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Sample records for acetyl-coa carboxylase accase

  1. Synonymous mutation gene design to overexpress ACCase in creeping bentgrass to obtain resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides.

    PubMed

    Heckart, Douglas L; Schwartz, Brian M; Raymer, Paul L; Parrott, Wayne A

    2016-08-01

    Overexpression of a native gene can cause expression of both introduced and native genes to be silenced by posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) mechanisms. PTGS mechanisms rely on sequence identity between the transgene and native genes; therefore, designing genes with mutations that do not cause amino acid changes, known as synonymous mutations, may avoid PTGS. For proof of concept, the sequence of acetyl-coA carboxylase (ACCase) from creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) was altered with synonymous mutations. A native bentgrass ACCase was cloned and used as a template for the modified gene. Wild-type (WT) and modified genes were further modified with a non-synonymous mutation, coding for an isoleucine to leucine substitution at position 1781, known to confer resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides. Five-hundred calli of creeping bentgrass 'Penn A-4' were inoculated with Agrobacterium containing either the WT or modified genes, with or without the herbicide-resistance mutation. Six herbicide-resistant-transgenic events containing the modified gene with the 1781 mutation were obtained. Transcription of the modified ACCase was confirmed in transgenic plants, showing that gene-silencing mechanisms were avoided. Transgenic plants were confirmed to be resistant to the ACCase-inhibiting herbicide, sethoxydim, providing evidence that the modified gene was functional. The result is a novel herbicide-resistance trait and shows that overexpression of a native enzyme with a gene designed with synonymous mutations is possible. PMID:27116460

  2. Regulation and structure of the heteromeric acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Salie, Matthew J; Thelen, Jay J

    2016-09-01

    The enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) catalyzes the committed step of the de novo fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS) pathway by converting acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA. Two forms of ACCase exist in nature, a homomeric and heteromic form. The heteromeric form of this enzyme requires four different subunits for activity: biotin carboxylase; biotin carboxyl carrier protein; and α- and β-carboxyltransferases. Heteromeric ACCases (htACCase) can be found in prokaryotes and the plastids of most plants. The plant htACCase is regulated by diverse mechanisms reflected by the biochemical and genetic complexity of this multienzyme complex and the plastid stroma where it resides. In this review we summarize the regulation of the plant htACCase and also describe the structural characteristics of this complex from both prokaryotes and plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:27091637

  3. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  4. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  5. Ile-1781-Leu and Asp-2078-Gly Mutations in ACCase Gene, Endow Cross-resistance to APP, CHD, and PPZ in Phalaris minor from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Hipolito, Hugo; Fernandez, Pablo; Alcantara, Ricardo; Gherekhloo, Javid; Osuna, Maria Dolores; De Prado, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides that inhibit acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) are commonly used in Mexico to control weedy grasses such as little seed canarygrass (Phalaris minor). These herbicides are classified into three major families (ariloxyphenoxypropionates (APP), cyclohexanodiones (CHD), and, recently, phenylpyrazolines (PPZ)). In this work, the resistance to ACCase (APP, CHD, and PPZ) inhibiting herbicides was studied in a biotype of Phalaris minor (P. minor) from Mexico, by carrying out bioassays at the whole-plant level and investigating the mechanism behind this resistance. Dose-response and ACCase in vitro activity assays showed cross-resistance to all ACCase herbicides used. There was no difference in the absorption, translocation, and metabolism of the 14C-diclofop-methyl between the R and S biotypes. The PCR generated CT domain fragments of ACCase from the R biotype and an S reference were sequenced and compared. The Ile-1781-Leu and Asp-2078-Gly point mutations were identified. These mutations could explain the loss of affinity for ACCase by the ACCase-inhibing herbicides. This is the first report showing that this substitution confers resistance to APP, CHD, and PPZ herbicides in P. minor from Mexico. The mutations have been described previously only in a few cases; however, this is the first study reporting on a pattern of cross-resistance with these mutations in P. minor. The findings could be useful for better management of resistant biotypes carrying similar mutations. PMID:26370967

  6. GENES ENCODING PLASTID ACETYL-COA CARBOXYLASE AND 3-PHOSPHOGLYCERATE KINASE OF THE TRITICUM/AEGILOPS COMPLEX AND THE EVOLUTIONARY HISTORY OF POLYPLOID WHEAT.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The classic wheat evolutionary history is one of adaptive radiation of the diploid Triticum/Aegilops species (A, S, D) , genome convergence and divergence of the tetraploid (T. turgidum AABB, and T. timopheevii AAAGG) and hexaploid (T. aestivum, AABBDD) species. The objective of this study was to a...

  7. Kinetic studies on two isoforms of acetyl-CoA carboxylase from maize leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, D; Price, L J; Alban, C; Dehaye, L; Job, D; Cole, D J; Pallett, K E; Harwood, J L

    1996-01-01

    The steady-state kinetics of two multifunctional isoforms of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) from maize leaves (a major isoform, ACCase1 and a minor isoform, ACCase2) have been investigated with respect to reaction mechanism, inhibition by two graminicides of the aryloxyphenoxypropionate class (quizalofop and fluazifop) and some cellular metabolites. Substrate interaction and product inhibition patterns indicated that ADP and P(i) products from the first partial reaction were not released before acetyl-CoA bound to the enzymes. Product inhibition patterns did not match exactly those predicted for an ordered Ter Ter or a random Ter Ter mechanism, but were close to those postulated for an ordered mechanism. ACCase2 was about 1/2000 as sensitive as ACCase1 to quizalofop but only about 1/150 as sensitive to fluazifop. Fitting inhibition data to the Hill equation indicated that binding of quizalofop or fluazifop to ACCase1 was non-cooperative, as shown by the Hill constant (n(app)) values of 0.86 and 1.16 for quizalofop and fluazifop respectively. Apparent inhibition constant values (K' from the Hill equation) for ACCase1 were 0.054 microM for quizalofop and 21.8 microM for fluazifop. On the other hand, binding of quizalofop or fluazifop to ACCase2 exhibited positive co-operativity, as shown by the (napp) values of 1.85 and 1.59 for quizalofop and fluazifop respectively. K' values for ACCase2 were 1.7 mM for quizalofop and 140 mM for fluazifop. Kinetic parameters for the co-operative binding of quizalofop to maize ACCase2 were close to those of another multifunctional ACCase of limited sensitivity to graminicide, ACC220 from pea. Inhibition of ACCase1 by quizalofop was mixed-type with respect to acetyl-CoA or ATP, but the concentration of acetyl-CoA had the greater effect on the level of inhibition. Neither ACCase1 nor ACCase2 was appreciably sensitive to CoA esters of palmitic acid (16:0) or oleic acid (18:1). Approximate IC50 values were 10 microM (ACCase2) and 50

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis of Nucleus-Encoded Acetyl-CoA Carboxylases Targeted at the Cytosol and Plastid of Algae.

    PubMed

    Huerlimann, Roger; Zenger, Kyall R; Jerry, Dean R; Heimann, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of algal phylogeny is being impeded by an unknown number of events of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and primary and secondary/tertiary endosymbiosis. Through these events, previously heterotrophic eukaryotes developed photosynthesis and acquired new biochemical pathways. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) is a key enzyme in the fatty acid synthesis and elongation pathways in algae, where ACCase exists in two locations (cytosol and plastid) and in two forms (homomeric and heteromeric). All algae contain nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase in the cytosol, independent of the origin of the plastid. Nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase is also found in plastids of algae that arose from a secondary/tertiary endosymbiotic event. In contrast, plastids of algae that arose from a primary endosymbiotic event contain heteromeric ACCase, which consists of three nucleus-encoded and one plastid-encoded subunits. These properties of ACCase provide the potential to inform on the phylogenetic relationships of hosts and their plastids, allowing different hypothesis of endosymbiotic events to be tested. Alveolata (Dinoflagellata and Apicomplexa) and Chromista (Stramenopiles, Haptophyta and Cryptophyta) have traditionally been grouped together as Chromalveolata, forming the red lineage. However, recent genetic evidence groups the Stramenopiles, Alveolata and green plastid containing Rhizaria as SAR, excluding Haptophyta and Cryptophyta. Sequences coding for plastid and cytosol targeted homomeric ACCases were isolated from Isochrysis aff. galbana (TISO), Chromera velia and Nannochloropsis oculata, representing three taxonomic groups for which sequences were lacking. Phylogenetic analyses show that cytosolic ACCase strongly supports the SAR grouping. Conversely, plastidial ACCase groups the SAR with the Haptophyta, Cryptophyta and Prasinophyceae (Chlorophyta). These two ACCase based, phylogenetic relationships suggest that the plastidial homomeric ACCase was acquired by the

  9. Phylogenetic Analysis of Nucleus-Encoded Acetyl-CoA Carboxylases Targeted at the Cytosol and Plastid of Algae

    PubMed Central

    Huerlimann, Roger; Zenger, Kyall R.; Jerry, Dean R.; Heimann, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of algal phylogeny is being impeded by an unknown number of events of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and primary and secondary/tertiary endosymbiosis. Through these events, previously heterotrophic eukaryotes developed photosynthesis and acquired new biochemical pathways. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) is a key enzyme in the fatty acid synthesis and elongation pathways in algae, where ACCase exists in two locations (cytosol and plastid) and in two forms (homomeric and heteromeric). All algae contain nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase in the cytosol, independent of the origin of the plastid. Nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase is also found in plastids of algae that arose from a secondary/tertiary endosymbiotic event. In contrast, plastids of algae that arose from a primary endosymbiotic event contain heteromeric ACCase, which consists of three nucleus-encoded and one plastid-encoded subunits. These properties of ACCase provide the potential to inform on the phylogenetic relationships of hosts and their plastids, allowing different hypothesis of endosymbiotic events to be tested. Alveolata (Dinoflagellata and Apicomplexa) and Chromista (Stramenopiles, Haptophyta and Cryptophyta) have traditionally been grouped together as Chromalveolata, forming the red lineage. However, recent genetic evidence groups the Stramenopiles, Alveolata and green plastid containing Rhizaria as SAR, excluding Haptophyta and Cryptophyta. Sequences coding for plastid and cytosol targeted homomeric ACCases were isolated from Isochrysis aff. galbana (TISO), Chromera velia and Nannochloropsis oculata, representing three taxonomic groups for which sequences were lacking. Phylogenetic analyses show that cytosolic ACCase strongly supports the SAR grouping. Conversely, plastidial ACCase groups the SAR with the Haptophyta, Cryptophyta and Prasinophyceae (Chlorophyta). These two ACCase based, phylogenetic relationships suggest that the plastidial homomeric ACCase was acquired by the

  10. Structural analysis, plastid localization, and expression of the biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase from tobacco.

    PubMed

    Shorrosh, B S; Roesler, K R; Shintani, D; van de Loo, F J; Ohlrogge, J B

    1995-06-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase, EC 6.4.1.2) catalyzes the synthesis of malonyl-coenzyme A, which is utilized in the plastid for de novo fatty acid synthesis and outside the plastid for a variety of reactions, including the synthesis of very long chain fatty acids and flavonoids. Recent evidence for both multifunctional and multisubunit ACCase isozymes in dicot plants has been obtained. We describe here the isolation of a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv bright yellow 2 [NT1]) cDNA clone (E3) that encodes a 58.4-kD protein that shares 80% sequence similarity and 65% identity with the Anabaena biotin carboxylase subunit of ACCase. Similar to other biotin carboxylase subunits of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the E3-encoded protein contains a putative ATP-binding motif but lacks a biotin-binding site (methionine-lysine-methionine or methionine-lysine-leucine). The deduced protein sequence contains a putative transit peptide whose function was confirmed by its ability to direct in vitro chloroplast uptake. The subcellular localization of this biotin carboxylase has also been confirmed to be plastidial by western blot analysis of pea (Pisum sativum), alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), and castor (Ricinus communis L.) plastid preparations. Northern blot analysis indicates that the plastid biotin carboxylase transcripts are expressed at severalfold higher levels in castor seeds than in leaves. PMID:7610168

  11. Genes encoding biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase from Brassica napus and parental species: cloning, expression patterns, and evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genomics is a useful tool to investigate gene and genome evolution. Biotin carboxylase (BC), an important subunit of heteromeric ACCase that is a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis in dicots, catalyzes ATP, biotin-carboxyl-carrier protein and CO2 to form carboxybiotin-carbo...

  12. Insights into molecular assembly of ACCase heteromeric complex in Chlorella variabilis--a homology modelling, docking and molecular dynamic simulation study.

    PubMed

    Misra, Namrata; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2013-07-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase), a biotin-dependent enzyme that catalyses the first committed step of fatty acid biosynthesis, is considered as a potential target for improving lipid accumulation in oleaginous feedstocks, including microalgae. ACCase is composed of three distinct conserved domains, and understanding the structural details of each catalytic domain assumes great significance to gain insights into the molecular basis of the complex formation and mechanism of biotin transport. In the absence of a crystal structure for any single heteromeric ACCase till date, here we report the first heteromeric association model of ACCase from an oleaginous green microalga, Chlorella variabilis, using a combination of homology modelling, docking and molecular dynamic simulations. The binding site of the docked biotin carboxylase (BC) and carboxyltransferase (CT) were predicted to be contiguous but distinct in biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) molecule. Simulation studies revealed considerable flexibility for the BC and CT domains in the BCCP-bound forms, thus indicating the adaptive behaviour of BCCP. Further, principal component analysis revealed that in the presence of BCCP, the BC and CT domains exhibited an open-state conformation via the outward clockwise rotation of the binding helices. These conformational changes might be responsible for binding of BCCP domain and its translocation to the respective active sites. Various rearrangements of inter-domain hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) contributed to conformational changes in the structures. H-bond interactions between the interacting residue pairs involving Glu201BCCP/Arg255BC and Asp224BCCP/Gln228CT were found to be essential for the intermolecular assembly. The present findings are consistent with previous biochemical studies. PMID:23677812

  13. Effect of herbicide resistance endowing Ile-1781-Leu and Asp-2078-Gly ACCase gene mutations on ACCase kinetics and growth traits in Lolium rigidum

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Aiub, Martin M.; Yu, Qin; Han, Heping; Powles, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    The rate of herbicide resistance evolution in plants depends on fitness traits endowed by alleles in both the presence and absence (resistance cost) of herbicide selection. The effect of two Lolium rigidum spontaneous homozygous target-site resistance-endowing mutations (Ile-1781-Leu, Asp-2078-Gly) on both ACCase activity and various plant growth traits have been investigated here. Relative growth rate (RGR) and components (net assimilation rate, leaf area ratio), resource allocation to different organs, and growth responses in competition with a wheat crop were assessed. Unlike plants carrying the Ile-1781-Leu resistance mutation, plants homozygous for the Asp-2078-Gly mutation exhibited a significantly lower RGR (30%), which translated into lower allocation of biomass to roots, shoots, and leaves, and poor responses to plant competition. Both the negligible and significant growth reductions associated, respectively, with the Ile-1781-Leu and Asp-2078-Gly resistance mutations correlated with their impact on ACCase activity. Whereas the Ile-1781-Leu mutation showed no pleiotropic effects on ACCase kinetics, the Asp-2078-Gly mutation led to a significant reduction in ACCase activity. The impaired growth traits are discussed in the context of resistance costs and the effects of each resistance allele on ACCase activity. Similar effects of these two particular ACCase mutations on the ACCase activity of Alopecurus myosuroides were also confirmed. PMID:26019257

  14. Dominant mutations causing alterations in acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase confer tolerance to cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides in maize.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, W B; Marshall, L C; Burton, J D; Somers, D A; Wyse, D L; Gronwald, J W; Gengenbach, B G

    1990-01-01

    A partially dominant mutation exhibiting increased tolerance to cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides was isolated by exposing susceptible maize (Zea mays) tissue cultures to increasingly inhibitory concentrations of sethoxydim (a cyclohexanedione). The selected tissue culture (S2) was greater than 40-fold more tolerant to sethoxydim and 20-fold more tolerant to haloxyfop (an aryloxyphenoxypropionate) than the nonselected wild-type tissue culture. Regenerated S2 plants were heterozygous for the mutant allele and exhibited a high-level, but not complete, tolerance to both herbicides. Homozygous mutant families derived by self-pollinating the regenerated S2 plants exhibited no injury after treatment with 0.8 kg of sethoxydim per ha, which was greater than 16-fold the rate lethal to wild-type plants. Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase; EC 6.4.1.2) is the target enzyme of cyclohexanedione and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides. ACCase activities of the nonselected wild-type and homozygous mutant seedlings were similar in the absence of herbicide. ACCase activity from homozygous tolerant plants required greater than 100-fold more sethoxydim and 16-fold more haloxyfop for 50% inhibition than ACCase from wild-type plants. These results indicate that tolerance to sethoxydim and haloxyfop is controlled by a partially dominant nuclear mutation encoding a herbicide-insensitive alteration in maize ACCase. Images PMID:1976254

  15. The role of acyl-coenzyme A carboxylase complex in lipstatin biosynthesis of Streptomyces toxytricini

    PubMed Central

    Demirev, Atanas V.; Khanal, Anamika; Sedai, Bhishma R.; Lim, Si Kyu; Na, Min Kyun

    2010-01-01

    Streptomyces toxytricini produces lipstatin, a specific inhibitor of pancreatic lipase, which is derived from two fatty acid moieties with eight and 14 carbon atoms. The pccB gene locus in 10.6 kb fragment of S. toxytricini chromosomal DNA contains three genes for acyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) complex accA3, pccB, and pccE that are presumed to be involved in secondary metabolism. The pccB gene encoding a β subunit of ACCase [carboxyltransferase (CT)] was identified upstream of pccE gene for a small protein of ε subunit. The accA3 encoding the α subunit of ACCase [biotin carboxylase (BC)] was also identified downstream of pccB gene. When the pccB and pccE genes were inactivated by homologous recombination, the lipstatin production was reduced as much as 80%. In contrast, the accumulation of another compound, tetradeca-5.8-dienoic acid (the major lipstatin precursor), was 4.5-fold increased in disruptant compared with wild-type. It implies that PccB of S. toxytricini is involved in the activation of octanoic acid to hexylmalonic acid for lipstatin biosynthesis. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00253-010-2587-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20437235

  16. Chloroplast acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity is 2-oxoglutarate–regulated by interaction of PII with the biotin carboxyl carrier subunit

    PubMed Central

    Feria Bourrellier, Ana Belen; Valot, Benoit; Guillot, Alain; Ambard-Bretteville, Françoise; Vidal, Jean; Hodges, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The PII protein is a signal integrator involved in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria and plants. Upon sensing of cellular carbon and energy availability, PII conveys the signal by interacting with target proteins, thereby modulating their biological activity. Plant PII is located to plastids; therefore, to identify new PII target proteins, PII-affinity chromatography of soluble extracts from Arabidopsis leaf chloroplasts was performed. Several proteins were retained only when Mg-ATP was present in the binding medium and they were specifically released from the resin by application of a 2-oxoglutarate-containing elution buffer. Mass spectroscopy of SDS/PAGE-resolved protein bands identified the biotin carboxyl carrier protein subunits of the plastidial acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) and three other proteins containing a similar biotin/lipoyl-binding motif as putative PII targets. ACCase is a key enzyme initiating the synthesis of fatty acids in plastids. In in vitro reconstituted assays supplemented with exogenous ATP, recombinant Arabidopsis PII inhibited chloroplastic ACCase activity, and this was completely reversed in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate, pyruvate, or oxaloacetate. The inhibitory effect was PII-dose-dependent and appeared to be PII-specific because ACCase activity was not altered in the presence of other tested proteins. PII decreased the Vmax of the ACCase reaction without altering the Km for acetyl-CoA. These data show that PII function has evolved between bacterial and plant systems to control the carbon metabolism pathway of fatty acid synthesis in plastids. PMID:20018655

  17. ACCase mutations in Avena sterilis populations and their impact on plant fitness.

    PubMed

    Papapanagiotou, Aristeidis P; Paresidou, Maria I; Kaloumenos, Nikolaos S; Eleftherohorinos, Ilias G

    2015-09-01

    Avena sterilis (sterile oat) populations originating from wheat-growing regions of Greece, developed resistance to fenoxaprop, clodinafop and other herbicides. The partial ACCase gene sequence revealed six point mutations (Ile-1781-Leu, Trp-1999-Cys, Trp-2027-Cys, Ile-2041-Asn, Asp-2078-Gly, and Cys-2088-Arg) in 24 out of the 26 resistant (R) populations, confirming the molecular mechanism of resistance to ACCase-inhibiting herbicides. However, DNA sequence of two R populations did not reveal any known ACCase mutations, suggesting possible presence of unknown mutation or metabolism-based mechanism of resistance. The Cys-2088-Arg mutation is the first record for ACCase mutant conferring target-site resistance in A. sterilis worldwide. The evaluation of 12 R and 6 susceptible (S) populations under non-competitive field conditions did not indicate consistent mean growth rate differences, whereas the pot evaluation of the same (12 R and 6 S) populations grown in competition with wheat or in pure stands showed significant growth (fresh weight and panicle number) differences between six S populations and between six R populations containing the same ACCase mutation (Ile-2041-Asn). Finally, one S and five R (Trp-1999-Cys, Trp-2027-Cys, Ile-2041-Asn, Asp-2078-Gly, and Cys-2088-Arg) populations grown under field competitive conditions indicated fresh weight and panicle number differences in competition with other populations as compared with pure stands. These findings suggest clearly that the inconsistent fitness differences between R and S A. sterilis populations are not related with the ACCase resistance trait but they may result from other non-resistance fitness traits selected in their different geographical locations. PMID:26267051

  18. Deeper understanding of carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, James H

    2016-04-14

    In this issue of Blood, Tie et al report the development of a cleverly engineered, cell-based system for studying mutations in γ-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX), the enzyme responsible for converting glutamate residues in certain proteins to γ-carboxyglutamate (Gla). They use this cell-based assay system to help explain the clinical manifestations of some otherwise puzzling GGCX gene mutations in humans that cause phenotypes ranging from severe bleeding to Keutel syndrome. PMID:27081093

  19. Molecular basis of ALS- and/or ACCase-inhibitor resistance in shortawn foxtail (Alopecurus aequalis Sobol.).

    PubMed

    Xia, Wenwen; Pan, Lang; Li, Jun; Wang, Qiong; Feng, Yujuan; Dong, Liyao

    2015-07-01

    Alopecurus aequalis, a predominant weed species in wheat and oilseed rape fields, can no longer be controlled by mesosulfuron-methyl application after continuous use over several years. Based on dose-response studies, the putative resistant populations, JTJY-1 and JHHZ-1, were found to be resistant to mesosulfuron-methyl, with resistance index values of 5.5 and 14, respectively. Sensitivity assays of the mesosulfuron-methyl-resistant populations to other herbicides revealed that the JTJY-1 population had moderate or high cross resistance to sulfonylureas (SUs) and triazolopyrimidines (TPs), but displayed a low level resistance to imidazolinones (IMIs). JTJY-1 also had high multi-resistance to ACCase inhibitors, but remained susceptible to photosystem II inhibitors. The JHHZ-1 population was resistant to all ALS inhibitors tested, but was sensitive to ACCase inhibitors and photosystem II inhibitors. To clarify the molecular basis of resistance in JTJY-1 and JHHZ-1 population, the ALS and ACCase gene were sequenced. Two ALS mutations (Pro-197-Thr or Trp-574-Leu) were detected in the mesosulfuron-methyl-resistant plants. The ACCase gene analysis revealed that the resistant JTJY-1 population had an Ile-1781-Leu mutation. Furthermore, the presence of two different target site resistance (TSR) mechanisms (ALS and ACCase mutations) existing simultaneously in individual A. aequalis was firstly documented in the presented study. PMID:26071810

  20. A comparative study of drug resistance mechanism associated with active site and non-active site mutations: I388N and D425G mutants of acetyl-coenzyme-A carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2012-03-01

    A major concern in the development of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-inhibiting (ACCase; EC 6.4.1.2) herbicides is the emergence of resistance as a result of the selection of distinct mutations within the CT domain. Mutations associated with resistance have been demonstrated to include both active sites and non-active sites, including Ile-1781-Leu, Trp- 2027-Cys, Ile-2041-Asn, Asp-2078-Gly, and Gly-2096-Ala (numbered according to the Alopecurus myosuroides plastid ACCase). In the present study, extensive computational simulations, including molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) calculations, were carried out to compare the molecular mechanisms of active site mutation (I388N) and non-active site mutation (D425G) in Alopecurus myosuroides resistance to some commercial herbicides targeting ACCase, including haloxyfop (HF), diclofop (DF) and fenoxaprop (FR). All of the computational model and energetic results indicated that both I388N and D425G mutations have effects on the conformational change of the binding pocket. The π-π interaction between ligand and Phe377 and Tyr161' residues, which make an important contribution to the binding affinity, was decreased after mutation. As a result, the mutant-type ACCase has a lower affinity for the inhibitor than the wild-type enzyme, which accounts for the molecular basis of herbicidal resistance. The structural and mechanistic insights obtained from the present study will deepen our understanding of the interactions between ACCase and herbicides, which provides a molecular basis for the future design of a promising inhibitor with low resistance risk. PMID:22242795

  1. Pleiotropic Effect of AccD5 and AccE5 Depletion in Acyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase Activity and in Lipid Biosynthesis in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bazet Lyonnet, Bernardo; Diacovich, Lautaro; Cabruja, Matías; Bardou, Fabienne; Quémard, Annaïk; Gago, Gabriela; Gramajo, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacteria contain a large variety of fatty acids which are used for the biosynthesis of several complex cell wall lipids that have been implicated in the ability of the organism to resist host defenses. The building blocks for the biosynthesis of all these lipids are provided by a fairly complex set of acyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCases) whose subunit composition and roles within these organisms have not yet been clearly established. Previous biochemical and structural studies provided strong evidences that ACCase 5 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is formed by the AccA3, AccD5 and AccE5 subunits and that this enzyme complex carboxylates acetyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA with a clear substrate preference for the latest. In this work we used a genetic approach to unambiguously demonstrate that the products of both accD5 and accE5 genes are essential for the viability of Mycobacterium smegmatis. By obtaining a conditional mutant on the accD5-accE5 operon, we also demonstrated that the main physiological role of this enzyme complex was to provide the substrates for fatty acid and mycolic acid biosynthesis. Furthermore, enzymatic and biochemical analysis of the conditional mutant provided strong evidences supporting the notion that AccD5 and/or AccE5 have an additional role in the carboxylation of long chain acyl-CoA prior to mycolic acid condensation. These studies represent a significant step towards a better understanding of the roles of ACCases in mycobacteria and confirm ACCase 5 as an interesting target for the development of new antimycobacterial drugs. PMID:24950047

  2. Molecular survey of turfgrass species for mutations conferring resistance to ACCase inhibiting herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The control of grassy weeds in turfgrass is often problematic due to lack of herbicide selectivity. Seven different naturally occurring mutation sites have been reported to confer resistance to Acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase inhibiting herbicides. One or more of these mutation sites may hold potentia...

  3. Computational simulations of structural role of the active-site W374C mutation of acetyl-coenzyme-A carboxylase: multi-drug resistance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yu, Ning-Xi; Yang, Sheng-Gang; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2011-03-01

    Herbicides targeting grass plastidic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase, EC 6.4.1.2) are selectively effective against graminicides. The intensive worldwide use of this herbicide family has selected for resistance genes in a number of grass weed species. Recently, the active-site W374C mutation was found to confer multi-drug resistance toward haloxyfop (HF), fenoxaprop (FR), Diclofop (DF), and clodinafop (CF) in A. myosuroides. In order to uncover the resistance mechanism due to W374C mutation, the binding of above-mentioned four herbicides to both wild-type and the mutant-type ACCase was investigated in the current work by molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The binding free energies were calculated by molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method. The calculated binding free energy values for four herbicides were qualitatively consistent with the experimental order of IC(50) values. All the computational model and energetic results indicated that the W374C mutation has great effects on the conformational change of the binding pocket and the ligand-protein interactions. The most significant conformational change was found to be associated with the aromatic amino acid residues, such as Phe377, Tyr161' and Trp346. As a result, the π-π interaction between the ligand and the residue of Phe377 and Tyr161', which make important contributions to the binding affinity, was decreased after mutation and the binding affinity for the inhibitors to the mutant-type ACCase was less than that to the wild-type enzyme, which accounts for the molecular basis of herbicidal resistance. The structural role and mechanistic insights obtained from computational simulations will provide a new starting point for the rational design of novel inhibitors to overcome drug resistance associated with W374C mutation. PMID:20499260

  4. Genes encoding the alpha-carboxyltransferase subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase from Brassica napus and parental species: cloning, expression patterns, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Guo; Yin, Wei-Bo; Guo, Huan; Song, Li-Ying; Chen, Yu-Hong; Guan, Rong-Zhan; Wang, Jing-Qiao; Wang, Richard R-C; Hu, Zan-Min

    2010-05-01

    Heteromeric acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase), a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis in dicots, is a multi-enzyme complex consisting of biotin carboxylase, biotin carboxyl carrier protein, and carboxyltransferase (alpha-CT and beta-CT). In the present study, four genes encoding alpha-CT were cloned from Brassica napus, and two were cloned from each of the two parental species, B. rapa and B. oleracea. Comparative and cluster analyses indicated that these genes were divided into two major groups. The major divergence between group-1 and group-2 occurred in the second intron. Group-2 alpha-CT genes represented the ancestral form in the genus Brassica. The divergence of group-1 and group-2 genes occurred in their common ancestor 12.96-17.78 million years ago (MYA), soon after the divergence of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica (15-20 MYA). This time of divergence is identical to that reported for the paralogous subgenomes of diploid Brassica species (13-17 MYA). Real-time reverse transcription PCR revealed that the expression patterns of the two groups of genes were similar in different organs, except in leaves. To better understand the regulation and evolution of alpha-CT genes, promoter regions from two sets of orthologous gene copies from B. napus, B. rapa, and B. oleracea were cloned and compared. The function of the promoter of gene Bnalpha-CT-1-1 in group-1 and gene Bnalpha-CT-2-1 in group-2 was examined by assaying beta-glucuronidase activity in transgenic A. thaliana. Our results will be helpful in elucidating the evolution and regulation of ACCase in oilseed rape. PMID:20616867

  5. Multiple resistance to ACCase and AHAS-inhibiting herbicides in shortawn foxtail (Alopecurus aequalis Sobol.) from China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenlei; Yuan, Guohui; Liu, Weitang; Bi, Yaling; Du, Long; Zhang, Chao; Li, Qi; Wang, Jinxin

    2015-10-01

    Shortawn foxtail (Alopecurus aequalis) is a troublesome grass weed infesting winter wheat and oilseed rape productions in China. Fenoxaprop-p-ethyl and mesosulfuron-methyl failed to control shortawn foxtail of AHSX-1 population collected from a wheat field in Shou County, Anhui province. Molecular analyses revealed that Asp2078Gly mutation of ACCase and Trp574Leu mutation of AHAS were present in plants of the AHSX-1 population. The homozygous plants were isolated and cultured until seed maturity. Whole-plant herbicide bioassays were conducted in the greenhouse using the purified seeds of F1 generation. Dose-response experiments showed that the AHSX-1 population has evolved a very high level resistance to fenoxaprop-p-ethyl (RI = 275) and mesosulfuron-methyl (RI = 788). To determine the sensitivity to other herbicides, assays were conducted at the single recommended rate of each herbicide. Based on the results, the AHSX-1 population was considered to be highly resistant to clodinafop-propargyl, pyroxsulam and flucarbazone-sodium, moderately or highly resistant to quizalofop-p-ethyl, clethodim, sethoxydim and pinoxaden, and susceptible to isoproturon and chlorotoluron. This is the first report of Asp2078Gly mutation in shortawn foxtail and the two robust dCAPS markers designed could quickly detect Asp2078 and Trp574 mutations in ACCase and AHAS gene of shortawn foxtail, respectively. PMID:26453232

  6. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate carboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... carboxylase deficiency is an inherited disorder that causes lactic acid and other potentially toxic compounds to accumulate in ... features include developmental delay and a buildup of lactic acid in the blood (lactic acidosis). Increased acidity in ...

  7. Vitamin K-dependent carboxylation of the carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Berkner, Kathleen L.; Pudota, B. Nirmala

    1998-01-01

    Vitamin K-dependent (VKD) proteins require modification by the VKD-γ-glutamyl carboxylase, an enzyme that converts clusters of glus to glas in a reaction that requires vitamin K hydroquinone, for their activity. We have discovered that the carboxylase also carboxylates itself in a reaction dependent on vitamin K. When pure human recombinant carboxylase was incubated in vitro with 14CO2 and then analyzed after SDS/PAGE, a radiolabeled band corresponding to the size of the carboxylase was observed. Subsequent gla analysis of in vitro-modified carboxylase by base hydrolysis and HPLC showed that all of the radioactivity could be attributed to gla residues. Quantitation of gla, asp, and glu residues indicated 3 mol gla/mol carboxylase. Radiolabeled gla was acid-labile, confirming its identity, and was not observed if vitamin K was not included in the in vitro reaction. Carboxylase carboxylation also was detected in baculovirus(carboxylase)-infected insect cells but not in mock-infected insect cells, which do not express endogenous VKD proteins or carboxylase. Finally, we showed that the carboxylase was carboxylated in vivo. Carboxylase was purified from recombinant carboxylase BHK cells cultured in the presence or absence of vitamin K and analyzed for gla residues. Carboxylation of the carboxylase only was observed with carboxylase isolated from BHK cells cultured in vitamin K, and 3 mol gla/mol carboxylase were detected. Analyses of carboxylase and factor IX carboxylation in vitro suggest a possible role for carboxylase carboxylation in factor IX turnover, and in vivo studies suggest a potential role in carboxylase stability. The discovery of carboxylase carboxylation has broad implications for the mechanism of VKD protein carboxylation and Warfarin-based anti-coagulant therapies that need to be considered both retrospectively and in the future. PMID:9435215

  8. Enzymatic Characterization of a Prokaryotic Urea Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, Takeshi; Kanou, Norihisa; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2004-01-01

    We identified the first prokaryotic urea carboxylase (UCA) from a member of the alpha subclass of the class Proteobacteria, Oleomonas sagaranensis. This enzyme (O. sagaranensis Uca) was composed of 1,171 amino acids, and its N-terminal region resembled the biotin carboxylase domains of various biotin-dependent carboxylases. The C-terminal region of the enzyme harbored the Met-Lys-Met motif found in biotin carboxyl carrier proteins. The primary structure of the enzyme was 45% identical to that of the urea carboxylase domain of urea amidolyase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. O. sagaranensis Uca did not harbor the allophanate hydrolase domain found in the yeast enzyme, but a separate gene with structural similarity was found to be adjacent to the uca gene. Purified recombinant O. sagaranensis Uca displayed ATP-dependent carboxylase activity towards urea (Vmax = 21.2 μmol mg−1 min−1) but not towards acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and propionyl-CoA, indicating that the gene encoded a bona fide UCA and not an acetyl-CoA or propionyl-CoA carboxylase. The enzyme also exhibited high levels of activity towards acetamide and formamide. Kinetic parameters of the enzyme reaction were determined with ATP, urea, acetamide, and formamide. O. sagaranensis could grow on urea, acetamide, and formamide as sole nitrogen sources; moreover, ATP-dependent urea-degrading activity was found in cells grown with urea but not in cells grown with ammonia. The results suggest that the UCA of this organism may be involved in the assimilation of these compounds as nitrogen sources. Furthermore, orthologues of the O. sagaranensis uca gene were found to be widely distributed among Bacteria. This implies that there are two systems of urea degradation in Bacteria, a pathway catalyzed by the previously described ureases and the UCA-allophanate hydrolase pathway identified in this study. PMID:15090492

  9. Evolutionary history and biotechnological future of carboxylases.

    PubMed

    Schada von Borzyskowski, Lennart; Rosenthal, Raoul G; Erb, Tobias J

    2013-11-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a potent greenhouse gas whose presence in the atmosphere is a critical factor for global warming. At the same time atmospheric CO2 is also a cheap and readily available carbon source that can in principle be used to synthesize value-added products. However, as uncatalyzed chemical CO2-fixation reactions usually require quite harsh conditions to functionalize the CO2 molecule, not many processes have been developed that make use of CO2. In contrast to synthetical chemistry, Nature provides a multitude of different carboxylating enzymes whose carboxylating principle(s) might be exploited in biotechnology. This review focuses on the biochemical features of carboxylases, highlights possible evolutionary scenarios for the emergence of their reactivity, and discusses current, as well as potential future applications of carboxylases in organic synthesis, biotechnology and synthetic biology. PMID:23702164

  10. Photocontrol of Sorghum Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Martine; Crétin, Claude; Keryer, Eliane; Vidal, Jean; Gadal, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the light effect on phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the C4 plant sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Pers., var Tamaran) leaves was investigated. Following exposure to light a new isozyme of PEPC, specific for the green leaf and responsible for primary CO2 fixation in photosynthesis, was established. Northern blot experiments revealed the presence of PEPC mRNA showing a molecular weight of 3.4 kilobases. During the greening process, concomitant to enzyme activity, PEPC protein and PEPC messenger RNA amounts increased considerably. This photoresponse was shown to be under phytochrome control. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665664

  11. Structure and function of biotin-dependent carboxylases

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Biotin-dependent carboxylases include acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC), 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC), geranyl-CoA carboxylase (GCC), pyruvate carboxylase (PC), and urea carboxylase (UC). They contain biotin carboxylase (BC), carboxyltransferase (CT) and biotin-carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) components. These enzymes are widely distributed in nature and have important functions in fatty acid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, polyketide biosynthesis, urea utilization, and other cellular processes. ACCs are also attractive targets for drug discovery against type 2 diabetes, obesity, cancer, microbial infections, and other diseases, and the plastid ACC of grasses is the target of action of three classes of commercial herbicides. Deficiencies in the activities of PCC, MCC or PC are linked to serious diseases in humans. Our understanding of these enzymes has been greatly enhanced over the past few years by the crystal structures of the holoenzymes of PCC, MCC, PC, and UC. The structures reveal unanticipated features in the architectures of the holoenzymes, including the presence of previously unrecognized domains, and provide a molecular basis for understanding their catalytic mechanism as well as the large collection of disease-causing mutations in PCC, MCC and PC. This review will summarize the recent advances in our knowledge on the structure and function of these important metabolic enzymes. PMID:22869039

  12. Novel Insights into the Biotin Carboxylase Domain Reactions of Pyruvate Carboxylase from Rhizobium etli†

    PubMed Central

    Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Menefee, Ann L.; Adina-Zada, Abdussalam; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Surinya, Kathy H.; Wallace, John C.; Attwood, Paul V.; St. Maurice, Martin; Cleland, W. Wallace

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic mechanism of the MgATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin in the biotin carboxylase domain of pyruvate carboxylase from R. etli (RePC) is common to the biotin-dependent carboxylases. The current site-directed mutagenesis study has clarified the catalytic functions of several residues proposed to be pivotal in MgATP-binding and cleavage (Glu218 and Lys245), HCO3− deprotonation (Glu305 and Arg301) and biotin enolization (Arg353). The E218A mutant was inactive for any reaction involving the BC domain and the E218Q mutant exhibited a 75-fold decrease in kcat for both pyruvate carboxylation and the full reverse reaction. The E305A mutant also showed a 75- and 80-fold decrease in kcat for both pyruvate carboxylation and the full reverse reaction, respectively. While Glu305 appears to be the active site base which deprotonates HCO3−, Lys245, Glu218 and Arg301 are proposed to contribute to catalysis through substrate binding interactions. The reactions of the biotin carboxylase and carboxyl transferase domains were uncoupled in the R353M-catalyzed reactions, indicating that Arg353 may not only facilitate the formation of the biotin enolate, but also assist in coordinating catalysis between the two spatially distinct active sites. The 2.5 and 4-fold increase in kcat for the full reverse reaction with the R353K and R353M mutants, respectively, suggests that mutation of Arg353 allows carboxybiotin increased access to the biotin carboxylase domain active site. The proposed chemical mechanism is initiated by the deprotonation of HCO3− by Glu305 and concurrent nucleophilic attack on the γ-phosphate of MgATP. The trianionic carboxyphosphate intermediate formed reversibly decomposes in the active site to CO2 and PO43−. PO43− then acts as the base to deprotonate the tethered biotin at the N1-position. Stabilized by interactions between the ureido oxygen and Arg353, the biotin-enolate reacts with CO2 to give carboxybiotin. The formation of a distinct salt

  13. Expression of PEP carboxylase from Escherichia coli complements the phenotypic effects of pyruvate carboxylase mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Flores, C L; Gancedo, C

    1997-08-01

    We investigated the effects of the expression of the Escherichia coli ppc gene encoding PEP carboxylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants devoid of pyruvate carboxylase. Functional expression of the ppc gene restored the ability of the yeast mutants to grow in glucose-ammonium medium. Growth yield in this medium was the same in the transformed yeast than in the wild type although the growth rate of the transformed yeast was slower. Growth in pyruvate was slowed down in the transformed strain, likely due to a futile cycle produced by the simultaneous action of PEP carboxykinase and PEP carboxylase. PMID:9276461

  14. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase in Prochloron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berhow, M. A.; Mcfadden, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase, enzymes in the reductive pentose-phosphate cycle, were measured in cell-free extracts of Prochloran didemni. The partial purification and characterization of RuBP carboxylase were described. Prochloron RuBP carboxylase, when purified by isopycnic centrifugation in reoriented linear 0.2 to 0.8 M sucrose gradients, sedimented to a position which corresponded to that of the 520,000-dalton spinach enzyme. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the Prochloron enzyme was composed of large and small subunits (MW = 57,500 and 18,800). Though results established that the enzymes RuBP carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase were present in levels comparable to other CO2-fixing microorganisms, it was suggested that other enzymes in the Calvin cycle limit growth or that additional enzymic insufficiencies exist.

  15. Characterizing the importance of the biotin carboxylase domain dimer for S. aureus pyruvate carboxylase catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Linda P. C.; Chou, Chi-Yuan; Choi, Philip H.; Tong, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Biotin carboxylase (BC) is a conserved component among biotin-dependent carboxylases and catalyzes the MgATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin, using bicarbonate as the CO2 donor. Studies with E. coli BC have suggested long-range communication between the two active sites of a dimer, although its mechanism is not well understood. In addition, mutations in the dimer interface can produce stable monomers that are still catalytically active. A homologous dimer for the BC domain is observed in the structure of tetrameric pyruvate carboxylase (PC) holoenzyme. We have introduced site-specific mutations in the BC domain dimer interface of S. aureus PC (SaPC), equivalent to those used for E. coli BC, and also made chimeras replacing the SaPC BC domain with the E. coli BC subunit (EcBC chimera) or the yeast ACC BC domain (ScBC chimera). We assessed the catalytic activities of these mutants and characterized their oligomerization states by gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments. The K442E mutant and the ScBC chimera disrupted the BC dimer and were catalytically inactive, while the F403A mutant and the EcBC chimera were still tetrameric and retained catalytic activity. The R54E mutant was also tetrameric but was catalytically inactive. Crystal structures of the R54E, F403A and K442E mutants showed that they were tetrameric in the crystal, with conformational changes near the mutation site as well as in the tetramer organization. We have also produced the isolated BC domain of SaPC. In contrast to E. coli BC, the SaPC BC domain is monomeric in solution and catalytically inactive. PMID:23286247

  16. Characterizing the importance of the biotin carboxylase domain dimer for Staphylococcus aureus pyruvate carboxylase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linda P C; Chou, Chi-Yuan; Choi, Philip H; Tong, Liang

    2013-01-22

    Biotin carboxylase (BC) is a conserved component among biotin-dependent carboxylases and catalyzes the MgATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin, using bicarbonate as the CO₂ donor. Studies with Escherichia coli BC have suggested long-range communication between the two active sites of a dimer, although its mechanism is not well understood. In addition, mutations in the dimer interface can produce stable monomers that are still catalytically active. A homologous dimer for the BC domain is observed in the structure of the tetrameric pyruvate carboxylase (PC) holoenzyme. We have introduced site-specific mutations into the BC domain dimer interface of Staphylococcus aureus PC (SaPC), equivalent to those used for E. coli BC, and also made chimeras replacing the SaPC BC domain with the E. coli BC subunit (EcBC chimera) or the yeast ACC BC domain (ScBC chimera). We assessed the catalytic activities of these mutants and characterized their oligomerization states by gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments. The K442E mutant and the ScBC chimera disrupted the BC dimer and were catalytically inactive, while the F403A mutant and the EcBC chimera were still tetrameric and retained catalytic activity. The R54E mutant was also tetrameric but was catalytically inactive. Crystal structures of the R54E, F403A, and K442E mutants showed that they were tetrameric in the crystal, with conformational changes near the mutation site as well as in the tetramer organization. We have also produced the isolated BC domain of SaPC. In contrast to E. coli BC, the SaPC BC domain is monomeric in solution and catalytically inactive. PMID:23286247

  17. Interaction Between the Biotin Carboxyl Carrier Domain and the Biotin Carboxylase Domain in Pyruvate Carboxylase from Rhizobium etli†

    PubMed Central

    Lietzan, Adam D.; Menefee, Ann L.; Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Kumar, Sudhanshu; Attwood, Paul V.; Wallace, John C.; Cleland, W. Wallace; Maurice, Martin St.

    2011-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in mammalian tissues. To effect catalysis, the tethered biotin of PC must gain access to active sites in both the biotin carboxylase domain and the carboxyl transferase domain. Previous studies have demonstrated that a mutation of threonine 882 to alanine in PC from Rhizobium etli renders the carboxyl transferase domain inactive and favors the positioning of biotin in the biotin carboxylase domain. We report the 2.4 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of the Rhizobium etli PC T882A mutant which reveals the first high-resolution description of the domain interaction between the biotin carboxyl carrier protein domain and the biotin carboxylase domain. The overall quaternary arrangement of Rhizobium etli PC remains highly asymmetrical and is independent of the presence of allosteric activator. While biotin is observed in the biotin carboxylase domain, its access to the active site is precluded by the interaction between Arg353 and Glu248, revealing a mechanism for regulating carboxybiotin access to the BC domain active site. The binding location for the biotin carboxyl carrier protein domain demonstrates that tethered biotin cannot bind in the biotin carboxylase domain active site in the same orientation as free biotin, helping to explain the difference in catalysis observed between tethered biotin and free biotin substrates in biotin carboxylase enzymes. Electron density located in the biotin carboxylase domain active site is assigned to phosphonoacetate, offering a probable location for the putative carboxyphosphate intermediate formed during biotin carboxylation. The insights gained from the T882A Rhizobium etli PC crystal structure provide a new series of catalytic snapshots in PC and offer a revised perspective on catalysis in the biotin-dependent enzyme family. PMID:21958016

  18. Structure, function and regulation of pyruvate carboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Jitrapakdee, S; Wallace, J C

    1999-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC; EC 6.4.1.1), a member of the biotin-dependent enzyme family, catalyses the ATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate. PC has been found in a wide variety of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In mammals, PC plays a crucial role in gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis, in the biosynthesis of neurotransmitter substances, and in glucose-induced insulin secretion by pancreatic islets. The reaction catalysed by PC and the physical properties of the enzyme have been studied extensively. Although no high-resolution three-dimensional structure has yet been determined by X-ray crystallography, structural studies of PC have been conducted by electron microscopy, by limited proteolysis, and by cloning and sequencing of genes and cDNA encoding the enzyme. Most well characterized forms of active PC consist of four identical subunits arranged in a tetrahedron-like structure. Each subunit contains three functional domains: the biotin carboxylation domain, the transcarboxylation domain and the biotin carboxyl carrier domain. Different physiological conditions, including diabetes, hyperthyroidism, genetic obesity and postnatal development, increase the level of PC expression through transcriptional and translational mechanisms, whereas insulin inhibits PC expression. Glucocorticoids, glucagon and catecholamines cause an increase in PC activity or in the rate of pyruvate carboxylation in the short term. Molecular defects of PC in humans have recently been associated with four point mutations within the structural region of the PC gene, namely Val145-->Ala, Arg451-->Cys, Ala610-->Thr and Met743-->Thr. PMID:10229653

  19. Active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Stringer, C.D.; Milanez, S.; Lee, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous affinity labeling studies and comparative sequence analyses have identified two different lysines at the active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and have suggested their essentiality to function. The essential lysines occupy positions 166 and 329 in the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and positions 175 and 334 in the spinach enzyme. Based on the pH-dependencies of inactivations of the two enzymes by trinitrobenzene sulfonate, Lys-166 (R. rubrum enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 7.9 and Lys-334 (spinach enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 9.0. These low pK/sub a/ values as well as the enhanced nucleophilicities of the lysyl residues argue that both are important to catalysis rather than to substrate binding. Lys-166 may correspond to the essential base that initiates catalysis and that displays a pK/sub a/ of 7.5 in the pH-curve for V/sub max//K/sub m/. Cross-linking experiments with 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonate stilbene demonstrate that the two active-site lysines are within 12 A. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Probing functional divergence of 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide carboxylases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hasik

    The conversion of AIR to CAIR catalyzed by AIR carboxylase represents the only carbon-carbon bond formation step in de novo purine biosynthesis. Prokaryotic and most eukaryotic AIR carboxylases utilize two proteins, PurK and PurE to accomplish the conversion of AIR to CAIR via N5-CAIR from AIR, ATP, and bicarbonate. In vertebrates, AIR carboxylases utilizes AIR and CO2 directly to produce CAIR without a free intermediate. NAIR is a slow-tight binding inhibitor for G. gallus AIR carboxylase while this compound is a simple competitive inhibitor in the case of the Escherichia coli system. The tight binding nature of NAIR suggested that this compound represents a transition state analog. A structure- activity study was extended in order to understand the role of ring electronics and substituents of NAIR for the tight-binding phenomenon. The analysis of inhibition data of azole nucleotide inhibitors was summarized as follows; (1) N3 of NAIR is not critical for binding, (2) ring electronics are important for binding in the nitro azole derivatives while they are not critical in the series of carboxy amino azole nucleotides, (3) the nitro group is a critical binding element for the tight-binding of NAIR, (4) the exocyclic amino group contributes to the optimum display of charge density of NAIR for tight-binding, (5) the carboxyl group of CAIR plays an import role for initial binding through electrostatic interactions. The fact that the gene for AIR carboxylase from both avian and methanogen can functionally complement E. coli purK and purE mutants despite the lack of any sequence homology with purK raised questions about the divergent functions of AIR carboxylases. The M. thermoautotrophicum AIR carboxylase was overexpressed and the catalytic function was established. Based on the stoichimetry of the ATP consumption, substrate specificities, and NAIR inhibition pattern, the methanogen AIR carboxylase is proposed to be distinctive from the E. coli and vertebrate forms and

  1. Carboxylases in Natural and Synthetic Microbial Pathways▿†

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Tobias J.

    2011-01-01

    Carboxylases are among the most important enzymes in the biosphere, because they catalyze a key reaction in the global carbon cycle: the fixation of inorganic carbon (CO2). This minireview discusses the physiological roles of carboxylases in different microbial pathways that range from autotrophy, carbon assimilation, and anaplerosis to biosynthetic and redox-balancing functions. In addition, the current and possible future uses of carboxylation reactions in synthetic biology are discussed. Such uses include the possible transformation of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide into value-added compounds and the production of novel antibiotics. PMID:22003013

  2. Characterization of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase from Thiobacillus thioparus and Thiobacillus neapolitanus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. J.; Johnson, M. K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1968-01-01

    Ribulose diphosphate carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase activity in chemosynthetic autotrophs Thiobacillus thioparus and Thiobacillus neapolitanus, noting sedimentation and gel filtration characteristics

  3. Covalent dimerization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase subunits by UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, R M; Franco, E; Teixeira, A R

    1996-08-15

    The effect of UV radiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from a variety of plant species was examined. The exposition of plant leaves or the pure enzyme to UV radiation produced a UV-dependent accumulation of a +5 kDa polypeptide (P65). Different approaches were utilized to elucidate the origin and structure of P65: electrophoretic and fluorographic analyses of 35S-labelled ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase exposed to UV radiation and immunological experiments using antibodies specific for P65, for the large and small subunits of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase and for high-molecular-mass aggregates of the enzyme. These studies revealed that P65 is a dimer, formed by the covalent, non-disulphide linkage of one small subunit with one large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. For short periods of time (< 1 h), the amount of P65 formed increased with the duration of the exposure to the UV radiation and with the energy of the radiation applied. Prolonged exposure to UV radiation (1-6 h) resulted in the formation of high-molecular-mass aggregates of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. Formation of P65 was shown to depend on the native state of the protein, was stimulated by inhibitors of enzyme activity, and was inhibited by activators of enzyme activity. A UV-independent accumulation of P65 was also achieved by the in vitro incubation of plant crude extracts. However, the UV-dependent and the UV-independent formation of P65 seemed to occur by distinct molecular mechanisms. The UV-dependent accumulation of P65 was immunologically detected in all species examined, including Lemna minor, Arum italicum, Brassica oleracea, Triticum aestivum, Zea mays, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting that it may constitute a universal response to UV radiation, common to all photo-synthetic tissues. PMID:8761476

  4. Ultrasensitive regulation of anapleurosis via allosteric activation of PEP carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi-Fan; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Reaves, Marshall Louis; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2012-01-01

    Anapleurosis is the filling of the TCA cycle with four-carbon units. The common substrate for both anapleurosis and glucose phosphorylation in bacteria is the terminal glycolytic metabolite, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). Here we show that E. coli quickly and almost completely turns off PEP consumption upon glucose removal. The resulting build-up of PEP is used to quickly import glucose if it becomes re-available. The switch-like termination of anapleurosis results from depletion of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), an ultrasensitive allosteric activator of PEP carboxylase. E. coli expressing an FBP-insensitive point mutant of PEP carboxylase grow normally on steady glucose. However, they fail to build-up PEP upon glucose removal, grow poorly on oscillating glucose, and suffer from futile cycling at the PEP node on gluconeogenic substrates. Thus, bacterial central carbon metabolism is intrinsically programmed with ultrasensitive allosteric regulation to enable rapid adaptation to changing environmental conditions. PMID:22522319

  5. Properties of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase immobilized on porous glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapira, J.; Hanson, C. L.; Lyding, J. M.; Reilly, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase from spinach has been bound to arylamine porous glass with a diazo linkage and to alklamine porous glass with glutaraldehyde. Stability at elevated temperatures and responses to changes of pH and ribulose-1,5-diphosphate, Mg(2+), and dithiothreitol concentrations were not significantly different from the soluble enzyme, though stability at 4 C was somewhat improved.

  6. Multiple Carboxylase Deficiency (Late Onset) Due to Deficiency of Biotinidase

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Debadatta; Das, Manoj Kumar; Dhar, Sandipan; Mukhopadhyay, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Biotinidase is a ubiquitous mammalian cell enzyme occurring in liver, serum and kidney. It cleaves biotin from biocytin, which is a cofactor for biotin dependent enzymes, namely the human carboxylases. Biotinidase deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of neurological, dermatological, immunological and ophthalmological abnormalities. This is a case of a 3-year-old boy presenting with delayed developmental milestones, tachypnea, progressively increasing ataxia, alopecia and dermatitis, all which dramatically responded to high doses of biotin. PMID:25284861

  7. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate carboxylase in developing rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, F. J.; Hanson, R. W.

    1967-01-01

    1. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate carboxylase were measured in foetal, newborn and adult rat liver extracts by a radiochemical assay involving the fixation of [14C]bicarbonate. 2. Pyruvate-carboxylase activity in both foetal and adult liver occurs mainly in mitochondrial and nuclear fractions, with about 10% of the activity in the cytoplasm. 3. Similar studies of the intracellular distribution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase show that more than 90% of the activity is in the cytoplasm. However, in the 17-day foetal liver about 90% of the activity is in mitochondria and nuclei. 4. Pyruvate-carboxylase activity in both particulate and soluble fractions is very low in the 17-day foetal liver and increases to near adult levels before birth. 5. Phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxykinase activity in the soluble cell fraction increases 25-fold in the first 2 days after birth. This same enzyme in the mitochondria has considerable activity in the foetal and adult liver and is lower in the newborn. 6. Kinetic and other studies on the properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase have shown no differences between the soluble and mitochondrial enzymes. 7. It is suggested that the appearance of the soluble phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase at birth initiates the rapid increase in overall gluconeogenesis at this stage. PMID:6049928

  8. Ribulose diphosphate carboxylase of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis

    SciTech Connect

    Terekhova, I.V.; Chernyad'ev, I.I.; Doman, N.G.

    1986-11-20

    The ribulose diphosphate (RDP) carboxylase activity of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis is represented by two peaks when a cell homogenate is centrifuged in a sucrose density gradient. In the case of differential centrifugation (40,000 g, 1 h), the activity of the enzyme was distributed between the supernatant liquid (soluble form) and the precipitate (carboxysomal form). From the soluble fraction, in which 80-95% of the total activity of the enzyme is concentrated, electrophoretically homogeneous RDP carboxylase was isolated by precipitation with ammonium sulfate and centrifugation in a sucrose density gradient. The purified enzyme possessed greater electrophoretic mobility in comparison with the RDP carboxylase of beans Vicia faba. The molecular weight of the enzyme, determined by gel filtration, was 450,000. The enzyme consists of monotypic subunits with a molecular weight of 53,000. The small subunits were not detected in electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel in the presence of SDS after fixation and staining of the gels by various methods.

  9. Dimerization of the Bacterial Biotin Carboxylase Subunit Is Required for Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase Activity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexander C.

    2012-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (acteyl-CoA) carboxylase (ACC) is the first committed enzyme of the fatty acid synthesis pathway. Escherichia coli ACC is composed of four different proteins. The first enzymatic activity of the ACC complex, biotin carboxylase (BC), catalyzes the carboxylation of the protein-bound biotin moiety of another subunit with bicarbonate in an ATP-dependent reaction. Although BC is found as a dimer in cell extracts and the carboxylase activities of the two subunits of the dimer are interdependent, mutant BC proteins deficient in dimerization are reported to retain appreciable activity in vitro (Y. Shen, C. Y. Chou, G. G. Chang, and L. Tong, Mol. Cell 22:807–818, 2006). However, in vivo BC must interact with the other proteins of the complex, and thus studies of the isolated BC may not reflect the intracellular function of the enzyme. We have tested the abilities of three BC mutant proteins deficient in dimerization to support growth and report that the two BC proteins most deficient in dimerization fail to support growth unless expressed at high levels. In contrast, the wild-type protein supports growth at low expression levels. We conclude that BC must be dimeric to fulfill its physiological function. PMID:22037404

  10. Evidence for Light-stimulated Synthesis of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in Leaves of Maize 1

    PubMed Central

    Hague, Donald R.; Sims, Thomas L.

    1980-01-01

    Illumination (22,000 lumens per meter2) of etiolated maize plants for 80 hours brings about a 5-fold increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity per unit of protein. An increase in carboxylase protein and incorporation of [35S]methionine into the protein occurs simultaneously with the activity increase. In green plants, the level of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase protein and enzyme activity is dependent on the intensity of light during growth. These results are consistent with the conclusion that the activity increase results from light-stimulated de novo synthesis of phosphoenolypyruvate carboxylase protein. Images PMID:16661464

  11. Inhibition of biotin carboxylase by a reaction intermediate analog: implications for the kinetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C Z; Amspacher, D; Strongin, R; Waldrop, G L

    1999-12-20

    The first committed step in long-chain fatty acid synthesis is catalyzed by the multienzyme complex acetyl CoA carboxylase. One component of the acetyl CoA carboxylase complex is biotin carboxylase which catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin. The Escherichia coli form of biotin carboxylase can be isolated from the other components of the acetyl CoA carboxylase complex such that enzymatic activity is retained. The synthesis of a reaction intermediate analog inhibitor of biotin carboxylase has been described recently (Organic Lett. 1, 99-102, 1999). The inhibitor is formed by coupling phosphonoacetic acid to the 1'-N of biotin. In this paper the characterization of the inhibition of biotin carboxylase by this reaction-intermediate analog is described. The analog showed competitive inhibition versus ATP with a slope inhibition constant of 8 mM. Noncompetitive inhibition was found for the analog versus biotin. Phosphonoacetate exhibited competitive inhibition with respect to ATP and noncompetitive inhibition versus bicarbonate. Biotin was found to be a noncompetitive substrate inhibitor of biotin carboxylase. These data suggested that biotin carboxylase had an ordered addition of substrates with ATP binding first followed by bicarbonate and then biotin. PMID:10600526

  12. Identification of the N-linked glycosylation sites of vitamin K-dependent carboxylase and the effect of glycosylation on carboxylase function†

    PubMed Central

    Tie, Jian-Ke; Zheng, Mei-Yan; Pope, R. Marshall; Straight, David L.; Stafford, Darrel W.

    2014-01-01

    The vitamin K-dependent carboxylase is an integral membrane protein which is required for the post-translational modification of a variety of vitamin K-dependent proteins. Previous studies have suggested carboxylase is a glycoprotein with N-linked glycosylation sites. In the present study, we identified the N-glycosylation sites of carboxylase by mass spectrometric peptide mapping analyses combined with site-directed mutagenesis. Our mass spectrometric results show that the N-linked glycosylation in carboxylase occurs at positions N459, N550, N605, and N627. Eliminating these glycosylation sites by changing asparagine to glutamine caused the mutant carboxylase to migrate faster in SDS-PAGE gel analyses, adding further evidence that these sites are glycosylated. In addition, the mutation studies identified N525, a site not recoverable by mass spectroscopy analysis, as a glycosylation site. Furthermore, the potential glycosylation site at N570 is glycosylated only if all the five natural glycosylation sites are simultaneously mutated. Removal of the oligosaccharides by glycosidase from wild-type carboxylase or by eliminating the functional glycosylation sites by site-directed mutagenesis did not affect either the carboxylation or epoxidation activity when the small pentapeptide FLEEL was used as substrate, suggesting that N-linked glycosylation is not required for the enzymatic function of carboxylase. In contrast, when site N570 and the five natural glycosylation sites were mutated simultaneously, the resulting carboxylase protein was degraded. Our results suggest that N-linked glycosylation is not essential for carboxylase enzymatic activity but it is important for protein folding and stability. PMID:17144668

  13. Activation and inhibition of pyruvate carboxylase from Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Zeczycki, Tonya N; Menefee, Ann L; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Wallace, John C; Attwood, Paul V; St Maurice, Martin; Cleland, W Wallace

    2011-11-15

    While crystallographic structures of the R. etli pyruvate carboxylase (PC) holoenzyme revealed the location and probable positioning of the essential activator, Mg(2+), and nonessential activator, acetyl-CoA, an understanding of how they affect catalysis remains unclear. The current steady-state kinetic investigation indicates that both acetyl-CoA and Mg(2+) assist in coupling the MgATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin in the biotin carboxylase (BC) domain with pyruvate carboxylation in the carboxyl transferase (CT) domain. Initial velocity plots of free Mg(2+) vs pyruvate were nonlinear at low concentrations of Mg(2+) and a nearly complete loss of coupling between the BC and CT domain reactions was observed in the absence of acetyl-CoA. Increasing concentrations of free Mg(2+) also resulted in a decrease in the K(a) for acetyl-CoA. Acetyl phosphate was determined to be a suitable phosphoryl donor for the catalytic phosphorylation of MgADP, while phosphonoacetate inhibited both the phosphorylation of MgADP by carbamoyl phosphate (K(i) = 0.026 mM) and pyruvate carboxylation (K(i) = 2.5 mM). In conjunction with crystal structures of T882A R. etli PC mutant cocrystallized with phosphonoacetate and MgADP, computational docking studies suggest that phosphonoacetate could coordinate to one of two Mg(2+) metal centers in the BC domain active site. Based on the pH profiles, inhibition studies, and initial velocity patterns, possible mechanisms for the activation, regulation, and coordination of catalysis between the two spatially distinct active sites in pyruvate carboxylase from R. etli by acetyl-CoA and Mg(2+) are described. PMID:21958066

  14. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  15. The dynamic organization of fungal acetyl-CoA carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Hunkeler, Moritz; Stuttfeld, Edward; Hagmann, Anna; Imseng, Stefan; Maier, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) catalyse the committed step in fatty-acid biosynthesis: the ATP-dependent carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA. They are important regulatory hubs for metabolic control and relevant drug targets for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Eukaryotic ACCs are single-chain multienzymes characterized by a large, non-catalytic central domain (CD), whose role in ACC regulation remains poorly characterized. Here we report the crystal structure of the yeast ACC CD, revealing a unique four-domain organization. A regulatory loop, which is phosphorylated at the key functional phosphorylation site of fungal ACC, wedges into a crevice between two domains of CD. Combining the yeast CD structure with intermediate and low-resolution data of larger fragments up to intact ACCs provides a comprehensive characterization of the dynamic fungal ACC architecture. In contrast to related carboxylases, large-scale conformational changes are required for substrate turnover, and are mediated by the CD under phosphorylation control. PMID:27073141

  16. Carboxylase Levels and Carbon Dioxide Fixation in Baker's Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cazzulo, J. J.; Claisse, L. M.; Stoppani, A. O. M.

    1968-01-01

    Levels of pyruvate carboxylase (PC), phosphopyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), and malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) were compared in wild-type bakers' yeast (I), a cytoplasmic-respiratory mutant (II), a biotin-deficient wild-type yeast (III), and a biotin-deficient respiratory mutant (IV). PC activities were greatly reduced in III and IV, whereas PEPC was reduced in II and IV. Malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) could not be detected in any of the yeasts. With yeast I growing on glucose as the sole carbon source, PEPC decreased to negligible levels during the logarithmic phase of growth (glucose repression effect), whereas PC increased. Both enzymes reverted to their original levels during the stationary phase, when glucose in the medium was exhausted. In agreement with the leading role of PC for CO2 assimilation, the rates of 14CO2 fixation in yeasts I and II were approximately equal and were much higher than that in yeast IV. With I and II, most of the 14C was distributed similarly in oxalacetate derivatives; with yeast IV, most of 14C appeared in a compound apparently unrelated to CO2 fixation via C4-dicarboxylic acids. PMID:5732499

  17. The dynamic organization of fungal acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Hunkeler, Moritz; Stuttfeld, Edward; Hagmann, Anna; Imseng, Stefan; Maier, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) catalyse the committed step in fatty-acid biosynthesis: the ATP-dependent carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA. They are important regulatory hubs for metabolic control and relevant drug targets for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Eukaryotic ACCs are single-chain multienzymes characterized by a large, non-catalytic central domain (CD), whose role in ACC regulation remains poorly characterized. Here we report the crystal structure of the yeast ACC CD, revealing a unique four-domain organization. A regulatory loop, which is phosphorylated at the key functional phosphorylation site of fungal ACC, wedges into a crevice between two domains of CD. Combining the yeast CD structure with intermediate and low-resolution data of larger fragments up to intact ACCs provides a comprehensive characterization of the dynamic fungal ACC architecture. In contrast to related carboxylases, large-scale conformational changes are required for substrate turnover, and are mediated by the CD under phosphorylation control. PMID:27073141

  18. The dynamic organization of fungal acetyl-CoA carboxylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunkeler, Moritz; Stuttfeld, Edward; Hagmann, Anna; Imseng, Stefan; Maier, Timm

    2016-04-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) catalyse the committed step in fatty-acid biosynthesis: the ATP-dependent carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA. They are important regulatory hubs for metabolic control and relevant drug targets for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Eukaryotic ACCs are single-chain multienzymes characterized by a large, non-catalytic central domain (CD), whose role in ACC regulation remains poorly characterized. Here we report the crystal structure of the yeast ACC CD, revealing a unique four-domain organization. A regulatory loop, which is phosphorylated at the key functional phosphorylation site of fungal ACC, wedges into a crevice between two domains of CD. Combining the yeast CD structure with intermediate and low-resolution data of larger fragments up to intact ACCs provides a comprehensive characterization of the dynamic fungal ACC architecture. In contrast to related carboxylases, large-scale conformational changes are required for substrate turnover, and are mediated by the CD under phosphorylation control.

  19. Metabolic analysis of Escherichia coli in the presence and absence of the carboxylating enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Gokarn, R.R.; Eiteman, M.A.; Altman, E.

    2000-05-01

    Fermentation patterns of Escherichia coli with and without the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC) and pyruvate carboxylase (PYC) enzymes were compared under anaerobic conditions with glucose as a carbon source. Time profiles of glucose and fermentation product concentrations were determined and used to calculate metabolic fluxes through central carbon pathways during exponential cell growth. The presence of the Rhizobium etli pyc gene in E. coli (JCL1242/pTrc99A-pyc) restored the succinate producing ability of E. coli ppc null mutants (JCL1242), with PYC competing favorably with both pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase. Succinate formation was slightly greater by JCL1242/pTrc99a-pyc than by cells which overproduced PPC(JCL1242/pPC201, ppc{sup +}), even though PPC activity in cell extracts of JCL1242/pPC201 (ppc{sup +}) was 40-fold greater than PYC activity in extracts of JCL1242/pTrc99a-pyc. Flux calculations indicate that during anaerobic metabolism the pyc{sup +} strain had a 34% greater specific glucose consumption rate, a 37% greater specific rate of ATP formation, and a 6% greater specific growth rate compared to the ppc{sup +} strain. In light of the important position of pyruvate at the juncture of NADH-generating pathways and NADH-dissimilating branches, the results show that when PPC or PYC is expressed, the metabolic network adapts by altering the flux to lactate and the molar ratio of ethanol to acetate formation.

  20. Targeting Pyruvate Carboxylase Reduces Gluconeogenesis and Adiposity and Improves Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kumashiro, Naoki; Beddow, Sara A.; Vatner, Daniel F.; Majumdar, Sachin K.; Cantley, Jennifer L.; Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Fat, Ioana; Guigni, Blas; Jurczak, Michael J.; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Kahn, Mario; Perler, Bryce K.; Puchowicz, Michelle A.; Manchem, Vara Prasad; Bhanot, Sanjay; Still, Christopher D.; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Cline, Gary W.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Samuel, Varman T.

    2013-01-01

    We measured the mRNA and protein expression of the key gluconeogenic enzymes in human liver biopsy specimens and found that only hepatic pyruvate carboxylase protein levels related strongly with glycemia. We assessed the role of pyruvate carboxylase in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism in rats through a loss-of-function approach using a specific antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) to decrease expression predominantly in liver and adipose tissue. Pyruvate carboxylase ASO reduced plasma glucose concentrations and the rate of endogenous glucose production in vivo. Interestingly, pyruvate carboxylase ASO also reduced adiposity, plasma lipid concentrations, and hepatic steatosis in high fat–fed rats and improved hepatic insulin sensitivity. Pyruvate carboxylase ASO had similar effects in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats. Pyruvate carboxylase ASO did not alter de novo fatty acid synthesis, lipolysis, or hepatocyte fatty acid oxidation. In contrast, the lipid phenotype was attributed to a decrease in hepatic and adipose glycerol synthesis, which is important for fatty acid esterification when dietary fat is in excess. Tissue-specific inhibition of pyruvate carboxylase is a potential therapeutic approach for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, hepatic insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. PMID:23423574

  1. Perspective of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, the key catalyst in photosynthesis and photorespiration

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, B.A.

    1980-11-01

    Reported works dealing with the opposing processes photosynthesis and photorespiration, catalyzed by ribulose biphosphate carboxylase (RuBP) are summarized with 75 references being cited. Some recent findings that suggest that it should be possible to increase the RuBP carboxylase:oxygenase ratio by mutation and that this increase should lead to higher plant productivity are reported. It is pointed out that a better understanding of these catalytic mechanisms is necessary before the activities can be tailored to specific purposes. (BLM)

  2. Variations in Km(CO2) of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase among Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Hock-Hin; Badger, Murray R.; Watson, Leslie

    1980-01-01

    A survey of the Km(CO2) values of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase from 60 grass species shows that enzyme from C3 grasses consistently exhibits lower Km(CO2) than does that from C4 grasses. Systematically ordered variation in Km(CO2) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylases from C3 and C4 grasses is also apparent and, among C4 grasses, this shows some correlation with C4 types. PMID:16661586

  3. Crystallization and structure of a recombinant ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Gunter; Lindqvist, Ylva; Brändén, Carl-Ivar; Lorimer, George

    1988-07-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase is the key enzyme in photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation and photorespiration. The dimeric carboxylase from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant enzyme has been crystallized in a number of different crystal forms. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme has been determined by X-ray crystallographic methods to 2.9Åresolution.

  4. Chemical and Physical Characterization of the Activation of Ribulosebiphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Donnelly, M. I.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Hartman, F. C.

    1983-08-01

    Molecular structure of ribulosebiphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase isolated from Rhodospirillium was compared with the enzyme isolated from Alcaligens eutrophus. Peptides derived from the active center of the bacterial enzyme were highly homologous with those isolated from spinach. Molecular shapes of the carboxylases were estimated using neutron scattering data. These studies suggested that the enzyme as isolated from R. rubrum is a solid prolate ellipsoid or cylinder, while the spinach enzyme resembles a hollow sphere.

  5. Induction of pyruvate carboxylase apoenzyme and holoenzyme in 3T3-L1 cells during differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Freytag, Svend O.; Utter, Merton F.

    1980-01-01

    The specific activity of pyruvate carboxylase [pyruvate:carbon-dioxide ligase (ADP-forming); EC 6.4.1.1] in 3T3-L1 cells increases approximately 20-fold when these cells differentiate to an adipocyte-like form [Mackall, J. C. & Lane, M. D. (1977) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 79, 720-725]. A specific antibody to the purified rat liver enzyme quantitatively precipitated pyruvate carboxylase from 3T3-L1 crude homogenates. Use of this immunological technique permitted us to demonstrate that the increase in pyruvate carboxylase activity is due to an increase in the intracellular concentration of the enzyme. The content of pyruvate carboxylase in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells is sufficiently high (1-2% of total protein) that the increase in this large protein (subunit Mr = 130,000) can be visualized when 3T3-L1 crude extracts are subjected to electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels. When 3T3-L1 cells differentiated in the presence of avidin, they contained less than 5% of the pyruvate carboxylase activity of cells that differentiated in the absence of avidin. However, the immunoprecipitable pyruvate carboxylase content of the avidin-treated cells was essentially the same as that of cells that differentiated without avidin. Full activity of the enzyme was rapidly restored in the avidin-treated cells upon the addition of excess biotin. The recovery of activity was closely correlated with the incorporation of [14C]biotin into immunoprecipitable pyruvate carboxylase. The rapidity with which the activity was restored and the insensitivity of the process to inhibitors of protein synthesis strongly suggest that the apoenzyme of pyruvate carboxylase accumulates during differentiation in the presence of avidin. Images PMID:6929488

  6. Chemical and physical characterization of the activation of ribulosebiphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M.I.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Hartman, F.C.

    1983-01-01

    Molecular structure of ribulosebiphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase isolated from Rhodospirillium was compared with the enzyme isolated from Alcaligens eutrophus. Peptides derived from the active center of the bacterial enzyme were highly homologous with those isolated from spinach. Molecular shapes of the carboxylases were estimated using neutron scattering data. These studies suggested that the enzyme as isolated from R. rubrum is a solid prolate ellipsoid or cylinder, while the spinach enzyme resembles a hollow sphere. 1 drawing.

  7. Regulation of Plant Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase by Adenylate Nucleotides 1

    PubMed Central

    Eastwell, Kenneth C.; Stumpf, Paul K.

    1983-01-01

    The assay of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.2) does not follow ideal zero-order kinetics when assayed in a crude extract from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) germ. Our results show that the lack of ideality is the consequence of contamination by ATPase and adenylate kinase. These enzyme activities generate significant amounts of ADP and AMP in the assay mixture, thus limiting the availability of ATP for the carboxylase reaction. Moreover, ADP and AMP are competitive inhibitors, with respect to ATP, of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Similar relationships between adenylate nucleotides and acetyl-CoA carboxylase are found in isolated chloroplasts. There is no evidence that acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity in the extracts of the plant systems examined is altered by covalent modification, such as a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle. A scheme is presented that illustrates the dependency of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthesis on the energy demands of the chloroplasts in vivo. PMID:16662980

  8. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B.; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO2 from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  9. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L

    2015-06-23

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO₂ from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  10. Transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase by phosphorus deficiency in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kentaro; Koizumi, Nozomu; Sato, Fumihiko

    2003-03-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), which catalyses the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate using HCO(3)(-) to generate oxaloacetic acid, is an important enzyme in the primary metabolism of plants. Although the PEPC genes (ppc) comprise only a small gene family, the function of each gene is not clear, except for roles in C(4) photosynthesis and CAM. Three PEPC genes (Nsppc1-3) from the C(3) plant Nicotiana sylvestris were used to investigate their roles and regulation in a C(3) plant, and their regulation by phosphorus depletion in particular. First, the induction of PEPC by phosphorus depletion was confirmed. Next, Nsppc1 was determined to be mainly responsive to phosphorus deficiency at the transcriptional level. Further studies using transgenic tobacco harbouring a chimeric gene consisting of the 2.0 kb promoter region of Nsppc1 and the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter showed that PEPC is transcriptionally induced. It was also found that sucrose had a synergistic effect on the induction of PEPC by phosphorus deficiency. A series of transgenic tobacco containing 5'-deletion mutants of Nsppc1 promoter::GUS fusion revealed that the -539 to -442 bp Nsppc1 promoter region, relative to the translation start site, was necessary for the response to phosphorus deficiency. Gain-of-function analysis using a construct containing three tandem repeats of the -539 to -442 bp region confirmed that this region was sufficient to induce the phosphorus-deficiency response in tobacco. PMID:12598567

  11. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from methanol-grown Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Shively, J M; Saluja, A; McFadden, B A

    1978-01-01

    Paracoccus denitrificans grows on methanol as the sole source of energy and carbon, which it assimilates aerobically via the reductive pentose phosphate cycle. This gram-negative bacterium grew rapidly on 50 mM methanol (generation time, 7 h, 30 degrees C) in excellent yield (3 g of wet-packed cells per liter of culture). Electron microscopic studies indicated that the late-log-phase cells were coccoid, having a thick envelope surrounding a layer of more diffuse electron-dense material and a relatively electron-transparent core. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase in the 15,000 X g supernatant of fresh cells had specific activities (micromoles of CO2 fixed per minute per milligram of protein) of 0.026, 0.049, 0.085, 0.128, and 0.034 during the lag, early, mild-, and late log, and late stationary phases, respectively. The enzyme was purified 40-fold by pelleting at 159,000 X g, salting out, sedimentation into a 0.2 to 0.8 M linear sucrose gradient, and elution from a diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex column. The enzyme was homogeneous by the criteria of electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gels polymerized from several acrylamide concentrations and sedimentation behavior. The molecular weight of the native enzyme, as measured by gel electrophoresis and gel filtration, averaged 525,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate dissociated the enzyme into two types of subunits with molecular weights of 55,000 and 13,600. The S20,w of the enzyme was 14.0 Km values for ribulose bisphosphate and CO2 were 0.166 and 0.051 mM, respectively, and the enzyme was inhibited to the extent of 94% by 1 mM 6-phosphogluconate. Images PMID:659365

  12. Metabolite Regulation of Partially Purified Soybean Nodule Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Kathryn A.; Turpin, David H.; Plaxton, William C.

    1990-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) was purified 40-fold from soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) nodules to a specific activity of 5.2 units per milligram per protein and an estimated purity of 28%. Native and subunit molecular masses were determined to be 440 and 100 kilodaltons, respectively, indicating that the enzyme is a homotetramer. The response of enzyme activity to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) concentration and to various effectors was influenced by assay pH and glycerol addition to the assay. At pH 7 in the absence of glycerol, the Km (PEP) was about twofold greater than at pH 7 in the presence of glycerol or at pH 8. At pH 7 or pH 8 the Km (MgPEP) was found to be significantly lower than the respective Km (PEP) values. Glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, glucose-1-phosphate, and dihydroxyacetone phosphate activated PEPC at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol, but had no effect under the other assay conditions. Malate, aspartate, glutamate, citrate, and 2-oxoglutarate were potent inhibitors of PEPC at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol, but their effectiveness was decreased by raising the pH to 8 and/or by adding glycerol. In contrast, 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate were less effective inhibitors at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol than under the other assay conditions. Inorganic phosphate (up to 20 millimolar) was an activator at pH 7 in the absence of glycerol but an inhibitor under the other assay conditions. The possible significance of metabolite regulation of PEPC is discussed in relation to the proposed functions of this enzyme in legume nodule metabolism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16667849

  13. Analysis and elucidation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Shylajanaciyar, Mohandass; Dineshbabu, Gnanasekaran; Rajalakshmi, Ramamoorthy; Subramanian, Gopalakrishnan; Prabaharan, Dharmar; Uma, Lakshmanan

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) a cytosolic enzyme of higher plants is also found in bacteria and cyanobacteria. Genetic and biochemical investigations have indicated that there are several isoforms of PEPC belonging to C3; C3/C4 and C4 groups but, the evolution of PEPC in cyanobacteria is not yet understood. The present study opens up an opportunity to understand the isoforms and functions of PEPC in cyanobacteria. The variations observed in PEPC among lower and higher orders of cyanobacteria, suggests convergent evolution of PEPC. There is a specific PEPC phosphorylation residue 'serine' at the N-terminus and PEPC determinant residue 'serine' at the C-terminal that facilitates high affinity for substrate binding. These residues were unique to higher orders of cyanobacteria, but, not in lower orders and other prokaryotes. The different PEPC forms of cyanobacteria were investigated for their kinetic properties with phosphoenolpyruvate as the substrate and the findings corroborated well with the in silico findings. In vitro enzymatic study of cyanobacteria belonging to three different orders demonstrated the role of aspartate as an allosteric effector, which inhibited PEPC by interacting with the highly conserved residues in the active site. The differences in mode of inhibition among the different order, thus, give a fair picture about the cyanobacterial PEPCs. The higher orders appear to possess the sequence coordinates and functionally conserved residues similar to isoforms of C4 type higher plants, whereas isoforms of PEPC of the lower orders did not resemble either that of C3 or C4 plants. PMID:25586080

  14. Underlying Resistance Mechanisms in the Cynosurus echinatus Biotype to Acetyl CoA Carboxylase-Inhibiting Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pablo; Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Cruz-Hipólito, Hugo; Osuna, María D; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog dogtail (Cynosurus echinatus) is an annual grass, native to Europe, but also widely distributed in North and South America, South Africa, and Australia. Two hedgehog dogtail biotypes, one diclofop-methyl (DM)-resistant and one DM-susceptible were studied in detail for experimental dose-response resistance mechanisms. Herbicide rates that inhibited shoot growth by 50% (GR50) were determined for DM, being the resistance factor (GR50R/GR50S) of 43.81. When amitrole (Cyt. P450 inhibitor) was applied before treatment with DM, the R biotype growth was significantly inhibited (GR50 of 1019.9 g ai ha(-1)) compared with the GR50 (1484.6 g ai ha(-1)) found for the R biotype without pretreatment with amitrole. However, GR50 values for S biotype do not vary with or without amitrole pretreatment. Dose-response experiments carried out to evaluate cross-resistance, showed resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate (APP), cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylpyrazoline (PPZ) inhibiting herbicides. Both R and S biotypes had a similar (14)C-DM uptake and translocation. The herbicide was poorly distributed among leaves, the rest of the shoot and roots with unappreciable acropetal and/or basipetal DM translocation at 96 h after treatment (HAT). The metabolism of (14)C-DM, D-acid and D-conjugate metabolites were identified by thin-layer chromatography. The results showed that DM resistance in C. echinatus is likely due to enhanced herbicide metabolism, involving Cyt. P450 as was demonstrated by indirect assays (amitrole pretreatment). The ACCase in vitro assays showed that the target site was very sensitive to APP, CHD and PPZ herbicides in the C. echinatus S biotype, while the R biotype was insensitive to the previously mentioned herbicides. DNA sequencing studies confirmed that C. echinatus cross-resistance to ACCase inhibitors has been conferred by specific ACCase double point mutations Ile-2041-Asn and Cys-2088-Arg. PMID:27148285

  15. Underlying Resistance Mechanisms in the Cynosurus echinatus Biotype to Acetyl CoA Carboxylase-Inhibiting Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Pablo; Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Cruz-Hipólito, Hugo; Osuna, María D.; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog dogtail (Cynosurus echinatus) is an annual grass, native to Europe, but also widely distributed in North and South America, South Africa, and Australia. Two hedgehog dogtail biotypes, one diclofop-methyl (DM)-resistant and one DM-susceptible were studied in detail for experimental dose-response resistance mechanisms. Herbicide rates that inhibited shoot growth by 50% (GR50) were determined for DM, being the resistance factor (GR50R/GR50S) of 43.81. When amitrole (Cyt. P450 inhibitor) was applied before treatment with DM, the R biotype growth was significantly inhibited (GR50 of 1019.9 g ai ha-1) compared with the GR50 (1484.6 g ai ha-1) found for the R biotype without pretreatment with amitrole. However, GR50 values for S biotype do not vary with or without amitrole pretreatment. Dose-response experiments carried out to evaluate cross-resistance, showed resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate (APP), cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylpyrazoline (PPZ) inhibiting herbicides. Both R and S biotypes had a similar 14C-DM uptake and translocation. The herbicide was poorly distributed among leaves, the rest of the shoot and roots with unappreciable acropetal and/or basipetal DM translocation at 96 h after treatment (HAT). The metabolism of 14C-DM, D-acid and D-conjugate metabolites were identified by thin-layer chromatography. The results showed that DM resistance in C. echinatus is likely due to enhanced herbicide metabolism, involving Cyt. P450 as was demonstrated by indirect assays (amitrole pretreatment). The ACCase in vitro assays showed that the target site was very sensitive to APP, CHD and PPZ herbicides in the C. echinatus S biotype, while the R biotype was insensitive to the previously mentioned herbicides. DNA sequencing studies confirmed that C. echinatus cross-resistance to ACCase inhibitors has been conferred by specific ACCase double point mutations Ile-2041-Asn and Cys-2088-Arg. PMID:27148285

  16. Mitochondrial SIRT4-type proteins in C. elegans and mammals interact with pyruvate carboxylase and other acetylated biotin-dependent carboxylases

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Martina; Karaca, Samir; Wenzel, Dirk; Ho, Linh; Tishkoff, Daniel; Lombard, David B.; Verdin, Eric; Urlaub, Henning; Jedrusik-Bode, Monika; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The biological and enzymatic function of SIRT4 is largely uncharacterized. We show that the C. elegans SIR-2.2 and SIR-2.3 orthologs of SIRT4 are ubiquitously expressed, also localize to mitochondria and function during oxidative stress. Further, we identified conserved interaction with mitochondrial biotin-dependent carboxylases (PC, PCC, MCCC), key enzymes in anaplerosis and ketone body formation. The carboxylases were found acetylated on multiple lysine residues and detailed analysis of mPC suggested that one of these residues, K748ac, might regulate enzymatic activity. Nevertheless, no changes in mPC acetylation levels and enzymatic activity could be detected upon overexpression or loss of functional SIRT4. PMID:23438705

  17. Competing carboxylases: circadian and metabolic regulation of Rubisco in C3 and CAM Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.

    PubMed

    Davies, B N; Griffiths, H

    2012-07-01

    The temporal co-ordination of ribulose 1·5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) activities by Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. in C(3) and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) modes was investigated under conventional light-dark (LD) and continuous light (LL) conditions. When C(3) , net CO(2) assimilation rate increased during each subjective night under LL with maximum carboxylation unrelated to Rubisco activation state. The CAM circadian rhythm of CO(2) uptake was more pronounced, with CO(2) assimilation rate maximal towards the end of each subjective night. In vivo and in vitro techniques were integrated to map carboxylase enzyme regulation to the framework provided by CAM LL gas exchange activity. Rubisco was activated in vitro throughout each subjective dark period and consistently deactivated at each subjective dawn, similar to that observed at true dawn in constitutive CAM species. Instantaneous carbon isotope discrimination showed in vivo carboxylase co-dominance during the CAM subjective night, initially by Rubisco and latterly C(4) (PEPc), despite both enzymes seemingly activated in vitro. The circadian rhythm in titratable acidity accumulation was progressively damped over successive subjective nights, but maintenance of PEPc carboxylation capacity ensures that CAM plants do not become progressively more 'C(3) -like' with time under LL. PMID:22239463

  18. Rapid changes in chick liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase indicative of phosphorylation control.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S D

    1983-10-31

    Liver fatty acid synthesis was suppressed 75,95 and 90% within 1, 2 and 4 hrs respectively of depriving chicks of food. Accompanying this rapid drop in lipogenesis was a marked reduction in acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity, i.e., 40 and 75% decrease after 2 and 4 hrs of fasting. Adding 10 mM citrate to the crude liver supernatant, or incubating the supernatant at 37 degrees, 30 min increased activity of the briefly fasted birds, but neither method restored carboxylase activity to fed level. Heat and citrate activation were additive and together resulted in an activity comparable to the fed condition. The heat-dependent activation was accelerated by exogenous phosphoprotein phosphatase, and completely blocked by 100 mM NaF. Thus, enhancement of carboxylase activity from liver of briefly fasted chicks appears to be a dephosphorylation process. This is the first report indicating acute changes in chick carboxylase activity may involve a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mechanism. PMID:6140006

  19. Isolation of Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase from Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is a multi-functional enzyme that catalyzes the fixation of CO2 and O2 in photosynthesis and photorespiration, respectively. As the rate-limiting step in photosynthesis, improving the catalytic properties of Rubisco has long been viewed as a...

  20. Crystal Structure of the alpha6beta6 Holoenzyme of propionyl-coenzyme A Carboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Sadre-Bazzaz, K; Shen, Y; Deng, B; Zhou, Z; Tong, L

    2010-01-01

    Propionyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (PCC), a mitochondrial biotin-dependent enzyme, is essential for the catabolism of the amino acids Thr, Val, Ile and Met, cholesterol and fatty acids with an odd number of carbon atoms. Deficiencies in PCC activity in humans are linked to the disease propionic acidaemia, an autosomal recessive disorder that can be fatal in infants. The holoenzyme of PCC is an {alpha}{sub 6}{beta}{sub 6} dodecamer, with a molecular mass of 750 kDa. The {alpha}-subunit contains the biotin carboxylase (BC) and biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) domains, whereas the {beta}-subunit supplies the carboxyltransferase (CT) activity. Here we report the crystal structure at 3.2-{angstrom} resolution of a bacterial PCC {alpha}{sub 6}{beta}{sub 6} holoenzyme as well as cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstruction at 15-{angstrom} resolution demonstrating a similar structure for human PCC. The structure defines the overall architecture of PCC and reveals unexpectedly that the {alpha}-subunits are arranged as monomers in the holoenzyme, decorating a central {beta}{sub 6} hexamer. A hitherto unrecognized domain in the {alpha}-subunit, formed by residues between the BC and BCCP domains, is crucial for interactions with the {beta}-subunit. We have named it the BT domain. The structure reveals for the first time the relative positions of the BC and CT active sites in the holoenzyme. They are separated by approximately 55 {angstrom}, indicating that the entire BCCP domain must translocate during catalysis. The BCCP domain is located in the active site of the {beta}-subunit in the current structure, providing insight for its involvement in the CT reaction. The structural information establishes a molecular basis for understanding the large collection of disease-causing mutations in PCC and is relevant for the holoenzymes of other biotin-dependent carboxylases, including 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC) and eukaryotic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC).

  1. Activation of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase by glutamate and Mg2+ is mediated by protein phosphatase-2A.

    PubMed Central

    Gaussin, V; Hue, L; Stalmans, W; Bollen, M

    1996-01-01

    The activation of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase by Na(+)-cotransported amino acids such as glutamine has been attributed mainly to the stimulation of its dephosphorylation by accumulating dicarboxylic acids, e.g. glutamate. We report here on a hepatic species of protein phosphatase-2A that activates acetyl-CoA carboxylase in the presence of physiological concentrations of glutamate or Mg2+ and, under these conditions, accounts for virtually all the hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphatase activity. Glutamate also stimulated the dephosphorylation of a synthetic pentadecapeptide encompassing the Ser-79 phosphorylation site of rat acetyl-CoA carboxylase, but did not affect the dephosphorylation of other substrates such as phosphorylase. Conversely, protamine, which stimulated the dephosphorylation of phosphorylase, inhibited the activation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. A comparison with various species of muscle protein phosphatase-2A showed that the stimulatory effects of glutamate and Mg2+ on the acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphatase activity are largely mediated by the regulatory A subunit. Glutamate and Mg2+ emerge from our study as novel regulators of protein phosphatase-2A when acting on acetyl-CoA carboxylase. PMID:8645208

  2. Computational redesign of bacterial biotin carboxylase inhibitors using structure-based virtual screening of combinatorial libraries.

    PubMed

    Brylinski, Michal; Waldrop, Grover L

    2014-01-01

    As the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria steadily increases, there is an urgent need for new antibacterial agents. Because fatty acid synthesis is only used for membrane biogenesis in bacteria, the enzymes in this pathway are attractive targets for antibacterial agent development. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the committed and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three distinct protein components: biotin carboxylase, biotin carboxyl carrier protein, and carboxyltransferase. Fragment-based screening revealed that amino-oxazole inhibits biotin carboxylase activity and also exhibits antibacterial activity against Gram-negative organisms. In this report, we redesigned previously identified lead inhibitors to expand the spectrum of bacteria sensitive to the amino-oxazole derivatives by including Gram-positive species. Using 9,411 small organic building blocks, we constructed a diverse combinatorial library of 1.2×10⁸ amino-oxazole derivatives. A subset of 9×10⁶ of these compounds were subjected to structure-based virtual screening against seven biotin carboxylase isoforms using similarity-based docking by eSimDock. Potentially broad-spectrum antibiotic candidates were selected based on the consensus ranking by several scoring functions including non-linear statistical models implemented in eSimDock and traditional molecular mechanics force fields. The analysis of binding poses of the top-ranked compounds docked to biotin carboxylase isoforms suggests that: (1) binding of the amino-oxazole anchor is stabilized by a network of hydrogen bonds to residues 201, 202 and 204; (2) halogenated aromatic moieties attached to the amino-oxazole scaffold enhance interactions with a hydrophobic pocket formed by residues 157, 169, 171 and 203; and (3) larger substituents reach deeper into the binding pocket to form additional hydrogen bonds with the side chains of residues 209 and 233. These structural insights into drug

  3. Carbon dioxide assimilation in blue-green algae: initial studies on the structure of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Tabita, F R; Stevens, S E; Gibson, J L

    1976-01-01

    D-Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase was purified from the blue-green alga Anabaena cylindrica (Lemm) by procedures involving acid precipitation, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. The enzyme was homogeneous by the criterion of polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis and was a multimer of a single-size polypeptide chain of 54,000 daltons. The carboxylases from four species of blue-green algae (Anabaena, Nostoc strain MAC, Agmenellum quadruplicatum strain PR-6, and Anacystis nidulans strain TX20) were closely similar in molecular size, since enzyme activity was eluted at the same volume after sucrose gradient centrifugation. Further analysis by gel filtration indicated that the four blue-green algal carboxylases were nearly identical in molecular weight, ranging from 449 to 453,000. The amino acid composition of the Anabaena carboxylase was determined and was found to resemble closely the composition of the large subunit from eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms. Images PMID:812868

  4. Crystal Structures of Human and Staphylococcus aureus Pyruvate Carboxylase and Molecular Insights into the Carboxyltransfer Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang,S.; Tong, L.

    2008-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the biotin-dependent production of oxaloacetate and has important roles in gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, insulin secretion and other cellular processes. PC contains the biotin carboxylase (BC), carboxyltransferase (CT) and biotin-carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) domains. We report here the crystal structures at 2.8-Angstroms resolution of full-length PC from Staphylococcus aureus and the C-terminal region (missing only the BC domain) of human PC. A conserved tetrameric association is observed for both enzymes, and our structural and mutagenesis studies reveal a previously uncharacterized domain, the PC tetramerization (PT) domain, which is important for oligomerization. A BCCP domain is located in the active site of the CT domain, providing the first molecular insights into how biotin participates in the carboxyltransfer reaction. There are dramatic differences in domain positions in the monomer and the organization of the tetramer between these enzymes and the PC from Rhizobium etli.

  5. Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase by cystamine may mediate the hypotriglyceridemic activity of pantethine.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    2001-03-01

    Pantethine is a versatile and well-tolerated hypolipidemic agent whose efficacy in this regard appears to be mediated by its catabolic product cystamine, a nucleophile which avidly attacks disulfide groups. An overview of pantethine research suggests that the hypotriglyceridemic activity of pantethine reflects cystamine-mediated inhibition of the hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase, which can be expected to activate hepatic fatty acid oxidation. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase as well as a more distal enzyme in the cholesterol synthetic pathway may account for pantethine's hypocholesterolemic effects. If pantethine does indeed effectively inhibit hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase, it may have adjuvant utility in the hepatothermic therapy of obesity. As a safe and effective compound of natural origin, pantethine merits broader use in the management of hyperlipidemias. PMID:11359352

  6. Localization of Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase in the Guard Cells by an Indirect, Immunofluorescence Technique 1

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Soundararajan; Smith, Bruce N.

    1982-01-01

    Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase, a key enzyme in the photosynthetic carboxylation process, has been localized through an indirect immunofluorescent technique in the guard cells of some of the 41 species of plants examined. This sample includes 17 families of both dicotyledons and monocotyledons, one gymnosperm, and one pteridophyte. Plants were selected to represent all of the three major photosynthetic categories, namely C3, C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism. Antibodies raised against tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase were used for this immunofluorescent study. A good degree of fluorescence was observed in the guard cells of seven out of 21 species exhibiting Crassulacean acid metabolism. C3 plants exhibited a very low degree (almost negligible) of fluorescence, while the C4 species did not exhibit any fluorescence. Images PMID:16662174

  7. Vitamin K-dependent carboxylase: possible role of the substrate "propeptide" as an intracellular recognition site.

    PubMed Central

    Suttie, J W; Hoskins, J A; Engelke, J; Hopfgartner, A; Ehrlich, H; Bang, N U; Belagaje, R M; Schoner, B; Long, G L

    1987-01-01

    The liver microsomal vitamin K-dependent carboxylase catalyzes the posttranslational conversion of specific glutamate residues to gamma-carboxyglutamate residues in a limited number of proteins. A number of these proteins have been shown to contain a homologous basic amino acid-rich "propeptide" between the leader sequence and the amino terminus of the mature protein. Plasmids encoding protein C, a vitamin K-dependent protein, containing or lacking a propeptide region were constructed and the protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein products were assayed as substrates in an in vitro vitamin K-dependent carboxylase system. Only proteins containing a propeptide region were substrates for the enzyme. These data support the hypothesis that this sequence of the primary gene product is an important recognition site for this processing enzyme. PMID:3543932

  8. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from pennywort (Umbilicus rupestris). Changes in properties after exposure to water stress.

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, P P; Bryant, J A; Woodward, F I

    1984-01-01

    Umbilicus rupestris (pennywort) switches from C3 photosynthesis to an incomplete form of crassulacean acid metabolism (referred to as 'CAM-idling') when exposed to water stress (drought). This switch is accompanied by an increase in the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. This enzyme also shows several changes in properties, including a marked decrease in sensitivity to acid pH, a lower Km for phosphoenolpyruvate, very much decreased sensitivity to the allosteric inhibitor malate, and increased responsiveness to the allosteric effector glucose 6-phosphate. The Mr of the enzyme remains unchanged, at approx. 185 000. These changes in properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase are discussed in relation to the roles of the enzyme in C3 and in CAM plants. Images Fig. 5. PMID:6712622

  9. Purification and Characterization of the Acetone Carboxylase of Cupriavidus metallidurans Strain CH34

    PubMed Central

    Rosier, Caroline; Leys, Natalie; Henoumont, Céline; Mergeay, Max

    2012-01-01

    Acetone carboxylase (Acx) is a key enzyme involved in the biodegradation of acetone by bacteria. Except for the Helicobacteraceae family, genome analyses revealed that bacteria that possess an Acx, such as Cupriavidus metallidurans strain CH34, are associated with soil. The Acx of CH34 forms the heterohexameric complex α2β2γ2 and can carboxylate only acetone and 2-butanone in an ATP-dependent reaction to acetoacetate and 3-keto-2-methylbutyrate, respectively. PMID:22492439

  10. Purification and characterization of the acetone carboxylase of Cupriavidus metallidurans strain CH34.

    PubMed

    Rosier, Caroline; Leys, Natalie; Henoumont, Céline; Mergeay, Max; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2012-06-01

    Acetone carboxylase (Acx) is a key enzyme involved in the biodegradation of acetone by bacteria. Except for the Helicobacteraceae family, genome analyses revealed that bacteria that possess an Acx, such as Cupriavidus metallidurans strain CH34, are associated with soil. The Acx of CH34 forms the heterohexameric complex α(2)β(2)γ(2) and can carboxylate only acetone and 2-butanone in an ATP-dependent reaction to acetoacetate and 3-keto-2-methylbutyrate, respectively. PMID:22492439

  11. Light Induction of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in Etiolated Maize Leaf Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Shinobu; Matsunaga, Kazumi; Sugiyama, Tatsuo

    1981-01-01

    An antibody for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was used to isolate and to quantitate the enzyme from greening maize (cv. KOU 6) leaves. The increase in enzyme activity during greening was due to de novo synthesis, which was paralleled by increases in enzyme protein and incorporation of leucine. The light-induced activity was due to one specific isoenzyme. The action spectrum for enzyme synthesis had red and blue peaks. Images PMID:16661613

  12. Crystal structure of the 500 kD yeast acetyl-CoA carboxylase holoenzyme dimer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jia; Tong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) has crucial roles in fatty acid metabolism and is an attractive target for drug discovery against diabetes, cancer and other diseases1–6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ACC (ScACC) is crucial for the production of very-long-chain fatty acids and the maintenance of the nuclear envelope7,8. ACC contains biotin carboxylase (BC) and carboxyltransferase (CT) activities, and its biotin is linked covalently to the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP). Most eukaryotic ACCs are 250 kD, multi-domain enzymes and function as homo-dimers and higher oligomers. They contain a unique, 80 kD central region that shares no homology with other proteins. While the structures of the BC, CT and BCCP domains and other biotin-dependent carboxylase holoenzymes are known1,9–14, currently there is no structural information on the ACC holoenzyme. Here we report the crystal structure of the full-length, 500 kD holoenzyme dimer of ScACC. The structure is strikingly different from those of the other biotin-dependent carboxylases. The central region contains five domains and is important for positioning the BC and CT domains for catalysis. The structure unexpectedly reveals a dimer of the BC domain and extensive conformational differences compared to the structure of BC domain alone, which is a monomer. These structural changes explain why the BC domain alone is catalytically inactive and define the molecular mechanism for the inhibition of eukaryotic ACC by the natural product soraphen A15,16 and by phosphorylation of a Ser residue just prior to the BC domain core in mammalian ACC. The BC and CT active sites are separated by 80 Å, and the entire BCCP domain must translocate during catalysis. PMID:26458104

  13. Regulation of pyc1 encoding pyruvate carboxylase isozyme I by nitrogen sources in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Huet, C; Menendez, J; Gancedo, C; François, J M

    2000-12-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the existence of PYC1 and PYC2 encoding cytosolic pyruvate carboxylase isoform I and II is rather puzzling, owing to the lack of potent differential gene regulation by the carbon sources. We report several findings indicating that these two genes are differentially regulated by the nature of the nitrogen source. In wild-type cells, the activity of pyruvate carboxylase, which is the sum of pyruvate carboxylase isoform I and II, was two- to fivefold lower in carbon medium containing aspartate, asparagine, glutamate or glutamine instead of ammonium as the nitrogen source, whereas it was 1.5- to threefold higher when the ammonium source was substituted by arginine, methionine, threonine or leucine. These enzymatic changes were independent of the nature of the carbon source and closely correlated to the changes in beta-galactosidase from PYC1-lacZ gene fusion and in PYC1 transcripts. Transfer of exponentially growing cells of the pyc2 mutant from an aspartate or a glutamate medium to an ammonium medium caused a fivefold increase in PYC1 mRNA in less than 30 min, whereas in the inverse experiment, PYC1 transcripts returned within 30 min to the low levels found in aspartate/glutamate medium. By contrast, these conditions affected neither the pyruvate carboxylase activity encoded by PYC2 nor PYC2 mRNA. Considering that changes in PYC1 expression inversely correlated with changes in alpha-ketoglutarate concentration or in alpha-ketoglutarate/glutamate ratio following the nitrogen shift experiments, and taking into account the pivotal role of this metabolite in ammonium assimilation, it is suggested that changes in alpha-ketoglutarate or in the alpha-ketoglutarate/glutamate ratio might be implicated in triggering the nitrogen effects on PYC1 expression. The physiological significance of the differential sensitivity of PYC1 and PYC2 genes with respect to the nitrogen source in the growth medium is also discussed. PMID:11082192

  14. Discovery of spirocyclic-diamine inhibitors of mammalian acetyl CoA-carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kung, Daniel W; Griffith, David A; Esler, William P; Vajdos, Felix F; Mathiowetz, Alan M; Doran, Shawn D; Amor, Paul A; Bagley, Scott W; Banks, Tereece; Cabral, Shawn; Ford, Kristen; Garcia-Irizarry, Carmen N; Landis, Margaret S; Loomis, Kathrine; McPherson, Kirk; Niosi, Mark; Rockwell, Kristin L; Rose, Colin; Smith, Aaron C; Southers, James A; Tapley, Susan; Tu, Meihua; Valentine, James J

    2015-11-15

    A novel series of spirocyclic-diamine based, isoform non-selective inhibitors of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is described. These spirodiamine derivatives were discovered by design of a library to mimic the structural rigidity and hydrogen-bonding pattern observed in the co-crystal structure of spirochromanone inhibitor I. The lead compound 3.5.1 inhibited de novo lipogenesis in rat hepatocytes, with an IC50 of 0.30 μM. PMID:26411795

  15. Crystal structure of the 500-kDa yeast acetyl-CoA carboxylase holoenzyme dimer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jia; Tong, Liang

    2015-10-29

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) has crucial roles in fatty acid metabolism and is an attractive target for drug discovery against diabetes, cancer and other diseases. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ACC (ScACC) is crucial for the production of very-long-chain fatty acids and the maintenance of the nuclear envelope. ACC contains biotin carboxylase (BC) and carboxyltransferase (CT) activities, and its biotin is linked covalently to the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP). Most eukaryotic ACCs are 250-kilodalton (kDa), multi-domain enzymes and function as homodimers and higher oligomers. They contain a unique, 80-kDa central region that shares no homology with other proteins. Although the structures of the BC, CT and BCCP domains and other biotin-dependent carboxylase holoenzymes are known, there is currently no structural information on the ACC holoenzyme. Here we report the crystal structure of the full-length, 500-kDa holoenzyme dimer of ScACC. The structure is remarkably different from that of the other biotin-dependent carboxylases. The central region contains five domains and is important for positioning the BC and CT domains for catalysis. The structure unexpectedly reveals a dimer of the BC domain and extensive conformational differences compared to the structure of the BC domain alone, which is a monomer. These structural changes reveal why the BC domain alone is catalytically inactive and define the molecular mechanism for the inhibition of eukaryotic ACC by the natural product soraphen A and by phosphorylation of a Ser residue just before the BC domain core in mammalian ACC. The BC and CT active sites are separated by 80 Å, and the entire BCCP domain must translocate during catalysis. PMID:26458104

  16. Variations in Kinetic Properties of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylases among Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Hock-Hin; Badger, Murray R.; Watson, Leslie

    1981-01-01

    Studies of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase from taxonomically diverse plants show that the enzyme from C3 and crassulacean acid metabolism pathway species exhibits lower Km(CO2) values (12-25 micromolar) than does that from C4 species (28-34 micromolar). RuBP carboxylase from aquatic angiosperms, an aquatic bryophyte, fresh water and marine algae has yielded consistently high Km(CO2) values (30-70 micromolar), similar in range to that of the enzyme from C4 terrestrial plants. This variation in Km(CO2) is discussed in relation to the correlation between the existence of CO2-concentrating mechanisms for photosynthesis and the affinity of the enzyme for CO2. The Km(RuBP) of the enzyme from various sources ranges from 10 to 136 micromolar; mean ± sd = 36 ± 20 micromolar. This variation in Km(RuBP) does not correlate with different photosynthetic pathways, but shows taxonomic patterns. Among the dicotyledons, the enzyme from crassinucellate species exhibits lower Km(RuBP) (18 ± 4 micromolar) than does that from tenuinucellate species (25 ± 7 micromolar). Among the Poaceae, RuBP carboxylase from Triticeae, chloridoids, andropogonoids, Microlaena, and Tetrarrhena has yielded lower Km(RuBP) values (29 ± 11 micromolar) than has that from other members of the grass family (46 ± 10 micromolar). PMID:16661826

  17. Tissue Distribution of Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase in Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Stumpf, Paul K.

    1984-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase [acetyl-CoA—carbon dioxide ligase (ADP forming), EC 6.4.1.2] is a biotin-containing enzyme catalyzing the formation of malonyl-CoA. The tissue distribution of this enzyme was determined for leaves of C3- and C4-plants. The mesophyll tissues of the C3-plants Pisum sativum and Allium porrum contained 90% of the leaf acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity, with the epidermal tissues containing the remainder. Western blotting of proteins fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, using 125I-streptavidin as a probe, revealed biotinyl proteins of molecular weights 62,000, 51,000, and 32,000 in P. sativum and 62,000, 34,000, and 32,000 in A. porrum. In the C4-plant sorghum, epidermal protoplasts, mesophyll protoplasts and strands of bundle sheath cells contained 35, 47, and 17%, respectively, of the total leaf acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. In Zea mays leaves the respective figures were 10% for epidermal protoplasts, 56% for mesophyll protoplasts, and 32% for bundle sheath strands. Biotinyl proteins of molecular weights 62,000 and 51,000 were identified in leaves of sorghum and Z. mays. The results are discussed with respect to each tissue's requirements for malonyl-CoA for various metabolic pathways. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16663756

  18. A Substrate-induced Biotin Binding Pocket in the Carboxyltransferase Domain of Pyruvate Carboxylase*

    PubMed Central

    Lietzan, Adam D.; St. Maurice, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Biotin-dependent enzymes catalyze carboxyl transfer reactions by efficiently coordinating multiple reactions between spatially distinct active sites. Pyruvate carboxylase (PC), a multifunctional biotin-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the bicarbonate- and MgATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in mammalian tissues. To complete the overall reaction, the tethered biotin prosthetic group must first gain access to the biotin carboxylase domain and become carboxylated and then translocate to the carboxyltransferase domain, where the carboxyl group is transferred from biotin to pyruvate. Here, we report structural and kinetic evidence for the formation of a substrate-induced biotin binding pocket in the carboxyltransferase domain of PC from Rhizobium etli. Structures of the carboxyltransferase domain reveal that R. etli PC occupies a symmetrical conformation in the absence of the biotin carboxylase domain and that the carboxyltransferase domain active site is conformationally rearranged upon pyruvate binding. This conformational change is stabilized by the interaction of the conserved residues Asp590 and Tyr628 and results in the formation of the biotin binding pocket. Site-directed mutations at these residues reduce the rate of biotin-dependent reactions but have no effect on the rate of biotin-independent oxaloacetate decarboxylation. Given the conservation with carboxyltransferase domains in oxaloacetate decarboxylase and transcarboxylase, the structure-based mechanism described for PC may be applicable to the larger family of biotin-dependent enzymes. PMID:23698000

  19. Carbon dioxide assimilation by leaves, isolated chloroplasts, and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from spinach.

    PubMed

    Lilley, R M; Walker, D A

    1975-06-01

    The relationship between rate of photosynthesis and CO(2) concentration has been reinvestigated using isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts. The apparently low CO(2) concentration required for half-maximal photosynthesis is shown to result partly from a ceiling imposed by electron transport. In double reciprocal plots of rate against CO(2) concentration, this ceiling results in departures from linearity at high CO(2) concentrations. If these rate limitations are disregarded in extrapolation the "true" CO(2) concentration required for half maximal carboxylation by intact chloroplasts is approximately 46 mum (CO(2)).When assayed under comparable conditions, ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from these chloroplasts also shows an apparent Km (CO(2)) of approximately 46 mum, suggesting that its characteristics are not modified by extraction. An improved assay for ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase yielded rates of carboxylation considerably higher than those previously reported, the highest maximal velocities recorded approaching 1000 mumoles CO(2) fixed mg(-1) chlorophyll hr(-1) at 20 C. With such Km and V(max), values the carboxylase would be able to achieve, at concentrations of CO(2) less than atmospheric, rates of CO(2) fixation equal to those displayed by the parent tissue or by the average plant under favorable conditions in its natural environment. PMID:16659216

  20. The distribution of carbonic anhydrase and ribulose diphosphate carboxylase in maize leaves.

    PubMed

    Poincelot, R P

    1972-09-01

    Extraction of maize (Zea mays) leaves by progressive grinding under suitably protective conditions yields total carbonic anhydrase activities (4800 units per milligram chlorophyll) comparable to the activity in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves. The total ribulose diphosphate carboxylase activity was also equal to or greater than the best literature values for maize. Of the total leaf carbonic anhydrase, 72.5% on a chlorophyll basis was present in the mesophyll cells and 14.2% in the bundle-sheath cells. The distribution of the total leaf ribulose diphosphate carboxylase between the mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells was 42.0 and 48.7% respectively. There was three times as much total chlorophyll in extracts of the mesophyll cells compared with the bundle-sheath cells of maize. Similar results for the above distribution of the two enzymes were found using a differential grinding technique. The possible function of carbonic anhydrase in photosynthesis is discussed. The equal distribution of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase activity between the mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells casts doubt upon the hypothesis that a rigid biochemical compartmentation exists between these cell types in maize. PMID:16658170

  1. Pyruvate carboxylase deficiency: clinical and biochemical response to anaplerotic diet therapy.

    PubMed

    Mochel, Fanny; DeLonlay, Pascale; Touati, Guy; Brunengraber, Henri; Kinman, Renee P; Rabier, Daniel; Roe, Charles R; Saudubray, Jean-Marie

    2005-04-01

    A six-day-old girl was referred for severe hepatic failure, dehydratation, axial hypotonia, and both lactic acidosis and ketoacidosis. Biotin-unresponsive pyruvate carboxylase deficiency type B was diagnosed. Triheptanoin, an odd-carbon triglyceride, was administrated as a source for acetyl-CoA and anaplerotic propionyl-CoA. Although this patient succumbed to a severe infection, during the six months interval of her anaplerotic and biochemical management, the following important observations were documented: (1) the immediate reversal (less than 48 h) of major hepatic failure with full correction of all biochemical abnormalities, (2) on citrate supplementation, the enhanced export from the liver of triheptanoin's metabolites, namely 5 carbon ketone bodies, increasing the availability of these anaplerotic substrates for peripheral organs, (3) the demonstration of the transport of C5 ketone bodies-representing alternative energetic fuel for the brain-across the blood-brain barrier, associated to increased levels of glutamine and free gamma-aminobutyric acid (f-GABA) in the cerebrospinal fluid. Considering that pyruvate carboxylase is a key enzyme for anaplerosis, besides the new perspectives brought by anaplerotic therapies in those rare pyruvate carboxylase deficiencies, this therapeutic trial also emphasizes the possible extended indications of triheptanoin in various diseases where the citric acid cycle is impaired. PMID:15781190

  2. Phosphoenol Pyruvate Carboxylase in Parasitic Plants: Further Characterization in Various Species and Localization at the Level of Cells and Tissues in Lathraea clandestina L.

    PubMed

    Renaudin, S; Thalouarn, P; Rey, L; Vidal, J; Larher, F

    1984-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEP carboxylase, EC 4.1.1.31) activity was demonstrated in a range of holo and hemiparasitic phanerogams. Lathraea clandestina was used as a model for a more detailed study. Enzyme activity levels were determined in the various plant parts. Great changes in enzyme capacity were observed in the shoots according to the time of measurement during a 24 hr cycle. PEP carboxylase characterized at the cellular level by using an indirect immunofluorescence method was found to be mainly located in the cytosol. The possible functions of PEP carboxylase in parasitic plants are discussed. PMID:23195386

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of the cDNA coding for the biotin-containing subunit of 3-methylcrotonoyl-CoA carboxylase: identification of the biotin carboxylase and biotin-carrier domains.

    PubMed Central

    Song, J; Wurtele, E S; Nikolau, B J

    1994-01-01

    Soybean genomic clones were isolated based on hybridization to probes that code for the conserved biotinylation domain of biotin-containing enzymes. The corresponding cDNA was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli through fusion to the bacterial trpE gene. The resulting chimeric protein was biotinylated in E. coli. Antibodies raised against the chimeric protein reacted specifically with an 85-kDa biotin-containing polypeptide from soybean and inhibited 3-methylcrotonoyl-CoA carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.4) activity in cell-free extracts of soybean leaves. Thus, the isolated soybean gene and corresponding cDNA code for the 85-kDa biotin-containing subunit of 3-methylcrotonoyl-CoA carboxylase. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA and portions of the genomic clones was determined. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the biotin-containing subunit of 3-methylcrotonoyl-CoA carboxylase with sequences of other biotin enzymes suggests that this subunit contains the functional domains for the first half-reaction catalyzed by all biotin-dependent carboxylases--namely, the carboxylation of biotin. These domains are arranged serially on the polypeptide, with the biotin carboxylase domain at the amino terminus and the biotin-carboxyl carrier domain at the carboxyl terminus. Images PMID:8016064

  4. Pyruvate Occupancy in the Carboxyl Transferase Domain of Pyruvate Carboxylase Facilitates Product Release from the Biotin Carboxylase Domain through an Intermolecular Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Westerhold, Lauren E; Adams, Stephanie L; Bergman, Hanna L; Zeczycki, Tonya N

    2016-06-21

    Protein structure, ligand binding, and catalytic turnover contributes to the governance of catalytic events occurring at spatially distinct domains in multifunctional enzymes. Coordination of these catalytic events partially rests on the ability of spatially discrete active sites to communicate with other allosteric and active sites on the same polypeptide chain (intramolecular) or on different polypeptide chains (intermolecular) within the holoenzyme. Often, communication results in long-range effects on substrate binding or product release. For example, pyruvate binding to the carboxyl transferase (CT) domain of pyruvate carboxylase (PC) increases the rate of product release in the biotin carboxylase (BC) domain. In order to address how CT domain ligand occupancy is "sensed" by other domains, we generated functional, mixed hybrid tetramers using the E218A (inactive BC domain) and T882S (low pyruvate binding, low activity) mutant forms of PC. The apparent Ka pyruvate for the pyruvate-stimulated release of Pi catalyzed by the T882S:E218A[1:1] hybrid tetramer was comparable to the wild-type enzyme and nearly 10-fold lower than that for the T882S homotetramer. In addition, the ratio of the rates of oxaloacetate formation to Pi release for the WT:T882S[1:1] and E218A:T882S[1:1] hybrid tetramer-catalyzed reactions was 0.5 and 0.6, respectively, while the T882S homotetramer exhibited a near 1:1 coupling of the two domains, suggesting that the mechanisms coordinating catalytic events is more complicated that we initially assumed. The results presented here are consistent with an intermolecular communication mechanism, where pyruvate binding to the CT domain is "sensed" by domains on a different polypeptide chain within the tetramer. PMID:27254467

  5. Partitioning of Nitrogen among Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase, and Pyruvate Orthophosphate Dikinase as Related to Biomass Productivity in Maize Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, T; Mizuno, M; Hayashi, M

    1984-07-01

    Maize (Zea mays L. cv Golden Cross Bantam T51) seedlings were grown under full sunlight or 50% sunlight in a temperature-controlled glasshouse at the temperatures of near optimum (30/25 degrees C) and suboptimum (17/13 degrees C) with seven levels of nitrate-N (0.4 to 12 millimolars). The contents of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPD), and ribulose-1,5-P(2) carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) were immunochemically determined for each treatment with rabbit antibodies raised against the respective maize leaf proteins (anti-PEPC and anti-PPD) or spinach leaf protein (anti-RuBisCO). The content of each enzymic protein increased with increasing N and raised under reduced temperature. The positive effect of light intensity on their contents was evident only at near optimal temperature. The relative increase in PEPC and PPD content with increasing N was significantly greater than that of RuBisCO irrespective of growth conditions. These enzymic proteins comprised about 8, 6, and 35% of total soluble protein, respectively, at near optimal growth condition. In contrast to significant increase in the proportion of soluble protein allocated to PEPC and PPD seen under certain conditions, the proportion allocated to RuBisCO decreased reciprocally with an increased biomass yield by N supply.These results indicated that the levels of PEPC and PPD parallel to maize biomass more tightly than that of RuBisCO at least under near optimal growth condition. PMID:16663684

  6. Activities of Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase and Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase and 14C-Bicarbonate Fixation during in Vitro Culture of Pinus radiata Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prakash P.; Bender, Ludwig; Thorpe, Trevor A.

    1988-01-01

    The activities of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), as indicators of autotrophic and nonautotrophic CO2 fixation, were measured in excised cotyledons of Pinus radiata D. Don cultured for 21 days under shoot-forming (SF) and nonshoot-forming (NSF) conditions. The activity of RuBPC was found to increase in both SF and NSF cultures during the initial 5 days of culture. However, it leveled off from day 5 to day 10 and subsequently began to decrease until the end of the culture period under the SF conditions. In contrast, in the NSF cultures, RuBPC activity increased until day 15, when it was twofold higher than the maximum activity found in the SF cultures. An increase in PEPC activity of about 2.5 times the level of activity in freshly excised cotyledons was observed during the initial 5 days of culture under the SF conditions. PEPC activity began to decline after day 5 until it reached the level of activity seen in NSF cotyledons by day 15. In contrast, the activity of PEPC did not show any significant increase during the initial 10 days of culture under the NSF conditions. The Km (phosphoenolpyruvate) of PEPC from SF cotyledons was about 35% higher than that of NSF cotyledons. Cotyledons from two culture periods (days 5 and 15) were incubated for 15 seconds with NaH14CO3. The label in the malate and asparatate fractions as a percentage of total 14C incorporation was 3 times higher in the SF cotyledons than in the NSF cotyledons. A higher incorporation of 14C into products of photosynthesis under the NSF conditions was also observed. PMID:16666206

  7. Structural evidence for substrate-induced synergism and half-sites reactivity in biotin carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Mochalkin, Igor; Miller, J. Richard; Evdokimov, Artem; Lightle, Sandra; Yan, Chunhong; Stover, Charles Ken; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial acetyl-CoA carboxylase is a multifunctional biotin-dependent enzyme that consists of three separate proteins: biotin carboxylase (BC), biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase (CT). Acetyl-CoA carboxylase is a potentially attractive target for novel antibiotics because it catalyzes the first committed step in fatty acid biosynthesis. In the first half-reaction, BC catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of BCCP. In the second half-reaction, the carboxyl group is transferred from carboxybiotinylated BCCP to acetyl-CoA to produce malonyl-CoA. A series of structures of BC from several bacteria crystallized in the presence of various ATP analogs is described that addresses three major questions concerning the catalytic mechanism. The structure of BC bound to AMPPNP and the two catalytically essential magnesium ions resolves inconsistencies between the kinetics of active-site BC mutants and previously reported BC structures. Another structure of AMPPNP bound to BC shows the polyphosphate chain folded back on itself, and not in the correct (i.e., extended) conformation for catalysis. This provides the first structural evidence for the hypothesis of substrate-induced synergism, which posits that ATP binds nonproductively to BC in the absence of biotin. The BC homodimer has been proposed to exhibit half-sites reactivity where the active sites alternate or “flip-flop” their catalytic cycles. A crystal structure of BC showed the ATP analog AMPPCF2P bound to one subunit while the other subunit was unliganded. The liganded subunit was in the closed or catalytic conformation while the unliganded subunit was in the open conformation. This provides the first structural evidence for half-sites reactivity in BC. PMID:18725455

  8. Inactivation of Maize Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase by the Binding to Chloroplast Membranes 1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min-Xian; Wedding, Randolph T.

    1992-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) purified from maize (Zea mays L.) leaves associates with maize leaf chloroplast membrane in vitro. The binding of PEPC to the membrane results in enzyme inactivation. A protein isolated from a maize leaf chloroplast membrane preparation inactivated PEPC. Treatment with membrane preparation or with partially purified inactivating protein accelerates PEPC inactivation at low temperature (4°C). Interaction of PEPC with chloroplast membrane or inactivating protein may inactivate the enzyme by influencing dissociation of the enzyme active tetramer. PMID:16652972

  9. Isolation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from leaves.

    PubMed

    Carmo-Silva, A Elizabete; Barta, Csengele; Salvucci, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the fixation of CO2 and O2 in photosynthesis and photorespiration, respectively. As the rate-limiting step in photosynthesis, improving the catalytic properties of Rubisco has long been viewed as a viable strategy for increasing plant productivity. Advances in biotechnology have made this goal more attainable by making it possible to modify Rubisco in planta. To properly evaluate the properties of Rubisco, it is necessary to isolate the enzyme in pure form. This chapter describes procedures for rapid and efficient purification of Rubisco from leaves of several species. PMID:20960141

  10. Reactions catalyzed by 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide carboxylases from Escherichia coli and Gallus gallus: a case for divergent catalytic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Firestine, S M; Poon, S W; Mueller, E J; Stubbe, J; Davisson, V J

    1994-10-01

    A comparative investigation of the substrate requirements for the enzyme 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) carboxylase from E. coli and G. gallus has been conducted using in vivo and in vitro studies. In Escherichia coli, two enzymes PurK and PurE are required for the transformation of AIR to 4-carboxy-5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (CAIR). The Gallus gallus PurCE is a bifunctional enzyme containing AIR carboxylase and 4-[(N-succinylamino)carbonyl]-5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (SAICAR) synthetase. The E. coli PurE and the C-terminal domain of the G. gallus PurCE protein maintain a significant degree of amino acid sequence identity and also share CAIR as a product of their enzymatic activities. The substrate requirements of AIR carboxylases from E. coli and G. gallus have been compared by a series of in vitro experiments. The carbamic acid, N5-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide (N5-CAIR) is a substrate for the E. coli PurE (Mueller et al., 1994) but not for the G. gallus AIR carboxylase. In contrast, AIR and CO2 are substrates for the G. gallus AIR carboxylase. The recognition properties of the two proteins were also compared using inhibition studies with 4-nitro-5- aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (NAIR). NAIR is a tight-binding inhibitor of the G. gallus AIR carboxylase (K(i) = 0.34 nM) but only a steady-state inhibitor (K(i) = 0.5 microM) of the E. coli PurE. These data suggest significant differences in the transition states for the reactions catalyzed by these two evolutionarily related enzymes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7918411

  11. Dark/Light modulation of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity in plants from different photosynthetic categories.

    PubMed

    Vu, J C; Allen, L H; Bowes, G

    1984-11-01

    Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBPCase) from several plants had substantially greater activity in extracts from lightexposed leaves than dark leaves, even when the extracts were incubated in vitro with saturating HCO(3) (-) and Mg(2+) concentrations. This occurred in Glycine max, Lycopersicon esculentum, Nicotiana tabacum, Panicum bisulcatum, and P. hylaeicum (C(3)); P. maximum (C(4) phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase); P. milioides (C(3)/C(4)); and Bromelia pinguin and Ananas comosus (Crassulacean acid metabolism). Little or no difference between light and dark leaf extracts of RuBPCase was observed in Triticum aestivum (C(3)); P. miliaceum (C(4) NAD malic enzyme); Zea mays and Sorghum bicolor (C(4) NADP malic enzyme); Moricandia arvensis (C(3)/C(4)); and Hydrilla verticillata (submersed aquatic macrophyte). It is concluded that, in many plants, especially Crassulacean acid metabolism and C(3) species, a large fraction of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in the dark is in an inactivatable state that cannot respond to CO(2) and Mg(2+) activation, but which can be converted to an activatable state upon exposure of the leaf to light. PMID:16663937

  12. Dark/Light Modulation of Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase Activity in Plants from Different Photosynthetic Categories 1

    PubMed Central

    Vu, J. Cu V.; Allen, Leon H.; Bowes, George

    1984-01-01

    Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBPCase) from several plants had substantially greater activity in extracts from lightexposed leaves than dark leaves, even when the extracts were incubated in vitro with saturating HCO3− and Mg2+ concentrations. This occurred in Glycine max, Lycopersicon esculentum, Nicotiana tabacum, Panicum bisulcatum, and P. hylaeicum (C3); P. maximum (C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase); P. milioides (C3/C4); and Bromelia pinguin and Ananas comosus (Crassulacean acid metabolism). Little or no difference between light and dark leaf extracts of RuBPCase was observed in Triticum aestivum (C3); P. miliaceum (C4 NAD malic enzyme); Zea mays and Sorghum bicolor (C4 NADP malic enzyme); Moricandia arvensis (C3/C4); and Hydrilla verticillata (submersed aquatic macrophyte). It is concluded that, in many plants, especially Crassulacean acid metabolism and C3 species, a large fraction of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in the dark is in an inactivatable state that cannot respond to CO2 and Mg2+ activation, but which can be converted to an activatable state upon exposure of the leaf to light. PMID:16663937

  13. A Symmetrical Tetramer for S. aureus Pyruvate Carboxylase in Complex with Coenzyme A

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.; Xiang, S; Lasso, G; Gil, D; Valle, M; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) is a conserved metabolic enzyme with important cellular functions. We report crystallographic and cryo-electron microscopy (EM) studies of Staphylococcus aureus PC (SaPC) in complex with acetyl-CoA, an allosteric activator, and mutagenesis, biochemical, and structural studies of the biotin binding site of its carboxyltransferase (CT) domain. The disease-causing A610T mutation abolishes catalytic activity by blocking biotin binding to the CT active site, and Thr908 might play a catalytic role in the CT reaction. The crystal structure of SaPC in complex with CoA reveals a symmetrical tetramer, with one CoA molecule bound to each monomer, and cryo-EM studies confirm the symmetrical nature of the tetramer. These observations are in sharp contrast to the highly asymmetrical tetramer of Rhizobium etli PC in complex with ethyl-CoA. Our structural information suggests that acetyl-CoA promotes a conformation for the dimer of the biotin carboxylase domain of PC that might be catalytically more competent.

  14. Hybrid Structure of a Dynamic Single-Chain Carboxylase from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Anna; Hunkeler, Moritz; Stuttfeld, Edward; Maier, Timm

    2016-08-01

    Biotin-dependent acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylases (aCCs) are involved in key steps of anabolic pathways and comprise three distinct functional units: biotin carboxylase (BC), biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyl transferase (CT). YCC multienzymes are a poorly characterized family of prokaryotic aCCs of unidentified substrate specificity, which integrate all functional units into a single polypeptide chain. We employed a hybrid approach to study the dynamic structure of Deinococcus radiodurans (Dra) YCC: crystal structures of isolated domains reveal a hexameric CT core with extended substrate binding pocket and a dimeric BC domain. Negative-stain electron microscopy provides an approximation of the variable positioning of the BC dimers relative to the CT core. Small-angle X-ray scattering yields quantitative information on the ensemble of Dra YCC structures in solution. Comparison with other carrier protein-dependent multienzymes highlights a characteristic range of large-scale interdomain flexibility in this important class of biosynthetic enzymes. PMID:27396827

  15. Pathway of assembly of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Anabaena 7210 expressed in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevitz, M.; Somerville, C.R.; McIntosh, L.

    1985-10-01

    The authors have placed the genes encoding ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the Anabaena 7120 operon under transcriptional control of the lac promoter carried on the Escherichia coli plasmid pUC19. The genes encoding both the large and small subunit polypeptides (rbcL and rbcS) are transcribed and translated so that approx. = 0.6% of the soluble protein in E. coli extracts is a fully functional holoenzyme with a sedimentation coefficient of approximately 18S, which contains stoichiometric amounts of the two subunits. However, expression of the large subunit polypeptide vastly exceeds that of the small subunit because the majority of transcripts terminate in the intergenic region between the rbcL and rbcS genes. As a result, excess large subunit is synthesized and accumulates in E. coli as an insoluble and catalytically inactive form. Because small subunit is found only in the high molecular weight soluble form of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, the authors propose that the small subunit promotes assembly of the hexadecameric form of the enzyme via heterodimers of large and small subunits.

  16. Active site histidine in spinach ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase modified by diethyl pyrocarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Y.; McFadden, B.A.; el-Gul, T.

    1985-07-16

    (TH) Diethyl pyrocarbonate was synthesized from (TH) ethanol prepared by the reduction of acetaldehyde by NaB3H4. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) from spinach was inactivated with this reagent at pH 7.0 the presence of 20 mM MgS , and tryptic peptides that contained modified histidine residues were isolated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Labeling of the enzyme was conducted in the presence and absence of the competitive inhibitor sedoheptulose 1,7-bisphosphate. The amount of one peptide that was heavily labeled in the absence of this compound was reduced 10-fold in its presence. The labeled residue was histidine-298. This result, in combination with earlier experiments, suggests that His-298 in spinach RuBisCO is located in the active site domain and is essential to enzyme activity. This region of the primary structure is strongly conserved in seven other ribulosebisphosphate carboxylases from divergent sources.

  17. Functional conformations for pyruvate carboxylase during catalysis explored by cryoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lasso, Gorka; Yu, Linda P C; Gil, David; Lázaro, Melisa; Tong, Liang; Valle, Mikel

    2014-06-10

    The tetrameric enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PC), a biotin-dependent carboxylase, produces oxaloacetate by two consecutive reactions that take place in distant active sites. Previous crystal structures revealed two different configurations for PC tetramers, the so-called symmetric and asymmetric, which were understood as characteristic molecular architectures for PC from different organisms. We have analyzed PC samples from Staphylococcus aureus while the enzyme generates oxaloacetate, expecting PC tetramers to display the conformational landscape relevant for its functioning. Using cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) and sorting techniques, we detect previously defined symmetric and asymmetric architectures, demonstrating that PC maps both arrangements by large conformational changes. Furthermore, we observe that each configuration is coupled to one of the two consecutive enzymatic reactions. The findings describe the structural transitions relevant for the allosteric control of the multifunctional PC and demonstrate that by cryo-EM and classification, we can characterize freely working macromolecules. PMID:24882745

  18. Treatment of pyruvate carboxylase deficiency with high doses of citrate and aspartate.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, A; Kahler, S G; Kishnani, P S; Artigas-Lopez, M; Pappu, A S; Steiner, R; Millington, D S; Van Hove, J L

    1999-12-01

    A patient with severe pyruvate carboxylase deficiency presented at age 11 weeks with metabolic decompensation after routine immunization. She was comatose, had severe lactic acidemia (22 mM) and ketosis, low aspartate and glutamate, elevated citrulline and proline, and mild hyperammonemia. Head magnetic resonance imaging showed subdural hematomas and mild generalized brain atrophy. Biotin-unresponsive pyruvate carboxylase deficiency was diagnosed. To provide oxaloacetate, she was treated with high-dose citrate (7.5 mol/kg(-1)/day(-1)), aspartate (10 mmol/kg(-1)/day(-1)), and continuous drip feeding. Lactate and ketones diminished dramatically, and plasma amino acids normalized, except for arginine, which required supplementation. In the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), glutamine remained low and lysine elevated, showing the treatment had not normalized brain chemistry. Metabolic decompensations, triggered by infections or fasting, diminished after the first year. They were characterized by severe lactic and ketoacidosis, hypernatremia, and a tendency to hypoglycemia. At age 3(1/2) years she has profound mental retardation, spasticity, and grand mal and myoclonic seizures only partially controlled by anticonvulsants. The new treatment regimen has helped maintain metabolic control, but the neurological outcome is still poor. PMID:10588840

  19. Effect of Nitrate and Ammonium Nutrition of Nonnodulated Phaseolus vulgaris L. on Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase and Pyruvate Kinase Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Patrick; Erismann, Karl H.

    1985-01-01

    Young bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Saxa) were fed with 3.5 or 10 millimolar N in either the form of NO3− or NH4+, after being grown on N-free nutrient solution for 8 days. The pH of the nutrient solutions was either 6 or 4. The cell sap pH and the extractable activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and of pyruvate kinase from roots and primary leaves were measured over several days. The extractable activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (based on soluble protein) from primary leaves increased with NO3− nutrition, whereas with NH4+ nutrition and on N-free nutrient solution the activity remained at a low level. Phosphoenopyruvate carboxylase activity from the roots of NH4+-fed plants at pH 4 was finally somewhat higher than from the roots of plants grown on NO3− at the same pH. There was no difference in activity from the root between the N treatments when pH in the nutrient solutions was 6. The extractable activity of pyruvate kinase from roots and primary leaves seemed not to be influenced by the N nutrition of the plants. The results are discussed in relation to the physiological function of both enzymes with special regard to the postulated functions of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in C3 plants as an anaplerotic enzyme and as part of a cellular pH stat. PMID:16664265

  20. Studies on acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase from rat mammary gland and mammary tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, P M; Feltman, D S; Ahmad, F

    1982-01-01

    The activities of two lipogenic enzymes, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase, were determined in two transplantable mammary adenocarcinomas (13762 and R3230AC) carried by non-pregnant, pregnant and lactating rats, and in mammary tissue of control animals (non-tumour-carrying) of comparable physiological states. During mammary-gland differentiation of control or tumour-carrying animals, the activities of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase in the lactating gland increased by about 40--50-fold over the values found in non-pregnant animals. On the other hand, in tumours carried by lactating dams there were only modest increases (1.5--2-fold) in acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase compared with the neoplasms carried by non-pregnant animals. On the basis of the Km values for different substrates and immunodiffusion and immunotitration data, the fatty acid synthase of neoplastic tissues appeared to be indistinguishable from the control mammary-gland enzyme. However, a comparison of the immunotitration and immunodiffusion experiments indicated that the mammary-gland acetyl-CoA carboxylase might differ from the enzyme present in mammary neoplasms. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6130760

  1. Immunolocalization of carbonic anhydrase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in developing seeds of Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Aivalakis, Georgios; Dimou, Maria; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Plati, Fotini; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Drossopoulos, J B

    2004-03-01

    To investigate the role of carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) during Medicago sativa seed development, the distribution of both proteins was examined using an immunohistological approach. Both enzymes are co-localized in most ovular and embryonic tissues. In early stages of seed development, both proteins were abundant in embryo and integuments, while at subsequent stages both proteins are accumulated in endosperm, nucellus and integuments. At late stages of seed development when both endosperm and nucellus are degraded, significant accumulation of both proteins was observed in the embryo proper. Chlorophyll was found to accumulate in embryos after the heart stage and reached a maximum at mature stage. It is suggested that CA and PEPC play a role in respiratory carbon dioxide refixation while generating malate to support amino acid and/or fatty acids biosynthesis. PMID:15051041

  2. Activation and Inhibition of Ribulose 1,5-Diphosphate Carboxylase by 6-Phosphogluconate 1

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Douglas K.; Bassham, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-diphosphate carboxylase, when activated by preincubation with 1 mm bicarbonate and 10 mm MgCl2 in the absence of ribulose 1,5-diphosphate, remains activated for 20 minutes or longer after reaction is initiated by addition of ribulose diphosphate. If as little as 50 μm 6-phosphogluconate is added during this preincubation period, 5 minutes before the start of the reaction, a further 188% activation is observed. However, addition of 6-phosphogluconate at the same time or later than addition of ribulose diphosphate, or at any time with 50 mm bicarbonate, gives inhibition of the enzyme activity. Possible relevance of these effects in vivo regulatory effects is discussed. PMID:16658565

  3. Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 2 Is Dispensable for CD8+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang Eun; Walsh, Matthew C.; Hoehn, Kyle L.; James, David E.; Wherry, E. John; Choi, Yongwon

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of T cells is closely associated with dynamic changes in nutrient and energy metabolism. However, the extent to which specific metabolic pathways and molecular components are determinative of CD8+ T cell fate remains unclear. It has been previously established in various tissues that acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) regulates fatty acid oxidation (FAO) by inhibiting carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), a rate-limiting enzyme of FAO in mitochondria. Here, we explore the cell-intrinsic role of ACC2 in T cell immunity in response to infections. We report here that ACC2 deficiency results in a marginal increase of cellular FAO in CD8+ T cells, but does not appear to influence antigen-specific effector and memory CD8+ T cell responses during infection with listeria or lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. These results suggest that ACC2 is dispensable for CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:26367121

  4. Expression of Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in a cyanobacterium. Functional complementation of Synechococcus PCC 7942 ppc.

    PubMed Central

    Luinenburg, I; Coleman, J R

    1993-01-01

    The gene (ppc) coding for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7942 has been inactivated via insertional mutagenesis while being functionally complemented by Escherichia coli ppc. Cyanobacterial cells functionally complemented by E. coli ppc showed decreased PEPCase activity in crude cell lysates and detergent-permeabilized whole cell assays. Decreased rates of growth, reduced levels of chlorophyll a, and decreased photosynthetic O2 evolution capacity per cell when compared to wild-type cyanobacterial cells were also observed. Phycobiliprotein levels were not affected. The results are discussed in terms of the impact of reduced PEPCase activity on cyanobacterial cell metabolism and the regulatory properties of the E. coli gene product. PMID:8278492

  5. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors from avocado (Persea americana Mill) fruits.

    PubMed

    Hashimura, H; Ueda, C; Kawabata, J; Kasai, T

    2001-07-01

    A methanol extract of avocado fruits showed potent inhibitory activity against acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a key enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis. The active principles were isolated and identified as (5E,12Z,15Z)-2-hydroxy-4-oxoheneicosa-5,12,15-trienyl (1), (2R,12Z,15Z)-2-hydroxy-4-oxoheneicosa-12,15-dienyl (2), (2R*,4R*)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-enyl (3) and (2R*,4R*)-2,4-dihydroxyheptadec-16-ynyl (4) acetates by instrumental analyses. The IC50 of the compounds were 4.0 x 10(-6), 4.9 x 10(-6), 9.4 x 10(-6), and 5.1 x 10(-6) M, respectively. PMID:11515553

  6. Intermittent ataxia and immunodeficiency with multiple carboxylase deficiencies: a biotin-responsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Sander, J E; Malamud, N; Cowan, M J; Packman, S; Amman, A J; Wara, D W

    1980-11-01

    A small group of inborn errors of metabolism are manifested by intermittent cerebellar ataxia. We have previously reported a family with an inherited metabolic defect resulting in multiple carboxylase deficiencies which were responsive to pharmacological doses of biotin. Affected children presented with a skin rash, infections, acute intermittent ataxia, and lactic acidosis. Two affected siblings died prior to diagnosis and therapy, and a detailed postmortem examination was performed on one of them. The brain was characterized by atrophy restricted to the superior vermis of the cerebellum, a finding strikingly similar to that found in chronic alcoholism. Intermittent ataxia would suggest a potentially treatable metabolic disease, and clinical evaluation should include studies of intermediary metabolism and immune function. PMID:7436398

  7. Inhibition of E. coli P-enolpyruvate carboxylase by P-enol-3-bromopyruvate

    SciTech Connect

    Asem, K.; Smith, T.E.

    1986-05-01

    The generality of the mechanism based inhibition of P-enolpyruvate carboxylases (PEPCase) by P-enol-3-bromopyruvate (BrPEP) was tested by measuring its effects on the allosterically regulated enzyme from E. coli. In the presence of 1mM Mn/sup 2 +/, BrPEP appears to be a competitive inhibitor (K/sub i/ = 0.0087mM) of PEPCase. Incubation of 0.005mM PEPCase with 0.5mM (or 1.0mM)BrPEP along with H/sup 14/CO/sub 3//sup -/ and Mn/sup 2 +/, yielded, upon reduction with NaBH/sub 4/, a protein containing radioactivity in an amount approximately proportional to that expected from the loss of catalytic activity. At both a 25- and a 50-fold excess (0.5mM and 1.0mM, respectively) of BrPEP to PEPCase subunits, first order loss of activity occurred with k values of 5.24 x 10/sup -3/ min/sup -1/ and 1.03 x 10/sup -2/ min/sup -1/, respectively. At the lower concentration of BrPEP the inactivation process appeared to be reversible after 40 min with no further inhibition occurring even up to two hours of incubation. At the higher concentration of BrPEP, the rate of inhibition slowed dramatically after 50 min and appeared insignificant over the next hour. These data suggest that BrPEP irreversibly inactivates the E. coli PEP carboxylase, but that there may be considerable dissociation of the product, Br-oxaloacetate, before irreversible binding occurs, and that the reduced rate of inactivation may be due to depletion of BrPEP.

  8. Structural and Biochemical Studies on the Regulation of Biotin Carboxylase by Substrate Inhibition and Dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    C Chou; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Biotin carboxylase (BC) activity is shared among biotin-dependent carboxylases and catalyzes the Mg-ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin using bicarbonate as the CO{sub 2} donor. BC has been studied extensively over the years by structural, kinetic, and mutagenesis analyses. Here we report three new crystal structures of Escherichia coli BC at up to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution, complexed with different ligands. Two structures are wild-type BC in complex with two ADP molecules and two Ca{sup 2+} ions or two ADP molecules and one Mg{sup 2+} ion. One ADP molecule is in the position normally taken by the ATP substrate, whereas the other ADP molecule occupies the binding sites of bicarbonate and biotin. One Ca{sup 2+} ion and the Mg{sup 2+} ion are associated with the ADP molecule in the active site, and the other Ca{sup 2+} ion is coordinated by Glu-87, Glu-288, and Asn-290. Our kinetic studies confirm that ATP shows substrate inhibition and that this inhibition is competitive against bicarbonate. The third structure is on the R16E mutant in complex with bicarbonate and Mg-ADP. Arg-16 is located near the dimer interface. The R16E mutant has only a 2-fold loss in catalytic activity compared with the wild-type enzyme. Analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that the mutation significantly destabilized the dimer, although the presence of substrates can induce dimer formation. The binding modes of bicarbonate and Mg-ADP are essentially the same as those to the wild-type enzyme. However, the mutation greatly disrupted the dimer interface and caused a large re-organization of the dimer. The structures of these new complexes have implications for the catalysis by BC.

  9. Structural and Biochemical Studies on the Regulation of Biotin Carboxylase by Substrate Inhibition and Dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Chi-Yuan; Tong, Liang

    2012-06-19

    Biotin carboxylase (BC) activity is shared among biotin-dependent carboxylases and catalyzes the Mg-ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin using bicarbonate as the CO{sub 2} donor. BC has been studied extensively over the years by structural, kinetic, and mutagenesis analyses. Here we report three new crystal structures of Escherichia coli BC at up to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution, complexed with different ligands. Two structures are wild-type BC in complex with two ADP molecules and two Ca{sup 2+} ions or two ADP molecules and one Mg{sup 2+} ion. One ADP molecule is in the position normally taken by the ATP substrate, whereas the other ADP molecule occupies the binding sites of bicarbonate and biotin. One Ca{sup 2+} ion and the Mg{sup 2+} ion are associated with the ADP molecule in the active site, and the other Ca{sup 2+} ion is coordinated by Glu-87, Glu-288, and Asn-290. Our kinetic studies confirm that ATP shows substrate inhibition and that this inhibition is competitive against bicarbonate. The third structure is on the R16E mutant in complex with bicarbonate and Mg-ADP. Arg-16 is located near the dimer interface. The R16E mutant has only a 2-fold loss in catalytic activity compared with the wild-type enzyme. Analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that the mutation significantly destabilized the dimer, although the presence of substrates can induce dimer formation. The binding modes of bicarbonate and Mg-ADP are essentially the same as those to the wild-type enzyme. However, the mutation greatly disrupted the dimer interface and caused a large re-organization of the dimer. The structures of these new complexes have implications for the catalysis by BC.

  10. Vitamin K-dependent carboxylase: affinity purification from bovine liver by using a synthetic propeptide containing the gamma-carboxylation recognition site.

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, B R; Ulrich, M M; Jacobs, M; Vermeer, C; Walsh, C; Furie, B; Furie, B C

    1989-01-01

    The vitamin K-dependent carboxylase catalyzes the posttranslational modification of specific glutamic acid residues to form gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues within the vitamin K-dependent proteins. This enzyme recognizes the gamma-carboxylation recognition site on the propeptide of the precursor forms of the vitamin K-dependent blood coagulation proteins. To purify this enzyme to homogeneity, the carboxylase from bovine liver microsomes was solubilized with 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS), the protein was fractionated with ammonium sulfate, and then the enzyme was isolated by affinity chromatography using a synthetic peptide based upon the structure of the prothrombin propeptide. Elution with 10 mM propeptide yielded a single major band on SDS gel electrophoresis with a molecular weight of 77,000. In the presence of high concentrations of propeptide, only minimal carboxylase activity was measurable. Antibodies to the protein inhibited the carboxylase activity in crude preparations. In an alternative affinity purification strategy the propeptide was coupled through an NH2-terminal cysteine to an activated thiol-Sepharose column. The carboxylase-propeptide complex was eluted at 25 degrees C by reductive cleavage of the enzyme-propeptide complex in the presence of detergent and phospholipids. The eluted protein (Mr, 77,000) contained both stable vitamin K-dependent carboxylase and vitamin K epoxidase activity. The protein, purified by either method, was detected as a single band (Mr, 77,000) in a Western blot using anti-carboxylase antibodies. A 10,000-fold purification of carboxylase activity from crude microsomes was estimated. Purified bovine liver vitamin K-dependent carboxylase should facilitate the study of its structure and of the mechanism of action of vitamin K as a cofactor in the reaction catalyzed by this enzyme. Images PMID:2780546

  11. Glutamine synthetase in ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase deficient tobacco mutants in cell suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Hirel, B; Nato, A; Martin, F

    1984-06-01

    In two tobacco mutants lacking ribulose, 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase the amount of glutamine synthetase and its activity were determined and compared with the wild type green cells. It was shown that in these two mutants glutamine synthetase protein content was six times lower than in the wild type. This situation was comparable to that found in etiolated cells where ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was absent. These observations suggest that a common regulatory mechanism might control the dual light dependent biosynthesis of both enzymes. The results have also implications concerning the efficiency of the reassimilation of ammonia by chloroplastic glutamine synthetase during the photorespiratory process. PMID:24253436

  12. Nitrate-Dependent Degradation of Acetone by Alicycliphilus and Paracoccus Strains and Comparison of Acetone Carboxylase Enzymes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dullius, Carlos Henrique; Chen, Ching-Yuan; Schink, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    A novel acetone-degrading, nitrate-reducing bacterium, strain KN Bun08, was isolated from an enrichment culture with butanone and nitrate as the sole sources of carbon and energy. The cells were motile short rods, 0.5 to 1 by 1 to 2 μm in size, which gave Gram-positive staining results in the exponential growth phase and Gram-negative staining results in the stationary-growth phase. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate was assigned to the genus Alicycliphilus. Besides butanone and acetone, the strain used numerous fatty acids as substrates. An ATP-dependent acetone-carboxylating enzyme was enriched from cell extracts of this bacterium and of Alicycliphilus denitrificans K601T by two subsequent DEAE Sepharose column procedures. For comparison, acetone carboxylases were enriched from two additional nitrate-reducing bacterial species, Paracoccus denitrificans and P. pantotrophus. The products of the carboxylase reaction were acetoacetate and AMP rather than ADP. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of cell extracts and of the various enzyme preparations revealed bands corresponding to molecular masses of 85, 78, and 20 kDa, suggesting similarities to the acetone carboxylase enzymes described in detail for the aerobic bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain Py2 (85.3, 78.3, and 19.6 kDa) and the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. Protein bands were excised and compared by mass spectrometry with those of acetone carboxylases of aerobic bacteria. The results document the finding that the nitrate-reducing bacteria studied here use acetone-carboxylating enzymes similar to those of aerobic and phototrophic bacteria. PMID:21841031

  13. Carboxylation mechanism and stereochemistry of crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase, a carboxylating enoyl-thioester reductase

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Tobias J.; Brecht, Volker; Fuchs, Georg; Müller, Michael; Alber, Birgit E.

    2009-01-01

    Chemo- and stereoselective reductions are important reactions in chemistry and biology, and reductases from biological sources are increasingly applied in organic synthesis. In contrast, carboxylases are used only sporadically. We recently described crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase, which catalyzes the reduction of (E)-crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA but also the reductive carboxylation of (E)-crotonyl-CoA to ethylmalonyl-CoA. In this study, the complete stereochemical course of both reactions was investigated in detail. The pro-(4R) hydrogen of NADPH is transferred in both reactions to the re face of the C3 position of crotonyl-CoA. In the course of the carboxylation reaction, carbon dioxide is incorporated in anti fashion at the C2 atom of crotonyl-CoA. For the reduction reaction that yields butyryl-CoA, a solvent proton is added in anti fashion instead of the CO2. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase is a member of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and shares the same phylogenetic origin. The stereospecificity of the hydride transfer from NAD(P)H within this superfamily is highly conserved, although the substrates and reduction reactions catalyzed by its individual representatives differ quite considerably. Our findings led to a reassessment of the stereospecificity of enoyl(-thioester) reductases and related enzymes with respect to their amino acid sequence, revealing a general pattern of stereospecificity that allows the prediction of the stereochemistry of the hydride transfer for enoyl reductases of unknown specificity. Further considerations on the reaction mechanism indicated that crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase may have evolved from enoyl-CoA reductases. This may be useful for protein engineering of enoyl reductases and their application in biocatalysis. PMID:19458256

  14. Structural and functional analysis of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene from the purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris No. 7.

    PubMed Central

    Inui, M; Dumay, V; Zahn, K; Yamagata, H; Yukawa, H

    1997-01-01

    The ppc gene, encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), from Rhodopseudomonas palustris No. 7 was cloned and sequenced. Primer extension analysis identified a transcriptional start site 42 bp upstream of the ppc initiation codon. An R. palustris No. 7 PEPC-deficient strain showed a slower doubling time compared with the wild-type strain either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark, when pyruvate was used as a carbon source. PMID:9244286

  15. Discovery of Small Molecule Isozyme Non-specific Inhibitors of Mammalian Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.; Freeman-Cook, K; Elliott, R; Vajdos, F; Rajamohan, F; Kohls, D; Marr, E; Harwood Jr., H; Esler, W; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Screening Pfizer's compound library resulted in the identification of weak acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors, from which were obtained rACC1 CT-domain co-crystal structures. Utilizing HTS hits and structure-based drug discovery, a more rigid inhibitor was designed and led to the discovery of sub-micromolar, spirochromanone non-specific ACC inhibitors. Low nanomolar, non-specific ACC-isozyme inhibitors that exhibited good rat pharmacokinetics were obtained from this chemotype.

  16. Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase Activity in Developing Seedlings and Chloroplasts of Barley and Its Virescens Mutant 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Lawrence W.; Zalik, Saul

    1981-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase activity of whole tissue homogenates and chloroplast preparations was analyzed as the acetyl-CoA-dependent incorporation of [14C]bicarbonate into an acid-stable product. The absolute requirement for ATP and MgCl2, the complete inhibition with avidin, and end-product analysis were consistent with the presence of acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. Little difference was found between the mutant and normal tissue homogenates from the 1- to 3-day growth stages, during which period both showed a 3-fold increase. However, by 4 days, the activity of the mutant exceeded that of the normal. Fractionation studies showed that the enzyme was a soluble protein present in the stromal fraction of chloroplasts. The biotin content was also highest in the stroma, although it was found in the lamellar fraction as well. For both the mutant and the normal, the highest acetyl-CoA carboxylase activities were obtained in the stromal preparations from 4-day seedlings (54 and 31 nmoles per milligram protein per minute for the mutant and the normal, respectively) with a progressive decline by 6 and 8 days. The difference between the mutant and the normal was not due to the accumulation of an inhibitor in the normal. PMID:16661731

  17. Characterization of the Mycobacterial Acyl-CoA Carboxylase Holo Complexes Reveals Their Functional Expansion into Amino Acid Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ehebauer, Matthias T.; Zimmermann, Michael; Jakobi, Arjen J.; Noens, Elke E.; Laubitz, Daniel; Cichocki, Bogdan; Marrakchi, Hedia; Lanéelle, Marie-Antoinette; Daffé, Mamadou; Sachse, Carsten; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Sauer, Uwe; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Biotin-mediated carboxylation of short-chain fatty acid coenzyme A esters is a key step in lipid biosynthesis that is carried out by multienzyme complexes to extend fatty acids by one methylene group. Pathogenic mycobacteria have an unusually high redundancy of carboxyltransferase genes and biotin carboxylase genes, creating multiple combinations of protein/protein complexes of unknown overall composition and functional readout. By combining pull-down assays with mass spectrometry, we identified nine binary protein/protein interactions and four validated holo acyl-coenzyme A carboxylase complexes. We investigated one of these - the AccD1-AccA1 complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with hitherto unknown physiological function. Using genetics, metabolomics and biochemistry we found that this complex is involved in branched amino-acid catabolism with methylcrotonyl coenzyme A as the substrate. We then determined its overall architecture by electron microscopy and found it to be a four-layered dodecameric arrangement that matches the overall dimensions of a distantly related methylcrotonyl coenzyme A holo complex. Our data argue in favor of distinct structural requirements for biotin-mediated γ-carboxylation of α−β unsaturated acid esters and will advance the categorization of acyl-coenzyme A carboxylase complexes. Knowledge about the underlying structural/functional relationships will be crucial to make the target category amenable for future biomedical applications. PMID:25695631

  18. Quaternary Structure of the Oxaloacetate Decarboxylase Membrane Complex and Mechanistic Relationships to Pyruvate Carboxylases*

    PubMed Central

    Balsera, Monica; Buey, Ruben M.; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2011-01-01

    The oxaloacetate decarboxylase primary Na+ pump (OAD) is an essential membrane protein complex that functions in the citrate fermentation pathway of some pathogenic bacteria under anaerobic conditions. OAD contains three different subunits: Oad-α, a biotinylated extrinsic protein that catalyzes the α-ketodecarboxylation of oxaloacetate; Oad-γ, a structural bitopic membrane protein whose cytosolic tail (named as Oad-γ′) binds tightly to Oad-α; and Oad-β, a multispan transmembrane α-helical protein that constitutes the Na+ channel. How OAD is organized structurally at the membrane and what the molecular determinants are that lead to an efficient energy coupling mechanism remain elusive. In the present work, we elucidate the stoichiometry of the native complex as well as the low resolution structure of the peripheral components of OAD (Oad-α and Oad-γ′) by small angle x-ray scattering. Our results point to a quaternary assembly similar to the pyruvate carboxylase complex organization. Herein, we propose a model in which the association in pairs of Oad-α dimers, mediated by Oad-γ, results in the acquisition of a functional oligomeric state at the bacterial membrane. New structural insights for the conformational rearrangements associated with the carboxylbiotin transfer reaction within OAD are provided. PMID:21209096

  19. Insulin stimulates the dephosphorylation and activation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Witters, L.A.; Watts, T.D.; Daniels, D.L.; Evans, J.L. )

    1988-08-01

    The mechanism underlying the ability of insulin to acutely activate acetyl-CoA carboxylase has been examined in Fao Reuber hepatoma cells. Insulin promotes the rapid activation of AcCoACase, as measured in cell lysates, and this stimulation persists to the same degree after isolation of AcCoACase by avidin-Sepharose chromatography. The insulin-stimulated enzyme, as compared with control enzyme, exhibits an increase in both citrate-independent and -dependent activity and a decrease in the K{sub a} for citrate. Direct examination of the phosphorylation state of isolated {sup 32}P-labeled AcCoACase after insulin exposure reveals a marked decrease in total enzyme phosphorylation coincident with activation. The dephosphorylation due to insulin appears to be restricted to the phosphorylation sites previously shown to regulate AcCoACase activity. All of these effects of insulin are mimicked by a low molecular weight autocrine factor, tentatively identified as an oligosaccharide, present in conditioned medium of hepatoma cells. These data suggest that insulin may activate AcCoACase by inhibiting the activity of protein kinase(s) or stimulating the activity of protein phosphatase(s) that control the phosphorylation state of the enzyme.

  20. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Identified as a Key Enzyme in Erythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum Carbon Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Watson, David G.; Breitling, Rainer; Coombs, Graham H.; Müller, Sylke

    2014-01-01

    Phospoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is absent from humans but encoded in the Plasmodium falciparum genome, suggesting that PEPC has a parasite-specific function. To investigate its importance in P. falciparum, we generated a pepc null mutant (D10Δpepc), which was only achievable when malate, a reduction product of oxaloacetate, was added to the growth medium. D10Δpepc had a severe growth defect in vitro, which was partially reversed by addition of malate or fumarate, suggesting that pepc may be essential in vivo. Targeted metabolomics using 13C-U-D-glucose and 13C-bicarbonate showed that the conversion of glycolytically-derived PEP into malate, fumarate, aspartate and citrate was abolished in D10Δpepc and that pentose phosphate pathway metabolites and glycerol 3-phosphate were present at increased levels. In contrast, metabolism of the carbon skeleton of 13C,15N-U-glutamine was similar in both parasite lines, although the flux was lower in D10Δpepc; it also confirmed the operation of a complete forward TCA cycle in the wild type parasite. Overall, these data confirm the CO2 fixing activity of PEPC and suggest that it provides metabolites essential for TCA cycle anaplerosis and the maintenance of cytosolic and mitochondrial redox balance. Moreover, these findings imply that PEPC may be an exploitable target for future drug discovery. PMID:24453970

  1. Activating phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in combination for improvement of succinate production.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zaigao; Zhu, Xinna; Chen, Jing; Li, Qingyan; Zhang, Xueli

    2013-08-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylation is an important step in the production of succinate by Escherichia coli. Two enzymes, PEP carboxylase (PPC) and PEP carboxykinase (PCK), are responsible for PEP carboxylation. PPC has high substrate affinity and catalytic velocity but wastes the high energy of PEP. PCK has low substrate affinity and catalytic velocity but can conserve the high energy of PEP for ATP formation. In this work, the expression of both the ppc and pck genes was modulated, with multiple regulatory parts of different strengths, in order to investigate the relationship between PPC or PCK activity and succinate production. There was a positive correlation between PCK activity and succinate production. In contrast, there was a positive correlation between PPC activity and succinate production only when PPC activity was within a certain range; excessive PPC activity decreased the rates of both cell growth and succinate formation. These two enzymes were also activated in combination in order to recruit the advantages of each for the improvement of succinate production. It was demonstrated that PPC and PCK had a synergistic effect in improving succinate production. PMID:23747698

  2. Deregulation of feedback inhibition of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase for improved lysine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Bommareddy, Rajesh Reddy; Frank, Doinita; Rappert, Sugima; Zeng, An-Ping

    2014-02-01

    Allosteric regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) controls the metabolic flux distribution of anaplerotic pathways. In this study, the feedback inhibition of Corynebacterium glutamicum PEPC was rationally deregulated, and its effect on metabolic flux redistribution was evaluated. Based on rational protein design, six PEPC mutants were designed, and all of them showed significantly reduced sensitivity toward aspartate and malate inhibition. Introducing one of the point mutations (N917G) into the ppc gene, encoding PEPC of the lysine-producing strain C. glutamicum LC298, resulted in ∼37% improved lysine production. In vitro enzyme assays and (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis showed ca. 20 and 30% increases in the PEPC activity and corresponding flux, respectively, in the mutant strain. Higher demand for NADPH in the mutant strain increased the flux toward pentose phosphate pathway, which increased the supply of NADPH for enhanced lysine production. The present study highlights the importance of allosteric regulation on the flux control of central metabolism. The strategy described here can also be implemented to improve other oxaloacetate-derived products. PMID:24334667

  3. Abiotic stresses affecting water balance induce phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase expression in roots of wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    González, María-Cruz; Sánchez, Rosario; Cejudo, Francisco J

    2003-04-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) plays an important role in CO(2) fixation in C4 and CAM plants. In C3 plants, PEPC is widely expressed in most organs; however, its function is not yet clearly established. With the aim of providing clues on the function of PEPC in C3 plants, we have analyzed its pattern of expression in wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings. Roots showed almost double the level of PEPC activity of shoots. Further analysis of PEPC expression in roots by in situ localization techniques showed a high accumulation of PEPC transcripts and polypeptides in meristematic cells, whereas in the rest of the root PEPC localized preferentially to the vascular tissue. Treatment with NaCl and LiCl induced PEPC expression in roots. Similarly, other abiotic stresses affecting water status, such as drought or cold, induced PEPC expression. Induction was root-specific except for the cold treatment, which also induced PEPC in shoots, although to a lesser extent. In contrast, hypoxia, which does not affect water balance, did not promote any induction of PEPC expression. These results suggest an important role for this enzyme in the adaptation of plants to environmental changes. PMID:12687366

  4. Functional metagenomic selection of ribulose 1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from uncultivated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Varaljay, Vanessa A; Satagopan, Sriram; North, Justin A; Witte, Brian; Dourado, Manuella N; Anantharaman, Karthik; Arbing, Mark A; McCann, Shelley Hoeft; Oremland, Ronald S; Banfield, Jillian F; Wrighton, Kelly C; Tabita, F Robert

    2016-04-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is a critical yet severely inefficient enzyme that catalyses the fixation of virtually all of the carbon found on Earth. Here, we report a functional metagenomic selection that recovers physiologically active RubisCO molecules directly from uncultivated and largely unknown members of natural microbial communities. Selection is based on CO2 -dependent growth in a host strain capable of expressing environmental deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), precluding the need for pure cultures or screening of recombinant clones for enzymatic activity. Seventeen functional RubisCO-encoded sequences were selected using DNA extracted from soil and river autotrophic enrichments, a photosynthetic biofilm and a subsurface groundwater aquifer. Notably, three related form II RubisCOs were recovered which share high sequence similarity with metagenomic scaffolds from uncultivated members of the Gallionellaceae family. One of the Gallionellaceae RubisCOs was purified and shown to possess CO2 /O2 specificity typical of form II enzymes. X-ray crystallography determined that this enzyme is a hexamer, only the second form II multimer ever solved and the first RubisCO structure obtained from an uncultivated bacterium. Functional metagenomic selection leverages natural biological diversity and billions of years of evolution inherent in environmental communities, providing a new window into the discovery of CO2 -fixing enzymes not previously characterized. PMID:26617072

  5. Inhibition of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase by two classes of grass-selective herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Rendina, A.R.; Craig-Kennard, A.C.; Beaudoin, J.D.; Breen, M.K. )

    1990-05-01

    The selective grass herbicides diclofop, haloxyfop, and trifop (((aryloxy)phenoxy)propionic acids) and alloxydim, sethoxydim, and clethodim (cyclohexanediones) are potent, reversible inhibitors of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) partially purified from barley, corn, and wheat. Although inhibition of the wheat enzyme by clethodim and diclofop is noncompetitive versus each of the substrates adenosine triphosphate (ATP), HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), diclofop and clethodim are nearly competitive versus acetyl-CoA since the level of inhibition is most sensitive to the concentration of acetyl-CoA (K{sub is} < K{sub ii}). To conclusively show whether the herbicides interact at the biotin carboxylation site or the carboxyl transfer site, the inhibition of isotope exchange and partial reactions catalyzed at each site was studied with the wheat enzyme. Only the ({sup 14}C)acetyl-CoA-malonyl-CoA exchange and decarboxylation of ({sup 14}C)malonyl-CoA reactions are strongly inhibited by clethodim and diclofop, suggesting that the herbicides interfere with the carboxyl transfer site rather than the biotin carboxylation site of the enzyme. Double-inhibition studies with diclofop and clethodim suggest that the ((aryloxy)phenoxy)propionic acid and cyclohexanedione herbicides may bind to the same region of the enzyme.

  6. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from cherimoya fruit: properties, kinetics and effects of high CO(2).

    PubMed

    Muñoz, T; Escribano, M I; Merodio, C

    2001-12-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) regulatory properties were studied in non-photosynthetic (mesocarp) and photosynthetic (peel) tissues from cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) fruit stored in air, in order to gain a better understanding of in vivo enzyme regulation. Analyses were also performed with fruit treated with 20% CO(2)-20% O(2) to define the role of PEPC as part of an adaptive mechanism to high external carbon dioxide levels. The results revealed that the special kinetic characteristics of the enzyme from mesocarp--high V(max) and low sensibility to L-malate inhibition - are related to the active acid metabolism of these fruits and point to a high rate of reassimilation of respired CO(2) into keto-acids. With respect to fruit stored in air, PEPC in crude extracts from CO(2)-treated cherimoyas gave a similar V(max) (1.12+/-0.03 microkat x mg(-1) protein), a lower apparent K(m) (68+/-9 microM for PEP) and a higher I(50) of L-malate (5.95+/-0.3 mM). These kinetic values showed the increase in the affinity of this enzyme toward one of its substrate, PEP, by elevated external CO(2) concentrations. The lower K(m) value and lower sensitivity to L-malate are consistent with higher in vivo carboxylation reaction efficiency in CO(2)-treated cherimoyas, while pointing to an additional enzyme regulation system via CO(2). PMID:11730863

  7. Improvement of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity of Phaeodactylum tricornutum PEPCase 1 through protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kwang Suk; Jeon, Hancheol; Seo, Seungbeom; Lee, Yew; Jin, EonSeon

    2014-06-10

    In order to mitigate CO2 accumulation and decrease the rate of global warming and climate change, we previously presented a strategy for the development of an efficient CO2 capture and utilization system. The system employs two recombinant enzymes, carbonic anhydrase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, which were originated from microalgae. Although utilization of this integrated system would require a large quantity of high quality PEPCase protein, such quantities could be produced by increasing the solubility of the Phaeodactylum tricornutum PEPCase 1 (PtPEPCase 1) protein in the Escherichia coli heterologous expression system. We first expressed the putative mitochondria targeting peptide- and chloroplast transit peptide-truncated proteins of PtPEPCase 1, mPtPEPCase 1 and cPtPEPCase 1, respectively, in E. coli. After affinity chromatography, the amount of purified PEPCase protein from 500mL of E. coli culture was greatest for cPtPEPCase 1 (1.99mg), followed by mPtPEPCase 1 (0.82mg) and PtPEPCase 1 (0.61mg). Furthermore, the enzymatic activity of mPtPEPCase 1 and cPtPEPCase 1 showed approximately 1.6-fold (32.19 units/mg) and 3-fold (59.48 units/mg) increases, respectively. Therefore, cPtPEPCase 1 purified using the E. coli heterogeneous expression system could be a strong candidate for a platform technology to capture CO2 and produce value-added four-carbon platform chemicals. PMID:24835101

  8. Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase Activity in Anther-Derived Plants of Saintpaulia ionantha Wendl. Shag 1

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskaran, Shyamala; Smith, Roberta H.; Finer, John J.

    1983-01-01

    Plants obtained from anther culture of the African violet, Saintpaulia ionantha Wendl. `Shag' and vegetatively cloned copies of the parent anther donor plant were examined for their ploidy and ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase (RuBPcase) activity. The cloned parent plants were all diploid and did not vary much in their nuclear DNA, chlorophyll, and RuBPcase activity. Some of the anther-derived plants were similar to the parent plants while others were not. Different levels of ploidy were observed among the androgenetic plants. RuBPcase activities higher than that of the parent plants were found in some anther-derived plants. However, there was no direct correlation between ploidy and RuBPcase activity. Expression of nuclear genes from a single parent in the anther-derived plants and it's diploidization or plastid changes during early stages of microsporogenesis or androgenesis are suggested as possible reasons for the variations observed among them. This could be a useful technique to obtain physiological variants which could be agronomically desirable. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16663273

  9. Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase Activity in Anther-Derived Plants of Saintpaulia ionantha Wendl. Shag.

    PubMed

    Bhaskaran, S; Smith, R H; Finer, J J

    1983-11-01

    Plants obtained from anther culture of the African violet, Saintpaulia ionantha Wendl. ;Shag' and vegetatively cloned copies of the parent anther donor plant were examined for their ploidy and ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase (RuBPcase) activity. The cloned parent plants were all diploid and did not vary much in their nuclear DNA, chlorophyll, and RuBPcase activity. Some of the anther-derived plants were similar to the parent plants while others were not. Different levels of ploidy were observed among the androgenetic plants. RuBPcase activities higher than that of the parent plants were found in some anther-derived plants. However, there was no direct correlation between ploidy and RuBPcase activity. Expression of nuclear genes from a single parent in the anther-derived plants and it's diploidization or plastid changes during early stages of microsporogenesis or androgenesis are suggested as possible reasons for the variations observed among them. This could be a useful technique to obtain physiological variants which could be agronomically desirable. PMID:16663273

  10. Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Induction in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. by Cytokinin 1

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Jürgen M.; Piepenbrock, Mechtild

    1992-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase), the key enzyme of Crassulacean acid metabolism, is induced by water stress in leaves of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. In water-stressed plants or excised leaves, exogenous cytokinin suppresses PEPCase transcript accumulation in the leaves. Cytokinin (6-benzylaminopurine) used in concentrations from 5 to 500 micromolar (a) inhibits the upregulation of PEPCase transcripts, enzyme activity, and Crassulacean acid metabolism induction in salt-stressed intact plants when sprayed once daily during the stress period, (b) inhibits the accumulation of PEPCase mRNA in leaves from well-watered plants, (c) down-regulates PEPCase transcripts within 8 hours in prestressed, intact plants after a single spraying of an individual leaf, (d) inhibits accumulation of PEPCase transcripts in excised, wilting leaves, and (e) accelerates the net decrease of PEPCase transcripts in excised leaves from prestressed plants under rehydration conditions. When roots, the main site of cytokinin biosynthesis, are excised, PEPCase induction under drought stress is intensified. We propose that roots, acting as sensors of soil water status, may regulate PEPCase gene expression in the leaves with cytokinin as a signal transducer. ImagesFigure 2Figure 7 PMID:16669088

  11. Soraphen A, an inhibitor of acetyl CoA carboxylase activity, interferes with fatty acid elongation

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Donald B.; Torres-Gonzalez, Moises; Olson, L. Karl

    2010-01-01

    Acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC1 & ACC2) generates malonyl CoA, a substrate for de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and an inhibitor of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO). Malonyl CoA is also a substrate for microsomal fatty acid elongation, an important pathway for saturated (SFA), mono- (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis. Despite the interest in ACC as a target for obesity and cancer therapy, little attention has been given to the role ACC plays in long chain fatty acid synthesis. This report examines the effect of pharmacological inhibition of ACC on DNL & palmitate (16:0) and linoleate (18:2,n-6) metabolism in HepG2 and LnCap cells. The ACC inhibitor, soraphen A, lowers cellular malonyl CoA, attenuates DNL and the formation of fatty acid elongation products derived from exogenous fatty acids, i.e., 16:0 & 18:2,n-6; IC50 ~ 5 nM. Elevated expression of fatty acid elongases (Elovl5, Elovl6) or desaturases (FADS1, FADS2) failed to override the soraphen A effect on SFA, MUFA or PUFA synthesis. Inhibition of fatty acid elongation leads to the accumulation of 16- and 18-carbon unsaturated fatty acids derived from 16:0 and 18:2,n-6, respectively. Pharmacological inhibition of ACC activity will not only attenuate DNL and induce FAO, but will also attenuate the synthesis of very long chain saturated, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:21184748

  12. Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase from the Green Alga Selenastrum minutum1

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Kathryn A.; Plaxton, William C.; Turpin, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Two isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) with very different regulatory properties were partially purified from the green alga Selenastrum minutum. They were designated PEPC1 and PEPC2. PEPC1 showed sigmoidal kinetics with respect to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) whereas PEPC2 exhibited a typical Michaelis-Menten response. The S0.5(PEP) of PEPC1 was 2.23 millimolar. This was fourfold greater than the S0.5(PEP) of PEPC2, which was 0.57 millimolar. PEPC1 was activated more than fourfold by 2.0 millimolar glutamine and sixfold by 2.0 millimolar dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) at a subsaturating PEP concentration of 0.625 millimolar. In contrast, PEPC2 showed only 8% and 52% activation by glutamine and DHAP, respectively. The effects of glutamine and DHAP were additive. PEPC1 was more sensitive to inhibition by glutamate, 2-oxoglutarate, and aspartate than PEPC2. Both isoforms were equally inhibited by malate. All of these metabolites affected only the S0.5(PEP) not the Vmax. The regulatory properties of S. minutum PEPC in vitro are discussed in terms of (a) increased rates of dark carbon fixation (shown to be catalyzed predominantly by PEPC) and (b) changes in metabolite levels in vivo during enhanced NH4+ assimilation. Finally, a model is proposed for the regulation of PEPC in vivo in relation to its role in replenishing tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates consumed in NH4+ assimilation. PMID:16667617

  13. Improving polyketide and fatty acid synthesis by engineering of the yeast acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Wook; Da Silva, Nancy A

    2014-10-10

    Polyketides and fatty acids are important in the production of pharmaceuticals, industrial chemicals, and biofuels. The synthesis of the malonyl-CoA building block, catalyzed by acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Acc1), is considered a limiting step to achieving high titers of polyketides and fatty acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Acc1 is deactivated by AMP-activated serine/threonine protein kinase (Snf1) when glucose is depleted. To prevent this deactivation, the enzyme was aligned with the Rattus norvegicus (rat) Acc1 to identify a critical amino acid (Ser-1157) for phosphorylation and deactivation. Introduction of a S1157A mutation into Acc1 resulted in 9-fold higher specific activity following glucose depletion. The enzyme was tested in yeast engineered to produce the polyketide 6-methylsalisylic acid (6-MSA). Both 6-MSA and native fatty acid levels increased by 3-fold. Utilization of this modified Acc1 enzyme will also be beneficial for other products built from malonyl-CoA. PMID:25078432

  14. Soybean ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit: Mechanisms and determinants of RNA turnover. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, R.B.

    1993-12-31

    An in vitro degradation system has been developed from petunia and soybean polysomes in order to investigate the mechanisms and determinants controlling RNA turnover in higher plants. This system faithfully degrades soybean ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS) mRNA into the same products observed in total RNA preparations. In previous years it was shown that the most stable products represent a nested constellation of fragments, which are shortened from their 3{prime} ends, and have intact 5{prime} ends. Exogenous rbcS RNA tagged with novel 5{prime} sequence 15 or 56 bp long were synthesized in vitro as Sp6 and T7 runoff transcripts, respectively. When added to the system they were degraded faithfully into constellation of products which were 15 or 56 bp longer than the endogenous products, respectively. Detailed kinetics on the appearance of these exogenous products confirmed degradation proceeds in an overall 3{prime} to 5{prime} direction but suggested that there are multiple pathways through which the RNA may be degraded. To further demonstrate a precursor product relationships, in vitro synthesized transcripts truncated at their 3{prime} ends were shown to degrade into the expected smaller fragments previously mapped in the 5{prime} portion of the rbcS RNA.

  15. Fluoride, hydrogen, and formate activate ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase formation in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Im, D S; Friedrich, C G

    1983-01-01

    Alcaligenes eutrophus formed ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase; EC 4.1.1.39) when grown on fructose. Addition of sodium fluoride (NaF) to fructose minimal medium resulted in a slightly decreased growth rate and a rapid fivefold increase in RuBPCase specific activity. With citrate, a glucogenic carbon source, RuBPCase was also formed, However, addition of NaF to cells growing on citrate resulted in a 50% decrease in RuBPCase specific activity. Among the enzymes of fructose catabolism, NaF (10 mM) inhibited enolase in vitro by 98% and gluconate 6-phosphate dehydratase by 87%. Inhibition of the dehydratase by NaF was insignificant in vivo, as determined with a mutant defective in phosphoglycerate mutase activity. Growth of this mutant on fructose was not inhibited by NaF, and only a minor increase in RuBPCase activity was observed. From these results, we concluded that the product of the enolase reaction, phosphoenolpyruvate, played a role in RuBPCase formation. Addition of H2 or formate to the wild type growing on fructose or citrate did not affect the growth rate but resulted in rapid formation of RuBPCase activity. Mutants impaired in H2 metabolism formed RuBPCase at a low rate during growth on fructose plus H2 but at a high rate on formate. Apparently, additional reductant from H2 or formate metabolism induced RuBPCase formation in A. eutrophus. PMID:6841316

  16. A mutation affecting carbon catabolite repression suppresses growth defects in pyruvate carboxylase mutants from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, M A; Gamo, F J; Gancedo, C

    1995-12-18

    Yeasts with disruptions in the genes PYC1 and PYC2 encoding the isoenzymes of pyruvate carboxylase cannot grow in a glucose-ammonium medium (Stucka et al. (1991) Mol. Gen. Genet. 229, 307-315). We have isolated a dominant mutation, BPC1-1, that allows growth in this medium of yeasts with interrupted PYC1 and PYC2 genes. The BPC1-1 mutation abolishes catabolite repression of a series of genes and allows expression of the enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle during growth in glucose. A functional glyoxylate cycle is necessary for suppression as a disruption of gene ICL1 encoding isocitrate lyase abolished the phenotypic effect of BPC1-1 on growth in glucose-ammonium. Concurrent expression from constitutive promoters of genes ICL1 and MLS1 (encoding malate synthase) also suppressed the growth phenotype of pyc1 pyc2 mutants. The mutation BPC1-1 is either allelic or closely linked to the mutation DGT1-1. PMID:8543050

  17. Urea carboxylase and allophanate hydrolase are components of a multifunctional protein in yeast.

    PubMed

    Sumrada, R A; Cooper, T G

    1982-08-10

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae can use urea as sole nitrogen source by degrading it in two steps (urea carboxylase and allophanate hydrolase) to ammonia and carbon dioxide. We previously demonstrated that: 1) the enzymatic functions required for degradation are encoded in two tightly linked genetic loci and 2) pleiotropic mutations each resulting in the loss of both activities are found in both loci. These and other observations led to the hypothesis that urea degradation might be catalyzed by a multifunctional polypeptide. Waheed and Castric (1977) J. Biol. Chem. 252, 1628-1632), on the other hand, purified urea amidolyase from Candida utilis and reported it to be a tetramer composed of nonidentical 70- and 170-kilodalton subunits. To resolve the differing views of urea amidolyase structure, we purified the protein using rapid methods designed to avoid proteolytic cleavage. Application of these methods resulted in the isolation of a single, inducible and repressible, 204-kilodalton species. We observed no evidence for the existence of nonidentical subunits. A similar inducible, high molecular weight species was also detected in C. utilis. These biochemical results support our earlier hypothesis that urea degradation is carried out in yeast by an inducible and repressible protein composed of identical, multifunctional subunits. PMID:6124544

  18. Metal Ion Interactions with Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase from Crassula argentea and Zea mays1

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tien T.; Ngam-ek, Apinya; Jenkins, Joane; Grover, Scott D.

    1988-01-01

    Metal ion interactions with phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from the CAM plant Crassula argentea and the C4 plant Zea mays were kinetically analyzed. Fe2+ and Cd2+ were found to be active metal cofactors along with the previously known active metals Mg2+, Mn2+, and Co2+. In studies with the Crassula enzyme, Mg2+ yielded the highest Vmax value but also generated the highest values of Km(metal) and Km(pep). For these five active metals lower Km(metal) values tended to be associated with lower Km(pep) values. PEP saturation curves showed more kinetic cooperativity than the corresponding metal saturation curves. The activating metal ions all have ionic radii in the range of 0.86 to 1.09 Å. Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, and Ni2+ inhibited competitively with respect to Mg2+, whereas Be2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and Pd2+ showed mixed-type inhibition. Vmax trends with the five active metals were similar for the C. argentea and Z. mays enzymes except that Cd2+ was less effective with the maize enzyme. Km(metal) values were 10- to 60-fold higher in the enzyme from Z. mays. PMID:16665847

  19. Regulation of synthesis of pyruvate carboxylase in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Yakunin, A F; Hallenbeck, P C

    1997-01-01

    The synthesis of pyruvate carboxylase (PC) was studied by using quantitative immunoblot analysis with an antibody raised against PC purified from Rhodobacter capsulatus and was found to vary 20-fold depending on the growth conditions. The PC content was high in cells grown on pyruvate or on carbon substrates metabolized via pyruvate (lactate, D-malate, glucose, or fructose) and low in cells grown on tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates or substrates metabolized without intermediate formation of pyruvate (acetate or glutamate). Under dark aerobic growth conditions with lactate as a carbon source, the PC content was approximately twofold higher than that found under light anaerobic growth conditions. The results of incubation experiments demonstrate that PC synthesis is induced by pyruvate and repressed by TCA cycle intermediates, with negative control dominating over positive control. The content of PC in R. capsulatus cells was also directly related to the growth rate in continuous cultures. The analysis of intracellular levels of pyruvate and TCA cycle intermediates in cells grown under different conditions demonstrated that the content of PC is directly proportional to the ratio between pyruvate and C4 dicarboxylates. These results suggest that the regulation of PC synthesis by oxygen and its direct correlation with growth rate may reflect effects on the balance of intracellular pyruvate and C4 dicarboxylates. Thus, this important enzyme is potentially regulated both allosterically and at the level of synthesis. PMID:9045800

  20. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase intrinsically located in the chloroplast of rice plays a crucial role in ammonium assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Masumoto, Chisato; Miyazawa, Shin-Ichi; Ohkawa, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Takuya; Taniguchi, Yojiro; Murayama, Seiji; Kusano, Miyako; Saito, Kazuki; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Miyao, Mitsue

    2010-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a key enzyme of primary metabolism in bacteria, algae, and vascular plants, and is believed to be cytosolic. Here we show that rice (Oryza sativa L.) has a plant-type PEPC, Osppc4, that is targeted to the chloroplast. Osppc4 was expressed in all organs tested and showed high expression in the leaves. Its expression in the leaves was confined to mesophyll cells, and Osppc4 accounted for approximately one-third of total PEPC protein in the leaf blade. Recombinant Osppc4 was active in the PEPC reaction, showing Vmax comparable to cytosolic isozymes. Knockdown of Osppc4 expression by the RNAi technique resulted in stunting at the vegetative stage, which was much more marked when rice plants were grown with ammonium than with nitrate as the nitrogen source. Comparison of leaf metabolomes of ammonium-grown plants suggested that the knockdown suppressed ammonium assimilation and subsequent amino acid synthesis by reducing levels of organic acids, which are carbon skeleton donors for these processes. We also identified the chloroplastic PEPC gene in other Oryza species, all of which are adapted to waterlogged soil where the major nitrogen source is ammonium. This suggests that, in addition to glycolysis, the genus Oryza has a unique route to provide organic acids for ammonium assimilation that involves a chloroplastic PEPC, and that this route is crucial for growth with ammonium. This work provides evidence for diversity of primary ammonium assimilation in the leaves of vascular plants. PMID:20194759

  1. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase content, assimilatory charge, and mesophyll conductance in leaves

    PubMed

    Eichelmann; Laisk

    1999-01-01

    The content of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) (Et; EC 4.1.1.39) measured in different-aged leaves of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and other plants grown under different light intensities, varied from 2 to 75 &mgr;mol active sites m-2. Mesophyll conductance (&mgr;) was measured under 1.5% O2, as well as postillumination CO2 uptake (assimilatory charge, a gas-exchange measure of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate pool). The dependence of &mgr; on Et saturated at Et = 30 &mgr;mol active sites m-2 and &mgr; = 11 mm s-1 in high-light-grown leaves. In low-light-grown leaves the dependence tended toward saturation at similar Et but reached a &mgr; of only 6 to 8 mm s-1. &mgr; was proportional to the assimilatory charge, with the proportionality constant (specific carboxylation efficiency) between 0.04 and 0.075 &mgr;M-1 s-1. Our data show that the saturation of the relationship between Et and &mgr; is caused by three limiting components: (a) the physical diffusion resistance (a minor limitation), (b) less than full activation of Rubisco (related to Rubisco activase and the slower diffusibility of Rubisco at high protein concentrations in the stroma), and (c) chloroplast metabolites, especially 3-phosphoglyceric acid and free inorganic phosphate, which control the reaction kinetics of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation by competitive binding to active sites. PMID:9880359

  2. Small Oligomers of Ribulose-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase (Rubisco) Activase Are Required for Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Keown, Jeremy R.; Griffin, Michael D. W.; Mertens, Haydyn D. T.; Pearce, F. Grant

    2013-01-01

    Ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to remove tight binding inhibitors from Rubisco, thus playing a key role in regulating photosynthesis in plants. Although several structures have recently added much needed structural information for different Rubisco activase enzymes, the arrangement of these subunits in solution remains unclear. In this study, we use a variety of techniques to show that Rubisco activase forms a wide range of structures in solution, ranging from monomers to much higher order species, and that the distribution of these species is highly dependent on protein concentration. The data support a model in which Rubisco activase forms an open spiraling structure rather than a closed hexameric structure. At protein concentrations of 1 μm, corresponding to the maximal activity of the enzyme, Rubisco activase has an oligomeric state of 2–4 subunits. We propose a model in which Rubisco activase requires at least 1 neighboring subunit for hydrolysis of ATP. PMID:23720775

  3. Molecular cloning of matrix Gla protein: implications for substrate recognition by the vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Price, P A; Fraser, J D; Metz-Virca, G

    1987-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP), a low molecular weight protein found in bone, dentin, and cartilage, contains 5 residues of the vitamin K-dependent amino acid gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla). We have used antibodies raised against MGP and oligonucleotide probes to screen a lambda gt11 cDNA library constructed from the rat osteosarcoma cells (line ROS 17/2) that had been pretreated with 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. By sequencing several cloned cDNAs, we established a 523-base-pair sequence that predicts an 84-residue mature MGP and a 19-residue hydrophobic signal peptide. The 84-residue mature rat MGP predicted from the cDNA sequence has an additional 5 residues at its C terminus (-Arg-Arg-Gly-Ala-Lys) not seen in the sequence of MGP isolated from bovine bone. The structure of rat MGP provides insight into the mechanisms by which the vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylase recognizes substrate. The present studies show that MGP, unlike other vitamin K-dependent proteins, lacks a propeptide. The absence of an MGP propeptide demonstrates that gamma-carboxylation and secretion of vitamin K-dependent proteins need not be linked to the presence of a propeptide or to its proteolytic removal. The propeptides of other vitamin K-dependent proteins are structurally homologous, and there is evidence that this homologous propeptide domain is important to substrate recognition by the gamma-carboxylase. Mature MGP has a sequence segment (residues 15-30) that is homologous to the propeptide of other vitamin K-dependent proteins and probably serves the same role in gamma-carboxylase recognition. Rat MGP also has a second sequence that has recently been identified in all known vitamin K-dependent vertebrate proteins, the invariant unit Glu-Xaa-Xaa-Xaa-Glu-Xaa-Cys (EXXXEXC). Since the glutamic residues in this unit are sites of gamma-carboxylation, it has been suggested that the EXXXEXC unit could allow the gamma-carboxylase to discriminate between substrate and product. The

  4. Multiple Inter-Kingdom Horizontal Gene Transfers in the Evolution of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Su, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Pepcase is a gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase that exists in bacteria, archaea and plants,playing an important role in plant metabolism and development. Most plants have two or more pepcase genes belonging to two gene sub-families, while only one gene exists in other organisms. Previous research categorized one plant pepcase gene as plant-type pepcase (PTPC) while the other as bacteria-type pepcase (BTPC) because of its similarity with the pepcase gene found in bacteria. Phylogenetic reconstruction showed that PTPC is the ancestral lineage of plant pepcase, and that all bacteria, protistpepcase and BTPC in plants are derived from a lineage of pepcase closely related with PTPC in algae. However, their phylogeny contradicts the species tree and traditional chronology of organism evolution. Because the diversification of bacteria occurred much earlier than the origin of plants, presumably all bacterialpepcase derived from the ancestral PTPC of algal plants after divergingfrom the ancestor of vascular plant PTPC. To solve this contradiction, we reconstructed the phylogeny of pepcase gene family. Our result showed that both PTPC and BTPC are derived from an ancestral lineage of gamma-proteobacteriapepcases, possibly via an ancient inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria to the eukaryotic common ancestor of plants, protists and cellular slime mold. Our phylogenetic analysis also found 48other pepcase genes originated from inter-kingdom HGTs. These results imply that inter-kingdom HGTs played important roles in the evolution of the pepcase gene family and furthermore that HGTsare a more frequent evolutionary event than previouslythought. PMID:23251445

  5. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum. PMID:26168906

  6. In vivo monoubiquitination of anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase occurs at Lys624 in germinating sorghum seeds.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ballesta, Isabel; Feria, Ana-Belén; Ni, Hong; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William Charles; Echevarría, Cristina

    2014-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) is an important cytosolic regulatory enzyme that plays a pivotal role in numerous physiological processes in plants, including seed development and germination. Previous studies demonstrated the occurrence of immunoreactive PEPC polypeptides of ~110 kDa and 107 kDa (p110 and p107, respectively) on immunoblots of clarified extracts of germinating sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) seeds. In order to establish the biochemical basis for this observation, a 460 kDa PEPC heterotetramer composed of an equivalent ratio of p110 and p107 subunits was purified to near homogeneity from the germinated seeds. Mass spectrometry established that p110 and p107 are both encoded by the same plant-type PEPC gene (CP21), but that p107 was in vivo monoubiquitinated at Lys624 to form p110. This residue is absolutely conserved in vascular plant PEPCs and is proximal to a PEP-binding/catalytic domain. Anti-ubiquitin IgG immunodetected p110 but not p107, whereas incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme (USP-2 core) efficiently converted p110 into p107, while relieving the enzyme's feedback inhibition by L-malate. Partial PEPC monoubiquitination was also detected during sorghum seed development. It is apparent that monoubiquitination at Lys624 is opposed to phosphorylation at Ser7 in terms of regulating the catalytic activity of sorghum seed PEPC. PEPC monoubiquitination is hypothesized to fine-tune anaplerotic carbon flux according to the cell's immediate physiological requirements for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates needed in support of biosynthesis and carbon-nitrogen interactions. PMID:24288181

  7. Epigenetic regulation of pyruvate carboxylase gene expression in the postpartum liver.

    PubMed

    Walker, C G; Crookenden, M A; Henty, K M; Handley, R R; Kuhn-Sherlock, B; White, H M; Donkin, S S; Snell, R G; Meier, S; Heiser, A; Loor, J J; Mitchell, M D; Roche, J R

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is essential for maintenance of whole body glucose homeostasis and glucose supply for mammary lactose synthesis in the dairy cow. Upregulation of the gluconeogenic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PC) during the transition period is vital in the adaptation to the greater glucose demands associated with peripartum lactogenesis. The objective of this study was to determine if PC transcription in hepatocytes is regulated by DNA methylation and if treatment with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) alters methylation of an upstream DNA sequence defined as promoter 1. Dairy cows were left untreated (n=20), or treated with a NSAID during the first 5 d postcalving (n=20). Liver was biopsied at d 7 precalving and d 7, 14, and 28 postcalving. Total PC and transcript specific gene expression was quantified using quantitative PCR and DNA methylation of promoter 1 was quantified using bisulfite Sanger sequencing. Expression of PC changed over the transition period, with increased expression postcalving occurring concurrently with increased circulating concentration of nonesterified fatty acids. The DNA methylation percentage was variable at all sites quantified and ranged from 21 to 54% across the 15 CpG dinucleotides within promoter 1. The DNA methylation at wk 1 postcalving, however, was not correlated with gene expression of promoter 1-regulated transcripts and we did not detect an effect of NSAID treatment on DNA methylation or PC gene expression. Our results do not support a role for DNA methylation in regulating promoter 1-driven gene expression of PC at wk 1 postcalving. Further research is required to determine the mechanisms regulating increased PC expression over the transition period. PMID:27085418

  8. Developmental and molecular physiological evidence for the role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in rapid cotton fibre elongation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Rong; Wang, Lu; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Cotton fibres are hair-like single-cells that elongate to several centimetres long after their initiation from the ovule epidermis at anthesis. The accumulation of malate, along with K+ and sugars, is thought to play an important role in fibre elongation through osmotic regulation and charge balance. However, there is a lack of evidence for or against such an hypothesis. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a key enzyme responsible for the synthesis of malate. The potential role of PEPC in cotton fibre elongation is examined here. Developmentally, PEPC activity was higher at the rapid elongation phase than that at the slow elongation stage. Genotypically, PEPC activity correlated positively with the rate of fibre elongation and the final fibre length attained. Importantly, suppression of PEPC activity by LiCl that reduces its phosphorylation status decreased fibre length. To examine the molecular basis underlying PEPC activity, two cDNAs encoding PEPC, GhPEPC1 and 2, were cloned, which represents the major PEPC genes expressed in cotton fibre. RT-PCR analyses revealed that GhPEPC1 and 2 were highly expressed at the rapid elongation phase but weakly at the slow-to-terminal elongation period. In situ hybridization detected mRNA of GhPEPC1 and 2 in 1 d young fibres but not in the ovule epidermis prior to fibre initiation. Collectively, the data indicate that cotton fibre elongation requires high activity of PEPC, probably through the expression of the GhPEPC1 and 2 genes. PMID:19815688

  9. Identification of Interactions between Abscisic Acid and Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Galka, Marek M.; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Buhrow, Leann M.; Nelson, Ken M.; Switala, Jacek; Cutler, Adrian J.; Palmer, David R. J.; Loewen, Peter C.; Abrams, Suzanne R.; Loewen, Michele C.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid ((+)-ABA) is a phytohormone involved in the modulation of developmental processes and stress responses in plants. A chemical proteomics approach using an ABA mimetic probe was combined with in vitro assays, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), x-ray crystallography and in silico modelling to identify putative (+)-ABA binding-proteins in crude extracts of Arabidopsis thaliana. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was identified as a putative ABA-binding protein. Radiolabelled-binding assays yielded a Kd of 47 nM for (+)-ABA binding to spinach Rubisco, which was validated by ITC, and found to be similar to reported and experimentally derived values for the native ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) substrate. Functionally, (+)-ABA caused only weak inhibition of Rubisco catalytic activity (Ki of 2.1 mM), but more potent inhibition of Rubisco activation (Ki of ~ 130 μM). Comparative structural analysis of Rubisco in the presence of (+)-ABA with RuBP in the active site revealed only a putative low occupancy (+)-ABA binding site on the surface of the large subunit at a location distal from the active site. However, subtle distortions in electron density in the binding pocket and in silico docking support the possibility of a higher affinity (+)-ABA binding site in the RuBP binding pocket. Overall we conclude that (+)-ABA interacts with Rubisco. While the low occupancy (+)-ABA binding site and weak non-competitive inhibition of catalysis may not be relevant, the high affinity site may allow ABA to act as a negative effector of Rubisco activation. PMID:26197050

  10. Transcription control of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activase and adjacent genes in Anabaena species.

    PubMed Central

    Li, L A; Tabita, F R

    1994-01-01

    The gene encoding ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) activase (rca) was uniformly localized downstream from the genes encoding the large and small subunits of RubisCO (rbcL and rbcS) in three strains of Anabaena species. However, two open reading frames (ORF1 and ORF2), situated between rbcS and rca in Anabaena sp. strain CA, were not found in the intergenic region of Anabaena variabilis and Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. During autotrophic growth of Anabaena cells, rca and rbc transcripts accumulated in the light and diminished in the dark; light-dependent expression of these genes was not affected by the nitrogen source and the concentration of exogenous CO2 supplied to the cells. When grown on fructose, rca- and rbc-specific transcripts accumulated in A. variabilis regardless of whether the cells were illuminated. Transcript levels, however, were much lower in dark-grown heterotrophic cultures than in photoheterotrophic cultures. In photoheterotrophic cultures, the expression of the rca and rbc genes was similar to that in cultures grown with CO2 as the sole source of carbon. Although the rbcL-rbcS and rca genes are linked and are in the same transcriptional orientation in Anabaena strains, hybridization of rbc and rca to distinct transcripts suggested that these genes are not cotranscribed, consistent with the results of primer extension and secondary structure analysis of the nucleotide sequence. Transcription from ORF1 and ORF2 was not detected under the conditions examined, and the function of these putative genes remains unknown. Images PMID:7961423

  11. In vivo monoubiquitination of anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase occurs at Lys624 in germinating sorghum seeds

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) is an important cytosolic regulatory enzyme that plays a pivotal role in numerous physiological processes in plants, including seed development and germination. Previous studies demonstrated the occurrence of immunoreactive PEPC polypeptides of ~110kDa and 107kDa (p110 and p107, respectively) on immunoblots of clarified extracts of germinating sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) seeds. In order to establish the biochemical basis for this observation, a 460kDa PEPC heterotetramer composed of an equivalent ratio of p110 and p107 subunits was purified to near homogeneity from the germinated seeds. Mass spectrometry established that p110 and p107 are both encoded by the same plant-type PEPC gene (CP21), but that p107 was in vivo monoubiquitinated at Lys624 to form p110. This residue is absolutely conserved in vascular plant PEPCs and is proximal to a PEP-binding/catalytic domain. Anti-ubiquitin IgG immunodetected p110 but not p107, whereas incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme (USP-2 core) efficiently converted p110 into p107, while relieving the enzyme’s feedback inhibition by l-malate. Partial PEPC monoubiquitination was also detected during sorghum seed development. It is apparent that monoubiquitination at Lys624 is opposed to phosphorylation at Ser7 in terms of regulating the catalytic activity of sorghum seed PEPC. PEPC monoubiquitination is hypothesized to fine-tune anaplerotic carbon flux according to the cell’s immediate physiological requirements for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates needed in support of biosynthesis and carbon–nitrogen interactions. PMID:24288181

  12. The ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase gene cluster of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Baxter, Nardia J; Hirt, Robert P; Bodrossy, Levente; Kovacs, Kornel L; Embley, T Martin; Prosser, James I; Murrell, J Colin

    2002-04-01

    The genes encoding the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) were localised to an 8.3-kb EcoRI fragment of the genome. Genes encoding the large subunit ( cbbL), small subunit ( cbbS) and putative regulatory gene ( cbbQ) were shown to be located on one cluster. Surprisingly, cbbO, a second putative regulatory gene, was not located in the remaining 1.2-kb downstream (3') of cbbQ. However, probing of the M. capsulatus (Bath) genome with cbbO from Nitrosomonas europaea demonstrated that a cbbO homologue was contained within a separate 3.0-kb EcoRI fragment. Instead of a cbbR ORF being located upstream (5') of cbbL, there was a moxR-like ORF that was transcribed in the opposite direction to cbbL. There were three additional ORFs within the large 8.3-kb EcoRI fragment: a pyrE-like ORF, an rnr-like ORF and an incomplete ORF with no sequence similarity to any known protein. Phylogenetic analysis of cbbL from M. capsulatus (Bath) placed it within clade A of the green-type Form 1 Rubisco. cbbL was expressed in M. capsulatus (Bath) when grown with methane as a sole carbon and energy source under both copper-replete and copper-limited conditions. M. capsulatus (Bath) was capable of autotrophic growth on solid medium but not in liquid medium. Preliminarily investigations suggested that other methanotrophs may also be capable of autotrophic growth. Rubisco genes were also identified, by PCR, in Methylococcus-like strains and Methylocaldum species; however, no Rubisco genes were found in Methylomicrobium album BG8, Methylomonas methanica S1, Methylomonas rubra, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b or Methylocystis parvus OBBP. PMID:11889481

  13. In Vivo and in Vitro Phosphorylation of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase from Wheat Seeds during Germination.

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, L.; Gonzalez, M. C.; Cejudo, F. J.; Vidal, J.; Echevarria, C.

    1996-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity was detected in the aleurone endosperm of wheat (Triticum aestivum cv Chinese Spring) seeds, and specific anti-Sorghum C4 PEPC polyclonal anti-bodies cross-reacted with 103- and 100-kD polypeptides present in dry seeds and seeds that had imbibed; in addition, a new, 108-kD polypeptide was detected 6 h after imbibition. The use of specific anti-phosphorylation-site immunoglobulin G (APS-IgG) identified the presence of a phosphorylation motif equivalent to that found in other plant PEPCs studied so far. The binding of this APS-IgG to the target protein promoted changes in the properties of seed PEPC similar to those produced by phosphorylation, as previously shown for the recombinant Sorghum leaf C4 PEPC. In desalted seed extracts, an endogenous PEPC kinase activity catalyzed a bona fide phosphorylation of the target protein, as deduced from the immunoinhibition of the in vitro phosphorylation reaction by the APS- IgG. In addition, the major, 103-kD PEPC polypeptide was also shown to be radiolabeled in situ 48 h after imbibition in [32P]orthophosphate. The ratio between optimal (pH 8) and suboptimal (pH 7.3 or 7.1) PEPC activity decreased during germination, thereby suggesting a change in catalytic rate related to an in vivo phosphorylation process. These collective data document that the components needed for the regulatory phosphorylation of PEPC are present and functional during germination of wheat seeds. PMID:12226309

  14. Multiple inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfers in the evolution of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene family.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yingmei; Cai, Jing; Wang, Wen; Su, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Pepcase is a gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase that exists in bacteria, archaea and plants,playing an important role in plant metabolism and development. Most plants have two or more pepcase genes belonging to two gene sub-families, while only one gene exists in other organisms. Previous research categorized one plant pepcase gene as plant-type pepcase (PTPC) while the other as bacteria-type pepcase (BTPC) because of its similarity with the pepcase gene found in bacteria. Phylogenetic reconstruction showed that PTPC is the ancestral lineage of plant pepcase, and that all bacteria, protistpepcase and BTPC in plants are derived from a lineage of pepcase closely related with PTPC in algae. However, their phylogeny contradicts the species tree and traditional chronology of organism evolution. Because the diversification of bacteria occurred much earlier than the origin of plants, presumably all bacterialpepcase derived from the ancestral PTPC of algal plants after divergingfrom the ancestor of vascular plant PTPC. To solve this contradiction, we reconstructed the phylogeny of pepcase gene family. Our result showed that both PTPC and BTPC are derived from an ancestral lineage of gamma-proteobacteriapepcases, possibly via an ancient inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria to the eukaryotic common ancestor of plants, protists and cellular slime mold. Our phylogenetic analysis also found 48other pepcase genes originated from inter-kingdom HGTs. These results imply that inter-kingdom HGTs played important roles in the evolution of the pepcase gene family and furthermore that HGTsare a more frequent evolutionary event than previouslythought. PMID:23251445

  15. Despite slow catalysis and confused substrate specificity, all ribulose bisphosphate carboxylases may be nearly perfectly optimized

    PubMed Central

    Tcherkez, Guillaume G. B.; Farquhar, Graham D.; Andrews, T. John

    2006-01-01

    The cornerstone of autotrophy, the CO2-fixing enzyme, d-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), is hamstrung by slow catalysis and confusion between CO2 and O2 as substrates, an “abominably perplexing” puzzle, in Darwin's parlance. Here we argue that these characteristics stem from difficulty in binding the featureless CO2 molecule, which forces specificity for the gaseous substrate to be determined largely or completely in the transition state. We hypothesize that natural selection for greater CO2/O2 specificity, in response to reducing atmospheric CO2:O2 ratios, has resulted in a transition state for CO2 addition in which the CO2 moiety closely resembles a carboxylate group. This maximizes the structural difference between the transition states for carboxylation and the competing oxygenation, allowing better differentiation between them. However, increasing structural similarity between the carboxylation transition state and its carboxyketone product exposes the carboxyketone to the strong binding required to stabilize the transition state and causes the carboxyketone intermediate to bind so tightly that its cleavage to products is slowed. We assert that all Rubiscos may be nearly perfectly adapted to the differing CO2, O2, and thermal conditions in their subcellular environments, optimizing this compromise between CO2/O2 specificity and the maximum rate of catalytic turnover. Our hypothesis explains the feeble rate enhancement displayed by Rubisco in processing the exogenously supplied carboxyketone intermediate, compared with its nonenzymatic hydrolysis, and the positive correlation between CO2/O2 specificity and 12C/13C fractionation. It further predicts that, because a more product-like transition state is more ordered (decreased entropy), the effectiveness of this strategy will deteriorate with increasing temperature. PMID:16641091

  16. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in Arabidopsis Leaves Plays a Crucial Role in Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism1

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianghua; Yi, Keke; Liu, Yu; Xie, Li; Zhou, Zhongjing; Chen, Yue; Hu, Zhanghua; Zheng, Tao; Liu, Renhu; Chen, Yunlong; Chen, Jinqing

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a crucial enzyme that catalyzes an irreversible primary metabolic reaction in plants. Previous studies have used transgenic plants expressing ectopic PEPC forms with diminished feedback inhibition to examine the role of PEPC in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. To date, the in vivo role of PEPC in carbon and nitrogen metabolism has not been analyzed in plants. In this study, we examined the role of PEPC in plants, demonstrating that PPC1 and PPC2 were highly expressed genes encoding PEPC in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves and that PPC1 and PPC2 accounted for approximately 93% of total PEPC activity in the leaves. A double mutant, ppc1/ppc2, was constructed that exhibited a severe growth-arrest phenotype. The ppc1/ppc2 mutant accumulated more starch and sucrose than wild-type plants when seedlings were grown under normal conditions. Physiological and metabolic analysis revealed that decreased PEPC activity in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant greatly reduced the synthesis of malate and citrate and severely suppressed ammonium assimilation. Furthermore, nitrate levels in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant were significantly lower than those in wild-type plants due to the suppression of ammonium assimilation. Interestingly, starch and sucrose accumulation could be prevented and nitrate levels could be maintained by supplying the ppc1/ppc2 mutant with exogenous malate and glutamate, suggesting that low nitrogen status resulted in the alteration of carbon metabolism and prompted the accumulation of starch and sucrose in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant. Our results demonstrate that PEPC in leaves plays a crucial role in modulating the balance of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in Arabidopsis. PMID:25588735

  17. Glucose and fat metabolism in adipose tissue of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Oh, WonKeun; Abu-Elheiga, Lutfi; Kordari, Parichher; Gu, Zeiwei; Shaikenov, Tattym; Chirala, Subrahmanyam S.; Wakil, Salih J.

    2005-01-01

    Acc2-/- mutant mice, when fed a high-fat/high-carbohydrate (HF/HC) diet, were protected against diet-induced obesity and diabetes. To investigate the role of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) in the regulation of energy metabolism in adipose tissues, we studied fatty acid and glucose oxidation in primary cultures of adipocytes isolated from wild-type and Acc2-/- mutant mice fed either normal chow or a HF/HC diet. When fed normal chow, oxidation of [14C]palmitate in adipocytes of Acc2-/- mutant mice was ≈80% higher than in adipocytes of WT mice, and it remained significantly higher in the presence of insulin. Interestingly, in addition to increased fatty acid oxidation, we also observed increased glucose oxidation in adipocytes of Acc2-/- mutant mice compared with that of WT mice. When fed a HF/HC diet for 4-5 months, adipocytes of Acc2-/- mutant mice maintained a 25% higher palmitate oxidation and a 2-fold higher glucose oxidation than WT mice. The mRNA level of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) decreased several fold in the adipose tissue of WT mice fed a HF/HC diet; however, in the adipose tissue of Acc2-/- mutant mice, it was 7-fold higher. Moreover, lipolysis activity was higher in adipocytes of Acc2-/- mutant mice compared with that in WT mice. These findings suggest that continuous fatty acid oxidation in the adipocytes of Acc2-/- mutant mice, combined with a higher level of glucose oxidation and a higher rate of lipolysis, are major factors leading to efficient maintenance of insulin sensitivity and leaner Acc2-/- mutant mice. PMID:15677334

  18. Isolated spinach ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase and method of inactivating ribulose-1,5-bisphosphatase carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase activity

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) from a plant which has a des(methyl) lysyl residue in the LS is disclosed. In addition, the full-length cDNA clones for Rubisco LSMT are disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of inactivating the enzymatic activity of Rubisco LSMT are also disclosed.

  19. Structure and substrate selectivity of the 750-kDa α6β6 holoenzyme of geranyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Ashley R; Huang, Christine S; Zhang, Xing; Zhou, Z Hong; Tong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Geranyl-CoA carboxylase (GCC) is essential for the growth of Pseudomonas organisms with geranic acid as the sole carbon source. GCC has the same domain organization and shares strong sequence conservation with the related biotin-dependent carboxylases 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC) and propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC). Here we report the crystal structure of the 750-kDa α6β6 holoenzyme of GCC, which is similar to MCC but strikingly different from PCC. The structures provide evidence in support of two distinct lineages of biotin-dependent acyl-CoA carboxylases, one carboxylating the α carbon of a saturated organic acid and the other carboxylating the γ carbon of an α-β unsaturated acid. Structural differences in the active site region of GCC and MCC explain their distinct substrate preferences. Especially, a glycine residue in GCC is replaced by phenylalanine in MCC, which blocks access by the larger geranyl-CoA substrate. Mutation of this residue in the two enzymes can change their substrate preferences. PMID:26593090

  20. Mechanism of glucagon inhibition of liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Interrelationship of the effects of phosphorylation, polymer-protomer transition, and citrate on enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Swenson, T L; Porter, J W

    1985-03-25

    The short-term regulation of rat liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase by glucagon has been studied in hepatocytes from rats that had been fasted and refed a fat-free diet. Glucagon inhibition of the activity of this enzyme can be accounted for by a direct correlation between phosphorylation, polymer-protomer ratio, and activity. Glucagon rapidly inactivates acetyl-CoA carboxylase with an accompanying 4-fold increase in the phosphorylation of the enzyme and 3-fold increase in the protomer-polymer ratio of enzyme protein. Citrate, an allosteric activator of acetyl-CoA carboxylase required for enzyme activity, has no effect on these phenomena, indicating a mechanism that is independent of citrate concentration within the cell. The observation of these effects of glucagon on acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity is absolutely dependent upon the minimization of proteolytic degradation of the enzyme after cell lysis. Therefore, for the first time, an interrelationship has been demonstrated between phosphorylation, protomer-polymer ratio, and citrate for the inactivation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase by glucagon. PMID:2857722

  1. Structure and substrate selectivity of the 750-kDa α6β6 holoenzyme of geranyl-CoA carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Jurado, Ashley R.; Huang, Christine S.; Zhang, Xing; Zhou, Z. Hong; Tong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Geranyl-CoA carboxylase (GCC) is essential for the growth of Pseudomonas organisms with geranic acid as the sole carbon source. GCC has the same domain organization and shares strong sequence conservation with the related biotin-dependent carboxylases 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC) and propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC). Here we report the crystal structure of the 750-kDa α6β6 holoenzyme of GCC, which is similar to MCC but strikingly different from PCC. The structures provide evidence in support of two distinct lineages of biotin-dependent acyl-CoA carboxylases, one carboxylating the α carbon of a saturated organic acid and the other carboxylating the γ carbon of an α-β unsaturated acid. Structural differences in the active site region of GCC and MCC explain their distinct substrate preferences. Especially, a glycine residue in GCC is replaced by phenylalanine in MCC, which blocks access by the larger geranyl-CoA substrate. Mutation of this residue in the two enzymes can change their substrate preferences. PMID:26593090

  2. Comparative Characterization of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in C3, C4, and C3-C4 Intermediate Panicum Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Holaday, A. Scott; Black, Clanton C.

    1981-01-01

    Various properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases were compared in leaf preparations from C3-C4 intermediate, C3, and C4Panicum species. Values of Vmax in micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour at pH 8.3 were 57 to 75 for the enzyme from Panicum milioides, Panicum schenckii, and Panicum decipiens (all C3-C4). The values for Panicum laxum (C3) and Panicum prionitis (C4) were 20 to 40 and 952 to 1374, respectively. The Vmax values did not change at pH 7.3 except for the C4 value, which increased about 24%. At pH 8.3, the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases from C3 and C3-C4 species had slightly higher Km HCO3− and lower K′ phosphoenolpyruvate values than did the C4 enzyme. With each species at pH 7.3, all K′ phosphoenolpyruvate values were 2- to 4-fold greater. The enzyme from all species was inhibited 85 to 90% by 1 millimolar malate at rate-limiting phosphoenolpyruvate and Mg2+ levels. With low levels of malate, 0.2 millimolar, the rate curve with respect to phosphoenolpyruvate was distinctly sigmoidal, and the inhibition was not eliminated at 5 millimolar phosphoenolpyruvate. Malate at 10 millimolar protected all phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases from inactivation at 55 C at pH 5.5, but not at pH 8.3. Aspartate did not protect well. When incubated at 37 C at pH 8.3 without phosphoenolpyruvate, but with HCO3−, the enzyme from several C4 grasses lost 92 to 98% of the initial activity after 4 minutes, whereas the enzymes from C3 and C3-C4Panicum species retained 60 to 70% of their activities. In contrast, 5 millimolar phosphoenolpyruvate stabilized the enzyme at 37 C in all plant extracts. The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from C3-C4 intermediate Panicum species has properties most similar to the enzyme from C3Panicum species. The higher leaf activity of the enzyme from the intermediate plants than from C3 species is not due to any unusual property assayed other than a higher Vmax. PMID:16661669

  3. Inactivation of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum and spinach with the new affinity label 2-bromo-1,5-dihydroxy-3-pentanone 1,5-bisphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M.I.; Hartman, F.C.

    1981-11-16

    In an attempt to identify the active-site base believed to initiate catalysis by ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase, we have synthesized 2-bromo-1, 5-dihydroxy-3-pentanone 1,5-bisphosphate, a reactive analogue of a postulated intermediate of carboxylation. Although highly unstable, this compound can be shown to inactivate the carboxylases from both Rhodospirillum rubrum and spinach rapidly and irreversibly. Inactivation follows pseudo first-order kinetics, shows rate saturation and is greatly reduced by saturating amounts of the competitive inhibitor, 2-carboxyribitol 1,5-bisphosphate. The incorporation of reagent, quantified by reducing the modified carboxylases with (/sup 3/H)NaBH/sub 4/, shows that inactivation results from the modification of approximately one residue per catalytic subunit of the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and less than one residue per protomeric unit of the spinach enzyme.

  4. Regulation of bovine pyruvate carboxylase mRNA and promoter expression by thermal stress.

    PubMed

    White, H M; Koser, S L; Donkin, S S

    2012-09-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in gluconeogenesis from lactate and is a determinant of tricarboxylic acid cycle carbon flux. Bovine PC 5' untranslated region (UTR) mRNA variants are the products of a single PC gene containing 3 promoter regions (P3, P2, and P1, 5' to 3') that are responsive to physiological and nutritional stressors. The objective of this study was to determine the direct effects of thermal stress on PC mRNA and gene expression in bovine hepatocyte monolayer cultures, rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells, and Madin-Darby bovine kidney epithelial (MDBK) cells. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3 Holstein bull calves and used to prepare monolayer cultures. Rat hepatoma cells and MDBK cells were obtained from American Type Culture Collection, Manassas, VA. Beginning 24 h after initial seeding, cells were subjected to either 37°C (control) or 42°C (thermal stress) for 24 h. Treatments were applied in triplicate in a minimum of 3 independent cell preparations. For bovine primary hepatocytes, endogenous expression of bovine PC mRNA increased (P < 0.1) with 24 h of thermal stress (1.31 vs. 2.79 ± 0.49, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively), but there was no change (P ≥ 0.1) in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) mRNA expression. Similarly, exposure of MDBK cells to thermal stress increased (P < 0.1) expression of bovine PC mRNA without altering (P ≥ 0.1) PEPCK-C mRNA expression. Conversely, there was no effect (P ≥ 0.1) of thermal stress on endogenous rat PC (0.47 vs. 0.30 ± 0.08, control vs. thermal stress) or PEPCK-C (1.61 vs. 1.20 ± 0.48, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively) mRNA expressions in H4IIE cells. To further investigate the regulation of PC, H4IIE cells were transiently transfected with bovine promoter-luciferase constructs containing either P1, P2, or P3, and exposed to thermal stress for 23 h. Activity of P1 was suppressed (P < 0.1) 5-fold, activity of P2

  5. The role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase during C4 photosynthetic isotope exchange and stomatal conductance.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Asaph B; Baroli, Irene; Badger, Murray R; Ivakov, Alexander; Lea, Peter J; Leegood, Richard C; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2007-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) plays a key role during C(4) photosynthesis and is involved in anaplerotic metabolism, pH regulation, and stomatal opening. Heterozygous (Pp) and homozygous (pp) forms of a PEPC-deficient mutant of the C(4) dicot Amaranthus edulis were used to study the effect of reduced PEPC activity on CO(2) assimilation rates, stomatal conductance, and (13)CO(2) (Delta(13)C) and C(18)OO (Delta(18)O) isotope discrimination during leaf gas exchange. PEPC activity was reduced to 42% and 3% and the rates of CO(2) assimilation in air dropped to 78% and 10% of the wild-type values in the Pp and pp mutants, respectively. Stomatal conductance in air (531 mubar CO(2)) was similar in the wild-type and Pp mutant but the pp mutant had only 41% of the wild-type steady-state conductance under white light and the stomata opened more slowly in response to increased light or reduced CO(2) partial pressure, suggesting that the C(4) PEPC isoform plays an essential role in stomatal opening. There was little difference in Delta(13)C between the Pp mutant (3.0 per thousand +/- 0.4 per thousand) and wild type (3.3 per thousand +/- 0.4 per thousand), indicating that leakiness (), the ratio of CO(2) leak rate out of the bundle sheath to the rate of CO(2) supply by the C(4) cycle, a measure of the coordination of C(4) photosynthesis, was not affected by a 60% reduction in PEPC activity. In the pp mutant Delta(13)C was 16 per thousand +/- 3.2 per thousand, indicative of direct CO(2) fixation by Rubisco in the bundle sheath at ambient CO(2) partial pressure. Delta(18)O measurements indicated that the extent of isotopic equilibrium between leaf water and the CO(2) at the site of oxygen exchange () was low (0.6) in the wild-type and Pp mutant but increased to 0.9 in the pp mutant. We conclude that in vitro carbonic anhydrase activity overestimated as compared to values determined from Delta(18)O in wild-type plants. PMID:17827274

  6. Purification and characterization of a novel phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from banana fruit.

    PubMed Central

    Law, R D; Plaxton, W C

    1995-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from ripened banana (Musa cavendishii L.) fruits has been purified 127-fold to apparent homogeneity and a final specific activity of 32 mumol of oxaloacetate produced/min per mg of protein. Non-denaturing PAGE of the final preparation resolved a single protein-staining band that co-migrated with PEPC activity. Polypeptides of 103 (alpha-subunit) and 100 (beta-subunit) kDa, which stain for protein with equal intensity and cross-react strongly with anti-(maize leaf PEPC) immune serum, were observed following SDS/PAGE of the final preparation. CNBr cleavage patterns of the two subunits were similar, but not identical, suggesting that these polypeptides are related, but distinct, proteins. The enzyme's native molecular mass was estimated to be about 425 kDa. These data indicate that in contrast to the homotetrameric PEPC from most other sources, the banana fruit enzyme exists as an alpha 2 beta 2 heterotetramer. Monospecific rabbit anti-(banana PEPC) immune serum effectively immunoprecipitated the activity of the purified enzyme. Immunoblotting studies established that the 100 kDa subunit did not arise via proteolysis of the 103 kDa subunit after tissue extraction, and that the subunit composition of banana PEPC remains uniform throughout the ripening process. PEPC displayed a typical pH activity profile with an alkaline optimum and activity rapidly decreasing below pH 7.0. Enzymic activity was absolutely dependent on the presence of a bivalent metal cation, with Mg2+ or Mn2+ fulfilling this requirement. The response of the PEPC activity to PEP concentration and to various effectors was greatly influenced by pH and glycerol addition to the assay. The enzyme was activated by hexose-monophosphates and potently inhibited by malate, succinate, aspartate and glutamate at pH 7.0, whereas the effect of these metabolites was considerably diminished or completely abolished at pH 8.0. The significance of metabolite regulation of PEPC is

  7. Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity in isolated rat adipocytes incubated with glucagon. Interactions with the effects of insulin, adrenaline and adenosine deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Zammit, Victor A.; Corstorphine, Clark G.

    1982-01-01

    1. Adipocytes isolated from epididymal fat-pads of fed rats were incubated with different concentrations of glucagon, insulin, adrenaline and adenosine deaminase, and the effects of these agents on the `initial' activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase in the cells were studied. 2. Glucagon (at concentrations between 0.1 and 10nm) inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. Maximal inhibition was approx. 70% of the `control' activity in the absence of added hormone, and the concentration of hormone required for half-maximal inhibition was 0.3–0.5nm-glucagon. 3. Incubation of cells with adenosine deaminase resulted in a similar inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. Preincubation of adipocytes with adenosine deaminase did not alter either the sensitivity of carboxylase activity to increasing concentrations of glucagon or the maximal extent of inhibition. 4. Adrenaline inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase to the same extent as glucagon. Preincubation of the cells with glucagon did not alter the sensitivity of enzyme activity to adrenaline or the degree of maximal inhibition. 5. Insulin activated the enzyme by 70–80% of `control' activity. Preincubation of the cells with glucagon did not alter the concentration of insulin required to produce half the maximal stimulatory effect (about 12μunits of insulin/ml). The effects of insulin and glucagon appeared to be mediated completely independently, and were approximately quantitatively similar but opposite. These characteristics resulted in the mutual cancellation of the effects of the two hormones when they were both present at equally effective concentrations. 6. The implications of these findings with regard to current concepts about the mechanism of regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and to the regulation of the enzyme in vivo are discussed. PMID:6131671

  8. Association of polymorphisms in the promoter I of bovine acetyl-CoA carboxylase-alpha gene with beef fatty acid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter I (PI) region of bovine acetyl-CoA carboxylase-alpha (ACACA) gene and evaluate the extent to which they were associated with lipid-related traits and fatty acid composition of beef. Eight novel SNPs w...

  9. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation process as a probable mechanism for the diurnal regulatory changes of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in CAM plants.

    PubMed

    Brulfert, J; Vidal, J; Le Marechal, P; Gadal, P; Queiroz, O; Kluge, M; Kruger, I

    1986-04-14

    Day and night forms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31) (PEPC) were extracted from leaves of the CAM plants Kalanchoe daigremontiana, K. tubiflora and K. blossfeldiana previously fed with [32P] labelled phosphate solution. A one-step immunochemical purification followed by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography showed that, in all species, the night form of the enzyme was phosphorylated and not the day form. Limited acid hydrolysis of the night form and two-dimensional separation identified predominantly labelled phosphoserine and phosphothreonine. In vitro addition of exogenous acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) to desalted night form-containing extracts resulted within 30 min in a shift in PEPC enzymic properties similar to the in vivo changes from night to day form. It is suggested that phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of the enzyme could be the primary in vivo process which might explain the observed rhythmicity of enzymic properties. PMID:3707571

  10. Serine-15 is the regulatory seryl-phosphorylation site in C sub 4 -leaf phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) from maize

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Jinan; Chollet, R. )

    1990-05-01

    The {sup 32}P-labeled regulatory site phosphopeptide was purified from a tryptic digest of in vitro phosphorylated/activated dark-form PEPCase by metal ion affinity and reversed-phase chromatography and subjected to automated Edman degradation analysis. The amino acid sequence of this phosphoseryl peptide is His-His-Ser(P)-Ile-Asp-Ala-Gln-Leu-Arg. This nonapeptide, which corresponds exactly to residues 13-21 in the deduced primary sequence of the maize leaf carboxylase, is far removed from a recently identified active-site cysteine (Cys-553) in the C-terminal region of the primary structure. Comparative analysis of the deduced N-terminal sequences of C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, and CAM leaf PEPCases suggests that the motif of Lys/Arg-X-X-Ser is an important structural requirement of the C{sub 4}- and CAM-leaf protein-serine kinases.

  11. Activity ratios of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase accurately reflect carbamylation ratios. [Phaseolus vulgaris, Spinacla oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Butz, N.D.; Sharkey, T.D. )

    1989-03-01

    Activity ratios and carbamylation ratios of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) were determined for leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris and Spinacia oleracea exposed to a variety of partial pressures of CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} and photon flux densities (PFD). It was found that activity ratios accurately predicted carbamylation ratios except in extracts from leaves held in low PFD. In particular, it was confirmed that the loss of FuBPCase activity in low partial pressure of O{sub 2} and high PFD results from reduced carbamylation. Activity ratios of RuBPCase were lower than carbamylation ratios for Phaseolus leaves sampled in low PFD, presumably because of the presence of 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate. Spinacia leaves sampled in darkness also exhibited lower activity ratios than carbamylation ratios indicating that this species may also have an RuBPCase inhibitor even though carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate has not been detected in this species in the past.

  12. Cloning and developmental expression of pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit N-methyltransferase

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .epsilon.N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) is disclosed. This enzyme catalyzes methylation of the .epsilon.-amine of lysine-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. In addition, a full-length cDNA clone for Rubisco LSMT is disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which (1) have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA, and (2) have the Rubisco LSMT gene product or the action of the gene product deleted from the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of using the gene to selectively deliver desired agents to a plant are also disclosed.

  13. Cloning and developmental expression of pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit epsilon N-methyltransferase

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) is disclosed. This enzyme catalyzes methylation of the .epsilon.-amine of lysine-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. In addition, a full-length cDNA clone for Rubisco LSMT is disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which (1) have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA, and (2) have the Rubisco LSMT gene product or the action of the gene product deleted from the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of using the gene to selectively deliver desired agents to a plant are also disclosed.

  14. Cloning and developmental expression of pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit epsilon N-methyltransferase

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, R.L.

    1999-02-02

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS){sup {epsilon}}N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) is disclosed. This enzyme catalyzes methylation of the {epsilon}-amine of lysine-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. In addition, a full-length cDNA clone for Rubisco LSMT is disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which (1) have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA, and (2) have the Rubisco LSMT gene product or the action of the gene product deleted from the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of using the gene to selectively deliver desired agents to a plant are also disclosed. 8 figs.

  15. Cloning and developmental expression of pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit N-methyltransferase

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, R.L.

    1998-03-03

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) {epsilon}N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) is disclosed. This enzyme catalyzes methylation of the {epsilon}-amine of lysine-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. In addition, a full-length cDNA clone for Rubisco LSMT is disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which (1) have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA, and (2) have the Rubisco LSMT gene product or the action of the gene product deleted from the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of using the gene to selectively deliver desired agents to a plant are also disclosed. 5 figs.

  16. Control of light saturated photosynthesis: Concentration and activity of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. Final report, September 1, 1993--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Geider, R.J. |

    1997-05-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is one of the most abundant enzymes on the planet and is responsible for catalysing the net fixation of CO{sub 2} into organic matter. It is central, therefore, to primary productivity in marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Rubisco is a large enzyme with low substrate affinity and low catalytic efficiency and is considered to limit the rate of light-saturated photosynthesis. This report summarizes research into the molecular basis of the regulation of phytoplankton photosynthesis. It describes experimental and theoretical studies of the role of Rubisco in regulating the photosynthetic rate of phytoplankton. It also describes the integration of a mechanistically based phytoplankton growth model into a description of primary productivity in the sea. This work was conducted as part of the Ocean Margins Program.

  17. Synthesis of the small subunit of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase from genes cloned into plasmids containing the SP6 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, S; Smith, S M

    1986-01-01

    DNA sequences encoding ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit precursor from Pisum sativum L. have been transcribed from plasmids containing the SP6 promoter, and translated in a wheat germ cell-free system. The small subunit precursor polypeptide, its N-terminal leader sequence (transit peptide) and the mature small subunit have each been synthesized independently from three different plasmid constructs. The precursor polypeptide is imported into isolated pea chloroplasts and processed to the mature small subunit by a stromal proteinase. The mature polypeptide is neither imported, nor subject to proteolysis by stromal extracts. The transit peptide alone is very rapidly degraded by a stromal proteinase activity which can be inhibited by EDTA or 1,10-phenanthroline. The use of these gene constructs helps to establish the crucial role of the transit peptide in protein import into the chloroplast. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3827863

  18. Evolution of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Protein Kinase Family in C3 and C4 Flaveria spp.1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Aldous, Sophia H.; Weise, Sean E.; Sharkey, Thomas D.; Waldera-Lupa, Daniel M.; Stühler, Kai; Mallmann, Julia; Groth, Georg; Gowik, Udo; Westhoff, Peter; Arsova, Borjana

    2014-01-01

    The key enzyme for C4 photosynthesis, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase (PEPC), evolved from nonphotosynthetic PEPC found in C3 ancestors. In all plants, PEPC is phosphorylated by Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Protein Kinase (PPCK). However, differences in the phosphorylation pattern exist among plants with these photosynthetic types, and it is still not clear if they are due to interspecies differences or depend on photosynthetic type. The genus Flaveria contains closely related C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 species, which are evolutionarily young and thus well suited for comparative analysis. To characterize the evolutionary differences in PPCK between plants with C3 and C4 photosynthesis, transcriptome libraries from nine Flaveria spp. were used, and a two-member PPCK family (PPCKA and PPCKB) was identified. Sequence analysis identified a number of C3- and C4-specific residues with various occurrences in the intermediates. Quantitative analysis of transcriptome data revealed that PPCKA and PPCKB exhibit inverse diel expression patterns and that C3 and C4 Flaveria spp. differ in the expression levels of these genes. PPCKA has maximal expression levels during the day, whereas PPCKB has maximal expression during the night. Phosphorylation patterns of PEPC varied among C3 and C4 Flaveria spp. too, with PEPC from the C4 species being predominantly phosphorylated throughout the day, while in the C3 species the phosphorylation level was maintained during the entire 24 h. Since C4 Flaveria spp. evolved from C3 ancestors, this work links the evolutionary changes in sequence, PPCK expression, and phosphorylation pattern to an evolutionary phase shift of kinase activity from a C3 to a C4 mode. PMID:24850859

  19. Comparative modeling and molecular dynamics suggest high carboxylase activity of the Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14 RbcL protein.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira; de Azevedo, Juliana Simão Nina; da Silva Gonçalves Vianez, João Lídio; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa

    2016-03-01

    Rubisco catalyzes the first step reaction in the carbon fixation pathway, bonding atmospheric CO2/O2 to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate; it is therefore considered one of the most important enzymes in the biosphere. Genetic modifications to increase the carboxylase activity of rubisco are a subject of great interest to agronomy and biotechnology, since this could increase the productivity of biomass in plants, algae and cyanobacteria and give better yields in crops and biofuel production. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize in silico the catalytic domain of the rubisco large subunit (rbcL gene) of Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14, and identify target sites to improve enzyme affinity for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. A three-dimensional model was built using MODELLER 9.14, molecular dynamics was used to generate a 100 ns trajectory by AMBER12, and the binding free energy was calculated using MM-PBSA, MM-GBSA and SIE methods with alanine scanning. The model obtained showed characteristics of form-I rubisco, with 15 beta sheets and 19 alpha helices, and maintained the highly conserved catalytic site encompassing residues Lys175, Lys177, Lys201, Asp203, and Glu204. The binding free energy of the enzyme-substrate complexation of Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14 showed values around -10 kcal mol(-1) using the SIE method. The most important residues for the interaction with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate were Arg295 followed by Lys334. The generated model was successfully validated, remaining stable during the whole simulation, and demonstrated characteristics of enzymes with high carboxylase activity. The binding analysis revealed candidates for directed mutagenesis sites to improve rubisco's affinity. PMID:26936271

  20. A 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficient human skin fibroblast transcriptome reveals underlying mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zandberg, L; van Dyk, H C; van der Westhuizen, F H; van Dijk, A A

    2016-09-01

    Isolated 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC) deficiency is an autosomal recessive inherited metabolic disease of leucine catabolism with a highly variable phenotype. Apart from extensive mutation analyses of the MCCC1 and MCCC2 genes encoding 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.4), molecular data on MCC deficiency gene expression studies in human tissues is lacking. For IEMs, unbiased '-omics' approaches are starting to reveal the secondary cellular responses to defects in biochemical pathways. Here we present the first whole genome expression profile of immortalized cultured skin fibroblast cells of two clinically affected MCC deficient patients and two healthy individuals generated using Affymetrix(®)HuExST1.0 arrays. There were 16191 significantly differentially expressed transcript IDs of which 3591 were well annotated and present in the predefined knowledge database of Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software used for downstream functional analyses. The most noticeable feature of this MCCA deficient skin fibroblast transcriptome was the typical genetic hallmark of mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased antioxidant response and disruption of energy homeostasis, which was confirmed by mitochondrial functional analyses. The MCC deficient transcriptome seems to predict oxidative stress that could alter the complex secondary cellular response that involve genes of the glycolysis, the TCA cycle, OXPHOS, gluconeogenesis, β-oxidation and the branched-chain fatty acid metabolism. An important emerging insight from this human MCCA transcriptome in combination with previous reports is that chronic exposure to the primary and secondary metabolites of MCC deficiency and the resulting oxidative stress might impact adversely on the quality of life and energy levels, irrespective of whether MCC deficient individuals are clinically affected or asymptomatic. PMID:27417235

  1. The biochemistry of fatty liver and kidney syndrome. Biotin-mediated restoration of hepatic gluconeogenesis in vitro and its relationship to pyruvate carboxylase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, D W

    1976-01-01

    Liver slices from chicks affected by the fatty liver and kidney syndrome display an extremely low extent of hepatic gluconeogenesis which is associated with decreased activities of certain rate-limiting gluconeogenic enzymes. Pyruvate carboxylase activity is particularly severely affected, being less than 4% of control values. Incubation of affected slices in a biotin-containing nutrient medium restores both gluconeogenesis and pyruvate carboxylase actiivity (the latter to approx. 35% of the control valve). Activities of the other enzymes studied were not greatly affected by this treatment. Restoration of gluconeogenesis did not occur if biotin was excluded from the nutrient medium, nor was it prevented by protein-synthesis inhibitors. It is concluded that the syndrome involves the lack of available biotin in the liver rather than suppression of apocarboxylase synthesis. PMID:182141

  2. AMPK activation represses the human gene promoter of the cardiac isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase: Role of nuclear respiratory factor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, Tasneem; Opie, Lionel H.; Essop, M. Faadiel

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} AMPK inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta gene promoter activity. {yields} Nuclear respiratory factor-1 inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta promoter activity. {yields} AMPK regulates acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta at transcriptional level. -- Abstract: The cardiac-enriched isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC{beta}) produces malonyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1. AMPK inhibits ACC{beta} activity, lowering malonyl-CoA levels and promoting mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation. Previously, AMPK increased promoter binding of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), a pivotal transcriptional modulator controlling gene expression of mitochondrial proteins. We therefore hypothesized that NRF-1 inhibits myocardial ACC{beta} promoter activity via AMPK activation. A human ACC{beta} promoter-luciferase construct was transiently transfected into neonatal cardiomyocytes {+-} a NRF-1 expression construct. NRF-1 overexpression decreased ACC{beta} gene promoter activity by 71 {+-} 4.6% (p < 0.001 vs. control). Transfections with 5'-end serial promoter deletions revealed that NRF-1-mediated repression of ACC{beta} was abolished with a pPII{beta}-18/+65-Luc deletion construct. AMPK activation dose-dependently reduced ACC{beta} promoter activity, while NRF-1 addition did not further decrease it. We also investigated NRF-1 inhibition in the presence of upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF1), a known transactivator of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter. Here NRF-1 blunted USF1-dependent induction of ACC{beta} promoter activity by 58 {+-} 7.5% (p < 0.001 vs. control), reversed with a dominant negative NRF-1 construct. NRF-1 also suppressed endogenous USF1 transcriptional activity by 55 {+-} 6.2% (p < 0.001 vs. control). This study demonstrates that NRF-1 is a novel transcriptional inhibitor of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter in the mammalian heart. Our data extends AMPK regulation of ACC{beta} to the transcriptional level.

  3. Dynamics of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase gene expression in the coccolithophorid Coccolithus pelagicus during a tracer release experiment in the Northeast Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Wyman, Michael; Davies, John T; Hodgson, Sylvia; Tarran, Glen A; Purdie, Duncan A

    2005-03-01

    We report a pronounced diel rhythm in ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) gene expression in a natural population of the coccolithophorid Coccolithus pelagicus sampled during a Lagrangian experiment in the Northeast Atlantic. Our observations show that there is greater heterogeneity in the temporal regulation of RubisCO expression among planktonic chromophytes than has been reported hitherto. PMID:15746374

  4. A sensitive, simultaneous analysis of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase efficiencies: Graphical determination of the CO2/O 2 specificity factor.

    PubMed

    Kostov, R V; McFadden, B A

    1995-01-01

    A simple approach to determine CO2/O2 specificity factor (τ) of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase is described. The assay measures the amount of CO2 fixation at varying [CO2]/[O2] ratios after complete consumption of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP). Carbon dioxide fixation catalyzed by the carboxylase was monitored by directly measuring the moles of (14)CO2 incorporated into 3-phosphoglycerate (PGA). This measurement at different [CO2]/[O2] ratios is used to determine graphically by several different linear plots the total RuBP consumed by the two activities and the CO2/O2 specificity factor. The assay can be used to measure the amounts of products of the carboxylase and oxygenase reactions and to determine the concentration of the substrate RuBP converted to an endpoint amount of PGA and phosphoglycolate. The assay was found to be suitable for all [CO2]/[O2] ratios examined, ranging from 14 to 215 micromolar CO2 (provided as 1-16 mM NaHCO3) and 614 micromolar O2 provided as 50% O2. The procedure described is extremely rapid and sensitive. Specificity factors for enzymes of highly divergent τ values are in good agreement with previously published data. PMID:24306640

  5. Identification of the large subunit of Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase as a substrate for transglutaminase in Medicageo sativa L. (alfalfa)

    SciTech Connect

    Margosiak, S.A.; Dharma, A.; Carver, M.R.B.; Gonzales, A.P., Louie, D.; Kuehn, G.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Extract prepared from floral meristematic tissue of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) were investigated for expression of the enzyme transglutaminase in order to identify the major protein substrate for transglutaminase-directed modifications among plant proteins. The large polymorphic subunits of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in alfalfa, with molecular weights of 52,700 and 57,600, are major substrates for transglutaminase in these extracts. This was established by: (a) covalent conjugation of monodansylcadaverine to the large subunit followed by fluorescent detection in SDS-polyacrylamide gels; (b) covalent conjugation of ({sup 14}C)putrescine to the large subunit with detection by autoradiography; (c) covalent conjugation of monodansylcadaverine to the large subunit and demonstration of immunocross-reactivity on nitrocellulose transblot of the modified large subunit with antibody prepared in rabbits against dansylated-ovalbumin; (d) demonstration of a direct dependence of the rate of transglutaminase-mediated, ({sup 14}C)putresciene incorporation upon the concentration of ribulose, 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from alfalfa or spinach; and (e) presumptive evidence from size exclusion chromatography that transglutaminase may cofractionate with native molecules of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in crude extracts.

  6. The source and characteristics of chemiluminescence associated with the oxygenase reaction catalyzed by Mn(2+)-ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Lilley, R M; Riesen, H; Andrews, T J

    1993-07-01

    We confirm the observation of Mogel and McFadden (Mogel, S.N., and McFadden, B. A. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 8333-8337) that ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) exhibits chemiluminescence while catalyzing its oxygenase reaction in the presence of Mn2+. However, our results with the spinach and Rhodospirillum rubrum enzymes differ markedly in the following respects. 1) Chemiluminescence intensity was directly proportional to enzyme concentration and behaved as if representing the rate of oxygenase catalysis. 2) The wavelength spectrum peaked at about 770 nm and extended beyond 810 nm. This seems inconsistent with chemiluminescence generated by simultaneous decay of pairs of singlet O2 molecules. It is consistent with manganese(II) luminescence and we discuss its possible sources. The time course of chemiluminescence (resolution, 0.25 s) was distinctively different for spinach and R. rubrum enzymes during the initial 5 s of catalysis, with the bacterial enzyme exhibiting a pronounced initial "burst." Chemiluminescence by the spinach enzyme responded to substrate concentrations in a manner consistent with known oxygenase properties, exhibiting Michaelis-Menten kinetics with ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (Km 400 nM). Chemiluminescence required carbamylated enzyme with Mn2+ bound at the active site (activation energy, -57.1 KJ.mol-1). As an indicator of oxygenase activity, chemiluminescence represents an improvement over oxygen electrode measurements in response time and sensitivity by factors of at least 100. PMID:8314755

  7. (Nuclear genes from nicotiana encoding the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase). Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cashmore, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    Two pea nuclear genes encoding ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rbcS) were isolated and completely sequenced. These sequence studies include approximately 1 kb of 5' noncoding region and several hundred nucleotides of 3' noncoding sequences. The two genes are tightly linked being separated by 10 kb of DNA and they are oriented with their 3' ends towards one another. The two genes (ss3.6 and ss8.0) correspond to two of five EcoRI fragments of pea DNA that hybridize to a rbcS hybridization probe. The two genes ss3.6 and ss8.0 are quite divergent at their 5' and their 3' ends and in the first of the two intervening sequences. In direct contrast the second of the two intervening sequences is total conserved between the two genes. This conservation of sequence identity could result directly from evolutionary forces selecting against any sequence change. Such selection would presumably reflect a very sequence-dependent function for these introns. A role in splicing is one possibility and a transcriptional regulatory element is another possibility. 9 refs.

  8. Temperature Responses of C4 Photosynthesis: Biochemical Analysis of Rubisco, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase, and Carbonic Anhydrase in Setaria viridis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Ryan A.; Gandin, Anthony; Cousins, Asaph B.

    2015-01-01

    The photosynthetic assimilation of CO2 in C4 plants is potentially limited by the enzymatic rates of Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc), and carbonic anhydrase (CA). Therefore, the activity and kinetic properties of these enzymes are needed to accurately parameterize C4 biochemical models of leaf CO2 exchange in response to changes in CO2 availability and temperature. There are currently no published temperature responses of both Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics from a C4 plant, nor are there known measurements of the temperature dependency of the PEPc Michaelis-Menten constant for its substrate HCO3−, and there is little information on the temperature response of plant CA activity. Here, we used membrane inlet mass spectrometry to measure the temperature responses of Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics, PEPc carboxylation kinetics, and the activity and first-order rate constant for the CA hydration reaction from 10°C to 40°C using crude leaf extracts from the C4 plant Setaria viridis. The temperature dependencies of Rubisco, PEPc, and CA kinetic parameters are provided. These findings describe a new method for the investigation of PEPc kinetics, suggest an HCO3− limitation imposed by CA, and show similarities between the Rubisco temperature responses of previously measured C3 species and the C4 plant S. viridis. PMID:26373659

  9. Promotion of photosynthesis in transgenic rice over-expressing of maize C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene by nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pingbo; Li, Xia; Huo, Kai; Wei, Xiaodong; Dai, Chuanchao; Lv, Chuangen

    2014-03-15

    We determined the effects of exogenous nitric oxide on photosynthesis and gene expression in transgenic rice plants (PC) over-expressing the maize C4pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Seedlings were subjected to treatments with NO donors, an NO scavenger, phospholipase inhibitors, a Ca(2+) chelator, a Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, and a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibitor, individually and in various combinations. The NO donors significantly increased the net photosynthetic rate (PN) of PC and wild-type (WT), especially that of PC. Treatment with an NO scavenger did inhibit the PN of rice plants. The treatments with phospholipase inhibitors and a Ca(2+) chelator decreased the PN of WT and PC, and photosynthesis was more strongly inhibited in WT than in PC. Further analyses showed that the NO donors increased endogenous levels of NO and PLD activity, but decreased endogenous levels of Ca(2+) both WT and PC. However, there was a greater increase in NO in WT and a greater increase in PLD activity and Ca(2+) level in PC. The NO donors also increased both PEPC activity and pepc gene expression in PC. PEPC activity can be increased by SNP alone. But the expression of its encoding gene in PC might be regulated by SNP, together with PA and Ca(2+). PMID:24594398

  10. Pyruvate Carboxylase Activates the RIG-I-like Receptor-Mediated Antiviral Immune Response by Targeting the MAVS signalosome.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhongying; Zhou, Yaqin; Zhu, Shengli; Feng, Jian; Chen, Xueyuan; Liu, Shi; Peng, Nanfang; Yang, Xiaodan; Xu, Gang; Zhu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    When retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 protein (RIG-I)-like receptors sense viral dsRNA in the cytosol, RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) are recruited to the mitochondria to interact with mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) and initiate antiviral immune responses. In this study, we demonstrate that the biotin-containing enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PC) plays an essential role in the virus-triggered activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling mediated by MAVS. PC contributes to the enhanced production of type I interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and PC knockdown inhibits the virus-triggered innate immune response. In addition, PC shows extensive antiviral activity against RNA viruses, including influenza A virus (IAV), human enterovirus 71 (EV71), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Furthermore, PC mediates antiviral action by targeting the MAVS signalosome and induces IFNs and pro-inflammatory cytokines by promoting phosphorylation of NF-κB inhibitor-α (IκBα) and the IκB kinase (IKK) complex, as well as NF-κB nuclear translocation, which leads to activation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), including double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and myxovirus resistance protein 1 (Mx1). Our findings suggest that PC is an important player in host antiviral signaling. PMID:26906558

  11. Multiple isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the Orchidaceae (subtribe Oncidiinae): implications for the evolution of crassulacean acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Silvera, Katia; Winter, Klaus; Rodriguez, B. Leticia; Albion, Rebecca L.; Cushman, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) catalyses the initial fixation of atmospheric CO2 into oxaloacetate and subsequently malate. Nocturnal accumulation of malic acid within the vacuole of photosynthetic cells is a typical feature of plants that perform crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). PEPC is a ubiquitous plant enzyme encoded by a small gene family, and each member encodes an isoform with specialized function. CAM-specific PEPC isoforms probably evolved from ancestral non-photosynthetic isoforms by gene duplication events and subsequent acquisition of transcriptional control elements that mediate increased leaf-specific or photosynthetic-tissue-specific mRNA expression. To understand the patterns of functional diversification related to the expression of CAM, ppc gene families and photosynthetic patterns were characterized in 11 closely related orchid species from the subtribe Oncidiinae with a range of photosynthetic pathways from C3 photosynthesis (Oncidium cheirophorum, Oncidium maduroi, Rossioglossum krameri, and Oncidium sotoanum) to weak CAM (Oncidium panamense, Oncidium sphacelatum, Gomesa flexuosa and Rossioglossum insleayi) and strong CAM (Rossioglossum ampliatum, Trichocentrum nanum, and Trichocentrum carthagenense). Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two main ppc lineages in flowering plants, two main ppc lineages within the eudicots, and three ppc lineages within the Orchidaceae. Our results indicate that ppc gene family expansion within the Orchidaceae is likely to be the result of gene duplication events followed by adaptive sequence divergence. CAM-associated PEPC isoforms in the Orchidaceae probably evolved from several independent origins. PMID:24913627

  12. Algal evolution in relation to atmospheric CO2: carboxylases, carbon-concentrating mechanisms and carbon oxidation cycles

    PubMed Central

    Raven, John A.; Giordano, Mario; Beardall, John; Maberly, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis evolved at least 2.4 Ga; all oxygenic organisms use the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco)–photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle (PCRC) rather than one of the five other known pathways of autotrophic CO2 assimilation. The high CO2 and (initially) O2-free conditions permitted the use of a Rubisco with a high maximum specific reaction rate. As CO2 decreased and O2 increased, Rubisco oxygenase activity increased and 2-phosphoglycolate was produced, with the evolution of pathways recycling this inhibitory product to sugar phosphates. Changed atmospheric composition also selected for Rubiscos with higher CO2 affinity and CO2/O2 selectivity correlated with decreased CO2-saturated catalytic capacity and/or for CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). These changes increase the energy, nitrogen, phosphorus, iron, zinc and manganese cost of producing and operating Rubisco–PCRC, while biosphere oxygenation decreased the availability of nitrogen, phosphorus and iron. The majority of algae today have CCMs; the timing of their origins is unclear. If CCMs evolved in a low-CO2 episode followed by one or more lengthy high-CO2 episodes, CCM retention could involve a combination of environmental factors known to favour CCM retention in extant organisms that also occur in a warmer high-CO2 ocean. More investigations, including studies of genetic adaptation, are needed. PMID:22232762

  13. A Different Mechanism for the Inhibition of the Carboxyltransferase Domain of Acetyl-coenzyme A Carboxylase by Tepraloxydim

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, S.; Callaghan, M; Watson, K; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) are crucial metabolic enzymes and are attractive targets for drug discovery. Haloxyfop and tepraloxydim belong to two distinct classes of commercial herbicides and kill sensitive plants by inhibiting the carboxyltransferase (CT) activity of ACC. Our earlier structural studies showed that haloxyfop is bound near the active site of the CT domain, at the interface of its dimer, and a large conformational change in the dimer interface is required for haloxyfop binding. We report here the crystal structure at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution of the CT domain of yeast ACC in complex with tepraloxydim. The compound has a different mechanism of inhibiting the CT activity compared to haloxyfop, as well as the mammalian ACC inhibitor CP-640186. Tepraloxydim probes a different region of the dimer interface and requires only small but important conformational changes in the enzyme, in contrast to haloxyfop. The binding mode of tepraloxydim explains the structure-activity relationship of these inhibitors, and provides a molecular basis for their distinct sensitivity to some of the resistance mutations, as compared to haloxyfop. Despite the chemical diversity between haloxyfop and tepraloxydim, the compounds do share two binding interactions to the enzyme, which may be important anchoring points for the development of ACC inhibitors

  14. Enhancement of succinate production by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli with co-expression of nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase and pyruvate carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiangfeng; Gou, Dongmei; Liang, Liya; Liu, Rongming; Chen, Xu; Zhang, Changqing; Zhang, Jiuhua; Chen, Kequan; Jiang, Min

    2013-08-01

    Escherichia coli BA002, in which the ldhA and pflB genes are deleted, cannot utilize glucose anaerobically due to the inability to regenerate NAD(+). To restore glucose utilization, overexpression of nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRTase) encoded by the pncB gene, a rate-limiting enzyme of NAD(H) synthesis pathway, resulted in a significant increase in cell mass and succinate production under anaerobic conditions. However, a high concentration of pyruvate accumulated. Thus, co-expression of NAPRTase and the heterologous pyruvate carboxylase (PYC) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris NZ9000 in recombinant E. coli BA016 was investigated. The total concentration of NAD(H) was 9.8-fold higher in BA016 than in BA002, and the NADH/NAD(+) ratio decreased from 0.60 to 0.04. Under anaerobic conditions, BA016 consumed 17.50 g l(-1) glucose and produced 14.08 g l(-1) succinate with a small quantity of pyruvate. Furthermore, when the reducing agent dithiothreitol or reduced carbon source sorbitol was added, the cell growth and carbon source consumption rate of BA016 was reasonably enhanced and succinate productivity increased. PMID:23740313

  15. Genetic inhibition of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity increases liver fat and alters global protein acetylationa

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Jenny D.Y.; Lawrence, Robert T.; Healy, Marin E.; Dominy, John E.; Liao, Jason A.; Breen, David S.; Byrne, Frances L.; Kenwood, Brandon M.; Lackner, Carolin; Okutsu, Saeko; Mas, Valeria R.; Caldwell, Stephen H.; Tomsig, Jose L.; Cooney, Gregory J.; Puigserver, Pere B.; Turner, Nigel; James, David E.; Villén, Judit; Hoehn, Kyle L.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid deposition in the liver is associated with metabolic disorders including fatty liver disease, type II diabetes, and hepatocellular cancer. The enzymes acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) and ACC2 are powerful regulators of hepatic fat storage; therefore, their inhibition is expected to prevent the development of fatty liver. In this study we generated liver-specific ACC1 and ACC2 double knockout (LDKO) mice to determine how the loss of ACC activity affects liver fat metabolism and whole-body physiology. Characterization of LDKO mice revealed unexpected phenotypes of increased hepatic triglyceride and decreased fat oxidation. We also observed that chronic ACC inhibition led to hyper-acetylation of proteins in the extra-mitochondrial space. In sum, these data reveal the existence of a compensatory pathway that protects hepatic fat stores when ACC enzymes are inhibited. Furthermore, we identified an important role for ACC enzymes in the regulation of protein acetylation in the extra-mitochondrial space. PMID:24944901

  16. Interaction between potyvirus P3 and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) of host plants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Luo, Zhaopeng; Yan, Fei; Lu, Yuwen; Zheng, Hongying; Chen, Jianping

    2011-08-01

    The P3 protein encoded by Shallot yellow stripe virus onion isolate (SYSV-O) interacted in the Yeast Two-hybrid (Y2H) system and in co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assays with the large subunit of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) protein that is encoded by the rbcL gene of its onion host. Dissection analysis by Y2H showed that the main part of SYSV P3 (amino acids 1-390) and onion RbcL (amino acids 1-137) were responsible for the interaction. The P3 proteins encoded by Onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV), Soybean mosaic virus Pinellia isolate (SMV-P), and Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) also interacted with RbcL, suggesting that a P3/RbcL interaction might exist generally for potyviruses. An interaction between P3 of these potyviruses and the small subunit of RubisCO (RbcS) was also demonstrated. Moreover, the P3N-PIPO protein encoded by a newly identified open reading frame embedded within the P3 cistron also interacted with both RbcL and RbcS. It is possible that the potyvirus P3 protein affects the normal functions of RubisCO which thus contributes to symptom development. PMID:21400205

  17. [Activity of NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in wheat leaves under water stress].

    PubMed

    Cherniad'ev, I I; Monakhova, O F

    2006-01-01

    The activities of NADP: glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), an enzyme complex comprising of phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) and glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPK; EC 4.1.1.31) in seedlings and leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants of the cultivars Mironovskaya 808 and Lutescens 758 have been compared under conditions of normal water supply, water deficiency, and subsequent rehydration. GAPDH activity, which determines the carbohydrate route of photosynthetic metabolism at the initial stages, is decreased by water stress to a greater extent than that of PEPK, on the activity of which non-carbohydrate metabolic pathways depend. Pretreatment of seedlings and mature plants with natural (6-benzylaminopurine) and synthetic (tidiazuron, kartolin-2, and kartolin-4) cytokinins attenuates the loss of enzyme activities during drought and facilitates their recovery within the period of rehydration; both effects are underlain by augmentation of reparation processes. The relative intensification of non-carbohydrate pathways of photosynthetic metabolism, observed under conditions of water deficiency, is accompanied by an increase in the osmotic pressure of cell sap. Possible mechanisms of this protector effect of cytokinin preparations are discussed. PMID:16878554

  18. Methylcrotonyl-CoA Carboxylase Regulates Triacylglycerol Accumulation in the Model Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Feng; Huang, Weichao; Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Chunye; Xiong, Qian; Bowler, Chris; Yang, Juan; Xu, Jin; Hu, Hanhua

    2014-01-01

    The model marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum can accumulate high levels of triacylglycerols (TAGs) under nitrogen depletion and has attracted increasing attention as a potential system for biofuel production. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in TAG accumulation in diatoms are largely unknown. Here, we employed a label-free quantitative proteomics approach to estimate differences in protein abundance before and after TAG accumulation. We identified a total of 1193 proteins, 258 of which were significantly altered during TAG accumulation. Data analysis revealed major changes in proteins involved in branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolic processes, glycolysis, and lipid metabolic processes. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and protein gel blot analysis confirmed that four genes associated with BCAA degradation were significantly upregulated at both the mRNA and protein levels during TAG accumulation. The most significantly upregulated gene, encoding the β-subunit of methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC2), was selected for further functional studies. Inhibition of MCC2 expression by RNA interference disturbed the flux of carbon (mainly in the form of leucine) toward BCAA degradation, resulting in decreased TAG accumulation. MCC2 inhibition also gave rise to incomplete utilization of nitrogen, thus lowering biomass during the stationary growth phase. These findings help elucidate the molecular and metabolic mechanisms leading to increased lipid production in diatoms. PMID:24769481

  19. Pyruvate Carboxylase Activates the RIG-I-like Receptor-Mediated Antiviral Immune Response by Targeting the MAVS signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhongying; Zhou, Yaqin; Zhu, Shengli; Feng, Jian; Chen, Xueyuan; Liu, Shi; Peng, Nanfang; Yang, Xiaodan; Xu, Gang; Zhu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    When retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 protein (RIG-I)-like receptors sense viral dsRNA in the cytosol, RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) are recruited to the mitochondria to interact with mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) and initiate antiviral immune responses. In this study, we demonstrate that the biotin-containing enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PC) plays an essential role in the virus-triggered activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling mediated by MAVS. PC contributes to the enhanced production of type I interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and PC knockdown inhibits the virus-triggered innate immune response. In addition, PC shows extensive antiviral activity against RNA viruses, including influenza A virus (IAV), human enterovirus 71 (EV71), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Furthermore, PC mediates antiviral action by targeting the MAVS signalosome and induces IFNs and pro-inflammatory cytokines by promoting phosphorylation of NF-κB inhibitor-α (IκBα) and the IκB kinase (IKK) complex, as well as NF-κB nuclear translocation, which leads to activation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), including double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and myxovirus resistance protein 1 (Mx1). Our findings suggest that PC is an important player in host antiviral signaling. PMID:26906558

  20. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibition by ND-630 reduces hepatic steatosis, improves insulin sensitivity, and modulates dyslipidemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Harriman, Geraldine; Greenwood, Jeremy; Bhat, Sathesh; Huang, Xinyi; Wang, Ruiying; Paul, Debamita; Tong, Liang; Saha, Asish K.; Westlin, William F.; Kapeller, Rosana; Harwood, H. James

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous inhibition of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) isozymes ACC1 and ACC2 results in concomitant inhibition of fatty acid synthesis and stimulation of fatty acid oxidation and may favorably affect the morbidity and mortality associated with obesity, diabetes, and fatty liver disease. Using structure-based drug design, we have identified a series of potent allosteric protein–protein interaction inhibitors, exemplified by ND-630, that interact within the ACC phosphopeptide acceptor and dimerization site to prevent dimerization and inhibit the enzymatic activity of both ACC isozymes, reduce fatty acid synthesis and stimulate fatty acid oxidation in cultured cells and in animals, and exhibit favorable drug-like properties. When administered chronically to rats with diet-induced obesity, ND-630 reduces hepatic steatosis, improves insulin sensitivity, reduces weight gain without affecting food intake, and favorably affects dyslipidemia. When administered chronically to Zucker diabetic fatty rats, ND-630 reduces hepatic steatosis, improves glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and reduces hemoglobin A1c (0.9% reduction). Together, these data suggest that ACC inhibition by representatives of this series may be useful in treating a variety of metabolic disorders, including metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and fatty liver disease. PMID:26976583

  1. Algal evolution in relation to atmospheric CO2: carboxylases, carbon-concentrating mechanisms and carbon oxidation cycles.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Giordano, Mario; Beardall, John; Maberly, Stephen C

    2012-02-19

    Oxygenic photosynthesis evolved at least 2.4 Ga; all oxygenic organisms use the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco)-photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle (PCRC) rather than one of the five other known pathways of autotrophic CO(2) assimilation. The high CO(2) and (initially) O(2)-free conditions permitted the use of a Rubisco with a high maximum specific reaction rate. As CO(2) decreased and O(2) increased, Rubisco oxygenase activity increased and 2-phosphoglycolate was produced, with the evolution of pathways recycling this inhibitory product to sugar phosphates. Changed atmospheric composition also selected for Rubiscos with higher CO(2) affinity and CO(2)/O(2) selectivity correlated with decreased CO(2)-saturated catalytic capacity and/or for CO(2)-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). These changes increase the energy, nitrogen, phosphorus, iron, zinc and manganese cost of producing and operating Rubisco-PCRC, while biosphere oxygenation decreased the availability of nitrogen, phosphorus and iron. The majority of algae today have CCMs; the timing of their origins is unclear. If CCMs evolved in a low-CO(2) episode followed by one or more lengthy high-CO(2) episodes, CCM retention could involve a combination of environmental factors known to favour CCM retention in extant organisms that also occur in a warmer high-CO(2) ocean. More investigations, including studies of genetic adaptation, are needed. PMID:22232762

  2. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Kinase in Tobacco Leaves Is Activated by Light in a Similar but Not Identical Way as in Maize.

    PubMed Central

    Li, B.; Zhang, X. Q.; Chollet, R.

    1996-01-01

    We have previously reported the partial purification of a Ca2+- independent phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) protein-serine/threonine kinase (PEPC-PK) from illuminated leaves of N-sufficient tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants (Y.-H. Wang, R. Chollet [1993] FEBS Lett 328: 215-218). We now report that this C3 PEPC-kinase is reversibly light activated in vivo in a time-dependent manner. As the kinase becomes light activated, the activity and L-malate sensitivity of its target protein increases and decreases, respectively. The light activation of tobacco PEPC-PK is prevented by pretreatment of detached leaves with various photosynthesis and cytosolic protein-synthesis inhibitors. Similarly, specific inhibitors of glutamine synthetase block the light activation of tobacco leaf PEPC-kinase under both photorespiratory and nonphotorespiratory conditions. This striking effect is partially and specifically reversed by exogenous glutamine, whereas it has no apparent effect on the light activation of the maize (Zea mays L.) leaf kinase. Using an in situ "activity-gel" phosphorylation assay, we have identified two major Ca2+-independent PEPC-kinase catalytic polypeptides in illuminated tobacco leaves that have the same molecular masses (approximately 30 and 37 kD) as found in illuminated maize leaves. Collectively, these results indicate that the phosphorylation of PEPC in N-sufficient leaves of tobacco (C3) and maize (C4) is regulated through similar but not identical light-signal transduction pathways. PMID:12226305

  3. Construction and use of a gene bank of Alcaligenes eutrophus in the analysis of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, K; Wilke-Douglas, M

    1984-01-01

    A gene bank of the DNA from the hydrogen bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus ATCC 17707 was constructed in the broad host range cosmid vector pVK102 and established in Escherichia coli. A triparental replica plating procedure was developed to allow rapid screening of large numbers of isolated E. coli gene bank clones for complementation of A. eutrophus mutants. This procedure was used to identify hybrid cosmids that complemented CO2 fixation-negative (Cfx-), H2 uptake-negative (Hup-), and auxotrophic A. eutrophus mutants. The average insert DNA size in these hybrid cosmids was 22 kilobases. Nine hybrid cosmids that complemented ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-negative (RuBPCase-) mutants were characterized. They fell into two distinct groups with respect to their restriction patterns. Complementing subclones from the two groups contained no common restriction fragments, but hybridization experiments indicated a high degree of sequence homology. Restriction fragments corresponding to one of the subclones were absent in total DNA from a cured strain that had lost plasmid pAE7, indigenous to the wild type. It is concluded that functional CO2 fixation genes in the A. eutrophus ATCC 17707 chromosome are reiterated on plasmid pAE7. Images PMID:6090401

  4. Mode of action of the macrolide-type antibiotic, chlorothricin. Effect of the antibiotic on the catalytic activity and some structural parameters of pyruvate carboxylases purified from rat and chicken liver.

    PubMed

    Schindler, P W; Scrutton, M C

    1975-07-15

    The macrolide-type antibiotic chlorothricin inhibits pyruvate carboxylases purified from rat liver, chicken liver and Azotobacter vinelandii. Under standard assay conditions the concentration of chlorothricin required for half-maximal inhibition of oxalacetate synthesis is 0.26 mM (rat liver), 0.12 mM (chicken liver), and 0.5 mM (Azobacter vinelandii). Inhibition by chlorothricin appears non-competitive in character when measured as a function of the concentration of the substrates of the pyruvate carboxylase reaction as well as of CoASAc and Mg2+. This pattern of inhibition suggests that this antibiotic interacts at unique sites on chicken and rat liver pyruvate carboxylase which are distinct from both the catalytic and activator sites. Interaction of chlorothricin with the two vertebrate liver pyruvate carboxylases differs from the effect exerted by this antibiotic on pyruvate carboxylase purified from Azotobacter vinelandii. A sigmoidal relationship between initial velocity and inhibitor concentration is observed for the vertebrate enzymes under most conditions whereas a hyperbolic profile characterizes the concentration dependence of inhibition of the Azotobacter vinelandii enzyme by chlorothricin. In the case of rat liver pyruvate carboxylase chlorothricin does not alter the extent of cooperativity in the relationship between initial rate and CoASAc concentration. However, a small but significant increase of the Hill coefficient from a value of 2.7 in the absence of antibiotic to that of 3.3 in the presence of 0.5 mM chlorothricin is observed for chicken liver pyruvate carboxylase. Chlorothricin decreases the rate of inactivation observed when rat liver pyruvate carboxylase is incubated with trinitrobenzenesulfonate and when chicken liver pyruvate carboxylase is incubated at 2 degrees C. The maximal decrease in inactivation observed in the presence of saturating concentrations of antibiotic is 50% for cold inactivation of the chicken liver enzyme and 60% for

  5. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase gene expression and diversity of Lake Erie planktonic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H.H.; Tabita, F.R.

    1996-06-01

    Carbon dioxide fixation is carried out primarily through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate cycle, in which rubulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is the key enzyme. The primary structure of the large subunit of form I RubisCO is well conserved; however, four distinct types, A, B, C, and D, may be distinguished. To better understand the environmental regulation of RubisCO in Lake Erie phytoplanktonic microorganisms, we have isolated total RNA and DNA from four Lake Erie sampling sites. Probes prepared from RubisCO large-subunit genes (rbcL) of the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC6301 (representative of type IB) and the diatom Cylindrotheca sp. strain N1 (representative of type ID) was determined. It appeared that type ID (diatom) rbcL gene expression per gene dose decreased as the sampling sites shifted toward open water. By contrast, a similar trend was not observed for cyanobacterial (type IB) rbcL gene expression per gene dose. Thus far, a total of 21 clones of rbcL genes derived from mRNA have been obtained and completely sequenced from the Ballast Island site. For surface water samples, deduced amino acid sequences of five of six clones appeared to be representative of green algae. In contrast, six of nine sequenced rbcL clones from 10-m-deep samples were a chromophytic and rhodophytic lineages. At 5 m deep, the active CO{sub 2}-fixing planktonic organisms represented a diverse group, including organisms related to Chlorella ellipsoidea, Cylindrotheca sp. strain N1, and Olisthodiscus luteus. Although many more samplings at diverse sites must be accomplished, the discovery of distinctly different sequences of rbcL mRNA at different water depths suggests that there is a stratification of active CO{sub 2}-fixing organisms in western Lake Erie. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Construction of a Synechocystis PCC6803 mutant suitable for the study of variant hexadecameric ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Amichay, D; Levitz, R; Gurevitz, M

    1993-11-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 was chosen as a target organism for construction of a suitable photosynthetic host to enable selection of variant plant-like ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) enzymes. The DNA region containing the operon encoding Rubisco (rbc) was cloned, sequenced and used for the construction of a transformation vector bearing flanking sequences to the rbc genes. This vector was utilized for the construction of a cyanobacterial rbc null mutant in which the entire sequence comprising both rbc genes, was replaced by the Rhodospirillum rubrum rbcL gene linked to a chloramphenicol resistance gene. Chloramphenicol-resistant colonies, Syn6803 delta rbc, were detected within 8 days when grown under 5% CO2 in air. These transformants were unable to grow in air (0.03% CO2). Analysis of their genome and Rubisco protein confirmed the site of the mutation at the rbc locus, and indicated that the mutation had segregated throughout all of the chromosome copies, consequently producing only the bacterial type of the enzyme. In addition, no carboxysome structures could be detected in the new mutant. Successful restoration of the wild-type rbc locus, using vectors bearing the rbc operon flanked by additional sequences at both termini, could only be achieved upon incubating the transformed cells under 5% CO2 in air prior to their transferring to air. The yield of restored transformants was proportionally related to the length of those sequences flanking the rbc operon which participate in the homologous recombination. The Syn6803 delta rbc mutant is amenable for the introduction of in vitro mutagenized rbc genes into the rbc locus, aiming at the genetic modification of the hexadecameric type Rubisco. PMID:8219082

  7. Osteoblast-Specific γ-Glutamyl Carboxylase-Deficient Mice Display Enhanced Bone Formation With Aberrant Mineralization.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kotaro; Shiba, Sachiko; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Urano, Tomohiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Amizuka, Norio; Inoue, Satoshi

    2015-07-01

    Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin that is necessary for blood coagulation. In addition, it has bone-protective effects. Vitamin K functions as a cofactor of γ-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX), which activates its substrates by carboxylation. These substrates are found throughout the body and examples include hepatic blood coagulation factors. Furthermore, vitamin K functions as a ligand of the nuclear receptor known as steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR) and its murine ortholog, pregnane X receptor (PXR). We have previously reported on the bone-protective role of SXR/PXR signaling by demonstrating that systemic Pxr-knockout mice displayed osteopenia. Because systemic Ggcx-knockout mice die shortly after birth from severe hemorrhage, the GGCX-mediated effect of vitamin K on bone metabolism has been difficult to evaluate. In this work, we utilized Ggcx-floxed mice to generate osteoblast-specific GGCX-deficient (Ggcx(Δobl/Δobl)) mice by crossing them with Col1-Cre mice. The bone mineral density (BMD) of Ggcx(Δobl/Δobl) mice was significantly higher than that of control Col1-Cre (Ggcx(+/+)) mice. Histomorphometrical analysis of trabecular bones in the proximal tibia showed increased osteoid volume and a higher rate of bone formation in Ggcx(Δobl/Δobl) mice. Histomorphometrical analysis of cortical bones revealed a thicker cortical width and a higher rate of bone formation in Ggcx(Δobl/Δobl) mice. Electron microscopic examination revealed disassembly of mineralized nodules and aberrant calcification of collagen fibers in Ggcx(Δobl/Δobl) mice. The mechanical properties of bones from Ggcx(Δobl/Δobl) mice tended to be stronger than those from control Ggcx(+/+) mice. These results suggest that GGCX in osteoblasts functions to prevent abnormal mineralization in bone formation, although this function may not be a prerequisite for the bone-protective effect of vitamin K. PMID:25600070

  8. Composition, quaternary structure, and catalytic properties of D-ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase from Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    McFadden, B A; Lord, J M; Rowe, A; Dilks, S

    1975-05-01

    D-Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase has been purified in one step by sedimenting extracts of autotrophically-grown Euglena gracilis into a linear 0.2-0.8 M sucrose density gradient. The resultant product was pure by the criteria of disc electrophoresis in gels polymerized from 5 or 7.5% acrylamide and sedimentation. The molecular weight of the enzyme estimated by density gradient centrifugation and electrophoresis in gels polymerized from various concentrations of acrylamide was 5.25 X 10(5). The S20,W was 16.4 S. Dissociation and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate established that the enzyme was composed of two types of subunits (mr 50,000 and 15,000). The oligomeric structure was visualized through negative staining and transmission electron microscopy leading to a model for the quaternary structure. Although the enzyme was moderately unstable, the estimated maximal specific activity was 1.6 mumol CO2 fixed min-1 mg protien-1 at 30 degrees C and pH 8.0 Km values were 2.2 m M, 15. 1 MUM and 0.63 mM for Mg2+, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate, and CO2, respectively, when measured under air. 6-Phospho-D-gluconate was a noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (Ki = 0.04 mM). Oxygen was a competitive inhibitor with respect to CO2 suggesting that the enzyme was also an oxygenase. The latter was confirmed by experiments showing a molar equivalence between ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-dependent oxygen consumption and phosphoglycerate production. PMID:807477

  9. Decline of activity and quantity of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and net photosynthesis in ozone-treated potato foliage

    SciTech Connect

    Dann, M.S.; Pell, E.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The effect of ozone (O{sub 3}) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activity and quantity and net photosynthesis in greenhouse-grown Solanum tuberosum L. cv Norland foliage was studied in relation to oxidant-induced premature senescence. Plants, 26 days old, were exposed to 0.06 to 0.08 microliters per liter O{sub 3} from 1,000 to 1,600 hours for 4 days in a controlled environment chamber. On day 5, plants were exposed to a 6-hour simulated inversion in which O{sub 3} peaked at 0.12 microliters per liter. Net photosynthesis declined in response to O{sub 3} but recovered to near control levels 3 days after the exposure ended. Rubisco activity and quantity in control potato foliage increased and then decreased during the 12-day interval of the study. In some experiments foliage studied was physiologically mature and Rubisco activity had peaked when O{sub 3} exposure commenced. In those cases, O{sub 3} accelerated the decline in Rubisco activity. When less mature foliage was treated with O{sub 3}, the leaves never achieved the maximal level of Rubisco activity observed in control foliage and also exhibited more rapid decline in initial and total activity. Percent activation of Rubisco (initial/total activity) was not affected significantly by treatment. Quantity of Rubisco decreased in concert with activity. The reduction in the quantity of Rubisco, an important foliage storage protein, could contribute to premature senescence associated with toxicity of this air pollutant.

  10. Metabolite Control Overrides Circadian Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Kinase and CO(2) Fixation in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Borland; Hartwell; Jenkins; Wilkins; Nimmo

    1999-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) catalyzes the primary fixation of CO(2) in Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. Flux through the enzyme is regulated by reversible phosphorylation. PEPc kinase is controlled by changes in the level of its translatable mRNA in response to a circadian rhythm. The physiological significance of changes in the levels of PEPc-kinase-translatable mRNA and the involvement of metabolites in control of the kinase was investigated by subjecting Kalanchoë daigremontiana leaves to anaerobic conditions at night to modulate the magnitude of malate accumulation, or to a rise in temperature at night to increase the efflux of malate from vacuole to cytosol. Changes in CO(2) fixation and PEPc kinase activity reflected those in kinase mRNA. The highest rates of CO(2) fixation and levels of kinase mRNA were observed in leaves subjected to anaerobic treatment for the first half of the night and then transferred to ambient air. In leaves subjected to anaerobic treatment overnight and transferred to ambient air at the start of the day, PEPc-kinase-translatable mRNA and activity, the phosphorylation state of PEPc, and fixation of atmospheric CO(2) were significantly higher than those for control leaves for the first 3 h of the light period. A nighttime temperature increase from 19 degrees C to 27 degrees C led to a rapid reduction in kinase mRNA and activity; however, this was not observed in leaves in which malate accumulation had been prevented by anaerobic treatment. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that a high concentration of malate reduces both kinase mRNA and the accumulation of the kinase itself. PMID:10557237

  11. Role of pyruvate carboxylase in accumulation of intracellular lipid of the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica ACA-DC 50109.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Yuan; Zhang, Yan; Chi, Zhe; Liu, Guang-Lei; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2015-02-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica ACA-DC 50109 is an oleaginous yeast. In order to know the function of pyruvate carboxylase (PYC) in lipid biosynthesis, the PYC gene cloned from Pichia guilliermondii Pcla22 was overexpressed in the oleaginous yeast. The lipid contents in the wild-type strain ACA-DC 50109 and the transformants P4, P7, and P103 were 30.2 % (w/w) 36.5 % (w/w), 38.2 % (w/w), and 37.9 % (w/w). However, the amount of the secreted citric acids by strains ACA-DC 50109, P4, P77, and P103 were 0.5, 10.1, 11.5, and 9.4 g/L. In order to reduce the amount of the secreted citric acid, the PYC gene and endogenous ACL1 gene encoding ATP citrate lyase (ACL1) were simultaneously overexpressed in the oleaginous yeast. The lipid contents of the transformants PA19, PA56, PA124 were 44.4 % (w/w), 45.3 % (w/w), and 43.7 % (w/w). At the same time, the amount of the secreted citric acid by the transformants PA19, PA56, and PA124 was reduced to 5.4, 6.2, and 6.3 g/L. The PYC and ACL1 activities and their gene transcriptional levels in all the transformants were greatly enhanced compared to those in their wild-type strain ACA-DC 50109. During 10-L fermentation, lipid content in the transformant PA56 was 49.6 % (w/w) and the amount of secreted citric acid was 2.9 g/L. This meant that PYC and ACL1 can play an important role in accumulation of intracellular lipid of the oleaginous yeast Y. lipolytica ACA-DC 50109. PMID:25427679

  12. Positive selection of Kranz and non-Kranz C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase amino acids in Suaedoideae (Chenopodiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Rosnow, Josh J.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Roalson, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    In subfamily Suaedoideae, four independent gains of C4 photosynthesis are proposed, which includes two parallel origins of Kranz anatomy (sections Salsina and Schoberia) and two independent origins of single-cell C4 anatomy (Bienertia and Suaeda aralocaspica). Additional phylogenetic support for this hypothesis was generated from sequence data of the C-terminal portion of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene used in C4 photosynthesis (ppc-1) in combination with previous sequence data. ppc-1 sequence was generated for 20 species in Suaedoideae and two outgroup Salsola species that included all types of C4 anatomies as well as two types of C3 anatomies. A branch-site test for positively selected codons was performed using the software package PAML. From labelling of the four branches where C4 is hypothesized to have developed (foreground branches), residue 733 (maize numbering) was identified to be under positive selection with a posterior probability >0.99 and residue 868 at the >0.95 interval using Bayes empirical Bayes (BEB). When labelling all the branches within C4 clades, the branch-site test identified 13 codons to be under selection with a posterior probability >0.95 by BEB; this is discussed considering current information on functional residues. The signature C4 substitution of an alanine for a serine at position 780 in the C-terminal end (which is considered a major determinant of affinity for PEP) was only found in four of the C4 species sampled, while eight of the C4 species and all the C3 species have an alanine residue; indicating that this substitution is not a requirement for C4 function. PMID:24600021

  13. QM/MM study of the reaction mechanism of the carboxyl transferase domain of pyruvate carboxylase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiang; Liu, Yongjun

    2014-07-15

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the carboxylation of pyruvate to produce oxaloacetate. Its activity is directly related to insulin release and thus PC has recently attracted great interest as a potential target for diabetes treatment. In this article, the catalytic mechanism of the carboxyl transferase domain of PC from Staphylococcus aureus was investigated by using a combined quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical approach. Our calculation results indicate that the catalytic reaction starts from the decarboxylation of carboxybiotin to generate an enol-BTI intermediate, followed by two consecutive proton-transfer processes (from T908 to enol-BTI and from PYR to T908). During the catalytic reaction, the main-chain amide of T908 plays a key role in catching CO2 and preventing its diffusion from the active center. A triad of residues, R571, Q575, and K741, contributes both to substrate binding and enol-pyruvate stabilization. The oxyanion hole, consisting of the side-chain hydroxyl of S911 and the side-chain amino of Q870, plays an important role in stabilizing the hydroxyl anion of BTI. The coordination of the metal cation by pyruvate is a second sphere, rather than an inner sphere, interaction, and the metal cation stabilizes the species through the medium of residue K741. The decarboxylation of carboxybiotin corresponds to the highest free energy barrier of 21.7 kcal/mol. Our results may provide useful information for both the regulation of enzyme activity and the development of related biocatalytic applications. PMID:24963911

  14. Mutations in the PCCA gene encoding the {alpha} subunit of propionyl-CoA carboxylase in patients with propionic acidemia

    SciTech Connect

    Campeau, E.; Leon-Del-Rio, A.; Gravel, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    Propionic acidemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a deficiency of the mitochondrial biotin-dependent enzyme, propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC). PCC has the structure {alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 4}, with the {alpha} subunit containing the biotin prosthetic group. This study is concerned with defining the spectrum of mutations occurring in the PCCA gene encoding the {alpha} subunit. Mutations were initially assigned to this gene through complementation experiments done after somatic fusion of patient fibroblasts. The analyses were performed on PCR-amplified reverse transcripts of fibroblast RNA. The mutations were identified by single strand conformational polymorphism analysis and direct sequencing of PCR products. Three candidate disease-causing mutations and one DNA polymorphism were identified in the {alpha} subunit sequence in different patients: (1) a 3 bp deletion {triangle}CTG{sub 2058-2060}, which eliminates Cys687 near the biotin binding site (Lys669); (2) T{sub 611}{r_arrow}A which converts Met204 to Lys in a highly conserved region matching that of an ATP binding site; (3) An {approximately}50 bp deletion near the 3{prime} end of the cDNA which likely corresponds to the loss of an exon due to a splicing defect; and (4) a 3 bp insertion, +CAG{sub 2203}, located downstream of the stop codon, which is likely a DNA polymorphism. In order to determine the effect of the Cys687 deletion on the biotinylation of PCC, we expressed the mutation in a 67 amino acid C-terminal fragment of the PCC {alpha} subunit in E. coli in which biotinylation is directed by the bacterial biotin ligase. While the mutant peptide was expressed at about half-normal levels, the biotinylation of the peptide that was present was reduced to only {approximately}20% normal. We suggest, therefore, that the absence of PCC activity due to {triangle}Cys687 results at least in part from defective biotinylation of an unstable protein.

  15. Insights into the carboxyltransferase reaction of pyruvate carboxylase from the structures of bound product and intermediate analogs.

    PubMed

    Lietzan, Adam D; St Maurice, Martin

    2013-11-15

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) is a biotin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the MgATP- and bicarbonate-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in central metabolism. The carboxyltransferase (CT) domain of PC catalyzes the transfer of a carboxyl group from carboxybiotin to the accepting substrate, pyruvate. It has been hypothesized that the reactive enolpyruvate intermediate is stabilized through a bidentate interaction with the metal ion in the CT domain active site. Whereas bidentate ligands are commonly observed in enzymes catalyzing reactions proceeding through an enolpyruvate intermediate, no bidentate interaction has yet been observed in the CT domain of PC. Here, we report three X-ray crystal structures of the Rhizobium etli PC CT domain with the bound inhibitors oxalate, 3-hydroxypyruvate, and 3-bromopyruvate. Oxalate, a stereoelectronic mimic of the enolpyruvate intermediate, does not interact directly with the metal ion. Instead, oxalate is buried in a pocket formed by several positively charged amino acid residues and the metal ion. Furthermore, both 3-hydroxypyruvate and 3-bromopyruvate, analogs of the reaction product oxaloacetate, bind in an identical manner to oxalate suggesting that the substrate maintains its orientation in the active site throughout catalysis. Together, these structures indicate that the substrates, products and intermediates in the PC-catalyzed reaction are not oriented in the active site as previously assumed. The absence of a bidentate interaction with the active site metal appears to be a unique mechanistic feature among the small group of biotin-dependent enzymes that act on α-keto acid substrates. PMID:24157795

  16. Characterization of spinach ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activase isoforms reveals hexameric assemblies with increased thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Keown, Jeremy R; Pearce, Frederick Grant

    2014-12-15

    Most plants contain two isoforms of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase (Rca), a chloroplast protein that maintains the activity of Rubisco during photosynthesis. The longer (α-) Rca isoform has previously been shown to regulate the activity of Rubisco in response to both the ADP:ATP ratio and redox potential via thioredoxin-f. We have characterized the arrangement of the different spinach (Spinacia oleracea) isoforms in solution, and show how the presence of nucleotides changes the oligomeric state. Although the shorter (β-) isoform from both tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and spinach tend to form a range of oligomers in solution, the size of which are relatively unaffected by the addition of nucleotide, the spinach α-isoform assembles as a hexamer in the presence of adenosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate (ATPγS). These hexamers have significantly higher heat stability, and may play a role in optimizing photosynthesis at higher temperatures. Hexamers were also observed for mixtures of the two isoforms, suggesting that the α-isoform can act as a structural scaffold for hexamer formation by the β-isoform. Additionally, it is shown that a variant of the tobacco β-isoform acts in a similar fashion to the α-isoform of spinach, forming thermally stable hexamers in the presence of ATPγS. Both isoforms had similar rates of ATP hydrolysis, suggesting that a propensity for hexamer formation may not necessarily be correlated with activity. Modelling of the hexameric structures suggests that although the N-terminus of Rca forms a highly dynamic, extended structure, the C-terminus is located adjacent to the intersubunit interface. PMID:25247706

  17. Characteristics and composition of the vitamin K-dependent gamma-glutamyl carboxylase-binding domain on osteocalcin.

    PubMed Central

    Houben, Roger J T J; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Stanley, Thomas B; Acher, Francine; Azerad, Robert; Käkönen, Sanna-Maria; Vermeer, Cees; Soute, Berry A M

    2002-01-01

    Two different sites on vitamin K-dependent gamma-glutamyl carboxylase (VKC) are involved in enzyme-substrate interaction: the propeptide-binding site required for high-affinity substrate binding and the active site for glutamate carboxylation. Synthetic descarboxy osteocalcin (d-OC) is a low-K(m) substrate for the VKC, but unique since it possesses a high-affinity recognition site for the VKC, distinct from the propeptide which is essential as a binding site for VKC. However, the exact location and composition of this VKC-recognition domain on d-OC has remained unclear until now. Using a stereospecific substrate analogue [t-butyloxycarbonyl-(2S,4S)-4-methylglutamic acid-Glu-Val (S-MeTPT)] we demonstrate in this paper that the high affinity of d-OC for VKC cannot be explained by a direct interaction with either the active site or with the propeptide-binding site on VKC. It is shown using various synthetic peptides derived from d-OC that there are two domains on d-OC necessary for recognition: one located between residues 1 and 12 and a second between residues 26 and 39, i.e. at the C-terminal side of the gamma-carboxyglutamate (Gla) domain. Both internal sequences contribute substantially to the efficiency of carboxylation. On the basis of these data we postulate the presence of a second high-affinity substrate-binding site on VKC capable of specifically binding d-OC, which is the first vitamin K-dependent substrate of which the VKC binding domain is interrupted by the Gla domain. PMID:11988107

  18. Investigation of the Roles of Allosteric Domain Arginine, Aspartate, and Glutamate Residues of Rhizobium etli Pyruvate Carboxylase in Relation to Its Activation by Acetyl CoA.

    PubMed

    Sirithanakorn, Chaiyos; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Attwood, Paul V

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of allosteric activation of pyruvate carboxylase by acetyl CoA is not fully understood. Here we have examined the roles of residues near the acetyl CoA binding site in the allosteric activation of Rhizobium etli pyruvate carboxylase using site-directed mutagenesis. Arg429 was found to be especially important for acetyl CoA binding as substitution with serine resulted in a 100-fold increase in the Ka of acetyl CoA activation and a large decrease in the cooperativity of this activation. Asp420 and Arg424, which do not make direct contact with bound acetyl CoA, were nonetheless found to affect acetyl CoA binding when mutated, probably through changed interactions with another acetyl CoA binding residue, Arg427. Thermodynamic activation parameters for the pyruvate carboxylation reaction were determined from modified Arrhenius plots and showed that acetyl CoA acts to decrease the activation free energy of the reaction by both increasing the activation entropy and decreasing the activation enthalpy. Most importantly, mutations of Asp420, Arg424, and Arg429 enhanced the activity of the enzyme in the absence of acetyl CoA. A main focus of this work was the detailed investigation of how this increase in activity occurred in the R424S mutant. This mutation decreased the activation enthalpy of the pyruvate carboxylation reaction by an amount consistent with removal of a single hydrogen bond. It is postulated that Arg424 forms a hydrogen bonding interaction with another residue that stabilizes the asymmetrical conformation of the R. etli pyruvate carboxylase tetramer, constraining its interconversion to the symmetrical conformer that is required for catalysis. PMID:27379711

  19. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase gene expression and diversity of Lake Erie planktonic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Tabita, F R

    1996-06-01

    Carbon dioxide fixation is carried out primarily through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate cycle, in which ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is the key enzyme. The primary structure of the large subunit of form I RubisCO is well conserved; however, four distinct types, A, B, C, and D, may be distinguished, with types A and B and types C and D more closely related to one another. To better understand the environmental regulation of RubisCO in Lake Erie phytoplanktonic microorganisms, we have isolated total RNA and DNA from four Lake Erie sampling sites. Probes prepared from RubisCO large-subunit genes (rbcL) of the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC6301 (representative of type IB) and the diatom Cylindrotheca sp. strain N1 (representative of type ID) were hybridized to the isolated RNA and DNA. To quantitate rbcL gene expression for each sample, the amount of gene expression per gene dose (i.e., the amount of mRNA divided by the amount of target DNA) was determined. With a limited number of sampling sites, it appeared that type ID (diatom) rbcL gene expression per gene dose decreased as the sampling sites shifted toward open water. By contrast, a similar trend was not observed for cyanobacterial (type IB) rbcL gene expression per gene dose. Complementary DNA specific for rbcL was synthesized from Lake Erie RNA samples and used as a template for PCR amplification of portions of various rbcL genes. Thus far, a total of 21 clones of rbcL genes derived from mRNA have been obtained and completely sequenced from the Ballast Island site. For surface water samples, deduced amino acid sequences of five of six clones appeared to be representative of green algae. In contrast, six of nine sequenced rbcL clones from 10-m-deep samples were of chromophytic and rhodophytic lineages. At 5 m deep, the active CO2-fixing planktonic organisms represented a diverse group, including organisms related to Chlorella ellipsoidea

  20. Mild water stress effects on carbon-reduction-cycle intermediates, ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity, and spatial homogeneity of photosynthesis in intact leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, T.D.; Seemann, J.R. Univ. of Nevada, Reno )

    1989-04-01

    We have examined the effect of mild water stress on photosynthetic chloroplast reactions of intact Phaseolus vulgaris leaves by measuring two parameters of ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase activity and the pool sizes of RuBP, 3-phosphoglycerate (PGA), triose phosphates, hexose monophosphates, and ATP. We also tested for patchy stomatal closure by feeding {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. The k{sub cat} of RuBP carboxylase (moles CO{sub 2} fixed per mole enzyme per second) which could be measured after incubating the enzyme with CO{sub 2} and Mg{sup 2+} was unchanged by water stress. The ratio of activity before and after incubation with CO{sub 2} and Mg{sup 2+} (the carbamylation state) was slightly reduced by severe stress but not by mild stress. Likewise, the concentration of RuBP was slightly reduced by severe stress but not by mild stress. The concentration of PGA was markedly reduced by both mild and severe water stress. The concentration of triose phosphates did not decline as much as PGA. We found that photosynthesis in water stressed leaves occurred in patches. The patchiness of photosynthesis during water stress may lead to an underestimation of the effect of stomatal closure. We conclude that reductions in whole leaf photosynthesis caused by mild water stress are primarily the result of stomatal closure and that there is no indication of damage to chloroplast reactions.

  1. Moringa oleifera leaf extract ameliorates alloxan-induced diabetes in rats by regeneration of β cells and reduction of pyruvate carboxylase expression.

    PubMed

    Abd El Latif, Amira; El Bialy, Badr El Said; Mahboub, Hamada Dahi; Abd Eldaim, Mabrouk Attia

    2014-10-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam. contains many active ingredients with nutritional and medicinal values. It is commonly used in folk medicine as an antidiabetic agent. The present study was designed to investigate how an aqueous extract from the leaves of M. oleifera reveals hypoglycemia in diabetic rats. M. oleifera leaf extract counteracted the alloxan-induced diabetic effects in rats as it normalized the elevated serum levels of glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, and malondialdehyde, and normalized mRNA expression of the gluconeogenic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase in hepatic tissues. It also increased live body weight gain and normalized the reduced mRNA expression of fatty acid synthase in the liver of diabetic rats. Moreover, it restored the normal histological structure of the liver and pancreas damaged by alloxan in diabetic rats. This study revealed that the aqueous extract of M. oleifera leaves possesses potent hypoglycemic effects through the normalization of elevated hepatic pyruvate carboxylase enzyme and regeneration of damaged hepatocytes and pancreatic β cells via its antioxidant properties. PMID:25289966

  2. Mild Water Stress Effects on Carbon-Reduction-Cycle Intermediates, Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase Activity, and Spatial Homogeneity of Photosynthesis in Intact Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Thomas D.; Seemann, Jeffrey R.

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the effect of mild water stress on photosynthetic chloroplast reactions of intact Phaseolus vulgaris leaves by measuring two parameters of ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase activity and the pool sizes of RuBP, 3-phosphoglycerate (PGA), triose phosphates, hexose monophosphates, and ATP. We also tested for patchy stomatal closure by feeding 14CO2. The kcat of RuBP carboxylase (moles CO2 fixed per mole enzyme per second) which could be measured after incubating the enzyme with CO2 and Mg2+ was unchanged by water stress. The ratio of activity before and after incubation with CO2 and Mg2+ (the carbamylation state) was slightly reduced by severe stress but not by mild stress. Likewise, the concentration of RuBP was slightly reduced by severe stress but not by mild stress. The concentration of PGA was markedly reduced by both mild and severe water stress. The concentration of triose phosphates did not decline as much as PGA. We found that photosynthesis in water stressed leaves occurred in patches. The patchiness of photosynthesis during water stress may lead to an underestimation of the effect of stomatal closure. We conclude that reductions in whole leaf photosynthesis caused by mild water stress are primarily the result of stomatal closure and that there is no indication of damage to chloroplast reactions. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:16666664

  3. Involvement of phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in the light-dependent up-regulation of sorghum leaf phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase-kinase

    PubMed Central

    Monreal, José Antonio; López-Baena, Francisco Javier; Vidal, Jean; Echevarría, Cristina; García-Mauriño, Sofía

    2010-01-01

    The photosynthetic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (C4-PEPC) is regulated by phosphorylation by a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase (PEPC-k). In Digitaria sanguinalis mesophyll protoplasts, this light-mediated transduction cascade principally requires a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and a Ca2+-dependent step. The present study investigates the cascade components at the higher integrated level of Sorghum bicolor leaf discs and leaves. PEPC-k up-regulation required light and photosynthetic electron transport. However, the PI-PLC inhibitor U-73122 and inhibitors of calcium release from intracellular stores only partially blocked this process. Analysis of [32P]phosphate-labelled phospholipids showed a light-dependent increase in phospholipase D (PLD) activity. Treatment of leaf discs with n-butanol, which decreases the formation of phosphatidic acid (PA) by PLD, led to the partial inhibition of the C4-PEPC phosphorylation, suggesting the participation of PLD/PA in the signalling cascade. PPCK1 gene expression was strictly light-dependent. Addition of neomycin or n-butanol decreased, and a combination of both inhibitors markedly reduced PPCK1 expression and the concomitant rise in PEPC-k activity. The calcium/calmodulin antagonist W7 blocked the light-dependent up-regulation of PEPC-k, pointing to a Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) integrating both second messengers, calcium and PA, which were shown to increase the activity of sorghum CDPK. PMID:20410319

  4. Effect of Triacontanol on Chlamydomonas: II. Specific Activity of Ribulose-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase, Ribulose-Bisphosphate Concentration, and Characteristics of Photorespiration.

    PubMed

    Houtz, R L; Ries, S K; Tolbert, N E

    1985-10-01

    Increased photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells treated with triacontanol (TRIA) was not due to changes in glycolate excretion, CO(2) compensation point, or the sensitivity of photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation to O(2). Kinetic analysis of TRIA-treated cells showed that the increase in photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation was a result of an increase in the apparent V(max) for intact cells. The total activity of ribulose-P(2) carboxylase/oxygenase was higher in cell lysates from TRIA-treated cells. However quantification of this enzyme concentration by binding of [(14)C]carboxyarabinitol-P(2) did not show an increase in TRIA-treated cells. Thus, there was an increase in the specific activity of ribulose-P(2) carboxylase/oxygenase extracted from Chlamydomonas cells treated with TRIA. TRIA alone had no effect on the activity of the enzyme in cell lysates from Chlamydomonas or purified from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves.The ribulose-P(2) pool was 50 to 60% higher in cells treated with TRIA that were assayed for photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation at high- and low-CO(2). TRIA also increased ribulose-P(2) levels in the absence of CO(2) in the light with atmospheres of N(2) or N(2) with 21% O(2). PMID:16664415

  5. Simple determination of the CO sub 2 /O sub 2 specificity of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase by the specific radioactivity of ( sup 14 C) glycerate 3-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Genhai Zhu; Jensen, R.G.; Hallick, R.B.; Wildner, G.F. )

    1992-02-01

    A new method is presented for measurement of the CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} specificity factor of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). The ({sup 14}C)3-phosphoglycerate (PGA) from the Rubisco carboxylase reaction and its dilution by the Rubisco oxygenase reaction was monitored by directly measuring the specific radioactivity of PGA. {sup 14}CO{sub 2} fixation with Rubisco occurred under two reaction conditions: carboxylase with oxygenase with 40 micromolar CO{sub 2} in O{sub 2}-saturated water and carboxylase only with 160 micromolar CO{sub 2} under N{sub 2}. Detection of the specific radioactivity used the amount of PGA as obtained from the peak area, which was determined by pulsed amperometry following separation by high-performance anion exchange chromatography and the radioactive counts of the ({sup 14}C)PGA in the same peak. The specificity factor of Rubisco from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) (93 {plus minus} 4), from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (66 {plus minus} 1), and from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum (13) were comparable with the published values measured by different methods.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of AntE, a crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase from Streptomyces sp. NRRL 2288

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihan; Chen, Jing; Mori, Takahiro; Yan, Yan; Liu, Wen; Abe, Ikuro

    2014-01-01

    AntE from Streptomyces sp. NRRL 2288 is a crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase that catalyzes the reductive carboxylation of various α,β-unsaturated acyl-CoAs to provide the building block at the C7 position for antimycin A biosynthesis. Recombinant AntE expressed in Escherichia coli was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group I222 or I212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.4, b = 96.7, c = 129.6 Å, α = β = γ = 90.0°. A diffraction data set was collected at the KEK Photon Factory to 2.29 Å resolution. PMID:24915081

  7. Photoperiodism and crassulacean acid metabolism : I. Immunological and kinetic evidences for different patterns of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoforms in photoperiodically inducible and non-inducible Crassulacean acid metabolism plants.

    PubMed

    Brulfert, J; Müller, D; Kluge, M; Queiroz, O

    1982-05-01

    Plants of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana v. Poelln. Tom Thumb and Sedum morganianum E. Walth. were grown under controlled photoperiodic conditions under either short or long days. Gaz exchange measurements confirmed that in K. blossfeldiana Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) was photoperiodically inducible and that S. morganianum performed CAM independently of photoperiod. With K. blossfeldiana, a comparison of catalytic and regulatory properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) from short-day and long-day grown plants showed differences, but not with S. morganianum. Ouchterlony double diffusion tests and immunotitration experiments (using a S. morganianum PEPC antibody) established that CAM is induced in K. blossfeldiana-but not in S. morganianum-through the synthesis of a new PEPC isoform; this form shows an immunological behavior different from that prevailing under non-inductive conditions and can be considered as specific for CAM performance. PMID:24276159

  8. Inhibition of acetate and propionate assimilation by itaconate via propionyl-CoA carboxylase in isocitrate lyase-negative purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ivan A; Filatova, Ludmila V; Ivanovsky, Ruslan N

    2002-10-29

    Itaconate is known as a potent inhibitor of isocitrate lyase. Unexpectedly, itaconate was a strong inhibitor of acetate and propionate assimilation in isocitrate lyase-negative purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum. It was shown that in cell extracts of R. rubrum itaconate inhibited propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) activity. The participation of PCC in propionate assimilation in R. rubrum is well-documented, but the inhibition of acetate assimilation suggests that PCC is also involved in acetate metabolism. PCC is one of the enzymes of the citramalate cycle, the anaplerotic pathway proposed for R. rubrum as a substitute for the glyoxylate cycle. These results provide further support for the hypothesis of the occurrence of the citramalate cycle in R. rubrum. PCC from other isocitrate lyase-negative phototrophs, Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Phaeospirillum fulvum, was not inhibited by itaconate. PMID:12423751

  9. Accumulation fatty acids of in Chlorella vulgaris under heterotrophic conditions in relation to activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, temperature, and co-immobilization with Azospirillum brasilense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, Luis A.; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E.

    2014-10-01

    The relation between fatty acid accumulation, activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and consequently lipid accumulation was studied in the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris co-immobilized with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense under dark heterotrophic conditions with Na acetate as a carbon source. In C. vulgaris immobilized alone, cultivation experiments for 6 days showed that ACC activity is directly related to fatty acid accumulation, especially in the last 3 days. In co-immobilization experiments, A. brasilense exerted a significant positive effect over ACC activity, increased the quantity in all nine main fatty acids, increased total lipid accumulation in C. vulgaris, and mitigated negative effects of nonoptimal temperature for growth. No correlation between ACC activity and lipid accumulation in the cells was established for three different temperatures. This study demonstrated that the interaction between A. brasilense and C. vulgaris has a significant effect on fatty acid and lipid accumulation in the microalgae.

  10. Cloning, expression, purification and physical and kinetic characterization of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from orange (Citrus sinensis osbeck var. Valencia) fruit juice sacs.

    PubMed

    Perotti, Valeria E; Figueroa, Carlos M; Andreo, Carlos S; Iglesias, Alberto A; Podestá, Florencio E

    2010-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPCase) from orange fruit juice sacs has been cloned and heterogously expressed in high yield. The purified recombinant enzyme displays properties typical of plant PEPCase, including activation by sugar phosphates and inhibition by malate and citrate. Malate inhibition is weak in the physiological pH range, and the enzyme is also poorly affected by Glu and Asp, known inhibitors of C(3) plants PEPCases. However, it is strongly inhibited by citrate. Orange fruit PEPCase phosphorylation by mammalian protein kinase A decreased inhibition by malate. The enzyme presents an unusual high molecular mass in the absence of PEP, while in its presence it displays a more common tetrameric arrangement. The overall properties of the enzyme suggest that it is suited for organic acid synthesis and NADH reoxidation in the mature fruit. The present study provides the first analysis of a recombinant fruit PEPCase. PMID:21802611

  11. Cloning and Characterization of a Pyruvate Carboxylase Gene from Penicillium rubens and Overexpression of the Genein the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica for Enhanced Citric Acid Production.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ge-Yi; Lu, Yi; Chi, Zhe; Liu, Guang-Lei; Zhao, Shou-Feng; Jiang, Hong; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a pyruvate carboxylase gene (PYC1) from a marine fungus Penicillium rubens I607 was cloned and characterized. ORF of the gene (accession number: KM397349.1) had 3534 bp encoding 1177 amino acids with a molecular weight of 127.531 kDa and a PI of 6.20. The promoter of the gene was located at -1200 bp and contained a TATAA box, several CAAT boxes and a sequence 5'-SYGGRG-3'. The PYC1 deduced from the gene had no signal peptide, was a homotetramer (α4), and had the four functional domains. After expression of the PYC1 gene from the marine fungus in the marine-derived yeast Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b, the transformant PR32 obtained had much higher specific pyruvate carboxylase activity (0.53 U/mg) than Y. lipolytica SWJ-1b (0.07 U/mg), and the PYC1 gene expression (133.8%) and citric acid production (70.2 g/l) by the transformant PR32 were also greatly enhanced compared to those (100 % and 27.3 g/l) by Y. lipolytica SWJ-1b. When glucose concentration in the medium was 60.0 g/l, citric acid (CA) concentration formed by the transformant PR32 was 36.1 g/l, leading to conversion of 62.1% of glucose into CA. During a 10-l fed-batch fermentation, the final concentration of CA was 111.1 ± 1.3 g/l, the yield was 0.93 g/g, the productivity was 0.46 g/l/h, and only 1.72 g/l reducing sugar was left in the fermented medium within 240 h. HPLC analysis showed that most of the fermentation products were CA. However, minor malic acid and other unknown products also existed in the culture. PMID:26470708

  12. Propionyl Coenzyme A (Propionyl-CoA) Carboxylase in Haloferax mediterranei: Indispensability for Propionyl-CoA Assimilation and Impacts on Global Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Propionyl coenzyme A (propionyl-CoA) is an important intermediate during the biosynthesis and catabolism of intracellular carbon storage of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) in haloarchaea. However, the haloarchaeal propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) and its physiological significance remain unclear. In this study, we identified a PCC that catalyzed propionyl-CoA carboxylation with an acetyl-CoA carboxylation side activity in Haloferax mediterranei. Gene knockout/complementation demonstrated that the PCC enzyme consisted of a fusion protein of a biotin carboxylase and a biotin-carboxyl carrier protein (PccA [HFX_2490]), a carboxyltransferase component (PccB [HFX_2478]), and an essential small subunit (PccX [HFX_2479]). Knockout of pccBX led to an inability to utilize propionate and a higher intracellular propionyl-CoA level, indicating that the PCC enzyme is indispensable for propionyl-CoA utilization. Interestingly, H. mediterranei DBX (pccBX-deleted strain) displayed multiple phenotypic changes, including retarded cell growth, decreased glucose consumption, impaired PHBV biosynthesis, and wrinkled cells. A propionyl-CoA concentration equivalent to the concentration that accumulated in DBX cells was demonstrated to inhibit succinyl-CoA synthetase of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in vitro. Genome-wide microarray analysis showed that many genes for glycolysis, pyruvate oxidation, PHBV accumulation, electron transport, and stress responses were affected in DBX. This study not only identified the haloarchaeal PCC for the metabolism of propionyl-CoA, an important intermediate in haloarchaea, but also demonstrated that impaired propionyl-CoA metabolism affected global metabolism in H. mediterranei. PMID:25398867

  13. Transcriptional regulation of a gene encoding the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase in soybean tissue is linked to the phytochrome response.

    PubMed Central

    Berry-Lowe, S L; Meagher, R B

    1985-01-01

    The effects of white light, far-red light, and darkness on the transcription of a soybean ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase small subunit gene, SRS1, were investigated. RNA was labeled with [alpha-32P]UTP in nuclei isolated from plants grown under different conditions of light and darkness and used to probe Southern blots and dot blots. The levels of small subunit mRNA synthesis were normalized to ribosomal RNA synthesis. We demonstrate that the SRS1 gene is transcribed at a rate 16- to 32-fold higher in plants grown in the light than in those grown in darkness. Transcription of the small subunit increased dramatically when plants grown in darkness were given 30 min to 6 h of light and then leveled off after 24 to 48 h of exposure. When light-grown seedlings were exposed to greater than 2 h of darkness, a gradual decrease in transcription was detected. This decrease in transcription reached basal dark-grown levels after 48 h of exposure to darkness. The increase in transcription in etiolated seedlings treated with white light for 15 min could be reduced to basal levels if the treatment was followed by treatment with far-red light for 15 min. In addition, transcription in ligh-grown seedlings was reduced to basal levels when plants were exposed to far-red light for 15 min. The transcription of this ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase small subunit gene is strongly positively regulated by white light, is negatively regulated by far-red light, and exhibits a classic phytochrome-linked response. Images PMID:3837851

  14. New insights into the post-translational modification of multiple phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoenzymes by phosphorylation and monoubiquitination during sorghum seed development and germination

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ballesta, Isabel; Baena, Guillermo; Gandullo, Jacinto; Wang, Liqun; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William Charles; Echevarría, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; E.C. 4.1.1.31) was characterized in developing and germinating sorghum seeds, focusing on the transcript and polypeptide abundance of multiple plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PTPC) genes, and the post-translational modification of each isoenzyme by phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination during germination. We observed high levels of SbPPC4 (Sb07g014960) transcripts during early development (stage I), and extensive transcript abundance of SbPPC2 (Sb02g021090) and SbPPC3 (Sb04g008720) throughout the entire life cycle of the seed. Although tandem mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of immunopurified PTPC indicated that four different PTPC isoenzymes were expressed in the developing and germinating seeds, SbPPC3 was the most abundant isozyme of the developing seed, and of the embryo and the aleurone layer of germinating seeds. In vivo phosphorylation of the different PTPC isoenzymes at their conserved N-terminal seryl phosphorylation site during germination was also established by MS/MS analysis. Furthermore, three of the four isoenzymes were partially monoubiquitinated, with MS/MS pinpointing SbPPC2 and SbPPC3 monoubiquitination at the conserved Lys-630 and Lys-624 residues, respectively. Our results demonstrate that monoubiquitination and phosphorylation simultaneously occur in vivo with different PTPC isozymes during seed germination. In addition, we show that PTPC monoubiquitination in germinating sorghum seeds always increases at stage II (emergence of the radicle), is maintained during the aerobic period of rapid cell division and reserve mobilization, and remains relatively constant until stage IV–V when coleoptiles initiate the formation of the photosynthetic tissues. PMID:27194739

  15. New insights into the post-translational modification of multiple phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoenzymes by phosphorylation and monoubiquitination during sorghum seed development and germination.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ballesta, Isabel; Baena, Guillermo; Gandullo, Jacinto; Wang, Liqun; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William Charles; Echevarría, Cristina

    2016-05-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; E.C. 4.1.1.31) was characterized in developing and germinating sorghum seeds, focusing on the transcript and polypeptide abundance of multiple plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PTPC) genes, and the post-translational modification of each isoenzyme by phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination during germination. We observed high levels of SbPPC4 (Sb07g014960) transcripts during early development (stage I), and extensive transcript abundance of SbPPC2 (Sb02g021090) and SbPPC3 (Sb04g008720) throughout the entire life cycle of the seed. Although tandem mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of immunopurified PTPC indicated that four different PTPC isoenzymes were expressed in the developing and germinating seeds, SbPPC3 was the most abundant isozyme of the developing seed, and of the embryo and the aleurone layer of germinating seeds. In vivo phosphorylation of the different PTPC isoenzymes at their conserved N-terminal seryl phosphorylation site during germination was also established by MS/MS analysis. Furthermore, three of the four isoenzymes were partially monoubiquitinated, with MS/MS pinpointing SbPPC2 and SbPPC3 monoubiquitination at the conserved Lys-630 and Lys-624 residues, respectively. Our results demonstrate that monoubiquitination and phosphorylation simultaneously occur in vivo with different PTPC isozymes during seed germination. In addition, we show that PTPC monoubiquitination in germinating sorghum seeds always increases at stage II (emergence of the radicle), is maintained during the aerobic period of rapid cell division and reserve mobilization, and remains relatively constant until stage IV-V when coleoptiles initiate the formation of the photosynthetic tissues. PMID:27194739

  16. Sethoxydim treatment inhibits lipid metabolism and enhances the accumulation of anthocyanins in rape (Brassica napus L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Belkebir, Aicha; Benhassaine-Kesri, Ghouziel

    2013-09-01

    Cyclohexanediones (e.g., sethoxydim) are known to be inhibitors of plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) of monocotyledonous plants and provoke plant death. When rape leaves were treated with 10(-3) M sethoxydim, growth rate, chlorophyll and lipid contents were reduced, but plant resisted to herbicide. [1-(14)C] Acetate labelling showed that lipid synthesis was affected by sethoxydim, probably through inhibition of chloroplast homomeric ACCase activity, and the fatty acid synthase activity (FAS) was reduced because of malonyl-CoA deficiency. In contrast, sethoxydim treatment provoked an increase in phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity with an accumulation of cinnamic acid, naringenin and anthocyanins. The accumulation of anthocyanins seems to reduce the damaging effect of the herbicide stress. Thus, in plant cell, the flux of carbon seems to be oriented towards protective mechanisms, and the two ACCases could have an important role in this orientation. PMID:25149245

  17. Biotin augments acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 gene expression in the hypothalamus, leading to the suppression of food intake in mice.

    PubMed

    Sone, Hideyuki; Kamiyama, Shin; Higuchi, Mutsumi; Fujino, Kaho; Kubo, Shizuka; Miyazawa, Masami; Shirato, Saya; Hiroi, Yuka; Shiozawa, Kota

    2016-07-29

    It is known that biotin prevents the development of diabetes by increasing the functions of pancreatic beta-cells and improving insulin sensitivity in the periphery. However, its anti-obesity effects such as anorectic effects remain to be clarified. Acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), a biotin-dependent enzyme, has two isoforms (ACC1 and ACC2) and serves to catalyze the reaction of acetyl CoA to malonyl CoA. In the hypothalamus, ACC2 increases the production of malonyl CoA, which acts as a satiety signal. In this study, we investigated whether biotin increases the gene expression of ACC2 in the hypothalamus and suppresses food intake in mice administered excessive biotin. Food intake was significantly decreased by biotin, but plasma regulators of appetite, including glucose, ghrelin, and leptin, were not affected. On the other hand, biotin notably accumulated in the hypothalamus and enhanced ACC2 gene expression there, but it did not change the gene expression of ACC1, malonyl CoA decarboxylase (a malonyl CoA-degrading enzyme), and AMP-activated protein kinase α-2 (an ACC-inhibitory enzyme). These findings strongly suggest that biotin potentiates the suppression of appetite by upregulating ACC2 gene expression in the hypothalamus. This effect of biotin may contribute to the prevention of diabetes by biotin treatment. PMID:27181349

  18. In vitro synthesis and processing of a maize chloroplast transcript encoded by the ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hanley-Bowdoin, L; Orozco, E M; Chua, N H

    1985-01-01

    The large subunit gene (rbcL) of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase was transcribed in vitro by using maize and pea chloroplast extracts and a cloned plastid DNA template containing 172 base pairs (bp) of the maize rbcL protein-coding region and 791 bp of upstream sequences. Three major in vitro RNA species were synthesized which correspond to in vivo maize rbcL RNAs with 5' termini positioned 300, 100 to 105, and 63 nucleotides upstream of the protein-coding region. A deletion of 109 bp, including the "-300" 5' end (the 5' end at position -300), depressed all rbcL transcription in vitro. A plasmid DNA containing this 109-bp fragment was sufficient to direct correct transcription initiation in vitro. A cloned template, containing 191 bp of plastid DNA which includes the -105 and -63 rbcL termini, did not support transcription in vitro. Exogenously added -300 RNA could be converted to the -63 transcript by maize chloroplast extract. These results established that the -300 RNA is the primary maize rbcL transcript, the -63 RNA is a processed form of the -300 transcript, and synthesis of the -105 RNA is dependent on the -300 region. The promoter for the maize rbcL gene is located within the 109 bp flanking the -300 site. Mutagenesis of the 109-bp chloroplast sequence 11 bp upstream of the -300 transcription initiation site reduced rbcL promoter activity in vitro. Images PMID:2874479

  19. Electrophoretic Assay for Ribulose 1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase in Guard Cells and Other Leaf Cells of Vicia faba L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Tarczynski, Mitchell C.; Outlaw, William H.; Arold, Norbert; Neuhoff, Volker; Hampp, Rüdiger

    1989-01-01

    The ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) contents of guard cells and other cells of Vicia faba L. leaflet were determined. To prevent proteolysis, proteins of frozen protoplast preparations or of cells excised from freeze-dried leaf were extracted directly in a sodium-dodecyl-sulfate-containing solution, which was heated immediately after sample addition. Protein profiles of the different cell types were obtained by electrophoresis of the extracts and subsequent densitometry of the stained protein bands. About one-third of the protein of palisade parenchyma and of spongy parenchyma was Rubisco large subunit. Using chlorophyll (Chl):protein ratios previously obtained, we calculate mesophyll contained ca. 22 millimoles Rubisco per mole Chl. In contrast, guard-cell protoplast preparations were calculated to contain from 0.7 to 2.2 millimoles Rubisco per mole Chl. The upper end of this range is an overestimate resulting from contamination by mesophyll and to the method of peak integration. Extracts of excised guard cells were calculated to contain 0.05 to 0.17 millimole Rubisco per mole Chl. We conclude that Rubisco is absent, or virtually so, in guard cells of V. faba. PMID:16666669

  20. The MDM2-p53-pyruvate carboxylase signalling axis couples mitochondrial metabolism to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomu; Cheng, Kenneth K Y; Liu, Zhuohao; Yang, Jin-Kui; Wang, Baile; Jiang, Xue; Zhou, Yawen; Hallenborg, Philip; Hoo, Ruby L C; Lam, Karen S L; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Gao, Xin; Xu, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is pivotal for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic β-cells. However, little is known about the molecular machinery that controls the homeostasis of intermediary metabolites in mitochondria. Here we show that the activation of p53 in β-cells, by genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of its negative regulator MDM2, impairs GSIS, leading to glucose intolerance in mice. Mechanistically, p53 activation represses the expression of the mitochondrial enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PC), resulting in diminished production of the TCA cycle intermediates oxaloacetate and NADPH, and impaired oxygen consumption. The defective GSIS and mitochondrial metabolism in MDM2-null islets can be rescued by restoring PC expression. Under diabetogenic conditions, MDM2 and p53 are upregulated, whereas PC is reduced in mouse β-cells. Pharmacological inhibition of p53 alleviates defective GSIS in diabetic islets by restoring PC expression. Thus, the MDM2-p53-PC signalling axis links mitochondrial metabolism to insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis, and could represent a therapeutic target in diabetes. PMID:27265727

  1. Integration and expression of Sorghum C(4) phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and chloroplastic NADP(+)-malate dehydrogenase separately or together in C(3) potato plants(1).

    PubMed

    Beaujean, A; Issakidis-Bourguet, E; Catterou, M; Dubois, F; Sangwan, R S.; Sangwan-Norreel, B S.

    2001-05-01

    We have integrated two cDNAs expressing Sorghum photosynthetic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (C(4)-PEPC) and NADP-malate dehydrogenase (cpMDH), two key enzymes involved in the primary carbon fixation pathway of NADP-malic enzyme-type C(4) plants, separately or together into a C(3) plant (potato). Analysis of the transgenic plants showed a 1.5-fold increase in PEPC and cpMDH activities compared to untransformed plants. Immunolocalization confirmed an increase at the protein level of these two enzymes in the transgenic plants and indicated that the Sorghum cpMDH was specifically addressed to the chloroplasts of potato mesophyll cells. However, integration of either or both of the cDNAs into the potato genome did not appear to significantly modify either tuber starch grain content or the rate of photosynthetic O(2) production compared to control untransformed plants. The low level of transgene expression probably explains the lack of influence on carbon metabolism and photosynthetic rates. This general observation suggests that some complex mechanism may regulate the level of production of foreign C(4) metabolism enzymes in C(3) plants. PMID:11337077

  2. Effect of CO{sub 2} concentration on carbonic anhydrase and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase expression in pea

    SciTech Connect

    Majeau, N.; Coleman, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    The effect of external CO{sub 2} concentration on the expression of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was examined in pea (Pisum sativum cv Little Marvel) leaves. Enzyme activities and their transcript levels were reduced in plants grown at 1000 {mu}L/L CO{sub 2} compared with plants grown in ambient air. Growth at 160 {mu}L/L CO{sub 2} also appeared to reduce steady-state transcript levels for the rbcS, the gene encoding the small subunit of Rubisco, and for ca, the gene encoding CA; however, rbcS transcripts were reduced to a greater extent at this concentration. Rubisco activity was slightly lower in plants grown at 160 {mu}L/L CO{sub 2}, and CA activity was significantly higher than that observed in air-grown plants. Transfer of plants from 1000 {mu}L/L to air levels of CO{sub 2} resulted in a rapid increase in both ca and rbcS transcript abundance in fully expanded leaves, followed by an increase in enzyme activity. Plants transferred from air to high-CO{sub 2} concentrations appeared to modulate transcript abundance and enzyme activity less quickly. Foliar carbohydrate levels were also examined in plants grown continuously at high and ambient CO{sub 2}, and following changes in growth conditions that rapidly altered ca and rbcS transcript abundance and enzyme activities. 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Increased expression of fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum in the valproic acid model of autism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianling; Wu, Wei; Fu, Yingmei; Yu, Shunying; Cui, Donghong; Zhao, Min; Du, Yasong; Li, Jijun; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to investigate alterations in enzymes associated with fatty acid synthesis, namely fatty acid synthase (FASN) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum of the valproic acid (VPA)-induced animal model of autism. In this model, pregnant rats were given a single intraperitoneal injection of VPA, and prefrontal cortex and cerebellum samples from their pups were analyzed. The results of western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses demonstrated that the protein and mRNA expression levels of FASN, ACC and phospho-ACC (pACC) were increased in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum of the VPA model of autism. Furthermore, in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum of the VPA model of autism, AMPK expression is increased, whereas PI3K and Akt expression are unchanged. This suggests that disorder of the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/FASN and/or adenosine 5′-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/ACC pathway may be involved in the pathogenesis of autism. It is hypothesized that fatty acid synthesis participates in autism through PI3K/Akt/FASN and AMPK/ACC pathways. PMID:27602061

  4. The glossyhead1 Allele of ACC1 Reveals a Principal Role for Multidomain Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase in the Biosynthesis of Cuticular Waxes by Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.; Xu, C.; Zhao, H.; Parsons, E. P.; Kosma, D. K.; Xu, X.; Chao, D.; Lohrey, G.; Bangarusamy, D. K.; Wang, G.; Bressan, R. A.; Jenks, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    A novel mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), having highly glossy inflorescence stems, postgenital fusion in floral organs, and reduced fertility, was isolated from an ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized population and designated glossyhead1 (gsd1). The gsd1 locus was mapped to chromosome 1, and the causal gene was identified as a new allele of Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase1 (ACC1), a gene encoding the main enzyme in cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A synthesis. This, to our knowledge, is the first mutant allele of ACC1 that does not cause lethality at the seed or early germination stage, allowing for the first time a detailed analysis of ACC1 function in mature tissues. Broad lipid profiling of mature gsd1 organs revealed a primary role for ACC1 in the biosynthesis of the very-long-chain fatty acids (C{sub 20:0} or longer) associated with cuticular waxes and triacylglycerols. Unexpectedly, transcriptome analysis revealed that gsd1 has limited impact on any lipid metabolic networks but instead has a large effect on environmental stress-responsive pathways, especially senescence and ethylene synthesis determinants, indicating a possible role for the cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A-derived lipids in stress response signaling.

  5. Evolution of the C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase promoter of the C4 species Flaveria trinervia: the role of the proximal promoter region

    PubMed Central

    Engelmann, Sascha; Zogel, Corinna; Koczor, Maria; Schlue, Ute; Streubel, Monika; Westhoff, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background The key enzymes of photosynthetic carbon assimilation in C4 plants have evolved independently several times from C3 isoforms that were present in the C3 ancestral species. The C4 isoform of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), the primary CO2-fixing enzyme of the C4 cycle, is specifically expressed at high levels in mesophyll cells of the leaves of C4 species. We are interested in understanding the molecular changes that are responsible for the evolution of this C4-characteristic PEPC expression pattern, and we are using the genus Flaveria (Asteraceae) as a model system. It is known that cis-regulatory sequences for mesophyll-specific expression of the ppcA1 gene of F. trinervia (C4) are located within a distal promoter region (DR). Results In this study we focus on the proximal region (PR) of the ppcA1 promoter of F. trinervia and present an analysis of its function in establishing a C4-specific expression pattern. We demonstrate that the PR harbours cis-regulatory determinants which account for high levels of PEPC expression in the leaf. Our results further suggest that an intron in the 5' untranslated leader region of the PR is not essential for the control of ppcA1 gene expression. Conclusion The allocation of cis-regulatory elements for enhanced expression levels to the proximal region of the ppcA1 promoter provides further insight into the regulation of PEPC expression in C4 leaves. PMID:18208593

  6. Salt stress leads to differential expression of two isogenes of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase during Crassulacean acid metabolism induction in the common ice plant.

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, J C; Meyer, G; Michalowski, C B; Schmitt, J M; Bohnert, H J

    1989-01-01

    The common ice plant is a facultative halophyte in which Crassulacean acid metabolism, a metabolic adaptation to arid environments, can be induced by irrigating plants with high levels of NaCl or by drought. This stress-induced metabolic transition is accompanied by up to a 50-fold increase in the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase). To analyze the molecular basis of this plant response to water stress, we have isolated and characterized two members of the PEPCase gene family from the common ice plant. The PEPCase isogenes, designated Ppc1 and Ppc2, have conserved intron-exon organizations, are 76.4% identical at the nucleotide sequence level within exons, and encode predicted polypeptides with 83% amino acid identity. Steady-state levels of mRNAs from the two genes differ dramatically when plants are salt-stressed. Transcripts of Ppc1 increase about 30-fold in leaves within 5 days of salt stress. In contrast, steady-state levels of Ppc2 transcripts decrease slightly in leaf tissue over the same stress period. Steady-state levels of transcripts of both genes decrease in roots over 5 days of salt stress. We have used in vitro transcription assays with nuclei isolated from leaves to demonstrate that the increased expression of Ppc1 caused by water stress occurs in part at the transcriptional level. PMID:2535520

  7. Regulating Pyruvate Carboxylase in the Living Culture of Aspergillus Terreus Nrrl 1960 by L-Aspartate for Enhanced Itaconic Acid Production.

    PubMed

    Songserm, Pajareeya; Thitiprasert, Sitanan; Tolieng, Vasana; Piluk, Jiraporn; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Assabumrungrat, Sutthichai; Yang, Shang-Tian; Karnchanatat, Aphichart; Thongchul, Nuttha

    2015-10-01

    Aspergillus terreus was reported as the promising fungal strain for itaconic acid; however, the commercial production suffers from the low yield. Low production yield was claimed as the result of completing the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle towards biomass synthesis while under limiting phosphate and nitrogen; TCA cycle was somewhat shunted and consequently, the metabolite fluxes move towards itaconic acid production route. By regulating enzymes in TCA cycle, it is believed that itaconic acid production can be improved. One of the key responsible enzymes involved in itaconic acid production was triggered in this study. Pyruvate carboxylase was allosterically inhibited by L-aspartate. The presence of 10 mM L-aspartate in the production medium directly repressed PC expression in the living A. terreus while the limited malate flux regulated the malate/citrate antiporters resulting in the increasing cis-aconitate decarboxylase activity to simultaneously convert cis-aconitate, citrate isomer, into itaconic acid. The transport of cis-aconitate via the antiporters induced citrate synthase and 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase activities in response to balance the fluxes of TCA intermediates. Successively, itaconic acid production yield and final concentration could be improved by 8.33 and 60.32 %, respectively, compared to those obtained from the control fermentation with the shortened lag time to produce itaconic acid during the production phase. PMID:26208692

  8. Decreasing the Rate of Metabolic Ketone Reduction in the Discovery of a Clinical Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) inhibitors offer significant potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hepatic steatosis, and cancer. However, the identification of tool compounds suitable to test the hypothesis in human trials has been challenging. An advanced series of spirocyclic ketone-containing ACC inhibitors recently reported by Pfizer were metabolized in vivo by ketone reduction, which complicated human pharmacology projections. We disclose that this metabolic reduction can be greatly attenuated through introduction of steric hindrance adjacent to the ketone carbonyl. Incorporation of weakly basic functionality improved solubility and led to the identification of 9 as a clinical candidate for the treatment of T2DM. Phase I clinical studies demonstrated dose-proportional increases in exposure, single-dose inhibition of de novo lipogenesis (DNL), and changes in indirect calorimetry consistent with increased whole-body fatty acid oxidation. This demonstration of target engagement validates the use of compound 9 to evaluate the role of DNL in human disease. PMID:25423286

  9. Diversity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large-subunit genes in the MgCl2-dominated deep hypersaline anoxic basin discovery.

    PubMed

    van der Wielen, Paul W J J

    2006-06-01

    Partial sequences of the form I (cbbL) and form II (cbbM) of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) large subunit genes were obtained from the brine and interface of the MgCl2-dominated deep hypersaline anoxic basin Discovery. CbbL and cbbM genes were found in both brine and interface of the Discovery Basin but were absent in the overlying seawater. The diversity of both genes in the brine and interface was low, which might caused by the extreme saline conditions in Discovery of approximately 5 M MgCl2. None of the retrieved sequences were closely related to sequences deposited in the GenBank database. A phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the cbbL sequences were affiliated with a Thiobacillus sp. or with one of the RuBisCO genes from Hydrogenovibrio marinus. The cbbM sequences clustered with thiobacilli or formed a new group with no close relatives. The results implicate that bacteria with the potential for carbon dioxide fixation and chemoautotrophy are present in the Discovery Basin. This is the first report demonstrating that RuBisCO genes are present under hypersaline conditions of 5 M MgCl2. PMID:16734797

  10. Decreasing the rate of metabolic ketone reduction in the discovery of a clinical acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor for the treatment of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Griffith, David A; Kung, Daniel W; Esler, William P; Amor, Paul A; Bagley, Scott W; Beysen, Carine; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Santos; Doran, Shawn D; Limberakis, Chris; Mathiowetz, Alan M; McPherson, Kirk; Price, David A; Ravussin, Eric; Sonnenberg, Gabriele E; Southers, James A; Sweet, Laurel J; Turner, Scott M; Vajdos, Felix F

    2014-12-26

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) inhibitors offer significant potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hepatic steatosis, and cancer. However, the identification of tool compounds suitable to test the hypothesis in human trials has been challenging. An advanced series of spirocyclic ketone-containing ACC inhibitors recently reported by Pfizer were metabolized in vivo by ketone reduction, which complicated human pharmacology projections. We disclose that this metabolic reduction can be greatly attenuated through introduction of steric hindrance adjacent to the ketone carbonyl. Incorporation of weakly basic functionality improved solubility and led to the identification of 9 as a clinical candidate for the treatment of T2DM. Phase I clinical studies demonstrated dose-proportional increases in exposure, single-dose inhibition of de novo lipogenesis (DNL), and changes in indirect calorimetry consistent with increased whole-body fatty acid oxidation. This demonstration of target engagement validates the use of compound 9 to evaluate the role of DNL in human disease. PMID:25423286

  11. RNAi knockdown of acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene eliminates jinggangmycin-enhanced reproduction and population growth in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Xin; Ge, Lin-Quan; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Lu, Xiu-Li; Li, Xin; Stanley, David; Song, Qi-Sheng; Wu, Jin-Cai

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in ecology lies in understanding the coexistence of intraguild species, well documented at the organismal level, but not at the molecular level. This study focused on the effects of the antibiotic, jinggangmycin (JGM), a fungicide widely used in Asian rice agroecosystems, on reproduction of insects within the planthopper guild, including the brown planthopper (BPH) Nilaparvata lugens and the white-backed planthopper (WBPH) Sogatella furcifera, both serious resurgence rice pests. JGM exposure significantly increased BPH fecundity and population growth, but suppressed both parameters in laboratory and field WBPH populations. We used digital gene expression and transcriptomic analyses to identify a panel of differentially expressed genes, including a set of up-regulated genes in JGM-treated BPH, which were down-regulated in JGM-treated WBPH. RNAi silencing of Acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC), highly expressed in JGM-treated BPH, reduced ACC expression (by > 60%) and eliminated JGM-induced fecundity increases in BPH. These findings support our hypothesis that differences in ACC expression separates intraguild species at the molecular level. PMID:26482193

  12. Modification of the Host Cell Lipid Metabolism Induced by Hypolipidemic Drugs Targeting the Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase Impairs West Nile Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Casas, Josefina; Sobrino, Francisco; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2015-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurotropic flavivirus transmitted by the bite of mosquitoes that causes meningitis and encephalitis in humans, horses, and birds. Several studies have highlighted that flavivirus infection is highly dependent on cellular lipids for virus replication and infectious particle biogenesis. The first steps of lipid synthesis involve the carboxylation of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to malonyl-CoA that is catalyzed by the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). This makes ACC a key enzyme of lipid synthesis that is currently being evaluated as a therapeutic target for different disorders, including cancers, obesity, diabetes, and viral infections. We have analyzed the effect of the ACC inhibitor 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA) on infection by WNV. Lipidomic analysis of TOFA-treated cells confirmed that this drug reduced the cellular content of multiple lipids, including those directly implicated in the flavivirus life cycle (glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and cholesterol). Treatment with TOFA significantly inhibited the multiplication of WNV in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis of the antiviral effect of this drug showed that the inhibitory effect was related to a reduction of viral replication. Furthermore, treatment with another ACC inhibitor, 3,3,14,14-tetramethylhexadecanedioic acid (MEDICA 16), also inhibited WNV infection. Interestingly, TOFA and MEDICA 16 also reduced the multiplication of Usutu virus (USUV), a WNV-related flavivirus. These results point to the ACC as a druggable cellular target suitable for antiviral development against WNV and other flaviviruses. PMID:26503654

  13. An unusual insertion/deletion in the gene encoding the. beta. -subunit of propionyl-CoA carboxylase is a frequent mutation in Caucasian propionic acidemia

    SciTech Connect

    Tahara, T.; Kraus, J.P.; Rosenberg, L.E. )

    1990-02-01

    Propionic acidemia is an inherited disorder of organic acid metabolism that is caused by deficiency of propionly-CoA carboxylase. Affected patients fall into two complementation groups, pccA and pccBC (subgroups B, C, and BC), resulting from deficiency of the nonidentical {alpha} and {beta} subunits of PCC, respectively. The authors have detected an unusual insertion/deletion in the DNA of patients from the pccBC and pccC subgroups that replaces 14 nucleotides in the coding sequence of the {beta} subunit with 12 nucleotides unrelated to this region of the gene. Among 14 unrelated Caucasian patients in the pccBc complementation group, this unique mutation was found in 8 of 28 mutant alleles examined. Mutant allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization to amplified genomic DNAs revealed that the inserted 12 nucleotides do not originate in an {approx}1000-bp region around the mutation. In the course of the investigation, they identified another mutation in the same exon: a 3-bp in-frame deletion that eliminates one of two isoleucine codons immediately preceding the Msp I site. Two unrelated patients were compound heterozygotes for this single-codon deletion and for the insertion/deletion described above. They conclude that either there is a propensity for the PCC {beta}-subunit gene to undergo mutations of this sort at this position or, more likely, the mutations in all of the involved Caucasian patients have a common origin in preceding generations.

  14. Decreasing the Rate of Metabolic Ketone Reduction in the Discovery of a Clinical Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, David A.; Kung, Daniel W.; Esler, William P.; Amor, Paul A.; Bagley, Scott W.; Beysen, Carine; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Santos; Doran, Shawn D.; Limberakis, Chris; Mathiowetz, Alan M.; McPherson, Kirk; Price, David A.; Ravussin, Eric; Sonnenberg, Gabriele E.; Southers, James A.; Sweet, Laurel J.; Turner, Scott M.; Vajdos, Felix F.

    2014-12-26

    We found that Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) inhibitors offer significant potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hepatic steatosis, and cancer. However, the identification of tool compounds suitable to test the hypothesis in human trials has been challenging. An advanced series of spirocyclic ketone-containing ACC inhibitors recently reported by Pfizer were metabolized in vivo by ketone reduction, which complicated human pharmacology projections. Here, we disclose that this metabolic reduction can be greatly attenuated through introduction of steric hindrance adjacent to the ketone carbonyl. Incorporation of weakly basic functionality improved solubility and led to the identification of 9 as a clinical candidate for the treatment of T2DM. Phase I clinical studies demonstrated dose-proportional increases in exposure, single-dose inhibition of de novo lipogenesis (DNL), and changes in indirect calorimetry consistent with increased whole-body fatty acid oxidation. This demonstration of target engagement validates the use of compound 9 to evaluate the role of DNL in human disease.

  15. Evidence for effects on the in vivo activity of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase during development of Mn toxicity in tobacco. [Nicotiana tabacum L. cv KY14

    SciTech Connect

    Houtz, R.L.; Nable, R.O.; Cheniae, G.M. )

    1988-04-01

    The progressive decrease in net photosynthesis accompanying development of Mn toxicity in young leaves of burley tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv KY 14) is a result of effects on in vivo activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco, EC 4.1.1.39). This conclusion is supported by: (a) decrease in rates of CO{sub 2} depletion during measurements of CO{sub 2} compensation, (b) increase in leaf RuBP concentrations, (c) progressive decreases in rate-constants of RuBP loss (light to dark transition analyses) with progressive increases of leaf Mn concentrations, and (d) restoration of diminished rates of net photosynthesis to control rates by elevated CO{sub 2} (5%). Moreover, elevated CO{sub 2} (1100 microliters per liter) during culture of Mn-treated plants decreased elevated RuBP concentrations to control levels and alleviated foliar symptoms of Mn toxicity. These effects of Mn toxicity on in vivo activity of rubisco were not expressed by in vitro kinetic analyses of rubisco prepared under conditions to sequester Mn or to adsorb polyphenols or their oxidation products. Similarly, the in vitro activity of fructose bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) was unaffected by Mn toxicity.

  16. The MDM2–p53–pyruvate carboxylase signalling axis couples mitochondrial metabolism to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaomu; Cheng, Kenneth K. Y.; Liu, Zhuohao; Yang, Jin-Kui; Wang, Baile; Jiang, Xue; Zhou, Yawen; Hallenborg, Philip; Hoo, Ruby L. C.; Lam, Karen S. L.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Gao, Xin; Xu, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is pivotal for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic β-cells. However, little is known about the molecular machinery that controls the homeostasis of intermediary metabolites in mitochondria. Here we show that the activation of p53 in β-cells, by genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of its negative regulator MDM2, impairs GSIS, leading to glucose intolerance in mice. Mechanistically, p53 activation represses the expression of the mitochondrial enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PC), resulting in diminished production of the TCA cycle intermediates oxaloacetate and NADPH, and impaired oxygen consumption. The defective GSIS and mitochondrial metabolism in MDM2-null islets can be rescued by restoring PC expression. Under diabetogenic conditions, MDM2 and p53 are upregulated, whereas PC is reduced in mouse β-cells. Pharmacological inhibition of p53 alleviates defective GSIS in diabetic islets by restoring PC expression. Thus, the MDM2–p53–PC signalling axis links mitochondrial metabolism to insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis, and could represent a therapeutic target in diabetes. PMID:27265727

  17. Quantitative analyses of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) large-subunit genes (cbbL) in typical paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ke-Qing; Bao, Peng; Bao, Qiong-Li; Jia, Yan; Huang, Fu-Yi; Su, Jian-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-01-01

    The Calvin cycle is known to be the major pathway for CO2 fixation, but our current understanding of its occurrence and importance in paddy soils is poor. In this study, the diversity of three ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large-subunit genes (cbbLG, cbbLR, cbbM) was investigated by clone library, T-RFLP, qPCR, and enzyme assay in five paddy soils in China. The cbbLG sequences revealed a relatively low level of diversity and were mostly related to the sequences of species from Thiobacillus. In contrast, highly diverse cbbLR and cbbM sequences were dispersed on the phylogenetic trees, and most of them were distantly related to known sequences, even forming separate clusters. Abundances of three cbbL genes ranged from 10(6) to 10(9) copies g(-1) soil, and cbbLR outnumbered cbbM and cbbLG in all soil samples, indicating that cbbLR may play a more important role than other two cbbL genes. Soil properties significantly influenced cbbL diversity in five paddy soils, of which clay content, C/N ratio, CEC, pH, and SOC correlated well with variations in microbial composition and abundance. In summary, this study provided a comparison of three cbbL genes, advancing our understanding of their role in carbon sequestration and nutrient turnover in the paddy soil. PMID:24024547

  18. Residues in three conserved regions of the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase are required for quaternary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fitchen, J.H.; McIntosh, L. ); Knight, S.; Andersson, I.; Branden, C.I. )

    1990-08-01

    To explore the role of individual residues in the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, small subunits with single amino acid substitutions in three regions of relative sequence conservation were produced by directed mutagenesis of the rbcS gene from Anabaena 7120. These altered small subunits were cosythesized with large subunits (from an expressed Anabaena rbcL gene) in Escherichia coli. Mutants were analyzed for effects on quaternary structure and catalytic activity. Changing Glu-13S (numbering used is that of the spinach enzyme) to Val, Trp-67S to Arg, Pro-73S to His, or Tyr-98S to Asn prevented accumulation of stable holoenzyme. Interpretation of these results using a model for the three-dimensional structure of the spinach enzyme based on x-ray crystallographic data suggests that our small subunit mutants containing substitutions at positions 13S and 67S probably do not assemble because of mispairing or nonpairing of charged residues on the interfacing surfaces of the large and small subunits. The failure of small subunits substituted at positions 73S or 98S to assemble correctly may result from disruption of intersubunit or intrasubunit hydrophobic pockets, respectively.

  19. [Effect of co-expression of nicotinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase and pyruvate carboxylase on succinic acid production in Escherichia coli BA002].

    PubMed

    Cao, Weijia; Gou, Dongmei; Liang, Liya; Liu, Rongming; Chen, Kequan; Ma, Jiangfeng; Jiang, Min

    2013-12-01

    Escherichia coli BA002, in which the ldhA and pflB genes are deleted, cannot utilize glucose anaerobically due to the inability to regenerate NAD+. To restore glucose utilization, overexpression of nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (NAPRTase) encoded by the pncB gene, a rate-limiting enzyme of NAD(H) synthesis pathway, resulted in a significant increase in cell mass and succinate production under anaerobic conditions. However, a high concentration of pyruvate was accumulated. Thus, co-expression of NAPRTase and the heterologous pyruvate carboxylase (PYC) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris NZ9000 in recombinant E. coli BA016 was investigated. Results in 3 L fermentor showed that OD600 is 4.64 and BA016 consumed 35.00 g/L glucose and produced 25.09 g/L succinate after 112 h under anaerobic conditions. Overexpression of pncB and pyc in BA016, the accumulation of pyruvic acid was further decreased, and the formation of succinic acid was further increased. PMID:24660633

  20. Maternal obesity reduces milk lipid production in lactating mice by inhibiting acetyl-CoA carboxylase and impairing fatty acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Saben, Jessica L; Bales, Elise S; Jackman, Matthew R; Orlicky, David; MacLean, Paul S; McManaman, James L

    2014-01-01

    Maternal metabolic and nutrient trafficking adaptations to lactation differ among lean and obese mice fed a high fat (HF) diet. Obesity is thought to impair milk lipid production, in part, by decreasing trafficking of dietary and de novo synthesized lipids to the mammary gland. Here, we report that de novo lipogenesis regulatory mechanisms are disrupted in mammary glands of lactating HF-fed obese (HF-Ob) mice. HF feeding decreased the total levels of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 (ACC), and this effect was exacerbated in obese mice. The relative levels of phosphorylated (inactive) ACC, were elevated in the epithelium, and decreased in the adipose stroma, of mammary tissue from HF-Ob mice compared to those of HF-fed lean (HF-Ln) mice. Mammary gland levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which catalyzes formation of inactive ACC, were also selectively elevated in mammary glands of HF-Ob relative to HF-Ln dams or to low fat fed dams. These responses correlated with evidence of increased lipid retention in mammary adipose, and decreased lipid levels in mammary epithelial cells, of HF-Ob dams. Collectively, our data suggests that maternal obesity impairs milk lipid production, in part, by disrupting the balance of de novo lipid synthesis in the epithelial and adipose stromal compartments of mammary tissue through processes that appear to be related to increased mammary gland AMPK activity, ACC inhibition, and decreased fatty acid synthesis. PMID:24849657

  1. Maternal Obesity Reduces Milk Lipid Production in Lactating Mice by Inhibiting Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase and Impairing Fatty Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Saben, Jessica L.; Bales, Elise S.; Jackman, Matthew R.; Orlicky, David; MacLean, Paul S.; McManaman, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal metabolic and nutrient trafficking adaptations to lactation differ among lean and obese mice fed a high fat (HF) diet. Obesity is thought to impair milk lipid production, in part, by decreasing trafficking of dietary and de novo synthesized lipids to the mammary gland. Here, we report that de novo lipogenesis regulatory mechanisms are disrupted in mammary glands of lactating HF-fed obese (HF-Ob) mice. HF feeding decreased the total levels of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 (ACC), and this effect was exacerbated in obese mice. The relative levels of phosphorylated (inactive) ACC, were elevated in the epithelium, and decreased in the adipose stroma, of mammary tissue from HF-Ob mice compared to those of HF-fed lean (HF-Ln) mice. Mammary gland levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which catalyzes formation of inactive ACC, were also selectively elevated in mammary glands of HF-Ob relative to HF-Ln dams or to low fat fed dams. These responses correlated with evidence of increased lipid retention in mammary adipose, and decreased lipid levels in mammary epithelial cells, of HF-Ob dams. Collectively, our data suggests that maternal obesity impairs milk lipid production, in part, by disrupting the balance of de novo lipid synthesis in the epithelial and adipose stromal compartments of mammary tissue through processes that appear to be related to increased mammary gland AMPK activity, ACC inhibition, and decreased fatty acid synthesis. PMID:24849657

  2. Expression of glnB and a glnB-Like Gene (glnK) in a Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase-Deficient Mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yilei; Tabita, F. Robert

    1998-01-01

    In a ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO)-deficient mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, strain 16PHC, nitrogenase activity was derepressed in the presence of ammonia under photoheterotrophic growth conditions. Previous studies also showed that reintroduction of a functional RubisCO and Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) pathway suppressed the deregulation of nitrogenase synthesis in this strain. In this study, the derepression of nitrogenase synthesis in the presence of ammonia in strain 16PHC was further explored by using a glnB::lacZ fusion, since the product of the glnB gene is known to have a negative effect on ammonia-regulated nif control. It was found that glnB expression was repressed in strain 16PHC under photoheterotrophic growth conditions with either ammonia or glutamate as the nitrogen source; glutamine synthetase (GS) levels were also affected in this strain. However, when cells regained a functional CBB pathway by trans complementation of the deleted genes, wild-type levels of GS and glnB expression were restored. Furthermore, a glnB-like gene, glnK, was isolated from this organism, and its expression was found to be under tight nitrogen control in the wild type. Surprisingly, glnK expression was found to be derepressed in strain 16PHC under photoheterotrophic conditions in the presence of ammonia. PMID:9721307

  3. Posttranslational Modifications in the Amino- Terminal Region of the Large Subunit of Ribulose- 1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase from Several Plant Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Houtz, Robert L.; Poneleit, Loelle; Jones, Samantha B.; Royer, Malcolm; Stults, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A combination of limited tryptic proteolysis, reverse phasehigh performance liquid chromatography, Edman degradative sequencing, amino acid analysis, and fast-atom bombardment mass-spectrometry was used to remove and identify the first 14 to 18 N-terminal amino acid residues of the large subunit of higher plant-type ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Marchantia polymorpha, pea (Pisum sativum), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), potato (Solanum tuberosum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), soybean (Glycine max), petunia (Petunia x hybrida), cowpea (Vigna sinensis), and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) plants. The N-terminal tryptic peptide from acetylated Pro-3 to Lys-8 of the large subunit of Rubisco was identical in all species, but the amino acid sequence of the penultimate N-terminal tryptic peptide varied. Eight of the 10 species examined contained a trimethyllysyl residue at position 14 in the large subunit of Rubisco, whereas Chlamydomonas and Marchantia contained an unmodified lysyl residue at this position. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:16668742

  4. Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Conflict in Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Is Associated with Nuclear and Plastidic Candidate Genes Encoding Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanova, Vera S.; Zaytseva, Olga O.; Mglinets, Anatoliy V.; Shatskaya, Natalia V.; Kosterin, Oleg E.; Vasiliev, Gennadiy V.

    2015-01-01

    In crosses of wild and cultivated peas (Pisum sativum L.), nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility frequently occurs manifested as decreased pollen fertility, male gametophyte lethality, sporophyte lethality. High-throughput sequencing of plastid genomes of one cultivated and four wild pea accessions differing in cross-compatibility was performed. Candidate genes for involvement in the nuclear-plastid conflict were searched in the reconstructed plastid genomes. In the annotated Medicago truncatula genome, nuclear candidate genes were searched in the portion syntenic to the pea chromosome region known to harbor a locus involved in the conflict. In the plastid genomes, a substantial variability of the accD locus represented by nucleotide substitutions and indels was found to correspond to the pattern of cross-compatibility among the accessions analyzed. Amino acid substitutions in the polypeptides encoded by the alleles of a nuclear locus, designated as Bccp3, with a complementary function to accD, fitted the compatibility pattern. The accD locus in the plastid genome encoding beta subunit of the carboxyltransferase of acetyl-coA carboxylase and the nuclear locus Bccp3 encoding biotin carboxyl carrier protein of the same multi-subunit enzyme were nominated as candidate genes for main contribution to nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility in peas. Existence of another nuclear locus involved in the accD-mediated conflict is hypothesized. PMID:25789472

  5. Identification and sequence analysis of Escherichia coli purE and purK genes encoding 5'-phosphoribosyl-5-amino-4-imidazole carboxylase for de novo purine biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, W; Sampei, G; Aiba, A; Mizobuchi, K

    1989-01-01

    It has been shown that the Escherichia coli purE locus specifying 5'-phosphoribosyl-5-amino-4-imidazole carboxylase in de novo purine nucleotide synthesis is divided into two cistrons. We cloned and determined a 2,449-nucleotide sequence including the purE locus. This sequence contains two overlapped open reading frames, ORF-18 and ORF-39, encoding proteins with molecular weights of 18,000 and 39,000, respectively. The purE mutations of CSH57A and DCSP22 were complemented by plasmids carrying ORF-18, while that of NK6051 was complemented by plasmids carrying ORF-39. Thus, the purE locus consists of two distinct genes, designated purE and purK for ORF-18 and ORF-39, respectively. These genes constitute a single operon. A highly conserved 16-nucleotide sequence, termed the PUR box, was found in the upstream region of purE by comparing the sequences of the purF and purMN operons. We also found three entire and one partial repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) sequences in the downstream region of purK. Roles of the PUR box and REP sequences are discussed in relation to the genesis of the purEK operon. Images PMID:2644189

  6. Cloning and characterization of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit (RbcS) cDNA from green microalga Ankistrodesmus convolutus.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Tran; Chi, Vu Thi Quynh; Abdullah, Mohd Puad; Omar, Hishamuddin; Noroozi, Mostafa; Napis, Suhaimi

    2011-11-01

    An initial study on gene cloning and characterization of unicellular green microalga Ankistrodesmus convolutus was carried out to isolate and characterize the full-length cDNA of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit (RbcS) as a first step towards elucidating the structure of A. convolutus RbcS gene. The full-length of A. convolutus RbcS cDNA (AcRbcS) contained 28 bp of 5' untranslated region (UTR), 225 bp of 3' non-coding region, and an open reading frame of 165 amino acids consisting of a chloroplast transit peptide with 24 amino acids and a mature protein of 141 amino acids. The amino acid sequence has high identity to those of other green algae RbcS genes. The AcRbcS contained a few conserved domains including protein kinase C phosphorylation site, tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site and N-myristoylation sites. The AcRbcS was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and a ~21 kDa of anticipated protein band was observed on SDS-PAGE. From the phylogenetic analysis of RbcS protein sequences, it was found that the RbcS of A. convolutus has closer genetic relationship with green microalgae species compared to those of green seaweed and green macroalgae species. Southern hybridization analysis revealed that the AcRbcS is a member of a small multigene family comprising of two to six members in A. convolutus genome. Under different illumination conditions, RT-PCR analysis showed that AcRbcS transcription was reduced in the dark, and drastically recovered in the light condition. Results presented in this paper established a good foundation for further study on the photosynthetic process of A. convolutus and other green algae species where little information is known on Rubisco small subunit. PMID:21287365

  7. Expression and methylation of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and acetyl-CoA carboxylase are associated with fatty liver syndrome in chicken.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Li, Qinghe; Liu, Ranran; Zhao, Guiping; Zhang, Yonghong; Zheng, Maiqing; Cui, Huanxian; Li, Peng; Cui, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jie; Wen, Jie

    2016-06-01

    The typical characteristic of fatty liver syndrome (FLS) is an increased hepatic triacylglycerol content, and a sudden decline in egg production often occurs. FLS may develop into fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome (FLHS), characterized by sudden death from hepatic rupture and hemorrhage. DNA methylation is associated with transcriptional silencing, leading to the etiology and pathogenesis of some animal diseases. The roles of DNA methylation in the genesis of FLS, however, are largely unknown. The lipogenic methyl-deficient diet (MDD) caused FLS similar to human nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). After 16 Jingxing-Huang (JXH) hens were fed MDD for 10 wk, eight exhibited FLS (designated as FLS-susceptible birds); the remainder, without FLS, served as controls (NFLS). Physiological and biochemical variables, gene expression levels, and DNA methylation were determined in the liver. The development of FLS in JXH hens was accompanied by abnormal lipid accumulation. Relative expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) were significantly up-regulated in the FLS group in comparison with the NFLS group. The transcript abundance of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1c), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) did not differ between the two groups. Interestingly, MTTP and ACC mRNA abundance were negatively correlated with the level of promoter methylation. The extent of DNA methylation of the cytosine-guanine (CpG) sites in the SREBP-1c, FAS, PPARα, and LXRα promoter regions was also analyzed by direct sequencing but none differed between FLS and NFLS birds. Taken together, these results specify link DNA methylation to the pathogenesis of FLS in chickens. PMID:27083546

  8. Ozone-induced ethylene emission accelerates the loss of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and nuclear-encoded mRNAs in senescing potato leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, R.E.; Schlagnhaufer, C.D.; Arteca, R.N.

    1995-11-01

    The relationships among O{sub 3}-induced accelerated senescence, induction of ethylene, and changes in specific mRNA and protein levels were investigated in potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Norland) plants. When plants were exposed to 0.08 {mu}L L{sup -1} O{sub 3} for 5 h d{sup -1}, steady-state levels of rbcS mRNA declined at least 5-fold in expanding leaves after 3 d of O{sub 3} exposure and ethylene levels increased 6- to 10-fold. The expression of OIP-1, a 1-aminocyclo-propane-1-carboxylate synthase cDNA from potato, correlated with increased production of ethylene and decreased levels of rbcS mRNA in foliage of plants treated with O{sub 3}. In plants exposed to 0.30 {mu}L L{sup -1} O{sub 3} for 4 h, rbcS transcript levels were reduced 4-fold, whereas nuclear run-on experiments revealed that rbcS mRNA may be due, in part, to posttranscriptional regulation. The levels of transcripts for other chloroplast proteins, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and a photosystem II chlorophyll a/b-binding protein decreased in O{sub 3}-treated plants, in parallel with the decrease in rbcS mRNA. The steady-state mRNA level of a cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase increased in O{sub 3}-treated plants. The induction of ethylene and changes in transcript levels preceded visible leaf damage and decreases in ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase protein levels. 40 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Discrimination in the dark. Resolving the interplay between metabolic and physical constraints to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity during the crassulacean acid metabolism cycle.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Howard; Cousins, Asaph B; Badger, Murray R; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2007-02-01

    A model defining carbon isotope discrimination (delta13C) for crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants was experimentally validated using Kalanchoe daigremontiana. Simultaneous measurements of gas exchange and instantaneous CO2 discrimination (for 13C and 18O) were made from late photoperiod (phase IV of CAM), throughout the dark period (phase I), and into the light (phase II). Measurements of CO2 response curves throughout the dark period revealed changing phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) capacity. These systematic changes in PEPC capacity were tracked by net CO2 uptake, stomatal conductance, and online delta13C signal; all declined at the start of the dark period, then increased to a maximum 2 h before dawn. Measurements of delta13C were higher than predicted from the ratio of intercellular to external CO2 (p(i)/p(a)) and fractionation associated with CO2 hydration and PEPC carboxylations alone, such that the dark period mesophyll conductance, g(i), was 0.044 mol m(-2) s(-1) bar(-1). A higher estimate of g(i) (0.085 mol m(-2) s(-1) bar(-1)) was needed to account for the modeled and measured delta18O discrimination throughout the dark period. The differences in estimates of g(i) from the two isotope measurements, and an offset of -5.5 per thousand between the 18O content of source and transpired water, suggest spatial variations in either CO2 diffusion path length and/or carbonic anhydrase activity, either within individual cells or across a succulent leaf. Our measurements support the model predictions to show that internal CO2 diffusion limitations within CAM leaves increase delta13C discrimination during nighttime CO2 fixation while reducing delta13C during phase IV. When evaluating the phylogenetic distribution of CAM, carbon isotope composition will reflect these diffusive limitations as well as relative contributions from C3 and C4 biochemistry. PMID:17142488

  10. Leaf succulence determines the interplay between carboxylase systems and light use during Crassulacean acid metabolism in Kalanchöe species.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Howard; Robe, Wendy E; Girnus, Jan; Maxwell, Kate

    2008-01-01

    The photosynthetic physiology of Crassulacean acid metabolism was investigated in two Kalanchoë species with differing leaf succulence. The magnitude of CAM was higher for the more succulent leaves of K. daigremontiana, compared to the less succulent leaves of K. pinnata. High succulence was related to low mesophyll conductance: K. pinnata was able to maximize diurnal carbon gain by the C(3) pathway, whereas increased succulence is associated with a higher commitment to the CAM cycle in K. daigremontiana. The Rubisco specificity factor, tau, determining selectivity for CO(2) over O(2), was similar for both species (approximately 88), and lower than that of Spinacea (approximately 95), but in contrast to C(4) plants, the Rubisco K(mCO(2)) (determined independently) was also lower in Kalanchoë spp. than in spinach. Differences in light use were related to the nature of the sink strength in each Phase of CAM, with PEPC activity resulting in low electron transport rates. Decarboxylation was marked by high, non-saturated rates of electron transport, with Rubisco activity and activation state increasing in both species during the course of the light period. The degree of succulence, and extent of CAM activity, was associated with a progressive inhibition of PSII photochemistry and potential Rubisco activity during the night in both species. Rubisco could be 'woken up' more rapidly in K. pinnata, whereas 45 min light acclimation was required for full recovery of electron transport and Rubisco activity in K. daigremontiana. Leaf morphology therefore seems to alter the expression of and dependence on CAM, but also the extent of co-regulation of carboxylase networks and light use capacity. PMID:18408219

  11. Abundance and distribution of archaeal acetyl-CoA/propionyl-CoA carboxylase genes indicative for putatively chemoautotrophic Archaea in the tropical Atlantic's interior.

    PubMed

    Bergauer, Kristin; Sintes, Eva; van Bleijswijk, Judith; Witte, Harry; Herndl, Gerhard J

    2013-06-01

    Recently, evidence suggests that dark CO2 fixation in the pelagic realm of the ocean does not only occur in the suboxic and anoxic water bodies but also in the oxygenated meso- and bathypelagic waters of the North Atlantic. To elucidate the significance and phylogeny of the key organisms mediating dark CO2 fixation in the tropical Atlantic, we quantified functional genes indicative for CO2 fixation. We used a Q-PCR-based assay targeting the bifunctional acetyl-CoA/propionyl-CoA carboxylase (accA subunit), a key enzyme powering inter alia the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle (HP/HB) and the archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA). Quantification of accA-like genes revealed a consistent depth profile in the upper mesopelagial with increasing gene abundances from subsurface layers towards the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), coinciding with an increase in archaeal amoA gene abundance. Gene abundance profiles of metabolic marker genes (accA, amoA) were correlated with thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA gene abundances as well as CO2 fixation rates to link the genetic potential to actual rate measurements. AccA gene abundances correlated with archaeal amoA gene abundance throughout the water column (r(2)  = 0.309, P < 0.0001). Overall, a substantial genetic predisposition of CO2 fixation was present in the dark realm of the tropical Atlantic in both Archaea and Bacteria. Hence, dark ocean CO2 fixation might be more widespread among prokaryotes inhabiting the oxygenated water column of the ocean's interior than hitherto assumed. PMID:23330917

  12. Cardiac-specific deletion of acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) prevents metabolic remodeling during pressure-overload hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Olson, David P.; Marney, Luke C.; Garcia-Menendez, Lorena; Synovec, Robert E.; Tian, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Decreased fatty acid oxidation (FAO) with increased reliance on glucose are hallmarks of metabolic remodeling that occurs in pathological cardiac hypertrophy and is associated with decreased myocardial energetics and impaired cardiac function. To date, it has not been tested whether prevention of the metabolic switch that occurs during the development of cardiac hypertrophy has unequivocal benefits on cardiac function and energetics. Objectives Since malonyl CoA production via acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) inhibits mitochondrial fatty acid transport, we hypothesized that mice with a cardiac-specific deletion of ACC2 (ACC2H−/−) would maintain cardiac fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and improve function and energetics during the development of pressure-overload hypertrophy. Methods and Results ACC2 deletion led to a significant reduction in cardiac malonyl CoA levels. In isolated perfused heart experiments, left ventricular (LV) function and oxygen consumption were similiar in ACC2H−/− mice despite an ~60% increase in FAO compared to controls (CON). After 8 weeks of pressure-overload via transverse aortic constriction (TAC), ACC2H−/− mice exhibited a substrate utilization profile similar to sham animals while CON-TAC hearts had decreased FAO with increased glycolysis and anaplerosis. Myocardial energetics, assessed by 31P NMR spectroscopy, and cardiac function were maintained in ACC2H−/− after 8 weeks of TAC. Furthermore, ACC2H−/−-TAC demonstrated an attenuation of cardiac hypertrophy with a significant reduction in fibrosis relative to CON-TAC. Conclusions These data suggest that reversion to the fetal metabolic profile in chronic pathological hypertrophy is associated with impaired myocardial function and energetics and maintenance of the inherent cardiac metabolic profile and mitochondrial oxidative capacity is a viable therapeutic strategy. PMID:22730442

  13. Recombinant thermoactive phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and its coupling with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs) for the conversion of CO2 to oxaloacetate.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Sonia; De Luca, Viviana; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T; Carginale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-15

    With the continuous increase of atmospheric CO2 in the last decades, efficient methods for carbon capture, sequestration, and utilization are urgently required. The possibility of converting CO2 into useful chemicals could be a good strategy to both decreasing the CO2 concentration and for achieving an efficient exploitation of this cheap carbon source. Recently, several single- and multi-enzyme systems for the catalytic conversion of CO2 mainly to bicarbonate have been implemented. In order to design and construct a catalytic system for the conversion of CO2 to organic molecules, we implemented an in vitro multienzyme system using mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes. The system, in fact, was constituted by a recombinant phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, in combination with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs), for converting CO2 into oxaloacetate, a compound of potential utility in industrial processes. The catalytic procedure is in two steps: the conversion of CO2 into bicarbonate by CA, followed by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate with bicarbonate, catalyzed by PEPC, with formation of oxaloacetate (OAA). All tested CAs, belonging to α-, β-, and γ-CA classes, were able to increase OAA production compared to procedures when only PEPC was used. Interestingly, the efficiency of the CAs tested in OAA production was in good agreement with the kinetic parameters for the CO2 hydration reaction of these enzymes. This PEPC also revealed to be thermoactive and thermostable, and when coupled with the extremely thermostable CA from Sulphurhydrogenibium azorense (SazCA) the production of OAA was achieved even if the two enzymes were exposed to temperatures up to 60 °C, suggesting a possible role of the two coupled enzymes in biotechnological processes. PMID:26712095

  14. Isolated 3-Methylcrotonyl-CoA Carboxylase Deficiency: Evidence for an Allele-Specific Dominant Negative Effect and Responsiveness to Biotin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Matthias R.; Dantas, M. Fernanda; Suormala, Terttu; Almashanu, Shlomo; Giunta, Cecilia; Friebel, Dolores; Gebhardt, Boris; Fowler, Brian; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Baumgartner, E. Regula; Valle, David

    2004-01-01

    Deficiency of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC) results in elevated excretion of 3-methylcrotonylglycine (3-MCG) and 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid (3-HIVA). MCC is a heteromeric mitochondrial enzyme comprising biotin-containing α subunits and smaller β subunits, encoded by MCCA and MCCB, respectively. Mutations in these genes cause isolated MCC deficiency, an autosomal recessive disorder with a variable phenotype that ranges from severe neonatal to asymptomatic adult forms. No reported patients have responded to biotin therapy. Here, we describe two patients with a biochemical and, in one case, clinical phenotype of MCC deficiency, both of whom were responsive to biotin. The first patient presented at 3 months with seizures and progressive psychomotor retardation. Metabolic investigation at 2 years revealed elevated excretion of 3-MCG and 3-HIVA, suggesting MCC deficiency. High-dose biotin therapy was associated with a dramatic reduction in seizures, normalization of the electroencephalogram, and correction of the organic aciduria, within 4 weeks. MCC activity in fibroblasts was 25% of normal levels. The second patient, a newborn detected by tandem-mass-spectrometry newborn screening, displayed the same biochemical phenotype and remained asymptomatic with biotin up to the age of 18 months. In both patients, sequence analysis of the complete open reading frames of MCCA and MCCB revealed heterozygosity for MCCA-R385S and for the known polymorphic variant MCCA-P464H but revealed no other coding alterations. MCCA-R385S is unusual, in that it has a normal amount of MCCα protein but confers no MCC activity. We show that MCCA-R385S, but not other MCCA missense alleles, reduces the MCC activity of cotransfected MCCA–wild-type allele. Our results suggest that MCCA-R385S is a dominant negative allele and is biotin responsive in vivo. PMID:15359379

  15. Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Phosphorylation by Metabolites and Abscisic Acid during the Development and Germination of Barley Seeds1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Feria, Ana-Belén; Alvarez, Rosario; Cochereau, Ludivine; Vidal, Jean; García-Mauriño, Sofía; Echevarría, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    During barley (Hordeum vulgare) seed development, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity increased and PEPC-specific antibodies revealed housekeeping (103-kD) and inducible (108-kD) subunits. Bacterial-type PEPC fragments were immunologically detected in denatured protein extracts from dry and imbibed conditions; however, on nondenaturing gels, the activity of the recently reported octameric PEPC (in castor [Ricinus communis] oil seeds) was not detected. The phosphorylation state of the PEPC, as judged by l-malate 50% inhibition of initial activity values, phosphoprotein chromatography, and immunodetection of the phosphorylated N terminus, was found to be high between 8 and 18 d postanthesis (DPA) and during imbibition. In contrast, the enzyme appeared to be in a low phosphorylation state from 20 DPA up to dry seed. The time course of 32/36-kD, Ca2+-independent PEPC kinase activity exhibited a substantial increase after 30 DPA that did not coincide with the PEPC phosphorylation profile. This kinase was found to be inhibited by l-malate and not by putative protein inhibitors, and the PEPC phosphorylation status correlated with high glucose-6-phosphate to malate ratios, thereby suggesting an in vivo metabolic control of the kinase. PEPC phosphorylation was also regulated by photosynthate supply at 11 DPA. In addition, when fed exogenously to imbibing seeds, abscisic acid significantly increased PEPC kinase activity. This was further enhanced by the cytosolic protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide but blocked by protease inhibitors, thereby suggesting that the phytohormone acts on the stability of the kinase. We propose that a similar abscisic acid-dependent effect may contribute to produce the increase in PEPC kinase activity during desiccation stages. PMID:18753284

  16. Genes encoding plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-phosphoglycerate kinase of the Triticum/Aegilops complex and the evolutionary history of polyploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaoxing; Sirikhachornkit, Anchalee; Su, Xiujuan; Faris, Justin; Gill, Bikram; Haselkorn, Robert; Gornicki, Piotr

    2002-06-11

    The classic wheat evolutionary history is one of adaptive radiation of the diploid Triticum/Aegilops species (A, S, D), genome convergence and divergence of the tetraploid (Triticum turgidum AABB, and Triticum timopheevii AAGG) and hexaploid (Triticum aestivum, AABBDD) species. We analyzed Acc-1 (plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase) and Pgk-1 (plastid 3-phosphoglycerate kinase) genes to determine phylogenetic relationships among Triticum and Aegilops species of the wheat lineage and to establish the timeline of wheat evolution based on gene sequence comparisons. Triticum urartu was confirmed as the A genome donor of tetraploid and hexaploid wheat. The A genome of polyploid wheat diverged from T. urartu less than half a million years ago (MYA), indicating a relatively recent origin of polyploid wheat. The D genome sequences of T. aestivum and Aegilops tauschii are identical, confirming that T. aestivum arose from hybridization of T. turgidum and Ae. tauschii only 8,000 years ago. The diploid Triticum and Aegilops progenitors of the A, B, D, G, and S genomes all radiated 2.5-4.5 MYA. Our data suggest that the Acc-1 and Pgk-1 loci have different histories in different lineages, indicating genome mosaicity and significant intraspecific differentiation. Some loci of the S genome of Aegilops speltoides and the G genome of T. timophevii are closely related, suggesting the same origin of some parts of their genomes. None of the Aegilops genomes analyzed is a close relative of the B genome, so the diploid progenitor of the B genome remains unknown. PMID:12060759

  17. Pyramiding expression of maize genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) synergistically improve the photosynthetic characteristics of transgenic wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, HuiFang; Xu, WeiGang; Wang, HuiWei; Hu, Lin; Li, Yan; Qi, XueLi; Zhang, Lei; Li, ChunXin; Hua, Xia

    2014-09-01

    Using particle bombardment transformation, we introduced maize pepc cDNA encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ppdk cDNA encoding pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) into the C3 crop wheat to generate transgenic wheat lines carrying cDNA of pepc (PC lines), ppdk (PK lines) or both (PKC lines). The integration, transcription, and expression of the foreign genes were confirmed by Southern blot, Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (Q-RT-PCR), and Western blot analysis. Q-RT-PCR results indicated that the average relative expression levels of pepc and ppdk in the PKC lines reached 10 and 4.6, respectively, compared to their expressions in untransformed plants (set to 1). The enzyme activities of PEPC and PPDK in the PKC lines were 4.3- and 2.1-fold higher, respectively, than in the untransformed control. The maximum daily net photosynthetic rates of the PKC, PC, and PK lines were enhanced by 26.4, 13.3, and 4.5%, respectively, whereas the diurnal accumulations of photosynthesis were 21.3, 13.9, and 6.9%, respectively, higher than in the control. The Fv/Fm of the transgenic plants decreased less than in the control under high temperature and high light conditions (2 weeks after anthesis), suggesting that the transgenic wheat transports more absorbed light energy into a photochemical reaction. The exogenous maize C4-specific pepc gene was more effective than ppdk at improving the photosynthetic performance and yield characteristics of transgenic wheat, while the two genes showed a synergistic effect when they were transformed into the same genetic background, because the PKC lines exhibited improved photosynthetic and physiological traits. PMID:24595619

  18. Reciprocal Control of Anaplerotic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase by in Vivo Monoubiquitination and Phosphorylation in Developing Proteoid Roots of Phosphate-Deficient Harsh Hakea1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Shane, Michael W.; Fedosejevs, Eric T.; Plaxton, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates important functions for phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPC) in inorganic phosphate (Pi)-starved plants. This includes controlling the production of organic acid anions (malate, citrate) that are excreted in copious amounts by proteoid roots of nonmycorrhizal species such as harsh hakea (Hakea prostrata). This, in turn, enhances the bioavailability of mineral-bound Pi by solubilizing Al3+, Fe3+, and Ca2+ phosphates in the rhizosphere. Harsh hakea thrives in the nutrient-impoverished, ancient soils of southwestern Australia. Proteoid roots from Pi-starved harsh hakea were analyzed over 20 d of development to correlate changes in malate and citrate exudation with PEPC activity, posttranslational modifications (inhibitory monoubiquitination versus activatory phosphorylation), and kinetic/allosteric properties. Immature proteoid roots contained an equivalent ratio of monoubiquitinated 110-kD and phosphorylated 107-kD PEPC polypeptides (p110 and p107, respectively). PEPC purification, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry indicated that p110 and p107 are subunits of a 430-kD heterotetramer and that they both originate from the same plant-type PEPC gene. Incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme converted the p110:p107 PEPC heterotetramer of immature proteoid roots into a p107 homotetramer while significantly increasing the enzyme’s activity under suboptimal but physiologically relevant assay conditions. Proteoid root maturation was paralleled by PEPC activation (e.g. reduced Km [PEP] coupled with elevated I50 [malate and Asp] values) via in vivo deubiquitination of p110 to p107, and subsequent phosphorylation of the deubiquitinated subunits. This novel mechanism of posttranslational control is hypothesized to contribute to the massive synthesis and excretion of organic acid anions that dominates the carbon metabolism of the mature proteoid roots. PMID:23407057

  19. Associations of polymorphisms in the promoter I of bovine acetyl-CoA carboxylase-alpha gene with beef fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Knight, T J; Reecy, J M; Wheeler, T L; Shackelford, S D; Cundiff, L V; Beitz, D C

    2010-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter I (PI) region of the bovine acetyl-CoA carboxylase-alpha (ACACA) gene and to evaluate the extent to which they were associated with lipid-related traits. Eight novel SNPs were identified, which were AJ276223:g.2064T>A (SNP1), g.2155C>T (SNP2), g.2203G>T (SNP3), g.2268T>C (SNP4), g.2274G>A (SNP5), g.2340A>G (SNP6), g.2350T>C (SNP7) and g.2370A>G (SNP8). Complete linkage disequilibrium was observed among SNP1, 2, 4, 5, 6 and 8. Phenotypic data were collected from 573 cross-bred steers with six sire breeds, including Hereford, Angus, Brangus, Beefmaster, Bonsmara and Romosinuano. The genotypes of SNP1/2/4/5/6/8 were significantly associated with adjusted backfat thickness. The genotypes of SNP3 were significantly associated with triacylglycerol (TAG) content and fatty acid composition of longissimus dorsi muscle (LM) in Brangus-, Romosinuano- and Bonsmara-sired cattle. Cattle with g.2203GG genotype had greater concentrations of TAG, total lipid, total saturated fatty acid and total monounsaturated fatty acid than did cattle with g.2203GT genotype. The genotypes of SNP7 were significantly associated with fatty acid composition of LM. Cattle with genotype g.2350TC had greater amounts of several fatty acids in LM than did cattle with genotype g.2350CC. Our results suggested that the SNPs in the PI region of ACACA gene are associated with variations in the fatty acid contents in LM. PMID:20002363

  20. Bacterial- and plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isozymes from developing castor oil seeds interact in vivo and associate with the surface of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonho; Khuu, Nicholas; Howard, Alexander S M; Mullen, Robert T; Plaxton, William C

    2012-07-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from developing castor oil seeds (COS) exists as two distinct oligomeric isoforms. The typical class-1 PEPC homotetramer consists of 107-kDa plant-type PEPC (PTPC) subunits, whereas the allosterically desensitized 910-kDa class-2 PEPC hetero-octamer arises from the association of class-1 PEPC with 118-kDa bacterial-type PEPC (BTPC) subunits. The in vivo interaction and subcellular location of COS BTPC and PTPC were assessed by imaging fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged PEPCs in tobacco suspension-cultured cells. The BTPC-FP mainly localized to cytoplasmic punctate/globular structures, identified as mitochondria by co-immunostaining of endogenous cytochrome oxidase. Inhibition of respiration with KCN resulted in proportional decreases and increases in mitochondrial versus cytosolic BTPC-FP, respectively. The FP-PTPC and NLS-FP-PTPC (containing an appended nuclear localization signal, NLS) localized to the cytosol and nucleus, respectively, but both co-localized with mitochondrial-associated BTPC when co-expressed with BTPC-FP. Transmission electron microscopy of immunogold-labeled developing COS revealed that BTPC and PTPC are localized at the mitochondrial (outer) envelope, as well as the cytosol. Moreover, thermolysin-sensitive BTPC and PTPC polypeptides were detected on immunoblots of purified COS mitochondria. Overall, our results demonstrate that: (i) COS BTPC and PTPC interact in vivo as a class-2 PEPC complex that associates with the surface of mitochondria, (ii) BTPC's unique and divergent intrinsically disordered region mediates its interaction with PTPC, whereas (iii) the PTPC-containing class-1 PEPC is entirely cytosolic. We hypothesize that mitochondrial-associated class-2 PEPC facilitates rapid refixation of respiratory CO(2) while sustaining a large anaplerotic flux to replenish tricarboxylic acid cycle C-skeletons withdrawn for biosynthesis. PMID:22404138

  1. Drought-inhibited ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity is mediated through increased release of ethylene and changes in the ratio of polyamines in pakchoi.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xingxue; Zhou, Guolin; Yang, Wengang; Wang, Aihua; Hu, Zhenhua; Lin, Chufa; Chen, Xin

    2014-09-15

    To study the mechanisms of drought inhibiting photosynthesis and the role of PAs and ethylene, the photosynthetic rate (Pn), the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm), the intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), photorespiratory rate (Pr), the amount of chlorophyll (chl), antioxidant enzyme activity, ethylene levels, RuBPC (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase) activity and endogenous polyamine levels of pakchoi were examined, and an inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) and an inhibitor of ethylene synthesis and spermidine (Spd) were used to induce the change of endogenous polyamine levels. The results show that drought induced a decrease in Pn and RuBPC activity, an increase in the intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), but no change in the actual photochemical efficiency of PSII (ΦPSII), and chlorophyll content. In addition, drought caused an increase in the free putrescine (fPut), the ethylene levels, a decrease in the Spd and spermine (Spm) levels, and the PAs/fPut ratio in the leaves. The exogenous application of Spd and amino oxiacetic acid (AOAA, an inhibitor of ethylene synthesis) markedly reversed these drought-induced effects on polyamine, ethylene, Pn, the PAs/fPut ratio and RuBPCase activity in leaves. Methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG), an inhibitor of SAMDC resulting in the inability of activated cells to synthesize Spd and Spm, exacerbates the negative effects induced by drought. These results suggest that the decrease in Pn is at least partially attributed to the decrease of RuBPC activity under drought stress and that drought inhibits RuBPC activity by decreasing the ratio of PAs/fPut and increasing the release of ethylene. PMID:25046760

  2. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase genes as a functional marker for chemolithoautotrophic halophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in hypersaline habitats.

    PubMed

    Tourova, Tatjana P; Kovaleva, Olga L; Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Muyzer, Gerard

    2010-07-01

    The presence and diversity of the cbb genes encoding the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) (a key enzyme of the Calvin-Benson cycle of autotrophic CO(2) assimilation) were investigated in pure cultures of seven genera of halophilic chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) and in sediments from a hypersaline lake in which such bacteria have been recently discovered. All of the halophilic SOB strains (with the exception of Thiohalomonas nitratireducens) possessed the cbbL gene encoding RuBisCO form I, while the cbbM gene encoding RuBisCO form II was detected only in some of the pure cultures. The general topologies of the CbbL/CbbM trees and the 16S rRNA gene tree were different, but both markers showed that the halophilic SOB genera formed independent lineages in the Gammaproteobacteria. In some cases, such as with several strains of the genus Thiohalospira and with Thioalkalibacter halophilus, the cbbL clustering was incongruent with the positions of these strains on the ribosomal tree. In the cbbM tree, the clustering of Thiohalospira and Thiohalorhabdus strains was incongruent with their branching in both cbbL and 16S rRNA gene trees. cbbL and cbbM genes related to those found in the analysed halophilic SOB were also detected in a sediment from a hypersaline lake in Kulunda Steppe (Russia). Most of the cbbL and cbbM genes belonged to members of the genus Thiohalorhabdus. In the cbbL clone library, sequences related to those of Halothiobacillus and Thiohalospira were detected as minor components. Some of the environmental cbbM sequences belonged to as yet unknown phylotypes, representing deep lineages of halophilic autotrophs. PMID:20299400

  3. Chromium downregulates the expression of Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 1 gene in lipogenic tissues of domestic goats: a potential strategy for meat quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Najafpanah, Mohammad Javad; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Zali, Abolfazl; Moradi-Shahrebabak, Hossein; Mousapour, Hojatollah

    2014-06-15

    Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 1 (ACC1) is a biotin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the carboxylation of Acetyl CoA to form Malonyl CoA, the key intermediate metabolite in fatty acid synthesis. In this study, the mRNA expression of the ACC1 gene was evaluated in four different tissues (liver, visceral fat, subcutaneous fat, and longissimus muscle) of the domestic goat (Capra hircus) kids feeding on four different levels of trivalent chromium (0, 0.5, 1, and 1.5mg/day) as food supplementation. RT-qPCR technique was used for expression analyses and heat shock protein 90 gene (HSP-90) was considered as reference gene for data normalization. Our results revealed that 1.5mg/day chromium significantly reduced the expression of the ACC1 gene in liver, visceral fat, and subcutaneous fat tissues, but not in longissimus muscles (P<0.05). We measured some phenotypic traits of kid's carcasses to detect their probable correlations with chromium-mediated downregulation of ACC1 expression. Interestingly, changes in ACC1 expression were accompanied with decreased accumulation of fats in adipose tissues such that the subcutaneous fat thickness and heart fat percentage decreased in kids feeding on chromium. By contrast, chromium supplemented kids showed higher percentage of muscles despite the fact that their total body weight did not differ from that of non-supplemented kids. Our study suggests that trivalent chromium alters the direction of energy accumulation towards muscles rather than fats and provides insights into application of chromium supplementation as a useful strategy for improvement of meat quality in domestic animals. PMID:24704275

  4. Status of the substrate binding sites of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase as determined with 2-C-carboxyarabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Genhai; Jensen, R.G. )

    1990-05-01

    The properties of the tight and specific binding of 2-C-carboxy-D-arabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate (CABP), which occurs only to reaction sites of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) that are activated by CO{sub 2} and Mg{sup 2+}, were studied. With fully active purified spinach (Spinacia oleracea) Rubisco the rate of tight binding of ({sup 14}C)CABP fit a multiple exponential rate equation with half of the sites binding with a rate constant of 40 per minute and the second half of the sites binding at 3.2 per minute. This suggests that after CABP binds to one site of a dimer of Rubisco large subunits, binding to the second site is considerably slower, indicating negative cooperativity as previously reported. The rate of CABP binding to partially activated Rubisco was complete within 2 to 5 minutes, with slower binding to inactive sites as they formed the carbamate and bound Mg{sup 2+}. Addition of ({sup 14}C)CABP and EDTA stopped binding of Mg{sup 2+} and allowed tight binding of the radiolabel only to sites which were CO{sub 2}/Mg{sup 2+}-activated at that moment. The rate of CO{sub 2} fixation was proportional to the CO{sub 2}/Mg{sup 2+}-activated sites. During light-dependent CO{sub 2} fixation with isolated spinach chloroplasts, the amount of carbamylation was proportional to Rubisco activity either initially upon lysis of the plastids or following total activation with Mg{sup 2+} and CO{sub 2}. Lysis of chloroplasts in media with ({sup 14}C)CABP plus EDTA estimated those carbamylated sites having Mg{sup 2+}. The loss of Rubisco activation during illumination was partially due to the lack of Mg{sup 2+} to stabilize the carbamylated sites.

  5. Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylases by soraphen A prevents lipid accumulation and adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Cordonier, Elizabeth L; Jarecke, Sarah K; Hollinger, Frances E; Zempleni, Janos

    2016-06-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACC) 1 and 2 catalyze the carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA and depend on biotin as a coenzyme. ACC1 localizes in the cytoplasm and produces malonyl-CoA for fatty acid (FA) synthesis. ACC2 localizes in the outer mitochondrial membrane and produces malonyl-CoA that inhibits FA import into mitochondria for subsequent oxidation. We hypothesized that ACCs are checkpoints in adipocyte differentiation and tested this hypothesis using the ACC1 and ACC2 inhibitor soraphen A (SA) in murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. When 3T3-L1 cells were treated with 100nM SA for 8 days after induction of differentiation, the expression of PPARγ mRNA and FABP4 mRNA decreased by 40% and 50%, respectively, compared with solvent controls; the decrease in gene expression was accompanied by a decrease in FABP4 protein expression and associated with a decrease in lipid droplet accumulation. The rate of FA oxidation was 300% greater in SA-treated cells compared with vehicle controls. Treatment with exogenous palmitate restored PPARγ and FABP4 mRNA expression and FABP4 protein expression in SA-treated cells. In contrast, SA did not alter lipid accumulation if treatment was initiated on day eight after induction of differentiation. We conclude that loss of ACC1-dependent FA synthesis and loss of ACC2-dependent inhibition of FA oxidation prevent lipid accumulation in adipocytes and inhibit early stages of adipocyte differentiation. PMID:27041646

  6. Reduction of Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Content by Antisense RNA Reduces Photosynthesis in Transgenic Tobacco Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Graham S.; Evans, John R.; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Arvidsson, Yvonne B. C.; Andrews, T. John

    1992-01-01

    A complementary DNA for the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was cloned from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and fused in the antisense orientation to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. This antisense gene was introduced into the tobacco genome, and the resulting transgenic plants were analyzed to assess the effect of the antisense RNA on Rubisco activity and photosynthesis. The mean content of extractable Rubisco activity from the leaves of 10 antisense plants was 18% of the mean level of activity of control plants. The soluble protein content of the leaves of anti-small subunit plants was reduced by the amount equivalent to the reduction in Rubisco. There was little change in phosphoribulokinase activity, electron transport, and chlorophyll content, indicating that the loss of Rubisco did not affect these other components of photosynthesis. However, there was a significant reduction in carbonic anhydrase activity. The rate of CO2 assimilation measured at 1000 micromoles quanta per square meter per second, 350 microbars CO2, and 25°C was reduced by 63% (mean value) in the antisense plants and was limited by Rubisco activity over a wide range of intercellular CO2 partial pressures (pi). In control leaves, Rubisco activity only limited the rate of CO2 assimilation below a pi of 400 microbars. Despite the decrease in photosynthesis, there was no reduction in stomatal conductance in the antisense plants, and the stomata still responded to changes in pi. The unchanged conductance and lower CO2 assimilation resulted in a higher pi, which was reflected in greater carbon isotope discrimination in the leaves of the antisense plants. These results suggest that stomatal function is independent of total leaf Rubisco activity. PMID:16668627

  7. Enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic rice over-expressing of maize C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene via NO and Ca(2+).

    PubMed

    Qian, Baoyun; Li, Xia; Liu, Xiaolong; Chen, Pingbo; Ren, Chengang; Dai, Chuanchao

    2015-03-01

    We determined the effects of endogenous nitric oxide and Ca(2+) on photosynthesis and gene expression in transgenic rice plants (PC) over-expressing the maize C4pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) under drought. In this study, seedlings were subjected to PEG 6000 treatments using PC and wild type (WT; Kitaake). The results showed that, compared with WT, PC had higher relative water content (RWC) and net photosynthetic rate (Pn) under drought. During a 2-day re-watering treatment, Pn recovered faster in PC than in WT. Further analyses showed that, under the drought treatment, the amount of endogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) increased in WT mainly via NADPH oxidase. While in PC, the endogenous nitric oxide (NO) content increased via nitrate reductase and nitric oxide synthase on day 2 of the drought treatment and day 1 of the re-watering treatment. After 2 days of drought treatment, PC also showed higher PEPC activity, calcium content, phospholipase D (PLD) activity, C4-pepc and NAC6 transcript levels, and protein kinase activity as compared with PC without treatment. These changes did not occur in WT. Correlation analysis also proved NO associated with these indicators in PC. Based on these results, there was a particular molecular mechanism of drought tolerance in PC. The mechanism is related to the signaling processes via NO and Ca(2+) involving the protein kinase and the transcription factor, resulted in up-regulation of PEPC activity and its gene expression, such as C4pepc. Some genes encode antioxidant system, cu/zn-sod as well, which promote antioxidant system to clear MDA and superoxide anion radical, thereby conferring drought tolerance. PMID:25460871

  8. Characterization of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and transcriptional analysis of its related genes in Saccharina japonica (Laminariales, Phaeophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhanru; Liu, Fuli; Li, Qiuying; Yao, Jianting; Duan, Delin

    2014-03-01

    Saccharina japonica is a common macroalga in sublittoral communities of cold seawater environments, and consequently may have highly efficient ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activity for carbon assimilation. In our study, we cloned the full-length Rubisco gene from S. japonica ( SJ-rbc). It contained an open reading frame for a large subunit gene ( SJ — rbcL) of 1 467 bp, a small subunit gene ( SJ-rbcS) of 420 bp, and a SJ-rbcL/S intergenic spacer of 269 bp. The deduced peptides of SJ-rbcL and SJ-rbcS were 488 and 139 amino acids with theoretical molecular weights and isoelectric points of 53.97 kDa, 5.81 and 15.84 kDa, 4.71, respectively. After induction with 1 mmol/L isopropyl- β-D-thiogalactopyranoside for 5 h and purification by Ni2+ affinity chromatography, electrophoresis and western blot detection demonstrated successful expression of the 55 kDa SJ-rbcL protein. Real-time quantitative PCR showed that the mRNA levels of SJ-rbcL in gametophytes increased when transferred into normal growth conditions and exhibited diurnal variations: increased expression during the day but suppressed expression at night. This observation implied that Rubisco played a role in normal gametophytic growth and development. In juvenile sporophytes, mRNA levels of SJ-rbcL, carbonic anhydrase, Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle-related enzyme, and chloroplast light-harvesting protein were remarkably increased under continuous light irradiance. Similarly, expression of these genes was up-regulated under blue light irradiance at 350 μmol/(m2·s). Our results indicate that long-term white light and short-term blue light irradiance enhances juvenile sporophytic growth by synergistic effects of various photosynthetic elements.

  9. Structure-Function Studies with the Unique Hexameric Form II Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase (Rubisco) from Rhodopseudomonas palustris*

    PubMed Central

    Satagopan, Sriram; Chan, Sum; Perry, L. Jeanne; Tabita, F. Robert

    2014-01-01

    The first x-ray crystal structure has been solved for an activated transition-state analog-bound form II ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). This enzyme, from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, assembles as a unique hexamer with three pairs of catalytic large subunit homodimers around a central 3-fold symmetry axis. This oligomer arrangement is unique among all known Rubisco structures, including the form II homolog from Rhodospirillum rubrum. The presence of a transition-state analog in the active site locked the activated enzyme in a “closed” conformation and revealed the positions of critical active site residues during catalysis. Functional roles of two form II-specific residues (Ile165 and Met331) near the active site were examined via site-directed mutagenesis. Substitutions at these residues affect function but not the ability of the enzyme to assemble. Random mutagenesis and suppressor selection in a Rubisco deletion strain of Rhodobacter capsulatus identified a residue in the amino terminus of one subunit (Ala47) that compensated for a negative change near the active site of a neighboring subunit. In addition, substitution of the native carboxyl-terminal sequence with the last few dissimilar residues from the related R. rubrum homolog increased the enzyme's kcat for carboxylation. However, replacement of a longer carboxyl-terminal sequence with termini from either a form III or a form I enzyme, which varied both in length and sequence, resulted in complete loss of function. From these studies, it is evident that a number of subtle interactions near the active site and the carboxyl terminus account for functional differences between the different forms of Rubiscos found in nature. PMID:24942737

  10. Light is essential for degradation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase large subunit during sudden death syndrome development in soybean.

    PubMed

    Ji, J; Scott, M P; Bhattacharyya, M K

    2006-09-01

    FUSARIUM SOLANI f. sp. GLYCINES (Fsg) has been reported to produce at least two phytotoxins. Cell-free FSG culture filtrates containing phytotoxins have been shown to develop foliar sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybean. We have investigated the changes in protein profiles of diseased leaves caused by cell-free FSG culture filtrates prepared from FSG isolates. Two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was conducted to investigate the protein profiles of diseased and healthy leaves. An approximately 55 kDa protein was found to be absent in diseased leaves. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric analyses and a database search revealed that the missing protein is the ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit, which is involved in carbon assimilation and photorespiration. This result was confirmed by Western blot experiments. We have shown that light is essential for disappearance of the Rubisco large subunit initiated by cell-free FSG culture filtrates. The disappearance of the protein is fairly rapid and occurs within 24 h, presumably due to degradation. Cell-free, FSG culture-induced degradation of the Rubisco large subunit was accompanied by accumulation of reactive oxygen species under light conditions. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labelling experiments suggested that programmed cell death was initiated in leaves of seedlings fed with cell-free FSG culture filtrates. These results suggest that, in the presence of light, FSG culture filtrates containing phytotoxins cause degradation of the Rubisco large subunit and accumulation of free radicals and, thereby, initiate programmed cell death leading to foliar SDS development in soybean. PMID:16821191

  11. Reciprocal control of anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase by in vivo monoubiquitination and phosphorylation in developing proteoid roots of phosphate-deficient harsh hakea.

    PubMed

    Shane, Michael W; Fedosejevs, Eric T; Plaxton, William C

    2013-04-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates important functions for phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPC) in inorganic phosphate (Pi)-starved plants. This includes controlling the production of organic acid anions (malate, citrate) that are excreted in copious amounts by proteoid roots of nonmycorrhizal species such as harsh hakea (Hakea prostrata). This, in turn, enhances the bioavailability of mineral-bound Pi by solubilizing Al(3+), Fe(3+), and Ca(2+) phosphates in the rhizosphere. Harsh hakea thrives in the nutrient-impoverished, ancient soils of southwestern Australia. Proteoid roots from Pi-starved harsh hakea were analyzed over 20 d of development to correlate changes in malate and citrate exudation with PEPC activity, posttranslational modifications (inhibitory monoubiquitination versus activatory phosphorylation), and kinetic/allosteric properties. Immature proteoid roots contained an equivalent ratio of monoubiquitinated 110-kD and phosphorylated 107-kD PEPC polypeptides (p110 and p107, respectively). PEPC purification, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry indicated that p110 and p107 are subunits of a 430-kD heterotetramer and that they both originate from the same plant-type PEPC gene. Incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme converted the p110:p107 PEPC heterotetramer of immature proteoid roots into a p107 homotetramer while significantly increasing the enzyme's activity under suboptimal but physiologically relevant assay conditions. Proteoid root maturation was paralleled by PEPC activation (e.g. reduced Km [PEP] coupled with elevated I50 [malate and Asp] values) via in vivo deubiquitination of p110 to p107, and subsequent phosphorylation of the deubiquitinated subunits. This novel mechanism of posttranslational control is hypothesized to contribute to the massive synthesis and excretion of organic acid anions that dominates the carbon metabolism of the mature proteoid roots. PMID:23407057

  12. Decline of Activity and Quantity of Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase and Net Photosynthesis in Ozone-Treated Potato Foliage 1

    PubMed Central

    Dann, Michael S.; Pell, Eva J.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of ozone (O3) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activity and quantity and net photosynthesis in greenhouse-grown Solanum tuberosum L. cv `Norland' foliage was studied in relation to oxidant-induced premature senescence. Plants, 26 days old, were exposed to 0.06 to 0.08 microliters per liter O3 from 1000 to 1600 hours for 4 days in a controlled environment chamber. On day 5, plants were exposed to a 6-hour simulated inversion in which O3 peaked at 0.12 microliters per liter. Net photosynthesis declined in response to O3 but recovered to near control levels 3 days after the exposure ended. Rubisco activity and quantity in control potato foliage increased and then decreased during the 12-day interval of the study. In some experiments foliage studied was physiologically mature and Rubisco activity had peaked when O3 exposure commenced. In those cases, O3 accelerated the decline in Rubisco activity. When less mature foliage was treated with O3, the leaves never achieved the maximal level of Rubisco activity observed in control foliage and also exhibited more rapid decline in initial and total activity. Percent activation of Rubisco (initial/total activity) was not affected significantly by treatment. Quantity of Rubisco decreased in concert with activity. The decrease in activities is most likely due to a decrease in available protein rather than a decrease in the percentage of Rubisco activated in vivo. The reduction in the quantity of Rubisco, an important foliar storage protein, could contribute to premature senescence associated with toxicity of this air pollutant. PMID:16667037

  13. 2-(4-bromoacetamido)anilino-2-deoxypentitol 1,5-bisphosphate, a new affinity label for ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum: determination of reaction parameters and characterization of an active site peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Herndon, C.S.; Hartman, F.C.

    1984-03-10

    Reductive amination of ribulose-P/sub 2/ with p-phenylenediamine in the presence of sodium cyanoborohydride yielded an epimeric mixture which was resolved by chromatography. Subsequent bromoacetylation of the isolated amino bisphosphates gave reagents A and B (ribo and arabino epimers of 2-(4-bromoacetamido)anilino-2-deoxypentitol 1.5-bisphosphate) which were competitive inhibitors of the carboxylase with K/sub i/ values of 705 and 104 ..mu..M, respectively. Reagent A exhibited no time-dependent effects on the carboxylase in either the deactivated or activated state. Incubation of the enzyme with reagent B in the presence of the essential activators CO/sub 2/ and Mg/sup 2 +/, however, resulted in an irreversible, time-dependent loss of activity, with a K/sub inact/ of 125 ..mu..M and a minimal half-time of 7.3 min. Covalent incorporation of (/sup 14/C)reagent B was directly proportional to the loss of activity, with total inactivation correlating with an incorporation of 1.1 mol of reagent/mol of subunit. Inclusion of the competitive inhibitor 2-carboxyribitol 1,5-bisphosphate protected against inactivation with a concomitant reduction in incorporation. Neither reagent affected the activity of spinach carboxylase. Fractionation of (/sup 14/C)reagent B-modified enzyme on DEAE-cellulose, subsequent to carboxymethylation and tryptic digestion, revealed two major radioactive peaks of approximately equal area. Digestion of each peak with alkaline phosphatase and rechromatography on DEAE-cellulose resulted in pure peptides I and II. The peptides were identical except in the site of labeling: peptide I contained a modified cysteinyl residue while peptide II contained a modified histidyl residue. 60 references, 7 figures, tables.

  14. Overproduction of recombinant ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC6301 in glucose-controlled high-cell-density fermentations by Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Kleman, G L; Horken, K M; Tabita, F R; Strohl, W R

    1996-01-01

    A predictive and feedback glucose feed controller, previously developed for nutrient-sufficient growth of Escherichia coli to high cell densities, was used to produce large quantities of a heterologous, cyanobacterial recombinant hexadecameric (L8S8) protein, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) in E. coli. Culture and plasmid stability conditions were optimized to yield the production of approximately 1 g of soluble, active recombinant RubisCO per liter. Recombinant RubisCO also was produced in lactose-induced high-cell-density fermentation of E. coli K-12. PMID:8795245

  15. Isolated spinach ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxgenase large subunit .epsilon. n-methyltransferase and method of inactivating ribulose-1,5-bishosphatase .epsilon. n-methyltransferase activity

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .sup..epsilon. N-methyltansferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) from a plant which has a des(methyl) lysyl residue in the LS is disclosed. In addition, the full-length cDNA clones for Rubisco LSMT are disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of inactivating the enzymatic activity of Rubisco LSMT are also disclosed.

  16. Photosynthetic acclimation to elevated CO{sub 2} occurs in transformed tobacco with decreased ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase content

    SciTech Connect

    Sicher, R.C.; Kremer, D.F.; Rodermel, S.R.

    1994-02-01

    Inhibition of net carbon assimilation rates during growth at elevated CO{sub 2} was studied in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants containing zero to two copies of antisense DNA sequences to the small subunit polypeptide (rbcS) gene of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). High- and low-Rubisco tobacco plants were obtained from the selfed progeny of the original line 3 transformant. Assimilation rates of high- and low-Rubisco tobacco plants increased 22 and 71%, respectively, when transferred from 35- to 70-Pa CO{sub 2} chamber air at 900 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1} photon flux density. However, CO{sub 2}-dependent increases of net carbon assimilation rates of high- and low-Rubisco plants virtually disappeared after 9 d of growth in elevated CO{sub 2} chamber air. Total above-ground dry matter production of high- and low-Rubisco plants was 28 and 53% greater, respectively, after 9 d of growth at 70 Pa compared with 35 Pa CO{sub 2}. Most of this dry weight gain was due to increased specific leaf weight. Rubisco activity, Rubisco protein, and total chlorophyll were lower in both high- and low-Rubisco plants grown in enriched compared with ambient CO{sub 2} chamber air. Soluble leaf protein also decreased in response to CO{sub 2} enrichment in high- but not in low-Rub tobacco plants. Decreased Rubisco activities in CO{sub 2}adapted high- and low-Rubisco plants were not attributable to changes in activation state of the enzyme. Carbonic anhydrase activities and subunit levels measured with specific antibodies were similar in high- and low-Rubisco tobacco plants and were unchanged by CO{sub 2} enrichment. Collectively, these findings suggested that photosynthetic acclimation to enriched CO{sub 2} occurred in tobacco plants either with or without transgenically decreased Rubisco in CO{sub 2}-adapted tobacco plants was related to decreased specific activity of this enzyme. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. The bacterial signal transduction protein GlnB regulates the committed step in fatty acid biosynthesis by acting as a dissociable regulatory subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Edileusa C M; Rodrigues, Thiago E; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Pedrosa, Fabio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Forchhammer, Karl; Huergo, Luciano F

    2015-03-01

    Biosynthesis of fatty acids is one of the most fundamental biochemical pathways in nature. In bacteria and plant chloroplasts, the committed and rate-limiting step in fatty acid biosynthesis is catalyzed by a multi-subunit form of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase enzyme (ACC). This enzyme carboxylates acetyl-CoA to produce malonyl-CoA, which in turn acts as the building block for fatty acid elongation. In Escherichia coli, ACC is comprised of three functional modules: the biotin carboxylase (BC), the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) and the carboxyl transferase (CT). Previous data showed that both bacterial and plant BCCP interact with signal transduction proteins belonging to the PII family. Here we show that the GlnB paralogues of the PII proteins from E. coli and Azospirillum brasiliense, but not the GlnK paralogues, can specifically form a ternary complex with the BC-BCCP components of ACC. This interaction results in ACC inhibition by decreasing the enzyme turnover number. Both the BC-BCCP-GlnB interaction and ACC inhibition were relieved by 2-oxoglutarate and by GlnB uridylylation. We propose that the GlnB protein acts as a 2-oxoglutarate-sensitive dissociable regulatory subunit of ACC in Bacteria. PMID:25557370

  18. Isolation and sequencing of an active-site peptide from Rhodospirillum rubrum ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase after affinity labeling with 2-((Bromoacetyl)amino)pentitol 1,5-bisphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Fraij, B.; Hartman, F.C.

    1983-01-01

    2-((Bromoacetyl)amino)pentitol 1,5-bisphosphate was reported to be a highly selective affinity label for ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum. The enzyme has now been inactivated with a /sup 14/C-labeled reagent in order to identify the target residue at the sequence level. Subsequent to inactivation, the enzyme was carboxymethylated with iodoacetate and then digested with trypsin. The only radioactive peptide in the digest was obtained at a high degree of purity by successive chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, SP-Sephadex, and Sephadex G-25. On the basis of amino acid analysis of the purified peptide, the derivatized residue was a methionyl sulfonium salt. Automated Edman degradation confirmed the purity of the labeled peptide and established its sequence as Leu-Gln-Gly-Ala-Ser-Gly-Ile-His-Thr-Gly-Thr-Met-Gly-Phe-Gly-Lys-Met-Glu-Gly-Glu-Ser-Ser-Asp-Arg. Cleavage of this peptide with cyanogen bromide showed that the reagent moiety was covalently attached to the second methionyl residue. Sequence homology with the carboxylase/oxygenase from spinach indicates that the lysyl residue immediately preceding the alkylated methionine corresponds to Lys-334, a residue previously implicated at the active site. 31 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  19. Potential Functional Replacement of the Plastidic Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Subunit (accD) Gene by Recent Transfers to the Nucleus in Some Angiosperm Lineages1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau-Gueutin, Mathieu; Huang, Xun; Higginson, Emily; Ayliffe, Michael; Day, Anil; Timmis, Jeremy N.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells originated when an ancestor of the nucleated cell engulfed bacterial endosymbionts that gradually evolved into the mitochondrion and the chloroplast. Soon after these endosymbiotic events, thousands of ancestral prokaryotic genes were functionally transferred from the endosymbionts to the nucleus. This process of functional gene relocation, now rare in eukaryotes, continues in angiosperms. In this article, we show that the chloroplastic acetyl-CoA carboxylase subunit (accD) gene that is present in the plastome of most angiosperms has been functionally relocated to the nucleus in the Campanulaceae. Surprisingly, the nucleus-encoded accD transcript is considerably smaller than the plastidic version, consisting of little more than the carboxylase domain of the plastidic accD gene fused to a coding region encoding a plastid targeting peptide. We verified experimentally the presence of a chloroplastic transit peptide by showing that the product of the nuclear accD fused to green fluorescent protein was imported in the chloroplasts. The nuclear gene regulatory elements that enabled the erstwhile plastidic gene to become functional in the nuclear genome were identified, and the evolution of the intronic and exonic sequences in the nucleus is described. Relocation and truncation of the accD gene is a remarkable example of the processes underpinning endosymbiotic evolution. PMID:23435694

  20. DNA Analysis of Herbarium Specimens of the Grass Weed Alopecurus myosuroides Reveals Herbicide Resistance Pre-Dated Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Délye, Christophe; Deulvot, Chrystel; Chauvel, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) alleles carrying one point mutation that confers resistance to herbicides have been identified in arable grass weed populations where resistance has evolved under the selective pressure of herbicides. In an effort to determine whether herbicide resistance evolves from newly arisen mutations or from standing genetic variation in weed populations, we used herbarium specimens of the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides to seek mutant ACCase alleles carrying an isoleucine-to-leucine substitution at codon 1781 that endows herbicide resistance. These specimens had been collected between 1788 and 1975, i.e., prior to the commercial release of herbicides inhibiting ACCase. Among the 734 specimens investigated, 685 yielded DNA suitable for PCR. Genotyping the ACCase locus using the derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence (dCAPS) technique identified one heterozygous mutant specimen that had been collected in 1888. Occurrence of a mutant codon encoding a leucine residue at codon 1781 at the heterozygous state was confirmed in this specimen by sequencing, clearly demonstrating that resistance to herbicides can pre-date herbicides in weeds. We conclude that point mutations endowing resistance to herbicides without having associated deleterious pleiotropic effects can be present in weed populations as part of their standing genetic variation, in frequencies higher than the mutation frequency, thereby facilitating their subsequent selection by herbicide applications. PMID:24146749

  1. Reverse-Genetic Analysis of the Two Biotin-Containing Subunit Genes of the Heteromeric Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase in Arabidopsis Indicates a Unidirectional Functional Redundancy1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu; Ilarslan, Hilal; Brachova, Libuse; Qian, Hui-Rong; Li, Ling; Che, Ping; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Nikolau, Basil J.

    2011-01-01

    The heteromeric acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase catalyzes the first and committed reaction of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in plastids. This enzyme is composed of four subunits: biotin carboxyl-carrier protein (BCCP), biotin carboxylase, α-carboxyltransferase, and β-carboxyltransferase. With the exception of BCCP, single-copy genes encode these subunits in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Reverse-genetic approaches were used to individually investigate the physiological significance of the two paralogous BCCP-coding genes, CAC1A (At5g16390, codes for BCCP1) and CAC1B (At5g15530, codes for BCCP2). Transfer DNA insertional alleles that completely eliminate the accumulation of BCCP2 have no perceptible effect on plant growth, development, and fatty acid accumulation. In contrast, transfer DNA insertional null allele of the CAC1A gene is embryo lethal and deleteriously affects pollen development and germination. During seed development the effect of the cac1a null allele first becomes apparent at 3-d after flowering, when the synchronous development of the endosperm and embryo is disrupted. Characterization of CAC1A antisense plants showed that reducing BCCP1 accumulation to 35% of wild-type levels, decreases fatty acid accumulation and severely affects normal vegetative plant growth. Detailed expression analysis by a suite of approaches including in situ RNA hybridization, promoter:reporter transgene expression, and quantitative western blotting reveal that the expression of CAC1B is limited to a subset of the CAC1A-expressing tissues, and CAC1B expression levels are only about one-fifth of CAC1A expression levels. Therefore, a likely explanation for the observed unidirectional redundancy between these two paralogous genes is that whereas the BCCP1 protein can compensate for the lack of BCCP2, the absence of BCCP1 cannot be tolerated as BCCP2 levels are not sufficient to support heteromeric acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase activity at a level that is required for

  2. Improving production of malonyl coenzyme A-derived metabolites by abolishing Snf1-dependent regulation of Acc1.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Chen, Yun; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylase (ACCase) plays a central role in carbon metabolism and has been the site of action for the development of therapeutics or herbicides, as its product, malonyl-CoA, is a precursor for production of fatty acids and other compounds. Control of Acc1 activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs mainly at two levels, i.e., regulation of transcription and repression by Snf1 protein kinase at the protein level. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for improving the activity of ACCase in S. cerevisiae by abolishing posttranslational regulation of Acc1 via site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that introduction of two site mutations in Acc1, Ser659 and Ser1157, resulted in an enhanced activity of Acc1 and increased total fatty acid content. As Snf1 regulation of Acc1 is particularly active under glucose-limited conditions, we evaluated the effect of the two site mutations in chemostat cultures. Finally, we showed that our modifications of Acc1 could enhance the supply of malonyl-CoA and therefore successfully increase the production of two industrially important products derived from malonyl-CoA, fatty acid ethyl esters and 3-hydroxypropionic acid. IMPORTANCE ACCase is responsible for carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to produce malonyl-CoA, which is a crucial step in the control of fatty acid metabolism. ACCase opened the door for pharmaceutical treatments of obesity and diabetes as well as the development of new herbicides. ACCase is also recognized as a promising target for developing cell factories, as its malonyl-CoA product serves as a universal precursor for a variety of high-value compounds in white biotechnology. Yeast ACCase is a good model in understanding the enzyme's catalysis, regulation, and inhibition. The present study describes the importance of protein phosphorylation in regulation of yeast ACCase and identifies potential regulation sites. This study led to the generation of a more efficient ACCase, which

  3. New Rimocidin/CE-108 Derivatives Obtained by a Crotonyl-CoA Carboxylase/Reductase Gene Disruption in Streptomyces diastaticus var. 108: Substrates for the Polyene Carboxamide Synthase PcsA

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Leticia; Al-Refai, Mahmoud; Nieto, Cristina; Laatsch, Hartmut; Malpartida, Francisco; Seco, Elena M.

    2015-01-01

    The rimJ gene, which codes for a crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase, lies within the biosynthetic gene cluster for two polyketides belonging to the polyene macrolide group (CE-108 and rimocidin) produced by Streptomyces diastaticus var. 108. Disruption of rimJ by insertional inactivation gave rise to a recombinant strain overproducing new polyene derivatives besides the parental CE-108 (2a) and rimocidin (4a). The structure elucidation of one of them, CE-108D (3a), confirmed the incorporation of an alternative extender unit for elongation step 13. Other compounds were also overproduced in the fermentation broth of rimJ disruptant. The new compounds are in vivo substrates for the previously described polyene carboxamide synthase PcsA. The rimJ disruptant strain, constitutively expressing the pcsA gene, allowed the overproduction of CE-108E (3b), the corresponding carboxamide derivative of CE-108D (3a), with improved pharmacological properties. PMID:26284936

  4. Design of small molecule inhibitors of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 and 2 showing reduction of hepatic malonyl-CoA levels in vivo in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Christoffer; Blaho, Stefan; Saitton, David Blomberg; Brickmann, Kay; Broddefalk, Johan; Davidsson, Ojvind; Drmota, Tomas; Folmer, Rutger; Hallberg, Kenth; Hallén, Stefan; Hovland, Ragnar; Isin, Emre; Johannesson, Petra; Kull, Bengt; Larsson, Lars-Olof; Löfgren, Lars; Nilsson, Kristina E; Noeske, Tobias; Oakes, Nick; Plowright, Alleyn T; Schnecke, Volker; Ståhlberg, Pernilla; Sörme, Pernilla; Wan, Hong; Wellner, Eric; Oster, Linda

    2011-05-15

    Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylases has the potential for modulating long chain fatty acid biosynthesis and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Hybridization of weak inhibitors of ACC2 provided a novel, moderately potent but lipophilic series. Optimization led to compounds 33 and 37, which exhibit potent inhibition of human ACC2, 10-fold selectivity over inhibition of human ACC1, good physical and in vitro ADME properties and good bioavailability. X-ray crystallography has shown this series binding in the CT-domain of ACC2 and revealed two key hydrogen bonding interactions. Both 33 and 37 lower levels of hepatic malonyl-CoA in vivo in obese Zucker rats. PMID:21515056

  5. Determining Photosynthetic Parameters from Leaf CO2 Exchange and Chlorophyll Fluorescence (Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Specificity Factor, Dark Respiration in the Light, Excitation Distribution between Photosystems, Alternative Electron Transport Rate, and Mesophyll Diffusion Resistance.

    PubMed

    Laisk, A.; Loreto, F.

    1996-03-01

    Using simultaneous measurements of leaf gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence, we determined the excitation partitioning to photosystem II (PSII), the CO2/O2 specificity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, the dark respiration in the light, and the alternative electron transport rate to acceptors other than bisphosphoglycerate, and the transport resistance for CO2 in the mesophyll cells for individual leaves of herbaceous and tree species. The specificity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase for CO2 was determined from the slope of the O2 dependence of the CO2 compensation point between 1.5 and 21% O2. Its value, on the basis of dissolved CO2 and O2 concentrations at 25.5[deg]C, varied between 86 and 89. Dark respiration in the light, estimated from the difference between the CO2 compensation point and the CO2 photocompensation point, was about 20 to 50% of the respiration rate in the dark. The excitation distribution to PSII was estimated from the extrapolation of the dependence of the PSII quantum yield on F/Fm to F = 0, where F is steady-state and Fm is pulse-satuarated fluorescence, and varied between 0.45 and 0.6. The alternative electron transport rate was found as the difference between the electron transport rates calculated from fluorescence and from gas exchange, and at low CO2 concentrations and 10 to 21% O2, it was 25 to 30% of the maximum electron transport. The calculated mesophyll diffusion resistance accounted for about 20 to 30% of the total mesophyll resistance, which also includes carboxylation resistance. Whole-leaf photosynthesis is limited by gas phase, mesophyll diffusion, and carboxylation resistances in nearly the same proportion in both herbaceous species and trees. PMID:12226229

  6. Changes of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase content, ribulose bisphosphate concentration, and photosynthetic activity during adaptation of high-CO/sub 2/ grown cells to low-CO/sub 2/ conditions in Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, A.; Canvin, D.T.

    1986-02-01

    Changes of some photosynthetic properties of high-CO/sub 2/ grown cells of Chlorella pyrenoidosa during adaptation to low-CO/sub 2/ conditions have been investigated. The K/sub m/ value of photosynthesis of the high-CO/sub 2/ grown cells for dissolved inorganic carbon was 3.3 millimolar and decreased to 25 to 30 micromolar within 4 hours after transferring to air. In the presence of saturating CO/sub 2/ concentrations the photosynthetic activity of the high-CO/sub 2/ grown cells was 1.5 times as high as that of the low-CO/sub 2/ grown cells. There was a significant rise of the photosynthetic activity during adaptation of the high-CO/sub 2/ grown cells to air, followed by a steady decrease. The activity of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in both the high and low-CO/sub 2/ grown cells was close to the photosynthetic activity of the cells. The concentration of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) was higher in the low-CO/sub 2/ adapting and low-CO/sub 2/ grown celsl than in the high-CO/sub 2/ grown cells regardless of the photosynthetic rate. This seems to be due to an increased RuBP regeneration activity during adaptation followed by maintenance of the new higher concentration. The RuBP level always exceeded the concentration of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase RuBP binding sites in both the high- and low-CO/sub 2/ grown cells at any dissolved inorganic carbon concentration.

  7. Pollen Expression of Herbicide Target Site Resistance Genes in Annual Ryegrass (Lolium rigidum).

    PubMed Central

    Richter, J.; Powles, S. B.

    1993-01-01

    Herbicide resistance can occur either through target-site insensitivity or by nontarget site-based mechanisms. Two herbicide-resistant biotypes of Lolium rigidum Gaud., one resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides (biotype WLR1) and the other resistant to acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACCase)-inhibiting herbicides (biotype WLR96) through target-site insensitivity at the whole plant and enzymic levels, were found to express this resistance in the pollen. Pollen produced by resistant biotypes grew uninhibited when challenged with herbicide, whereas that from a susceptible biotype was inhibited. A third biotype, SLR31, resistant to ACCase-inhibiting and certain ALS-inhibiting herbicides at the whole plant level through nontarget site-based mechanisms, did not exhibit this expression in the pollen. The technique described may form the basis for a rapid screen for certain nuclear-encoded, target site-based herbicide-resistance mechanisms. PMID:12231886

  8. Does Decrease in Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase by Antisense RbcS Lead to a Higher N-Use Efficiency of Photosynthesis under Conditions of Saturating CO2 and Light in Rice Plants?

    PubMed

    Makino, A.; Shimada, T.; Takumi, S.; Kaneko, K.; Matsuoka, M.; Shimamoto, K.; Nakano, H.; Miyao-Tokutomi, M.; Mae, T.; Yamamoto, N.

    1997-06-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants with decreased ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) were obtained by transformation with the rice rbcS antisense gene under the control of the rice rbcS promoter. The primary transformants were screened for the Rubisco to leaf N ratio, and the transformant with 65% wild-type Rubisco was selected as a plant set with optimal Rubisco content at saturating CO2 partial pressures for photosynthesis under conditions of high irradiance and 25[deg]C. This optimal Rubisco content was estimated from the amounts and kinetic constants of Rubisco and the gas-exchange data. The R1 selfed progeny of the selected transformant were grown hydroponically with different N concentrations. Rubisco content in the R1 population was distributed into two groups: 56 plants had about 65% wild-type Rubisco, whereas 23 plants were very similar to the wild type. Although the plants with decreased Rubisco showed 20% lower rates of light-saturated photosynthesis in normal air (36 Pa CO2), they had 5 to 15% higher rates of photosynthesis in elevated partial pressures of CO2, (100-115 Pa CO2) than the wild-type plants for a given leaf N content. We conclude that the rice plants with 65% wild-type Rubisco show a higher N-use efficiency of photosynthesis under conditions of saturating CO2 and high irradiance. PMID:12223722

  9. Influence of Plant Growth at High CO2 Concentrations on Leaf Content of Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase and Intracellular Distribution of Soluble Carbohydrates in Tobacco, Snapdragon, and Parsley.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Bd.; Palmquist, D. E.; Seemann, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the possible role of leaf cytosolic hexoses and the expression of mannitol metabolism as mechanisms that may affect the repression of photosynthetic capacity when plants are grown at 1000 versus 380 [mu]L L-1 CO2. In plants grown at high CO2, leaf ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase content declined by [greater than or equal to]20% in tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris) but was not affected in the mannitol-producing species snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) and parsley (Petroselinum hortense). In the three species mesophyll glucose and fructose at midday occurred almost entirely in the vacuole (>99%), irrespective of growth CO2 levels. The estimated cytosolic concentrations of glucose and fructose were [less than or equal to]100 [mu]M. In the three species grown at high CO2, total leaf carbohydrates increased 60 to 100%, but mannitol metabolism did not function as an overflow mechanism for the increased accumulation of carbohydrate. In both snapdragon and parsley grown at ambient or high CO2, mannitol occurred in the chloroplast and cytosol at estimated midday concentrations of 0.1 M or more each. The compartmentation of leaf hexoses and the metabolism of alternate carbohydrates are further considered in relation to photosynthetic acclimation to high levels of CO2. PMID:12223804

  10. Ultrastructural detection of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase protein and its subunit mRNAs in wild-type and holoenzyme-deficient Nicotiana using immuno-gold and in-situ-hybridization techniques.

    PubMed

    Brangeon, J; Nato, A; Forchioni, A

    1989-02-01

    In-situ-localization techniques have been adapted to the ultrastructural detection of the holoenzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) and its composite large- and smallsubunit mRNAs in wild-type and mutant RuBPCase deficient plantlets of Nicotiana tabacum L. Immuno-gold techniques which show the distribution of target proteins have confirmed visually the presence of the holoenzyme in the wild-type plastids and its total absence in the enzyme-less mutant. Using in-situ hybridization coupled with electron microscopy and biotinylated probes for the two subunits, we have directly visualized specific small-subunit mRNAs located in the cytoplasm and large-subunit mRNAs confined to plastids in the enzyme-deficient mutant, and with apparent distributions comparable to those visualized in the wild-type counterpart. These results show that (i) gene products can be visualized in situ by electronmicroscopy techniques under conditions where the respective cellular compartments are readily recognizable and (ii) that an accumulation of mRNAs corresponding to the composite subunits can occur without translation and-or assembly of the protein. PMID:24212337

  11. Serine 363 of a Hydrophobic Region of Archaeal Ribulose 1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus and Thermococcus kodakaraensis Affects CO2/O2 Substrate Specificity and Oxygen Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Kreel, Nathan E.; Tabita, F. Robert

    2015-01-01

    Archaeal ribulose 1, 5-bisphospate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is differentiated from other RubisCO enzymes and is classified as a form III enzyme, as opposed to the form I and form II RubisCOs typical of chemoautotrophic bacteria and prokaryotic and eukaryotic phototrophs. The form III enzyme from archaea is particularly interesting as several of these proteins exhibit unusual and reversible sensitivity to molecular oxygen, including the enzyme from Archaeoglobus fulgidus. Previous studies with A. fulgidus RbcL2 had shown the importance of Met-295 in oxygen sensitivity and pointed towards the potential significance of another residue (Ser-363) found in a hydrophobic pocket that is conserved in all RubisCO proteins. In the current study, further structure/function studies have been performed focusing on Ser-363 of A. fulgidus RbcL2; various changes in this and other residues of the hydrophobic pocket point to and definitively establish the importance of Ser-363 with respect to interactions with oxygen. In addition, previous findings had indicated discrepant CO2/O2 specificity determinations of the Thermococcus kodakaraensis RubisCO, a close homolog of A. fulgidus RbcL2. It is shown here that the T. kodakaraensis enzyme exhibits a similar substrate specificity as the A. fulgidus enzyme and is also oxygen sensitive, with equivalent residues involved in oxygen interactions. PMID:26381513

  12. The glossyhead1 Allele of ACC1 Reveals a Principal Role for Multidomain Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase in the Biosynthesis of Cuticular Waxes by Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Shiyou; Zhao, Huayan; Parsons, Eugene P.; Xu, Changcheng; Kosma, Dylan K.; Xu, Xiaojing; Chao, Daiyin; Lohrey, Gregory; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth K.; Wang, Guangchao; Bressan, Ray A.; Jenks, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    A novel mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), having highly glossy inflorescence stems, postgenital fusion in floral organs, and reduced fertility, was isolated from an ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized population and designated glossyhead1 (gsd1). The gsd1 locus was mapped to chromosome 1, and the causal gene was identified as a new allele of Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase1 (ACC1), a gene encoding the main enzyme in cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A synthesis. This, to our knowledge, is the first mutant allele of ACC1 that does not cause lethality at the seed or early germination stage, allowing for the first time a detailed analysis of ACC1 function in mature tissues. Broad lipid profiling of mature gsd1 organs revealed a primary role for ACC1 in the biosynthesis of the very-long-chain fatty acids (C20:0 or longer) associated with cuticular waxes and triacylglycerols. Unexpectedly, transcriptome analysis revealed that gsd1 has limited impact on any lipid metabolic networks but instead has a large effect on environmental stress-responsive pathways, especially senescence and ethylene synthesis determinants, indicating a possible role for the cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A-derived lipids in stress response signaling. PMID:21949210

  13. Localization in the Tomato Genome of DNA Restriction Fragments Containing Sequences Homologous to the rRNA (45s), the Major Chlorophyll a/b Binding Polypeptide and the Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, C. E.; Tanksley, S. D.; Bernatzky, R.

    1986-01-01

    DNA restriction fragments containing sequences homologous to the ribosomal RNA (45s), the major chlorophyll a/b binding polypeptide (CAB) and the small subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (RBCS) genes have been localized and mapped in the tomato nuclear genome by linkage analysis. Ribosomal RNA genes map to a single locus, R45s, which resides in a terminal position on the short arm of chromosome 2 and corresponds to the Nucleolar Organizer Region. The size of the 45s repeating unit is estimated to be approximately 9 kb in Lycopersicon esculentum and 11 kb in Lycopersicon pennellii. Five loci were found to contain CAB sequences. Two of the loci, Cab-1 (chromosome 2) and Cab-3 (chromosome 8), together accounted for more than 80% of the hybridization signal. These loci contain more than one CAB structural gene. The other three loci, Cab-2 (chromosome 8), Cab-4 (chromosome 7) and Cab-5 (chromosome 12), each account for <10% of the total signal and may contain only a single copy of the CAB structural sequence. Three loci were found to contain RBCS sequences. Rbcs-2 (chromosome 3) and Rbcs-3 (chromosome 2) were responsible for >80% of the signal, with the remainder being associated with Rbcs-1 (chromosome 2). Rbcs-2 and Rbcs-3 may contain more than one copy of the gene. PMID:17246311

  14. Plant, cell, and molecular mechanisms of abscisic-acid regulation of stomatal apertures. In vivo phosphorylation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in guard cells of Vicia faba L. is enhanced by fusicoccin and suppressed by abscisic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Z.; Aghoram, K.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Plants regulate water loss and CO{sub 2} gain by modulating the aperture sizes of stomata that penetrate the epidermis. Aperture size itself is increased by osmolyte accumulation and consequent turgor increase in the pair of guard cells that flank each stoma. Guard-cell phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, which catalyzes the regulated step leading to malate synthesis, is crucial for charge and pH maintenance during osmolyte accumulation. Regulation of this cytosolic enzyme by effectors is well documented, but additional regulation by posttranslational modification is predicted by the alteration of PEPC kinetics during stomatal opening. In this study, the authors have investigated whether this alteration is associated with the phosphorylation status of this enzyme. Using sonicated epidermal peels (isolated guard cells) pre-loaded with {sub 32}PO{sub 4}, the authors induced stomatal opening and guard-cell malate accumulation by incubation with 5 {micro}M fusicoccin (FC). In corroboratory experiments, guard cells were incubated with 5 {micro}M fusicoccin (FC). In corroboratory experiments, guard cells were incubated with the FC antagonist, 10 {micro}M abscisic acid (ABA). The phosphorylation status of PEPC was assessed by immunoprecipitation, electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and autoradiography. PEPC was phosphorylated when stomata were stimulated to open, and phosphorylation was lessened by incubation with ABA.

  15. Analysis of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in a treatment plant of acid rock drainage from a Japanese pyrite mine by use of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large-subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Kazuo; Okabayashi, Ai; Kikumoto, Mei; Manchur, Mohammed Abul; Wakai, Satoshi; Kanao, Tadayoshi

    2010-03-01

    Iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in a treatment plant of acid rock drainage (ARD) from a pyrite mine in Yanahara, Okayama prefecture, Japan, were analyzed using the gene (cbbL) encoding the large subunit of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). Analyses of partial sequences of cbbL genes from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus caldus strains revealed the diversity in their cbbL gene sequences. In contrast to the presence of two copies of form I cbbL genes (cbbL1 and cbbL2) in A. ferrooxidans genome, A. thiooxidans and A. caldus had a single copy of form I cbbL gene in their genomes. A phylogenetic analysis based on deduced amino acid sequences from cbbL genes detected in the ARD treatment plant and their close relatives revealed that 89% of the total clones were affiliated with A. ferrooxidans. Clones loosely affiliated with the cbbL from A. thiooxidans NB1-3 or Thiobacillus denitrificans was also detected in the treatment plant. cbbL gene sequences of iron- or sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from the ARD and the ARD treatment plant were not detected in the cbbL libraries from the treatment plant, suggesting the low frequencies of isolates in the samples. PMID:20159572

  16. Prebiotic Fiber Increases Hepatic Acetyl CoA Carboxylase Phosphorylation and Suppresses Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Secretion More Effectively When Used with Metformin in Obese Rats1,2

    PubMed Central

    Pyra, Kim A.; Saha, Dolan C.; Reimer, Raylene A.

    2013-01-01

    Independently, metformin (MET) and the prebiotic, oligofructose (OFS), have been shown to increase glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) secretion. Our objective was to determine whether using OFS as an adjunct with MET augments GLP-1 secretion in obese rats. Male, diet-induced obese Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to: 1) high-fat/-sucrose diet [HFHS; control (C); 20% fat, 50% sucrose wt:wt]; 2) HFHS+10% OFS (OFS); 3) HFHS + MET [300 mg/kg/d (MET)]; 4) HFHS+10% OFS+MET (OFS +MET). Body composition, glycemia, satiety hormones, and mechanisms related to dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) activity in plasma, hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK; Western blots), and gut microbiota (qPCR) were examined. Direct effects of MET and SCFA were examined in human enteroendocrine cells. The interaction between OFS and MET affected fat mass, hepatic TG, secretion of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and leptin, and AMPKα2 mRNA and phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase (pACC) levels (P < 0.05). Combined, OFS and MET reduced GIP secretion to a greater extent than either treatment alone (P < 0.05). The hepatic pACC level was increased by OFS+MET by at least 50% above all other treatments, which did not differ from each other (P < 0.05). OFS decreased plasma DPP4 activity (P < 0.001). Cecal Bifidobacteria (P < 0.001) were markedly increased and C. leptum decreased (P < 0.001) with OFS consumption. In human enteroendocrine cells, the interaction between MET and SCFA affected GLP-1 secretion (P < 0.04) but was not associated with higher GLP-1 than the highest individual doses. In conclusion, the combined actions of OFS and MET were associated with important interaction effects that have the potential to improve metabolic outcomes associated with obesity. PMID:22223580

  17. Quantification of growth-defense trade-offs in a common currency: nitrogen required for phenolamide biosynthesis is not derived from ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase turnover

    PubMed Central

    Wielsch, Nathalie; Bartram, Stefan; Hummert, Christian; Svatoš, Aleš; Baldwin, Ian T.; Groten, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Induced defenses are thought to be economical: growth and fitness-limiting resources are only invested into defenses when needed. To date, this putative growth-defense trade-off has not been quantified in a common currency at the level of individual compounds. Here, a quantification method for 15N-labeled proteins enabled a direct comparison of nitrogen (N) allocation to proteins, specifically, ribulose-1,5-bisposphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) as proxy for growth, with that into small N-containing defense metabolites (nicotine, phenolamides) as proxies for defense after herbivory. After repeated simulated herbivory, total N decreased in the shoots of wild type (WT) Nicotiana attenuata plants, but not in two transgenic lines impaired in jasmonate defense signaling (irLOX3) and phenolamide biosynthesis (irMYB8). N was reallocated among different compounds within elicited rosette leaves: in WT, a strong decrease in total soluble protein (TSP) and RuBisCO was accompanied by an increase in defense metabolites; irLOX3 showed a similar, albeit attenuated pattern; while irMYB8 rosette leaves were the least responsive to elicitation with overall higher levels of RuBisCO. Induced defenses were higher in the older compared to the younger rosette leaves, supporting the hypothesis that tissue developmental stage influences defense investments. We propose that MYB8, probably by regulating the production of phenolamides, indirectly mediates protein pool sizes after herbivory. Although the decrease in absolute N invested in TSP and RuBisCO elicited by simulated herbivory was much larger than the N-requirements of nicotine and phenolamide biosynthesis, 15N flux studies revealed that N for phenolamide synthesis originates from recently assimilated N rather than from RuBisCO turnover. PMID:23590461

  18. Purification and characterization of high- and low-molecular-mass isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Kinetic, structural and immunological evidence that the green algal enzyme is distinct from the prokaryotic and higher plant enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Rivoal, J; Plaxton, W C; Turpin, D H

    1998-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a key enzyme in the supply of carbon skeletons for the assimilation of nitrogen by green algae. Two PEPC isoforms with respective native molecular masses of 400 (PEPC1) and 650 (PEPC2) kDa have been purified from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CW-15 cc1883 (Chlorophyceae). SDS/PAGE, immunoblot and CNBr peptide-mapping analyses indicate the presence of the same 100 kDa PEPC catalytic subunit in both isoforms. PEPC1 is a homotetramer, whereas PEPC2 seems to be a complex between the PEPC catalytic subunit and other immunologically unrelated polypeptides of 50-70 kDa. Kinetic analyses indicate that these PEPC isoforms are (1) differentially regulated by pH, (2) activated by glutamine and dihydroxyacetone phosphate and (3) inhibited by glutamate, aspartate, 2-oxoglutarate and malate. These results are consistent with the current model for the regulation of anaplerotic carbon fixation in green algae, and demonstrate that green algal PEPCs are uniquely regulated by glutamine. Several techniques were used to assess the structural relationships between C. reinhardtii PEPC and the higher plant or prokaryotic enzyme. Immunoblot studies using anti-(green algal or higher plant PEPC) IgGs suggested that green algal (C. reinhardtii, Selenastrum minutum), higher plant (maize, banana fruit, tobacco) and prokaryotic (Synechococcus leopoliensis, Escherichia coli) PEPCs have little or no immunological relatedness. Moreover, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the C. reinhardtii PEPC subunit did not have significant similarity to the highly conserved corresponding region in enzymes from higher plants, and CNBr cleavage patterns of green algal PEPCs were distinct from those of higher plant and cyanobacterial PEPCs. These results point to significant evolutionary divergence between green algal, higher plant and prokaryotic PEPCs. PMID:9512480

  19. Structural and functional consequences of the replacement of proximal residues Cys(172) and Cys(192) in the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    García-Murria, María-Jesús; Karkehabadi, Saeid; Marín-Navarro, Julia; Satagopan, Sriram; Andersson, Inger; Spreitzer, Robert J; Moreno, Joaquín

    2008-04-15

    Proximal Cys(172) and Cys(192) in the large subunit of the photosynthetic enzyme Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase; EC 4.1.1.39) are evolutionarily conserved among cyanobacteria, algae and higher plants. Mutation of Cys(172) has been shown to affect the redox properties of Rubisco in vitro and to delay the degradation of the enzyme in vivo under stress conditions. Here, we report the effect of the replacement of Cys(172) and Cys(192) by serine on the catalytic properties, thermostability and three-dimensional structure of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Rubisco. The most striking effect of the C172S substitution was an 11% increase in the specificity factor when compared with the wild-type enzyme. The specificity factor of C192S Rubisco was not altered. The V(c) (V(max) for carboxylation) was similar to that of wild-type Rubisco in the case of the C172S enzyme, but approx. 30% lower for the C192S Rubisco. In contrast, the K(m) for CO(2) and O(2) was similar for C192S and wild-type enzymes, but distinctly higher (approximately double) for the C172S enzyme. C172S Rubisco showed a critical denaturation temperature approx. 2 degrees C lower than wild-type Rubisco and a distinctly higher denaturation rate at 55 degrees C, whereas C192S Rubisco was only slightly more sensitive to temperature denaturation than the wild-type enzyme. X-ray crystal structures reveal that the C172S mutation causes a shift of the main-chain backbone atoms of beta-strand 1 of the alpha/beta-barrel affecting a number of amino acid side chains. This may cause the exceptional catalytic features of C172S. In contrast, the C192S mutation does not produce similar structural perturbations. PMID:18072944

  20. Targeted quantitative proteomic investigation employing multiple reaction monitoring on quantitative changes in proteins that regulate volatile biosynthesis of strawberry fruit at different ripening stages.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun; Du, Lina; Li, Li; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Forney, Charles F; Fillmore, Sherry; Zhang, ZhaoQi; Li, XiHong

    2015-08-01

    A targeted quantitative proteomic investigation employing the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM, SRM) technique was conducted on strawberry fruit at different development stages. We investigated 22 proteins and isoforms from 32 peptides with 111 peptide transitions, which may be involved in the volatile aroma biosynthesis pathway. The normalized protein abundance was significantly changed in coincidence with increased volatile production and advanced fruit maturities. Among them, alcohol acyltransferase (AAT), quinone oxidoreductase (QR), malonyl Co-A decarboxylase, (MLYCD), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACCase), and acyl Co-A synthetase (ACAs) were increased significantly. Several alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs), and 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase were significantly decreased. Furthermore, the expression of seven genes related to strawberry volatile production was also investigated using real-time qPCR. Among the tested genes, QR, AAT, ACCase, OMT, PDC and ADH showed increased up-regulation during fruit ripening, while 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IMD) decreased. Strong correlation between quantitative proteomic data and gene expression suggested that AAT, QR, ACCase, and PDC played critical roles in volatile biosynthesis of strawberry during fruit ripening. Poor correlation between protein abundance and gene expression of ADH was found. PMID:26087350

  1. D-Xylose as a sugar complement regulates blood glucose levels by suppressing phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCK) in streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetic rats and by enhancing glucose uptake in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunju; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Kim, Kyung-Mi; Jung, Sangwon; Yoo, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is more frequently diagnosed and is characterized by hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. D-Xylose, a sucrase inhibitor, may be useful as a functional sugar complement to inhibit increases in blood glucose levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the anti-diabetic effects of D-xylose both in vitro and stretpozotocin (STZ)-nicotinamide (NA)-induced models in vivo. MATERIALS/METHODS Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: (i) normal control; (ii) diabetic control; (iii) diabetic rats supplemented with a diet where 5% of the total sucrose content in the diet was replaced with D-xylose; and (iv) diabetic rats supplemented with a diet where 10% of the total sucrose content in the diet was replaced with D-xylose. These groups were maintained for two weeks. The effects of D-xylose on blood glucose levels were examined using oral glucose tolerance test, insulin secretion assays, histology of liver and pancreas tissues, and analysis of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCK) expression in liver tissues of a STZ-NA-induced experimental rat model. Levels of glucose uptake and insulin secretion by differentiated C2C12 muscle cells and INS-1 pancreatic β-cells were analyzed. RESULTS In vivo, D-xylose supplementation significantly reduced fasting serum glucose levels (P < 0.05), it slightly reduced the area under the glucose curve, and increased insulin levels compared to the diabetic controls. D-Xylose supplementation enhanced the regeneration of pancreas tissue and improved the arrangement of hepatocytes compared to the diabetic controls. Lower levels of PEPCK were detected in the liver tissues of D-xylose-supplemented rats (P < 0.05). In vitro, both 2-NBDG uptake by C2C12 cells and insulin secretion by INS-1 cells were increased with D-xylose supplementation in a dose-dependent manner compared to treatment with glucose alone. CONCLUSIONS In this study, D-xylose exerted anti-diabetic effects in vivo by

  2. Assembly of in Vitro-Synthesized Large Subunits into Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Is Sensitive to CI-, Requires ATP, and Does Not Proceed When Large Subunits Are Synthesized at Temperatures [greater than or equal to]32[deg]C.

    PubMed Central

    Hubbs, A. E.; Roy, H.

    1993-01-01

    In higher plants, ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) consists of eight large "L" subunits, synthesized in chloroplasts, and eight small "S" subunits, synthesized as precursors in the cytosol. Assembly of these into holoenzyme occurs in the chloroplast stroma after import and processing of the S subunits. A chloroplast chaperonin interacts with the L subunits, which dissociate from the chaperonin before they assemble into holoenzyme. Our laboratory has reported L subunit assembly into Rubisco in chloroplast extracts after protein synthesis in leaves, intact chloroplasts, and most recently in membrane-free chloroplast extracts. We report here that the incorporation of in vitro-synthesized L subunits into holoenzyme depends on the conditions of L subunit synthesis. Rubisco assembly did not occur after L subunit synthesis at 160 mM KCI. When L subunit synthesis occurred at approximately 70 mM KCI, assembly depended on the temperature at which L subunit synthesis took place. These phenomena were the result of postsynthetic events taking place during incubation for protein synthesis. We separated these events from protein synthesis by lowering the temperature during protein synthesis. Lower temperatures supported the synthesis of full-length Rubisco L subunits. The assembly of these completed L subunits into Rubisco required intervening incubation with ATP, before addition of S subunits. ATP treatment mobilized L subunits from a complex with the chloroplast chaperonin 60 oligomer. Addition of 130 mM KCI at the beginning of the intervening incubation with ATP blocked the incorporation of L subunits into Rubisco. The inhibitory effect of high KCI was due to CI- and came after association of newly synthesized L subunits with chaperonin 60, but before S subunit addition. It is interesting that L subunits synthesized at [greater than or equal to]32[deg]C failed to assemble into Rubisco under any conditions. These results agree with previous results obtained

  3. The Importance of the Strictly Conserved, C-terminal Glycine Residue in Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase for Overall Catalysis: Mutagenesis and Truncation of GLY-961 in the Sorghum C4 Leaf Isoform

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,W.; Ahmed, S.; Moriyama, H.; Chollet, R.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a 'multifaceted', allosteric enzyme involved in C4 acid metabolism in green plants/microalgae and prokaryotes. Before the elucidation of the three-dimensional structures of maize C4 leaf and Escherichia coli PEPC, our truncation analysis of the sorghum C4 homologue revealed important roles for the enzyme's C-terminal {alpha}-helix and its appended QNTG{sup 961} tetrapeptide in polypeptide stability and overall catalysis, respectively. Collectively, these functional and structural observations implicate the importance of the PEPC C-terminal tetrapeptide for both catalysis and negative allosteric regulation. We have now more finely dissected this element of PEPC structure-function by modification of the absolutely conserved C-terminal glycine of the sorghum C4 isoform by site-specific mutagenesis (G961(A/V/D)) and truncation ({Delta}C1/C4). Although the C4 polypeptide failed to accumulate in a PEPC{sup -} strain (XH11) of E. coli transformed with the Asp mutant, the other variants were produced at wild-type levels. Although neither of these four mutants displayed an apparent destabilization of the purified PEPC homotetramer, all were compromised catalytically in vivo and in vitro. Functional complementation of XH11 cells under selective growth conditions was restricted progressively by the Ala, {Delta}C1 and Val, and {Delta}C4 modifications. Likewise, steady-state kinetic analysis of the purified mutant enzymes revealed corresponding negative trends in k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K0.5 (phosphoenolpyruvate) but not in K{sub 0.5} or the Hill coefficient. Homology modeling of these sorghum C-terminal variants against the structure of the closely related maize C4 isoform predicted perturbations in active-site molecular cavities and/or ion-pairing with essential, invariant Arg-638. These collective observations reveal that even a modest, neutral alteration of the PEPC C-terminal hydrogen atom side chain is detrimental to enzyme

  4. Effects of Growth Temperature on the Responses of Ribulose-1,5-Biphosphate Carboxylase, Electron Transport Components, and Sucrose Synthesis Enzymes to Leaf Nitrogen in Rice, and Their Relationships to Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Makino, A.; Nakano, H.; Mae, T.

    1994-08-01

    Effects of growth temperature on the photosynthetic gas-exchange rates and their underlying biochemical properties were examined in young, fully expanded leaves of rice (Oryza sativa L.). The plants were grown hydroponically under day/night temperature regimes of 18/15[deg]C, 23/18[deg]C, and 30/23[deg]C and all photosynthetic measurements were made at a leaf temperature of 25[deg]C and an irradiance of 1800 [mu]mol quanta m-2 s-1. Growth temperature affected the photosynthetic CO2 response curve. The relative ratio of the initial slope to the CO2-saturated photosynthesis increased with rising growth temperature. This was caused mainly by an increase in CO2-limited photosynthesis for a given leaf nitrogen content with rising growth temperature. However, there was no difference in ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) content at any given leaf nitrogen content among temperature treatments. In addition, the activation state and catalytic turnover rate of Rubisco were not affected by growth temperature. The increase in CO2-limited photosynthesis with rising growth temperature was the result of an increase in the CO2 transfer conductance between the intercellular airspaces and the carboxylation sites. The amounts of total chlorophyll and light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein II increased for the same leaf nitrogen content with rising growth temperature, but the amounts of cytochrome f and coupling factor 1 and the activities of cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and sucrose-phosphate synthase were the same between plants grown at 23/18[deg]C and those grown at 30/23[deg]C. Similarly, CO2-saturated photosynthesis was not different for the same leaf nitrogen content between these treatments. For the 18/15[deg]C-grown plants, a slight decrease in the amounts of cytochrome f and coupling factor 1 and an increase in the activities of cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and sucrose-phosphate synthase were found, but these were not reflected in CO2-saturated

  5. Rapid switch of hepatic fatty acid metabolism from oxidation to esterification during diurnal feeding of meal-fed rats correlates with changes in the properties of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, but not of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I.

    PubMed Central

    Moir, A M; Zammit, V A

    1993-01-01

    The effects of the ingestion of a meal on the partitioning of hepatic fatty acids between oxidation and esterification were studied in vivo for meal-fed rats. The time course for the reversal of the starved state was extremely rapid and the process was complete within 2 h, in marked contrast with the reversal of the effects of starvation in rats fed ad libitum [A. M. B. Moir and V. A. Zammit (1993) Biochem. J. 289, 49-55]. This rapid reversal occurred in spite of the fact that, in the liver of the meal-fed animals before feeding, a similar degree of partitioning of fatty acids in favour of oxidation was observed as in 24 h-starved rats (previously fed ad libitum). This suggested that the lower degree of ketonaemia observed in meal-fed rats before a meal is not due to the inability of acylcarnitine formation to compete successfully with esterification of fatty acids to the glycerol moiety. Investigation of the possible mechanisms that could contribute towards the rapid switching-off of fatty acid oxidation revealed that this was correlated with a very rapid rise and overshoot in hepatic malonyl-CoA concentration, but not with any change in the activity, or sensitivity to malonyl-CoA, of the mitochondrial overt carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT I). The role of these two parameters in the reversal of fasting-induced hepatic fatty acid oxidation was thus the inverse of that observed previously for refed 24 h-starved rats. The rapid increase in [malonyl-CoA] was accompanied by an immediate and complete reversion of the kinetic characteristics (Ka for citrate, expressed/total activity ratio) of acetyl-CoA carboxylase to those found in the post-meal animals, again in contrast with the time course observed in refed 24 h-starved rats [A. M. B. Moir and V. A. Zammit (1990) Biochem. J. 272, 511-517]. The rapidity with which these changes occurred was specific to the partitioning of acyl-CoA; the meal-induced diversion of glycerolipids towards phospholipid synthesis and the

  6. Isozyme-nonselective N-substituted bipiperidylcarboxamide acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitors reduce tissue malonyl-CoA concentrations, inhibit fatty acid synthesis, and increase fatty acid oxidation in cultured cells and in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Harwood, H James; Petras, Stephen F; Shelly, Lorraine D; Zaccaro, Lawrence M; Perry, David A; Makowski, Michael R; Hargrove, Diane M; Martin, Kelly A; Tracey, W Ross; Chapman, Justin G; Magee, William P; Dalvie, Deepak K; Soliman, Victor F; Martin, William H; Mularski, Christian J; Eisenbeis, Shane A

    2003-09-26

    Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), with its resultant inhibition of fatty acid synthesis and stimulation of fatty acid oxidation, has the potential to favorably affect the multitude of cardiovascular risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome. To achieve maximal effectiveness, an ACC inhibitor should inhibit both the lipogenic tissue isozyme (ACC1) and the oxidative tissue isozyme (ACC2). Herein, we describe the biochemical and acute physiological properties of CP-610431, an isozyme-nonselective ACC inhibitor identified through high throughput inhibition screening, and CP-640186, an analog with improved metabolic stability. CP-610431 inhibited ACC1 and ACC2 with IC50s of approximately 50 nm. Inhibition was reversible, uncompetitive with respect to ATP, and non-competitive with respect to bicarbonate, acetyl-CoA, and citrate, indicating interaction with the enzymatic carboxyl transfer reaction. CP-610431 also inhibited fatty acid synthesis, triglyceride (TG) synthesis, TG secretion, and apolipoprotein B secretion in HepG2 cells (ACC1) with EC50s of 1.6, 1.8, 3.0, and 5.7 microm, without affecting either cholesterol synthesis or apolipoprotein CIII secretion. CP-640186, also inhibited both isozymes with IC50sof approximately 55 nm but was 2-3 times more potent than CP-610431 in inhibiting HepG2 cell fatty acid and TG synthesis. CP-640186 also stimulated fatty acid oxidation in C2C12 cells (ACC2) and in rat epitrochlearis muscle strips with EC50s of 57 nm and 1.3 microm. In rats, CP-640186 lowered hepatic, soleus muscle, quadriceps muscle, and cardiac muscle malonyl-CoA with ED50s of 55, 6, 15, and 8 mg/kg. Consequently, CP-640186 inhibited fatty acid synthesis in rats, CD1 mice, and ob/ob mice with ED50s of 13, 11, and 4 mg/kg, and stimulated rat whole body fatty acid oxidation with an ED50 of approximately 30 mg/kg. Taken together, These observations indicate that isozyme-nonselective ACC inhibition has the potential to favorably affect risk

  7. Effects of manganese-excess on CO2 assimilation, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, carbohydrates and photosynthetic electron transport of leaves, and antioxidant systems of leaves and roots in Citrus grandis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Very little is known about the effects of manganese (Mn)-excess on citrus photosynthesis and antioxidant systems. Seedlings of sour pummelo (Citrus grandis) were irrigated for 17 weeks with nutrient solution containing 2 μM (control) or 500 μM (excess) MnSO4. The objective of this study were to understand the mechanisms by which Mn-excess leads to a decrease in CO2 assimilation and to test the hypothesis that Mn-induced changes in antioxidant systems differ between roots and leaves. Results Mn-excess decreased CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, increased intercellular CO2 concentration, but did not affect chlorophyll (Chl) level. Both initial and total ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activity in Mn-excess leaves decreased to a lesser extent than CO2 assimilation. Contents of glucose, fructose, starch and total nonstructural carbohydrates did not differ between Mn-excess leaves and controls, while sucrose content was higher in the former. Chl a fluorescence (OJIP) transients from Mn-excess leaves showed increased O-step and decreased P-step, accompanied by positive L- and K-bands. Mn-excess decreased maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry (Fv/Fm) and total performance index (PItot,abs), but increased relative variable fluorescence at I-steps (VI) and energy dissipation. On a protein basis, Mn-excess leaves displayed higher activities of monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and contents of antioxidants, similar ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities and lower dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) activities; while Mn-excess roots had similar or lower activities of antioxidant enzymes and contents of antioxidants. Mn-excess did not affect malondialdehyde (MDA) content of roots and leaves. Conclusions Mn-excess impaired the whole photosynthetic electron transport chain from the donor side of photosystem II (PSII) up

  8. Engineering of Primary Carbohydrate Metabolism for Increased Production of Actinorhodin in Streptomyces coelicolor▿

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yong-Gu; Butler, Michael J.; Chater, Keith F.; Lee, Kye Joon

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of the current studies were to determine the roles of key enzymes in central carbon metabolism in the context of increased production of antibiotics in Streptomyces coelicolor. Genes for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoglucomutase (Pgm) were deleted and those for the acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) were overexpressed. Under the conditions tested, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase encoded by zwf2 plays a more important role than that encoded by zwf1 in determining the carbon flux to actinorhodin (Act), while the function of Pgm encoded by SCO7443 is not clearly understood. The pgm-deleted mutant unexpectedly produced abundant glycogen but was impaired in Act production, the exact reverse of what had been anticipated. Overexpression of the ACCase resulted in more rapid utilization of glucose and sharply increased the efficiency of its conversion to Act. From the current experiments, it is concluded that carbon storage metabolism plays a significant role in precursor supply for Act production and that manipulation of central carbohydrate metabolism can lead to an increased production of Act in S. coelicolor. PMID:16950896

  9. Ultraviolet and 5'fluorodeoxyuridine induced random mutagenesis in Chlorella vulgaris and its impact on fatty acid profile: a new insight on lipid-metabolizing genes and structural characterization of related proteins.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Josephine; Rangamaran, Vijaya Raghavan; Gopal, Dharani; Shivasankarasubbiah, Kumar T; Thilagam, Mary Leema J; Peter Dhassiah, Magesh; Padinjattayil, Divya Shridhar M; Valsalan, VinithKumar N; Manambrakat, Vijayakumaran; Dakshinamurthy, Sivakumar; Thirunavukkarasu, Sivaraman; Ramalingam, Kirubagaran

    2015-02-01

    The present study was aimed at randomly mutating the microalga, Chlorella vulgaris, in order to alter its cellular behaviour towards increased lipid production for efficient biodiesel production from algal biomass. Individual mutants from ultraviolet light (UV-1 (30 s exposure), UV-2 (60 s exposure) and UV-3 (90 s exposure)) and 5'fluorodeoxyuridine (5'FDU-1 (0.25 mM) and 5'FDU-2 (0.50 mM)) exposed cells were identified to explore an alternative method for lipid enhancement. A marginally significant decrease in biomass in the UV mutants; marked increase in the lipid content in UV-2 and 5'FDU-1 mutants; significant increase in saturated fatty acids level, especially in UV-2 mutant; insignificant increase in lipid production when these mutants were subjected to an additional stress of nitrogen starvation and predominantly enhanced level of unsaturated fatty acids in all the strains except UV-2 were noted. Chloroplast ultrastructural alterations and defective biosynthesis of chloroplast specific lipid constituents were observed in the mutants. Modelling of three-dimensional structures of acetyl coA carboxylase (ACCase), omega-6, plastid delta-12 and microsomal delta-12 fatty acid desaturases for the first time and ligand-interaction studies greatly substantiated our findings. A replacement of leucine by a serine residue in the acetyl coA carboxylase gene of UV-2 mutant suggests the reason behind lipid enhancement in UV-2 mutant. Higher activity of ACCase in UV-2 and 5'FDU-1 strongly proves the functional consequences of gene mutation to lipid production. In conclusion, algal mutants exhibited significant impact on biodiesel production through structural alterations in the lipid-metabolizing genes, thereby enhancing lipid production and saturated fatty acid levels. PMID:25189135

  10. Genetics Home Reference: 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... break down proteins containing a particular building block (amino acid) called leucine. Infants with 3-MCC deficiency appear ... for the fourth step in processing leucine, an amino acid that is part of many proteins. Mutations in ...

  11. Discovery and optimization of antibacterial AccC inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Cliff C.; Shipps, Jr., Gerald W.; Yang, Zhiwei; Sun, Binyuan; Kawahata, Noriyuki; Soucy, Kyle A.; Soriano, Aileen; Orth, Peter; Xiao, Li; Mann, Paul; Black, Todd

    2010-09-17

    The biotin carboxylase (AccC) is part of the multi-component bacterial acetyl coenzyme-A carboxylase (ACCase) and is essential for pathogen survival. We describe herein the affinity optimization of an initial hit to give 2-(2-chlorobenzylamino)-1-(cyclohexylmethyl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazole-5-carboxamide (1), which was identified using our proprietary Automated Ligand Identification System (ALIS). The X-ray co-crystal structure of 1 was solved and revealed several key interactions and opportunities for further optimization in the ATP site of AccC. Structure Based Drug Design (SBDD) and parallel synthetic approaches resulted in a novel series of AccC inhibitors, exemplified by (R)-2-(2-chlorobenzylamino)-1-(2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine-5-carboxamide (40). This compound is a potent and selective inhibitor of bacterial AccC with an IC{sub 50} of 20 nM and a MIC of 0.8 {micro}g/mL against a sensitized strain of Escherichia coli (HS294 E. coli).

  12. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  13. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K.; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  14. 3,5 Diiodo-L-Thyronine (T2) Does Not Prevent Hepatic Steatosis or Insulin Resistance in Fat-Fed Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vatner, Daniel F.; Snikeris, Jaclyn; Popov, Violeta; Perry, Rachel J.; Rahimi, Yasmeen; Samuel, Varman T.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone mimetics are alluring potential therapies for diseases like dyslipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and insulin resistance. Though diiodothyronines are thought inactive, pharmacologic treatment with 3,5- Diiodo-L-Thyronine (T2) reportedly reduces hepatic lipid content and improves glucose tolerance in fat-fed male rats. To test this, male Sprague Dawley rats fed a safflower-oil based high-fat diet were treated with T2 (0.25 mg/kg-d) or vehicle. Neither 10 nor 30 days of T2 treatment had an effect on weight, adiposity, plasma fatty acids, or hepatic steatosis. Insulin action was quantified in vivo by a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. T2 did not alter fasting plasma glucose or insulin concentration. Basal endogenous glucose production (EGP) rate was unchanged. During the clamp, there was no difference in insulin stimulated whole body glucose disposal. Insulin suppressed EGP by 60% ± 10 in T2-treated rats as compared with 47% ± 4 suppression in the vehicle group (p = 0.32). This was associated with an improvement in hepatic insulin signaling; insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation was ~2.5 fold greater in the T2-treated group as compared with the vehicle-treated group (p = 0.003). There was no change in expression of genes thought to mediate the effect of T2 on hepatic metabolism, including genes that regulate hepatic lipid oxidation (ppara, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a), genes that regulate hepatic fatty acid synthesis (srebp1c, acetyl coa carboxylase, fatty acid synthase), and genes involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis (L-pyruvate kinase, glucose 6 phosphatase). Therefore, in contrast with previous reports, in Sprague Dawley rats fed an unsaturated fat diet, T2 administration failed to improve NAFLD or whole body insulin sensitivity. Though there was a modest improvement in hepatic insulin signaling, this was not associated with significant differences in hepatic insulin action. Further study will be necessary before

  15. 3,5 Diiodo-L-Thyronine (T2) Does Not Prevent Hepatic Steatosis or Insulin Resistance in Fat-Fed Sprague Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Vatner, Daniel F; Snikeris, Jaclyn; Popov, Violeta; Perry, Rachel J; Rahimi, Yasmeen; Samuel, Varman T

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone mimetics are alluring potential therapies for diseases like dyslipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and insulin resistance. Though diiodothyronines are thought inactive, pharmacologic treatment with 3,5- Diiodo-L-Thyronine (T2) reportedly reduces hepatic lipid content and improves glucose tolerance in fat-fed male rats. To test this, male Sprague Dawley rats fed a safflower-oil based high-fat diet were treated with T2 (0.25 mg/kg-d) or vehicle. Neither 10 nor 30 days of T2 treatment had an effect on weight, adiposity, plasma fatty acids, or hepatic steatosis. Insulin action was quantified in vivo by a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. T2 did not alter fasting plasma glucose or insulin concentration. Basal endogenous glucose production (EGP) rate was unchanged. During the clamp, there was no difference in insulin stimulated whole body glucose disposal. Insulin suppressed EGP by 60% ± 10 in T2-treated rats as compared with 47% ± 4 suppression in the vehicle group (p = 0.32). This was associated with an improvement in hepatic insulin signaling; insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation was ~2.5 fold greater in the T2-treated group as compared with the vehicle-treated group (p = 0.003). There was no change in expression of genes thought to mediate the effect of T2 on hepatic metabolism, including genes that regulate hepatic lipid oxidation (ppara, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a), genes that regulate hepatic fatty acid synthesis (srebp1c, acetyl coa carboxylase, fatty acid synthase), and genes involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis (L-pyruvate kinase, glucose 6 phosphatase). Therefore, in contrast with previous reports, in Sprague Dawley rats fed an unsaturated fat diet, T2 administration failed to improve NAFLD or whole body insulin sensitivity. Though there was a modest improvement in hepatic insulin signaling, this was not associated with significant differences in hepatic insulin action. Further study will be necessary before

  16. Microalgal Triacylglycerols as Feedstocks for Biofuel Production: Perspectives and Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q.; Sommerfeld, M.; Jarvis, E.; Ghirardi, M.; Posewitz, M; Seibert, M.; Darzins, A.

    2008-01-01

    Microalgae represent an exceptionally diverse but highly specialized group of micro-organisms adapted to various ecological habitats. Many microalgae have the ability to produce substantial amounts (e.g. 20-50% dry cell weight) of triacylglycerols (TAG) as a storage lipid under photo-oxidative stress or other adverse environmental conditions. Fatty acids, the building blocks for TAGs and all other cellular lipids, are synthesized in the chloroplast using a single set of enzymes, of which acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACCase) is key in regulating fatty acid synthesis rates. However, the expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis is poorly understood in microalgae. Synthesis and sequestration of TAG into cytosolic lipid bodies appear to be a protective mechanism by which algal cells cope with stress conditions, but little is known about regulation of TAG formation at the molecular and cellular level. While the concept of using microalgae as an alternative and renewable source of lipid-rich biomass feedstock for biofuels has been explored over the past few decades, a scalable, commercially viable system has yet to emerge. Today, the production of algal oil is primarily confined to high-value specialty oils with nutritional value, rather than commodity oils for biofuel. This review provides a brief summary of the current knowledge on oleaginous algae and their fatty acid and TAG biosynthesis, algal model systems and genomic approaches to a better understanding of TAG production, and a historical perspective and path forward for microalgae-based biofuel research and commercialization.

  17. Soybean ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit: Mechanisms and determinants of RNA turnover in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, R.B.

    1990-02-01

    The goals of examining the mechanisms and determinants of RNA turnover in higher plants remain the same. We will continue with two of the major approaches (1) in vivo chemical modification of RNA structure and (2) analysis of Rubisco SSU RNA structure and turnover in transgenic plants. We plan to reduce the amount of molecular physiology (studies of transcription and steady state levels) to a minimum and expand these efforts into the analysis of plant rebonucleases. We have also broadened our examination of light induced turnover of rubisco SSU RNA to include general RNA turnover. We plan to identify specific 3{prime}->5{prime} precessive ribonuclease by complementation of E. coli mutants. The activity of these novel RNases and their potential role in plant RNA turnover and processing will be characterized.

  18. Metabonomics classifies pathways affected by bioactive compounds. Artificial neural network classification of NMR spectra of plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Ott, Karl-Heinz; Araníbar, Nelly; Singh, Bijay; Stockton, Gerald W

    2003-03-01

    The biochemical mode-of-action (MOA) for herbicides and other bioactive compounds can be rapidly and simultaneously classified by automated pattern recognition of the metabonome that is embodied in the 1H NMR spectrum of a crude plant extract. The ca. 300 herbicides that are used in agriculture today affect less than 30 different biochemical pathways. In this report, 19 of the most interesting MOAs were automatically classified. Corn (Zea mays) plants were treated with various herbicides such as imazethapyr, glyphosate, sethoxydim, and diuron, which represent various biochemical modes-of-action such as inhibition of specific enzymes (acetohydroxy acid synthase [AHAS], protoporphyrin IX oxidase [PROTOX], 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase [EPSPS], acetyl CoA carboxylase [ACC-ase], etc.), or protein complexes (photosystems I and II), or major biological process such as oxidative phosphorylation, auxin transport, microtubule growth, and mitosis. Crude isolates from the treated plants were subjected to 1H NMR spectroscopy, and the spectra were classified by artificial neural network analysis to discriminate the herbicide modes-of-action. We demonstrate the use and refinement of the method, and present cross-validated assignments for the metabolite NMR profiles of over 400 plant isolates. The MOA screen also recognizes when a new mode-of-action is present, which is considered extremely important for the herbicide discovery process, and can be used to study deviations in the metabolism of compounds from a chemical synthesis program. The combination of NMR metabolite profiling and neural network classification is expected to be similarly relevant to other metabonomic profiling applications, such as in drug discovery. PMID:12590124

  19. Enhanced acetyl-CoA production is associated with increased triglyceride accumulation in the green alga Chlorella desiccata

    PubMed Central

    Avidan, Omri; Brandis, Alexander; Rogachev, Ilana; Pick, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Triglycerides (TAGs) from microalgae can be utilized as food supplements and for biodiesel production, but little is known about the regulation of their biosynthesis. This work aimed to test the relationship between acetyl-CoA (Ac-CoA) levels and TAG biosynthesis in green algae under nitrogen deprivation. A novel, highly sensitive liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technique enabled us to determine the levels of Ac-CoA, malonyl-CoA, and unacetylated (free) CoA in green microalgae. A comparative study of three algal species that differ in TAG accumulation levels shows that during N starvation, Ac-CoA levels rapidly rise, preceding TAG accumulation in all tested species. The levels of Ac-CoA in the high TAG accumulator Chlorella desiccata exceed the levels in the moderate TAG accumulators Dunaliella tertiolecta and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Similarly, malonyl-CoA and free CoA levels also increase, but to lower extents. Calculated cellular concentrations of Ac-CoA are far lower than reported K mAc-CoA values of plastidic Ac-CoA carboxylase (ptACCase) in plants. Transcript level analysis of plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (ptPDH), the major chloroplastic Ac-CoA producer, revealed rapid induction in parallel with Ac-CoA accumulation in C. desiccata, but not in D. tertiolecta or C. reinhardtii. It is proposed that the capacity to accumulate high TAG levels in green algae critically depends on their ability to divert carbon flow towards Ac-CoA. This requires elevation of the chloroplastic CoA pool level and enhancement of Ac-CoA biosynthesis. These conclusions may have important implications for future genetic manipulation to enhance TAG biosynthesis in green algae. PMID:25922486

  20. Production of free monounsaturated fatty acids by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) are the best components for biodiesel when considering the low temperature fluidity and oxidative stability. However, biodiesel derived from vegetable oils or microbial lipids always consists of significant amounts of polyunsaturated and saturated fatty acids (SFAs) alkyl esters, which hampers its practical applications. Therefore, the fatty acid composition should be modified to increase MUFA contents as well as enhancing oil and lipid production. Results The model microorganism Escherichia coli was engineered to produce free MUFAs. The fatty acyl-ACP thioesterase (AtFatA) and fatty acid desaturase (SSI2) from Arabidopsis thaliana were heterologously expressed in E. coli BL21 star(DE3) to specifically release free unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) and convert SFAs to UFAs. In addition, the endogenous fadD gene (encoding acyl-CoA synthetase) was disrupted to block fatty acid catabolism while the native acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) was overexpressed to increase the malonyl coenzyme A (malonyl-CoA) pool and boost fatty acid biosynthesis. The finally engineered strain BL21ΔfadD/pE-AtFatAssi2&pA-acc produced 82.6 mg/L free fatty acids (FFAs) under shake-flask conditions and FFAs yield on glucose reached about 3.3% of the theoretical yield. Two types of MUFAs, palmitoleate (16:1Δ9) and cis-vaccenate (18:1Δ11) made up more than 75% of the FFA profiles. Fed-batch fermentation of this strain further enhanced FFAs production to a titer of 1.27 g/L without affecting fatty acid compositions. Conclusions This study demonstrated the possibility to regulate fatty acid composition by using metabolic engineering approaches. FFAs produced by the recombinant E. coli strain consisted of high-level MUFAs and biodiesel manufactured from these fatty acids would be more suitable for current diesel engines. PMID:24716602

  1. Enhanced acetyl-CoA production is associated with increased triglyceride accumulation in the green alga Chlorella desiccata.

    PubMed

    Avidan, Omri; Brandis, Alexander; Rogachev, Ilana; Pick, Uri

    2015-07-01

    Triglycerides (TAGs) from microalgae can be utilized as food supplements and for biodiesel production, but little is known about the regulation of their biosynthesis. This work aimed to test the relationship between acetyl-CoA (Ac-CoA) levels and TAG biosynthesis in green algae under nitrogen deprivation. A novel, highly sensitive liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technique enabled us to determine the levels of Ac-CoA, malonyl-CoA, and unacetylated (free) CoA in green microalgae. A comparative study of three algal species that differ in TAG accumulation levels shows that during N starvation, Ac-CoA levels rapidly rise, preceding TAG accumulation in all tested species. The levels of Ac-CoA in the high TAG accumulator Chlorella desiccata exceed the levels in the moderate TAG accumulators Dunaliella tertiolecta and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Similarly, malonyl-CoA and free CoA levels also increase, but to lower extents. Calculated cellular concentrations of Ac-CoA are far lower than reported K mAc-CoA values of plastidic Ac-CoA carboxylase (ptACCase) in plants. Transcript level analysis of plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (ptPDH), the major chloroplastic Ac-CoA producer, revealed rapid induction in parallel with Ac-CoA accumulation in C. desiccata, but not in D. tertiolecta or C. reinhardtii. It is proposed that the capacity to accumulate high TAG levels in green algae critically depends on their ability to divert carbon flow towards Ac-CoA. This requires elevation of the chloroplastic CoA pool level and enhancement of Ac-CoA biosynthesis. These conclusions may have important implications for future genetic manipulation to enhance TAG biosynthesis in green algae. PMID:25922486

  2. Transgene silencing of sucrose synthase in alfalfa stem vascular tissue by a truncated phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase: sucrose synthase construct

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important role of sucrose synthase (SUS, EC 2.4.1.13) in plants is to provide UDP-glucose needed for cellulose synthesis in cell walls. We examined if over-expressing SUS in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) would increase cellulose content of stem cell walls. Alfalfa plants were transformed with two ...

  3. Catalytic roles of flexible regions at the active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco)

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Harpel, M.R.; Chen, Yuh-Ru; Larson, E.M.; Larimer, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    Chemical and mutagenesis studies of Rubisco have identified Lys329 and Glu48 as active-site residues that are located in distinct, interacting domains from adjacent subunits. Crystallographic analyses have shown that Lys329 is the apical residue in a 12-residue flexible loop (loop 6) of the {Beta},{alpha}-barrel domain of the active site and that Glu48 resides at the end of helix B of the N-terminal domain of the active site. When phosphorylated ligands are bound by the enzyme, loop 6 adopts a closed conformation and, in concert with repositioning of helix B, thereby occludes the active site from the external environment. In this closed conformation, the {gamma}-carboxylate of Glu48 and the {epsilon}-amino group of Lys329 engage in intersubunit electrostatic interaction. By use of appropriate site-directed mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum Rubisco, we are addressing several issues: the catalytic roles of Lys329 and Glu48, the functional significance of the intersubunit salt bridge comprised of these two residues, and the roles of loop 6 and helix B in stabilizing labile reaction intermediates. Characterization of novel products derived from misprocessing of D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) by the mutant proteins have illuminated the structure of the key intermediate in the normal oxygenase pathway.

  4. Regulatory regions in the promoters of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PYC1 and PYC2 genes encoding isoenzymes of pyruvate carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, J; Gancedo, C

    1998-07-15

    We have identified regions in the promoters of the PYC1 and PYC2 genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in their regulation in different culture conditions. In the case of PYC1, a UAS in the region between -330/-297 and three repressing sequences with the common central core CCGCC at positions -457, -432 and -399 were identified. Specific binding of nuclear proteins to the -330/-214 DNA fragment was abolished in rtg mutants suggesting a role for the RTG genes in the control of PYC1 expression. In the case of the PYC2 promoter, elimination of a fragment from -417 to -291 brings about a two-fold decrease in the expression in repressed conditions and a similar increase in derepression. PMID:9682484

  5. Regulation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) activase: product inhibition, cooperativity, and magnesium activation.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Suratna; Henderson, J Nathan; Liles, Kevin; Hilton, Matthew T; Wachter, Rebekka M

    2015-10-01

    In many photosynthetic organisms, tight-binding Rubisco inhibitors are released by the motor protein Rubisco activase (Rca). In higher plants, Rca plays a pivotal role in regulating CO2 fixation. Here, the ATPase activity of 0.005 mm tobacco Rca was monitored under steady-state conditions, and global curve fitting was utilized to extract kinetic constants. The kcat was best fit by 22.3 ± 4.9 min(-1), the Km for ATP by 0.104 ± 0.024 mm, and the Ki for ADP by 0.037 ± 0.007 mm. Without ADP, the Hill coefficient for ATP hydrolysis was extracted to be 1.0 ± 0.1, indicating noncooperative behavior of homo-oligomeric Rca assemblies. However, the addition of ADP was shown to introduce positive cooperativity between two or more subunits (Hill coefficient 1.9 ± 0.2), allowing for regulation via the prevailing ATP/ADP ratio. ADP-mediated activation was not observed, although larger amounts led to competitive product inhibition of hydrolytic activity. The catalytic efficiency increased 8.4-fold upon cooperative binding of a second magnesium ion (Hill coefficient 2.5 ± 0.5), suggesting at least three conformational states (ATP-bound, ADP-bound, and empty) within assemblies containing an average of about six subunits. The addition of excess Rubisco (24:1, L8S8/Rca6) and crowding agents did not modify catalytic rates. However, high magnesium provided for thermal Rca stabilization. We propose that magnesium mediates the formation of closed hexameric toroids capable of high turnover rates and amenable to allosteric regulation. We suggest that in vivo, the Rca hydrolytic activity is tuned by fluctuating [Mg(2+)] in response to changes in available light. PMID:26283786

  6. Soybean ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit: Mechanisms and determinants on RNA turnover: Progress report, May 1988--December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, R.

    1989-01-01

    The goal of this work is to elucidate the mechanisms and determinants behind the light induced turnover and general chemical instability of Rubisco small subunit (SSU) RNA. Three approaches are being used: (A) to use molecular physiology to help define the phenomena and identify the possible cellular machinery involved in these processes; (B) SSU RNA stability will be assayed in transgenic plants; and (C) in vivo RNA structure is being examined via chemical modification of RNA. The tremendous success we have had with assaying in vivo RNA structure by DMS modification and a need to validate this technique with sufficient controls has resulted in our adding an additional goal to the project: to develop a DMS modification map of 18S rRNA and portions of Rubisco SSU RNA and predict a potential secondary structures.

  7. Phylogeny and evolutionary history of Leymus (Triticeae; Poaceae) based on a single-copy nuclear gene encoding plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xing; Sha, Li-Na; Yang, Rui-Wu; Zhang, Hai-Qin; Kang, Hou-Yang; Ding, Cun-Bang; Zhang, Li; Zheng, You-Liang; Zhou, Yong-Hong

    2009-01-01

    Background Single- and low- copy genes are less likely subject to concerted evolution, thus making themselves ideal tools for studying the origin and evolution of polyploid taxa. Leymus is a polyploid genus with a diverse array of morphology, ecology and distribution in Triticeae. The genomic constitution of Leymus was assigned as NsXm, where Ns was presumed to be originated from Psathyrostachys, while Xm represented a genome of unknown origin. In addition, little is known about the evolutionary history of Leymus. Here, we investigate the phylogenetic relationship, genome donor, and evolutionary history of Leymus based on a single-copy nuclear Acc1 gene. Results Two homoeologues of the Acc1 gene were isolated from nearly all the sampled Leymus species using allele-specific primer and were analyzed with those from 35 diploid taxa representing 18 basic genomes in Triticeae. Sequence diversity patterns and genealogical analysis suggested that (1) Leymus is closely related to Psathyrostachys, Agropyron, and Eremopyrum; (2) Psathyrostachys juncea is an ancestral Ns-genome donor of Leymus species; (3) the Xm genome in Leymus may be originated from an ancestral lineage of Agropyron and Eremopyrum triticeum; (4) the Acc1 sequences of Leymus species from the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau are evolutionarily distinct; (5) North America Leymus species might originate from colonization via the Bering land bridge; (6) Leymus originated about 11-12MYA in Eurasia, and adaptive radiation might have occurred in Leymus during the period of 3.7-4.3 MYA and 1.7-2.1 MYA. Conclusion Leymus species have allopolyploid origin. It is hypothesized that the adaptive radiation of Leymus species might have been triggered by the recent upliftings of the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau and subsequent climatic oscillations. Adaptive radiation may have promoted the rapid speciation, as well as the fixation of unique morphological characters in Leymus. Our results shed new light on our understanding of the origin of Xm genome, the polyploidization events and evolutionary history of Leymus that could account for the rich diversity and ecological adaptation of Leymus species. PMID:19814813

  8. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) Gene Expression and Photosynthetic Activity in Nutrient-enriched Mesocosm Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, M.; Davies, J. T.; Weston, K.; Crawford, D. W.; Purdie, D. A.

    1998-02-01

    The temporal variability in carbon dioxide fixation rates and the relative abundance ofrbcLSmRNA (encoding the large subunit of the Calvin cycle enzyme, RubisCO) was determined for nutrient-stimulated populations of marine phytoplankton enclosed in diatom-dominated and coccolithophorid-dominated mesocosms. Both mesocosms were characterized by successive bloom events that were preceded by marked increases in the level of RubisCO gene expression. In general, maxima inrbcLmRNA abundance showed the strongest temporal covariation with peaks in the value of the photosynthetic parameter PBmax, the chlorophyll-specific maximum rate of CO2fixation. Somewhat looser temporal co-variations were observed between peaks in transcript levels and maxima in chlorophyll concentrations or phytoplankton biomass. The specific contribution of the haptophyteEmiliania huxleyito the overall level of gene expression in the diatom-dominated enclosure was investigated using an homologousrbcLgene probe. The results were compared to data obtained at lower hybridization stringency using a generalrbcLprobe originating from the oceanic cyanobacteriumSynechococcusWH8103. The comparative data suggest that, whereas diatoms made a substantial contribution to the mRNA signal during the initial part of the experiment, the contribution ofE. huxleyito the overall level of gene expression increased as the experiment progressed.

  9. Impact of ozone on the activity and quantity of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in potato foliage and its relation to premature senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Dann, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Plants, 26 days old, were exposed to O{sub 3} for five days in a controlled environment chamber. Initial and total activities and quantity of enzyme declined in both O{sub 3}-treated and control plants. Ozone accelerated the decline and produced a significantly greater decrease in activity and quantity by the fifth day of O{sub 3} exposure. Percent activation of the enzyme did not change. Enzyme activity and quantity of O{sub 3}-treated plants remained below control levels throughout a seven-day post-exposure observation period. Ozone may accelerate the decline in rubisco by increasing enzyme acceptability to proteases. To test this hypothesis, rubisco was purified from Norland potato foliage and the enzyme exposed to O{sub 3} or oxygen (O{sub 2}) in vitro. Following oxidant treatment, the extract was treated with exogenous protease. Oxidant treatment reduced the quantity of rubisco an average of 15%. Addition of protease further reduced the quantity by another 30% after O{sub 3} but no O{sub 2} treatment.

  10. A Delphi-based consensus clinical practice protocol for the diagnosis and management of 3-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Georgianne L; Koeberl, Dwight D; Matern, Dietrich; Barshop, Bruce; Braverman, Nancy; Burton, Barbara; Cederbaum, Stephen; Fiegenbaum, Annette; Garganta, Cheryl; Gibson, James; Goodman, Stephen I; Harding, Cary; Kahler, Stephen; Kronn, David; Longo, Nicola

    2008-04-01

    3-MCC deficiency is among the most common inborn errors of metabolism identified on expanded newborn screening (1:36,000 births). However, evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis and management of this disorder are lacking. Using the traditional Delphi method, a panel of 15 experts in inborn errors of metabolism was convened to develop consensus-based clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of 3-MCC screen-positive infants and their mothers. The Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine system was used to grade the literature review and create recommendations graded from A (evidence level of randomized clinical trials) to D (expert opinion). Panelists reviewed the initial evaluation of the screen-positive infant-mother dyad, diagnostic guidelines, and management of diagnosed patients. Grade D consensus recommendations were made in each of these three areas. The panel did not reach consensus on all issues. This consensus protocol is intended to assist clinicians in the diagnosis and management of screen-positive newborns for 3-MCC deficiency and to encourage the development of evidence-based guidelines. PMID:18155630

  11. aP2-Cre-mediated inactivation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 causes growth retardation and reduced lipid accumulation in adipose tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adipose tissue is one of the major sites for fatty acid synthesis and lipid storage. We generated adipose (fat)-specific ACC1 knockout (FACC1KO) mice using the aP2-Cre/loxP system. FACC1KO mice showed prenatal growth retardation; after weaning, however, their weight gain was comparable to that of wi...

  12. S-NITROSYLATED PROTEINS OF A MEDICINAL, CAM PLANT KALANCHOE PINNATA: RIBULOSE-1, 5-BISPHOSPATE CARBOXYLASE/OXYGENASE ACTIVITY TARGETED FOR INHIBITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a new addition to signaling molecules that affect a myriad of processes in plants. However, the mechanistic details are scanty. NO post-translationally modifies proteins by S-nitrosylation of cysteines. Soluble S-nitrosoproteome of a medicinal, crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM)...

  13. Soybean ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit: Mechanisms and determinants of RNA turnover at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Foundation (UGRF)

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, R.B.

    1990-07-01

    The experimental approaches which were used to examine RNA turnover outlined in our 1988 proposal are given. The first approach evaluates RNA structure in vivo by chemical modification. The second approach investigates molecular physiology by studying light regulated changes in rbcS RNA turnover rates. The third approach examines the determinants of RNA turnover in transgenic plants by searching for a transgenic system to examine light regulated RNA turnover. The structure of soybean rbcS RNA degradation products was studies in transgenic petunia. The fourth approach investigates the molecular evolution of RbcS sequences. 8 figs. (FL)

  14. Effect of Nd{sup 3+} ion on carboxylation activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chao; Hong Fashui . E-mail: Hongfsh_cn@sina.com; Wu Kang; Ma, Hong-bing; Zhang Xueguang; Hong Chengjiao; Wu Cheng; Gao Fengqing; Yang Fan; Zheng Lei; Wang Xuefeng; Liu Tao; Xie Yaning; Xu Jianhua; Li Zhongrui

    2006-03-31

    Neodymium (Nd), as a member of rare earth elements, proved to enhance the photosynthesis rate and organic substance accumulation of spinach through the increase in carboxylation activity of Rubisco. Although the oxygenase activity of spinach Rubisco was slightly changed with the Nd{sup 3+} treatment, the specific factor of Rubisco was greatly increased. It was partially due to the promotion of Rubisco activase (R-A) activity but mainly to the formation of Rubisco-Rubisco activase super-complex, a heavier molecular mass protein (about 1200 kD) comprising both Rubisco and Rubisco activase. This super-complex was found during the extraction procedure of Rubisco by the gel electrophoresis and Western-blot studies. The formation of Rubisco-R-A super-complex suggested that the secondary structure of the protein purified from the Nd{sup 3+}-treated spinach was different from that of the control. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of the 'Rubisco' purified from the Nd{sup 3+}-treated spinach revealed that Nd was bound with four oxygen atoms and two sulfur atoms of amino acid residues at the Nd-O and Nd-S bond lengths of 2.46 and 2.89 A, respectively.

  15. Mechanism and Significance of Post-Translational Modifications in the Large (LS) and Small (SS) Subunits of Ribulose-1,5 Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Houtz, Robert, L.

    2012-11-09

    This project focused on a molecular and biochemical characterization of the protein methyltransferases responsible for methylation of the LS and SS in Rubisco, and the associated functional consequences accompanying these modifications. Our results provided some of the most informative structural and mechanistic understandings of SET domain protein methyltransferases. These results also positioned us to provide the first unambiguous assignment of the kinetic reaction mechanism for SET-domain protein methyltransferases, and to design and engineer an alternative substrate for Rubisco LSMT, enabling substrate specificity and functional significance studies. We demonstrated that the minimal substrate recognized by Rubisco LSMT is free lysine as well as monomethyllysine, an observation corroborated both by structural analyses as well as enzymatic activity and subsequent product distribution analyses. Ternary complexes between Rubisco LSMT and free lysine compared to complexes with monomethyllysine demonstrated that the structural basis for multiple methyl group additions is a consequence of hydrogen-bond driven spatial shifts in the amino group of Lys-14, which maintains the direct in-line geometry necessary for SN2 nucleophilic attack. The structural observations are also consistent with the previous proposal that the multiplicity of methyl group additions takes place through a processive mechanism, with successive methyl group additions to an enzyme protein complex which does not disassociate prior to the formation of trimethyllysine. This mechanism has important implications, since the regulation of gene expression by SET domain histone methyltransferases is not only dependent on site-specific lysine methylation, but also the degree of methylation. We examined the kinetic reaction mechanism for three different types of SET domain protein methyltransferases, each under conditions supporting mono-, di-, or trimethyllysine formation corroborated by product analyses. Additionally, the tight initial binding of Rubisco LSMT to Rubisco also allowed us to design a novel immobilized complex between Rubisco and Rubisco LSMT, which allowed for an unambiguous demonstration of the requirement for trimethyllysine formation prior to disassociation of the Rubisco LSMT:Rubisco complex, and therefore proof of the processive mechanism for methyl group transfer. These kinetic studies also demonstrated that an important factor has been overlooked in all kinetic analyses of SET domain protein methyltransferases reported to date. This factor is the influence of the low turnover number for SET domain protein methyltransferases and how, relative to the time-frame of kinetic enzyme assays, this can generate changes in kinetic profiles shifting reciprocal plot patterns from random/ordered bi-bi to the real kinetic reaction mechanism plots of ping-pong. Although the ternary complexes of Rubisco LSMT with S-Adenosylhomocysteine and lysine and monomethyllysine were informative in regard to reaction mechanism, they were not helpful in identifying the mechanism used by Rubisco LSMT for determining substrate specificity. We were unsuccessful at obtaining ternary complexes of Rubisco LSMT with bound synthetic polypeptide substrates, as has been reported for several histone methyltransferases. However, we were able to model a polypeptide sequence corresponding to the N-terminal region of the LS of Rubisco into the apparent substrate binding cleft in Rubisco LSMT. Knowledge of the determinants of polypeptide substrate specificity are important for identifying possible alternate substrates, as well as the possibility of generating more desirable substrates amenable to site-directed mutagenesis experiments unlike Rubisco. We determined that Rubisco LSMT is capable of methylating synthetic polypeptide mimics of the N-terminal region of the LS, both free as well as conjugated to keyhole limpet hemacyanin, but with considerable less efficiency than intact holoenzyme.

  16. The propeptide region of clotting factor IX is a signal for a vitamin K dependent carboxylase: evidence from protein engineering of amino acid -4.

    PubMed Central

    Galeffi, P; Brownlee, G G

    1987-01-01

    Homologous "propeptide" regions are present in a family of vitamin K-dependent mammalian proteins, including clotting factors II, VII, IX, X, protein C, protein S and bone "gla" proteins. To test the hypothesis that the propeptide is a signal for the correct gamma-carboxylation of the adjacent gamma-carboxy region, we have mutated amino acid -4 of human factor IX from an arginine to a glutamine residue, by M13-directed site-specific mutagenesis of a cDNA clone. After expression of mutant factor IX in dog kidney cells, we find that it is secreted into the medium in a precursor form containing the propeptide, and is inefficiently gamma-carboxylated compared to the control, wild-type, recombinant factor IX. This result supports the hypothesis that the propeptide region is required for efficient gamma-carboxylation of factor IX in dog kidney cells. Furthermore, it confirms previous results that arginine at amino acid -4 is required for correct propeptide processing. Images PMID:3684602

  17. Electron transport, pep carboxylase activity, and maximal net co2 assimilation exhibit coordinated and proportional decline with loss of hydraulic conductance during water stress in Zea mays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efforts to improve the photosynthetic performance of species are presently focused on leaf-level traits (e.g., quantum efficiency, mesophyll osmoregulation, stress protein regulation). Here, we emphasize that efforts to improve plant performance in arid environments would benefit from also consider...

  18. The 5'-flanking region of the gene encoding the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase is crucial for growth of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 at the level of CO2 in air.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, D; Kaplan, A; Ariel, R; Kessel, M; Seijffers, J

    1989-11-01

    Transformation of the high-CO2-requiring mutants (hcr) O221 and E1 derived from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 by a wild-type DNA library restored their ability to grow at the level of CO2 in air. A plasmid (pE12) containing a 10-kilobase DNA insert was rescued from a O221 heterogenote and proved to transform both O221 and E1 to the wild-type phenotype. The capacity of the pE12 subclones to confer the wild-type phenotype to O221 transformants enabled the mapping of the mutation in O221 (designated hcrO221) within a 232-base-pair PstI-BstXI DNA restriction fragment. Sequence analysis revealed two open reading frames (ORFs) at positions -1745 to -1262 (ORFI) and -1218 to -393 (ORFII) upstream of the rbcL gene. A 3-kilobase PstI fragment of O221 was cloned, and hcrO221 was found to be a point mutation within the PstI-BstXI region -1309 nucleotides upstream of the rbcL gene. The significance of this flanking region for adaptation to air levels of CO2 was further demonstrated by the generation of new hcr mutants following insertional inactivation of wild-type DNA in the BstXI site. Electron microscopy revealed aberrant carboxysome structures in growing cells of the hcr mutants, a defect that was possibly related to the mutation, since transformation with pE12 derivatives restored the carboxysome structure to normal. PMID:2509426

  19. The glossyhead1 Allele of ACC1 Reveals a Principal Role for multidomain acetyl-coenzyme a carboxylase in the biosynthesis of cuticular waxes by arabidopsis[c][w][oa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana having highly glossy inflorescence stems, post-genital fusion in floral organs, and reduced fertility, was isolated from an EMS-mutagenized population and designated glossyhead1 (gsd1). The gsd1 locus was mapped to chromosome 1, and the causal gene identified a...

  20. CO2 assimilation, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, carbohydrates and photosynthetic electron transport probed by the JIP-test, of tea leaves in response to phosphorus supply

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zheng-He; Chen, Li-Song; Chen, Rong-Bing; Zhang, Fang-Zhou; Jiang, Huan-Xin; Tang, Ning

    2009-01-01

    Background Although the effects of P deficiency on tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) growth, P uptake and utilization as well as leaf gas exchange and Chl a fluorescence have been investigated, very little is known about the effects of P deficiency on photosynthetic electron transport, photosynthetic enzymes and carbohydrates of tea leaves. In this study, own-rooted 10-month-old tea trees were supplied three times weekly for 17 weeks with 500 mL of nutrient solution at a P concentration of 0, 40, 80, 160, 400 or 1000 μM. This objective of this study was to determine how P deficiency affects CO2 assimilation, Rubisco, carbohydrates and photosynthetic electron transport in tea leaves to understand the mechanism by which P deficiency leads to a decrease in CO2 assimilation. Results Both root and shoot dry weight increased as P supply increased from 0 to 160 μM, then remained unchanged. P-deficient leaves from 0 to 80 μM P-treated trees showed decreased CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, but increased intercellular CO2 concentration. Both initial and total Rubisco activity, contents of Chl and total soluble protein in P-deficient leaves decreased to a lesser extent than CO2 assimilation. Contents of sucrose and starch were decreased in P-deficient leaves, whereas contents of glucose and fructose did not change significantly except for a significant increase in the lowest P leaves. OJIP transients from P-deficient leaves displayed a rise at the O-step and a depression at the P-step, accompanied by two new steps at about 150 μs (L-step) and at about 300 μs (K-step). RC/CSo, TRo/ABS (or Fv/Fm), ETo/ABS, REo/ABS, maximum amplitude of IP phase, PIabs and PItot, abs were decreased in P-deficient leaves, while VJ, VI and dissipated energy were increased. Conclusion P deficiency decreased photosynthetic electron transport capacity by impairing the whole electron transport chain from the PSII donor side up to the PSI, thus decreasing ATP content which limits RuBP regeneration, and hence, the rate of CO2 assimilation. Energy dissipation is enhanced to protect P-deficient leaves from photo-oxidative damage in high light. PMID:19379526

  1. Structure and identification of a pterin dehydratase-like protein as a ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) assembly factor in the α-carboxysome.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Nicole M; Sundberg, Christopher D; Gidaniyan, Soheil D; Cascio, Duilio; Yeates, Todd O

    2014-03-14

    Carboxysomes are proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments that increase the efficiency of the rate-limiting step in carbon fixation by sequestering reaction substrates. Typically, α-carboxysomes are genetically encoded as a single operon expressing the structural proteins and the encapsulated enzymes of the microcompartment. In addition, depending on phylogeny, as many as 13 other genes are found to co-occur near or within α-carboxysome operons. One of these genes codes for a protein with distant homology to pterin-4α-carbinolamine dehydratase (PCD) enzymes. It is present in all α-carboxysome containing bacteria and has homologs in algae and higher plants. Canonical PCDs play an important role in amino acid hydroxylation, a reaction not associated with carbon fixation. We determined the crystal structure of an α-carboxysome PCD-like protein from the chemoautotrophic bacterium Thiomonas intermedia K12, at 1.3-Å resolution. The protein retains a three-dimensional fold similar to canonical PCDs, although the prominent active site cleft present in PCD enzymes is disrupted in the α-carboxysome PCD-like protein. Using a cell-based complementation assay, we tested the PCD-like proteins from T. intermedia and two additional bacteria, and found no evidence for PCD enzymatic activity. However, we discovered that heterologous co-expression of the PCD-like protein from Halothiobacillus neapolitanus with RuBisCO and GroELS in Escherichia coli increased the amount of soluble, assembled RuBisCO recovered from cell lysates compared with co-expression of RuBisCO with GroELS alone. We conclude that this conserved PCD-like protein, renamed here α-carboxysome RuBisCO assembly factor (or acRAF), is a novel RuBisCO chaperone integral to α-carboxysome function. PMID:24459150

  2. EK-2612, a new cyclohexane-1,3-dione possessing selectivity between rice (Oryza sativa) and barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli).

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Joon; Kim, Jin-Seog; Hong, Kyoung Sik; Hwang, In-Taek; Kim, Kyoung Mahn; Kim, Hyeong-Rae; Cho, Kwang Yun

    2004-09-01

    A newly synthesized experimental compound, EK-2612 is one of the class of cyclohexane-1,3-diones which are commonly known to be grasskillers. A greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate the herbicidal performances of EK-2612 on several grass species in comparison with tralkoxydim, a commercialized cyclohexanedione derivative. Like tralkoxydim, the compound EK-2612 showed excellent control efficacy on most grass weeds tested through foliar application rates between 250 and 63 g AI ha(-1). Unlike tralkoxydim, however, EK-2612 showed a good rice safety, and there was no rice damage observed at the level below 125 g AI ha(-1), while rice injury developed at the same application rates of tralkoxydim. With this rice safety, EK-2612 controlled barnyardgrass effectively up to the two-leaf stage under both submerged and dried paddy conditions. An in vitro ACCase assay indicated that EK-2612 is a strong ACCase inhibitor; however, the dose-response was not substantially different in rice and barnryardgrass, showing I50 values of 0.1 and 0.12 microM, respectively. These results suggest that the compound EK-2612 is targeting plant ACCase, but the whole-plant rice safety is not attributable to a different inhibition of the target site in rice from that in barnyardgrass. PMID:15382506

  3. Transmembrane Domain Interactions and Residue Proline 378 Are Essential for Proper Structure, Especially Disulfide Bond Formation, in the Human Vitamin K-Dependent γ-Glutamyl Carboxylase†

    PubMed Central

    Tie, Jian-Ke; Zheng, Mei-Yan; Hsiao, Kuang-Ling N.; Perera, Lalith; Stafford, Darrel W.; Straight, David L.

    2009-01-01

    We used recombinant techniques to create a two-chain form (residues 1–345 and residues 346–758) of the vitamin K-dependent γ-glutamyl carboxylase, a glycoprotein located in the endoplasmic reticulum containing five transmembrane domains. The two-chain carboxylase had carboxylase and epoxidase activities similar to those of one-chain carboxylase. In addition, it had normal affinity for the propeptide of factor IX. We employed this molecule to investigate formation of the one disulfide bond in carboxylase, the transmembrane structure of carboxylase, and the potential interactions among the carboxylase’s transmembrane domains. Our results indicate that the two peptides of the two-chain carboxylase are joined by a disulfide bond. Proline 378 is important for the structure necessary for disulfide formation. Results with the P378L carboxylase indicate that noncovalent bonds maintain the two-chain structure even when the disulfide bond is disrupted. As we had previously proposed, the fifth transmembrane domain of carboxylase is the last and only transmembrane domain in the C-terminal peptide of the two-chain carboxylase. We show that the noncovalent association between the two chains of carboxylase involves an interaction between the fifth transmembrane domain and the second transmembrane domain. Results of a homology model of transmembrane domains 2 and 5 suggest that not only do these two domains associate but that transmembrane domain 2 may interact with another transmembrane domain. This latter interaction may be mediated at least in part by a motif of glycine residues in the second transmembrane domain. PMID:18498174

  4. Evolution of herbicide resistance mechanisms in grass weeds.

    PubMed

    Matzrafi, Maor; Gadri, Yaron; Frenkel, Eyal; Rubin, Baruch; Peleg, Zvi

    2014-12-01

    Herbicide resistant weeds are becoming increasingly common, threatening global food security. Here, we present BrIFAR: a new model system for the functional study of mechanisms of herbicide resistance in grass weeds. We have developed a large collection of Brachypodium accessions, the BrI collection, representing a wide range of habitats. Wide screening of the responses of the accessions to four major herbicide groups (PSII, ACCase, ALS/AHAS and EPSPS inhibitors) identified 28 herbicide-resistance candidate accessions. Target-site resistance to PSII inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a known history of herbicide applications. An amino acid substitution in the psbA gene (serine264 to glycine) conferred resistance and also significantly affected the flowering and shoot dry weight of the resistant accession, as compared to the sensitive accession. Non-target site resistance to ACCase inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a history of herbicide application and from a nature reserve. In-vitro enzyme activity tests and responses following pre-treatment with malathion (a cytochrome-P450 inhibitor) indicated sensitivity at the enzyme level, and give strong support to diclofop-methyl and pinoxaden enhanced detoxification as NTS resistance mechanism. BrIFAR can promote better understanding of the evolution of mechanisms of herbicide resistance and aid the implementation of integrative management approaches for sustainable agriculture. PMID:25443832

  5. Evolution of prokaryote and eukaryote lines inferred from sequence evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. T.; George, D. G.; Yeh, L.-S.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of prokaryotes and early eukaryotes, including their symbiotic relationships, as inferred from phylogenetic trees of bacterial ferredoxin, 5S ribosomal RNA, ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase large chain, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase polypeptide II.

  6. Organic geochemical studies of modern microbial mats from Shark Bay: Part I: Influence of depth and salinity on lipid biomarkers and their isotopic signatures.

    PubMed

    Pagès, A; Grice, K; Ertefai, T; Skrzypek, G; Jahnert, R; Greenwood, P

    2014-09-01

    The present study investigated the influence of abiotic conditions on microbial mat communities from Shark Bay, a World Heritage area well known for a diverse range of extant mats presenting structural similarities with ancient stromatolites. The distributions and stable carbon isotopic values of lipid biomarkers [aliphatic hydrocarbons and polar lipid fatty acids (PLFAs)] and bulk carbon and nitrogen isotope values of biomass were analysed in four different types of mats along a tidal flat gradient to characterize the microbial communities and systematically investigate the relationship of the above parameters with water depth. Cyanobacteria were dominant in all mats, as demonstrated by the presence of diagnostic hydrocarbons (e.g. n-C17 and n-C17:1). Several subtle but important differences in lipid composition across the littoral gradient were, however, evident. For instance, the shallower mats contained a higher diatom contribution, concordant with previous mat studies from other locations (e.g. Antarctica). Conversely, the organic matter (OM) of the deeper mats showed evidence for a higher seagrass contribution [high C/N, 13C-depleted long-chain n-alkanes]. The morphological structure of the mats may have influenced CO2 diffusion leading to more 13C-enriched lipids in the shallow mats. Alternatively, changes in CO2 fixation pathways, such as increase in the acetyl COA-pathway by sulphate-reducing bacteria, could have also caused the observed shifts in δ13C values of the mats. In addition, three smooth mats from different Shark Bay sites were analysed to investigate potential functional relationship of the microbial communities with differing salinity levels. The C25:1 HBI was identified in the high salinity mat only and a lower abundance of PLFAs associated with diatoms was observed in the less saline mats, suggesting a higher abundance of diatoms at the most saline site. Furthermore, it appeared that the most and least saline mats were dominated by

  7. Cost-effectiveness analysis of robotic-assisted laparoscopy for newly diagnosed uterine cancers

    PubMed Central

    Leitao, Mario M; Bartashnik, Aleksandra; Wagner, Isaac; Lee, Stephen J; Caroline, Ari; Hoskins, William J; Thaler, Howard T; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R; Sonoda, Yukio; Brown, Carol L; Jewell, Elizabeth L; Barakat, Richard R; Gardner, Ginger J

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed the direct costs of 3 surgical approaches in uterine cancer and the cost impact of incorporating robot-assisted surgery. Methods A cost system that allocates the actual cost of resources used to treat each patient, as opposed to borrowing cost data from a billing system, was used to determine direct costs for patients who underwent surgery for uterine cancer from 2009–2010. These costs included all aspects of surgical care up to 6 months after discharge. Total amortized direct costs (AC) included the capital cost of 3 dual console DaVinci Si platforms with 5 years of service contracts. Non-amortized costs (NAC) were also calculated (excluded capital costs). Modeling was performed to estimate the mean cost of surgical care for patients presenting with endometrial cancer from 2007–2010 Results Of 436 cases (132 laparoscopic, 262 robotic, 42 laparotomy), total mean AC/case was $20,489 (laparoscopy), $23,646 (robot), and $24,642 (laparotomy) (P<0.05 [robot vs laparoscopy]; P=0.6 [robot vs laparotomy]). Total NAC/case was $20,289, $20,467, and $24,433, respectively (P=0.9 [robot vs laparoscopy]; P=0.03 [robot vs laparotomy]). The planned surgical approach in 2007 was laparoscopy-68%, robot-8%, and laparotomy-24% compared to 26%, 64%, and 9%, respectively, in 2010 (P<0.001). The modeled mean AC/case was $21,738 in 2007 and $22,678 in 2010 (+$940). NAC was $21,298 in 2007 and $20,573 in 2010 (−$725). Conclusion Laparoscopy is least expensive when including capital acquisition costs. Laparoscopy and robotic surgery are comparable if upfront costs are excluded. There is cost neutralization with the robot when it helps decrease laparotomy rates. PMID:24785856

  8. Carbon Dioxide Fixation and Related Properties in Sections of the Developing Green Maize Leaf 1

    PubMed Central

    Perchorowicz, John T.; Gibbs, Martin

    1980-01-01

    Light and dark 14CO2 assimilation, pulse-chase (14CO2 followed by 12CO2) labeling experiments both in the light and in the dark, photorespiratory activity and some enzymes (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, and NADP-malic enzyme) were followed in sections of 2.5 centimeters from the base (younger tissue) to the tip (oldest tissue) of the green maize leaf. Tissue was taken from the third leaf of 12- to 16-day-old plants consisting of sections 0 to 2.5 centimeters (base), 4.5 to 7.0 centimeters (center) and 9.0 to 11.5 centimeters (top) measured from the base. Some of these properties were also determined in the intact leaves of 4-day-old maize plants. Electron microscopy indicated a Kranz anatomy in all sections. Differentiation into mesophyll granal chloroplasts and bundle sheath agranal chloroplasts had taken place only in the center and top pieces. All of the sections contained PEP carboxylase, RuBP carboxylase, and NADP-malic enzyme. The ratio of PEP:RuBP carboxylase increased from 3.03 (top) to 4.66 (base) whereas the PEP carboxylase:NADP-malic enzyme ratio rose from 2.87 (top) to 9.57 (base). Under conditions of light or dark, the majority of the newly incorporated 14CO2 was found in malate and aspartate in all sections and in 4-day-old leaves. The 14C-labeling pattern typical of C4 plants was present in the center and top sections and to a lesser extent in the 4-day-old leaves. In the base tissue, the percentage of radioactivity in malate and aspartate remained relatively constant both during photosynthesis and pulse-chase experiments. In contrast, radioactivity in glycerate-3-phosphate decreased with time coupled to an increase in sugar phosphates. To account for the isotopic pattern in the base tissue, parallel fixation by PEP carboxylase and RuBP carboxylase was proposed with the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle functioning to some extent independently within the bundle sheath chloroplasts. The

  9. Regulation of immunological and inflammatory functions by biotin.

    PubMed

    Kuroishi, Toshinobu

    2015-12-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble B-complex vitamin and is well-known as a co-factor for 5 indispensable carboxylases. Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) catalyzes the biotinylation of carboxylases and other proteins, whereas biotinidase catalyzes the release of biotin from biotinylated peptides. Previous studies have reported that nutritional biotin deficiency and genetic defects in either HLCS or biotinidase induces cutaneous inflammation and immunological disorders. Since biotin-dependent carboxylases involve various cellular metabolic pathways including gluconeogenesis, fatty acid synthesis, and the metabolism of branched-chain amino acids and odd-chain fatty acids, metabolic abnormalities may play important roles in immunological and inflammatory disorders caused by biotin deficiency. Transcriptional factors, including NF-κB and Sp1/3, are also affected by the status of biotin, indicating that biotin regulates immunological and inflammatory functions independently of biotin-dependent carboxylases. An in-vivo analysis with a murine model revealed the therapeutic effects of biotin supplementation on metal allergies. The novel roles of biotinylated proteins and their related enzymes have recently been reported. Non-carboxylase biotinylated proteins induce chemokine production. HLCS is a nuclear protein involved in epigenetic and chromatin regulation. In this review, comprehensive knowledge on the regulation of immunological and inflammatory functions by biotin and its potential as a therapeutic agent is discussed. PMID:26168302

  10. Metabolic control of urea catabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardi and Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Hodson, R C; Williams, S K; Davidson, W R

    1975-03-01

    In the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardi (strain y-1), synthesis of the enzymes required for urea hydrolysis is under substrate induction control by urea and under end product repression control by ammonia. Hydrolysis of urea if effected by the sequential action of the discrete enzymes urea carboxylase and allophanate lyase, collectively called urea amidolyase. The carboxylase converts urea to allophanate in a reaction requiring biotin, adenosine 5'-triphosphate, and Mg2+. The lyase hydrolzyes allophanate to ammonium ions and bicarbonate. Neither activity is present in more than trace amounts when cultures are grown with ammonia or urea plus ammonia, or when they are starved for nitrogen for 8 h. Urea in the absence of ammonia induces both activities 10 to 100 times the basal levels. Addition of ammonia to an induced culture causes complete cessation of carboxylase accumulation and an 80% depression of lyase accumulation. Ammonia does not reduce urea uptake by repressed cells, so it does not prevent induction by the mechanism of inducer exclusion. The unicellular green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa (strain 3 Emerson) also has discrete carboxylase and lyase enzymes, but only the carboxylase exhibits metabolic control. PMID:1116994

  11. Differential Expression of Rubisco in Sporophytes and Gametophytes of Some Marine Macroalgae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangce; Niu, Jianfeng; Zhou, Baicheng

    2011-01-01

    Rubisco (ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase), a key enzyme of photosynthetic CO2 fixation, is one of the most abundant proteins in both higher plants and algae. In this study, the differential expression of Rubisco in sporophytes and gametophytes of four seaweed species — Porphyra yezoensis, P. haitanensis, Bangia fuscopurpurea (Rhodophyte) and Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae) — was studied in terms of the levels of transcription, translation and enzyme activity. Results indicated that both the Rubisco content and the initial carboxylase activity were notably higher in algal gametophytes than in the sporophytes, which suggested that the Rubisco content and the initial carboxylase activity were related to the ploidy of the generations of the four algal species. PMID:21283730

  12. Biotinylation: a novel posttranslational modification linking cell autonomous circadian clocks with metabolism.

    PubMed

    He, Lan; Hamm, J Austin; Reddy, Alex; Sams, David; Peliciari-Garcia, Rodrigo A; McGinnis, Graham R; Bailey, Shannon M; Chow, Chi-Wing; Rowe, Glenn C; Chatham, John C; Young, Martin E

    2016-06-01

    Circadian clocks are critical modulators of metabolism. However, mechanistic links between cell autonomous clocks and metabolic processes remain largely unknown. Here, we report that expression of the biotin transporter slc5a6 gene is decreased in hearts of two distinct genetic mouse models of cardiomyocyte-specific circadian clock disruption [i.e., cardiomyocyte-specific CLOCK mutant (CCM) and cardiomyocyte-specific BMAL1 knockout (CBK) mice]. Biotinylation is an obligate posttranslational modification for five mammalian carboxylases: acetyl-CoA carboxylase α (ACCα), ACCβ, pyruvate carboxylase (PC), methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC), and propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC). We therefore hypothesized that the cardiomyocyte circadian clock impacts metabolism through biotinylation. Consistent with decreased slc5a6 expression, biotinylation of all carboxylases is significantly decreased (10-46%) in CCM and CBK hearts. In association with decreased biotinylated ACC, oleate oxidation rates are increased in both CCM and CBK hearts. Consistent with decreased biotinylated MCC, leucine oxidation rates are significantly decreased in both CCM and CBK hearts, whereas rates of protein synthesis are increased. Importantly, feeding CBK mice with a biotin-enriched diet for 6 wk normalized myocardial 1) ACC biotinylation and oleate oxidation rates; 2) PCC/MCC biotinylation (and partially restored leucine oxidation rates); and 3) net protein synthesis rates. Furthermore, data suggest that the RRAGD/mTOR/4E-BP1 signaling axis is chronically activated in CBK and CCM hearts. Finally we report that the hepatocyte circadian clock also regulates both slc5a6 expression and protein biotinylation in the liver. Collectively, these findings suggest that biotinylation is a novel mechanism by which cell autonomous circadian clocks influence metabolic pathways. PMID:27084392

  13. Synthesis, storage, and stability of (4-/sup 14/C)oxaloacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, M.D.; Heldt, H.W.

    1985-03-01

    A simple procedure for preparing (4-/sup 14/C)oxaloacetic acid based on the reaction between (/sup 14/C)HCO-3 and phosphoenolpyruvate catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase is described. A simple method for preparing highly purified phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from maize leaves is described and the degradation of oxaloacetate under conditions of varying pH and divalent metal ion concentration is reported. (4-/sup 14/C)Oxaloacetic acid is stable for several months in 0.1 M HCl solution at -80 degrees C.

  14. Photorespiration and carbon concentrating mechanisms: two adaptations to high O2, low CO2 conditions.

    PubMed

    Moroney, James V; Jungnick, Nadine; Dimario, Robert J; Longstreth, David J

    2013-11-01

    This review presents an overview of the two ways that cyanobacteria, algae, and plants have adapted to high O2 and low CO2 concentrations in the environment. First, the process of photorespiration enables photosynthetic organisms to recycle phosphoglycolate formed by the oxygenase reaction catalyzed by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Second, there are a number of carbon concentrating mechanisms that increase the CO2 concentration around Rubisco which increases the carboxylase reaction enhancing CO2 fixation. This review also presents possibilities for the beneficial modification of these processes with the goal of improving future crop yields. PMID:23771683

  15. Propionic acidemia in a parturient presenting for induction of labor.

    PubMed

    Schmeck, Alison; Beilin, Yaakov

    2014-11-01

    Propionic acidemia is a congenital disorder of metabolism where the enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase is nonfunctional, resulting in an accumulation of propionic acid in the blood. It is important to avoid excess protein intake and a catabolic state to prevent acidemia. Additionally, it may be wise to avoid anesthetic drugs metabolized by propionyl-CoA carboxylase because use of these drugs may lead to acidosis. We present a case of a parturient with propionic acidemia who presented for induction of labor. PMID:25611862

  16. Mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA deficiency resulting from CA5A alterations presents with hyperammonemia in early childhood.

    PubMed

    van Karnebeek, Clara D; Sly, William S; Ross, Colin J; Salvarinova, Ramona; Yaplito-Lee, Joy; Santra, Saikat; Shyr, Casper; Horvath, Gabriella A; Eydoux, Patrice; Lehman, Anna M; Bernard, Virginie; Newlove, Theresa; Ukpeh, Henry; Chakrapani, Anupam; Preece, Mary Anne; Ball, Sarah; Pitt, James; Vallance, Hilary D; Coulter-Mackie, Marion; Nguyen, Hien; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Bhavsar, Amit P; Sinclair, Graham; Waheed, Abdul; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia

    2014-03-01

    Four children in three unrelated families (one consanguineous) presented with lethargy, hyperlactatemia, and hyperammonemia of unexplained origin during the neonatal period and early childhood. We identified and validated three different CA5A alterations, including a homozygous missense mutation (c.697T>C) in two siblings, a homozygous splice site mutation (c.555G>A) leading to skipping of exon 4, and a homozygous 4 kb deletion of exon 6. The deleterious nature of the homozygous mutation c.697T>C (p.Ser233Pro) was demonstrated by reduced enzymatic activity and increased temperature sensitivity. Carbonic anhydrase VA (CA-VA) was absent in liver in the child with the homozygous exon 6 deletion. The metabolite profiles in the affected individuals fit CA-VA deficiency, showing evidence of impaired provision of bicarbonate to the four enzymes that participate in key pathways in intermediary metabolism: carbamoylphosphate synthetase 1 (urea cycle), pyruvate carboxylase (anaplerosis, gluconeogenesis), propionyl-CoA carboxylase, and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (branched chain amino acids catabolism). In the three children who were administered carglumic acid, hyperammonemia resolved. CA-VA deficiency should therefore be added to urea cycle defects, organic acidurias, and pyruvate carboxylase deficiency as a treatable condition in the differential diagnosis of hyperammonemia in the neonate and young child. PMID:24530203

  17. Microbial physiology vol. 29

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, A.H. ); Tempest, D.W. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters: Hydrogen metabolism in Rhizobium: energetics, regulation, enzymology and genetics; The physiology and biochemistry of pili; Carboxysomes and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase; Archaebacteria: the comparative enzymology of their central metabolic pathways; and Physiology of lipoteichoic acids in bacteria.

  18. EVALUATION OF MILK SOMATIC CELLS AS A SOURCE OF MRNA FOR STUDY OF MAMMARY GLAND LIPOGENSIS IN LACTATING BEEF COWS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to compare mRNA levels for acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) extracted from mammary gland and from somatic cell pellets of the milk from each mammary gland. Eighteen primiparous beef cows (BW = 411 ± ...

  19. Photorespiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, K. K.; Hall, D. O.

    1982-01-01

    Topics in this discussion of photorespiration (light-dependent oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide evolution from leaves) include: (1) the biochemistry of photorespiration; (2) ribulose biphosphate carboxylase and glycollate synthesis; (3) metabolism of glycollate; (4) plants lacking photorespiratory systems; and (5) advantages of…

  20. Transgene silencing of sucrose synthase in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) stem vascular tissue suggests a role for invertase in cell wall cellulose synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants were transformed with two constructs: (1) a truncated phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase promoter isolated from alfalfa nodules (PEPC-4) fused to GUS; and (2) PEPC-4 fused with sucrose synthase (SUS) isolated from alfalfa nodules. Histochemical staining for GUS in st...

  1. How will soybeans respond to elevated temperatures when grown at future CO2 concentrations under fully open air field conditions (FACE)?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevating CO2 and temperature both influence plant productivity through their direct effects on photosynthesis. This is true because O2 and CO2 compete for same active sites of ribulose bisphophate carboxylase-oxygenase (rubisco). Increasing temperature increases oxygenation relative to carboxylati...

  2. Management of a patient with holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Van Hove, Johan L K; Josefsberg, Sagi; Freehauf, Cynthia; Thomas, Janet A; Thuy, Le Phuc; Barshop, Bruce A; Woontner, Michael; Mock, Donald M; Chiang, Pei-Wen; Spector, Elaine; Meneses-Morales, Iván; Cervantes-Roldán, Rafael; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2008-12-01

    We investigated in a patient with holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency, the relation between the biochemical and genetic factors of the mutant protein with the pharmacokinetic factors of successful biotin treatment. A girl exhibited abnormal skin at birth, and developed in the first days of life neonatal respiratory distress syndrome and metabolic abnormalities diagnostic of multiple carboxylase deficiency. Enzyme assays showed low carboxylase activities. Fibroblast analysis showed poor incorporation of biotin into the carboxylases, and low transfer of biotin by the holocarboxylase synthetase enzyme. Kinetic studies identified an increased Km but a preserved Vmax. Mutation analysis showed the child to be a compound heterozygote for a new nonsense mutation Q379X and for a novel missense mutation Y663H. This mutation affects a conserved amino acid, which is located the most 3' of all recorded missense mutations thus far described, and extends the region of functional biotin interaction. Treatment with biotin 100mg/day gradually improved the biochemical abnormalities in blood and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), corrected the carboxylase enzyme activities, and provided clinical stability and a normal neurodevelopmental outcome. Plasma concentrations of biotin were increased to more than 500 nM, thus exceeding the increased Km of the mutant enzyme. At these pharmacological concentrations, the CSF biotin concentration was half the concentration in blood. Measuring these pharmacokinetic variables can aid in optimizing treatment, as individual tailoring of dosing to the needs of the mutation may be required. PMID:18974016

  3. MANAGEMENT OF A PATIENT WITH HOLOCARBOXYLASE SYNTHETASE DEFICIENCY

    PubMed Central

    Van Hove, Johan LK; Josefsberg, Sagi; Freehauf, Cynthia; Thomas, Janet A.; Thuy, Le Phuc; Barshop, Bruce A.; Woontner, Michael; Mock, Donald M; Chiang, Pei-Wen; Spector, Elaine; Meneses-Morales, Iván; Cervantes-Roldán, Rafael; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    We investigated in a patient with holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency, the relation between the biochemical and genetic factors of the mutant protein with the pharmacokinetic factors of successful biotin treatment. A girl exhibited abnormal skin at birth, and developed in the first days of life neonatal respiratory distress syndrome and metabolic abnormalities diagnostic of multiple carboxylase deficiency. Enzyme assays showed low carboxylase activities. Fibroblast analysis showed poor incorporation of biotin into the carboxylases, and low transfer of biotin by the holocarboxylase synthetase enzyme. Kinetic studies identified an increased Km but a preserved Vmax. Mutation analysis showed the child to be a compound heterozygote for a new nonsense mutation Q379X and for a novel missense mutation Y663H. This mutation affects a conserved amino acid, which is located the most 3′ of all recorded missense mutations thus far described, and extends the region of functional biotin interaction. Treatment with biotin 100 mg/day gradually improved the biochemical abnormalities in blood and in cerebrospinal fluid, corrected the carboxylase enzyme activities, and provided clinical stability and a normal neurodevelopmental outcome. Plasma concentrations of biotin were increased to more than 500 nM, thus exceeding the increased Km of the mutant enzyme. At these pharmacological concentrations, the CSF biotin concentration was half the concentration in blood. Measuring these pharmacokinetic variables can aid in optimizing treatment, as individual tailoring of dosing to the needs of the mutation may be required. PMID:18974016

  4. Evaluation of milk somatic cells as a source of mRNA for study of lipogenesis in the mammary gland of lactating beef cows supplemented with dietary high-linoleate safflower seeds.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objectives were 2-fold: to determine the effect of dietary linoleate on milk fat composition and on transcript abundance of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) mRNA in mammary tissue, and to evaluate milk somatic ce...

  5. Compassionate Use of Triheptanoin (C7) for Inherited Disorders of Energy Metabolism

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Very Long-chain acylCoA Dehydrogenase (VLCAD) Deficiency; Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase Deficiencies (CPT1, CPT2); Mitochondrial Trifunctional Protein Deficiency; Long-chain Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency; Glycogen Storage Disorders; Pyruvate Carboxylase Deficiency Disease; ACYL-CoA DEHYDROGENASE FAMILY, MEMBER 9, DEFICIENCY of; Barth Syndrome

  6. Mitochondrial Carbonic Anhydrase VA Deficiency Resulting from CA5A Alterations Presents with Hyperammonemia in Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    van Karnebeek, Clara D.; Sly, William S.; Ross, Colin J.; Salvarinova, Ramona; Yaplito-Lee, Joy; Santra, Saikat; Shyr, Casper; Horvath, Gabriella A.; Eydoux, Patrice; Lehman, Anna M.; Bernard, Virginie; Newlove, Theresa; Ukpeh, Henry; Chakrapani, Anupam; Preece, Mary Anne; Ball, Sarah; Pitt, James; Vallance, Hilary D.; Coulter-Mackie, Marion; Nguyen, Hien; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Bhavsar, Amit P.; Sinclair, Graham; Waheed, Abdul; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Four children in three unrelated families (one consanguineous) presented with lethargy, hyperlactatemia, and hyperammonemia of unexplained origin during the neonatal period and early childhood. We identified and validated three different CA5A alterations, including a homozygous missense mutation (c.697T>C) in two siblings, a homozygous splice site mutation (c.555G>A) leading to skipping of exon 4, and a homozygous 4 kb deletion of exon 6. The deleterious nature of the homozygous mutation c.697T>C (p.Ser233Pro) was demonstrated by reduced enzymatic activity and increased temperature sensitivity. Carbonic anhydrase VA (CA-VA) was absent in liver in the child with the homozygous exon 6 deletion. The metabolite profiles in the affected individuals fit CA-VA deficiency, showing evidence of impaired provision of bicarbonate to the four enzymes that participate in key pathways in intermediary metabolism: carbamoylphosphate synthetase 1 (urea cycle), pyruvate carboxylase (anaplerosis, gluconeogenesis), propionyl-CoA carboxylase, and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (branched chain amino acids catabolism). In the three children who were administered carglumic acid, hyperammonemia resolved. CA-VA deficiency should therefore be added to urea cycle defects, organic acidurias, and pyruvate carboxylase deficiency as a treatable condition in the differential diagnosis of hyperammonemia in the neonate and young child. PMID:24530203

  7. Growth at elevated CO2 delays the adverse effects of drought stress on leaf photosynthesis of the C4 sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane was grown in sunlit greenhouses at 360 and 720 ppm CO2, and drought was imposed for 13 days on 4-month old plants. Leaf CO2 exchange rate (CER) and activity of Rubisco were marginally affected by high CO2 but were reduced by drought, whereas activity of PEP carboxylase was reduced by high ...

  8. Localization and mapping of CO/sub 2/ fixation genes within two gene clusters in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.L.; Tabita, F.R.

    1988-05-01

    Two fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase structural genes (fbpA and fbpB) have been identified within two unlinked gene clusters that were previously shown to contain the Rhodobacter sphaeroides sequences that code form I and form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase and phosphoribulokinase. The fbpA and fbpB genes were localized to a region immediately upstream from the corresponding prkA and prkB sequences and were found to be transcribed in the same direction as the phosphoribulokinase and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase genes based on inducible expression of fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase activity directed by the lac promoter. A recombinant plasmid was constructed that contained the tandem fbpA and prkA genes inserted downstream from the lac promoter in plasmid pUC18. Both gene products were expressed in Escherichia coli upon induction of transcription with isopropyl ..beta..-D-thiogalactoside, demonstrating that the two genes can be cotranscribed. A Zymomonas mobilis glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate-dehydrogenase gene (gap) hybridized to a DNA sequence located approximately 1 kilobase upstream from the form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase gene. Although no corresponding gap sequence was found within the form I gene cluster, an additional region of homology was detected immediately upstream from the sequences that encode the form I and form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenases.

  9. Discoveries in Rubisco: a historical perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historic discoveries and key observations related to Rubisco (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase), from 1947 to 2006, are presented. Currently, around 200 papers describing Rubisco research are published each year and the literature contains more than 5000 manuscripts on the subject. Wh...

  10. Circadian rhythms in crassulacean acid metabolism: phase relationships between gas exchange, leaf water relations and malate metabolism in Kalanchoë daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Buchanan-Bollig, I C; Smith, J A

    1984-06-01

    Gas exchange, leaf water relations, malate content and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase activity in crude extracts were examined for circadian rhythmicity in the crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana. At low irradiance (20 W m(-2)) the rhythm in CO2 uptake continued for several days with a period length of approx. 22 h, whereas the transpiration rhythm was no longer apparent after 24 h. This shows that the CO2 rhythm in continuous light (LL) is not under stomatal control. Circadian oscillations in malate content were detectable for up to 72 h in LL but were of much reduced amplitude. This was reflected in the changes in leaf water relations, which quickly damped after transfer to LL. The activity of PEP carboxylase assayed immediately after extraction showed a rhythmicity for at least 18 h, but after 36 h, values from different plants were scattered. We suggest that the CO2-uptake rhythm is primarily the result of endogenous changes in the activity of PEP carboxylase, which competes to varying degrees with ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase for CO2. PMID:24253720

  11. Physiological evidence for plasticity in glycolate/glycerate transport during photorespiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photorespiration recycles fixed carbon following the oxygenation reaction of Ribulose, 1–5, carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco). The recycling of photorespiratory C2 to C3 intermediates is not perfectly efficient and reduces photosynthesis in C3 plants. Recently, a plastidic lycolate/ glycerate transpo...

  12. Rubisco Activase Activity Assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase functions as a mechano-chemical motor protein using the energy from ATP hydrolysis to contort the structure of its target protein, Rubisco. This action modulates the activation state of Rubisco by removing tightly-bound inhibitory s...

  13. Vitamin K

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin K, a fat-soluble vitamin, is an enzyme cofactor for post-translation modification of specific glutamate residues that are converted into '-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) residues by a vitamin K-dependent (VKD) carboxylase. Seven VKD coagulation proteins are synthesized in the liver. The extra-he...

  14. Molecular cloning and expression profile of ß-ketoacyl-acp synthase gene from tung tree (Vernicia fordii Hemsl.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tung tree (Vernicia fordii) is an important woody oil tree. Tung tree seeds contain 50-60% oil with approximately 80 mole a-eleostearic acid (9cis, 11trans, 13trans octadecatrienoic acid). Fatty acid synthesis is catalyzed by the concerted action of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase, a ...

  15. Missense mutation in the Chlamydomonas chloroplast gene that encodes the Rubisco large subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Spreitzer, R.J.; Brown, T.; Chen, Zhixiang; Zhang, Donghong; Al-Abed, S.R. )

    1988-04-01

    The 69-12Q mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii lacks ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity, but retains holoenzyme protein. It results from a mutation in the chloroplast large-subunit gene that causes an isoleucine-for-threonine substitution at amino-acid residue 173. Considering that lysine-175 is involved in catalysis, it appears that mutations cluster at the active site.

  16. Biophysical characterization of higher plant Rubisco activase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase (Rca) is a chaperone-like protein of the AAA+ family, which uses mechanochemical energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to release tightly bound inhibitors from the active site of the primary carbon fixing enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate oxygenase/carboxylase (Rubisco). Mechanistic and...

  17. COMPLEMENTATION OF THE NUCLEAR ANTISENSE RBCS GENE INTO THE TOBACCO PLASTID GENOME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The small subunit (rbcS) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is a nuclear gene-encoded protein that is imported into chloroplasts where it assembles with the large subunit (rbcL) after removal of the transit peptide to form Rubisco. We have explored the possibility that the ...

  18. Genome sequence of strain IMCC2047, a novel marine member of the Gammaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ilnam; Kang, Dongmin; Oh, Hyun-Myung; Kim, Hana; Kim, Hee-Jin; Kang, Tae-Wook; Kim, Seon-Young; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2011-07-01

    Strain IMCC2047 was isolated from the Yellow Sea using dilution-to-extinction culturing. The strain was shown to occupy a distinct phylogenetic position within the Gammaproteobacteria. Here we present the genome sequence of strain IMCC2047, which harbors genes for various metabolic pathways, including proteorhodopsin and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. PMID:21602327

  19. Structural Changes Associated with the Acute Thermal Instability of Rubisco Activase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inhibition of photosynthesis at moderately high temperatures has been linked to a decrease in ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activation. This decrease is thought to be a consequence of the thermal instability of Rubisco’s chaperone, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxyla...

  20. Body Condition Score and Day of Lactation Affect Lipogenic mRNA Abundance and Transpription Factors in Adipose Tissue of Beef Cows Fed Supplemental Fat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that BCS at parturition and postpartum dietary fat supplementation will alter transcription factors and mRNA abundance of adipose tissue lipogenic and lipolytic enzymes during lactation in beef cows. Our objective was to determine abundance of mRNA for acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), h...

  1. Enhancement in leaf photosynthesis and upregulation of rubisco in the C4 sorghum plant at elevated growth carbon dioxide and temperature occur at early stages of leaf ontogeny.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain sorghum was grown at 350 and 700 (high) ppm CO2, and at daytime maximum/nighttime minimum temperatures of 30/20 and 36/26C. Gas exchange rates, activities of Rubisco and PEP carboxylase (PEPC), leaf area, and biomass of various plant components were determined at different stages of leaf and p...

  2. Dietary vitamin K and therapeutic warfarin alter susceptibility to vascular calcification in experimental chronic kidney disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), with vascular calcification (VC) being a key modifier of disease progression. A local regulator of vascular calcification is vitamin K. This gamma-glutamyl carboxylase substrate is an essential ...

  3. Effects of exogenous spermidine on photosynthetic capacity and expression of Calvin cycle genes in salt-stressed cucumber seedlings.

    PubMed

    Shu, Sheng; Chen, Lifang; Lu, Wei; Sun, Jin; Guo, Shirong; Yuan, Yinhui; Li, Jun

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the effects of exogenous spermidine (Spd) on growth, photosynthesis and expression of the Calvin cycle-related genes in cucumber seedlings (Cucumis sativus L.) exposed to NaCl stress. Salt stress reduced net photosynthetic rates (PN), actual photochemical efficiency of PSII (ΦPSII) and inhibited plant growth. Application of exogenous Spd to salinized nutrient solution alleviated salinity-induced the inhibition of plant growth, together with an increase in PN and ΦPSII. Salinity markedly reduced the maximum carboxylase activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Vcmax), the maximal velocity of RuBP regeneration (Jmax), triose-phosphate utilization capacity (TPU) and carboxylation efficiency (CE). Spd alleviated the negative effects on CO2 assimilation induced by salt stress. Moreover, Spd significantly increased the activities and contents of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and fructose-1,6-biphosphate aldolase (ALD; aldolase) in the salt-stressed cucumber leaves. On the other hand, salinity up-regulated the transcriptional levels of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RCA), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribrokinase (PRK) and down-regulated the transcriptional levels of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (RbcL), ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit (RbcS), ALD, triose-3-phosphate isomerase (TPI), fructose-1,6-bisphosphate phosphatase (FBPase) and 3-phosphoglyceric acid kinase (PGK). However, Spd application to salt-stressed plant roots counteracted salinity-induced mRNA expression changes in most of the above-mentioned genes. These results suggest that Spd could improve photosynthetic capacity through regulating gene expression and activity of key enzymes for CO2 fixation, thus confers tolerance to salinity on cucumber plants. PMID:25069716

  4. N- and C-terminal domains in human holocarboxylase synthetase participate in substrate recognition

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Yousef I.; Moriyama, Hideaki; Olsen, Lars J.; Bi, Xin; Zempleni, Janos

    2009-01-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) catalyzes the binding of the vitamin biotin to carboxylases and histones. Carboxylases mediate essential steps in macronutrient metabolism. For example, propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) catalyzes the carboxylation of propionyl-CoA in the metabolism of odd-chain fatty acids. HCS comprises four putative domains, i.e., the N-terminus, the biotin transfer/ATP binding domain, a putative linker domain, and the C-terminus. Both N- and C-termini are essential for biotinylation of carboxylases by HCS, but the exact functions of these two domains in enzyme catalysis are unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that N- and C-termini play roles in substrate recognition by HCS. Yeast-two-hybrid (Y2H) assays were used to study interactions between the four domains of human HCS with p67, a PCC-based polypeptide and HCS substrate. Both N- and C-termini interacted with p67 in Y2H assays, whereas the biotin transfer/ATP-binding and the linker domains did not interact with p67. The essentiality of N- and C-termini for interactions with carboxylases was confirmed in rescue experiments with mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using constructs of truncated human HCS. Finally, a computational biology approach was used to model the 3D structure of human HCS and identify amino acid residues that interact with p67. In silico predictions were consistent with observations from Y2H assays and yeast rescue experiments, and suggested docking of p67 near Arg508 and Ser515 within the central domain of HCS. PMID:19157941

  5. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of a novel BCCP subunit gene from Aleurites moluccana.

    PubMed

    Xuan, W Y; Zhang, Y; Liu, Z Q; Feng, D; Luo, M Y

    2015-01-01

    Aleurites moluccana L. is grown as a roadside tree in southern China and the oil content of its seed is higher than other oil plants, such as Jatropha curcas and Camellia oleifera. A. moluccana is considered a promising energy plant because its seed oil could be used to produce biodiesel and bio-jet fuel. In addition, the bark, leaves, and kernels of A. moluccana have various medical and commercial uses. Here, a novel gene coding the biotin carboxyl carrier protein subunit (BCCP) was cloned from A. moluccana L. using the homology cloning method combined with rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) technology. The isolated full-length cDNA sequence (designated AM-accB) was 1188 bp, containing a 795-bp open reading frame coding for 265 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of AM-accB contained a biotinylated domain located between amino acids 190 and 263. A. moluccana BCCP shows high identity at the amino acid level to its homologues in other higher plants, such as Vernicia fordii, J. curcas, and Ricinus communis (86, 77, and 70%, respectively), which all contain conserved domains for ACCase activity. The expression of the AM-accB gene during the middle stage of development and maturation in A. moluccana seeds was higher than that in early and later stages. The expression pattern of the AM-accB gene is very similar to that of the oil accumulation rate. PMID:26345927

  6. In silico identification and comparative genomics of candidate genes involved in biosynthesis and accumulation of seed oil in plants.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arti; Chauhan, Rajinder Singh

    2012-01-01

    Genes involved in fatty acids biosynthesis, modification and oil body formation are expected to be conserved in structure and function in different plant species. However, significant differences in the composition of fatty acids and total oil contents in seeds have been observed in different plant species. Comparative genomics was performed on 261 genes involved in fatty acids biosynthesis, TAG synthesis, and oil bodies formation in Arabidopsis, Brassica rapa, castor bean and soybean. In silico expression analysis revealed that stearoyl desaturase, FatB, FAD2, oleosin and DGAT are highly abundant in seeds, thereby considered as ideal candidates for mining of favorable alleles in natural population. Gene structure analysis for major genes, ACCase, FatA, FatB, FAD2, FAD3 and DGAT, which are known to play crucial role in oil synthesis revealed that there are uncommon variations (SNPs and INDELs) which lead to varying content and composition of fatty acids in seed oil. The predicted variations can provide good targets for seed oil QTL identification, understanding the molecular mechanism of seed oil accumulation, and genetic modification to enhance seed oil yield in plants. PMID:22312320

  7. In Silico Identification and Comparative Genomics of Candidate Genes Involved in Biosynthesis and Accumulation of Seed Oil in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arti; Chauhan, Rajinder Singh

    2012-01-01

    Genes involved in fatty acids biosynthesis, modification and oil body formation are expected to be conserved in structure and function in different plant species. However, significant differences in the composition of fatty acids and total oil contents in seeds have been observed in different plant species. Comparative genomics was performed on 261 genes involved in fatty acids biosynthesis, TAG synthesis, and oil bodies formation in Arabidopsis, Brassica rapa, castor bean and soybean. In silico expression analysis revealed that stearoyl desaturase, FatB, FAD2, oleosin and DGAT are highly abundant in seeds, thereby considered as ideal candidates for mining of favorable alleles in natural population. Gene structure analysis for major genes, ACCase, FatA, FatB, FAD2, FAD3 and DGAT, which are known to play crucial role in oil synthesis revealed that there are uncommon variations (SNPs and INDELs) which lead to varying content and composition of fatty acids in seed oil. The predicted variations can provide good targets for seed oil QTL identification, understanding the molecular mechanism of seed oil accumulation, and genetic modification to enhance seed oil yield in plants. PMID:22312320

  8. Elementary Mode Analysis for the Rational Design of Efficient Succinate Conversion from Glycerol by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jianan; Liu, Dehua

    2010-01-01

    By integrating the restriction of oxygen and redox sensing/regulatory system, elementary mode analysis was used to predict the metabolic potential of glycerol for succinate production by E. coli under either anaerobic or aerobic conditions. It was found that although the theoretical maximum succinate yields under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions are 1.0 mol/mol glycerol, the aerobic condition was considered to be more favorable for succinate production. Although increase of the oxygen concentration would reduce the succinate yield, the calculation suggests that controlling the molar fraction of oxygen to be under 0.65 mol/mol would be beneficial for increasing the succinate productivity. Based on the elementary mode analysis, the rational genetic modification strategies for efficient succinate production under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were obtained, respectively. Overexpressing the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase or heterogonous pyruvate carboxylase is considered to be the most efficient strategy to increase the succinate yield. PMID:20886007

  9. Differential gene expression in C4 plants. Research proposal, February 1, 1982-January 31, 1983. [Pea plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cashmore, A. R.

    1981-11-01

    The topic of this research proposal is slightly different from that originally outlined. Specifically, instead of characterizing the genes encoding the small subunit of RuBP carboxylase and the chlorophyll a/b binding polypeptide from corn, these genes from pea are being characterized. The above polypeptides represent the major products of cytoplasmic protein synthesis in green leaves. CDNA clones encoding the above polypeptides were isolated and characterized. Both of these cDNA clones have now been sequenced, providing the amino acid sequences for the carboxylase small subunit and, for the first time, for the chlorophyll a/b binding polypeptide. Pea nuclear DNA was cloned into the lambda phage Charon 4, and cloned nuclear DNA sequences encoding the above polypeptides were isolated. Future work will be concerned with the structural and functional characterization of these nuclear genes.

  10. Some enzyme activities associated with the chlorophyll containing layers of the immature barley pericarp.

    PubMed

    Duffus, C M; Rosie, R

    1973-09-01

    Some photosynthetic and biochemical properties of the chlorophyl containing layers of the pericarp of developing barley have been investigated. The tissue changes from pale green to bright green early in development, chlorophyll disappearing only at the later stages of maturity. It contains chloroplasts and probably amyloplasts and starch bearing chloroplasts. It is capable of high rates of light dependent oxygen evolution. It has been shown that the enzyme phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31) is present in the pericarp and is 100 times as active in carbon dioxide fixation as ribulose diphosphate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.39). Other enzymes present in the pericarp are phosphoenol pyruvate synthetase, pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.1), malate NAD and NADP dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.1.37), malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.40), and fructose 1,6 diphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11). PMID:24458756

  11. Changes in Metabolite Levels in Kalanchoë daigremontiana and the Regulation of Malic Acid Accumulation in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, W; McAulay, A

    1977-03-01

    Changes in glucose-6-P, fructose-6-P, fructose-1,6-diP, 6-phospho-gluconate, phosphoenolpyruvate, 3-phosphoglycerate, and pyruvate levels in the leaves of the Crassulacean plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hammet et Perrier were measured enzymically during transitions from CO(2)-free air to air, air to CO(2)-free air, and throughout the course of acid accumulation in darkness. The data are discussed in terms of the involvement of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in malic acid synthesis and in terms of the regulation of the commencement of malic acid synthesis and accumulation through the effects of CO(2) on storage carbohydrate mobilization and its termination through the effects of malic acid on phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity. PMID:16659872

  12. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase in Plants Exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism 1

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, P.; Campbell, Wilbur H.; Black, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase has been found in significant activities in a number of plants exhibiting Crassulacean acid metabolism. Thirty-five species were surveyed for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, ribulose diphosphate carboxylase, malic enzyme, and malate dehydrogenase (NAD). Plants which showed high activities of malic enzyme contained no detectable phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, while plants with high activities of the latter enzyme contained little malic enzyme. It is proposed that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase acts as a decarboxylase during the light period, furnishing CO2 for the pentose cycle and phosphoenolpyruvate for gluconeogenesis. Some properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in crude extracts of pineapple leaves were investigated. The enzyme required Mn2+, Mg2+, and ATP for maximum activity. About 60% of the activity could be pelleted, along with chloroplasts and mitochondria, in extracts from leaves kept in the dark overnight. PMID:16658562

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of biotin protein ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Pendini, Nicole R.; Polyak, Steve W.; Booker, Grant W.; Wallace, John C.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.

    2008-01-01

    Biotin protein ligase from Staphylococcus aureus catalyses the biotinylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase. Recombinant biotin protein ligase from S. aureus has been cloned, expressed and purified. Crystals were grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as the precipitant at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.3 Å resolution from crystals using synchrotron X-ray radiation at 100 K. The diffraction was consistent with the tetragonal space group P42212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 93.665, c = 131.95. PMID:18540065

  14. Biotin protein ligase from Corynebacterium glutamicum: role for growth and L: -lysine production.

    PubMed

    Peters-Wendisch, P; Stansen, K C; Götker, S; Wendisch, V F

    2012-03-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is a biotin auxotrophic Gram-positive bacterium that is used for large-scale production of amino acids, especially of L-glutamate and L-lysine. It is known that biotin limitation triggers L-glutamate production and that L-lysine production can be increased by enhancing the activity of pyruvate carboxylase, one of two biotin-dependent proteins of C. glutamicum. The gene cg0814 (accession number YP_225000) has been annotated to code for putative biotin protein ligase BirA, but the protein has not yet been characterized. A discontinuous enzyme assay of biotin protein ligase activity was established using a 105aa peptide corresponding to the carboxyterminus of the biotin carboxylase/biotin carboxyl carrier protein subunit AccBC of the acetyl CoA carboxylase from C. glutamicum as acceptor substrate. Biotinylation of this biotin acceptor peptide was revealed with crude extracts of a strain overexpressing the birA gene and was shown to be ATP dependent. Thus, birA from C. glutamicum codes for a functional biotin protein ligase (EC 6.3.4.15). The gene birA from C. glutamicum was overexpressed and the transcriptome was compared with the control strain revealing no significant gene expression changes of the bio-genes. However, biotin protein ligase overproduction increased the level of the biotin-containing protein pyruvate carboxylase and entailed a significant growth advantage in glucose minimal medium. Moreover, birA overexpression resulted in a twofold higher L-lysine yield on glucose as compared with the control strain. PMID:22159614

  15. Consumption of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by higher plant carbonic anhydrase (CA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protoschill-Krebs, G.; Wilhelm, C.; Kesselmeier, J.

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA), isolated from pea leaves, was found to consume carbonyl sulphide (COS), a climatic relevant trace gas in the atmosphere. The isolated enzyme, free of other carboxylases, showed a very high affinity towards this substrate. The experiments confirm that CA is the key enzyme for the consumption of COS in higher plants. Furthermore, the identification of this enzyme furthers our understanding of additional sinks for COS, which are needed to understand the balance of known global sources.

  16. Metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate through alternate pathways in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Jin, Eunsook S; Moreno, Karlos X; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Fidelino, Leila; Merritt, Matthew E; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2016-04-01

    The source of hyperpolarized (HP) [(13) C]bicarbonate in the liver during metabolism of HP [1-(13) C]pyruvate is uncertain and likely changes with physiology. Multiple processes including decarboxylation through pyruvate dehydrogenase or pyruvate carboxylase followed by subsequent decarboxylation via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (gluconeogenesis) could play a role. Here we tested which metabolic fate of pyruvate contributed to the appearance of HP [(13) C]bicarbonate during metabolism of HP [1-(13) C]pyruvate by the liver in rats after 21 h of fasting compared to rats with free access to food. The (13) C NMR of HP [(13) C]bicarbonate was observed in the liver of fed rats, but not in fasted rats where pyruvate carboxylation and gluconeogenesis was active. To further explore the relative fluxes through pyruvate carboxylase versus pyruvate dehydrogenase in the liver under typical conditions of hyperpolarization studies, separate parallel experiments were performed with rats given non-hyperpolarized [2,3-(13) C]pyruvate. (13) C NMR analysis of glutamate isolated from the liver of rats revealed that flux from injected pyruvate through pyruvate dehydrogenase was dominant under fed conditions whereas flux through pyruvate carboxylase dominated under fasted conditions. The NMR signal of HP [(13) C]bicarbonate does not parallel pyruvate carboxylase activity followed by subsequent decarboxylation reaction leading to glucose production. In the liver of healthy well-fed rats, the appearance of HP [(13) C]bicarbonate exclusively reflects decarboxylation of HP [1-(13) C]pyruvate via pyruvate dehydrogenase. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26836042

  17. Icosahedral inclusions (carboxysomes) of Nitrobacter agilis.

    PubMed Central

    Shively, J M; Bock, E; Westphal, K; Cannon, G C

    1977-01-01

    The icosahedral bodies of Nitrobacter agilis are about 120 nm in diameter and, as viewed by electron microscopy, consist of an outer shell enclosing 10-nm particles. The inner 10-nm particle is the enzyme D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase. The bodies isolated from cells incubated 1 month without nitrite had a specific activity for the enzyme of 0.54 mu mol of CO2 fixed per min per mg of protein. Images PMID:199579

  18. Haloxyfop mode of action in liquid cultures of proso millet: An analysis of haloxyfop sensitivity changes during growth

    SciTech Connect

    Irzyk, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    Haloxyfop is a grass-selective herbicide that inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase in species that are not tolerant to the herbicide. Liquid cultures of proso millet (Panicum miliaceum) cells treated with haloxyfop at different phases of growth exhibited different levels of sensitivity to the herbicide. Treatment of 1-d cultures with 1 {mu}M haloxyfop completely inhibited growth within 48 h. In contrast, 1 mM haloxyfop was required to elicit a similar response in 4-, 7-, or 10-d cultures. Calculated IC{sub 50} values indicated a 300-fold decrease in haloxyfop sensitivity during the period from 1 to 4 d. This period of growth coincided with the greatest increase in cell number during culture growth and suggested that dividing cells are most sensitive to haloxyfop. Uptake and metabolism of {sup 14}C-haloxyfop in 1-d and 4-d cultures were compared. In both cultures, amounts of radiolabel uptake were similar. Almost all radioactivity extracted from 1- and 4-d cells was present as the parent compound. These results suggested that the sensitivity change was related to other factors. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity of proso millet cells, measured in vitro by the acetyl-CoA-dependent incorporation of {sup 14} C-bicarbonate into an acid-stable product, was essentially constant during culture growth. Micromolar concentrations of haloxyfop significantly inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity from both sensitive and insensitive cultures. Thus, the change in the sensitivity of cultures to haloxyfop was not correlated with changes in acetyl-CoA carboxylase abundance, activity, or sensitivity to haloxyfop during culture growth. In vivo incorporation of {sup 14}C-acetate into lipids was decreased by 1 {mu}M haloxyfop in both 1-d and 4-d cultures at the earliest sampling times but the amount of inhibition was significantly greater in the sensitive cultures.

  19. The oxygen and carbon dioxide compensation points of C3 plants: possible role in regulating atmospheric oxygen.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, N E; Benker, C; Beck, E

    1995-11-21

    The O2 and CO2 compensation points (O2 and CO2) of plants in a closed system depend on the ratio of CO2 and O2 concentrations in air and in the chloroplast and the specificities of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). The photosynthetic O2 is defined as the atmospheric O2 level, with a given CO2 level and temperature, at which net O2 exchange is zero. In experiments with C3 plants, the O2 with 220 ppm CO2 is 23% O2; O2 increases to 27% with 350 ppm CO2 and to 35% O2 with 700 ppm CO2. At O2 levels below the O2, CO2 uptake and reduction are accompanied by net O2 evolution. At O2 levels above the O2, net O2 uptake occurs with a reduced rate of CO2 fixation, more carbohydrates are oxidized by photorespiration to products of the C2 oxidative photosynthetic carbon cycle, and plants senesce prematurely. The CO2 increases from 50 ppm CO2 with 21% O2 to 220 ppm with 100% O2. At a low CO2/high O2 ratio that inhibits the carboxylase activity of Rubisco, much malate accumulates, which suggests that the oxygen-insensitive phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase becomes a significant component of the lower CO2 fixation rate. Because of low global levels of CO2 and a Rubisco specificity that favors the carboxylase activity, relatively rapid changes in the atmospheric CO2 level should control the permissive O2 that could lead to slow changes in the immense O2 pool. PMID:11607591

  20. Gas exchange characteristics as indicators of the basic limiting factors in photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    Photosynthesis provides essentially all of the primary productivity on Earth. The rate of photosynthesis varies widely between and even within species. The basic processes are similar in most C{sub 3} plant species and so the differences in the rate of photosynthesis must be governed by feedback mechanisms regulating the rate of photosynthesis to meet the needs of the plant. Understanding these feedback mechanisms may allow us to modify them to adapt photosynthesis to the needs of humans. In this research I have concentrated on one feedback mechanism. This feedback mechanism comes into play when the capacity for starch and sucrose synthesis cannot keep pace with the chloroplast's ability to produce triose phosphate. My colleagues and I have demonstrated that this type of feedback can occur under natural conditions and that both electron transport and Rubisco (RuBP) carboxylase are reduced in activity during this feedback. We demonstrated that the reduced activity of RuBP carboxylase is caused by reduced carbamylation. These studies have led us to speculate that the role of RuBP carboxylase decarbamylation (deactivation) is to regulate the pool of free phosphate inside the chloroplast stroma. In these and other ways this research has contributed to our understanding of how the rate of photosynthesis is established in plants and how that rate might be modified in the future.

  1. Strategies for the allocation of resources under sulfur limitation in the green alga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Giordano, M; Pezzoni, V; Hell, R

    2000-10-01

    The effect of sulfur limitation on the partitioning of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur was investigated in Dunaliella salina. D. salina was able to adapt to 6 microM sulfate; under these conditions, the cells showed reduced growth and photosynthetic rates. Whereas intracellular sulfate was depleted, phosphate, nitrate, and ammonium increased. Amino acids showed a general increase, and alanine became the most abundant amino acid. The activities of four key enzymes of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen metabolism were differentially regulated: Adenosine 5' triphosphate sulfurylase activity increased 4-fold, nitrate reductase and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase activities decreased 4- and 11-fold, respectively, whereas carbonic anhydrase activity remained unchanged. Sulfur limitation elicited specific increase or decrease of the abundance of several proteins, such us Rubisco, PEP carboxylase, and a light harvesting complex protein. The accumulation of potentially toxic ammonium indicates an insufficient availability of carbon skeletons. Sulfur deficiency thus induces an imbalance between carbon and nitrogen. The dramatic reduction in PEP carboxylase activity suggests that carbon was diverted away from anaplerosis and possibly channeled into C3 metabolism. These results indicate that it is the coordination of key steps and components of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur metabolism that allows D. salina to adapt to prolonged sulfur limitation. PMID:11027733

  2. Genetic Variability in Carbon Fixation, Sucrose-P-Synthase and ADP Glucose Pyrophosphorylase in Maize Plants of Differing Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Rocher, J. P.; Prioul, J. L.; Lecharny, A.; Reyss, A.; Joussaume, M.

    1989-01-01

    The net photosynthetic rate and the activities of ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCo), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, sucrose-P-synthase, and ADP glucose-pyrophosphorylase, key enzymes of the leaf carbohydrate metabolism were compared in eight maize (Zea mays L.) genotypes presenting large differences in growth rate. The sucrose-P-synthase activity varied in the ratio 1 to 3 from the less active to the more active genotype and this variation was highly correlated with those in growth rate. ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase activity was not significantly different from one genotype to another whatever the basis for expression, leaf area, or soluble protein. The photosynthetic rate varied with similar amplitude (1:1) to the RubisCo activity or RubisCo quantity but the correlation with growth rate was highly significant for photosynthesis and nonsignificant for RubisCo or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. So, in our series of genotypes the sucrose synthesis capacities as expressed by sucrose phosphate synthase activity seem to have a good predicting value for mean growth rate at a young stage. PMID:16666558

  3. Carboxylation and anaplerosis in neurons and glia.

    PubMed

    Hassel, B

    2000-01-01

    Anaplerosis, or de novo formation of intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, compensates for losses of TCA cycle intermediates, especially alpha-ketoglutarate, from brain cells. Loss of alpha-ketoglutarate occurs through release of glutamate and GABA from neurons and through export of glutamine from glia, because these amino acids are alpha-ketoglutarate derivatives. Anaplerosis in the brain may involve four different carboxylating enzymes: malic enzyme, phosphoenopyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), propionyl-CoA carboxylase, and pyruvate carboxylase. Anaplerotic carboxylation was for many years thought to occur only in glia through pyruvate carboxylase; therefore, loss of transmitter glutamate and GABA from neurons was thought to be compensated by uptake of glutamine from glia. Recently, however, anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation was demonstrated in glutamatergic neurons, meaning that these neurons to some extent can maintain transmitter synthesis independently of glutamine. Malic enzyme, which may carboxylate pyruvate, was recently detected in neurons. The available data suggest that neuronal and glial pyruvate carboxylation could operate at as much as 30% and 40-60% of the TCA cycle rate, respectively. Cerebral carboxylation reactions are probably balanced by decarboxylation reactions,, because cerebral CO2 formation equals O2 consumption. The finding of pyruvate carboxylation in neurons entails a major revision of the concept of the glutamine cycle. PMID:11414279

  4. Photosynthetic Gene Expression in Meristems and during Initial Leaf Development in a C4 Dicotyledonous Plant.

    PubMed

    Ramsperger, V. C.; Summers, R. G.; Berry, J. O.

    1996-08-01

    Immunolocalization and fluorescent in situ hybridization were used with confocal microscopy to examine patterns of photosynthetic gene expression during initial stages of leaf development in the C4 dicot Amaranthus hypochondriacus. mRNAs encoding the large and small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase were present in the apical dome and in all cells of the leaf primordia. In contrast, these polypeptides were detected only in cells of the ground meristem, with no accumulation detected in the apical dome or in other leaf primordia cells. The ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase transcripts showed very little cell-type specificity as leaf structures began to differentiate, whereas their polypeptides accumulated primarily in bundle-sheath precursor cells. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase mRNAs were abundant in meristems and leaf primordia, although their corresponding polypeptides did not accumulate in leaves until the leaf vascular system began to differentiate. These polypeptides were mostly restricted to premesophyll cells from their earliest detection, whereas their transcripts remained present in nearly all leaf cells. These findings indicate that individual C4 genes are independently regulated as they become initially localized to their appropriate cell types. Furthermore, posttranscriptional regulation plays a major role in determining early patterns of C4 gene expression. PMID:12226343

  5. Process Design for the Biocatalysis of Value-Added Chemicals from Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Eiteman

    2007-07-31

    This report describes results toward developing a process to sequester CO{sub 2} centered on the enzymes PEP carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase. The process involves the use of bacteria to convert CO{sub 2} and glucose as a co-substrate and generates succinic acid as a commodity chemical product. The study reports on strain development and process development. In the area of strain development, knockouts in genes which divert carbon from the enzymatic steps involved in CO{sub 2} consumption were completed, and were shown not to affect significantly the rate of CO{sub 2} sequestration and succinic acid generation. Furthermore, the pyc gene encoding for pyruvate carboxylase proved to be unstable when integrated onto the chromosome. In the area of process development, an optimal medium, pH and base counterion were obtained, leading to a sequestration rate as great as 800 mg/Lh. Detailed studies of gas phase composition demonstrated that CO{sub 2} composition has a significant affect on CO{sub 2} sequestration, while the presence of 'toxic' compounds in the gas, including NO{sub 2}, CO and SO{sub 2} did not have a detrimental effect on sequestration. Some results on prolonging the rate of sequestration indicate that enzyme activities decrease with time, suggesting methods to prolong enzyme activity may benefit the overall process.

  6. Role of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylation in Acetobacter xylinum

    PubMed Central

    Benziman, Moshe

    1969-01-01

    Glucose-grown cells of Acetobacter xylinum oxidized acetate only when the reaction mixture was supplemented with catalytic quantities of glucose or intermediates of the citrate cycle. Extracts, prepared by sonic treatment, catalyzed the formation of oxalacetate when incubated with phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and bicarbonate. Oxalacetate was not formed in the presence of pyruvate plus adenosine triphosphate. The ability to promote carboxylation of PEP was lower in succinate-grown cells than in glucose-grown cells. PEP carboxylase, partially purified from extracts by ammonium sulfate fractionation, catalyzed the stoichiometric formation of oxalacetate and inorganic phosphate from PEP and bicarbonate. The enzyme was not affected by acetyl-coenzyme A or inorganic phosphate. It was inhibited by adenosine diphosphate in a manner competitive with PEP (K1 = 1.3 mm) and by dicarboxylic acids of the citrate cycle; of these, succinate was the most potent inhibitor. It is suggested that the physiological role of PEP carboxylase in A. xylinum is to affect the net formation of C4 acids from C3 precursors, which are essential for the maintainance of the citrate cycle during growth on glucose. The relationship of PEP carboxylase to other enzyme systems metabolizing PEP and oxalacetate in A. xylinum is discussed. PMID:5788692

  7. Ameliorative effect of Withania coagulans on dyslipidemia and oxidative stress in nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Kirtikar; Dikshit, Piyush; Tyagi, Mool Kumar; Shukla, Rimi; Gambhir, Jasvinder K

    2012-10-01

    Present study aims to evaluate the effect of Withania coagulans fruit (aqWC) on diabetic-dyslipidemia and antioxidant/oxidant status in DM. Diabetic animals were treated with aqWC at a dose of 250 mg/kg bw for 30 days. Lipid profile, MDA, GSH, SOD, FRAP, HMG CoA reductase and acetyl CoA carboxylase activities were estimated in blood and tissues. Total cholesterol, TAG and LDL were significantly elevated whereas HDL was decreased in diabetic animals (p<0.05), simultaneously the lipid content and HMG CoA reductase activities were also increased, whereas acetyl CoA carboxylase activity decreased significantly in tissues of diabetic animals. MDA was increased and antioxidants such as SOD, GSH and FRAP decreased significantly in DM (p<0.05). Oral administration of aqWC to diabetic animals produced significant improvement in serum lipid profile and tissue lipid content. Activity of HMG CoA reductase decreased, whereas acetyl CoA carboxylase activity increased significantly in tissues after aqWC treatment. Administration of aqWC to diabetic animals also showed significant increase in antioxidant levels i.e., GSH, SOD, FRAP and reduced level of MDA in blood and tissue homogenates as compared to diabetic controls (p<0.05). These results suggest that aqWC treatment improved lipid profile and decreased oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus. PMID:22842119

  8. An immunohistochemical study of the compartmentation of metabolism during the development of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) berries.

    PubMed

    Famiani, F; Walker, R P; Técsi, L; Chen, Z H; Proietti, P; Leegood, R C

    2000-04-01

    The compartmentation of key processes in sugar, organic acid and amino acid metabolism was studied during the development of the flesh and seeds of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) berries. Antibodies specific for enzymes involved in sugar (cell wall and vacuolar invertases, pyrophosphate: fructose 6-phosphate phosphotransferase, aldolase, NADP-glyceraldehyde-P dehydrogenase, cytosolic fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase), photosynthesis (Rubisco, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, sedoheptulose 1,7-bisphosphatase), amino acid metabolism (cytosolic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferases, alanine aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamine synthetase), organic acid metabolism (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, NAD- and NADP-dependent malic enzyme, ascorbate peroxidase), and lipid metabolism (acetyl CoA carboxylase, isocitrate lyase) were used to determine how their abundance changed during development. There were marked changes in the abundance of many of these enzymes in both the flesh and seeds. The intercellular location of some enzymes was investigated using immunohistochemistry. Several enzymes (e.g. phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and those involved in amino acid metabolism) were associated with tissues likely to function in the transport of imported assimilates, such as the vasculature. Although other enzymes (e.g. NADP-malic enzyme and soluble acid invertase, involved in the metabolism of sugars and organic acids) were largely present in the parenchyma cells of the flesh, their distribution was extremely heterogeneous. This study shows that when considering the metabolism of complex structures such as fruit, it is essential to consider how metabolism is compartmentalized between and within different tissues, even when they are apparently structurally homogeneous. PMID:10938859

  9. Impaired vitamin K recycling in uremia is rescued by vitamin K supplementation.

    PubMed

    Kaesler, Nadine; Magdeleyns, Elke; Herfs, Marjolein; Schettgen, Thomas; Brandenburg, Vincent; Fliser, Danilo; Vermeer, Cees; Floege, Jürgen; Schlieper, Georg; Krüger, Thilo

    2014-08-01

    In chronic kidney disease, vitamin K-dependent proteins, including the calcification inhibitor matrix Gla protein, are largely uncarboxylated indicating that functional vitamin K deficiency may contribute to uremic vascular calcification. Since the effects of uremia on the vitamin K cycle are unknown, we investigated the influence of uremia and vitamin K supplementation on the activity of the vitamin K cycle and extraosseous calcification. Uremia was induced in rats by an adenine-supplemented diet and vitamin K1 or K2 was administered over 4 and 7 weeks. After 4 weeks of adenine diet, the activity of the vitamin K cycle enzyme γ-carboxylase but not the activities of DT-diaphorase or vitamin K epoxide reductase were reduced. Serum levels of undercarboxylated matrix Gla protein increased, indicating functional vitamin K deficiency. There was no light microscopy-detectable calcification at this stage but chemically determined aortic and renal calcium content was increased. Vitamin K treatment reduced aortic and renal calcium content after 4 weeks. Seven weeks of uremia induced overt calcification in the aorta, heart, and kidneys; however, addition of vitamin K restored intrarenal γ-carboxylase activity and overstimulated it in the liver along with reducing heart and kidney calcification. Thus, uremic vitamin K deficiency may partially result from a reduction of the γ-carboxylase activity which possibly contributes to calcification. Pharmacological vitamin K supplementation restored the vitamin K cycle and slowed development of soft tissue calcification in experimental uremia. PMID:24429407

  10. Carbon Dioxide Metabolism in Leaf Epidermal Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Willmer, C. M.; Pallas, J. E.; Black, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    A number of plant species were surveyed to obtain pure leaf epidermal tissue in quantity. Commelina communis L. and Tulipa gesnariana L. (tulip) were chosen for further work. Chlorophyll a/b ratios of epidermal tissues were 2.41 and 2.45 for C. communis and tulip, respectively. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase, malic enzyme, and NAD+ and NADP+ malate dehydrogenases were assayed with epidermal tissue and leaf tissue minus epidermal tissue. In both species, there was less ribulose 1,5-diphosphate than phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity in epidermal tissue whether expressed on a protein or chlorophyll basis whereas the reverse was true for leaf tissue minus epidermal tissue. In both species, malic enzyme activities were higher in epidermal tissue than in the remaining leaf tissue when expressed on a protein or chlorophyll basis. In both species, NAD+ and NADP+ malate dehydrogenase activities were higher in the epidermal tissue when expressed on a chlorophyll basis; however, on a protein basis, the converse was true. Microautoradiography of C. communis epidermis and histochemical tests for keto acids suggested that CO2 fixation occurred predominantly in the guard cells. The significance and possible location of the enzymes are discussed in relation to guard cell metabolism. Images PMID:16658581

  11. Measurement of 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate in plant leaves by isotope dilution. [Spinacea oleracea; Triticum aestivum; Arabidopsis thaliana; Maize; Phaseolus vulgaris; Petunia hybrida

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.D.; Kobza, J.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1991-05-01

    The level of 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate (CA1P) in leaves of 12 species was determined by an isotope dilution assay. {sup 14}C-labeled standard was synthesized from (2-{sup 14}C)carboxyarabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate using acid phosphatase, and was added at the initial point of leaf extraction. Leaf CA1P was purified and its specific activity determined. CA1P was found in dark-treated leaves of all species examined, including spinach (Spinacea oleracea), wheat (Triticum aestivum), Arabidopsis thaliana, and maize (Zea mays). The highest amounts were found in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and petunia (Petunia hybrida), which had 1.5 to 1.8 moles CA1P per mole ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase catalytic sites. Most species had intermediate amounts of CA1P (0.2 to 0.8 mole CA1P per mole catalytic sites). Such intermediate to high levels of CA1P support the hypothesis that CA1P functions in many species as a light-dependent regulator of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity and whole leaf photosynthetic CO{sub 2} assimilation. However, CA1P levels in spinach, wheat, and A. thaliana were particularly low (less than 0.09 mole CA1P per mole catalytic sites). In such species, CA1P does not likely have a significant role in regulating ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity, but could have a different physiological role.

  12. Nitrate Acts as a Signal to Induce Organic Acid Metabolism and Repress Starch Metabolism in Tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Scheible, W. R.; Gonzalez-Fontes, A.; Lauerer, M.; Muller-Rober, B.; Caboche, M.; Stitt, M.

    1997-01-01

    Nia30(145) transformants with very low nitrate reductase activity provide an in vivo screen to identify processes that are regulated by nitrate. Nia30(145) resembles nitrate-limited wild-type plants with respect to growth rate and protein and amino acid content but accumulates large amounts of nitrate when it is grown on high nitrate. The transcripts for nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase, cytosolic glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase increased; NR and nitrite reductase activity increased in leaves and roots; and glutamine synthetase activity increased in roots. The transcripts for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, cytosolic pyruvate kinase, citrate synthase, and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase increased; phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity increased; and malate, citrate, isocitrate, and [alpha]-oxoglutarate accumulated in leaves and roots. There was a decrease of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase transcript and activity, and starch decreased in the leaves and roots. After adding 12 mM nitrate to nitrate-limited Nia30(145), the transcripts for NR and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase increased, and the transcripts for ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase decreased within 2 and 4 hr, respectively. Starch was remobilized at almost the same rate as in wild-type plants, even though growth was not stimulated in Nia30(145). It is proposed that nitrate acts as a signal to initiate coordinated changes in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. PMID:12237366

  13. Overexpression of ACC gene from oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi enhanced the lipid accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with increased levels of glycerol 3-phosphate substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiancai; Xu, Ronghua; Wang, Ruling; Haque, Mohammad Enamul; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-06-01

    The conversion of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA by acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is the rate-limiting step in fatty acid biosynthesis. In this study, a gene coding for ACC was isolated and characterized from an oleaginous yeast, Lipomyces starkeyi. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of L. starkeyi acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene (LsACC1) showed that the expression levels were upregulated with the fast accumulation of lipids. The LsACC1 was co-overexpressed with the glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GPD1), which regulates lipids biosynthesis by supplying another substrates glycerol 3-phosphate for storage lipid assembly, in the non-oleaginous yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Further, the S. cerevisiae acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ScACC1) was transferred with GPD1 and its function was analyzed in comparison with LsACC1. The results showed that overexpressed LsACC1 and GPD1 resulted in a 63% increase in S. cerevisiae. This study gives new data in understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of fatty acids and lipid biosynthesis in yeasts. PMID:26865376

  14. Photosynthetic Characteristics of Portulaca grandiflora, a Succulent C(4) Dicot : CELLULAR COMPARTMENTATION OF ENZYMES AND ACID METABOLISM.

    PubMed

    Ku, S B; Shieh, Y J; Reger, B J; Black, C C

    1981-11-01

    The succulent, cylindrical leaves of the C(4) dicot Portulaca grandiflora possess three distinct green cell types: bundle sheath cells (BSC) in radial arrangement around the vascular bundles; mesophyll cells (MC) in an outer layer adjacent to the BSC; and water storage cells (WSC) in the leaf center. Unlike typical Kranz leaf anatomy, the MC do not surround the bundle sheath tissue but occur only in the area between the bundle sheath and the epidermis. Intercellular localization of photosynthetic enzymes was characterized using protoplasts isolated enzymatically from all three green cell types.Like other C(4) plants, P. grandiflora has ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and the decarboxylating enzyme, NADP(+)-malic enzyme, in the BSC. Unlike other C(4) plants, however, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, pyruvate, Pi dikinase, and NADP(+)-malate dehydrogenase of the C(4) pathway were present in all three green cell types, indicating that all are capable of fixing CO(2) via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and regenerating phosphoenolpyruvate. Other enzymes were about equally distributed between MC and BSC similar to other C(4) plants. The enzyme profile of the WSC was similar to that of the MC but with reduced activity in most enzymes, except mitochondrion-associated enzymes.Intracellular localization of enzymes was studied in organelles partitioned by differential centrifugation using mechanically ruptured mesophyll and bundle sheath protoplasts. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was a cytosolic enzyme in both cells; whereas, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and NADP(+)-malic enzyme were exclusively compartmentalized in the bundle sheath chloroplasts. NADP(+)-malate dehydrogenase, pyruvate, Pi dikinase, aspartate aminotransferase, 3-phosphoglycerate kinase, and NADP(+)-triose-P dehydrogenase were predominantly localized in the chloroplasts while alanine aminotransferase and NAD(+)-malate dehydrogenase were mainly present in the cytosol of both cell types. Based

  15. An Integrated Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Divergent Evolutionary Pattern of Oil Biosynthesis in High- and Low-Oil Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Shi-Bo; Li, Qi-Gang; Song, Jian; Hao, Yu-Qi; Zhou, Ling; Zheng, Huan-Quan; Dunwell, Jim M.; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Seed oils provide a renewable source of food, biofuel and industrial raw materials that is important for humans. Although many genes and pathways for acyl-lipid metabolism have been identified, little is known about whether there is a specific mechanism for high-oil content in high-oil plants. Based on the distinct differences in seed oil content between four high-oil dicots (20~50%) and three low-oil grasses (<3%), comparative genome, transcriptome and differential expression analyses were used to investigate this mechanism. Among 4,051 dicot-specific soybean genes identified from 252,443 genes in the seven species, 54 genes were shown to directly participate in acyl-lipid metabolism, and 93 genes were found to be associated with acyl-lipid metabolism. Among the 93 dicot-specific genes, 42 and 27 genes, including CBM20-like SBDs and GPT2, participate in carbohydrate degradation and transport, respectively. 40 genes highly up-regulated during seed oil rapid accumulation period are mainly involved in initial fatty acid synthesis, triacylglyceride assembly and oil-body formation, for example, ACCase, PP, DGAT1, PDAT1, OLEs and STEROs, which were also found to be differentially expressed between high- and low-oil soybean accessions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed distinct differences of oleosin in patterns of gene duplication and loss between high-oil dicots and low-oil grasses. In addition, seed-specific GmGRF5, ABI5 and GmTZF4 were predicted to be candidate regulators in seed oil accumulation. This study facilitates future research on lipid biosynthesis and potential genetic improvement of seed oil content. PMID:27159078

  16. Treatment influence on herbicide resistance level of Belgian Alopecurus myosuroides populations (black-grass).

    PubMed

    Marechal, P Y; Henriet, F; Bodson, B

    2009-01-01

    Black-grass is a common grass weed, widely spread in Northern Europe and also in Belgium. For ages, it has been an increasing problem in industrial crops, especially winter cereals. Therefore, farmers started to spray herbicide intensively and soon cases of failure occurred for different molecules and different modes of action. Black-grass populations have been tested in greenhouses to assess the influence of an herbicide treatment as to the resistance level regarding three different herbicides: chlortoluron, fenoxaprop-P and mesosulfuron+iodosulfuron. Black-grass seeds were collected in field trials in six locations in Belgium, on individuals which have survived the herbicide treatment. Each population comes from trial plots, measuring 2 meters wide by 5 meters long and characterized by a single or a combination of products. Herbicides sprayed were isoproturon, flufenacet+diflufenican, ACCase inhibitors and ALS inhibitors. Seeds were also collected in the untreated plots. The population present in these last ones corresponds to the former population, before the herbicide selection pressure was applied. In the glasshouse assay, this population was used as the standard population to compare with other populations issued from the same field. The 'R' rating system was set up with this population to assess the evolution of resistance level, year in, year out. Rothamsted and Peldon populations were also included as cross-reference. Each field population presented different behaviours towards herbicide applied in greenhouses and some cases of resistance can be highlighted. Generally, a reduction of treatment efficiency between field and greenhouse results was clearly visible for the whole of studied active ingredients. Indeed, a distribution shift of the populations towards higher resistance classes could be observed. This is particularly remarkable for active ingredients sharing the same mode of action. For example, it has been found that populations already sprayed

  17. Global perspective of herbicide-resistant weeds.

    PubMed

    Heap, Ian

    2014-09-01

    Two hundred and twenty weed species have evolved resistance to one or more herbicides, and there are now 404 unique cases (species × site of action) of herbicide-resistant weeds globally. ALS inhibitor-resistant weeds account for about a third of all cases (133/404) and are particularly troublesome in rice and cereals. Although 71 weed species have been identified with triazine resistance, their importance has dwindled with the shift towards Roundup Ready® crops in the USA and the reduction of triazine usage in Europe. Forty-three grasses have evolved resistance to ACCase inhibitors, with the most serious cases being Avena spp., Lolium spp., Phalaris spp., Setaria spp. and Alopecurus myosuroides, infesting more than 25 million hectares of cereal production globally. Of the 24 weed species with glyphosate resistance, 16 have been found in Roundup Ready® cropping systems. Although Conyza canadensis is the most widespread glyphosate-resistant weed, Amaranthus palmeri and Amaranthus tuberculartus are the two most economically important glyphosate-resistant weeds because of the area they infest and the fact that these species have evolved resistance to numerous other herbicide sites of action, leaving growers with few herbicidal options for their control. The agricultural chemical industry has not brought any new herbicides with novel sites of action to market in over 30 years, making growers reliant on using existing herbicides in new ways. In addition, tougher registration and environmental regulations on herbicides have resulted in a loss of some herbicides, particularly in Europe. The lack of novel herbicide chemistries being brought to market combined with the rapid increase in multiple resistance in weeds threatens crop production worldwide. PMID:24302673

  18. Seasonal changes in the expression of energy metabolism-related genes in white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle in female Japanese black bears.

    PubMed

    Shimozuru, Michito; Nagashima, Akiko; Tanaka, Jun; Tsubota, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Bears undergo annual cycles in body mass: rapid fattening in autumn (i.e., hyperphagia), and mass loss in winter (i.e., hibernation). To investigate how Japanese black bears (Ursus thibetanus japonicus) adapt to such extreme physiological conditions, we analyzed changes in the mRNA expression of energy metabolism-related genes in white adipose tissues and skeletal muscle throughout three physiological stages: normal activity (June), hyperphagia (November), and hibernation (March). During hyperphagia, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed the upregulation of de novo lipogenesis-related genes (e.g., fatty acid synthase and diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2) in white adipose tissue, although the bears had been maintained with a constant amount of food. In contrast, during the hibernation period, we observed a downregulation of genes involved in glycolysis (e.g., glucose transporter 4) and lipogenesis (e.g., acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1) and an upregulation of genes in fatty acid catabolism (e.g., carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A) in both tissue types. In white adipose tissues, we observed upregulation of genes involved in glyceroneogenesis, including pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1, suggesting that white adipose tissue plays a role in the recycling of circulating free fatty acids via re-esterification. In addition, the downregulation of genes involved in amino acid catabolism (e.g., alanine aminotransferase) and the TCA cycle (e.g., pyruvate carboxylase) indicated a role of skeletal muscle in muscle protein sparing and pyruvate recycling via the Cori cycle. These examples of coordinated transcriptional regulation would contribute to rapid mass gain during the pre-hibernation period and to energy preservation and efficient energy production during the hibernation period. PMID:26880364

  19. Possible involvement of AMP-activated protein kinase in PGE1-induced synthesis of osteoprotegerin in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    KAINUMA, SHINGO; OTSUKA, TAKANOBU; KUROYANAGI, GEN; YAMAMOTO, NAOHIRO; MATSUSHIMA-NISHIWAKI, RIE; KOZAWA, OSAMU; TOKUDA, HARUHIKO

    2016-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is firmly established as a central regulator of cellular energy homeostasis. We have previously reported that prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) stimulates the synthesis of osteoprotegerin through p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. The present study investigated the involvement of AMPK in PGE1-induced osteoprotegerin synthesis in MC3T3-E1 cells. The levels of osteoprotegerin were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, while the phosphorylation of AMPK, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, p38 MAP kinase and SAPK/JNK were analyzed by western blotting. In addition, the mRNA expression levels of osteoprotegerin were determined by a reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. It was revealed that PGE1 significantly induced the phosphorylation of the α and β subunits of AMPK in a time-dependent manner (P<0.05). In addition, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a direct substrate of AMPK, was significantly phosphorylated by PGE1 (P<0.05). Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, was revealed to suppress the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, which significantly reduced the release and mRNA expression levels of PGE1-stimulated osteoprotegerin (P<0.05). However, the PGE1-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase and SAPK/JNK were not affected by compound C. The results of the present study indicated that AMPK may positively regulate PGE1-stimulated osteoprotegerin synthesis in osteoblasts; thus providing novel insight into the regulatory mechanisms underlying bone metabolism. PMID:27168848

  20. Induction of Reduced Photorespiratory Activity in Submersed and Amphibious Aquatic Macrophytes 1

    PubMed Central

    Salvucci, Michael E.; Bowes, George

    1981-01-01

    Incubation under water in a 30 C/14-hour or 12 C/10-hour photoperiod caused the CO2 compensation points of 10 aquatic macrophytes to decrease below 25 or increase above 50 microliters CO2 per liter, respectively. Submerged and aerial leaves of two amphibious angiosperms (Myriophyllum brasiliense and Proserpinaca palustris) maintained high compensation points when incubated in air but, when the submerged or aerial leaves of Proserpinaca were incubated under water, the compensation points dropped as low as 10. This suggests that, in addition to temperature and photoperiod, some factor associated with submergence regulates the compensation point of aquatic plants. In the high-compensation point plants, photorespiration, as a percentage of net photosynthesis, was equivalent to that in terrestrial C3 plants. For Hydrilla verticillata, the decreasing CO2 compensation points (110, 40, and 10) were associated with reduced photorespiration, as indicated by decreased O2 inhibition, decreased rates of CO2 evolution into CO2-free air, and increased net photosynthetic rates. The decrease in the CO2 compensation points of Hydrilla, Egeria densa, and Cabomba caroliniana was accompanied by an increase in the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate, but not of ribulose bisphosphate, carboxylase. In Hydrilla, several C4 enzymes also increased in activity to the following levels (micromoles per gram fresh weight per hour): pyruvate Pi dikinase (35), pyrophosphatase (716), adenylate kinase (525), NAD and NADP malate dehydrogenase (6565 and 30), NAD and NADP malic enzymes (239 and 44), and aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (357 and 85), whereas glycolate oxidase (6) and phosphoglycolate and phosphoglycerate phosphatases (76 and 32) showed no change. Glycolate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were undetectable. The reduced photorespiration in these plants may be due to increased CO2 fixation via a C4 acid pathway. However, for three Myriophyllum species, some other

  1. Efficient aerobic succinate production from glucose in minimal medium with Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Litsanov, Boris; Kabus, Armin; Brocker, Melanie; Bott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Summary Corynebacterium glutamicum, an established industrial amino acid producer, has been genetically modified for efficient succinate production from the renewable carbon source glucose under fully aerobic conditions in minimal medium. The initial deletion of the succinate dehydrogenase genes (sdhCAB) led to an accumulation of 4.7 g l−1 (40 mM) succinate as well as high amounts of acetate (125 mM) as by‐product. By deleting genes for all known acetate‐producing pathways (pta‐ackA, pqo and cat) acetate production could be strongly reduced by 83% and succinate production increased up to 7.8 g l−1 (66 mM). Whereas overexpression of the glyoxylate shunt genes (aceA and aceB) or overproduction of the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PCx) had only minor effects on succinate production, simultaneous overproduction of pyruvate carboxylase and PEP carboxylase resulted in a strain that produced 9.7 g l−1 (82 mM) succinate with a specific productivity of 1.60 mmol g (cdw)−1 h−1. This value represents the highest productivity among currently described aerobic bacterial succinate producers. Optimization of the production conditions by decoupling succinate production from cell growth using the most advanced producer strain (C. glutamicumΔpqoΔpta‐ackAΔsdhCABΔcat/pAN6‐pycP458Sppc) led to an additional increase of the product yield to 0.45 mol succinate mol−1 glucose and a titre of 10.6 g l−1 (90 mM) succinate. PMID:22018023

  2. Biochemistry of photosynthesis in species of triticum of differing ploidy.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, G P; Keys, A J; Leech, R M

    1984-01-01

    Illuminated flag leaves of Triticum monococcum(2X), T. urartu(2X), T. dicoccum(4X), T. dicoccoides(4X), and T. aestivum(6X) were exposed to (14)CO(2) for 10 seconds and subsequently allowed to continue photosynthesis in the ambient air for periods of up to 2 minutes. The relative distribution of (14)C among water-soluble products in the leaves was similar for each species at each sampling time. After the 10-second pulse of (14)CO(2), radioactivity was mainly in phosphate esters with less than 5% in C(4) acids. Subsequently, radioactivity increased in sucrose, glycine, and serine at the expense of that in phosphate esters. By 2 minutes, between 18% and 29% of the (14)C was in glycine plus serine. The results suggest rapid photorespiration in all species and an absence of C(4) photosynthesis.d-Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.39) was partly purified from seedling leaves of each of the five Triticum species. Each preparation was assayed for simultaneous carboxylase and oxygenase activities in 2.1 millimolar NaHCO(3) and 265 micromolar O(2) at pH 8.2 and 25 degrees C. The mean ratio of carboxylase to oxygenase activities was 6.11 +/- 0.16 (standard error); differences between values for different species were not statistically significant. The results do not explain the faster rates of photosynthesis per unit leaf area reported for diploid and tetraploid species of Triticum compared to the hexaploid. PMID:16663364

  3. Stimulation of growth and photosynthetic carbon metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with triacontanol

    SciTech Connect

    Houtz, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Treatment of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dangeard cells (-, strain N. 90), cultured at 5% CO/sub 2/, with 1 to 1000 ..mu..g/L triacontanol (TRIA) resulted in a 21% to 35% increase in cell density, 7% to 31% increase in total chlorophyll, and 20% to 100% increase in photosynthetic CO/sub 2/ assimilation. Chlamydomonas cells responded to a broad range of TRIA concentrations that were at least 10-fold above the optimum concentration for higher plants. Octacosanol inhibited the effect of TRIA on photosynthetic CO/sub 2/ assimilation. TRIA did not alter glycolate excretion, the CO/sub 2/ compensation point or sensitivity of photosynthetic CO/sub 2/ assimilation to O/sub 2/ in Chlamydomonas. Kinetic analysis of TRIA-treated cells showed that the increase in photosynthetic CO/sub 2/ assimilation was a result of an increase in the whole-cell apparent Vmax. The activity of RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase was significantly higher in cell lysates from TRIA-treated cells than those from control cells. However, quantification of RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase levels by /sup 14/CABP binding did not show increased enzyme levels in TRIA-treated cells. Therefore, there was an increase in the specific activity of RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase extracted from Chlamydomonas cells treated with TRIA. TRIA alone had no effect in vitro on the activity of RuBPcarboxylase/oxygenase purified from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves or from cell lysates of Chlamydomonas. RuBP levels were significantly higher in TRIA-treated cells at high and low CO/sub 2/. Increased RuBP levels in TRIA-treated Chlamydomonas cells were also observed in the absence of CO/sub 2/ with atmospheres of N/sub 2/ and 21% O/sub 2/.

  4. Temperature Dependence of Photosynthesis in Agropyron smithii Rydb. 1

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Russell K.; Stidham, Mark A.; Williams, George J.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Uribe, Ernest G.

    1982-01-01

    As part of an extensive analysis of the factors regulating photosynthesis in Agropyron smithii Rydb., a C3 grass, we have examined the response of leaf gas exchange and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase activity to temperature. Emphasis was placed on elucidating the specific processes which regulate the temperature response pattern. The inhibitory effects of above-optimal temperatures on net CO2 uptake were fully reversible up to 40°C. Below 40°C, temperature inhibition was primarily due to O2 inhibition of photosynthesis, which reached a maximum of 65% at 45°C. The response of stomatal conductance to temperature did not appear to have a significant role in determining the overall temperature response of photosynthesis. The intracellular conductance to CO2 increased over the entire experimental temperature range, having a Q10 of 1.2 to 1.4. Increases in the apparent Michaelis constant (Kc) for RuBP carboxylase were observed in both in vitro and in vivo assays. The Q10 values for the maximum velocity (Vmax) of CO2 fixation by RuBP carboxylase in vivo was lower (1.3-1.6) than those calculated from in vitro assays (1.8-2.2). The results suggest that temperature-dependent changes in enzyme capacity may have a role in above-optimum temperature limitations below 40°C. At leaf temperatures above 40°C, decreases in photosynthetic capacity were partially dependent on temperature-induced irreversible reductions in the quantum yield for CO2 uptake. PMID:16662320

  5. The regulation of the air: a hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisbet, E. G.; Fowler, C. M. R.; Nisbet, R. E. R.

    2011-09-01

    We propose the hypothesis that natural selection, acting on the specificity of rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) for carbon dioxide over oxygen, has controlled the CO2:O2 ratio of the atmosphere since the evolution of photosynthesis and has also sustained the Earth's greenhouse-set surface temperature. Rubisco works in partnership with the nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase to control atmospheric pressure. Together, these two enzymes control global surface temperature and indirectly the pH and oxygenation of the ocean. Thus, the co-evolution of these two enzymes may have produced clement conditions on the Earth's surface, allowing life to be sustained.

  6. Nitrosomonas communis strain YNSRA, an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium, isolated from the reed rhizoplane in an aquaponics plant.

    PubMed

    Tokuyama, Tatsuaki; Mine, Atsusi; Kamiyama, Kaoru; Yabe, Ryuichi; Satoh, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Hirotoshi; Takahashi, Reiji; Itonaga, Koji

    2004-01-01

    An ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (strain YNSRA) was isolated from the rhizoplane of the reed (Phragmites communis) used in an aquaponics plant which is a wastewater treatment plant. Strain YNSRA was identified as Nitrosomonas communis by taxonomic studies. The hydroxylamine-cytochrome c reductase (HCR) of strain YNSRA was found to have a higher activity (25.60 u/mg) than that of Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC25978T (8.94 u/mg). Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO) activity was detected at very low levels in strain YNSRA, whereas strain ATCC25978T had definite activity. PMID:16233712

  7. [Advances in research on CO2 concentrating mechanism of green algae].

    PubMed

    Xia, Jianrong; Gao, Kunshan

    2002-11-01

    Unicellular green algae plays a key role in freshwater ecosystem, which possesses a CO2 concentrating mechanism that can increase the level of CO2 at the active site of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) by actively transporting inorganic carbon when adapted to low CO2 concentration. The mechanism results in an increase in photosynthetic rate, and a decrease in photorespiration. This mechanism and its environmental regulation such as light, temperature, CO2 concentration and nutrient are reviewed in this paper to enhance further studies on response of phytoplankton to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration in China. PMID:12625019

  8. Stimulation of CAM Photosynthesis in Kalanchoë blossfeldiana by Transferring to Nitrogen-Deficient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Koichi

    1988-01-01

    Kalanchoë blossfeldiana Poelln. cv Hikan plants were grown hydroponically with nutrient solution containing 5 millimolar NO3− (or NH4+) for 1 to 2 months and then transferred to nutrient solution containing no nitrogen. CO2 uptake at night, nocturnal increase in titratable acidity, and activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase increased after the transfer. Thus, transfer to nitrogen-deficient conditions stimulates Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM photosynthesis) in K. blossfeldiana. The importance of the plant nitrogen status (nitrogen-withdrawal status) for induction and stimulation of CAM photosynthesis is discussed. PMID:16666163

  9. Use of carglumic acid in the treatment of hyperammonaemia during metabolic decompensation of patients with propionic acidaemia.

    PubMed

    Abacan, M; Boneh, A

    2013-08-01

    Propionic acidaemia (PA) results from propionyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency. During metabolic decompensation, the accumulation of propionyl-CoA causes secondary hyperammonaemia through N-acetylglutamate synthetase inactivation. Carglumic acid, a structural analogue of N-acetylglutamate, was given to patients with PA (n=3) during episodes of metabolic decompensation (n=8; age range: birth to 4years), in addition to high energy/low protein intake and carnitine. Plasma ammonia concentrations normalised within 6-19h. Carglumic acid was well tolerated with no side effects noted. PMID:23791308

  10. Propionic acidemia--biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Barash, V; Elpeleg, O; Amit, R; Gottfried, S; Yatziv, S; Gutman, A

    1989-02-01

    The first documented case of propionic acidemia in Israel is described. Diagnosis was based on three independent methods: analysis of urinary organic acids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, assay of propionyl CoA carboxylase activity and oxidation of 1-14C-propionate by cultured skin fibroblasts. The use of more than one method for confirmation of the diagnosis is considered to be of importance in providing an additional margin of safety in cases where genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis in future pregnancies are indicated. PMID:2495260

  11. [Blood propionic acid with hyperammonemic coma].

    PubMed

    Stöckler, S; Kastner, U; Pokits, B; Müller, W; Roscher, A

    1987-01-01

    We report on a mature male newborn who presented clinically on the 2nd day of live with poor feeding and acidotic breathing. Laboratory findings like severe metabolic acidosis, hyperammonemia, hyperglycinemia, ketonuria and elevated urinary excretion of lactate and propionate suggested the presence of organoacidopathia. Propionic acidemia, however could be diagnosed definitively only when the characteristic urinary and blood metabolites were found during the state of a hyperammonemic coma provoked by a fully oral protein regimen. The diagnosis was affirmed by reduced propionate fixation and by reduced propionyl-CoA-carboxylase shown in the patient's skin fibroblasts. PMID:3682709

  12. [Juvenile glaucoma in propionic acidemia].

    PubMed

    Rosentreter, A; Gaki, S; Dinslage, S; Dietlein, T S

    2012-12-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from deficiency of the biotin-dependent enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase, which is necessary for the catabolism of branched chain amino acids and odd-chain fatty acids. Although optic atrophy was documented in four cases, no glaucomatous optic atrophy has yet been described. This article describes the first case of a 12-year-old boy with PA showing bilateral glaucomatous optic disc atrophy due to dysgenetic changes of the angle of the anterior chamber. PMID:22733289

  13. Ectomycorrhizal association of three Lactarius species with Carpinus and Quercus trees in a Mexican montane cloud forest.

    PubMed

    Lamus, Valentina; Montoya, Leticia; Aguilar, Carlos J; Bandala, Victor M; Ramos, David

    2012-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi are being monitored in the Santuario del Bosque de Niebla in the central region of Veracruz (eastern Mexico). Based on the comparison of DNA sequences (ITS rDNA) of spatiotemporally co-occurring basidiomes and EM root tips, we discovered the EM symbiosis of Lactarius indigo, L. areolatus and L. strigosipes with Carpinus caroliniana, Quercus xalapensis and Quercus spp. The host of the EM tips was identified by comparison of the large subunit of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase gene (rbcL). Descriptions coupled with photographs of ectomycorrhizas and basidiomes are presented. PMID:22675052

  14. Carbon isotope geochemistry and geobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation values were used to understand the history of the biosphere. For example, plankton analyses confirmed that marine extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous period were indeed severe (see Hsu's article in Sundquist and Broeker, 1984). Variations in the isotopic compositions of carbonates and evaporitic sulfates during the Paleozoic reflect the relative abundances of euxinic (anoxic) marine environments and organic deposits from terrestrial flora. The carbon isotopic composition of Precambrian sediments suggest that the enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase has existed for perhaps 3.5 billion years.

  15. Photosynthetic flexibility in maize exposed to salinity and shade

    PubMed Central

    Sharwood, Robert E.; Sonawane, Balasaheb V.; Ghannoum, Oula

    2014-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis involves a close collaboration of the C3 and C4 metabolic cycles across the mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells. This study investigated the coordination of C4 photosynthesis in maize plants subjected to two salinity (50 and 100mM NaCl) treatments and one shade (20% of full sunlight) treatment. Photosynthetic efficiency was probed by combining leaf gas-exchange measurements with carbon isotope discrimination and assaying the key carboxylases [ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)] and decarboxylases [nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK)] operating in maize leaves. Generally, salinity inhibited plant growth and photosynthesis to a lesser extent than shade. Salinity reduced photosynthesis primarily by reducing stomatal conductance and secondarily by equally reducing Rubisco and PEPC activities; the decarboxylases were inhibited more than the carboxylases. Salinity increased photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination (Δp) and reduced leaf dry-matter carbon isotope composition (13δ) due to changes in p i/p a (intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressure), while CO2 leakiness out of the bundle sheath (ϕ) was similar to that in control plants. Acclimation to shade was underpinned by a greater downregulation of PEPC relative to Rubisco activity, and a lesser inhibition of NADP-ME (primary decarboxylase) relative to PEP-CK (secondary decarboxylase). Shade reduced Δp and ɸ without significantly affecting leaf 13δ or p i/p a relative to control plants. Accordingly, shade perturbed the balance between the C3 and C4 cycles during photosynthesis in maize, and demonstrated the flexible partitioning of C4 acid decarboxylation activity between NADP-ME and PEP-CK in response to the environment. This study highlights the need to improve our understanding of the links between leaf 13δ and photosynthetic Δp, and the role

  16. Biochemical Properties and Biological Function of a Monofunctional Microbial Biotin Protein Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Kyle G.; Beckett, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    Biotin protein ligases constitute a family of enzymes that catalyze biotin linkage to biotin-dependent carboxylases. In bacteria these enzymes are functionally divided into two classes; the monofunctional enzymes that only catalyze biotin addition and the bifunctional enzymes that also bind to DNA to regulate transcription initiation. Biochemical and biophysical studies of the bifunctional Escherichia coli ligase suggest that several properties of the enzyme have evolved to support its additional regulatory role. Included among these properties are the order of substrate binding and linkage between oligomeric state and ligand binding. PMID:20499837

  17. Wild Manihot Species Do Not Possess C4 Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    CALATAYUD, P.‐A.; BARÓN, C. H.; VELÁSQUEZ, H.; ARROYAVE, J. A.; LAMAZE, T.

    2002-01-01

    Cultivated cassava (Manihot esculenta) has a higher rate of photosynthesis than is usual for C3 plants and photosynthesis is not light saturated. For these reasons it has been suggested that cultivated cassava could be derived from wild species possessing C4 photosynthesis. The natural abundance of 13C and activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and phosphoglycolate phosphatase were measured in leaves of 20 wild cassava species to test this hypothesis. All the species studied, including M. flabellifolia the potential wild progenitor of cultivated cassava, clearly exhibited C3 not C4 characteristics. PMID:12096814

  18. Regulation of photosynthetic carbon fixation on the ocean margins. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.H.

    1997-06-01

    The US Department of Energy is concerned with the fate of energy-related materials, including carbon dioxide, in the marine environment. Using laboratory studies, as well as field studies, an attempt was made to understand the molecular regulation of photosynthetic carbon reduction. The objectives were: to determine the mechanism of regulation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBPCase) in phytoplankton in response to changes in light fields; and to determine regulation of (RuBPCase) in response to light under nutrient deprivation.

  19. Regulation of photosynthetic carbon fixation on the ocean margins

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.H.; Tabita, F.R.

    1994-05-03

    The goals of our DOE OMP project are to (1) understand regulation of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO) in phytoplankton cultures in response to light regime; (2) determine regulation of RubisCO in response to light during nutrient limitation in these cultures; (3) to determine mechanisms of RubisCO regulation in natural populations of phytoplankton on the ocean margins in the Gulf of Mexico and (4) to measure regulation of RubisCO in phytoplankton of the Hatteras System. Two goals are laboratory-based, and two are ship-based.

  20. Computational analysis of the oscillatory dynamics in the processes of CO₂ assimilation and photorespiration.

    PubMed

    Dubinsky, Andrey Yu; Ivlev, Alexander A

    2011-02-01

    The computational analysis of the model system consisting of the processes of CO₂ assimilation and photorespiration shows the appearance of sustained oscillations in the system which might reflect their presence in photosynthesizing cells. Concentrations of CO₂ and O₂ oscillate in opposite phases causing Rubisco switching continuously between the carboxylase (CO₂ assimilation) and the oxygenase (photorespiration) reactions. The results of modeling are consistent with carbon isotopic and other observed data. They show that the oscillation period varies from about 1s to 3s depending on the values of parameters taken. Too high concentrations of O₂ suppress the oscillations. PMID:21078363

  1. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  2. Lipid accumulation and biosynthesis genes response of the oleaginous Chlorella pyrenoidosa under three nutrition stressors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microalgae can accumulate considerable amounts of lipids under different nutrient-deficient conditions, making them as one of the most promising sustainable sources for biofuel production. These inducible processes provide a powerful experimental basis for fully understanding the mechanisms of physiological acclimation, lipid hyperaccumulation and gene expression in algae. In this study, three nutrient-deficiency strategies, viz nitrogen-, phosphorus- and iron-deficiency were applied to trigger the lipid hyperaccumulation in an oleaginous Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Regular patterns of growth characteristics, lipid accumulation, physiological parameters, as well as the expression patterns of lipid biosynthesis-related genes were fully analyzed and compared. Results Our results showed that all the nutrient stress conditions could enhance the lipid content considerably compared with the control. The total lipid and neutral lipid contents exhibit the most marked increment under nitrogen deficiency, achieving 50.32% and 34.29% of dry cell weight at the end of cultivation, respectively. Both photosynthesis indicators and reactive oxygen species parameters reveal that physiological stress turned up when exposed to nutrient depletions. Time-course transcript patterns of lipid biosynthesis-related genes showed that diverse expression dynamics probably contributes to the different lipidic phenotypes under stress conditions. By analyzing the correlation between lipid content and gene expression level, we pinpoint several genes viz. rbsL, me g6562, accA, accD, dgat g2354, dgat g3280 and dgat g7063, which encode corresponding enzymes or subunits of malic enzyme, ACCase and diacylglycerol acyltransferase in the de novo TAG biosynthesis pathway, are highly related to lipid accumulation and might be exploited as target genes for genetic modification. Conclusion This study provided us not only a comprehensive picture of adaptive mechanisms from physiological perspective, but

  3. Vitamin K status in chronic kidney disease: a report of a study and a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Voong, Kieran; Harrington, Dominic; Goldsmith, David

    2013-10-01

    Hepatic vitamin K-dependent proteins (e.g., Factors II, VII, IX and X) form part of the clotting cascade. Factor II (FII)/Prothrombin incorporates 10 Glu residues on the N-terminal region that are γ-carboxylated to Gla residues by the action of γ-glutamyl carboxylase to confer biological activity. Vitamin K is also required for the normal function of Matrix Gla Protein (MGP)--one of several non-clotting-related extra-hepatic vitamin K-dependent proteins. MGP is known to have protective action against vascular calcification--indeed it is a powerful tissue-bound inhibitory mechanism and can be found in blood vessel walls. The mature protein is also dependent on activation by γ-glutamyl carboxylase enzyme to convert Glu residues in its amino acid sequence to Gla. This reaction can only take place when the enzyme is activated in the presence of vitamin K. It is of great potential interest to investigate whether subtle deficiencies of vitamin K may, through its effect on the action of MGP, be a contributing factor to vascular calcification in CKD patients, in whom CV disease is greatly accelerated and in whom vascular calcification is not only common, but progresses aggressively, and is something for which as yet there is no clinically applicable remedy. PMID:23296791

  4. Tobacco guard cells fix CO2 by both Rubisco and PEPcase while sucrose acts as a substrate during light-induced stomatal opening.

    PubMed

    Daloso, Danilo M; Antunes, Werner C; Pinheiro, Daniela P; Waquim, Jardel P; Araújo, Wagner L; Loureiro, Marcelo E; Fernie, Alisdair R; Williams, Thomas C R

    2015-11-01

    Transcriptomic and proteomic studies have improved our knowledge of guard cell function; however, metabolic changes in guard cells remain relatively poorly understood. Here we analysed metabolic changes in guard cell-enriched epidermal fragments from tobacco during light-induced stomatal opening. Increases in sucrose, glucose and fructose were observed during light-induced stomatal opening in the presence of sucrose in the medium while no changes in starch were observed, suggesting that the elevated fructose and glucose levels were a consequence of sucrose rather than starch breakdown. Conversely, reduction in sucrose was observed during light- plus potassium-induced stomatal opening. Concomitant with the decrease in sucrose, we observed an increase in the level as well as in the (13) C enrichment in metabolites of, or associated with, the tricarboxylic acid cycle following incubation of the guard cell-enriched preparations in (13) C-labelled bicarbonate. Collectively, the results obtained support the hypothesis that sucrose is catabolized within guard cells in order to provide carbon skeletons for organic acid production. Furthermore, they provide a qualitative demonstration that CO2 fixation occurs both via ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPcase). The combined data are discussed with respect to current models of guard cell metabolism and function. PMID:25871738

  5. Vacuolar Localization of Proteases and Degradation of Chloroplasts in Mesophyll Protoplasts from Senescing Primary Wheat Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Wittenbach, Vernon A.; Lin, Willy; Hebert, Richard R.

    1982-01-01

    Mesophyll protoplasts isolated from primary leaves of wheat seedlings were used to follow the localization of proteases and the breakdown of chloroplasts during dark-induced senescence. Protoplasts were readily obtained from leaf tissue, even after 80% of the chlorophyll and protein had been lost. Intact chloroplasts and vacuoles could be isolated from the protoplasts at all stages of senescence. All the proteolytic activity associated with the degradation of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase in the protoplasts could be accounted for by that localized within the vacuole. Moreover, this localization was retained late into senescence. Protoplasts isolated during leaf senescence first showed a decline in photosynthesis, then a decline in ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity, followed by a decline in chloroplast number. There was a close correlation between the decline in chloroplast number and the loss of chlorophyll and soluble protein per protoplast, suggesting a sequential degradation of chloroplasts during senescence. Ultrastructural studies indicated a movement of chloroplasts in toward the center of the protoplasts during senescence. Thus, within senescing protoplasts, chloroplasts appeared either to move into invaginations of the vacuole or to be taken up into the vacuole. Images PMID:16662193

  6. Enhanced succinate production from glycerol by engineered Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Wu, Hui; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2016-10-01

    In this study, an engineered strain Escherichia coli MLB (ldhA(-)pflB(-)) was constructed for production of succinate from glycerol. The succinate yield was 0.37mol/mol in anaerobic culture, however, the growth and glycerol consumption rates were very slow, resulting in a low succinate level. Two-stage fermentation was performed in flasks, and the succinate yield reached 0.93mol/mol, but the succinate titer was still low. Hence, overexpression of malate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase and PEP carboxykinase (PCK) from E. coli, and pyruvate carboxylase from Corynebacterium glutamicum in MLB was investigated for improving succinate production. Overexpression of PCK resulted in remarkable enhancement of glycerol consumption and succinate production. In flask experiments, the succinate concentration reached 118.1mM, and in a 1.5-L bioreactor the succinate concentration further increased to 360.2mM. The highest succinate yield achieved 0.93mol/mol, which was 93% of the theoretical yield, in the anaerobic stage. PMID:27371794

  7. GLP-1(32-36)amide Pentapeptide Increases Basal Energy Expenditure and Inhibits Weight Gain in Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Tomas, Eva; Stanojevic, Violeta; McManus, Karen; Khatri, Ashok; Everill, Paul; Bachovchin, William W; Habener, Joel F

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence of obesity-related diabetes is increasing worldwide. Here we report the identification of a pentapeptide, GLP-1(32-36)amide (LVKGRamide), derived from the glucoincretin hormone GLP-1, that increases basal energy expenditure and curtails the development of obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and hepatic steatosis in diet-induced obese mice. The pentapeptide inhibited weight gain, reduced fat mass without change in energy intake, and increased basal energy expenditure independent of physical activity. Analyses of tissues from peptide-treated mice reveal increased expression of UCP-1 and UCP-3 in brown adipose tissue and increased UCP-3 and inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase in skeletal muscle, findings consistent with increased fatty acid oxidation and thermogenesis. In palmitate-treated C2C12 skeletal myotubes, GLP-1(32-36)amide activated AMPK and inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase, suggesting activation of fat metabolism in response to energy depletion. By mass spectroscopy, the pentapeptide is rapidly formed from GLP-1(9-36)amide, the major form of GLP-1 in the circulation of mice. These findings suggest that the reported insulin-like actions of GLP-1 receptor agonists that occur independently of the GLP-1 receptor might be mediated by the pentapeptide, and the previously reported nonapeptide (FIAWLVKGRamide). We propose that by increasing basal energy expenditure, GLP-1(32-36)amide might be a useful treatment for human obesity and associated metabolic disorders. PMID:25858562

  8. Green Roots: Photosynthesis and Photoautotrophy in an Underground Plant Organ.

    PubMed Central

    Flores, H. E.; Dai, Yr.; Cuello, J. L.; Maldonado-Mendoza, I. E.; Loyola-Vargas, V. M.

    1993-01-01

    The potential for photosynthetic and photoautotrophic growth was studied in hairy root cultures of Asteraceae and Solanaceae species. Upon transfer to light, initially heterotrophic root cultures of Acmella oppositifolia and Datura innoxia greened rapidly, differentiated chloroplasts, and developed light-dependent CO2 fixation in the cortical cells. Photosynthetic potential was expressed in root cultures of all the Asteraceae genera examined (Acmella, Artemisia, Rudbeckia, Stevia, and Tagetes). Hairy roots of A. oppositifolia and D. innoxia were further adapted to photoautotrophy by growing in the presence of light and added CO2 (1-5%) and by direct or sequential transfers into media containing progressively lower sugar concentrations. The transition to photoautotrophy was accompanied by an increase in CO2 fixation and in the specific activity of 1,5-ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/ oxygenase (Rubisco). During the adaptation of A. oppositifolia roots to photoautotrophy, the ratio of Rubisco to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase increased significantly, approaching that found in the leaves. The levels and patterns of alkaloids and polyacetylenes produced by Solanaceae and Asteraceae hairy roots, respectively, were dramatically altered in photomixotrophic and photoautotrophic cultures. Photoautotrophic roots of A. oppositifolia have been mainitained in vitro for over 2 years. PMID:12231691

  9. Integrated, Step-Wise, Mass-Isotopomeric Flux Analysis of the TCA Cycle.

    PubMed

    Alves, Tiago C; Pongratz, Rebecca L; Zhao, Xiaojian; Yarborough, Orlando; Sereda, Sam; Shirihai, Orian; Cline, Gary W; Mason, Graeme; Kibbey, Richard G

    2015-11-01

    Mass isotopomer multi-ordinate spectral analysis (MIMOSA) is a step-wise flux analysis platform to measure discrete glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolic rates. Importantly, direct citrate synthesis rates were obtained by deconvolving the mass spectra generated from [U-(13)C6]-D-glucose labeling for position-specific enrichments of mitochondrial acetyl-CoA, oxaloacetate, and citrate. Comprehensive steady-state and dynamic analyses of key metabolic rates (pyruvate dehydrogenase, β-oxidation, pyruvate carboxylase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and PEP/pyruvate cycling) were calculated from the position-specific transfer of (13)C from sequential precursors to their products. Important limitations of previous techniques were identified. In INS-1 cells, citrate synthase rates correlated with both insulin secretion and oxygen consumption. Pyruvate carboxylase rates were substantially lower than previously reported but showed the highest fold change in response to glucose stimulation. In conclusion, MIMOSA measures key metabolic rates from the precursor/product position-specific transfer of (13)C-label between metabolites and has broad applicability to any glucose-oxidizing cell. PMID:26411341

  10. Activities of principal photosynthetic enzymes in green macroalga Ulva linza: functional implication of C₄ pathway in CO₂ assimilation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianfang; Zhang, Xiaowen; Ye, Naihao; Zheng, Zhou; Mou, Shanli; Dong, Meitao; Xu, Dong; Miao, Jinlai

    2013-06-01

    The green-tide-forming macroalga Ulva linza was profiled by transcriptome sequencing to ascertain whether the alga carries both C3 and C4 photosynthesis genes. The key enzymes involved in C4 metabolism including pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) were found. When measured under normal and different stress conditions, expression of rbcL was higher under normal conditions and lower under the adverse conditions, whereas that of PPDK was higher under some adverse conditions, namely desiccation, high salinity, and low salinity. Both ribulose-1, 5-biphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) and PPDK were found to play a role in carbon fixation, with significantly higher PPDK activity across the stress conditions. These results suggest that elevated PPDK activity alters carbon metabolism in U. linza leading to partial operation of the C4 carbon metabolism, a pathway that, under stress conditions, probably contributes to the hardy character of U. linza and thus to its wide distribution. PMID:23737004

  11. Requirement of carbon dioxide for initial growth of facultative methylotroph, Acidomonas methanolica MB58.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Ryoji; Katayama, Hiroko; Tanaka, Mitsuo

    2015-07-01

    The facultative methylotrophic bacterium Acidomonas methanolica MB58 can utilize C1 compounds via the ribulose monophosphate pathway. A large gene cluster comprising three components related to C1 metabolism was found in the genome. From upstream, the first was an mxa cluster encoding proteins for oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde; the second was the rmp cluster encoding enzymes for formaldehyde fixation; and the third was the cbb gene cluster encoding proteins for carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation. Examination of CO2 requirements for growth of A. methanolica MB58 cells demonstrated that it did not grow on any carbon source under CO2-free conditions. Measurement of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity and RT-PCR analysis demonstrated enzymatic activity was detected in A. methanolica MB58 at growth phase, regardless of carbon sources. However, methanol dehydrogenase and 3-hexlose-6-phosphate synthase expression was regulated by methanol or formaldehyde; it were detected during growth and apparently differed from ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase expression. These results suggested that A. methanolica MB58 may be initially dependent on autotrophic growth and that carbon assimilation was subsequently coupled with the ribulose monophosphate pathway at early- to mid-log phases during methylotrophic growth. PMID:25511787

  12. Carbon isotope fractionation by thermophilic phototrophic sulfur bacteria: evidence for autotrophic growth in natural populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madigan, M. T.; Takigiku, R.; Lee, R. G.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Purple phototrophic bacteria of the genus Chromatium can grow as either photoautotrophs or photoheterotrophs. To determine the growth mode of the thermophilic Chromatium species, Chromatium tepidum, under in situ conditions, we have examined the carbon isotope fractionation patterns in laboratory cultures of this organism and in mats of C. tepidum which develop in sulfide thermal springs in Yellowstone National Park. Isotopic analysis (13C/12C) of total carbon, carotenoid pigments, and bacteriochlorophyll from photoautotrophically grown cultures of C. tepidum yielded 13C fractionation factors near -20%. Cells of C. tepidum grown on excess acetate, wherein synthesis of the Calvin cycle enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase) was greatly repressed, were isotopically heavier, fractionation factors of ca. -7% being observed. Fractionation factors determined by isotopic analyses of cells and pigment fractions of natural populations of C. tepidum growing in three different sulfide thermal springs in Yellowstone National Park were approximately -20%, indicating that this purple sulfur bacterium grows as a photoautotroph in nature.

  13. Drought-Induced Effects on Nitrate Reductase Activity and mRNA and on the Coordination of Nitrogen and Carbon Metabolism in Maize Leaves1

    PubMed Central

    Foyer, Christine H.; Valadier, Marie-Hélène; Migge, Andrea; Becker, Thomas W.

    1998-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) plants were grown to the nine-leaf stage. Despite a saturating N supply, the youngest mature leaves (seventh position on the stem) contained little NO3− reserve. Droughted plants (deprived of nutrient solution) showed changes in foliar enzyme activities, mRNA accumulation, photosynthesis, and carbohydrate and amino acid contents. Total leaf water potential and CO2 assimilation rates, measured 3 h into the photoperiod, decreased 3 d after the onset of drought. Starch, glucose, fructose, and amino acids, but not sucrose (Suc), accumulated in the leaves of droughted plants. Maximal extractable phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities increased slightly during water deficit, whereas the sensitivity of this enzyme to the inhibitor malate decreased. Maximal extractable Suc phosphate synthase activities decreased as a result of water stress, and there was an increase in the sensitivity to the inhibitor orthophosphate. A correlation between maximal extractable foliar nitrate reductase (NR) activity and the rate of CO2 assimilation was observed. The NR activation state and maximal extractable NR activity declined rapidly in response to drought. Photosynthesis and NR activity recovered rapidly when nutrient solution was restored at this point. The decrease in maximal extractable NR activity was accompanied by a decrease in NR transcripts, whereas Suc phosphate synthase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase mRNAs were much less affected. The coordination of N and C metabolism is retained during drought conditions via modulation of the activities of Suc phosphate synthase and NR commensurate with the prevailing rate of photosynthesis. PMID:9576798

  14. Failure of dietary leucine to influence the tryptophan-niacin pathway in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Penz, A M; Clifford, A J; Rogers, Q R; Kratzer, F H

    1984-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted with young chicks to determine whether dietary leucine affects the conversion of tryptophan to niacin. Either tryptophan or niacin improved growth and reduced perosis when chicks were fed a purified diet marginal in tryptophan and deficient in niacin. Addition of 4.8% L-leucine to the diet did not alter the growth and perosis prevention response obtained with tryptophan. Liver weight was slightly increased by the addition of 5.4% L-leucine to the diet. Plasma insulin was slightly reduced by leucine and by isoleucine and valine. Picolinic carboxylase in the kidney was reduced in chicks fed 0.2% tryptophan with no niacin and was also reduced when isoleucine and valine were added to the diets. Liver picolinic carboxylase activity was not influenced by diet. Plasma isoleucine and valine were reduced by the addition of leucine to the diet and were increased again when isoleucine and valine were added to the diet. Plasma leucine was increased by the addition of leucine but was not altered by valine and isoleucine. Plasma tryptophan was not influenced by dietary supplements of leucine or isoleucine and valine. The results show that in the chick there is no evidence for an effect of leucine on the tryptophan to niacin pathway. PMID:6693983

  15. Genetic engineering approaches for enhanced production of biodiesel fuel from microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Roessler, P.G.

    1993-12-31

    Efforts are currently underway in several laboratories to develop renewable fuels from biological sources. This group has been involved in research concerning the production of lipid-derived {open_quotes}biodiesel{close_quotes} fuel from microscopic algae. Lipid accumulation in algae typically occurs during periods of environmental stress, including growth under nutrient-deficient conditions. Biochemical studies have suggested that acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a biotin-containing enzyme that catalyzes an early step in fatty acid biosynthesis, may be involved in the control of this lipid accumulation process. Therefore, it may be possible to enhance lipid production rates by increasing the activity of this enzyme via genetic engineering. As a first step toward this objective, the authors have cloned the gene that encodes ACC from the eukaryotic alga Cyclotella cryptica, representing the first time that this gene has been isolated from a photosynthetic organism. The amino acid sequence of ACC deducted from this gene exhibits a high degree of similarity to the sequences of animal and yeast ACCs in the biotin carboxylase and carboxyltransferase domains, but less similarity exists in the bioin carboxyl carrier protein domain. Comparison of the genomic nucleotide sequence to the sequences of cDNA clones has revealed the presence of two introns in the gene. The authors are currently constructing expression vectors containing this gene and developing algal transformation protocols to enable over expression of ACC in C. cryptica and all other algal species.

  16. Overexpression of malate dehydrogenase in transgenic alfalfa enhances organic acid synthesis and confers tolerance to aluminum.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, M; Temple, S J; Allan, D L; Vance, C P; Samac, D A

    2001-12-01

    Al toxicity is a severe impediment to production of many crops in acid soil. Toxicity can be reduced through lime application to raise soil pH, however this amendment does not remedy subsoil acidity, and liming may not always be practical or cost-effective. Addition of organic acids to plant nutrient solutions alleviates phytotoxic Al effects, presumably by chelating Al and rendering it less toxic. In an effort to increase organic acid secretion and thereby enhance Al tolerance in alfalfa (Medicago sativa), we produced transgenic plants using nodule-enhanced forms of malate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase cDNAs under the control of the constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. We report that a 1.6-fold increase in malate dehydrogenase enzyme specific activity in root tips of selected transgenic alfalfa led to a 4.2-fold increase in root concentration as well as a 7.1-fold increase in root exudation of citrate, oxalate, malate, succinate, and acetate compared with untransformed control alfalfa plants. Overexpression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase enzyme specific activity in transgenic alfalfa did not result in increased root exudation of organic acids. The degree of Al tolerance by transformed plants in hydroponic solutions and in naturally acid soil corresponded with their patterns of organic acid exudation and supports the concept that enhancing organic acid synthesis in plants may be an effective strategy to cope with soil acidity and Al toxicity. PMID:11743127

  17. Photosynthetic carbon fixation characteristics of fruiting structures of Brassica campestris L

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, H.R.; Sheoran, I.S.; Singh, R.

    1987-04-01

    Activities of key enzymes of the Calvin cycle and C/sub 4/ metabolism, rates of CO/sub 2/ fixation, and the initial products of photosynthetic /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ fixation were determined in the podwall, seed coat (fruiting structures), and the subtending leaf (leaf below a receme) of Brassica campestris L. cv Toria. Compared to activities of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and other Calvin cycle enzymes, e.g. NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase, the activities of phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase and other enzymes of C/sub 4/ metabolism, viz. NADP-malate dehydrogenase, NADP-malic enzyme, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, and glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, were generally much higher in seed than in podwall and leaf. Podwall and leaf were comparable to each other. Pulse-chase experiments showed that in seed the major product of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ assimilation was malate (in short time), whereas in podwall and leaf, the label initially appeared in 3-PGA. With time, the label moved to sucrose. In contrast to legumes, Brassica pods were able to fix net CO/sub 2/ during light. However, respiratory losses were very high during the dark period.

  18. Contribution of C3 carboxylation to the circadian rhythm of carbon dioxide uptake in a Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Wyka, Tomasz P; Lüttge, Ulrich E

    2003-05-01

    During the endogenous circadian rhythm of carbon dioxide uptake in continuous light by a Crassula cean acid metabolism plant, Kalanchoë daigremontiana, the two carboxylating enzymes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), are active simultaneously, although, until now, only the role of PEPC in generating the rhythm has been acknowledged. According to the established model, the rhythm is primarily regulated at the PEPC activity level, modulated by periodic compartmentation of its inhibitor, malate, in the vacuole and controlled by tension/relaxation of the tonoplast. However, the circadian accumulation of malic acid (the main indicator of PEPC activity) dampened significantly within the first few periods without affecting the rhythm's amplitude. Moreover, the amount of malate accumulated during a free-running oscillation was several-fold lower than the amount expected if PEPC were the key carboxylating enzyme, based on a 1:1 stoichiometry of CO(2) and malate. Together with the observation that rates of CO(2) uptake under continuous light were higher than in darkness, the evidence shows that C(3) carboxylation greatly contributes to the generation of rhythmic CO(2) uptake in continuous light in this 'obligate' CAM plant. Because the shift from predominantly CAM to predominantly C(3) carboxylation is smooth and does not distort the trajectory of the rhythm, its control probably arises from a robust network of oscillators, perhaps also involving stomata. PMID:12709493

  19. Redundancy of stomatal control for the circadian photosynthetic rhythm in Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier.

    PubMed

    Wyka, T P; Duarte, H M; Lüttge, U E

    2005-03-01

    In continuous light, the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier has a circadian rhythm of gas exchange with peaks occurring during the subjective night. The rhythm of gas exchange is coupled to a weak, reverse phased rhythm of quantum yield of photosystem II (Phi (PSII)). To test if the rhythm of Phi (PSII) persists in the absence of stomatal control, leaves were coated with a thin layer of translucent silicone grease which prevented CO2 and H2O exchange. In spite of this treatment, the rhythm of Phi (PSII) occurred with close to normal phase timing and with a much larger amplitude than in uncoated leaves. The mechanism underlying the Phi (PSII) rhythm in coated leaves can be explained by a circadian activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). At peaks of PEPC activity, the small amount of CO2 contained in the coated leaf could have become depleted, preventing the carboxylase activity of Rubisco and causing decreases in electron transport rates (observed as deep troughs of Phi (PSII) at 23-h in LL and at ca. 24-h intervals afterwards). Peaks of Phi (PSII) would be caused by a downregulation of PEPC leading to improved supply of CO2 to Rubisco. Substrate limitation of photochemistry at 23 h (trough of Phi (PSII)) was also suggested by the weak response of ETR in coated leaves to stepwise light enhancement. These results show that photosynthetic rhythmicity in K. daigremontiana is independent of stomatal regulation and may originate in the mesophyll. PMID:15822013

  20. Strategies for improving C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    von Caemmerer, Susanne; Furbank, Robert T

    2016-06-01

    Recent activities to improve photosynthetic performance in crop plants has focused mainly on C3 photosynthesis where there are clear identified targets such as improving Rubisco kinetics, installation of a CO2 concentrating mechanism and alleviating limitations in chloroplast electron transport. Here we address strategies to improve photosynthetic performance in C4 plants, which utilize a CO2 concentrating mechanism, having evolved a complex blend of anatomy and biochemistry to achieve this. While the limitations to photosynthetic flux are not as well studied in C4 plants, work in transgenic Flaveria bidentis, a transformable model C4 dicot, and recent transcriptional analysis of leaves from diverse C4 plants, provides several gene candidates for improvement of carbon metabolism (such as pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and Rubisco) and for access of CO2 to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the mesophyll cells (such as carbonic anhydrase and CO2 porins). Chloroplast electron transport in C4 plants is shared between the two cell types, providing opportunities not only to alleviate limitations to flux through intersystem electron transport by targeting nuclear encoded proteins in the cytochrome (Cyt) b6/f complex, but in better sharing the harvesting of light energy between mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts. Gene candidates for improvement of C4 photosynthesis could be utilized either through transgenic approaches or via mining natural allelic variation in sequenced populations of crop species. PMID:27127850