poly onto xylan by ether bond. The film strength of xylan derivatives has been significantly increased, especially for the PCA-xylan derivative. The increases in tensile stress at break, tensile strength, tensile yield stress, and Young's modulus were: 24.04%, 31.30%, 55.56%, and 28.21%, respectively. After laccase/phenolics were modified, xylan had a good antibacterial effect to E. coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and Bacillus subtilis. The SD-xylan, FA-xylan, and PCA-xylan showed a greater efficacy against E. coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and Bacillus subtilis, respectively.

  17. Purification and characterization of an esterase involved in cellulose acetate degradation by Neisseria sicca SB.

    PubMed

    Moriyoshi, K; Ohmoto, T; Ohe, T; Sakai, K

    1999-10-01

    An esterase catalyzing the hydrolysis of acetyl ester moieties in cellulose acetate was purified 1,110-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity from the culture supernatant of Neisseria sicca SB, which can assimilate cellulose acetate as the sole carbon and energy source. The purified enzyme was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 40 kDa and the isoelectric point was 5.3. The pH and temperature optima of the enzyme were 8.0-8.5 and 45 degrees C. The enzyme catalyzed the hydrolysis of acetyl saccharides, p-nitrophenyl esters of short-chain fatty acids, and was slightly active toward aliphatic and aromatic esters. The K(m) and Vmax for cellulose acetate (degree of substitution, 0.88) and p-nitrophenyl acetate were 0.0162% (716 microM as acetyl content in the polymer) and 36.0 microM, and 66.8 and 39.1 mumol/min/mg, respectively. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and diisopropyl fluorophosphate, which indicated that the enzyme was a serine esterase.

  18. Behavior of cellulose and xylan in aqueous ammonia pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Xin, Donglin; Jia, Lili; Zhao, Chengjuan; Zhang, Junhua

    2014-12-01

    The effect of aqueous ammonia on the solubilization of cellulose and xylans was investigated by detecting the amounts of reducing sugars and monosaccharides in the treatment liquors. The degree of cellulose and xylan solubilization increased with the increase of treatment temperature. When the treatment temperature increased from 20 to 90 °C, the amounts of reducing sugars released from Avicel and cellulose fiber by 21 % ammonia at a solid to liquid ratio of 1:10 for 24 h increased from 1.0 and 0.9 to 4.4 and 2.7 mg/g dry matter (DM), respectively. The amounts of reducing sugars released from wheat straw, beechwood, and oat spelt xylans increased from 1.2-7.0 to 3.3-13.5 mg/g DM. Xylans appeared to be more susceptible than cellulose in aqueous ammonia treatment. Structure analysis of untreated and treated Avicel and cellulose fiber showed that aqueous ammonia increased the specific surface area and crystallinity index of cellulose. Most of the cellulose and xylan that were solubilized existed in the form of oligomers such as cello-oligosaccharides and xylo-oligosaccharides. Xylobiose and xylotriose were the main oligosaccharides released from oat spelt xylan by aqueous ammonia treatment as confirmed by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The results here indicated that a slight amount of cellulose and xylans was solubilized and low amounts of cellulase inhibitors, oligomers, were found during mild aqueous ammonia pretreatment process. Therefore, from the economical perspectives, mild ammonia pretreatment would be favorable for aqueous ammonia pretreatment of lignocelluloses.

  19. Identification of a novel carbohydrate esterase from Bjerkandera adusta: structural and function predictions through bioinformatics analysis and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Cuervo-Soto, Laura I; Valdés-García, Gilberto; Batista-García, Ramón; del Rayo Sánchez-Carbente, María; Balcázar-López, Edgar; Lira-Ruan, Verónica; Pastor, Nina; Folch-Mallol, Jorge Luis

    2015-03-01

    A new gene from Bjerkandera adusta strain UAMH 8258 encoding a carbohydrate esterase (designated as BacesI) was isolated and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The gene had an open reading frame of 1410 bp encoding a polypeptide of 470 amino acid residues, the first 18 serving as a secretion signal peptide. Homology and phylogenetic analyses showed that BaCesI belongs to carbohydrate esterases family 4. Three-dimensional modeling of the protein and normal mode analysis revealed a breathing mode of the active site that could be relevant for esterase activity. Furthermore, the overall negative electrostatic potential of this enzyme suggests that it degrades neutral substrates and will not act on negative substrates such as peptidoglycan or p-nitrophenol derivatives. The enzyme shows a specific activity of 1.118 U mg(-1) protein on 2-naphthyl acetate. No activity was detected on p-nitrophenol derivatives as proposed from the electrostatic potential data. The deacetylation activity of the recombinant BaCesI was confirmed by measuring the release of acetic acid from several substrates, including oat xylan, shrimp shell chitin, N-acetylglucosamine, and natural substrates such as sugar cane bagasse and grass. This makes the protein very interesting for the biofuels production industry from lignocellulosic materials and for the production of chitosan from chitin.

  20. Identification of a novel carbohydrate esterase from Bjerkandera adusta: structural and function predictions through bioinformatics analysis and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Cuervo-Soto, Laura I; Valdés-García, Gilberto; Batista-García, Ramón; del Rayo Sánchez-Carbente, María; Balcázar-López, Edgar; Lira-Ruan, Verónica; Pastor, Nina; Folch-Mallol, Jorge Luis

    2015-03-01

    A new gene from Bjerkandera adusta strain UAMH 8258 encoding a carbohydrate esterase (designated as BacesI) was isolated and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The gene had an open reading frame of 1410 bp encoding a polypeptide of 470 amino acid residues, the first 18 serving as a secretion signal peptide. Homology and phylogenetic analyses showed that BaCesI belongs to carbohydrate esterases family 4. Three-dimensional modeling of the protein and normal mode analysis revealed a breathing mode of the active site that could be relevant for esterase activity. Furthermore, the overall negative electrostatic potential of this enzyme suggests that it degrades neutral substrates and will not act on negative substrates such as peptidoglycan or p-nitrophenol derivatives. The enzyme shows a specific activity of 1.118 U mg(-1) protein on 2-naphthyl acetate. No activity was detected on p-nitrophenol derivatives as proposed from the electrostatic potential data. The deacetylation activity of the recombinant BaCesI was confirmed by measuring the release of acetic acid from several substrates, including oat xylan, shrimp shell chitin, N-acetylglucosamine, and natural substrates such as sugar cane bagasse and grass. This makes the protein very interesting for the biofuels production industry from lignocellulosic materials and for the production of chitosan from chitin. PMID:25586442

  1. Penicillium brasilianum as an enzyme factory; the essential role of feruloyl esterases for the hydrolysis of the plant cell wall.

    PubMed

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Olavarria, Reyes; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2007-06-30

    The production of arabinoxylan-degrading enzymes by the fungus Penicillium brasilianum, grown on different carbon and nitrogen sources as well as different environmental conditions was investigated. Highest feruloyl esterase (225 mU/ml) and alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase (211 mU/ml) activities were obtained when P. brasilianum was grown on sugar beet pulp, whereas maximum xylanase (17 U/ml) activity was found during growth on oat spelt xylan. Yeast extract was the preferable nitrogen source for the production of all the three enzymes. Further optimization of the production of the crude enzyme mixture was examined by experimental design using a D-optimal quadratic model. Investigation of the microbial regulation of enzyme production showed that the presence of free ferulic acid further stimulated the production and pointing to that the fungal regulatory mechanism involved a coordinated production and secretion of feruloyl esterase, xylanase and alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase. Since agroindustrial by-products are a potential source of phenolic acids, crude enzyme mixtures of P. brasilianum were tested for their hydrolysis abilities against eight complex or model substrates. While total release of phenolic acids and pentoses was not observed, the synergistic enhancement of hydrolysis in the presence of feruloyl esterase was clearly demonstrated.

  2. Hydrolysis kinetics of tulip tree xylan in hot compressed water.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Junho; Lee, Hun Wook; Sim, Seungjae; Myint, Aye Aye; Park, Hee Jeong; Lee, Youn-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass, a promising renewable resource, can be converted into numerous valuable chemicals post enzymatic saccharification. However, the efficacy of enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass is low; therefore, pretreatment is necessary to improve the efficiency. Here, a kinetic analysis was carried out on xylan hydrolysis, after hot compressed water pretreatment of the lignocellulosic biomass conducted at 180-220°C for 5-30min, and on subsequent xylooligosaccharide hydrolysis. The weight ratio of fast-reacting xylan to slow-reacting xylan was 5.25 in tulip tree. Our kinetic results were applied to three different reaction systems to improve the pretreatment efficiency. We found that semi-continuous reactor is promising. Lower reaction temperatures and shorter space times in semi-continuous reactor are recommended for improving xylan conversion and xylooligosaccharide yield. In the theoretical calculation, 95% of xylooligosaccharide yield and xylan conversion were achieved simultaneously with high selectivity (desired product/undesired product) of 100 or more. PMID:27208738

  3. Cellulose- and xylan-degrading thermophilic anaerobic bacteria from biocompost.

    PubMed

    Sizova, M V; Izquierdo, J A; Panikov, N S; Lynd, L R

    2011-04-01

    Nine thermophilic cellulolytic clostridial isolates and four other noncellulolytic bacterial isolates were isolated from self-heated biocompost via preliminary enrichment culture on microcrystalline cellulose. All cellulolytic isolates grew vigorously on cellulose, with the formation of either ethanol and acetate or acetate and formate as principal fermentation products as well as lactate and glycerol as minor products. In addition, two out of nine cellulolytic strains were able to utilize xylan and pretreated wood with roughly the same efficiency as for cellulose. The major products of xylan fermentation were acetate and formate, with minor contributions of lactate and ethanol. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA and glycosyl hydrolase family 48 (GH48) gene sequences revealed that two xylan-utilizing isolates were related to a Clostridium clariflavum strain and represent a distinct novel branch within the GH48 family. Both isolates possessed high cellulase and xylanase activity induced independently by either cellulose or xylan. Enzymatic activity decayed after growth cessation, with more-rapid disappearance of cellulase activity than of xylanase activity. A mixture of xylan and cellulose was utilized simultaneously, with a significant synergistic effect observed as a reduction of lag phase in cellulose degradation.

  4. Preparation of xylan citrate--a potential adsorbent for industrial wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Shuaiyang, Wang; Huiling, Li; Junli, Ren; Chuanfu, Liu; Feng, Peng; Runcang, Sun

    2013-02-15

    The novel and degradable xylan citrate was prepared by the environmental-friendly semi-dry oven method. Xylan reacted with citric acid (CA) to yield xylan citrate at high temperature. The influence of the different weight ratios of CA and xylan on the product yield, the carboxyl group content and degree of esterification were comparatively discussed. The results showed that there were higher carboxyl group content and degree of esterification in modified xylan than native xylan. The product yield of 128.2%, the carboxyl group content of 1174.3 meq/100 g and degree of esterification of 33.1% were achieved at the CA/xylan weight ratio of 2.4 in the absence of catalyst. Furthermore, the adsorption capacity of xylan after modification was improved greatly. These materials with better properties can enhance their water affinity, and improve their adsorption of copper ions and methyl orange in aqueous solution due to carboxyl groups. PMID:23399244

  5. Effects of cationic xylan from annual plants on the mechanical properties of paper.

    PubMed

    Deutschle, Alexander L; Römhild, Katrin; Meister, Frank; Janzon, Ron; Riegert, Christiane; Saake, Bodo

    2014-02-15

    Xylan from oat spelt and wheat was used as an additive to enhance the dry strength of paper. The absorption of xylan by the cellulose fibers was increased by cationization to different degrees of substitution. Paper hand sheets with different doses of xylan and industrial cationic starch were produced, and the mechanical properties were determined. Absorption measurements of cationic oat spelt xylan on pulp fibers explained the differing influences of low and high cationized xylan addition on paper strength. The addition of cationic oat spelt xylan with a degree of substitution of 0.1 at a 4% dose provided the largest improvement in the tensile-index (67%), burst-index (105%) and tear-index (77%). Compared to cationic starch, cationic oat spelt xylan additives led to similar paper strength values, excepting the tear strength. The structural differences and protein impurities made the wheat xylan unsuitable as a strength additive for paper pulp.

  6. Xylan polysaccharides fabricated into nanofibrous substrate for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, J; Rajeswari, R; Shayanti, M; Sridhar, R; Sundarrajan, S; Balamurugan, R; Ramakrishna, S

    2013-04-01

    Myocardial infarction, a main cause of heart failure, leads to loss of cardiac tissue impairment of left ventricular function. Repair of diseased myocardium with in vitro engineered cardiac muscle patch/injectable biopolymers with cells may become a viable option for myocardial infarction. We attempted to solve these problems by in vitro study by selecting a plant based polysaccharides beech wood Xylan for the normal functioning of infarcted myocardium. The present study fabricated Xylan based nanofibrous scaffolds cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (Glu) vapors for 24 h, 48 h and 1% Glu blended fibers for the culture of neonatal rat cardiac cells for myocardial infarction. These nanofibers were characterized by SEM, FT-IR, tensile testing and cell culture studies for the normal expression of cardiac proteins. The observed results showed that the Xylan/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) 24h Glu vapor cross-linked nanofibers (427 nm) having mechanical strength of 2.43 MPa and Young modulus of 3.74 MPa are suitable for the culture of cardiac cells. Cardiac cells proliferation increased only by 11% in Xylan/PVA 24h Glu cross-linked nanofibers compared to control tissue culture plate (TCP). The normal cardiac cell morphology was observed in 24h cross-linked Xylan/PVA nanofibers but 48 h cross-linked fibers cell morphology was changed to flattened and elongated on the fibrous surfaces. Confocal analysis for cardiac expression proteins actinin, connexin 43 was observed normally in 24h Glu cross-linked nanofibers compared to all other nanofibrous scaffolds. The fabricated Xylan/PVA nanofibrous scaffold may have good potential for the normal functioning of infarcted myocardium.

  7. Reduced Wall Acetylation Proteins Play Vital and Distinct Roles in Cell Wall O-Acetylation in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Yuzuki; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Gille, Sascha; Harholt, Jesper; Chong, Sun-Li; Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Mellerowicz, Ewa J.; Tenkanen, Maija; Cheng, Kun; Pauly, Markus; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2013-01-01

    The Reduced Wall Acetylation (RWA) proteins are involved in cell wall acetylation in plants. Previously, we described a single mutant, rwa2, which has about 20% lower level of O-acetylation in leaf cell walls and no obvious growth or developmental phenotype. In this study, we generated double, triple, and quadruple loss-of-function mutants of all four members of the RWA family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In contrast to rwa2, the triple and quadruple rwa mutants display severe growth phenotypes revealing the importance of wall acetylation for plant growth and development. The quadruple rwa mutant can be completely complemented with the RWA2 protein expressed under 35S promoter, indicating the functional redundancy of the RWA proteins. Nevertheless, the degree of acetylation of xylan, (gluco)mannan, and xyloglucan as well as overall cell wall acetylation is affected differently in different combinations of triple mutants, suggesting their diversity in substrate preference. The overall degree of wall acetylation in the rwa quadruple mutant was reduced by 63% compared with the wild type, and histochemical analysis of the rwa quadruple mutant stem indicates defects in cell differentiation of cell types with secondary cell walls. PMID:24019426

  8. [3H]Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol hydrolysis by extracts of Zea mays L. vegetative tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, P. J.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    [3H]Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was hydrolyzed by buffered extracts of acetone powders prepared from 4 day shoots of dark grown Zea mays L. seedlings. The hydrolytic activity was proportional to the amount of extract added and was linear for up to 6 hours at 37 degrees C. Boiled or alcohol denatured extracts were inactive. Analysis of reaction mixtures by high performance liquid chromatography demonstrated that not all isomers of indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol were hydrolyzed at the same rate. Buffered extracts of acetone powders were prepared from coleoptiles and mesocotyls. The rates of hydrolysis observed with coleoptile extracts were greater than those observed with mesocotyl extracts. Active extracts also catalyzed the hydrolysis of esterase substrates such as alpha-naphthyl acetate and the methyl esters of indoleacetic acid and naphthyleneacetic acid. Attempts to purify the indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol hydrolyzing activity by chromatographic procedures resulted in only slight purification with large losses of activity. Chromatography over hydroxylapatite allowed separation of two enzymically active fractions, one of which catalyzed the hydrolysis of both indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and esterase substrates. With the other enzymic hydrolysis of esterase substrates was readily demonstrated, but no hydrolysis of indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was ever detected.

  9. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David L.; Kataeva, Irina; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  10. Designer xylanosomes: protein nanostructures for enhanced xylan hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This work is the first report of the successful design, construction, and application of multi-functional, self-assembling biocatalysts for targeted xylan hydrolysis, termed xylanosomes. Using the architecture of cellulosomes found in some anaerobic cellulolytic microbes, four different xylanosomes...

  11. The mechanism by which arabinoxylanases can recognize highly decorated xylans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzymatic degradation of plant cell walls is an important biological process of increasing environmental and industrial significance. Xylan, a major component of the plant cell wall, consists of a backbone of beta 1,4-xylose (Xylp) units that are often decorated with arabinofuranose (Araf) side ...

  12. Molecular Dissection of Xylan Biosynthesis During Wood Formation in Poplar

    EPA Science Inventory

    Xylan, being the second most abundant polysaccharide in dicot wood, is considered to be one of the factors contributing to wood biomass recalcitrance for biofuel production. To better utilize wood as biofuel feedstock, it is crucial to functionally characterize all the genes invo...

  13. Modelling substrate specificity and enantioselectivity for lipases and esterases by substrate-imprinted docking

    PubMed Central

    Juhl, P Benjamin; Trodler, Peter; Tyagi, Sadhna; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Background Previously, ways to adapt docking programs that were developed for modelling inhibitor-receptor interaction have been explored. Two main issues were discussed. First, when trying to model catalysis a reaction intermediate of the substrate is expected to provide more valid information than the ground state of the substrate. Second, the incorporation of protein flexibility is essential for reliable predictions. Results Here we present a predictive and robust method to model substrate specificity and enantioselectivity of lipases and esterases that uses reaction intermediates and incorporates protein flexibility. Substrate-imprinted docking starts with covalent docking of reaction intermediates, followed by geometry optimisation of the resulting enzyme-substrate complex. After a second round of docking the same substrate into the geometry-optimised structures, productive poses are identified by geometric filter criteria and ranked by their docking scores. Substrate-imprinted docking was applied in order to model (i) enantioselectivity of Candida antarctica lipase B and a W104A mutant, (ii) enantioselectivity and substrate specificity of Candida rugosa lipase and Burkholderia cepacia lipase, and (iii) substrate specificity of an acetyl- and a butyrylcholine esterase toward the substrates acetyl- and butyrylcholine. Conclusion The experimentally observed differences in selectivity and specificity of the enzymes were reproduced with an accuracy of 81%. The method was robust toward small differences in initial structures (different crystallisation conditions or a co-crystallised ligand), although large displacements of catalytic residues often resulted in substrate poses that did not pass the geometric filter criteria. PMID:19493341

  14. Selective chemical oxidation and depolymerization of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) xylan with oligosaccharide product analysis by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xylan is a barrier to enzymatic hydrolysis of plant cell walls. It is well accepted that the xylan layer needs to be removed to efficiently hydrolyze cellulose and consequently pretreatment conditions are in part optimized for maximal xylan depolymerization or displacement. Xylan consists of a long ...

  15. Phenol esterase activity of porcine skin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alkyl esters of plant-derived phenols may serve as slow-release sources for cutaneous delivery of antioxidants. The ability of skin esterases to hydrolyze phenolic esters was examined. Esters of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol were prepared from decanoic and lipoic acids. Ferulic acid was esterified ...

  16. New Extremophilic Lipases and Esterases from Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, Maria E; González Siso, Maria I

    2014-01-01

    Lipolytic enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of ester bonds in the presence of water. In media with low water content or in organic solvents, they can catalyze synthetic reactions such as esterification and transesterification. Lipases and esterases, in particular those from extremophilic origin, are robust enzymes, functional under the harsh conditions of industrial processes owing to their inherent thermostability and resistance towards organic solvents, which combined with their high chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity make them very attractive biocatalysts for a variety of industrial applications. Likewise, enzymes from extremophile sources can provide additional features such as activity at extreme temperatures, extreme pH values or high salinity levels, which could be interesting for certain purposes. New lipases and esterases have traditionally been discovered by the isolation of microbial strains producing lipolytic activity. The Genome Projects Era allowed genome mining, exploiting homology with known lipases and esterases, to be used in the search for new enzymes. The Metagenomic Era meant a step forward in this field with the study of the metagenome, the pool of genomes in an environmental microbial community. Current molecular biology techniques make it possible to construct total environmental DNA libraries, including the genomes of unculturable organisms, opening a new window to a vast field of unknown enzymes with new and unique properties. Here, we review the latest advances and findings from research into new extremophilic lipases and esterases, using metagenomic approaches, and their potential industrial and biotechnological applications. PMID:24588890

  17. Loss-of-Function Mutation of REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION2 in Arabidopsis Leads to Reduced Cell Wall Acetylation and Increased Resistance to Botrytis cinerea1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Yuzuki; Nafisi, Majse; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Orfila, Caroline; Gille, Sascha; Rautengarten, Carsten; Cherk, Candice; Marcus, Susan E.; Somerville, Shauna; Pauly, Markus; Knox, J. Paul; Sakuragi, Yumiko; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all polysaccharides in plant cell walls are O-acetylated, including the various pectic polysaccharides and the hemicelluloses xylan, mannan, and xyloglucan. However, the enzymes involved in the polysaccharide acetylation have not been identified. While the role of polysaccharide acetylation in vivo is unclear, it is known to reduce biofuel yield from lignocellulosic biomass by the inhibition of microorganisms used for fermentation. We have analyzed four Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homologs of the protein Cas1p known to be involved in polysaccharide O-acetylation in Cryptococcus neoformans. Loss-of-function mutants in one of the genes, designated REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION2 (RWA2), had decreased levels of acetylated cell wall polymers. Cell wall material isolated from mutant leaves and treated with alkali released about 20% lower amounts of acetic acid when compared with the wild type. The same level of acetate deficiency was found in several pectic polymers and in xyloglucan. Thus, the rwa2 mutations affect different polymers to the same extent. There were no obvious morphological or growth differences observed between the wild type and rwa2 mutants. However, both alleles of rwa2 displayed increased tolerance toward the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. PMID:21212300

  18. Characterization of esterases from Cucurbita pepo cv. "Eskandrani".

    PubMed

    Fahmy, Afaf S; Abo-Zeid, Amal Z; Mohamed, Tarek M; Ghanem, Hala M; Borai, Ibrahim H; Mohamed, Saleh A

    2008-01-01

    Two of the six esterases identified in Cucurbita pepo cv. "Eskandrani" were purified to homogeneity using two chromatography steps: anion exchange and gel filtration. The molecular weights of C. pepo esterases EIc and EII were 50,000 +/- 1500 and 68,000 +/- 1900 Da from gel filtration and 47,000 and 66,000 Da from SDS/PAGE, respectively, suggesting a monomeric structure for both enzymes. Esterases EIc and EII had K(m) values of 1.22 and 1.56 mM and pH optima at 9.0 and 8.0, respectively. The substrate specificity of C. pepo esterases EIc and EII were determined for a number of p-nitrophenyl esters, where their affinity toward these substrates were decreased as carbon atom number increased. Esterases EIc and EII had the same temperature optima, 40 degrees C. Thermal stability studies of esterases EIc and EII indicated that half maximal activities of EIc and EII esterases were reached at 55 degrees C and 50 degrees C, while they lost 45%, 51% and 70%, 77% of their activities after 30 and 90 min of incubation at 40 degrees C, respectively. The effect of different metal cations and inhibitors were examined. The inhibition studies revealed that the active sites of the two esterases contain serine and cysteine residues. The characteristics of C. pepo esterases are closely similar to those of microbial esterases used in food processing and food industry. PMID:17321740

  19. Xylella fastidiosa esterase rather than hydroxynitrile lyase.

    PubMed

    Torrelo, Guzman; Ribeiro de Souza, Fayene Zeferino; Carrilho, Emanuel; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-03-01

    In 2009, we reported that the product of the gene SCJ21.16 (XFa0032) from Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-restricted plant pathogen that causes a range of diseases in several important crops, encodes a protein (XfHNL) with putative hydroxynitrile lyase activity. Sequence analysis and activity tests indicated that XfHNL exhibits an α/β-hydrolase fold and could be classified as a member of the family of FAD-independent HNLs. Here we provide a more detailed sequence analysis and new experimental data. Using pure heterologously expressed XfHNL we show that this enzyme cannot catalyse the cleavage/synthesis of mandelonitrile and that this protein is in fact a non-enantioselective esterase. Homology modelling and ligand docking simulations were used to study the active site and support these results. This finding could help elucidate the common ancestor of esterases and hydroxynitrile lyases with an α/β -hydrolase fold. PMID:25684099

  20. Synthesis of fibrinolytic active silver nanoparticle using wheat bran xylan as a reducing and stabilizing agent.

    PubMed

    Harish, B S; Uppuluri, Kiran Babu; Anbazhagan, Veerappan

    2015-11-01

    A facile synthesis of highly stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was reported using a biopolymer, xylan as both a reducing and stabilizing agent. Xylan was isolated from waste biomass, wheat bran (WB) by alkaline treatment and was characterized by Fehling's test, dinitrosalicylic acid assay, FTIR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The nanoparticles were polydispersed with the size ranging from 20 to 45 nm. The synthesized WB-xylan AgNPs showed excellent free radical scavenging activity. In addition, WB-xylan AgNPs showed fibrinolytic activity as evidenced by the zone of clearance in fibrin plate assay. The biomedical potential of the WB-xylan AgNPs was demonstrated by dissolution of preformed blood clots. These results suggest that the development of xylan-metal nanoparticle composite would be feasible to treat thrombus related diseases. PMID:26256330

  1. The role of the plant-specific ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 protein in Arabidopsis cell wall polysaccharide O-acetylation.

    PubMed

    Schultink, Alex; Naylor, Dan; Dama, Murali; Pauly, Markus

    2015-04-01

    A mutation in the ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 (AXY9) gene was found to be causative for the decreased xyloglucan acetylation phenotype of the axy9.1 mutant, which was identified in a forward genetic screen for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants. The axy9.1 mutant also exhibits decreased O-acetylation of xylan, implying that the AXY9 protein has a broad role in polysaccharide acetylation. An axy9 insertional mutant exhibits severe growth defects and collapsed xylem, demonstrating the importance of wall polysaccharide O-acetylation for normal plant growth and development. Localization and topological experiments indicate that the active site of the AXY9 protein resides within the Golgi lumen. The AXY9 protein appears to be a component of the plant cell wall polysaccharide acetylation pathway, which also includes the REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION and TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins. The AXY9 protein is distinct from the TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins, reported to be polysaccharide acetyltransferases, but does share homology with them and other acetyltransferases, suggesting that the AXY9 protein may act to produce an acetylated intermediate that is part of the O-acetylation pathway.

  2. The role of the plant-specific ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 protein in Arabidopsis cell wall polysaccharide O-acetylation.

    PubMed

    Schultink, Alex; Naylor, Dan; Dama, Murali; Pauly, Markus

    2015-04-01

    A mutation in the ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 (AXY9) gene was found to be causative for the decreased xyloglucan acetylation phenotype of the axy9.1 mutant, which was identified in a forward genetic screen for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants. The axy9.1 mutant also exhibits decreased O-acetylation of xylan, implying that the AXY9 protein has a broad role in polysaccharide acetylation. An axy9 insertional mutant exhibits severe growth defects and collapsed xylem, demonstrating the importance of wall polysaccharide O-acetylation for normal plant growth and development. Localization and topological experiments indicate that the active site of the AXY9 protein resides within the Golgi lumen. The AXY9 protein appears to be a component of the plant cell wall polysaccharide acetylation pathway, which also includes the REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION and TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins. The AXY9 protein is distinct from the TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins, reported to be polysaccharide acetyltransferases, but does share homology with them and other acetyltransferases, suggesting that the AXY9 protein may act to produce an acetylated intermediate that is part of the O-acetylation pathway. PMID:25681330

  3. Suppression of Dwarf and irregular xylem Phenotypes Generates Low-Acetylated Biomass Lines in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bensussan, Matthieu; Lefebvre, Valérie; Ducamp, Aloïse; Trouverie, Jacques; Gineau, Emilie; Fortabat, Marie-Noëlle; Guillebaux, Alexia; Baldy, Aurélie; Naquin, Delphine; Herbette, Stéphane; Lapierre, Catherine; Mouille, Gregory; Horlow, Christine; Durand-Tardif, Mylène

    2015-06-01

    eskimo1-5 (esk1-5) is a dwarf Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant that has a constitutive drought syndrome and collapsed xylem vessels, along with low acetylation levels in xylan and mannan. ESK1 has xylan O-acetyltransferase activity in vitro. We used a suppressor strategy on esk1-5 to screen for variants with wild-type growth and low acetylation levels, a favorable combination for ethanol production. We found a recessive mutation in the KAKTUS (KAK) gene that suppressed dwarfism and the collapsed xylem character, the cause of decreased hydraulic conductivity in the esk1-5 mutant. Backcrosses between esk1-5 and two independent knockout kak mutants confirmed suppression of the esk1-5 effect. kak single mutants showed larger stem diameters than the wild type. The KAK promoter fused with a reporter gene showed activity in the vascular cambium, phloem, and primary xylem in the stem and hypocotyl. However, suppression of the collapsed xylem phenotype in esk1 kak double mutants was not associated with the recovery of cell wall O-acetylation or any major cell wall modifications. Therefore, our results indicate that, in addition to its described activity as a repressor of endoreduplication, KAK may play a role in vascular development. Furthermore, orthologous esk1 kak double mutants may hold promise for ethanol production in crop plants.

  4. Novel choline esterase based sensor for monitoring of organophosphorus pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, E.S.; Ghindilis, A.L.; Atanasov, P.

    1996-12-31

    Organophosphorus compounds are significant major environmental pollutants due to their intensive use as pesticides. The modern techniques based on inhibition of choline esterase enzyme activity are discussed. Potentiometric electrodes based on detection of choline esterase inhibition by analytes has been developed. The detection of choline esterase activity is based on the novel principle of molecular transduction. Immobilized peroxidase acting as the molecular transducer, catalyzes the electroreduction of hydrogen peroxide by direct (mediatorless) electron transfer. The sensing element consists of a carbon based electrode containing an assembly of co-immobilized enzymes: choline esterase, choline oxidase and peroxidase.

  5. NeuA sialic acid O-acetylesterase activity modulates O-acetylation of capsular polysaccharides in Group B Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda L.; Cao, Hongzhi; Patel, Silpa K.; Diaz, Sandra; Ryan, Wesley; Carlin, Aaron F.; Thon, Vireak; Lewis, Warren G.; Varki, Ajit; Chen, Xi; Nizet, Victor

    2008-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a common cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. A major GBS virulence determinant is its sialic acid (Sia)-capped capsular polysaccharide (CPS). Recently, we discovered the presence and genetic basis of capsular Sia O-acetylation in GBS. We now characterize a GBS Sia O-acetylesterase that modulates the degree of GBS surface O-acetylation. The GBS Sia O-acetylesterase operates cooperatively with the GBS CMP-Sia synthetase, both part of a single polypeptide encoded by the neuA gene. NeuA de-O-acetylation of free 9-O-acetyl-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5,9Ac2) was enhanced by CTP and Mg2+, the substrate and co-factor respectively of the N-terminal GBS CMP-Sia synthetase domain. In contrast, the homologous bi-functional NeuA esterase from E. coli K1 did not display cofactor dependence. Further analyses showed that in vitro, GBS NeuA can operate via two alternate enzymatic pathways: de-O-acetylation of Neu5,9Ac2, followed by CMP-activation of Neu5Ac; or, activation of Neu5,9Ac2, then de-O-acetylation of CMP-Neu5,9Ac2. Consistent with in vitro esterase assays, genetic deletion of GBS neuA led to accumulation of intracellular O-acetylated Sias, and over-expression of GBS NeuA reduced O-acetylation of Sias on the bacterial surface. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved asparagine residue 301 abolished esterase activity, but preserved CMP-Sia synthetase activity, as evidenced by hyper-O-acetylation of CPS Sias on GBS expressing only the N301A NeuA allele. These studies demonstrate a novel mechanism regulating the extent of capsular Sia O-acetylation in intact bacteria, and provide a genetic strategy for manipulating GBS O-acetylation, in order to explore the role of this modification in GBS pathogenesis and immunogenicity. PMID:17646166

  6. Molecular Mechanisms Associated with Xylan Degradation by Xanthomonas Plant Pathogens*

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Camila Ramos; Hoffmam, Zaira Bruna; de Matos Martins, Vanesa Peixoto; Zanphorlin, Leticia Maria; de Paula Assis, Leandro Henrique; Honorato, Rodrigo Vargas; Lopes de Oliveira, Paulo Sérgio; Ruller, Roberto; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2014-01-01

    Xanthomonas pathogens attack a variety of economically relevant plants, and their xylan CUT system (carbohydrate utilization with TonB-dependent outer membrane transporter system) contains two major xylanase-related genes, xynA and xynB, which influence biofilm formation and virulence by molecular mechanisms that are still elusive. Herein, we demonstrated that XynA is a rare reducing end xylose-releasing exo-oligoxylanase and not an endo-β-1,4-xylanase as predicted. Structural analysis revealed that an insertion in the β7-α7 loop induces dimerization and promotes a physical barrier at the +2 subsite conferring this unique mode of action within the GH10 family. A single mutation that impaired dimerization became XynA active against xylan, and high endolytic activity was achieved when this loop was tailored to match a canonical sequence of endo-β-1,4-xylanases, supporting our mechanistic model. On the other hand, the divergent XynB proved to be a classical endo-β-1,4-xylanase, despite the low sequence similarity to characterized GH10 xylanases. Interestingly, this enzyme contains a calcium ion bound nearby to the glycone-binding region, which is required for catalytic activity and structural stability. These results shed light on the molecular basis for xylan degradation by Xanthomonas and suggest how these enzymes synergistically assist infection and pathogenesis. Our findings indicate that XynB contributes to breach the plant cell wall barrier, providing nutrients and facilitating the translocation of effector molecules, whereas the exo-oligoxylanase XynA possibly participates in the suppression of oligosaccharide-induced immune responses. PMID:25266726

  7. Molecular mechanisms associated with xylan degradation by Xanthomonas plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Santos, Camila Ramos; Hoffmam, Zaira Bruna; de Matos Martins, Vanesa Peixoto; Zanphorlin, Leticia Maria; de Paula Assis, Leandro Henrique; Honorato, Rodrigo Vargas; Lopes de Oliveira, Paulo Sérgio; Ruller, Roberto; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2014-11-14

    Xanthomonas pathogens attack a variety of economically relevant plants, and their xylan CUT system (carbohydrate utilization with TonB-dependent outer membrane transporter system) contains two major xylanase-related genes, xynA and xynB, which influence biofilm formation and virulence by molecular mechanisms that are still elusive. Herein, we demonstrated that XynA is a rare reducing end xylose-releasing exo-oligoxylanase and not an endo-β-1,4-xylanase as predicted. Structural analysis revealed that an insertion in the β7-α7 loop induces dimerization and promotes a physical barrier at the +2 subsite conferring this unique mode of action within the GH10 family. A single mutation that impaired dimerization became XynA active against xylan, and high endolytic activity was achieved when this loop was tailored to match a canonical sequence of endo-β-1,4-xylanases, supporting our mechanistic model. On the other hand, the divergent XynB proved to be a classical endo-β-1,4-xylanase, despite the low sequence similarity to characterized GH10 xylanases. Interestingly, this enzyme contains a calcium ion bound nearby to the glycone-binding region, which is required for catalytic activity and structural stability. These results shed light on the molecular basis for xylan degradation by Xanthomonas and suggest how these enzymes synergistically assist infection and pathogenesis. Our findings indicate that XynB contributes to breach the plant cell wall barrier, providing nutrients and facilitating the translocation of effector molecules, whereas the exo-oligoxylanase XynA possibly participates in the suppression of oligosaccharide-induced immune responses. PMID:25266726

  8. The Mechanism by Which Arabinoxylanases Can Recognize Highly Decorated Xylans*

    PubMed Central

    Labourel, Aurore; Crouch, Lucy I.; Brás, Joana L. A.; Jackson, Adam; Rogowski, Artur; Gray, Joseph; Yadav, Madhav P.; Henrissat, Bernard; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Najmudin, Shabir; Baslé, Arnaud; Cuskin, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic degradation of plant cell walls is an important biological process of increasing environmental and industrial significance. Xylan, a major component of the plant cell wall, consists of a backbone of β-1,4-xylose (Xylp) units that are often decorated with arabinofuranose (Araf) side chains. A large penta-modular enzyme, CtXyl5A, was shown previously to specifically target arabinoxylans. The mechanism of substrate recognition displayed by the enzyme, however, remains unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of the arabinoxylanase and the enzyme in complex with ligands. The data showed that four of the protein modules adopt a rigid structure, which stabilizes the catalytic domain. The C-terminal non-catalytic carbohydrate binding module could not be observed in the crystal structure, suggesting positional flexibility. The structure of the enzyme in complex with Xylp-β-1,4-Xylp-β-1,4-Xylp-[α-1,3-Araf]-β-1,4-Xylp showed that the Araf decoration linked O3 to the xylose in the active site is located in the pocket (−2* subsite) that abuts onto the catalytic center. The −2* subsite can also bind to Xylp and Arap, explaining why the enzyme can utilize xylose and arabinose as specificity determinants. Alanine substitution of Glu68, Tyr92, or Asn139, which interact with arabinose and xylose side chains at the −2* subsite, abrogates catalytic activity. Distal to the active site, the xylan backbone makes limited apolar contacts with the enzyme, and the hydroxyls are solvent-exposed. This explains why CtXyl5A is capable of hydrolyzing xylans that are extensively decorated and that are recalcitrant to classic endo-xylanase attack. PMID:27531750

  9. Esterases and putative lipases from tropical isolates of Aureobasidium pullulans.

    PubMed

    Kudanga, Tukayi; Mwenje, Eddie; Mandivenga, Faith; Read, John S

    2007-04-01

    Esterases and lipases have been studied in a number of fungi, though very little is known about esterases from Aureobasidium pullulans especially from the African tropics. In this study, forty-two Zimbabwean isolates were screened for lipase activity on tributyrin agar. Extracellular esterase activities of seven selected isolates were studied under varying conditions using para-nitrophenol acetate as substrate. Twenty isolates (48%) showed lipolytic activity; sixteen showed negative results for lipase activity while the rest showed weak activities. Esterase activities in broth cultures ranged from 0.011-0.223 mmol/microg protein/min while activities ranged from 1.5-12.8 U/ml under solid state fermentation. The esterases were optimally active at pH 7.6-8.0, showed a temperature optimum of 35 degrees C and retained more than 50% activity at temperatures up to 60 degrees C and at pH 4.0-7.0 after 150 min. Enzyme production was optimal after 5-6 days with diammonium hydrogen phosphate as nitrogen source. Isolates showed variations in preference for carbon source for esterase production. The A. pullulans esterases differed from most fungal esterases in that they are optimally active in alkaline conditions and are active over a broad pH range. PMID:17440916

  10. Redistribution of Xylan in Maize Cell Walls During Dilute Acid Pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Brunecky, R.; Vinzant, T. B.; Porter, S. E.; Donohoe, B. S.; Johnson, D. K.; Himmel, M. E.

    2009-04-15

    Developing processes for the conversion of biomass for use in transportation fuels production is becoming a critically important economic and engineering challenge. Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising technology for increasing the enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass. However, a deeper understanding of the pretreatability of biomass is needed so that the rate of formation and yields of sugars can be increased. Xylan is an important hemicellulosic component of the plant cell wall and acts as a barrier to cellulose, essentially blocking cellulase action. To better understand xylan hydrolysis in corn stover, we have studied changes in the distribution of xylan caused by dilute acid pretreatment using correlative microscopy. A dramatic loss of xylan antibody signal from the center of the cell wall and an increase or retention of xylan at the plasma membrane interface and middle lamella of the cell were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). We also observed a reduction in xylan fluorescence signal by CLSM that is generally consistent with the decrease in xylan content measured experimentally in the bulk sample, however, the compartmentalization of this xylan retention was not anticipated.

  11. Enhanced production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) from beechwood xylan by recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Ashe, Christopher S; Stipanovic, Arthur J; Nomura, Christopher T

    2014-01-01

    Microbial conversion of plant biomass to value-added products is an attractive option to address the impacts of petroleum dependency. In this study, a bacterial system was developed that can hydrolyze xylan and utilize xylan-derived xylose for growth and production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). A β-xylosidase and an endoxylanase were engineered into a P(LA-co-3HB)-producing Escherichia coli strain to obtain a xylanolytic strain. Although PHA production yields using xylan as sole carbon source were minimal, when the xylan-based media was supplemented with a single sugar (xylose or arabinose) to permit the accumulation of xylan-derived xylose in the media, PHA production yields increased up to 18-fold when compared to xylan-based production, and increased by 37 % when compared to production from single sugar sources alone. ¹H-Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis shows higher accumulation of xylan-derived xylose in the media when xylan was supplemented with arabinose to prevent xylose uptake by catabolite repression. ¹H-NMR, gel permeation chromatography, and differential scanning calorimetry analyses corroborate that the polymers maintain physical properties regardless of the carbon source. This study demonstrates that accumulation of biomass-derived sugars in the media prior to their uptake by microbes is an important aspect to enhance PHA production when using plant biomass as feedstock.

  12. Arabidopsis thaliana IRX10 and two related proteins from psyllium and Physcomitrella patens are xylan xylosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jacob Krüger; Johnson, Nathan Robert; Wilkerson, Curtis Gene

    2014-10-01

    The enzymatic mechanism that governs the synthesis of the xylan backbone polymer, a linear chain of xylose residues connected by β-1,4 glycosidic linkages, has remained elusive. Xylan is a major constituent of many kinds of plant cell walls, and genetic studies have identified multiple genes that affect xylan formation. In this study, we investigate several homologs of one of these previously identified xylan-related genes, IRX10 from Arabidopsis thaliana, by heterologous expression and in vitro xylan xylosyltransferase assay. We find that an IRX10 homolog from the moss Physcomitrella patens displays robust activity, and we show that the xylosidic linkage formed is a β-1,4 linkage, establishing this protein as a xylan β-1,4-xylosyltransferase. We also find lower but reproducible xylan xylosyltransferase activity with A. thaliana IRX10 and with a homolog from the dicot plant Plantago ovata, showing that xylan xylosyltransferase activity is conserved over large evolutionary distance for these proteins. PMID:25139408

  13. Arabidopsis thaliana IRX10 and two related proteins from psyllium and Physcomitrella patens are xylan xylosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jacob Krüger; Johnson, Nathan Robert; Wilkerson, Curtis Gene

    2014-10-01

    The enzymatic mechanism that governs the synthesis of the xylan backbone polymer, a linear chain of xylose residues connected by β-1,4 glycosidic linkages, has remained elusive. Xylan is a major constituent of many kinds of plant cell walls, and genetic studies have identified multiple genes that affect xylan formation. In this study, we investigate several homologs of one of these previously identified xylan-related genes, IRX10 from Arabidopsis thaliana, by heterologous expression and in vitro xylan xylosyltransferase assay. We find that an IRX10 homolog from the moss Physcomitrella patens displays robust activity, and we show that the xylosidic linkage formed is a β-1,4 linkage, establishing this protein as a xylan β-1,4-xylosyltransferase. We also find lower but reproducible xylan xylosyltransferase activity with A. thaliana IRX10 and with a homolog from the dicot plant Plantago ovata, showing that xylan xylosyltransferase activity is conserved over large evolutionary distance for these proteins.

  14. Enlarging the substrate portfolio of the thermophilic esterase EST2 from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Pennacchio, Angela; Mandrich, Luigi; Manco, Giuseppe; Trincone, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    The enzymatic regioselective hydrolysis of (a) acetylated mono- to tetrasaccharides of different nature, (b) of acetylated aryl glycosides and (c) of different acetylated nucleosides was studied enlarging the portfolio of substrates that can be employed by the thermophilic esterase EST2 from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius. The reactions were optimised to the extent that the amount of enzyme needed was lowered of two orders of magnitude with respect to the previously reported reactions, namely from 4000 to 40 U of enzyme per reaction. New additional solvents were screened and dramatic changes in regioselectivity were observed depending on the amount and type of solvent used. For example, in the presence of 10 % DMF, only two α-D-glucose products 6-OH and 4,6-OH (in a 76:24 ratio) were detected, whereas with 25 % DMF, at least four products of similar amount were observed. This versatility adds specific value to the biocatalyst making possible the design of biocatalytic reactions with different hydrophobic ester substrates. As an additional remarkable example, EST2 catalysed with a good yield and high regioselectivity the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl β-D-xylopyranoside triacetate producing only the monoacetylated derivative with acetyl group in 3-O-position, in 2 min. The results with nucleosides as substrates are particularly interesting. The peracetates of 3',5'-di-O-acetylthymidine are converted almost quantitatively (95 %) to the monoacetylated derivative possessing free secondary OH; this regioselectivity is complementary to hydrolysis/alcoholysis reactions catalysed by CAL-B lipase or to other microbial hydrolytic biocatalysts, generally giving products with free primary OH groups. A docking analysis was undertaken with all analysed substrates suggesting a structural interpretation of the results. In most of cases, the best pose of the selected substrate was in line with the observed regioselectivity. PMID:26216109

  15. Synthesis and thermal characterization of xylan-graft-polyacrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Ünlü, Cüneyt H; Öztekin, N Simge; Atıcı, Oya Galioğlu

    2012-10-01

    In this study emulsion polymerization of acrylonitrile using xylan from agricultural waste material (corn cob) and cerium ammonium nitrate was investigated in terms of catalyst acid. Stock ceric solutions were prepared using either nitric or perchloric acid as catalyst. Optimum conditions were determined using different parameters such as reaction time, temperature, and component concentrations. Nitric acid catalyzed reactions resulted in maximum conversion ratio (96%) at 50°C, 1 h where ceric ion, acrylonitrile, xylan, and catalyst concentrations were 21.7 mmol l(-1), 0.5 mol l(-1), 0.2% (w/v), and 0.1 mol l(-1), respectively. However, 83% conversion was obtained with perchloric acid catalysis at 27 °C, 1 h where concentrations were 5.4 mmol l(-1), 0.8 mol l(-1), 0.5% (w/v), and 0.2 mol l(-1), respectively. Copolymer synthesis using perchloric acid was realized at milder conditions than using nitric acid. Thermal analyses of obtained polymers were conducted to characterize copolymers. Results showed that calculated activation energy, maximum degradation temperature, and heat of thermal decomposition changed relying mainly on molecular weight. PMID:22840048

  16. From plant biomass to bio-based chemicals: latest developments in xylan research.

    PubMed

    Deutschmann, Rudolf; Dekker, Robert F H

    2012-01-01

    For a hundred years or more, oil and natural gas has supplied fuel and other raw chemicals to support economic growth. In the last decades their shrinking reservoirs and the increasing cost of production has become obvious, leading researchers to look for alternative substitutes of all the chemical materials presently derived from oil and gas. This review is focused on xylan, the second most abundant plant polysaccharide on our planet. Some xylan-derived products have already found commercial applications (ethanol, xylitol, xylo-oligosaccharides) while others could have a great future in a wide range of industries. The chemical and structural variations of xylans produced by different plants, and the concentration of xylan in various plant resources are summarized. This review discusses the latest research developments in extraction and purification methodologies, and chemical modification, as well as the analytical methods necessary for xylan related research. PMID:22776161

  17. Purification and characterization of an esterase involved in poly(vinyl alcohol) degradation by Pseudomonas vesicularis PD.

    PubMed

    Sakai, K; Fukuba, M; Hasui, Y; Moriyoshi, K; Ohmoto, T; Fujita, T; Ohe, T

    1998-10-01

    An esterase catalyzing the hydrolysis of acetyl ester moieties in poly(vinyl alcohol) was purified 400-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity from the cytoplasmic fraction of Pseudomonas vesicularis PD, which was capable of assimilating poly(vinyl alcohol) as the sole carbon and energy source. The purified enzyme was a homodimeric protein with a molecular mass of 80 kDa and the isoelectric point was 6.8. The pH and temperature optima of the enzyme were 8.0 and 45 degrees C. The enzyme catalyzed the hydrolysis of side chains of poly(vinyl alcohol), short-chain p-nitrophenyl esters, 2-naphthyl acetate, and phenyl acetate, and was slightly active toward aliphatic esters. The enzyme was also active toward the enzymatic degradation products, acetoxy hydroxy fatty acids, of poly(vinyl alcohol). The K(m) and Vmax of poly(vinyl alcohol) (degree of polymerization, 500; saponification degree, 86.5-89.0 mol%) and p-nitrophenyl acetate were 0.381% (10.6 mM as acetyl content in the polymer) and 2.56 microM, and 6.52 and 12.6 mumol/min/mg, respectively. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and diisopropyl fluorophosphate at a concentration of 5 mM, which indicated that the enzyme was a serine esterase. The pathway for the metabolism of poly(vinyl alcohol) is also discussed.

  18. Structural features determining thermal adaptation of esterases.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Filip; Mandrysch, Agathe; Poojari, Chetan; Strodel, Birgit; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2016-02-01

    The adaptation of microorganisms to extreme living temperatures requires the evolution of enzymes with a high catalytic efficiency under these conditions. Such extremophilic enzymes represent valuable tools to study the relationship between protein stability, dynamics and function. Nevertheless, the multiple effects of temperature on the structure and function of enzymes are still poorly understood at the molecular level. Our analysis of four homologous esterases isolated from bacteria living at temperatures ranging from 10°C to 70°C suggested an adaptation route for the modulation of protein thermal properties through the optimization of local flexibility at the protein surface. While the biochemical properties of the recombinant esterases are conserved, their thermal properties have evolved to resemble those of the respective bacterial habitats. Molecular dynamics simulations at temperatures around the optimal temperatures for enzyme catalysis revealed temperature-dependent flexibility of four surface-exposed loops. While the flexibility of some loops increased with raising the temperature and decreased with lowering the temperature, as expected for those loops contributing to the protein stability, other loops showed an increment of flexibility upon lowering and raising the temperature. Preserved flexibility in these regions seems to be important for proper enzyme function. The structural differences of these four loops, distant from the active site, are substantially larger than for the overall protein structure, indicating that amino acid exchanges within these loops occurred more frequently thereby allowing the bacteria to tune atomic interactions for different temperature requirements without interfering with the overall enzyme function.

  19. Interaction of OH- with xylan and its hydrated complexes: structures and molecular dynamics study using elongation method.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lin; Liu, Kai; Aoki, Yuriko

    2015-05-01

    The interaction of OH(-) group with (xylan)12 and its hydrated complexes were theoretically studied using elongation optimization (ELG-OPT) method and elongation ab initio molecular dynamics simulation (ELG-MD) method. OH(-) group could abstract a H-atom from the terminal xylan ring to form a complex (xylan)12(-)-H2O without any energy barrier. One and two extra water molecules were also added to the same terminal xylan ring. All the geometry optimization results obtained using elongation method were compared with conventional calculation results, and it suggested that ELG-OPT method worked well for (xylan)12, (xylan)12-OH(-), and its hydrated complexes. Moreover 10 ps ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were performed for complexes (xylan)12(-)-H2O, (xylan)12(-)-2H2O, and (xylan)12(-)-3H2O at 300 K, 500 K, and 700 K. (xylan)12(-)-H2O complex was stable at room temperature. However H2O molecule which was formed by OH(-) group could move at 500 K. At 700 K the H-abstract reaction reversed. Adding an extra water molecule only accelerated the water transfer reaction, but no more chemical reactions occurred, and the transfer time decreased when the temperature increased. The complex (xylan)12(-)-H2O became very stable when adding two extra water molecules even at high temperature, and it indicated that two extra water molecules stabilized the complex (xylan)12(-)-H2O.

  20. XAX1 from glycosyltransferase family 61 mediates xylosyltransfer to rice xylan

    PubMed Central

    Chiniquy, Dawn; Sharma, Vaishali; Schultink, Alex; Baidoo, Edward E.; Rautengarten, Carsten; Cheng, Kun; Carroll, Andrew; Ulvskov, Peter; Harholt, Jesper; Keasling, Jay D.; Pauly, Markus; Scheller, Henrik V.; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2012-01-01

    Xylan is the second most abundant polysaccharide on Earth and represents an immense quantity of stored energy for biofuel production. Despite its importance, most of the enzymes that synthesize xylan have yet to be identified. Xylans have a backbone of β-1,4–linked xylose residues with substitutions that include α-(1→2)–linked glucuronosyl, 4-O-methyl glucuronosyl, and α-1,2- and α-1,3-arabinofuranosyl residues. The substitutions are structurally diverse and vary by taxonomy, with grass xylan representing a unique composition distinct from dicots and other monocots. To date, no enzyme has yet been identified that is specific to grass xylan synthesis. We identified a xylose-deficient loss-of-function rice mutant in Os02g22380, a putative glycosyltransferase in a grass-specific subfamily of family GT61. We designate the mutant xax1 for xylosyl arabinosyl substitution of xylan 1. Enzymatic fingerprinting of xylan showed the specific absence in the mutant of a peak, which was isolated and determined by 1H-NMR to be (β-1,4-Xyl)4 with a β-Xylp-(1→2)-α-Araf-(1→3). Rice xax1 mutant plants are deficient in ferulic and coumaric acid, aromatic compounds known to be attached to arabinosyl residues in xylan substituted with xylosyl residues. The xax1 mutant plants exhibit an increased extractability of xylan and increased saccharification, probably reflecting a lower degree of diferulic cross-links. Activity assays with microsomes isolated from tobacco plants transiently expressing XAX1 demonstrated xylosyltransferase activity onto endogenous acceptors. Our results provide insight into grass xylan synthesis and how substitutions may be modified for increased saccharification for biofuel generation. PMID:23027943

  1. [Role of Human Orphan Esterases in Drug-induced Toxicity].

    PubMed

    Fukami, Tatsuki

    2015-01-01

    Esterases hydrolyze compounds containing ester, amide, and thioester bonds, causing prodrug activation or detoxification. Among esterases, carboxylesterases have been studied in depth due to their ability to hydrolyze a variety of drugs. However, there are several drugs for which the involved esterase(s) is unknown. We found that flutamide, phenacetin, rifamycins (rifampicin, rifabutin, and rifapentine), and indiplon are hydrolyzed by arylacetamide deacetylase (AADAC), which is highly expressed in human liver and gastrointestinal tissues. Flutamide hydrolysis is considered associated with hepatotoxicity. Phenacetin, a prodrug of acetaminophen, was withdrawn due to side effects such as methemoglobinemia and renal failure. It was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo using mice that AADAC is responsible for phenacetin hydrolysis, which leads to methemoglobinemia. In addition, it was shown that AADAC-mediated hydrolysis attenuates the cytotoxicity of rifamycins. Thus AADAC plays critical roles in drug-induced toxicity. Another orphan esterase, α/β hydrolase domain containing 10 (ABHD10), was found responsible for deglucuronidation of acyl-glucuronides including mycophenolic acid acyl-glucuronide and probenecid acyl-glucuronide. Because acyl-glucuronides appear associated with toxicity, ABHD10 would function as a detoxification enzyme. The roles of orphan esterases are becoming increasingly understood. Further studies will facilitate our knowledge of the pharmacologic and toxicological significance of orphan esterases in drug therapy. PMID:26521872

  2. Esterase patterns of species in the Drosophila buzzatii cluster.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, A S; de Campos Bicudo, H E; Ceron, C R; Cordeiro, J A

    1995-01-01

    A comparative analysis was made of the esterase isoenzyme patterns of eight iso-female lines, four of Drosophila serido (B31 D1, A55, B59, Q1, B50Q3), two of D. koepferae (B20D2 and B25D7), one of D. seriema (A95) and one of D. buzzatii (Buz). In all, 43 bands in the spectrum of esterase isoenzymes were detected by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels. They showed variations in specific reactions with alpha and beta-naphthyl acetate, number of patterns yielded in their intra-isofemale line combinations, frequencies of such combinations and the thickness and staining degree of some bands, in different individuals, lines and species. Among bands detected exclusively in males, seven may be considered sex-specific (5 alpha-esterases and 2 beta-esterases). These male-specific alpha-esterases have in common the inability to cleave beta-naphthyl acetate in the absence of alpha-naphthyl, denoting a possible common function. The similarity index (SI) and analysis of dependence were calculated in an attempt to quantify the differentiation of the iso-female lines studied, on the basis of esterase bands. SI mean value allowed the separation of the isofemale lines into five classes. Each species had its own pattern of esterase bands, but some bands were shared. A divergence hypothesis for the isofemale lines and the species is discussed.

  3. Novel organic solvent-tolerant esterase isolated by metagenomics: insights into the lipase/esterase classification.

    PubMed

    Berlemont, Renaud; Spee, Olivier; Delsaute, Maud; Lara, Yannick; Schuldes, Jörg; Simon, Carola; Power, Pablo; Daniel, Rolf; Galleni, Moreno

    2013-01-01

    in order to isolate novel organic solvent-tolerant (OST) lipases, a metagenomic library was built using DNA derived from a temperate forest soil sample. A two-step activity-based screening allowed the isolation of a lipolytic clone active in the presence of organic solvents. Sequencing of the plasmid pRBest recovered from the positive clone revealed the presence of a putative lipase/esterase encoding gene. The deduced amino acid sequence (RBest1) contains the conserved lipolytic enzyme signature and is related to the previously described OST lipase from Lysinibacillus sphaericus 205y, which is the sole studied prokaryotic enzyme belonging to the 4.4 α/β hydrolase subgroup (abH04.04). Both in vivo and in vitro studies of the substrate specificity of RBest1, using triacylglycerols or nitrophenyl-esters, respectively, revealed that the enzyme is highly specific for butyrate (C4) compounds, behaving as an esterase rather than a lipase. The RBest1 esterase was purified and biochemically characterized. The optimal esterase activity was observed at pH 6.5 and at temperatures ranging from 38 to 45 °C. Enzymatic activity, determined by hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl esters, was found to be affected by the presence of different miscible and non-miscible organic solvents, and salts. Noteworthy, RBest1 remains significantly active at high ionic strength. These findings suggest that RBest1 possesses the ability of OST enzymes to molecular adaptation in the presence of organic compounds and resistance of halophilic proteins.

  4. Bacteriophage 933W encodes a functional esterase downstream of the Shiga toxin 2a operon.

    PubMed

    Nübling, Simone; Eisele, Thomas; Stöber, Helen; Funk, Joschua; Polzin, Sabrina; Fischer, Lutz; Schmidt, Herbert

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the 1938bp open reading frame z1466, which is encoded directly downstream the Shiga toxin 2a (Stx2a) operon in E. coli O157:H7 phage 933W was cloned and expressed recombinantly. Purification with Ni-NTA agarose beads with subsequent SDS-PAGE revealed a 68kDa protein, designated 933Wp42-His. Analysis of 933Wp42-His demonstrated an esterase activity by activity staining of native gels using triacetin as a substrate. Purified 933Wp42-His demonstrated a Km value of about 10mM and a Vmax value of 1.667nkat/ml for 4-methylumbelliferyl-acetate (4-MUF-Ac) as a substrate. The enzyme was most active in the pH-range of 7.0-8.0, and at 50°C. Furthermore, 933Wp42-His was able to hydrolyze acetic acid from mucin, and 5-N-acetyl-9-O-acetyl neuraminic acid (Neu5,9Ac2). This is the first description of an enzymatic activity of the Stx-phage-encoded protein 933Wp42. Its role in substrate utilization during colonization and human infection is discussed.

  5. The Xylan Delignification Process for biomass conversion to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, M.C.; Zhao, C.; Lei, S.; Tyson, G.

    1995-10-01

    An extrusion process melded with alkaline peroxide chemical pretreatements allows the lignin and hemicellulose in biomass to be solublibzed, and the cellulose component to be made available for enzymatic breakdown. This process is called the Xylan Delignification Process (XDP). In this paper, some results of the XDP on promoting enzymatic breakdown and SSF of corn stalks switch grass and straw are reported. It was found that the XDP process allowed quick (6 hour) and reasonably complete (85--88%) hydrolysis of the cellulose fraction of cornstalks, but was less effective in allowing utilization of the switch grass with 76% yeild noted in 24 hours. Solubilization of the lignin and hemicellulose were not acheived on a first set of corn stalk, switch grass, and straw samples, but was noted on a second straw sample.

  6. Birch pulp xylan works as a food hydrocolloid in acid milk gels and is fermented slowly in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Sibakov, Natalia; Hakala, Terhi K; Sözer, Nesli; Nordlund, Emilia; Poutanen, Kaisa; Aura, Anna-Marja

    2016-12-10

    The objective was to evaluate the potential of birch xylan as a food hydrocolloid and dietary fibre. High-molecular weight xylan was isolated from birch kraft pulp by alkaline extraction, and enzymatically hydrolysed. Fermentability of xylans was evaluated using an in vitro colon model and performance as a hydrocolloid was studied in low-fat acid milk gels (1.5% and 3% w/w). Texture of the gels and water holding capacity of xylans were compared with inulin, fructooligosaccharide and xylooligosaccharide. Xylans showed slower fermentation rate by faecal microbiota than the references. Xylan-enriched acid milk gels (3% w/w) had improved water holding capacity (over 2-fold) and showed lower spontaneous syneresis, firmness and elasticity when compared to control (no hydrocolloids) or to references. In conclusion, birch xylan improved texture of low-fat acid milk gel applications, and the slow in vitro fermentation rate predicts lower incidence of intestinal discomfort in comparison to the commercial references.

  7. The Role of the Plant-Specific ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 Protein in Arabidopsis Cell Wall Polysaccharide O-Acetylation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schultink, Alex; Naylor, Dan; Dama, Murali; Pauly, Markus

    2015-01-01

    A mutation in the ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 (AXY9) gene was found to be causative for the decreased xyloglucan acetylation phenotype of the axy9.1 mutant, which was identified in a forward genetic screen for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants. The axy9.1 mutant also exhibits decreased O-acetylation of xylan, implying that the AXY9 protein has a broad role in polysaccharide acetylation. An axy9 insertional mutant exhibits severe growth defects and collapsed xylem, demonstrating the importance of wall polysaccharide O-acetylation for normal plant growth and development. Localization and topological experiments indicate that the active site of the AXY9 protein resides within the Golgi lumen. The AXY9 protein appears to be a component of the plant cell wall polysaccharide acetylation pathway, which also includes the REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION and TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins. The AXY9 protein is distinct from the TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins, reported to be polysaccharide acetyltransferases, but does share homology with them and other acetyltransferases, suggesting that the AXY9 protein may act to produce an acetylated intermediate that is part of the O-acetylation pathway. PMID:25681330

  8. A Bacillus licheniformis pectin acetylesterase is specific for homogalacturonans acetylated at O-3.

    PubMed

    Remoroza, C; Wagenknecht, M; Gu, F; Buchholt, H C; Moerschbacher, B M; Schols, H A; Gruppen, H

    2014-07-17

    A recombinant acetylesterase from Bacillus licheniformis DSM13, belonging to carbohydrate esterase family 12, was purified and biochemically characterized. The purified enzyme, termed BliPAE, was capable of deacetylating acetylated pectins, e.g. sugar beet pectin (SBP). Contrary to its provisional annotation as rhamnogalacturonan acetylesterase, the enzyme specifically removed acetyl groups from the homogalacturonan region classifying it as a PAE. The recombinant enzyme has a molecular mass of 26.7 kDa and shows optimal activity at pH 8.0 and 50°C. It is stable in the range pH 5.0-7.0 and below 50°C. Methylesterification of the galacturonic acid (GalA) moieties reduces the deacetylation efficacy of BliPAE. The enzyme efficiently removes acetyl groups from SBPs with low degree of methylesterification (DM) 9-30, releasing about 75% of the acetyl groups present in the homogalacturonan. Furthermore, (1)H NMR of polymer and LC-HILIC-MS(n) after endo-PGII and PL degradation were used to structurally characterize the BliPAE-modified pectins. The results show that BliPAE removes acetyl groups specifically when substituted at the O-3 position of GalA moieties.

  9. Suppression of Dwarf and irregular xylem Phenotypes Generates Low-Acetylated Biomass Lines in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Valérie; Ducamp, Aloïse; Trouverie, Jacques; Fortabat, Marie-Noëlle; Guillebaux, Alexia; Baldy, Aurélie; Naquin, Delphine; Lapierre, Catherine; Mouille, Gregory; Horlow, Christine; Durand-Tardif, Mylène

    2015-01-01

    eskimo1-5 (esk1-5) is a dwarf Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant that has a constitutive drought syndrome and collapsed xylem vessels, along with low acetylation levels in xylan and mannan. ESK1 has xylan O-acetyltransferase activity in vitro. We used a suppressor strategy on esk1-5 to screen for variants with wild-type growth and low acetylation levels, a favorable combination for ethanol production. We found a recessive mutation in the KAKTUS (KAK) gene that suppressed dwarfism and the collapsed xylem character, the cause of decreased hydraulic conductivity in the esk1-5 mutant. Backcrosses between esk1-5 and two independent knockout kak mutants confirmed suppression of the esk1-5 effect. kak single mutants showed larger stem diameters than the wild type. The KAK promoter fused with a reporter gene showed activity in the vascular cambium, phloem, and primary xylem in the stem and hypocotyl. However, suppression of the collapsed xylem phenotype in esk1 kak double mutants was not associated with the recovery of cell wall O-acetylation or any major cell wall modifications. Therefore, our results indicate that, in addition to its described activity as a repressor of endoreduplication, KAK may play a role in vascular development. Furthermore, orthologous esk1 kak double mutants may hold promise for ethanol production in crop plants. PMID:25888614

  10. Characterization of a Feruloyl Esterase from Lactobacillus plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Torres, María; Reverón, Inés; Mancheño, José Miguel; de las Rivas, Blanca

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is frequently found in the fermentation of plant-derived food products, where hydroxycinnamoyl esters are abundant. L. plantarum WCFS1 cultures were unable to hydrolyze hydroxycinnamoyl esters; however, cell extracts from the strain partially hydrolyze methyl ferulate and methyl p-coumarate. In order to discover whether the protein Lp_0796 is the enzyme responsible for this hydrolytic activity, it was recombinantly overproduced and enzymatically characterized. Lp_0796 is an esterase that, among other substrates, is able to efficiently hydrolyze the four model substrates for feruloyl esterases (methyl ferulate, methyl caffeate, methyl p-coumarate, and methyl sinapinate). A screening test for the detection of the gene encoding feruloyl esterase Lp_0796 revealed that it is generally present among L. plantarum strains. The present study constitutes the description of feruloyl esterase activity in L. plantarum and provides new insights into the metabolism of hydroxycinnamic compounds in this bacterial species. PMID:23793626

  11. [Purification and characterization of esterase from Morganella morganii ZJB-09203].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Renchao; Wang, Tianzhen; Li, Xiaojun; Zheng, Yuguo

    2014-01-01

    Enantioselective hydrolysis of 2-carboxyethyl-3-cyano-5-methylhexanoic acid (CNDE) is the key step in chemoenzymatic synthesis of pregabalin. We purified an intracellular carboxyl esterase from Morganella morganii ZJB-09203, which exhibited high enantioselectivity and activity towards CNDE. The carboxyl esterase was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fraction precipitation, Phenyl Sepharose 6 FF hydrophobic interaction chromatography, anion exchange with DEAE Sephadex A-50 and Bio-Scale CHT column. The purified enzyme was a monomer with molecular mass of 68 kDa determined by SDS-PAGE and gel chromatography. Substrate specificity of the enzyme towards p-nitrophenyl esters suggested that the purified enzyme was an esterase. The optimal reaction pH for CNDE hydrolysis was 9.0, and optimal temperature was 45 degrees C. The esterase was stable between pH 7.0 and 9.0, and at 40 degrees C. The enzyme activity was enhanced by Ca2+, Cu2+ and Mn2+, whereas strongly inhibited by Co2+, Fe3+, Ni2+ and EDTA. Meanwhile, we investigated the kinetic parameters of the esterase towards p-nitrophenyl esters and effect of CNDE concentration on conversion. The present study reported the esterase capable of stereospecific hydrolysis of CNDE for the first time. Our research will provide foundations for industrial production of Pregabalin using the new biocatalyst.

  12. Accumulation of recalcitrant xylan in mushroom-compost is due to a lack of xylan substituent removing enzyme activities of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Edita; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Kapsokalyvas, Dimitris; Xing, Lia; van Zandvoort, Marc A M J; de Vries, Ronald P; Gruppen, Harry; Kabel, Mirjam A

    2015-11-01

    The ability of Agaricus bisporus to degrade xylan in wheat straw based compost during mushroom formation is unclear. In this paper, xylan was extracted from the compost with water, 1M and 4M alkali. Over the phases analyzed, the remaining xylan was increasingly substituted with (4-O-methyl-)glucuronic acid and arabinosyl residues, both one and two arabinosyl residues per xylosyl residue remained. In the 1M and 4M KOH soluble solids of spent compost, 33 and 49 out of 100 xylosyl residues, respectively, were substituted. The accumulation of glucuronic acid substituents matched with the analysis that the two A. bisporus genes encoding for α-glucuronidase activity (both GH115) were not expressed in the A. bisporus mycelium in the compost during fruiting. Also, in a maximum likelihood tree it was shown that it is not likely that A. bisporus possesses genes encoding for the activity to remove arabinose from xylosyl residues having two arabinosyl residues.

  13. Xylan hydrolysis in Populus trichocarpa × P. deltoides and model substrates during hydrothermal pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Trajano, Heather L; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Tomkins, Bruce A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Hahn, Michael G; Van Berkel, Gary J; Wyman, Charles E

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies defined easy and difficult to hydrolyze fractions of hemicellulose that may result from bonds among cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. To understand how such bonds affect hydrolysis, Populus trichocarpa × Populus deltoides, holocellulose isolated from P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides and birchwood xylan were subjected to hydrothermal flow-through pretreatment. Samples were characterized by glycome profiling, HPLC, and UPLC-MS. Glycome profiling revealed steady fragmentation and removal of glycans from solids during hydrolysis. The extent of polysaccharide fragmentation, hydrolysis rate, and total xylose yield were lowest for P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides and greatest for birchwood xylan. Comparison of results from P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides and holocellulose suggested that lignin-carbohydrate complexes reduce hydrolysis rates and limit release of large xylooligomers. Smaller differences between results with holocellulose and birchwood xylan suggest xylan-cellulose hydrogen bonds limited hydrolysis, but to a lesser extent. These findings imply cell wall structure strongly influences hydrolysis.

  14. Hydrolysis by commercial enzyme mixtures of AFEX-treated corn fiber and isolated xylans

    SciTech Connect

    Hespell, R.B.; O`Bryan, P.J.; Bothast, R.J.; Moniruzzaman, M.

    1997-01-01

    Corn fiber is a coproduct produced during the corn wet-milling process and is similar to other high hemicellulose/cellulose-containing biomass such as grasses, straws, or bagasse, all of which represent potential fermentation feedstock for conversion into biofuels or other products. Corn fiber was subjected to ammonia-explosion (AFEX) treatment to increase degradability and then enzymatically digested with a combined mixture of commercial amylase, xylanase, and cellulose enzyme preparations. Whereas the starch and cellulose components were converted solely to glucose, oligosaccharides represented 30-40% of the xylan degradation products. This enzyme mixture also produced substantial oligosaccharides with xylans purified from corn fiber, corn germ, beech-wood, oatspelt, or wheat germ. Commercial xylan-degrading enzyme preparations containing xylanase, xylosidase, and arabinosidase activities were then used alone or in varying combinations to attempt to maximize degradation of these isolated xylans of differing chemical compositions. 25 refs., 5 tabs.

  15. Ethanol production from xylan-removed sugarcane bagasse using low loading of commercial cellulase.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingbo; Zhou, Pengfei; Liu, Hongmei; Wu, Kejing; Xiao, Wenjuan; Gong, Yingxue; Lin, Jianghai; Liu, Zehuan

    2014-07-01

    Xylan was always extracted as the feedstock for xylooligosaccharides production. The xylan-removed residue may contain high content of cellulose and thus had a possibility to be converted into ethanol. After soaked in 12% of NaOH at room temperature overnight, solubilization of cellulose, xylan, and lignin was 4.64%, 72.06%, and 81.87% respectively. The xylan-removed sugarcane bagasse (XRSB) was enzymatically hydrolyzed by using decreased cellulase loadings. The results showed that 7.5 FPU/g cellulose could obtain a cellulose conversion yield of 82%. Increasing the cellulase loading did not result in higher yield. Based on this, bioethanol production was performed using 7.5 FPU/g cellulose by employing fed-batch fermentation mode. The final ethanol concentration reached 40.59 g/L corresponding to 74.2% of the theoretical maximum. The high titer ethanol and low cellulase loading may reduce the overall cost.

  16. Isolation and characterization of xylans from seed pericarp of Argania spinosa fruit.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Youssef; Vignon, Michel R

    2005-05-23

    Hemicellulose-type polysaccharides were isolated from the pericarp of seeds of Argania spinosa (L.) Skeels fruit by sequential alkaline extractions and fractionated by precipitation. Water soluble and water insoluble fractions were obtained, purified and characterized by sugar analysis and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The water soluble fractions were assumed to be (4-O-methyl-D-glucurono)-D-xylans, with 4-O-methyl-D-glucopyranosyluronic acid groups linked to C-2 of a (1-->4)-beta-D-xylan. The 1H NMR spectrum showed that the water soluble xylans have, on average, one non-reducing terminal residue of 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronic acid for every seven xylose units. The water insoluble fractions consisted of a neutral xylan with linear (1-->4)-beta-D-xylopyranosyl units. PMID:15854618

  17. Histone acetylation: truth of consequences?

    PubMed

    Choi, Jennifer K; Howe, Leann J

    2009-02-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged into a nucleoprotein structure known as chromatin, which is comprised of DNA, histones, and nonhistone proteins. Chromatin structure is highly dynamic, and can shift from a transcriptionally inactive state to an active form in response to intra- and extracellular signals. A major factor in chromatin architecture is the covalent modification of histones through the addition of chemical moieties, such as acetyl, methyl, ubiquitin, and phosphate groups. The acetylation of the amino-terminal tails of histones is a process that is highly conserved in eukaryotes, and was one of the earliest histone modifications characterized. Since its identification in 1964, a large body of evidence has accumulated demonstrating that histone acetylation plays an important role in transcription. Despite our ever-growing understanding of the nuclear processes involved in nucleosome acetylation, however, the exact biochemical mechanisms underlying the downstream effects of histone acetylation have yet to be fully elucidated. To date, histone acetylation has been proposed to function in 2 nonmutually exclusive manners: by directly altering chromatin structure, and by acting as a molecular tag for the recruitment of chromatin-modifying complexes. Here, we discuss recent research focusing on these 2 potential roles of histone acetylation and clarify what we actually know about the function of this modification.

  18. Investigating Mass Transport Limitations on Xylan Hydrolysis During Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Ashutosh; Pilath, Heid M.; Parent, Yves; Chatterjee, Siddharth G.; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Yarbrough, John M.; Himmel, Michael E.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Johnson, David K.

    2014-04-28

    Mass transport limitations could be an impediment to achieving high sugar yields during biomass pretreatment and thus be a critical factor in the economics of biofuels production. The objective of this work was to study the mass transfer restrictions imposed by the structure of biomass on the hydrolysis of xylan during dilute acid pretreatment of biomass. Mass transfer effects were studied by pretreating poplar wood at particle sizes ranging from 10 micrometers to 10 mm. This work showed a significant reduction in the rate of xylan hydrolysis in poplar when compared to the intrinsic rate of hydrolysis for isolated xylan that is possible in the absence of mass transfer. In poplar samples we observed no significant difference in the rates of xylan hydrolysis over more than two orders of magnitude in particle size. It appears that no additional mass transport restrictions are introduced by increasing particle size from 10 micrometers to 10 mm. This work suggests that the rates of xylan hydrolysis in biomass particles are limited primarily by the diffusion of hydrolysis products out of plant cell walls. A mathematical description is presented to describe the kinetics of xylan hydrolysis that includes transport of the hydrolysis products through biomass into the bulk solution. The modeling results show that the effective diffusion coefficient of the hydrolysis products in the cell wall is several orders of magnitude smaller than typical values in other applications signifying the role of plant cell walls in offering resistance to diffusion of the hydrolysis products.

  19. Characterization of Esterases Produced by a Ruminal Bacterium Identified as Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens1

    PubMed Central

    Lanz, Wayne W.; Williams, Phletus P.

    1973-01-01

    An obligately anaerobic ruminal bacterial isolate was selected from 18 tributyrin-degrading isolates and identified as Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens strain 53. The culture in late exponential phase contained enzymes which could be released by sonic disruption. These enzymes degraded substrates at a rate in the order 1-naphthyl acetate (NA) > 1-naphthyl butyrate > 1-naphthyl propionate but did not degrade 1-naphthyl palmitate or 1-naphthyl phosphate. The enzymes on NA were neither stimulated nor inhibited by CoCl2, MgCl2, and MnCl (each varied from 10−6 to 10−4 M). CaCl at 10−3 M stimulated esterase activity by 16%. Aliphatic substrates were hydrolyzed at a rate in the order triacetin > tributyrin > tripropionin, and ethyl acetate > ethyl formate. Similarly, aromatic fluorescein diesters were degraded at a rate in the order acetyl > propionyl > caproyl > butyryl > capryl > lauryl. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic zymograms indicated that the enzyme composite contained cathodally migrating bands. By column chromatography, these enzymes were separated into six NA-degrading fractions. Fraction V contained an esterase which had an optimal temperature of 39 C, a Km of 7.6 × 10−4 on NA, and a molecular weight of about 66,000. This enzyme was inhibited by paraoxon (41%, 10−4 M), eserine (17%, 10−2 M), NaF (17%, 10−2 M), and diisopropyl fluorophosphate (62%, 10−4 M) but not by 1-naphthyl N-methyl carbamate at 8.4 × 10−4 M. PMID:4734862

  20. Acetylator phenotype in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    McLaren, E H; Burden, A C; Moorhead, P J

    1977-07-30

    The proportions of slow and fast acetylators in a group of diabetics with symptomatic peripheral neuropathy were compared with those in a group of diabetics who had had the disease for at least 10 years without developing neuropathy. There was a significantly higher proportion of fast acetylators in the group of diabetics without neuropathy than in those with neuropathy or in the normal population. Hence genetic factors separate from the diabetic diathesis may determine the development of neuropathy in any particular diabetic.

  1. Use of xylan, an agricultural by-product, in wheat gluten based biodegradable films: mechanical, solubility and water vapor transfer rate properties.

    PubMed

    Kayserilioğlu, Betül S; Bakir, Ufuk; Yilmaz, Levent; Akkaş, Nuri

    2003-05-01

    The possibility of using xylan, as an agricultural by-product, for production of composite films in combinations with wheat gluten was investigated. Different levels of xylan (0-40% w/w) were incorporated into wheat gluten to form biodegradable composite films. Films were prepared at pH 4 and 11, and dried at either uncontrolled or controlled conditions. The mechanical properties, solubilities and water vapour transfer rate (WVTR) of the composite films were studied. Films were obtained with added xylan without decreasing film-forming quality. Xylan can be used as an additive, as much as 40% (w/w), in wheat gluten films. Changing pH, wheat gluten/xylan ratio, xylan type and drying conditions affected mechanical and solubility properties, however, WVTR was not affected by xylan additions. Wheat gluten/xylan composite films having different characteristics can be produced depending on xylan type, composition and process conditions.

  2. An esterase gene from Lactobacillus casei cotranscribed with genes encoding a phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system and regulated by a LevR-like activator and sigma54 factor.

    PubMed

    Yebra, María J; Viana, Rosa; Monedero, Vicente; Deutscher, Josef; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar

    2004-01-01

    A new esterase-encoding gene was found in the draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus casei BL23 (CECT5275). It is located in an operon together with genes encoding the EIIA, EIIB, EIIC, and EIID proteins of a mannose class phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system. After overproduction in Escherichia coli and purification, the esterase could hydrolyze acetyl sugars, hence the operon was named esu for esterase-sugar uptake genes. Upstream of the genes encoding the EII components (esuABCD) and the esterase (esuE), two genes transcribed in the opposite sense were found which encode a Bacillus subtilis LevR-like transcriptional activator (esuR) and a sigma54-like transcriptional factor (rpoN). As compared with the wild-type strain, elevated fructose phosphorylation was detected in L. casei mutants constitutively expressing the esu operon. However, none of the many sugars tested could induce the esu operon. The fact that EsuE exhibits esterase activity on acetyl sugars suggests that this operon could be involved in the uptake and metabolism of esterified sugars. Expression of the esu operon is similar to that of the B. subtilis lev operon: it contains a -12,-24 consensus promoter typical of sigma54-regulated genes, and EsuR and RpoN are essential for its transcription which is negatively regulated by EIIB(Esu). The esuABCDE transcription unit represents the first sigma54-regulated operon in lactobacilli. Furthermore, replacement of His852 in the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system regulation domain II of EsuR with Ala indicated that the transcription activator function of EsuR is inhibited by EIIB(Esu)-mediated phosphorylation at His852. PMID:15925903

  3. The xylan-degrading enzyme system of Talaromyces emersonii: novel enzymes with activity against aryl beta-D-xylosides and unsubstituted xylans.

    PubMed Central

    Tuohy, M G; Puls, J; Claeyssens, M; Vrsanská, M; Coughlan, M P

    1993-01-01

    Talaromyces emersonii, a thermophilic aerobic fungus, produces a complete xylan-degrading enzyme system when grown on appropriate substrates. In this paper we present the physicochemical and catalytic properties of three enzymes, xylosidase (Xyl) I (M(r) 181,000; pI 8.9), II (M(r) 131,000; pI 5.3) and III (M(r) 54,200; pI 4.2). Xyl I and II appear to be dimeric and Xyl III is a single-subunit protein. All three enzymes catalyse the hydrolysis of aryl beta-D-xylosides and xylo-oligosaccharides. Xyl I is a classic beta-xylosidase (1,4-beta-D-xylan xylohydrolase; EC 3.2.1.37), and Xyl II and III are novel xylanases (endo-1,4-beta-D-xylan xylanohydrolase; EC 3.2.1.8) which we believe have not hitherto been reported. In addition to the above substrates, they also catalyse the extensive hydrolysis of unsubstituted xylans, and may have considerable biotechnological potential. The hydrolysis product profiles and bond-cleavage frequencies with various substrates are presented. PMID:8452541

  4. Direct xylan conversion into glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, by Pseudozyma antarctica PYCC 5048(T).

    PubMed

    Faria, Nuno Torres; Marques, Susana; Fonseca, César; Ferreira, Frederico Castelo

    2015-04-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL) are glycolipid biosurfactants, produced by Pseudozyma spp., with increasing commercial interest. While MEL can be produced from d-glucose and d-xylose, the direct conversion of the respective lignocellulosic polysaccharides, cellulose and xylan, was not reported yet. The ability of Pseudozyma antarctica PYCC 5048(T) and Pseudozyma aphidis PYCC 5535(T) to use cellulose (Avicel(®)) and xylan (beechwood) as carbon and energy source has been assessed along with their capacity of producing cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes, toward a consolidated bioprocess (CBP) for MEL production. The yeasts assessed were neither able to grow in medium containing Avicel(®) nor produce cellulolytic enzymes under the conditions tested. On contrary, both yeasts were able to efficiently grow in xylan, but MEL production was only detected in P. antarctica PYCC 5048(T) cultures. MEL titers reached 1.3g/l after 10 days in batch cultures with 40g/l xylan, and 2.0g/l in fed-batch cultures with xylan feeding (additional 40g/l) at day 4. High levels of xylanase activities were detected in xylan cultures, reaching 47-62U/ml (31-32U/mg) at 50°C, and still exhibiting more than 10U/ml under physiological temperature (28°C). Total β-xylosidase activities, displayed mainly as wall-bounded and extracellular activity, accounted for 0.154 and 0.176U/ml in P. antarctica PYCC 5048(T) and P. aphidis PYCC 5535(T) cultures, respectively. The present results demonstrate the potential of Pseudozyma spp. for using directly a fraction of lignocellulosic biomass, xylan, and combining in the same bioprocess the production of xylanolytic enzymes with MEL production.

  5. Direct xylan conversion into glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, by Pseudozyma antarctica PYCC 5048(T).

    PubMed

    Faria, Nuno Torres; Marques, Susana; Fonseca, César; Ferreira, Frederico Castelo

    2015-04-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL) are glycolipid biosurfactants, produced by Pseudozyma spp., with increasing commercial interest. While MEL can be produced from d-glucose and d-xylose, the direct conversion of the respective lignocellulosic polysaccharides, cellulose and xylan, was not reported yet. The ability of Pseudozyma antarctica PYCC 5048(T) and Pseudozyma aphidis PYCC 5535(T) to use cellulose (Avicel(®)) and xylan (beechwood) as carbon and energy source has been assessed along with their capacity of producing cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes, toward a consolidated bioprocess (CBP) for MEL production. The yeasts assessed were neither able to grow in medium containing Avicel(®) nor produce cellulolytic enzymes under the conditions tested. On contrary, both yeasts were able to efficiently grow in xylan, but MEL production was only detected in P. antarctica PYCC 5048(T) cultures. MEL titers reached 1.3g/l after 10 days in batch cultures with 40g/l xylan, and 2.0g/l in fed-batch cultures with xylan feeding (additional 40g/l) at day 4. High levels of xylanase activities were detected in xylan cultures, reaching 47-62U/ml (31-32U/mg) at 50°C, and still exhibiting more than 10U/ml under physiological temperature (28°C). Total β-xylosidase activities, displayed mainly as wall-bounded and extracellular activity, accounted for 0.154 and 0.176U/ml in P. antarctica PYCC 5048(T) and P. aphidis PYCC 5535(T) cultures, respectively. The present results demonstrate the potential of Pseudozyma spp. for using directly a fraction of lignocellulosic biomass, xylan, and combining in the same bioprocess the production of xylanolytic enzymes with MEL production. PMID:25765311

  6. Xylan derivatives and their application potential - mini-review of own results.

    PubMed

    Petzold-Welcke, Katrin; Schwikal, Katrin; Daus, Stephan; Heinze, Thomas

    2014-01-16

    The chemical modification of xylan is a promising path to new biopolymer ethers and esters with specific properties depending on the functional groups, the degree of substitution, and the substitution pattern. The reaction of 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan (GX) from birch with sodium monochloroacetate and 2,3-epoxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride in aqueous sodium hydroxide/slurry medium is described. The influence of the conditions of activation on product structure and properties are discussed in some detail. Methylation of GX was investigated under completely heterogeneous conditions or starting with dissolved polymer using methyl halides as reagents in the presence of NaOH. An activation of the biopolymer has been carried out before the reaction to enhance the accessibility of the reagents. Furthermore, novel xylan esters were efficiently synthesized by conversion of the hemicellulose with furan- and pyroglutamic acid as well as ibuprofen and N,N'-carbonyldiimidazole as activating agent under homogeneous conditions in dimethyl sulfoxide. This conditions are also appropriate to synthesize novel xylan ester containing xylan-4-[N,N,N-trimethylammonium]butyrate chloride moieties. Homogeneous syntheses of xylan sulfates could be carried out in a N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF)/LiCl as solvent applying sulfur trioxide complexes with DMF or pyridine. Advanced analytical techniques including NMR spectroscopy, HPLC, scanning electron microscopy, rheology, measurements of turbidity and surface tension allow description of structure-property-relationships; selected results will be briefly discussed. Xylan esters may form spherical nanoparticles of a size down to 60 nm and a narrow particle size distribution applying a simple dialysis process and may be used for drug delivery applications. For cationic xylan derivatives a wide range of applications as paper strength additives, flocculation aids, and antimicrobial agents are proposed.

  7. Xylan synthetase activity in differentiated xylem cells of sycamore trees (Acer pseudoplatanus).

    PubMed

    Dalessandro, G; Northcote, D H

    1981-01-01

    Particulate enzymic preparations obtained from homogenates of differentiated xylem cells isolated from sycamore trees, catalyzed the formation of a radioactive xylan in the presence of UDP-D-[U-(14)C]xylose as substrate. The synthesized xylan was not dialyzable through Visking cellophane tubing. Successive extraction with cold water, hot water and 5% NaOH dissolved respectively 15, 5 and 80% of the radioactive polymer. Complete acid hydrolysis of the water-insoluble polysaccharide synthesized from UDP-D-[U-(14)C]xylose released all the radioactivity as xylose. β-1,4-Xylodextrins, degree of polymerization 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, were obtained by partial acid hydrolysis (fuming HCl or 0.1 M HCl) of radioactive xylan. The polymer was hydrolysed to xylose, xylobiose and xylotriose by Driselase which contains 1,4-β xylanase activities. Methylation and then hydrolysis of the xylan released two methylated sugars which were identified as di-O-methyl[(14)C]xylose and tri-O-methyl-[(14)C]xylose, suggesting a 1→4-linked polymer. The linkage was confirmed by periodate oxidation studies. The apparent Km value of the synthetase for UDP-D-xylose was 0.4 mM. Xylan synthetase activity was not potentiated in the presence of a detergent. The enzymic activity was stimulated by Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) ions, although EDTA in the range of concentrations between 0.01 and 1 mM did not affect the reaction rate. It appears that the xylan synthetase system associated with membranes obtained from differentiated xylem cells of sycamore trees may serve for catalyzing the in vivo synthesis of the xylan main chain during the biogenesis of the plant cell wall.

  8. Three-dimensional structure of homodimeric cholesterol esterase-ligand complex at 1.4 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, V.; Addlagatta, A.; Wawrzak, Z.; Duax, W.

    2010-03-08

    The three-dimensional structure of a Candida cylindracea cholesterol esterase (ChE) homodimer (534 x 2 amino acids) in complex with a ligand of proposed formula C{sub 23}H{sub 48}O{sub 2} has been determined at 1.4 {angstrom} resolution in space group P1 using synchrotron low-temperature data. The structure refined to R = 0.136 and R{sub free} = 0.169 and has revealed new stereochemical details in addition to those detected for the apo- and holo-forms at 1.9 and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively [Ghosh et al. (1995), Structure, 3, 279-288]. The cholesterol esterase structure is a dimer with four spatially separated interfacial contact areas and two symmetry-related pairs of openings to an internal intradimer cavity. Hydrophobic active-site gorges in each subunit face each other across a central interfacial cavity. The ChE subunits have carbohydrate chains attached to their Asn314 and Asn351 residues, with two ordered N-acetyl-D-glucosoamine moieties visible at each site. The side chains of 14 residues have two alternative conformations with occupancy values of 0.5 {+-} 0.2. For each subunit the electron density in the enzyme active-site gorge is well modeled by a C{sub 23}-chain fatty acid.

  9. Differential recognition of plant cell walls by microbial xylan-specific carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    McCartney, Lesley; Blake, Anthony W; Flint, James; Bolam, David N; Boraston, Alisdair B; Gilbert, Harry J; Knox, J Paul

    2006-03-21

    Glycoside hydrolases that degrade plant cell walls have complex molecular architectures in which one or more catalytic modules are appended to noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). CBMs promote binding to polysaccharides and potentiate enzymic hydrolysis. Although there are diverse sequence-based families of xylan-binding CBMs, these modules, in general, recognize both decorated and unsubstituted forms of the target polysaccharide, and thus the evolutionary rationale for this diversity is unclear. Using immunohistochemistry to interrogate the specificity of six xylan-binding CBMs for their target polysaccharides in cell walls has revealed considerable differences in the recognition of plant materials between these protein modules. Family 2b and 15 CBMs bind to xylan in secondary cell walls in a range of dicotyledon species, whereas family 4, 6, and 22 CBMs display a more limited capability to bind to secondary cell walls. A family 35 CBM, which displays more restricted ligand specificity against purified xylans than the other five protein modules, reveals a highly distinctive binding pattern to plant material including the recognition of primary cell walls of certain dicotyledons, a feature shared with CBM15. Differences in the specificity of the CBMs toward walls of wheat grain and maize coleoptiles were also evident. The variation in CBM specificity for ligands located in plant cell walls provides a biological rationale for the repertoire of structurally distinct xylan-binding CBMs present in nature, and points to the utility of these modules in probing the molecular architecture of cell walls.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Periodate-Oxidized Polysaccharides: Dialdehyde Xylan (DAX).

    PubMed

    Amer, Hassan; Nypelö, Tiina; Sulaeva, Irina; Bacher, Markus; Henniges, Ute; Potthast, Antje; Rosenau, Thomas

    2016-09-12

    The cleavage of the C2-C3 bond in the building units of 1 → 4-linked polysaccharides by periodate formally results in two aldehyde units, which are present in several masked forms. The structural elucidation of such polysaccharide dialdehydes remains a big challenge. Since polysaccharide derivatives are increasingly applied in materials technology, unveiling the exact structure is of utmost importance. To address this issue for xylan, dialdehyde xylan (DAX, oxidation degree of 91.5%) has been synthesized as water-soluble polymer. The ATR-FTIR spectrum of DAX showed free aldehyde to be absent and exhibited a characteristic absorption at 858 cm(-1) related to hemiacetal groups. By a combination of 1D and 2D NMR techniques, it was confirmed that oxidized xylan is present as poly(2,6-dihydroxy-3-methoxy-5-methyl-3,5-diyl-1,4-dioxane). Based on GPC analysis, the DAX polymer shows a slightly lower molar mass (6.6 kDa) compared to the starting material (7.7 kDa) right after oxidation, and degraded further after one month of storage in 0.1 M NaCl solution (4.3 kDa). The oxidized xylan demonstrated lower thermal stability upon TGA analysis and a greater amount of residual char (20.6%) compared to the unmodified xylan (13.7%). PMID:27529432

  11. Fatal Intoxication with Acetyl Fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Susan M; Haikal, Nabila A; Kraner, James C

    2016-01-01

    Among the new psychoactive substances encountered in forensic investigations is the opioid, acetyl fentanyl. The death of a 28-year-old man from recreational use of this compound is reported. The decedent was found in the bathroom of his residence with a tourniquet secured around his arm and a syringe nearby. Postmortem examination findings included marked pulmonary and cerebral edema and needle track marks. Toxicological analysis revealed acetyl fentanyl in subclavian blood, liver, vitreous fluid, and urine at concentrations of 235 ng/mL, 2400 ng/g, 131 ng/mL, and 234 ng/mL, respectively. Acetyl fentanyl was also detected in the accompanying syringe. Death was attributed to recreational acetyl fentanyl abuse, likely through intravenous administration. The blood acetyl fentanyl concentration is considerably higher than typically found in fatal fentanyl intoxications. Analysis of this case underscores the need for consideration of a wide range of compounds with potential opioid-agonist activity when investigating apparent recreational drug-related deaths. PMID:26389815

  12. Hydro-liquefaction of microcrystalline cellulose, xylan and industrial lignin in different supercritical solvents.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingyin; Liu, Dong; Hou, Xulian; Wu, Pingping; Song, Linhua; Yan, Zifeng

    2016-11-01

    The influences of solvent on hydro-liquefaction of cellulose, xylan, and lignin were investigated using micro-autoclave. The maximum conversion and bio-oil yield obtained from cellulose and xylan liquefaction were achieved in methanol, whereas similar liquefaction characteristics of lignin were observed in methanol and ethanol. The molecular simulation of interactions between solvents and subcomponents indicated that methanol and ethanol were highly miscible with raw materials. GC-MS and FT-ICR MS characterization revealed that the chemical compositions of liquid products highly depended on the utilized feedstocks. Esters, ketones, and aldehydes were mainly produced from cellulose and xylan conversion, whereas aromatic compounds were primarily derived from lignin conversion. EA results showed that methanol favored the hydrogenation and deoxygenation, resulting in the heating value increased. It could be concluded that the oil quality was highly improved in supercritical methanol. PMID:27497089

  13. Hydro-liquefaction of microcrystalline cellulose, xylan and industrial lignin in different supercritical solvents.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingyin; Liu, Dong; Hou, Xulian; Wu, Pingping; Song, Linhua; Yan, Zifeng

    2016-11-01

    The influences of solvent on hydro-liquefaction of cellulose, xylan, and lignin were investigated using micro-autoclave. The maximum conversion and bio-oil yield obtained from cellulose and xylan liquefaction were achieved in methanol, whereas similar liquefaction characteristics of lignin were observed in methanol and ethanol. The molecular simulation of interactions between solvents and subcomponents indicated that methanol and ethanol were highly miscible with raw materials. GC-MS and FT-ICR MS characterization revealed that the chemical compositions of liquid products highly depended on the utilized feedstocks. Esters, ketones, and aldehydes were mainly produced from cellulose and xylan conversion, whereas aromatic compounds were primarily derived from lignin conversion. EA results showed that methanol favored the hydrogenation and deoxygenation, resulting in the heating value increased. It could be concluded that the oil quality was highly improved in supercritical methanol.

  14. Investigation on molar mass, solubility and enzymatic fragmentation of xylans by multi-detected SEC chromatography.

    PubMed

    Saake, B; Kruse, T; Puls, J

    2001-12-01

    Four xylan samples from different origin were investigated, using a multi-detector, size exclusion, chromatographic system with two chromatographic column sets and mobile phases differing in the DMSO:water ratio. Molar mass distribution could be analysed best using a mobile phase of DMSO:water (90:10) with addition of 0.05 M LiBr, a system offering good solubilisation of the polymers and a proper chromatographic separation. SEC analysis in aqueous systems provided information on solubility and aggregation of xylans. A comparison of UV- and RI-signals in different systems gave further information on lignin impurities, which in some cases were involved in aggregation phenomena. Both analytical systems were applied to study the enzymatic fragmentation of xylans. Combining the information derived from the two systems can differentiate between the enzymatic degradation of the well-dissolved and the associated polymer fractions. PMID:11601543

  15. Acetylator phenotype in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, E H; Burden, A C; Moorhead, P J

    1977-01-01

    The proportions of slow and fast acetylators in a group of diabetics with symptomatic peripheral neuropathy were compared with those in a group of diabetics who had had the disease for at least 10 years without developing neuropathy. There was a significantly higher proportion of fast acetylators in the group of diabetics without neuropathy than in those with neuropathy or in the normal population. Hence genetic factors separate from the diabetic diathesis may determine the development of neuropathy in any particular diabetic. PMID:871863

  16. Transcriptomic Analysis of Xylan Utilization Systems in Paenibacillus sp. Strain JDR-2

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Neha; Crooks, Casey; St. John, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Xylans, including methylglucuronoxylans (MeGXn) and methylglucuronoarabinoxylans (MeGAXn), are the predominant polysaccharides in hemicellulose fractions of dicots and monocots available for conversion to biofuels and chemicals. Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 (Pjdr2) efficiently depolymerizes MeGXn and MeGAXn and assimilates the generated oligosaccharides, resulting in efficient saccharification and subsequent metabolism of these polysaccharides. A xylan utilization regulon encoding a cell-associated GH10 (glycoside hydrolase family 10) endoxylanase, transcriptional regulators, ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporters, an intracellular GH67 α-glucuronidase, and other glycoside hydrolases contributes to complete metabolism. This GH10/GH67 system has been proposed to account for preferential utilization of xylans compared to free oligo- and monosaccharides. To identify additional genes contributing to MeGXn and MeGAXn utilization, the transcriptome of Pjdr2 has been sequenced following growth on each of these substrates as well as xylose and arabinose. Increased expression of genes with different substrates identified pathways common or unique to the utilization of MeGXn or MeGAXn. Coordinate upregulation of genes comprising the GH10/GH67 xylan utilization regulon is accompanied with upregulation of genes encoding a GH11 endoxylanase and a GH115 α-glucuronidase, providing evidence for a novel complementary pathway for processing xylans. Elevated expression of genes encoding a GH43 arabinoxylan arabinofuranohydrolase and an arabinose ABC transporter on MeGAXn but not on MeGXn supports a process in which arabinose may be removed extracellularly followed by its rapid assimilation. Further development of Pjdr2 for direct conversion of xylans to targeted products or introduction of these systems into fermentative strains of related bacteria may lead to biocatalysts for consolidated bioprocessing of hemicelluloses released from lignocellulose. PMID:25527555

  17. Analysis of lignin-carbohydrate and lignin-lignin linkages after hydrolase treatment of xylan-lignin, glucomannan-lignin and glucan-lignin complexes from spruce wood.

    PubMed

    Du, Xueyu; Pérez-Boada, Marta; Fernández, Carmen; Rencoret, Jorge; del Río, José C; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Li, Jiebing; Gutiérrez, Ana; Martínez, Angel T

    2014-05-01

    Xylan-lignin (XL), glucomannan-lignin (GML) and glucan-lignin (GL) complexes were isolated from spruce wood, hydrolyzed with xylanase or endoglucanase/β-glucosidase, and analyzed by analytical pyrolysis and 2D-NMR. The enzymatic hydrolysis removed most of the polysaccharide moieties in the complexes, and the lignin content and relative abundance of lignin-carbohydrate linkages increased. Analytical pyrolysis confirmed the action of the enzymatic hydrolysis, with strong decreases of levoglucosane and other carbohydrate-derived products. Unexpectedly it also revealed that the hydrolase treatment alters the pattern of lignin breakdown products, resulting in higher amounts of coniferyl alcohol. From the anomeric carbohydrate signals in the 2D-NMR spectra, phenyl glycoside linkages (undetectable in the original complexes) could be identified in the hydrolyzed GML complex. Lower amounts of glucuronosyl and benzyl ether linkages were also observed after the hydrolysis. From the 2D-NMR spectra of the hydrolyzed complexes, it was concluded that the lignin in GML is less condensed than in XL due to its higher content in β-O-4' ether substructures (62 % of side chains in GML vs 53 % in XL) accompanied by more coniferyl alcohol end units (16 vs 13 %). In contrast, the XL lignin has more pinoresinols (11 vs 6 %) and dibenzodioxocins (9 vs 2 %) than the GML (and both have ~13 % phenylcoumarans and 1 % spirodienones). Direct 2D-NMR analysis of the hydrolyzed GL complex was not possible due to its low solubility. However, after sample acetylation, an even less condensed lignin than in the GML complex was found (with up to 72 % β-O-4' substructures and only 1 % pinoresinols). The study provides evidence for the existence of structurally different lignins associated to hemicelluloses (xylan and glucomannan) and cellulose in spruce wood and, at the same time, offers information on some of the chemical linkages between the above polymers.

  18. In Vitro Antioxidant, Anticoagulant and Antimicrobial Activity and in Inhibition of Cancer Cell Proliferation by Xylan Extracted from Corn Cobs

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Silveira, Raniere Fagundes; Fidelis, Gabriel Pereira; Costa, Mariana Santana Santos Pereira; Telles, Cinthia Beatrice Silva; Dantas-Santos, Nednaldo; de Oliveira Elias, Susana; Ribeiro, Vanessa Bley; Barth, Afonso Luis; Macedo, Alexandre José; Leite, Edda Lisboa; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Xylan is one of most abundant polymer after cellulose. However, its potential has yet to be completely recognized. Corn cobs contain a considerable reservoir of xylan. The aim of this work was to study some of the biological activities of xylan obtained from corn cobs after alkaline extraction enhanced by ultrasonication. Physical chemistry and infrared analyses showed 130 kDa heteroxylan containing mainly xylose:arabinose: galactose:glucose (5.0:1.5:2.0:1.2). Xylan obtained exhibited total antioxidant activity corresponding to 48.5 mg of ascorbic acid equivalent/g of xylan. Furthermore, xylan displayed high ferric chelating activity (70%) at 2 mg/mL. Xylan also showed anticoagulant activity in aPTT test. In antimicrobial assay, the polysaccharide significantly inhibited bacterial growth of Klebsiella pneumoniae. In a test with normal and tumor human cells, after 72 h, only HeLa tumor cell proliferation was inhibited (p < 0.05) in a dose-dependent manner by xylan, reaching saturation at around 2 mg/mL, whereas 3T3 normal cell proliferation was not affected. The results suggest that it has potential clinical applications as antioxidant, anticoagulant, antimicrobial and antiproliferative compounds. PMID:22312261

  19. Regiospecific Ester Hydrolysis by Orange Peel Esterase - An Undergraduate Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugg, Timothy D. H.; Lewin, Andrew M.; Catlin, Eric R.

    1997-01-01

    A simple but effective experiment has been developed to demonstrate the regiospecificity of enzyme catalysis using an esterase activity easily isolated from orange peel. The experiment involves the preparation of diester derivatives of para-, meta- and ortho-hydroxybenzoic acid (e.g. methyl 4-acetoxy-benzoic acid). The derivatives are incubated with orange peel esterase, as a crude extract, and with commercially available pig liver esterase and porcine pancreatic lipase. The enzymatic hydrolysis reactions are monitored by thin layer chromatography, revealing which of the two ester groups is hydrolysed, and the rate of the enzyme-catalysed reaction. The results of a group experiment revealed that in all cases hydrolysis was observed with at least one enzyme, and in most cases the enzymatic hydrolysis was specific for production of either the hydroxy-ester or acyl-acid product. Specificity towards the ortho-substituted series was markedly different to that of the para-substituted series, which could be rationalised in the case of pig liver esterase by a published active site model.

  20. Glucuronoyl esterases are active on polymeric substrate, methyl esterified glucuronoxylan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alkali extracted beechwood glucuronoxylan methyl ester prepared by esterification of 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronic acid side residues by methanol was found to serve as substrate of microbial glucuronoyl esterases from Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Schizophyllum commune and Trichoderma reesei. The enzymatic d...

  1. Synthesis of Pro-Xylane: a new biologically active C-glycoside in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Cavezza, Alexandre; Boulle, Christophe; Guéguiniat, Amélie; Pichaud, Patrick; Trouille, Simon; Ricard, Louis; Dalko-Csiba, Maria

    2009-02-01

    The scope and limitation of Lubineau's reaction were evaluated for the synthesis of C-glycosides (compounds 1-13). Further transformation of side chain carbonyl was also achieved (compounds 16-23). Optimization of these two steps was investigated in xylose case. Some of the compounds were shown to stimulate sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) synthesis. Compound 20 (called Pro-Xylane) was identified as the best activator of GAGs biosynthesis. Pro-Xylane was developed using environmentally friendly conditions relevant to 'Green-Chemistry' principles and launched on the market in September 2006. This compound is the first example of 'Green' chemical used in cosmetic.

  2. Conversion of Acetic Acid from the Catalytic Pyrolysis of Xylan Over CeO2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heejin; Ko, Jeong Huy; Kwon, Woo Hyun; Park, Young-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    CeO2 was synthesized hydrothermally in supercritical water and applied to the catalytic pyrolysis of xylan. Acetic acid, which is the main component in bio-oil produced from the non-catalytic pyrolysis of xylan, deteriorates the fuel quality of the oil. Catalysis over CeO2 effectively converted the acetic acid to ketone species, such as acetone, thereby reducing the acidity of the oil considerably. The content of aromatics in bio-oil was also increased substantially by catalysis. PMID:27483777

  3. Increase of xylan synthetase activity during xylem differentiation of the vascular cambium of sycamore and poplar trees.

    PubMed

    Dalessandro, G; Northcote, D H

    1981-01-01

    The activity of a β-(1-4)-xylan synthetase, a membrane-bound enzymic system, was measured in particulate enzymic preparations (1,000 g and 1,000-100,000 g pellets) obtained from homogenates of cambial cells, differentiating xylem cells and differentiated xylem cells isolated from actively growing trees of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatamus) and poplar (Populus robusta). The specific activity (nmol of xylan formed min(-1) mg(-1) of protein) as well as the activity calculated on a per cell basis (nmol of xylan formed min(-1) cell(-1)) of this enzymic system, markedly increased as cells differentiate from the vascular cambium to xylem. This increase is closely correlated with the enhanced deposition of xylan occurring during the formation of secondary thickening. The possible control of xylan synthesis during the biogenesis of plant cell wall is discussed.

  4. In vitro comparison of rat and chicken brain neurotoxic esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, R.; Padilla, S.

    1986-04-01

    A systematic comparison was undertaken to characterize neurotoxic esterase (NTE) from rat and chicken brain in terms of inhibitor sensitivities, pH optima, and molecular weights. Paraoxon titration of phenyl valerate (PV)-hydrolyzing carboxylesterases showed that rat esterases were more sensitive than chicken to paraoxon inhibition at concentrations less than or equal to microM and superimposable with chicken esterases at concentrations of 2.5-1000 microM. Mipafox titration of the paraoxon-resistant esterases at a fixed paraoxon concentration of 100 microM (mipafox concentration: 0-1000 microM) resulted in a mipafox I50 of 7.3 microM for chicken brain NTE and 11.6 microM for rat brain NTE. NTE (i.e., paraoxon-resistant, mipafox-sensitive esterase activity) comprised 80% of chicken and 60% of rat brain paraoxon-resistant activity with the specific activity of chicken brain NTE approximately twice that of rat brain NTE. The pH maxima for NTE from both species was similar showing broad, slightly alkaline optima from pH 7.9 to 8.6. (/sup 3/H)Diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate (DFP)-labeled NTE from the brains of both species had an apparent mol wt of 160,000 measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In conclusion, NTE from both species was very similar, with the mipafox I50 for rat NTE within the range of reported values for chicken and human NTE, and the inhibitor parameters of the chicken NTE assay were applicable for the rat NTE assay.

  5. High-throughput screening method for lipases/esterases.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Díaz, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Jorge Alberto; de Los Ángeles Camacho-Ruiz, María; Mateos-Díaz, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) methods for lipases and esterases are generally performed by using synthetic chromogenic substrates (e.g., p-nitrophenyl, resorufin, and umbelliferyl esters) which may be misleading since they are not their natural substrates (e.g., partially or insoluble triglycerides). In previous works, we have shown that soluble nonchromogenic substrates and p-nitrophenol (as a pH indicator) can be used to quantify the hydrolysis and estimate the substrate selectivity of lipases and esterases from several sources. However, in order to implement a spectrophotometric HTS method using partially or insoluble triglycerides, it is necessary to find particular conditions which allow a quantitative detection of the enzymatic activity. In this work, we used Triton X-100, CHAPS, and N-lauroyl sarcosine as emulsifiers, β-cyclodextrin as a fatty acid captor, and two substrate concentrations, 1 mM of tributyrin (TC4) and 5 mM of trioctanoin (TC8), to improve the test conditions. To demonstrate the utility of this method, we screened 12 enzymes (commercial preparations and culture broth extracts) for the hydrolysis of TC4 and TC8, which are both classical substrates for lipases and esterases (for esterases, only TC4 may be hydrolyzed). Subsequent pH-stat experiments were performed to confirm the preference of substrate hydrolysis with the hydrolases tested. We have shown that this method is very useful for screening a high number of lipases (hydrolysis of TC4 and TC8) or esterases (only hydrolysis of TC4) from wild isolates or variants generated by directed evolution using nonchromogenic triglycerides directly in the test.

  6. High-throughput screening method for lipases/esterases.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Díaz, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Jorge Alberto; de Los Ángeles Camacho-Ruiz, María; Mateos-Díaz, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) methods for lipases and esterases are generally performed by using synthetic chromogenic substrates (e.g., p-nitrophenyl, resorufin, and umbelliferyl esters) which may be misleading since they are not their natural substrates (e.g., partially or insoluble triglycerides). In previous works, we have shown that soluble nonchromogenic substrates and p-nitrophenol (as a pH indicator) can be used to quantify the hydrolysis and estimate the substrate selectivity of lipases and esterases from several sources. However, in order to implement a spectrophotometric HTS method using partially or insoluble triglycerides, it is necessary to find particular conditions which allow a quantitative detection of the enzymatic activity. In this work, we used Triton X-100, CHAPS, and N-lauroyl sarcosine as emulsifiers, β-cyclodextrin as a fatty acid captor, and two substrate concentrations, 1 mM of tributyrin (TC4) and 5 mM of trioctanoin (TC8), to improve the test conditions. To demonstrate the utility of this method, we screened 12 enzymes (commercial preparations and culture broth extracts) for the hydrolysis of TC4 and TC8, which are both classical substrates for lipases and esterases (for esterases, only TC4 may be hydrolyzed). Subsequent pH-stat experiments were performed to confirm the preference of substrate hydrolysis with the hydrolases tested. We have shown that this method is very useful for screening a high number of lipases (hydrolysis of TC4 and TC8) or esterases (only hydrolysis of TC4) from wild isolates or variants generated by directed evolution using nonchromogenic triglycerides directly in the test. PMID:22426713

  7. Protein acetylation in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Soppa, Jörg

    2010-09-16

    Proteins can be acetylated at the alpha-amino group of the N-terminal amino acid (methionine or the penultimate amino acid after methionine removal) or at the epsilon-amino group of internal lysines. In eukaryotes the majority of proteins are N-terminally acetylated, while this is extremely rare in bacteria. A variety of studies about N-terminal acetylation in archaea have been reported recently, and it was revealed that a considerable fraction of proteins is N-terminally acetylated in haloarchaea and Sulfolobus, while this does not seem to apply for methanogenic archaea. Many eukaryotic proteins are modified by differential internal acetylation, which is important for a variety of processes. Until very recently, only two bacterial proteins were known to be acetylation targets, but now 125 acetylation sites are known for E. coli. Knowledge about internal acetylation in archaea is extremely limited; only two target proteins are known, only one of which--Alba--was used to study differential acetylation. However, indications accumulate that the degree of internal acetylation of archaeal proteins might be underestimated, and differential acetylation has been shown to be essential for the viability of haloarchaea. Focused proteomic approaches are needed to get an overview of the extent of internal protein acetylation in archaea.

  8. Evidence for a blockwise distribution of acetyl groups onto homogalacturonans from a commercial sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) pectin.

    PubMed

    Ralet, Marie-Christine; Crépeau, Marie-Jeanne; Bonnin, Estelle

    2008-06-01

    Commercial acid-extracted sugar beet pectin was extensively hydrolysed using an endo-polygalacturonase (AnPGI from Aspergillus niger or AnPGII from A. niger or FmPG from Fusarium moniliforme) in combination with Aspergillus aculeatus pectin methyl-esterase (AaPME). The homogalacturonan-derived oligogalacturonates released were quantified by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography and their structure determined by mass spectrometry. The different endo-polygalacturonases exhibited variable tolerance towards acetyl groups. AnPGI was the most active and FmPG the less. A hypothetical homogalacturonan was constructed using the AnPGI-recovered oligogalacturonates as building blocks and the validity of the model was checked taking into account FmPG observed requirements and hydrolysis products. A blockwise repartition of the acetyl groups onto sugar beet pectin homogalacturonan is proposed.

  9. Effect of xylan structure on reactivity in graft copolymerization and subsequent binding to cellulose.

    PubMed

    Littunen, Kuisma; Kilpeläinen, Petri; Junka, Karoliina; Sipponen, Mika; Master, Emma R; Seppälä, Jukka

    2015-04-13

    The grafting reactivities with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) of five xylans from hardwood and cereal sources were compared. The structural property that best predicted the reactivities of xylans with GMA was the fraction of 4-O-methylglucuronic acid (MeGlcA) substitution. A comparatively high level of arabinose substitution was also positively correlated to reactivity with GMA. The impact of MeGlcA and arabinose branching groups is likely attributed to the solubilizing effect of these substituents. Consistent with this prediction, low water solubility and high lignin content were found to hinder reactivity. Even though oligomeric substrates have the advantage of water solubility, modified xylo-oligosaccharides were difficult to purify. Accordingly, delignified and high-molecular weight xylans that are soluble or dispersible in water are best suited for this type of backbone derivatization. Adsorption studies with a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation indicated that grafting lowered the total adsorption of arabinoxylan but did not significantly affect the fraction of xylans adsorbed irreversibly on cellulose.

  10. Arabidopsis GUX Proteins Are Glucuronyltransferases Responsible for the Addition of Glucuronic Acid Side Chains onto Xylan

    EPA Science Inventory

    Xylan, the second most abundant cell wall polysaccharide, is composed of a linear backbone of β-(1,4)-linked xylosyl residues that are often substituted with sugar side chains, such as glucuronic acid (GlcA) and methylglucuronic acid (MeGlcA). It has recently been shown that muta...

  11. Properties of polyvinyl alcohol/xylan composite films with citric acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuaiyang; Ren, Junli; Li, Weiying; Sun, Runcang; Liu, Shijie

    2014-03-15

    Composite films of xylan and polyvinyl alcohol were produced with citric acid as a new plasticizer or a cross-linking agent. The effects of citric acid content and polyvinyl alcohol/xylan weight ratio on the mechanical properties, thermal stability, solubility, degree of swelling and water vapor permeability of the composite films were investigated. The intermolecular interactions and morphology of composite films were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and SEM. The results indicated that polyvinyl alcohol/xylan composite films had good compatibility. With an increase in citric acid content from 10% to 50%, the tensile strength reduced from 35.1 to 11.6 MPa. However, the elongation at break increased sharply from 15.1% to 249.5%. The values of water vapor permeability ranged from 2.35 to 2.95 × 10(-7)g/(mm(2)h). Interactions between xylan and polyvinyl alcohol in the presence of citric acid become stronger, which were caused by hydrogen bond and ester bond formation among the components during film forming.

  12. In situ enzyme aided adsorption of soluble xylan biopolymers onto cellulosic material.

    PubMed

    Chimphango, Annie F A; Görgens, J F; van Zyl, W H

    2016-06-01

    The functional properties of cellulose fibers can be modified by adsorption of xylan biopolymers. The adsorption is improved when the degree of biopolymers substitution with arabinose and 4-O-methyl-glucuronic acid (MeGlcA) side groups, is reduced. α-l-Arabinofuranosidase (AbfB) and α-d-glucuronidase (AguA) enzymes were applied for side group removal, to increase adsorption of xylan from sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L) bagasse (BH), bamboo (Bambusa balcooa) (BM), Pinus patula (PP) and Eucalyptus grandis (EH) onto cotton lint. The AguA treatment increased the adsorption of all xylans by up to 334%, whereas, the AbfB increased the adsorption of the BM and PP by 31% and 44%, respectively. A combination of AguA and AbfB treatment increased the adsorption, but to a lesser extent than achieved with AguA treatment. This indicated that the removal of the glucuronic acid side groups provided the most significant increase in xylan adsorption to cellulose, in particular through enzymatic treatment.

  13. In situ enzyme aided adsorption of soluble xylan biopolymers onto cellulosic material.

    PubMed

    Chimphango, Annie F A; Görgens, J F; van Zyl, W H

    2016-06-01

    The functional properties of cellulose fibers can be modified by adsorption of xylan biopolymers. The adsorption is improved when the degree of biopolymers substitution with arabinose and 4-O-methyl-glucuronic acid (MeGlcA) side groups, is reduced. α-l-Arabinofuranosidase (AbfB) and α-d-glucuronidase (AguA) enzymes were applied for side group removal, to increase adsorption of xylan from sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L) bagasse (BH), bamboo (Bambusa balcooa) (BM), Pinus patula (PP) and Eucalyptus grandis (EH) onto cotton lint. The AguA treatment increased the adsorption of all xylans by up to 334%, whereas, the AbfB increased the adsorption of the BM and PP by 31% and 44%, respectively. A combination of AguA and AbfB treatment increased the adsorption, but to a lesser extent than achieved with AguA treatment. This indicated that the removal of the glucuronic acid side groups provided the most significant increase in xylan adsorption to cellulose, in particular through enzymatic treatment. PMID:27083357

  14. Xylan-based temperature/pH sensitive hydrogels for drug controlled release.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cundian; Ren, Junli; Zhao, Cui; Kong, Weiqing; Dai, Qingqing; Chen, Qifeng; Liu, Chuanfu; Sun, Runcang

    2016-10-20

    Xylan-based temperature/pH sensitive hydrogels were prepared by the crosslinking copolymerization of xylan with N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) and acrylic acid (AA) using N,Ń-methylenebis-acrylamide (MBA) as a cross-linker and 2,2-dimethoxy-2-phenylacetophenone as a photoinitiator via ultraviolet irradiation. The influence of the NIPAm, AA and MBA amount on properties of xylan-based hydrogels was discussed. The morphology and interactions of hydrogels were characterized by SEM and FTIR. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of hydrogels was investigated by DSC. The results indicated that the LCST of hydrogels emerged at around 34°C and increased with increasing the AA content. The drug encapsulation efficiency of as-prepared hydrogels reached to 97.60% and the cumulative release rate of acetylsalicylic acid was 90.12% and 26.35% in the intestinal and gastric fluid, respectively. Xylan-based hydrogels were proved to be biocompatible with NIH3T3 cell by MTT assay and showed the promising application as drug carriers for the intestinal-targeted oral drug delivery. PMID:27474557

  15. Digestive and physiological effects of a wheat bran extract, arabino-xylan-oligosaccharide, in breakfast cereal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We assessed whether a wheat bran extract containing arabino-xylan-oligosaccharide (AXOS) elicited a prebiotic effect and influenced other physiologic parameters when consumed in ready-to-eat cereal at two dose levels. This double-blind, randomized, controlled, crossover trial evaluated the effects o...

  16. Synthesis and characterization of carboxymethyl xylan-g-poly(propylene oxide) and its application in films.

    PubMed

    Peng, Pai; Zhai, Meizhi; She, Diao; Gao, Yuefang

    2015-11-20

    Carboxymethyl xylan-g-poly(propylene oxide) (CMX-g-PPO) was successfully synthesized by grafting poly(propylene oxide) chains onto xylan from bamboo using the Al(Oi-Pr)3 initiated ring-opening polymerization of propylene oxides, followed by carboxymethylation with sodium chloroacetate under microwave irradiation. The synthesized CMX-g-PPO was well characterized by FT-IR, (13)C NMR, and AFM. The AFM imaging showed that the average sizes of xylan were 422.1×67.4×1.2nm, while the average sizes of grafting branches PPO were 128.0×38.5×5.1nm, which firstly provided an irrefutable and visual evidence for the structure of grafted xylan at single molecular level. Subsequently, a serial of CMX-g-PPO/CS films were prepared without addition of any plasticizers. The surface morphologies, wettability, water vapor barrier properties, mechanical properties, and thermal stabilities of the obtained films were characterized and compared with those of the control films by AFM, contact angle, WVP, tensile testing, and TGA, respectively. PMID:26344263

  17. Mode of action of Bacillus licheniformis pectin methylesterase on highly methylesterified and acetylated pectins.

    PubMed

    Remoroza, Connie; Wagenknecht, Martin; Buchholt, Hans Christian; Moerschbacher, Bruno M; Gruppen, Harry; Schols, Henk A

    2015-01-22

    A gene encoding a putative pectinesterase from Bacillus licheniformis DSM13 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The resulting recombinant enzyme (BliPME) was purified and characterized as a pectin methylesterase. The enzyme showed maximum activity at pH 8.0 and 50°C. BliPME is able to release up to 100% of the methylesters from lime pectin (DM 34-76→DM 0) and up to 73% of all methylesters from SBPs (DM 30-73→DM 14). BliPME efficiently de-methylesterifies lemon pectins and SBPs in a blockwise manner and is quite tolerant towards the acetyl groups present within the SBPs. Detailed analysis of the BliPME-modified pectins using HILIC-MSn and the classical calcium reactivity measurement showed that the enzyme generates pectins with low methylesterification (lime and SBP) and high acetyl content (SBP) while creating blocks of nonmethylesterified galacturonic acid residues. The high activity of BliPME towards highly methylesterified and acetylated pectins makes this novel esterase more efficient in removing methylesters from highly esterified beet pectin compared to other PMEs, e.g. Aspergillus niger PME.

  18. Electrophoretic and densitometric analysis of esterase activity as an indicator of mercury toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, M.J.; Guttman, S.I.

    1995-12-31

    In an earlier experiment, esterase activity as determined by starch gel electrophoresis was absent in larval caddisflies (Nectopsyche albida) that succumbed to mercury exposure, but was present in control larvae. To test the effects of mercury exposure duration on esterase activity, additional larval N. albida were exposed under conditions identical to those in the earlier experiment, and esterase activity was determined by electrophoresis of several live individuals every 12 hours. To test the effects of mercury concentration on esterase activity, homogenates of unexposed N. albida were electrophoresed, and esterase activity was determined using esterase-specific stains spiked with various concentrations of mercury. Following both experiments, esterase activity was quantified by laser densitometry of stained electrophoresis gels, Results indicate that: (1) inorganic mercury inhibited esterase activity, (2) inhibition increased with exposure time, and (3) inhibition increased with mercury concentration. Esterase inhibition may be a causal factor in mortality related to mercury exposure. Quantification of esterase activity by densitometry of electrophoretic gels may be an alternative method of rapid toxicity assessment.

  19. The beta-D-xylosidase of Trichoderma reesei is a multifunctional beta-D-xylan xylohydrolase.

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, M C; Vrsanska, M; Jurickova, M; Hirsch, J; Biely, P; Kubicek, C P

    1997-01-01

    An extracellular multifunctional beta-D-xylan xylohydrolase, previously described as beta-xylosidase, was purified from Trichoderma reesei RUT C-30 to physical homogeneity. The active enzyme was a 100 (+/-5) kDa glycosylated monomer that exhibited a pl of 4.7. Its activity was optimal at pH 4 and it was stable between pH 3 and 6. Its temperature-stability was moderate (70 degrees zero of activity remaining after 60 min at 50 degrees C) and optimal activity was observed at 60 degrees C. It is capable of hydrolysing beta-1.4-xylo-oligosaccharides [degree of polymerization (DP) 2-7], the apparent Vmax increasing with increasing chain length. The enzyme also attacked debranched beech-wood (Lenzing) xylan and 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan, forming xylose as the only end product. The K(m) for xylan was 0.7 g/l. For this reason we consider the enzyme to be a beta-D-xylan xylohydrolase. The enzyme also exhibits alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase activity on 4-nitrophenyl alpha-L-arabinofuranoside, and evidence is presented that this is not caused by an impurity in the enzyme preparation. The beta-D-xylan xylohydrolase exhibits glycosyltransferase activity with xylo-oligosaccharides and at high concentrations of 4-nitrophenyl beta-D-xylopyranoside (4-Nph-beta-Xyl). The enzyme hydrolyses beta-1, 4-linkages preferentially to beta-1,3-linkages, and beta-1,2-linked xylo-oligosaccharides are not hydrolysed at all. The enzyme liberates terminal beta-1,4-xylopyranose residues linked to a 2-O-substituted xylopyranose residue, but not that linked to a 3-O-substituted xylopyranose residue. The enzyme does not attack methyl, methyl 1-thio-benzyl or butyl l-thio-beta-D-xylopyranosides and 4-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl and phenyl beta-D-xylopyranosides. PMID:9020869

  20. Characterization of Xylan Utilization and Discovery of a New Endoxylanase in Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum through Targeted Gene Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Podkaminer, Kara K.; Guss, Adam M.; Trajano, Heather L.; Hogsett, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The economical production of fuels and commodity chemicals from lignocellulose requires the utilization of both the cellulose and hemicellulose fractions. Xylanase enzymes allow greater utilization of hemicellulose while also increasing cellulose hydrolysis. Recent metabolic engineering efforts have resulted in a strain of Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum that can convert C5 and C6 sugars, as well as insoluble xylan, into ethanol at high yield. To better understand the process of xylan solubilization in this organism, a series of targeted deletions were constructed in the homoethanologenic T. saccharolyticum strain M0355 to characterize xylan hydrolysis and xylose utilization in this organism. While the deletion of β-xylosidase xylD slowed the growth of T. saccharolyticum on birchwood xylan and led to an accumulation of short-chain xylo-oligomers, no other single deletion, including the deletion of the previously characterized endoxylanase XynA, had a phenotype distinct from that of the wild type. This result indicates a multiplicity of xylanase enzymes which facilitate xylan degradation in T. saccharolyticum. Growth on xylan was prevented only when a previously uncharacterized endoxylanase encoded by xynC was also deleted in conjunction with xynA. Sequence analysis of xynC indicates that this enzyme, a low-molecular-weight endoxylanase with homology to glycoside hydrolase family 11 enzymes, is secreted yet untethered to the cell wall. Together, these observations expand our understanding of the enzymatic basis of xylan hydrolysis by T. saccharolyticum. PMID:23023741

  1. A novel mechanism of xylan binding by a lectin-like module from Streptomyces lividans xylanase 10A.

    PubMed Central

    Boraston, A B; Tomme, P; Amandoron, E A; Kilburn, D G

    2000-01-01

    The C-terminal module of xylanase 10A from Streptomyces lividans is a family 13 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM13). CBM13 binds mono- and oligo-saccharides with association constants of approximately 1x10(2) M(-1)-1x10(3) M(-1). It appears to be specific only for pyranose sugars. CBM13 binds insoluble and soluble xylan, holocellulose, pachyman, lichenan, arabinogalactan and laminarin. The association constant for binding to soluble xylan is (6.2+/-0. 6)x10(3)/mol of xylan polymer. Site-directed mutation indicates the involvement of three functional sites on CBM13 in binding to soluble xylan. The sites are similar in sequence, and are predicted to have similar structures, to the alpha, beta and gamma sites of ricin toxin B-chain, which is also in family 13. The affinity of a single binding site on CBM13 for soluble xylan is only approximately (0. 5+/-0.1)x10(3)/mol of xylan. The binding of CBM13 to soluble xylan involves additive and co-operative interactions between the three binding sites. This mechanism of binding has not previously been reported for CBMs binding polysaccharides. CBM13 is the first bacterial module from family 13 to be described in detail. PMID:10970811

  2. Birch pulp xylan works as a food hydrocolloid in acid milk gels and is fermented slowly in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Sibakov, Natalia; Hakala, Terhi K; Sözer, Nesli; Nordlund, Emilia; Poutanen, Kaisa; Aura, Anna-Marja

    2016-12-10

    The objective was to evaluate the potential of birch xylan as a food hydrocolloid and dietary fibre. High-molecular weight xylan was isolated from birch kraft pulp by alkaline extraction, and enzymatically hydrolysed. Fermentability of xylans was evaluated using an in vitro colon model and performance as a hydrocolloid was studied in low-fat acid milk gels (1.5% and 3% w/w). Texture of the gels and water holding capacity of xylans were compared with inulin, fructooligosaccharide and xylooligosaccharide. Xylans showed slower fermentation rate by faecal microbiota than the references. Xylan-enriched acid milk gels (3% w/w) had improved water holding capacity (over 2-fold) and showed lower spontaneous syneresis, firmness and elasticity when compared to control (no hydrocolloids) or to references. In conclusion, birch xylan improved texture of low-fat acid milk gel applications, and the slow in vitro fermentation rate predicts lower incidence of intestinal discomfort in comparison to the commercial references. PMID:27577922

  3. Flow properties of acetylated chickpea protein dispersions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li H; Hung, Tran V

    2010-06-01

    Chickpea protein concentrate was acetylated with acetic anhydride at 5 levels. Acetylated chickpea protein (ACP) dispersions at 3 levels (6%, 45%, and 49%) were chosen for this flow property study. Effects of protein concentration, temperature, concentrations of salt addition and particularly, degree of acetylation on these properties were examined. Compared with native chickpea proteins, the ACP dispersions exhibited a strong shear thinning behavior. Within measured temperature range (15 to 55 degrees C), the apparent viscosities of native chickpea protein dispersions were temperature independent; those of ACP dispersions were thermally affected. The flow index (n), consistency coefficient (m), apparent yield stress, and apparent viscosities of ACP dispersions increased progressively up to 45% acetylation but decreased at 49% acetylation level. Conformational studies by gel filtration suggested that chickpea proteins were associated or polymerized at up to 45% acetylation but the associated subunits gradually dissociated to smaller units at higher levels (49%) of acetylation.

  4. Selective chemical oxidation and depolymerization of switchgrass [corrected] (Panicum virgatum L.) xylan with [corrected] oligosaccharide product analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Michael J; Dien, Bruce S; O'Bryan, Patricia J; Sarath, Gautam; Cotta, Michael A

    2011-04-15

    Xylan is a barrier to enzymatic hydrolysis of plant cell walls. It is well accepted that the xylan layer needs to be removed to efficiently hydrolyze cellulose; consequently, pretreatment conditions are (in part) optimized for maximal xylan depolymerization or displacement. Xylan consists of a long chain of β-1,4-linked xylose units substituted with arabinose (typically α-1,3-linked in grasses) and glucuronic acid (α-1,2-linked). Xylan has been proposed to have a structural function in plants and therefore may play a role in determining biomass reactivity to pretreatment. It has been proposed that substitutions along xylan chains are not random and, based upon studies of pericarp xylan, are organized in domains that have specific structural functions. Analysis of intact xylan is problematic because of its chain length (> degree of polymerization (d.p.) 100) and heterogeneous side groups. Traditionally, enzymatic end-point products have been characterized due to the limited products generated. Analysis of resultant arabino-xylo-oligosaccharides by mass spectrometry is complicated by the isobaric pentose sugars that primarily compose xylan. In this report, the variation in pentose ring structures was exploited for selective oxidation of the arabinofuranose primary alcohols followed by acid depolymerization to provide oligosaccharides with modified arabinose branches intact. Switchgrass samples were analyzed by hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC)-liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MSMS) and off-line nanospray MS to demonstrate the utility of this chemistry for determination of primary hydroxyl groups on oligosaccharide structures, with potential applications for determining the sequence of arabino-xylo-oligosaccharides present in plant cell wall material.

  5. Overexpression of esterase D in kidney from trisomy 13 fetuses

    SciTech Connect

    Loughna, S.; Moore, G. ); Gau, G.; Blunt, S. ); Nicolaides, K. )

    1993-10-01

    Human trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) occurs in approximately 1 in 5,000 live births. It is compatible with life, but prolonged survival is rare. Anomalies often involve the urogenital, cardiac, craniofacial, and central nervous systems. It is possible that these abnormalities may be due to the overexpression of developmentally important genes on chromosome 13. The expression of esterase D (localized to chromosome 13q14.11) has been investigated in both muscle and kidney from trisomy 13 fetuses and has been compared with normal age- and sex-matched fetal tissues, by using northern analysis. More than a twofold increase in expression of esterase D was found in the kidney of two trisomy 13 fetuses, with normal levels in a third. Overexpression was not seen in the muscle tissues from these fetuses. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. The Serratia marcescens bioH gene encodes an esterase.

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Eri; Sakurai, Naoki; Omori, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    The 3.9 kb chromosomal DNA was cloned from Serratia marcescens Sr41, which confers on Escherichia coli cells a phenotype of clear halo formation on tributyrin agar plates. Three complete open reading frames (ORFs) were identified in the inserted DNA, and one ORF was demonstrated to encode a 28 kDa protein of 255 amino acids related to esterase activity. Interestingly, the ORF was 70% identical to a product of the E. coli bioH gene, which lies at a locus separated from the bioABFCD operon and acts in the early steps of the biotin synthetic pathway before pimeloyl-CoA synthesis. This gene complemented a bioH-deficient mutation of E. coli. From the sequence analysis, BioH is presumed to be a serine hydrolase, which belongs to the alpha/beta hydrolase-fold family comprising a wide variety of hydrolases including esterases. A catalytic triad composed of a nucleophilic residue (Ser80), an acidic residue (Asp206), and histidine (His234) was conserved in BioH, and the nucleophilic residue Ser, a catalytic center, was situated in the consensus sequence of G-X-S-X-G-G, a nucleophile elbow. Although the enzymatic function of BioH is not yet elucidated, the bioH gene products from S. marcescens and E. coli show esterase activity, which may imply the hydrolysis of a precursor leading to pimeloyl-CoA ester. The esterase activity of BioH and its CoA binding activity recently reported agree with a current hypothesis of pimeloyl-CoA ester synthesis from CoA and acylester derivatives including an acyl-carrier protein.

  7. The conversion of C'IS to C'1 esterase by plasmin and trypsin.

    PubMed

    Ratnoff, O D; Naff, G B

    1967-02-01

    The formation of C'1 esterase from C'1, the first component of complement, may be brought about by the action of plasmin or trypsin upon C'1s, a subcomponent of C'1. These enzymes also decrease the esterolytic activity of C'1 esterase. The formation of C'1 esterase was demonstrated by measuring the appearance of an agent or agents with esterolytic properties and the capacity to inactivate C'2 and C'4, attributes of C'1 esterase. The activity of the agent which evolved was blocked by serum inhibitor of C'1 esterase. The implications of these observations, that the formation of C'1 esterase during complement fixation is mediated by proteolytic processes, are under study. The possible inhibition of C'1q by soybean trypsin inhibitor is in agreement with this hypothesis.

  8. 3 Benzyl-6-chloropyrone: a suicide inhibitor of cholesterol esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Saint, C.; Gallo, I.; Kantorow, M.; Bailey, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Cholesterol, absorbed from the intestine, appears in lymph as the ester. Cholesterol esterase is essential for this process, since depletion of the enzyme blocks and repletion restores, absorption. Selective inhibitors of cholesterol esterase may thus prove useful in reducing cholesterol uptake. A series of potential suicide substrates were synthesized which, following cleavage by the enzyme, would attack the putative nucleophile in the active site. One of these, 3-benzyl-6-chloropyrone (3BCP), inhibited both synthesis and hydrolysis of /sup 14/C-cholesteryl oleate with an I/sub 50/ of approximately 150 ..mu..M. The inactivation was time-dependent and characteristic of a suicide mechanism. The ..cap alpha.. pyrone structure (lactone analog) is cleaved by a serine-hydroxyl in the active site. This generates an enoyl chloride which inactivates the imidazole believed to play a part in the catalytic function of the enzyme. Inhibition by 3BCP is selective for cholesterol esterase. The activity of pancreatic lipase as not affected by concentrations up to 1 mM.

  9. Preparation and Properties of Novel Dentin Adhesives with Esterase Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Gu; Ye, Qiang; Topp, Elizabeth M.; Kostoryz, Elisabet L.; Wang, Yong; Kieweg, Sarah L.; Spencer, Paulette

    2012-01-01

    A new methacrylate monomer, trimethylolpropane mono allyl ether dimethacrylate (TMPEDMA), was synthesized and evaluated. This branched methacrylate was designed to increase esterase-resistance when incorporated into conventional HEMA (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)/BisGMA (2,2-bis[4(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxy-propyloxy)-phenyl] propane) dental adhesives. The new adhesives, HEMA/BisGMA/TMPEDMA in a 45/30/25 (w/w) ratio were formulated with H2O at 0 (A0T) and 8 wt % water (A8T) and compared with control adhesives (HEMA/BisGMA, 45/55 (w/w), at 0 (A0) and 8 wt % (A8) water). Camphoroquinone (CQ), 2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate and diphenyliodonium hexafluorophosphate were used as photoinitiators. The new adhesives showed a degree of conversion comparable with the control and improved modulus and glass transition temperature (Tg). Exposure of photopolymerized discs to porcine liver esterase for up to eight days showed that the net cumulative methacrylic acid (MAA) release in adhesives formulated with the new monomer and 8% water (A8T: 182 μg/mL) was dramatically (P < 0.05) decreased in comparison to the control (A8: 361.6 μg/mL). The results demonstrate that adhesives made with the new monomer and cured in water to simulate wet bonding are more resistant to esterase than conventional HEMA/BisGMA adhesive. PMID:22919119

  10. Investigating Histone Acetylation Stoichiometry and Turnover Rate.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Baeza, J; Denu, J M

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is a dynamic epigenetic modification that functions in the regulation of DNA-templated reactions, such as transcription. This lysine modification is reversibly controlled by histone (lysine) acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Here, we present methods employing isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry (MS) to comprehensively investigate histone acetylation dynamics. Turnover rates of histone acetylation are determined by measuring the kinetics of labeling from (13)C-labeled precursors of acetyl-CoA, which incorporates (13)C-carbon onto histones via the acetyltransferase reaction. Overall histone acetylation states are assessed from complete protease digestion to single amino acids, which is followed by MS analysis. Determination of site-specific acetylation stoichiometry is achieved by chemically acetylating endogenous histones with isotopic acetic anhydride, followed by trypsin digestion and LC-MS analysis. Combining metabolic labeling with stoichiometric analysis permits determination of both acetylation level and acetylation dynamics. When comparing genetic, diet, or environmental perturbations, these methods permit both a global and site-specific evaluation of how histone acetylation is dynamically regulated.

  11. Investigating Histone Acetylation Stoichiometry and Turnover Rate.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Baeza, J; Denu, J M

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is a dynamic epigenetic modification that functions in the regulation of DNA-templated reactions, such as transcription. This lysine modification is reversibly controlled by histone (lysine) acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Here, we present methods employing isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry (MS) to comprehensively investigate histone acetylation dynamics. Turnover rates of histone acetylation are determined by measuring the kinetics of labeling from (13)C-labeled precursors of acetyl-CoA, which incorporates (13)C-carbon onto histones via the acetyltransferase reaction. Overall histone acetylation states are assessed from complete protease digestion to single amino acids, which is followed by MS analysis. Determination of site-specific acetylation stoichiometry is achieved by chemically acetylating endogenous histones with isotopic acetic anhydride, followed by trypsin digestion and LC-MS analysis. Combining metabolic labeling with stoichiometric analysis permits determination of both acetylation level and acetylation dynamics. When comparing genetic, diet, or environmental perturbations, these methods permit both a global and site-specific evaluation of how histone acetylation is dynamically regulated. PMID:27423860

  12. Analysis of acetylation stoichiometry suggests that SIRT3 repairs nonenzymatic acetylation lesions.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Brian T; Moustafa, Tarek; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Zechner, Rudolf; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2015-11-01

    Acetylation is frequently detected on mitochondrial enzymes, and the sirtuin deacetylase SIRT3 is thought to regulate metabolism by deacetylating mitochondrial proteins. However, the stoichiometry of acetylation has not been studied and is important for understanding whether SIRT3 regulates or suppresses acetylation. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we measured acetylation stoichiometry in mouse liver tissue and found that SIRT3 suppressed acetylation to a very low stoichiometry at its target sites. By examining acetylation changes in the liver, heart, brain, and brown adipose tissue of fasted mice, we found that SIRT3-targeted sites were mostly unaffected by fasting, a dietary manipulation that is thought to regulate metabolism through SIRT3-dependent deacetylation. Globally increased mitochondrial acetylation in fasted liver tissue, higher stoichiometry at mitochondrial acetylation sites, and greater sensitivity of SIRT3-targeted sites to chemical acetylation in vitro and fasting-induced acetylation in vivo, suggest a nonenzymatic mechanism of acetylation. Our data indicate that most mitochondrial acetylation occurs as a low-level nonenzymatic protein lesion and that SIRT3 functions as a protein repair factor that removes acetylation lesions from lysine residues.

  13. Improving biofuel feedstocks by modifying xylan biosynthesis (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Jane

    2013-03-01

    Jane Lau of the Joint BioEnergy Institute on "Improving biofuel feedstocks by modifying xylan biosynthesis" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  14. Utilization of xylan by yeasts and its conversion to ethanol by Pichia stipitis strains. [Cryptococcus; Pichia stipitis; Candida shehatae

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Biely, P.; Latta, R.K.; Barbosa, M.F.S.; Schneider, H.

    1986-08-01

    Yeasts able to grow on D-xylose were screened for the ability to hydrolyze xylan. Xylanase activity was found to be rare; a total of only 19 of more than 250 strains yielded a positive test result. The activity was localized largely in the genus Cryptococcus and in Pichia stipitis and its anamorph Candida shehatae. The ability to hydrolyze xylan was generally uncoupled from that to hydrolyze cellulose; only three of the xylan-positive strains also yielded a positive test for cellulolytic activity. Of the 19 xylanolytic strains. 2. P. stipitis CBS 5773 and CBS 5775, converted xylan into ethanol, with about 60% of a theoretical yield computed on the basis of the amount of D-xylose present originally that could be released by acid hydrolysis.

  15. Protein acetylation in metabolism - metabolites and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Keir J; Zhang, Hongbo; Katsyuba, Elena; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Reversible acetylation was initially described as an epigenetic mechanism regulating DNA accessibility. Since then, this process has emerged as a controller of histone and nonhistone acetylation that integrates key physiological processes such as metabolism, circadian rhythm and cell cycle, along with gene regulation in various organisms. The widespread and reversible nature of acetylation also revitalized interest in the mechanisms that regulate lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and deacetylases (KDACs) in health and disease. Changes in protein or histone acetylation are especially relevant for many common diseases including obesity, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, as well as for some rare diseases such as mitochondrial diseases and lipodystrophies. In this Review, we examine the role of reversible acetylation in metabolic control and how changes in levels of metabolites or cofactors, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, coenzyme A, acetyl coenzyme A, zinc and butyrate and/or β-hydroxybutyrate, directly alter KAT or KDAC activity to link energy status to adaptive cellular and organismal homeostasis.

  16. Accumulation of Peptidoglycan O-Acetylation Leads to Altered Cell Wall Biochemistry and Negatively Impacts Pathogenesis Factors of Campylobacter jejuni*

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Reuben; Frirdich, Emilisa; Sychantha, David; Biboy, Jacob; Taveirne, Michael E.; Johnson, Jeremiah G.; DiRita, Victor J.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Clarke, Anthony J.; Gaynor, Erin C.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in the developed world. Despite its prevalence, its mechanisms of pathogenesis are poorly understood. Peptidoglycan (PG) is important for helical shape, colonization, and host-pathogen interactions in C. jejuni. Therefore, changes in PG greatly impact the physiology of this organism. O-acetylation of peptidoglycan (OAP) is a bacterial phenomenon proposed to be important for proper cell growth, characterized by acetylation of the C6 hydroxyl group of N-acetylmuramic acid in the PG glycan backbone. The OAP gene cluster consists of a PG O-acetyltransferase A (patA) for translocation of acetate into the periplasm, a PG O-acetyltransferase B (patB) for O-acetylation, and an O-acetylpeptidoglycan esterase (ape1) for de-O-acetylation. In this study, reduced OAP in ΔpatA and ΔpatB had minimal impact on C. jejuni growth and fitness under the conditions tested. However, accumulation of OAP in Δape1 resulted in marked differences in PG biochemistry, including O-acetylation, anhydromuropeptide levels, and changes not expected to result directly from Ape1 activity. This suggests that OAP may be a form of substrate level regulation in PG biosynthesis. Ape1 acetylesterase activity was confirmed in vitro using p-nitrophenyl acetate and O-acetylated PG as substrates. In addition, Δape1 exhibited defects in pathogenesis-associated phenotypes, including cell shape, motility, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity, and sodium deoxycholate sensitivity. Δape1 was also impaired for chick colonization and adhesion, invasion, intracellular survival, and induction of IL-8 production in INT407 cells in vitro. The importance of Ape1 in C. jejuni biology makes it a good candidate as an antimicrobial target. PMID:27474744

  17. Highly Branched Xylan Made by IRREGULAR XYLEM14 and MUCILAGE-RELATED21 Links Mucilage to Arabidopsis Seeds1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Günl, Markus; Usadel, Björn

    2015-01-01

    All cells of terrestrial plants are fortified by walls composed of crystalline cellulose microfibrils and a variety of matrix polymers. Xylans are the second most abundant type of polysaccharides on Earth. Previous studies of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) irregular xylem (irx) mutants, with collapsed xylem vessels and dwarfed stature, highlighted the importance of this cell wall component and revealed multiple players required for its synthesis. Nevertheless, xylan elongation and substitution are complex processes that remain poorly understood. Recently, seed coat epidermal cells were shown to provide an excellent system for deciphering hemicellulose production. Using a coexpression and sequence-based strategy, we predicted several MUCILAGE-RELATED (MUCI) genes that encode glycosyltransferases (GTs) involved in the production of xylan. We now show that MUCI21, a member of an uncharacterized clade of the GT61 family, and IRX14 (GT43 protein) are essential for the synthesis of highly branched xylan in seed coat epidermal cells. Our results reveal that xylan is the most abundant xylose-rich component in Arabidopsis seed mucilage and is required to maintain its architecture. Characterization of muci21 and irx14 single and double mutants indicates that MUCI21 is a Golgi-localized protein that likely facilitates the addition of xylose residues directly to the xylan backbone. These unique branches seem to be necessary for pectin attachment to the seed surface, while the xylan backbone maintains cellulose distribution. Evaluation of muci21 and irx14 alongside mutants that disrupt other wall components suggests that mucilage adherence is maintained by complex interactions between several polymers: cellulose, xylans, pectins, and glycoproteins. PMID:26482889

  18. 2-Acetyl-pyridinium bromanilate.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lynne H; Boyle, Bryan; Clive, Lesley A; Collins, Anna; Currie, Lynsey D; Gogol, Malgorzata; Hastings, Claire; Jones, Andrew O F; Kennedy, Jennifer L; Kerr, Graham B; Kidd, Alastair; Lawton, Lorreta M; Macintyre, Susan J; Maclean, Niall M; Martin, Alan R G; McGonagle, Kate; Melrose, Samantha; Rew, Gaius A; Robinson, Colin W; Schmidtmann, Marc; Turnbull, Felicity B; Williams, Lewis G; Wiseman, Alan Y; Wocial, Malgorzata H; Wilson, Chick C

    2009-01-01

    In the crystal of the title mol-ecular salt (systematic name: 2-acetyl-pyridinium 2,5-dibromo-4-hydr-oxy-3,6-dioxocyclo-hexa-1,4-dienolate), C(7)H(8)NO(+)·C(6)HBr(2)O(4) (-), centrosymmetric rings consisting of two cations and two anions are formed, with the components linked by alternating O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Short O⋯Br contacts [3.243 (2) and 3.359 (2) Å] may help to consolidate the packing. PMID:21583087

  19. A Method to determine lysine acetylation stoichiometries

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles

    2014-07-21

    A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the lack of stoichiometry information. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of lysine acetylation on proteins globally. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy on hundreds of acetylated peptides from cell lysates and cross-validated the measurements via immunoblotting.

  20. An unusual xylan in Arabidopsis primary cell walls is synthesised by GUX3, IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14

    SciTech Connect

    Mortimer, Jenny C.; Faria-Blanc, Nuno; Yu, Xiaolan; Tryfona, Theodora; Sorieul, Mathias; Ng, Yao Z.; Zhang, Zhinong; Stott, Katherine; Anders, Nadine; Dupree, Paul

    2015-06-04

    Xylan is a crucial component of many plant primary and secondary cell walls. However, the structure and function of xylan in the dicotyledon primary cell wall is not well understood. Here, we characterized a xylan that is specific to tissues enriched in Arabidopsis primary cell walls. Unlike previously described xylans, this xylan carries a pentose linked 1–2 to the α-1,2-d-glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains on the β-1,4-Xyl backbone. The frequent and precisely regular spacing of GlcA substitutions every six xylosyl residues along the backbone is also unlike that previously observed in secondary cell wall xylan. Molecular genetics, in vitro assays, and expression data suggest that IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14 are required for xylan backbone synthesis in primary cell wall synthesising tissues. IRX9 and IRX10 are not involved in the primary cell wall xylan synthesis but are functionally exchangeable with IRX9L and IRX10L. GUX3 is the only glucuronyltransferase required for the addition of the GlcA decorations on the xylan. The differences in xylan structure in primary versus secondary cell walls might reflect the different roles in cross-linking and interaction with other cell wall components.

  1. An unusual xylan in Arabidopsis primary cell walls is synthesised by GUX3, IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14

    DOE PAGES

    Mortimer, Jenny C.; Faria-Blanc, Nuno; Yu, Xiaolan; Tryfona, Theodora; Sorieul, Mathias; Ng, Yao Z.; Zhang, Zhinong; Stott, Katherine; Anders, Nadine; Dupree, Paul

    2015-06-04

    Xylan is a crucial component of many plant primary and secondary cell walls. However, the structure and function of xylan in the dicotyledon primary cell wall is not well understood. Here, we characterized a xylan that is specific to tissues enriched in Arabidopsis primary cell walls. Unlike previously described xylans, this xylan carries a pentose linked 1–2 to the α-1,2-d-glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains on the β-1,4-Xyl backbone. The frequent and precisely regular spacing of GlcA substitutions every six xylosyl residues along the backbone is also unlike that previously observed in secondary cell wall xylan. Molecular genetics, in vitro assays,more » and expression data suggest that IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14 are required for xylan backbone synthesis in primary cell wall synthesising tissues. IRX9 and IRX10 are not involved in the primary cell wall xylan synthesis but are functionally exchangeable with IRX9L and IRX10L. GUX3 is the only glucuronyltransferase required for the addition of the GlcA decorations on the xylan. The differences in xylan structure in primary versus secondary cell walls might reflect the different roles in cross-linking and interaction with other cell wall components.« less

  2. An unusual xylan in Arabidopsis primary cell walls is synthesised by GUX3, IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Jenny C; Faria-Blanc, Nuno; Yu, Xiaolan; Tryfona, Theodora; Sorieul, Mathias; Ng, Yao Z; Zhang, Zhinong; Stott, Katherine; Anders, Nadine; Dupree, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Xylan is a crucial component of many plant primary and secondary cell walls. However, the structure and function of xylan in the dicotyledon primary cell wall is not well understood. Here, we characterized a xylan that is specific to tissues enriched in Arabidopsis primary cell walls. Unlike previously described xylans, this xylan carries a pentose linked 1–2 to the α-1,2-d-glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains on the β-1,4-Xyl backbone. The frequent and precisely regular spacing of GlcA substitutions every six xylosyl residues along the backbone is also unlike that previously observed in secondary cell wall xylan. Molecular genetics, in vitro assays, and expression data suggest that IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14 are required for xylan backbone synthesis in primary cell wall synthesising tissues. IRX9 and IRX10 are not involved in the primary cell wall xylan synthesis but are functionally exchangeable with IRX9L and IRX10L. GUX3 is the only glucuronyltransferase required for the addition of the GlcA decorations on the xylan. The differences in xylan structure in primary versus secondary cell walls might reflect the different roles in cross-linking and interaction with other cell wall components. PMID:26043357

  3. An unusual xylan in Arabidopsis primary cell walls is synthesised by GUX3, IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Jenny C; Faria-Blanc, Nuno; Yu, Xiaolan; Tryfona, Theodora; Sorieul, Mathias; Ng, Yao Z; Zhang, Zhinong; Stott, Katherine; Anders, Nadine; Dupree, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Xylan is a crucial component of many plant primary and secondary cell walls. However, the structure and function of xylan in the dicotyledon primary cell wall is not well understood. Here, we characterized a xylan that is specific to tissues enriched in Arabidopsis primary cell walls. Unlike previously described xylans, this xylan carries a pentose linked 1-2 to the α-1,2-d-glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains on the β-1,4-Xyl backbone. The frequent and precisely regular spacing of GlcA substitutions every six xylosyl residues along the backbone is also unlike that previously observed in secondary cell wall xylan. Molecular genetics, in vitro assays, and expression data suggest that IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14 are required for xylan backbone synthesis in primary cell wall synthesising tissues. IRX9 and IRX10 are not involved in the primary cell wall xylan synthesis but are functionally exchangeable with IRX9L and IRX10L. GUX3 is the only glucuronyltransferase required for the addition of the GlcA decorations on the xylan. The differences in xylan structure in primary versus secondary cell walls might reflect the different roles in cross-linking and interaction with other cell wall components.

  4. Towards the industrialization of new biosurfactants: Biotechnological opportunities for the lactone esterase gene from Starmerella bombicola.

    PubMed

    Roelants, Sophie L K W; Ciesielska, Katarzyna; De Maeseneire, Sofie L; Moens, Helena; Everaert, Bernd; Verweire, Stijn; Denon, Quenten; Vanlerberghe, Brecht; Van Bogaert, Inge N A; Van der Meeren, Paul; Devreese, Bart; Soetaert, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Although sophorolipids (SLs) produced by S. bombicola are a real showcase for the industrialization of microbial biosurfactants, some important drawbacks are associated with this efficient biological process, e.g., the simultaneous production of acidic and lactonic SLs. Depending on the application, there is a requirement for the naturally produced mixture to be manipulated to give defined ratios of the components. Recently, the enzyme responsible for the lactonization of SLs was discovered. The discovery of the gene encoding this lactone esterase (sble) enabled the development of promising S. bombicola strains producing either solely lactonic (using a sble overexpression strain described in this paper: oe sble) or solely acidic SLs (using a sble deletion strain, which was recently described, but not characterized yet: Δsble). The new S. bombicola strains were used to investigate the production processes (fermentation and purification) of either lactonic or acidic SLs. The strains maintain the high inherent productivities of the wild-type or even perform slightly better and thus represent a realistic industrial opportunity. 100% acidic SLs with a mixed acetylation pattern were obtained for the Δsble strain, while the inherent capacity to selectively produce lactonic SLs was significantly increased (+42%) for the oe sble strain (99% lactonic SLs). Moreover, the regulatory effect of citrate on lactone SL formation for the wild-type was absent in this new strain, which indicates that it is more robust and better suited for the industrial production of lactonic SLs. Basic parameters were determined for the purified SLs, which confirm that the two new strains produce molecules with distinctive properties of which the application potential can now easily be investigated independently.

  5. Fusion of the OsmC domain from esterase EstO confers thermolability to the cold-active xylanase Xyn8 from Pseudoalteromonas arctica.

    PubMed

    Elleuche, Skander; Piascheck, Henning; Antranikian, Garabed

    2011-03-01

    The OsmC-region (osmotically induced protein family) of the two-domain esterase EstO from the psychrotolerant bacterium Pseudoalteromonas arctica has been shown to increase thermolability. In an attempt to test if these properties can be conferred to another enzyme, we genetically fused osmC to the 3'-region of the family 8 xylanase encoding gene xyn8 from P. arctica. The chimeric open reading frame xyn8-OsmC was cloned and the chimeric protein was purified after heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. Xyn8 and Xyn8-OsmC showed cold-adapted properties (more than 60% activity at 0°C) using birchwood xylan as the preferred substrate. Maximal catalytic activity is slightly shifted from 15°C (Xyn8) to 20°C for Xyn8-OsmC. Thermostability of Xyn8-OsmC is significantly changed in comparison to wild-type Xyn8. The OsmC-fusion variant showed an apparent decrease in thermostability between 40 and 45°C, while both proteins are highly instable at 50°C.

  6. Acetylation regulates Jun protein turnover in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daoyong; Suganuma, Tamaki; Workman, Jerry L

    2013-11-01

    C-Jun is a major transcription factor belonging to the activating protein 1 (AP-1) family. Phosphorylation has been shown to be critical for c-Jun activation and stability. Here, we report that Jra, the Drosophila Jun protein, is acetylated in vivo. We demonstrate that the acetylation of Jra leads to its rapid degradation in response to osmotic stress. Intriguingly, we also found that Jra phosphorylation antagonized its acetylation, indicating the opposite roles of acetylation and phosphorylation in Jra degradation process under osmotic stress. Our results provide new insights into how c-Jun proteins are precisely regulated by the interplay of different posttranslational modifications.

  7. Composition, Assembly, and Trafficking of a Wheat Xylan Synthase Complex1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Wiemels, Richard E.; Soya, Aaron; Whitley, Rebekah; Held, Michael; Faik, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Xylans play an important role in plant cell wall integrity and have many industrial applications. Characterization of xylan synthase (XS) complexes responsible for the synthesis of these polymers is currently lacking. We recently purified XS activity from etiolated wheat (Triticum aestivum) seedlings. To further characterize this purified activity, we analyzed its protein composition and assembly. Proteomic analysis identified six main proteins: two glycosyltransferases (GTs) TaGT43-4 and TaGT47-13; two putative mutases (TaGT75-3 and TaGT75-4) and two non-GTs; a germin-like protein (TaGLP); and a vernalization related protein (TaVER2). Coexpression of TaGT43-4, TaGT47-13, TaGT75-3, and TaGT75-4 in Pichia pastoris confirmed that these proteins form a complex. Confocal microscopy showed that all these proteins interact in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but the complexes accumulate in Golgi, and TaGT43-4 acts as a scaffold protein that holds the other proteins. Furthermore, ER export of the complexes is dependent of the interaction between TaGT43-4 and TaGT47-13. Immunogold electron microscopy data support the conclusion that complex assembly occurs at specific areas of the ER before export to the Golgi. A di-Arg motif and a long sequence motif within the transmembrane domains were found conserved at the NH2-terminal ends of TaGT43-4 and homologous proteins from diverse taxa. These conserved motifs may control the forward trafficking of the complexes and their accumulation in the Golgi. Our findings indicate that xylan synthesis in grasses may involve a new regulatory mechanism linking complex assembly with forward trafficking and provide new insights that advance our understanding of xylan biosynthesis and regulation in plants. PMID:26917684

  8. Hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegel, J.

    1994-05-01

    The longterm goal of this research effort is to obtain an anaerobic thermophilic bacterium that efficiently converts various hemicellulose-containing biomass to ethanol over a broad pH range. The strategy is to modify the outfit and regulation of the rate-limiting xylanases, glycosidases and xylan esterases in the ethanologenic, anaerobic thermophile Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus, which grows between pH 4.5 and 9.5. Although it utilizes xylans, the xylanase, acetyl(xylan) esterase and O-methylglucuronidase activities in T. ethanolicus are barely measurable and regarded as the rate limiting steps in its xylan utilization. Thus, and also due to the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophiles, we characterize the hemicellulolytic enzymes from this and other anaerobic thermophiles as enzyme donors. Beside the active xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus, exhibiting the two different activities, we characterized 2 xylosidases, two acetyl(xylan) esterases, and an O-methylglucuronidase from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. We will continue with the characterization of xylanases from novel isolated slightly acidophilic, neutrophilic and slightly alkalophilic thermophiles. We have cloned, subcloned and partially sequenced the 165,000 Da (2 x 85,000) xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus and started with the cloning of the esterases from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. Consequently, we will develop a shuttle vector and continue to apply electroporation of autoplasts as a method for cloning into T. ethanolicus.

  9. Production and properties of xylan-degrading enzymes from Cellulomonas uda

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, P,; Wagner, F.

    1986-04-01

    Xylan degradation and production of ..beta..-xylanase and ..beta..-xylosidase activities were studied in cultures of Cellulomonas uda grown on purified xylan from birchwood. Beta-xylanase activity was found to be associated with the cells, although in various degrees. The formation of ..beta..-xylanase activity was induced by xylotriose and repressed by xylose. Beta-xylosidase activity was cell bound. Both constitutive and inducible ..beta..-xylosidase activities were suggested. Beta-xylanase and ..beta..-xylosidase activities were inhibited competitively be xylose. Beta-xylanase activity had a pronounced optimum pH of 5.8, whereas the optimum pH of ..beta..-xylosidase activity ranged from 5.4 to 6.1. The major products of xylan degradation by a crude preparation of ..beta..-xylanase activity, in decreasing order of amount, were xylobiose, xylotriose, xylose and small amounts of xylotetraose. This pattern suggests that ..beta..-xylanase activity secreted by C. uda is of the endosplitting type. Supernatants of cultures grown on cellulose showed not only ..beta..-glucanase byt also ..beta..-xylanase activity. The latter could be attributed to an endo-1,4-..beta..-glucanase activity which had a low ..beta..-xylanase activity. 54 references.

  10. Enhancing enzymatic hydrolysis of xylan by adding sodium lignosulfonate and long-chain fatty alcohols.

    PubMed

    Lou, Hongming; Yuan, Long; Qiu, Xueqing; Qiu, Kexian; Fu, Jinguo; Pang, Yuxia; Huang, Jinhao

    2016-01-01

    Sodium lignosulfonate (SXSL) and long-chain fatty alcohols (LFAs) could enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis of xylan, and the compound of SXSL and LFAs have synergies on the enzymatic hydrolysis. SXSL shows a strong enhancement in buffer pH range from 4.0 to 6.0. The enhancement increased with the SXSL dosage and the xylanase loading. The cellulose and lignin in corncob substrate could not only adsorb xylanase nonproductively, but also seriously reduce the accessibility of xylanase on xylan to impede the enzymatic hydrolysis of xylan. Cellulase could break the plant cell wall structure of corncob and make additives work better. The xylose yield of corncob at 72h increased from 59.4% to 73.7% by adding the compound of 5g/L SXSL and 0.01% (v/v) n-decanol, which was higher than that without cellulase and additives by 30.7%. Meanwhile, the glucose yield at 72h of corncob increased from 45.8% to 62.3%. PMID:26476164

  11. Biochemical and Structural Insights into Xylan Utilization by the Thermophilic Bacterium Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yejun; Agarwal, Vinayak; Dodd, Dylan; Kim, Jason; Bae, Brian; Mackie, Roderick I.; Nair, Satish K.; Cann, Isaac K. O.

    2012-01-01

    Hemicellulose is the next most abundant plant cell wall component after cellulose. The abundance of hemicellulose such as xylan suggests that their hydrolysis and conversion to biofuels can improve the economics of bioenergy production. In an effort to understand xylan hydrolysis at high temperatures, we sequenced the genome of the thermophilic bacterium Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus. Analysis of the partial genome sequence revealed a gene cluster that contained both hydrolytic enzymes and also enzymes key to the pentose-phosphate pathway. The hydrolytic enzymes in the gene cluster were demonstrated to convert products from a large endoxylanase (Xyn10A) predicted to anchor to the surface of the bacterium. We further use structural and calorimetric studies to demonstrate that the end products of Xyn10A hydrolysis of xylan are recognized and bound by XBP1, a putative solute-binding protein, likely for transport into the cell. The XBP1 protein showed preference for xylo-oligosaccharides as follows: xylotriose > xylobiose > xylotetraose. To elucidate the structural basis for the oligosaccharide preference, we solved the co-crystal structure of XBP1 complexed with xylotriose to a 1.8-Å resolution. Analysis of the biochemical data in the context of the co-crystal structure reveals the molecular underpinnings of oligosaccharide length specificity. PMID:22918832

  12. Production and Properties of Xylan-Degrading Enzymes from Cellulomonas uda

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, Peter; Wagner, Fritz

    1986-01-01

    Xylan degradation and production of β-xylanase and β-xylosidase activities were studied in cultures of Cellulomonas uda grown on purified xylan from birchwood. β-Xylanase activity was found to be associated with the cells, although in various degrees. The formation of β-xylanase activity was induced by xylotriose and repressed by xylose. β-Xylosidase activity was cell bound. Both constitutive and inducible β-xylosidase activities were suggested. β-Xylanase and β-xylosidase activities were inhibited competitively by xylose. β-Xylanase activity had a pronounced optimum pH of 5.8, whereas the optimum pH of β-xylosidase activity ranged from 5.4 to 6.1. The major products of xylan degradation by a crude preparation of β-xylanase activity, in decreasing order of amount, were xylobiose, xylotriose, xylose, and small amounts of xylotetraose. This pattern suggests that β-xylanase activity secreted by C. uda is of the endosplitting type. Supernatants of cultures grown on cellulose showed not only β-glucanase but also β-xylanase activity. The latter could be attributed to an endo-1,4-β-glucanase activity which had a low β-xylanase activity. PMID:16347038

  13. An Open Receptor-Binding Cavity of Hemagglutinin-Esterase-Fusion Glycoprotein from Newly-Identified Influenza D Virus: Basis for Its Broad Cell Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hao; Qi, Jianxun; Khedri, Zahra; Diaz, Sandra; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Varki, Ajit; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause seasonal flu each year and pandemics or epidemic sporadically, posing a major threat to public health. Recently, a new influenza D virus (IDV) was isolated from pigs and cattle. Here, we reveal that the IDV utilizes 9-O-acetylated sialic acids as its receptor for virus entry. Then, we determined the crystal structures of hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein (HEF) of IDV both in its free form and in complex with the receptor and enzymatic substrate analogs. The IDV HEF shows an extremely similar structural fold as the human-infecting influenza C virus (ICV) HEF. However, IDV HEF has an open receptor-binding cavity to accommodate diverse extended glycan moieties. This structural difference provides an explanation for the phenomenon that the IDV has a broad cell tropism. As IDV HEF is structurally and functionally similar to ICV HEF, our findings highlight the potential threat of the virus to public health. PMID:26816272

  14. An Open Receptor-Binding Cavity of Hemagglutinin-Esterase-Fusion Glycoprotein from Newly-Identified Influenza D Virus: Basis for Its Broad Cell Tropism.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Qi, Jianxun; Khedri, Zahra; Diaz, Sandra; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Varki, Ajit; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause seasonal flu each year and pandemics or epidemic sporadically, posing a major threat to public health. Recently, a new influenza D virus (IDV) was isolated from pigs and cattle. Here, we reveal that the IDV utilizes 9-O-acetylated sialic acids as its receptor for virus entry. Then, we determined the crystal structures of hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein (HEF) of IDV both in its free form and in complex with the receptor and enzymatic substrate analogs. The IDV HEF shows an extremely similar structural fold as the human-infecting influenza C virus (ICV) HEF. However, IDV HEF has an open receptor-binding cavity to accommodate diverse extended glycan moieties. This structural difference provides an explanation for the phenomenon that the IDV has a broad cell tropism. As IDV HEF is structurally and functionally similar to ICV HEF, our findings highlight the potential threat of the virus to public health. PMID:26816272

  15. Interaction between human serum esterases and environmental metal compounds.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Antonio F; Gil, Fernando; Leno, Esther; López, Olga; Rodrigo, Lourdes; Pla, Antonio

    2009-07-01

    Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) and cholinesterase (BChE) are two of the major human serum esterases. Although most of variation in PON1 activity results from genetic factors, there is growing evidence that environmental chemicals also modulate its activity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether environmental exposure to metal compounds has any influence on those esterases. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a representative sample of the general population of Andalusia, South of Spain. PON1 activity against different substrates (paraoxon, phenylacetate, diazoxon and dihydrocoumarin) and BChE were measured in serum from 536 healthy subjects. Potential associations of these esterases with metal compounds, age, sex and body mass index as well as life-style habits (smoking, alcohol drinking and food habits) were explored. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that blood lead levels were significantly associated with increased PON1 in serum regardless of the substrate used for the assay. Mercury also showed a significant and direct association with PON1 towards paraoxon and phenylacetate. In turn, cadmium and zinc levels were significantly associated with a decreased PON1 activity (zinc was associated with all PON1 activities and cadmium with PON1 towards paraoxon and diazoxon). Arsenic, nickel and manganese failed to be significantly associated with any of the PON1 activities assayed. PON1 192R alloform predicted significantly higher levels of arsenic and lead. BChE, however, was inversely associated with serum levels of manganese and zinc. These results suggest that PON1 and BChE activities are modulated by background exposure to metal compounds, which may have implications in public health given the defensive role played by both enzyme proteins against environmental toxicants. The potential underlying mechanisms merit further investigation.

  16. Esterase patterns and phylogenetic relationships of Drosophila species in the saltans subgroup (saltans group).

    PubMed

    Nascimento, A P; de Campos, Bicudo H E M

    2002-01-01

    The esterase patterns of sixteen strains from four species in the saltans subgroup were analyzed using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Thirty-four esterase bands were detected. By using alpha and beta naphthyl acetates as substrates, they were classified in 18 alpha-esterases (they hydrolyse the alpha-naphtyl substrate), 15 beta-esterases (they hydrolyse the beta-naphtyl substrate) and 1 alpha/beta-esterase (it hydrolyses the alpha and beta-naphtyl substrates). Among the alpha-esterases, three were detected exclusively in males. Malathion, Eserine and pCMB were used as inhibitors in order to characterize biochemically the esterases. The results indicated the presence of cholinesterases, carboxylesterases and acetylesterases. The degree of mobility of the bands in the gels, their specificity to alpha and beta naphthyl acetates and the results of the inhibition tests allowed us to recognize tentatively nine genetic loci. Phylogenetic relationships among species inferred on the basis of the esterase patterns by PAUP 4.0b8, with neighbor-joining search and a bootstrap analysis showed that, although the four species are closely related, D. septentriosaltans, D. saltans and D. austrosaltans are closer to each other than to D. prosaltans. These results showed to be consistent with phylogenetic relationships previously inferred from inversion polymorphism.

  17. Structure of the catalytic domain of glucuronoyl esterase Cip2 from Hypocrea jecorina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structure of the catalytic domain of glucuronoyl esterase Cip2 from the fungus Hypocrea jecorina was determined at a resolution of 1.9 Angstroms. This is the first structure of the newly established carbohydrate esterase family 15. The structure has revealed the residues Ser278–His411–Glu301 pre...

  18. 21 CFR 173.140 - Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.140 Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei. Esterase-lipase enzyme, consisting of enzyme... animals. (c) The enzyme is produced by a process which completely removes the organism Mucor miehei...

  19. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Moore, Jeffrey C.

    1998-01-01

    A method for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases which exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase.

  20. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Moore, Jeffrey C.

    1999-01-01

    A method for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases which exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase.

  1. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, F.H.; Moore, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    A method is disclosed for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases. These enzymes exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase. 43 figs.

  2. 21 CFR 173.140 - Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.140 Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei. Esterase-lipase enzyme, consisting of enzyme derived from Mucor miehei var. Cooney et Emerson by... Emerson is nonpathogenic and nontoxic in man or other animals. (c) The enzyme is produced by a...

  3. 21 CFR 173.140 - Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.140 Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei. Esterase-lipase enzyme, consisting of enzyme derived from Mucor miehei var. Cooney et Emerson by... Emerson is nonpathogenic and nontoxic in man or other animals. (c) The enzyme is produced by a...

  4. 21 CFR 173.140 - Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.140 Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei. Esterase-lipase enzyme, consisting of enzyme derived from Mucor miehei var. Cooney et Emerson by... Emerson is nonpathogenic and nontoxic in man or other animals. (c) The enzyme is produced by a...

  5. 21 CFR 173.140 - Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.140 Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei. Esterase-lipase enzyme, consisting of enzyme derived from Mucor miehei var. Cooney et Emerson by... Emerson is nonpathogenic and nontoxic in man or other animals. (c) The enzyme is produced by a...

  6. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, F.H.; Moore, J.C.

    1999-05-25

    A method is disclosed for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases which exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase. 43 figs.

  7. Lipases or esterases: does it really matter? Toward a new bio-physico-chemical classification.

    PubMed

    Ali, Yassine Ben; Verger, Robert; Abousalham, Abdelkarim

    2012-01-01

    Carboxylester hydrolases, commonly named esterases, consist of a large spectrum of enzymes defined by their ability to catalyze the hydrolysis of carboxylic ester bonds and are widely distributed among animals, plants, and microorganisms. Lipases are lipolytic enzymes which constitute a special class of carboxylic esterases capable of releasing long-chain fatty acids from natural water-insoluble carboxylic esters. However, up to now, several unsuccessful attempts aimed at differentiating "lipases" from "esterases" by using various criteria. These criteria were based on the first substrate used chronologically, primary sequence comparisons, some kinetic parameters, or some structural features.Lipids are biological compounds which, by definition, are insoluble in water. Taking into account this basic physico-chemical criterion, we primarily distinguish lipolytic esterases (L, acting on lipids) from nonlipolytic esterases (NL, not acting on lipids). In view of the biochemical data accumulated up to now, we proposed a new classification of esterases based on various criteria of physico-chemical, chemical, anatomical, or cellular nature. We believe that the present attempt matters scientifically for several reasons: (1) to help newcomers in the field, performing a few key experiments to figure out if a newly isolated esterase is lipolytic or not; (2) to clarify a debate between scientists in the field; and (3) to formulate questions which are relevant to the still unsolved problem of the structure-function relationships of esterases. PMID:22426710

  8. Production, Purification, and Properties of Extracellular Carboxyl Esterases from Bacillus subtilis NRRL 365

    PubMed Central

    Meghji, K.; Ward, O. P.; Araujo, A.

    1990-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis NRRL 365 produced high extracellular carboxyl esterase activity in submerged culture media containing wheat bran, corn steep liquor, and salts. Supplementation of this medium with glucose reduced esterase activity to 37% of that in the unsupplemented control. Esterase activity was purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephadex A-50 ion-exchange chromatography with sodium chloride gradient elution, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The resultant purified components, esterases I and II, manifested single bands following silver staining of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels and had final specific activities of 80 and 520 U/mg, respectively. Molecular weights for components I and II were 36,000 and 105,000 to 110,000, respectively. Esterases I and II both had a pH optimum of 8.0, with relative activities of 10 and 85%, respectively, at pH 9.0. Kms with p-nitrophenylacetate were 0.91 mM for esterase I and 0.67 mM for esterase II. In general, patterns of enzyme inhibition were similar for both components. Differences were observed in the relative activities of esterases I and II towards p-nitrophenyl esters of acetate, propionate, and butyrate; Activity ratios for components I and II were 100:94:48 and 100:36:23, respectively. The purified components did not hydrolyze long-chain triglycerides and did not manifest proteolytic activity. Images PMID:16348375

  9. Correlation of leukocyte esterase activity and bacterial isolation from body fluids.

    PubMed Central

    Smalley, D L; Bradley, M E

    1984-01-01

    We evaluated 230 body fluid samples, of which 131 were peritoneal effluents and 99 were other body fluids. Of these, 63 dialysates were culture positive, and 54 (85.7%) of these 63 were leukocyte esterase positive. Of 99 other body fluids, 8 were both culture positive and leukocyte esterase positive. PMID:6520224

  10. Lipases or esterases: does it really matter? Toward a new bio-physico-chemical classification.

    PubMed

    Ali, Yassine Ben; Verger, Robert; Abousalham, Abdelkarim

    2012-01-01

    Carboxylester hydrolases, commonly named esterases, consist of a large spectrum of enzymes defined by their ability to catalyze the hydrolysis of carboxylic ester bonds and are widely distributed among animals, plants, and microorganisms. Lipases are lipolytic enzymes which constitute a special class of carboxylic esterases capable of releasing long-chain fatty acids from natural water-insoluble carboxylic esters. However, up to now, several unsuccessful attempts aimed at differentiating "lipases" from "esterases" by using various criteria. These criteria were based on the first substrate used chronologically, primary sequence comparisons, some kinetic parameters, or some structural features.Lipids are biological compounds which, by definition, are insoluble in water. Taking into account this basic physico-chemical criterion, we primarily distinguish lipolytic esterases (L, acting on lipids) from nonlipolytic esterases (NL, not acting on lipids). In view of the biochemical data accumulated up to now, we proposed a new classification of esterases based on various criteria of physico-chemical, chemical, anatomical, or cellular nature. We believe that the present attempt matters scientifically for several reasons: (1) to help newcomers in the field, performing a few key experiments to figure out if a newly isolated esterase is lipolytic or not; (2) to clarify a debate between scientists in the field; and (3) to formulate questions which are relevant to the still unsolved problem of the structure-function relationships of esterases.

  11. A Method to Determine Lysine Acetylation Stoichiometries

    DOE PAGES

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong-Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; et al

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a common protein posttranslational modification that regulates a variety of biological processes. A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the difficulty in measuring the proportion of lysine residues that are acetylated. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of protein lysine acetylation. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy for ~750 acetylated peptides from mammalian cell lysates. Furthermore, the acetylation on N-terminal tail of histone H4 was cross-validated by treating cells with sodiummore » butyrate, a potent deacetylase inhibitor, and comparing changes in stoichiometry levels measured by our method with immunoblotting measurements. Of note we observe that acetylation stoichiometry is high in nuclear proteins, but very low in mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. In summary, our method opens new opportunities to study in detail the relationship of lysine acetylation levels of proteins with their biological functions.« less

  12. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.828 Acetylated monoglycerides. The food additive acetylated... of catalytic agents that are not food additives or are authorized by regulation, followed by...

  13. A comparison of multiple esterases as biomarkers of organophosphate exposure and effect in two earthworm species.

    PubMed

    Henson-Ramsey, Heather; Schneider, Ashley; Stoskopf, Michael K

    2011-04-01

    Two different earthworm species, Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus terrestris, were exposed to 5 μg/cm(2) of malathion to evaluate their usefulness as sentinels of organophosphate exposure and to assess three different esterases, as biomarkers of malathion exposure and effect. Tissue xenobiotic burdens and esterase activity were determined for each species and each esterase in order to assess variability. E. fetida exhibited 4-fold less variability in tissue burdens than did L. terrestris and had less variable basal esterase activities. An attempt was made to correlate malathion and malaoxon tissue burdens with esterase activity post-exposure. There was no malaoxon present in the earthworm tissues. No significant correlations were determined by comparing acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase, nor carboxylesterase activities with malathion burdens. PMID:21404045

  14. Esterase Activity and Intracellular Localization in Reconstructed Human Epidermal Cultured Skin Models

    PubMed Central

    Katayanagi, Mishina; Hashimoto, Fumie

    2015-01-01

    Background Reconstructed human epidermal culture skin models have been developed for cosmetic and pharmaceutical research. Objective This study evaluated the total and carboxyl esterase activities (i.e., Km and Vmax, respectively) and localization in two reconstructed human epidermal culture skin models (LabCyte EPI-MODEL [Japan Tissue Engineering] and EpiDerm [MatTek/Kurabo]). The usefulness of the reconstruction cultured epidermis was also verified by comparison with human and rat epidermis. Methods Homogenized epidermal samples were fractioned by centrifugation. p-nitrophenyl acetate and 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate were used as substrates of total esterase and carboxyl esterase, respectively. Results Total and carboxyl esterase activities were present in the reconstructed human epidermal culture skin models and were localized in the cytosol. Moreover, the activities and localization were the same as those in human and rat epidermis. Conclusion LabCyte EPI-MODEL and EpiDerm are potentially useful for esterase activity prediction in human epidermis. PMID:26082583

  15. Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning from a home-made shampoo.

    PubMed

    Sadaka, Yair; Broides, Arnon; Tzion, Raffi Lev; Lifshitz, Matitiahu

    2011-07-01

    Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning is a major health problem in children. We report an unusual cause of organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning. Two children were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit due to organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning after exposure from a home-made shampoo that was used for the treatment of head lice. Owing to no obvious source of poisoning, the diagnosis of organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning in one of these patients was delayed. Both patients had an uneventful recovery. Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning from home-made shampoo is possible. In cases where the mode of poisoning is unclear, direct questioning about the use of home-made shampoo is warranted, in these cases the skin and particularly the scalp should be rinsed thoroughly as soon as possible.

  16. Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning from a home-made shampoo

    PubMed Central

    Sadaka, Yair; Broides, Arnon; Tzion, Raffi Lev; Lifshitz, Matitiahu

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning is a major health problem in children. We report an unusual cause of organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning. Two children were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit due to organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning after exposure from a home-made shampoo that was used for the treatment of head lice. Owing to no obvious source of poisoning, the diagnosis of organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning in one of these patients was delayed. Both patients had an uneventful recovery. Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning from home-made shampoo is possible. In cases where the mode of poisoning is unclear, direct questioning about the use of home-made shampoo is warranted, in these cases the skin and particularly the scalp should be rinsed thoroughly as soon as possible. PMID:21887044

  17. Dual-component system dimethyl sulfoxide/LiCl as a solvent and catalyst for homogeneous ring-opening grafted polymerization of ε-caprolactone onto xylan.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Qin; Chen, Ming-Jie; Liu, Chuan-Fu; Sun, Run-Cang

    2014-01-22

    The preparation of xylan-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) (xylan-g-PCL) copolymers was investigated by homogeneous ring-opening polymerization (ROP) in a dual-component system containing Lewis base LiCl and strong polar aprotic solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). DMSO/LiCl acted as solvent, base, and catalyst for the ROP reaction. The effects of the parameters, including the reaction temperature, molar ratio of ε-caprolactone (ε-CL) to anhydroxylose units (AXU) in xylan, and reaction time, on the degree of substitution (DS) and weight percent of PCL side chain (WPCL) were investigated. The results showed that xylan-g-PCL copolymers with low DS in the range of 0.03-0.39 were obtained under the given conditions. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H correlation spectroscopy (COSY), and (1)H-(13)C correlation two-dimensional (2D) NMR [heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC)] characterization provided more evidence of the attachment of side chains onto xylan. Only one ε-CL was confirmed to be attached onto xylan with each side chain. Integration of resonances assigned to the substituted C2 and C3 in the HSQC spectrum also indicated 69.23 and 30.77% of PCL side chains attached to AXU at C3 and C2 positions, respectively. Although the attachment of PCL onto xylan led to the decreased thermal stability of xylan, the loss of unrecovered xylan fractions with low molecular weight because of the high solubility of xylan in DMSO/LiCl resulted in the increased thermal stability of the samples. This kind of xylan derivative has potential application in environmentally friendly and biodegradable materials considering the good biodegradability of xylan and PCL. PMID:24387806

  18. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions.

    PubMed

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-08-17

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation.

  19. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation. PMID:27600229

  20. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation.

  1. Profiling and functional classification of esterases in olive (Olea europaea) pollen during germination

    PubMed Central

    Rejón, Juan D.; Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Rodríguez-García, María Isabel; Castro, Antonio J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims A pollen grain contains a number of esterases, many of which are released upon contact with the stigma surface. However, the identity and function of most of these esterases remain unknown. In this work, esterases from olive pollen during its germination were identifided and functionally characterized. Methods The esterolytic capacity of olive (Olea europaea) pollen was examined using in vitro and in-gel enzymatic assays with different enzyme substrates. The functional analysis of pollen esterases was achieved by inhibition assays by using specific inhibitors. The cellular localization of esterase activities was performed using histochemical methods. Key Results Olive pollen showed high levels of non-specific esterase activity, which remained steady after hydration and germination. Up to 20 esterolytic bands were identified on polyacrylamide gels. All the inhibitors decreased pollen germinability, but only diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DIFP) hampered pollen tube growth. Non-specific esterase activity is localized on the surface of oil bodies (OBs) and small vesicles, in the pollen intine and in the callose layer of the pollen tube wall. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was mostly observed in the apertures, exine and pollen coat, and attached to the pollen tube wall surface and to small cytoplasmic vesicles. Conclusions In this work, for the first time a systematic functional characterization of esterase enzymes in pollen from a plant species with wet stigma has been carried out. Olive pollen esterases belong to four different functional groups: carboxylesterases, acetylesterases, AChEs and lipases. The cellular localization of esterase activity indicates that the intine is a putative storage site for esterolytic enzymes in olive pollen. Based on inhibition assays and cellular localization of enzymatic activities, it can be concluded that these enzymes are likely to be involved in pollen germination, and pollen tube growth and penetration of

  2. Branched nanotrees with immobilized acetylcholine esterase for nanobiosensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risveden, Klas; Dick, Kimberly A.; Bhand, Sunil; Rydberg, Patrik; Samuelson, Lars; Danielsson, Bengt

    2010-02-01

    A novel lab-on-a-chip nanotree enzyme reactor is demonstrated for the detection of acetylcholine. The reactors are intended for use in the RISFET (regional ion sensitive field effect transistor) nanosensor, and are constructed from gold-tipped branched nanorod structures grown on SiNx-covered wafers. Two different reactors are shown: one with simple, one-dimensional nanorods and one with branched nanorod structures (nanotrees). Significantly higher enzymatic activity is found for the nanotree reactors than for the nanorod reactors, most likely due to the increased gold surface area and thereby higher enzyme binding capacity. A theoretical calculation is included to show how the enzyme kinetics and hence the sensitivity can be influenced and increased by the control of electrical fields in relation to the active sites of enzymes in an electronic biosensor. The possible effects of electrical fields employed in the RISFET on the function of acetylcholine esterase is investigated using quantum chemical methods, which show that the small electric field strengths used are unlikely to affect enzyme kinetics. Acetylcholine esterase activity is determined using choline oxidase and peroxidase by measuring the amount of choline formed using the chemiluminescent luminol reaction.

  3. A halotolerant type A feruloyl esterase from Pleurotus eryngii.

    PubMed

    Nieter, Annabel; Haase-Aschoff, Paul; Linke, Diana; Nimtz, Manfred; Berger, Ralf G

    2014-03-01

    An extracellular feruloyl esterase (PeFaeA) from the culture supernatant of Pleurotus eryngii was purified to homogeneity using cation exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and size exclusion chromatography. The length of the complete coding sequence of PeFaeA was determined to 1668 bp corresponding to a protein of 555 amino acids. The catalytic triad of Ser-Glu-His demonstrated the uniqueness of the enzyme compared to previously published FAEs. The purified PeFaeA was a monomer with an estimated molecular mass of 67 kDa. Maximum feruloyl esterase (FAE) activity was observed at pH 5.0 and 50 °C, respectively. Metal ions (5 mM), except Hg(2+), had no significant influence on the enzyme activity. Substrate specificity profiling characterized the enzyme as a type A FAE preferring bulky natural substrates, such as feruloylated saccharides, rather than small synthetic ones. Km and kcat of the purified enzyme for methyl ferulate were 0.15 mM and 0.85 s(-1). In the presence of 3 M NaCl activity of the enzyme increased by 28 %. PeFaeA alone released only little ferulic acid from destarched wheat bran (DSWB), whereas after addition of Trichoderma viride xylanase the concentration increased more than 20 fold. PMID:24607359

  4. Food induced esterase phenocopies in the snail Cepaea nemoralis.

    PubMed

    Oxford, G S

    1975-12-01

    Hepatopancreatic extracts from the snail Cepaea nemoralis, assayed straight from the field, often contain three or four heavily staining esterase zones which migrate to the cathodal end of polyacrylamide disc gels during electrophoresis. Previous breeding results showed that the heavily straining zones appeared allelic but to incorporate these multibanded phenotypes, a super gene of five closely linked loci was tentatively proposed. Further breeding work again failed to demonstrate multiple zones in parents or offspring and so experiments were conducted to see whether the multi-zoned phenotypes in the wild were produced by secondary modification of single primary products. Wild snails yielding extracts containing more than two heavily staining zones were shown to possess only two such zones after three months under laboratory conditions. Also, the ingestion of nettle (Urtica dioica L.) has been demonstrated to induce extra esterase zones in laboratory-reared animals. Some of the secondarily induced zones appear identical in physical, biochemical and electrophoretic properties to the primary products of other alleles, and thus appear to be electrophoretic phenocopies. A model is suggested which could account for this phenomenon. PMID:1061709

  5. The Structure- and Metal-dependent Activity of Escherichia coli PgaB Provides Insight into the Partial De-N-acetylation of Poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine*

    PubMed Central

    Little, Dustin J.; Poloczek, Joanna; Whitney, John C.; Robinson, Howard; Nitz, Mark; Howell, P. Lynne

    2012-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides are required for the development and integrity of biofilms produced by a wide variety of bacteria. In Escherichia coli, partial de-N-acetylation of the exopolysaccharide poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) by the periplasmic protein PgaB is required for polysaccharide intercellular adhesin-dependent biofilm formation. To understand the molecular basis for PNAG de-N-acetylation, the structure of PgaB in complex with Ni2+ and Fe3+ have been determined to 1.9 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively, and its activity on β-1,6-GlcNAc oligomers has been characterized. The structure of PgaB reveals two (β/α)x barrel domains: a metal-binding de-N-acetylase that is a member of the family 4 carbohydrate esterases (CE4s) and a domain structurally similar to glycoside hydrolases. PgaB displays de-N-acetylase activity on β-1,6-GlcNAc oligomers but not on the β-1,4-(GlcNAc)4 oligomer chitotetraose and is the first CE4 member to exhibit this substrate specificity. De-N-acetylation occurs in a length-dependent manor, and specificity is observed for the position of de-N-acetylation. A key aspartic acid involved in de-N-acetylation, normally seen in other CE4s, is missing in PgaB, suggesting that the activity of PgaB is attenuated to maintain the low levels of de-N-acetylation of PNAG observed in vivo. The metal dependence of PgaB is different from most CE4s, because PgaB shows increased rates of de-N-acetylation with Co2+ and Ni2+ under aerobic conditions, and Co2+, Ni2+ and Fe2+ under anaerobic conditions, but decreased activity with Zn2+. The work presented herein will guide inhibitor design to combat biofilm formation by E. coli and potentially a wide range of medically relevant bacteria producing polysaccharide intercellular adhesin-dependent biofilms. PMID:22810235

  6. Acetylation modulates the STAT signaling code.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Martin; Ginter, Torsten; Brand, Peter; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2012-12-01

    A fascinating question of modern biology is how a limited number of signaling pathways generate biological diversity and crosstalk phenomena in vivo. Well-defined posttranslational modification patterns dictate the functions and interactions of proteins. The signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) are physiologically important cytokine-induced transcription factors. They are targeted by a multitude of posttranslational modifications that control and modulate signaling responses and gene expression. Beyond phosphorylation of serine and tyrosine residues, lysine acetylation has recently emerged as a critical modification regulating STAT functions. Interestingly, acetylation can determine STAT signaling codes by various molecular mechanisms, including the modulation of other posttranslational modifications. Here, we provide an overview on the acetylation of STATs and how this protein modification shapes cellular cytokine responses. We summarize recent advances in understanding the impact of STAT acetylation on cell growth, apoptosis, innate immunity, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we discuss how STAT acetylation can be targeted by small molecules and we consider the possibility that additional molecules controlling STAT signaling are regulated by acetylation. Our review also summarizes evolutionary aspects and we show similarities between the acetylation-dependent control of STATs and other important molecules. We propose the concept that, similar to the 'histone code', distinct posttranslational modifications and their crosstalk orchestrate the functions and interactions of STAT proteins. PMID:22795479

  7. Degradation and utilization of xylans by the rumen anaerobe Prevotella bryantii (formerly P. ruminicola subsp. brevis) B(1)4.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, K; Martin, J C; Marinsek-Logar, R; Flint, H J

    1997-12-01

    Freshly harvested whole cells from cultures of P. bryantii B(1)4 grown with oat spelt xylan (OSX) as an energy source showed less than 25% of the enzyme activity against OSX, and less than 15% of the activity against birchwood xylan (BWX) and carboxymethylcellulose, that was detectable in sonicated cell preparations. This indicates that much of this hydrolytic activity is either periplasmic, membrane-associated or intracellular and may be concerned with the processing of transported oligosaccharides.P. bryantii B(1)4 cultures were able to utilise up to 45% and 51% of the total pentose present in OSX and BWX, respectively, after 24 h, but could utilize 84% of a water-soluble fraction of BWX. Analysis of the xylan left undegraded after incubation with P. bryantii showed that while xylose and arabinose were removed to a similar extent, uronic acids were utilized to a greater extent than xylose. Predigestion of xylans with two cloned xylanases from the cellulolytic rumen anaerobe Ruminococcus flavefaciens gave little increase in overall pentose utilization suggesting that external P. bryantii xylanases are as effective as the cloned R. flavefaciens enzymes in releasing products that can be utilised by P. bryantii cells. The xylanase system of P. bryantiiis able to efficiently utilise not only xylo-oligosaccharides but also larger water-soluble xylan fragments. PMID:16887612

  8. Distribution of cell-wall xylans in bryophytes and tracheophytes: new insights into basal interrelationships of land plants.

    PubMed

    Carafa, Anna; Duckett, Jeffrey G; Knox, J Paul; Ligrone, Roberto

    2005-10-01

    Xylans are known to be major cellulose-linking polysaccharides in secondary cell walls in higher plants. We used two monoclonal antibodies (LM10 and LM11) for a comparative immunocytochemical analysis of tissue and cell distribution of xylans in a number of taxa representative of all major tracheophyte and bryophyte lineages. The results show that xylans containing the epitopes recognized by LM10 and LM11 are ubiquitous components of secondary cell walls in vascular and mechanical tissues in all present-living tracheophytes. In contrast, among the three bryophyte lineages, LM11 binding was detected in specific cell-wall layers in pseudoelaters and spores in the sporophyte of hornworts, while no binding was observed with either antibody in the gametophyte or sporophyte of liverworts and mosses. The ubiquitous occurrence of xylans containing LM10 and LM11 epitopes in tracheophytes suggests that the appearance of these polysaccharides has been a pivotal event for the evolution of highly efficient vascular and mechanical tissues. LM11 binding in the sporophyte of hornworts, indicating the presence of relatively highly substituted xylans (possibly arabinoxylans), separates these from the other bryophytes and is consistent with recent molecular data indicating a sister relationship of the hornworts with tracheophytes.

  9. Modifying solubility of polymeric xylan extracted from Eucalyptus grandis and sugarcane bagasse by suitable side chain removing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Katiana R; Chimphango, Annie F A; Görgens, Johann F

    2015-10-20

    α-l-Arabinofuranosidase (AbfB) and novel α-d-glucuronidase (Agu1B) enzymes were applied for selective hydrolysis of beechwood (Fagus sylvatica) xylan (Sigma-Aldrich) as well as xylans extracted from Eucalyptus grandis and sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) bagasse, leading to precipitation of these carbohydrate biopolymers. Hemicellulose extraction was performed with two mild-alkali methods, Höije and Pinto. Precipitation occurred after removal of 67, 40 and 16% 4-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid (MeGlcA) present in polymeric xylans from beechwood, E. grandis (Pinto) and E. grandis (Höije), respectively. Precipitation was maximized at Agu1B levels of 3.79-7.53mg/gsubstrate and hemicellulose concentrations of 4.5-5.0% (w/v). Polymeric xylan from sugarcane bagasse precipitated after removal of 48 and 22% of arabinose and MeGlcA, respectively, at optimal AbfB and Agu1B dosages of 9.0U/g and 6.4mg/g, respectively. Both the purity of polymeric xylans and structure thereof had a critical impact on the propensity for precipitation, and morphology of the resulting precipitate. Nano-to micro-meter precipitates were produced, with potential for carbohydrate nanotechnology applications.

  10. Akt-dependent metabolic reprogramming regulates tumor cell histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Nathaniel W.; Wei, Shuanzeng; Venneti, Sriram; Worth, Andrew J.; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Lim, Hee-Woong; Liu, Shichong; Jackson, Ellen; Aiello, Nicole M.; Haas, Naomi B.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Judkins, Alexander; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Stanger, Ben Z.; Feldman, Michael D.; Blair, Ian A.; Wellen, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone acetylation plays important roles in gene regulation, DNA replication, and the response to DNA damage, and it is frequently deregulated in tumors. We postulated that tumor cell histone acetylation levels are determined in part by changes in acetyl-CoA availability mediated by oncogenic metabolic reprogramming. Here, we demonstrate that acetyl-CoA is dynamically regulated by glucose availability in cancer cells and that the ratio of acetyl-CoA: coenzyme A within the nucleus modulates global histone acetylation levels. In vivo, expression of oncogenic Kras or Akt stimulates histone acetylation changes that precede tumor development. Furthermore, we show that Akt's effects on histone acetylation are mediated through the metabolic enzyme ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), and that pAkt(Ser473) levels correlate significantly with histone acetylation marks in human gliomas and prostate tumors. The data implicate acetyl-CoA metabolism as a key determinant of histone acetylation levels in cancer cells. PMID:24998913

  11. An organic-solvent-tolerant esterase from thermophilic Bacillus licheniformis S-86.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sebastián; Martínez, M Alejandra; Pandey, Ashok; Castro, Guillermo R

    2009-01-01

    A thermophile, halotolerant and organic-solvent-tolerant esterase producer Bacillus sp. S-86 strain previously isolated was found to belong to Bacillus licheniformis species through morphological, biochemical, 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and rDNA intergenic spacers amplification (ITS-PCR). The strain can grow at 55 degrees C in presence of C2-C7 alkanols (log P=-0.86 to 2.39), and NaCl concentrations up to 15% (w/v). This bacterium showed optimal growth and esterase production at 50 degrees C. Two different molecular weight esterase activities were detected in zymographic assays. PMSF inhibited type I esterase activity, showing no inhibitory effect on type II esterase activity. B. licheniformis S-86 was able to grow in presence of hydroxylic organic-solvents like propan-2-ol, butan-1-ol and 3-methylbutan-1-ol. At a sub-lethal concentration of these solvents (392 mmoll(-1) propan-2-ol; 99 mmol l(-1) butan-1-ol, 37 mmol l(-1) 3-methylbutan-1-ol), adequate to produce 50% cell growth inhibition at 50 degrees C, an increment between 1.9 and 2.3 times was observed in type I esterase production, and between 2.2 and 3.1 times in type II esterase production. PMID:18723341

  12. Esterase and lipase in camel tick Hyalomma dromedarii (Acari: Ixodidae) during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, Afaf S; Abdel-Gany, Somia S; Mohamed, Tarek M; Mohamed, Saleh A

    2004-02-01

    Esterase and lipase activity showed significant changes during embryogenesis of camel tick Hyalomma dromedarii. From the elution profile of chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, six forms of H. dromedarii esterase (El to EVI) can be distinguished. Esterase EIII was purified to homogeneity after chromatography on Sepharose 6B. The molecular mass of esterase EIII was 45 kDa for the native enzyme and represented a monomer of 45 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Esterase EIII had an acidic pI at 5.3. Lipase activity was detected in the same DEAE-cellulose peaks (LI to LVI) of H. dromedarii esterases. The highest lipase activity was exhibited by lipase LIII. Esterase EIII and lipase LIII were compared with respect to Michaelis constant, substrate specificity, temperature optimum, heat stability, pH optimum, effect of metal ions and inhibitors. This study suggests that H. dromedarii lipolytic enzymes may play a central role in the interconversion of lipovitellins during embryogenesis. PMID:14990212

  13. Comparison of mesophilic and thermophilic feruloyl esterases: characterization of their substrate specificity for methyl phenylalkanoates.

    PubMed

    Topakas, Evangelos; Christakopoulos, Paul; Faulds, Craig B

    2005-02-23

    The active sites of feruloyl esterases from mesophilic and thermophilic sources were probed using methyl esters of phenylalkanoic acids. Only 13 out of 26 substrates tested were significant substrates for all the enzymes. Lengthening or shortening the aliphatic side chain while maintaining the same aromatic substitutions completely abolished activity for both enzymes, which demonstrates the importance of the correct distance between the aromatic group and the ester bond. Maintaining the phenylpropanoate structure but altering the substitutions of the aromatic ring demonstrated that the type-A esterase from the mesophilic fungus Fusarium oxysporum (FoFaeA) showed a preference for methoxylated substrates, in contrast to the type-B esterase from the same source (FoFaeB) and the thermophilic type-B (StFaeB) and type-C (StFaeC) from Sporotrichum thermophile, which preferred hydroxylated substrates. All four esterases hydrolyzed short chain aliphatic acid (C2-C4) esters of p-nitrophenol, but not the C12 ester of laurate. All the feruloyl esterases were able to release ferulic acid from the plant cell wall material in conjunction with a xylanase, but only the type-A esterase FoFaeA was effective in releasing the 5,5' form of diferulic acid. The thermophilic type-B esterase had a lower catalytic efficiency than its mesophilic counterpart, but released more ferulic acid from plant cell walls.

  14. Purification and properties of an esterase from organophosphate-resistant strain of the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed Central

    Merryweather, A T; Crampton, J M; Townson, H

    1990-01-01

    Organophosphate-resistant and -susceptible strains of Culex quinquefasciatus (mosquito) have been compared on the basis of their esterase activities. The homozygous resistant strain (Dar) shows two highly active esterases after starch-gel electrophoresis, of Rm 0.2 and 0.4, which are absent from susceptible strains (Apo, Mon), and which previous selection studies have shown to be inseparable from organophosphate resistance. After SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and silver staining of total C. quinquefasciatus proteins, a 62 kDa band is observed in strain Dar at high concentrations, and in susceptible strains in trace amounts. After Western blotting, this 62 kDa protein is recognized by antisera raised against the two esterases eluted from starch gels. After chromatofocusing of Dar proteins, the 62 kDa protein is seen to be associated with esterase activity, and of a similar pI to that observed for esterases after isoelectric focusing. Post-translational modification is not required for recognition of the 62 kDa putative esterase, since the protein is immunoprecipitated by the anti-esterase serum from products of translation of Dar mRNA in vitro. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2178604

  15. Distribution of esterase activity in porcine ear skin, and the effects of freezing and heat separation.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wing Man; Ng, Keng Wooi; Sakenyte, Kristina; Heard, Charles M

    2012-08-20

    Porcine ear skin is widely used to study skin permeation and absorption of ester compounds, whose permeation and absorption profiles may be directly influenced by in situ skin esterase activity. Importantly, esterase distribution and activity in porcine ear skin following common protocols of skin handling and storage have not been characterised. Thus, we have compared the distribution and hydrolytic activity of esterases in freshly excised, frozen, heated and explanted porcine ear skin. Using an esterase staining kit, esterase activity was found to be localised in the stratum corneum and viable epidermis. Under frozen storage and a common heating protocol of epidermal sheet separation, esterase staining in the skin visibly diminished. This was confirmed by a quantitative assay using HPLC to monitor the hydrolysis of aspirin, in freshly excised, frozen or heated porcine ear skin. Compared to vehicle-only control, the rate of aspirin hydrolysis was approximately three-fold higher in the presence of freshly excised skin, but no different in the presence of frozen or heated skin. Therefore, frozen and heat-separated porcine ear skin should not be used to study the permeation of ester-containing permeants, in particular co-drugs and pro-drugs, whose hydrolysis or degradation can be modulated by skin esterases.

  16. Xylan oligosaccharides and cellobiohydrolase I (TrCel7A) interaction and effect on activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The well-studied cellulase mixture secreted by Trichoderma reesei (anamorph to Hypocrea jecorina) contains two cellobiohydolases (CBHs), cellobiohydrolase I (TrCel7A) and cellobiohydrolase II (TrCeI6A), that are core enzymes for the solubilisation of cellulose. This has attracted significant research interest because of the role of the CBHs in the conversion of biomass to fermentable sugars. However, the CHBs are notoriously slow and susceptible to inhibition, which presents a challenge for the commercial utilisation of biomass. The xylans and xylan fragments that are also present in the biomass have been suggested repeatedly as one cause of the reduced activity of CHBs. Yet, the extent and mechanisms of this inhibition remain poorly elucidated. Therefore, we studied xylan oligosaccharides (XOSs) of variable lengths with respect to their binding and inhibition of both TrCel7A and an enzyme variant without the cellulose-binding domain (CBM). Results We studied the binding of XOSs to TrCel7A by isothermal titration calorimetry. We found that XOSs bind to TrCel7A and that the affinity increases commensurate with XOS length. The CBM, on the other hand, did not affect the affinity significantly, which suggests that XOSs may bind to the active site. Activity assays of TrCel7A clearly demonstrated the negative effect of the presence of XOSs on the turnover number. Conclusions On the basis of these binding data and a comparison of XOS inhibition of the activity of the two enzyme variants towards, respectively, soluble and insoluble substrates, we propose a competitive mechanism for XOS inhibition of TrCel7A with phosphoric swollen cellulose as a substrate. PMID:22035059

  17. Identification of a Secreted Lipolytic Esterase in Propionibacterium freudenreichii, a Ripening Process Bacterium Involved in Emmental Cheese Lipolysis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Dherbécourt, J.; Falentin, H.; Jardin, J.; Maillard, M.-B.; Baglinière, F.; Barloy-Hubler, F.; Thierry, A.

    2010-01-01

    Lipolysis plays an important role in the formation of cheese flavor. In Emmental cheese, the main part of lipolysis has been associated with the presence of Propionibacterium freudenreichii, a species used as a ripening culture. Our aim was to identify the most probable lipolytic esterase(s) involved in cheese lipolysis by P. freudenreichii. Since cheese lipolysis mainly occurs during P. freudenreichii growth, we hypothesized that P. freudenreichii possesses secreted lipolytic esterase(s). For 12 putative esterase genes previously identified from the genome of P. freudenreichii CIRM1, the level of expression was quantified by real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR, and the subcellular localization of esterases was predicted in silico. The esterase activity in extracellular and intracellular extracts of P. freudenreichii was characterized by zymography, and the extracellular esterases were identified by mass spectrometry. Finally, the best candidate was overexpressed in the same strain. All of the 12 genes encoding putative esterases were expressed. Esterase PF#279 was predicted to be secreted in the medium, PF#774 to be surface exposed, and the 10 remaining putative esterases to be intracellular. Zymography revealed that esterase activities in culture supernatant differed from the ones detected in intracellular extracts. PF#279 was identified as the sole esterase present in culture supernatant. Transformed P. freudenreichii CIRM1 clones overexpressing PF#279 showed 5 to 8 times more lipolytic activity on milk fat than the wild-type strain. Combining in silico, biochemical, and genetic approaches, we showed that PF#279 is the sole secreted esterase in P. freudenreichii and is active on milk fat. Therefore, it is likely a key component in cheese lipolysis by P. freudenreichii. PMID:20038704

  18. An advanced understanding of the specific effects of xylan and surface lignin contents on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Xiaohui; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhang, Xiao

    2013-01-17

    A deep understanding of biomass recalcitrance has been hampered by the intricate and heterogeneous nature of pretreated biomass substrates obtained from random deconstruction methods. In this study, we established a unique methodology based on chemical pulping principles to create "reference substrates" with intact cellulose fibers and controlled morphological and chemical properties that enable us to investigate the individual effect of xylan, bulk, and surface lignin content on enzymatic hydrolysis. We also developed and demonstrated an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique for quantifying surface lignin content on biomass substrates. The results from this study show that, apart from its hindrance effect, xylan can facilitate cellulose fibril swelling and thus create more accessible surface area, which improves enzyme and substrate interactions. Surface lignin has a significant impact on enzyme adsorption kinetics and hydrolysis rate. Advanced understanding of xylan, bulk, and surface lignin effects provides critical information for an effective biomass conversion process.

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Xylan-Degrading Strains of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens from a Napier Grass-Fed Anaerobic Digester †

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, G. W.; Aldrich, H. C.; Williams, D.; Mannarelli, B.; Wilkie, A.; Hespell, R. B.; Smith, P. H.; Ingram, L. O.

    1988-01-01

    Six new xylanolytic bacterial strains have been isolated from a Napier grass-fed anaerobic digester. These strains were identified as Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and were similar in many respects to ruminal isolates described previously. The new isolates exhibited a high degree of DNA homology with several ruminal strains of B. fibrisolvens. Xylan or xylose was required to induce the production of enzymes for xylan degradation, xylanase and xylosidase. Production of these enzymes was repressed in the presence of glucose. Xylanase activity was predominantly extracellular, while that of xylosidases was cell associated. The new isolates of B. fibrisolvens grew well in defined medium containing xylan as the sole carbon source and did not produce obvious slime or capsular layers. These strains may be useful for future genetic investigations. Images PMID:16347622

  20. Isolation and characterization of xylan-degrading strains of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens from a napier grass-fed anaerobic digester

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, G.W.; Aldrich, H.C.; Williams, D.; Mannarelli, B.; Wilkie, A.; Hespell, R.B.; Smith, P.H.; Ingram, L.O.

    1988-05-01

    Six new xylanolytic bacterial strains have been isolated from a Napier grass-fed anaerobic digester. These strains were identified as Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and were similar in many respects to ruminal isolates described previously. The new isolates exhibited a high degree of DNA homology with several ruminal strains of B. fibrisolvens. Xylan or xylose was required to induce the production of enzymes for xylan degradation, xylanase and xylosidase. Production of these was repressed in the presence of glucose. Xylanase activity was predominantly extracellular, while that of xylosidases was cell associated. The new isolates of B. fibrisolvens grew well in defined medium containing xylan as the sole carbon source and did not produce obvious slime or capsular layers. These strains may be useful for future genetic investigations.

  1. Acetylator phenotypes in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Penketh, R J A; Gibney, S F A; Nurse, G T; Hopkinson, D A

    1983-01-01

    Acetylator phenotypes have been determined in 139 unrelated subjects from the hitherto untested populations of Papua New Guinea, and their relevance to current antituberculous isoniazid chemotherapy is discussed. PMID:6842533

  2. Histone deacetylase 3 indirectly modulates tubulin acetylation.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Travis; Seiler, Caroline; Wolny, Marcin; Hughes, Ruth; Watson, Peter; Schwabe, John; Grigg, Ronald; Peckham, Michelle

    2015-12-15

    Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), a member of the Class I subfamily of HDACs, is found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Its roles in the nucleus have been well characterized, but its cytoplasmic roles are still not elucidated fully. We found that blocking HDAC3 activity using MI192, a compound specific for HDAC3, modulated tubulin acetylation in the human prostate cancer cell line PC3. A brief 1 h treatment of PC3 cells with MI192 significantly increased levels of tubulin acetylation and ablated the dynamic behaviour of microtubules in live cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown (KD) of HDAC3 in PC3 cells, significantly increased levels of tubulin acetylation, and overexpression reduced it. However, the active HDAC3-silencing mediator of retinoic and thyroid receptors (SMRT)-deacetylase-activating domain (DAD) complex did not directly deacetylate tubulin in vitro. These data suggest that HDAC3 indirectly modulates tubulin acetylation.

  3. Heterologous Expression of Two Ferulic Acid Esterases from Penicillium funiculosum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoshaug, Eric P.; Selig, Michael J.; Baker, John O.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Adney, William S.

    Two recombinant ferulic acid esterases from Penicillium funiculosum produced in Aspergillus awamori were evaluated for their ability to improve the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The genes, faeA and faeB, were cloned from P. funiculosum and expressed in A. awamori using their native signal sequences. Both enzymes contain a catalytic domain connected to a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module by a threonine-rich linker peptide. Interestingly, the carbohydrate binding-module is N-terminal in FaeA and C-terminal in FaeB. The enzymes were purified to homogeneity using column chromatography, and their thermal stability was characterized by differential scanning microcalorimetry. We evaluated both enzymes for their potential to enhance the cellulolytic activity of purified Trichoderma reesei Cel7A on pretreated corn stover.

  4. Heterologous Expression of Two Ferulic Acid Esterases from Penicillium Funiculosum

    SciTech Connect

    Knoshaug, E. P.; Selig, M. J.; Baker, J. O.; Decker, S. R.; Himmel, M. E.; Adney, W. S.

    2008-01-01

    Two recombinant ferulic acid esterases from Penicillium funiculosum produced in Aspergillus awamori were evaluated for their ability to improve the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The genes, faeA and faeB, were cloned from P. funiculosum and expressed in A. awamori using their native signal sequences. Both enzymes contain a catalytic domain connected to a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module by a threonine-rich linker peptide. Interestingly, the carbohydrate binding-module is N-terminal in FaeA and C-terminal in FaeB. The enzymes were purified to homogeneity using column chromatography, and their thermal stability was characterized by differential scanning microcalorimetry. We evaluated both enzymes for their potential to enhance the cellulolytic activity of purified Trichoderma reesei Cel7A on pretreated corn stover.

  5. Esterase variation at three loci in meat ants.

    PubMed

    Halliday, R B

    1979-01-01

    The meat ant (Iridomyrmex purpureus) occurs in a number of color forms, with uncertain taxonomic status. Gel electrophresis of meat ant extracts, followed by nonspecific esterase staining, reveals several zones of activity. Allelic variation at three loci is proposed to account for variation in some of these zones. Two of the loci (Es-1, Es-2) appear to have recessive null alleles, whose frequencies have been estimated by the method of maximum likelihood. Geographic variation in allele frequency is attributed to behavioral and geographic subdivision of the population. Apparent disturbances in segregation ratios and deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium can be accounted for if it is argued that some nests contain more than one queen. Differences in gene frequency between sympatric populations of the red and blue forms of I. purpureus are observed, confirming their reproductive is isolation and sibling species status.

  6. Plasma B-esterase activities in European raptors.

    PubMed

    Roy, Claudie; Grolleau, Gérard; Chamoulaud, Serge; Rivière, Jean-Louis

    2005-01-01

    B-esterases are serine hydrolases composed of cholinesterases, including acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and carboxylesterase (CbE). These esterases, found in blood plasma, are inhibited by organophosphorus (OP) and carbamate (CB) insecticides and can be used as nondestructive biomarkers of exposure to anticholinesterase insecticides. Furthermore, B-esterases are involved in detoxification of these insecticides. In order to establish the level of these enzymes and to have reference values for their normal activities, total plasma cholinesterase (ChE), AChE and BChE activities, and plasma CbE activity were determined in 729 European raptors representing 20 species, four families, and two orders. The diurnal families of the Falconiforme order were represented by Accipitridae and Falconidae and the nocturnal families of the Strigiforme order by Tytonidae and Strigidae. Intraspecies differences in cholinesterase activities according to sex and/or age were investigated in buzzards (Buteo buteo), sparrowhawks (Accipiter nisus), kestrels (Falco tinnunculus), barn owls (Tyto alba), and tawny owls (Strix aluco). Sex-related differences affecting ChE and AChE activities were observed in young kestrels (2-3-mo-old) and age-related differences in kestrels (ChE and AChE), sparrowhawks (AChE), and tawny owls (ChE, AChE, and BChE). The interspecies analysis yielded a negative correlation between ChE activity and body mass taking into account the relative contribution of AChE and BChE to ChE activity, with the exception of the honey buzzard (Pernis apivorus). The lowest ChE activities were found in the two largest species, Bonelli's eagle (Hieraaetus fasciatus) and Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus) belonging to the Accipitridae family. The highest ChE activities were found in the relatively small species belonging to the Tytonidae and Strigidae families and in honey buzzard of the Accipitridae family. Species of the Accipitridae, Tytonidae, and

  7. Levels of histone acetylation in thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Puppin, Cinzia; Passon, Nadia; Lavarone, Elisa; Di Loreto, Carla; Frasca, Francesco; Vella, Veronica; Vigneri, Riccardo; Damante, Giuseppe

    2011-08-12

    Histone acetylation is a major mechanism to regulate gene transcription. This post-translational modification is modified in cancer cells. In various tumor types the levels of acetylation at several histone residues are associated to clinical aggressiveness. By using immunohistochemistry we show that acetylated levels of lysines at positions 9-14 of H3 histone (H3K9-K14ac) are significantly higher in follicular adenomas (FA), papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC), follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTC) and undifferentiated carcinomas (UC) than in normal tissues (NT). Similar data have been obtained when acetylated levels of lysine 18 of H3 histone (H3K18ac) were evaluated. In this case, however, no difference was observed between NT and UC. When acetylated levels of lysine 12 of H4 histone (H4K12ac) were evaluated, only FA showed significantly higher levels in comparison with NT. These data indicate that modification histone acetylation is an early event along thyroid tumor progression and that H3K18 acetylation is switched off in the transition between differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid tumors. By using rat thyroid cell lines that are stably transfected with doxycyclin-inducible oncogenes, we show that the oncoproteins RET-PTC, RAS and BRAF increase levels of H3K9-K14ac and H3K18ac. In the non-tumorigenic rat thyroid cell line FRTL-5, TSH increases levels of H3K18ac. However, this hormone decreases levels of H3K9-K14ac and H4K12ac. In conclusion, our data indicate that neoplastic transformation and hormonal stimulation can modify levels of histone acetylation in thyroid cells. PMID:21763277

  8. Acetyl-L-carnitine increases mitochondrial protein acetylation in the aged rat heart.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Janos; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Lee, Kwangwon; Virmani, Ashraf; Koverech, Aleardo; Cavazza, Claudio; Chance, Mark R; Hoppel, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Previously we showed that in vivo treatment of elderly Fisher 344 rats with acetylcarnitine abolished the age-associated defect in respiratory chain complex III in interfibrillar mitochondria and improved the functional recovery of the ischemic/reperfused heart. Herein, we explored mitochondrial protein acetylation as a possible mechanism for acetylcarnitine's effect. In vivo treatment of elderly rats with acetylcarnitine restored cardiac acetylcarnitine content and increased mitochondrial protein lysine acetylation and increased the number of lysine-acetylated proteins in cardiac subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar mitochondria. Enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, mitochondrial β-oxidation, and ATP synthase of the respiratory chain showed the greatest acetylation. Acetylation of isocitrate dehydrogenase, long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, complex V, and aspartate aminotransferase was accompanied by decreased catalytic activity. Several proteins were found to be acetylated only after treatment with acetylcarnitine, suggesting that exogenous acetylcarnitine served as the acetyl-donor. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that acetylcarnitine treatment also induced changes in mitochondrial protein amount; a two-fold or greater increase/decrease in abundance was observed for thirty one proteins. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the first time that in the aged rat heart in vivo administration of acetylcarnitine provides acetyl groups for protein acetylation and affects the amount of mitochondrial proteins. PMID:25660059

  9. Acetylation Reader Proteins: Linking Acetylation Signaling to Genome Maintenance and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kyle M.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin-based DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are fundamental for preventing genome and epigenome instability, which are prevalent in cancer. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the addition and removal of acetyl groups on lysine residues, a post-translational modification important for the DDR. Acetylation can alter chromatin structure as well as function by providing binding signals for reader proteins containing acetyl-lysine recognition domains, including the bromodomain (BRD). Acetylation dynamics occur upon DNA damage in part to regulate chromatin and BRD protein interactions that mediate key DDR activities. In cancer, DDR and acetylation pathways are often mutated or abnormally expressed. DNA damaging agents and drugs targeting epigenetic regulators, including HATs, HDACs, and BRD proteins, are used or are being developed to treat cancer. Here, we discuss how histone acetylation pathways, with a focus on acetylation reader proteins, promote genome stability and the DDR. We analyze how acetylation signaling impacts the DDR in the context of cancer and its treatments. Understanding the relationship between epigenetic regulators, the DDR, and chromatin is integral for obtaining a mechanistic understanding of genome and epigenome maintenance pathways, information that can be leveraged for targeting acetylation signaling, and/or the DDR to treat diseases, including cancer. PMID:27631103

  10. Acetylation Reader Proteins: Linking Acetylation Signaling to Genome Maintenance and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fade; Chiu, Li-Ya; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-09-01

    Chromatin-based DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are fundamental for preventing genome and epigenome instability, which are prevalent in cancer. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the addition and removal of acetyl groups on lysine residues, a post-translational modification important for the DDR. Acetylation can alter chromatin structure as well as function by providing binding signals for reader proteins containing acetyl-lysine recognition domains, including the bromodomain (BRD). Acetylation dynamics occur upon DNA damage in part to regulate chromatin and BRD protein interactions that mediate key DDR activities. In cancer, DDR and acetylation pathways are often mutated or abnormally expressed. DNA damaging agents and drugs targeting epigenetic regulators, including HATs, HDACs, and BRD proteins, are used or are being developed to treat cancer. Here, we discuss how histone acetylation pathways, with a focus on acetylation reader proteins, promote genome stability and the DDR. We analyze how acetylation signaling impacts the DDR in the context of cancer and its treatments. Understanding the relationship between epigenetic regulators, the DDR, and chromatin is integral for obtaining a mechanistic understanding of genome and epigenome maintenance pathways, information that can be leveraged for targeting acetylation signaling, and/or the DDR to treat diseases, including cancer.

  11. Histone acetylation and globin gene switching.

    PubMed Central

    Hebbes, T R; Thorne, A W; Clayton, A L; Crane-Robinson, C

    1992-01-01

    An affinity-purified antibody that recognises the epitope epsilon-acetyl lysine has been used to fractionate chicken erythrocyte mononucleosomes obtained from 5 and 15 day embryos. The antibody bound chromatin was enriched in multiply acetylated forms of the core histones H3, H4 and H2B, but not in ubiquitinated H2A. The DNA of these modified nucleosomes was probed with genomic sequences from the embryonic beta rho gene (active at 5 days) and from the adult beta A gene (active at 15 days). Both genes were found to be highly enriched in the acetylated nucleosomes fractionated from both 5 day and from 15 day erythrocytes. We conclude that globin switching is not linked to a change in acetylation status of the genes and that a 'poised' gene carries histones acetylated to a similar level as a transcriptionally active gene. Core histone acetylation is not therefore a direct consequence of the transcriptional process and might operate at the level of the globin locus as a general enabling step for transcription. Images PMID:1549462

  12. Protein acetylation in metabolism - metabolites and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Keir J; Zhang, Hongbo; Katsyuba, Elena; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Reversible acetylation was initially described as an epigenetic mechanism regulating DNA accessibility. Since then, this process has emerged as a controller of histone and nonhistone acetylation that integrates key physiological processes such as metabolism, circadian rhythm and cell cycle, along with gene regulation in various organisms. The widespread and reversible nature of acetylation also revitalized interest in the mechanisms that regulate lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and deacetylases (KDACs) in health and disease. Changes in protein or histone acetylation are especially relevant for many common diseases including obesity, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, as well as for some rare diseases such as mitochondrial diseases and lipodystrophies. In this Review, we examine the role of reversible acetylation in metabolic control and how changes in levels of metabolites or cofactors, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, coenzyme A, acetyl coenzyme A, zinc and butyrate and/or β-hydroxybutyrate, directly alter KAT or KDAC activity to link energy status to adaptive cellular and organismal homeostasis. PMID:26503676

  13. Compost Grown Agaricus bisporus Lacks the Ability to Degrade and Consume Highly Substituted Xylan Fragments

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Ronald P.; Gruppen, Harry; Kabel, Mirjam A.

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Agaricus bisporus is commercially grown for the production of edible mushrooms. This cultivation occurs on compost, but not all of this substrate is consumed by the fungus. To determine why certain fractions remain unused, carbohydrate degrading enzymes, water-extracted from mushroom-grown compost at different stages of mycelium growth and fruiting body formation, were analyzed for their ability to degrade a range of polysaccharides. Mainly endo-xylanase, endo-glucanase, β-xylosidase and β-glucanase activities were determined in the compost extracts obtained during mushroom growth. Interestingly, arabinofuranosidase activity able to remove arabinosyl residues from doubly substituted xylose residues and α-glucuronidase activity were not detected in the compost enzyme extracts. This correlates with the observed accumulation of arabinosyl and glucuronic acid substituents on the xylan backbone in the compost towards the end of the cultivation. Hence, it was concluded that compost grown A. bisporus lacks the ability to degrade and consume highly substituted xylan fragments. PMID:26237450

  14. Acid-catalyzed conversion of xylose, xylan and straw into furfural by microwave-assisted reaction.

    PubMed

    Yemiş, Oktay; Mazza, Giuseppe

    2011-08-01

    Furfural is a biomass derived-chemical that can be used to replace petrochemicals. In this study, the acid-catalyzed conversion of xylose and xylan to furfural by microwave-assisted reaction was investigated at selected ranges of temperature (140-190°C), time (1-30 min), substrate concentration (1:5-1:200 solid:liquid ratio), and pH (2-0.13). We found that a temperature of 180°C, a solid:liquid ratio of 1:200, a residence time of 20 min, and a pH of 1.12 gave the best furfural yields. The effect of different Brønsted acids on the conversion efficiency of xylose and xylan was also evaluated, with hydrochloric acid being found to be the most effective catalyst. The microwave-assisted process provides highly efficient conversion: furfural yields obtained from wheat straw, triticale straw, and flax shives were 48.4%, 45.7%, and 72.1%, respectively. PMID:21620690

  15. An expansin from the marine bacterium Hahella chejuensis acts synergistically with xylanase and enhances xylan hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Jin; Kim, In Jung; Kim, Jihyun F; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2013-12-01

    HcEXLX2 is a bacterial expansin found in a marine bacterium, Hahella chejuensis. Previously, HcEXLX2 was reported to act synergistically with a commercial cellulase preparation on the cellulose hydrolysis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible synergistic activity of HcEXLX2 with an endo-type xylanase from Saccharophagus degradans 2-40(T) (Xyn10C) in the hydrolysis of xylan. When 160 μg of HcEXLX2 was incubated with 12 μg of Xyn10C, the yield of reducing sugar increased 3.1 times when compared to that without HcEXLX2. The optimal temperature and pH for the synergism of HcEXLX2 with Xyn10C were 30°C and pH 7, respectively. In addition, binding experiments revealed that HcEXLX2 binds to xylan more preferentially than to Avicel. These results imply that HcEXLX2 could be used as an accessory protein to boost the activity of xylanase if its synergistic effect is strengthened at lower dosages.

  16. Conversion of xylan to ethanol by ethanologenic strains of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella oxytoca

    SciTech Connect

    Burchhardt, G.; Ingram, L.O. )

    1992-04-01

    A two-stage process was evaluated for the fermentation of polymeric feedstocks to ethanol by a single, genetically engineered microorganism. The truncated xylanase gene (xynZ) from the thermophilic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum was fused with the N terminus of lacZ to eliminate secretory signals. This hybrid gene was expressed at high levels in ethanologenic strains of Escherichia coli KO11 and Klebsiella oxytoca M5A1(pLOI555). Large amounts of xylanase (25 to 93 mU/mg of cell protein) accumulated as intracellular products during ethanol production. Cells containing xylanase for saccharification. After cooling, the hydrolysate was fermented to ethanol with the same organism (30C), thereby replenishing the supply of xylanase for a subsequent saccharification. Recombinant E. coli metabolized only xylose, while recombinant K. oxytoca M5A1 metabolized xylose, xylobiose, and xylotriose but not xylotetrose. Derivatives of this latter organism produced large amounts of intracellular xylosidase, and the organism is presumed to transport both xylobiose and xylotriose for intracellular hydrolysis. By using recombinant M5A1, approximately 34% of the maximal theoretical yield of ethanol was obtained from xylan by this two-stage process. The yield appeared to be limited by the digestability of commercial xylan rather than by a lack of sufficient xylanase or by ethanol toxicity. In general form, this two-stage process, which uses a single, genetically engineered microorganism, should be applicable for the production of useful chemicals from a wide range of biomass polymers.

  17. Compost Grown Agaricus bisporus Lacks the Ability to Degrade and Consume Highly Substituted Xylan Fragments.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Edita; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; de Vries, Ronald P; Gruppen, Harry; Kabel, Mirjam A

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Agaricus bisporus is commercially grown for the production of edible mushrooms. This cultivation occurs on compost, but not all of this substrate is consumed by the fungus. To determine why certain fractions remain unused, carbohydrate degrading enzymes, water-extracted from mushroom-grown compost at different stages of mycelium growth and fruiting body formation, were analyzed for their ability to degrade a range of polysaccharides. Mainly endo-xylanase, endo-glucanase, β-xylosidase and β-glucanase activities were determined in the compost extracts obtained during mushroom growth. Interestingly, arabinofuranosidase activity able to remove arabinosyl residues from doubly substituted xylose residues and α-glucuronidase activity were not detected in the compost enzyme extracts. This correlates with the observed accumulation of arabinosyl and glucuronic acid substituents on the xylan backbone in the compost towards the end of the cultivation. Hence, it was concluded that compost grown A. bisporus lacks the ability to degrade and consume highly substituted xylan fragments.

  18. Preparation and adsorption property of xylan/poly(acrylic acid) magnetic nanocomposite hydrogel adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Baichen; Jing, Zhanxin; Wang, Haihong

    2015-03-15

    Adsorbents based on natural polysaccharides have attracted increasing interest because of their low-cost and biodegradability, particularly, polysaccharide-based nanocomposite adsorbents. In this study the xylan/poly(acrylic acid) magnetic nanocomposite hydrogel adsorbent was prepared from wheat straw xylan and Fe3O4 nanoparticles, and its adsorption property was studied on methylene blue removal. The prepared hydrogel adsorbent had a semi-interpenetrating network structure and exhibited a macro-porous structure with interconnected porous channels. Super-paramagnetic characteristic behavior was observed from magnetic analysis using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The optimum condition for methylene blue adsorption on the adsorbent was found at pH 8 with an adsorbent dosage of 3g/L and an initial concentration of 400mg/L, and the removal percentage reached above 90%. The adsorption isotherm of methylene blue on the prepared hydrogel adsorbent was fitted to the Langmuir model, and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model could describe the adsorption process. All obtained results indicated that the prepared hydrogel adsorbent is promising for water treatment applications. PMID:25542101

  19. Influenza C virus esterase: analysis of catalytic site, inhibition, and possible function.

    PubMed Central

    Vlasak, R; Muster, T; Lauro, A M; Powers, J C; Palese, P

    1989-01-01

    The active site serine of the acetylesterase of influenza C virus was localized to amino acid 71 of the hemagglutinin-esterase protein by affinity labeling with 3H-labeled diisopropylfluorophosphate. This serine and the adjacent amino acids (Phe-Gly-Asp-Ser) are part of a consensus sequence motif found in serine hydrolases. Since comparative analysis failed to reveal esterase sequence similarities with other serine hydrolases, we suggest that this viral enzyme is a serine hydrolase constituting a new family of serine esterases. Furthermore, we found that the influenza C virus esterase was inhibited by isocoumarin derivatives, with 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin being the most potent inhibitor. Addition of this compound prevented elution of influenza C virus from erythrocytes and inhibited virus infectivity, possibly through inhibition of virus entry into cells. Images PMID:2495370

  20. Esterase detoxification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors by human or rat liver in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphate (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxification can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON) are considered...

  1. Exposure to a Cutinase-like Serine Esterase Triggers Rapid Lysis of Multiple Mycobacterial Species*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Bhatti, Alexandra; Ke, Danxia; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Lenaerts, Anne; Kremer, Laurent; Guerardel, Yann; Zhang, Peijun; Ojha, Anil K.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacteria are shaped by a thick envelope made of an array of uniquely structured lipids and polysaccharides. However, the spatial organization of these molecules remains unclear. Here, we show that exposure to an esterase from Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msmeg_1529), hydrolyzing the ester linkage of trehalose dimycolate in vitro, triggers rapid and efficient lysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and Mycobacterium marinum. Exposure to the esterase immediately releases free mycolic acids, while concomitantly depleting trehalose mycolates. Moreover, lysis could be competitively inhibited by an excess of purified trehalose dimycolate and was abolished by a S124A mutation affecting the catalytic activity of the esterase. These findings are consistent with an indispensable structural role of trehalose mycolates in the architectural design of the exposed surface of the mycobacterial envelope. Importantly, we also demonstrate that the esterase-mediated rapid lysis of M. tuberculosis significantly improves its detection in paucibacillary samples. PMID:23155047

  2. Esterase and Malate Dehydrogenase Phenotypes in Portuguese Populations of Meloidogyne Species

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Célia S.; de O. Abrantes, Isabel M.

    1989-01-01

    Nonspecific esterases and malate dehydrogenases of 1-5 females from 40 root-knot nematode populations from Portugal were analyzed by electrophoresis in 0.4-mm-thick polyacrylamide gels. Fourteen major bands of esterase activity were detected, corresponding to 10 distinct phenotypes, Meloidogyne javanica and M. hapla had distinct species-specific phenotypes. Two phenotypes occurred in M. arenaria. The most variability was found among M. incognita populations. Of the remaining two phenotypes, one was associated with M. hispanica and the other belonged to a new species. Three malate dehydrogenase phenotypes were discerned on the basis of particular combinations of the eight main bands of activity found. As previously found, esterases were more useful than malate dehydrogenases in identification of the major Meloidogyne species. The host plant had no effect on the nematode esterase or malate dehydrogenase phenotypes. PMID:19287618

  3. Influenza C virus esterase: analysis of catalytic site, inhibition, and possible function

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasak, R.; Muster, T.; Lauro, A.M.; Powers, J.C.; Palese, P.

    1989-05-01

    The active site serine of the acetylesterase of influenza C virus was localized to amino acid 71 of the hemagglutinin-esterase protein by affinity labeling with /sup 3/H-labeled diisopropylfluorophosphate. This serine and the adjacent amino acids (Phe-Gly-Asp-Ser) are part of a consensus sequence motif found in serine hydrolases. Since comparative analysis failed to reveal esterase sequence similarities with other serine hydrolases, the authors suggest that this viral enzyme is a serine hydrolase constituting a new family of serine esterases. Furthermore, they found that the influenza C virus esterase was inhibited by isocoumarin derivatives, with 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin being the most potent inhibitor. Addition of this compound prevented elution of influenza C virus from erythrocytes and inhibited virus infectivity, possibly through inhibition of virus entry into cells.

  4. The search of the target of promotion: Phenylbenzoate esterase activities in hen peripheral nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, A. . E-mail: angelo.moretto@icps.it; Nicolli, A.; Lotti, M.

    2007-03-15

    Certain esterase inhibitors, such as carbamates, phosphinates and sulfonyl halides, do not cause neuropathy as some organophosphates, but they may exacerbate chemical or traumatic insults to axons. This phenomenon is called promotion of axonopathies. Given the biochemical and toxicological characteristics of these compounds, the hypothesis was made that the target of promotion is a phenyl valerate (PV) esterase similar to neuropathy target esterase (NTE), the target of organophosphate induced delayed polyneuropathy. However, attempts to identify a PV esterase in hen peripheral nerve have been, so far, unsuccessful. We tested several esters, other than PV, as substrates of esterases from crude homogenate of the hen peripheral nerve. The ideal substrate should be poorly hydrolysed by NTE but extensively by enzyme(s) that are insensitive to non-promoters, such as mipafox, and sensitive to promoters, such as phenyl methane sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF). When phenyl benzoate (PB) was used as substrate, about 65% of total activity was resistant to the non-promoter mipafox (up to 0.5 mM, 20 min, pH 8.0), that inhibits NTE and other esterases. More than 90% of this resistant activity was sensitive to the classical promoter PMSF (1 mM, 20 min, pH 8.0) with an IC{sub 50} of about 0.08 mM (20 min, pH 8.0). On the contrary, the non-promoter p-toluene sulfonyl fluoride caused only about 10% inhibition at 0.5 mM. Several esterase inhibitors including, paraoxon, phenyl benzyl carbamate, di-n-butyl dichlorovinyl phosphate and di-isopropyl fluorophosphate, were tested both in vitro and in vivo for inhibition of this PB activity. Mipafox-resistant PMSF-sensitive PB esterase activity(ies) was inhibited by promoters but not by non promoters and neuropathic compounds.

  5. Characterization and structural modeling of a new type of thermostable esterase from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Levisson, Mark; van der Oost, John; Kengen, Servé W M

    2007-06-01

    A bioinformatic screening of the genome of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima for ester-hydrolyzing enzymes revealed a protein with typical esterase motifs, though annotated as a hypothetical protein. To confirm its putative esterase function the gene (estD) was cloned, functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Recombinant EstD was found to exhibit significant esterase activity with a preference for short acyl chain esters (C4-C8). The monomeric enzyme has a molecular mass of 44.5 kDa and optimal activity around 95 degrees C and at pH 7. Its thermostability is relatively high with a half-life of 1 h at 100 degrees C, but less stable compared to some other hyperthermophilic esterases. A structural model was constructed with the carboxylesterase Est30 from Geobacillus stearothermophilus as a template. The model covered most of the C-terminal part of EstD. The structure showed an alpha/beta-hydrolase fold and indicated the presence of a typical catalytic triad consisting of a serine, aspartate and histidine, which was verified by site-directed mutagenesis and inhibition studies. Phylogenetic analysis showed that EstD is only distantly related to other esterases. A comparison of the active site pentapeptide motifs revealed that EstD should be grouped into a new family of esterases (Family 10). EstD is the first characterized member of this family. PMID:17466017

  6. Production and purification of a solvent-resistant esterase from Bacillus licheniformis S-86.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sebastián; Baigorí, Mario D; Pandey, Ashok; Castro, Guillermo R

    2008-12-01

    New thermophilic and organic-solvent-tolerant Bacillus licheniformis S-86 strain is able to produce two active and solvent-stable esterases. Production of type I and II esterases was substantially enhanced when oils and surfactants were supplied as carbon sources. Grape oil (0.1% v/v) and Tween 20 to 60 (0.1% v/v) had enhanced enzyme production between 1.6- and 2.2-folds. Type II esterase was purified to homogeneity in a five-step procedure. This esterase was purified 76.7-fold with a specific activity of 135 U mg(-1). Molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated to be 38.4 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Type II esterase was active mostly on esters with short acyl chains, which allowed to classify the enzyme as a carboxylesterase with a K (m) of 80.2 mmol l(-1) and a V (max) of 256.4 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) for p-nitrophenyl acetate. Also, B. licheniformis S-86 type II esterase displayed activity in presence of water-miscible organic solvents at 50% concentration and stability after 1-h incubation. PMID:18543118

  7. Differences in Esterase Activity to Aspirin and p-Nitrophenyl Acetate among Human Serum Albumin Preparations.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Akitoshi; Okada, Masaya; Inagaki, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Sachiyo; Hamaguchi, Tsuneo; Iwakawa, Seigo

    2016-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) has two major ligand-binding sites, sites I and II, and also hydrolyzes some compounds at both sites. In the present study, we investigated differences in esterase activity among HSA preparations, and also the effects of warfarin, indomethacin, and naproxen on the hydrolytic activities of HSA to aspirin and p-nitrophenyl acetate. The esterase activities of HSA to aspirin or p-nitrophenyl acetate were measured from the pseudo-first-order formation rate constant (kobs) of salicylic acid or p-nitrophenol by HSA. Inter-lot variations were observed in the esterase activities of HSA to aspirin and p-nitrophenyl acetate; however, the esterase activity of HSA to aspirin did not correlate with that to p-nitrophenyl acetate. The inhibitory effects of warfarin and indomethacin on the esterase activity of HSA to aspirin were stronger than that of naproxen. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of naproxen on the esterase activity of HSA to p-nitrophenyl acetate was stronger than those of warfarin and indomethacin. These results suggest that the administration of different commercial HSA preparations and the co-administration with site I or II high-affinity binding drugs may change the pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs that are hydrolyzed by HSA. PMID:27476944

  8. Structural, Kinetic and Proteomic Characterization of Acetyl Phosphate-Dependent Bacterial Protein Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Alexandria; Sorensen, Dylan; Minasov, George; Lima, Bruno P.; Scholle, Michael; Mrksich, Milan; Anderson, Wayne F.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Schilling, Birgit; Wolfe, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    The emerging view of Nε-lysine acetylation in eukaryotes is of a relatively abundant post-translational modification (PTM) that has a major impact on the function, structure, stability and/or location of thousands of proteins involved in diverse cellular processes. This PTM is typically considered to arise by the donation of the acetyl group from acetyl-coenzyme A (acCoA) to the ε-amino group of a lysine residue that is reversibly catalyzed by lysine acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Here, we provide genetic, mass spectrometric, biochemical and structural evidence that Nε-lysine acetylation is an equally abundant and important PTM in bacteria. Applying a recently developed, label-free and global mass spectrometric approach to an isogenic set of mutants, we detected acetylation of thousands of lysine residues on hundreds of Escherichia coli proteins that participate in diverse and often essential cellular processes, including translation, transcription and central metabolism. Many of these acetylations were regulated in an acetyl phosphate (acP)-dependent manner, providing compelling evidence for a recently reported mechanism of bacterial Nε-lysine acetylation. These mass spectrometric data, coupled with observations made by crystallography, biochemistry, and additional mass spectrometry showed that this acP-dependent acetylation is both non-enzymatic and specific, with specificity determined by the accessibility, reactivity and three-dimensional microenvironment of the target lysine. Crystallographic evidence shows acP can bind to proteins in active sites and cofactor binding sites, but also potentially anywhere molecules with a phosphate moiety could bind. Finally, we provide evidence that acP-dependent acetylation can impact the function of critical enzymes, including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, triosephosphate isomerase, and RNA polymerase. PMID:24756028

  9. Complete genome sequence of the marine, cellulose and xylan degrading bacterium Glaciecola sp. 4H-3-7+YE-5

    SciTech Connect

    Klippel, Dr Barbara; Bruce, David; Davenport, Karen W.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, James; Han, Shunsheng; Land, Miriam L; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nolan, Matt; Pennacchio, Len; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Woyke, Tanja; Wiebusch, Sigrid; Basner, Alexander; Abe, Fumiyoshi; Horikoshi, Koki; Antranikian, Garabed

    2011-01-01

    Glaciecola sp. 4H-3-7+YE-5 was isolated from deep sea sediments at Suruga Bay in Japan and is capable of efficiently hydrolyzing cellulose and xylan. The complete genome sequence of Glaciecola sp. 4H-3-7+YE-5 revealed several genes encoding putatively novel glycoside hydrolases associated with plant biomass degradation.

  10. Suppression of xylan endotransglycosylase PtxtXyn10A affects cellulose microfibril angle in secondary wall in aspen wood.

    PubMed

    Derba-Maceluch, Marta; Awano, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Junko; Lucenius, Jessica; Ratke, Christine; Kontro, Inkeri; Busse-Wicher, Marta; Kosik, Ondrej; Tanaka, Ryo; Winzéll, Anders; Kallas, Åsa; Leśniewska, Joanna; Berthold, Fredrik; Immerzeel, Peter; Teeri, Tuula T; Ezcurra, Ines; Dupree, Paul; Serimaa, Ritva; Mellerowicz, Ewa J

    2015-01-01

    Certain xylanases from family GH10 are highly expressed during secondary wall deposition, but their function is unknown. We carried out functional analyses of the secondary-wall specific PtxtXyn10A in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides). PtxtXyn10A function was analysed by expression studies, overexpression in Arabidopsis protoplasts and by downregulation in aspen. PtxtXyn10A overexpression in Arabidopsis protoplasts resulted in increased xylan endotransglycosylation rather than hydrolysis. In aspen, the enzyme was found to be proteolytically processed to a 68 kDa peptide and residing in cell walls. Its downregulation resulted in a corresponding decrease in xylan endotransglycosylase activity and no change in xylanase activity. This did not alter xylan molecular weight or its branching pattern but affected the cellulose-microfibril angle in wood fibres, increased primary growth (stem elongation, leaf formation and enlargement) and reduced the tendency to form tension wood. Transcriptomes of transgenic plants showed downregulation of tension wood related genes and changes in stress-responsive genes. The data indicate that PtxtXyn10A acts as a xylan endotransglycosylase and its main function is to release tensional stresses arising during secondary wall deposition. Furthermore, they suggest that regulation of stresses in secondary walls plays a vital role in plant development.

  11. Deconstruction of lignin linked p-coumarates, ferulates and xylan by NaOH enhances the enzymatic conversion of glucan.

    PubMed

    Murciano Martínez, Patricia; Punt, Arjen M; Kabel, Mirjam A; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-09-01

    Thermo-assisted NaOH pretreatment to deconstruct xylan and lignin in sugar cane bagasse (SCB) is poorly understood. Hence, in this research it is was aimed to study the effect of NaOH pretreatment on the insoluble remaining lignin structures. Hereto, SCB milled fibres were pretreated using different dosages of NaOH at different temperatures and residence times. Of untreated SCB about 63% of the lignin compounds were assigned as p-coumarates and ferulates, analysed by pyrolysis-GC/MS as 4-vinyl phenol and 4-vinyl guaiacol, and designated as non-core lignin (NCL) compounds. More severe NaOH pretreatments resulted in lower xylan and lower lignin recoveries in the insoluble residues. Especially, the relative abundance of NCL decreased and this decrease followed a linear trend with the decrease in xylan. Core lignin compounds, analysed as phenol, guaiacol and syringol, accumulated in the residues. The decrease in residual xylan and NCL correlated positively with the enzymatic hydrolysis of the residual glucan. PMID:27233096

  12. Paenibacillus tundrae sp. nov. and Paenibacillus xylanexedens sp. nov., Psychrotolerant, Xylan-Degrading, Bacteria from Alaskan Tundra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Psychrotolerant, xylan-degrading, strains of bacteria were isolated from soil beneath moist non-acidic and acidic tundra in northern Alaska. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that each strain belonged to the genus Paenibacillus. The highest levels of 16S rRNA gene sim...

  13. Expression of Aeromonas punctata ME-1 exo-xylanase X in E. coli for efficient hydrolysis of xylan to xylose.

    PubMed

    Juturu, Veeresh; Teh, Tong Mei; Wu, Jin Chuan

    2014-12-01

    exo-Xylanase X from Aeromonas punctata ME-1 was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli with a carboxy terminal His tag (6×) and a molecular mass of 39.42 kDa, which is in agreement with the prediction from its amino acid composition. The recombinant exo-xylanase reached 186 mg l(-1) after induction by isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside. Its optimal temperature and pH were 50 °C and 6, respectively. The enzyme showed not only an exo-xylanase activity with K m of 3.90 mg ml(-1) and V max of 12.9 U μg(-1) for hydrolysis of Remazol Brilliant Blue-xylan but also a considerable exo-glucanase activity (27.9 U mg(-1)) on P-nitrophenyl β-D-cellobioside. It hydrolyzed xylan predominantly to xylobiose, xylotriose, xylotetraose, and xylose. An enzyme mixture of exo-xylanase and endo-xylanase (50 μg ml(-1) each) yielded a larger amount (330 mg l(-1)) of xylose from beechwood xylan than the controls (270 and 150 mg l(-1)) using them alone at 100 μg ml(-1), indicating a synergistic action between the two xylanases favoring the hydrolysis of beechwood xylan to release more xylose. PMID:25213085

  14. Functional Characterization of a Novel Dactylosporangium Esterase and Its Utilization in the Asymmetric Synthesis of (R)-Methyl Mandelate.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dun; Zhang, Yun; Sun, Aijun; Hu, Yunfeng

    2016-09-01

    One novel esterase DAEst6 was identified from the genome of Dactylosporangium aurantiacum subsp. Hamdenensis NRRL 18085. DAEst6 was further characterized to be an esterase which exhibited high resistance to high pH values. Esterase DAEst6 could resolve racemic methyl mandelate and generate (R)-methyl mandelate, one key drug intermediate, with an enantiomeric excess and a conversion of 99 and 49 %, respectively, after process optimization. The optimal working condition for the preparation of (R)-methyl mandelate through DAEst6 was found to be 10-mM racemic methyl mandelate, no organic co-solvents, pH 7.5, and 40 °C, for 5 h. Our work was the first report about the functional characterization of one novel Dactylosporangium esterase and the utilization of one Dactylosporangium esterase in kinetic resolution. Dactylosporangium esterases represented by DAEst6 possess great potential in the generation of valuable chiral drug intermediates and chemicals.

  15. Proteomic analysis of acetylation in thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Woo; Kim, Dooil; Lee, Yong-Jik; Kim, Jung-Ae; Choi, Ji Young; Kang, Sunghyun; Pan, Jae-Gu

    2013-08-01

    Recent analysis of prokaryotic N(ε)-lysine-acetylated proteins highlights the posttranslational regulation of a broad spectrum of cellular proteins. However, the exact role of acetylation remains unclear due to a lack of acetylated proteome data in prokaryotes. Here, we present the N(ε)-lysine-acetylated proteome of gram-positive thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus. Affinity enrichment using acetyl-lysine-specific antibodies followed by LC-MS/MS analysis revealed 253 acetylated peptides representing 114 proteins. These acetylated proteins include not only common orthologs from mesophilic Bacillus counterparts, but also unique G. kaustophilus proteins, indicating that lysine acetylation is pronounced in thermophilic bacteria. These data complement current knowledge of the bacterial acetylproteome and provide an expanded platform for better understanding of the function of acetylation in cellular metabolism.

  16. Switching Catalysis from Hydrolysis to Perhydrolysis in Pseudomonas fluorescens Esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, D.; Bernhardt, P; Morley, K; Jiang, Y; Cheeseman, J; Purpero, V; Schrag, J; Kazlauskas, R

    2010-01-01

    Many serine hydrolases catalyze perhydrolysis, the reversible formation of peracids from carboxylic acids and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we showed that a single amino acid substitution in the alcohol binding pocket, L29P, in Pseudomonas fluorescens (SIK WI) aryl esterase (PFE) increased the specificity constant of PFE for peracetic acid formation >100-fold [Bernhardt et al. (2005) Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 44, 2742]. In this paper, we extend this work to address the three following questions. First, what is the molecular basis of the increase in perhydrolysis activity? We previously proposed that the L29P substitution creates a hydrogen bond between the enzyme and hydrogen peroxide in the transition state. Here we report two X-ray structures of L29P PFE that support this proposal. Both structures show a main chain carbonyl oxygen closer to the active site serine as expected. One structure further shows acetate in the active site in an orientation consistent with reaction by an acyl-enzyme mechanism. We also detected an acyl-enzyme intermediate in the hydrolysis of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone by mass spectrometry. Second, can we further increase perhydrolysis activity? We discovered that the reverse reaction, hydrolysis of peracetic acid to acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, occurs at nearly the diffusion limited rate. Since the reverse reaction cannot increase further, neither can the forward reaction. Consistent with this prediction, two variants with additional amino acid substitutions showed 2-fold higher k{sub cat}, but K{sub m} also increased so the specificity constant, k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, remained similar. Third, how does the L29P substitution change the esterase activity? Ester hydrolysis decreased for most esters (75-fold for ethyl acetate) but not for methyl esters. In contrast, L29P PFE catalyzed hydrolysis of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone five times more efficiently than wild-type PFE. Molecular modeling suggests that moving the carbonyl group closer to the

  17. Heterologous expression of family 10 xylanases from Acidothermus cellulolyticus enhances the exoproteome of Caldicellulosiruptor bescii and growth on xylan substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Sun -Ki; Chung, Daehwan; Himmel, Michael E.; Bomble, Yannick J.; Westpheling, Janet

    2016-08-22

    The ability to deconstruct plant biomass without conventional pretreatment has made members of the genus Caldicellulosiruptor the target of investigation for the consolidated processing of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels and bioproducts. These Gram-positive bacteria are hyperthermophilic anaerobes and the most thermophilic cellulolytic organisms so far described. They use both C5 and C6 sugars simultaneously and have the ability to grow well on xylan, a major component of plant cell walls. This is an important advantage for their use to efficiently convert biomass at yields sufficient for an industrial process. For commodity chemicals, yield from substrate is perhaps the most importantmore » economic factor. In an attempt to improve even further the ability of C. bescii to use xylan, we introduced two xylanases from Acidothermus cellulolyticus. Acel_0180 includes tandem carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM2 and CBM3) located at the C-terminus, one of which, CBM2, is not present in C. bescii. Also, the sequences of Xyn10A and Acel_0180 have very little homology with the GH10 domains present in C. bescii. For these reasons, we selected these xylanases as potential candidates for synergistic interaction with those in the C. bescii exoproteome. As a result, heterologous expression of two xylanases from Acidothermus cellulolyticus in Caldicellulosiruptor bescii resulted in a modest, but significant increase in the activity of the exoproteome of C. bescii on xylan substrates. Even though the increase in extracellular activity was modest, the ability of C. bescii to grow on these substrates was dramatically improved suggesting that the xylan substrate/microbe interaction substantially increased deconstruction over the secreted free enzymes alone. In conclusion, we anticipate that the ability to efficiently use xylan, a major component of plant cell walls for conversion of plant biomass to products of interest, will allow the conversion of renewable, sustainable, and

  18. Cationic and anionic polyelectrolyte complexes of xylan and chitosan. Interaction with lignocellulosic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mocchiutti, Paulina; Schnell, Carla N; Rossi, Gerardo D; Peresin, María S; Zanuttini, Miguel A; Galván, María V

    2016-10-01

    Cationic (CatPECs) and anionic (AnPECs) polyelectrolyte complexes from xylan and chitosan were formed, characterized and adsorbed onto unbleached fibers for improving the papermaking properties. They were prepared at a level of 30% of neutralization charge ratio by modifying the order of addition of polyelectrolytes and the ionic strength (0.01N and 0.1N NaCl). The charge density, colloidal stability and particle size of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) was measured using polyelectrolyte titration method, Turbiscan and Zetasizer Nano equipments, respectively. All the complexes were stable even after seven days from PEC formation. DRIFT spectra of complexes were also analyzed. The adsorption behavior of them onto cellulose nanofibrils model surfaces was studied using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, and surface plasmon resonance. It was found that the PEC layers were viscoelastic and highly hydrated. Finally, it is shown that the adsorbed PECs onto cellulosic fibers markedly improved the tensile and crushing strengths of paper.

  19. Homogeneous esterification of xylan-rich hemicelluloses with maleic anhydride in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xin-Wen; Ren, Jun-Li; Sun, Run-Cang

    2010-12-13

    Generation of bioenergy, new functional polymers, or chemicals and biomaterials from hemicelluloses are important uses for biomass. In this paper, a novel functional biopolymer with carbon-carbon double bond and carboxyl groups was prepared by a homogeneous esterification of xylan-rich hemicelluloses (XH) with maleic anhydride in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl) ionic liquid using LiOH as catalyst. The biopolymers with degrees of substitution (DS) between 0.095 and 0.75 were accessible in a completely homogeneous system by changing reaction temperature, reaction time, the dosage of catalyst, and the molar ratio of maleic anhydride to anhydroxylose unit in XH. Results obtained from FT-IR and (13)C NMR spectroscopies confirmed the structure of hemicellulosic derivatives with carbon-carbon double bond and carboxyl groups, implying an efficient method to prepare a novel and important functional biopolymer for biomaterials.

  20. Structural analysis of thermostabilizing mutations of cocaine esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Nance, Mark R.; Gao, Daquan; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Macdonald, Joanne; Tamburi, Patricia; Yoon, Dan; Landry, Donald M.; Woods, James H.; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Tesmer, John J.G.; Sunahara, Roger K.

    2010-09-03

    Cocaine is considered to be the most addictive of all substances of abuse and mediates its effects by inhibiting monoamine transporters, primarily the dopamine transporters. There are currently no small molecules that can be used to combat its toxic and addictive properties, in part because of the difficulty of developing compounds that inhibit cocaine binding without having intrinsic effects on dopamine transport. Most of the effective cocaine inhibitors also display addictive properties. We have recently reported the use of cocaine esterase (CocE) to accelerate the removal of systemic cocaine and to prevent cocaine-induced lethality. However, wild-type CocE is relatively unstable at physiological temperatures ({tau}{sub 1/2} {approx} 13 min at 37 C), presenting challenges for its development as a viable therapeutic agent. We applied computational approaches to predict mutations to stabilize CocE and showed that several of these have increased stability both in vitro and in vivo, with the most efficacious mutant (T172R/G173Q) extending half-life up to 370 min. Here we present novel X-ray crystallographic data on these mutants that provide a plausible model for the observed enhanced stability. We also more extensively characterize the previously reported variants and report on a new stabilizing mutant, L169K. The improved stability of these engineered CocE enzymes will have a profound influence on the use of this protein to combat cocaine-induced toxicity and addiction in humans.

  1. Inhibition of monocyte esterase activity by organophosphate insecticides.

    PubMed

    Lee, M J; Waters, H C

    1977-11-01

    Organophosphate insecticides, such as Vapona, Naled, and Rabon, are highly potent inhibitors of an enzyme found in human monocytes. The enzyme, a specific monocyte esterase, could be inhibited by Vapona in blood samples via airborne contamination at levels easily achieved from commercial slow-release insecticide strips. Fifty percent inhibition (I50)--as measured on the Hemalog D (Technicon Corp.)--occurred at solution concentrations of 0.22, 1.5, and 2.6 X 10(-6) g/liter for Vapona, Rabon, and Naled, respectively. Parathion (a thiophosphate) and Baygon (a carbamate) were less potent, with I50 values of 3.7 X 10(-5) and 1.5 X 10(-4) g/liter, respectively. Dursban (another thiophosphate) and Carbaryl (a carbamate) showed only marginal inhibition. Eserine, malathion, nicotine and pyrethrum had no inhibitory effect up to 0.5 g/liter. The occurrence of this effect in vivo has not yet been shown, nor is it clear what the implications of such an effect would be. The inhibition of this enzyme by airborne contaminants, however, may interfere with the proper functioning of the Hemalog D. PMID:907842

  2. Identification of petrogenic produced water components as acetylcholine esterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Froment, Jean; Langford, Katherine; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Bråte, Inger Lise N; Brooks, Steven J; Thomas, Kevin V

    2016-08-01

    Effect-directed analysis (EDA) was applied to identify acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitors in produced water. Common produced water components from oil production activities, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylphenols, and naphthenic acids were tested for AChE inhibition using a simple mixture of PAHs and naphthenic acids. Produced water samples collected from two offshore platforms in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea were extracted by solid phase extraction and fractionated by open-column liquid solid chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) before being tested using a high-throughput and automated AChE assay. The HPLC fractions causing the strongest AChE inhibition were analysed by gas chromatography coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-HR-ToF-MS). Butylated hydroxytoluene and 4-phenyl-1,2-dihydronaphthalene were identified as two produced water components capable of inhibiting AChE at low concentrations. In order to assess the potential presence of such compounds discharged into aquatic ecosystems, AChE activity in fish tissues was measured. Saithe (Pollachius virens) caught near two offshore platforms showed lower enzymatic activity than those collected from a reference location. Target analysis of saithe did not detected the presence of these two putative AChE inhibitors and suggest that additional compounds such as PAHs, naphthenic acids and yet un-identified compounds may also contribute to the purported AChE inhibition observed in saithe. PMID:27176761

  3. Mycobacteriophage Lysin B is a novel mycolylarabinogalactan esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, K.; Sun, Q.; Sacchettini, J.; Hatfull, G.F.

    2010-08-27

    Mycobacteriophages encounter a unique problem among phages of Gram-positive bacteria, in that lysis must not only degrade the peptidoglycan layer but also circumvent a mycolic acid-rich outer membrane covalently attached to the arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan complex. Mycobacteriophages accomplish this by producing two lysis enzymes, Lysin A (LysA) that hydrolyses peptidoglycan, and Lysin B (LysB), a novel mycolylarabinogalactan esterase, that cleaves the mycolylarabinogalactan bond to release free mycolic acids. The D29 LysB structure shows an {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase organization with a catalytic triad common to cutinases, but which contains an additional four-helix domain implicated in the binding of lipid substrates. Whereas LysA is essential for mycobacterial lysis, a Giles {Delta}lysB mutant mycobacteriophage is viable, but defective in the normal timing, progression and completion of host cell lysis. We propose that LysB facilitates lysis by compromising the integrity of the mycobacterial outer membrane linkage to the arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan layer.

  4. Lipases and esterases from extremophiles: overview and case example of the production and purification of an esterase from Thermus thermophilus HB27.

    PubMed

    Fuciños, Pablo; González, Roberto; Atanes, Estrella; Sestelo, Ana Belén Fernández; Pérez-Guerra, Nelson; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Rúa, María Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Extremophiles are organisms that have evolved to exist in a variety of extreme environments. They fall into a number of different classes that include thermophiles, halophiles, acidophiles, alkalophiles, psychrophiles, and barophiles (piezophiles). Extremophiles have the potential to produce uniquely valuable biocatalysts that function under conditions in which usually the enzymes of their nonextremophilic counterparts could not. Among novel enzymes isolated from extremophilic microorganisms, hydrolases, and particularly lipases and esterases are experiencing a growing demand. Lipases (EC 3.1.1.3) and esterases (EC 3.1.1.1) catalyze the cleavage of ester bounds in aqueous media and the reverse reaction in organic solvents. Both lipolytic enzymes have relevant applications in food, dairy, detergent, biofuel, and pharmaceutical industries. Here, we summarize the properties of lipases and esterases from the main extremophile groups: thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, psychrophiles, halophiles, alkalophiles/acidophiles, and solvent-resistant microorganisms.We report the biomass and lipolytic activity production by Thermus thermophilus HB27 in 5-L stirred-tank bioreactor at 70°C. Suitability of thermal spring water for culture media formulation is shown. In addition, a protocol to isolate and purify a cell-bound esterase from this microorganism is described.

  5. Lipases and esterases from extremophiles: overview and case example of the production and purification of an esterase from Thermus thermophilus HB27.

    PubMed

    Fuciños, Pablo; González, Roberto; Atanes, Estrella; Sestelo, Ana Belén Fernández; Pérez-Guerra, Nelson; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Rúa, María Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Extremophiles are organisms that have evolved to exist in a variety of extreme environments. They fall into a number of different classes that include thermophiles, halophiles, acidophiles, alkalophiles, psychrophiles, and barophiles (piezophiles). Extremophiles have the potential to produce uniquely valuable biocatalysts that function under conditions in which usually the enzymes of their nonextremophilic counterparts could not. Among novel enzymes isolated from extremophilic microorganisms, hydrolases, and particularly lipases and esterases are experiencing a growing demand. Lipases (EC 3.1.1.3) and esterases (EC 3.1.1.1) catalyze the cleavage of ester bounds in aqueous media and the reverse reaction in organic solvents. Both lipolytic enzymes have relevant applications in food, dairy, detergent, biofuel, and pharmaceutical industries. Here, we summarize the properties of lipases and esterases from the main extremophile groups: thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, psychrophiles, halophiles, alkalophiles/acidophiles, and solvent-resistant microorganisms.We report the biomass and lipolytic activity production by Thermus thermophilus HB27 in 5-L stirred-tank bioreactor at 70°C. Suitability of thermal spring water for culture media formulation is shown. In addition, a protocol to isolate and purify a cell-bound esterase from this microorganism is described. PMID:22426723

  6. The Secreted Esterase of Propionibacterium freudenreichii Has a Major Role in Cheese Lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Abeijón Mukdsi, María Claudia; Falentin, Hélène; Maillard, Marie-Bernadette; Chuat, Victoria; Medina, Roxana Beatriz; Parayre, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Free fatty acids are important flavor compounds in cheese. Propionibacterium freudenreichii is the main agent of their release through lipolysis in Swiss cheese. Our aim was to identify the esterase(s) involved in lipolysis by P. freudenreichii. We targeted two previously identified esterases: one secreted esterase, PF#279, and one putative cell wall-anchored esterase, PF#774. To evaluate their role in lipolysis, we constructed overexpression and knockout mutants of P. freudenreichii CIRM-BIA1T for each corresponding gene. The sequences of both genes were also compared in 21 wild-type strains. All strains were assessed for their lipolytic activity on milk fat. The lipolytic activity observed matched data previously reported in cheese, thus validating the relevance of the method used. The mutants overexpressing PF#279 or PF#774 released four times more fatty acids than the wild-type strain, demonstrating that both enzymes are lipolytic esterases. However, inactivation of the pf279 gene induced a 75% reduction in the lipolytic activity compared to that of the wild-type strain, whereas inactivation of the pf774 gene did not modify the phenotype. Two of the 21 wild-type strains tested did not display any detectable lipolytic activity. Interestingly, these two strains exhibited the same single-nucleotide deletion at the beginning of the pf279 gene sequence, leading to a premature stop codon, whereas they harbored a pf774 gene highly similar to that of the other strains. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate that PF#279 is the main lipolytic esterase in P. freudenreichii and a key agent of Swiss cheese lipolysis. PMID:24242250

  7. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  8. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  9. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  10. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  11. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  12. Histone deacetylase 3 indirectly modulates tubulin acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Travis; Seiler, Caroline; Wolny, Marcin; Hughes, Ruth; Watson, Peter; Schwabe, John; Grigg, Ronald; Peckham, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), a member of the Class I subfamily of HDACs, is found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Its roles in the nucleus have been well characterized, but its cytoplasmic roles are still not elucidated fully. We found that blocking HDAC3 activity using MI192, a compound specific for HDAC3, modulated tubulin acetylation in the human prostate cancer cell line PC3. A brief 1 h treatment of PC3 cells with MI192 significantly increased levels of tubulin acetylation and ablated the dynamic behaviour of microtubules in live cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown (KD) of HDAC3 in PC3 cells, significantly increased levels of tubulin acetylation, and overexpression reduced it. However, the active HDAC3–silencing mediator of retinoic and thyroid receptors (SMRT)–deacetylase-activating domain (DAD) complex did not directly deacetylate tubulin in vitro. These data suggest that HDAC3 indirectly modulates tubulin acetylation. PMID:26450925

  13. Solid-state fermentation as a potential technique for esterase/lipase production by halophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Martin del Campo, Martha; Camacho, Rosa M; Mateos-Díaz, Juan C; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Córdova, Jesus; Rodríguez, Jorge A

    2015-11-01

    Halophilic archaea are extremophiles, adapted to high-salt environments, showing a big biotechnological potential as enzyme, lipids and pigments producers. Four inert supports (perlite, vermiculite, polyurethane foam and glass fiber) were employed for solid-state fermentation (SSF) of the halophilic archaeon Natronococcus sp. TC6 to investigate biomass and esterase production. A very low esterase activity and high water activity were observed when perlite, vermiculite and polyurethane were used as supports. When glass fiber was employed, an important moisture loss was observed (8.6%). Moreover, moisture retention was improved by mixing polyurethane and glass fiber, resulting in maximal biomass and esterase production. Three halophilic archaea: Natronococcus sp. TC6, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and Haloarcula marismortui were cultured by submerged fermentation (SmF) and by SSF; an improvement of 1.3- to 6.2-fold was observed in the biomass and esterase production when SSF was used. Growth was not homogeneous in the mixture, but was predominant in the glass fiber thus was probably because the glass fiber provides a holder to the cells, while the polyurethane acts as an impregnation medium reservoir. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first report on haloarchaea cultivation by SSF aiming biomass and esterase/lipase activity production.

  14. Esterase Active in Polar Organic Solvents from the Yeast Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165.

    PubMed

    Alex, Deepthy; Shainu, Anju; Pandey, Ashok; Sukumaran, Rajeev K

    2014-01-01

    Esterases/lipases active in water miscible solvents are highly desired in biocatalysis where substrate solubility is limited and also when the solvent is desired as an acyl acceptor in transesterification reactions, as with the case of biodiesel production. We have isolated an esterase from the glycolipid producing yeast-Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165 which in its crude form was alkali active, thermo stable, halo tolerant and also capable of acting in presence of high methanol concentration. The crude enzyme which maintained 90% of its original activity after being treated at 70°C was purified and the properties were characterized. The partially purified esterase preparation had temperature and pH optima of 60°C and 8.0 respectively. The enzyme retained almost complete activity in presence of 25% methanol and 80% activity in the same strength of ethanol. Conditions of enzyme production were optimized, which lead to 9 fold increase in the esterase yield. One of the isoforms of the enzyme LIP1 was purified to homogeneity and characterized. Purified LIP1 had a K m and V max of 0.01 and 1.12, respectively. The purified esterase lost its thermo and halo tolerance but interestingly, retained 97% activity in methanol. PMID:24800063

  15. Biochemical Characterization of a First Fungal Esterase from Rhizomucor miehei Showing High Efficiency of Ester Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Xu, Haibo; Yan, Qiaojuan; Yang, Shaoqing; Duan, Xiaojie; Jiang, Zhengqiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Esterases with excellent merits suitable for commercial use in ester production field are still insufficient. The aim of this research is to advance our understanding by seeking for more unusual esterases and revealing their characterizations for ester synthesis. Methodology/Principal Findings A novel esterase-encoding gene from Rhizomucor miehei (RmEstA) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Sequence analysis revealed a 975-bp ORF encoding a 324-amino-acid polypeptide belonging to the hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) family IV and showing highest similarity (44%) to the Paenibacillus mucilaginosus esterase/lipase. Recombinant RmEstA was purified to homogeneity: it was 34 kDa by SDS-PAGE and showed optimal pH and temperature of 6.5 and 45°C, respectively. The enzyme was stable to 50°C, under a broad pH range (5.0–10.6). RmEstA exhibited broad substrate specificity toward p-nitrophenol esters and short-acyl-chain triglycerols, with highest activities (1,480 U mg−1 and 228 U mg−1) for p-nitrophenyl hexanoate and tributyrin, respectively. RmEstA efficiently synthesized butyl butyrate (92% conversion yield) when immobilized on AOT-based organogel. Conclusion RmEstA has great potential for industrial applications. RmEstA is the first reported esterase from Rhizomucor miehei. PMID:24204998

  16. Isolation and characterization of novel lipases/esterases from a bovine rumen metagenome.

    PubMed

    Privé, Florence; Newbold, C Jamie; Kaderbhai, Naheed N; Girdwood, Susan G; Golyshina, Olga V; Golyshin, Peter N; Scollan, Nigel D; Huws, Sharon A

    2015-07-01

    Improving the health beneficial fatty acid content of meat and milk is a major challenge requiring an increased understanding of rumen lipid metabolism. In this study, we isolated and characterized rumen bacterial lipases/esterases using functional metagenomics. Metagenomic libraries were constructed from DNA extracted from strained rumen fluid (SRF), solid-attached bacteria (SAB) and liquid-associated rumen bacteria (LAB), ligated into a fosmid vector and subsequently transformed into an Escherichia coli host. Fosmid libraries consisted of 7,744; 8,448; and 7,680 clones with an average insert size of 30 to 35 kbp for SRF, SAB and LAB, respectively. Transformants were screened on spirit blue agar plates containing tributyrin for lipase/esterase activity. Five SAB and four LAB clones exhibited lipolytic activity, and no positive clones were found in the SRF library. Fosmids from positive clones were pyrosequenced and twelve putative lipase/esterase genes and two phospholipase genes retrieved. Although the derived proteins clustered into diverse esterase and lipase families, a degree of novelty was seen, with homology ranging from 40 to 78% following BlastP searches. Isolated lipases/esterases exhibited activity against mostly short- to medium-chain substrates across a range of temperatures and pH. The function of these novel enzymes recovered in ruminal metabolism needs further investigation, alongside their potential industrial uses. PMID:25575887

  17. Esterase Active in Polar Organic Solvents from the Yeast Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165

    PubMed Central

    Shainu, Anju; Pandey, Ashok; Sukumaran, Rajeev K.

    2014-01-01

    Esterases/lipases active in water miscible solvents are highly desired in biocatalysis where substrate solubility is limited and also when the solvent is desired as an acyl acceptor in transesterification reactions, as with the case of biodiesel production. We have isolated an esterase from the glycolipid producing yeast-Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165 which in its crude form was alkali active, thermo stable, halo tolerant and also capable of acting in presence of high methanol concentration. The crude enzyme which maintained 90% of its original activity after being treated at 70°C was purified and the properties were characterized. The partially purified esterase preparation had temperature and pH optima of 60°C and 8.0 respectively. The enzyme retained almost complete activity in presence of 25% methanol and 80% activity in the same strength of ethanol. Conditions of enzyme production were optimized, which lead to 9 fold increase in the esterase yield. One of the isoforms of the enzyme LIP1 was purified to homogeneity and characterized. Purified LIP1 had a Km and Vmax of 0.01 and 1.12, respectively. The purified esterase lost its thermo and halo tolerance but interestingly, retained 97% activity in methanol. PMID:24800063

  18. Isolation and characterization of novel lipases/esterases from a bovine rumen metagenome.

    PubMed

    Privé, Florence; Newbold, C Jamie; Kaderbhai, Naheed N; Girdwood, Susan G; Golyshina, Olga V; Golyshin, Peter N; Scollan, Nigel D; Huws, Sharon A

    2015-07-01

    Improving the health beneficial fatty acid content of meat and milk is a major challenge requiring an increased understanding of rumen lipid metabolism. In this study, we isolated and characterized rumen bacterial lipases/esterases using functional metagenomics. Metagenomic libraries were constructed from DNA extracted from strained rumen fluid (SRF), solid-attached bacteria (SAB) and liquid-associated rumen bacteria (LAB), ligated into a fosmid vector and subsequently transformed into an Escherichia coli host. Fosmid libraries consisted of 7,744; 8,448; and 7,680 clones with an average insert size of 30 to 35 kbp for SRF, SAB and LAB, respectively. Transformants were screened on spirit blue agar plates containing tributyrin for lipase/esterase activity. Five SAB and four LAB clones exhibited lipolytic activity, and no positive clones were found in the SRF library. Fosmids from positive clones were pyrosequenced and twelve putative lipase/esterase genes and two phospholipase genes retrieved. Although the derived proteins clustered into diverse esterase and lipase families, a degree of novelty was seen, with homology ranging from 40 to 78% following BlastP searches. Isolated lipases/esterases exhibited activity against mostly short- to medium-chain substrates across a range of temperatures and pH. The function of these novel enzymes recovered in ruminal metabolism needs further investigation, alongside their potential industrial uses.

  19. Selective induction of xenobiotic metabolizing esterases/amidases of liver by methaqualone consumption.

    PubMed

    Kaur, S; Ali, B

    1983-08-01

    The present investigation reports the influence of po and ip methaqualone administration on the hydrolytic metabolism of acetylsalicylic acid, procaine, p-nitrophenylacetate, acetanilid, and butyrylcholine in the liver, kidney, and brain of male rats. Oral administration of methaqualone (60 mg/kg/day) to rats for 20 days caused 41.0, 46.5, and 55.0% stimulation of acetylsalicyclic acid esterase I, acetylsalicyclic acid esterase II, and acetanilid N-deacetylase, respectively, in the liver. Under such conditions, the activities of other esterases remained unaffected. The responses of tissue esterases to ip methaqualone treatment (40 mg/kg/day for 6 days) were similar to those observed after po methaqualone administration. Since a single po dose of methaqualone failed to produce any alteration in the rate of metabolism of acetylsalicylic acid, procaine, p-nitrophenylacetate, acetanilid, and butyrylcholine within 20 hr, it may be interpreted that the stimulation of acetylsalicylic acid and acetanilid metabolism is possibly due to selective enhanced de novo synthesis of the enzymes/isozymes necessary for the hydrolysis of the two drugs. The ability of the kidney and brain to metabolize the esters/amides was not modified by po or ip methaqualone pretreatment suggesting the possibility of noninducible forms of renal and neuronal esterases/amidases.

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of a new and highly thermostable esterase from Geobacillus sp. JM6.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanbing; Zheng, Wenguang; Ni, Hui; Liu, Han; Xiao, Anfeng; Cai, Huinong

    2015-10-01

    A new lipolytic enzyme gene was cloned from a thermophile Geobacillus sp. JM6. The gene contained 750 bp and encoded a 249-amino acid protein. The recombinant enzyme was expressed and purified from Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) with a molecular mass of 33.6 kDa. Enzyme assays using p-nitrophenyl esters with different acyl chain lengths as the substrates confirmed its esterase activity, yielding the highest activity with p-nitrophenyl butyrate. When p-nitrophenyl butyrate was used as a substrate, the optimum reaction temperature and pH for the enzyme were 60 °C and pH 7.5, respectively. Geobacillus sp. JM6 esterase showed excellent thermostability with 68% residual activity after incubation at 100 °C for 18 h. A theoretical structural model of strain JM6 esterase was developed with a monoacylglycerol lipase from Bacillus sp. H-257 as a template. The predicted core structure exhibits an α/β hydrolase fold, and a putative catalytic triad (Ser97, Asp196, and His226) was identified. Inhibition assays with PMSF indicated that serine residue is involved in the catalytic activity of strain JM6 esterase. The recombinant esterase showed a relatively good tolerance to the detected detergents and denaturants, such as SDS, Chaps, Tween 20, Tween 80, Triton X-100, sodium deoxycholate, urea, and guanidine hydrochloride.

  1. The classification of esterases: an important gene family involved in insecticide resistance--a review.

    PubMed

    Montella, Isabela Reis; Schama, Renata; Valle, Denise

    2012-06-01

    The use of chemical insecticides continues to play a major role in the control of disease vector populations, which is leading to the global dissemination of insecticide resistance. A greater capacity to detoxify insecticides, due to an increase in the expression or activity of three major enzyme families, also known as metabolic resistance, is one major resistance mechanisms. The esterase family of enzymes hydrolyse ester bonds, which are present in a wide range of insecticides; therefore, these enzymes may be involved in resistance to the main chemicals employed in control programs. Historically, insecticide resistance has driven research on insect esterases and schemes for their classification. Currently, several different nomenclatures are used to describe the esterases of distinct species and a universal standard classification does not exist. The esterase gene family appears to be rapidly evolving and each insect species has a unique complement of detoxification genes with only a few orthologues across species. The examples listed in this review cover different aspects of their biochemical nature. However, they do not appear to contribute to reliably distinguish among the different resistance mechanisms. Presently, the phylogenetic criterion appears to be the best one for esterase classification. Joint genomic, biochemical and microarray studies will help unravel the classification of this complex gene family.

  2. Insecticidal properties of genetically engineered baculoviruses expressing an insect juvenile hormone esterase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, R; O'Reilly, D R; Hammock, B D; Miller, L K

    1992-01-01

    Exploring the possibility of enhancing the properties of baculoviruses as biological control agents of insect pests, we tested the effect of expressing an insect gene (jhe) encoding juvenile hormone esterase. Juvenile hormone esterase inactivates juvenile hormone, which regulates the outcome of an insect molt. A cDNA encoding the juvenile hormone esterase of Heliothis virescens was inserted into the genome of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus such that the gene was expressed under the control of a strong, modified viral promoter. This virus, however, naturally encodes an ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyltransferase which inactivates ecdysone, the hormone which initiates molting. Since ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyltransferase could mask the effects of jhe expression by blocking molting entirely, jhe-expressing viruses in which the ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyltransferase gene was deleted or disrupted were constructed. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of proteins from infected cells revealed several intracellular proteins and two major secreted proteins which reacted with antibodies to authentic juvenile hormone esterase. Western blot analysis coupled with tunicamycin treatment indicated that differential glycosylation was responsible for the multiple products. Hemolymph of recombinant virus-infected fourth-instar Trichoplusia ni larvae contained levels of juvenile hormone esterase activity 40-fold higher than maximal levels found in uninfected larvae. However, little or no difference in developmental characteristics, weight gain, or time of mortality was observed between insects infected with the jhe-expressing viruses and control viruses. Images PMID:1622228

  3. Solid-state fermentation as a potential technique for esterase/lipase production by halophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Martin del Campo, Martha; Camacho, Rosa M; Mateos-Díaz, Juan C; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Córdova, Jesus; Rodríguez, Jorge A

    2015-11-01

    Halophilic archaea are extremophiles, adapted to high-salt environments, showing a big biotechnological potential as enzyme, lipids and pigments producers. Four inert supports (perlite, vermiculite, polyurethane foam and glass fiber) were employed for solid-state fermentation (SSF) of the halophilic archaeon Natronococcus sp. TC6 to investigate biomass and esterase production. A very low esterase activity and high water activity were observed when perlite, vermiculite and polyurethane were used as supports. When glass fiber was employed, an important moisture loss was observed (8.6%). Moreover, moisture retention was improved by mixing polyurethane and glass fiber, resulting in maximal biomass and esterase production. Three halophilic archaea: Natronococcus sp. TC6, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and Haloarcula marismortui were cultured by submerged fermentation (SmF) and by SSF; an improvement of 1.3- to 6.2-fold was observed in the biomass and esterase production when SSF was used. Growth was not homogeneous in the mixture, but was predominant in the glass fiber thus was probably because the glass fiber provides a holder to the cells, while the polyurethane acts as an impregnation medium reservoir. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first report on haloarchaea cultivation by SSF aiming biomass and esterase/lipase activity production. PMID:26369647

  4. A novel esterase from a marine metagenomic library exhibiting salt tolerance ability.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zemin; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Quan; Fang, Wei; Peng, Hui; Zhang, Xuecheng; Xiao, Yazhong

    2014-06-28

    A putative lipolytic enzyme gene, named as est9x, was obtained from a marine microbial metagenome of the South China Sea. Sequence analysis showed that Est9X shares lower than 27% sequence identities with the characterized lipolytic enzymes, but possesses a catalytic triad highly conserved in lipolytic enzymes of the α/β hydrolase superfamily. By phylogenetic tree construction, Est9X was grouped into a new lipase/esterase family. To understand Est9X protein in depth, it was recombinantly expressed, purified, and biochemically characterized. Within potential hydrolytic activities, only lipase/esterase activity was detected for Est9X, confirming its identity as a lipolytic enzyme. When using p-nitrophenol esters with varying lengths of fatty acid as substrates, Est9X exhibited the highest activity to the C2 substrate, indicating it is an esterase. The optimal activity of Est9X occurred at a temperature of 65°C, and Est9X was pretty stable below the optimum temperature. Distinguished from other salttolerant esterases, Est9X's activity was tolerant to and even promoted by as high as 4 M NaCl. Our results imply that Est9X is a unique esterase and could be a potential candidate for industrial application under extreme conditions.

  5. Property enhancement of optically transparent bionanofiber composites by acetylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogi, Masaya; Abe, Kentaro; Handa, Keishin; Nakatsubo, Fumiaki; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2006-12-01

    The authors studied acetylation of bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers to widen the applications of BC nanocomposites in optoelectronic devices. The slight acetylation of BC nanofibers significantly reduces the hygroscopicity of BC nanocomposites, while maintaining their high optical transparency and thermal stability. Furthermore, the degradation in optical transparency at elevated temperature (200°C) was significantly reduced by acetylation treatment. Therefore, the acetylation of bionanofibers has an extraordinary potential as treatment for property enhancement of bionanofiber composites.

  6. Cellular function of neuropathy target esterase in lysophosphatidylcholine action

    SciTech Connect

    Vose, Sarah C.; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Gulevich, Alex G.; Lin, Amy Y.; Holland, Nina T.; Casida, John E.

    2008-11-01

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) plays critical roles in embryonic development and maintenance of peripheral axons. It is a secondary target of some organophosphorus toxicants including analogs of insecticides and chemical warfare agents. Although the mechanistic role of NTE in vivo is poorly defined, it is known to hydrolyze lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) in vitro and may protect cell membranes from cytotoxic accumulation of LPC. To determine the cellular function of NTE, Neuro-2a and COS-7 cells were transfected with a full-length human NTE-containing plasmid yielding recombinant NTE (rNTE). We find the same inhibitor sensitivity and specificity profiles for rNTE assayed with LPC or phenyl valerate (a standard NTE substrate) and that this correlation extends to the LPC hydrolases of human brain, lymphocytes and erythrocytes. All of these LPC hydrolases are therefore very similar to each other in respect to a conserved inhibitor binding site conformation. NTE is expressed in brain and lymphocytes and contributes to LPC hydrolase activities in these tissues. The enzyme or enzymes responsible for erythrocyte LPC hydrolase activity remain to be identified. We also show that rNTE protects Neuro-2a and COS-7 cells from exogenous LPC cytotoxicity. Expression of rNTE in Neuro-2a cells alters their phospholipid balance (analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with single ion monitoring) by lowering LPC-16:0 and LPC-18:0 and elevating glycerophosphocholine without a change in phosphatidylcholine-16:0/18:1 or 16:0/18:2. NTE therefore serves an important function in LPC homeostasis and action.

  7. 40 CFR 721.10520 - Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acetylated fatty acid glycerides... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10520 Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... acetylated fatty acid glycerides (PMN P-11-160) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10520 - Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acetylated fatty acid glycerides... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10520 Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... acetylated fatty acid glycerides (PMN P-11-160) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  9. Fermentation of a bacterial cellulose/xylan composite by mixed ruminal microflora: implications for the role of polysaccharide matrix interactions in plant cell wall biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Weimer, P J; Hackney, J M; Jung, H J; Hatfield, R D

    2000-05-01

    Growth of the cellulose-synthesizing bacterium Acetobacter xylinum ATCC 53524 in media supplemented with 5% (w/v) glucose and 0.2% (w/v) of a water-soluble, nearly linear xylan from tobacco stalks resulted in the synthesis of a highly crystalline composite having a xylose/glucose ratio ranging from 0.06 to 0.24. The digestion of one composite (88% cellulose/12% xylan) by mixed ruminal microflora displayed kinetics of gas production similar to those of an unassociated mixture of the two components added in a xylan/cellulose ratio similar to that of the composite. The data suggest that intimate association of xylan and cellulose, as is typically found in secondary plant cell walls, does not inhibit the rate of digestion of the component polysaccharides.

  10. Immunoelectron microscopic demonstration of an esterase on the outer membrane of Xanthomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed Central

    Debette, J; Prensier, G

    1989-01-01

    Xanthomonas maltophilia (later synonym of Pseudomonas maltophilia), an ubiquitous species, is known to show proteolytic and lipolytic activities. A cell-bound esterase which hydrolyzes beta-naphthyl acetate during growth has been extracted from a strain isolated from soil. Because of its strongly hydrophobic character, the enzyme could be efficiently solubilized only by Triton X-100. This nonionic detergent must be added in polyacrylamide gels to permit migration. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies raised against the Triton-soluble esterase complex were used to localize the enzyme at the ultrastructural level. Electron microscopy of cell sections of this organism and immunogold labeling demonstrated that the enzyme was located on the outer membrane. Such an envelope-bound esterase may produce assimilable substrates for X. maltophilia which can grow in various environments. Images PMID:2495761

  11. Eco-friendly surface modification on polyester fabrics by esterase treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jindan; Cai, Guoqiang; Liu, Jinqiang; Ge, Huayun; Wang, Jiping

    2014-03-01

    Currently, traditional alkali deweighting technology is widely used to improve the hydrophilicity of polyester fabrics. However, the wastewater and heavy chemicals in the effluent cause enormous damage to the environment. Esterase treatment, which is feasible in mild conditions with high selectivity, can provide a clean and efficient way for polyester modification. Under the optimum conditions, the polyester fabric hydrolysis process of esterase had a linear kinetics. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) results showed that hydroxyl and carboxyl groups were produced only on the surface of modified fiber without changing the chemical composition of the bulk. These fibers exhibited much improved fabric wicking, as well as greatly improved oily stain removal performance. Compared to the harsh alkali hydrolysis, the enzyme treatment led to smaller weight loss and better fiber integrity. The esterase treatment technology is promising to produce higher-quality polyester textiles with an environmental friendly approach.

  12. Isoenzyme status and genetic variability of serum esterases in the lesser snow goose, Anser caerulescens caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Bargiello, T A; Grossfield, J; Steele, R W; Cooke, F

    1977-08-01

    A maximum of 22 bands comprising four esterase subgroups--acetylesterase, carboxylesterase, cholinesterase, and acetylcholinesterase--were detected following electrophoresis of lesser snow goose sera on polyacrylamide gels. A minimum of seven structural genes was surmised to be involved in the biosynthesis of these enzymes following physiochemical characterizations. The genetic variability of these loci was calculated to be 1.25% average heterozygosity, while 14.3% of the loci were polymorphic. These estimates of genetic variability were substantially lower than those reported for other vertebrate species. The low degree of genetic variability found in snow goose serum esterases coupled with the extensive protein multiplicity observed may possibly reflect an adaptive strategy based on "biochemical plasticity" rather than genic heterozygosity for this species. The nature of evolutionary forces acting upon multiple enzyme systems such as esterases is discussed. The concept of "conditional neutrality" is introduced and defined within this context. PMID:921742

  13. Extraction and purification of wheat-esterase using aqueous two-phase systems of ionic liquid and salt.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Feng, Zhibiao; Liu, Chunhong; Xu, Yingcao; Li, Dongmei; Ji, Guo

    2015-05-01

    To explore a new and simple rapid extraction and purification technique for wheat-esterase, an ionic liquids (ILs)-based aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) was developed for the purification of wheat-esterase from wheat extracts. Effects of various process parameters such as the concentrations of [Bmim]BF4, the types and concentrations of phase-forming salt, the system pH and the temperature on partitioning of wheat-esterase were evaluated. The obtained data indicated that wheat-esterase was preferentially partitioned into the ILs-rich phase and the ATPS composed of 20 % [Bmim]BF4 (w/w) and 25 % (w/w) NaH2PO4(pH = 4.8) showed good selectivity on wheat-esterase. Under the optimum conditions, wheat-esterase was purified with an acceptable yield (88.93 %), but produced wheat-esterase was 4.23 times as pure. It was obvious that temperature shows little influence on the purification between 10 and 50 °C. Sephadex G-150FF revealed that the band intensity of contaminating proteins in ATPS fraction almost disappeared. Therefore, ILs-based ATPS was an effective method for partitioning and recovery of wheat-esterase from wheat crude extracts. PMID:25892786

  14. Three Novel Rice Genes Closely Related to the Arabidopsis IRX9, IRX9L, and IRX14 Genes and Their Roles in Xylan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chiniquy, Dawn; Varanasi, Patanjali; Oh, Taeyun; Harholt, Jesper; Katnelson, Jacob; Singh, Seema; Auer, Manfred; Simmons, Blake; Adams, Paul D.; Scheller, Henrik V.; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2013-01-01

    Xylan is the second most abundant polysaccharide on Earth, and represents a major component of both dicot wood and the cell walls of grasses. Much knowledge has been gained from studies of xylan biosynthesis in the model plant, Arabidopsis. In particular, the irregular xylem (irx) mutants, named for their collapsed xylem cells, have been essential in gaining a greater understanding of the genes involved in xylan biosynthesis. In contrast, xylan biosynthesis in grass cell walls is poorly understood. We identified three rice genes Os07g49370 (OsIRX9), Os01g48440 (OsIRX9L), and Os06g47340 (OsIRX14), from glycosyltransferase family 43 as putative orthologs to the putative β-1,4-xylan backbone elongating Arabidopsis IRX9, IRX9L, and IRX14 genes, respectively. We demonstrate that the over-expression of the closely related rice genes, in full or partly complement the two well-characterized Arabidopsis irregular xylem (irx) mutants: irx9 and irx14. Complementation was assessed by measuring dwarfed phenotypes, irregular xylem cells in stem cross sections, xylose content of stems, xylosyltransferase (XylT) activity of stems, and stem strength. The expression of OsIRX9 in the irx9 mutant resulted in XylT activity of stems that was over double that of wild type plants, and the stem strength of this line increased to 124% above that of wild type. Taken together, our results suggest that OsIRX9/OsIRX9L, and OsIRX14, have similar functions to the Arabidopsis IRX9 and IRX14 genes, respectively. Furthermore, our expression data indicate that OsIRX9 and OsIRX9L may function in building the xylan backbone in the secondary and primary cell walls, respectively. Our results provide insight into xylan biosynthesis in rice and how expression of a xylan synthesis gene may be modified to increase stem strength. PMID:23596448

  15. Solid acids as catalysts for the conversion of D-xylose, xylan and lignocellulosics into furfural in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luxin; Yu, Hongbing; Wang, Pan

    2013-05-01

    With the aim to develop an ecologically viable catalytic pathway for furfural production without the use of inorganic acids, H3PW12O40, Amberlyst-5 and NKC-9 (macroporous styrene-based sulfonic acid resin) were used as catalysts for producing furfural from xylose, xylan and lignocellulosic biomass in [BMIM]Cl under microwave irradiation at atmospheric pressure. A surprisingly high furfural yield of 93.7% from xylan was obtained by H3PW12O40 at 160 °C in 10 min. The degradation of furfural affected by single addition of [BMIM]Cl and solid acids was also investigated. The IL could be easily recycled and reused with stable solvent capacity for multiple runs (5×) after the product furfural was extracted with ethyl acetate.

  16. Solid acids as catalysts for the conversion of D-xylose, xylan and lignocellulosics into furfural in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luxin; Yu, Hongbing; Wang, Pan

    2013-05-01

    With the aim to develop an ecologically viable catalytic pathway for furfural production without the use of inorganic acids, H3PW12O40, Amberlyst-5 and NKC-9 (macroporous styrene-based sulfonic acid resin) were used as catalysts for producing furfural from xylose, xylan and lignocellulosic biomass in [BMIM]Cl under microwave irradiation at atmospheric pressure. A surprisingly high furfural yield of 93.7% from xylan was obtained by H3PW12O40 at 160 °C in 10 min. The degradation of furfural affected by single addition of [BMIM]Cl and solid acids was also investigated. The IL could be easily recycled and reused with stable solvent capacity for multiple runs (5×) after the product furfural was extracted with ethyl acetate. PMID:23567725

  17. The xylan utilization system of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris controls epiphytic life and reveals common features with oligotrophic bacteria and animal gut symbionts.

    PubMed

    Déjean, Guillaume; Blanvillain-Baufumé, Servane; Boulanger, Alice; Darrasse, Armelle; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Girard, Anne-Laure; Carrére, Sébastien; Jamet, Stevie; Zischek, Claudine; Lautier, Martine; Solé, Magali; Büttner, Daniela; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Arlat, Matthieu

    2013-05-01

    Xylan is a major structural component of plant cell wall and the second most abundant plant polysaccharide in nature. Here, by combining genomic and functional analyses, we provide a comprehensive picture of xylan utilization by Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc) and highlight its role in the adaptation of this epiphytic phytopathogen to the phyllosphere. The xylanolytic activity of Xcc depends on xylan-deconstruction enzymes but also on transporters, including two TonB-dependent outer membrane transporters (TBDTs) which belong to operons necessary for efficient growth in the presence of xylo-oligosaccharides and for optimal survival on plant leaves. Genes of this xylan utilization system are specifically induced by xylo-oligosaccharides and repressed by a LacI-family regulator named XylR. Part of the xylanolytic machinery of Xcc, including TBDT genes, displays a high degree of conservation with the xylose-regulon of the oligotrophic aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Moreover, it shares common features, including the presence of TBDTs, with the xylan utilization systems of Bacteroides ovatus and Prevotella bryantii, two gut symbionts. These similarities and our results support an important role for TBDTs and xylan utilization systems for bacterial adaptation in the phyllosphere, oligotrophic environments and animal guts.

  18. Modification of xylan in alkaline treated bleached hardwood kraft pulps as classified by attenuated total-internal-reflection (ATR) FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiwen; Hu, Thomas Q; Jang, Ho Fan; Grant, Edward

    2015-08-20

    The glucuronoxylan composition of a pulp affects the bonding between cellulosic fibres, and thus correlates with such network properties as tensile strength. Here, we demonstrate the promise of attenuated total-internal-reflection (ATR) FTIR spectroscopy as a rapid means for classifying the xylan contained in commercial bleached kraft pulps. This study draws upon samples composed of bleached eucalyptus kraft pulps and combinations of eucalyptus with other commercial bleached kraft pulps. We subject these pulp samples to systematic extraction by sodium hydroxide solutions with concentrations ranging from 0.5% to 6% to build a standard sample library with varying xylan content, quantified by acid hydrolysis, HPLC carbohydrate separation and titration. This pulp chemistry of mild alkaline extraction removes up to two-thirds of the xylan. In the NaOH concentration regime of 0.5-4%, the infrared spectral variance reflects the decrease in hemicellulose concentration as well as the cellulose crystallinity. A residual xylan component remains resistant to base solutions of higher concentrations. Principal component analysis of infrared spectra distinguishes this residual xylan as structurally variant. Both partial least squares multivariate analysis and univariate analysis confined to a feature at 964 cm(-1) in normalized second derivative IR spectra show a very good correlation with xylan content quantified by HPLC. PMID:25965501

  19. Long-Term Enrichment on Cellulose or Xylan Causes Functional and Taxonomic Convergence of Microbial Communities from Anaerobic Digesters

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yangyang; Wilkins, David; Lu, Hongyuan; Cai, Mingwei

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose and xylan are two major components of lignocellulosic biomass, which represents a potentially important energy source, as it is abundant and can be converted to methane by microbial action. However, it is recalcitrant to hydrolysis, and the establishment of a complete anaerobic digestion system requires a specific repertoire of microbial functions. In this study, we maintained 2-year enrichment cultures of anaerobic digestion sludge amended with cellulose or xylan to investigate whether a cellulose- or xylan-digesting microbial system could be assembled from sludge previously used to treat neither of them. While efficient methane-producing communities developed under mesophilic (35°C) incubation, they did not under thermophilic (55°C) conditions. Illumina amplicon sequencing results of the archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that the mature cultures were much lower in richness than the inocula and were dominated by single archaeal (genus Methanobacterium) and bacterial (order Clostridiales) groups, although at finer taxonomic levels the bacteria were differentiated by substrates. Methanogenesis was primarily via the hydrogenotrophic pathway under all conditions, although the identity and growth requirements of syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacteria were unclear. Incubation conditions (substrate and temperature) had a much greater effect than inoculum source in shaping the mature microbial community, although analysis based on unweighted UniFrac distance found that the inoculum still determined the pool from which microbes could be enriched. Overall, this study confirmed that anaerobic digestion sludge treating nonlignocellulosic material is a potential source of microbial cellulose- and xylan-digesting functions given appropriate enrichment conditions. PMID:26712547

  20. Esterases immobilized on aminosilane modified magnetic nanoparticles as a catalyst for biotransformation reactions.

    PubMed

    Alex, Deepthy; Mathew, Abraham; Sukumaran, Rajeev K

    2014-09-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by reacting ferrous and ferric salts in presence of aqueous ammonia. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were amino functionalized by treating with 3-aminopropyl triethoxy silane (APTES) and was coupled with glutaraldehyde. A novel solvent tolerant esterase from Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165 was immobilized on the MNPs through covalent bonding to the glutaraldehyde. The magnetite nanoparticles had a size range of 10-100 nm, confirmed by DLS. Lipases immobilized on MNPs were evaluated for biotransformation reactions including synthesis of ethyl acetate and transesterification of vegetable oil for producing biodiesel. The MNP immobilized esterase had prolonged shelf life and there was no loss in enzyme activity. PMID:24968816

  1. Esterases immobilized on aminosilane modified magnetic nanoparticles as a catalyst for biotransformation reactions.

    PubMed

    Alex, Deepthy; Mathew, Abraham; Sukumaran, Rajeev K

    2014-09-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by reacting ferrous and ferric salts in presence of aqueous ammonia. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were amino functionalized by treating with 3-aminopropyl triethoxy silane (APTES) and was coupled with glutaraldehyde. A novel solvent tolerant esterase from Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165 was immobilized on the MNPs through covalent bonding to the glutaraldehyde. The magnetite nanoparticles had a size range of 10-100 nm, confirmed by DLS. Lipases immobilized on MNPs were evaluated for biotransformation reactions including synthesis of ethyl acetate and transesterification of vegetable oil for producing biodiesel. The MNP immobilized esterase had prolonged shelf life and there was no loss in enzyme activity.

  2. [Erythropoietin-forming and esterase activity of rat kidney subcellular fractions during stimulation of erythropoiesis].

    PubMed

    Novikov, N M; Voronkov, S F; Voloshchenko, L G; Mikhaĭlova, S N

    1977-01-01

    Stimulation of erythropoiesis in rats (hemolytic-phenylhydrazine and acute posthemorrhagic anemia, effect of hypoxic hypoxia) was accompanied by an increased erythropoietine-formating activity in kidney microsomes and light mitochondria. The phenomenon correlated with an increased esterase activity in hypotonic supernatant of kidney homogenate mainly due to the enzymatic fraction, corresponding to alpha2-globulin by its mobility. Histochemical examination of kidney showed that the most distinct alterations in the esterase activity were observed in epithelial cells of nephron proximal part and in capillary endothelium.

  3. Direct transformation of xylan-type hemicelluloses to furfural via SnCl₄ catalysts in aqueous and biphasic systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenju; Ren, Junli; Li, Huiling; Deng, Aojie; Sun, Runcang

    2015-05-01

    Direct catalytic transformation of xylan-type hemicelluloses to furfural in the aqueous system and the biphasic system were comparatively investigated under mild conditions. Screening of several promising chlorides for conversion of beech xylan in the aqueous system revealed the Lewis acid SnCl4 was the most effective catalyst. Comparing to the single aqueous system, the bio-based 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF)/H2O biphasic system was more conducive to the synthesis of furfural, in which the highest furfural yield of 78.1% was achieved by using SnCl4 as catalysts under the optimized reaction conditions (150°C, 120 min). Additionally, the influences of xylan-type hemicelluloses with different chemical and structural features from beech, corncob and bagasse on the furfural production were studied. It was found that furfural yield to some extent was determined by the xylose content in hemicelluloses and also had relationships with the molecular weight of hemicelluloses and the degree of crystallization.

  4. Direct transformation of xylan-type hemicelluloses to furfural via SnCl₄ catalysts in aqueous and biphasic systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenju; Ren, Junli; Li, Huiling; Deng, Aojie; Sun, Runcang

    2015-05-01

    Direct catalytic transformation of xylan-type hemicelluloses to furfural in the aqueous system and the biphasic system were comparatively investigated under mild conditions. Screening of several promising chlorides for conversion of beech xylan in the aqueous system revealed the Lewis acid SnCl4 was the most effective catalyst. Comparing to the single aqueous system, the bio-based 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF)/H2O biphasic system was more conducive to the synthesis of furfural, in which the highest furfural yield of 78.1% was achieved by using SnCl4 as catalysts under the optimized reaction conditions (150°C, 120 min). Additionally, the influences of xylan-type hemicelluloses with different chemical and structural features from beech, corncob and bagasse on the furfural production were studied. It was found that furfural yield to some extent was determined by the xylose content in hemicelluloses and also had relationships with the molecular weight of hemicelluloses and the degree of crystallization. PMID:25742750

  5. Assembly of Xylanases into Designer Cellulosomes Promotes Efficient Hydrolysis of the Xylan Component of a Natural Recalcitrant Cellulosic Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Moraïs, Sarah; Barak, Yoav; Hadar, Yitzhak; Wilson, David B.; Shoham, Yuval; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT In nature, the complex composition and structure of the plant cell wall pose a barrier to enzymatic degradation. Nevertheless, some anaerobic bacteria have evolved for this purpose an intriguing, highly efficient multienzyme complex, the cellulosome, which contains numerous cellulases and hemicellulases. The rod-like cellulose component of the plant cell wall is embedded in a colloidal blend of hemicelluloses, a major component of which is xylan. In order to enhance enzymatic degradation of the xylan component of a natural complex substrate (wheat straw) and to study the synergistic action among different xylanases, we have employed a variation of the designer cellulosome approach by fabricating a tetravalent complex that includes the three endoxylanases of Thermobifida fusca (Xyn10A, Xyn10B, and Xyn11A) and an Xyl43A β-xylosidase from the same bacterium. Here, we describe the conversion of Xyn10A and Xyl43A to the cellulosomal mode. The incorporation of the Xyl43A enzyme together with the three endoxylanases into a common designer cellulosome served to enhance the level of reducing sugars produced during wheat straw degradation. The enhanced synergistic action of the four xylanases reflected their immediate juxtaposition in the complex, and these tetravalent xylanolytic designer cellulosomes succeeded in degrading significant (~25%) levels of the total xylan component of the wheat straw substrate. The results suggest that the incorporation of xylanases into cellulosome complexes is advantageous for efficient decomposition of recalcitrant cellulosic substrates—a distinction previously reserved for cellulose-degrading enzymes. PMID:22086489

  6. Facilitating the enzymatic saccharification of pulped bamboo residues by degrading the remained xylan and lignin-carbohydrates complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Caoxing; He, Juan; Li, Xin; Min, Douyong; Yong, Qiang

    2015-09-01

    Kraft pulping was performed on bamboo residues and its impact on the chemical compositions and the enzymatic digestibility of the samples were investigated. To improve the digestibility of sample by degrading the xylan and lignin-carbohydrates complexes (LCCs), xylanase and α-L-arabinofuranosidase (AF) were supplemented with cellulase. The results showed more carbohydrates were remained in the samples pulped with low effective alkali (EA) charge, compared to conventional kraft pulping. When 120 IU/g xylanase and 15 IU/g AF were supplemented with 20 FPU/g cellulase, the xylan degradation yield of the sample pulped with 12% EA charge increased from 68.20% to 88.35%, resulting in an increased enzymatic saccharification efficiency from 58.98% to 83.23%. The amount of LCCs in this sample decreased from 8.63/100C9 to 2.99/100C9 after saccharification with these enzymes. The results indicated that degrading the remained xylan and LCCs in the pulp could improve its enzymatic digestibility.

  7. Acetylation and characterization of banana (Musa paradisiaca) starch.

    PubMed

    Bello-Pérez, L A; Contreras-Ramos, S M; Jìmenez-Aparicio, A; Paredes-López, O

    2000-01-01

    Banana native starch was acetylated and some of its functional properties were evaluated and compared to corn starch. In general, acetylated banana starch presented higher values in ash, protein and fat than corn acetylated starch. The modified starches had minor tendency to retrogradation assessed as % transmittance of starch pastes. At high temperature acetylated starches presented a water retention capacity similar to their native counterpart. The acetylation considerably increased the solubility of starches, and a similar behavior was found for swelling power. When freeze-thaw stability was studied, acetyl banana starch drained approximately 60% of water in the first and second cycles, but in the third and fourth cycles the percentage of separated water was low. However, acetyl corn starch showed lower freeze-thaw stability than the untreated sample. The modification increased the viscosity of banana starch pastes.

  8. Dynamic Protein Acetylation in Plant–Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gaoyuan; Walley, Justin W.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen infection triggers complex molecular perturbations within host cells that results in either resistance or susceptibility. Protein acetylation is an emerging biochemical modification that appears to play central roles during host–pathogen interactions. To date, research in this area has focused on two main themes linking protein acetylation to plant immune signaling. Firstly, it has been established that proper gene expression during defense responses requires modulation of histone acetylation within target gene promoter regions. Second, some pathogens can deliver effector molecules that encode acetyltransferases directly within the host cell to modify acetylation of specific host proteins. Collectively these findings suggest that the acetylation level for a range of host proteins may be modulated to alter the outcome of pathogen infection. This review will focus on summarizing our current understanding of the roles of protein acetylation in plant defense and highlight the utility of proteomics approaches to uncover the complete repertoire of acetylation changes triggered by pathogen infection. PMID:27066055

  9. Fragrance material review on acetyl cedrene.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, J; Letizia, C S; Politano, V T; Api, A M

    2013-12-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of acetyl cedrene when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Acetyl cedrene is a member of the fragrance structural group Alkyl Cyclic Ketones. The generic formula for this group can be represented as (R1)(R2)CO. These fragrances can be described as being composed of an alkyl, R1, and various substituted and bicyclic saturated or unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons, R2, in which one of the rings may include up to 12 carbons. Alternatively, R2 may be a carbon bridge of C2-C4 carbon chain length between the ketone and cyclic hydrocarbon. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for acetyl cedrene were evaluated then summarized and includes physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, skin sensitization, elicitation, phototoxicity, photoallergy, toxicokinetics, repeated dose, reproductive toxicity, and genotoxicity data. A safety assessment of the entire Alkyl Cyclic Ketones will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2013) (Belsito, D., Bickers, D., Bruze, M., Calow, P., Dagli, M., Fryer, A.D., Greim, H., Miyachi, Y., Saurat, J.H., Sipes, I.G., 2013. A Toxicologic and Dermatologic Assessment of Alkyl Cyclic Ketones When Used as Fragrance Ingredients. Submitted with this manuscript.) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all Alkyl Cyclic Ketones in fragrances.

  10. Fragrance material review on acetyl carene.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, J; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2013-12-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of acetyl carene when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Acetyl carene is a member of the fragrance structural group Alkyl Cyclic Ketones. These fragrances can be described as being composed of an alkyl, R1, and various substituted and bicyclic saturated or unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons, R2, in which one of the rings may include up to 12 carbons. Alternatively, R2 may be a carbon bridge of C2-C4 carbon chain length between the ketone and cyclic hydrocarbon. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for acetyl carene were evaluated then summarized and includes physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, and skin sensitization data. A safety assessment of the entire Alkyl Cyclic Ketones will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (Belsito, D., Bickers, D., Bruze, M., Calow, P., Dagli, M., Fryer, A.D., Greim, H., Miyachi, Y., Saurat, J.H., Sipes, I.G., 2013A Toxicologic and dermatologic assessment of alkyl cyclic ketones when used as fragrance ingredients. (submitted for publication).) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all Alkyl Cyclic Ketones in fragrances.

  11. Cationic and anionic polyelectrolyte complexes of xylan and chitosan. Interaction with lignocellulosic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mocchiutti, Paulina; Schnell, Carla N; Rossi, Gerardo D; Peresin, María S; Zanuttini, Miguel A; Galván, María V

    2016-10-01

    Cationic (CatPECs) and anionic (AnPECs) polyelectrolyte complexes from xylan and chitosan were formed, characterized and adsorbed onto unbleached fibers for improving the papermaking properties. They were prepared at a level of 30% of neutralization charge ratio by modifying the order of addition of polyelectrolytes and the ionic strength (0.01N and 0.1N NaCl). The charge density, colloidal stability and particle size of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) was measured using polyelectrolyte titration method, Turbiscan and Zetasizer Nano equipments, respectively. All the complexes were stable even after seven days from PEC formation. DRIFT spectra of complexes were also analyzed. The adsorption behavior of them onto cellulose nanofibrils model surfaces was studied using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, and surface plasmon resonance. It was found that the PEC layers were viscoelastic and highly hydrated. Finally, it is shown that the adsorbed PECs onto cellulosic fibers markedly improved the tensile and crushing strengths of paper. PMID:27312617

  12. An arabino(glucurono)xylan isolated from immunomodulatory active hemicellulose fraction of Salvia officinalis L.

    PubMed

    Capek, P; Matulová, M

    2013-08-01

    From the aerial parts of sage (Salvia officinalis L.) an arabino-(4-O-methyl-glucurono)-xylan (AGX) was isolated by alkaline extraction followed by precipitation with barium hydroxide solution. Polymer was isolated from sage as a light brown polysaccharide material of molecular mass (Mp) 84,000. Compositional analyses of sage AGX revealed xylose (81%), arabinose (10%), glucuronic acid (8%) and small amounts of hexoses (1%). Linkage sugar analyses showed the (1→4)-linked xylopyranosyl backbone with low degree of substitution (9-10%) at O-2 and O-3. Arabinofuranose residues were found as the terminal, 1,3-, 1,5- and 1,3,5-linked. NMR structural analyses of acidic oligomers, generated by partial acidic hydrolysis of AGX, confirmed a substitution of xylose residues by glucuronic acid and its 4-O-methyl derivate at O-2 at an average on every fourteenth xylose residue. NMR and FT-IR measurements, as well as a high negative optical rotation confirmed the β configuration of glycosidic linkages in AGX backbone.

  13. A cluster of at least three esterase genes in Lucilia cuprina includes malathion carboxylesterase and two other esterases implicated in resistance to organophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, K.A. |; Russell, R.J.; Oakeshott, J.G.

    1994-12-01

    Three distinct malathion carboxylesterase (MCE) phenotypes have been identified among strains of Lucilia cuprina. The high-activity phenotype shows 1.6- and 3.3-fold more MCE specific activity than the intermediate- and low-activity phenotypes, respectively. Flies with high MCE activity are 1000-fold more resistant to malathion than flies with either low or intermediate MCE phenotypes, which are equally susceptible. High and low MCE specific activity are allelic and encoded by the Rmal gene on chromosome 4. Rmal is clustered within one map unit of two other esterase genes, Rop1 and E9, which are implicated in resistance to other organophosphate insecticides. Intermediate MCE specific activity is also inherited within the cluster, although its allelism to Rmal, Rop1, or E9 is unclear. The cluster does not contain the gene for the hemolymph esterase E4, which maps 6.1 map units from Rop1, on the other side of the bubbled wing marker. The cluster appears to be homologous to part of a tandem array of 11 esterase genes on chromosome 3R of Drosophila melanogaster. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Antibodies specific to acetylated histones document the existence of deposition- and transcription-related histone acetylation in Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    In this study, we have constructed synthetic peptides which are identical to hyperacetylated amino termini of two Tetrahymena core histones (tetra-acetylated H4 and penta-acetylated hv1) and used them to generate polyclonal antibodies specific for acetylated forms (mono-, di-, tri-, etc.) of these histones. Neither of these antisera recognizes histone that is unacetylated. Immunoblotting analyses demonstrate that both transcription-related and deposition-related acetate groups on H4 are recognized by both antisera. In addition, the antiserum raised against penta-acetylated hv1 also recognizes acetylated forms of this variant. Immunofluorescent analyses with both antisera demonstrate that, as expected, histone acetylation is specific to macronuclei (or new macronuclei) at all stages of the life cycle except when micronuclei undergo periods of rapid replication and chromatin assembly. During this time micronuclear staining is also detected. Our results also suggest that transcription-related acetylation begins selectively in new macronuclei immediately after the second postzygotic division. Acetylated histone is not observed in new micronuclei during stages corresponding to anlagen development and, therefore, histone acetylation can be distributed asymmetrically in development. Equally striking is the rapid turnover of acetylated histone in parental macronuclei during the time of their inactivation and elimination from the cell. Taken together, these data lend strong support to the idea that modulation of histone acetylation plays an important role in gene activation and in chromatin assembly. PMID:2654136

  15. [Studies on sialidase and esterase in influenza viruses].

    PubMed

    Cabezas, J A

    1991-01-01

    The main contributions of the author and collaborators about sialidase (EC 3.2.1.18) of influenza virus types A and B and O-acetylesterase (EC 3.1.1.53) of type C are summarized. After a short introduction on the topic, the negative results obtained by the author on inhibitors are commented. Then, the peculiarities of the three procedures assayed, based on the NADH determination as a measurement for the sialidase activity, are discussed. The spectrofluorimetric measurement of NADH concentration is a more sensitive and convenient procedure than that by spectrophotometry, although it is less sensitive than that based on bioluminiscence. Sialidase activity is generally higher in influenza virus type A than in type B; however, some differences have been found between the three sub-types A analysed. Furthermore, thermal stability and stability against changes in the pH values are higher for influenza virus from ducks, followed by those from humans and, finally, by those from pigs. O-acetylesterase of influenza virus type C shows a broad specificity; it acts on O-acetyl-containing compounds which may not be sialic acids. It seems that this enzyme might contribute to facilitate the action of sialidase of influenza virus types A and B. The peculiarities of influenza virus type C suggest to include this type as a new genus in the future classification of viruses.

  16. Esterase detoxification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors using human liver samples in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphate (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxification can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON1) are consider...

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an acetylxylan esterase from Bacillus pumilus.

    PubMed

    Benini, S; Degrassi, G; Krastanova, I; Lamba, D; Venturi, V

    2001-12-01

    The gene encoding for acetylxylan esterase from Bacillus pumilus has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein has been purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The crystals obtained are of regular shape of dimensions 0.05 x 0.05 x 0.05 mm with R32 symmetry and diffract to 2.0 A using synchrotron radiation.

  18. A thermoactive uropygial esterase from chicken: purification, characterisation and synthesis of flavour esters.

    PubMed

    Fendri, Ahmed; Louati, Hanen; Sellami, Mohamed; Gargouri, Héla; Smichi, Nabil; Zarai, Zied; Aissa, Imen; Miled, Nabil; Gargouri, Youssef

    2012-06-01

    A lipolytic activity was located in the chicken uropygial glands, from which a carboxylesterase (CUE) was purified. Pure CUE has an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa. The purified esterase displayed its maximal activity (200 U/mg) on short-chain triacylglycerols (tributyrin) at a temperature of 50°C. No significant lipolytic activity was found when medium chain (trioctanoin) or long chain (olive oil) triacylglycerols were used as substrates. The enzyme retained 75% of its maximal activity when incubated during 2h at 50°C. The NH(2)-terminal amino acid sequence showed similarities with the esterase purified recently from turkey pharyngeal tissue. Esterase activity remains stable after its incubation during 30 min in presence of organic solvents such as hexane or butanol. CUE is a serine enzyme since it was inactivated by phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride (PMSF), a serine-specific inhibitor. The purified enzyme, which tolerates the presence of some organic solvent and a high temperature, can be used in non-aqueous synthesis reactions. Hence, the uropygial esterase immobilised onto CaCO(3) was tested to produce the isoamyl and the butyl acetate (flavour esters). Reactions were performed at 50°C in presence of hexane. High synthesis yields of 91 and 67.8% were obtained for isoamyl and butyl acetate, respectively. PMID:22531158

  19. Tissue-specific inhibition and recovery of esterase activities in Lumbricus terrestris experimentally exposed to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Vejares, Sandra González; Sabat, Pablo; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C

    2010-04-01

    Exposure and effect assessment of organophosphate (OP) pesticides generally involves the use of cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition. In earthworm, this enzyme activity is often measured in homogenates from the whole organism. Here we examine the tissue-specific response of ChE and carboxylesterase (CE) activities in Lumbricus terrestris experimentally exposed to chlorpyrifos-spiked field soils. Esterases were measured in different gut segments and in the seminal vesicles of earthworms following acute exposure (2 d) to the OP and during 35d of a recovery period. We found that inhibition of both esterase activities was dependent on the tissue. Cholinesterase activity decreased in the pharynx, crop, foregut and seminal vesicles in a concentration-dependent way, whereas CE activity (4-nitrophenyl valerate) was strongly inhibited in these tissues. Gizzard CE activity was not inhibited by the OP, even an increase of enzyme activity was evident during the recovery period. These results suggest that both esterases should be determined jointly in selected tissues of earthworms. Moreover, the high levels of gut CE activity and its inhibition and recovery dynamic following OP exposure suggest that this esterase could play an important role as an enzymatic barrier against OP uptake from the ingested contaminated soil. PMID:20045489

  20. Phylogenetic classification of Aureobasidium pullulans strains for production of feruloyl esterase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to phylogenetically classify diverse strains of A. pullulans and determine their production of feruloyl esterase. Seventeen strains from the A. pullulans literature were phylogenetically classified. Phenotypic traits of color variation and endo-ß-1,4-xylanase overproduction were as...

  1. Evolution and homologous recombination of the hemagglutinin-esterase gene sequences from porcine torovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the present study was to gain new insights into the evolution, homologous recombination and selection pressures imposed on the porcine torovirus (PToV), by examining changes in the hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) gene. The most recent common ancestor of PToV was estimated to have emerge...

  2. Engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce feruloyl esterase for the release of ferulic acid from switchgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Aspergillus niger ferulic acid esterase gene (faeA) was cloned into Saccharomyces cerevisiae via a yeast expression vector, resulting in efficient expression and secretion of the enzyme in the medium. The recombinant enzyme was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange and hydrophobic interactio...

  3. Usefulness of Leukocyte Esterase Test Versus Rapid Strep Test for Diagnosis of Acute Strep Pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A study to compare the usage of throat swab testing for leukocyte esterase on a test strip(urine dip stick-multi stick) to rapid strep test for rapid diagnosis of Group A Beta hemolytic streptococci in cases of acute pharyngitis in children. Hypothesis: The testing of throat swab for leukocyte esterase on test strip currently used for urine testing may be used to detect throat infection and might be as useful as rapid strep. Methods: All patients who come with a complaint of sore throat and fever were examined clinically for erythema of pharynx, tonsils and also for any exudates. Informed consent was obtained from the parents and assent from the subjects. 3 swabs were taken from pharyngo-tonsillar region, testing for culture, rapid strep & Leukocyte Esterase. Results: Total number is 100. Cultures 9(+); for rapid strep== 84(-) and16 (+); For LE== 80(-) and 20(+) Statistics: From data configuration Rapid Strep versus LE test don’t seem to be a random (independent) assignment but extremely aligned. The Statistical results show rapid and LE show very agreeable results. Calculated Value of Chi Squared Exceeds Tabulated under 1 Degree Of Freedom (P<.0.0001) reject Null Hypothesis and Conclude Alternative Conclusions: Leukocyte esterase on throat swab is as useful as rapid strep test for rapid diagnosis of strep pharyngitis on test strip currently used for urine dip stick causing acute pharyngitis in children. PMID:27335975

  4. Cholesterol esterase inhibitory activity of bioactives from leaves of Mangifera indica L

    PubMed Central

    Gururaja, G. M.; Mundkinajeddu, Deepak; Dethe, Shekhar M.; Sangli, Gopala K.; Abhilash, K.; Agarwal, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the earlier studies, methanolic extract of Mangifera indica L leaf was exhibited hypocholesterol activity. However, the bioactive compounds responsible for the same are not reported so far. Objective: To isolate the bioactive compounds with hypocholesterol activity from the leaf extract using cholesterol esterase inhibition assay which can be used for the standardization of extract. Materials and Methods: The leaf methanolic extract of M. indica (Sindoora variety) was partitioned with ethyl acetate and chromatographed on silica gel to yield twelve fractions and the activity was monitored by using cholesterol esterase inhibition assay. Active fractions were re-chromatographed to yield individual compounds. Results and Discussion: A major compound mangiferin present in the extract was screened along with other varieties of mango leaves for cholesterol esterase inhibition assay. However, the result indicates that compounds other than mangiferin may be active in the extract. Invitro pancreatic cholesterol esterase inhibition assay was used for bioactivity guided fractionation (BAGF) to yield bioactive compound for standardization of extract. Bioactivity guided fractionation afford the active fraction containing 3b-taraxerol with an IC50 value of 0.86μg/ml. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that M. indica methanol extract of leaf have significant hypocholesterol activity which is standardized with 3b-taraxerol, a standardized extract for hypocholesterol activity resulted in development of dietary supplement from leaves of Mangifera indica. PMID:26692750

  5. Electrochemical biosensor for carbofuran pesticide based on esterases from Eupenicillium shearii FREI-39 endophytic fungus.

    PubMed

    Grawe, Gregory Ferreira; de Oliveira, Tássia Regina; de Andrade Narciso, Esther; Moccelini, Sally Katiuce; Terezo, Ailton José; Soares, Marcos Antonio; Castilho, Marilza

    2015-01-15

    In this work, a biosensor was constructed by physical adsorption of the isolated endophytic fungus Eupenicillium shearii FREI-39 esterase on halloysite, using graphite powder, multi-walled carbon nanotubes and mineral oil for the determination of carbofuran pesticide by inhibition of the esterase using square-wave voltammetry (SWV). Specific esterase activities were determined each 2 days over a period of 15 days of growth in four different inoculation media. The highest specific activity was found on 6th day, with 33.08 U on PDA broth. The best performance of the proposed biosensor was obtained using 0.5 U esterase activity. The carbofuran concentration response was linear in the range from 5.0 to 100.0 µg L(-1) (r=0.9986) with detection and quantification limits of 1.69 µg L(-1) and 5.13 µg L(-1), respectively. A recovery study of carbofuran in spiked water samples showed values ranging from 103.8±6.7% to 106.7±9.7%. The biosensor showed good repeatability and reproducibility and remained stable for a period of 20 weeks. The determination of carbofuran in spiked water samples using the proposed biosensor was satisfactory when compared to the chromatographic reference method. The results showed no significant difference at the 95% confidence level with t-test statistics. The application of enzymes from endophytic fungi in constructing biosensors broadens the biotechnological importance of these microorganisms.

  6. Chaperone-like activities of {alpha}-synuclein: {alpha}-Synuclein assists enzyme activities of esterases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Misun; Kim, SeungBum; Kang, Mira; Ryu, Yeonwoo . E-mail: ywryu@ajou.ac.kr; Doohun Kim, T. . E-mail: doohunkim@ajou.ac.kr

    2006-08-11

    {alpha}-Synuclein, a major constituent of Lewy bodies (LBs), has been implicated to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), although the physiological function of {alpha}-synuclein has not yet been known. Here we have shown that {alpha}-synuclein, which has no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure, can protect the enzyme activity of microbial esterases against stress conditions such as heat, pH, and organic solvents. In particular, the flexibility of {alpha}-synuclein and its C-terminal region seems to be important for complex formation, but the structural integrity of the C-terminal region may not be required for stabilization of enzyme activity. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in vivo enzyme assays showed highly specific interactions of esterases with {alpha}-synuclein. Our results indicate that {alpha}-synuclein not only protects the enzyme activity of microbial esterases in vitro, but also can stabilize the active conformation of microbial esterases in vivo.

  7. Absence of "A"-esterase activity in the serum of a patient with Tangier disease.

    PubMed

    Mackness, M I; Peuchant, E; Dumon, M F; Walker, C H; Clerc, M

    1989-12-01

    The levels of apolipoprotein A-I, A-II and B in subjects who are homozygous or heterozygous for Tangier disease are reported and compared with the amount of "A"-esterase in the serum. The "A"-esterases hydrolyse toxic organophosphate pesticides and are currently classified by the nomenclature committee of the International Union of Biochemistry as arylesterases (EC 3.1.1.2) although recent evidence has cast doubt on this classification. The apolipoprotein data are consistent with previous data reported for a number of Tangier patients. The homozygote has a marked reduction in apo A-I and A-II levels and a 30% reduction in apo B. The heterozygotes have about a 50% reduction of apo A-I, a slight reduction in apo A-II and no change in apo B. These apolipoprotein values correspond to a marked reduction in HDL cholesterol for the homozygote and substantial reductions in the heterozygotes. The "A"-esterase activity is zero in one homozygote while heterozygotes have about 5% of the levels in control subjects. Arylesterase activity appears to be essentially normal. The data thus support previous observations that the HDL "A"-esterase activity is greatly reduced in those conditions where HDL apo A-I is markedly reduced, e.g., in "Fish-eye" Disease.

  8. O-Acetylation of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Gille, Sascha; Pauly, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Plant cell walls are composed of structurally diverse polymers, many of which are O-acetylated. How plants O-acetylate wall polymers and what its function is remained elusive until recently, when two protein families were identified in the model plant Arabidopsis that are involved in the O-acetylation of wall polysaccharides – the reduced wall acetylation (RWA) and the trichome birefringence-like (TBL) proteins. This review discusses the role of these two protein families in polysaccharide O-acetylation and outlines the differences and similarities of polymer acetylation mechanisms in plants, fungi, bacteria, and mammals. Members of the TBL protein family had been shown to impact pathogen resistance, freezing tolerance, and cellulose biosynthesis. The connection of TBLs to polysaccharide O-acetylation thus gives crucial leads into the biological function of wall polymer O-acetylation. From a biotechnological point understanding the O-acetylation mechanism is important as acetyl-substituents inhibit the enzymatic degradation of wall polymers and released acetate can be a potent inhibitor in microbial fermentations, thus impacting the economic viability of, e.g., lignocellulosic based biofuel production. PMID:22639638

  9. Cloning, sequencing, and regulation of expression of an extracellular esterase gene from the plant pathogen Streptomyces scabies.

    PubMed Central

    Raymer, G; Willard, J M; Schottel, J L

    1990-01-01

    The gene that encodes the extracellular esterase produced by Streptomyces scabies has been cloned and sequenced. The gene was identified by hybridization to a synthetic oligonucleotide that corresponds to the amino-terminal amino acid sequence determined for the secreted form of the esterase. Nucleotide sequence analysis predicted a 345-amino-acid open reading frame, a putative ribosome-binding site, and 39 amino acids at the amino terminus of the sequence that is not found in the secreted protein. This 39-amino-acid sequence has many of the characteristics common to known signal peptides. End mapping the esterase transcript revealed a single 5' end of the mRNA located 51 nucleotides upstream from the start point for translation. Northern (RNA) hybridization analysis of the esterase message by using the cloned esterase gene as a probe indicated that the esterase mRNA is about 1,440 nucleotides in length and was detected only when the cells were grown in the presence of zinc. These results suggest that the level of esterase mRNA detected in the cells is regulated by zinc. Images PMID:2254271

  10. Gel-electrophoretic identification of hen brain neurotoxic esterase, labelled with tritiated di-isopropyl phosphorofluoridate.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D G; Johnson, M K

    1981-01-01

    The particulate fraction from hen brain was labelled with [3H]di-isopropyl phosphorofluoridate (DiPF) and separated by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Four radioactive protein bands (1--4) of molecular weights 155000, 92000, 60000, and 30000 were resolved. Most of the labelling of bands 2, 3 and 4 was inhibited by preincubation with Paraoxon. The residue in band 4 was sensitive to pH 5.2. Successive treatments with Paraoxon and pH 5.2 resulted in the abolition of bands 3 and 4. Bands 1 and 2 contained one and two polypeptides respectively, whose labelling was sensitive to Mipafox, but one, in band 2, was sensitive to higher concentrations of Paraoxon. The concentrations of the other two polypeptides were 6.7 and 1.95 pmol of DiPF bound/g of brain in bands 1 and 2 respectively. Both were as sensitive to Mipafox as neurotoxic esterase and were also sensitive to phenyl benzylcarbamate. 4-Nitrophenyl di-n-pentylphosphinate given in vivo inhibited neurotoxic esterase and the labelling of the band-1 polypeptide by 82% and 84% respectively, but inhibited the labelling of the band 2 polypeptide by 51%. The phosphinate in vitro produced 98% inhibition of the labelling of the band-1 polypeptide, with only 26% inhibition of the band-2 polypeptide, under conditions sufficient to inhibit neurotoxic esterase totally. Both neurotoxic esterase and the band-1 polypeptide were found in the forebrain at 1.74-fold their concentration in the rest of the brain, whereas the band-2 polypeptide was uniformly distributed. The evidence indicates that the Mipafox-sensitive polypeptide in band 1 is the [3H]DiPF-labelled active-site subunit of neurotoxic esterase. The catalytic-centre activity of the enzyme for phenyl valerate hydrolysis was found to be 2.6 x 10(5) min-1. PMID:7340807

  11. Association of esterases with insecticide resistance in Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jennifer R; Ottea, James

    2012-06-01

    The southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus Say, is a competent vector of human disease and an important target of mosquito abatement programs. However, these management programs have been compromised by development of insecticide resistance. In the current study, susceptibilities to naled and resmethrin, two adulticides used in mosquito abatement, were monitored using a topical and contact bioassay, respectively, in five field- collected populations of C. quinquefasciatus (MARC, HOOD1, HOOD2, MINLOVE, and THIB). Frequencies of resistance, measured as survival after treatment with discriminating concentrations (i.e., sufficient to kill > 90% of a reference susceptible strain) were high (88.0-96.8%) in all field collections treated with naled, but were variable (3.3-94.2%) with resmethrin. In addition, esterase activities in mosquitoes from these collections were quantified using alpha-naphthyl acetate and ranged from 1.08 to 3.39 micromol alpha-naphthol produced min(-1) mg prot(-1). Heightened activities were associated with decreased insecticide susceptibility in HOOD1, THIB, and MINLOVE but not HOOD2. Esterases were visualized using native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and intra- and interstrain differences in banding patterns were detected. In addition, esterases from MINLOVE mosquitoes were more numerous and intensely staining when compared with those from a laboratory-susceptible strain. Finally, naled synergized the toxicity of resmethrin in populations with decreased insecticide susceptibility and increased esterase activity by 2.5-(MINLOVE) to three-fold (THIB). Results from this study will allow management strategies for populations of C. quinquefasciatus to be optimized, and provide a foundation for further studies exploring use of esterase inhibitors as synergists of pyrethroid toxicity. PMID:22812138

  12. Preparation, physicochemical characterization and application of acetylated lotus rhizome starches.

    PubMed

    Sun, Suling; Zhang, Ganwei; Ma, Chaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Acetylated lotus rhizome starches were prepared, physicochemically characterized and used as food additives in puddings. The percentage content of the acetyl groups and degree of substitution increased linearly with the amount of acetic anhydride used. The introduction of acetyl groups was confirmed via Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The values of the pasting parameters were lower for acetylated starch than for native starch. Acetylation was found to increase the light transmittance (%), the freeze-thaw stability, the swelling power and the solubility of the starch. Sensorial scores for puddings prepared using native and acetylated lotus rhizome starches as food additives indicated that puddings produced from the modified starches with superior properties over those prepared from native starch. PMID:26453845

  13. 2-Acetyl­pyridinium bromanilate

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Lynne H.; Boyle, Bryan; Clive, Lesley A.; Collins, Anna; Currie, Lynsey D.; Gogol, Malgorzata; Hastings, Claire; Jones, Andrew O. F.; Kennedy, Jennifer L.; Kerr, Graham B.; Kidd, Alastair; Lawton, Lorreta M.; Macintyre, Susan J.; MacLean, Niall M.; Martin, Alan R. G.; McGonagle, Kate; Melrose, Samantha; Rew, Gaius A.; Robinson, Colin W.; Schmidtmann, Marc; Turnbull, Felicity B.; Williams, Lewis G.; Wiseman, Alan Y.; Wocial, Malgorzata H.; Wilson, Chick C.

    2009-01-01

    In the crystal of the title mol­ecular salt (systematic name: 2-acetyl­pyridinium 2,5-dibromo-4-hydr­oxy-3,6-dioxocyclo­hexa-1,4-dienolate), C7H8NO+·C6HBr2O4 −, centrosymmetric rings consisting of two cations and two anions are formed, with the components linked by alternating O—H⋯O and N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Short O⋯Br contacts [3.243 (2) and 3.359 (2) Å] may help to consolidate the packing. PMID:21583087

  14. Survey of the human acetylator polymorphism in spontaneous disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D A

    1984-01-01

    There is ample evidence that the human acetylator phenotypes are associated with drug induced phenomena. It is principally the slow acetylators who exhibit toxic adverse effects because of their relative inability to detoxify the original drug compounds. In rare instances, however, it is the rapid acetylators who are at a disadvantage. In the matter of association of spontaneous disease with either acetylator phenotype, there are two groups of disorders to consider. First, disorders in which carcinogenic amines are known to be an aetiological factor. This is because these amines are substrates for the polymorphic N-acetyltransferase activity and hence there is a possible rational basis for searching for an association. Secondly, other disorders where searches for associations are based more on hunches. In the first group there is a definite statistical association between cancer of the bladder and the slow acetylator phenotype. In prevalence studies the slow phenotype is 39% more associated with bladder cancer than is the rapid phenotype. On the basis of the evidence now available it is not possible to say whether this association is because slow acetylators develop the disease more frequently or whether they survive longer. In the second group the relevant studies show (1) a greatly increased prevalence of slow acetylators in Gilbert's disease; (2) a confirmed association between the rapid acetylator phenotype and diabetes; (3) a possible association between the rapid acetylator phenotype and breast cancer; (4) a possible association between the slow acetylator phenotype and leprosy in Chinese patients; (5) an earlier age of onset of thyrotoxicosis (Graves' disease) in slow acetylators than in rapid acetylators; (6) no evidence of an association between either phenotype and spontaneous systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:6387123

  15. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of acetylated EGCG and antioxidant properties of the acetylated derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) acetylated derivatives were prepared by lipase catalyzed acylation of EGCG with vinyl acetate to improve its lipophilicity and expand its application in lipophilic media. The immobilized lipase, Lipozyme RM IM, was found to be the optimum catalyst. The optimiz...

  16. Determination of Acetylation of the Gli Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Coni, Sonia; Di Magno, Laura; Canettieri, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The Gli transcription factors (Gli1, Gli2, and Gli3) are the final effectors of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling and play a key role in development and cancer. The activity of the Gli proteins is finely regulated by covalent modifications, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and acetylation. Both Gli1 and Gli2 are acetylated at a conserved lysine, and this modification causes the inhibition of their transcriptional activity. Thus, the acetylation status of these proteins represents a useful marker to monitor Hh activation in pathophysiological conditions. Herein we describe the techniques utilized to detect in vitro and intracellular acetylation of the Gli transcription factors. PMID:26179046

  17. Xylan synthesized by Irregular Xylem 14 (IRX14) maintains the structure of seed coat mucilage in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ruibo; Li, Junling; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Xun; Yang, Xuanwen; Tang, Qi; He, Guo; Zhou, Gongke; Kong, Yingzhen

    2016-01-01

    During differentiation, the Arabidopsis seed coat epidermal cells synthesize and secrete large quantities of pectinaceous mucilage into the apoplast, which is then released to encapsulate the seed upon imbibition. In this study, we showed that mutation in Irregular Xylem 14 (IRX14) led to a mucilage cohesiveness defect due to a reduced xylan content. Expression of IRX14 was detected specifically in the seed coat epidermal cells, reaching peak expression at 13 days post-anthesis (DPA) when the accumulation of mucilage polysaccharides has ceased. Sectioning of the irx14-1 seed coat revealed no visible structural change in mucilage secretory cell morphology. Although the total amount of mucilage was comparable with the wild type (WT), the partition between water-soluble and adherent layers was significantly altered in irx14-1, with redistribution from the adherent layer to the water-soluble layer. The monosaccharide composition analysis revealed that xylose content was significantly reduced in irx14-1 water-soluble and adherent mucilage compared with the WT. The macromolecular characteristics of the water-soluble mucilage were modified in irx14-1 with a loss of the larger polymeric components. In accordance, glycome profiling and dot immunoblotting of seed mucilage using antibodies specific for rhamnogalacturonan I (RG I) and xylan confirmed the ultra-structural alterations in the irx14-1 mucilage. Meanwhile, the crystalline cellulose content was reduced in the irx14-1 mucilage. These results demonstrated that IRX14 was required for the biosynthesis of seed mucilage xylan, which plays an essential role in maintaining mucilage architecture potentially through altering the crystallization and organization of cellulose. PMID:26834178

  18. Improved enantioselectivity of thermostable esterase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus toward (S)-ketoprofen ethyl ester by directed evolution and characterization of mutant esterases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinyeong; Kim, Seungbum; Yoon, Sangyoung; Hong, Eunsoo; Ryu, Yeonwoo

    2015-08-01

    Thermostable esterases have potential applications in various biotechnology industries because of their resistance to high temperature and organic solvents. In a previous study, we isolated an esterase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus DSM 4304 (Est-AF), which showed high thermostability but low enantioselectivity toward (S)-ketoprofen ethyl ester. (R)-ketoprofenor (S)-ketoprofenis produced by esterase hydrolysis of the ester bond of (R,S)-ketoprofen ethyl ester and (S)-ketoprofen has better pharmaceutical activity and lower side effects than (R)-ketoprofen. Therefore, we have generated mutants of Est-AF that retained high thermostability whilst improving enantioselectivity. A library of Est-AF mutants was created by error-prone polymerase chain reaction, and mutants with improved enantioselectivity were isolated by site-saturation mutagenesis. The regions of Est-AF containing amino acid mutations were analyzed by homology modeling of its three-dimensional structure, and structure-based explanations for the changes in enantioselectivity are proposed. Finally, we isolated two mutants showing improved enantioselectivity over Est-AF (ee% = -16.2 ± 0.2 and E = 0.7 ± 0.0): V138G (ee% = 35.9 ± 1.0 and E = 3.0 ± 0.1) and V138G/L200R (ee% = 89.2 ± 0.2 and E = 19.5 ± 0.5). We also investigated various characteristics of these mutants and found that the mutants showed similar thermostability and resistance to additives or organic solvents to Est-AF, without a significant trade-off between activity and stability.

  19. N-acetylaspartate catabolism determines cytosolic acetyl-CoA levels and histone acetylation in brown adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Prokesch, A.; Pelzmann, H. J.; Pessentheiner, A. R.; Huber, K.; Madreiter-Sokolowski, C. T.; Drougard, A.; Schittmayer, M.; Kolb, D.; Magnes, C.; Trausinger, G.; Graier, W. F.; Birner-Gruenberger, R.; Pospisilik, J. A.; Bogner-Strauss, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation depends on the abundance of nucleo-cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA. Here, we present a novel route for cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA production in brown adipocytes. N-acetylaspartate (NAA) is a highly abundant brain metabolite catabolized by aspartoacylase yielding aspartate and acetate. The latter can be further used for acetyl-CoA production. Prior to this work, the presence of NAA has not been described in adipocytes. Here, we show that accumulation of NAA decreases the brown adipocyte phenotype. We increased intracellular NAA concentrations in brown adipocytes via media supplementation or knock-down of aspartoacylase and measured reduced lipolysis, thermogenic gene expression, and oxygen consumption. Combinations of approaches to increase intracellular NAA levels showed additive effects on lipolysis and gene repression, nearly abolishing the expression of Ucp1, Cidea, Prdm16, and Ppara. Transcriptome analyses of aspartoacylase knock-down cells indicate deficiencies in acetyl-CoA and lipid metabolism. Concordantly, cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA levels and global histone H3 acetylation were decreased. Further, activating histone marks (H3K27ac and H3K9ac) in promoters/enhancers of brown marker genes showed reduced acetylation status. Taken together, we present a novel route for cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA production in brown adipocytes. Thereby, we mechanistically connect the NAA pathway to the epigenomic regulation of gene expression, modulating the phenotype of brown adipocytes. PMID:27045997

  20. Lysine Acetylation Activates Mitochondrial Aconitase in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Jolyn; Weddle, Alexis; Kinter, Caroline S.; Humphries, Kenneth M.; Mather, Timothy; Szweda, Luke I.; Kinter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    High throughput proteomics studies have identified several thousand acetylation sites on over one thousand proteins. Mitochondrial aconitase, the Krebs cycle enzyme that converts citrate to isocitrate, has been identified in many of these reports. Acetylated mitochondrial aconitase has also been identified as a target for sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) catalyzed deacetylation. However, the functional significance of mitochondrial aconitase acetylation has not been determined. Using in vitro strategies, mass spectrometric analyses, and an in vivo mouse model of obesity, we found a significant acetylation-dependent activation of aconitase. Isolated heart mitochondria subjected to in vitro chemical acetylation with either acetic anhydride or acetyl-CoA resulted in increased aconitase activity that was reversed with SIRT3 treatment. Quantitative mass spectrometry was used to measure acetylation at 21 lysine residues and found significant increases with both in vitro treatments. A high fat diet (60% kcal from fat) was used as an in vivo model and also showed significantly increased mitochondrial aconitase activity without changes in protein level. The high fat diet also produced increased aconitase acetylation at multiple sites as measured by the quantitative mass spectrometry assays. Treatment of isolated mitochondria from these mice with SIRT3 abolished the high fat diet-induced activation of aconitase and reduced acetylation. Finally, kinetic analyses found that the increase in activity was a result of increased maximal velocity and molecular modeling suggests the potential for acetylation at K144 to perturb the tertiary structure of the enzyme. The results of this study reveal a novel activation of mitochondrial aconitase by acetylation. PMID:26061789

  1. An esterase on the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for the hydrolysis of long chain acyl esters.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, I; Shiga, S; Kageyama, M

    1979-09-01

    A new esterase activity which hydrolyzes palmitoyl-CoA was found in the membrane fraction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All the 11 strains of P. aeruginosa tested possessed this esterase activity. The esterase was constitutive and was fully active on the intact cell bodies toward substrates in the medium. It was located on the outer membrane of the cell envelope, and was not released into the culture medium. This activity was designated as OM (outer membrane) esterase. OM esterase was solubilized from the cell envelope with EDTA-Triton X-100 and purified 690-fold. It was a minor component of the outer membrane. Its molecular weight was approximately 55,000. The activity was rather stable to heat, a wide range of pH, and treatment with detergents and organic solvents. No cofactors were required. The pH optimum of the reaction was 8.5. Among various acyl-CoAs, only long chain (C12--C18) thioesters were hydrolyzed. OM esterase also hydrolyzed some kinds of oxy-esters such as p-nitrophenyl acyl esters, monoacyl esters of sucrose and Tween 80 (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate). On the other hand, triglycerides, phospholipids, or hydrophobic monoesters were not hydrolyzed at all. Thus, this enzyme seems to have specificity for long chain acyl esters with hydrophilic groups, whether thio- or oxy-ester. Mutants deficient in this esterase activity were isolated. These mutants were unable to grow on Tween 80 as a sole carbon source. This suggests a possible role of OM esterase in the utilization of acyl esters as carbon sources.

  2. Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize xylan as a sole carbohydrate source by co-expression of an endoxylanase, xylosidase and a bacterial xylose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Mert, Marlin John; la Grange, Daniël Coenrad; Rose, Shaunita Hellouise; van Zyl, Willem Heber

    2016-04-01

    Xylan represents a major component of lignocellulosic biomass, and its utilization by Saccharomyces cerevisiae is crucial for the cost effective production of ethanol from plant biomass. A recombinant xylan-degrading and xylose-assimilating Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain was engineered by co-expression of the xylanase (xyn2) of Trichoderma reesei, the xylosidase (xlnD) of Aspergillus niger, the Scheffersomyces stipitis xylulose kinase (xyl3) together with the codon-optimized xylose isomerase (xylA) from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. Under aerobic conditions, the recombinant strain displayed a complete respiratory mode, resulting in higher yeast biomass production and consequently higher enzyme production during growth on xylose as carbohydrate source. Under oxygen limitation, the strain produced ethanol from xylose at a maximum theoretical yield of ~90 %. This study is one of only a few that demonstrates the construction of a S. cerevisiae strain capable of growth on xylan as sole carbohydrate source by means of recombinant enzymes. PMID:26749525

  3. Arabinose substitution degree in xylan positively affects lignocellulose enzymatic digestibility after various NaOH/H2SO4 pretreatments in Miscanthus.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengcheng; Ren, Shuangfeng; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Zhengdan; Xie, Guosheng; Chen, Yan; Tu, Yuanyuan; Li, Qing; Zhou, Shiguang; Li, Yu; Tu, Fen; Liu, Lin; Wang, Yanting; Jiang, Jianxiong; Qin, Jingping; Li, Shizhong; Li, Qiwei; Jing, Hai-Chun; Zhou, Fasong; Gutterson, Neal; Peng, Liangcai

    2013-02-01

    Xylans are the major hemicelluloses in grasses, but their effects on biomass saccharification remain unclear. In this study, we examined the 79 representative Miscanthus accessions that displayed a diverse cell wall composition and varied biomass digestibility. Correlation analysis showed that hemicelluloses level has a strong positive effect on lignocellulose enzymatic digestion after NaOH or H(2)SO(4) pretreatment. Characterization of the monosaccharide compositions in the KOH-extractable and non-KOH-extractable hemicelluloses indicated that arabinose substitution degree of xylan is the key factor that positively affects biomass saccharification. The xylose/arabinose ratio after individual enzyme digestion revealed that the arabinose in xylan is partially associated with cellulose in the amorphous regions, which negatively affects cellulose crystallinity for high biomass digestibility. The results provide insights into the mechanism of lignocellulose enzymatic digestion upon pretreatment, and also suggest a goal for the genetic modification of hemicelluloses towards the bioenergy crop breeding of Miscanthus and grasses.

  4. The role of calcium in the hydrolysis of the organophosphate paraoxon by human serum A-esterase.

    PubMed

    Vitarius, J A; Sultatos, L G

    1995-01-01

    Human serum A-esterase is a calcium-dependent enzyme that hydrolyzes the organophosphate paraoxon by an Ordered Uni Bi kinetic mechanism. Incubation of various concentrations of calcium chloride with human serum A-esterase resulted in corresponding changes in appk3 and appE for the reaction, while appk2 was unaffected. Carboxyglutamic acid (CAG) prevented calcium chloride from altering appk3, but not appE. Similarly CAG reduced the calcium-stimulated nonenzymatic hydrolysis of paraoxon, as well as the calcium-stimulated de-phosphorylation of chymotrypsin phosphorylated by paraoxon. These results suggest that calcium plays two roles in the hydrolysis of paraoxon by A-esterase. Firstly, calcium is required in order to maintain an active site. In this capacity calcium might participate directly in the catalytic reaction, or it might be required in order to maintain the appropriate confirmation of the active site. And secondly, free calcium (or calcium weakly associated with A-esterase) facilitates the removal of diethyl phosphate from A-esterase, probably by polarizing the P = O bond of the diethyl phosphate-A-esterase intermediate, thereby rendering phosphorus more susceptible to nucleophilic attack by hydroxide ions. PMID:7823759

  5. The ferulic acid esterases of Chrysosporium lucknowense C1: purification, characterization and their potential application in biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Kühnel, S; Pouvreau, L; Appeldoorn, M M; Hinz, S W A; Schols, H A; Gruppen, H

    2012-01-01

    Three ferulic acid esterases from the filamentous fungus Chrysosporium lucknowense C1 were purified and characterized. The enzymes were most active at neutral pH and temperatures up to 45 °C. All enzymes released ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid from a soluble corn fibre fraction. Ferulic acid esterases FaeA1 and FaeA2 could also release complex dehydrodiferulic acids and dehydrotriferulic acids from corn fibre oligomers, but released only 20% of all ferulic acid present in sugar beet pectin oligomers. Ferulic acid esterase FaeB2 released almost no complex ferulic acid oligomers from corn fibre oligomers, but 60% of all ferulic acid from sugar beet pectin oligomers. The ferulic acid esterases were classified based on both, sequence similarity and their activities toward synthetic substrates. The type A ferulic acid esterases FaeA1 and FaeA2 are the first members of the phylogenetic subfamily 5 to be biochemically characterized. Type B ferulic acid esterase FaeB2 is a member of subfamily 6.

  6. Gene Cloning and Nucleotide Sequencing and Properties of a Cocaine Esterase from Rhodococcus sp. Strain MB1

    PubMed Central

    Bresler, Matthew M.; Rosser, Susan J.; Basran, Amrik; Bruce, Neil C.

    2000-01-01

    A strain of Rhodococcus designated MB1, which was capable of utilizing cocaine as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen for growth, was isolated from rhizosphere soil of the tropane alkaloid-producing plant Erythroxylum coca. A cocaine esterase was found to initiate degradation of cocaine, which was hydrolyzed to ecgonine methyl ester and benzoate; both of these esterolytic products were further metabolized by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB1. The structural gene encoding a cocaine esterase, designated cocE, was cloned from Rhodococcus sp. strain MB1 genomic libraries by screening recombinant strains of Rhodococcus erythropolis CW25 for growth on cocaine. The nucleotide sequence of cocE corresponded to an open reading frame of 1,724 bp that codes for a protein of 574 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of cocaine esterase has a region of similarity with the active serine consensus of X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidases, suggesting that the cocaine esterase is a serine esterase. The cocE coding sequence was subcloned into the pCFX1 expression plasmid and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant cocaine esterase was purified to apparent homogeneity and was found to be monomeric, with an Mr of approximately 65,000. The apparent Km of the enzyme (mean ± standard deviation) for cocaine was measured as 1.33 ± 0.085 mM. These findings are of potential use in the development of a linked assay for the detection of illicit cocaine. PMID:10698749

  7. Density functional theory investigations on the structure and dissolution mechanisms for cellobiose and xylan in an ionic liquid: gas phase and cluster calculations.

    PubMed

    Payal, Rajdeep Singh; Bharath, R; Periyasamy, Ganga; Balasubramanian, S

    2012-01-19

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out for cellobiose and xylan chosen as models for cellulose and hemicellulose, respectively, in gas phase, implicit and explicit solvent (water, methanol, and the ionic liquid, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium acetate) media using plane wave and atom centered basis set approaches in order to find out lowest energy conformers and configurations. Geometry, vibrational properties, and (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift values have been discussed under all three conditions. Calculations predict that inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding play an important role in the dissolution processes. In the gas phase and in implicit solvent, the anti-anti conformer of cellobiose and the anti-syn conformer of xylan are the most stable due to the formation of a large number of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. However, in the cluster calculations containing ion pairs of the ionic liquid (IL) surrounding the cellulosic units, the anti-syn conformer of cellobiose is more stable as intramolecular hydrogen bonds are substituted by intermolecular ones formed with the ions of the IL. The complexes of cellobiose (or of xylan) with the ions of the ionic liquid are stable with large negative binding energies ranging between -21 and -55 kcal mol(-1). The predicted (1)H NMR values of the lowest energy cellobiose conformers are in good agreement with the experimental value. Xylan binds stronger with the IL than cellobiose does by 20 kcal mol(-1). Furthermore, the two pentose rings in xylan are rotated by 60° to each other in contrast to their coplanarity in cellobiose, which can explain the higher solubility and the amorphous nature of hemicellulose in ionic liquids. The fewer number of hydroxyl groups in xylan (relative to cellobiose) does not affect the number of cations present in its first solvation shell while the number of anions is reduced.

  8. Structural characterization (1->2)-beta-xylose-(1->3)-alpha-arabinose-containing oligosaccharide products of extracted switchgrass (Panicum virgatum, L.) xylan treatment with alpha-arabinofuranosidase and beta-endo-xylanase.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum, L.) is a potential dedicated biomass crop for use in biocatalytic conversion systems to biofuels. Nearly 30% of switchgrass cell wall material is xylan. The complete depolymerization of xylan is desirable both as an additional carbon source for microbial fermentation a...

  9. Cocaine metabolism: cocaine and norcocaine hydrolysis by liver and serum esterases.

    PubMed

    Stewart, D J; Inaba, T; Lucassen, M; Kalow, W

    1979-04-01

    The hydrolysis of cocaine and its N-demethylated product, norcocaine, by esterases was examined in liver and serum. Both liver and serum enzymatically formed ecgonine methyl ester from cocaine. The liver enzyme had a much lower affinity for cocaine than that of serum, indicating that a different form of esterase was present in liver. The liver enzyme had a similar affinity for both norcocaine and cocaine. Likewise, the serum enzyme showed similar affinities for both substrates. The Vmax estimates, however, were consistently higher for norcocaine than cocaine in both liver and serum. Benzoyl ecgonine, a major metabolite of cocaine formed by hydrolysis, was not produced enzymatically in either serum or liver; the rate of spontaneous formation at physiological pH suggests that this metabolite may arise nonenzymatically in the body.

  10. A New Strategy for Fluorogenic Esterase Probes Displaying Low Levels of Non-specific Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungwoo; Kim, Hyunjin; Choi, Yongdoo; Kim, Youngmi

    2015-06-26

    A new design for fluorescence probes of esterase activity that features a carboxylate-side pro-fluorophore is demonstrated with boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based probes 1 a and 1 b. Because the design relies on the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of an ester group that is not electronically activated, these probes exhibit a stability to background hydrolysis that is far superior to classical alcohol-side profluorophore-based probes, large signal-to-noise ratios, reduced sensitivity to pH variations, and high enzymatic reactivity. The utility of probe 1 a was established with a real-time fluorescence imaging experiment of endogenous esterase activity that does not require washing of the extracellular medium. PMID:26033618

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth inhibition on medical plastic materials by immobilized esterases and acylase.

    PubMed

    Kisch, Johannes Martin; Utpatel, Christian; Hilterhaus, Lutz; Streit, Wolfgang R; Liese, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Biofilms are matrix-encapsulated cell aggregates that cause problems in technical and health-related areas; for example, 65 % of all human infections are biofilm associated. This is mainly due to their ameliorated resistance against antimicrobials and immune systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a biofilm-forming organism, is commonly responsible for nosocomial infections. Biofilm development is partly mediated by signal molecules, such as acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) in Gram-negative bacteria. We applied horse liver esterase, porcine kidney acylase, and porcine liver esterase; these can hydrolyze AHLs, thereby inhibiting biofilm formation. As biofilm infections are often related to foreign material introduced into the human body, we immobilized the enzymes on medical plastic materials. Biofilm formation was quantified by Crystal Violet staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy, revealing up to 97 % (on silicone), 54 % (on polyvinyl chloride), and 77 % (on polyurethane) reduced biomass after 68 h growth.

  12. Review on technological and scientific aspects of feruloyl esterases: A versatile enzyme for biorefining of biomass.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, Nishant; Rodríguez-Duran, L V; Saucedo-Castaneda, G; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2015-10-01

    With increasing focus on sustainable energy, bio-refining from lignocellulosic biomass has become a thrust area of research. With most of the works being focused on biofuels, significant efforts are also being directed towards other value added products. Feruloyl esterases (EC. 3.1.1.73) can be used as a tool for bio-refining of lignocellulosic material for the recovery and purification of ferulic acid and related hydroxycinnamic acids ubiquitously found in the plant cell wall. More and more genes coding for feruloyl esterases have been mined out from various sources to allow efficient enzymatic release of ferulic acid and allied hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) from plant-based biomass. A sum up on enzymatic extraction of HCAs and its recovery from less explored agro residual by-products is still a missing link and this review brushes up the achieved landmarks so far in this direction and also covers a detailed patent search on this biomass refining enzyme.

  13. Review on technological and scientific aspects of feruloyl esterases: A versatile enzyme for biorefining of biomass.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, Nishant; Rodríguez-Duran, L V; Saucedo-Castaneda, G; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2015-10-01

    With increasing focus on sustainable energy, bio-refining from lignocellulosic biomass has become a thrust area of research. With most of the works being focused on biofuels, significant efforts are also being directed towards other value added products. Feruloyl esterases (EC. 3.1.1.73) can be used as a tool for bio-refining of lignocellulosic material for the recovery and purification of ferulic acid and related hydroxycinnamic acids ubiquitously found in the plant cell wall. More and more genes coding for feruloyl esterases have been mined out from various sources to allow efficient enzymatic release of ferulic acid and allied hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) from plant-based biomass. A sum up on enzymatic extraction of HCAs and its recovery from less explored agro residual by-products is still a missing link and this review brushes up the achieved landmarks so far in this direction and also covers a detailed patent search on this biomass refining enzyme. PMID:26159377

  14. Application of glutaraldehyde for the staining of esterase-active cells with carboxyfluorescein diacetate.

    PubMed

    Morono, Yuki; Takano, Suguru; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko; Tanji, Yasunori; Unno, Hajime; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2004-03-01

    Staining of esterase-active bacteria with carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) has been used to evaluate the viability of various types of cell. However, the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria prevents CFDA from permeating into the cell. Although EDTA can increase the permeability of the outer membrane allowing CFDA to enter the cells, it was experimentally confirmed that there is still considerable difficulty in visualizing viable cells due to passive diffusion of carboxyfluorescein (CF), a hydrolyzed product of CFDA, out of the cells. We found that glutaraldehyde enhances the discriminative recognition of esterase-active Gram-negative bacteria under microscopic observation by improving the efficacy of staining. We believe the successful staining in the presence of glutaraldehyde is due to two separate effects: an increase in the permeability of CFDA into the cell and prevention of leakage of CF out of the cell.

  15. An Alternative Strategy for Pan-acetyl-lysine Antibody Generation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiongyi; Tang, Hui; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Pan, Hong; Karnani, Neerja; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in cell signaling. In acetylome studies, a high-quality pan-acetyl-lysine antibody is key to successful enrichment of acetylated peptides for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we show an alternative method to generate polyclonal pan-acetyl-lysine antibodies using a synthesized random library of acetylated peptides as the antigen. Our antibodies are tested to be specific for acetyl-lysine peptides/proteins via ELISA and dot blot. When pooled, five of our antibodies show broad reactivity to acetyl-lysine peptides, complementing a commercial antibody in terms of peptide coverage. The consensus sequence of peptides bound by our antibody cocktail differs slightly from that of the commercial antibody. Lastly, our antibodies are tested in a proof-of-concept to analyze the acetylome of HEK293 cells. In total we identified 1557 acetylated peptides from 416 proteins. We thus demonstrated that our antibodies are well-qualified for acetylome studies and can complement existing commercial antibodies. PMID:27606599

  16. Effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine acetylation in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tahir, I M; Iqbal, T; Saleem, S; Mehboob, H; Akhter, N; Riaz, M

    2016-03-01

    The effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine N-acetylation by human N-acetyltrasferase-2 (NAT2) was studied in 19 (n=19) healthy male volunteers in two different phases. In the first phase of the study the volunteers were given an oral dose of sulfamethazine 500 mg alone and blood and urine samples were collected. After the 10-day washout period the same selected volunteers were again administered sulfamethazine 500 mg along with 1000 mg acetaminophen. The acetylation of sulfamethazine by human NAT2 in both phases with and without acetaminophen was determined by HPLC to establish their respective phenotypes. In conclusion obtained statistics of present study revealed that acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) decreased sulfamethazine acetylation in plasma of both slow and fast acetylator male volunteers. A highly significant (P<0.0001) decrease in plasma-free and total sulfamethazine concentration was also observed when acetaminophen was co-administered. Urine acetylation status in both phases of the study was found not to be in complete concordance with that of plasma. Acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) increased the acetyl, free and total sulfamethazine concentration in urine of both slow and fast acetylators. Urine acetylation analysis has not been found to be a suitable approach for phenotypic studies.

  17. An Alternative Strategy for Pan-acetyl-lysine Antibody Generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Yee; Sim, Choon Kiat; Zhang, Qiongyi; Tang, Hui; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Pan, Hong; Karnani, Neerja; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in cell signaling. In acetylome studies, a high-quality pan-acetyl-lysine antibody is key to successful enrichment of acetylated peptides for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we show an alternative method to generate polyclonal pan-acetyl-lysine antibodies using a synthesized random library of acetylated peptides as the antigen. Our antibodies are tested to be specific for acetyl-lysine peptides/proteins via ELISA and dot blot. When pooled, five of our antibodies show broad reactivity to acetyl-lysine peptides, complementing a commercial antibody in terms of peptide coverage. The consensus sequence of peptides bound by our antibody cocktail differs slightly from that of the commercial antibody. Lastly, our antibodies are tested in a proof-of-concept to analyze the acetylome of HEK293 cells. In total we identified 1557 acetylated peptides from 416 proteins. We thus demonstrated that our antibodies are well-qualified for acetylome studies and can complement existing commercial antibodies.

  18. Global analysis of lysine acetylation in strawberry leaves.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Wenyue; Zhao, Yun; Ruan, Songlin; Zhang, Hengmu; Yan, Chengqi; Jin, Liang; Cao, Lingling; Zhu, Jun; Ma, Huasheng; Cheng, Zhongyi

    2015-01-01

    Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and dynamic post-translational modification. It plays an important role in regulating diverse cellular processes including chromatin dynamic, metabolic pathways, and transcription in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although studies of lysine acetylome in plants have been reported, the throughput was not high enough, hindering the deep understanding of lysine acetylation in plant physiology and pathology. In this study, taking advantages of anti-acetyllysine-based enrichment and high-sensitive-mass spectrometer, we applied an integrated proteomic approach to comprehensively investigate lysine acetylome in strawberry. In total, we identified 1392 acetylation sites in 684 proteins, representing the largest dataset of acetylome in plants to date. To reveal the functional impacts of lysine acetylation in strawberry, intensive bioinformatic analysis was performed. The results significantly expanded our current understanding of plant acetylome and demonstrated that lysine acetylation is involved in multiple cellular metabolism and cellular processes. More interestingly, nearly 50% of all acetylated proteins identified in this work were localized in chloroplast and the vital role of lysine acetylation in photosynthesis was also revealed. Taken together, this study not only established the most extensive lysine acetylome in plants to date, but also systematically suggests the significant and unique roles of lysine acetylation in plants. PMID:26442052

  19. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.372 N-Acetyl-L-methionine. The food additive N-acetyl-L... section. The minimum amount of the additive to achieve the desired effect must be used, and the...

  20. An Alternative Strategy for Pan-acetyl-lysine Antibody Generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Yee; Sim, Choon Kiat; Zhang, Qiongyi; Tang, Hui; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Pan, Hong; Karnani, Neerja; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in cell signaling. In acetylome studies, a high-quality pan-acetyl-lysine antibody is key to successful enrichment of acetylated peptides for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we show an alternative method to generate polyclonal pan-acetyl-lysine antibodies using a synthesized random library of acetylated peptides as the antigen. Our antibodies are tested to be specific for acetyl-lysine peptides/proteins via ELISA and dot blot. When pooled, five of our antibodies show broad reactivity to acetyl-lysine peptides, complementing a commercial antibody in terms of peptide coverage. The consensus sequence of peptides bound by our antibody cocktail differs slightly from that of the commercial antibody. Lastly, our antibodies are tested in a proof-of-concept to analyze the acetylome of HEK293 cells. In total we identified 1557 acetylated peptides from 416 proteins. We thus demonstrated that our antibodies are well-qualified for acetylome studies and can complement existing commercial antibodies. PMID:27606599

  1. A facile and practical synthesis of N-acetyl enamides.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenjun; Capacci, Andrew; Sarvestani, Max; Wei, Xudong; Yee, Nathan K; Senanayake, Chris H

    2009-12-18

    A facile and practical method for the synthesis of N-acetyl alpha-arylenamides has been developed from corresponding ketoximes as the starting materials with ferrous acetate as the reducing reagent. This methodology offers mild reaction conditions, simple purification procedures, and high yields for a variety of N-acetyl enamides. PMID:19921804

  2. Medial temporal N-acetyl aspartate in pediatric major depression

    PubMed Central

    MacMaster, Frank P.; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S. Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R.

    2008-01-01

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD-case control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  3. Medial temporal N-acetyl-aspartate in pediatric major depression.

    PubMed

    MacMaster, Frank P; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R

    2008-10-30

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD case-control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in the left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  4. Study on Dendrobium officinale O-acetyl-glucomannan (Dendronan®): part II. Fine structures of O-acetylated residues.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiaohui; Cui, Steve W; Nie, Shaoping; Phillips, Glyn O; Goff, H Douglas; Wang, Qi

    2015-03-01

    Main objective of this study was to investigate the detailed structural information about O-acetylated sugar residues in Dendronan(®). A water solution (2%, w/w) of Dendronan(®) was treated with endo-β-mannanase to produce oligosaccharides rich in O-acetylated sugar residues. The oligosaccharides were partly recovered by ethanol precipitation (70%, w/w). The recovered sample (designated Hydrolyzed Dendrobium officinale Polysaccharide, HDOP) had a yield of 24.7% based on the dry weight of Dendronan(®) and was highly O-acetylated. A D2O solution of HDOP (6%, w/w) generated strong signals in (1)H, (13)C, 2D (1)H-(1)H COSY, 2D (1)H-(1)H TOCSY, 2D (1)H-(1)H NOESY, 2D (1)H-(13)C HMQC, and 2D (1)H-(13)C HMBC NMR spectra. Results of NMR analyses showed that the majority of O-acetylated mannoses were mono-substituted with acetyl groups at O-2 or O-3 position. There were small amounts of mannose residues with di-O-acetyl substitution at both O-2 and O-3 positions. Minor levels of mannoses with 6-O-acetyl, 2,6-di-O-acetyl, and 3,6-di-O-acetyl substitutions were also identified. Much information about sugar residue sequence was extracted from 2D (1)H-(13)C HMBC and 2D (1)H-(1)H NOESY spectra. (1)J(C-H) coupling constants of major sugar residues were obtained. Evidences for the existence of branches or O-acetylated glucoses in HDOP were not found. The major structure of Dendronan(®) is shown as follows: [Formula: see text] M: β-D-mannopyranose; G: β-D-glucopyranose; a: O-acetyl group.

  5. Genetic diversity analysis of Capsicum spp germplasm bank accessions based on α/β-esterase polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, E R; Bronzato, A R; Orasmo, G R; Lopes, A C A; Gomes, R L F; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S

    2013-04-12

    Genetic diversity and structure were analyzed in 10 accessions belonging to Banco Ativo de Germoplasma de Capsicum located at Federal University of Piauí in northwestern Brazil that receives pepper samples grown in community gardens in various regions and Brazilian states. Selections were made from seeds of C. chinense (4 accessions), C. annuum (5 accessions), and C. baccatum (1 accession). Samples consisting of leaves were collected from 4-10 plants of each accession (a total of 85 plants). Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to identify α- and β-esterase polymorphisms. Polymorphism was clearly detected in 5 loci. Sixteen alleles were found at 5 α/β-esterase loci of the three Capsicum species. In the C. chinense samples, the highest HO and HE values were 0.3625 and 0.4395, respectively, whereas in C. annuum samples, HO and HE values were 0.2980 and 0.3310, respectively; the estimated HO and HE values in C. chinense samples were higher than those detected in C. annuum samples. A deficit of homozygous individuals was found in C. chinense (FIS = -0.6978) and C. annuum (FIS = 0.7750). Genetic differentiation between C. chinense and C. annuum at these loci was high (FST = 0.1867) indicating that C. chinense and C. annuum are genetically structured species for α/β- esterase isozymes. The esterase analysis showed high genetic diversity among the C. chinense and C. annuum samples and very high genetic differentiation (FST = 0.6321) among the C. chinense and C. annuum samples and the C. baccatum accession.

  6. A Chlorogenic Acid Esterase with a Unique Substrate Specificity from Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Haase-Aschoff, Paul; Kelle, Sebastian; Linke, Diana; Krings, Ulrich; Popper, Lutz; Berger, Ralf G.

    2014-01-01

    An extracellular chlorogenic acid esterase from Ustilago maydis (UmChlE) was purified to homogeneity by using three separation steps, including anion-exchange chromatography on a Q Sepharose FF column, preparative isoelectric focusing (IEF), and, finally, a combination of affinity chromatography and hydrophobic interaction chromatography on polyamide. SDS-PAGE analysis suggested a monomeric protein of ∼71 kDa. The purified enzyme showed maximal activity at pH 7.5 and at 37°C and was active over a wide pH range (3.5 to 9.5). Previously described chlorogenic acid esterases exhibited a comparable affinity for chlorogenic acid, but the enzyme from Ustilago was also active on typical feruloyl esterase substrates. Kinetic constants for chlorogenic acid, methyl p-coumarate, methyl caffeate, and methyl ferulate were as follows: Km values of 19.6 μM, 64.1 μM, 72.5 μM, and 101.8 μM, respectively, and kcat/Km values of 25.83 mM−1 s−1, 7.63 mM−1 s−1, 3.83 mM−1 s−1 and 3.75 mM−1 s−1, respectively. UmChlE released ferulic, p-coumaric, and caffeic acids from natural substrates such as destarched wheat bran (DSWB) and coffee pulp (CP), confirming activity on complex plant biomass. The full-length gene encoding UmChlE consisted of 1,758 bp, corresponding to a protein of 585 amino acids, and was functionally produced in Pichia pastoris GS115. Sequence alignments with annotated chlorogenic acid and feruloyl esterases underlined the uniqueness of this enzyme. PMID:25548041

  7. Environmental Factors Modulating the Stability and Enzymatic Activity of the Petrotoga mobilis Esterase (PmEst).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Jose L S; Yoneda, Juliana S; Martins, Julia M; DeMarco, Ricardo; Jameson, David M; Castro, Aline M; Bossolan, Nelma R S; Wallace, B A; Araujo, Ana P U

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes isolated from thermophilic organisms found in oil reservoirs can find applications in many fields, including the oleochemical, pharmaceutical, bioenergy, and food/dairy industries. In this study, in silico identification and recombinant production of an esterase from the extremophile bacteria Petrotoga mobilis (designated PmEst) were performed. Then biochemical, bioinformatics and structural characterizations were undertaken using a combination of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) and fluorescence spectroscopies to correlate PmEst stability and hydrolytic activity on different substrates. The enzyme presented a high Michaelis-Menten constant (KM 0.16 mM) and optimum activity at ~55°C for p-nitrophenyl butyrate. The secondary structure of PmEst was preserved at acid pH, but not under alkaline conditions. PmEst was unfolded at high concentrations of urea or guanidine through apparently different mechanisms. The esterase activity of PmEst was preserved in the presence of ethanol or propanol and its melting temperature increased ~8°C in the presence of these organic solvents. PmEst is a mesophilic esterase with substrate preference towards short-to medium-length acyl chains. The SRCD data of PmEst is in agreement with the prediction of an α/β protein, which leads us to assume that it displays a typical fold of esterases from this family. The increased enzyme stability in organic solvents may enable novel applications for its use in synthetic biology. Taken together, our results demonstrate features of the PmEst enzyme that indicate it may be suitable for applications in industrial processes, particularly, when the use of polar organic solvents is required. PMID:27351338

  8. Environmental Factors Modulating the Stability and Enzymatic Activity of the Petrotoga mobilis Esterase (PmEst)

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Julia M.; DeMarco, Ricardo; Jameson, David M.; Castro, Aline M.; Bossolan, Nelma R. S.; Wallace, B. A.; Araujo, Ana P. U.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes isolated from thermophilic organisms found in oil reservoirs can find applications in many fields, including the oleochemical, pharmaceutical, bioenergy, and food/dairy industries. In this study, in silico identification and recombinant production of an esterase from the extremophile bacteria Petrotoga mobilis (designated PmEst) were performed. Then biochemical, bioinformatics and structural characterizations were undertaken using a combination of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) and fluorescence spectroscopies to correlate PmEst stability and hydrolytic activity on different substrates. The enzyme presented a high Michaelis-Menten constant (KM 0.16 mM) and optimum activity at ~55°C for p-nitrophenyl butyrate. The secondary structure of PmEst was preserved at acid pH, but not under alkaline conditions. PmEst was unfolded at high concentrations of urea or guanidine through apparently different mechanisms. The esterase activity of PmEst was preserved in the presence of ethanol or propanol and its melting temperature increased ~8°C in the presence of these organic solvents. PmEst is a mesophilic esterase with substrate preference towards short-to medium-length acyl chains. The SRCD data of PmEst is in agreement with the prediction of an α/β protein, which leads us to assume that it displays a typical fold of esterases from this family. The increased enzyme stability in organic solvents may enable novel applications for its use in synthetic biology. Taken together, our results demonstrate features of the PmEst enzyme that indicate it may be suitable for applications in industrial processes, particularly, when the use of polar organic solvents is required. PMID:27351338

  9. Biochemical Characterization of a Family 15 Carbohydrate Esterase from a Bacterial Marine Arctic Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    De Santi, Concetta; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2016-01-01

    Background The glucuronoyl esterase enzymes of wood-degrading fungi (Carbohydrate Esterase family 15; CE15) form part of the hemicellulolytic and cellulolytic enzyme systems that break down plant biomass, and have possible applications in biotechnology. Homologous enzymes are predicted in the genomes of several bacteria, however these have been much less studied than their fungal counterparts. Here we describe the recombinant production and biochemical characterization of a bacterial CE15 enzyme denoted MZ0003, which was identified by in silico screening of a prokaryotic metagenome library derived from marine Arctic sediment. MZ0003 has high similarity to several uncharacterized gene products of polysaccharide-degrading bacterial species, and phylogenetic analysis indicates a deep evolutionary split between these CE15s and fungal homologs. Results MZ0003 appears to differ from previously-studied CE15s in some aspects. Some glucuronoyl esterase activity could be measured by qualitative thin-layer chromatography which confirms its assignment as a CE15, however MZ0003 can also hydrolyze a range of other esters, including p-nitrophenyl acetate, which is not acted upon by some fungal homologs. The structure of MZ0003 also appears to differ as it is predicted to have several large loop regions that are absent in previously studied CE15s, and a combination of homology-based modelling and site-directed mutagenesis indicate its catalytic residues deviate from the conserved Ser-His-Glu triad of many fungal CE15s. Taken together, these results indicate that potentially unexplored diversity exists among bacterial CE15s, and this may be accessed by investigation of the microbial metagenome. The combination of low activity on typical glucuronoyl esterase substrates, and the lack of glucuronic acid esters in the marine environment suggest that the physiological substrate of MZ0003 and its homologs is likely to be different from that of related fungal enzymes. PMID:27433797

  10. A chlorogenic acid esterase with a unique substrate specificity from Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Nieter, Annabel; Haase-Aschoff, Paul; Kelle, Sebastian; Linke, Diana; Krings, Ulrich; Popper, Lutz; Berger, Ralf G

    2015-03-01

    An extracellular chlorogenic acid esterase from Ustilago maydis (UmChlE) was purified to homogeneity by using three separation steps, including anion-exchange chromatography on a Q Sepharose FF column, preparative isoelectric focusing (IEF), and, finally, a combination of affinity chromatography and hydrophobic interaction chromatography on polyamide. SDS-PAGE analysis suggested a monomeric protein of ∼71 kDa. The purified enzyme showed maximal activity at pH 7.5 and at 37°C and was active over a wide pH range (3.5 to 9.5). Previously described chlorogenic acid esterases exhibited a comparable affinity for chlorogenic acid, but the enzyme from Ustilago was also active on typical feruloyl esterase substrates. Kinetic constants for chlorogenic acid, methyl p-coumarate, methyl caffeate, and methyl ferulate were as follows: Km values of 19.6 μM, 64.1 μM, 72.5 μM, and 101.8 μM, respectively, and kcat/Km values of 25.83 mM(-1) s(-1), 7.63 mM(-1) s(-1), 3.83 mM(-1) s(-1) and 3.75 mM(-1) s(-1), respectively. UmChlE released ferulic, p-coumaric, and caffeic acids from natural substrates such as destarched wheat bran (DSWB) and coffee pulp (CP), confirming activity on complex plant biomass. The full-length gene encoding UmChlE consisted of 1,758 bp, corresponding to a protein of 585 amino acids, and was functionally produced in Pichia pastoris GS115. Sequence alignments with annotated chlorogenic acid and feruloyl esterases underlined the uniqueness of this enzyme.

  11. Heterologous Expression and Biochemical Characterisation of Fourteen Esterases from Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongqiang; Coppin, Chris W.; Devonshire, Alan L.; Scott, Colin; East, Peter; Russell, Robyn J.; Oakeshott, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Esterases have recurrently been implicated in insecticide resistance in Helicoverpa armigera but little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. We used a baculovirus system to express 14 of 30 full-length esterase genes so far identified from midgut cDNA libraries of this species. All 14 produced esterase isozymes after native PAGE and the isozymes for seven of them migrated to two regions of the gel previously associated with both organophosphate and pyrethroid resistance in various strains. Thirteen of the enzymes obtained in sufficient yield for further analysis all showed tight binding to organophosphates and low but measurable organophosphate hydrolase activity. However there was no clear difference in activity between the isozymes from regions associated with resistance and those from elsewhere in the zymogram, or between eight of the isozymes from a phylogenetic clade previously associated with resistance in proteomic and quantitative rtPCR experiments and five others not so associated. By contrast, the enzymes differed markedly in their activities against nine pyrethroid isomers and the enzymes with highest activity for the most insecticidal isomers were from regions of the gel and, in some cases, the phylogeny that had previously been associated with pyrethroid resistance. Phospholipase treatment confirmed predictions from sequence analysis that three of the isozymes were GPI anchored. This unusual feature among carboxylesterases has previously been suggested to underpin an association that some authors have noted between esterases and resistance to the Cry1Ac toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis. However these three isozymes did not migrate to the zymogram region previously associated with Cry1Ac resistance. PMID:23799064

  12. Genetic diversity analysis of Capsicum spp germplasm bank accessions based on α/β-esterase polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, E R; Bronzato, A R; Orasmo, G R; Lopes, A C A; Gomes, R L F; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity and structure were analyzed in 10 accessions belonging to Banco Ativo de Germoplasma de Capsicum located at Federal University of Piauí in northwestern Brazil that receives pepper samples grown in community gardens in various regions and Brazilian states. Selections were made from seeds of C. chinense (4 accessions), C. annuum (5 accessions), and C. baccatum (1 accession). Samples consisting of leaves were collected from 4-10 plants of each accession (a total of 85 plants). Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to identify α- and β-esterase polymorphisms. Polymorphism was clearly detected in 5 loci. Sixteen alleles were found at 5 α/β-esterase loci of the three Capsicum species. In the C. chinense samples, the highest HO and HE values were 0.3625 and 0.4395, respectively, whereas in C. annuum samples, HO and HE values were 0.2980 and 0.3310, respectively; the estimated HO and HE values in C. chinense samples were higher than those detected in C. annuum samples. A deficit of homozygous individuals was found in C. chinense (FIS = -0.6978) and C. annuum (FIS = 0.7750). Genetic differentiation between C. chinense and C. annuum at these loci was high (FST = 0.1867) indicating that C. chinense and C. annuum are genetically structured species for α/β- esterase isozymes. The esterase analysis showed high genetic diversity among the C. chinense and C. annuum samples and very high genetic differentiation (FST = 0.6321) among the C. chinense and C. annuum samples and the C. baccatum accession. PMID:23661440

  13. Cell biology (Communication arising): Tubulin acetylation and cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, Alexander; Ackerman, Brian; Gundersen, Gregg G.

    2003-01-01

    Although the protein tubulin is known to undergo several post-translational modifications that accumulate in stable but not dynamic microtubules inside cells, the function of these modifications is unknown. Hubbert et al. have shown that the enzyme HDAC6 (for histone deacetylase 6) reverses the post-translational acetylation of tubulin, and provide evidence that reducing tubulin acetylation enhances cell motility. They also suggest that decreasing tubulin acetylation reduces microtubule stability. However, we find that microtubule stabilization is not promoted by tubulin acetylation. We conclude that the alteration in cell motility observed by Hubbert et al. in cells overexpressing HDAC6 results not from changes in the formation of stable microtubules, but from alterations in the degree of tubulin acetylation.

  14. Comparative genome analyses of novel Mangrovimonas-like strains isolated from estuarine mangrove sediments reveal xylan and arabinan utilization genes.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Balachandra; Lau, Nyok-Sean; Furusawa, Go; Kim, Seok-Won; Taylor, Todd D; Foong, Swee Yeok; Shu-Chien, Alexander Chong

    2016-02-01

    To date, the genus Mangrovimonas consists of only one species, Mangrovimonas yunxiaonensis strain LY01 that is known to have algicidal effects against harmful algal blooms (HABs) of Alexandrium tamarense. In this study, the whole genome sequence of three Mangrovimonas-like strains, TPBH4(T)(=LMG 28913(T),=JCM 30882(T)), ST2L12(T)(=LMG 28914(T),=JCM 30880(T)) and ST2L15(T)(=LMG 28915(T),=JCM 30881(T)) isolated from estuarine mangrove sediments in Perak, Malaysia were described. The sequenced genomes had a range of assembly size ranging from 3.56 Mb to 4.15 Mb which are significantly larger than that of M. yunxiaonensis LY01 (2.67 Mb). Xylan, xylose, L-arabinan and L-arabinose utilization genes were found in the genome sequences of the three Mangrovimonas-like strains described in this study. In contrast, these carbohydrate metabolism genes were not found in the genome sequence of LY01. In addition, TPBH4(T) and ST2L12(T) show capability to degrade xylan using qualitative plate assay method. PMID:26795059

  15. Direct and efficient xylitol production from xylan by Saccharomyces cerevisiae through transcriptional level and fermentation processing optimizations.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Qu, Hongnan; Li, Chun; Zhou, Xiaohong

    2013-12-01

    In this study, four engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying xylanase, β-xylosidase and xylose reductase genes by different transcriptional regulations were constructed to directly convert xylan to xylitol. According to the results, the high-copy number plasmid required a rigid selection for promoter characteristics, on the contrast, the selection of promoters could be more flexible for low-copy number plasmid. For cell growth and xylitol production, glucose and galactose were found more efficient than other sugars. The semi-aerobic condition and feeding of co-substrates were taken to improve the yield of xylitol. It was found that the strain containing high-copy number plasmid had the highest xylitol yield, but it was sensitive to the change of fermentation. However, the strain carrying low-copy number plasmid was more adaptable to different processes. By optimization of the transcriptional regulation and fermentation processes, the xylitol concentration could be increased of 1.7 folds and the yield was 0.71 g xylitol/g xylan.

  16. Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393, a member of the human colonic microbiome, upregulates multiple endoxylanases during growth on xylan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kui; Pereira, Gabriel V.; Cavalcante, Janaina J. V.; Zhang, Meiling; Mackie, Roderick; Cann, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Many human diets contain arabinoxylan, and the ease of genome sequencing coupled with reduced cost have led to unraveling the arsenal of genes utilized by the colonic Bacteroidetes to depolymerize this polysaccharide. The colonic Bacteroidetes with potential to ferment arabinoxylans include Bacteroides intestinalis. In this study, we analyzed the hydrolytic activities of members of a xylan degradation cluster encoded on the genome of Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393. Here, it is demonstrated that a cocktail of the xylanolytic enzymes completely hydrolyze arabinoxylans found in human diets. We show that this bacterium and relatives have evolved and secrete a unique bifunctional endoxylanase/arabinofuranosidase in the same polypeptide. The bifunctional enzyme and other secreted enzymes attack the polysaccharides extracellularly to remove the side-chains, exposing the xylan backbone for cleavage to xylo-oligosaccharides and xylose. These end products are transported into the cell where a β-xylosidase cleaves the oligosaccharides to fermentable sugars. While our experiments focused on B. intestinalis, it is likely that the extracellular enzymes also release nutrients to members of the colonic microbial community that practice cross-feeding. The presence of the genes characterized in this study in other colonic Bacteroidetes suggests a conserved strategy for energy acquisition from arabinoxylan, a component of human diets. PMID:27681607

  17. Cloning, expression and characterization of a novel esterase from a South China Sea sediment metagenome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Fuchao; Chen, Huaxin; Zhao, Jin; Yan, Jinfei; Jiang, Peng; Li, Ronggui; Zhu, Baoli

    2015-07-01

    Lipolytic enzymes, including esterases and lipases, represent a group of hydrolases that catalyze the cleavage and formation of ester bonds. A novel esterase gene, scsEst01, was cloned from a South China Sea sediment metagenome. The scsEst01 gene consisted of 921 bp encoding 307 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence shared less than 90% identity with other lipolytic enzymes in the NCBI nonredundant protein database. ScsEst01 was successfully co-expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) with chaperones (dnaK-dnaJ-grpE) to prevent the formation of inclusion bodies. The recombinant protein was purified on an immobilized metal ion affinity column containing chelating Sepharose charged with Ni2+. The enzyme was characterized using p -nitrophenol butyrate as a substrate. ScsEst01 had the highest lipolytic activity at 35°C and pH 8.0, indicative of a meso-thermophilic alkaline esterase. ScsEst01 was thermostable at 20°C. The lipolytic activity of scsEst01 was strongly increased by Fe2+, Mn2+ and 1% Tween 80 or Tween 20.

  18. Hormone-sensitive lipase is a cholesterol esterase of the intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Grober, Jacques; Lucas, Stéphanie; Sörhede-Winzell, Maria; Zaghini, Isabelle; Mairal, Aline; Contreras, Juan-Antonio; Besnard, Philippe; Holm, Cecilia; Langin, Dominique

    2003-02-21

    The identity of the enzymes responsible for lipase and cholesterol esterase activities in the small intestinal mucosa is not known. Because hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the hydrolysis of acylglycerols and cholesteryl esters, we sought to determine whether HSL could be involved. HSL mRNA and protein were detected in all segments of the small intestine by Northern and Western blot analyses, respectively. Immunocytochemistry experiments revealed that HSL was expressed in the differentiated enterocytes of the villi and was absent in the undifferentiated cells of the crypt. Diacylglycerol lipase and cholesterol esterase activities were found in the different segments. Analysis of gut from HSL-null mice showed that diacylglycerol lipase activity was unchanged in the duodenum and reduced in jejunum. Neutral cholesterol esterase activity was totally abolished in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of HSL-null mice. Analysis of HSL mRNA structure showed two types of transcripts expressed in equal amounts with alternative 5'-ends transcribed from two exons. This work demonstrates that HSL is expressed in the mucosa of the small intestine. The results also reveal that the enzyme participates in acylglycerol hydrolysis in jejunal enterocytes and cholesteryl ester hydrolysis throughout the small intestine. PMID:12482847

  19. Newly Identified Thermostable Esterase from Sulfobacillus acidophilus: Properties and Performance in Phthalate Ester Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Fan, Xiang; Qiu, Yong-Jun; Li, Cheng-Yuan; Xing, Shuai; Zheng, Yi-Tao

    2014-01-01

    EstS1, a newly identified thermostable esterase from Sulfobacillus acidophilus DSM10332, was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to enzymatically degrade phthalate esters (PAEs) to their corresponding monoalkyl PAEs. The optimal pH and temperature of the esterase were found to be 8.0 and 70°C, respectively. The half-life of EstS1 at 60°C was 15 h, indicating that the enzyme had good thermostability. The specificity constant (kcat/Km) of the enzyme for p-nitrophenyl butyrate was as high as 6,770 mM−1 s−1. The potential value of EstS1 was demonstrated by its ability to effectively hydrolyze 35 to 82% of PAEs (10 mM) within 2 min at 37°C, with all substrates being completely degraded within 24 h. At 60°C, the time required for complete hydrolysis of most PAEs was reduced by half. To our knowledge, this enzyme is a new esterase identified from thermophiles that is able to degrade various PAEs at high temperatures. PMID:25149523

  20. Identification and characterization of a novel salt-tolerant esterase from a Tibetan glacier metagenomic library.

    PubMed

    De Santi, Concetta; Ambrosino, Luca; Tedesco, Pietro; Zhai, Lei; Zhou, Cheng; Xue, Yanfen; Ma, Yanhe; de Pascale, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    A salt-tolerant esterase, designated H9Est, was identified from a metagenomic library of the Karuola glacier. H9Est gene comprised 1071 bp and encoded a polypeptide of 357 amino acids with a molecular mass of 40 kDa. Sequence analysis revealed that H9Est belonged to the family IV of bacterial lypolitic enzyme. H9Est was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the purified enzyme showed hydrolytic activity towards p-nitrophenyl esters with carbon chain from 2 to 8. The optimal esterase activity was at 40°C and pH 8.0 and the enzyme retained its activity towards some miscible organic solvents such as polyethylene glycol. A three-dimensional model of H9Est revealed that S200, D294, and H324 formed the H9Est catalytic triad. Circular Dichroism spectra and molecular dynamic simulation indicated that the esterase had a wide denaturation temperature range and flexible loops that would be beneficial for H9Est performance at low temperatures while retaining heat-resistant features. PMID:25920073

  1. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylation suggests the widespread function is regulated by protein acetylation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zuoming; Zhu, Honglin; Zhou, Yong; Wu, Chengcheng; Liu, Yue; Sheng, Qing; Lv, Zhengbing; Zhang, Wenping; Yu, Wei; Jiang, Caiying; Xie, Longfei; Zhang, Yaozhou; Yao, Juming

    2015-09-01

    Lysine acetylation in proteins is a dynamic and reversible PTM and plays an important role in diverse cellular processes. In this study, using lysine-acetylation (Kac) peptide enrichment coupled with nano HPLC/MS/MS, we initially identified the acetylome in the silkworms. Overall, a total of 342 acetylated proteins with 667 Kac sites were identified in silkworm. Sequence motifs analysis around Kac sites revealed an enrichment of Y, F, and H in the +1 position, and F was also enriched in the +2 and -2 positions, indicating the presences of preferred amino acids around Kac sites in the silkworm. Functional analysis showed the acetylated proteins were primarily involved in some specific biological processes. Furthermore, lots of nutrient-storage proteins, such as apolipophorin, vitellogenin, storage proteins, and 30 K proteins, were highly acetylated, indicating lysine acetylation may represent a common regulatory mechanism of nutrient utilization in the silkworm. Interestingly, Ser2 proteins, the coating proteins of larval silk, were found to contain many Kac sites, suggesting lysine acetylation may be involved in the regulation of larval silk synthesis. This study is the first to identify the acetylome in a lepidoptera insect, and expands greatly the catalog of lysine acetylation substrates and sites in insects.

  2. Esterases of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae), parasitic mite of the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Dmitryjuk, Małgorzata; Żołtowska, Krystyna; Frączek, Regina; Lipiński, Zbigniew

    2014-04-01

    Varroa destructor is an ectoparasite that causes serious damage to the population of the honeybee. Increasing resistance of the parasite to acaricides is related, among others, to metabolic adaptations of its esterases to facilitate decomposition of the chemicals used. Esterases are a large heterogeneous group of enzymes that metabolize a number of endogenous and exogenous substrates with ester binding. The aim of the present study was to determine the activity of esterases in the body extracts (BE) and excretion/secretion products (E/SP) of the mite. The enzymes contained in the E/SP should originate mainly from the salivary glands and the alimentary system and they may play a particularly important role in the first line of defence of the mite against acaricides. Activity of cholinesterases (ChEs) [acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase], carboxylesterases (CEs) and phosphatases [alkaline phosphatase (AP) and acid phosphatase (AcP)] was investigated. The activity of all the enzymes except AChE was higher in the E/SP than in the BE. ChEs from the BE and from the E/SP reacted differently on eserine, a ChE inhibitor. Eserine inhibited both enzymes from the BE, increased decomposition of acetylcholine, but did not influence hydrolysis of butyrylcholine by the E/SP. Activity of the CEs from the BE in relation to the esters of carboxylic acids can be presented in the following series: C10 > C12 > C14 > C8 > C2 > C4 = C16, while activity of the CEs from the E/SP was: C4 > C8 > C2 > C14 > C10 > C12 > C16. The inhibitor of CEs, triphenyl phosphate, reduced the activity of esterases C2–C8 and C14–C16; however, it acted in the opposite way to CEs C10 and C12. The activity of both phosphatases was higher in the E/SP than in the BE (AcP about twofold and AP about 2.6-fold); the activities of AP and AcP in the same material were similar. Given the role of esterases in resistance to pesticides, further studies are necessary to obtain complete biochemical

  3. Organophosphorus compound esterase profiles as predictors of therapeutic and toxic effects.

    PubMed

    Makhaeva, Galina F; Radchenko, Eugene V; Palyulin, Vladimir A; Rudakova, Elena V; Aksinenko, Alexey Yu; Sokolov, Vladimir B; Zefirov, Nikolay S; Richardson, Rudy J

    2013-03-25

    Certain organophosphorus compounds (OPCs) inhibit various serine esterases (EOHs) via phosphorylation of their active site serines. We focused on 4 EOHs of particular toxicological interest: acetylcholinesterase (AChE: acute neurotoxicity; cognition enhancement), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE: inhibition of drug metabolism and/or stoichiometric scavenging of EOH inhibitors; cognition enhancement), carboxylesterase (CaE: inhibition of drug metabolism and/or stoichiometric scavenging of EOH inhibitors), and neuropathy target esterase (NTE: delayed neurotoxicity, OPIDN). The relative degree of inhibition of these EOHs constitutes the "esterase profile" of an OPC and serves as a major determinant of its net physiological effects. Thus, understanding and controlling the esterase profile of OPC activity and selectivity toward these 4 target enzymes is a significant undertaking. In the present study, we analyzed the inhibitor properties of 52 OPCs against the 4 EOHs, along with pairwise and multitarget selectivities between them, using 2 QSAR approaches: Hansch modeling and Molecular Field Topology Analysis (MFTA). The general formula of the OPCs was (RO)(2)P(O)X, where R = alkyl, X = - SCH(Hal)COOEt (Hal = Cl, Br), -SCHCl(2), -SCH(2)Br, -OCH(CF(3))R(1) (R(1) = C(6)H(5), CF(3), COOEt, COOMe). The Hansch model showed that increasing neuropathic potential correlated with rising R hydrophobicity; moreover, OPC binding to scavenger EOHs (BChE and CaE) had different effects on potential acute and delayed neurotoxicity. Predicted protective roles of BChE and CaE against acute toxicity were enhanced with increasing hydrophobicity, but projected protection against OPIDN was decreased. Next, Molecular Field Topology Analysis (MFTA) models were built, considering atomic descriptors, e.g., effective charge, van der Waals radius of environment, and group lipophilicity. Activity/selectivity maps confirmed predictions from Hansch models and revealed other structural factors affecting

  4. Novel Redox-Dependent Esterase Activity (EC 3.1.1.2) for DJ-1: Implications for Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Mayorga, Emmanuel; Díaz-Sánchez, Ángel G; Dagda, Ruben K; Domínguez-Solís, Carlos A; Dagda, Raul Y; Coronado-Ramírez, Cynthia K; Martínez-Martínez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Mutations the in human DJ-1 (hDJ-1) gene are associated with early-onset autosomal recessive forms of Parkinson's disease (PD). hDJ-1/parkinsonism associated deglycase (PARK7) is a cytoprotective multi-functional protein that contains a conserved cysteine-protease domain. Given that cysteine-proteases can act on both amide and ester substrates, we surmised that hDJ-1 possessed cysteine-mediated esterase activity. To test this hypothesis, hDJ-1 was overexpressed, purified and tested for activity towards 4-nitrophenyl acetate (pNPA) as µmol of pNPA hydrolyzed/min/mg·protein (U/mg protein). hDJ-1 showed maximum reaction velocity esterase activity (Vmax = 235.10 ± 12.00 U/mg protein), with a sigmoidal fit (S0.5 = 0.55 ± 0.040 mM) and apparent positive cooperativity (Hill coefficient of 2.05 ± 0.28). A PD-associated mutant of DJ-1 (M26I) lacked activity. Unlike its protease activity which is inactivated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), esterase activity of hDJ-1 is enhanced upon exposure to low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (<10 µM) and plateaus at elevated concentrations (>100 µM) suggesting that its activity is resistant to oxidative stress. Esterase activity of DJ-1 requires oxidation of catalytic cysteines, as chemically protecting cysteines blocked its activity whereas an oxido-mimetic mutant of DJ-1 (C106D) exhibited robust esterase activity. Molecular docking studies suggest that C106 and L126 within its catalytic site interact with esterase substrates. Overall, our data show that hDJ-1 contains intrinsic redox-sensitive esterase activity that is abolished in a PD-associated mutant form of the hDJ-1 protein. PMID:27556455

  5. Microbial acetyl conjugation of T-2 toxin and its derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizawa, T; Onomoto, C; Morooka, N

    1980-01-01

    The acetyl conjugation of T-2 toxin and its derivatives, the 12,13-epoxytrichothecene mycotoxins, was studied by using mycelia of trichothecene-producing strains of Fusarium graminearum, F. nivale, Calonectria nivalis, and F. sporotrichoides, T-2 toxin was efficiently converted into acetyl T-2 toxin by all strains except a T-2 toxin-producing strain of F. sporotrichoides, which hydrolyzed the substrate to HT-2-toxin and neosolaniol. HT-2 toxin was conjugated to 3-acetyl HT-2 toxin as an only product by mycelia of F. graminearum and C. nivalis, but was also resistant to conjugation by both F. nivale and F. sporotrichoides. Neosolaniol was also biotransformed selectively into 3-acetyl neosolaniol by F. graminearum. However, 3-acetyl HT-2 toxin was not acetylated by any of the strains under the conditions employed, but was hydrolyzed to HT-2 toxin by F. graminearum and F. nivale. This is the first report on the biological 3 alpha-O-acetyl conjugation of T-2 toxin and its derivatives. PMID:7396487

  6. Chitosan Molecular Structure as a Function of N-Acetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Franca, Eduardo F.; Freitas, Luiz C.; Lins, Roberto D.

    2011-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to characterize the structure and solubility of chitosan nanoparticle-like structures as a function of the deacetylation level (0, 40, 60, and 100%) and the spatial distribution of the N-acetyl groups in the particles. The polysaccharide chains of highly N-deacetylated particles where the N-acetyl groups are uniformly distributed present a high flexibility and preference for the relaxed two-fold helix and five-fold helix motifs. When these groups are confined to a given region of the particle, the chains adopt preferentially a two-fold helix with f and w values close to crystalline chitin. Nanoparticles with up to 40% acetylation are moderately soluble, forming stable aggregates when the N-acetyl groups are unevenly distributed. Systems with 60% or higher N-acetylation levels are insoluble and present similar degrees of swelling regardless the distribution of their N-acetyl groups. Overall particle solvation is highly affected by electrostatic forces resulting from the degree of acetylation. The water mobility and orientation around the polysaccharide chains affects the stability of the intramolecular O3- HO3(n) ... O5(n+ 1) hydrogen bond, which in turn controls particle aggregation.

  7. Consolidated bioprocessing of poly(lactate-co-3-hydroxybutyrate) from xylan as a sole feedstock by genetically-engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Scheel, Ryan A; Bergey, Norman Scott; Stipanovic, Arthur J; Matsumoto, Ken'ichiro; Taguchi, Seiichi; Nomura, Christopher T

    2016-10-01

    Consolidated bioprocessing of lignocellulose is an attractive strategy for the sustainable production of petroleum-based alternatives. One of the underutilized sources of carbon in lignocellulose is the hemicellulosic fraction which largely consists of the polysaccharide xylan. In this study, Escherichia coli JW0885 (pyruvate formate lyase activator protein mutant, pflA(-)) was engineered to express recombinant xylanases and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)-producing enzymes for the biosynthesis of poly(lactate-co-3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(LA-co-3HB)] from xylan as a consolidated bioprocess. The results show that E. coli JW0885 was capable of producing P(LA-co-3HB) when xylan was the only feedstock and different feeding and growth parameters were examined in order to improve upon initial yields. The highest yields of P(LA-co-3HB) copolymer obtained in this study occurred when xylan was added during mid-exponential growth after cells had been grown at high shaking-speeds (290 rpm). The results showed an inverse relationship between total PHA production and LA-monomer incorporation into the copolymer. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses corroborate that the polymers produced maintain physical properties characteristic of LA-incorporating PHB-based copolymers. The present study achieves the first ever engineering of a consolidated bioprocessing bacterial system for the production of a bioplastic from a hemicelluosic feedstock. PMID:27067372

  8. Comparative Analysis of End Point Enzymatic Digests of Arabino-Xylan Isolated from Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L) of Varying Maturities using LC-MSn †

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Michael J.; Dien, Bruce S.; O’Bryan, Patricia J.; Sarath, Gautam; Cotta, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L., SG) is a perennial grass presently used for forage and being developed as a bioenergy crop for conversion of cell wall carbohydrates to biofuels. Up to 50% of the cell wall associated carbohydrates are xylan. SG was analyzed for xylan structural features at variable harvest maturities. Xylan from each of three maturities was isolated using classical alkaline extraction to yield fractions (Xyl A and B) with varying compositional ratios. The Xyl B fraction was observed to decrease with plant age. Xylan samples were subsequently prepared for structure analysis by digesting with pure endo-xylanase, which preserved side-groups, or a commercial carbohydrase preparation favored for biomass conversion work. Enzymatic digestion products were successfully permethylated and analyzed by reverse-phase liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (RP-HPLC-MSn). This method is advantageous compared to prior work on plant biomass because it avoids isolation of individual arabinoxylan oligomers. The use of RP-HPLC- MSn differentiated 14 structural oligosaccharides (d.p. 3–9) from the monocomponent enzyme digestion and nine oligosaccharide structures (d.p. 3–9) from hydrolysis with a cellulase enzyme cocktail. The distribution of arabinoxylan oligomers varied depending upon the enzyme(s) applied but did not vary with harvest maturity. PMID:24957770

  9. Consolidated bioprocessing of poly(lactate-co-3-hydroxybutyrate) from xylan as a sole feedstock by genetically-engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Scheel, Ryan A; Bergey, Norman Scott; Stipanovic, Arthur J; Matsumoto, Ken'ichiro; Taguchi, Seiichi; Nomura, Christopher T

    2016-10-01

    Consolidated bioprocessing of lignocellulose is an attractive strategy for the sustainable production of petroleum-based alternatives. One of the underutilized sources of carbon in lignocellulose is the hemicellulosic fraction which largely consists of the polysaccharide xylan. In this study, Escherichia coli JW0885 (pyruvate formate lyase activator protein mutant, pflA(-)) was engineered to express recombinant xylanases and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)-producing enzymes for the biosynthesis of poly(lactate-co-3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(LA-co-3HB)] from xylan as a consolidated bioprocess. The results show that E. coli JW0885 was capable of producing P(LA-co-3HB) when xylan was the only feedstock and different feeding and growth parameters were examined in order to improve upon initial yields. The highest yields of P(LA-co-3HB) copolymer obtained in this study occurred when xylan was added during mid-exponential growth after cells had been grown at high shaking-speeds (290 rpm). The results showed an inverse relationship between total PHA production and LA-monomer incorporation into the copolymer. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses corroborate that the polymers produced maintain physical properties characteristic of LA-incorporating PHB-based copolymers. The present study achieves the first ever engineering of a consolidated bioprocessing bacterial system for the production of a bioplastic from a hemicelluosic feedstock.

  10. Remarkable similarity among bacteria isolated from four hosts after eight-week enrichments of feces with cellulose and xylan/pectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The intestinal microbiota allows mammals to recover energy stored in plant biomass through fermentation of plant cell walls, primarily cellulose and hemicellulose. Bacteria were isolated from 8-week continuous culture enrichments with cellulose and xylan/pectin from cow (n=4), goat (n=4), human (n=4...

  11. Supplementation with xylanase and β-xylosidase to reduce xylo-oligomer and xylan inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose and pretreated corn stover

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hemicellulose is often credited with being one of the important physical barriers to enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose, and acts by blocking enzyme access to the cellulose surface. In addition, our recent research has suggested that hemicelluloses, particularly in the form of xylan and its oligomers, can more strongly inhibit cellulase activity than do glucose and cellobiose. Removal of hemicelluloses or elimination of their negative effects can therefore become especially pivotal to achieving higher cellulose conversion with lower enzyme doses. Results In this study, cellulase was supplemented with xylanase and β-xylosidase to boost conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose in pretreated biomass through conversion of xylan and xylo-oligomers to the less inhibitory xylose. Although addition of xylanase and β-xylosidase did not necessarily enhance Avicel hydrolysis, glucan conversions increased by 27% and 8% for corn stover pretreated with ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) and dilute acid, respectively. In addition, adding hemicellulase several hours before adding cellulase was more beneficial than later addition, possibly as a result of a higher adsorption affinity of cellulase and xylanase to xylan than glucan. Conclusions This key finding elucidates a possible mechanism for cellulase inhibition by xylan and xylo-oligomers and emphasizes the need to optimize the enzyme formulation for each pretreated substrate. More research is needed to identify advanced enzyme systems designed to hydrolyze different substrates with maximum overall enzyme efficacy. PMID:21702938

  12. 9-O-Acetylation of sialic acids is catalysed by CASD1 via a covalent acetyl-enzyme intermediate.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Anna-Maria T; Bakkers, Mark J G; Buettner, Falk F R; Hartmann, Maike; Grove, Melanie; Langereis, Martijn A; de Groot, Raoul J; Mühlenhoff, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acids, terminal sugars of glycoproteins and glycolipids, play important roles in development, cellular recognition processes and host-pathogen interactions. A common modification of sialic acids is 9-O-acetylation, which has been implicated in sialoglycan recognition, ganglioside biology, and the survival and drug resistance of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. Despite many functional implications, the molecular basis of 9-O-acetylation has remained elusive thus far. Following cellular approaches, including selective gene knockout by CRISPR/Cas genome editing, we here show that CASD1--a previously identified human candidate gene--is essential for sialic acid 9-O-acetylation. In vitro assays with the purified N-terminal luminal domain of CASD1 demonstrate transfer of acetyl groups from acetyl-coenzyme A to CMP-activated sialic acid and formation of a covalent acetyl-enzyme intermediate. Our study provides direct evidence that CASD1 is a sialate O-acetyltransferase and serves as key enzyme in the biosynthesis of 9-O-acetylated sialoglycans. PMID:26169044

  13. Acetylation of Mammalian ADA3 Is Required for Its Functional Roles in Histone Acetylation and Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mohibi, Shakur; Srivastava, Shashank; Bele, Aditya; Mirza, Sameer; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2016-10-01

    Alteration/deficiency in activation 3 (ADA3) is an essential component of specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes. We have previously shown that ADA3 is required for establishing global histone acetylation patterns and for normal cell cycle progression (S. Mohibi et al., J Biol Chem 287:29442-29456, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M112.378901). Here, we report that these functional roles of ADA3 require its acetylation. We show that ADA3 acetylation, which is dynamically regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, reflects a balance of coordinated actions of its associated HATs, GCN5, PCAF, and p300, and a new partner that we define, the deacetylase SIRT1. We use mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis to identify major sites of ADA3 acetylated by GCN5 and p300. Acetylation-defective mutants are capable of interacting with HATs and other components of HAT complexes but are deficient in their ability to restore ADA3-dependent global or locus-specific histone acetylation marks and cell proliferation in Ada3-deleted murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Given the key importance of ADA3-containing HAT complexes in the regulation of various biological processes, including the cell cycle, our study presents a novel mechanism to regulate the function of these complexes through dynamic ADA3 acetylation. PMID:27402865

  14. Evidence for N----O acetyl migration as the mechanism for O acetylation of peptidoglycan in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, C; Clarke, A J

    1991-01-01

    O-acetylated peptidoglycan was purified from Proteus mirabilis grown in the presence of specifically radiolabelled glucosamine derivatives, and the migration of the radiolabel was monitored. Mild-base hydrolysis of the isolated peptidoglycan (to release ester-linked acetate) from cells grown in the presence of 40 microM [acetyl-3H]N-acetyl-D-glucosamine resulted in the release of [3H]acetate, as detected by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The inclusion of either acetate, pyruvate, or acetyl phosphate, each at 1 mM final concentration, did not result in a diminution of mild-base-released [3H]acetate levels. No such release of [3H]acetate was observed with peptidoglycan isolated from either Escherichia coli incubated with the same radiolabel or P. mirabilis grown with [1,6-3H]N-acetyl-D-glucosamine or D-[1-14C]glucosamine. These observations support a hypothesis that O acetylation occurs by N----O acetyl transfer within the sacculus. A decrease in [3H]acetate release by mild-base hydrolysis was observed with the peptidoglycan of P. mirabilis cultures incubated in the presence of antagonists of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, penicillin G and D-cycloserine. The absence of free-amino sugars in the peptidoglycan of P. mirabilis but the detection of glucosamine in spent culture broths implies that N----O transacetylation is intimately associated with peptidoglycan turnover. PMID:2066331

  15. THE CESA (CE3B) CARBOXY-TERMINAL DOMAIN OF RUMINOCOCCUS FLAVEFACIENS 17 HAS GLUCURONOYL ESTERASE ACTIVITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several types of covalent linkages between lignin and xylan in plant cell walls have been shown. One of such linkages could be an ester bond between hydroxyl groups of lignin moieties and the carboxyl group of the 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronic acid (MeGlcA) side groups of glucuronoxylan. Enzymes capable...

  16. Contrasted enzymatic cocktails reveal the importance of cellulases and hemicellulases activity ratios for the hydrolysis of cellulose in presence of xylans.

    PubMed

    Dondelinger, Eve; Aubry, Nathalie; Ben Chaabane, Fadhel; Cohen, Céline; Tayeb, Jean; Rémond, Caroline

    2016-03-01

    Various enzymatic cocktails were produced from two Trichoderma reesei strains, a cellulase hyperproducer strain and a strain with β-glucosidase activity overexpression. By using various carbon sources (lactose, glucose, xylose, hemicellulosic hydrolysate) for strains growth, contrasted enzymatic activities were obtained. The enzymatic cocktails presented various levels of efficiency for the hydrolysis of cellulose Avicel into glucose, in presence of xylans, or not. These latter were also hydrolyzed with different extents according to cocktails. The most efficient cocktails (TR1 and TR3) on Avicel were richer in filter paper activity (FPU) and presented a low ratio FPU/β-glucosidase activity. Cocktails TR2 and TR5 which were produced on the higher amount of hemicellulosic hydrolysate, possess both high xylanase and β-xylosidase activities, and were the most efficient for xylans hydrolysis. When hydrolysis of Avicel was conducted in presence of xylans, a decrease of glucose release occurred for all cocktails compared to hydrolysis of Avicel alone. Mixing TR1 and TR5 cocktails with two different ratios of proteins (1/1 and 1/4) resulted in a gain of efficiency for glucose release during hydrolysis of Avicel in presence of xylans compared to TR5 alone. Our results demonstrate the importance of combining hemicellulase and cellulase activities to improve the yields of glucose release from Avicel in presence of xylans. In this context, strategies involving enzymes production with carbon sources comprising mixed C5 and C6 sugars or combining different cocktails produced on C5 or on C6 sugars are of interest for processes developed in the context of lignocellulosic biorefinery. PMID:27001439

  17. Transcriptional changes related to secondary wall formation in xylem of transgenic lines of tobacco altered for lignin or xylan content which show improved saccharification

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Charis M.; Daudi, Arsalan; Millar, David J.; Bindschedler, Laurence V.; Khan, Safina; Bolwell, G. Paul; Devoto, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an EST library (EH663598–EH666265) obtained from xylogenic tissue cultures of tobacco that had been previously generated was annotated. The library proved to be enriched in transcripts related to the synthesis and modification of secondary cell walls. The xylem-specific transcripts for most of the genes of the lignification and xylan pathways were identified and several full-length sequences obtained. Gene expression was determined in available tobacco lines down-regulated for enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway: CINNAMATE 4-HYDROXYLASE (sc4h), CINNAMOYL-COA REDUCTASE (asccr) and lignification-specific peroxidase (asprx). In addition, lines down-regulated in the nucleotide-sugar pathway to xylan formation through antisense expression of UDP-GLUCURONIC ACID DECARBOXYLASE (asuxs) were also analysed. It is shown herein that most transcripts were down-regulated for both lignin and xylan synthesis pathways in these lines, while CELLULOSE SYNTHASE A3 was up-regulated in lignin-modified lines. The analysis indicates the existence of interdependence between lignin and xylan pathways at the transcriptional level and also shows that levels of cellulose, xylan and lignin are not necessarily directly correlated to differences in transcription of the genes involved upstream, as shown by cell wall fractionation and sugar analysis. It is therefore suggested that cell wall biosynthesis regulation occurs at different levels, and not merely at the transcriptional level. In addition, all lines analyzed showed improved enzymic saccharification of secondary but not primary walls. Nevertheless, this demonstrates potential industrial applicability for the approach undertaken to improve biomass utility. PMID:22119077

  18. A non-modular type B feruloyl esterase from Neurospora crassa exhibits concentration-dependent substrate inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Crepin, Valerie F; Faulds, Craig B; Connerton, Ian F

    2003-01-01

    Feruloyl esterases, a subclass of the carboxylic acid esterases (EC 3.1.1.1), are able to hydrolyse the ester bond between the hydroxycinnamic acids and sugars present in the plant cell wall. The enzymes have been classified as type A or type B, based on their substrate specificity for aromatic moieties. We show that Neurospora crassa has the ability to produce multiple ferulic acid esterase activities depending upon the length of fermentation with either sugar beet pulp or wheat bran substrates. A gene identified on the basis of its expression on sugar beet pulp has been cloned and overexpressed in Pichia pastoris. The gene encodes a single-domain ferulic acid esterase, which represents the first report of a non-modular type B enzyme (fae-1 gene; GenBank accession no. AJ293029). The purified recombinant protein has been shown to exhibit concentration-dependent substrate inhibition (K(m) 0.048 mM, K (i) 2.5 mM and V(max) 8.2 units/mg against methyl 3,4-dihydroxycinnamate). The kinetic behaviour of the non-modular enzyme is discussed in terms of the diversity in the roles of the feruloyl esterases in the mobilization of plant cell wall materials and their respective modes of action. PMID:12435269

  19. Conserved tyrosine 182 residue in hyperthermophilic esterase EstE1 plays a critical role in stabilizing the active site.

    PubMed

    Truongvan, Ngoc; Chung, Hye-Shin; Jang, Sei-Heon; Lee, ChangWoo

    2016-03-01

    An aromatic amino acid, Tyr or Trp, located in the esterase active site wall, is highly conserved, with hyperthermophilic esterases showing preference for Tyr and lower temperature esterases showing preference for Trp. In this study, we investigated the role of Tyr(182) in the active site wall of hyperthermophilic esterase EstE1. Mutation of Tyr to Phe or Ala had a moderate effect on EstE1 thermal stability. However, a small-to-large mutation such as Tyr to His or Trp had a devastating effect on thermal stability. All mutant EstE1 enzymes showed reduced catalytic rates and enhanced substrate affinities as compared with wild-type EstE1. Hydrogen bond formation involving Tyr(182) was unimportant for maintaining EstE1 thermal stability, as the EstE1 structure is already adapted to high temperatures via increased intramolecular interactions. However, removal of hydrogen bond from Tyr(182) significantly decreased EstE1 catalytic activity, suggesting its role in stabilization of the active site. These results suggest that Tyr is preferred over a similarly sized Phe residue or bulky His or Trp residue in the active site walls of hyperthermophilic esterases for stabilizing the active site and regulating catalytic activity at high temperatures. PMID:26838013

  20. Partially Acetylated Sugarcane Bagasse For Wicking Oil From Contaminated Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sugarcane bagasse was partially acetylated to enhance its oil-wicking ability in saturated environments while holding moisture for hydrocarbon biodegradation. The water sorption capacity of raw bagasse was reduced fourfold after treatment, which indicated considerably increased ...

  1. Acetylation of C/EBPα inhibits its granulopoietic function

    PubMed Central

    Bararia, Deepak; Kwok, Hui Si; Welner, Robert S.; Numata, Akihiko; Sárosi, Menyhárt B.; Yang, Henry; Wee, Sheena; Tschuri, Sebastian; Ray, Debleena; Weigert, Oliver; Levantini, Elena; Ebralidze, Alexander K.; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) is an essential transcription factor for myeloid lineage commitment. Here we demonstrate that acetylation of C/EBPα at lysine residues K298 and K302, mediated at least in part by general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5), impairs C/EBPα DNA-binding ability and modulates C/EBPα transcriptional activity. Acetylated C/EBPα is enriched in human myeloid leukaemia cell lines and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) samples, and downregulated upon granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)- mediated granulocytic differentiation of 32Dcl3 cells. C/EBPα mutants that mimic acetylation failed to induce granulocytic differentiation in C/EBPα-dependent assays, in both cell lines and in primary hematopoietic cells. Our data uncover GCN5 as a negative regulator of C/EBPα and demonstrate the importance of C/EBPα acetylation in myeloid differentiation. PMID:27005833

  2. Acetylation of banana fibre to improve oil absorbency.

    PubMed

    Teli, M D; Valia, Sanket P

    2013-01-30

    Oil spill leaves detrimental effects on the environment, living organisms and economy. In the present work, an attempt is made to provide an efficient, easily deployable method of cleaning up oil spills and recovering of the oil. The work reports the use of banana fibres which were acetylated for oil spill recovery. The product so formed was characterized by FT-IR, TG, SEM and its degree of acetylation was also evaluated. The extent of acetylation was measured by weight percent gain. The oil sorption capacity of the acetylated fibre was higher than that of the commercial synthetic oil sorbents such as polypropylene fibres as well as un-modified fibre. Therefore, these oil sorption-active materials which are also biodegradable can be used to substitute non-biodegradable synthetic materials in oil spill cleanup. PMID:23218302

  3. Data detailing the platelet acetyl-lysine proteome

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Joseph E.; David, Larry L.; McCarty, Owen J.T.

    2015-01-01

    Here we detail proteomics data that describe the acetyl-lysine proteome of blood platelets (Aslan et al., 2015 [1]). An affinity purification – mass spectrometry (AP-MS) approach was used to identify proteins modified by Nε-lysine acetylation in quiescent, washed human platelets. The data provide insights into potential regulatory mechanisms of platelet function mediated by protein lysine acetylation. Additionally, as platelets are anucleate and lack histone proteins, they offer a unique and valuable system to study the regulation of cytosolic proteins by lysine acetylation. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaino et al., 2014 [2]) via with PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002332. PMID:26904711

  4. Data detailing the platelet acetyl-lysine proteome.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Joseph E; David, Larry L; McCarty, Owen J T

    2015-12-01

    Here we detail proteomics data that describe the acetyl-lysine proteome of blood platelets (Aslan et al., 2015 [1]). An affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) approach was used to identify proteins modified by Nε-lysine acetylation in quiescent, washed human platelets. The data provide insights into potential regulatory mechanisms of platelet function mediated by protein lysine acetylation. Additionally, as platelets are anucleate and lack histone proteins, they offer a unique and valuable system to study the regulation of cytosolic proteins by lysine acetylation. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaino et al., 2014 [2]) via with PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002332. PMID:26904711

  5. Cellulases and xylanase of an anaerobic rumen fungus grown on wheat straw, wheat straw holocellulose, cellulose, and xylan.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, S E; Theodorou, M K; Trinci, A P

    1987-01-01

    The activities of cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes produced by an anaerobic fungus (R1) which resembled Neocallimastix sp. were investigated. Carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase), cellobiase, and filter paper (FPase) activities had pH optima of 6.0, 5.5, and 6.0, respectively. CMCase and cellobiase activities both had a temperature optimum of 50 degrees C, whereas FPase had an optimum of 45 degrees C. The pH and temperature optima for xylanase activity were pH 6.0 and 50 degrees C, respectively. Growth of the fungus on wheat straw, wheat straw holocellulose, or cellulose resulted in substantial colonization, with at least 43 to 58% losses in substrate dry matter and accumulation of comparable amounts of formate. This end product was correlated to apparent loss of substrate dry weight and could be used as an indicator of fungal growth. Milling of wheat straw did not enhance the rate or extent of substrate degradation. Growth of the R1 isolate on the above substrates or xylan also resulted in accumulation of high levels of xylanase activity and lower cellulase activities. Of the cellulases, CMCase was the most active and was associated with either low or trace amounts of cellobiase and FPase activities. During growth on xylan, reducing sugars, including arabinose and xylose, rapidly accumulated in the medium. Xylose and other reducing sugars, but not arabinose, were subsequently used for growth. Reducing sugars also accumulated, but not as rapidly, when the fungus was grown on wheat straw, wheat straw holocellulose, or cellulose. Xylanase activities detected during growth of R1 on media containing glucose, xylose, or cellobiose suggested that enzyme production was constitutive.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:3606104

  6. Xylan utilization in human gut commensal bacteria is orchestrated by unique modular organization of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meiling; Chekan, Jonathan R.; Dodd, Dylan; Hong, Pei-Ying; Radlinski, Lauren; Revindran, Vanessa; Nair, Satish K.; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes that degrade dietary and host-derived glycans represent the most abundant functional activities encoded by genes unique to the human gut microbiome. However, the biochemical activities of a vast majority of the glycan-degrading enzymes are poorly understood. Here, we use transcriptome sequencing to understand the diversity of genes expressed by the human gut bacteria Bacteroides intestinalis and Bacteroides ovatus grown in monoculture with the abundant dietary polysaccharide xylan. The most highly induced carbohydrate active genes encode a unique glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 10 endoxylanase (BiXyn10A or BACINT_04215 and BACOVA_04390) that is highly conserved in the Bacteroidetes xylan utilization system. The BiXyn10A modular architecture consists of a GH10 catalytic module disrupted by a 250 amino acid sequence of unknown function. Biochemical analysis of BiXyn10A demonstrated that such insertion sequences encode a new family of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) that binds to xylose-configured oligosaccharide/polysaccharide ligands, the substrate of the BiXyn10A enzymatic activity. The crystal structures of CBM1 from BiXyn10A (1.8 Å), a cocomplex of BiXyn10A CBM1 with xylohexaose (1.14 Å), and the CBM from its homolog in the Prevotella bryantii B14 Xyn10C (1.68 Å) reveal an unanticipated mode for ligand binding. A minimal enzyme mix, composed of the gene products of four of the most highly up-regulated genes during growth on wheat arabinoxylan, depolymerizes the polysaccharide into its component sugars. The combined biochemical and biophysical studies presented here provide a framework for understanding fiber metabolism by an important group within the commensal bacterial population known to influence human health. PMID:25136124

  7. Cellulases and xylanase of an anaerobic rumen fungus grown on wheat straw, wheat straw holocellulose, cellulose and xylan

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, S.E.; Theodorou, M.K.; Trinci, A.P.J.

    1987-06-01

    The activities of cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes produced by an anaerobic fungus (RI) which resembled Neocallimastix sp. were investigated. Carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase), cellobiase, and filter paper (FPase) activities had pH optima of 6.0, 5.5 and 6.0, respectively. CMCase and cellobiase activities both had a temperature optimum of 50 degrees C, whereas FPase had an optimum of 45 degrees C. The pH and temperature optima for xylanase activity were pH 6.0 and 50 degrees C, respectively. Growth of the fungus on wheat straw, wheat straw holocellulose, or cellulose resulted in substantial colonization, with at least 43 to 58% losses in substrate dry matter and accumulation of comparable amounts of formate. This end product was correlated to apparent loss of substrate dry weight and could be used as an indicator of fungal growth. Milling of wheat straw did not enhance the rate or extent of substrate degradation. Growth of the RI isolate on the above substrates or xylan also resulted in accumulation of high levels of xylanase activity and lower cellulase activities. Of the cellulases, CMCase was the most active and was associated with either low or trace amounts of cellobiase and FPase activities. During growth on xylan, reducing sugars, including arabinose and xylose, rapidly accumulated in the medium. Xylose and other reducing sugars, but not arabinose, were subsequently used for growth. Reducing sugars also accumulated, but not as rapidly, when the fungus was grown on wheat straw, wheat straw holocellulose, or cellulose. Xylanase activities detected during growth of RI on media containing glucose, xylose, or cellobiose suggested that enzyme production was constitutive. Xylanase activity was mainly cell associated in these cultures, but there was a considerable increase in activity during fungal autolysis. (Refs. 33).

  8. Mechanistic insights into the regulation of metabolic enzymes by acetylation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The activity of metabolic enzymes is controlled by three principle levels: the amount of enzyme, the catalytic activity, and the accessibility of substrates. Reversible lysine acetylation is emerging as a major regulatory mechanism in metabolism that is involved in all three levels of controlling metabolic enzymes and is altered frequently in human diseases. Acetylation rivals other common posttranslational modifications in cell regulation not only in the number of substrates it modifies, but also the variety of regulatory mechanisms it facilitates. PMID:22826120

  9. Biochemical studies on a versatile esterase that is most catalytically active with polyaromatic esters

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Lores, Iván; Peña-García, Carlina; Bargiela, Rafael; Reyes-Duarte, Dolores; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Peláez, Ana Isabel; Sánchez, Jesús; Ferrer, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we applied a community genomic approach using a naphthalene-enriched community (CN1) to isolate a versatile esterase (CN1E1) from the α/β-hydrolase family. The protein shares low-to-medium identity (≤ 57%) with known esterase/lipase-like proteins. The enzyme is most active at 25–30°C and pH 8.5; it retains approximately 55% of its activity at 4°C and less than 8% at ≥ 55°C, which indicates that it is a cold-adapted enzyme. CN1E1 has a distinct substrate preference compared with other α/β-hydrolases because it is catalytically most active for hydrolysing polyaromatic hydrocarbon (phenanthrene, anthracene, naphthalene, benzoyl, protocatechuate and phthalate) esters (7200–21 000 units g−1 protein at 40°C and pH 8.0). The enzyme also accepts 44 structurally different common esters with different levels of enantio-selectivity (1.0–55 000 units g−1 protein), including (±)-menthyl-acetate, (±)-neomenthyl acetate, (±)-pantolactone, (±)-methyl-mandelate, (±)-methyl-lactate and (±)-glycidyl 4-nitrobenzoate (in that order). The results provide the first biochemical evidence suggesting that such broad-spectrum esterases may be an ecological advantage for bacteria that mineralize recalcitrant pollutants (including oil refinery products, plasticizers and pesticides) as carbon sources under pollution pressure. They also offer a new tool for the stereo-assembly (i.e. through ester bonds) of multi-aromatic molecules with benzene rings that are useful for biology, chemistry and materials sciences for cases in which enzyme methods are not yet available. PMID:24418210

  10. Biochemical studies on a versatile esterase that is most catalytically active with polyaromatic esters.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Lores, Iván; Peña-García, Carlina; Bargiela, Rafael; Reyes-Duarte, Dolores; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Peláez, Ana Isabel; Sánchez, Jesús; Ferrer, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Herein, we applied a community genomic approach using a naphthalene-enriched community (CN1) to isolate a versatile esterase (CN1E1) from the α/β-hydrolase family. The protein shares low-to-medium identity (≤ 57%) with known esterase/lipase-like proteins. The enzyme is most active at 25-30°C and pH 8.5; it retains approximately 55% of its activity at 4°C and less than 8% at ≥ 55°C, which indicates that it is a cold-adapted enzyme. CN1E1 has a distinct substrate preference compared with other α/β-hydrolases because it is catalytically most active for hydrolysing polyaromatic hydrocarbon (phenanthrene, anthracene, naphthalene, benzoyl, protocatechuate and phthalate) esters (7200-21 000 units g(-1) protein at 40°C and pH 8.0). The enzyme also accepts 44 structurally different common esters with different levels of enantio-selectivity (1.0-55 000 units g(-1) protein), including (±)-menthyl-acetate, (±)-neomenthyl acetate, (±)-pantolactone, (±)-methyl-mandelate, (±)-methyl-lactate and (±)-glycidyl 4-nitrobenzoate (in that order). The results provide the first biochemical evidence suggesting that such broad-spectrum esterases may be an ecological advantage for bacteria that mineralize recalcitrant pollutants (including oil refinery products, plasticizers and pesticides) as carbon sources under pollution pressure. They also offer a new tool for the stereo-assembly (i.e. through ester bonds) of multi-aromatic molecules with benzene rings that are useful for biology, chemistry and materials sciences for cases in which enzyme methods are not yet available.

  11. Characterization of EST3: a metagenome-derived esterase with suitable properties for biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Maester, Thaís Carvalho; Pereira, Mariana Rangel; Machado Sierra, E G; Balan, Andrea; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes

    2016-07-01

    Metagenomic libraries from diverse environments have been extensive sources of many lipases and esterases; nevertheless, most of these enzymes remain biochemically uncharacterized. We previously built a metagenomic fosmid library from a microbial consortium specialized for diesel oil degradation and tested it for lipolytic activity. In the present study, we identified the PL14.H10 clone that was subcloned and sequenced, which enabled the identification of the EST3 protein. This enzyme exhibited 74 % amino acid identity with the uncharacterized alpha/beta hydrolase from Parvibaculum lavamentivorans [GenBank: WP012110575.1] and was classified into lipolytic enzyme family IV. Biochemical characterization revealed that EST3 presents high activity in a wide range of temperature with highest activity from 41 to 45 °C. Also, this thermostable esterase acts from mild acidic to alkaline conditions with an optimum pH of 6.0. The enzyme exhibited activity against p-nitrophenyl esters of different chain lengths and highest catalytic efficiency against p-nitrophenyl caprylate. The activity of the protein was increased in the presence of 0.5 mM of Mn(+2), Li(+), EDTA, and 1 % of CTAB and exhibited half of the activity in the presence of 10 % methanol and ethanol. Moreover, the homology model of EST3 was built and compared to other esterases, revealing a substrate channel that should fit a wide range of substrates. Taken together, the data presented in this work reveal the unique and interesting characteristics of EST3 that might be explored for further use in biotechnological applications.

  12. Feruloyl esterase activity is influenced by bile, probiotic intestinal adhesion and milk fat.

    PubMed

    Mukdsi, M C Abeijón; Argañaraz Martínez, E; Chaia, A Perez; Medina, R B

    2016-09-01

    Cinnamoyl esterases (CE) are microbial and mammalian intestinal enzymes able to release antioxidant hydroxycinnamic acids from their non-digestible ester-linked forms naturally present in vegetable foods. Previous findings showed that oral administration of Lactobacillus fermentum CRL1446 increased intestinal CE activity and improved oxidative status in mice. The aim of this work was to evaluate the in vitro CE activity of L. fermentum CRL1446 and the effect of bile on this activity, as well as strain resistance to simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) conditions and its ability to adhere to intestinal epithelium and influence its basal CE activity. L. fermentum CRL1446 and L. fermentum ATCC14932 (positive control for CE activity) were able to hydrolyse different synthetic hydroxycinnamates, with higher specificity toward methyl ferulate (3,853.73 and 899.19 U/g, respectively). Feruloyl esterase (FE) activity was mainly intracellular in L. fermentum CRL1446 and cell-surface associated in L. fermentum ATCC14932. Both strains tolerated simulated GIT conditions and were able to adhere ex vivo to intestinal epithelium. Pre-incubation of L. fermentum strains with bile increased FE activity in both whole cells and supernatants (~2-fold), compared to controls, suggesting that cells were permeabilised by bile, allowing more substrate to enter the cell and/or leakage of FE enzymes. Three-fold higher FE activities were detected in intestinal tissue fragments with adhered L. fermentum CRL1446 cells compared to control fragments (without bacteria), indicating that this strain provides exogenous FE activity and could stimulate esterase activity in the intestinal mucosa. Finally, we found that milk fat had a negative effect on FE activity of intestinal tissue, in absence or presence of adhered L. fermentum. These results help explaining the increase in intestinal FE activity previously observed in mice fed with L. fermentum CRL1446, and support the potential use of this strain

  13. Regulation of S-Adenosylhomocysteine Hydrolase by Lysine Acetylation*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Kavran, Jennifer M.; Chen, Zan; Karukurichi, Kannan R.; Leahy, Daniel J.; Cole, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    S-Adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) is an NAD+-dependent tetrameric enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of S-adenosylhomocysteine to adenosine and homocysteine and is important in cell growth and the regulation of gene expression. Loss of SAHH function can result in global inhibition of cellular methyltransferase enzymes because of high levels of S-adenosylhomocysteine. Prior proteomics studies have identified two SAHH acetylation sites at Lys401 and Lys408 but the impact of these post-translational modifications has not yet been determined. Here we use expressed protein ligation to produce semisynthetic SAHH acetylated at Lys401 and Lys408 and show that modification of either position negatively impacts the catalytic activity of SAHH. X-ray crystal structures of 408-acetylated SAHH and dually acetylated SAHH have been determined and reveal perturbations in the C-terminal hydrogen bonding patterns, a region of the protein important for NAD+ binding. These crystal structures along with mutagenesis data suggest that such hydrogen bond perturbations are responsible for SAHH catalytic inhibition by acetylation. These results suggest how increased acetylation of SAHH may globally influence cellular methylation patterns. PMID:25248746

  14. Acetyl Radical Generation in Cigarette Smoke: Quantification and Simulations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Na; Green, Sarah A

    2014-10-01

    Free radicals are present in cigarette smoke and can have a negative effect on human health. However, little is known about their formation mechanisms. Acetyl radicals were quantified in tobacco smoke and mechanisms for their generation were investigated by computer simulations. Acetyl radicals were trapped from the gas phase using 3-amino-2, 2, 5, 5-tetramethyl-proxyl (3AP) on solid support to form stable 3AP adducts for later analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Simulations were performed using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). A range of 10-150 nmol/cigarette of acetyl radical was measured from gas phase tobacco smoke of both commerial and research cigarettes under several different smoking conditions. More radicals were detected from the puff smoking method compared to continuous flow sampling. Approximately twice as many acetyl radicals were trapped when a glass filber particle filter (GF/F specifications) was placed before the trapping zone. Simulations showed that NO/NO2 reacts with isoprene, initiating chain reactions to produce hydroxyl radical, which abstracts hydrogen from acealdehyde to generate acetyl radical. These mechanisms can account for the full amount of acetyl radical detected experimentally from cigarette smoke. Similar mechanisms may generate radicals in second hand smoke. PMID:25253993

  15. Acetyl radical generation in cigarette smoke: Quantification and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Na; Green, Sarah A.

    2014-10-01

    Free radicals are present in cigarette smoke and can have a negative effect on human health. However, little is known about their formation mechanisms. Acetyl radicals were quantified in tobacco smoke and mechanisms for their generation were investigated by computer simulations. Acetyl radicals were trapped from the gas phase using 3-amino-2, 2, 5, 5-tetramethyl-proxyl (3AP) on solid support to form stable 3AP adducts for later analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Simulations were performed using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). A range of 10-150 nmol/cigarette of acetyl radical was measured from gas phase tobacco smoke of both commercial and research cigarettes under several different smoking conditions. More radicals were detected from the puff smoking method compared to continuous flow sampling. Approximately twice as many acetyl radicals were trapped when a glass fiber particle filter (GF/F specifications) was placed before the trapping zone. Simulations showed that NO/NO2 reacts with isoprene, initiating chain reactions to produce hydroxyl radical, which abstracts hydrogen from acetaldehyde to generate acetyl radical. These mechanisms can account for the full amount of acetyl radical detected experimentally from cigarette smoke. Similar mechanisms may generate radicals in second hand smoke.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the glucuronoyl esterase catalytic domain from Hypocrea jecorina

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, S. J.; Li, X.-L.; Cotta, M. A.; Biely, P.; Duke, N. E. C.; Schiffer, M.; Pokkuluri, P. R.

    2008-04-01

    The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from H. jecorina was overexpresssed, purified and crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei) was overexpresssed, purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.4 M sodium/potassium phosphate pH 6.9. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. This is the first enzyme with glucoronoyl esterase activity to be crystallized; its structure will be valuable in lignocellulose-degradation research.

  17. A novel feruloyl esterase from rumen microbial metagenome: Gene cloning and enzyme characterization in the release of mono- and diferulic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A feruloyl esterase (FAE) gene was isolated from a rumen microbial metagenome, cloned into E. coli, and expressed in active form. The enzyme (RuFae4) was classified as a Type D feruloyl esterase based on its action on synthetic substrates and ability to release diferulates. The RuFae4 alone releas...

  18. p-Nitrophenylacetate hydrolysis by honey bee esterases: kinetics and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Spoonamore, J E; Frohlich, D R; Wells, M A

    1993-03-01

    1. The kinetics and inhibition of p-nitrophenylacetate hydrolysis by cytosolic esterases of 1-day old female honey bees, Apis mellifera L., were studied. 2. The calculated values obtained were Km = 2.27 x 10(-5)M and Vmax = 2.48 x 10(-8) mol/s per mg protein. 3. The inhibition mechanisms examined for four organophosphorus insecticides were highly competitive in nature and based on competitive inhibition coefficients the order of toxicity was naled > dichlorvos > cis-mevinphos = trans-mevinphos. 4. Comparisons are made with the alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata (Fab). PMID:8498090

  19. Est10: A Novel Alkaline Esterase Isolated from Bovine Rumen Belonging to the New Family XV of Lipolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, María Cecilia; Loaces, Inés; Amarelle, Vanesa; Senatore, Daniella; Iriarte, Andrés; Fabiano, Elena; Noya, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    A metagenomic fosmid library from bovine rumen was used to identify clones with lipolytic activity. One positive clone was isolated. The gene responsible for the observed phenotype was identified by in vitro transposon mutagenesis and sequencing and was named est10. The 367 amino acids sequence harbors a signal peptide, the conserved secondary structure arrangement of alpha/beta hydrolases, and a GHSQG pentapeptide which is characteristic of esterases and lipases. Homology based 3D-modelling confirmed the conserved spatial orientation of the serine in a nucleophilic elbow. By sequence comparison, Est10 is related to hydrolases that are grouped into the non-specific Pfam family DUF3089 and to other characterized esterases that were recently classified into the new family XV of lipolytic enzymes. Est10 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as a His-tagged fusion protein, purified and biochemically characterized. Est10 showed maximum activity towards C4 aliphatic chains and undetectable activity towards C10 and longer chains which prompted its classification as an esterase. However, it was able to efficiently catalyze the hydrolysis of aryl esters such as methyl phenylacetate and phenyl acetate. The optimum pH of this enzyme is 9.0, which is uncommon for esterases, and it exhibits an optimal temperature at 40°C. The activity of Est10 was inhibited by metal ions, detergents, chelating agents and additives. We have characterized an alkaline esterase produced by a still unidentified bacterium belonging to a recently proposed new family of esterases. PMID:25973851

  20. Purification and characterization of an extracellular esterase with organic solvent tolerance from a halotolerant isolate, Salimicrobium sp. LY19

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Halotolerant bacteria are excellent sources for selecting novel enzymes. Being intrinsically stable and active under high salinities, enzymes from these prokaryotes have evolved to function optimally under extreme conditions, making them robust biocatalysts with potential applications in harsh industrial processes. Results A halotolerant strain LY19 showing lipolytic activity was isolated from saline soil of Yuncheng Salt Lake, China. It was identified as belonging to the genus of Salimicrobium by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The extracellular enzyme was purified to homogeneity with molecular mass of 57 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Substrate specificity test revealed that the enzyme preferred short-chain p-nitrophenyl esters and exhibited maximum activity towards p-nitrophenyl butyrate (p-NPB), indicating an esterase activity. The esterase was highly active and stable over broad temperature (20°C-70°C), pH (7.0-10.0) and NaCl concentration (2.5%-25%) ranges, with an optimum at 50°C, pH 7.0 and 5% NaCl. Significant inhibition of the esterase was shown by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and phenylarsine oxide (PAO), which indicated that it was a metalloenzyme with serine and cysteine residues essential for enzyme activity. Moreover, the esterase displayed high activity and stability in the presence of hydrophobic organic solvents with log Pow ≥ 0.88 than in the absence of an organic solvent or in the presence of hydrophilic solvents. Conclusions Results from the present study indicated the novel extracellular esterase from Salimicrobium sp. LY19 exhibited thermostable, alkali-stable, halotolerant and organic solvent-tolerant properties. These features led us to conclude that the esterase may have considerable potential for industrial applications in organic synthesis reactions. PMID:24325447

  1. Functional characterization of a novel microbial esterase identified from the Indian Ocean and its use in the stereoselective preparation of ( R)-methyl mandelate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiayuan; Sun, Aijun; Zhang, Yun; Deng, Dun; Wang, Yongfei; Ma, Sanmei; Hu, Yunfeng

    2016-11-01

    Genomic mining has identified a novel microbial alkaline esterase from the Indian Ocean. This esterase was overexpressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and further functionally characterized. Under optimal conditions (10 mmol/L substrate, pH 6.0, 2 h at 40 °C), this esterase can hydrolyze racemic methyl mandelate to ( R)-methyl mandelate with very high optical purity ( e.e. >99%) and yield (nearly 90%). Interestingly, the stereoselectivity of this esterase is opposite to that of two previously reported lipases that can generate ( S)-methyl mandelate through the hydrolysis of racemic methyl mandelate. No organic solvents or other additives were required to optimize the optical purity and production of the final chiral product ( R)-methyl mandelate, which can potentially simplify the production procedure of ( R)-methyl mandelate catalyzed by esterase.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the glucuronoyl esterase catalytic domain from Hypocrea jecorina.

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, S. J.; Li, X. -L.; Cotta, M. A.; Biely, P.; Duke, N. E. C.; Schiffer, M.; Pokkuluri, P. R.; Biosciences Division; National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research; Slovak Academy of Sciences

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei) was overexpresssed, purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.4 M sodium/potassium phosphate pH 6.9. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. This is the first enzyme with glucoronoyl esterase activity to be crystallized; its structure will be valuable in lignocellulose-degradation research.

  3. Downregulation of GAUT12 in Populus deltoides by RNA silencing results in reduced recalcitrance, increased growth and reduced xylan and pectin in a woody biofuel feedstock

    DOE PAGES

    Biswal, Ajaya K.; Hao, Zhangying; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Yang, Xiaohan; Winkeler, Kim; Collins, Cassandra; Mohanty, Sushree S.; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Gelineo-Albersheim, Ivana; Hunt, Kimberly; et al

    2015-03-12

    The inherent recalcitrance of woody bioenergy feedstocks is a major challenge for their use as a source of second-generation biofuel. Secondary cell walls that constitute the majority of hardwood biomass are rich in cellulose, xylan, and lignin. The interactions among these polymers prevent facile accessibility and deconstruction by enzymes and chemicals. Plant biomass that can with minimal pretreatment be degraded into sugars is required to produce renewable biofuels in a cost-effective manner. The following are the results: GAUT12/IRX8 is a putative glycosyltransferase proposed to be involved in secondary cell wall glucuronoxylan and/or pectin biosynthesis based on concomitant reductions of bothmore » xylan and the pectin homogalacturonan (HG) in Arabidopsis irx8 mutants. Two GAUT12 homologs exist in Populus trichocarpa, PtGAUT12.1 and PtGAUT12.2. Knockdown expression of both genes simultaneously has been shown to reduce xylan content in Populus wood. We tested the proposition that RNA interference (RNAi) downregulation of GAUT12.1 alone would lead to increased sugar release in Populus wood, that is, reduced recalcitrance, based on the hypothesis that GAUT12 synthesizes a wall structure required for deposition of xylan and that cell walls with less xylan and/or modified cell wall architecture would have reduced recalcitrance. Using an RNAi approach, we generated 11 Populus deltoides transgenic lines with 50 to 67% reduced PdGAUT12.1 transcript expression compared to wild type (WT) and vector controls. Ten of the eleven RNAi lines yielded 4 to 8% greater glucose release upon enzymatic saccharification than the controls. The PdGAUT12.1 knockdown (PdGAUT12.1-KD) lines also displayed 12 to 52% and 12 to 44% increased plant height and radial stem diameter, respectively, compared to the controls. Knockdown of PdGAUT12.1 resulted in a 25 to 47% reduction in galacturonic acid and 17 to 30% reduction in xylose without affecting total lignin content, revealing that in

  4. Identification of cellular factors binding to acetylated HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Allouch, Awatef; Cereseto, Anna

    2011-11-01

    The viral protein integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of the HIV-1 cDNA into the host cellular genome. We have recently demonstrated that IN is acetylated by a cellular histone acetyltransferase, p300, which modifies three lysines located in the C-terminus of the viral factor (Cereseto et al. in EMBO J 24:3070-3081, 2005). This modification enhances IN catalytic activity, as demonstrated by in vitro assays. Consistently, mutations introduced in the targeted lysines greatly decrease the efficiency of HIV-1 integration. Acetylation was proven to regulate protein functions by modulating protein-protein interactions. HIV-1 to efficiently complete its replication steps, including the integration reaction, requires interacting with numerous cellular factors. Therefore, we sought to investigate whether acetylation might modulate the interaction between IN and the cellular factors. To this aim we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening that differs from the screenings so far performed (Rain et al. in Methods 47:291-297, 2009; Studamire and Goff in Retrovirology 5:48, 2008) for using as bait IN constitutively acetylated. From this analysis we have identified thirteen cellular factors involved in transcription, chromatin remodeling, nuclear transport, RNA binding, protein synthesis regulation and microtubule organization. To validate these interactions, binding assays were performed showing that acetylation increases the affinity of IN with specific factors. Nevertheless, few two-hybrid hits bind with the same affinity the acetylated and the unmodified IN. These results further underlie the relevance of IN post-translational modification by acetylation in HIV-1 replication cycle.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the metalloglycoprotein esterase A4 using a baculovirus expression system

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraki, Toshiki; Shibayama, Naoya; Yoon, Young-Ho; Yun, Kyung-Mook; Hamamoto, Toshiro; Tame, Jeremy R. H.; Park, Sam-Yong

    2007-09-01

    Esterase A4 (EA4) is a timer protein found in diapause eggs of the silkworm Bombyx mori. The gene for this metalloglycoprotein was cloned from B. mori eggs and expressed using a baculovirus expression system in silkworm pupae. Crystals of the purified protein have been grown that diffract to beyond 2.1 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. Esterase A4 (EA4) is a timer protein found in diapause eggs of the silkworm Bombyx mori. The gene for this metalloglycoprotein was cloned from B. mori eggs and expressed using a baculovirus expression system in silkworm pupae. Crystals of the purified protein have been grown that diffract to beyond 2.1 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. The protein crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.1, b = 73.9, c = 47.4 Å, β = 104.1°. With one dimer per asymmetric unit, the crystal volume per unit protein weight (V{sub M}) is 2.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and the solvent content is 47%.

  6. Entamoeba histolytica: soluble and membrane-associated neutral sphingomyelinase-C and other unidentified esterase activity.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Palacios-Corona, Rebeca; Hernández-Luna, Carlos; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito David; Torres de la Cruz, Victor M; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I; González-Salazar, Francisco; Garza-González, Jesús Norberto; Escobedo-Guajardo, Brenda Leticia; Said-Fernández, Salvador

    2010-08-01

    Sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity was measured in Entamoeba histolytica particulate and soluble subcellular fractions. The effects on SMase of incubation time, total protein concentration, pH, and several divalent cations were determined. SMase-C and other unidentified esterase activity were detected in soluble and particulate fractions. SMase-C was 94.5-96.0% higher than the unidentified esterase activity. Soluble and insoluble SMase-C specific activities increased with protein dose and incubation time. Soluble and insoluble SMase-C activities were maximum at pH 7.5 and were dependent on Mg(2+), Mn(2+), or Co(2+), and inhibited by Zn(2+), Hg(2+), Ca(2+), and EDTA. SMase-C was active in the pH range of 3-10 and its maximum activity was at pH 7.5. The soluble and insoluble SMases have remarkably similar physicochemical properties, strongly suggesting that E. histolytica has just one isoform of neutral SMase-C that had not been described before and might be essential for E. histolytica metabolism or virulence. PMID:20350542

  7. Esterase activity of carbonic anhydrases serves as surrogate for selecting antibodies blocking hydratase activity.

    PubMed

    Uda, Narasimha Rao; Seibert, Volker; Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Müller, Philipp; Herzig, Petra; Gondi, Gabor; Zeidler, Reinhard; van Dijk, Marc; Zippelius, Alfred; Renner, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) and carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12) were proposed as potential targets for cancer therapy more than 20 years ago. However, to date, there are only very few antibodies that have been described to specifically target CA9 and CA12 and also block the enzymatic activity of their targets. One of the early stage bottlenecks in identifying CA9- and CA12-inhibiting antibodies has been the lack of a high-throughput screening system that would allow for rapid assessment of inhibition of the targeted carbon dioxide hydratase activity of carbonic anhydrases. In this study, we show that measuring the esterase activity of carbonic anhydrase offers a robust and inexpensive screening method for identifying antibody candidates that block both hydratase and esterase activities of carbonic anhydrase's. To our knowledge, this is the first implementation of a facile surrogate-screening assay to identify potential therapeutic antibodies that block the clinically relevant hydratase activity of carbonic anhydrases. PMID:25775095

  8. A feruloyl esterase (FAE) characterized by relatively high thermostability from the edible mushroom Russula virescens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Rui; Ma, Zengqiang; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzibun

    2014-01-01

    A monomeric feruloyl esterase (FAE) with a molecular mass of 62 kDa was acquired from fresh fruiting bodies of the edible mushroom Russula virescens. The isolation procedure involved ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and SP-Sepharose and finally fast protein liquid chromatography-gel filtration on Superdex 75. Two amino acid sequences were obtained after tryptic digestion, and they both showed some homology with the esterase of some fungi. Maximal activity was observed at pH 5.0 and at 50 °C. The enzyme displayed relatively high thermostability as evidenced by over 70 % residual activity at 70 °C and about 34 % residual activity at 80 °C. The K m and V max for this enzyme on methyl ferulate were 0.19 mM and 1.65 U/mg proteins, respectively. The purified FAE prefers methyl ferulate over methyl caffeate and is least active on methyl p-coumarate. The FAE activity was not significantly affected by the presence of cations such as Mn(2+), Ca(2+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), and K(+) ions but inhibited by Al(3+), Hg(2+), Fe(2+), and Pb(2+) ions at a tested concentration of 2. 5 mM.

  9. Leukocyte esterase urine strips for the screening of men with urethritis--use in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Tyndall, M W; Nasio, J; Maitha, G; Ndinya-Achola, J O; Plummer, F A; Sellors, J W; Luinstra, K E; Jang, D; Mahony, J B; Chernesky, M A

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES--The leukocyte esterase (LE) strip is a useful tool for the screening of men with urethritis. In developing countries, where laboratory facilities are limited, and sexually transmitted diseases endemic, simple and inexpensive diagnostic tests which perform well, would be of great value. METHODS--Men presenting with urethritis to a referral clinic for sexually transmitted diseases in Nairobi, Kenya participated in this cohort analytical study. First-void urine was collected for LE dipstick testing as part of the diagnostic work-up. The results of the dipstick measurement were compared with the laboratory detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. RESULTS--Of 200 men with symptoms of urethritis, 33 (17%) had a pathogen detected from the urethra or the urine. Chlamydia was detected in urine by PCR in 22 (11%), and gonorrhoea was cultured from the urethra in 11 (6%). Esterase activity (trace or greater) had a sensitivity of 76%, a specificity of 80%, a positive predictive value of 42% and a negative predictive value of 94% for the presence of chlamydia or gonorrhoea. CONCLUSIONS--The use of the LE dipstick for the screening of men with symptomatic urethritis can improve diagnostic accuracy and reduce the amount of empiric antimicrobial therapy. The low detection rate of chlamydia in these men with a clinical diagnosis of nongonococcal urethritis needs further study. PMID:8300096

  10. Crystal structure of human esterase D: a potential genetic marker of retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dong; Li, Yang; Song, Gaojie; Zhang, David; Shaw, Neil; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2009-07-10

    Retinoblastoma (RB), a carcinoma of the retina, is caused by mutations in the long arm of chromosome 13, band 13q14. The esterase D (ESD) gene maps at a similar location as the RB gene locus and therefore serves as a potential marker for the prognosis of retinoblastoma. Because very little is known about the structure and function of ESD, we determined the 3-dimensional structure of the enzyme at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution using X-ray crystallography. ESD shows a single domain with an {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold. A number of insertions are observed in the canonical {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold. The active site is located in a positively charged, shallow cleft on the surface lined by a number of aromatic residues. Superimposition studies helped identify the typical catalytic triad residues -- Ser-153, His264, and Asp230 -- involved in catalysis. Mutagenesis of any of the catalytic triad residues to alanine abolished the enzyme activity. Backbone amides of Leu54 and Met150 are involved in the formation of the oxyanion hole. Interestingly, a M150A mutation increased the enzyme activity by 62%. The structure of human ESD determined in this study will aid the elucidation of the physiological role of the enzyme in the human body and will assist in the early diagnosis of retinoblastoma. Wu, D., Li, Y., Song, G., Zhang, D., Shaw, N., Liu, Z. J. Crystal structure of human esterase D: a potential genetic marker of retinoblastoma.

  11. Crystal structures of Ophiostoma piceae sterol esterase: structural insights into activation mechanism and product release.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, Javier; Vaquero, María Eugenia; Prieto, Alicia; Barriuso, Jorge; Martínez, María Jesús; Hermoso, Juan A

    2014-09-01

    Sterol esterases are able to efficiently hydrolyze both sterol esters and triglycerides and to carry out synthesis reactions in the presence of organic solvents. Their high versatility makes them excellent candidates for biotechnological purposes. Sterol esterase from fungus Ophiostoma piceae (OPE) belongs to the family abH03.01 of the Candida rugosa lipase-like proteins. Crystal structures of OPE were solved in this study for the closed and open conformations. Enzyme activation involves a large displacement of the conserved lid, structural rearrangements of loop α16-α17, and formation of a dimer with a large opening. Three PEG molecules are placed in the active site, mimicking chains of the triglyceride substrate, demonstrating the position of the oxyanion hole and the three pockets that accommodate the sn-1, sn-2 and sn-3 fatty acids chains. One of them is an internal tunnel, connecting the active center with the outer surface of the enzyme 30 Å far from the catalytic Ser220. Based on our structural and biochemical results we propose a mechanism by which a great variety of different substrates can be hydrolyzed in OPE paving the way for the construction of new variants to improve the catalytic properties of these enzymes and their biotechnological applications. PMID:25108239

  12. [Characters of two gravity-related esterases in carrot callus cells].

    PubMed

    Guan, P Z; Fei, C K; Yin, J; Liu, M; Zhao, Q; Cai, W M

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of identification of two gravity-related esterases (grEST1 and grEST2) in carrot callus cells (Cai et al. 1998), we continued the study of the characteristics of these two esterases. They have the very special characteristic of SDS resistance. Their activities could be inhibited partially by deoxycholate. beta-Phenylpropionic acid, AgNO3 and CuSO4 had no inhibitory effect on their activities. The activities of grEST1 and grEST2 could be decreased by ascorbic acid and cysteine, and the influence by cysteine was particularly obvious. The molecular weights of grEST1 and grEST2 were shown to be near the ranges of 49-66 kD and 43-59 kD respectively by non-denaturing electrophoresis containing deoxycholate, Triton X-100 and SDS respectively, and the isoelectric points were approximately pH 5.4 and 4.9 respectively. Besides, grEST1 and grEST2 were found in the fraction precipitating at value between 30% and 40% saturation with (NH4)2SO4.

  13. 3-d structure-based amino acid sequence alignment of esterases, lipases and related proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, M.K.; Doctor, B.P.; Cygler, M.; Schrag, J.D.; Sussman, J.L.

    1993-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, enzymes with potential as pretreatment drugs for organophosphate toxicity, are members of a larger family of homologous proteins that includes carboxylesterases, cholesterol esterases, lipases, and several nonhydrolytic proteins. A computer-generated alignment of 18 of the proteins, the acetylcholinesases, butyrylcholinesterases, carboxylesterases, some esterases, and the nonenzymatic proteins has been previously presented. More recently, the three-dimensional structures of two enzymes enzymes in this group, acetylcholinesterase from Torpedo californica and lipase from Geotrichum candidum, have been determined. Based on the x-ray structures and the superposition of these two enzymes, it was possible to obtain an improved amino acid sequence alignment of 32 members of this family of proteins. Examination of this alignment reveals that 24 amino acids are invariant in all of the hydrolytic proteins, and an additional 49 are well conserved. Conserved amino acids include those of the active site, the disulfide bridges, the salt bridges, in the core of the proteins, and at the edges of secondary structural elements. Comparison of the three-dimensional structures makes it possible to find a well-defined structural basis for the conservation of many of these amino acids.

  14. Molecular cloning, overexpression and characterization of a novel feruloyl esterase from a soil metagenomic library.

    PubMed

    Sang, Shu Li; Li, Gang; Hu, Xiao Peng; Liu, Yu Huan

    2011-01-01

    The gene estF27, encoding a protein with feruloyl esterase activity, was cloned through functional screening from a soil metagenomic library and expressed in Escherichiacoli BL21 (DE3) with high solubility. Sequence analysis showed that estF27 encoded a protein of 291 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 31.16 kDa. According to the substrate specificity, EstF27 was classified as a type A feruloyl esterase. EstF27 displayed optimal activity at 40°C and pH 6.8. This enzyme was stable in a broad pH range of 5.0-10.0 over 24 h, and retained more than 50% of its activity after 96 or 120 h incubation in the presence of 3 M KCl or 5 M NaCl. The enzyme activity was slightly enhanced by the addition of Mg(2+) and Fe(3+) at a low concentration, and completely inhibited by Cu(2+). In the enzymatic hydrolysis of destarched wheat bran, EstF27 could release ferulic acid from it in the presence of xylanase from Thermomyces lanuginosus. Given its alkalitolerance, halotolerance and highly soluble expression, EstF27 is a promising candidate for industrial applications.

  15. Crystal structures of Ophiostoma piceae sterol esterase: structural insights into activation mechanism and product release.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, Javier; Vaquero, María Eugenia; Prieto, Alicia; Barriuso, Jorge; Martínez, María Jesús; Hermoso, Juan A

    2014-09-01

    Sterol esterases are able to efficiently hydrolyze both sterol esters and triglycerides and to carry out synthesis reactions in the presence of organic solvents. Their high versatility makes them excellent candidates for biotechnological purposes. Sterol esterase from fungus Ophiostoma piceae (OPE) belongs to the family abH03.01 of the Candida rugosa lipase-like proteins. Crystal structures of OPE were solved in this study for the closed and open conformations. Enzyme activation involves a large displacement of the conserved lid, structural rearrangements of loop α16-α17, and formation of a dimer with a large opening. Three PEG molecules are placed in the active site, mimicking chains of the triglyceride substrate, demonstrating the position of the oxyanion hole and the three pockets that accommodate the sn-1, sn-2 and sn-3 fatty acids chains. One of them is an internal tunnel, connecting the active center with the outer surface of the enzyme 30 Å far from the catalytic Ser220. Based on our structural and biochemical results we propose a mechanism by which a great variety of different substrates can be hydrolyzed in OPE paving the way for the construction of new variants to improve the catalytic properties of these enzymes and their biotechnological applications.

  16. Functional Analysis of Esterase TCE2 Gene from Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisduval) involved in Acaricide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Li; Wei, Peng; Wang, Xiangzun; Shen, Guangmao; Zhang, Jiao; Xiao, Wei; Xu, Zhifeng; Xu, Qiang; He, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The carmine spider mite, Tetranychus cinnabarinus is an important pest of crops and vegetables worldwide, and it has the ability to develop resistance against acaricides rapidly. Our previous study identified an esterase gene (designated TCE2) over-expressed in resistant mites. To investigate this gene’s function in resistance, the expression levels of TCE2 in susceptible, abamectin-, fenpropathrin-, and cyflumetofen-resistant strains were knocked down (65.02%, 63.14%, 57.82%, and 63.99%, respectively) via RNA interference. The bioassay data showed that the resistant levels to three acaricides were significantly decreased after the down-regulation of TCE2, indicating a correlation between the expression of TCE2 and the acaricide-resistance in T. cinnabarinus. TCE2 gene was then re-engineered for heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The recombinant TCE2 exhibited α-naphthyl acetate activity (483.3 ± 71.8 nmol/mg pro. min−1), and the activity of this enzyme could be inhibited by abamectin, fenpropathrin, and cyflumetofen, respectively. HPLC and GC results showed that 10 μg of the recombinant TCE2 could effectively decompose 21.23% fenpropathrin and 49.70% cyflumetofen within 2 hours. This is the first report of a successful heterologous expression of an esterase gene from mites. This study provides direct evidence that TCE2 is a functional gene involved in acaricide resistance in T. cinnabarinus. PMID:26725309

  17. Identification of two novel esterases from a marine metagenomic library derived from South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xinmin; He, Haoze; Guo, Changquan; Sun, Baolin

    2008-09-01

    The demand for novel biocatalysts is increasing in modern biotechnology, which greatly stimulates the development of powerful tools to explore the genetic resources in the environment. Metagenomics, a culture independent strategy, provides an access to valuable genetic resources of the uncultured microbes. In this study, two novel esterase genes designated as estA and estB, which encoded 277- and 328-amino-acid peptides, respectively, were isolated from a marine microbial metagenomic library by functional screening, and the corresponding esterases EstA and EstB were biochemically characterized. Amino acid sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis indicated that EstA together with other putative lipolytic enzymes was closely related to family III, and EstB with its relatives formed a subfamily of family IV. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that EstA contained classical catalytic triad made up of S146-D222-H255, whereas EstB contained an unusual catalytic triad which consisted of S-E-H, an important feature of the subfamily. EstA exhibited habitat-specific characteristics such as its high level of stability in the presence of various divalent cations and at high concentrations of NaCl. EstB displayed remarkable activity against p-nitrophenyl esters and was highly stable in 30% methanol, ethanol, dimethylformamide, and dimethyl sulfoxide, making EstB a potential candidate for industrial applications.

  18. Aspirin inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D. Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F.; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G. Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT-29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin-mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT-29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT-29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin-acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  19. Relationship of histone acetylation to DNA topology and transcription.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, W A; Luchnik, A N

    1991-12-01

    An autonomously replicating plasmid constructed from bovine papiloma virus (BPV) and pBR322 was stably maintained as a nuclear episome in a mouse cell culture. Addition to a cell culture of sodium butyrate (5 mM) induced an increase in plasmid DNA supercoiling of 3-5 turns, an increase in acetylation of cellular histones, and a decrease in plasmid transcription by 2- to 4-fold. After withdrawal of butyrate, DNA supercoiling began to fluctuate in a wave-like manner with an amplitude of up to 3 turns and a period of 3-4 h. These waves gradually faded by 24 h. The transcription of the plasmid and acetylation of cellular histones also oscillated with the same period. The wave-like alterations were not correlated with the cell cycle, for there was no resumption of DNA replication after butyrate withdrawal for at least 24 h. In vitro chemical acetylation of histones with acetyl adenylate also led to an increase in the superhelical density of plasmid DNA. The parallel changes in transcription, histone acetylation, and DNA supercoiling in vivo may indicate a functional innerconnection. Also, the observed in vivo variation in the level of DNA supercoiling directly indicates the possibility of its natural regulation in eukaryotic cells.

  20. Production of furfural from xylose, xylan and corncob in gamma-valerolactone using FeCl3·6H2O as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luxin; Yu, Hongbing; Wang, Pan; Li, Yong

    2014-01-01

    An efficient and simple one-pot monophasic reaction system with small carbon footprint for converting xylose, xylan and corncob into furfural was developed in gamma-valerolactone (GVL, an ideal sustainable solvent derived from lignocelluloses) by using FeCl3·6H2O as catalyst. Good yields of furfural from xylose were obtained, and the system was shown to work for xylan and corncob as well. A surprisingly high furfural yield of 79.6% from untreated corncob was achieved at 458 K for 100 min. Contrary to what was generally believed, the addition of water, reduced the rate of the reactions, but showed positive effect on preventing the furfural from degradation in GVL. Besides, the C6 sugars (glucose and cellulose) afforded 11.4-24.5% furfural yields when employing this catalytic approach. The reaction system proposed in this manuscript showed great potential for optimizing the catalytic process in furfural production.

  1. Production of xylitol and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol from xylan in napier grass by a hydrothermal process with phosphorus oxoacids followed by aqueous phase hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Takata, Eri; Tsuruoka, Tatsushi; Tsutsumi, Ken; Tsutsumi, Yuji; Tabata, Kenji

    2014-09-01

    The production of xylitol and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA) from napier grass was studied using two steps: a hydrothermal process with phosphorus oxoacids followed by aqueous phase hydrogenation with Pd/C. Xylose obtained from the napier grass by the hydrothermal treatment with 3.0 wt% phosphorous acid was subsequently converted into xylitol at 51.6% yield of the xylan in napier grass by hydrogenation with 5.0 wt% Pd/C. The furfural produced from napier grass with a 3.0 wt% phosphoric acid treatment was also directly subjected to the hydrogenation as a hydrolysate to yield 41.4% THFA based on the xylan in napier grass. The yields of xylitol and THFA obtained by hydrogenation using the napier grass hydrolysate containing xylose or furfural were almost the same as those of hydrogenation using commercial materials. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the production of THFA in high yield by hydrogenation directly from biomass hydrolysate.

  2. Furfural Production from d-Xylose and Xylan by Using Stable Nafion NR50 and NaCl in a Microwave-Assisted Biphasic Reaction.

    PubMed

    Le Guenic, Sarah; Gergela, David; Ceballos, Claire; Delbecq, Frederic; Len, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Pentose dehydration and direct transformation of xylan into furfural were performed in a water-cyclopentyl methyl ether (CPME) biphasic system under microwave irradiation. Heated up between 170 and 190 °C in the presence of Nafion NR50 and NaCl, d-xylose, l-arabinose and xylan gave furfural with maximum yields of 80%, 42% and 55%, respectively. The influence of temperature and reaction time on the reaction kinetics was discussed. This study was also completed by the survey of different reactant ratios, such as organic layer-water or catalyst-inorganic salt ratios. The exchange between proton and cation induced by an excess of NaCl was monitored, and a synergetic effect between the remaining protons and the released HCl was also discovered. PMID:27556444

  3. Asparagus IRX9, IRX10, and IRX14A Are Components of an Active Xylan Backbone Synthase Complex that Forms in the Golgi Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Lampugnani, Edwin R; Picard, Kelsey L; Song, Lili; Wu, Ai-Min; Farion, Isabela M; Zhao, Jia; Ford, Kris; Doblin, Monika S; Bacic, Antony

    2016-05-01

    Heteroxylans are abundant components of plant cell walls and provide important raw materials for the food, pharmaceutical, and biofuel industries. A number of studies in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have suggested that the IRREGULAR XYLEM9 (IRX9), IRX10, and IRX14 proteins, as well as their homologs, are involved in xylan synthesis via a Golgi-localized complex termed the xylan synthase complex (XSC). However, both the biochemical and cell biological research lags the genetic and molecular evidence. In this study, we characterized garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) stem xylan biosynthesis genes (AoIRX9, AoIRX9L, AoIRX10, AoIRX14A, and AoIRX14B) by heterologous expression in Nicotiana benthamiana We reconstituted and partially purified an active XSC and showed that three proteins, AoIRX9, AoIRX10, and AoIRX14A, are necessary for xylan xylosyltranferase activity in planta. To better understand the XSC structure and its composition, we carried out coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis to show the molecular interactions between these three IRX proteins. Using a site-directed mutagenesis approach, we showed that the DxD motifs of AoIRX10 and AoIRX14A are crucial for the catalytic activity. These data provide, to our knowledge, the first lines of biochemical and cell biological evidence that AoIRX9, AoIRX10, and AoIRX14A are core components of a Golgi-localized XSC, each with distinct roles for effective heteroxylan biosynthesis. PMID:26951434

  4. Asparagus IRX9, IRX10, and IRX14A Are Components of an Active Xylan Backbone Synthase Complex that Forms in the Golgi Apparatus1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wei; Picard, Kelsey L.; Song, Lili; Wu, Ai-Min; Farion, Isabela M.; Zhao, Jia; Ford, Kris; Bacic, Antony

    2016-01-01

    Heteroxylans are abundant components of plant cell walls and provide important raw materials for the food, pharmaceutical, and biofuel industries. A number of studies in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have suggested that the IRREGULAR XYLEM9 (IRX9), IRX10, and IRX14 proteins, as well as their homologs, are involved in xylan synthesis via a Golgi-localized complex termed the xylan synthase complex (XSC). However, both the biochemical and cell biological research lags the genetic and molecular evidence. In this study, we characterized garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) stem xylan biosynthesis genes (AoIRX9, AoIRX9L, AoIRX10, AoIRX14A, and AoIRX14B) by heterologous expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We reconstituted and partially purified an active XSC and showed that three proteins, AoIRX9, AoIRX10, and AoIRX14A, are necessary for xylan xylosyltranferase activity in planta. To better understand the XSC structure and its composition, we carried out coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis to show the molecular interactions between these three IRX proteins. Using a site-directed mutagenesis approach, we showed that the DxD motifs of AoIRX10 and AoIRX14A are crucial for the catalytic activity. These data provide, to our knowledge, the first lines of biochemical and cell biological evidence that AoIRX9, AoIRX10, and AoIRX14A are core components of a Golgi-localized XSC, each with distinct roles for effective heteroxylan biosynthesis. PMID:26951434

  5. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Analysis of the Glucuronoyl Esterase Catalytic Domain from Hypocrea jecorina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei) was over-expressed, purified, and crystallized by sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.4 M sodium/potassium phosphate pH 6.9. Crystals had space group P212121 and X-ray diffraction data were...

  6. Structure and properties of the esterase from non-LTR retrotransposons suggest a role for lipids in retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Anna M; Schmidt, Steffen; Jonas, Stefanie; Vollmer, Benjamin; Khazina, Elena; Weichenrieder, Oliver

    2013-12-01

    Non-LTR retrotransposons are mobile genetic elements and play a major role in eukaryotic genome evolution and disease. Similar to retroviruses they encode a reverse transcriptase, but their genomic integration mechanism is fundamentally different, and they lack homologs of the retroviral nucleocapsid-forming protein Gag. Instead, their first open reading frames encode distinct multi-domain proteins (ORF1ps) presumed to package the retrotransposon-encoded RNA into ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs). The mechanistic roles of ORF1ps are poorly understood, particularly of ORF1ps that appear to harbor an enzymatic function in the form of an SGNH-type lipolytic acetylesterase. We determined the crystal structures of the coiled coil and esterase domains of the ORF1p from the Danio rerio ZfL2-1 element. We demonstrate a dimerization of the coiled coil and a hydrolytic activity of the esterase. Furthermore, the esterase binds negatively charged phospholipids and liposomes, but not oligo-(A) RNA. Unexpectedly, the esterase can split into two dynamic half-domains, suited to engulf long fatty acid substrates extending from the active site. These properties indicate a role for lipids and membranes in non-LTR retrotransposition. We speculate that Gag-like membrane targeting properties of ORF1ps could play a role in RNP assembly and in membrane-dependent transport or localization processes. PMID:24003030

  7. ISOLATION OF JUVENILE HORMONES ESTERASE AND ITS PARTIAL CDNA CLONE FROM THE BEETLE, TENEBRIO MOLITOR. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Juvenile hormone esterase (JHE) plays an essential role in insect development. It is partially responsible for the clearance of juvenile hormone (JH) which regulates various aspects of insect development and reproduction. Because of its role in regulating JH titer, this enzyme...

  8. Statistical optimization of medium components and physicochemical parameters to simultaneously enhance bacterial growth and esterase production by Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Mazzucotelli, Cintia Anabela; Moreira, María del Rosario; Ansorena, María Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a genus extensively studied because of its high potential for biotechnological application, principally in biocontrol techniques. However, the optimization of esterase production by this strain has been scarcely studied. The aim of this work was to select and optimize the physicochemical and nutritional parameters that significantly influence the growth and esterase production of B. thuringiensis. To this purpose, 6 nutritional factors and 2 physicochemical parameters were evaluated using a Plackett-Burman design. Significant variables were optimized using a Box-Behnken design and through the desirability function to select the levels of the variables that simultaneously maximize microbial growth and esterase production. The optimum conditions resulting from simultaneous optimization of the responses under study were found to be 1 g/L glucose, 15 g/L peptone, and 3.25 g/L NaCl. Under these optimal conditions, it was possible to achieve a 2.5 log CFU/mL increase in bacterial growth and a 113-fold increase in esterase productivity, compared with minimal medium without agitation.

  9. Generation of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) accumulating heterologous endo-xylanase or ferulic acid esterase in the endosperm

    SciTech Connect

    Harholt, Jesper; Bach, Inga C; Lind-Bouquin, Solveig; Nunan, Kylie J.; Madrid, Susan M.; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Holm, Preben B.; Scheller, Henrik V.

    2009-12-08

    Endo-xylanase (from Bacillus subtilis) or ferulic acid esterase (from Aspergillus niger) were expressed in wheat under the control of the endosperm specific 1DX5 glutenin promoter. Constructs both with and without the endoplasmic reticulum retention signal KDEL were used. Transgenic plants were recovered in all four cases but no qualitative differences could be observed whether KDEL was added or not. Endo-xylanase activity in transgenic grains was increased between two and three fold relative to wild type. The grains were shriveled and had a 25-33% decrease in mass. Extensive analysis of the cell walls showed a 10-15% increase in arabinose to xylose ratio, a 50% increase in the proportion of water extractable arabinoxylan, and a shift in the MW of the water extractable arabinoxylan from being mainly larger than 85 kD to being between 2 kD and 85 kD. Ferulic acid esterase expressing grains were also shriveled and the seed weight was decreased by 20-50%. No ferulic acid esterase activity could be detected in wild type grains whereas ferulic acid esterase activity was detected in transgenic lines. The grain cell walls had 15-40% increase in water unextractable arabinoxylan and a decrease in monomeric ferulic acid between 13 and 34%. In all the plants the observed changes are consistent with a plant response that serves to minimize the effect of the heterologously expressed enzymes by increasing arabinoxylan biosynthesis and cross-linking.

  10. Novel ferulate esterase from Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria and analyses of the recombinant enzyme produced in E. coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a plate containing ethyl ferulate as sole carbon source, various bacteria cultures were screened for ferulate esterase (FAE). Among a dozen of species showing positive FAE, one Lactobacillus fermentum strain NRRL 1932 demonstrated the strongest activity. Using a published sequence of ferulate ...

  11. Novel feruloyl esterase from Lactobacillus fermentum NRRL B-1932 and analysis of the recombinant enzyme produced in Escherichia coli.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using agar plates containing ethyl ferulate as the sole carbon source, 33 Lactobacillus strains were screened for feruloyl esterase (FE) activity. Among a dozen species showing a clearing zone on the opaque plate containing ethyl ferulate, Lactobacillus fermentum NRRL B-1932 demonstrated the stronge...

  12. Monitoring Lipase/Esterase Activity by Stopped Flow in a Sequential Injection Analysis System Using p-Nitrophenyl Butyrate

    PubMed Central

    Pliego, Jorge; Mateos, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez, Jorge; Valero, Francisco; Baeza, Mireia; Femat, Ricardo; Camacho, Rosa; Sandoval, Georgina; Herrera-López, Enrique J.

    2015-01-01

    Lipases and esterases are biocatalysts used at the laboratory and industrial level. To obtain the maximum yield in a bioprocess, it is important to measure key variables, such as enzymatic activity. The conventional method for monitoring hydrolytic activity is to take out a sample from the bioreactor to be analyzed off-line at the laboratory. The disadvantage of this approach is the long time required to recover the information from the process, hindering the possibility to develop control systems. New strategies to monitor lipase/esterase activity are necessary. In this context and in the first approach, we proposed a lab-made sequential injection analysis system to analyze off-line samples from shake flasks. Lipase/esterase activity was determined using p-nitrophenyl butyrate as the substrate. The sequential injection analysis allowed us to measure the hydrolytic activity from a sample without dilution in a linear range from 0.05–1.60 U/mL, with the capability to reach sample dilutions up to 1000 times, a sampling frequency of five samples/h, with a kinetic reaction of 5 min and a relative standard deviation of 8.75%. The results are promising to monitor lipase/esterase activity in real time, in which optimization and control strategies can be designed. PMID:25633600

  13. Monitoring lipase/esterase activity by stopped flow in a sequential injection analysis system using p-nitrophenyl butyrate.

    PubMed

    Pliego, Jorge; Mateos, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez, Jorge; Valero, Francisco; Baeza, Mireia; Femat, Ricardo; Camacho, Rosa; Sandoval, Georgina; Herrera-López, Enrique J

    2015-01-01

    Lipases and esterases are biocatalysts used at the laboratory and industrial level. To obtain the maximum yield in a bioprocess, it is important to measure key variables, such as enzymatic activity. The conventional method for monitoring hydrolytic activity is to take out a sample from the bioreactor to be analyzed off-line at the laboratory. The disadvantage of this approach is the long time required to recover the information from the process, hindering the possibility to develop control systems. New strategies to monitor lipase/esterase activity are necessary. In this context and in the first approach, we proposed a lab-made sequential injection analysis system to analyze off-line samples from shake flasks. Lipase/esterase activity was determined using p-nitrophenyl butyrate as the substrate. The sequential injection analysis allowed us to measure the hydrolytic activity from a sample without dilution in a linear range from 0.05-1.60 U/mL, with the capability to reach sample dilutions up to 1000 times, a sampling frequency of five samples/h, with a kinetic reaction of 5 min and a relative standard deviation of 8.75%. The results are promising to monitor lipase/esterase activity in real time, in which optimization and control strategies can be designed. PMID:25633600

  14. The binding, synergistic and structural characteristics of BsEXLX1 for loosening the main components of lignocellulose: Lignin, xylan, and cellulose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qun; Chen, Liang; Lin, Hui; Yu, Daobing; Shen, Qi; Wan, Li; Zhao, Yuhua

    2016-10-01

    The bacterial expansin, BsEXLX1, has been studied as a model to understand the synergistic effect of expansins on lignocellulose degradation and the structure-function relationships of expansins. However, the specific mechanism is still poorly understood. In this study, the binding, synergistic and structural characteristics of BsEXLX1 for loosening the main components of lignocellulose: lignin, xylan, and cellulose, were further characterized. Results showed that BsEXLX1 preferentially binds to xylan over lignin or cellulose under various conditions. The binding of BsEXLX1 to all substrates increased linearly with the initial concentration of BsEXLX1. But the changing rate of binding (i.e., slope of the line; k value) varied with the incubation temperature. Interestingly, the binding of BsEXLX1 to substrates did not saturate. Mutating residue-125, 126 or 171 indicated their importance for binding, but they were less important for binding to xylan. Through binding assays and homologous modeling, it was concluded that residue-125 and 171 play more important roles in the structural maintenance of BsEXLX1. By comparing the synergistic activity of BsEXLX1 or its mutants, it was found that synergistic activity is not correlated with specific binding. All these results can lead deeper understand about the mechanism of wall loosening by expansins, and further promote the application of expansins in lignocellulose degradation. PMID:27542746

  15. Dynamic changes in histone acetylation regulate origins of DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, Ashwin; Gafken, Philip R.; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    While histone modifications have been implicated in many DNA-dependent processes, their precise role in DNA replication remains largely unknown. Here, we describe a very efficient, single-step method to specifically purify histones located around an origin of replication from S. cerevisiae. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we have obtained a comprehensive view of the histone modifications surrounding the origin of replication throughout the cell cycle. We have discovered that histone H3 and H4 acetylation is dynamically regulated around an origin of replication, at the level of multiply-acetylated histones. Furthermore, we find that this acetylation is required for efficient origin activation during S-phase. PMID:20228802

  16. Synthetic biology for engineering acetyl coenzyme A metabolism in yeast.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used cell factory for the production of fuels, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The use of this cell factory for cost-efficient production of novel fuels and chemicals requires high yields and low by-product production. Many industrially interesting chemicals are biosynthesized from acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), which serves as a central precursor metabolite in yeast. To ensure high yields in production of these chemicals, it is necessary to engineer the central carbon metabolism so that ethanol production is minimized (or eliminated) and acetyl-CoA can be formed from glucose in high yield. Here the perspective of generating yeast platform strains that have such properties is discussed in the context of a major breakthrough with expression of a functional pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the cytosol. PMID:25370498

  17. An acetylation rheostat for the control of muscle energy homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Menzies, Keir; Auwerx, Johan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years the role of acetylation has gained ground as an essential modulator of intermediary metabolism in skeletal muscle. Imbalance in energy homeostasis or chronic cellular stress, due to diet, aging or disease, translate into alterations in the acetylation levels of key proteins which governs bioenergetics, cellular substrate use and/or changes in mitochondrial content and function. For example, cellular stress induced by exercise or caloric restriction can alter the coordinated activity of acetyltransferases and deacetylases to increase mitochondrial biogenesis and function in order to adapt to low energetic levels. The natural duality of these enzymes, as metabolic sensors and effector proteins, have helped biologists understand how the body can integrate seemingly distinct signaling pathways to control mitochondrial biogenesis, insulin sensitivity, glucose transport, reactive oxygen species handling, angiogenesis and muscle satellite cell proliferation/differentiation. Our review will summarize the recent developments related to acetylation dependent responses following metabolic stress in skeletal muscle. PMID:23999889

  18. An acetylation rheostat for the control of muscle energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Keir; Auwerx, Johan

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, the role of acetylation has gained ground as an essential modulator of intermediary metabolism in skeletal muscle. Imbalance in energy homeostasis or chronic cellular stress, due to diet, aging, or disease, translate into alterations in the acetylation levels of key proteins which govern bioenergetics, cellular substrate use, and/or changes in mitochondrial content and function. For example, cellular stress induced by exercise or caloric restriction can alter the coordinated activity of acetyltransferases and deacetylases to increase mitochondrial biogenesis and function in order to adapt to low energetic levels. The natural duality of these enzymes, as metabolic sensors and effector proteins, has helped biologists to understand how the body can integrate seemingly distinct signaling pathways to control mitochondrial biogenesis, insulin sensitivity, glucose transport, reactive oxygen species handling, angiogenesis, and muscle satellite cell proliferation/differentiation. Our review will summarize the recent developments related to acetylation-dependent responses following metabolic stress in skeletal muscle. PMID:23999889

  19. Differences in distribution of esterase between cell fractions of rat liver homogenates prepared in various media. Relevance to the lysosomal location of the enzyme in the intact cell

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, Patience C.; Holt, S. J.

    1971-01-01

    The distribution of esterase in subcellular fractions of rat liver homogenates was compared with that of the lysosomal enzyme acid phosphatase and the microsomal enzyme glucose 6-phosphatase. Most of the esterase from sucrose homogenate sediments with glucose 6-phosphatase and about 8% is recovered in the supernatant. However, up to 53% of the esterase can be washed from microtome sections of unfixed liver, in which less cellular damage would be expected than that caused by homogenization. About 40% of both esterase and acid phosphatase are recovered in the soluble fraction after homogenization in aqueous glycerol or in a two-phase system (Arcton 113–0.25m-sucrose), although glucose 6-phosphatase is still recovered in the microsomal fraction of such homogenates. The esterase of the microsomal fraction prepared from a sucrose homogenate is much more readily released by treatment with 0.26% deoxycholate than are other constituents of this fraction. The release of esterase from the microsomal fraction by the detergent and its concomitant release with acid phosphatase after homogenization in glycerol or the two-phase system suggests that a greater proportion of esterase may be present in lysosomes of the intact cell than is indicated by the results of standard fractionation procedures. PMID:4335692

  20. Synthesis of polyrotaxanes from acetyl-β-cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristić, I. S.; Nikolić, L.; Nikolić, V.; Ilić, D.; Budinski-Simendić, J.

    2011-12-01

    Polyrotaxanes are intermediary products in the synthesis of topological gels. They are created by inclusion complex formation of hydrophobic linear macromolecules with cyclodextrins or their derivatives. Then, pairs of cyclodextrin molecules with covalently linkage were practically forming the nodes of the semi-flexible polymer network. Such gels are called topological gels and they can absorb huge quantities of water due to the net flexibility allowing the poly(ethylene oxide) chains to slide through the cyclodextrin cavities, without being pulled out altogether. For polyrotaxane formation poly(ethylene oxide) was used like linear macromolecules. There are hydroxyl groups at poly(ethylene oxide) chains, whereby the linking of the voluminous molecules should be made. To avoid the reaction of cyclodextrin OH groups with stoppers, they should be protected by, e.g., acetylation. In this work, the acetylation of the OH groups of β-cyclodextrin was performed by acetic acid anhydride with iodine as the catalyst. The acetylation reaction was assessed by the FTIR and HPLC method. By the HPLC analysis was found that the acetylation was completed in 20 minutes. Inserting of poly(ethylene oxide) with 4000 g/mol molecule mass into acetyl-β-cyclodextrin with 2:1 poly(ethylene oxide) monomer unit to acetyl-β-cyclodextrin ratio was also monitored by FTIR, and it was found that the process was completed in 12 h at the temperature of 10°C. If the process is performed at temperatures above 10°C, or for periods longer than 12 hours, the process of uncontrolled hydrolysis of acetate groups was initiated.

  1. Complex N-Acetylation of TriethylenetetramineS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Cerrada-Gimenez, Marc; Weisell, Janne; Hyvönen, Mervi T.; Hee Park, Myung; Alhonen, Leena; Vepsäläinen, Jouko

    2011-01-01

    Triethylenetetramine (TETA) is an efficient copper chelator that has versatile clinical potential. We have recently shown that spermidine/spermine-N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT1), the key polyamine catabolic enzyme, acetylates TETA in vitro. Here, we studied the metabolism of TETA in three different mouse lines: syngenic, SSAT1-overexpressing, and SSAT1-deficient (SSAT1-KO) mice. The mice were sacrificed at 1, 2, or 4 h after TETA injection (300 mg/kg i.p.). We found only N1-acetyltriethylenetetramine (N1AcTETA) and/or TETA in the liver, kidney, and plasma samples. As expected, SSAT1-overexpressing mice acetylated TETA at an accelerated rate compared with syngenic and SSAT1-KO mice. It is noteworthy that SSAT1-KO mice metabolized TETA as syngenic mice did, probably by thialysine acetyltransferase, which had a Km value of 2.5 ± 0.3 mM and a kcat value of 1.3 s−1 for TETA when tested in vitro with the human recombinant enzyme. Thus, the present results suggest that there are at least two N-acetylases potentially metabolizing TETA. However, their physiological significance for TETA acetylation requires further studies. Furthermore, we detected chemical intramolecular N-acetyl migration from the N1 to N3 position of N1AcTETA and N1,N8-diacetyltriethylenetetramine in an acidified high-performance liquid chromatography sample matrix. The complex metabolism of TETA together with the intramolecular N-acetyl migration may explain the huge individual variations in the acetylation rate of TETA reported earlier. PMID:21878558

  2. Esterase detoxication of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors using human liver samples in vitro.

    PubMed

    Moser, Virginia C; Padilla, Stephanie

    2016-04-15

    Organophosphorus (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxication can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON1) are considered factors underlying age-related sensitivity differences. We used an in vitro system to measure detoxication of AChE-inhibiting pesticides mediated via these esterases. Recombinant human AChE was used as a bioassay of inhibitor concentration following incubation with detoxifying tissue: liver plus Ca(+2) (to stimulate PON1s, measuring activity of both esterases) or EGTA (to inhibit PON1s, thereby measuring CaE activity). AChE inhibitory concentrations of aldicarb, chlorpyrifos oxon, malaoxon, methamidophos, oxamyl, paraoxon, and methylparaoxon were incubated with liver homogenates from adult male rat or one of 20 commercially provided human (11-83 years of age) liver samples. Detoxication was defined as the difference in inhibition produced by the pesticide alone and inhibition measured in combination with liver plus Ca(+2) or liver plus EGTA. Generally, rat liver produced more detoxication than did the human samples. There were large detoxication differences across human samples for some pesticides (especially malaoxon, chlorpyrifos oxon) but not for others (e.g., aldicarb, methamidophos); for the most part these differences did not correlate with age or sex. Chlorpyrifos oxon was fully detoxified only in the presence of Ca(+2) in both rat and human livers. Detoxication of paraoxon and methylparaoxon in rat liver was greater with Ca(+2), but humans showed less differentiation than rats between Ca(+2) and EGTA conditions. This suggests the importance of PON1 detoxication for these three OPs in the rat, but mostly only for chlorpyrifos oxon in human samples. Malaoxon was detoxified similarly with Ca(+2) or EGTA, and the differences across humans correlated with metabolism of p

  3. Esterases activity in the axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum exposed to chlorpyrifos and its implication to motor activity.

    PubMed

    Robles-Mendoza, Cecilia; Zúñiga-Lagunes, Sebastian R; Ponce de León-Hill, Claudia A; Hernández-Soto, Jesús; Vanegas-Pérez, Cecilia

    2011-10-01

    The axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum is a neotenic salamander considered a good biological model due to its ability to regenerate limbs, tail, brain and heart cells. Nevertheless, severe reduction of A. mexicanum wild populations in the lacustrine area of Xochimilco, the natural habitat of the axolotl, could be related to several environmental pressures as the presence of organophosphate pesticides (OPPs), intensively applied in agricultural activities in Xochimilco. Thus the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of environmentally realistic chlorpyrifos (CPF) concentrations, a OPP commonly used in this zone, on esterases activity (acetylcholinesterase and carboxylesterase) and bioconcentration of CPF and to relate them with the motor activity of A. mexicanum juveniles. Axolotls were exposed 48 h to 0.05 and 0.1mg CPF/L, and the responses were evaluated at the end of the CPF exposure. Results suggest that CPF is bioconcentrated into axolotls and that the CPF internal concentrations are related with the observed inhibition activity of AChE (>50%) and CbE (≈ 50%). CPF concentration responsible of the inhibition of the 50% of AChE activity (IC50) was estimated in 0.04 mg CPF/L; however IC50 for CbE activity was not possible to calculate since inhibition levels were lower than 50%, results that suggest a higher resistance of CbE enzymatic activity to CPF. However, motor activity was a more sensitive endpoint to CPF poisoning since time that axolotls spent active and walking, frequency and speed of swimming, frequency of prey attack were reduced >90% of control groups. The motor activity alterations in the axolotl could be related with the registered esterases inhibition. Thus important alterations on axolotls were identified even at short time and low concentrations of CPF exposure. Also, it was possible to link biochemical responses as esterases activity with higher levels of biological organization as behavior. This study provides tools for the regulation of the

  4. Esterase mediated resistance against synthetic pyrethroids in field populations of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Punjab districts of India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nirbhay Kumar; Rath, Shitanshu S

    2014-08-29

    Detection of resistance levels against cypermethrin and deltamethrin, the most commonly used synthetic pyrethroids (SP), in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus collected from thirteen districts of Punjab (India) was carried out using adult immersion test. The regression graphs of probit mortality of ticks plotted against log values of concentrations of drugs were utilized for the determination of slope of mortality, lethal concentration for 50% (LC50), 95% (LC95) and resistance factor (RF). On the basis of the data generated on variables (mortality, egg mass weight, reproductive index and percentage inhibition of oviposition) the resistance levels were categorized. Against cypermethrin RFs of 1.48-11.22 were recorded in 12 isolates whereas, one isolate was susceptible. Resistance factors against deltamethrin were 2.4-38.54 and all 13 isolates were found to be resistant. Quantitative analysis of general esterase activity (measured by the production of the metabolite naphthol) revealed a range of 3.34 ± 0.30-13.75 ± 1.33 and 1.31 ± 0.15-8.09 ± 0.68 μmol/min/mg protein for α and β-esterase activity, respectively in different field isolates. Further, multiple pairwise comparisons of the mean values with susceptible strain (Tukey, P = 0.05) revealed significant elevated levels of both α-esterase and β-esterase in nine tick isolates resistant to both deltamethrin and cypermethrin. The data generated on acaricide resistant status and esterase mediated mechanism in ticks will help in formulating tick control strategy for the region.

  5. A cold-adapted esterase of a novel marine isolate, Pseudoalteromonas arctica: gene cloning, enzyme purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Al Khudary, Rami; Venkatachalam, Ramprasath; Katzer, Moritz; Elleuche, Skander; Antranikian, Garabed

    2010-05-01

    A gene encoding an esterase (estO) was identified and sequenced from a gene library screen of the psychrotolerant bacterium Pseudoalteromonas arctica. Analysis of the 1,203 bp coding region revealed that the deduced peptide sequence is composed of 400 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 44.1 kDa. EstO contains a N-terminal esterase domain and an additional OsmC domain at the C-terminus (osmotically induced family of proteins). The highly conserved five-residue motif typical for all alpha/beta hydrolases (G x S x G) was detected from position 104 to 108 together with a putative catalytic triad consisting of Ser(106), Asp(196), and His(225). Sequence comparison showed that EstO exhibits 90% amino acid identity with hypothetical proteins containing similar esterase and OsmC domains but only around 10% identity to the amino acid sequences of known esterases. EstO variants with and without the OsmC domain were produced and purified as His-tag fusion proteins in E. coli. EstO displayed an optimum pH of 7.5 and optimum temperature of 25 degrees C with more than 50% retained activity at the freezing point of water. The thermostability of EstO (50% activity after 5 h at 40 degrees C) dramatically increased in the truncated variant (50% activity after 2.5 h at 90 degrees C). Furthermore, the esterase displays broad substrate specificity for esters of short-chain fatty acids (C(2)-C(8)).

  6. Leucocyte esterase, glucose and C-reactive protein in the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    De Vecchi, E; Villa, F; Bortolin, M; Toscano, M; Tacchini, L; Romanò, C L; Drago, L

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of joint fluid is of paramount importance for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections. Different markers of inflammation and/or infection in joint fluid have been proposed for diagnosis of these infections. In this study we evaluated the performance of leucocyte esterase, C-reactive protein (CRP) and glucose assays in synovial fluids from 129 patients with septic (n = 27) or aseptic (n = 102) prosthetic joint failure. Samples were collected in serum tubes and centrifuged to limit the presence of corpuscle interfering with the assays. Determinations of leucocyte esterase and glucose were carried out by means of enzymatic colorimetric reactions performed on strips for urine analysis. Tests were considered positive when graded + or ++ whereas traces or absence of colour were considered negative. CRP was measured using an automated turbidimetric method and considered suggestive for infections when >10 mg/L. Leucocyte esterase was positive in 25/27 infected patients and negative in 99/102 not infected patients (sensitivity 92.6%, specificity 97.0%). CRP was higher than the threshold in 22/27 infected patients and in 6/102 not infected patients (sensitivity: 81.5%; specificity: 94.1%) whereas glucose showed the lowest sensitivity (77.8%) and specificity (81.4%), being negative in 21/27 and 19/102 infected and not infected patients, respectively. CRP led to a correct diagnosis in 19 of 22 patients with discordant esterase and glucose results. In conclusion, evaluation of leucocyte esterase, glucose and CRP may represent a useful tool for rapid diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections. PMID:27040804

  7. Analysing deltamethrin susceptibility and pyrethroid esterase activity variations in sylvatic and domestic Triatoma infestans at the embryonic stage

    PubMed Central

    Santo-Orihuela, Pablo Luis; Carvajal, Guillermo; Picollo, María Inés; Vassena, Claudia Viviana

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the deltamethrin susceptibility of eggs from Triatoma infestans populations and the contribution of pyrethroid esterases to deltamethrin degradation. Insects were collected from sylvatic areas, including Veinte de Octubre and Kirus-Mayu (Bolivia) and from domiciliary areas, including El Palmar (Bolivia) and La Pista (Argentina). Deltamethrin susceptibility was determined by dose-response bioassays. Serial dilutions of deltamethrin (0.0005-1 mg/mL) were topically applied to 12-day-old eggs. Samples from El Palmar had the highest lethal dose ratio (LDR) value (44.90) compared to the susceptible reference strain (NFS), whereas the Veinte de Octubre samples had the lowest value (0.50). Pyrethroid esterases were evaluated using 7-coumaryl permethrate (7-CP) on individually homogenised eggs from each population and from NFS. The El Palmar and La Pista samples contained 40.11 and 36.64 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively, and these values were statistically similar to NFS (34.92 pmol/min/mg protein) and different from Kirus-Mayu and Veinte de Octubre (27.49 and 22.69 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively). The toxicological data indicate that the domestic populations were resistant to deltamethrin, but no statistical contribution of 7-CP esterases was observed. The sylvatic populations had similar LDR values to NFS, but lower 7-CP esterase activities. Moreover, this is the first study of the pyrethroid esterases on T. infestans eggs employing a specific substrate (7-CP). PMID:24402155

  8. Rapid selection and identification of Miscanthus genotypes with enhanced glucan and xylan yields from hydrothermal pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Because many Miscanthus genotypes can be cultivated with relatively high productivity and carbohydrate content, Miscanthus has great potential as an energy crop that can support large scale biological production of biofuels. Results In this study, batch hydrothermal pretreatment at 180°C for 35 min followed by enzymatic hydrolysis was shown to give the highest total sugar yields for Miscanthus x giganteus cv. Illinois planted in Illinois. High throughput pretreatment at 180°C for 35 min and 17.5 min followed by co-hydrolysis in a multi-well batch reactor identified two varieties out of 80 that had significantly higher sugar yields from pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis than others. The differences in performance were then related to compositions of the 80 varieties to provide insights into desirable traits for Miscanthus that enhance sugar yields. Conclusions High throughput pretreatment and co-hydrolysis (HTPH) rapidly identified promising genotypes from a wide range of Miscanthus genotypes, including hybrids of Miscanthus sacchariflorus/M. sinensis and Miscanthus lutarioriparius, differentiating the more commercially promising species from the rest. The total glucan plus xylan content in Miscanthus appeared to influence both mass and theoretical yields, while lignin and ash contents did not have a predictable influence on performance. PMID:22863302

  9. Molecular characterization of a cold-active recombinant xylanase from Flavobacterium johnsoniae and its applicability in xylan hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shicheng; Kaufman, Michael G.; Miazgowicz, Kerri L.; Bagdasarian, Michael; Walker, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    A novel xylanase gene, xyn10A, was cloned from Flavobacterium johsoniae, overexpressed in a flavobacterial expression system, the recombinant enzyme purified by Ni-affinity chromatography, and enzyme structure and activity analyzed. Xyn10A was found to be a modular xylanase with an Fn3 accessory domain on its N-terminal and a catalytic region on the C-terminal. The optimum pH and temperature for Xyn10A was 8.0 and 30° C, but Xyn10A retained 50% activity at 4°C, indicating that Xyn10A is a cold-active xylanase. A Fn3-deletion xylanase had relative activity ca. 3.6-fold lower than the wild-type, indicating that Fn3 promotes xylanase activity. The Fn3 region also contributed to stability of the enzyme at elevated temperatures. However, Fn3 did not bind this xylanase to insoluble substrates. The enzyme hydrolyzed xylo-oligosaccharides into xylobiose, and xylose with xylobiose as the main product, confirming that Xyn10A is a strict endo-β-1,4-xylanase. Xyn10A also hydrolyzed birchwood and beechwood xylan to yield mainly xylose, xylobiose and xylotriose. PMID:23196234

  10. Agar-agar entrapment increases the stability of endo-β-1,4-xylanase for repeated biodegradation of xylan.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Zainab; Shahid, Faiza; Ul Qader, Shah Ali; Aman, Afsheen

    2015-04-01

    Microbial xylanases, specially endo-β-1,4-xylanase catalyzes the hydrolysis of xylan, is considered one of the most significant hydrolases. It has numerous applications but most extensively is utilized in paper and pulp industry as a bio-bleaching agent. Immobilization technique is comprehensively studied with the expectation of modifying and improving enzyme stability and characteristics for commercial purposes. Currently, matrix entrapment technique is applied to immobilize endo-β-1,4-xylanase within agar-agar gel beads produced by Geobacillus stearothermophilus KIBGE-IB29. Maximal enzyme immobilization yield was achieved at 2.5% of agar-agar concentration. Optimized conditions demonstrated an increase in the optimal reaction time from 05 min to 30 min and incubation temperature from 50 °C to 60 °C with reference to free enzyme whereas; no effect was observed for optimum pH. Entrapment technique uniquely changed the kinetic parameters of immobilized endo-β-1,4-xylanase (Km: 0.5074 mg min(-1) to 0.5230 mg min(-1) and Vmax: 4773 U min(-1) to 968 U min(-1)) as compared to free enzyme. However, immobilized enzyme displayed broad thermal stability and retained 79.0% of its initial activity at 80 °C up to 30 min whereas; free enzyme completely lost its activity at this temperature. With respect to economic feasibility, the immobilized enzyme showed impressive recycling efficiency up to six reaction cycles. PMID:25603143

  11. Acetylated histone H4 is reduced in human gastric adenomas and carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ono, S; Oue, N; Kuniyasu, H; Suzuki, T; Ito, R; Matsusaki, K; Ishikawa, T; Tahara, E; Yasui, W

    2002-09-01

    Acetylation of core histones is closely linked to transcriptional activation of various genes. The acetylation levels of nucleosomal histones can be modified through a balance of histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases. To elucidate the role of histone acetylation in human gastric carcinogenesis, we studied the status of histone H4 acetylation in gastric carcinoma tissues and corresponding non-neoplastic mucosa. The status of histone acetylation was assessed by examining the expression of acetylated histone H4 through Western blotting and immunohistochemistry using an anti-acetylated histone H4 antibody. The levels of acetylated histone H4 expression were obviously reduced in 72% (13/18) of gastric carcinomas in comparison with non-neoplastic mucosa by Western blotting. In immunohistochemistry, acetylated histone H4 was clearly detected in the nuclei of both non-neoplastic epithelial and stromal cells, whereas the levels of acetylated histone H4 were heterogeneous or reduced in 66% (38/57) of gastric carcinomas and 46% (6/13) of gastric adenomas. Reduced expression of acetylated histone H4 was also observed in some areas of intestinal metaplasia adjacent to carcinomas. Reduction in the expression of acetylated histone H4 was significantly correlated with advanced stage, depth of tumor invasion and lymph node metastasis. These results suggest that low levels of histone acetylation may be closely associated with the development and progression of gastric carcinomas, possibly through alteration of gene expression.

  12. Biomass-to-bio-products application of feruloyl esterase from Aspergillus clavatus.

    PubMed

    Damásio, André R L; Braga, Cleiton Márcio Pinto; Brenelli, Lívia B; Citadini, Ana Paula; Mandelli, Fernanda; Cota, Junio; de Almeida, Rodrigo Ferreira; Salvador, Victor Hugo; Paixao, Douglas Antonio Alvaredo; Segato, Fernando; Mercadante, Adriana Zerlotti; de Oliveira Neto, Mario; do Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Squina, Fabio M

    2013-08-01

    The structural polysaccharides contained in plant cell walls have been pointed to as a promising renewable alternative to petroleum and natural gas. Ferulic acid is a ubiquitous component of plant polysaccharides, which is found in either monomeric or dimeric forms and is covalently linked to arabinosyl residues. Ferulic acid has several commercial applications in food and pharmaceutical industries. The study herein introduces a novel feruloyl esterase from Aspergillus clavatus (AcFAE). Along with a comprehensive functional and biophysical characterization, the low-resolution structure of this enzyme was also determined by small-angle X-ray scattering. In addition, we described the production of phenolic compounds with antioxidant capacity from wheat arabinoxylan and sugarcane bagasse using AcFAE. The ability to specifically cleave ester linkages in hemicellulose is useful in several biotechnological applications, including improved accessibility to lignocellulosic enzymes for biofuel production.

  13. Structure of EstA esterase from psychrotrophic Pseudoalteromonas sp. 643A covalently inhibited by monoethylphosphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Brzuszkiewicz, Anna; Nowak, Elzbieta; Dauter, Zbigniew; Dauter, Miroslawa; Cieslinski, Hubert; Dlugolecka, Anna; Kur, Józef

    2010-10-28

    The crystal structure of the esterase EstA from the cold-adapted bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. 643A was determined in a covalently inhibited form at a resolution of 1.35 {angstrom}. The enzyme has a typical SGNH hydrolase structure consisting of a single domain containing a five-stranded {beta}-sheet, with three helices at the convex side and two helices at the concave side of the sheet, and is ornamented with a couple of very short helices at the domain edges. The active site is located in a groove and contains the classic catalytic triad of Ser, His and Asp. In the structure of the crystal soaked in diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (DNP), the catalytic serine is covalently connected to a phosphonate moiety that clearly has only one ethyl group. This is the only example in the Protein Data Bank of a DNP-inhibited enzyme with covalently bound monoethylphosphate.

  14. Feruloyl esterases from Schizophyllum commune to treat food industry side-streams.

    PubMed

    Nieter, Annabel; Kelle, Sebastian; Linke, Diana; Berger, Ralf G

    2016-11-01

    Agro-industrial side-streams are abundant and renewable resources of hydroxycinnamic acids with potential applications as antioxidants and preservatives in the food, health, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Feruloyl esterases (FAEs) from Schizophyllum commune were functionally expressed in Pichia pastoris with extracellular activities of 6000UL(-1). The recombinant enzymes, ScFaeD1 and ScFaeD2, released ferulic acid from destarched wheat bran and sugar beet pectin. Overnight incubation of coffee pulp released caffeic (>60%), ferulic (>80%) and p-coumaric acid (100%) indicating applicability for the valorization of food processing wastes and enhanced biomass degradation. Based on substrate specificity profiling and the release of diferulates from destarched wheat bran, the recombinant FAEs were characterized as type D FAEs. ScFaeD1 and ScFaeD2 preferably hydrolyzed feruloylated saccharides with ferulic acid esterified to the O-5 position of arabinose residues and showed an unprecedented ability to hydrolyze benzoic acid esters.

  15. Potential of Ophiostoma piceae sterol esterase for biotechnologically relevant hydrolysis reactions

    PubMed Central

    Barba Cedillo, Víctor; Prieto, Alicia; Martínez, María Jesús

    2013-01-01

    The ascomycete Ophiostoma piceae produces a sterol esterase (OPE) with high affinity toward p-nitrophenol, glycerol, and sterol esters. Recently, this enzyme has been heterologously expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris under the AOX1 methanol-inducible promoter (PAOX1) using sorbitol as co-susbtrate, and the hydrolytic activity of the recombinant protein (OPE*) turned out to be improved from a kinetic point of view. In this study, we analyze the effects of sorbitol during the expression of OPE*, at first added as an additional carbon source, and methanol as inducer. The O. piceae enzyme was successfully used for PVAc hydrolysis, suggesting its potential applicability in recycled paper production to decrease stickies problems. PMID:23138020

  16. Bioassay technique using nonspecific esterase activities of Tetrahymena pyriformis for screening and assessing cytotoxicity of xenobiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaerts, P.; Senaud, J.; Bohatier, J. |

    1998-08-01

    A simple and rapid test for screening and assessing the cytotoxicity of xenobiotics was developed with Tetrahymena pyriformis. The method estimates the activities of nonspecific esterases of a cell by concentrating within it a specific amount of fluorescence associated with fluorescein dye. The 2-h median effective concentration (EC50) values of 10 inorganic and eight organic substances are presented and compared to those of three other bioassays: the conventional T. pyriformis proliferation rate 9-h median inhibitory concentrations, the Microtox 30-min EC50s, and the Daphnia magna 4-methylumbelliferyl {beta}-D galactoside 1-h EC50s. A highly significant correlation was found between the results obtained with the fluorescein diacetate test and those obtained with the growth inhibition and Microtox tests. This in vivo enzymatic test showed high sensitivity to all compounds tested except Cr{sup 6+} and sodium dodecyl sulfate.

  17. Adsorption of microbial esterases on Bacillus subtilis-templated cobalt oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eunjin; Ryu, Bum Han; Shim, Hyun-Woo; Ju, Hansol; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, T Doohun

    2014-04-01

    Due to low diffusion rates and large surface areas, nanomaterials have received great interest as supporting materials for enzyme immobilization. Here, the preparation of a cobalt oxide nanoparticle using Bacillus subtilis as a biological template and use of the nanostructure for microbial esterase immobilization is described. Morphological features and size distributions were investigated using electron microscopy (EM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Catalytic properties of enzyme-coated nanostructures were investigated using 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate and p-nitrophenyl (PNP) acetate as model substrates. Enzyme-coated nanostructures were observed to retain ∼85% of the initial activity after 15 successive reaction cycles, and enzyme immobilization processes could be repeated four times without a loss of immobilization potential. The present work demonstrates that B. subtilis-templated cobalt oxide nanoparticles have the potential to be used as biocompatible immobilization materials, and are promising candidates for the preparation of effective nanobiocatalysts.

  18. Addition of feruloyl esterase and xylanase produced on-site improves sugarcane bagasse hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Braga, Cleiton Márcio Pinto; Delabona, Priscila da Silva; Lima, Deise Juliana da Silva; Paixão, Douglas Antônio Alvaredo; Pradella, José Geraldo da Cruz; Farinas, Cristiane Sanchez

    2014-10-01

    Accessory enzymes that assist biomass degradation could be used to improve the recovery of fermentable sugar for use in biorefineries. In this study, different fungal strains isolated from the Amazon rainforest were evaluated in terms of their ability to produce feruloyl esterase (FAE) and xylanase enzymes, and an assessment was made of the contributions of the enzymes in the hydrolysis of pretreated sugarcane bagasse. In the selection step, screening using plate assays was followed by shake flask submerged cultivations. After carbon source selection and cultivation in a stirred-tank bioreactor, Aspergillusoryzae P21C3 proved to be a promising strain for production of the enzymes. Supplementation of a commercial enzyme preparation with 30% (v/v) crude enzymatic complex from A. oryzae P21C3 increased the conversion of cellulose derived from pretreated sugarcane bagasse by 36%. Supplementation with FAE and xylanase enzymes produced on-site can therefore be used to improve the hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse.

  19. Enzyme induced biodegradation of polycarbonate-polyurethanes: dose dependence effect of cholesterol esterase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y W; Labow, R S; Santerre, J P

    2003-05-01

    The current study has investigated the influence of esterase activity (80-400units/ml) on the biodegradation of polycarbonate-urethanes (PCNUs) by cholesterol esterase (CE), with a particular interest in studying the influence of different hard segment structures and their contribution to sensitizing the polymer towards enzyme catalyzed hydrolysis. Polycarbonate based polyurethanes were synthesized with varying hard segment content as well as hard segment chemistry based on three different diisocyanates, 1,6-hexane diisocyanate (HDI), 4,4'-methylene bisphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) and 4,4-methylene biscyclohexyl diisocyanate (HMDI). The effect of different chemistry on surface contact angle was measured in order to define the relative chemical nature of the surfaces. The enzyme dose response was found to be lower when hard segment content in the polymer was high. There was a very strong dependence on enzyme concentration for polyurethanes with different hard segment chemistry, despite the fact that the nature of the hydrolysable polycarbonate segment remained the same. The PCNU which showed the most dramatic dependence on enzyme concentration was synthesized with HMDI. At low enzyme concentration (80units/ml) this material was the most stable of the polymers while at elevated CE concentration (400units/ml) the polymer underwent a catastrophic breakdown. The findings suggested that protein binding on the surfaces was saturated even though enzyme degradation did not achieve saturation on any of the surfaces. The role of protein binding in modulating the hydrolytic action of the enzymes at different activity levels highlights a need for further study in this area.

  20. Structural studies of a thermophilic esterase from a new Planctomycetes species, Thermogutta terrifontis.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Christopher; Isupov, Michail N; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta; Littlechild, Jennifer A

    2015-08-01

    Thermogutta terrifontis esterase (TtEst), a carboxyl esterase identified in the novel thermophilic bacterium T. terrifontis from the phylum Planctomycetes, has been cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme has been characterized biochemically and shown to have activity towards small p-nitrophenyl (pNP) carboxylic esters, with optimal activity for pNP-propionate. The enzyme retained 95% activity after incubation for 1 h at 80 °C. The crystal structures of the native TtEst and its complexes with the substrate analogue D-malate and the product acetate have been determined to high resolution. The bound ligands have allowed the identification of the carboxyl and alcohol binding pockets in the enzyme active site. Comparison of TtEst with structurally related enzymes provides insight into how differences in their catalytic activity can be rationalized based upon the properties of the amino acid residues in their active site pockets. The mutant enzymes L37A and L251A have been constructed to extend the substrate range of TtEst towards the larger butyrate and valerate pNP-esters. These mutant enzymes have also shown a significant increase in activity towards acetate and propionate pNP esters. A crystal structure of the L37A mutant was determined with the butyrate product bound in the carboxyl pocket of the active site. The mutant structure shows an expansion of the pocket that binds the substrate carboxyl group, which is consistent with the observed increase in activity towards pNP-butyrate. PMID:26011036