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Sample records for acetylation curtails nucleosome

  1. Acetylation Mimics Within a Single Nucleosome Alter Local DNA Accessibility In Compacted Nucleosome Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Laxmi N.; Pepenella, Sharon; Rogge, Ryan; Hansen, Jeffrey C.; Hayes, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    The activation of a silent gene locus is thought to involve pioneering transcription factors that initiate changes in the local chromatin structure to increase promoter accessibility and binding of downstream effectors. To better understand the molecular requirements for the first steps of locus activation, we investigated whether acetylation of a single nucleosome is sufficient to alter DNA accessibility within a condensed 25-nucleosome array. We found that acetylation mimics within the histone H4 tail domain increased accessibility of the surrounding linker DNA, with the increased accessibility localized to the immediate vicinity of the modified nucleosome. In contrast, acetylation mimics within the H3 tail had little effect, but were able to synergize with H4 tail acetylation mimics to further increase accessibility. Moreover, replacement of the central nucleosome with a nucleosome free region also resulted in increased local, but not global DNA accessibility. Our results indicate that modification or disruption of only a single target nucleosome results in significant changes in local chromatin architecture and suggest that very localized chromatin modifications imparted by pioneer transcription factors are sufficient to initiate a cascade of events leading to promoter activation. PMID:27708426

  2. Histone Acetylation near the Nucleosome Dyad Axis Enhances Nucleosome Disassembly by RSC and SWI/SNF.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nilanjana; North, Justin A; Dechassa, Mekonnen Lemma; Manohar, Mridula; Prasad, Rashmi; Luger, Karolin; Ottesen, Jennifer J; Poirier, Michael G; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2015-12-01

    Signaling associated with transcription activation occurs through posttranslational modification of histones and is best exemplified by lysine acetylation. Lysines are acetylated in histone tails and the core domain/lateral surface of histone octamers. While acetylated lysines in histone tails are frequently recognized by other factors referred to as "readers," which promote transcription, the mechanistic role of the modifications in the lateral surface of the histone octamer remains unclear. By using X-ray crystallography, we found that acetylated lysines 115 and 122 in histone H3 are solvent accessible, but in biochemical assays they appear not to interact with the bromodomains of SWI/SNF and RSC to enhance recruitment or nucleosome mobilization, as previously shown for acetylated lysines in H3 histone tails. Instead, we found that acetylation of lysines 115 and 122 increases the predisposition of nucleosomes for disassembly by SWI/SNF and RSC up to 7-fold, independent of bromodomains, and only in conjunction with contiguous nucleosomes. Thus, in combination with SWI/SNF and RSC, acetylation of lateral surface lysines in the histone octamer serves as a crucial regulator of nucleosomal dynamics distinct from the histone code readers and writers.

  3. Lysine Acetylation Facilitates Spontaneous DNA Dynamics in the Nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongseong; Lee, Jaehyoun; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2015-12-01

    The nucleosome, comprising a histone protein core wrapped around by DNA, is the fundamental packing unit of DNA in cells. Lysine acetylation at the histone core elevates DNA accessibility in the nucleosome, the mechanism of which remains largely unknown. By employing our recently developed hybrid single molecule approach, here we report how the structural dynamics of DNA in the nucleosome is altered upon acetylation at histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56) that is critical for elevated DNA accessibility. Our results indicate that H3K56 acetylation facilitates the structural dynamics of the DNA at the nucleosome termini that spontaneously and repeatedly open and close on a ms time scale. The results support a molecular mechanism of histone acetylation in catalyzing DNA unpacking whose efficiency is ultimately limited by the spontaneous DNA dynamics at the nucleosome temini. This study provides the first and unique experimental evidence revealing a role of protein chemical modification in directly regulating the kinetic stability of the DNA packing unit.

  4. Histone acetylation dependent energy landscapes in tri-nucleosome revealed by residue-resolved molecular simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Le; Takada, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Histone tail acetylation is a key epigenetic marker that tends to open chromatin folding and activate transcription. Despite intensive studies, precise roles of individual lysine acetylation in chromatin folding have only been poorly understood. Here, we revealed structural dynamics of tri-nucleosomes with several histone tail acetylation states and analyzed histone tail interactions with DNA by performing molecular simulations at an unprecedentedly high resolution. We found versatile acetylation-dependent landscapes of tri-nucleosome. The H4 and H2A tail acetylation reduced the contact between the first and third nucleosomes mediated by the histone tails. The H3 tail acetylation reduced its interaction with neighboring linker DNAs resulting in increase of the distance between consecutive nucleosomes. Notably, two copies of the same histone in a single nucleosome have markedly asymmetric interactions with DNAs, suggesting specific pattern of nucleosome docking albeit high inherent flexibility. Estimated transcription factor accessibility was significantly high for the H4 tail acetylated structures. PMID:27698366

  5. Linker histone H1 and H3K56 acetylation are antagonistic regulators of nucleosome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Morgan; Luo, Yi; Nwokelo, Kingsley C; Goodwin, Michelle; Dreher, Sarah J; Zhang, Pei; Parthun, Mark R; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne; Ottesen, Jennifer J; Poirier, Michael G

    2015-12-09

    H1 linker histones are highly abundant proteins that compact nucleosomes and chromatin to regulate DNA accessibility and transcription. However, the mechanisms that target H1 regulation to specific regions of eukaryotic genomes are unknown. Here we report fluorescence measurements of human H1 regulation of nucleosome dynamics and transcription factor (TF) binding within nucleosomes. H1 does not block TF binding, instead it suppresses nucleosome unwrapping to reduce DNA accessibility within H1-bound nucleosomes. We then investigated H1 regulation by H3K56 and H3K122 acetylation, two transcriptional activating histone post translational modifications (PTMs). Only H3K56 acetylation, which increases nucleosome unwrapping, abolishes H1.0 reduction of TF binding. These findings show that nucleosomes remain dynamic, while H1 is bound and H1 dissociation is not required for TF binding within the nucleosome. Furthermore, our H3K56 acetylation measurements suggest that a single-histone PTM can define regions of the genome that are not regulated by H1.

  6. Acetylation of Histone H3 Lysine 56 Regulates Replication-Coupled Nucleosome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Zhou, Hui; Wurtele, Hugo; Davies, Brian; Horazdovsky, Bruce; Verreault, Alain; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1) and Rtt106 participate in the deposition of newly synthesized histones onto replicating DNA to form nucleosomes. This process is critical for the maintenance of genome stability and inheritance of functionally specialized chromatin structures in proliferating cells. However, the molecular functions of the acetylation of newly synthesized histones in this DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly pathway remain enigmatic. Here we show that histone H3 acetylated at lysine 56 (H3K56Ac) is incorporated onto replicating DNA and, by increasing the binding affinity of CAF-1 and Rtt106 for histone H3, H3K56Ac enhances the ability of these histone chaperones to assemble DNA into nucleosomes. Genetic analysis indicates that H3K56Ac acts in a nonredundant manner with the acetylation of the N-terminal residues of H3 and H4 in nucleosome assembly. These results reveal a mechanism by which H3K56Ac regulates replication-coupled nucleosome assembly mediated by CAF-1 and Rtt106. PMID:18662540

  7. Intra- and inter-nucleosomal interactions of the histone H4 tail revealed with a human nucleosome core particle with genetically-incorporated H4 tetra-acetylation.

    PubMed

    Wakamori, Masatoshi; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Suka, Noriyuki; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sakamoto, Kensaku; Umehara, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-11-26

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones, such as lysine acetylation of the N-terminal tails, play crucial roles in controlling gene expression. Due to the difficulty in reconstituting site-specifically acetylated nucleosomes with crystallization quality, structural analyses of histone acetylation are currently performed using synthesized tail peptides. Through engineering of the genetic code, translation termination, and cell-free protein synthesis, we reconstituted human H4-mono- to tetra-acetylated nucleosome core particles (NCPs), and solved the crystal structures of the H4-K5/K8/K12/K16-tetra-acetylated NCP and unmodified NCP at 2.4 Å and 2.2 Å resolutions, respectively. The structure of the H4-tetra-acetylated NCP resembled that of the unmodified NCP, and the DNA wrapped the histone octamer as precisely as in the unmodified NCP. However, the B-factors were significantly increased for the peripheral DNAs near the N-terminal tail of the intra- or inter-nucleosomal H4. In contrast, the B-factors were negligibly affected by the H4 tetra-acetylation in histone core residues, including those composing the acidic patch, and at H4-R23, which interacts with the acidic patch of the neighboring NCP. The present study revealed that the H4 tetra-acetylation impairs NCP self-association by changing the interactions of the H4 tail with DNA, and is the first demonstration of crystallization quality NCPs reconstituted with genuine PTMs.

  8. Acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 64 regulates nucleosome dynamics and facilitates transcription.

    PubMed

    Di Cerbo, Vincenzo; Mohn, Fabio; Ryan, Daniel P; Montellier, Emilie; Kacem, Salim; Tropberger, Philipp; Kallis, Eleni; Holzner, Monika; Hoerner, Leslie; Feldmann, Angelika; Richter, Florian Martin; Bannister, Andrew J; Mittler, Gerhard; Michaelis, Jens; Khochbin, Saadi; Feil, Robert; Schuebeler, Dirk; Owen-Hughes, Tom; Daujat, Sylvain; Schneider, Robert

    2014-03-25

    Post-translational modifications of proteins have emerged as a major mechanism for regulating gene expression. However, our understanding of how histone modifications directly affect chromatin function remains limited. In this study, we investigate acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 64 (H3K64ac), a previously uncharacterized acetylation on the lateral surface of the histone octamer. We show that H3K64ac regulates nucleosome stability and facilitates nucleosome eviction and hence gene expression in vivo. In line with this, we demonstrate that H3K64ac is enriched in vivo at the transcriptional start sites of active genes and it defines transcriptionally active chromatin. Moreover, we find that the p300 co-activator acetylates H3K64, and consistent with a transcriptional activation function, H3K64ac opposes its repressive counterpart H3K64me3. Our findings reveal an important role for a histone modification within the nucleosome core as a regulator of chromatin function and they demonstrate that lateral surface modifications can define functionally opposing chromatin states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01632.001.

  9. Acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 64 regulates nucleosome dynamics and facilitates transcription

    PubMed Central

    Di Cerbo, Vincenzo; Mohn, Fabio; Ryan, Daniel P; Montellier, Emilie; Kacem, Salim; Tropberger, Philipp; Kallis, Eleni; Holzner, Monika; Hoerner, Leslie; Feldmann, Angelika; Richter, Florian Martin; Bannister, Andrew J; Mittler, Gerhard; Michaelis, Jens; Khochbin, Saadi; Feil, Robert; Schuebeler, Dirk; Owen-Hughes, Tom; Daujat, Sylvain; Schneider, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins have emerged as a major mechanism for regulating gene expression. However, our understanding of how histone modifications directly affect chromatin function remains limited. In this study, we investigate acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 64 (H3K64ac), a previously uncharacterized acetylation on the lateral surface of the histone octamer. We show that H3K64ac regulates nucleosome stability and facilitates nucleosome eviction and hence gene expression in vivo. In line with this, we demonstrate that H3K64ac is enriched in vivo at the transcriptional start sites of active genes and it defines transcriptionally active chromatin. Moreover, we find that the p300 co-activator acetylates H3K64, and consistent with a transcriptional activation function, H3K64ac opposes its repressive counterpart H3K64me3. Our findings reveal an important role for a histone modification within the nucleosome core as a regulator of chromatin function and they demonstrate that lateral surface modifications can define functionally opposing chromatin states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01632.001 PMID:24668167

  10. Nucleosome free region dominates histone acetylation in targeting SWR1 to yeast promoters for H2A.Z replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Anand; Mizuguchi, Gaku; FitzGerald, Peter C.; Wei, Debbie; Wang, Feng; Huang, Yingzi; Luk, Ed; Woodcock, Christopher L; Wu, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Summary The histone variant H2A.Z is a genome-wide signature of nucleosomes proximal to eukaryotic regulatory DNA. While the multi-subunit chromatin remodeler SWR1 is known to catalyze ATP-dependent deposition of H2A.Z, the mechanism of SWR1 recruitment to S. cerevisiae promoters has been unclear. A sensitive assay for competitive binding of di-nucleosome substrates revealed that SWR1 preferentially binds long nucleosome-free DNA and the adjoining nucleosome core particle, allowing discrimination of gene promoters over gene bodies. Analysis of mutants indicates that the conserved Swc2/YL1 subunit and the ATPase domain of Swr1 are mainly responsible for binding to substrate. SWR1 binding is enhanced on nucleosomes acetylated by the NuA4 histone acetyltransferase, but recognition of nucleosome-free and nucleosomal DNA is dominant over interaction with acetylated histones. Such hierarchical cooperation between DNA and histone signals expands the dynamic range of genetic switches, unifying classical gene regulation by DNA-binding factors with ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling and post-translational histone modifications. PMID:24034247

  11. The NuA4 Core Complex Acetylates Nucleosomal Histone H4 through a Double Recognition Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Li, Chengmin; Chen, Zhihong; Jiang, Shuanying; Fan, Shilong; Wang, Jiawei; Dai, Junbiao; Zhu, Ping; Chen, Zhucheng

    2016-09-15

    NuA4 catalyzes the acetylation of nucleosomes at histone H4, which is a well-established epigenetic event, controlling many genomic processes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we report the crystal structures of the NuA4 core complex and a cryoelectron microscopy structure with the nucleosome. The structures show that the histone-binding pocket of the enzyme is rearranged, suggesting its activation. The enzyme binds the histone tail mainly through the target lysine residue, with a preference for a small residue at the -1 position. The complex engages the nucleosome at the dish face and orients its catalytic pocket close to the H4 tail to achieve selective acetylation. The combined data reveal a space-sequence double recognition mechanism of the histone tails by a modifying enzyme in the context of the nucleosome. PMID:27594449

  12. Bivalent interaction of the PZP domain of BRPF1 with the nucleosome impacts chromatin dynamics and acetylation.

    PubMed

    Klein, Brianna J; Muthurajan, Uma M; Lalonde, Marie-Eve; Gibson, Matthew D; Andrews, Forest H; Hepler, Maggie; Machida, Shinichi; Yan, Kezhi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Poirier, Michael G; Côté, Jacques; Luger, Karolin; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2016-01-01

    BRPF1 (bromodomain PHD finger 1) is a core subunit of the MOZ histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex, critical for normal developmental programs and implicated in acute leukemias. BRPF1 contains a unique assembly of zinc fingers, termed a PZP domain, the physiological role of which remains unclear. Here, we elucidate the structure-function relationship of this novel epigenetic reader and detail the biological and mechanistic consequences of its interaction with nucleosomes. PZP has a globular architecture and forms a 2:1 stoichiometry complex with the nucleosome, bivalently interacting with histone H3 and DNA. This binding impacts the nucleosome dynamics, shifting the DNA unwrapping/rewrapping equilibrium toward the unwrapped state and increasing DNA accessibility. We demonstrate that the DNA-binding function of the BRPF1 PZP domain is required for the MOZ-BRPF1-ING5-hEaf6 HAT complex to be recruited to chromatin and to acetylate nucleosomal histones. Our findings reveal a novel link between chromatin dynamics and MOZ-mediated acetylation.

  13. Bivalent interaction of the PZP domain of BRPF1 with the nucleosome impacts chromatin dynamics and acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Brianna J.; Muthurajan, Uma M.; Lalonde, Marie-Eve; Gibson, Matthew D.; Andrews, Forest H.; Hepler, Maggie; Machida, Shinichi; Yan, Kezhi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Poirier, Michael G.; Côté, Jacques; Luger, Karolin; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2016-01-01

    BRPF1 (bromodomain PHD finger 1) is a core subunit of the MOZ histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex, critical for normal developmental programs and implicated in acute leukemias. BRPF1 contains a unique assembly of zinc fingers, termed a PZP domain, the physiological role of which remains unclear. Here, we elucidate the structure-function relationship of this novel epigenetic reader and detail the biological and mechanistic consequences of its interaction with nucleosomes. PZP has a globular architecture and forms a 2:1 stoichiometry complex with the nucleosome, bivalently interacting with histone H3 and DNA. This binding impacts the nucleosome dynamics, shifting the DNA unwrapping/rewrapping equilibrium toward the unwrapped state and increasing DNA accessibility. We demonstrate that the DNA-binding function of the BRPF1 PZP domain is required for the MOZ-BRPF1-ING5-hEaf6 HAT complex to be recruited to chromatin and to acetylate nucleosomal histones. Our findings reveal a novel link between chromatin dynamics and MOZ-mediated acetylation. PMID:26626149

  14. Bivalent interaction of the PZP domain of BRPF1 with the nucleosome impacts chromatin dynamics and acetylation.

    PubMed

    Klein, Brianna J; Muthurajan, Uma M; Lalonde, Marie-Eve; Gibson, Matthew D; Andrews, Forest H; Hepler, Maggie; Machida, Shinichi; Yan, Kezhi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Poirier, Michael G; Côté, Jacques; Luger, Karolin; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2016-01-01

    BRPF1 (bromodomain PHD finger 1) is a core subunit of the MOZ histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex, critical for normal developmental programs and implicated in acute leukemias. BRPF1 contains a unique assembly of zinc fingers, termed a PZP domain, the physiological role of which remains unclear. Here, we elucidate the structure-function relationship of this novel epigenetic reader and detail the biological and mechanistic consequences of its interaction with nucleosomes. PZP has a globular architecture and forms a 2:1 stoichiometry complex with the nucleosome, bivalently interacting with histone H3 and DNA. This binding impacts the nucleosome dynamics, shifting the DNA unwrapping/rewrapping equilibrium toward the unwrapped state and increasing DNA accessibility. We demonstrate that the DNA-binding function of the BRPF1 PZP domain is required for the MOZ-BRPF1-ING5-hEaf6 HAT complex to be recruited to chromatin and to acetylate nucleosomal histones. Our findings reveal a novel link between chromatin dynamics and MOZ-mediated acetylation. PMID:26626149

  15. SMARCAD1 is an ATP-dependent stimulator of nucleosomal H2A acetylation via CBP, resulting in transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Doiguchi, Masamichi; Nakagawa, Takeya; Imamura, Yuko; Yoneda, Mitsuhiro; Higashi, Miki; Kubota, Kazuishi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Asahara, Hiroshi; Iida, Midori; Fujii, Satoshi; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Liu, Ziying; Nandu, Tulip; Kraus, W. Lee; Ueda, Hitoshi; Ito, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation plays a pivotal role in transcriptional regulation, and ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling activity is required for optimal transcription from chromatin. While these two activities have been well characterized, how they are coordinated remains to be determined. We discovered ATP-dependent histone H2A acetylation activity in Drosophila nuclear extracts. This activity was column purified and demonstrated to be composed of the enzymatic activities of CREB-binding protein (CBP) and SMARCAD1, which belongs to the Etl1 subfamily of the Snf2 family of helicase-related proteins. SMARCAD1 enhanced acetylation by CBP of H2A K5 and K8 in nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent fashion. Expression array analysis of S2 cells having ectopically expressed SMARCAD1 revealed up-regulated genes. Using native genome templates of these up-regulated genes, we found that SMARCAD1 activates their transcription in vitro. Knockdown analysis of SMARCAD1 and CBP indicated overlapping gene control, and ChIP-seq analysis of these commonly controlled genes showed that CBP is recruited to the promoter prior to SMARCAD1. Moreover, Drosophila genetic experiments demonstrated interaction between SMARCAD1/Etl1 and CBP/nej during development. The interplay between the remodeling activity of SMARCAD1 and histone acetylation by CBP sheds light on the function of chromatin and the genome-integrity network. PMID:26888216

  16. Histone H3 lysine 14 (H3K14) acetylation facilitates DNA repair in a positioned nucleosome by stabilizing the binding of the chromatin Remodeler RSC (Remodels Structure of Chromatin).

    PubMed

    Duan, Ming-Rui; Smerdon, Michael J

    2014-03-21

    Histone H3 acetylation is induced by UV damage in yeast and may play an important role in regulating the repair of UV photolesions in nucleosome-loaded genomic loci. However, it remains elusive how H3 acetylation facilitates repair. We generated a strongly positioned nucleosome containing homogeneously acetylated H3 at Lys-14 (H3K14ac) and investigated possible mechanisms by which H3K14 acetylation modulates repair. We show that H3K14ac does not alter nucleosome unfolding dynamics or enhance the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers by UV photolyase. Importantly, however, nucleosomes with H3K14ac have a higher affinity for purified chromatin remodeling complex RSC (Remodels the Structure of Chromatin) and show greater cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer repair compared with unacetylated nucleosomes. Our study indicates that, by anchoring RSC, H3K14 acetylation plays an important role in the unfolding of strongly positioned nucleosomes during repair of UV damage.

  17. UV-damaged DNA-binding protein in the TFTC complex links DNA damage recognition to nucleosome acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Marjorie; Moggs, Jonathan G.; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Lejeune, Fabrice; Dilworth, F.Jeffrey; Stevenin, James; Almouzni, Geneviève; Tora, Làszlò

    2001-01-01

    Initiation of transcription of protein-encoding genes by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) was thought to require transcription factor TFIID, a complex comprised of the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factors (TAFIIs). In the presence of TBP-free TAFII complex (TFTC), initiation of Pol II transcription can occur in the absence of TFIID. TFTC containing the GCN5 acetyltransferase acetylates histone H3 in a nucleosomal context. We have identified a 130 kDa subunit of TFTC (SAP130) that shares homology with the large subunit of UV-damaged DNA-binding factor. TFTC preferentially binds UV-irradiated DNA, UV-damaged DNA inhibits TFTC-mediated Pol II transcription and TFTC is recruited in parallel with the nucleotide excision repair protein XP-A to UV-damaged DNA. TFTC preferentially acetylates histone H3 in nucleosomes assembled on UV-damaged DNA. In agreement with this, strong histone H3 acetylation occurs in intact cells after UV irradiation. These results suggest that the access of DNA repair machinery to lesions within chromatin may be facilitated by TFTC via covalent modification of chromatin. Thus, our experiments reveal a molecular link between DNA damage recognition and chromatin modification. PMID:11406595

  18. Piccolo NuA4-catalyzed acetylation of nucleosomal histones: critical roles of an Esa1 Tudor/chromo barrel loop and an Epl1 enhancer of polycomb A (EPcA) basic region.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiehuan; Tan, Song

    2013-01-01

    Piccolo NuA4 is an essential yeast histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex that targets histones H4 and H2A in nucleosome substrates. While Piccolo NuA4's catalytic subunit Esa1 alone is unable to acetylate nucleosomal histones, its accessory subunits, Yng2 and Epl1, enable Esa1 to bind to and to act on nucleosomes. We previously determined that the Tudor domain of Esa1 and the EPcA homology domain of Epl1 play critical roles in Piccolo NuA4's ability to act on the nucleosome. In this work, we pinpoint a loop within the Esa1 Tudor domain and a short basic region at the N terminus of the Epl1 EPcA domain as necessary for this nucleosomal HAT activity. We also show that this Esa1 Tudor domain loop region is positioned close to nucleosomal DNA and that the Epl1 EPcA basic region is in proximity to the N-terminal histone H2A tail, the globular region of histone H4, and also to nucleosomal DNA when Piccolo NuA4 interacts with the nucleosome. Since neither region identified is required for Piccolo NuA4 to bind to nucleosomes and yet both are needed to acetylate nucleosomes, these regions may function after the enzyme binds nucleosomes to disengage substrate histone tails from nucleosomal DNA.

  19. Piccolo NuA4-Catalyzed Acetylation of Nucleosomal Histones: Critical Roles of an Esa1 Tudor/Chromo Barrel Loop and an Epl1 Enhancer of Polycomb A (EPcA) Basic Region

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiehuan

    2013-01-01

    Piccolo NuA4 is an essential yeast histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex that targets histones H4 and H2A in nucleosome substrates. While Piccolo NuA4's catalytic subunit Esa1 alone is unable to acetylate nucleosomal histones, its accessory subunits, Yng2 and Epl1, enable Esa1 to bind to and to act on nucleosomes. We previously determined that the Tudor domain of Esa1 and the EPcA homology domain of Epl1 play critical roles in Piccolo NuA4's ability to act on the nucleosome. In this work, we pinpoint a loop within the Esa1 Tudor domain and a short basic region at the N terminus of the Epl1 EPcA domain as necessary for this nucleosomal HAT activity. We also show that this Esa1 Tudor domain loop region is positioned close to nucleosomal DNA and that the Epl1 EPcA basic region is in proximity to the N-terminal histone H2A tail, the globular region of histone H4, and also to nucleosomal DNA when Piccolo NuA4 interacts with the nucleosome. Since neither region identified is required for Piccolo NuA4 to bind to nucleosomes and yet both are needed to acetylate nucleosomes, these regions may function after the enzyme binds nucleosomes to disengage substrate histone tails from nucleosomal DNA. PMID:23109429

  20. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Piccolo NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complex requires the Enhancer of Polycomb A domain and chromodomain to acetylate nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Selleck, William; Fortin, Israël; Sermwittayawong, Decha; Côté, Jacques; Tan, Song

    2005-07-01

    Chromatin modification complexes are key gene regulatory factors which posttranslationally modify the histone component of chromatin with epigenetic marks. To address what features of chromatin modification complexes are responsible for the specific recognition of nucleosomes compared to naked histones, we have performed a functional dissection of the Esa1-containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae Piccolo NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complex. Our studies define the Piccolo determinants sufficient to assemble its three subunits into a complex as well as Piccolo determinants sufficient to specifically acetylate a chromatin template. We find that the conserved Enhancer of Polycomb A (EPcA) homology region of the Epl1 component and the N-terminal 165 amino acids of the Yng2 component of Piccolo are sufficient with Esa1 to specifically act on nucleosomes. We also find that the Esa1 chromodomain plays a critical role in Piccolo's ability to distinguish between histones and nucleosomes. In particular, specific point mutations in the chromodomain putative hydrophobic cage which strongly hinder growth in yeast greatly reduce histone acetyltransferase activity on nucleosome substrates, independent of histone methylation or other modifications. However, the chromodomain is not required for Piccolo to bind to nucleosomes, suggesting a role for the chromodomain in a catalysis step after nucleosome binding.

  1. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Piccolo NuA4 Histone Acetyltransferase Complex Requires the Enhancer of Polycomb A Domain and Chromodomain To Acetylate Nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Selleck, William; Fortin, Israël; Sermwittayawong, Decha; Côté, Jacques; Tan, Song

    2005-01-01

    Chromatin modification complexes are key gene regulatory factors which posttranslationally modify the histone component of chromatin with epigenetic marks. To address what features of chromatin modification complexes are responsible for the specific recognition of nucleosomes compared to naked histones, we have performed a functional dissection of the Esa1-containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae Piccolo NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complex. Our studies define the Piccolo determinants sufficient to assemble its three subunits into a complex as well as Piccolo determinants sufficient to specifically acetylate a chromatin template. We find that the conserved Enhancer of Polycomb A (EPcA) homology region of the Epl1 component and the N-terminal 165 amino acids of the Yng2 component of Piccolo are sufficient with Esa1 to specifically act on nucleosomes. We also find that the Esa1 chromodomain plays a critical role in Piccolo's ability to distinguish between histones and nucleosomes. In particular, specific point mutations in the chromodomain putative hydrophobic cage which strongly hinder growth in yeast greatly reduce histone acetyltransferase activity on nucleosome substrates, independent of histone methylation or other modifications. However, the chromodomain is not required for Piccolo to bind to nucleosomes, suggesting a role for the chromodomain in a catalysis step after nucleosome binding. PMID:15964809

  2. Replicating nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic replication disrupts each nucleosome as the fork passes, followed by reassembly of disrupted nucleosomes and incorporation of newly synthesized histones into nucleosomes in the daughter genomes. In this review, we examine this process of replication-coupled nucleosome assembly to understand how characteristic steady-state nucleosome landscapes are attained. Recent studies have begun to elucidate mechanisms involved in histone transfer during replication and maturation of the nucleosome landscape after disruption by replication. A fuller understanding of replication-coupled nucleosome assembly will be needed to explain how epigenetic information is replicated at every cell division. PMID:26269799

  3. Curtailment and Stochastic Curtailment to Shorten the CES-D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelman, Matthew D.; Smits, Niels; Kim, Wonsuk; Riley, Barth

    2012-01-01

    The Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale is a well-known self-report instrument that is used to measure depressive symptomatology. Respondents who take the full-length version of the CES-D are administered a total of 20 items. This article investigates the use of curtailment and stochastic curtailment (SC), two sequential…

  4. Genome-wide nucleosome positioning during embryonic stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Teif, Vladimir B; Vainshtein, Yevhen; Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Mallm, Jan-Philipp; Marth, Caroline; Höfer, Thomas; Rippe, Karsten

    2012-11-01

    We determined genome-wide nucleosome occupancies in mouse embryonic stem cells and their neural progenitor and embryonic fibroblast counterparts to assess features associated with nucleosome positioning during lineage commitment. Cell-type- and protein-specific binding preferences of transcription factors to sites with either low (Myc, Klf4 and Zfx) or high (Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2) nucleosome occupancy as well as complex patterns for CTCF were identified. Nucleosome-depleted regions around transcription start and transcription termination sites were broad and more pronounced for active genes, with distinct patterns for promoters classified according to CpG content or histone methylation marks. Throughout the genome, nucleosome occupancy was correlated with certain histone methylation or acetylation modifications. In addition, the average nucleosome repeat length increased during differentiation by 5-7 base pairs, with local variations for specific regions. Our results reveal regulatory mechanisms of cell differentiation that involve nucleosome repositioning. PMID:23085715

  5. 10 CFR 580.03 - Curtailment priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ESSENTIAL AGRICULTURAL USES § 580.03 Curtailment priorities. (a) Notwithstanding any provision of law other... curtailment of deliveries of natural gas for any essential agricultural use, unless: (1) Such curtailment does... practicable and that the fuel is reasonably available as an alternative for such essential agricultural...

  6. The prenucleosome, a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Jia; Torigoe, Sharon E.; Brown, Christopher R.; Khuong, Mai T.; Kassavetis, George A.; Boeger, Hinrich; Kadonaga, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin comprises nucleosomes as well as nonnucleosomal histone–DNA particles. Prenucleosomes are rapidly formed histone–DNA particles that can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by a motor protein such as ACF. Here we show that the prenucleosome is a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome. It consists of a histone octamer associated with ∼80 base pair (bp) of DNA, which is located at a position that corresponds to the central 80 bp of a nucleosome core particle. Monomeric prenucleosomes with free flanking DNA do not spontaneously fold into nucleosomes but can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by an ATP-driven motor protein such as ACF or Chd1. In addition, histone H3K56, which is located at the DNA entry and exit points of a canonical nucleosome, is specifically acetylated by p300 in prenucleosomes relative to nucleosomes. Prenucleosomes assembled in vitro exhibit properties that are strikingly similar to those of nonnucleosomal histone–DNA particles in the upstream region of active promoters in vivo. These findings suggest that the prenucleosome, the only known stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome, is related to nonnucleosomal histone–DNA species in the cell. PMID:26680301

  7. The prenucleosome, a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Fei, Jia; Torigoe, Sharon E; Brown, Christopher R; Khuong, Mai T; Kassavetis, George A; Boeger, Hinrich; Kadonaga, James T

    2015-12-15

    Chromatin comprises nucleosomes as well as nonnucleosomal histone-DNA particles. Prenucleosomes are rapidly formed histone-DNA particles that can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by a motor protein such as ACF. Here we show that the prenucleosome is a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome. It consists of a histone octamer associated with ∼ 80 base pair (bp) of DNA, which is located at a position that corresponds to the central 80 bp of a nucleosome core particle. Monomeric prenucleosomes with free flanking DNA do not spontaneously fold into nucleosomes but can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by an ATP-driven motor protein such as ACF or Chd1. In addition, histone H3K56, which is located at the DNA entry and exit points of a canonical nucleosome, is specifically acetylated by p300 in prenucleosomes relative to nucleosomes. Prenucleosomes assembled in vitro exhibit properties that are strikingly similar to those of nonnucleosomal histone-DNA particles in the upstream region of active promoters in vivo. These findings suggest that the prenucleosome, the only known stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome, is related to nonnucleosomal histone-DNA species in the cell.

  8. 10 CFR 580.03 - Curtailment priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) CURTAILMENT PRIORITIES FOR ESSENTIAL AGRICULTURAL USES § 580.03 Curtailment priorities. (a) Notwithstanding any provision of law other than section 401(b) of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, or any other rule, regulation, or order...

  9. 10 CFR 580.03 - Curtailment priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) CURTAILMENT PRIORITIES FOR ESSENTIAL AGRICULTURAL USES § 580.03 Curtailment priorities. (a) Notwithstanding any provision of law other than section 401(b) of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, or any other rule, regulation, or order...

  10. 10 CFR 580.03 - Curtailment priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) CURTAILMENT PRIORITIES FOR ESSENTIAL AGRICULTURAL USES § 580.03 Curtailment priorities. (a) Notwithstanding any provision of law other than section 401(b) of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, or any other rule, regulation, or order...

  11. 10 CFR 580.03 - Curtailment priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) CURTAILMENT PRIORITIES FOR ESSENTIAL AGRICULTURAL USES § 580.03 Curtailment priorities. (a) Notwithstanding any provision of law other than section 401(b) of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, or any other rule, regulation, or order...

  12. Role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders.

    PubMed

    López, Alberto J; Wood, Marcelo A

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to understand how epigenetic mechanisms control gene expression during neurodevelopment. Two epigenetic mechanisms that have received considerable attention are DNA methylation and histone acetylation. Human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have linked several neurobiological disorders to genes whose products actively regulate DNA methylation and histone acetylation. More recently, a third major epigenetic mechanism, nucleosome remodeling, has been implicated in human developmental and intellectual disability (ID) disorders. Nucleosome remodeling is driven primarily through nucleosome remodeling complexes with specialized ATP-dependent enzymes. These enzymes directly interact with DNA or chromatin structure, as well as histone subunits, to restructure the shape and organization of nucleosome positioning to ultimately regulate gene expression. Of particular interest is the neuron-specific Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor (nBAF) complex. Mutations in nBAF subunit genes have so far been linked to Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS), Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NBS), schizophrenia, and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Together, these human developmental and ID disorders are powerful examples of the impact of epigenetic modulation on gene expression. This review focuses on the new and emerging role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and ID disorders and whether nucleosome remodeling affects gene expression required for cognition independently of its role in regulating gene expression required for development. PMID:25954173

  13. Single-Nucleosome Mapping of Histone Modifications in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Covalent modification of histone proteins plays a role in virtually every process on eukaryotic DNA, from transcription to DNA repair. Many different residues can be covalently modified, and it has been suggested that these modifications occur in a great number of independent, meaningful combinations. Published low-resolution microarray studies on the combinatorial complexity of histone modification patterns suffer from confounding effects caused by the averaging of modification levels over multiple nucleosomes. To overcome this problem, we used a high-resolution tiled microarray with single-nucleosome resolution to investigate the occurrence of combinations of 12 histone modifications on thousands of nucleosomes in actively growing S. cerevisiae. We found that histone modifications do not occur independently; there are roughly two groups of co-occurring modifications. One group of lysine acetylations shows a sharply defined domain of two hypo-acetylated nucleosomes, adjacent to the transcriptional start site, whose occurrence does not correlate with transcription levels. The other group consists of modifications occurring in gradients through the coding regions of genes in a pattern associated with transcription. We found no evidence for a deterministic code of many discrete states, but instead we saw blended, continuous patterns that distinguish nucleosomes at one location (e.g., promoter nucleosomes) from those at another location (e.g., over the 3′ ends of coding regions). These results are consistent with the idea of a simple, redundant histone code, in which multiple modifications share the same role. PMID:16122352

  14. Nucleosome phasing - new insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chereji, Razvan

    2014-03-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are organized into arrays of nucleosomes, in which stretches of 147 base-pairs of DNA are wrapped around octameric histones. Recently, a new method of mapping nucleosome positions was developed, which gives a much higher accuracy than the typical MNase-seq method. I present a statistical mechanics model which is able to reproduce the high-resolution nucleosome positioning data. I show that the DNA sequence is not the main cause of the nucleosome phasing which is observed genome-wide, and I present the major nucleosome phasing elements. The statistical mechanics framework is general enough to be useful in explaining different experimental observations, and I present a few results of this model.

  15. Statistical mechanics of nucleosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chereji, Razvan V.

    Eukaryotic cells contain long DNA molecules (about two meters for a human cell) which are tightly packed inside the micrometric nuclei. Nucleosomes are the basic packaging unit of the DNA which allows this millionfold compactification. A longstanding puzzle is to understand the principles which allow cells to both organize their genomes into chromatin fibers in the crowded space of their nuclei, and also to keep the DNA accessible to many factors and enzymes. With the nucleosomes covering about three quarters of the DNA, their positions are essential because these influence which genes can be regulated by the transcription factors and which cannot. We study physical models which predict the genome-wide organization of the nucleosomes and also the relevant energies which dictate this organization. In the last five years, the study of chromatin knew many important advances. In particular, in the field of nucleosome positioning, new techniques of identifying nucleosomes and the competing DNA-binding factors appeared, as chemical mapping with hydroxyl radicals, ChIP-exo, among others, the resolution of the nucleosome maps increased by using paired-end sequencing, and the price of sequencing an entire genome decreased. We present a rigorous statistical mechanics model which is able to explain the recent experimental results by taking into account nucleosome unwrapping, competition between different DNA-binding proteins, and both the interaction between histones and DNA, and between neighboring histones. We show a series of predictions of our new model, all in agreement with the experimental observations.

  16. Nucleosome Positioning and Epigenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2008-03-01

    The role of chromatin structure in gene regulation has recently taken center stage in the field of epigenetics, phenomena that change the phenotype without changing the DNA sequence. Recent work has also shown that nucleosomes, a complex of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer, experience a sequence dependent energy landscape due to the variation in DNA bend stiffness with sequence composition. In this talk, we consider the role nucleosome positioning might play in the formation of heterochromatin, a compact form of DNA generically responsible for gene silencing. In particular, we discuss how different patterns of nucleosome positions, periodic or random, could either facilitate or suppress heterochromatin stability and formation.

  17. Baculoviruses and nucleosome management.

    PubMed

    Volkman, Loy E

    2015-02-01

    Negatively-supercoiled-ds DNA molecules, including the genomes of baculoviruses, spontaneously wrap around cores of histones to form nucleosomes when present within eukaryotic nuclei. Hence, nucleosome management should be essential for baculovirus genome replication and temporal regulation of transcription, but this has not been documented. Nucleosome mobilization is the dominion of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. SWI/SNF and INO80, two of the best-studied complexes, as well as chromatin modifier TIP60, all contain actin as a subunit. Retrospective analysis of results of AcMNPV time course experiments wherein actin polymerization was blocked by cytochalasin D drug treatment implicate actin-containing chromatin modifying complexes in decatenating baculovirus genomes, shutting down host transcription, and regulating late and very late phases of viral transcription. Moreover, virus-mediated nuclear localization of actin early during infection may contribute to nucleosome management.

  18. Nucleosome Remodeling and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Peter B.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is kept flexible and dynamic to respond to environmental, metabolic, and developmental cues through the action of a family of so-called “nucleosome remodeling” ATPases. Consistent with their helicase ancestry, these enzymes experience conformation changes as they bind and hydrolyze ATP. At the same time they interact with DNA and histones, which alters histone–DNA interactions in target nucleosomes. Their action may lead to complete or partial disassembly of nucleosomes, the exchange of histones for variants, the assembly of nucleosomes, or the movement of histone octamers on DNA. “Remodeling” may render DNA sequences accessible to interacting proteins or, conversely, promote packing into tightly folded structures. Remodeling processes participate in every aspect of genome function. Remodeling activities are commonly integrated with other mechanisms such as histone modifications or RNA metabolism to assemble stable, epigenetic states. PMID:24003213

  19. Baculoviruses and nucleosome management

    SciTech Connect

    Volkman, Loy E.

    2015-02-15

    Negatively-supercoiled-ds DNA molecules, including the genomes of baculoviruses, spontaneously wrap around cores of histones to form nucleosomes when present within eukaryotic nuclei. Hence, nucleosome management should be essential for baculovirus genome replication and temporal regulation of transcription, but this has not been documented. Nucleosome mobilization is the dominion of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. SWI/SNF and INO80, two of the best-studied complexes, as well as chromatin modifier TIP60, all contain actin as a subunit. Retrospective analysis of results of AcMNPV time course experiments wherein actin polymerization was blocked by cytochalasin D drug treatment implicate actin-containing chromatin modifying complexes in decatenating baculovirus genomes, shutting down host transcription, and regulating late and very late phases of viral transcription. Moreover, virus-mediated nuclear localization of actin early during infection may contribute to nucleosome management. - Highlights: • Baculoviruses have negatively-supercoiled, circular ds DNA. • Negatively-supercoiled DNA spontaneously forms nucleosomes in the nucleus. • Nucleosomes must be mobilized for replication and transcription to proceed. • Actin-containing chromatin modifiers participate in baculovirus replication.

  20. Histone acetylation: truth of consequences?

    PubMed

    Choi, Jennifer K; Howe, Leann J

    2009-02-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged into a nucleoprotein structure known as chromatin, which is comprised of DNA, histones, and nonhistone proteins. Chromatin structure is highly dynamic, and can shift from a transcriptionally inactive state to an active form in response to intra- and extracellular signals. A major factor in chromatin architecture is the covalent modification of histones through the addition of chemical moieties, such as acetyl, methyl, ubiquitin, and phosphate groups. The acetylation of the amino-terminal tails of histones is a process that is highly conserved in eukaryotes, and was one of the earliest histone modifications characterized. Since its identification in 1964, a large body of evidence has accumulated demonstrating that histone acetylation plays an important role in transcription. Despite our ever-growing understanding of the nuclear processes involved in nucleosome acetylation, however, the exact biochemical mechanisms underlying the downstream effects of histone acetylation have yet to be fully elucidated. To date, histone acetylation has been proposed to function in 2 nonmutually exclusive manners: by directly altering chromatin structure, and by acting as a molecular tag for the recruitment of chromatin-modifying complexes. Here, we discuss recent research focusing on these 2 potential roles of histone acetylation and clarify what we actually know about the function of this modification.

  1. Nucleosome positioning determinants.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Alfonso G; Anderson, John N

    2007-08-17

    A previous report demonstrated that one site in a nucleosome assembled onto a synthetic positioning sequence known as Fragment 67 is hypersensitive to permanganate. The site is required for positioning activity and is located 1.5 turns from the dyad, which is a region of high DNA curvature in the nucleosome. Here, the permanganate sensitivity of the nucleosome positioning Fragment 601 was examined in order to expand the dataset of nucleosome sequences containing KMnO(4) hypersensitive sites. The hyperreactive T residue in the six sites detected as well as the one in Fragment 67 and three in the 5 S rDNA positioning sequence were contained within a TA step. Seven of the ten sequences were of the form CTAGPuG or the related sequence TTAAPu. These motifs were also found in the binding sites of several transcriptional regulatory proteins that kink DNA. In order to assess the significance of these sites, the 10 bp positioning determinant in Fragment 67 was removed and replaced by the nine sequences from the 5 S rDNA and Fragment 601. The results demonstrated that these derivative fragments promoted high nucleosome stability and positioning as compared to a control sequence that contained an AT step in place of the TA step. The importance of the TA step was further tested by making single base-pair substitutions in Fragment 67 and the results revealed that stability and positioning activity followed the order: TA>TG>TT>/=TC approximately GG approximately GA approximately AT. Sequences flanking the TA step were also shown to be critical for nucleosome stability and positioning. Nucleosome positioning was restored to near wild-type levels with (CTG)(3), which can form slipped stranded structures and with one base bulges that kink DNA. The results of this study suggest that local DNA structures are important for positioning and that single base-pair changes at these sites could have profound effects on those genomic functions that depend on ordered nucleosomes. PMID

  2. Sustainable food consumption. Product choice or curtailment?

    PubMed

    Verain, Muriel C D; Dagevos, Hans; Antonides, Gerrit

    2015-08-01

    Food consumption is an important factor in shaping the sustainability of our food supply. The present paper empirically explores different types of sustainable food behaviors. A distinction between sustainable product choices and curtailment behavior has been investigated empirically and predictors of the two types of behavior have been identified. Respondents were classified into four segments based on their sustainable food behaviors: unsustainers, curtailers, product-oriented consumers, and sustainers. Significant differences between the segments were found with regard to food choice motives, personal and social norms, food involvement, subjective knowledge on sustainable food, ability to judge how sustainably a product has been produced and socio-demographics. It is concluded that distinguishing between behavioral strategies toward sustainable food consumption is important as consumer segments can be identified that differ both in their level of sustainable food consumption and in the type of behavior they employ.

  3. Sustainable food consumption. Product choice or curtailment?

    PubMed

    Verain, Muriel C D; Dagevos, Hans; Antonides, Gerrit

    2015-08-01

    Food consumption is an important factor in shaping the sustainability of our food supply. The present paper empirically explores different types of sustainable food behaviors. A distinction between sustainable product choices and curtailment behavior has been investigated empirically and predictors of the two types of behavior have been identified. Respondents were classified into four segments based on their sustainable food behaviors: unsustainers, curtailers, product-oriented consumers, and sustainers. Significant differences between the segments were found with regard to food choice motives, personal and social norms, food involvement, subjective knowledge on sustainable food, ability to judge how sustainably a product has been produced and socio-demographics. It is concluded that distinguishing between behavioral strategies toward sustainable food consumption is important as consumer segments can be identified that differ both in their level of sustainable food consumption and in the type of behavior they employ. PMID:25913683

  4. New insights into nucleosome unwrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chereji, Razvan; Morozov, Alexandre

    2013-03-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are organized into arrays of nucleosomes, in which stretches of 147 base-pairs (bp) of DNA are wrapped around octameric histones. Recently, a new approach for direct mapping of nucleosome centers at bp resolution was developed [Brogaard et al., Nature 486, 496-501 (2012)] and some intriguing results appeared. About 40% of the inter-dyad distances are smaller than 147 bp, which imply massive nucleosome unwrapping, genome-wide, in vivo. The histogram of the inter-dyad distances presents small oscillations which indicate a step-wise unwrapping of the nucleosomal DNA from the histone. We present a statistical mechanics model for the nucleosome unwrapping, which is able to take into account sequence-dependent binding energies, sequence-independent potential barriers and wells, effective two-body interactions between the nucleosomes, competition between different species, cooperative-binding, and other important factors which dictate the nucleosome distribution along the DNA. We are able to reproduce the distribution of the inter-dyad distances, which cannot be obtained if there is no nucleosome unwrapping. The nucleosome unwrapping model can explain also the variable DNA accessibility and the nucleosome-induced cooperativity, which were observed experimentally.

  5. Histone acetylation and globin gene switching.

    PubMed Central

    Hebbes, T R; Thorne, A W; Clayton, A L; Crane-Robinson, C

    1992-01-01

    An affinity-purified antibody that recognises the epitope epsilon-acetyl lysine has been used to fractionate chicken erythrocyte mononucleosomes obtained from 5 and 15 day embryos. The antibody bound chromatin was enriched in multiply acetylated forms of the core histones H3, H4 and H2B, but not in ubiquitinated H2A. The DNA of these modified nucleosomes was probed with genomic sequences from the embryonic beta rho gene (active at 5 days) and from the adult beta A gene (active at 15 days). Both genes were found to be highly enriched in the acetylated nucleosomes fractionated from both 5 day and from 15 day erythrocytes. We conclude that globin switching is not linked to a change in acetylation status of the genes and that a 'poised' gene carries histones acetylated to a similar level as a transcriptionally active gene. Core histone acetylation is not therefore a direct consequence of the transcriptional process and might operate at the level of the globin locus as a general enabling step for transcription. Images PMID:1549462

  6. Nucleosomes undergo slow spontaneous gaping.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Thuy T M; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-04-30

    In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into a basic unit, the nucleosome which consists of 147 bp of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer composed of two copies each of the histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Nucleosome structures are diverse not only by histone variants, histone modifications, histone composition but also through accommodating different conformational states such as DNA breathing and dimer splitting. Variation in nucleosome structures allows it to perform a variety of cellular functions. Here, we identified a novel spontaneous conformational switching of nucleosomes under physiological conditions using single-molecule FRET. Using FRET probes placed at various positions on the nucleosomal DNA to monitor conformation of the nucleosome over a long period of time (30-60 min) at various ionic conditions, we identified conformational changes we refer to as nucleosome gaping. Gaping transitions are distinct from nucleosome breathing, sliding or tightening. Gaping modes switch along the direction normal to the DNA plane through about 5-10 angstroms and at minutes (1-10 min) time scale. This conformational transition, which has not been observed previously, may be potentially important for enzymatic reactions/transactions on nucleosomal substrate and the formation of multiple compression forms of chromatin fibers.

  7. DNA sequence templates adjacent nucleosome and ORC sites at gene amplification origins in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zimmer, Kurt; Rusch, Douglas B; Paranjape, Neha; Podicheti, Ram; Tang, Haixu; Calvi, Brian R

    2015-10-15

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication are bound by the origin recognition complex (ORC), which scaffolds assembly of a pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) that is then activated to initiate replication. Both pre-RC assembly and activation are strongly influenced by developmental changes to the epigenome, but molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. We have been examining the activation of origins responsible for developmental gene amplification in Drosophila. At a specific time in oogenesis, somatic follicle cells transition from genomic replication to a locus-specific replication from six amplicon origins. Previous evidence indicated that these amplicon origins are activated by nucleosome acetylation, but how this affects origin chromatin is unknown. Here, we examine nucleosome position in follicle cells using micrococcal nuclease digestion with Ilumina sequencing. The results indicate that ORC binding sites and other essential origin sequences are nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs). Nucleosome position at the amplicons was highly similar among developmental stages during which ORC is or is not bound, indicating that being an NDR is not sufficient to specify ORC binding. Importantly, the data suggest that nucleosomes and ORC have opposite preferences for DNA sequence and structure. We propose that nucleosome hyperacetylation promotes pre-RC assembly onto adjacent DNA sequences that are disfavored by nucleosomes but favored by ORC.

  8. Multiscale modeling of nucleosome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shantanu; Ding, Feng; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2007-03-01

    Nucleosomes form the fundamental building blocks of chromatin. Subtle modifications of the constituent histone tails mediate chromatin stability and regulate gene expression. For this reason, it is important to understand structural dynamics of nucleosomes at atomic levels. We report a novel multiscale model of the fundamental chromatin unit, a nucleosome, using a simplified model for rapid discrete molecular dynamics simulations and an all-atom model for detailed structural investigation. Using a simplified structural model, we perform equilibrium simulations of a single nucleosome at various temperatures. We further reconstruct all-atom nucleosome structures from simulation trajectories. We find that histone tails bind to nucleosomal DNA via strong salt-bridge interactions over a wide range of temperatures, suggesting a mechanism of chromatin structural organization whereby histone tails regulate inter- and intranucleosomal assemblies via binding with nucleosomal DNA. We identify specific regions of the histone core H2A/H2B-H4/H3-H3/H4-H2B/H2A, termed "cold sites", which retain a significant fraction of contacts with adjoining residues throughout the simulation, indicating their functional role in nucleosome organization. Cold sites are clustered around H3-H3, H2A-H4 and H4-H2A interhistone interfaces, indicating the necessity of these contacts for nucleosome stability. Essential dynamics analysis of simulation trajectories shows that bending across the H3-H3 is a prominent mode of intranucleosomal dynamics. We postulate that effects of salts on mononucleosomes can be modeled in discrete molecular dynamics by modulating histone-DNA interaction potentials. Local fluctuations in nucleosomal DNA vary significantly along the DNA sequence, suggesting that only a fraction of histone-DNA contacts make strong interactions dominating mononucleosomal dynamics. Our findings suggest that histone tails have a direct functional role in stabilizing higher-order chromatin

  9. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:26933790

  10. E APPROACH, FACING W SHOWING PARAPET CURTAILS Stanley Brook ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    E APPROACH, FACING W SHOWING PARAPET CURTAILS - Stanley Brook Bridge, Spanning Stanley Brook, Stanley Brook Motor Road, & Seaside Trail on Barr Hill-Day Mountain Carriage Road, Seal Harbor, Hancock County, ME

  11. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  12. Nucleosome organization in the Drosophila genome.

    PubMed

    Mavrich, Travis N; Jiang, Cizhong; Ioshikhes, Ilya P; Li, Xiaoyong; Venters, Bryan J; Zanton, Sara J; Tomsho, Lynn P; Qi, Ji; Glaser, Robert L; Schuster, Stephan C; Gilmour, David S; Albert, Istvan; Pugh, B Franklin

    2008-05-15

    Comparative genomics of nucleosome positions provides a powerful means for understanding how the organization of chromatin and the transcription machinery co-evolve. Here we produce a high-resolution reference map of H2A.Z and bulk nucleosome locations across the genome of the fly Drosophila melanogaster and compare it to that from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Like Saccharomyces, Drosophila nucleosomes are organized around active transcription start sites in a canonical -1, nucleosome-free region, +1 arrangement. However, Drosophila does not incorporate H2A.Z into the -1 nucleosome and does not bury its transcriptional start site in the +1 nucleosome. At thousands of genes, RNA polymerase II engages the +1 nucleosome and pauses. How the transcription initiation machinery contends with the +1 nucleosome seems to be fundamentally different across major eukaryotic lines.

  13. Conditions for positioning of nucleosomes on DNA.

    PubMed

    Sheinman, Michael; Chung, Ho-Ryun

    2015-08-01

    Positioning of nucleosomes along a eukaryotic genome plays an important role in its organization and regulation. There are many different factors affecting the location of nucleosomes. Some can be viewed as preferential binding of a single nucleosome to different locations along the DNA and some as interactions between neighboring nucleosomes. In this study, we analyze positioning of nucleosomes and derive conditions for their good positioning. Using analytic and numerical approaches we find that, if the binding preferences are very weak, an interplay between the interactions and the binding preferences is essential for a good positioning of nucleosomes, especially on correlated energy landscapes. Analyzing the empirical energy landscape, we conclude that good positioning of nucleosomes in vivo is possible only if they strongly interact. In this case, our model, predicting long-length-scale fluctuations of nucleosomes' occupancy along the DNA, accounts well for the empirical observations.

  14. Folding of Nucleosome Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steven; Jimenez-Useche, Isabel; Andresen, Kurt; Yuan, Chongli; Qiu, Xiangyun

    2014-03-01

    Chromatin conformation and dynamics is central to gene functions including packaging, regulation, and repair. At the molecular level, the basic building block of chromatin is a nucleosome core particle (NCP) made of 147 base pairs (bp) of dsDNA wrapped around an octamer of histone proteins. These NCPs are connected by short 10-90 bps of linker DNA as beads on a string. Key factors determining the packaging of NCP arrays to form chromatin include ionic condition, linker DNA length, and epigenetic modifications, especially of the histone tails. We have investigated how the conformations of model tetra-NCP arrays are modulated by these factors using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Here we present recent studies of the effects of ion (KCl and MgCl2), linker length, and histone modification (tail deletions) on NCP arrays. Our SAXS measurement makes it possible to learn about both the global compaction of NCP arrays and local inter-NCP spatial correlations within the same array.

  15. Nucleosome Organization in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Puya G; Pedersen, Brian A; Taylor, Jared F; Khattab, Omar S; Chen, Yu-Han; Chen, Yumay; Jacobsen, Steven E; Wang, Ping H

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental repeating unit of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome. Besides being involved in packaging DNA, nucleosome organization plays an important role in transcriptional regulation and cellular identity. Currently, there is much debate about the major determinants of the nucleosome architecture of a genome and its significance with little being known about its role in stem cells. To address these questions, we performed ultra-deep sequencing of nucleosomal DNA in two human embryonic stem cell lines and integrated our data with numerous epigenomic maps. Our analyses have revealed that the genome is a determinant of nucleosome organization with transcriptionally inactive regions characterized by a "ground state" of nucleosome profiles driven by underlying DNA sequences. DNA sequence preferences are associated with heterogeneous chromatin organization around transcription start sites. Transcription, histone modifications, and DNA methylation alter this "ground state" by having distinct effects on both nucleosome positioning and occupancy. As the transcriptional rate increases, nucleosomes become better positioned. Exons transcribed and included in the final spliced mRNA have distinct nucleosome profiles in comparison to exons not included at exon-exon junctions. Genes marked by the active modification H3K4m3 are characterized by lower nucleosome occupancy before the transcription start site compared to genes marked by the inactive modification H3K27m3, while bivalent domains, genes associated with both marks, lie exactly in the middle. Combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks (chromatin states) are associated with unique nucleosome profiles. Nucleosome organization varies around transcription factor binding in enhancers versus promoters. DNA methylation is associated with increasing nucleosome occupancy and different types of methylations have distinct location preferences within the nucleosome core particle. Finally, computational analysis of nucleosome

  16. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions. PMID:26966245

  17. Visible periodicity of strong nucleosome DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Salih, Bilal; Tripathi, Vijay; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Lowary and Widom assembled nucleosomes on synthetic random sequence DNA molecules, selected the strongest nucleosomes and discovered that the TA dinucleotides in these strong nucleosome sequences often appear at 10-11 bases from one another or at distances which are multiples of this period. We repeated this experiment computationally, on large ensembles of natural genomic sequences, by selecting the strongest nucleosomes--i.e. those with such distances between like-named dinucleotides, multiples of 10.4 bases, the structural and sequence period of nucleosome DNA. The analysis confirmed the periodicity of TA dinucleotides in the strong nucleosomes, and revealed as well other periodic sequence elements, notably classical AA and TT dinucleotides. The matrices of DNA bendability and their simple linear forms--nucleosome positioning motifs--are calculated from the strong nucleosome DNA sequences. The motifs are in full accord with nucleosome positioning sequences derived earlier, thus confirming that the new technique, indeed, detects strong nucleosomes. Species- and isochore-specific variations of the matrices and of the positioning motifs are demonstrated. The strong nucleosome DNA sequences manifest the highest hitherto nucleosome positioning sequence signals, showing the dinucleotide periodicities in directly observable rather than in hidden form.

  18. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions.

  19. Review fifteen years of search for strong nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, Edward N; Nibhani, Reshma

    2015-08-01

    Don Crothers, Mikael Kubista, Jon Widom, and their teams have been first to look for strong nucleosomes, in a bid to reveal the nucleosome positioning pattern(s) carried by the nucleosome DNA sequences. They were first to demonstrate that the nucleosome stability correlates with 10-11 base sequence periodicity, and that the strong nucleosomes localize preferentially in centromeres. This review describes these findings and their connection to recent discovery of the strong nucleosomes (SNs) with visibly periodic nucleosome DNA sequences.

  20. spFRET reveals changes in nucleosome breathing by neighboring nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Buning, Ruth; Kropff, Wietske; Martens, Kirsten; van Noort, John

    2015-02-18

    Chromatin, the structure in which DNA is compacted in eukaryotic cells, plays a key role in regulating DNA accessibility. FRET experiments on single nucleosomes, the basic units in chromatin, have revealed a dynamic nucleosome where spontaneous DNA unwrapping from the ends provides access to the nucleosomal DNA. Here we investigated how this DNA breathing is affected by extension of the linker DNA and by the presence of a neighboring nucleosome. We found that both electrostatic interactions between the entering and exiting linker DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions increase unwrapping. Interactions between neighboring nucleosomes are more likely in dinucleosomes spaced by 55 bp of linker DNA than in dinucleosomes spaced by 50 bp of linker DNA. Such increased unwrapping may not only increase the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA in chromatin fibers, it may also be key to folding of nucleosomes into higher order structures.

  1. spFRET reveals changes in nucleosome breathing by neighboring nucleosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buning, Ruth; Kropff, Wietske; Martens, Kirsten; van Noort, John

    2015-02-01

    Chromatin, the structure in which DNA is compacted in eukaryotic cells, plays a key role in regulating DNA accessibility. FRET experiments on single nucleosomes, the basic units in chromatin, have revealed a dynamic nucleosome where spontaneous DNA unwrapping from the ends provides access to the nucleosomal DNA. Here we investigated how this DNA breathing is affected by extension of the linker DNA and by the presence of a neighboring nucleosome. We found that both electrostatic interactions between the entering and exiting linker DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions increase unwrapping. Interactions between neighboring nucleosomes are more likely in dinucleosomes spaced by 55 bp of linker DNA than in dinucleosomes spaced by 50 bp of linker DNA. Such increased unwrapping may not only increase the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA in chromatin fibers, it may also be key to folding of nucleosomes into higher order structures.

  2. Functional roles of nucleosome stability and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chereji, Răzvan V; Morozov, Alexandre V

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosome is a histone-DNA complex known as the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin. Up to 90% of eukaryotic DNA is wrapped around consecutive octamers made of the core histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Nucleosome positioning affects numerous cellular processes that require robust and timely access to genomic DNA, which is packaged into the tight confines of the cell nucleus. In living cells, nucleosome positions are determined by intrinsic histone-DNA sequence preferences, competition between histones and other DNA-binding proteins for genomic sequence, and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers. We discuss the major energetic contributions to nucleosome formation and remodeling, focusing especially on partial DNA unwrapping off the histone octamer surface. DNA unwrapping enables efficient access to nucleosome-buried binding sites and mediates rapid nucleosome removal through concerted action of two or more DNA-binding factors. High-resolution, genome-scale maps of distances between neighboring nucleosomes have shown that DNA unwrapping and nucleosome crowding (mutual invasion of nucleosome territories) are much more common than previously thought. Ultimately, constraints imposed by nucleosome energetics on the rates of ATP-dependent and spontaneous chromatin remodeling determine nucleosome occupancy genome-wide, and shape pathways of cellular response to environmental stresses.

  3. Lupus nephritis: a nucleosome waste disposal defect?

    PubMed

    Berden, Jo H M; Grootscholten, Cecile; Jürgen, W C Dieker; van der Vlag, Johan

    2002-01-01

    Formation of anti-nuclear autoantibodies is a cardinal characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In recent years the nucleosome has been identified as the major autoantigen, since nucleosome specific T cells have been identified, which also drive the formation of anti-dsDNA and anti-histone antibodies. Nucleosome specific autoantibodies are present in a large majority of SLE patients and lupus mice. Nucleosomes are formed during apoptosis by organized cleavage of chromatin. These nucleosomes together with other lupus autoantigens cluster in apoptotic bodies at the surface of apoptotic cells. Systemic release of these autoantigens is normally prevented by swift removal of apoptotic cels. However, if the rate of apoptosis overflows the removal capacity and/or the cleaning machinery is reduced, nucleosomes are released. Furthermore, during apoptosis autoantigens can be modified, which makes them more immunogenic. Nucleosomes also play a pivotal role in the evolution of tissue lesions, especially glomerulonephritis. In lupus nephritis nucleosomes, anti-nucleosome autoantibodies and nucleosome/Ig complexes have been identified in the glomerular immune deposits. Via their cationic histone part nucleosomes can bind to heparan sulfate, a strong anionic constituent of the glomerular basement membrane.

  4. The Influence of Ionic Environment and Histone Tails on Columnar Order of Nucleosome Core Particles.

    PubMed

    Berezhnoy, Nikolay V; Liu, Ying; Allahverdi, Abdollah; Yang, Renliang; Su, Chun-Jen; Liu, Chuan-Fa; Korolev, Nikolay; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2016-04-26

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Nucleosome-nucleosome interactions are instrumental in chromatin compaction, and understanding NCP self-assembly is important for understanding chromatin structure and dynamics. Recombinant NCPs aggregated by multivalent cations form various ordered phases that can be studied by x-ray diffraction (small-angle x-ray scattering). In this work, the effects on the supramolecular structure of aggregated NCPs due to lysine histone H4 tail acetylations, histone H2A mutations (neutralizing the acidic patch of the histone octamer), and the removal of histone tails were investigated. The formation of ordered mainly hexagonal columnar NCP phases is in agreement with earlier studies; however, the highly homogeneous recombinant NCP systems used in this work display a more compact packing. The long-range order of the NCP columnar phase was found to be abolished or reduced by acetylation of the H4 tails, acidic patch neutralization, and removal of the H3 and H2B tails. Loss of nucleosome stacking upon removal of the H3 tails in combination with other tails was observed. In the absence of the H2A tails, the formation of an unknown highly ordered phase was observed. PMID:27119633

  5. Wind and Solar Energy Curtailment: Experience and Practices in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, L.; Cochran, J.; Wang, X.

    2014-03-01

    This report examines U.S. curtailment practices, with a particular emphasis on utilities in the Western states. The information presented here is based on a series of interviews conducted with utilities, system operators, wind energy developers, and non-governmental organizations. The report provides case studies of curtailment experience and examines the reasons for curtailment, curtailment procedures, compensation, and practices that can minimize curtailment.

  6. Histone chaperone Anp32e removes H2A.Z from DNA double-strand breaks and promotes nucleosome reorganization and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Gursoy-Yuzugullu, Ozge; Ayrapetov, Marina K; Price, Brendan D

    2015-06-16

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) requires open, flexible chromatin domains. The NuA4-Tip60 complex creates these flexible chromatin structures by exchanging histone H2A.Z onto nucleosomes and promoting acetylation of histone H4. Here, we demonstrate that the accumulation of H2A.Z on nucleosomes at DSBs is transient, and that rapid eviction of H2A.Z is required for DSB repair. Anp32e, an H2A.Z chaperone that interacts with the C-terminal docking domain of H2A.Z, is rapidly recruited to DSBs. Anp32e functions to remove H2A.Z from nucleosomes, so that H2A.Z levels return to basal within 10 min of DNA damage. Further, H2A.Z removal by Anp32e disrupts inhibitory interactions between the histone H4 tail and the nucleosome surface, facilitating increased acetylation of histone H4 following DNA damage. When H2A.Z removal by Anp32e is blocked, nucleosomes at DSBs retain elevated levels of H2A.Z, and assume a more stable, hypoacetylated conformation. Further, loss of Anp32e leads to increased CtIP-dependent end resection, accumulation of single-stranded DNA, and an increase in repair by the alternative nonhomologous end joining pathway. Exchange of H2A.Z onto the chromatin and subsequent rapid removal by Anp32e are therefore critical for creating open, acetylated nucleosome structures and for controlling end resection by CtIP. Dynamic modulation of H2A.Z exchange and removal by Anp32e reveals the importance of the nucleosome surface and nucleosome dynamics in processing the damaged chromatin template during DSB repair.

  7. Nucleosome spacing generated by ISWI and CHD1 remodelers is constant regardless of nucleosome density.

    PubMed

    Lieleg, Corinna; Ketterer, Philip; Nuebler, Johannes; Ludwigsen, Johanna; Gerland, Ulrich; Dietz, Hendrik; Mueller-Planitz, Felix; Korber, Philipp

    2015-05-01

    Arrays of regularly spaced nucleosomes are a hallmark of chromatin, but it remains unclear how they are generated. Recent genome-wide studies, in vitro and in vivo, showed constant nucleosome spacing even if the histone concentration was experimentally reduced. This counters the long-held assumption that nucleosome density determines spacing and calls for factors keeping spacing constant regardless of nucleosome density. We call this a clamping activity. Here, we show in a purified system that ISWI- and CHD1-type nucleosome remodelers have a clamping activity such that they not only generate regularly spaced nucleosome arrays but also generate constant spacing regardless of nucleosome density. This points to a functionally attractive nucleosome interaction that could be mediated either directly by nucleosome-nucleosome contacts or indirectly through the remodelers. Mutant Drosophila melanogaster ISWI without the Hand-Sant-Slide (HSS) domain had no detectable spacing activity even though it is known to remodel and slide nucleosomes. This suggests that the role of ISWI remodelers in generating constant spacing is not just to mediate nucleosome sliding; they actively contribute to the attractive interaction. Additional factors are necessary to set physiological spacing in absolute terms.

  8. Nucleosome Spacing Generated by ISWI and CHD1 Remodelers Is Constant Regardless of Nucleosome Density

    PubMed Central

    Lieleg, Corinna; Ketterer, Philip; Nuebler, Johannes; Ludwigsen, Johanna; Gerland, Ulrich; Dietz, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Arrays of regularly spaced nucleosomes are a hallmark of chromatin, but it remains unclear how they are generated. Recent genome-wide studies, in vitro and in vivo, showed constant nucleosome spacing even if the histone concentration was experimentally reduced. This counters the long-held assumption that nucleosome density determines spacing and calls for factors keeping spacing constant regardless of nucleosome density. We call this a clamping activity. Here, we show in a purified system that ISWI- and CHD1-type nucleosome remodelers have a clamping activity such that they not only generate regularly spaced nucleosome arrays but also generate constant spacing regardless of nucleosome density. This points to a functionally attractive nucleosome interaction that could be mediated either directly by nucleosome-nucleosome contacts or indirectly through the remodelers. Mutant Drosophila melanogaster ISWI without the HAND-SANT-SLIDE (HSS) domain had no detectable spacing activity even though it is known to remodel and slide nucleosomes. This suggests that the role of ISWI remodelers in generating constant spacing is not just to mediate nucleosome sliding; they actively contribute to the attractive interaction. Additional factors are necessary to set physiological spacing in absolute terms. PMID:25733687

  9. Mapping nucleosome positions using DNase-seq.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jianling; Luo, Kaixuan; Winter, Peter S; Crawford, Gregory E; Iversen, Edwin S; Hartemink, Alexander J

    2016-03-01

    Although deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) was used to probe the structure of the nucleosome in the 1960s and 1970s, in the current high-throughput sequencing era, DNase I has mainly been used to study genomic regions devoid of nucleosomes. Here, we reveal for the first time that DNase I can be used to precisely map the (translational) positions of in vivo nucleosomes genome-wide. Specifically, exploiting a distinctive DNase I cleavage profile within nucleosome-associated DNA--including a signature 10.3 base pair oscillation that corresponds to accessibility of the minor groove as DNA winds around the nucleosome--we develop a Bayes-factor-based method that can be used to map nucleosome positions along the genome. Compared to methods that require genetically modified histones, our DNase-based approach is easily applied in any organism, which we demonstrate by producing maps in yeast and human. Compared to micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-based methods that map nucleosomes based on cuts in linker regions, we utilize DNase I cuts both outside and within nucleosomal DNA; the oscillatory nature of the DNase I cleavage profile within nucleosomal DNA enables us to identify translational positioning details not apparent in MNase digestion of linker DNA. Because the oscillatory pattern corresponds to nucleosome rotational positioning, it also reveals the rotational context of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. We show that potential binding sites within nucleosome-associated DNA are often centered preferentially on an exposed major or minor groove. This preferential localization may modulate TF interaction with nucleosome-associated DNA as TFs search for binding sites. PMID:26772197

  10. Acetylated histone H4 is reduced in human gastric adenomas and carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ono, S; Oue, N; Kuniyasu, H; Suzuki, T; Ito, R; Matsusaki, K; Ishikawa, T; Tahara, E; Yasui, W

    2002-09-01

    Acetylation of core histones is closely linked to transcriptional activation of various genes. The acetylation levels of nucleosomal histones can be modified through a balance of histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases. To elucidate the role of histone acetylation in human gastric carcinogenesis, we studied the status of histone H4 acetylation in gastric carcinoma tissues and corresponding non-neoplastic mucosa. The status of histone acetylation was assessed by examining the expression of acetylated histone H4 through Western blotting and immunohistochemistry using an anti-acetylated histone H4 antibody. The levels of acetylated histone H4 expression were obviously reduced in 72% (13/18) of gastric carcinomas in comparison with non-neoplastic mucosa by Western blotting. In immunohistochemistry, acetylated histone H4 was clearly detected in the nuclei of both non-neoplastic epithelial and stromal cells, whereas the levels of acetylated histone H4 were heterogeneous or reduced in 66% (38/57) of gastric carcinomas and 46% (6/13) of gastric adenomas. Reduced expression of acetylated histone H4 was also observed in some areas of intestinal metaplasia adjacent to carcinomas. Reduction in the expression of acetylated histone H4 was significantly correlated with advanced stage, depth of tumor invasion and lymph node metastasis. These results suggest that low levels of histone acetylation may be closely associated with the development and progression of gastric carcinomas, possibly through alteration of gene expression.

  11. Reading sequence-directed computational nucleosome maps.

    PubMed

    Nibhani, Reshma; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Recently developed latest version of the sequence-directed single-base resolution nucleosome mapping reveals existence of strong nucleosomes and chromatin columnar structures (columns). Broad application of this simple technique for further studies of chromatin and chromosome structure requires some basic understanding as to how it works and what information it affords. The paper provides such an introduction to the method. The oscillating maps of singular nucleosomes, of short and long oligonucleosome columns, are explained, as well as maps of chromatin on satellite DNA and occurrences of counter-phase (antiparallel) nucleosome neighbors.

  12. Mapping nucleosome positions using DNase-seq

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jianling; Luo, Kaixuan; Winter, Peter S.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Hartemink, Alexander J.

    2016-01-01

    Although deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) was used to probe the structure of the nucleosome in the 1960s and 1970s, in the current high-throughput sequencing era, DNase I has mainly been used to study genomic regions devoid of nucleosomes. Here, we reveal for the first time that DNase I can be used to precisely map the (translational) positions of in vivo nucleosomes genome-wide. Specifically, exploiting a distinctive DNase I cleavage profile within nucleosome-associated DNA—including a signature 10.3 base pair oscillation that corresponds to accessibility of the minor groove as DNA winds around the nucleosome—we develop a Bayes-factor–based method that can be used to map nucleosome positions along the genome. Compared to methods that require genetically modified histones, our DNase-based approach is easily applied in any organism, which we demonstrate by producing maps in yeast and human. Compared to micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-based methods that map nucleosomes based on cuts in linker regions, we utilize DNase I cuts both outside and within nucleosomal DNA; the oscillatory nature of the DNase I cleavage profile within nucleosomal DNA enables us to identify translational positioning details not apparent in MNase digestion of linker DNA. Because the oscillatory pattern corresponds to nucleosome rotational positioning, it also reveals the rotational context of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. We show that potential binding sites within nucleosome-associated DNA are often centered preferentially on an exposed major or minor groove. This preferential localization may modulate TF interaction with nucleosome-associated DNA as TFs search for binding sites. PMID:26772197

  13. The nucleosome remodeling complex, Snf/Swi, is required for the maintenance of transcription in vivo and is partially redundant with the histone acetyltransferase, Gcn5.

    PubMed Central

    Sudarsanam, P; Cao, Y; Wu, L; Laurent, B C; Winston, F

    1999-01-01

    Snf/Swi, a nucleosome remodeling complex, is important for overcoming nucleosome-mediated repression of transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have addressed the mechanism by which Snf/Swi controls transcription in vivo of an Snf/Swi-dependent promoter, that of the SUC2 gene. By single-cell analysis, our results show that Snf/Swi is required for activated levels of SUC2 expression in every cell of a population. In addition, Snf/Swi is required for maintenance of SUC2 transcription, suggesting that continuous chromatin remodeling is necessary to maintain an active transcriptional state. Finally, Snf/Swi and Gcn5, a histone acetyltransferase, have partially redundant roles in the control of SUC2 transcription, suggesting a functional overlap between two different mechanisms believed to overcome repression by nucleosomes, nucleosome remodeling and histone acetylation. PMID:10357821

  14. Structural analysis of nucleosomal barrier to transcription

    PubMed Central

    Gaykalova, Daria A.; Kulaeva, Olga I.; Volokh, Olesya; Shaytan, Alexey K.; Hsieh, Fu-Kai; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.; Sokolova, Olga S.; Studitsky, Vasily M.

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of human and Drosophila genes are regulated at the level of transcript elongation and nucleosomes are likely targets for this regulation. However, the molecular mechanisms of formation of the nucleosomal barrier to transcribing RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and nucleosome survival during/after transcription remain unknown. Here we show that both DNA–histone interactions and Pol II backtracking contribute to formation of the barrier and that nucleosome survival during transcription likely occurs through allosterically stabilized histone–histone interactions. Structural analysis indicates that after Pol II encounters the barrier, the enzyme backtracks and nucleosomal DNA recoils on the octamer, locking Pol II in the arrested state. DNA is displaced from one of the H2A/H2B dimers that remains associated with the octamer. The data reveal the importance of intranucleosomal DNA–protein and protein–protein interactions during conformational changes in the nucleosome structure on transcription. Mechanisms of nucleosomal barrier formation and nucleosome survival during transcription are proposed. PMID:26460019

  15. A physical analysis of nucleosome positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerland, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    The first level of genome packaging in eukaryotic cells involves the formation of dense nucleosome arrays, with DNA coverage near 90% in yeasts. A high nucleosome coverage is essential for cells, e.g. to prevent cryptic transcription, and the local positions of specific nucleosomes can play an important role in gene regulation. It is known that in vivo nucleosome positions are affected by a complex mix of passive and active mechanisms, including sequence-specific histone-DNA binding, nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, ATP-dependent remodeling enzymes, transcription, and DNA replication. Yet, the statistical distribution of nucleosome positions is extremely well described by simple physical models that treat the chromatin fiber as an interacting one-dimensional gas. I will discuss how can we interpret this surprising observation from a mechanistic perspective. I will also discuss the kinetics of the interacting gas model, which is pertinent to the question of how cells achieve the high nucleosome coverage within a short time, e.g. after DNA replication.

  16. A brief review of nucleosome structure.

    PubMed

    Cutter, Amber R; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    The nucleosomal subunit organization of chromatin provides a multitude of functions. Nucleosomes elicit an initial ∼7-fold linear compaction of genomic DNA. They provide a critical mechanism for stable repression of genes and other DNA-dependent activities by restricting binding of trans-acting factors to cognate DNA sequences. Conversely they are engineered to be nearly meta-stable and disassembled (and reassembled) in a facile manner to allow rapid access to the underlying DNA during processes such as transcription, replication and DNA repair. Nucleosomes protect the genome from DNA damaging agents and provide a lattice onto which a myriad of epigenetic signals are deposited. Moreover, vast strings of nucleosomes provide a framework for assembly of the chromatin fiber and higher-order chromatin structures. Thus, in order to provide a foundation for understanding these functions, we present a review of the basic elements of nucleosome structure and stability, including the association of linker histones.

  17. Characterization of Dnmt1 Binding and DNA Methylation on Nucleosomes and Nucleosomal Arrays.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Anna; Gross, Thomas; Thalhammer, Verena; Längst, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes and the organisation into higher order structures of chromatin limits the access of sequence specific DNA binding factors to DNA. In cells, DNA methylation is preferentially occuring in the linker region of nucleosomes, suggesting a structural impact of chromatin on DNA methylation. These observations raise the question whether DNA methyltransferases are capable to recognize the nucleosomal substrates and to modify the packaged DNA. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of nucleosome binding and nucleosomal DNA methylation by the maintenance DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1. Our binding studies show that Dnmt1 has a DNA length sensing activity, binding cooperatively to DNA, and requiring a minimal DNA length of 20 bp. Dnmt1 needs linker DNA to bind to nucleosomes and most efficiently recognizes nucleosomes with symmetric DNA linkers. Footprinting experiments reveal that Dnmt1 binds to both DNA linkers exiting the nucleosome core. The binding pattern correlates with the efficient methylation of DNA linkers. However, the enzyme lacks the ability to methylate nucleosomal CpG sites on mononucleosomes and nucleosomal arrays, unless chromatin remodeling enzymes create a dynamic chromatin state. In addition, our results show that Dnmt1 functionally interacts with specific chromatin remodeling enzymes to enable complete methylation of hemi-methylated DNA in chromatin.

  18. Strong nucleosomes of A. thaliana concentrate in centromere regions.

    PubMed

    Salih, Bilal; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Earlier identified strongest nucleosome DNA sequences of A. thaliana, those with visible 10-11 base sequence periodicity, are mapped along chromosomes. Resulting positional distributions reveal distinct maxima, one per chromosome, located in the centromere regions. Sequence-directed nucleosome mapping demonstrates that the strong nucleosomes (SNs) make tight arrays, several 'parallel' nucleosomes each, suggesting a columnar chromatin structure. The SNs represent a new class of centromeric nucleosomes, presumably, participating in synapsis of chromatids and securing the centromere architecture.

  19. Histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Liu, Zi-Ning; Chow, Sih-Yao; Lu, Yi-Han; Li, Hsin

    2015-01-01

    A huge amount of information is stored in genomic DNA and this stored information resides inside the nucleus with the aid of chromosomal condensation factors. It has been reported that the repeat nucleosome core particle (NCP) consists of 147-bp of DNA and two copies of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Regulation of chromosomal structure is important to many processes inside the cell. In vivo, a group of histone chaperones facilitate and regulate nucleosome assembly. How NCPs are constructed with the aid of histone chaperones remains unclear. In this study, the histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process was investigated using single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments. It was found that Asf1 is able to exert more influence than Nap1 and poly glutamate acid (PGA) on the nucleosome formation process, which highlights Asf1's specific role in tetrasome formation. Thermodynamic parameters supported a model whereby energetically favored nucleosomal complexes compete with non-nucleosomal complexes. In addition, our kinetic findings propose the model that histone chaperones mediate nucleosome assembly along a path that leads to enthalpy-favored products with free histones as reaction substrates. PMID:25611318

  20. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1–2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10051.001 PMID:26895087

  1. Histone Chaperone-Mediated Nucleosome Assembly Process

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Liu, Zi-Ning; Chow, Sih-Yao; Lu, Yi-Han; Li, Hsin

    2015-01-01

    A huge amount of information is stored in genomic DNA and this stored information resides inside the nucleus with the aid of chromosomal condensation factors. It has been reported that the repeat nucleosome core particle (NCP) consists of 147-bp of DNA and two copies of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Regulation of chromosomal structure is important to many processes inside the cell. In vivo, a group of histone chaperones facilitate and regulate nucleosome assembly. How NCPs are constructed with the aid of histone chaperones remains unclear. In this study, the histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process was investigated using single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments. It was found that Asf1 is able to exert more influence than Nap1 and poly glutamate acid (PGA) on the nucleosome formation process, which highlights Asf1’s specific role in tetrasome formation. Thermodynamic parameters supported a model whereby energetically favored nucleosomal complexes compete with non-nucleosomal complexes. In addition, our kinetic findings propose the model that histone chaperones mediate nucleosome assembly along a path that leads to enthalpy-favored products with free histones as reaction substrates. PMID:25611318

  2. Structural basis for retroviral integration into nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Maskell, Daniel P; Renault, Ludovic; Serrao, Erik; Lesbats, Paul; Matadeen, Rishi; Hare, Stephen; Lindemann, Dirk; Engelman, Alan N; Costa, Alessandro; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-07-16

    Retroviral integration is catalysed by a tetramer of integrase (IN) assembled on viral DNA ends in a stable complex, known as the intasome. How the intasome interfaces with chromosomal DNA, which exists in the form of nucleosomal arrays, is currently unknown. Here we show that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) intasome is proficient at stable capture of nucleosomes as targets for integration. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reveals a multivalent intasome-nucleosome interface involving both gyres of nucleosomal DNA and one H2A-H2B heterodimer. While the histone octamer remains intact, the DNA is lifted from the surface of the H2A-H2B heterodimer to allow integration at strongly preferred superhelix location ±3.5 positions. Amino acid substitutions disrupting these contacts impinge on the ability of the intasome to engage nucleosomes in vitro and redistribute viral integration sites on the genomic scale. Our findings elucidate the molecular basis for nucleosome capture by the viral DNA recombination machinery and the underlying nucleosome plasticity that allows integration.

  3. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes.

    PubMed

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-02-19

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1-2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome.

  4. Histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Liu, Zi-Ning; Chow, Sih-Yao; Lu, Yi-Han; Li, Hsin

    2015-01-01

    A huge amount of information is stored in genomic DNA and this stored information resides inside the nucleus with the aid of chromosomal condensation factors. It has been reported that the repeat nucleosome core particle (NCP) consists of 147-bp of DNA and two copies of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Regulation of chromosomal structure is important to many processes inside the cell. In vivo, a group of histone chaperones facilitate and regulate nucleosome assembly. How NCPs are constructed with the aid of histone chaperones remains unclear. In this study, the histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process was investigated using single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments. It was found that Asf1 is able to exert more influence than Nap1 and poly glutamate acid (PGA) on the nucleosome formation process, which highlights Asf1's specific role in tetrasome formation. Thermodynamic parameters supported a model whereby energetically favored nucleosomal complexes compete with non-nucleosomal complexes. In addition, our kinetic findings propose the model that histone chaperones mediate nucleosome assembly along a path that leads to enthalpy-favored products with free histones as reaction substrates.

  5. Structural basis for retroviral integration into nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Maskell, Daniel P.; Renault, Ludovic; Serrao, Erik; Lesbats, Paul; Matadeen, Rishi; Hare, Stephen; Lindemann, Dirk; Engelman, Alan N.; Costa, Alessandro; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral integration is catalyzed by a tetramer of integrase (IN) assembled on viral DNA ends in a stable complex, known as the intasome1,2. How the intasome interfaces with chromosomal DNA, which exists in the form of nucleosomal arrays, is currently unknown. Here we show that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) intasome is proficient at stable capture of nucleosomes as targets for integration. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (EM) reveals a multivalent intasome-nucleosome interface involving both gyres of nucleosomal DNA and one H2A-H2B heterodimer. While the histone octamer remains intact, the DNA is lifted from the surface of the H2A-H2B heterodimer to allow integration at strongly preferred superhelix location (SHL) ±3.5 positions. Amino acid substitutions disrupting these contacts impinge on the ability of the intasome to engage nucleosomes in vitro and redistribute viral integration sites on the genomic scale. Our findings elucidate the molecular basis for nucleosome capture by the viral DNA recombination machinery and the underlying nucleosome plasticity that allows integration. PMID:26061770

  6. Oligonucleotide Sequence Motifs as Nucleosome Positioning Signals

    PubMed Central

    Collings, Clayton K.; Fernandez, Alfonso G.; Pitschka, Chad G.; Hawkins, Troy B.; Anderson, John N.

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the sequence patterns that characterize positioned nucleosomes, we first performed an analysis of the periodicities of the 256 tetranucleotides in a yeast genome-wide library of nucleosomal DNA sequences that was prepared by in vitro reconstitution. The approach entailed the identification and analysis of 24 unique tetranucleotides that were defined by 8 consensus sequences. These consensus sequences were shown to be responsible for most if not all of the tetranucleotide and dinucleotide periodicities displayed by the entire library, demonstrating that the periodicities of dinucleotides that characterize the yeast genome are, in actuality, due primarily to the 8 consensus sequences. A novel combination of experimental and bioinformatic approaches was then used to show that these tetranucleotides are important for preferred formation of nucleosomes at specific sites along DNA in vitro. These results were then compared to tetranucleotide patterns in genome-wide in vivo libraries from yeast and C. elegans in order to assess the contributions of DNA sequence in the control of nucleosome residency in the cell. These comparisons revealed striking similarities in the tetranucleotide occurrence profiles that are likely to be involved in nucleosome positioning in both in vitro and in vivo libraries, suggesting that DNA sequence is an important factor in the control of nucleosome placement in vivo. However, the strengths of the tetranucleotide periodicities were 3–4 fold higher in the in vitro as compared to the in vivo libraries, which implies that DNA sequence plays less of a role in dictating nucleosome positions in vivo. The results of this study have important implications for models of sequence-dependent positioning since they suggest that a defined subset of tetranucleotides is involved in preferred nucleosome occupancy and that these tetranucleotides are the major source of the dinucleotide periodicities that are characteristic of

  7. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone modifications and histone chaperones in nucleosome assembly: Lessons learned from Rtt109 histone acetyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Chen, Xiaoyue; Walters, Michael A; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, nucleosomes ahead of replication forks are disassembled to accommodate replication machinery. Following DNA replication, nucleosomes are then reassembled onto replicated DNA using both parental and newly synthesized histones. This process, termed DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly (RCNA), is critical for maintaining genome integrity and for the propagation of epigenetic information, dysfunctions of which have been implicated in cancers and aging. In recent years, it has been shown that RCNA is carefully orchestrated by a series of histone modifications, histone chaperones and histone-modifying enzymes. Interestingly, many features of RCNA are also found in processes involving DNA replication-independent nucleosome assembly like histone exchange and gene transcription. In yeast, histone H3 lysine K56 acetylation (H3K56ac) is found in newly synthesized histone H3 and is critical for proper nucleosome assembly and for maintaining genomic stability. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) regulator of Ty1 transposition 109 (Rtt109) is the sole enzyme responsible for H3K56ac in yeast. Much research has centered on this particular histone modification and histone-modifying enzyme. This Critical Review summarizes much of our current understanding of nucleosome assembly and highlights many important insights learned from studying Rtt109 HATs in fungi. We highlight some seminal features in nucleosome assembly conserved in mammalian systems and describe some of the lingering questions in the field. Further studying fungal and mammalian chromatin assembly may have important public health implications, including deeper understandings of human cancers and aging as well as the pursuit of novel anti-fungal therapies.

  8. Assessment of the possibility of forecasting future natural gas curtailments

    SciTech Connect

    Lemont, S.

    1980-01-01

    This study provides a preliminary assessment of the potential for determining probabilities of future natural-gas-supply interruptions by combining long-range weather forecasts and natural-gas supply/demand projections. An illustrative example which measures the probability of occurrence of heating-season natural-gas curtailments for industrial users in the southeastern US is analyzed. Based on the information on existing long-range weather forecasting techniques and natural gas supply/demand projections enumerated above, especially the high uncertainties involved in weather forecasting and the unavailability of adequate, reliable natural-gas projections that take account of seasonal weather variations and uncertainties in the nation's energy-economic system, it must be concluded that there is little possibility, at the present time, of combining the two to yield useful, believable probabilities of heating-season gas curtailments in a form useful for corporate and government decision makers and planners. Possible remedial actions are suggested that might render such data more useful for the desired purpose in the future. The task may simply require the adequate incorporation of uncertainty and seasonal weather trends into modeling systems and the courage to report projected data, so that realistic natural gas supply/demand scenarios and the probabilities of their occurrence will be available to decision makers during a time when such information is greatly needed.

  9. Working the kinks out of nucleosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Wilma K.; Zhurkin, Victor B.

    2011-01-01

    Condensation of DNA in the nucleosome takes advantage of its double-helical architecture. The DNA deforms at sites where the base pairs face the histone octamer. The largest so-called kink-and-slide deformations occur in the vicinity of arginines that penetrate the minor groove. Nucleosome structures formed from the 601 positioning sequence differ subtly from those incorporating an AT-rich human α-satellite DNA. Restraints imposed by the histone arginines on the displacement of base pairs can modulate the sequence-dependent deformability of DNA and potentially contribute to the unique features of the different nucleosomes. Steric barriers mimicking constraints found in the nucleosome induce the simulated large-scale rearrangement of canonical B-DNA to kink-and-slide states. The pathway to these states shows non-harmonic behavior consistent with bending profiles inferred from AFM measurements. PMID:21482100

  10. SWI/SNF- and RSC-catalyzed nucleosome mobilization requires internal DNA loop translocation within nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Peterson, Craig L; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2011-10-01

    The multisubunit SWI/SNF and RSC complexes utilize energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to mobilize nucleosomes and render the DNA accessible for various nuclear processes. Here we test the idea that remodeling involves intermediates with mobile DNA bulges or loops within the nucleosome by cross-linking the H2A N- or C-terminal tails together to generate protein "loops" that constrict separation of the DNA from the histone surface. Analyses indicate that this intranucleosomal cross-linking causes little or no change in remodeling-dependent exposure of DNA sequences within the nucleosome to restriction enzymes. However, cross-linking inhibits nucleosome mobilization and blocks complete movement of nucleosomes to extreme end positions on the DNA fragments. These results are consistent with evidence that nucleosome remodeling involves intermediates with DNA loops on the nucleosome surface but indicate that such loops do not freely diffuse about the surface of the histone octamer. We propose a threading model for movement of DNA loops around the perimeter of the nucleosome core.

  11. Two arginine residues suppress the flexibility of nucleosomal DNA in the canonical nucleosome core.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hidetoshi; Shirayama, Kazuyoshi; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of nucleosomes containing either canonical H3 or its centromere-specific variant CENP-A were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations showed that the histone cores were structurally stable during simulation periods of 100 ns and 50 ns, while DNA was highly flexible at the entry and exit regions and partially dissociated from the histone core. In particular, approximately 20-25 bp of DNA at the entry and exit regions of the CENP-A nucleosome exhibited larger fluctuations than DNA at the entry and exit regions of the H3 nucleosome. Our detailed analysis clarified that this difference in dynamics was attributable to a difference in two basic amino acids in the αN helix; two arginine (Arg) residues in H3 were substituted by lysine (Lys) residues at the corresponding sites in CENP-A. The difference in the ability to form hydrogen bonds with DNA of these two residues regulated the flexibility of nucleosomal DNA at the entry and exit regions. Our exonuclease III assay consistently revealed that replacement of these two Arg residues in the H3 nucleosome by Lys enhanced endonuclease susceptibility, suggesting that the DNA ends of the CENP-A nucleosome are more flexible than those of the H3 nucleosome. This difference in the dynamics between the two types of nucleosomes may be important for forming higher order structures in different phases.

  12. Trajectories of microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles.

    PubMed

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Armeev, Grigoriy A; Goncearenco, Alexander; Zhurkin, Victor B; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-06-01

    We present here raw trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations for nucleosome with linker DNA strands as well as minimalistic nucleosome core particle model. The simulations were done in explicit solvent using CHARMM36 force field. We used this data in the research article Shaytan et al., 2016 [1]. The trajectory files are supplemented by TCL scripts providing advanced visualization capabilities. PMID:27222871

  13. Nucleosome positioning, nucleotide excision repair and photoreactivation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Guintini, Laetitia; Charton, Romain; Peyresaubes, François; Thoma, Fritz; Conconi, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    The position of nucleosomes on DNA participates in gene regulation and DNA replication. Nucleosomes can be repressors by limiting access of factors to regulatory sequences, or activators by facilitating binding of factors to exposed DNA sequences on the surface of the core histones. The formation of UV induced DNA lesions, like cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), is modulated by DNA bending around the core histones. Since CPDs are removed by nucleotide excision repair (NER) and photolyase repair, it is of paramount importance to understand how DNA damage and repair are tempered by the position of nucleosomes. In vitro, nucleosomes inhibit NER and photolyase repair. In vivo, nucleosomes slow down NER and considerably obstruct photoreactivation of CPDs. However, over-expression of photolyase allows repair of nucleosomal DNA in a second time scale. It is proposed that the intrinsic abilities of nucleosomes to move and transiently unwrap could facilitate damage recognition and repair in nucleosomal DNA.

  14. Featuring the nucleosome surface as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Isabel Torres Gomes; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Santos, Guilherme Martins

    2015-05-01

    Chromatin is the major regulator of gene expression and genome maintenance. Proteins that bind the nucleosome, the repetitive unit of chromatin, and the histone H4 tail are critical to establishing chromatin architecture and phenotypic outcomes. Intriguingly, nucleosome-binding proteins (NBPs) and the H4 tail peptide compete for the same binding site at an acidic region on the nucleosome surface. Although the essential facts about the nucleosome were revealed 17 years ago, new insights into its atomic structure and molecular mechanisms are still emerging. Several complex nucleosome:NBP structures were recently revealed, characterizing the NBP-binding sites on the nucleosome surface. Here we discuss the potential of the nucleosome surface as a therapeutic target and the impact and development of exogenous nucleosome-binding molecules (eNBMs).

  15. Dynamic regulation of transcription factors by nucleosome remodeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Hada, Arjan; Sen, Payel; Olufemi, Lola; Hall, Michael A; Smith, Benjamin Y; Forth, Scott; McKnight, Jeffrey N; Patel, Ashok; Bowman, Gregory D; Bartholomew, Blaine; Wang, Michelle D

    2015-06-05

    The chromatin landscape and promoter architecture are dominated by the interplay of nucleosome and transcription factor (TF) binding to crucial DNA sequence elements. However, it remains unclear whether nucleosomes mobilized by chromatin remodelers can influence TFs that are already present on the DNA template. In this study, we investigated the interplay between nucleosome remodeling, by either yeast ISW1a or SWI/SNF, and a bound TF. We found that a TF serves as a major barrier to ISW1a remodeling, and acts as a boundary for nucleosome repositioning. In contrast, SWI/SNF was able to slide a nucleosome past a TF, with concurrent eviction of the TF from the DNA, and the TF did not significantly impact the nucleosome positioning. Our results provide direct evidence for a novel mechanism for both nucleosome positioning regulation by bound TFs and TF regulation via dynamic repositioning of nucleosomes.

  16. Nucleosome positioning in yeasts: methods, maps, and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lieleg, Corinna; Krietenstein, Nils; Walker, Maria; Korber, Philipp

    2015-06-01

    Eukaryotic nuclear DNA is packaged into nucleosomes. During the past decade, genome-wide nucleosome mapping across species revealed the high degree of order in nucleosome positioning. There is a conserved stereotypical nucleosome organization around transcription start sites (TSSs) with a nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) upstream of the TSS and a TSS-aligned regular array of evenly spaced nucleosomes downstream over the gene body. As nucleosomes largely impede access to DNA and thereby provide an important level of genome regulation, it is of general interest to understand the mechanisms generating nucleosome positioning and especially the stereotypical NDR-array pattern. We focus here on the most advanced models, unicellular yeasts, and review the progress in mapping nucleosomes and which nucleosome positioning mechanisms are discussed. There are four mechanistic aspects: How are NDRs generated? How are individual nucleosomes positioned, especially those flanking the NDRs? How are nucleosomes evenly spaced leading to regular arrays? How are regular arrays aligned at TSSs? The main candidates for nucleosome positioning determinants are intrinsic DNA binding preferences of the histone octamer, specific DNA binding factors, nucleosome remodeling enzymes, transcription, and statistical positioning. We summarize the state of the art in an integrative model where nucleosomes are positioned by a combination of all these candidate determinants. We highlight the predominance of active mechanisms involving nucleosome remodeling enzymes which may be recruited by DNA binding factors and the transcription machinery. While this mechanistic framework emerged clearly during recent years, the involved factors and their mechanisms are still poorly understood and require future efforts combining in vivo and in vitro approaches.

  17. UV damage in DNA promotes nucleosome unwrapping.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ming-Rui; Smerdon, Michael J

    2010-08-20

    The association of DNA with histones in chromatin impedes DNA repair enzymes from accessing DNA lesions. Nucleosomes exist in a dynamic equilibrium in which portions of the DNA molecule spontaneously unwrap, transiently exposing buried DNA sites. Thus, nucleosome dynamics in certain regions of chromatin may provide the exposure time and space needed for efficient repair of buried DNA lesions. We have used FRET and restriction enzyme accessibility to study nucleosome dynamics following DNA damage by UV radiation. We find that FRET efficiency is reduced in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the presence of UV photoproducts enhances spontaneous unwrapping of DNA from histones. Furthermore, this UV-induced shift in unwrapping dynamics is associated with increased restriction enzyme accessibility of histone-bound DNA after UV treatment. Surprisingly, the increased unwrapping dynamics is even observed in nucleosome core particles containing a single UV lesion at a specific site. These results highlight the potential for increased "intrinsic exposure" of nucleosome-associated DNA lesions in chromatin to repair proteins. PMID:20562439

  18. Traceless Synthesis of Asymmetrically Modified Bivalent Nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Carolin C; Agashe, Ninad D; Fierz, Beat

    2016-02-18

    Nucleosomes carry extensive post-translational modifications (PTMs), which results in complex modification patterns that are involved in epigenetic signaling. Although two copies of each histone coexist in a nucleosome, they may not carry the same PTMs and are often differently modified (asymmetric). In bivalent domains, a chromatin signature prevalent in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), namely H3 methylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3), coexists with H3K27me3 in asymmetric nucleosomes. We report a general, modular, and traceless method for producing asymmetrically modified nucleosomes. We further show that in bivalent nucleosomes, H3K4me3 inhibits the activity of the H3K27-specific lysine methyltransferase (KMT) polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) solely on the same histone tail, whereas H3K27me3 stimulates PRC2 activity across tails, thereby partially overriding the H3K4me3-mediated repressive effect. To maintain bivalent domains in ESCs, PRC2 activity must thus be locally restricted or reversed.

  19. Predicting Nucleosome Positioning Using Multiple Evidence Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Sheila M.; Weng, Zhiping; Bilmes, Jeff A.; Noble, William Stafford

    We describe a probabilistic model, implemented as a dynamic Bayesian network, that can be used to predict nucleosome positioning along a chromosome based on one or more genomic input tracks containing position-specific information (evidence). Previous models have either made predictions based on primary DNA sequence alone, or have been used to infer nucleosome positions from experimental data. Our framework permits the combination of these two distinct types of information. We show how this flexible framework can be used to make predictions based on either sequence-model scores or experimental data alone, or by using the two in combination to interpret the experimental data and fill in gaps. The model output represents the posterior probability, at each position along the chromosome, that a nucleosome core overlaps that position, given the evidence. This posterior probability is computed by integrating the information contained in the input evidence tracks along the entire input sequence, and fitting the evidence to a simple grammar of alternating nucleosome cores and linkers. In addition to providing a novel mechanism for the prediction of nucleosome positioning from arbitrary heterogeneous data sources, this framework is also applicable to other genomic segmentation tasks in which local scores are available from models or from data that can be interpreted as defining a probability assignment over labels at that position. The ability to combine sequence-based predictions and data from experimental assays is a significant and novel contribution to the ongoing research regarding the primary structure of chromatin and its effects upon gene regulation.

  20. Regulatory analysis for review and establishment of natural gas curtailment priorities. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    This report discusses important differences among alternatives for establishing natural gas curtailment priorities to deal with long-run supply shortages and short-run capacity shortages. Results from surveys and simulation of shortage costs for each alternative curtailment plan produced and major findings that are directly relevant for considering possible changes in the present curtailment system are discussed. This volume should be used to identify basic alternatives, to review findings which can guide review of any proposed policy change, and to gain a basic understanding of how curtailment alternatives were evaluated. This volume is sufficient for gaining an overall understanding of the effect that natural gas curtailment can have on both users and suppliers.

  1. Evaluating the effectiveness of localized control strategies to curtail chikungunya

    PubMed Central

    Ndeffo-Mbah, Martial L.; Durham, David P.; Skrip, Laura A.; Nsoesie, Elaine O.; Brownstein, John S.; Fish, Durland; Galvani, Alison P.

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya, a re-emerging arbovirus transmitted to humans by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes, causes debilitating disease characterized by an acute febrile phase and chronic joint pain. Chikungunya has recently spread to the island of St. Martin and subsequently throughout the Americas. The disease is now affecting 42 countries and territories throughout the Americas. While chikungunya is mainly a tropical disease, the recent introduction and subsequent spread of Ae. albopictus into temperate regions has increased the threat of chikungunya outbreaks beyond the tropics. Given that there are currently no vaccines or treatments for chikungunya, vector control remains the primary measure to curtail transmission. To investigate the effectiveness of a containment strategy that combines disease surveillance, localized vector control and transmission reduction measures, we developed a model of chikungunya transmission dynamics within a large residential neighborhood, explicitly accounting for human and mosquito movement. Our findings indicate that prompt targeted vector control efforts combined with measures to reduce transmission from symptomatic cases to mosquitoes may be highly effective approaches for controlling outbreaks of chikungunya, provided that sufficient detection of chikungunya cases can be achieved. PMID:27045523

  2. Changes in taste preference and steps taken after sleep curtailment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shannon L; Ludy, Mary-Jon; Tucker, Robin M

    2016-09-01

    A substantial proportion of the population does not achieve the recommended amount of sleep. Previous work demonstrates that sleep alterations perturb energy balance by disrupting appetite hormones, increasing energy intake, and decreasing physical activity. This study explored the influence of sleep duration on taste perception as well as effects on dietary intake and physical activity. Participants (n=24 habitual short sleepers and n=27 habitual long sleepers, 82.4% female, 88.2% white, 25.2±7.7years) completed two randomized taste visits; one following short sleep duration (≤7h) and one following long sleep duration (>7h). Taste perception measures included sweet and salt detection thresholds (ascending 3-alternative, forced-choice method), as well as sweet preference (Monell 2-series, forced-choice, paired-comparison, tracking method). Steps and sleep were tracked via FitBit, an activity monitoring device. Dietary intake was assessed using 24-hour recalls and analyzed using Nutritionist Pro. Habitual long-sleepers had a higher sweet taste preference (p=0.042) and took fewer steps (p=0.036) following sleep curtailment compared to the night where they slept >7h but did not experience changes in dietary intake or detection thresholds. Habitual short-sleepers did not experience changes in taste perception, activity, or dietary intake following sleep alteration. Habitual long-sleepers may be at greater risk of gaining weight when typical sleep patterns are disrupted. PMID:27184237

  3. Interacting epidemics? Sleep curtailment, insulin resistance, and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lucassen, Eliane A; Rother, Kristina I; Cizza, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    In the last 50 years, the average self-reported sleep duration in the United States has decreased by 1.5–2 hours in parallel with an increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Epidemiological studies and meta-analyses report a strong relationship between short or disturbed sleep, obesity, and abnormalities in glucose metabolism. This relationship is likely to be bidirectional and causal in nature, but many aspects remain to be elucidated. Sleep and the internal circadian clock influence a host of endocrine parameters. Sleep curtailment in humans alters multiple metabolic pathways, leading to more insulin resistance, possibly decreased energy expenditure, increased appetite, and immunological changes. On the other hand, psychological, endocrine, and anatomical abnormalities in individuals with obesity and/or diabetes can interfere with sleep duration and quality, thus creating a vicious cycle. In this review, we address mechanisms linking sleep with metabolism, highlight the need for studies conducted in real-life settings, and explore therapeutic interventions to improve sleep, with a potential beneficial effect on obesity and its comorbidities. PMID:22827862

  4. Nucleosomes Inhibit Cas9 Endonuclease Activity in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Hinz, John M; Laughery, Marian F; Wyrick, John J

    2015-12-01

    During Cas9 genome editing in eukaryotic cells, the bacterial Cas9 enzyme cleaves DNA targets within chromatin. To understand how chromatin affects Cas9 targeting, we characterized Cas9 activity on nucleosome substrates in vitro. We find that Cas9 endonuclease activity is strongly inhibited when its target site is located within the nucleosome core. In contrast, the nucleosome structure does not affect Cas9 activity at a target site within the adjacent linker DNA. Analysis of target sites that partially overlap with the nucleosome edge indicates that the accessibility of the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) is the critical determinant of Cas9 activity on a nucleosome.

  5. Structure and function of human histone H3.Y nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Kujirai, Tomoya; Horikoshi, Naoki; Sato, Koichi; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Machida, Shinichi; Osakabe, Akihisa; Kimura, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-07-27

    Histone H3.Y is a primate-specific, distant H3 variant. It is evolutionarily derived from H3.3, and may function in transcription regulation. However, the mechanism by which H3.Y regulates transcription has not been elucidated. In the present study, we determined the crystal structure of the H3.Y nucleosome, and found that many H3.Y-specific residues are located on the entry/exit sites of the nucleosome. Biochemical analyses revealed that the DNA ends of the H3.Y nucleosome were more flexible than those of the H3.3 nucleosome, although the H3.Y nucleosome was stable in vitro and in vivo Interestingly, the linker histone H1, which compacts nucleosomal DNA, appears to bind to the H3.Y nucleosome less efficiently, as compared to the H3.3 nucleosome. These characteristics of the H3.Y nucleosome are also conserved in the H3.Y/H3.3 heterotypic nucleosome, which may be the predominant form in cells. In human cells, H3.Y preferentially accumulated around transcription start sites (TSSs). Taken together, H3.Y-containing nucleosomes around transcription start sites may form relaxed chromatin that allows transcription factor access, to regulate the transcription status of specific genes.

  6. Categorical spectral analysis of periodicity in nucleosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hu; Rube, H. Tomas; Song, Jun S.

    2016-01-01

    DNA helical twist imposes geometric constraints on the location of histone–DNA interaction sites along nucleosomal DNA. Certain 10.5-bp periodic nucleotides in phase with these geometric constraints have been suggested to facilitate nucleosome positioning. However, the extent of nucleotide periodicity in nucleosomal DNA and its significance in directing nucleosome positioning still remain unclear. We clarify these issues by applying categorical spectral analysis to high-resolution nucleosome maps in two yeast species. We find that only a small fraction of nucleosomal sequences contain significant 10.5-bp periodicity. We further develop a spectral decomposition method to show that the previously observed periodicity in aligned nucleosomal sequences mainly results from proper phasing among nucleosomal sequences, and not from a preponderant occurrence of periodicity within individual sequences. Importantly, we show that this phasing may arise from the histones’ proclivity for putting preferred nucleotides at some of the evenly spaced histone–DNA contact points with respect to the dyad axis. We demonstrate that 10.5-bp periodicity, when present, significantly facilitates rotational, but not translational, nucleosome positioning. Finally, although periodicity only moderately affects nucleosome occupancy genome wide, reduced periodicity is an evolutionarily conserved signature of nucleosome-depleted regions around transcription start/termination sites. PMID:26893354

  7. Synergistic action of RNA polymerases in overcoming the nucleosomal barrier.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Bai, Lu; Johnson, Daniel S; Fulbright, Robert M; Kireeva, Maria L; Kashlev, Mikhail; Wang, Michelle D

    2010-06-01

    During gene expression, RNA polymerase (RNAP) encounters a major barrier at a nucleosome and yet must access the nucleosomal DNA. Previous in vivo evidence has suggested that multiple RNAPs might increase transcription efficiency through nucleosomes. Here we have quantitatively investigated this hypothesis using Escherichia coli RNAP as a model system by directly monitoring its location on the DNA via a single-molecule DNA-unzipping technique. When an RNAP encountered a nucleosome, it paused with a distinctive 10-base pair periodicity and backtracked by approximately 10-15 base pairs. When two RNAPs elongate in close proximity, the trailing RNAP apparently assists in the leading RNAP's elongation, reducing its backtracking and enhancing its transcription through a nucleosome by a factor of 5. Taken together, our data indicate that histone-DNA interactions dictate RNAP pausing behavior, and alleviation of nucleosome-induced backtracking by multiple polymerases may prove to be a mechanism for overcoming the nucleosomal barrier in vivo.

  8. Nucleosome positioning and composition modulate in silico chromatin flexibility.

    PubMed

    Clauvelin, N; Lo, P; Kulaeva, O I; Nizovtseva, E V; Diaz-Montes, J; Zola, J; Parashar, M; Studitsky, V M; Olson, W K

    2015-02-18

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes-the familiar assemblies of ∼150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins-found on chromatin fibers. Here we introduce a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs. We explore the effects of nucleosome positioning and the presence or absence of cationic N-terminal histone tails on the 'local' inter-nucleosomal interactions and the global deformations of the simulated chains. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition and numbers on the long-range communication between the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We also extract effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the simulations and implement the potentials in a larger-scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable effect of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility, with small changes in DNA linker length significantly altering the interactions of nucleosomes and the dimensions of the fiber as a whole. In addition, we find that these changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of long chromatin constructs. That is, simulated chromatin fibers with the same number of nucleosomes exhibit polymeric behaviors ranging from Gaussian to worm-like, depending upon nucleosome spacing. These findings suggest that the physical and mechanical properties of chromatin can span a wide range of behaviors, depending on nucleosome positioning, and

  9. A mitotic beacon reveals its nucleosome anchor.

    PubMed

    Hondele, Maria; Ladurner, Andreas

    2010-09-24

    Mitosis, nuclear envelope formation, and nucleocytoplasmic transport require chromosomes to identify themselves by enriching Ran-GTP around the chromatin fiber. In a recent Nature report, Makde et al. (2010) describe the structure of the Ran activator RCC1 anchored onto nucleosomes.

  10. NuA4 links methylation of histone H3 lysines 4 and 36 to acetylation of histones H4 and H3.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Daniel S; Anlembom, Timi Elvuchio; Wang, Jianing; Patel, Sanket R; Li, Bing; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2014-11-21

    Cotranscriptional methylation of histone H3 lysines 4 and 36 by Set1 and Set2, respectively, stimulates interaction between nucleosomes and histone deacetylase complexes to block cryptic transcription in budding yeast. We previously showed that loss of all H3K4 and H3K36 methylation in a set1Δset2Δ mutant reduces interaction between native nucleosomes and the NuA4 lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) complex. We now provide evidence that NuA4 preferentially binds H3 tails mono- and dimethylated on H3K4 and di- and trimethylated on H3K36, an H3 methylation pattern distinct from that recognized by the RPD3C(S) and Hos2/Set3 histone deacetylase complexes (HDACs). Loss of H3K4 or H3K36 methylation in set1Δ or set2Δ mutants reduces NuA4 interaction with bulk nucleosomes in vitro and in vivo, and reduces NuA4 occupancy of transcribed coding sequences at particular genes. We also provide evidence that NuA4 acetylation of lysine residues in the histone H4 tail stimulates SAGA interaction with nucleosomes and its recruitment to coding sequences and attendant acetylation of histone H3 in vivo. Thus, H3 methylation exerts opposing effects of enhancing nucleosome acetylation by both NuA4 and SAGA as well as stimulating nucleosome deacetylation by multiple HDACs to maintain the proper level of histone acetylation in transcribed coding sequences.

  11. Asymmetric nucleosomes flank promoters in the budding yeast genome.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Zentner, Gabriel E; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Nucleosomes in active chromatin are dynamic, but whether they have distinct structural conformations is unknown. To identify nucleosomes with alternative structures genome-wide, we used H4S47C-anchored cleavage mapping, which revealed that 5% of budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) nucleosome positions have asymmetric histone-DNA interactions. These asymmetric interactions are enriched at nucleosome positions that flank promoters. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) sequence-based profiles of asymmetric nucleosome positions revealed a corresponding asymmetry in MNase protection near the dyad axis, suggesting that the loss of DNA contacts around H4S47 is accompanied by protection of the DNA from MNase. Chromatin immunoprecipitation mapping of selected nucleosome remodelers indicated that asymmetric nucleosomes are bound by the RSC chromatin remodeling complex, which is required for maintaining nucleosomes at asymmetric positions. These results imply that the asymmetric nucleosome-RSC complex is a metastable intermediate representing partial unwrapping and protection of nucleosomal DNA on one side of the dyad axis during chromatin remodeling.

  12. DANPOS: dynamic analysis of nucleosome position and occupancy by sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaifu; Xi, Yuanxin; Pan, Xuewen; Li, Zhaoyu; Kaestner, Klaus; Tyler, Jessica; Dent, Sharon; He, Xiangwei; Li, Wei

    2013-02-01

    Recent developments in next-generation sequencing have enabled whole-genome profiling of nucleosome organizations. Although several algorithms for inferring nucleosome position from a single experimental condition have been available, it remains a challenge to accurately define dynamic nucleosomes associated with environmental changes. Here, we report a comprehensive bioinformatics pipeline, DANPOS, explicitly designed for dynamic nucleosome analysis at single-nucleotide resolution. Using both simulated and real nucleosome data, we demonstrated that bias correction in preliminary data processing and optimal statistical testing significantly enhances the functional interpretation of dynamic nucleosomes. The single-nucleotide resolution analysis of DANPOS allows us to detect all three categories of nucleosome dynamics, such as position shift, fuzziness change, and occupancy change, using a uniform statistical framework. Pathway analysis indicates that each category is involved in distinct biological functions. We also analyzed the influence of sequencing depth and suggest that even 200-fold coverage is probably not enough to identify all the dynamic nucleosomes. Finally, based on nucleosome data from the human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we demonstrated that DANPOS is also robust in defining functional dynamic nucleosomes, not only in promoters, but also in distal regulatory regions in the mammalian genome. PMID:23193179

  13. Nucleosome positioning and composition modulate in silico chromatin flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauvelin, N.; Lo, P.; Kulaeva, O. I.; Nizovtseva, E. V.; Diaz-Montes, J.; Zola, J.; Parashar, M.; Studitsky, V. M.; Olson, W. K.

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes—the familiar assemblies of ˜150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins—found on chromatin fibers. Here we introduce a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs. We explore the effects of nucleosome positioning and the presence or absence of cationic N-terminal histone tails on the ‘local’ inter-nucleosomal interactions and the global deformations of the simulated chains. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition and numbers on the long-range communication between the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We also extract effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the simulations and implement the potentials in a larger-scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable effect of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility, with small changes in DNA linker length significantly altering the interactions of nucleosomes and the dimensions of the fiber as a whole. In addition, we find that these changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of long chromatin constructs. That is, simulated chromatin fibers with the same number of nucleosomes exhibit polymeric behaviors ranging from Gaussian to worm-like, depending upon nucleosome spacing. These findings suggest that the physical and mechanical properties of chromatin can span a wide range of behaviors, depending on nucleosome

  14. Nucleosome positioning and composition modulate in silico chromatin flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Clauvelin, N.; Lo, P.; Kulaeva, O. I.; Nizovtseva, E. V.; Diaz-Montes, J.; Zola, J.; Parashar, M.; Studitsky, V. M.; Olson, W. K.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes—the familiar assemblies of ~ 150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins—found on chromatin fibers. Here we introduce a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs. We explore the effects of nucleosome positioning and the presence or absence of cationic N-terminal histone tails on the ‘local’ inter-nucleosomal interactions and the global deformations of the simulated chains. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition and numbers on the long-range communication between the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We also extract effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the simulations and implement the potentials in a larger-scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable effect of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility, with small changes in DNA linker length significantly altering the interactions of nucleosomes and the dimensions of the fiber as a whole. In addition, we find that these changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of long chromatin constructs. That is, simulated chromatin fibers with the same number of nucleosomes exhibit polymeric behaviors ranging from Gaussian to worm-like, depending upon nucleosome spacing. These findings suggest that the physical and mechanical properties of chromatin can span a wide range of behaviors, depending on nucleosome

  15. Overlapping Functions between SWR1 Deletion and H3K56 Acetylation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhiyun

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosome destabilization by histone variants and modifications has been implicated in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression, with the histone variant H2A.Z and acetylation of H3K56 (H3K56ac) being two examples. Here we find that deletion of SWR1, the major subunit of the SWR1 complex depositing H2A.Z into chromatin in exchange for H2A, promotes epigenetic white-opaque switching in Candida albicans. We demonstrate through nucleosome mapping that SWR1 is required for proper nucleosome positioning on the promoter of WOR1, the master regulator of switching, and that its effects differ in white and opaque cells. Furthermore, we find that H2A.Z is enriched adjacent to nucleosome-free regions at the WOR1 promoter in white cells, suggesting a role in the stabilization of a repressive chromatin state. Deletion of YNG2, a subunit of the NuA4 H4 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) that targets SWR1 activity through histone acetylation, produces a switching phenotype similar to that of swr1, and both may act downstream of the GlcNAc signaling pathway. We further uncovered a genetic interaction between swr1 and elevated H3K56ac with the discovery that the swr1 deletion mutant is highly sensitive to nicotinamide. Our results suggest that the interaction of H2A.Z and H3K56ac regulates epigenetic switching at the nucleosome level, as well as having global effects. PMID:25862154

  16. Histone acetylation: from code to web and router via intrinsically disordered regions.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Masami

    2013-01-01

    Structural changes of chromatin, which consists of nucleosomes and nucleosome-associated factors, lead to functional changes that are important determinants of eukaryotic gene regulation. These structural changes are regulated by modifications of histones and DNA, both of which are components of nucleosomes, as well as by replacement of histone variants and the actions of noncoding RNAs. In studies of chromatin modifications, a great deal of attention has been paid to histone acetylation. Progress in understanding this subject has been extensive, including i) elucidation of the relationship of histone acetylation and gene activity; ii) the first isolation of a histonemodifying enzyme; iii) the first identification of a factor that recognizes a modified site; iv) elucidation of the mechanism by which histone modification leads to structural changes in nucleosomes; and v) elucidation of the mechanism of border formation between euchromatin and heterochromatin. Histone acetylation is considered to be fundamental in several fields, including studies of a) the role of chromatin and epigenetics in higher-order biochemical systems such as transcription, DNA replication, and repair; b) biological phenomena such as cell proliferation and differentiation; and c) cancer and aging, potentially leading to clinical applications. In this review, I will discuss the histone code hypothesis, at one time believed to represent a unified theory regarding the functions of histone modification. In addition, I will describe the "modification web theory, " by which the problems in the histone code hypothesis can be overcome, as well as the "signal router theory, " which explains the mechanisms of formation, development, and evolution of the modification web from a structural viewpoint. Lastly, I will illustrate how these novel theories partially explain the robustness of biological systems against various perturbations, and elucidate the strategy that a cell employs to avoid fatal

  17. 41 CFR 101-39.105 - Discontinuance or curtailment of service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS AVIATION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MOTOR VEHICLES 39-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.1-Establishment, Modification, and Discontinuance of Interagency Fleet Management Systems § 101-39.105 Discontinuance or curtailment of service....

  18. DNA bending potentials for loop-mediated nucleosome repositioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, M.; Wocjan, T.; Langowski, J.; Smith, J. C.

    2012-02-01

    Nucleosome repositioning is a fundamental process in gene function. DNA elasticity is a key element of loop-mediated nucleosome repositioning. Two analytical models for DNA elasticity have been proposed: the linear sub-elastic chain (SEC), which allows DNA kinking, and the worm-like chain (WLC), with a harmonic bending potential. In vitro studies have shown that nucleosomes reposition in a discontiguous manner on a segment of DNA and this has also been found in ground-state calculations with the WLC analytical model. Here we study using Monte Carlo simulation the dynamics of DNA loop-mediated nucleosome repositioning at physiological temperatures using the SEC and WLC potentials. At thermal energies both models predict nearest-neighbor repositioning of nucleosomes on DNA, in contrast to the repositioning in jumps observed in experiments. This suggests a crucial role of DNA sequence in nucleosome repositioning.

  19. Universal full-length nucleosome mapping sequence probe.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vijay; Salih, Bilal; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    For the computational sequence-directed mapping of the nucleosomes, the knowledge of the nucleosome positioning motifs - 10-11 base long sequences - and respective matrices of bendability, is not sufficient, since there is no justified way to fuse these motifs in one continuous nucleosome DNA sequence. Discovery of the strong nucleosome (SN) DNA sequences, with visible sequence periodicity allows derivation of the full-length nucleosome DNA bendability pattern as matrix or consensus sequence. The SN sequences of three species (A. thaliana, C. elegans, and H. sapiens) are aligned (512 sequences for each species), and long (115 dinucleotides) matrices of bendability derived for the species. The matrices have strong common property - alternation of runs of purine-purine (RR) and pyrimidine-pyrimidine (YY) dinucleotides, with average period 10.4 bases. On this basis the universal [R,Y] consensus of the nucleosome DNA sequence is derived, with exactly defined positions of respective penta- and hexamers RRRRR, RRRRRR, YYYYY, and YYYYYY.

  20. MNase titration reveals differences between nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Mieczkowski, Jakub; Cook, April; Bowman, Sarah K.; Mueller, Britta; Alver, Burak H.; Kundu, Sharmistha; Deaton, Aimee M.; Urban, Jennifer A.; Larschan, Erica; Park, Peter J.; Kingston, Robert E.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin accessibility plays a fundamental role in gene regulation. Nucleosome placement, usually measured by quantifying protection of DNA from enzymatic digestion, can regulate accessibility. We introduce a metric that uses micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion in a novel manner to measure chromatin accessibility by combining information from several digests of increasing depths. This metric, MACC (MNase accessibility), quantifies the inherent heterogeneity of nucleosome accessibility in which some nucleosomes are seen preferentially at high MNase and some at low MNase. MACC interrogates each genomic locus, measuring both nucleosome location and accessibility in the same assay. MACC can be performed either with or without a histone immunoprecipitation step, and thereby compares histone and non-histone protection. We find that changes in accessibility at enhancers, promoters and other regulatory regions do not correlate with changes in nucleosome occupancy. Moreover, high nucleosome occupancy does not necessarily preclude high accessibility, which reveals novel principles of chromatin regulation. PMID:27151365

  1. DNA bending potentials for loop-mediated nucleosome repositioning

    SciTech Connect

    Langowski, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    Nucleosome repositioning is a fundamental process in gene function. DNA elasticity is a key element of loop-mediated nucleosome repositioning. Two analytical models for DNA elasticity have been proposed: the linear sub-elastic chain (SEC), which allows DNA kinking, and the worm-like chain (WLC), with a harmonic bending potential. In vitro studies have shown that nucleosomes reposition in a discontiguous manner on a segment of DNA and this has also been found in ground-state calculations with the WLC analytical model. Here we study using Monte Carlo simulation the dynamics of DNA loop-mediated nucleosome repositioning at physiological temperatures using the SEC and WLC potentials. At thermal energies both models predict nearest-neighbor repositioning of nucleosomes on DNA, in contrast to the repositioning in jumps observed in experiments. This suggests a crucial role of DNA sequence in nucleosome repositioning.

  2. Nucleosome breathing and remodeling constrain CRISPR-Cas9 function.

    PubMed

    Isaac, R Stefan; Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A; Lim, Wendell A; Narlikar, Geeta J; Almeida, Ricardo

    2016-04-28

    The CRISPR-Cas9 bacterial surveillance system has become a versatile tool for genome editing and gene regulation in eukaryotic cells, yet how CRISPR-Cas9 contends with the barriers presented by eukaryotic chromatin is poorly understood. Here we investigate how the smallest unit of chromatin, a nucleosome, constrains the activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. We find that nucleosomes assembled on native DNA sequences are permissive to Cas9 action. However, the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA to Cas9 is variable over several orders of magnitude depending on dynamic properties of the DNA sequence and the distance of the PAM site from the nucleosome dyad. We further find that chromatin remodeling enzymes stimulate Cas9 activity on nucleosomal templates. Our findings imply that the spontaneous breathing of nucleosomal DNA together with the action of chromatin remodelers allow Cas9 to effectively act on chromatin in vivo.

  3. "Anticipated" nucleosome positioning pattern in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Alexandra E; Trifonov, Edward N

    2011-11-15

    Linguistic (word count) analysis of prokaryotic genome sequences, by Shannon N-gram extension, reveals that the dominant hidden motifs in A+T rich genomes are T(A)(T)A and G(A)(T)C with uncertain number of repeating A and T. Since prokaryotic sequences are largely protein-coding, the motifs would correspond to amphipathic alpha-helices with alternating lysine and phenylalanine as preferential polar and non-polar residues. The motifs are also known in eukaryotes, as nucleosome positioning patterns. Their existence in prokaryotes as well may serve for binding of histone-like proteins to DNA. In this case the above patterns in prokaryotes may be considered as "anticipated" nucleosome positioning patterns which, quite likely, existed in prokaryotic genomes before the evolutionary separation between eukaryotes and prokaryotes.

  4. Elastic correlations in nucleosomal DNA structure.

    PubMed

    Mohammad-Rafiee, Farshid; Golestanian, Ramin

    2005-06-17

    The structure of DNA in the nucleosome core particle is studied using an elastic model that incorporates anisotropy in the bending energetics and twist-bend coupling. Using the experimentally determined structure of nucleosomal DNA [T. J. Richmond and C. A. Davey, Nature (London) 423, 145 (2003)], it is shown that elastic correlations exist between twist, roll, tilt, and stretching of DNA, as well as the distance between phosphate groups. The twist-bend coupling term is shown to be able to capture these correlations to a large extent, and a fit to the experimental data yields a new estimate of G = 25 nm for the value of the twist-bend coupling constant.

  5. The stability of nucleosomes at the replication fork.

    PubMed

    Gasser, R; Koller, T; Sogo, J M

    1996-05-01

    Purified simian virus (SV40) minichromosomes were photoreacted with psoralen under various conditions that moderately destabilize nucleosomes. This assay allows indirect distinction between stable nucleosomes, partially unravelled nucleosomes and nucleosomes containing (or lacking) histone H1. In replicating molecules the passage of the replication machinery destabilizes the nucleosomal organization of the chromatin fiber over a distance of 650 to 1100 bp. In front of the fork, an average of two nucleosomes are destabilized presumably by the dissociation of histone H1 and the advancing replication machinery. On daughter strands, the first nucleosome is detected at a distance of about 260 nucleotides from the elongation point. This nucleosome is interpreted to contain no histone H1, while no stepwise association of (H3-H4)2 tetramers with H2A/H2B dimers on nascent DNA can be detected in vivo. The second nucleosome after the replication fork appears to contain histone H1. The prolonged nuclease sensitivity of newly replicated chromatin described in the literature therefore may not be due to a slow reassociation of histone H1.

  6. The effect of DNA supercoiling on nucleosome structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Elbel, Tabea; Langowski, Jörg

    2015-02-18

    Nucleosomes have to open to allow access to DNA in transcription, replication, and DNA damage repair. Changes in DNA torsional strain (e.g. during transcription elongation) influence the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA. Here we investigated the effect of DNA supercoiling-induced torsional strain on nucleosome structure and stability by scanning force microscopy (SFM) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Nucleosomes were reconstituted onto 2.7 kb DNA plasmids with varying superhelical densities. The SFM results show a clear dependence of the amount of DNA wrapped around the nucleosome core on the strength and type of supercoiling. Negative supercoiling led to smaller nucleosome opening angles as compared to relaxed or positively supercoiled DNA. FCS experiments show that nucleosomes reconstituted on negatively superhelical DNA are more resistant to salt-induced destabilization, as seen by reduced H2A-H2B dimer eviction from the nucleosome. Our results show that changes in DNA topology, e.g. during transcription elongation, affect the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA.

  7. A positioned +1 nucleosome enhances promoter-proximal pausing.

    PubMed

    Jimeno-González, Silvia; Ceballos-Chávez, María; Reyes, José C

    2015-03-31

    Chromatin distribution is not uniform along the human genome. In most genes there is a promoter-associated nucleosome free region (NFR) followed by an array of nucleosomes towards the gene body in which the first (+1) nucleosome is strongly positioned. The function of this characteristic chromatin distribution in transcription is not fully understood. Here we show in vivo that the +1 nucleosome plays a role in modulating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) promoter-proximal pausing. When a +1 nucleosome is strongly positioned, elongating RNAPII has a tendency to stall at the promoter-proximal region, recruits more negative elongation factor (NELF) and produces less mRNA. The nucleosome-induced pause favors pre-mRNA quality control by promoting the addition of the cap to the nascent RNA. Moreover, the uncapped RNAs produced in the absence of a positioned nucleosome are degraded by the 5'-3' exonuclease XRN2. Interestingly, reducing the levels of the chromatin remodeler ISWI factor SNF2H decreases +1 nucleosome positioning and increases RNAPII pause release. This work demonstrates a function for +1 nucleosome in regulation of transcription elongation, pre-mRNA processing and gene expression.

  8. The effect of DNA supercoiling on nucleosome structure and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbel, Tabea; Langowski, Jörg

    2015-02-01

    Nucleosomes have to open to allow access to DNA in transcription, replication, and DNA damage repair. Changes in DNA torsional strain (e.g. during transcription elongation) influence the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA. Here we investigated the effect of DNA supercoiling-induced torsional strain on nucleosome structure and stability by scanning force microscopy (SFM) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Nucleosomes were reconstituted onto 2.7 kb DNA plasmids with varying superhelical densities. The SFM results show a clear dependence of the amount of DNA wrapped around the nucleosome core on the strength and type of supercoiling. Negative supercoiling led to smaller nucleosome opening angles as compared to relaxed or positively supercoiled DNA. FCS experiments show that nucleosomes reconstituted on negatively superhelical DNA are more resistant to salt-induced destabilization, as seen by reduced H2A-H2B dimer eviction from the nucleosome. Our results show that changes in DNA topology, e.g. during transcription elongation, affect the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA.

  9. A positioned +1 nucleosome enhances promoter-proximal pausing

    PubMed Central

    Jimeno-González, Silvia; Ceballos-Chávez, María; Reyes, José C.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin distribution is not uniform along the human genome. In most genes there is a promoter-associated nucleosome free region (NFR) followed by an array of nucleosomes towards the gene body in which the first (+1) nucleosome is strongly positioned. The function of this characteristic chromatin distribution in transcription is not fully understood. Here we show in vivo that the +1 nucleosome plays a role in modulating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) promoter-proximal pausing. When a +1 nucleosome is strongly positioned, elongating RNAPII has a tendency to stall at the promoter-proximal region, recruits more negative elongation factor (NELF) and produces less mRNA. The nucleosome-induced pause favors pre-mRNA quality control by promoting the addition of the cap to the nascent RNA. Moreover, the uncapped RNAs produced in the absence of a positioned nucleosome are degraded by the 5′-3′ exonuclease XRN2. Interestingly, reducing the levels of the chromatin remodeler ISWI factor SNF2H decreases +1 nucleosome positioning and increases RNAPII pause release. This work demonstrates a function for +1 nucleosome in regulation of transcription elongation, pre-mRNA processing and gene expression. PMID:25735750

  10. Nucleosome immobilization strategies for single-pair FRET microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Wiepke J A; Schmidt, Thomas; van Noort, John

    2008-10-01

    All genomic transactions in eukaryotes take place in the context of the nucleosome, the basic unit of chromatin, which is responsible for DNA compaction. Overcoming the steric hindrance that nucleosomes present for DNA-processing enzymes requires significant conformational changes. The dynamics of these have been hard to resolve. Single-pair Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (spFRET) microscopy is a powerful technique for observing conformational dynamics of the nucleosome. Nucleosome immobilization allows the extension of observation times to a limit set only by photobleaching, and thus opens the possibility of studying processes occurring on timescales ranging from milliseconds to minutes. It is crucial however, that immobilization itself does not introduce artifacts in the dynamics. Here we report on various nucleosome immobilization strategies, such as single-point attachment to polyethylene glycol (PEG) or surfaces coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA), and confinement in porous agarose or polyacrylamide gels. We compare the immobilization specificity and structural integrity of immobilized nucleosomes. A crosslinked star polyethylene glycol coating performs best with respect to tethering specificity and nucleosome integrity, and enables us to reproduce for the first time bulk nucleosome unwrapping kinetics in single nucleosomes without immobilization artifacts.

  11. DNA Architecture, Deformability, and Nucleosome Positioning†

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Olson, Wilma K.

    2010-01-01

    The positioning of DNA on nucleosomes is critical to both the organization and expression of the genetic message. Here we focus on DNA conformational signals found in the growing library of known high-resolution core-particle structures and the ways in which these features may contribute to the positioning of nucleosomes on specific DNA sequences. We survey the chemical composition of the protein-DNA assemblies and extract features along the DNA superhelical pathway — the minor-groove width and the deformations of successive base pairs — determined with reasonable accuracy in the structures. We also examine the extent to which the various nucleosome core-particle structures accommodate the observed settings of the crystallized sequences and the known positioning of the high-affinity synthetic ‘601’ sequence on DNA. We ‘thread’ these sequences on the different structural templates and estimate the cost of each setting with knowledge-based potentials that reflects the conformational properties of the DNA base-pair steps in other high-resolution protein-bound complexes. PMID:20232929

  12. Cigarette Smoke Component Acrolein Modulates Chromatin Assembly by Inhibiting Histone Acetylation*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Danqi; Fang, Lei; Li, Hongjie; Tang, Moon-shong; Jin, Chunyuan

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin structure and gene expression are both regulated by nucleosome assembly. How environmental factors influence histone nuclear import and the nucleosome assembly pathway, leading to changes in chromatin organization and transcription, remains unknown. Acrolein (Acr) is an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, which is abundant in the environment, especially in cigarette smoke. It has recently been implicated as a potential major carcinogen of smoking-related lung cancer. Here we show that Acr forms adducts with histone proteins in vitro and in vivo and preferentially reacts with free histones rather than with nucleosomal histones. Cellular fractionation analyses reveal that Acr exposure specifically inhibits acetylations of N-terminal tails of cytosolic histones H3 and H4, modifications that are important for nuclear import and chromatin assembly. Notably, Acr exposure compromises the delivery of histone H3 into chromatin and increases chromatin accessibility. Moreover, changes in nucleosome occupancy at several genomic loci are correlated with transcriptional responses to Acr exposure. Our data provide new insights into mechanisms whereby environmental factors interact with the genome and influence genome function. PMID:23770671

  13. Cigarette smoke component acrolein modulates chromatin assembly by inhibiting histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Danqi; Fang, Lei; Li, Hongjie; Tang, Moon-shong; Jin, Chunyuan

    2013-07-26

    Chromatin structure and gene expression are both regulated by nucleosome assembly. How environmental factors influence histone nuclear import and the nucleosome assembly pathway, leading to changes in chromatin organization and transcription, remains unknown. Acrolein (Acr) is an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, which is abundant in the environment, especially in cigarette smoke. It has recently been implicated as a potential major carcinogen of smoking-related lung cancer. Here we show that Acr forms adducts with histone proteins in vitro and in vivo and preferentially reacts with free histones rather than with nucleosomal histones. Cellular fractionation analyses reveal that Acr exposure specifically inhibits acetylations of N-terminal tails of cytosolic histones H3 and H4, modifications that are important for nuclear import and chromatin assembly. Notably, Acr exposure compromises the delivery of histone H3 into chromatin and increases chromatin accessibility. Moreover, changes in nucleosome occupancy at several genomic loci are correlated with transcriptional responses to Acr exposure. Our data provide new insights into mechanisms whereby environmental factors interact with the genome and influence genome function.

  14. A brief histone in time: understanding the combinatorial functions of histone PTMs in the nucleosome context.

    PubMed

    Ng, Marlee K; Cheung, Peter

    2016-02-01

    It has been over 50 years since Allfrey et al. proposed that histone acetylation regulates RNA synthesis, and the study of histone modifications has progressed at an extraordinary pace for the past two decades. In this review, we provide a perspective on some key events and advances in our understanding of histone modifications. We also highlight reagents and tools from past to present that facilitated progress in this research field. Using histone H3 phosphorylation as an underlying thread, we review the rationale that led to the proposal of the histone code hypothesis, as well as examples that illustrate the concepts of combinatorial histone modifications and cross-talk pathways. We further highlight the importance of investigating these mechanisms in the context of nucleosomes rather than just at the histone level and present current and developing approaches for such studies. Overall, research on histone modifications has yielded great mechanistic insights into the regulation of genomic functions, and extending these studies using nucleosomes will further elucidate the complexity of these pathways in a more physiologically relevant context.

  15. Quickly evolving histones, nucleosome stability and chromatin folding: all about histone H2A.Bbd.

    PubMed

    González-Romero, Rodrigo; Méndez, Josefina; Ausió, Juan; Eirín-López, José M

    2008-04-30

    Histone H2A.Bbd (Barr body-deficient) is a novel histone variant which is largely excluded from the inactive X chromosome of mammals. Discovered only 6 years ago, H2A.Bbd displays very unusual structural and functional properties, for instance, it is relatively shorter and only 48% identical compared to H2A, lacking both the typical C-terminal tail of the H2A family and the very last sequence of the docking domain, making it the most specialized among all histone variants known to date. Indeed, molecular evolutionary analyses have shown that H2A.Bbd is a highly hypervariable and quickly evolving protein exclusive to mammalian lineages, in striking contrast to all other histones. Different studies have described a deposition pattern of H2A.Bbd in the chromatin that overlaps with regions of histone H4 acetylation suggesting its association with transcriptionally active euchromatic regions of the genome. In this regard, it is believed that this histone variant plays an important role in determining such regions by destabilizing the nucleosome and locally unfolding the chromatin fiber. This review provides a concise, comprehensive and timely summary of the work published on H2A.Bbd structure and function. Special emphasis is placed on its chromatin deposition patterns in relation to gene expression profiles and its evolutionary history, as well as on the dynamics of H2A.Bbd-containing nucleosomes.

  16. Genome wide nucleosome mapping for HSV-1 shows nucleosomes are deposited at preferred positions during lytic infection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaewook; Sanders, Iryna F; Chen, Eric Z; Li, Hongzhe; Tobias, John W; Isett, R Benjamin; Penubarthi, Sindura; Sun, Hao; Baldwin, Don A; Fraser, Nigel W

    2015-01-01

    HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes). During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200 bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6 hr PI), using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152 kb). Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR), or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE), Early (E) and Late (L) genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes.

  17. Genome Wide Nucleosome Mapping for HSV-1 Shows Nucleosomes Are Deposited at Preferred Positions during Lytic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jaewook; Sanders, Iryna F.; Chen, Eric Z.; Li, Hongzhe; Tobias, John W.; Isett, R. Benjamin; Penubarthi, Sindura; Sun, Hao; Baldwin, Don A.; Fraser, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes). During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6hr PI), using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152kb). Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR), or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE), Early (E) and Late (L) genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes. PMID:25710170

  18. The energetic implications of curtailing versus storing wind- and solar-generated electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, C. J.; Dale, M.; Brandt, A. R.; Benson, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid deployment of power generation technologies harnessing wind and solar resources continues to reduce the carbon intensity of the power grid. But as these technologies comprise a larger fraction of power supply, their variable, weather-dependent nature poses challenges to power grid operation. Today, during times of power oversupply or unfavorable market conditions, power grid operators curtail these resources. Rates of curtailment are expected to increase with increased renewable electricity production. That is unless technologies are implemented that can provide grid flexibility to balance power supply with power demand. Curtailment is an obvious forfeiture of energy and it decreases the profitability of electricity from curtailed generators. What are less obvious are the energetic costs for technologies that provide grid flexibility. We present a theoretical framework to calculate how storage affects the energy return on energy investment (EROI) ratios of wind and solar resources. Our methods identify conditions under which it is more energetically favorable to store energy than it is to simply curtail electricity production. Electrochemically based storage technologies result in much smaller EROI ratios than large-scale geologically based storage technologies like compressed air energy storage (CAES) and pumped hydroelectric storage (PHS). All storage technologies paired with solar photovoltaic (PV) generation yield EROI ratios that are greater than curtailment. Due to their low energy stored on electrical energy invested (ESOIe) ratios, conventional battery technologies reduce the EROI ratios of wind generation below curtailment EROI ratios. To yield a greater net energy return than curtailment, battery storage technologies paired with wind generation need an ESOIe>80. We identify improvements in cycle life as the most feasible way to increase battery ESOIe. Depending upon the battery's embodied energy requirement, an increase of cycle life to 10

  19. Rigid-body molecular dynamics of DNA inside a nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Fathizadeh, Arman; Berdy Besya, Azim; Reza Ejtehadi, Mohammad; Schiessel, Helmut

    2013-03-01

    The majority of eukaryotic DNA, about three quarter, is wrapped around histone proteins forming so-called nucleosomes. To study nucleosomal DNA we introduce a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model based on sequence-dependent harmonic rigid base pair step parameters of DNA and nucleosomal binding sites. Mixed parametrization based on all-atom molecular dynamics and crystallographic data of protein-DNA structures is used for the base pair step parameters. The binding site parameters are adjusted by experimental B-factor values of the nucleosome crystal structure. The model is then used to determine the energy cost for placing a twist defect into the nucleosomal DNA which allows us to use Kramers theory to calculate nucleosome sliding caused by such defects. It is shown that the twist defect scenario together with the sequence-dependent elasticity of DNA can explain the slow time scales observed for nucleosome mobility along DNA. With this method we also show how the twist defect mechanism leads to a higher mobility of DNA in the presence of sin mutations near the dyad axis. Finally, by performing simulations on 5s rDNA, 601, and telomeric base pair sequences, it is demonstrated that the current model is a powerful tool to predict nucleosome positioning. PMID:23475204

  20. Tension-Dependent Free Energies of Nucleosome Unwrapping

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes form the basic unit of compaction within eukaryotic genomes, and their locations represent an important, yet poorly understood, mechanism of genetic regulation. Quantifying the strength of interactions within the nucleosome is a central problem in biophysics and is critical to understanding how nucleosome positions influence gene expression. By comparing to single-molecule experiments, we demonstrate that a coarse-grained molecular model of the nucleosome can reproduce key aspects of nucleosome unwrapping. Using detailed simulations of DNA and histone proteins, we calculate the tension-dependent free energy surface corresponding to the unwrapping process. The model reproduces quantitatively the forces required to unwrap the nucleosome and reveals the role played by electrostatic interactions during this process. We then demonstrate that histone modifications and DNA sequence can have significant effects on the energies of nucleosome formation. Most notably, we show that histone tails contribute asymmetrically to the stability of the outer and inner turn of nucleosomal DNA and that depending on which histone tails are modified, the tension-dependent response is modulated differently. PMID:27725965

  1. Choreography for nucleosomes: the conformational freedom of the nucleosomal filament and its limitations

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is organized into nucleosomes by coiling around core particles of histones, forming a nucleosomal filament. The significance for the conformation of the filament of the DNA entry/exit angle (α) at the nucleosome, the angle of rotation (β) of nucleosomes around their interconnecting DNA (linker DNA) and the length of the linker DNA, has been studied by means of wire models with straight linkers. It is shown that variations in α and β endow the filament with an outstanding conformational freedom when α is increased beyond 60–90°, owing to the ability of the filament to change between forward right-handed and backward left-handed coiling. A wealth of different helical and looped conformations are formed in response to repeated β sequences, and helical conformations are shown to be able to contract to a high density and to associate pairwise into different types of double fibers. Filaments with random β sequences are characterized by relatively stable loop clusters connected by segments of higher flexibility. Displacement of core particles along the DNA in such fibers, combined with limited twisting of the linkers, can generate the β sequence necessary for compaction into a regular helix, thus providing a model for heterochromatinization. PMID:17704136

  2. Touch, act and go: landing and operating on nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Speranzini, Valentina; Pilotto, Simona; Sixma, Titia K; Mattevi, Andrea

    2016-02-15

    Chromatin-associated enzymes are responsible for the installation, removal and reading of precise post-translation modifications on DNA and histone proteins. They are specifically recruited to the target gene by associated factors, and as a result of their activity, they contribute in modulating cell identity and differentiation. Structural and biophysical approaches are broadening our knowledge on these processes, demonstrating that DNA, histone tails and histone surfaces can each function as distinct yet functionally interconnected anchoring points promoting nucleosome binding and modification. The mechanisms underlying nucleosome recognition have been described for many histone modifiers and related readers. Here, we review the recent literature on the structural organization of these nucleosome-associated proteins, the binding properties that drive nucleosome modification and the methodological advances in their analysis. The overarching conclusion is that besides acting on the same substrate (the nucleosome), each system functions through characteristic modes of action, which bring about specific biological functions in gene expression regulation.

  3. Modeling the dynamics of the nucleosome at various levels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onufriev, Alexey; Fenley, Andrew; Zmuda-Ruscio, Jory; Adams, David

    2007-03-01

    The primary level of DNA compaction in eukaryotic organisms is the nucleosome, yet details of its dynamics are not fully understood. While the whole nucleosome must be highly stable, protective of its genetic material, at the same time its tightly wrapped DNA should be highly accessible, easily revealing its information content. A combination of atom-level classical molecular dynamics and a course-grained continuum description provide insights into the functioning of the system. In particular, the nucleosomal DNA appears to be considerably more flexible than what can be expected based on its canonical persistence length. A coarse-grained electrostatic model of the nucleosome explains how its stability can be modulated with small environmental changes as well as post-translational modifications. Implications for the nucleosome assembly process in vivo are discussed.

  4. Statistical physics of nucleosome positioning and chromatin structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    Genomic DNA is packaged into chromatin in eukaryotic cells. The fundamental building block of chromatin is the nucleosome, a 147 bp-long DNA molecule wrapped around the surface of a histone octamer. Arrays of nucleosomes are positioned along DNA according to their sequence preferences and folded into higher-order chromatin fibers whose structure is poorly understood. We have developed a framework for predicting sequence-specific histone-DNA interactions and the effective two-body potential responsible for ordering nucleosomes into regular higher-order structures. Our approach is based on the analogy between nucleosomal arrays and a one-dimensional fluid of finite-size particles with nearest-neighbor interactions. We derive simple rules which allow us to predict nucleosome occupancy solely from the dinucleotide content of the underlying DNA sequences.Dinucleotide content determines the degree of stiffness of the DNA polymer and thus defines its ability to bend into the nucleosomal superhelix. As expected, the nucleosome positioning rules are universal for chromatin assembled in vitro on genomic DNA from baker's yeast and from the nematode worm C.elegans, where nucleosome placement follows intrinsic sequence preferences and steric exclusion. However, the positioning rules inferred from in vivo C.elegans chromatin are affected by global nucleosome depletion from chromosome arms relative to central domains, likely caused by the attachment of the chromosome arms to the nuclear membrane. Furthermore, intrinsic nucleosome positioning rules are overwritten in transcribed regions, indicating that chromatin organization is actively managed by the transcriptional and splicing machinery.

  5. Nucleosome Stability Distinguishes Two Different Promoter Types at All Protein-Coding Genes in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Slawomir; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Jacquet, Philippe; Falcone, Jean-Luc; Rougemont, Jacques; Shore, David

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies indicate that eukaryotic promoters display a stereotypical chromatin landscape characterized by a well-positioned +1 nucleosome near the transcription start site and an upstream -1 nucleosome that together demarcate a nucleosome-free (or -depleted) region. Here we present evidence that there are two distinct types of promoters distinguished by the resistance of the -1 nucleosome to micrococcal nuclease digestion. These different architectures are characterized by two sequence motifs that are broadly deployed at one set of promoters where a nuclease-sensitive ("fragile") nucleosome forms, but concentrated in a narrower, nucleosome-free region at all other promoters. The RSC nucleosome remodeler acts through the motifs to establish stable +1 and -1 nucleosome positions, while binding of a small set of general regulatory (pioneer) factors at fragile nucleosome promoters plays a key role in their destabilization. We propose that the fragile nucleosome promoter architecture is adapted for regulation of highly expressed, growth-related genes.

  6. Nucleosomal regulation of chromatin composition and nuclear assembly revealed by histone depletion

    PubMed Central

    Zierhut, Christian; Jenness, Christopher; Kimura, Hiroshi; Funabiki, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosomes are the fundamental unit of chromatin, but the analysis of transcription-independent nucleosome functions has been thwarted by the confounding gene expression changes resultant of histone manipulation. Here we solve this dilemma by developing Xenopus laevis egg extracts deficient for nucleosome formation, and analyze the proteomic landscape and behavior of nucleosomal chromatin and nucleosome-free DNA. We show that while nucleosome-free DNA can recruit nuclear envelope membranes, nucleosomes are required for spindle assembly, lamina and nuclear pore complex (NPC) formation. In addition to RCC1, we reveal that ELYS, the initiator of NPC formation, fails to associate with naked DNA, but directly binds histones H2A–H2B and nucleosomes. Tethering ELYS and RCC1 to DNA bypassed the requirement for nucleosomes in NPC formation in a synergistic manner. Thus, the minimal essential function of nucleosomes in NPC formation is to recruit RCC1 and ELYS. PMID:24952593

  7. Z curve theory-based analysis of the dynamic nature of nucleosome positioning in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xueting; Liu, Hui; Liu, Hongbo; Su, Jianzhong; Lv, Jie; Cui, Ying; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Nucleosome is the elementary structural unit of eukaryotic chromatin. Instability of nucleosome positioning plays critical roles in chromatin remodeling in differentiation and disease. In this study, we investigated nucleosome dynamics in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome using a geometric model based on Z curve theory. We identified 52,941 stable nucleosomes and 7607 dynamic nucleosomes, compiling them into a genome-wide nucleosome dynamic positioning map and constructing a user-friendly visualization platform (http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/nucleosome). Our approach achieved a sensitivity of 90.31% and a specificity of 87.76% for S. cerevisiae. Analysis revealed transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) were enriched in linkers. And among the sparse nucleosomes around TFBSs, dynamic nucleosomes were slightly preferred. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis indicated that stable and dynamic nucleosomes were enriched on genes involved in different biological processes and functions. This study provides an approach for comprehending chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation of genes.

  8. Multivalent Engagement of TFIID to Nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    van Schaik, Frederik M. A.; Jansen, Pascal W. T. C.; Vermeulen, Michiel; Marc Timmers, H. T.

    2013-01-01

    The process of eukaryotic transcription initiation involves the assembly of basal transcription factor complexes on the gene promoter. The recruitment of TFIID is an early and important step in this process. Gene promoters contain distinct DNA sequence elements and are marked by the presence of post-translationally modified nucleosomes. The contributions of these individual features for TFIID recruitment remain to be elucidated. Here, we use immobilized reconstituted promoter nucleosomes, conventional biochemistry and quantitative mass spectrometry to investigate the influence of distinct histone modifications and functional DNA-elements on the binding of TFIID. Our data reveal synergistic effects of H3K4me3, H3K14ac and a TATA box sequence on TFIID binding in vitro. Stoichiometry analyses of affinity purified human TFIID identified the presence of a stable dimeric core. Several peripheral TAFs, including those interacting with distinct promoter features, are substoichiometric yet present in substantial amounts. Finally, we find that the TAF3 subunit of TFIID binds to poised promoters in an H3K4me3-dependent manner. Moreover, the PHD-finger of TAF3 is important for rapid induction of target genes. Thus, fine-tuning of TFIID engagement on promoters is driven by synergistic contacts with both DNA-elements and histone modifications, eventually resulting in a high affinity interaction and activation of transcription. PMID:24039962

  9. A one-dimensional model of Nucleosome distribution in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberg, Brendan; Moebius, Wolfram; Nguyen, Kien; Gerland, Ulrich

    2012-02-01

    Nucleosome positioning along DNA is neither random nor precisely regular. Genome-wide maps of nucleosome positions in various eukaryotes have revealed a common pattern around transcription start sites, involving a nucleosome-free region flanked by a periodic pattern in the average nucleosome density. We take a quantitative mathematical description of the nucleosome pattern, and incorporate specifically bound transcription factors. Our model assumes a dense, one-dimensional gas of particles, however, instead of previous work which assumes fixed-size particles interacting only by exclusion, our model explicitly accounts for transient unwrapping of short segments of nucleosomal DNA. Hence, such particles no longer have a fixed size, but interact by an effective repulsive potential. This model has been succesfully used, by us, to provide a unified description of 12 Hemiascomycota yeast species with a single unified set of model parameters. We incorporate into this model, specifically bound particles, or transcription factors (TF), which serve an important role in gene regulation. Nucleosome distribution patterns have an important influence on TF binding, and can even mediate interactions between transcription factors at a distance. This interaction can account for cooperative or competitive binding between these proteins, and we will discuss the implications this can have on gene regulation.

  10. Nucleosome positioning by genomic excluding-energy barriers

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Pascale; Chevereau, Guillaume; Vaillant, Cédric; Audit, Benjamin; Haftek-Terreau, Zofia; Marilley, Monique; Bouvet, Philippe; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Recent genome-wide nucleosome mappings along with bioinformatics studies have confirmed that the DNA sequence plays a more important role in the collective organization of nucleosomes in vivo than previously thought. Yet in living cells, this organization also results from the action of various external factors like DNA-binding proteins and chromatin remodelers. To decipher the code for intrinsic chromatin organization, there is thus a need for in vitro experiments to bridge the gap between computational models of nucleosome sequence preferences and in vivo nucleosome occupancy data. Here we combine atomic force microscopy in liquid and theoretical modeling to demonstrate that a major sequence signaling in vivo are high-energy barriers that locally inhibit nucleosome formation rather than favorable positioning motifs. We show that these genomic excluding-energy barriers condition the collective assembly of neighboring nucleosomes consistently with equilibrium statistical ordering principles. The analysis of two gene promoter regions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the human genome indicates that these genomic barriers direct the intrinsic nucleosome occupancy of regulatory sites, thereby contributing to gene expression regulation. PMID:20018700

  11. Dynamics of Nucleosome Positioning Maturation following Genomic Replication.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Pauline; Tonazzini, Saphia; Ziane, Rahima; Camasses, Alain; Rando, Oliver J; Radman-Livaja, Marta

    2016-09-01

    Chromatin is thought to carry epigenetic information from one generation to the next, although it is unclear how such information survives the disruptions of nucleosomal architecture occurring during genomic replication. Here, we measure a key aspect of chromatin structure dynamics during replication-how rapidly nucleosome positions are established on the newly replicated daughter genomes. By isolating newly synthesized DNA marked with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), we characterize nucleosome positions on both daughter genomes of S. cerevisiae during chromatin maturation. We find that nucleosomes rapidly adopt their mid-log positions at highly transcribed genes, which is consistent with a role for transcription in positioning nucleosomes in vivo. Additionally, experiments in hir1Δ mutants reveal a role for HIR in nucleosome spacing. We also characterized nucleosome positions on the leading and lagging strands, uncovering differences in chromatin maturation dynamics at hundreds of genes. Our data define the maturation dynamics of newly replicated chromatin and support a role for transcription in sculpting the chromatin template.

  12. DPNuc: Identifying Nucleosome Positions Based on the Dirichlet Process Mixture Model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huidong; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosomes and the free linker DNA between them assemble the chromatin. Nucleosome positioning plays an important role in gene transcription regulation, DNA replication and repair, alternative splicing, and so on. With the rapid development of ChIP-seq, it is possible to computationally detect the positions of nucleosomes on chromosomes. However, existing methods cannot provide accurate and detailed information about the detected nucleosomes, especially for the nucleosomes with complex configurations where overlaps and noise exist. Meanwhile, they usually require some prior knowledge of nucleosomes as input, such as the size or the number of the unknown nucleosomes, which may significantly influence the detection results. In this paper, we propose a novel approach DPNuc for identifying nucleosome positions based on the Dirichlet process mixture model. In our method, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations are employed to determine the mixture model with no need of prior knowledge about nucleosomes. Compared with three existing methods, our approach can provide more detailed information of the detected nucleosomes and can more reasonably reveal the real configurations of the chromosomes; especially, our approach performs better in the complex overlapping situations. By mapping the detected nucleosomes to a synthetic benchmark nucleosome map and two existing benchmark nucleosome maps, it is shown that our approach achieves a better performance in identifying nucleosome positions and gets a higher F-score. Finally, we show that our approach can more reliably detect the size distribution of nucleosomes.

  13. DPNuc: Identifying Nucleosome Positions Based on the Dirichlet Process Mixture Model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huidong; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosomes and the free linker DNA between them assemble the chromatin. Nucleosome positioning plays an important role in gene transcription regulation, DNA replication and repair, alternative splicing, and so on. With the rapid development of ChIP-seq, it is possible to computationally detect the positions of nucleosomes on chromosomes. However, existing methods cannot provide accurate and detailed information about the detected nucleosomes, especially for the nucleosomes with complex configurations where overlaps and noise exist. Meanwhile, they usually require some prior knowledge of nucleosomes as input, such as the size or the number of the unknown nucleosomes, which may significantly influence the detection results. In this paper, we propose a novel approach DPNuc for identifying nucleosome positions based on the Dirichlet process mixture model. In our method, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations are employed to determine the mixture model with no need of prior knowledge about nucleosomes. Compared with three existing methods, our approach can provide more detailed information of the detected nucleosomes and can more reasonably reveal the real configurations of the chromosomes; especially, our approach performs better in the complex overlapping situations. By mapping the detected nucleosomes to a synthetic benchmark nucleosome map and two existing benchmark nucleosome maps, it is shown that our approach achieves a better performance in identifying nucleosome positions and gets a higher F-score. Finally, we show that our approach can more reliably detect the size distribution of nucleosomes. PMID:26671796

  14. Statistical distributions of nucleosomes: nonrandom locations by a stochastic mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Kornberg, R D; Stryer, L

    1988-01-01

    Expressions are derived for distributions of nucleosomes in chromatin. Nucleosomes are placed on DNA at the densities found in bulk chromatin, and their locations are allowed to vary at random. No further assumptions are required to simulate the periodic patterns of digestion obtained with various nucleases. The introduction of a boundary constraint, due for example to sequence-specific protein binding, results in an array of regularly spaced nucleosomes at nonrandom locations, similar to the arrays reported for some genes and other chromosomal regions. PMID:3399412

  15. Structural dynamics of nucleosomes at single molecule resolution

    PubMed Central

    Choy, John S.; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The detailed mechanisms of how DNA that is assembled around a histone core can be accessed by DNA-binding proteins for transcription, replication, or repair, remain elusive nearly 40 years after Kornberg's nucleosome model was proposed. Uncovering the structural dynamics of nucleosomes is a crucial step in elucidating the mechanisms regulating genome accessibility. This requires the deconvolultion of multiple structural states within an ensemble. Recent advances in single molecule methods enable unprecedented efficiency in examining subpopulation dynamics. In this review, we summarize studies of nucleosome structure and dynamics from single molecule approaches and how they advance our understanding of the mechanisms that govern DNA transactions. PMID:22831768

  16. Keeping fingers crossed: heterochromatin spreading through interdigitation of nucleosome arrays.

    PubMed

    Grigoryev, Sergei A

    2004-04-23

    Interphase eukaryotic nuclei contain diffuse euchromatin and condensed heterochromatin. Current textbook models suggest that chromatin condensation occurs via accordion-type compaction of nucleosome zigzag chains. Recent studies have revealed several structural aspects that distinguish the highly compact state of condensed heterochromatin. These include an extensive lateral self-association of chromatin fibers, prominent nucleosome linker 'stems', and special protein factors that promote chromatin self-association. Here I review the molecular and structural determinants of chromatin compaction and discuss how heterochromatin spreading may be mediated by lateral self-association of zigzag nucleosome arrays. PMID:15094034

  17. 41 CFR 101-39.105-1 - Transfers from discontinued or curtailed fleet management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... discontinued or curtailed fleet management systems. 101-39.105-1 Section 101-39.105-1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS AVIATION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MOTOR VEHICLES 39-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS...

  18. Aristotelian-Inspired Model for Curtailing Academic Dishonesty in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation explores the growing epidemic of academic dishonesty in the United States in order to propose an Aristotelian-inspired model for developing moral character to curtail this epidemic. The task is laid out in four parts. Chapter one responds to the problem of "akrasia," adopting a modified version of Devin Henry's…

  19. 41 CFR 101-39.105-1 - Transfers from discontinued or curtailed fleet management systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... discontinued or curtailed fleet management systems. 101-39.105-1 Section 101-39.105-1 Public Contracts and... AVIATION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MOTOR VEHICLES 39-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.1-Establishment, Modification, and Discontinuance of Interagency Fleet Management Systems § 101-39.105-1 Transfers...

  20. 41 CFR 101-39.105 - Discontinuance or curtailment of service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., AND MOTOR VEHICLES 39-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.1-Establishment, Modification, and Discontinuance of Interagency Fleet Management Systems § 101-39.105 Discontinuance or curtailment of service. (a... efficiencies are realized from the operation of any fleet management system, the Administrator, GSA,...

  1. On Using Stochastic Curtailment to Shorten the SPRT in Sequential Mastery Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelman, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Sequential mastery testing (SMT) has been researched as an efficient alternative to paper-and-pencil testing for pass/fail examinations. One popular method for determining when to cease examination in SMT is the truncated sequential probability ratio test (TSPRT). This article introduces the application of stochastic curtailment in SMT to shorten…

  2. Mechanical model of the nucleosome and chromatin.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Thomas C; Zhmudsky, Oleksandr O

    2002-04-01

    A theoretical framework for evaluating the approximate energy and dynamic properties associated with the folding of DNA into nucleosomes and chromatin is presented. Experimentally determined elastic constants of linear DNA and a simple fold geometry are assumed in order to derive elastic constants for extended and condensed chromatin. The model predicts the Young s modulus of extended and condensed chromatin to within an order of magnitude of experimentally determined values. Thus we demonstrate that the elastic properties of DNA are a primary determinant of the elastic properties of the higher order folded states. The derived elastic constants are used to predict the speed of propagation of small amplitude waves that excite an extension(sound), twist, bend or shear motion in each folded state. Taken together the results demonstrate that folding creates a hierarchy of time, length and energy scales.

  3. Multiplexing Genetic and Nucleosome Positioning Codes: A Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Eslami-Mossallam, Behrouz; Schram, Raoul D.; Tompitak, Marco; van Noort, John; Schiessel, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is strongly bent inside fundamental packaging units: the nucleosomes. It is known that their positions are strongly influenced by the mechanical properties of the underlying DNA sequence. Here we discuss the possibility that these mechanical properties and the concomitant nucleosome positions are not just a side product of the given DNA sequence, e.g. that of the genes, but that a mechanical evolution of DNA molecules might have taken place. We first demonstrate the possibility of multiplexing classical and mechanical genetic information using a computational nucleosome model. In a second step we give evidence for genome-wide multiplexing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosacharomyces pombe. This suggests that the exact positions of nucleosomes play crucial roles in chromatin function. PMID:27272176

  4. Single-molecule decoding of combinatorially modified nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Shema, Efrat; Jones, Daniel; Shoresh, Noam; Donohue, Laura; Ram, Oren; Bernstein, Bradley E

    2016-05-01

    Different combinations of histone modifications have been proposed to signal distinct gene regulatory functions, but this area is poorly addressed by existing technologies. We applied high-throughput single-molecule imaging to decode combinatorial modifications on millions of individual nucleosomes from pluripotent stem cells and lineage-committed cells. We identified definitively bivalent nucleosomes with concomitant repressive and activating marks, as well as other combinatorial modification states whose prevalence varies with developmental potency. We showed that genetic and chemical perturbations of chromatin enzymes preferentially affect nucleosomes harboring specific modification states. Last, we combined this proteomic platform with single-molecule DNA sequencing technology to simultaneously determine the modification states and genomic positions of individual nucleosomes. This single-molecule technology has the potential to address fundamental questions in chromatin biology and epigenetic regulation. PMID:27151869

  5. DNA Shape Dominates Sequence Affinity in Nucleosome Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Gordon S.; Lequieu, Joshua P.; Hinckley, Daniel M.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2014-10-01

    Nucleosomes provide the basic unit of compaction in eukaryotic genomes, and the mechanisms that dictate their position at specific locations along a DNA sequence are of central importance to genetics. In this Letter, we employ molecular models of DNA and proteins to elucidate various aspects of nucleosome positioning. In particular, we show how DNA's histone affinity is encoded in its sequence-dependent shape, including subtle deviations from the ideal straight B-DNA form and local variations of minor groove width. By relying on high-precision simulations of the free energy of nucleosome complexes, we also demonstrate that, depending on DNA's intrinsic curvature, histone binding can be dominated by bending interactions or electrostatic interactions. More generally, the results presented here explain how sequence, manifested as the shape of the DNA molecule, dominates molecular recognition in the problem of nucleosome positioning.

  6. Transcriptional Regulators Compete with Nucleosomes Post-replication.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-04-21

    Every nucleosome across the genome must be disrupted and reformed when the replication fork passes, but how chromatin organization is re-established following replication is unknown. To address this problem, we have developed Mapping In vivo Nascent Chromatin with EdU and sequencing (MINCE-seq) to characterize the genome-wide location of nucleosomes and other chromatin proteins behind replication forks at high temporal and spatial resolution. We find that the characteristic chromatin landscape at Drosophila promoters and enhancers is lost upon replication. The most conspicuous changes are at promoters that have high levels of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) stalling and DNA accessibility and show specific enrichment for the BRM remodeler. Enhancer chromatin is also disrupted during replication, suggesting a role for transcription factor (TF) competition in nucleosome re-establishment. Thus, the characteristic nucleosome landscape emerges from a uniformly packaged genome by the action of TFs, RNAPII, and remodelers minutes after replication fork passage. PMID:27062929

  7. Asymmetric unwrapping of nucleosomes under tension directed by DNA local flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Thuy T M; Zhang, Qiucen; Zhou, Ruobo; Yodh, Jaya G; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-03-12

    Dynamics of the nucleosome and exposure of nucleosomal DNA play key roles in many nuclear processes, but local dynamics of the nucleosome and its modulation by DNA sequence are poorly understood. Using single-molecule assays, we observed that the nucleosome can unwrap asymmetrically and directionally under force. The relative DNA flexibility of the inner quarters of nucleosomal DNA controls the unwrapping direction such that the nucleosome unwraps from the stiffer side. If the DNA flexibility is similar on two sides, it stochastically unwraps from either side. The two ends of the nucleosome are orchestrated such that the opening of one end helps to stabilize the other end, providing a mechanism to amplify even small differences in flexibility to a large asymmetry in nucleosome stability. Our discovery of DNA flexibility as a critical factor for nucleosome dynamics and mechanical stability suggests a novel mechanism of gene regulation by DNA sequence and modifications.

  8. Multiscale modelling of nucleosome core particle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Korolev, Nikolay; Fan, Yanping; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-01

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Under the influence of multivalent cations, isolated mononucleosomes exhibit a rich phase behaviour forming various columnar phases with characteristic NCP-NCP stacking. NCP stacking is also a regular element of chromatin structure in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of nucleosome stacking and the conditions leading to self-assembly of NCPs is still incomplete. Due to the complexity of the system and the need to describe electrostatics properly by including the explicit mobile ions, novel modelling approaches based on coarse-grained (CG) methods at the multiscale level becomes a necessity. In this work we present a multiscale CG computer simulation approach to modelling interactions and self-assembly of solutions of NCPs induced by the presence of multivalent cations. Starting from continuum simulations including explicit three-valent cobalt(III)hexammine (CoHex3+) counterions and 20 NCPs, based on a previously developed advanced CG NCP model with one bead per amino acid and five beads per two DNA base pair unit (Fan et al 2013 PLoS One 8 e54228), we use the inverse Monte Carlo method to calculate effective interaction potentials for a ‘super-CG’ NCP model consisting of seven beads for each NCP. These interaction potentials are used in large-scale simulations of up to 5000 NCPs, modelling self-assembly induced by CoHex3+. The systems of ‘super-CG’ NCPs form a single large cluster of stacked NCPs without long-range order in agreement with experimental data for NCPs precipitated by the three-valent polyamine, spermidine3+.

  9. Multiscale modelling of nucleosome core particle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Korolev, Nikolay; Fan, Yanping; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-18

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Under the influence of multivalent cations, isolated mononucleosomes exhibit a rich phase behaviour forming various columnar phases with characteristic NCP-NCP stacking. NCP stacking is also a regular element of chromatin structure in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of nucleosome stacking and the conditions leading to self-assembly of NCPs is still incomplete. Due to the complexity of the system and the need to describe electrostatics properly by including the explicit mobile ions, novel modelling approaches based on coarse-grained (CG) methods at the multiscale level becomes a necessity. In this work we present a multiscale CG computer simulation approach to modelling interactions and self-assembly of solutions of NCPs induced by the presence of multivalent cations. Starting from continuum simulations including explicit three-valent cobalt(III)hexammine (CoHex(3+)) counterions and 20 NCPs, based on a previously developed advanced CG NCP model with one bead per amino acid and five beads per two DNA base pair unit (Fan et al 2013 PLoS One 8 e54228), we use the inverse Monte Carlo method to calculate effective interaction potentials for a 'super-CG' NCP model consisting of seven beads for each NCP. These interaction potentials are used in large-scale simulations of up to 5000 NCPs, modelling self-assembly induced by CoHex(3+). The systems of 'super-CG' NCPs form a single large cluster of stacked NCPs without long-range order in agreement with experimental data for NCPs precipitated by the three-valent polyamine, spermidine(3+).

  10. Nucleosome alterations caused by mutations at modifiable histone residues in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongde; Wang, Pingyan; Liu, Lingjie; Min, Zhu; Luo, Kun; Wan, Yakun

    2015-10-26

    Nucleosome organization exhibits dynamic properties depending on the cell state and environment. Histone proteins, fundamental components of nucleosomes, are subject to chemical modifications on particular residues. We examined the effect of substituting modifiable residues of four core histones with the non-modifiable residue alanine on nucleosome dynamics. We mapped the genome-wide nucleosomes in 22 histone mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and compared the nucleosome alterations relative to the wild-type strain. Our results indicated that different types of histone mutation resulted in different phenotypes and a distinct reorganization of nucleosomes. Nucleosome occupancy was altered at telomeres, but not at centromeres. The first nucleosomes upstream (-1) and downstream (+1) of the transcription start site (TSS) were more dynamic than other nucleosomes. Mutations in histones affected the nucleosome array downstream of the TSS. Highly expressed genes, such as ribosome genes and genes involved in glycolysis, showed increased nucleosome occupancy in many types of histone mutant. In particular, the H3K56A mutant exhibited a high percentage of dynamic genomic regions, decreased nucleosome occupancy at telomeres, increased occupancy at the +1 and -1 nucleosomes, and a slow growth phenotype under stress conditions. Our findings provide insight into the influence of histone mutations on nucleosome dynamics.

  11. Nucleosome alterations caused by mutations at modifiable histone residues in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongde; Wang, Pingyan; Liu, Lingjie; Min, Zhu; Luo, Kun; Wan, Yakun

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosome organization exhibits dynamic properties depending on the cell state and environment. Histone proteins, fundamental components of nucleosomes, are subject to chemical modifications on particular residues. We examined the effect of substituting modifiable residues of four core histones with the non-modifiable residue alanine on nucleosome dynamics. We mapped the genome-wide nucleosomes in 22 histone mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and compared the nucleosome alterations relative to the wild-type strain. Our results indicated that different types of histone mutation resulted in different phenotypes and a distinct reorganization of nucleosomes. Nucleosome occupancy was altered at telomeres, but not at centromeres. The first nucleosomes upstream (−1) and downstream (+1) of the transcription start site (TSS) were more dynamic than other nucleosomes. Mutations in histones affected the nucleosome array downstream of the TSS. Highly expressed genes, such as ribosome genes and genes involved in glycolysis, showed increased nucleosome occupancy in many types of histone mutant. In particular, the H3K56A mutant exhibited a high percentage of dynamic genomic regions, decreased nucleosome occupancy at telomeres, increased occupancy at the +1 and −1 nucleosomes, and a slow growth phenotype under stress conditions. Our findings provide insight into the influence of histone mutations on nucleosome dynamics. PMID:26498326

  12. DNA damage may drive nucleosomal reorganization to facilitate damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeGresley, Sarah E.; Wilt, Jamie; Antonik, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    One issue in genome maintenance is how DNA repair proteins find lesions at rates that seem to exceed diffusion-limited search rates. We propose a phenomenon where DNA damage induces nucleosomal rearrangements which move lesions to potential rendezvous points in the chromatin structure. These rendezvous points are the dyad and the linker DNA between histones, positions in the chromatin which are more likely to be accessible by repair proteins engaged in a random search. The feasibility of this mechanism is tested by considering the statistical mechanics of DNA containing a single lesion wrapped onto the nucleosome. We consider lesions which make the DNA either more flexible or more rigid by modeling the lesion as either a decrease or an increase in the bending energy. We include this energy in a partition function model of nucleosome breathing. Our results indicate that the steady state for a breathing nucleosome will most likely position the lesion at the dyad or in the linker, depending on the energy of the lesion. A role for DNA binding proteins and chromatin remodelers is suggested based on their ability to alter the mechanical properties of the DNA and DNA-histone binding, respectively. We speculate that these positions around the nucleosome potentially serve as rendezvous points where DNA lesions may be encountered by repair proteins which may be sterically hindered from searching the rest of the nucleosomal DNA. The strength of the repositioning is strongly dependent on the structural details of the DNA lesion and the wrapping and breathing of the nucleosome. A more sophisticated evaluation of this proposed mechanism will require detailed information about breathing dynamics, the structure of partially wrapped nucleosomes, and the structural properties of damaged DNA.

  13. Regulation of ISWI involves inhibitory modules antagonized by nucleosomal epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Clapier, Cedric R.; Cairns, Bradley R.

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling complexes (CRCs) mobilize nucleosomes to mediate the access of DNA-binding factors to their sites in vivo. These CRCs contain a catalytic subunit that bears an ATPase/DNA translocase domain, and flanking regions that bind nucleosomal epitopes1. A central question is whether and how these flanking regions regulate ATP hydrolysis or the coupling of hydrolysis to DNA translocation, to affect nucleosome sliding efficiency. ISWIfamily CRCs contain ISWI2, which utilizes its ATPase/DNA translocase domain to pump DNA around the histone octamer to enable sliding3-7_ENREF_13. ISWI is positively regulated by two ‘activating’ nucleosomal epitopes: the ‘basic patch’ on the H4 tail, and extranucleosomal (linker) DNA8-13. Previous work defined the HSS domain in the ISWI C-terminus that binds linker DNA, needed for ISWI activity14,15. Here, we define two new, conserved, and separate regulatory regions on Drosophila ISWI, AutoN and NegC, that negatively regulate ATP hydrolysis (AutoN) or the coupling of ATP hydrolysis to productive DNA translocation (NegC). Rather than ‘activating’, the two aforementioned nucleosomal epitopes actually inhibit the negative regulation of AutoN and NegC. Remarkably, mutation/removal of AutoN and NegC enables significant nucleosome sliding without the H4 ‘basic patch’ or extranucleosomal DNA, or the HSS domain – converting ISWI to biochemical attributes of SWI/SNF-family ATPases. Thus, the ISWI ATPase catalytic core is an intrinsically-active DNA translocase which conducts nucleosome sliding, onto which selective ‘inhibition-of-inhibition’ modules are placed, to help ensure that remodeling occurs only in the presence of proper nucleosomal epitopes. This supports a general concept for the specialization of chromatin remodeling ATPases, where specific regulatory modules adapt an ancient active DNA translocase to conduct particular tasks only on the appropriate chromatin landscape. PMID:23143334

  14. Counterion atmosphere and hydration patterns near a nucleosome core particle.

    PubMed

    Materese, Christopher K; Savelyev, Alexey; Papoian, Garegin A

    2009-10-21

    The chromatin folding problem is an exciting and rich field for modern research. On the most basic level, chromatin fiber consists of a collection of protein-nucleic acid complexes, known as nucleosomes, joined together by segments of linker DNA. Understanding how the cell successfully compacts meters of highly charged DNA into a micrometer size nucleus while still enabling rapid access to the genetic code for transcriptional processes is a challenging goal. In this work we shed light on the way mobile ions condense around the nucleosome core particle, as revealed by an extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulation. On a hundred nanosecond time scale, the nucleosome exhibited only small conformational fluctuations. We found that nucleosomal DNA is better neutralized by the combination of histone charges and mobile ions compared with free DNA. We provide a detailed physical explanation of this effect using ideas from electrostatics in continuous media. We also discovered that sodium condensation around the histone core is dominated by an experimentally characterized acidic patch, which is thought to play a significant role in chromatin compaction by binding with basic histone tails. Finally, we found that the nucleosome is extensively permeated by over a thousand water molecules, which in turn allows mobile ions to penetrate deeply into the complex. Overall, our work sheds light on the way ionic and hydration interactions within a nucleosome may affect internucleosomal interactions in higher order chromatin fibers. PMID:19778017

  15. Nucleosomes determine their own patch size in base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Meas, Rithy; Smerdon, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) processes non-helix distorting lesions (e.g., uracils and gaps) and is composed of two subpathways that differ in the number of nucleotides (nts) incorporated during the DNA synthesis step: short patch (SP) repair incorporates 1 nt and long patch (LP) repair incorporates 2-12 nts. This choice for either LP or SP repair has not been analyzed in the context of nucleosomes. Initial studies with uracil located in nucleosome core DNA showed a distinct DNA polymerase extension profile in cell-free extracts that specifically limits extension to 1 nt, suggesting a preference for SP BER. Therefore, we developed an assay to differentiate long and short repair patches in 'designed' nucleosomes containing a single-nucleotide gap at specific locations relative to the dyad center. Using cell-free extracts or purified enzymes, we found that DNA lesions in the nucleosome core are preferentially repaired by DNA polymerase β and there is a significant reduction in BER polymerase extension beyond 1 nt, creating a striking bias for incorporation of short patches into nucleosomal DNA. These results show that nucleosomes control the patch size used by BER. PMID:27265863

  16. Nucleosome breathing and remodeling constrain CRISPR-Cas9 function

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, R Stefan; Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A; Lim, Wendell A; Narlikar, Geeta J; Almeida, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 bacterial surveillance system has become a versatile tool for genome editing and gene regulation in eukaryotic cells, yet how CRISPR-Cas9 contends with the barriers presented by eukaryotic chromatin is poorly understood. Here we investigate how the smallest unit of chromatin, a nucleosome, constrains the activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. We find that nucleosomes assembled on native DNA sequences are permissive to Cas9 action. However, the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA to Cas9 is variable over several orders of magnitude depending on dynamic properties of the DNA sequence and the distance of the PAM site from the nucleosome dyad. We further find that chromatin remodeling enzymes stimulate Cas9 activity on nucleosomal templates. Our findings imply that the spontaneous breathing of nucleosomal DNA together with the action of chromatin remodelers allow Cas9 to effectively act on chromatin in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13450.001 PMID:27130520

  17. The universality of nucleosome organization: from yeast to human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chereji, Razvan

    The basic units of DNA packaging are called nucleosomes. Their locations on the chromosomes play an essential role in gene regulation. We study nucleosome positioning in yeast, fly, mouse, and human, and build biophysical models in order to explain the genome-wide nucleosome organization. We show that DNA sequence alone is not able to generate the phased arrays of nucleosomes observed in vivo near the transcription start sites. We discuss simple models which can account for the formation of nucleosome depleted regions and nucleosome phasing at the gene promoters. We show that the same principles apply to different organisms. References: [1] RV Chereji, D Tolkunov, G Locke, AV Morozov - Phys. Rev. E 83, 050903 (2011) [2] RV Chereji, AV Morozov - J. Stat. Phys. 144, 379 (2011) [3] RV Chereji, AV Morozov - Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 5236 (2014) [4] RV Chereji, T-W Kan, et al. - Nucleic Acids Res. (2015) doi: 10.1093/nar/gkv978 [5] RV Chereji, AV Morozov - Brief. Funct. Genomics 14, 50 (2015) [6] HA Cole, J Ocampo, JR Iben, RV Chereji, DJ Clark - Nucleic Acids Res. 42, 12512 (2014) [7] D Ganguli, RV Chereji, J Iben, HA Cole, DJ Clark - Genome Res. 24, 1637 (2014)

  18. Comprehensive nucleosome mapping of the human genome in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Druliner, Brooke R; Vera, Daniel; Johnson, Ruth; Ruan, Xiaoyang; Apone, Lynn M; Dimalanta, Eileen T; Stewart, Fiona J; Boardman, Lisa; Dennis, Jonathan H

    2016-03-22

    Altered chromatin structure is a hallmark of cancer, and inappropriate regulation of chromatin structure may represent the origin of transformation. Important studies have mapped human nucleosome distributions genome wide, but the role of chromatin structure in cancer progression has not been addressed. We developed a MNase-Transcription Start Site Sequence Capture method (mTSS-seq) to map the nucleosome distribution at human transcription start sites genome-wide in primary human lung and colon adenocarcinoma tissue. Here, we confirm that nucleosome redistribution is an early, widespread event in lung (LAC) and colon (CRC) adenocarcinoma. These altered nucleosome architectures are consistent between LAC and CRC patient samples indicating that they may serve as important early adenocarcinoma markers. We demonstrate that the nucleosome alterations are driven by the underlying DNA sequence and potentiate transcription factor binding. We conclude that DNA-directed nucleosome redistributions are widespread early in cancer progression. We have proposed an entirely new hierarchical model for chromatin-mediated genome regulation.

  19. Comprehensive nucleosome mapping of the human genome in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Druliner, Brooke R.; Vera, Daniel; Johnson, Ruth; Ruan, Xiaoyang; Apone, Lynn M.; Dimalanta, Eileen T.; Stewart, Fiona J.; Boardman, Lisa; Dennis, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    Altered chromatin structure is a hallmark of cancer, and inappropriate regulation of chromatin structure may represent the origin of transformation. Important studies have mapped human nucleosome distributions genome wide, but the role of chromatin structure in cancer progression has not been addressed. We developed a MNase-Transcription Start Site Sequence Capture method (mTSS-seq) to map the nucleosome distribution at human transcription start sites genome-wide in primary human lung and colon adenocarcinoma tissue. Here, we confirm that nucleosome redistribution is an early, widespread event in lung (LAC) and colon (CRC) adenocarcinoma. These altered nucleosome architectures are consistent between LAC and CRC patient samples indicating that they may serve as important early adenocarcinoma markers. We demonstrate that the nucleosome alterations are driven by the underlying DNA sequence and potentiate transcription factor binding. We conclude that DNA-directed nucleosome redistributions are widespread early in cancer progression. We have proposed an entirely new hierarchical model for chromatin-mediated genome regulation. PMID:26735342

  20. Nucleosomes determine their own patch size in base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Meas, Rithy; Smerdon, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) processes non-helix distorting lesions (e.g., uracils and gaps) and is composed of two subpathways that differ in the number of nucleotides (nts) incorporated during the DNA synthesis step: short patch (SP) repair incorporates 1 nt and long patch (LP) repair incorporates 2–12 nts. This choice for either LP or SP repair has not been analyzed in the context of nucleosomes. Initial studies with uracil located in nucleosome core DNA showed a distinct DNA polymerase extension profile in cell-free extracts that specifically limits extension to 1 nt, suggesting a preference for SP BER. Therefore, we developed an assay to differentiate long and short repair patches in ‘designed’ nucleosomes containing a single-nucleotide gap at specific locations relative to the dyad center. Using cell-free extracts or purified enzymes, we found that DNA lesions in the nucleosome core are preferentially repaired by DNA polymerase β and there is a significant reduction in BER polymerase extension beyond 1 nt, creating a striking bias for incorporation of short patches into nucleosomal DNA. These results show that nucleosomes control the patch size used by BER. PMID:27265863

  1. Protein acetylation sites mediated by Schistosoma mansoni GCN5

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes Maciel, Renata de; Furtado Madeiro da Costa, Rodrigo; Meirelles Bastosde Oliveira, Francisco; Rumjanek, Franklin David; Fantappie, Marcelo Rosado

    2008-05-23

    The transcriptional co-activator GCN5, a histone acetyltransferase (HAT), is part of large multimeric complexes that are required for chromatin remodeling and transcription activation. As in other eukaryotes, the DNA from the parasite Schistosome mansoni is organized into nucleosomes and the genome encodes components of chromatin-remodeling complexes. Using a series of synthetic peptides we determined that Lys-14 of histone H3 was acetylated by the recombinant SmGCN5-HAT domain. SmGCN5 was also able to acetylate schistosome non-histone proteins, such as the nuclear receptors SmRXR1 and SmNR1, and the co-activator SmNCoA-62. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of SmGCN5 protein in the nuclei of vitelline cells. Within the nucleus, SmGCN5 was found to be located in interchromatin granule clusters (IGCs), which are transcriptionally active structures. The data suggest that SmGCN5 is involved in transcription activation.

  2. A method for evaluating nucleosome stability with a protein-binding fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Hiroyuki; Horikoshi, Naoki; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-12-01

    Nucleosomes are extremely stable histone-DNA complexes that form the building blocks of chromatin, which accommodates genomic DNA within the nucleus. The dynamic properties of chromatin play essential roles in regulating genomic DNA functions, such as DNA replication, recombination, repair, and transcription. Histones are the protein components of nucleosomes, and their diverse modifications and variants increase the versatility of nucleosome structures and their dynamics in chromatin. Therefore, a technique to evaluate the physical properties of nucleosomes would facilitate functional studies of the various nucleosomes. In this report, we describe a convenient assay for evaluating the thermal stability of nucleosomes in vitro.

  3. Binding of NF-κB to nucleosomes: effect of translational positioning, nucleosome remodeling and linker histone H1.

    PubMed

    Lone, Imtiaz Nisar; Shukla, Manu Shubhdarshan; Charles Richard, John Lalith; Peshev, Zahary Yordanov; Dimitrov, Stefan; Angelov, Dimitar

    2013-01-01

    NF-κB is a key transcription factor regulating the expression of inflammatory responsive genes. How NF-κB binds to naked DNA templates is well documented, but how it interacts with chromatin is far from being clear. Here we used a combination of UV laser footprinting, hydroxyl footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay to investigate the binding of NF-κB to nucleosomal templates. We show that NF-κB p50 homodimer is able to bind to its recognition sequence, when it is localized at the edge of the core particle, but not when the recognition sequence is at the interior of the nucleosome. Remodeling of the nucleosome by the chromatin remodeling machine RSC was not sufficient to allow binding of NF-κB to its recognition sequence located in the vicinity of the nucleosome dyad, but RSC-induced histone octamer sliding allowed clearly detectable binding of NF-κB with the slid particle. Importantly, nucleosome dilution-driven removal of H2A-H2B dimer led to complete accessibility of the site located close to the dyad to NF-κB. Finally, we found that NF-κB was able to displace histone H1 and prevent its binding to nucleosome. These data provide important insight on the role of chromatin structure in the regulation of transcription of NF-κB dependent genes. PMID:24086160

  4. Strategies implemented by the textile industry in response to natural-gas curtailments

    SciTech Connect

    Schreibeis, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    An examination is made of specific activities undertaken by textile firms in North and South Carolina and Georgia to insulate themselves against production losses resulting from natural gas curtailments. Results of the research effort focusing on investigating patterns or trends of precautionary activities undertaken by the textile industry in response to fuel interruptions are presented. Chapter II delineates the scope of the project, research design, and nature of the textile industry. One hundred candidate firms for detailed study were identified and 34 discussed their alternate fuel strategies. Information obtained was analyzed by means of two statistical analysis techniques. Methods employed and results are described in Chapter III. Overall results are presented in Chapter IV. Variations in the strategies implemented by various concerns were accounted for in terms of geographic location, plant size, plant type, and the duration and extent of curtailment impacts. Ranges of expenditures for short- and long-term strategies are identified.

  5. Intracellular Hmgb1 Inhibits Inflammatory Nucleosome Release and Limits Acute Pancreatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Rui; Zhang, Qiuhong; Hou, Wen; Yan, Zhenwen; Chen, Ruochan; Bonaroti, Jillian; Bansal, Preeti; Billiar, Timothy R.; Tsung, Allan; Wang, Qingde; Bartlett, David L.; Whitcomb, David C; Chang, Eugene B.; Zhu, Xiaorong; Wang, Haichao; Lu, Ben; Tracey, Kevin J.; Cao, Lizhi; Fan, Xue-Gong; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Tang, Daolin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an abundant protein that regulates chromosome architecture and also functions as a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule. Little is known about its intracellular roles in response to tissue injury or during subsequent local and systemic inflammatory responses. We investigated the function of Hmgb1 in mice following induction of acute pancreatitis. METHODS: We utilized a Cre/LoxP system to create mice with pancreas-specific disruption in Hmbg1 (Pdx1-Cre; HMGB1flox/flox mice). Acute pancreatitis was induced in these mice (HMGB1flox/flox mice served as controls) following injection of L-arginine or cerulein. Pancreatic tissues and acinar cells were collected and analyzed by histologic, immunoblot, and immunohistochemical analyses. RESULTS: Following injection of L-arginine or cerulein, Pdx1-Cre; HMGB1flox/flox mice developed acute pancreatitis more rapidly than controls, with increased mortality. Pancreatic tissues of these mice also had higher levels of serum amylase, acinar cell death, leukocyte infiltration, and interstitial edema than controls. Pancreatic tissues and acinar cells collected from the Pdx1-Cre; HMGB1flox/flox mice following L-arginine- or cerulein injection demonstrated nuclear catastrophe with greater nucleosome release when compared with controls, along with increased phosphorylation/activation of RELA Nfκb, degradation of Iκb, and phosphorylation of Mapk. Inhibitors of reactive oxygen species (N-acetyl-L-cysteine) blocked L-arginine–induced DNA damage, necrosis, apoptosis, release of nucleosomes, and activation of Nfκb in pancreatic tissues and acinar cells from Pdx1-Cre; HMGB1flox/flox and control mice. Exogenous genomic DNA and recombinant histone H3 proteins significantly induced release of HMGB1 from mouse macrophages; administration of antibodies against H3 to mice reduced serum levels of HMGB1 and increased survival following L-arginine injection. CONCLUSIONS: In 2 mouse

  6. mChIP-KAT-MS, a method to map protein interactions and acetylation sites for lysine acetyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Leslie; Huard, Sylvain; Cotrut, Michael; Pourhanifeh-Lemeri, Roghayeh; Steunou, Anne-Lise; Hamza, Akil; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Zhou, Hu; Ning, Zhibin; Basu, Amrita; Côté, Jacques; Figeys, Daniel A.; Baetz, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Recent global proteomic and genomic studies have determined that lysine acetylation is a highly abundant posttranslational modification. The next challenge is connecting lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) to their cellular targets. We hypothesize that proteins that physically interact with KATs may not only predict the cellular function of the KATs but may be acetylation targets. We have developed a mass spectrometry-based method that generates a KAT protein interaction network from which we simultaneously identify both in vivo acetylation sites and in vitro acetylation sites. This modified chromatin-immunopurification coupled to an in vitro KAT assay with mass spectrometry (mChIP-KAT-MS) was applied to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae KAT nucleosome acetyltransferase of histone H4 (NuA4). Using mChIP-KAT-MS, we define the NuA4 interactome and in vitro-enriched acetylome, identifying over 70 previously undescribed physical interaction partners for the complex and over 150 acetyl lysine residues, of which 108 are NuA4-specific in vitro sites. Through this method we determine NuA4 acetylation of its own subunit Epl1 is a means of self-regulation and identify a unique link between NuA4 and the spindle pole body. Our work demonstrates that this methodology may serve as a valuable tool in connecting KATs with their cellular targets. PMID:23572591

  7. The RSC chromatin remodelling enzyme has a unique role in directing the accurate positioning of nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Wippo, Christian J; Israel, Lars; Watanabe, Shinya; Hochheimer, Andreas; Peterson, Craig L; Korber, Philipp

    2011-04-01

    Nucleosomes impede access to DNA. Therefore, nucleosome positioning is fundamental to genome regulation. Nevertheless, the molecular nucleosome positioning mechanisms are poorly understood. This is partly because in vitro reconstitution of in vivo-like nucleosome positions from purified components is mostly lacking, barring biochemical studies. Using a yeast extract in vitro reconstitution system that generates in vivo-like nucleosome patterns at S. cerevisiae loci, we find that the RSC chromatin remodelling enzyme is necessary for nucleosome positioning. This was previously suggested by genome-wide in vivo studies and is confirmed here in vivo for individual loci. Beyond the limitations of conditional mutants, we show biochemically that RSC functions directly, can be sufficient, but mostly relies on other factors to properly position nucleosomes. Strikingly, RSC could not be replaced by either the closely related SWI/SNF or the Isw2 remodelling enzyme. Thus, we pinpoint that nucleosome positioning specifically depends on the unique properties of the RSC complex.

  8. Chromatin fibers are formed by heterogeneous groups of nucleosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Maria Aurelia; Manzo, Carlo; García-Parajo, María Filomena; Lakadamyali, Melike; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2015-03-12

    Nucleosomes help structure chromosomes by compacting DNA into fibers. To gain insight into how nucleosomes are arranged in vivo, we combined quantitative super-resolution nanoscopy with computer simulations to visualize and count nucleosomes along the chromatin fiber in single nuclei. Nucleosomes assembled in heterogeneous groups of varying sizes, here termed "clutches," and these were interspersed with nucleosome-depleted regions. The median number of nucleosomes inside clutches and their compaction defined as nucleosome density were cell-type-specific. Ground-state pluripotent stem cells had, on average, less dense clutches containing fewer nucleosomes and clutch size strongly correlated with the pluripotency potential of induced pluripotent stem cells. RNA polymerase II preferentially associated with the smallest clutches while linker histone H1 and heterochromatin were enriched in the largest ones. Our results reveal how the chromatin fiber is formed at nanoscale level and link chromatin fiber architecture to stem cell state.

  9. Nap1 regulates proper CENP-B binding to nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Miya, Yuta; Shono, Nobuaki; Ohzeki, Jun-ichirou; Osakabe, Akihisa; Otake, Koichiro; Larionov, Vladimir; Earnshaw, William C; Kimura, Hiroshi; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2013-03-01

    CENP-B is a widely conserved centromeric satellite DNA-binding protein, which specifically binds to a 17-bp DNA sequence known as the CENP-B box. CENP-B functions positively in the de novo assembly of centromeric nucleosomes, containing the centromere-specific histone H3 variant, CENP-A. At the same time, CENP-B also prevents undesired assembly of the CENP-A nucleosome through heterochromatin formation on satellite DNA integrated into ectopic sites. Therefore, improper CENP-B binding to chromosomes could be harmful. However, no CENP-B eviction mechanism has yet been reported. In the present study, we found that human Nap1, an acidic histone chaperone, inhibited the non-specific binding of CENP-B to nucleosomes and apparently stimulated CENP-B binding to its cognate CENP-B box DNA in nucleosomes. In human cells, the CENP-B eviction activity of Nap1 was confirmed in model experiments, in which the CENP-B binding to a human artificial chromosome or an ectopic chromosome locus bearing CENP-B boxes was significantly decreased when Nap1 was tethered near the CENP-B box sequence. In contrast, another acidic histone chaperone, sNASP, did not promote CENP-B eviction in vitro and in vivo and did not stimulate specific CENP-B binding to CENP-A nucleosomes in vitro. We therefore propose a novel mechanism of CENP-B regulation by Nap1. PMID:23325853

  10. ATP-dependent nucleosome unwrapping catalyzed by human RAD51.

    PubMed

    North, Justin A; Amunugama, Ravindra; Klajner, Marcelina; Bruns, Aaron N; Poirier, Michael G; Fishel, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSB) occur in chromatin following replication fork collapse and chemical or physical damage [Symington and Gautier (Double-strand break end resection and repair pathway choice. Annu. Rev. Genet. 2011;45:247-271.)] and may be repaired by homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining. Nucleosomes are the fundamental units of chromatin and must be remodeled during DSB repair by HR [Andrews and Luger (Nucleosome structure(s) and stability: variations on a theme. Annu. Rev. Biophys. 2011;40:99-117.)]. Physical initiation of HR requires RAD51, which forms a nucleoprotein filament (NPF) that catalyzes homologous pairing and strand exchange (recombinase) between DNAs that ultimately bridges the DSB gap [San Filippo, Sung and Klein. (Mechanism of eukaryotic HR. Annu. Rev. Biochem. 2008;77:229-257.)]. RAD51 forms an NPF on single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Although the single-stranded DNA NPF is essential for recombinase initiation, the role of the dsDNA NPF is less clear. Here, we demonstrate that the human RAD51 (HsRAD51) dsDNA NPF disassembles nucleosomes by unwrapping the DNA from the core histones. HsRAD51 that has been constitutively or biochemically activated for recombinase functions displays significantly reduced nucleosome disassembly activity. These results suggest that HsRAD51 can perform ATP hydrolysis-dependent nucleosome disassembly in addition to its recombinase functions. PMID:23757189

  11. Flexible and dynamic nucleosome fiber in living mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Tadasu; Kaizu, Kazunari; Pack, Chan-Gi; Tamura, Sachiko; Tani, Tomomi; Hihara, Saera; Nagai, Takeharu; Takahashi, Koichi; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Genomic DNA is organized three dimensionally within cells as chromatin and is searched and read by various proteins by an unknown mechanism; this mediates diverse cell functions. Recently, several pieces of evidence, including our cryomicroscopy and synchrotron X-ray scattering analyses, have demonstrated that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibers without a 30-nm chromatin fiber (i.e., a polymer melt-like structure). This melt-like structure implies a less physically constrained and locally more dynamic state, which may be crucial for protein factors to scan genomic DNA. Using a combined approach of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, Monte Carlo computer simulations, and single nucleosome imaging, we demonstrated the flexible and dynamic nature of the nucleosome fiber in living mammalian cells. We observed local nucleosome fluctuation (~50 nm movement/30 ms) caused by Brownian motion. Our in vivo/in silico results suggest that local nucleosome dynamics facilitate chromatin accessibility and play a critical role in the scanning of genome information.

  12. Chromatin remodeling facilitates DNA incision in UV-damaged nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungeun; Kim, Deok Ryong; Ahn, Byungchan

    2004-08-31

    The DNA repair machinery must locate and repair DNA damage all over the genome. As nucleosomes inhibit DNA repair in vitro, it has been suggested that chromatin remodeling might be required for efficient repair in vivo. To investigate a possible contribution of nucleosome dynamics and chromatin remodeling to the repair of UV-photoproducts in nucleosomes, we examined the effect of a chromatin remodeling complex on the repair of UV-lesions by Micrococcus luteus UV endonuclease (ML-UV endo) and T4-endonuclease V (T4-endoV) in reconstituted mononucleosomes positioned at one end of a 175-bp long DNA fragment. Repair by ML-UV endo and T4-endoV was inefficient in mononucleosomes compared with naked DNA. However, the human nucleosome remodeling complex, hSWI/SNF, promoted more homogeneous repair by ML-UV endo and T4-endo V in reconstituted nucleosomes. This result suggests that recognition of DNA damage could be facilitated by a fluid state of the chromatin resulting from chromatin remodeling activities. PMID:15359130

  13. Integrated molecular mechanism directing nucleosome reorganization by human FACT

    PubMed Central

    Tsunaka, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Yoshie; Oyama, Takuji; Hirose, Susumu; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2016-01-01

    Facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) plays essential roles in chromatin remodeling during DNA transcription, replication, and repair. Our structural and biochemical studies of human FACT–histone interactions present precise views of nucleosome reorganization, conducted by the FACT-SPT16 (suppressor of Ty 16) Mid domain and its adjacent acidic AID segment. AID accesses the H2B N-terminal basic region exposed by partial unwrapping of the nucleosomal DNA, thereby triggering the invasion of FACT into the nucleosome. The crystal structure of the Mid domain complexed with an H3–H4 tetramer exhibits two separate contact sites; the Mid domain forms a novel intermolecular β structure with H4. At the other site, the Mid–H2A steric collision on the H2A-docking surface of the H3–H4 tetramer within the nucleosome induces H2A–H2B displacement. This integrated mechanism results in disrupting the H3 αN helix, which is essential for retaining the nucleosomal DNA ends, and hence facilitates DNA stripping from histone. PMID:26966247

  14. Genome-wide profiling of nucleosome sensitivity and chromatin accessibility in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chereji, Răzvan V; Kan, Tsung-Wai; Grudniewska, Magda K; Romashchenko, Alexander V; Berezikov, Eugene; Zhimulev, Igor F; Guryev, Victor; Morozov, Alexandre V; Moshkin, Yuri M

    2016-02-18

    Nucleosomal DNA is thought to be generally inaccessible to DNA-binding factors, such as micrococcal nuclease (MNase). Here, we digest Drosophila chromatin with high and low concentrations of MNase to reveal two distinct nucleosome types: MNase-sensitive and MNase-resistant. MNase-resistant nucleosomes assemble on sequences depleted of A/T and enriched in G/C-containing dinucleotides, whereas MNase-sensitive nucleosomes form on A/T-rich sequences found at transcription start and termination sites, enhancers and DNase I hypersensitive sites. Estimates of nucleosome formation energies indicate that MNase-sensitive nucleosomes tend to be less stable than MNase-resistant ones. Strikingly, a decrease in cell growth temperature of about 10°C makes MNase-sensitive nucleosomes less accessible, suggesting that observed variations in MNase sensitivity are related to either thermal fluctuations of chromatin fibers or the activity of enzymatic machinery. In the vicinity of active genes and DNase I hypersensitive sites nucleosomes are organized into periodic arrays, likely due to 'phasing' off potential barriers formed by DNA-bound factors or by nucleosomes anchored to their positions through external interactions. The latter idea is substantiated by our biophysical model of nucleosome positioning and energetics, which predicts that nucleosomes immediately downstream of transcription start sites are anchored and recapitulates nucleosome phasing at active genes significantly better than sequence-dependent models.

  15. RNA-dependent dynamic histone acetylation regulates MCL1 alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Dilshad H.; Gonzalez, Carolina; Cooper, Charlton; Sun, Jian-Min; Chen, Hou Yu; Healy, Shannon; Xu, Wayne; Smith, Karen T.; Workman, Jerry L.; Leygue, Etienne; Davie, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) and lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) catalyze dynamic histone acetylation at regulatory and coding regions of transcribed genes. Highly phosphorylated HDAC2 is recruited within corepressor complexes to regulatory regions, while the nonphosphorylated form is associated with the gene body. In this study, we characterized the nonphosphorylated HDAC2 complexes recruited to the transcribed gene body and explored the function of HDAC-complex-mediated dynamic histone acetylation. HDAC1 and 2 were coimmunoprecipitated with several splicing factors, including serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) which has roles in alternative splicing. The co-chromatin immunoprecipitation of HDAC1/2 and SRSF1 to the gene body was RNA-dependent. Inhibition of HDAC activity and knockdown of HDAC1, HDAC2 or SRSF1 showed that these proteins were involved in alternative splicing of MCL1. HDAC1/2 and KAT2B were associated with nascent pre-mRNA in general and with MCL1 pre-mRNA specifically. Inhibition of HDAC activity increased the occupancy of KAT2B and acetylation of H3 and H4 of the H3K4 methylated alternative MCL1 exon 2 nucleosome. Thus, nonphosphorylated HDAC1/2 is recruited to pre-mRNA by splicing factors to act at the RNA level with KAT2B and other KATs to catalyze dynamic histone acetylation of the MCL1 alternative exon and alter the splicing of MCL1 pre-mRNA. PMID:24234443

  16. Molecular basis for the autoregulation of the protein acetyl transferase Rtt109

    PubMed Central

    Stavropoulos, Pete; Nagy, Vivien; Blobel, Günter; Hoelz, André

    2008-01-01

    Rtt109 is a protein acetyltransferase (PAT) that is responsible for the acetylation of lysine-56 of histone 3 (H3K56) in yeast. H3K56 acetylation has been implicated in the weakening of the interaction between the histone core and the surrounding DNA in the nucleosomal particle. Rtt109, in cooperation with various histone chaperones, promotes genomic stability and is required for resistance to DNA damaging agents. Here, we present the crystal structure of Rtt109 in complex with acetyl-CoA at a 2.0-Å resolution. Rtt109 consists of a core PAT domain, which binds the acetyl-CoA cofactor. A second domain, the activation domain, is tightly associated with the PAT domain. Autoacetylation of lysine-290 within the activation domain is required for stabilizing the interaction between the two domains and is essential for catalysis. Biochemical analysis demonstrates the requirement of a loop within the PAT domain for the binding of the histone chaperone Vps75, and mutational analysis identifies key residues for catalysis. We propose a model in which the autoacetylation of Rtt109 is crucial for the regulation of its catalytic activity. PMID:18719104

  17. Histone acetylation characterizes chromatin presetting by NF1 and Oct1 and enhances glucocorticoid receptor binding to the MMTV promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Astrand, Carolina; Belikov, Sergey; Wrange, Orjan

    2009-09-10

    Transcription from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is induced by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). This switch was reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes. Previously, we showed that Nuclear Factor 1 (NF1) and Octamer Transcription Factor 1 (Oct1) bind constitutively to the MMTV promoter and thereby induce translational nucleosome positioning representing an intermediary, i.e. preset, state of nucleosome organization. Here we further characterize this NF1 and Oct1 induced preset chromatin in relation to the inactive and the hormone-activated state. The preset chromatin exhibits increased histone acetylation but does not cause dissociation of histone H1 as oppose to the hormone-activated state. Furthermore, upon hormone induction the preset MMTV chromatin displays an enhanced and prolonged GR binding capacity and transcription during an intrinsic and time-dependent silencing of the injected template. The silencing process correlates with a reduced histone acetylation. However, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA), does not counteract silencing in spite of its distinct stimulation of GR-DNA binding. The latter indicates the importance of histone acetylation to maintain DNA access for inducible factor binding. We discuss how constitutively bound factors such as NF1 and Oct1 may participate in the maintenance of tissue specificity of hormone responsive genes.

  18. Rapid Histone-Catalyzed DNA Lesion Excision and Accompanying Protein Modification in Nucleosomes and Nucleosome Core Particles.

    PubMed

    Weng, Liwei; Greenberg, Marc M

    2015-09-01

    C5'-Hydrogen atoms are frequently abstracted during DNA oxidation. The oxidized abasic lesion 5'-(2-phosphoryl-1,4-dioxobutane) (DOB) is an electrophilic product of the C5'-radical. DOB is a potent irreversible inhibitor of DNA polymerase β, and forms interstrand cross-links in free DNA. We examined the reactivity of DOB within nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles (NCPs), the monomeric component of chromatin. Depending upon the position at which DOB is generated within a NCP, it is excised from nucleosomal DNA at a rate 275-1500-fold faster than that in free DNA. The half-life of DOB (7.0-16.8 min) in NCPs is shorter than any other abasic lesion. DOB's lifetime in NCPs is also significantly shorter than the estimated lifetime of an abasic site within a cell, suggesting that the observed chemistry would occur intracellularly. Histones also catalyze DOB excision when the lesion is present in the DNA linker region of a nucleosome. Schiff-base formation between DOB and histone proteins is detected in nucleosomes and NCPs, resulting in pyrrolone formation at the lysine residues. The lysines modified by DOB are often post-translationally modified. Consequently, the histone modifications described herein could affect the regulation of gene expression and may provide a chemical basis for the cytotoxicity of the DNA damaging agents that produce this lesion.

  19. Acetylator phenotype in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    McLaren, E H; Burden, A C; Moorhead, P J

    1977-07-30

    The proportions of slow and fast acetylators in a group of diabetics with symptomatic peripheral neuropathy were compared with those in a group of diabetics who had had the disease for at least 10 years without developing neuropathy. There was a significantly higher proportion of fast acetylators in the group of diabetics without neuropathy than in those with neuropathy or in the normal population. Hence genetic factors separate from the diabetic diathesis may determine the development of neuropathy in any particular diabetic.

  20. Hierarchical looping of zigzag nucleosome chains in metaphase chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Grigoryev, Sergei A; Bascom, Gavin; Buckwalter, Jenna M; Schubert, Michael B; Woodcock, Christopher L; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-02-01

    The architecture of higher-order chromatin in eukaryotic cell nuclei is largely unknown. Here, we use electron microscopy-assisted nucleosome interaction capture (EMANIC) cross-linking experiments in combination with mesoscale chromatin modeling of 96-nucleosome arrays to investigate the internal organization of condensed chromatin in interphase cell nuclei and metaphase chromosomes at nucleosomal resolution. The combined data suggest a novel hierarchical looping model for chromatin higher-order folding, similar to rope flaking used in mountain climbing and rappelling. Not only does such packing help to avoid tangling and self-crossing, it also facilitates rope unraveling. Hierarchical looping is characterized by an increased frequency of higher-order internucleosome contacts for metaphase chromosomes compared with chromatin fibers in vitro and interphase chromatin, with preservation of a dominant two-start zigzag organization associated with the 30-nm fiber. Moreover, the strong dependence of looping on linker histone concentration suggests a hierarchical self-association mechanism of relaxed nucleosome zigzag chains rather than longitudinal compaction as seen in 30-nm fibers. Specifically, concentrations lower than one linker histone per nucleosome promote self-associations and formation of these looped networks of zigzag fibers. The combined experimental and modeling evidence for condensed metaphase chromatin as hierarchical loops and bundles of relaxed zigzag nucleosomal chains rather than randomly coiled threads or straight and stiff helical fibers reconciles aspects of other models for higher-order chromatin structure; it constitutes not only an efficient storage form for the genomic material, consistent with other genome-wide chromosome conformation studies that emphasize looping, but also a convenient organization for local DNA unraveling and genome access. PMID:26787893

  1. Hierarchical looping of zigzag nucleosome chains in metaphase chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryev, Sergei A.; Bascom, Gavin; Buckwalter, Jenna M.; Schubert, Michael B.; Woodcock, Christopher L.; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    The architecture of higher-order chromatin in eukaryotic cell nuclei is largely unknown. Here, we use electron microscopy-assisted nucleosome interaction capture (EMANIC) cross-linking experiments in combination with mesoscale chromatin modeling of 96-nucleosome arrays to investigate the internal organization of condensed chromatin in interphase cell nuclei and metaphase chromosomes at nucleosomal resolution. The combined data suggest a novel hierarchical looping model for chromatin higher-order folding, similar to rope flaking used in mountain climbing and rappelling. Not only does such packing help to avoid tangling and self-crossing, it also facilitates rope unraveling. Hierarchical looping is characterized by an increased frequency of higher-order internucleosome contacts for metaphase chromosomes compared with chromatin fibers in vitro and interphase chromatin, with preservation of a dominant two-start zigzag organization associated with the 30-nm fiber. Moreover, the strong dependence of looping on linker histone concentration suggests a hierarchical self-association mechanism of relaxed nucleosome zigzag chains rather than longitudinal compaction as seen in 30-nm fibers. Specifically, concentrations lower than one linker histone per nucleosome promote self-associations and formation of these looped networks of zigzag fibers. The combined experimental and modeling evidence for condensed metaphase chromatin as hierarchical loops and bundles of relaxed zigzag nucleosomal chains rather than randomly coiled threads or straight and stiff helical fibers reconciles aspects of other models for higher-order chromatin structure; it constitutes not only an efficient storage form for the genomic material, consistent with other genome-wide chromosome conformation studies that emphasize looping, but also a convenient organization for local DNA unraveling and genome access. PMID:26787893

  2. Mapping post-translational modifications of mammalian testicular specific histone variant TH2B in tetraploid and haploid germ cells and their implications on the dynamics of nucleosome structure.

    PubMed

    Pentakota, Satya Krishna; Sandhya, Sankaran; P Sikarwar, Arun; Chandra, Nagasuma; Satyanarayana Rao, Manchanahalli R

    2014-12-01

    Histones regulate a variety of chromatin templated events by their post-translational modifications (PTMs). Although there are extensive reports on the PTMs of canonical histones, the information on the histone variants remains very scanty. Here, we report the identification of different PTMs, such as acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation of a major mammalian histone variant TH2B. Our mass spectrometric analysis has led to the identification of both conserved and unique modifications across tetraploid spermatocytes and haploid spermatids. We have also computationally derived the 3-dimensional model of a TH2B containing nucleosome in order to study the spatial orientation of the PTMs identified and their effect on nucleosome stability and DNA binding potential. From our nucleosome model, it is evident that substitution of specific amino acid residues in TH2B results in both differential histone-DNA and histone-histone contacts. Furthermore, we have also observed that acetylation on the N-terminal tail of TH2B weakens the interactions with the DNA. These results provide direct evidence that, similar to somatic H2B, the testis specific histone TH2B also undergoes multiple PTMs, suggesting the possibility of chromatin regulation by such covalent modifications in mammalian male germ cells.

  3. The chromatin-binding protein HMGN3 stimulates histone acetylation and transcription across the Glyt1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Barkess, Gráinne; Postnikov, Yuri; Campos, Chrisanne D.; Mishra, Shivam; Mohan, Gokula; Verma, Sakshi; Bustin, Michael; West, Katherine L.

    2013-01-01

    HMGNs are nucleosome-binding proteins that alter the pattern of histone modifications and modulate the binding of linker histones to chromatin. The HMGN3 family member exists as two splice forms, HMGN3a which is full-length and HMGN3b which lacks the C-terminal RD (regulatory domain). In the present study, we have used the Glyt1 (glycine transporter 1) gene as a model system to investigate where HMGN proteins are bound across the locus in vivo, and to study how the two HMGN3 splice variants affect histone modifications and gene expression. We demonstrate that HMGN1, HMGN2, HMGN3a and HMGN3b are bound across the Glyt1 gene locus and surrounding regions, and are not enriched more highly at the promoter or putative enhancer. We conclude that the peaks of H3K4me3 (trimethylated Lys4 of histone H3) and H3K9ac (acetylated Lys9 of histone H3) at the active Glyt1a promoter do not play a major role in recruiting HMGN proteins. HMGN3a/b binding leads to increased H3K14 (Lys14 of histone H3) acetylation and stimulates Glyt1a expression, but does not alter the levels of H3K4me3 or H3K9ac enrichment. Acetylation assays show that HMGN3a stimulates the ability of PCAF [p300/CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein)-binding protein-associated factor] to acetylate nucleosomal H3 in vitro, whereas HMGN3b does not. We propose a model where HMGN3a/b-stimulated H3K14 acetylation across the bodies of large genes such as Glyt1 can lead to more efficient transcription elongation and increased mRNA production. PMID:22150271

  4. Reduced physical activity in adults at risk for type 2 diabetes who curtail their sleep

    PubMed Central

    Booth, J.N.; Bromley, L.E.; Darukhanavala, A.P.; Whitmore, H.R.; Imperial, J.G.; Penev, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Adults with parental history of type 2 diabetes have high metabolic morbidity, which is exacerbated by physical inactivity. Self-reported sleep <6 h/day is associated with increased incidence of obesity and diabetes, which may be mediated in part by sleep-loss-related reduction in physical activity. We examined the relationship between habitual sleep curtailment and physical activity in adults with parental history of type 2 diabetes. Forty-eight young urban adults with parental history of type 2 diabetes (27F/21M; mean [SD] age 26 [4] y; BMI 23.8 [2.5] kg/m2) each completed 13 [2] days of sleep and physical activity monitoring by wrist actigraphy and waist accelerometry while following their usual lifestyle at home. Laboratory polysomnography was used to screen for sleep disorders. The primary outcome of the study was the comparison of total daily activity counts between participants with habitual sleep <6 vs. ≥6 h/night. Secondary measures included daily time spent sedentary and in light, moderate, and vigorous physical activity. Short sleepers had no sleep abnormalities and showed signs of increased sleep pressure consistent with a behavioral pattern of habitual sleep curtailment. Compared to participants who slept ≥6 h/night, short sleepers had 27% fewer daily activity counts (P=0.042), spent less time in moderate-plus-vigorous physical activity (−43 min/day; P=0.010), and remained more sedentary (+69 min/day; P=0.026). Our results indicate that young urban adults with parental history of type 2 diabetes who habitually curtail their sleep have less daily physical activity and more sedentary living, which may enhance their metabolic risk. PMID:21996665

  5. Stability of the conservative mode of nucleosome assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Leffak, I M

    1983-01-01

    The conservative assembly of nucleosome histone octamer cores has been confirmed by electrophoretic analysis of density labeled histones following equilibrium buoyant density centrifugation. After normal replication, crosslinked octamers are shown not to contain a mixture of new and old core histones. Moreover, when DNA synthesis is inhibited by ara-C nucleosome cores are still assembled exclusively from nascent histone. Similarly, after release from cycloheximide inhibition newly synthesized core histone is conservatively deposited. Thus, a conservative mechanism of histone octamer assembly occurs when nascent histone is present in the normal stoichiometry to nascent DNA and when chromatin is assembled in nascent histone or nascent DNA excess. Images PMID:6856473

  6. Coupling between Histone Conformations and DNA Geometry in Nucleosomes on a Microsecond Timescale: Atomistic Insights into Nucleosome Functions.

    PubMed

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Armeev, Grigoriy A; Goncearenco, Alexander; Zhurkin, Victor B; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-01-16

    An octamer of histone proteins wraps about 200bp of DNA into two superhelical turns to form nucleosomes found in chromatin. Although the static structure of the nucleosomal core particle has been solved, details of the dynamic interactions between histones and DNA remain elusive. We performed extensively long unconstrained, all-atom microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of nucleosomes including linker DNA segments and full-length histones in explicit solvent. For the first time, we were able to identify and characterize the rearrangements in nucleosomes on a microsecond timescale including the coupling between the conformation of the histone tails and the DNA geometry. We found that certain histone tail conformations promoted DNA bulging near its entry/exit sites, resulting in the formation of twist defects within the DNA. This led to a reorganization of histone-DNA interactions, suggestive of the formation of initial nucleosome sliding intermediates. We characterized the dynamics of the histone tails upon their condensation on the core and linker DNA and showed that tails may adopt conformationally constrained positions due to the insertion of "anchoring" lysines and arginines into the DNA minor grooves. Potentially, these phenomena affect the accessibility of post-translationally modified histone residues that serve as important sites for epigenetic marks (e.g., at H3K9, H3K27, H4K16), suggesting that interactions of the histone tails with the core and linker DNA modulate the processes of histone tail modifications and binding of the effector proteins. We discuss the implications of the observed results on the nucleosome function and compare our results to different experimental studies.

  7. Role of hMOF-dependent histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation in the maintenance of TMS1/ASC gene activity1

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor-Vazirani, Priya; Kagey, Jacob D.; Powell, Doris R.; Vertino, Paula M.

    2008-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes in human cancers is associated with aberrant methylation of promoter region CpG islands and local alterations in histone modifications. However, the mechanisms that drive these events remain unclear. Here, we establish an important role for histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation (H4K16Ac) and the histone acetyltransferase hMOF in the regulation of TMS1/ASC, a proapoptotic gene that undergoes epigenetic silencing in human cancers. In the unmethylated and active state, the TMS1 CpG island is spanned by positioned nucleosomes and marked by histone H3K4 methylation. H4K16Ac was uniquely localized to two sharp peaks that flanked the unmethylated CpG island and corresponded to strongly positioned nucleosomes. Aberrant methylation and silencing of TMS1 was accompanied by loss of the H4K16Ac peaks, loss of nucleosome positioning, hypomethylation of H3K4 and hypermethylation of H3K9. In addition, a single peak of histone H4 lysine 20 trimethylation was observed near the transcription start site. Downregulation of hMOF or another component of the MSL complex resulted in a gene-specific decrease in H4K16Ac, loss of nucleosome positioning and silencing of TMS1. Gene silencing induced by H4K16 deacetylation occurred independently of changes in histone methylation and DNA methylation and was reversed upon hMOF re-expression. These results indicate that the selective marking of nucleosomes flanking the CpG island by hMOF is required to maintain TMS1 gene activity, and suggest that the loss of H4K16Ac, mobilization of nucleosomes and transcriptional downregulation may be important events in the epigenetic silencing of certain tumor suppressor genes in cancer. PMID:18701507

  8. Uniformity of nucleosome preservation pattern in Mammalian sperm and its connection to repetitive DNA elements.

    PubMed

    Samans, Birgit; Yang, Yang; Krebs, Stefan; Sarode, Gaurav Vilas; Blum, Helmut; Reichenbach, Myriam; Wolf, Eckhard; Steger, Klaus; Dansranjavin, Temuujin; Schagdarsurengin, Undraga

    2014-07-14

    Nucleosome-to-protamine exchange during mammalian spermiogenesis is essential for compaction and protection of paternal DNA. It is interesting that, depending on the species, 1% to 15% of nucleosomes are retained, but the generalizability and biological function of this retention are unknown. Here, we show concordantly in human and bovine that nucleosomes remained in sperm chromatin predominantly within distal intergenic regions and introns and associated with centromere repeats and retrotransposons (LINE1 and SINEs). In contrast, nucleosome depletion concerned particularly exons, 5'-UTR, 3'-UTR, TSS, and TTS and was associated with simple and low-complexity repeats. Overlap of human and bovine genes exhibiting nucleosome preservation in the promoter and gene body revealed a significant enrichment of signal transduction and RNA- and protein-processing factors. Our study demonstrates the genome-wide uniformity of the nucleosome preservation pattern in mammalian sperm and its connection to repetitive DNA elements and suggests a function in preimplantation processes for paternally derived nucleosomes.

  9. Nucleosome Presence at AML-1 Binding Sites Inversely Correlates with Ly49 Expression: Revelations from an Informatics Analysis of Nucleosomes and Immune Cell Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Wight, Andrew; Yang, Doo; Ioshikhes, Ilya; Makrigiannis, Andrew P

    2016-04-01

    Beyond its role in genomic organization and compaction, the nucleosome is believed to participate in the regulation of gene transcription. Here, we report a computational method to evaluate the nucleosome sensitivity for a transcription factor over a given stretch of the genome. Sensitive factors are predicted to be those with binding sites preferentially contained within nucleosome boundaries and lacking 10 bp periodicity. Based on these criteria, the Acute Myeloid Leukemia-1a (AML-1a) transcription factor, a regulator of immune gene expression, was identified as potentially sensitive to nucleosomal regulation within the mouse Ly49 gene family. This result was confirmed in RMA, a cell line with natural expression of Ly49, using MNase-Seq to generate a nucleosome map of chromosome 6, where the Ly49 gene family is located. Analysis of this map revealed a specific depletion of nucleosomes at AML-1a binding sites in the expressed Ly49A when compared to the other, silent Ly49 genes. Our data suggest that nucleosome-based regulation contributes to the expression of Ly49 genes, and we propose that this method of predicting nucleosome sensitivity could aid in dissecting the regulatory role of nucleosomes in general.

  10. Regulatory analysis for review and establishment of natural gas curtailment priorities

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    Technical appendices in Volume 4 provide data and detailed explanations for each of the seven components into which policy evaluation has been divided: (1) delineation of alternatives and then simulation of shortages under each alternative in each prototype company, (2) supplier decisions and costs, including allocation rules, (3) user fuel substitution costs, (4) calculation of user shortage costs, supplier operating cost, and non-user pollution cost, (5) institutional factors affecting implementation, (6) annual demand and supply trends, and (7) national projections for economic and environmental summaries. In essence, there is increasing detail and more intricate discussion from Volume 1 to Volumes 2 and 3 and then to the Technical Appendices in Volume 4. Volume 4 should be used to gain understanding of the many different curtailment plans across the nation and to better appreciate the types and levels of costs that occur to both users and suppliers. The diagrams and discussions in Volume 4 will help the reader interpret the important concepts in designing and evaluating curtailment alternatives. The scenarios on demand and supply in Volume 4 can provide background for other studies.

  11. Regulatory analysis for review and establishment of natural gas curtailment priorities. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    The overall perspective for policy review is in Volume 1. It contains a concise statement of the problem, a list of policy alternatives, all study findings, and an outline of the evaluations which produced the study findings. Volume 2 is a detailed evaluation of each policy alternative, except for the environmental impact assessment in Volume 3. Both Volumes 2 and 3 are designed to add details for the reader who has already studied Volume 1; background in Volume 1 is not repeated in other volumes. Volume 2 should be used to understand the basic causes for the differences in curtailment alternatives presented in Volume 1. It should also be used to gain understanding of how any additional curtailment alternative must be evaluated before it can be safely implemented. This volume also discusses the following basic policy goals which should guide the selection of any policy change: (1) efficiency as measured by shortage costs and supplier costs, (2) equity as measured by fairness among groups, (3) administrative burden as measured by record keeping and implementation problems, and (4) contribution toward special goals such as oil import reduction.

  12. Dynamic Competing Histone H4 K5K8 Acetylation and Butyrylation Are Hallmarks of Highly Active Gene Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Afsaneh; Zhang, Di; Huang, He; Barral, Sophie; Kwon, Oh Kwang; Qi, Shankang; Tang, Zhanyun; Buchou, Thierry; Vitte, Anne-Laure; He, Tieming; Cheng, Zhongyi; Montellier, Emilie; Gaucher, Jonathan; Curtet, Sandrine; Debernardi, Alexandra; Charbonnier, Guillaume; Puthier, Denis; Petosa, Carlo; Panne, Daniel; Rousseaux, Sophie; Roeder, Robert G.; Zhao, Yingming; Khochbin, Saadi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Recently discovered histone lysine acylation marks increase the functional diversity of nucleosomes well beyond acetylation. Here, we focus on histone butyrylation in the context of sperm cell differentiation. Specifically, we investigate the butyrylation of histone H4 lysine 5 and 8 at gene promoters where acetylation guides the binding of Brdt, a bromodomain-containing protein, thereby mediating stage-specific gene expression programs and post-meiotic chromatin reorganization. Genome-wide mapping data show that highly active Brdt-bound gene promoters systematically harbor competing histone acetylation and butyrylation marks at H4 K5 and H4 K8. Despite acting as a direct stimulator of transcription, histone butyrylation competes with acetylation, especially at H4 K5, to prevent Brdt binding. Additionally, H4 K5K8 butyrylation also marks retarded histone removal during late spermatogenesis. Hence, alternating H4 acetylation and butyrylation, while sustaining direct gene activation and dynamic bromodomain binding, could impact the final male epigenome features. PMID:27105113

  13. Dynamic Competing Histone H4 K5K8 Acetylation and Butyrylation Are Hallmarks of Highly Active Gene Promoters.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Afsaneh; Zhang, Di; Huang, He; Barral, Sophie; Kwon, Oh Kwang; Qi, Shankang; Tang, Zhanyun; Buchou, Thierry; Vitte, Anne-Laure; He, Tieming; Cheng, Zhongyi; Montellier, Emilie; Gaucher, Jonathan; Curtet, Sandrine; Debernardi, Alexandra; Charbonnier, Guillaume; Puthier, Denis; Petosa, Carlo; Panne, Daniel; Rousseaux, Sophie; Roeder, Robert G; Zhao, Yingming; Khochbin, Saadi

    2016-04-21

    Recently discovered histone lysine acylation marks increase the functional diversity of nucleosomes well beyond acetylation. Here, we focus on histone butyrylation in the context of sperm cell differentiation. Specifically, we investigate the butyrylation of histone H4 lysine 5 and 8 at gene promoters where acetylation guides the binding of Brdt, a bromodomain-containing protein, thereby mediating stage-specific gene expression programs and post-meiotic chromatin reorganization. Genome-wide mapping data show that highly active Brdt-bound gene promoters systematically harbor competing histone acetylation and butyrylation marks at H4 K5 and H4 K8. Despite acting as a direct stimulator of transcription, histone butyrylation competes with acetylation, especially at H4 K5, to prevent Brdt binding. Additionally, H4 K5K8 butyrylation also marks retarded histone removal during late spermatogenesis. Hence, alternating H4 acetylation and butyrylation, while sustaining direct gene activation and dynamic bromodomain binding, could impact the final male epigenome features. PMID:27105113

  14. Fatal Intoxication with Acetyl Fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Susan M; Haikal, Nabila A; Kraner, James C

    2016-01-01

    Among the new psychoactive substances encountered in forensic investigations is the opioid, acetyl fentanyl. The death of a 28-year-old man from recreational use of this compound is reported. The decedent was found in the bathroom of his residence with a tourniquet secured around his arm and a syringe nearby. Postmortem examination findings included marked pulmonary and cerebral edema and needle track marks. Toxicological analysis revealed acetyl fentanyl in subclavian blood, liver, vitreous fluid, and urine at concentrations of 235 ng/mL, 2400 ng/g, 131 ng/mL, and 234 ng/mL, respectively. Acetyl fentanyl was also detected in the accompanying syringe. Death was attributed to recreational acetyl fentanyl abuse, likely through intravenous administration. The blood acetyl fentanyl concentration is considerably higher than typically found in fatal fentanyl intoxications. Analysis of this case underscores the need for consideration of a wide range of compounds with potential opioid-agonist activity when investigating apparent recreational drug-related deaths. PMID:26389815

  15. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    PubMed

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use. PMID:25296770

  16. Dynamics of nucleosome assembly and effects of DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Yeon; Lee, Jaehyoun; Yue, Hongjun; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2015-02-13

    The nucleosome is the fundamental packing unit of the eukaryotic genome, and CpG methylation is an epigenetic modification associated with gene repression and silencing. We investigated nucleosome assembly mediated by histone chaperone Nap1 and the effects of CpG methylation based on three-color single molecule FRET measurements, which enabled direct monitoring of histone binding in the context of DNA wrapping. According to our observation, (H3-H4)2 tetramer incorporation must precede H2A-H2B dimer binding, which is independent of DNA termini wrapping. Upon CpG methylation, (H3-H4)2 tetramer incorporation and DNA termini wrapping are facilitated, whereas proper incorporation of H2A-H2B dimers is inhibited. We suggest that these changes are due to rigidified DNA and increased random binding of histones to DNA. According to the results, CpG methylation expedites nucleosome assembly in the presence of abundant DNA and histones, which may help facilitate gene packaging in chromatin. The results also indicate that the slowest steps in nucleosome assembly are DNA termini wrapping and tetramer positioning, both of which are affected heavily by changes in the physical properties of DNA. PMID:25550164

  17. Dynamics of nucleosome assembly and effects of DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Yeon; Lee, Jaehyoun; Yue, Hongjun; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2015-02-13

    The nucleosome is the fundamental packing unit of the eukaryotic genome, and CpG methylation is an epigenetic modification associated with gene repression and silencing. We investigated nucleosome assembly mediated by histone chaperone Nap1 and the effects of CpG methylation based on three-color single molecule FRET measurements, which enabled direct monitoring of histone binding in the context of DNA wrapping. According to our observation, (H3-H4)2 tetramer incorporation must precede H2A-H2B dimer binding, which is independent of DNA termini wrapping. Upon CpG methylation, (H3-H4)2 tetramer incorporation and DNA termini wrapping are facilitated, whereas proper incorporation of H2A-H2B dimers is inhibited. We suggest that these changes are due to rigidified DNA and increased random binding of histones to DNA. According to the results, CpG methylation expedites nucleosome assembly in the presence of abundant DNA and histones, which may help facilitate gene packaging in chromatin. The results also indicate that the slowest steps in nucleosome assembly are DNA termini wrapping and tetramer positioning, both of which are affected heavily by changes in the physical properties of DNA.

  18. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    PubMed

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use.

  19. Perturbations in nucleosome structure from heavy metal association

    PubMed Central

    Mohideen, Kareem; Muhammad, Reyhan; Davey, Curt A.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy metals have the potential to engage in strong bonding interactions and can thus function in essential as well as toxic or therapeutic capacities. We conducted crystallographic analyses of heavy cation binding to the nucleosome core particle and found that Co2+ and Ni2+ preferentially associate with the DNA major groove, in a sequence- and conformation-dependent manner. Conversely, Rb+ and Cs+ are found to bind only opportunistically to minor groove elements of the DNA, in particular at narrow AT dinucleotide sites. Furthermore, relative to Mn2+ the aggressive coordination of Co2+ and Ni2+ to guanine bases is observed to induce a shift in histone–DNA register around the nucleosome center by stabilizing DNA stretching over one region accompanied by expulsion of two bases at an opposing location. These ‘softer’ transition metals also associate with multiple histone protein sites, including inter-nucleosomal cross-linking, and display a proclivity for coordination to histidine. Sustained binding and the ability to induce structural perturbations at specific locations in the nucleosome may contribute to genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of carcinogenesis mediated by Co2+ and Ni2+. PMID:20494975

  20. Socioeconomic impacts of natural gas curtailments: a study of the textile industry in the southeastern United States. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    A study was undertaken to identify the effects of fuel curtailments in the textile industry in North and South Carolina. Regional economic and social structures were affected with natural gas curtailments in 1976 and 1977. This document presents results of the effects of production shutdown resulting from the curtailments. Chapter II presents background information on the pipelines that service the region. Chapters III and IV describe the affected communities and the observed increase in government expenditures to counteract the impacts. Chapter V contains a complete list of textile plants in the study area that had to either work under abbreviated schedules or close entirely during the winter of 1976-1977. Attention was given to economic impacts at the industrial level that may have been attributable to the curtailment. Chapter VI covers these topics. In some instances, textile mills have relocated their plant facilities because they could not be guaranteed continuous fuel service at their original site. These data are the main concern of Chapter VII. Chapter VIII concentrates on social impacts; many facilities which provide services essential to human needs were subjected to gas curtailments so that the critical energy supplies could be diverted to industry. Chapter VIII also discusses an interesting geographic separation between social and economic impacts.

  1. Acetylator phenotype in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, E H; Burden, A C; Moorhead, P J

    1977-01-01

    The proportions of slow and fast acetylators in a group of diabetics with symptomatic peripheral neuropathy were compared with those in a group of diabetics who had had the disease for at least 10 years without developing neuropathy. There was a significantly higher proportion of fast acetylators in the group of diabetics without neuropathy than in those with neuropathy or in the normal population. Hence genetic factors separate from the diabetic diathesis may determine the development of neuropathy in any particular diabetic. PMID:871863

  2. BRG1 Governs Nanog Transcription in Early Mouse Embryos and Embryonic Stem Cells via Antagonism of Histone H3 Lysine 9/14 Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Timothy S.; Cao, Zubing; Choi, Inchul; Ganguly, Avishek; Wilson, Catherine A.; Paul, Soumen

    2015-01-01

    During mouse preimplantation development, the generation of the inner cell mass (ICM) and trophoblast lineages comprises upregulation of Nanog expression in the ICM and its silencing in the trophoblast. However, the underlying epigenetic mechanisms that differentially regulate Nanog in the first cell lineages are poorly understood. Here, we report that BRG1 (Brahma-related gene 1) cooperates with histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) to regulate Nanog expression. BRG1 depletion in preimplantation embryos and Cdx2-inducible embryonic stem cells (ESCs) revealed that BRG1 is necessary for Nanog silencing in the trophoblast lineage. Conversely, in undifferentiated ESCs, loss of BRG1 augmented Nanog expression. Analysis of histone H3 within the Nanog proximal enhancer revealed that H3 lysine 9/14 (H3K9/14) acetylation increased in BRG1-depleted embryos and ESCs. Biochemical studies demonstrated that HDAC1 was present in BRG1-BAF155 complexes and BRG1-HDAC1 interactions were enriched in the trophoblast lineage. HDAC1 inhibition triggered an increase in H3K9/14 acetylation and a corresponding rise in Nanog mRNA and protein, phenocopying BRG1 knockdown embryos and ESCs. Lastly, nucleosome-mapping experiments revealed that BRG1 is indispensable for nucleosome remodeling at the Nanog enhancer during trophoblast development. In summary, our data suggest that BRG1 governs Nanog expression via a dual mechanism involving histone deacetylation and nucleosome remodeling. PMID:26416882

  3. Structure and nucleosome interaction of the yeast NuA4 and Piccolo-NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complexes

    PubMed Central

    Chittuluru, Johnathan R.; Chaban, Yuriy; Monnet-Saksouk, Julie; Carrozza, Michael J.; Sapountzi, Vasileia; Selleck, William; Huang, Jiehuan; Utley, Rhea T.; Cramet, Myriam; Allard, Stephane; Cai, Gang; Workman, Jerry L.; Fried, Michael G.; Tan, Song; Côté, Jacques; Asturias, Francisco J.

    2011-01-01

    We have used electron microscopy (EM) and biochemistry to characterize the structure and nucleosome core particle (NCP) interaction of NuA4, an essential yeast histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex conserved throughout eukaryotes. The ATM-related Tra1 subunit, shared with the SAGA coactivator, forms a large domain joined to a second portion that accommodates the Piccolo catalytic subcomplex and other NuA4 subunits. EM analysis of an NuA4–NCP complex shows the NCP bound at NuA4's periphery. EM characterization of Piccolo and Piccolo–NCP provided further information about subunit organization and confirmed that histone acetylation requires minimal contact with the NCP. A small conserved region at the N-terminus of Piccolo subunit Epl1 is essential for NCP interaction, whereas subunit Yng2 apparently positions Piccolo for efficient acetylation of H4 or H2A tails. Taken together, these results provide an understanding of NuA4 subunit organization and NCP interactions. PMID:21984211

  4. Structure and nucleosome interaction of the yeast NuA4 and Piccolo-NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complexes.

    PubMed

    Chittuluru, Johnathan R; Chaban, Yuriy; Monnet-Saksouk, Julie; Carrozza, Michael J; Sapountzi, Vasileia; Selleck, William; Huang, Jiehuan; Utley, Rhea T; Cramet, Myriam; Allard, Stephane; Cai, Gang; Workman, Jerry L; Fried, Michael G; Tan, Song; Côté, Jacques; Asturias, Francisco J

    2011-10-09

    We have used EM and biochemistry to characterize the structure of NuA4, an essential yeast histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex conserved throughout eukaryotes, and we have determined the interaction of NuA4 with the nucleosome core particle (NCP). The ATM-related Tra1 subunit, which is shared with the SAGA coactivator complex, forms a large domain joined to a second region that accommodates the catalytic subcomplex Piccolo and other NuA4 subunits. EM analysis of a NuA4-NCP complex shows the NCP bound at the periphery of NuA4. EM characterization of Piccolo and Piccolo-NCP provided further information about subunit organization and confirmed that histone acetylation requires minimal contact with the NCP. A small conserved region at the N terminus of Piccolo subunit enhancer of Polycomb-like 1 (Epl1) is essential for NCP interaction, whereas the subunit yeast homolog of mammalian Ing1 2 (Yng2) apparently positions Piccolo for efficient acetylation of histone H4 or histone H2A tails. Taken together, these results provide an understanding of the NuA4 subunit organization and the NuA4-NCP interactions.

  5. High mobility group protein 1: A collaborator in nucleosome dynamics and estrogen-responsive gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Scovell, William M

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is a multifunctional protein that interacts with DNA and chromatin to influence the regulation of transcription, DNA replication and repair and recombination. We show that HMGB1 alters the structure and stability of the canonical nucleosome (N) in a nonenzymatic, adenosine triphosphate-independent manner. As a result, the canonical nucleosome is converted to two stable, physically distinct nucleosome conformers. Although estrogen receptor (ER) does not bind to its consensus estrogen response element within a nucleosome, HMGB1 restructures the nucleosome to facilitate strong ER binding. The isolated HMGB1-restructured nucleosomes (N’ and N’’) remain stable and exhibit a number of characteristics that are distinctly different from the canonical nucleosome. These findings complement previous studies that showed (1) HMGB1 stimulates in vivo transcriptional activation at estrogen response elements and (2) knock down of HMGB1 expression by siRNA precipitously reduced transcriptional activation. The findings indicate that a major facet of the mechanism of HMGB1 action involves a restructuring of aspects of the nucleosome that appear to relax structural constraints within the nucleosome. The findings are extended to reveal the differences between ER and the other steroid hormone receptors. A working proposal outlines mechanisms that highlight the multiple facets that HMGB1 may utilize in restructuring the nucleosome. PMID:27247709

  6. Nucleosomal regulation of chromatin composition and nuclear assembly revealed by histone depletion.

    PubMed

    Zierhut, Christian; Jenness, Christopher; Kimura, Hiroshi; Funabiki, Hironori

    2014-07-01

    Nucleosomes are the fundamental unit of chromatin, but analysis of transcription-independent nucleosome functions has been complicated by the gene-expression changes resulting from histone manipulation. Here we solve this dilemma by developing Xenopus laevis egg extracts deficient for nucleosome formation and by analyzing the proteomic landscape and behavior of nucleosomal chromatin and nucleosome-free DNA. We show that although nucleosome-free DNA can recruit nuclear-envelope membranes, nucleosomes are required for spindle assembly and for formation of the lamina and of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). We show that, in addition to the Ran G-nucleotide exchange factor RCC1, ELYS, the initiator of NPC formation, fails to associate with naked DNA but directly binds histone H2A-H2B dimers and nucleosomes. Tethering ELYS and RCC1 to DNA bypasses the requirement for nucleosomes in NPC formation in a synergistic manner. Thus, the minimal essential function of nucleosomes in NPC formation is to recruit RCC1 and ELYS. PMID:24952593

  7. Structured nucleosome fingerprints enable high-resolution mapping of chromatin architecture within regulatory regions.

    PubMed

    Schep, Alicia N; Buenrostro, Jason D; Denny, Sarah K; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Greenleaf, William J

    2015-11-01

    Transcription factors canonically bind nucleosome-free DNA, making the positioning of nucleosomes within regulatory regions crucial to the regulation of gene expression. Using the assay of transposase accessible chromatin (ATAC-seq), we observe a highly structured pattern of DNA fragment lengths and positions around nucleosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and use this distinctive two-dimensional nucleosomal "fingerprint" as the basis for a new nucleosome-positioning algorithm called NucleoATAC. We show that NucleoATAC can identify the rotational and translational positions of nucleosomes with up to base-pair resolution and provide quantitative measures of nucleosome occupancy in S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. We demonstrate the application of NucleoATAC to a number of outstanding problems in chromatin biology, including analysis of sequence features underlying nucleosome positioning, promoter chromatin architecture across species, identification of transient changes in nucleosome occupancy and positioning during a dynamic cellular response, and integrated analysis of nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding.

  8. Flexibility and constraint in the nucleosome core landscape of Caenorhabditis elegans chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Steven M.; Tan, Frederick J.; McCullough, Heather L.; Riordan, Daniel P.; Fire, Andrew Z.

    2006-01-01

    Nucleosome positions within the chromatin landscape are known to serve as a major determinant of DNA accessibility to transcription factors and other interacting components. To delineate nucleosomal patterns in a model genetic organism, Caenorhabditis elegans, we have carried out a genome-wide analysis in which DNA fragments corresponding to nucleosome cores were liberated using an enzyme (micrococcal nuclease) with a strong preference for cleavage in non-nucleosomal regions. Sequence analysis of 284,091 putative nucleosome cores obtained in this manner from a mixed-stage population of C. elegans reveals a combined picture of flexibility and constraint in nucleosome positioning. As has previously been observed in studies of individual loci in diverse biological systems, we observe areas in the genome where nucleosomes can adopt a wide variety of positions in a given region, areas with little or no nucleosome coverage, and areas where nucleosomes reproducibly adopt a specific positional pattern. In addition to illuminating numerous aspects of chromatin structure for C. elegans, this analysis provides a reference from which to begin an investigation of relationships between the nucleosomal pattern, chromosomal architecture, and lineage-based gene activity on a genome-wide scale. PMID:17038564

  9. Structural mechanics of DNA wrapping in the nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Battistini, Federica; Hunter, Christopher A; Gardiner, Eleanor J; Packer, Martin J

    2010-02-19

    Experimental X-ray crystal structures and a database of calculated structural parameters of DNA octamers were used in combination to analyse the mechanics of DNA bending in the nucleosome core complex. The 1kx5 X-ray crystal structure of the nucleosome core complex was used to determine the relationship between local structure at the base-step level and the global superhelical conformation observed for nucleosome-bound DNA. The superhelix is characterised by a large curvature (597 degrees) in one plane and very little curvature (10 degrees) in the orthogonal plane. Analysis of the curvature at the level of 10-step segments shows that there is a uniform curvature of 30 degrees per helical turn throughout most of the structure but that there are two sharper kinks of 50 degrees at +/-2 helical turns from the central dyad base pair. The curvature is due almost entirely to the base-step parameter roll. There are large periodic variations in roll, which are in phase with the helical twist and account for 500 degrees of the total curvature. Although variations in the other base-step parameters perturb the local path of the DNA, they make minimal contributions to the total curvature. This implies that DNA bending in the nucleosome is achieved using the roll-slide-twist degree of freedom previously identified as the major degree of freedom in naked DNA oligomers. The energetics of bending into a nucleosome-bound conformation were therefore analysed using a database of structural parameters that we have previously developed for naked DNA oligomers. The minimum energy roll, the roll flexibility force constant and the maximum and minimum accessible roll values were obtained for each base step in the relevant octanucleotide context to account for the effects of conformational coupling that vary with sequence context. The distribution of base-step roll values and corresponding strain energy required to bend DNA into the nucleosome-bound conformation defined by the 1kx5 structure

  10. Structural basis for recognition of H3K56-acetylated histone H3-H4 by the chaperone Rtt106

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dan; Hu, Qi; Li, Qing; Thompson, James R; Cui, Gaofeng; Fazly, Ahmed; Davies, Brian A; Botuyan, Maria Victoria; Zhang, Zhiguo; Mer, Georges

    2013-04-08

    Dynamic variations in the structure of chromatin influence virtually all DNA-related processes in eukaryotes and are controlled in part by post-translational modifications of histones. One such modification, the acetylation of lysine 56 (H3K56ac) in the amino-terminal α-helix (αN) of histone H3, has been implicated in the regulation of nucleosome assembly during DNA replication and repair, and nucleosome disassembly during gene transcription. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the histone chaperone Rtt106 contributes to the deposition of newly synthesized H3K56ac-carrying H3-H4 complex on replicating DNA, but it is unclear how Rtt106 binds H3-H4 and specifically recognizes H3K56ac as there is no apparent acetylated lysine reader domain in Rtt106. Here, we show that two domains of Rtt106 are involved in a combinatorial recognition of H3-H4. An N-terminal domain homodimerizes and interacts with H3-H4 independently of acetylation while a double pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain binds the K56-containing region of H3. Affinity is markedly enhanced upon acetylation of K56, an effect that is probably due to increased conformational entropy of the αN helix of H3. Our data support a mode of interaction where the N-terminal homodimeric domain of Rtt106 intercalates between the two H3-H4 components of the (H3-H4)2 tetramer while two double PH domains in the Rtt106 dimer interact with each of the two H3K56ac sites in (H3-H4)2. We show that the Rtt106-(H3-H4)2 interaction is important for gene silencing and the DNA damage response.

  11. Use of a geomembrane steel sheet pile verticle barrier to curtail organic seepage

    SciTech Connect

    Guglielmetti, J.L.; Butler, P.B.

    1997-12-31

    At a Superfund site in Delaware, contaminated groundwater, seeping out of a riverbank, produced a visible sheen on the river. As part of an emergency response action, a geomembrane steel sheet pile vertical barrier system was installed to contain the sheen and contaminated soil and sediments. The response action presented an engineering challenge due to the close proximity manufacturing facilities, steep riverbank slopes, tidal fluctuations, high velocity river flow, and underground and overhead interferences. A unique vertical containment barrier was developed to stabilize the riverbank slope, curtail sheens on the river, and prevent groundwater mounding behind the vertical barrier. In addition, the cost-effective vertical barrier enables natural chemical and biological processes to contain the organic seepage without requiring a groundwater extraction system.

  12. Mapping sugar beet pectin acetylation pattern.

    PubMed

    Ralet, Marie-Christine; Cabrera, Juan Carlos; Bonnin, Estelle; Quéméner, Bernard; Hellìn, Pilar; Thibault, Jean-François

    2005-08-01

    Homogalacturonan-derived partly methylated and/or acetylated oligogalacturonates were recovered after enzymatic hydrolysis (endo-polygalacturonase+pectin methyl esterase+side-chain degrading enzymes) of sugar beet pectin followed by anion-exchange and size exclusion chromatography. Around 90% of the GalA and 75% of the acetyl groups present in the initial sugar beet pectin were recovered as homogalacturonan-derived oligogalacturonates, the remaining GalA and acetyl belonging to rhamnogalacturonic regions. Around 50% of the acetyl groups present in sugar beet homogalacturonans were recovered as partly methylated and/or acetylated oligogalacturonates of degree of polymerisation 5 whose structures were determined by electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (ESI-IT-MSn). 2-O-acetyl- and 3-O-acetyl-GalA were detected in roughly similar amounts but 2,3-di-O-acetylation was absent. Methyl-esterified GalA residues occurred mainly upstream 2-O-acetyl GalA. Oligogalacturonates containing GalA residues that are at once methyl- and acetyl-esterified were recovered in very limited amounts. A tentative mapping of the distribution of acetyl and methyl esters within sugar beet homogalacturonans is proposed. Unsubstituted GalA residues are likely to be present in limited amounts (approximately 10% of total GalA residues), due to the fact that methyl and acetyl groups are assumed to be most often not carried by the same residues.

  13. Protein acetylation in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Soppa, Jörg

    2010-09-16

    Proteins can be acetylated at the alpha-amino group of the N-terminal amino acid (methionine or the penultimate amino acid after methionine removal) or at the epsilon-amino group of internal lysines. In eukaryotes the majority of proteins are N-terminally acetylated, while this is extremely rare in bacteria. A variety of studies about N-terminal acetylation in archaea have been reported recently, and it was revealed that a considerable fraction of proteins is N-terminally acetylated in haloarchaea and Sulfolobus, while this does not seem to apply for methanogenic archaea. Many eukaryotic proteins are modified by differential internal acetylation, which is important for a variety of processes. Until very recently, only two bacterial proteins were known to be acetylation targets, but now 125 acetylation sites are known for E. coli. Knowledge about internal acetylation in archaea is extremely limited; only two target proteins are known, only one of which--Alba--was used to study differential acetylation. However, indications accumulate that the degree of internal acetylation of archaeal proteins might be underestimated, and differential acetylation has been shown to be essential for the viability of haloarchaea. Focused proteomic approaches are needed to get an overview of the extent of internal protein acetylation in archaea.

  14. Structure of RCC1 chromatin factor bound to the nucleosome core particle

    SciTech Connect

    Makde, Ravindra D.; England, Joseph R.; Yennawar, Hemant P.; Tan, Song

    2010-11-11

    The small GTPase Ran enzyme regulates critical eukaryotic cellular functions including nuclear transport and mitosis through the creation of a RanGTP gradient around the chromosomes. This concentration gradient is created by the chromatin-bound RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation) protein, which recruits Ran to nucleosomes and activates Ran's nucleotide exchange activity. Although RCC1 has been shown to bind directly with the nucleosome, the molecular details of this interaction were not known. Here we determine the crystal structure of a complex of Drosophila RCC1 and the nucleosome core particle at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, providing an atomic view of how a chromatin protein interacts with the histone and DNA components of the nucleosome. Our structure also suggests that the Widom 601 DNA positioning sequence present in the nucleosomes forms a 145-base-pair nucleosome core particle, not the expected canonical 147-base-pair particle.

  15. Crystal structure of the nucleosome containing ultraviolet light-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Naoki; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kagawa, Wataru; Osakabe, Akihisa; Matsumoto, Syota; Iwai, Shigenori; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-02-26

    The cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) is induced in genomic DNA by ultraviolet (UV) light. In mammals, this photolesion is primarily induced within nucleosomal DNA, and repaired exclusively by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. However, the mechanism by which the CPD is accommodated within the nucleosome has remained unknown. We now report the crystal structure of a nucleosome containing CPDs. In the nucleosome, the CPD induces only limited local backbone distortion, and the affected bases are accommodated within the duplex. Interestingly, one of the affected thymine bases is located within 3.0 Å from the undamaged complementary adenine base, suggesting the formation of complementary hydrogen bonds in the nucleosome. We also found that UV-DDB, which binds the CPD at the initial stage of the NER pathway, also efficiently binds to the nucleosomal CPD. These results provide important structural and biochemical information for understanding how the CPD is accommodated and recognized in chromatin.

  16. Statistical mechanics of nucleosome ordering by chromatin-structure-induced two-body interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chereji, Răzvan V.; Tolkunov, Denis; Locke, George; Morozov, Alexandre V.

    2011-05-01

    One-dimensional arrays of nucleosomes (DNA-bound histone octamers separated by stretches of linker DNA) fold into higher-order chromatin structures which ultimately make up eukaryotic chromosomes. Chromatin structure formation leads to 10-11 base pair (bp) discretization of linker lengths caused by the smaller free energy cost of packaging nucleosomes into regular chromatin fibers if their rotational setting (defined by the DNA helical twist) is conserved. We describe nucleosome positions along the fiber using a thermodynamic model of finite-size particles with both intrinsic histone-DNA interactions and an effective two-body potential. We infer one- and two-body energies directly from high-throughput maps of nucleosome positions. We show that higher-order chromatin structure helps explains in vitro and in vivo nucleosome ordering in transcribed regions, and plays a leading role in establishing well-known 10-11 bp genome-wide periodicity of nucleosome positions.

  17. The structure of nucleosomal core particles within transcribed and repressed gene regions.

    PubMed Central

    Studitsky, V M; Belyavsky, A V; Melnikova, A F; Mirzabekov, A D

    1988-01-01

    The arrangement of histones along DNA in nucleosomal core particles within transcribed heat shock gene (hsp 70) region and repressed insertion within ribosomal genes of Drosophila was analysed by using protein-DNA crosslinking methods combined with hybridization tests. In addition, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was employed to compare the overall nucleosomal shape and the nucleosomal DNA size. The arrangement of histones along DNA and general compactness of nucleosomes were shown to be rather similar in transcriptionally active and inactive genomic regions. On the other hand, nucleosomes within transcriptionally active chromatin are characterized by a larger size of nucleosomal DNA produced by micrococcal nuclease digestion and some peculiarity in electrophoretic mobility. Images PMID:3144704

  18. Chromatin assembled in the presence of cytosine arabinoside has a short nucleosome repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Leffak, I M

    1983-01-01

    Incubation of MSB cells with cytosine arabinoside (1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine, ara-C) inhibits 3H-thymidine incorporation into nascent DNA while nucleosome core histone synthesis proceeds in molar stoichiometry at about 20% of control rates. The excess nascent histone is incorporated into chromatin and nucleosome cores are assembled normally on the small amount of DNA which is synthesized at submaximal levels of ara-C. This DNA becomes packaged into a shortened nucleosome repeat, however. These results indicate that the nucleosome core is a strongly conserved unit of chromatin replication and suggest that the stoichiometry of nascent histone to DNA may be one factor influencing the establishment of the nucleosome repeat length. It cannot be the only factor, however, since the closely packed nucleosomes made in the presence of ara-C begin to return to their normal spacing within six hours after reversal. Images PMID:6889133

  19. Nucleosome assembly proteins and their interacting proteins in neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Attia, Mikaël; Rachez, Christophe; Avner, Philip; Rogner, Ute Christine

    2013-06-01

    Neuronal differentiation from neural stem cells into mature neurons is guided by the concerted action of specific transcription factors that stepwise exercise their role in the context of defined chromatin states. Amongst the classes of proteins that influence chromatin compaction and modification are nucleosome assembly proteins (NAPs). Mammals possess several nucleosome assembly protein 1 like proteins (NAP1L) that show either ubiquitous or neuron-restricted expression. The latter group is presumably involved in the process of neuronal differentiation. Mammalian NAP1Ls can potentially form both homo- and hetero-dimers and octamers, in theory allowing thousands of different combinations to be formed. Detailed studies have been performed on several of the NAP1Ls that point to a range of molecular roles, including transcriptional regulation, nuclear import, and control of cell division. This article aims at summarizing current knowledge of the mammalian NAP1L family and its interactions.

  20. An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanping; Korolev, Nikolay; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar) plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+)), divalent (Mg(2+)) or trivalent (Co(NH(3))(6) (3+)) cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+), to partial aggregation with Mg(2+) and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+). The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions. PMID:23418426

  1. An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanping; Korolev, Nikolay; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar) plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+)), divalent (Mg(2+)) or trivalent (Co(NH(3))(6) (3+)) cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+), to partial aggregation with Mg(2+) and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+). The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions.

  2. The nucleosome landscape of Plasmodium falciparum reveals chromatin architecture and dynamics of regulatory sequences

    PubMed Central

    Kensche, Philip Reiner; Hoeijmakers, Wieteke Anna Maria; Toenhake, Christa Geeke; Bras, Maaike; Chappell, Lia; Berriman, Matthew; Bártfai, Richárd

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the chromatin architecture has a pivotal role in regulating all DNA-associated processes and it is central to the control of gene expression. For Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of human malaria, the nucleosome positioning profile of regulatory regions deserves particular attention because of their extreme AT-content. With the aid of a highly controlled MNase-seq procedure we reveal how positioning of nucleosomes provides a structural and regulatory framework to the transcriptional unit by demarcating landmark sites (transcription/translation start and end sites). In addition, our analysis provides strong indications for the function of positioned nucleosomes in splice site recognition. Transcription start sites (TSSs) are bordered by a small nucleosome-depleted region, but lack the stereotypic downstream nucleosome arrays, highlighting a key difference in chromatin organization compared to model organisms. Furthermore, we observe transcription-coupled eviction of nucleosomes on strong TSSs during intraerythrocytic development and demonstrate that nucleosome positioning and dynamics can be predictive for the functionality of regulatory DNA elements. Collectively, the strong nucleosome positioning over splice sites and surrounding putative transcription factor binding sites highlights the regulatory capacity of the nucleosome landscape in this deadly human pathogen. PMID:26578577

  3. Structure of human nucleosome containing the testis-specific histone variant TSH2B

    SciTech Connect

    Urahama, Takashi; Horikoshi, Naoki; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-03-25

    The crystal structure of human nucleosome containing the testis-specific TSH2B variant has been determined. The TSH2B Ser85 residue does not interact with H4 in the nucleosome, and induces a local structural difference between TSH2B and H2B in nucleosomes. The human histone H2B variant TSH2B is highly expressed in testis and may function in the chromatin transition during spermatogenesis. In the present study, the crystal structure of the human testis-specific nucleosome containing TSH2B was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. A local structural difference between TSH2B and canonical H2B in nucleosomes was detected around the TSH2B-specific amino-acid residue Ser85. The TSH2B Ser85 residue does not interact with H4 in the nucleosome, but in the canonical nucleosome the H2B Asn84 residue (corresponding to the TSH2B Ser85 residue) forms water-mediated hydrogen bonds with the H4 Arg78 residue. In contrast, the other TSH2B-specific amino-acid residues did not induce any significant local structural changes in the TSH2B nucleosome. These findings may provide important information for understanding how testis-specific histone variants form nucleosomes during spermatogenesis.

  4. The Chd1 chromatin remodeler can sense both entry and exit sides of the nucleosome

    PubMed Central

    Nodelman, Ilana M.; Horvath, Kyle C.; Levendosky, Robert F.; Winger, Jessica; Ren, Ren; Patel, Ashok; Li, Ming; Wang, Michelle D.; Roberts, Elijah; Bowman, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin remodelers are essential for establishing and maintaining the placement of nucleosomes along genomic DNA. Yet how chromatin remodelers recognize and respond to distinct chromatin environments surrounding nucleosomes is poorly understood. Here, we use Lac repressor as a tool to probe how a DNA-bound factor influences action of the Chd1 remodeler. We show that Chd1 preferentially shifts nucleosomes away from Lac repressor, demonstrating that a DNA-bound factor defines a barrier for nucleosome positioning. Rather than an absolute block in sliding, the barrier effect was achieved by altered rates of nucleosome sliding that biased redistribution of nucleosomes away from the bound Lac repressor site. Remarkably, in addition to slower sliding toward the LacO site, the presence of Lac repressor also stimulated sliding in the opposite direction. These experiments therefore demonstrate that Chd1 responds to the presence of a bound protein on both entry and exit sides of the nucleosome. This sensitivity to both sides of the nucleosome allows for a faster and sharper response than would be possible by responding to only the entry side, and we speculate that dual entry/exit sensitivity is also important for regularly spaced nucleosome arrays generated by Chd1 and the related ISWI remodelers. PMID:27174939

  5. DNA-guided establishment of nucleosome patterns within coding regions of a eukaryotic genome.

    PubMed

    Beh, Leslie Y; Müller, Manuel M; Muir, Tom W; Kaplan, Noam; Landweber, Laura F

    2015-11-01

    A conserved hallmark of eukaryotic chromatin architecture is the distinctive array of well-positioned nucleosomes downstream from transcription start sites (TSS). Recent studies indicate that trans-acting factors establish this stereotypical array. Here, we present the first genome-wide in vitro and in vivo nucleosome maps for the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. In contrast with previous studies in yeast, we find that the stereotypical nucleosome array is preserved in the in vitro reconstituted map, which is governed only by the DNA sequence preferences of nucleosomes. Remarkably, this average in vitro pattern arises from the presence of subsets of nucleosomes, rather than the whole array, in individual Tetrahymena genes. Variation in GC content contributes to the positioning of these sequence-directed nucleosomes and affects codon usage and amino acid composition in genes. Given that the AT-rich Tetrahymena genome is intrinsically unfavorable for nucleosome formation, we propose that these "seed" nucleosomes--together with trans-acting factors--may facilitate the establishment of nucleosome arrays within genes in vivo, while minimizing changes to the underlying coding sequences.

  6. The nucleosome landscape of Plasmodium falciparum reveals chromatin architecture and dynamics of regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    Kensche, Philip Reiner; Hoeijmakers, Wieteke Anna Maria; Toenhake, Christa Geeke; Bras, Maaike; Chappell, Lia; Berriman, Matthew; Bártfai, Richárd

    2016-03-18

    In eukaryotes, the chromatin architecture has a pivotal role in regulating all DNA-associated processes and it is central to the control of gene expression. For Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of human malaria, the nucleosome positioning profile of regulatory regions deserves particular attention because of their extreme AT-content. With the aid of a highly controlled MNase-seq procedure we reveal how positioning of nucleosomes provides a structural and regulatory framework to the transcriptional unit by demarcating landmark sites (transcription/translation start and end sites). In addition, our analysis provides strong indications for the function of positioned nucleosomes in splice site recognition. Transcription start sites (TSSs) are bordered by a small nucleosome-depleted region, but lack the stereotypic downstream nucleosome arrays, highlighting a key difference in chromatin organization compared to model organisms. Furthermore, we observe transcription-coupled eviction of nucleosomes on strong TSSs during intraerythrocytic development and demonstrate that nucleosome positioning and dynamics can be predictive for the functionality of regulatory DNA elements. Collectively, the strong nucleosome positioning over splice sites and surrounding putative transcription factor binding sites highlights the regulatory capacity of the nucleosome landscape in this deadly human pathogen.

  7. Dynamics of the Competition Between Nucleosome Unwrapping and DNA Binding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundschuh, Ralf

    2015-03-01

    In eukaryotic organisms DNA is tightly wrapped into nucleosomes. This bears the question how this DNA can be accessed in order to be copied, transcribed, or repaired. A process that allows access to the DNA is transient unwrapping of the DNA from the histone proteins. We have developed a quantitative model of this unwrapping process which we calibrate by comparison to nucleosome unzipping experiments by the Wang group. We then apply this model to quantitatively explain the dynamics of transcription factor binding within nucleosomal DNA. In this context, it has been well known that nucleosomes reduce the affinity for transcription factors to binding sites covered by the nucleosome. It has been assumed that this is due to a reduction in on-rate since a transcription factor can only bind when a rare thermal fluctuation of the nucleosome makes the DNA accessible. However, recent experimental data surprisingly shows that the off-rate of transcription factors is also strongly affected in the presence of a nucleosome. The application of our nucleosome unwrapping free energy landscape demonstrates that this increase in off-rate by several orders of magnitude is a consequence of a competition between partial binding events of dimeric transcription factors and the nucleosome. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. 1105458 and 1410172.

  8. Crystal structures of heterotypic nucleosomes containing histones H2A.Z and H2A

    PubMed Central

    Horikoshi, Naoki; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Taguchi, Hiroyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    H2A.Z is incorporated into nucleosomes located around transcription start sites and functions as an epigenetic regulator for the transcription of certain genes. During transcriptional regulation, the heterotypic H2A.Z/H2A nucleosome containing one each of H2A.Z and H2A is formed. However, previous homotypic H2A.Z nucleosome structures suggested that the L1 loop region of H2A.Z would sterically clash with the corresponding region of canonical H2A in the heterotypic nucleosome. To resolve this issue, we determined the crystal structures of heterotypic H2A.Z/H2A nucleosomes. In the H2A.Z/H2A nucleosome structure, the H2A.Z L1 loop structure was drastically altered without any structural changes of the canonical H2A L1 loop, thus avoiding the steric clash. Unexpectedly, the heterotypic H2A.Z/H2A nucleosome is more stable than the homotypic H2A.Z nucleosome. These data suggested that the flexible character of the H2A.Z L1 loop plays an essential role in forming the stable heterotypic H2A.Z/H2A nucleosome. PMID:27358293

  9. Evidence of association between Nucleosome Occupancy and the Evolution of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Divergence of transcription factor binding sites is considered to be an important source of regulatory evolution. The associations between transcription factor binding sites and phenotypic diversity have been investigated in many model organisms. However, the understanding of other factors that contribute to it is still limited. Recent studies have elucidated the effect of chromatin structure on molecular evolution of genomic DNA. Though the profound impact of nucleosome positions on gene regulation has been reported, their influence on transcriptional evolution is still less explored. With the availability of genome-wide nucleosome map in yeast species, it is thus desirable to investigate their impact on transcription factor binding site evolution. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the role of nucleosome positioning in the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. Results We compared the transcription factor binding site frequency in nucleosome occupied regions and nucleosome depleted regions in promoters of old (orthologs among Saccharomycetaceae) and young (Saccharomyces specific) genes; and in duplicate gene pairs. We demonstrated that nucleosome occupied regions accommodate greater binding site variations than nucleosome depleted regions in young genes and in duplicate genes. This finding was confirmed by measuring the difference in evolutionary rates of binding sites in sensu stricto yeasts at nucleosome occupied regions and nucleosome depleted regions. The binding sites at nucleosome occupied regions exhibited a consistently higher evolution rate than those at nucleosome depleted regions, corroborating the difference in the selection constraints at the two regions. Finally, through site-directed mutagenesis experiment, we found that binding site gain or loss events at nucleosome depleted regions may cause more expression differences than those in nucleosome occupied regions. Conclusions Our study indicates the existence of

  10. Genome-wide mapping of nucleosome positioning and DNA methylation within individual DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Theresa K.; Liu, Yaping; Lay, Fides D.; Liang, Gangning; Berman, Benjamin P.; Jones, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning work together to generate chromatin structures that regulate gene expression. Nucleosomes are typically mapped using nuclease digestion requiring significant amounts of material and varying enzyme concentrations. We have developed a method (NOMe-seq) that uses a GpC methyltransferase (M.CviPI) and next generation sequencing to generate a high resolution footprint of nucleosome positioning genome-wide using less than 1 million cells while retaining endogenous DNA methylation information from the same DNA strand. Using a novel bioinformatics pipeline, we show a striking anti-correlation between nucleosome occupancy and DNA methylation at CTCF regions that is not present at promoters. We further show that the extent of nucleosome depletion at promoters is directly correlated to expression level and can accommodate multiple nucleosomes and provide genome-wide evidence that expressed non-CpG island promoters are nucleosome-depleted. Importantly, NOMe-seq obtains DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning information from the same DNA molecule, giving the first genome-wide DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning correlation at the single molecule, and thus, single cell level, that can be used to monitor disease progression and response to therapy. PMID:22960375

  11. Cracking the chromatin code: Precise rule of nucleosome positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, Edward N.

    2011-03-01

    Various aspects of packaging DNA in eukaryotic cells are outlined in physical rather than biological terms. The informational and physical nature of packaging instructions encoded in DNA sequences is discussed with the emphasis on signal processing difficulties - very low signal-to-noise ratio and high degeneracy of the nucleosome positioning signal. As the author has been contributing to the field from its very onset in 1980, the review is mostly focused at the works of the author and his colleagues. The leading concept of the overview is the role of deformational properties of DNA in the nucleosome positioning. The target of the studies is to derive the DNA bendability matrix describing where along the DNA various dinucleotide elements should be positioned, to facilitate its bending in the nucleosome. Three different approaches are described leading to derivation of the DNA deformability sequence pattern, which is a simplified linear presentation of the bendability matrix. All three approaches converge to the same unique sequence motif CGRAAATTTYCG or, in binary form, YRRRRRYYYYYR, both representing the chromatin code.

  12. Flow properties of acetylated chickpea protein dispersions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li H; Hung, Tran V

    2010-06-01

    Chickpea protein concentrate was acetylated with acetic anhydride at 5 levels. Acetylated chickpea protein (ACP) dispersions at 3 levels (6%, 45%, and 49%) were chosen for this flow property study. Effects of protein concentration, temperature, concentrations of salt addition and particularly, degree of acetylation on these properties were examined. Compared with native chickpea proteins, the ACP dispersions exhibited a strong shear thinning behavior. Within measured temperature range (15 to 55 degrees C), the apparent viscosities of native chickpea protein dispersions were temperature independent; those of ACP dispersions were thermally affected. The flow index (n), consistency coefficient (m), apparent yield stress, and apparent viscosities of ACP dispersions increased progressively up to 45% acetylation but decreased at 49% acetylation level. Conformational studies by gel filtration suggested that chickpea proteins were associated or polymerized at up to 45% acetylation but the associated subunits gradually dissociated to smaller units at higher levels (49%) of acetylation.

  13. Enzymatic and chemical mapping of nucleosome distribution in purified micro- and macronuclei of the ciliated model organism, Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Gao, Shan; Liu, Yifan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yurui; Song, Weibo

    2016-09-01

    Genomic distribution of the nucleosome, the basic unit of chromatin, contains important epigenetic information. To map nucleosome distribution in structurally and functionally differentiated micronucleus (MIC) and macronucleus (MAC) of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, we have purified MIC and MAC and performed micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion as well as hydroxyl radical cleavage. Different factors that may affect MNase digestion were examined, to optimize mono-nucleosome production. Mono-nucleosome purity was further improved by ultracentrifugation in a sucrose gradient. As MNase concentration increased, nucleosomal DNA sizes in MIC and MAC converged on 147 bp, as expected for the nucleosome core particle. Both MNase digestion and hydroxyl radical cleavage consistently showed a nucleosome repeat length of ~200 bp in MAC of Tetrahymena, supporting ~50 bp of linker DNA. Our work has systematically tested methods currently available for mapping nucleosome distribution in Tetrahymena, and provided a solid foundation for future epigenetic studies in this ciliated model organism. PMID:27568393

  14. Establishment of a promoter-based chromatin architecture on recently replicated DNA can accommodate variable inter-nucleosome spacing

    PubMed Central

    Fennessy, Ross T.; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes, the fundamental subunits of eukaryotic chromatin, are organized with respect to transcriptional start sites. A major challenge to the persistence of this organization is the disassembly of nucleosomes during DNA replication. Here, we use complimentary approaches to map the locations of nucleosomes on recently replicated DNA. We find that nucleosomes are substantially realigned with promoters during the minutes following DNA replication. As a result, the nucleosomal landscape is largely re-established before newly replicated chromosomes are partitioned into daughter cells and can serve as a platform for the re-establishment of gene expression programmes. When the supply of histones is disrupted through mutation of the chaperone Caf1, a promoter-based architecture is generated, but with increased inter-nucleosomal spacing. This indicates that the chromatin remodelling enzymes responsible for spacing nucleosomes are capable of organizing nucleosomes with a range of different linker DNA lengths. PMID:27106059

  15. Enzymatic and chemical mapping of nucleosome distribution in purified micro- and macronuclei of the ciliated model organism, Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Gao, Shan; Liu, Yifan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yurui; Song, Weibo

    2016-09-01

    Genomic distribution of the nucleosome, the basic unit of chromatin, contains important epigenetic information. To map nucleosome distribution in structurally and functionally differentiated micronucleus (MIC) and macronucleus (MAC) of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, we have purified MIC and MAC and performed micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion as well as hydroxyl radical cleavage. Different factors that may affect MNase digestion were examined, to optimize mono-nucleosome production. Mono-nucleosome purity was further improved by ultracentrifugation in a sucrose gradient. As MNase concentration increased, nucleosomal DNA sizes in MIC and MAC converged on 147 bp, as expected for the nucleosome core particle. Both MNase digestion and hydroxyl radical cleavage consistently showed a nucleosome repeat length of ~200 bp in MAC of Tetrahymena, supporting ~50 bp of linker DNA. Our work has systematically tested methods currently available for mapping nucleosome distribution in Tetrahymena, and provided a solid foundation for future epigenetic studies in this ciliated model organism.

  16. Single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer of nucleosomes in free diffusion: optimizing stability and resolution of subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Gansen, Alexander; Hauger, Florian; Tóth, Katalin; Langowski, Jörg

    2007-09-15

    We applied fluorescence detection methods on the single-molecule level to study structural variations and dynamic processes occurring within nucleosomes. Four fluorescent nucleosome constructs were made by attaching donor and acceptor fluorophores to different positions of two nucleosome positioning sequences and reconstituting nucleosomes by salt dialysis. The photochemical and biochemical stability of nucleosomes under single-molecule conditions was optimized by adding inert protein and free radical capturing additives, allowing us to define the best experimental conditions for single-molecule spectroscopy on highly diluted solutions of nucleosome complexes. We could demonstrate for the first time the resolution of conformational subpopulations of nucleosomes by single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer in a freely diffusing system and could show the effect of thermally induced nucleosome repositioning.

  17. Reactivity in ELISA with DNA-loaded nucleosomes in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Dieker, Jürgen; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; McHugh, Neil; Hamann, Philip; van der Vlag, Johan; Berden, Jo H

    2015-11-01

    Autoantibodies against nucleosomes are considered a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We compared in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis the diagnostic usefulness of a dsDNA-loaded nucleosome ELISA (anti-dsDNA-NcX) with ELISAs in which dsDNA or nucleosomes alone were coated. First, we analysed whether DNA loading on nucleosomes led to masking of epitopes by using defined monoclonal anti-DNA, anti-histone and nucleosome-specific autoantibodies to evaluate the accessibility of nucleosomal epitopes in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA. Second, autoantibody levels were measured in these 3 ELISAs in 100 patients with proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) before immunosuppressive treatment and in 128 non-SLE disease controls. In patients with LN inter-assay comparisons and associations with clinical and serological parameters were analysed. The panel of monoclonal antibodies revealed that all epitopes were equally accessible in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as in the two other ELISAs. Patients with proliferative lupus nephritis were positive with dsDNA-loaded nucleosomes in 86%, with DNA in 66% and with nucleosomes in 85%. In the non-lupus disease control group these frequencies were 1.6% (2 out of 128) for both the anti-dsDNA-NcX and the anti-dsDNA ELISA and 0% in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. The levels in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA were high in a group of patients with LN that showed absent reactivity in the anti-DNA or low levels in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. Anti-dsDNA-NcX positivity was associated with higher SLEDAI scores within this group. Within nucleosome-based ELISAs, we propose the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as the preferred test system. PMID:26597199

  18. Cell Cycle–Specified Fluctuation of Nucleosome Occupancy at Gene Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Gregory J; Lee, Cheol-Koo; Lieb, Jason D

    2006-01-01

    The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes influences the accessibility of underlying regulatory information. Nucleosome occupancy and positioning are best characterized in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, albeit in asynchronous cell populations or on individual promoters such as PHO5 and GAL1–10. Using FAIRE (formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements) and whole-genome microarrays, we examined changes in nucleosome occupancy throughout the mitotic cell cycle in synchronized populations of S. cerevisiae. Perhaps surprisingly, nucleosome occupancy did not exhibit large, global variation between cell cycle phases. However, nucleosome occupancy at the promoters of cell cycle–regulated genes was reduced specifically at the cell cycle phase in which that gene exhibited peak expression, with the notable exception of S-phase genes. We present data that establish FAIRE as a high-throughput method for assaying nucleosome occupancy. For the first time in any system, nucleosome occupancy was mapped genome-wide throughout the cell cycle. Fluctuation of nucleosome occupancy at promoters of most cell cycle–regulated genes provides independent evidence that periodic expression of these genes is controlled mainly at the level of transcription. The promoters of G2/M genes are distinguished from other cell cycle promoters by an unusually low baseline nucleosome occupancy throughout the cell cycle. This observation, coupled with the maintenance throughout the cell cycle of the stereotypic nucleosome occupancy states between coding and non-coding loci, suggests that the largest component of variation in nucleosome occupancy is “hard wired,” perhaps at the level of DNA sequence. PMID:17002501

  19. Reactivity in ELISA with DNA-loaded nucleosomes in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Dieker, Jürgen; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; McHugh, Neil; Hamann, Philip; van der Vlag, Johan; Berden, Jo H

    2015-11-01

    Autoantibodies against nucleosomes are considered a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We compared in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis the diagnostic usefulness of a dsDNA-loaded nucleosome ELISA (anti-dsDNA-NcX) with ELISAs in which dsDNA or nucleosomes alone were coated. First, we analysed whether DNA loading on nucleosomes led to masking of epitopes by using defined monoclonal anti-DNA, anti-histone and nucleosome-specific autoantibodies to evaluate the accessibility of nucleosomal epitopes in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA. Second, autoantibody levels were measured in these 3 ELISAs in 100 patients with proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) before immunosuppressive treatment and in 128 non-SLE disease controls. In patients with LN inter-assay comparisons and associations with clinical and serological parameters were analysed. The panel of monoclonal antibodies revealed that all epitopes were equally accessible in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as in the two other ELISAs. Patients with proliferative lupus nephritis were positive with dsDNA-loaded nucleosomes in 86%, with DNA in 66% and with nucleosomes in 85%. In the non-lupus disease control group these frequencies were 1.6% (2 out of 128) for both the anti-dsDNA-NcX and the anti-dsDNA ELISA and 0% in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. The levels in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA were high in a group of patients with LN that showed absent reactivity in the anti-DNA or low levels in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. Anti-dsDNA-NcX positivity was associated with higher SLEDAI scores within this group. Within nucleosome-based ELISAs, we propose the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as the preferred test system.

  20. Determinants of nucleosome positioning and their influence on plant gene expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Jung; Seddon, Alexander E; Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Major, Ian T; Floer, Monique; Howe, Gregg A; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2015-08-01

    Nucleosome positioning influences the access of transcription factors (TFs) to their binding sites and gene expression. Studies in plant, animal, and fungal models demonstrate similar nucleosome positioning patterns along genes and correlations between occupancy and expression. However, the relationships among nucleosome positioning, cis-regulatory element accessibility, and gene expression in plants remain undefined. Here we showed that plant nucleosome depletion occurs on specific 6-mer motifs and this sequence-specific nucleosome depletion is predictive of expression levels. Nucleosome-depleted regions in Arabidopsis thaliana tend to have higher G/C content, unlike yeast, and are centered on specific G/C-rich 6-mers, suggesting that intrinsic sequence properties, such as G/C content, cannot fully explain plant nucleosome positioning. These 6-mer motif sites showed higher DNase I hypersensitivity and are flanked by strongly phased nucleosomes, consistent with known TF binding sites. Intriguingly, this 6-mer-specific nucleosome depletion pattern occurs not only in promoter but also in genic regions and is significantly correlated with higher gene expression level, a phenomenon also found in rice but not in yeast. Among the 6-mer motifs enriched in genes responsive to treatment with the defense hormone jasmonate, there are no significant changes in nucleosome occupancy, suggesting that these sites are potentially preconditioned to enable rapid response without changing chromatin state significantly. Our study provides a global assessment of the joint contribution of nucleosome occupancy and motif sequences that are likely cis-elements to the control of gene expression in plants. Our findings pave the way for further understanding the impact of chromatin state on plant transcriptional regulatory circuits.

  1. Stable complex formation of CENP-B with the CENP-A nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Risa; Otake, Koichiro; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Horikoshi, Naoki; Miya, Yuta; Shiga, Tatsuya; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Ohzeki, Jun-ichirou; Larionov, Vladimir; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-05-26

    CENP-A and CENP-B are major components of centromeric chromatin. CENP-A is the histone H3 variant, which forms the centromere-specific nucleosome. CENP-B specifically binds to the CENP-B box DNA sequence on the centromere-specific repetitive DNA. In the present study, we found that the CENP-A nucleosome more stably retains human CENP-B than the H3.1 nucleosome in vitro. Specifically, CENP-B forms a stable complex with the CENP-A nucleosome, when the CENP-B box sequence is located at the proximal edge of the nucleosome. Surprisingly, the CENP-B binding was weaker when the CENP-B box sequence was located in the distal linker region of the nucleosome. This difference in CENP-B binding, depending on the CENP-B box location, was not observed with the H3.1 nucleosome. Consistently, we found that the DNA-binding domain of CENP-B specifically interacted with the CENP-A-H4 complex, but not with the H3.1-H4 complex, in vitro. These results suggested that CENP-B forms a more stable complex with the CENP-A nucleosome through specific interactions with CENP-A, if the CENP-B box is located proximal to the CENP-A nucleosome. Our in vivo assay also revealed that CENP-B binding in the vicinity of the CENP-A nucleosome substantially stabilizes the CENP-A nucleosome on alphoid DNA in human cells.

  2. Chromatin reconstitution on small DNA rings. IV. DNA supercoiling and nucleosome sequence preference.

    PubMed

    Duband-Goulet, I; Carot, V; Ulyanov, A V; Douc-Rasy, S; Prunell, A

    1992-04-20

    Nucleosome formation on inverted repeats or on some alternations of purines and pyrimidines can be inhibited in vitro by DNA supercoiling through their supercoiling-induced structural transitions to cruciforms or Z-form DNA, respectively. We report here, as a result of study of single nucleosome reconstitutions on a DNA minicircle, that a physiological level of DNA supercoiling can also enhance nucleosome sequence preference. The 357 base-pair minicircle was composed of a promoter of phage SP6 RNA polymerase joined to a 256 base-pair fragment containing a sea urchin 5 S RNA gene. Nucleosome formation on the promoter was found to be enhanced on a topoisomer with in vivo superhelix density when compared to topoisomers of lower or higher superhelical densities, to the nicked circle, or to the linear DNA. In contrast, nucleosomes at other positions appeared to be insensitive to supercoiling. This observation relied on a novel procedure for the investigation of nucleosome positioning. The reconstituted circular chromatin was first linearized using a restriction endonuclease, and the linear chromatin so obtained was electrophoresed as nucleoprotein in a polyacrylamide gel. The gel showed well-fractionated bands whose mobilities were a V-like function of nucleosome positions, with the nucleosome near the middle migrating less. This behavior is similar to that previously observed for complexes of sequence-specific DNA-bending proteins with circularly permuted DNA fragments, and presumably reflects the change in the direction of the DNA axis between the entrance and the exit of the particle. Possible mechanisms for such supercoiling-induced modulation of nucleosome formation are discussed in the light of the supercoiling-dependent susceptibility to cleavage of the naked minicircle with S1 and Bal31 nucleases; and a comparison between DNase I cleavage patterns of the modulated nucleosome and of another, non-modulated, overlapping nucleosome. PMID:1314907

  3. Promoter-Targeted Histone Acetylation of Chromatinized Parvoviral Genome Is Essential for the Progress of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mäntylä, Elina; Salokas, Kari; Oittinen, Mikko; Aho, Vesa; Mäntysaari, Pekka; Palmujoki, Lassi; Kalliolinna, Olli; Ihalainen, Teemu O.; Niskanen, Einari A.; Timonen, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The association of host histones with parvoviral DNA is poorly understood. We analyzed the chromatinization and histone acetylation of canine parvovirus DNA during infection by confocal imaging and in situ proximity ligation assay combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sequencing. We found that during late infection, parvovirus replication bodies were rich in histones bearing modifications characteristic of transcriptionally active chromatin, i.e., histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27ac). H3K27ac, in particular, was located in close proximity to the viral DNA-binding protein NS1. Importantly, our results show for the first time that in the chromatinized parvoviral genome, the two viral promoters in particular were rich in H3K27ac. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors efficiently interfered with the expression of viral proteins and infection progress. Altogether, our data suggest that the acetylation of histones on parvoviral DNA is essential for viral gene expression and the completion of the viral life cycle. IMPORTANCE Viral DNA introduced into cell nuclei is exposed to cellular responses to foreign DNA, including chromatinization and epigenetic silencing, both of which determine the outcome of infection. How the incoming parvovirus resists cellular epigenetic downregulation of its genes is not understood. Here, the critical role of epigenetic modifications in the regulation of parvovirus infection was demonstrated. We showed for the first time that a successful parvovirus infection is characterized by the deposition of nucleosomes with active histone acetylation on the viral promoter areas. The results provide new insights into the regulation of parvoviral gene expression, which is an important aspect of the development of parvovirus-based virotherapy. PMID:26842481

  4. Investigating Histone Acetylation Stoichiometry and Turnover Rate.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Baeza, J; Denu, J M

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is a dynamic epigenetic modification that functions in the regulation of DNA-templated reactions, such as transcription. This lysine modification is reversibly controlled by histone (lysine) acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Here, we present methods employing isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry (MS) to comprehensively investigate histone acetylation dynamics. Turnover rates of histone acetylation are determined by measuring the kinetics of labeling from (13)C-labeled precursors of acetyl-CoA, which incorporates (13)C-carbon onto histones via the acetyltransferase reaction. Overall histone acetylation states are assessed from complete protease digestion to single amino acids, which is followed by MS analysis. Determination of site-specific acetylation stoichiometry is achieved by chemically acetylating endogenous histones with isotopic acetic anhydride, followed by trypsin digestion and LC-MS analysis. Combining metabolic labeling with stoichiometric analysis permits determination of both acetylation level and acetylation dynamics. When comparing genetic, diet, or environmental perturbations, these methods permit both a global and site-specific evaluation of how histone acetylation is dynamically regulated.

  5. Investigating Histone Acetylation Stoichiometry and Turnover Rate.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Baeza, J; Denu, J M

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is a dynamic epigenetic modification that functions in the regulation of DNA-templated reactions, such as transcription. This lysine modification is reversibly controlled by histone (lysine) acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Here, we present methods employing isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry (MS) to comprehensively investigate histone acetylation dynamics. Turnover rates of histone acetylation are determined by measuring the kinetics of labeling from (13)C-labeled precursors of acetyl-CoA, which incorporates (13)C-carbon onto histones via the acetyltransferase reaction. Overall histone acetylation states are assessed from complete protease digestion to single amino acids, which is followed by MS analysis. Determination of site-specific acetylation stoichiometry is achieved by chemically acetylating endogenous histones with isotopic acetic anhydride, followed by trypsin digestion and LC-MS analysis. Combining metabolic labeling with stoichiometric analysis permits determination of both acetylation level and acetylation dynamics. When comparing genetic, diet, or environmental perturbations, these methods permit both a global and site-specific evaluation of how histone acetylation is dynamically regulated. PMID:27423860

  6. Hairpin Ribozyme Genes Curtail Alcohol Drinking: from Rational Design to in vivo Effects in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Sapag, Amalia; Irrazábal, Thergiory; Lobos-González, Lorena; Muñoz-Brauning, Carlos R; Quintanilla, María Elena; Tampier, Lutske

    2016-01-01

    Ribozyme genes were designed to reduce voluntary alcohol drinking in a rat model of alcohol dependence. Acetaldehyde generated from alcohol in the liver is metabolized by the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) such that diminishing ALDH2 activity leads to the aversive effects of blood acetaldehyde upon alcohol intake. A stepwise approach was followed to design genes encoding ribozymes targeted to the rat ALDH2 mRNA. In vitro studies of accessibility to oligonucleotides identified suitable target sites in the mRNA, one of which fulfilled hammerhead and hairpin ribozyme requirements (CGGUC). Ribozyme genes delivered in plasmid constructs were tested in rat cells in culture. While the hairpin ribozyme reduced ALDH2 activity 56% by cleavage and blockade (P < 0.0001), the hammerhead ribozyme elicited minor effects by blockade. The hairpin ribozyme was tested in vivo by adenoviral gene delivery to UChB alcohol drinker rats. Ethanol intake was curtailed 47% for 34 days (P < 0.0001), while blood acetaldehyde more than doubled upon ethanol administration and ALDH2 activity dropped 25% in liver homogenates, not affecting other ALDH isoforms. Thus, hairpin ribozymes targeted to 16 nt in the ALDH2 mRNA provide durable and specific effects in vivo, representing an improvement on previous work and encouraging development of gene therapy for alcoholism. PMID:27404720

  7. Modelling the impact of vaccination on curtailing Haemophilus influenzae serotype 'a'.

    PubMed

    Konini, Angjelina; Moghadas, Seyed M

    2015-12-21

    Haemophilus influenzae serotype a (Hia) is a human-restricted bacterial pathogen transmitted via direct contacts with an infectious individual. Currently, there is no vaccine available for prevention of Hia, and the disease is treated with antibiotics upon diagnosis. With ongoing efforts for the development of an anti-Hia protein-polysaccharide conjugated vaccine, we sought to investigate the effect of vaccination on curtailing Hia infection. We present the first stochastic model of Hia transmission and control dynamics, and parameterize it using available estimates in the literature. Since both naturally acquired and vaccine-induced immunity wane with time, model simulations show three important results. First, vaccination of only newborns cannot eliminate the pathogen from the population, even when a booster program is implemented with a high coverage. Second, achieving and maintaining a sufficiently high level of herd immunity for pathogen elimination requires vaccination of susceptible individuals in addition to a high vaccination coverage of newborns. Third, for a low vaccination rate of susceptible individuals, a high coverage of booster dose may be needed to raise the level of herd immunity for Hia eradication. Our findings highlight the importance of vaccination and timely boosting of the individual׳s immunity within the expected duration of vaccine-induced protection against Hia. When an anti-Hia vaccine becomes available, enhanced surveillance of Hia incidence and herd immunity could help determine vaccination rates and timelines for booster doses necessary to eliminate Hia from affected populations.

  8. A Model for Optimizing the Combination of Solar Electricity Generation, Supply Curtailment, Transmission and Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Marc J. R.

    With extraordinary recent growth of the solar photovoltaic industry, it is paramount to address the biggest barrier to its high-penetration across global electrical grids: the inherent variability of the solar resource. This resource variability arises from largely unpredictable meteorological phenomena and from the predictable rotation of the earth around the sun and about its own axis. To achieve very high photovoltaic penetration, the imbalance between the variable supply of sunlight and demand must be alleviated. The research detailed herein consists of the development of a computational model which seeks to optimize the combination of 3 supply-side solutions to solar variability that minimizes the aggregate cost of electricity generated therefrom: Storage (where excess solar generation is stored when it exceeds demand for utilization when it does not meet demand), interconnection (where solar generation is spread across a large geographic area and electrically interconnected to smooth overall regional output) and smart curtailment (where solar capacity is oversized and excess generation is curtailed at key times to minimize the need for storage.). This model leverages a database created in the context of this doctoral work of satellite-derived photovoltaic output spanning 10 years at a daily interval for 64,000 unique geographic points across the globe. Underpinning the model's design and results, the database was used to further the understanding of solar resource variability at timescales greater than 1-day. It is shown that--as at shorter timescales--cloud/weather-induced solar variability decreases with geographic extent and that the geographic extent at which variability is mitigated increases with timescale and is modulated by the prevailing speed of clouds/weather systems. Unpredictable solar variability up to the timescale of 30 days is shown to be mitigated across a geographic extent of only 1500km if that geographic extent is oriented in a north

  9. Hairpin Ribozyme Genes Curtail Alcohol Drinking: from Rational Design to in vivo Effects in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Sapag, Amalia; Irrazábal, Thergiory; Lobos-González, Lorena; Muñoz-Brauning, Carlos R; Quintanilla, María Elena; Tampier, Lutske

    2016-07-12

    Ribozyme genes were designed to reduce voluntary alcohol drinking in a rat model of alcohol dependence. Acetaldehyde generated from alcohol in the liver is metabolized by the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) such that diminishing ALDH2 activity leads to the aversive effects of blood acetaldehyde upon alcohol intake. A stepwise approach was followed to design genes encoding ribozymes targeted to the rat ALDH2 mRNA. In vitro studies of accessibility to oligonucleotides identified suitable target sites in the mRNA, one of which fulfilled hammerhead and hairpin ribozyme requirements (CGGUC). Ribozyme genes delivered in plasmid constructs were tested in rat cells in culture. While the hairpin ribozyme reduced ALDH2 activity 56% by cleavage and blockade (P < 0.0001), the hammerhead ribozyme elicited minor effects by blockade. The hairpin ribozyme was tested in vivo by adenoviral gene delivery to UChB alcohol drinker rats. Ethanol intake was curtailed 47% for 34 days (P < 0.0001), while blood acetaldehyde more than doubled upon ethanol administration and ALDH2 activity dropped 25% in liver homogenates, not affecting other ALDH isoforms. Thus, hairpin ribozymes targeted to 16 nt in the ALDH2 mRNA provide durable and specific effects in vivo, representing an improvement on previous work and encouraging development of gene therapy for alcoholism.

  10. High mobility group nucleosome-binding family proteins promote astrocyte differentiation of neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Motoshi; Lanjakornsiripan, Darin; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Kishi, Yusuke; Ogata, Toru; Gotoh, Yukiko

    2014-11-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the mammalian brain and are important for the functions of the central nervous system. Although previous studies have shown that the STAT signaling pathway or its regulators promote the generation of astrocytes from multipotent neural precursor cells (NPCs) in the developing mammalian brain, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the astrocytic fate decision have still remained largely unclear. Here, we show that the high mobility group nucleosome-binding (HMGN) family proteins, HMGN1, 2, and 3, promote astrocyte differentiation of NPCs during brain development. HMGN proteins were expressed in NPCs, Sox9(+) glial progenitors, and GFAP(+) astrocytes in perinatal and adult brains. Forced expression of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs in cultures or in the late embryonic neocortex increased the generation of astrocytes at the expense of neurons. Conversely, knockdown of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs suppressed astrocyte differentiation and promoted neuronal differentiation. Importantly, overexpression of HMGN proteins did not induce the phosphorylation of STAT3 or activate STAT reporter genes. In addition, HMGN family proteins did not enhance DNA demethylation and acetylation of histone H3 around the STAT-binding site of the gfap promoter. Moreover, knockdown of HMGN family proteins significantly reduced astrocyte differentiation induced by gliogenic signal ciliary neurotrophic factor, which activates the JAK-STAT pathway. Therefore, we propose that HMGN family proteins are novel chromatin regulatory factors that control astrocyte fate decision/differentiation in parallel with or downstream of the JAK-STAT pathway through modulation of the responsiveness to gliogenic signals. PMID:25069414

  11. NAP1-assisted nucleosome assembly on DNA measured in real time by single-molecule magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Vlijm, Rifka; Smitshuijzen, Jeremy S J; Lusser, Alexandra; Dekker, Cees

    2012-01-01

    While many proteins are involved in the assembly and (re)positioning of nucleosomes, the dynamics of protein-assisted nucleosome formation are not well understood. We study NAP1 (nucleosome assembly protein 1) assisted nucleosome formation at the single-molecule level using magnetic tweezers. This method allows to apply a well-defined stretching force and supercoiling density to a single DNA molecule, and to study in real time the change in linking number, stiffness and length of the DNA during nucleosome formation. We observe a decrease in end-to-end length when NAP1 and core histones (CH) are added to the dsDNA. We characterize the formation of complete nucleosomes by measuring the change in linking number of DNA, which is induced by the NAP1-assisted nucleosome assembly, and which does not occur for non-nucleosomal bound histones H3 and H4. By rotating the magnets, the supercoils formed upon nucleosome assembly are removed and the number of assembled nucleosomes can be counted. We find that the compaction of DNA at low force is about 56 nm per assembled nucleosome. The number of compaction steps and associated change in linking number indicate that NAP1-assisted nucleosome assembly is a two-step process. PMID:23050009

  12. Analysis of acetylation stoichiometry suggests that SIRT3 repairs nonenzymatic acetylation lesions.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Brian T; Moustafa, Tarek; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Zechner, Rudolf; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2015-11-01

    Acetylation is frequently detected on mitochondrial enzymes, and the sirtuin deacetylase SIRT3 is thought to regulate metabolism by deacetylating mitochondrial proteins. However, the stoichiometry of acetylation has not been studied and is important for understanding whether SIRT3 regulates or suppresses acetylation. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we measured acetylation stoichiometry in mouse liver tissue and found that SIRT3 suppressed acetylation to a very low stoichiometry at its target sites. By examining acetylation changes in the liver, heart, brain, and brown adipose tissue of fasted mice, we found that SIRT3-targeted sites were mostly unaffected by fasting, a dietary manipulation that is thought to regulate metabolism through SIRT3-dependent deacetylation. Globally increased mitochondrial acetylation in fasted liver tissue, higher stoichiometry at mitochondrial acetylation sites, and greater sensitivity of SIRT3-targeted sites to chemical acetylation in vitro and fasting-induced acetylation in vivo, suggest a nonenzymatic mechanism of acetylation. Our data indicate that most mitochondrial acetylation occurs as a low-level nonenzymatic protein lesion and that SIRT3 functions as a protein repair factor that removes acetylation lesions from lysine residues.

  13. Genome-wide nucleosome specificity and function of chromatin remodellers in ES cells

    PubMed Central

    de Dieuleveult, Maud; Yen, Kuangyu; Hmitou, Isabelle; Depaux, Arnaud; Boussouar, Fayçal; Dargham, Daria Bou; Jounier, Sylvie; Humbertclaude, Hélène; Ribierre, Florence; Baulard, Céline; Farrell, Nina P.; Park, Bongsoo; Keime, Céline; Carrière, Lucie; Berlivet, Soizick; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Werner, Michel; Deleuze, Jean-François; Olaso, Robert; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Chantalat, Sophie; Pugh, B. Franklin; Gérard, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Summary ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers allow access to DNA for transcription factors and the general transcription machinery, but whether mammalian chromatin remodellers1–3 target specific nucleosomes to regulate transcription is unclear. Here, we present genome-wide remodeller-nucleosome interaction profiles for Chd1, Chd2, Chd4, Chd6, Chd8, Chd9, Brg1 and Ep400 in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. These remodellers bind one or both full nucleosomes that flank MNase-defined nucleosome-free promoter regions (NFRs), where they separate divergent transcription. Surprisingly, large CpG-rich NFRs that extend downstream of annotated transcriptional start sites (TSSs) are nevertheless chromatinized with non-nucleosomal or subnucleosomal histone variants (H3.3 and H2A.Z) and modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K27ac). RNA polymerase (pol) II therefore navigates hundreds of bp of altered chromatin in the sense direction before encountering an MNase-resistant nucleosome at the 3′ end of the NFR. Transcriptome analysis upon remodeller depletion reveals reciprocal mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by remodellers. Whereas at active genes individual remodellers play either positive or negative roles via altering nucleosome stability, at polycomb-enriched bivalent genes the same remodellers act in an opposite manner. These findings indicate that remodellers target specific nucleosomes at the edge of NFRs, where they regulate ES cell transcriptional programs. PMID:26814966

  14. DNA-guided establishment of nucleosome patterns within coding regions of a eukaryotic genome

    PubMed Central

    Beh, Leslie Y.; Müller, Manuel M.; Muir, Tom W.; Kaplan, Noam; Landweber, Laura F.

    2015-01-01

    A conserved hallmark of eukaryotic chromatin architecture is the distinctive array of well-positioned nucleosomes downstream from transcription start sites (TSS). Recent studies indicate that trans-acting factors establish this stereotypical array. Here, we present the first genome-wide in vitro and in vivo nucleosome maps for the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. In contrast with previous studies in yeast, we find that the stereotypical nucleosome array is preserved in the in vitro reconstituted map, which is governed only by the DNA sequence preferences of nucleosomes. Remarkably, this average in vitro pattern arises from the presence of subsets of nucleosomes, rather than the whole array, in individual Tetrahymena genes. Variation in GC content contributes to the positioning of these sequence-directed nucleosomes and affects codon usage and amino acid composition in genes. Given that the AT-rich Tetrahymena genome is intrinsically unfavorable for nucleosome formation, we propose that these “seed” nucleosomes—together with trans-acting factors—may facilitate the establishment of nucleosome arrays within genes in vivo, while minimizing changes to the underlying coding sequences. PMID:26330564

  15. The impact of the HIRA histone chaperone upon global nucleosome architecture.

    PubMed

    Gal, Csenge; Moore, Karen M; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Kent, Nicholas A; Whitehall, Simon K

    2015-01-01

    HIRA is an evolutionarily conserved histone chaperone that mediates replication-independent nucleosome assembly and is important for a variety of processes such as cell cycle progression, development, and senescence. Here we have used a chromatin sequencing approach to determine the genome-wide contribution of HIRA to nucleosome organization in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Cells lacking HIRA experience a global reduction in nucleosome occupancy at gene sequences, consistent with the proposed role for HIRA in chromatin reassembly behind elongating RNA polymerase II. In addition, we find that at its target promoters, HIRA commonly maintains the full occupancy of the -1 nucleosome. HIRA does not affect global chromatin structure at replication origins or in rDNA repeats but is required for nucleosome occupancy in silent regions of the genome. Nucleosome organization associated with the heterochromatic (dg-dh) repeats located at the centromere is perturbed by loss of HIRA function and furthermore HIRA is required for normal nucleosome occupancy at Tf2 LTR retrotransposons. Overall, our data indicate that HIRA plays an important role in maintaining nucleosome architecture at both euchromatic and heterochromatic loci.

  16. Nanopores suggest a negligible influence of CpG methylation on nucleosome packaging and stability.

    PubMed

    Langecker, Martin; Ivankin, Andrey; Carson, Spencer; Kinney, Shannon R M; Simmel, Friedrich C; Wanunu, Meni

    2015-01-14

    Nucleosomes are the fundamental repeating units of chromatin, and dynamic regulation of their positioning along DNA governs gene accessibility in eukaryotes. Although epigenetic factors have been shown to influence nucleosome structure and dynamics, the impact of DNA methylation on nucleosome packaging remains controversial. Further, all measurements to date have been carried out under zero-force conditions. In this paper, we present the first automated force measurements that probe the impact of CpG DNA methylation on nucleosome stability. In solid-state nanopore force spectroscopy, a nucleosomal DNA tail is captured into a pore and pulled on with a time-varying electrophoretic force until unraveling is detected. This is automatically repeated for hundreds of nucleosomes, yielding statistics of nucleosome lifetime vs electrophoretic force. The force geometry, which is similar to displacement forces exerted by DNA polymerases and helicases, reveals that nucleosome stability is sensitive to DNA sequence yet insensitive to CpG methylation. Our label-free method provides high-throughput data that favorably compares with other force spectroscopy experiments and is suitable for studying a variety of DNA-protein complexes.

  17. Differential Nucleosome Occupancies across Oct4-Sox2 Binding Sites in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sebeson, Amy; Xi, Liqun; Zhang, Quanwei; Sigmund, Audrey; Wang, Ji-Ping; Widom, Jonathan; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    The binding sequence for any transcription factor can be found millions of times within a genome, yet only a small fraction of these sequences encode functional transcription factor binding sites. One of the reasons for this dichotomy is that many other factors, such as nucleosomes, compete for binding. To study how the competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors helps determine a functional transcription factor site from a predicted transcription factor site, we compared experimentally-generated in vitro nucleosome occupancy with in vivo nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding in murine embryonic stem cells. Using a solution hybridization enrichment technique, we generated a high-resolution nucleosome map from targeted regions of the genome containing predicted sites and functional sites of Oct4/Sox2 regulation. We found that at Pax6 and Nes, which are bivalently poised in stem cells, functional Oct4 and Sox2 sites show high amounts of in vivo nucleosome displacement compared to in vitro. Oct4 and Sox2, which are active, show no significant displacement of in vivo nucleosomes at functional sites, similar to nonfunctional Oct4/Sox2 binding. This study highlights a complex interplay between Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors and nucleosomes among different target genes, which may result in distinct patterns of stem cell gene regulation.

  18. Genome-wide nucleosome specificity and function of chromatin remodellers in ES cells.

    PubMed

    de Dieuleveult, Maud; Yen, Kuangyu; Hmitou, Isabelle; Depaux, Arnaud; Boussouar, Fayçal; Bou Dargham, Daria; Jounier, Sylvie; Humbertclaude, Hélène; Ribierre, Florence; Baulard, Céline; Farrell, Nina P; Park, Bongsoo; Keime, Céline; Carrière, Lucie; Berlivet, Soizick; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Werner, Michel; Deleuze, Jean-François; Olaso, Robert; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Chantalat, Sophie; Pugh, B Franklin; Gérard, Matthieu

    2016-02-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers allow access to DNA for transcription factors and the general transcription machinery, but whether mammalian chromatin remodellers target specific nucleosomes to regulate transcription is unclear. Here we present genome-wide remodeller-nucleosome interaction profiles for the chromatin remodellers Chd1, Chd2, Chd4, Chd6, Chd8, Chd9, Brg1 and Ep400 in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. These remodellers bind one or both full nucleosomes that flank micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-defined nucleosome-free promoter regions (NFRs), where they separate divergent transcription. Surprisingly, large CpG-rich NFRs that extend downstream of annotated transcriptional start sites are nevertheless bound by non-nucleosomal or subnucleosomal histone variants (H3.3 and H2A.Z) and marked by H3K4me3 and H3K27ac modifications. RNA polymerase II therefore navigates hundreds of base pairs of altered chromatin in the sense direction before encountering an MNase-resistant nucleosome at the 3' end of the NFR. Transcriptome analysis after remodeller depletion reveals reciprocal mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by remodellers. Whereas at active genes individual remodellers have either positive or negative roles via altering nucleosome stability, at polycomb-enriched bivalent genes the same remodellers act in an opposite manner. These findings indicate that remodellers target specific nucleosomes at the edge of NFRs, where they regulate ES cell transcriptional programs.

  19. Multivalent Interactions by the Set8 Histone Methyltransferase With Its Nucleosome Substrate.

    PubMed

    Girish, Taverekere S; McGinty, Robert K; Tan, Song

    2016-04-24

    Set8 is the only mammalian monomethyltransferase responsible for H4K20me1, a methyl mark critical for genomic integrity of eukaryotic cells. We present here a structural model for how Set8 uses multivalent interactions to bind and methylate the nucleosome based on crystallographic and solution studies of the Set8/nucleosome complex. Our studies indicate that Set8 employs its i-SET and c-SET domains to engage nucleosomal DNA 1 to 1.5 turns from the nucleosomal dyad and in doing so, it positions the SET domain for catalysis with H4 Lys20. Surprisingly, we find that a basic N-terminal extension to the SET domain plays an even more prominent role in nucleosome binding, possibly by making an arginine anchor interaction with the nucleosome H2A/H2B acidic patch. We further show that proliferating cell nuclear antigen and the nucleosome compete for binding to Set8 through this basic extension, suggesting a mechanism for how nucleosome binding protects Set8 from proliferating cell nuclear antigen-dependent degradation during the cell cycle.

  20. Strategies for crystallizing a chromatin protein in complex with the nucleosome core particle.

    PubMed

    Makde, Ravindra D; Tan, Song

    2013-11-15

    The molecular details of how chromatin factors and enzymes interact with the nucleosome are critical to understanding fundamental genetic processes including cell division and gene regulation. A structural understanding of such processes has been hindered by the difficulty in producing diffraction-quality crystals of chromatin proteins in complex with the nucleosome. We describe here the steps used to grow crystals of the 300-kDa RCC1 chromatin factor/nucleosome core particle complex that diffract to 2.9-Å resolution. These steps include both pre- and postcrystallization strategies potentially useful to other complexes. We screened multiple variant RCC1/nucleosome core particle complexes assembled using different RCC1 homologs and deletion variants, and nucleosomes containing nucleosomal DNA with different sequences and lengths, as well as histone deletion variants. We found that using RCC1 from different species produced different crystal forms of the RCC1/nucleosome complex consistent with key crystal packing interactions mediated by RCC1. Optimization of postcrystallization soaks to dehydrate the crystals dramatically improved the diffraction quality of the RCC1/nucleosome crystal from 5.0- to 2.9-Å resolution.

  1. Affinity, stoichiometry and cooperativity of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) binding to nucleosomal arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teif, Vladimir B.; Kepper, Nick; Yserentant, Klaus; Wedemann, Gero; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-02-01

    Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) participates in establishing and maintaining heterochromatin via its histone-modification-dependent chromatin interactions. In recent papers HP1 binding to nucleosomal arrays was measured in vitro and interpreted in terms of nearest-neighbour cooperative binding. This mode of chromatin interaction could lead to the spreading of HP1 along the nucleosome chain. Here, we reanalysed previous data by representing the nucleosome chain as a 1D binding lattice and showed how the experimental HP1 binding isotherms can be explained by a simpler model without cooperative interactions between neighboring HP1 dimers. Based on these calculations and spatial models of dinucleosomes and nucleosome chains, we propose that binding stoichiometry depends on the nucleosome repeat length (NRL) rather than protein interactions between HP1 dimers. According to our calculations, more open nucleosome arrays with long DNA linkers are characterized by a larger number of binding sites in comparison to chains with a short NRL. Furthermore, we demonstrate by Monte Carlo simulations that the NRL dependent folding of the nucleosome chain can induce allosteric changes of HP1 binding sites. Thus, HP1 chromatin interactions can be modulated by the change of binding stoichiometry and the type of binding to condensed (methylated) and non-condensed (unmethylated) nucleosome arrays in the absence of direct interactions between HP1 dimers.

  2. Novel nucleosomal particles containing core histones and linker DNA but no histone H1.

    PubMed

    Cole, Hope A; Cui, Feng; Ocampo, Josefina; Burke, Tara L; Nikitina, Tatiana; Nagarajavel, V; Kotomura, Naoe; Zhurkin, Victor B; Clark, David J

    2016-01-29

    Eukaryotic chromosomal DNA is assembled into regularly spaced nucleosomes, which play a central role in gene regulation by determining accessibility of control regions. The nucleosome contains ∼147 bp of DNA wrapped ∼1.7 times around a central core histone octamer. The linker histone, H1, binds both to the nucleosome, sealing the DNA coils, and to the linker DNA between nucleosomes, directing chromatin folding. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digests the linker to yield the chromatosome, containing H1 and ∼160 bp, and then converts it to a core particle, containing ∼147 bp and no H1. Sequencing of nucleosomal DNA obtained after MNase digestion (MNase-seq) generates genome-wide nucleosome maps that are important for understanding gene regulation. We present an improved MNase-seq method involving simultaneous digestion with exonuclease III, which removes linker DNA. Remarkably, we discovered two novel intermediate particles containing 154 or 161 bp, corresponding to 7 bp protruding from one or both sides of the nucleosome core. These particles are detected in yeast lacking H1 and in H1-depleted mouse chromatin. They can be reconstituted in vitro using purified core histones and DNA. We propose that these 'proto-chromatosomes' are fundamental chromatin subunits, which include the H1 binding site and influence nucleosome spacing independently of H1.

  3. Dynamic Nucleosome Movement Provides Structural Information of Topological Chromatin Domains in Living Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shinkai, Soya; Nozaki, Tadasu; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian genome is organized into submegabase-sized chromatin domains (CDs) including topologically associating domains, which have been identified using chromosome conformation capture-based methods. Single-nucleosome imaging in living mammalian cells has revealed subdiffusively dynamic nucleosome movement. It is unclear how single nucleosomes within CDs fluctuate and how the CD structure reflects the nucleosome movement. Here, we present a polymer model wherein CDs are characterized by fractal dimensions and the nucleosome fibers fluctuate in a viscoelastic medium with memory. We analytically show that the mean-squared displacement (MSD) of nucleosome fluctuations within CDs is subdiffusive. The diffusion coefficient and the subdiffusive exponent depend on the structural information of CDs. This analytical result enabled us to extract information from the single-nucleosome imaging data for HeLa cells. Our observation that the MSD is lower at the nuclear periphery region than the interior region indicates that CDs in the heterochromatin-rich nuclear periphery region are more compact than those in the euchromatin-rich interior region with respect to the fractal dimensions as well as the size. Finally, we evaluated that the average size of CDs is in the range of 100–500 nm and that the relaxation time of nucleosome movement within CDs is a few seconds. Our results provide physical and dynamic insights into the genome architecture in living cells. PMID:27764097

  4. Genome-wide mapping of nucleosome positions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to different nitrogen conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Du, Guocheng; Zou, Huijun; Xie, Guangfa; Chen, Jian; Shi, Zhongping; Zhou, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    Well-organized chromatin is involved in a number of various transcriptional regulation and gene expression. We used genome-wide mapping of nucleosomes in response to different nitrogen conditions to determine both nucleosome profiles and gene expression events in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nitrogen conditions influence general nucleosome profiles and the expression of nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) sensitive genes. The nucleosome occupancy of TATA-containing genes was higher compared to TATA-less genes. TATA-less genes in high or low nucleosome occupancy, showed a significant change in gene coding regions when shifting cells from glutamine to proline as the sole nitrogen resource. Furthermore, a correlation between the expression of nucleosome occupancy induced NCR sensitive genes or TATA containing genes in NCR sensitive genes, and nucleosome prediction were found when cells were cultured in proline or shifting from glutamine to proline as the sole nitrogen source compared to glutamine. These results also showed that variation of nucleosome occupancy accompany with chromatin-dependent transcription factor could influence the expression of a series of genes involved in the specific regulation of nitrogen utilization. PMID:27659668

  5. The Arabidopsis Adh gene exhibits diverse nucleosome arrangements within a small DNase I-sensitive domain.

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Palas, M A; Ferl, R J

    1995-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene from Arabidopsis shows enhanced sensitivity to DNase I in cells that express the gene. This generalized sensitivity to DNase I is demarcated by position -500 on the 5' side and the end of the mRNA on the 3' side. Thus, the gene defined as the promoter and mRNA coding region corresponds very closely in size with the gene defined as a nuclease-sensitive domain. This is a remarkably close correspondence between a sensitive domain and a eukaryotic transcriptional unit, because previously reported DNase I-sensitive domains include large regions of DNA that are not transcribed. Nucleosomes are present in the coding region of the Adh gene when it is expressed, indicating that the transcriptional elongation process causes nucleosome disruption rather than release of nucleosomes from the coding region. In addition, the regulatory region contains a loosely positioned nucleosome that is separated from adjacent nucleosomes by internucleosomic DNA segments longer than the average linker DNA in bulk chromatin. This specific array of nucleosomes coexists with bound transcription factors that could contribute to the organization of the nucleosome arrangement. These results enhance our understanding of the complex interactions among DNA, nucleosomes, and transcription factors during gene expression in plants. PMID:8535143

  6. Protein acetylation in metabolism - metabolites and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Keir J; Zhang, Hongbo; Katsyuba, Elena; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Reversible acetylation was initially described as an epigenetic mechanism regulating DNA accessibility. Since then, this process has emerged as a controller of histone and nonhistone acetylation that integrates key physiological processes such as metabolism, circadian rhythm and cell cycle, along with gene regulation in various organisms. The widespread and reversible nature of acetylation also revitalized interest in the mechanisms that regulate lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and deacetylases (KDACs) in health and disease. Changes in protein or histone acetylation are especially relevant for many common diseases including obesity, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, as well as for some rare diseases such as mitochondrial diseases and lipodystrophies. In this Review, we examine the role of reversible acetylation in metabolic control and how changes in levels of metabolites or cofactors, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, coenzyme A, acetyl coenzyme A, zinc and butyrate and/or β-hydroxybutyrate, directly alter KAT or KDAC activity to link energy status to adaptive cellular and organismal homeostasis.

  7. 2-Acetyl-pyridinium bromanilate.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lynne H; Boyle, Bryan; Clive, Lesley A; Collins, Anna; Currie, Lynsey D; Gogol, Malgorzata; Hastings, Claire; Jones, Andrew O F; Kennedy, Jennifer L; Kerr, Graham B; Kidd, Alastair; Lawton, Lorreta M; Macintyre, Susan J; Maclean, Niall M; Martin, Alan R G; McGonagle, Kate; Melrose, Samantha; Rew, Gaius A; Robinson, Colin W; Schmidtmann, Marc; Turnbull, Felicity B; Williams, Lewis G; Wiseman, Alan Y; Wocial, Malgorzata H; Wilson, Chick C

    2009-01-01

    In the crystal of the title mol-ecular salt (systematic name: 2-acetyl-pyridinium 2,5-dibromo-4-hydr-oxy-3,6-dioxocyclo-hexa-1,4-dienolate), C(7)H(8)NO(+)·C(6)HBr(2)O(4) (-), centrosymmetric rings consisting of two cations and two anions are formed, with the components linked by alternating O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Short O⋯Br contacts [3.243 (2) and 3.359 (2) Å] may help to consolidate the packing. PMID:21583087

  8. A Method to determine lysine acetylation stoichiometries

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles

    2014-07-21

    A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the lack of stoichiometry information. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of lysine acetylation on proteins globally. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy on hundreds of acetylated peptides from cell lysates and cross-validated the measurements via immunoblotting.

  9. Chromosomes. CENP-C reshapes and stabilizes CENP-A nucleosomes at the centromere.

    PubMed

    Falk, Samantha J; Guo, Lucie Y; Sekulic, Nikolina; Smoak, Evan M; Mani, Tomoyasu; Logsdon, Glennis A; Gupta, Kushol; Jansen, Lars E T; Van Duyne, Gregory D; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Lampson, Michael A; Black, Ben E

    2015-05-01

    Inheritance of each chromosome depends upon its centromere. A histone H3 variant, centromere protein A (CENP-A), is essential for epigenetically marking centromere location. We find that CENP-A is quantitatively retained at the centromere upon which it is initially assembled. CENP-C binds to CENP-A nucleosomes and is a prime candidate to stabilize centromeric chromatin. Using purified components, we find that CENP-C reshapes the octameric histone core of CENP-A nucleosomes, rigidifies both surface and internal nucleosome structure, and modulates terminal DNA to match the loose wrap that is found on native CENP-A nucleosomes at functional human centromeres. Thus, CENP-C affects nucleosome shape and dynamics in a manner analogous to allosteric regulation of enzymes. CENP-C depletion leads to rapid removal of CENP-A from centromeres, indicating their collaboration in maintaining centromere identity.

  10. Electrostatic effect of H1-histone protein binding on nucleosome repeat length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Teif, Vladimir B.

    2014-08-01

    Within a simple biophysical model we describe the effect of electrostatic binding of H1 histone proteins on the nucleosome repeat length in chromatin. The length of wrapped DNA optimizes its binding energy to the histone core and the elastic energy penalty of DNA wrapping. The magnitude of the effect predicted from our model is in agreement with the systematic experimental data on the linear variation of nucleosome repeat lengths with H1/nucleosome ratio (Woodcock C L et al 2006 Chromos. Res. 14 17-25). We compare our model to the data for different cell types and organisms, with a widely varying ratio of bound H1 histones per nucleosome. We underline the importance of this non-specific histone-DNA charge-balance mechanism in regulating the positioning of nucleosomes and the degree of compaction of chromatin fibers in eukaryotic cells.

  11. Stimulation of the Drosophila immune system alters genome-wide nucleosome occupancy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yingxue; Vera, Daniel L; Hughes, Kimberly A; Dennis, Jonathan H

    2015-03-01

    In eukaryotes, nucleosomes participate in all DNA-templated events by regulating access to the underlying DNA sequence. However, nucleosome dynamics during a genome response have not been well characterized [1,2]. We stimulated Drosophila S2 cells with heat-killed Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella typhimurium, and mapped genome-wide nucleosome occupancy at high temporal resolution by MNase-seq using Illumina HiSeq 2500. We show widespread nucleosome occupancy change in S2 cells during the immune response, with the significant nucleosomal loss occurring at 4 h after stimulation. Data have been deposited to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database repository with the dataset identifier GSE64507.

  12. Stimulation of the Drosophila immune system alters genome-wide nucleosome occupancy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yingxue; Vera, Daniel L; Hughes, Kimberly A; Dennis, Jonathan H

    2015-03-01

    In eukaryotes, nucleosomes participate in all DNA-templated events by regulating access to the underlying DNA sequence. However, nucleosome dynamics during a genome response have not been well characterized [1,2]. We stimulated Drosophila S2 cells with heat-killed Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella typhimurium, and mapped genome-wide nucleosome occupancy at high temporal resolution by MNase-seq using Illumina HiSeq 2500. We show widespread nucleosome occupancy change in S2 cells during the immune response, with the significant nucleosomal loss occurring at 4 h after stimulation. Data have been deposited to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database repository with the dataset identifier GSE64507. PMID:26484165

  13. Genome-wide Mapping of Nucleosome Positioning and DNA Methylation Within Individual DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaping; Lay, Fides D.; Liang, Gangning; Berman, Benjamin P.; Jones, Peter A.; Kelly, Terry

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning work together to generate chromatin structures that regulate gene expression. Nucleosomes are typically mapped using nuclease digestion requiring significant amounts of material and varying enzyme concentrations. We have developed a method that uses a GpC methyltransferase (M.CviPI) and next generation sequencing to footprint nucleosome positioning genome-wide using less than 1 million cells, which does not suffer from sequence based biases associated with MNase digestion and retains endogenous DNA methylation information. Using a novel bioinformatics pipeline we identify chromatin configurations associated with a variety of functional genomic loci including distinct promoter types, enhancers, insulators, X-inactivated and imprinted genes. Importantly, DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning information are obtained from the same DNA molecule, giving the first genome-wide DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning correlation at the single molecule level that can be used to monitor disease progression and response to therapy.

  14. Pioneer Transcription Factors Target Partial DNA Motifs on Nucleosomes to Initiate Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Soufi, Abdenour; Garcia, Meilin Fernandez; Jaroszewicz, Artur; Osman, Nebiyu; Pellegrini, Matteo; Zaret, Kenneth S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Pioneer transcription factors (TFs) access silent chromatin and initiate cell fate changes, using diverse types of DNA binding domains (DBDs). FoxA, the paradigm pioneer TF, has a winged helix DBD that resembles linker histone and thereby binds its target sites on nucleosomes and in compacted chromatin. Herein we compare the nucleosome and chromatin targeting activities of Oct4 (POU DBD), Sox2 (HMG box DBD), Klf4 (zinc finger DBD), and c-Myc (bHLH DBD), which together reprogram somatic cells to pluripotency. Purified Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4 proteins can bind nucleosomes in vitro, and in vivo they preferentially target silent sites enriched for nucleosomes. Pioneer activity relates simply to the ability of a given DBD to target partial motifs displayed on the nucleosome surface. Such partial motif recognition can occur by coordinate binding between factors. Our findings provide insight into how pioneer factors can target naïve chromatin sites. PMID:25892221

  15. Structure and dynamics of DNA loops on nucleosomes studied with atomistic, microsecond-scale molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pasi, Marco; Lavery, Richard

    2016-01-01

    DNA loop formation on nucleosomes is strongly implicated in chromatin remodeling and occurs spontaneously in nucleosomes subjected to superhelical stress. The nature of such loops depends crucially on the balance between DNA deformation and DNA interaction with the nucleosome core. Currently, no high-resolution structural data on these loops exist. Although uniform rod models have been used to study loop size and shape, these models make assumptions concerning DNA mechanics and DNA–core binding. We present here atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations for two different loop sizes. The results point to the key role of localized DNA kinking within the loops. Kinks enable the relaxation of DNA bending strain to be coupled with improved DNA–core interactions. Kinks lead to small, irregularly shaped loops that are asymmetrically positioned with respect to the nucleosome core. We also find that loop position can influence the dynamics of the DNA segments at the extremities of the nucleosome. PMID:27098037

  16. Acetylation of woody lignocellulose: significance and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Koutaniemi, Sanna; Tenkanen, Maija; Mellerowicz, Ewa J.

    2013-01-01

    Non-cellulosic cell wall polysaccharides constitute approximately one quarter of usable biomass for human exploitation. In contrast to cellulose, these components are usually substituted by O-acetyl groups, which affect their properties and interactions with other polymers, thus affecting their solubility and extractability. However, details of these interactions are still largely obscure. Moreover, polysaccharide hydrolysis to constituent monosaccharides is hampered by the presence of O-acetyl groups, necessitating either enzymatic (esterase) or chemical de-acetylation, increasing the costs and chemical consumption. Reduction of polysaccharide acetyl content in planta is a way to modify lignocellulose toward improved saccharification. In this review we: (1) summarize literature on lignocellulose acetylation in different tree species, (2) present data and current hypotheses concerning the role of O-acetylation in determining woody lignocellulose properties, (3) describe plant proteins involved in lignocellulose O-acetylation, (4) give examples of microbial enzymes capable to de-acetylate lignocellulose, and (5) discuss prospects for exploiting these enzymes in planta to modify xylan acetylation. PMID:23734153

  17. Acetylation regulates Jun protein turnover in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daoyong; Suganuma, Tamaki; Workman, Jerry L

    2013-11-01

    C-Jun is a major transcription factor belonging to the activating protein 1 (AP-1) family. Phosphorylation has been shown to be critical for c-Jun activation and stability. Here, we report that Jra, the Drosophila Jun protein, is acetylated in vivo. We demonstrate that the acetylation of Jra leads to its rapid degradation in response to osmotic stress. Intriguingly, we also found that Jra phosphorylation antagonized its acetylation, indicating the opposite roles of acetylation and phosphorylation in Jra degradation process under osmotic stress. Our results provide new insights into how c-Jun proteins are precisely regulated by the interplay of different posttranslational modifications.

  18. Curtailing patient-specific IMRT QA procedures from 2D dose error distribution

    PubMed Central

    Kurosu, Keita; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Otani, Yuki; Oda, Michio; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) test is conducted to verify the accuracy of dose delivery. It generally consists of three verification processes: the absolute point dose difference, the planar dose differences at each gantry angle, and the planar dose differences by 3D composite irradiation. However, this imposes a substantial workload on medical physicists. The objective of this study was to determine whether our novel method that predicts the 3D delivered dose allows certain patient-specific IMRT QAs to be curtailed. The object was IMRT QA for the pelvic region with regard to point dose and composite planar dose differences. We compared measured doses, doses calculated in the treatment planning system, and doses predicted by in-house software. The 3D predicted dose was reconstructed from the per-field measurement by incorporating the relative dose error distribution into the original dose grid of each beam. All point dose differences between the measured and the calculated dose were within ±3%, whereas 93.3% of them between the predicted and the calculated dose were within ±3%. As for planar dose differences, the gamma passing rates between the calculated and the predicted dose were higher than those between the calculated and the measured dose. Comparison and statistical analysis revealed a correlation between the predicted and the measured dose with regard to both point dose and planar dose differences. We concluded that the prediction-based approach is an accurate substitute for the conventional measurement-based approach in IMRT QA for the pelvic region. Our novel approach will help medical physicists save time on IMRT QA. PMID:26661854

  19. Changes in Insulin Secretion and Action in Adults With Familial Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Who Curtail Their Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Darukhanavala, Amy; Booth, John N.; Bromley, Lindsay; Whitmore, Harry; Imperial, Jacqueline; Penev, Plamen D.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Experimental sleep deprivation is accompanied by changes in glucose regulation. However, the effects of chronic sleep insufficiency on insulin secretion and action in populations at high risk for type 2 diabetes are not known. This study examined the relationship between objectively documented habitual sleep curtailment and measures of insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and oral glucose tolerance in free-living adults with parental history of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 47 healthy participants with parental history of type 2 diabetes (26 female/21 male, mean [SD] age 26 [4] years and BMI 23.8 [2.5] kg/m2) completed 13 (SD = 2) days of sleep and physical activity monitoring by wrist actigraphy and waist accelerometry while following their usual lifestyle at home. Laboratory polysomnography was used to screen for sleep disorders. Indices of diabetes risk based on oral glucose tolerance tests were compared between participants with habitual short sleep and those with usual sleep duration >6 h/day. RESULTS Consistent with a behavioral pattern of habitual sleep curtailment, short sleepers obtained an average of 1.5 h less sleep per night and showed signs of increased sleep pressure. Participants who habitually curtailed their sleep had considerably higher indices of insulin resistance and increased insulin secretion but maintained normal glucose tolerance similar to that of subjects who slept more. CONCLUSIONS Young lean adults with parental history of type 2 diabetes who habitually curtail their sleep have increased insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia—a pattern that has been associated with higher risk of developing diabetes in such susceptible individuals. PMID:21836106

  20. Structure-based Analysis of DNA Sequence Patterns Guiding Nucleosome Positioning in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Feng; Zhurkin, Victor B.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of genome-wide nucleosomal organization suggest that the DNA sequence is one of the major determinants of nucleosome positioning. Although the search for underlying patterns encoded in nucleosomal DNA has been going on for about 30 years, our knowledge of these patterns still remains limited. Based on our evaluations of DNA deformation energy, we developed new scoring functions to predict nucleosome positioning. There are three principal differences between our approach and earlier studies: (i) we assume that the length of nucleosomal DNA varies from 146 to 147 bp; (ii) we consider the anisotropic flexibility of pyrimidine-purine (YR) dimeric steps in the context of their neighbors (e.g., YYRR versus RYRY); (iii) we postulate that alternating AT-rich and GC-rich motifs reflect sequence-dependent interactions between histone arginines and DNA in the minor groove. Using these functions, we analyzed 20 nucleosome positions mapped in vitro at single nucleotide resolution (including clones 601, 603, 605, the pGUB plasmid, chicken β-globin and three 5S rDNA genes). We predicted 15 of the 20 positions with 1-bp precision, and two positions with 2-bp precision. The predicted position of the ‘601’ nucleosome (i.e., the optimum of the computed score) deviates from the experimentally determined unique position by no more than 1 bp — an accuracy exceeding that of earlier predictions. Our analysis reveals a clear heterogeneity of the nucleosomal sequences which can be divided into two groups based on the positioning ‘rules’ they follow. The sequences of one group are enriched by highly deformable YR/YYRR motifs at the minor-groove bending sites SHL ±3.5 and ±5.5, which is similar to the α-satellite sequence used in most crystallized nucleosomes. Apparently, the positioning of these nucleosomes is determined by the interactions between histones H2A/H2B and the terminal parts of nucleosomal DNA. In the other group (that includes the ‘601’ clone

  1. The stochastically curtailed generalized likelihood ratio: A new termination criterion for variable-length computerized classification tests.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Alan R; Fina, Anthony D

    2015-06-01

    Computerized classification tests (CCTs) are used to classify examinees into categories in the context of professional certification testing. The term "variable-length" refers to CCTs that terminate (i.e., cease administering items to the examinee) when a classification can be made with a prespecified level of certainty. The sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) is a common criterion for terminating variable-length CCTs, but recent research has proposed more efficient methods. Specifically, the stochastically curtailed SPRT (SCSPRT) and the generalized likelihood ratio criterion (GLR) have been shown to classify examinees with accuracy similar to the SPRT while using fewer items. This article shows that the GLR criterion itself may be stochastically curtailed, resulting in a new termination criterion, the stochastically curtailed GLR (SCGLR). All four criteria-the SPRT, SCSPRT, GLR, and the new SCGLR-were compared using a simulation study. In this study, we examined the criteria in testing conditions that varied several CCT design features, including item bank characteristics, pass/fail threshold, and examinee ability distribution. In each condition, the termination criteria were evaluated according to their accuracy (proportion of examinees classified correctly), efficiency (test length), and loss (a single statistic combing both accuracy and efficiency). The simulation results showed that the SCGLR can yield increased efficiency without sacrificing accuracy, relative to the SPRT, SCSPRT, and GLR in a wide variety of CCT designs. PMID:24907003

  2. The Pioneer Transcription Factor FoxA Maintains an Accessible Nucleosome Configuration at Enhancers for Tissue-Specific Gene Activation.

    PubMed

    Iwafuchi-Doi, Makiko; Donahue, Greg; Kakumanu, Akshay; Watts, Jason A; Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B Franklin; Lee, Dolim; Kaestner, Klaus H; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear DNA wraps around core histones to form nucleosomes, which restricts the binding of transcription factors to gene regulatory sequences. Pioneer transcription factors can bind DNA sites on nucleosomes and initiate gene regulatory events, often leading to the local opening of chromatin. However, the nucleosomal configuration of open chromatin and the basis for its regulation is unclear. We combined low and high levels of micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion along with core histone mapping to assess the nucleosomal configuration at enhancers and promoters in mouse liver. We find that MNase-accessible nucleosomes, bound by transcription factors, are retained more at liver-specific enhancers than at promoters and ubiquitous enhancers. The pioneer factor FoxA displaces linker histone H1, thereby keeping enhancer nucleosomes accessible in chromatin and allowing other liver-specific transcription factors to bind and stimulate transcription. Thus, nucleosomes are not exclusively repressive to gene regulation when they are retained with, and exposed by, pioneer factors.

  3. CENP-C directs a structural transition of CENP-A nucleosomes mainly through sliding of DNA gyres.

    PubMed

    Falk, Samantha J; Lee, Jaehyoun; Sekulic, Nikolina; Sennett, Michael A; Lee, Tae-Hee; Black, Ben E

    2016-03-01

    The histone H3 variant CENP-A is incorporated into nucleosomes that mark centromere location. We have recently reported that CENP-A nucleosomes, compared with their H3 counterparts, confer an altered nucleosome shape. Here, using a single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) approach with recombinant human histones and centromere DNA, we found that the nucleosome shape change directed by CENP-A is dominated by lateral passing of two DNA gyres (gyre sliding). A nonhistone centromere protein, CENP-C, binds and reshapes the nucleosome, sliding the DNA gyres back to positions similar to those in canonical nucleosomes containing conventional histone H3. The model that we generated to explain the CENP-A-nucleosome transition provides an example of a shape change imposed by external binding proteins and has notable implications for understanding of the epigenetic basis of the faithful inheritance of centromere location on chromosomes.

  4. A Method to Determine Lysine Acetylation Stoichiometries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong-Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; et al

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a common protein posttranslational modification that regulates a variety of biological processes. A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the difficulty in measuring the proportion of lysine residues that are acetylated. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of protein lysine acetylation. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy for ~750 acetylated peptides from mammalian cell lysates. Furthermore, the acetylation on N-terminal tail of histone H4 was cross-validated by treating cells with sodiummore » butyrate, a potent deacetylase inhibitor, and comparing changes in stoichiometry levels measured by our method with immunoblotting measurements. Of note we observe that acetylation stoichiometry is high in nuclear proteins, but very low in mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. In summary, our method opens new opportunities to study in detail the relationship of lysine acetylation levels of proteins with their biological functions.« less

  5. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.828 Acetylated monoglycerides. The food additive acetylated... of catalytic agents that are not food additives or are authorized by regulation, followed by...

  6. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions.

    PubMed

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-08-17

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation.

  7. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation. PMID:27600229

  8. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation.

  9. DNA repair of a single UV photoproduct in a designed nucleosome

    SciTech Connect

    Kosmoskil, Joseph V.; Ackerman, Eric J. ); Smerdon, Michael J.

    2001-08-28

    Eukaryotic DNA repair enzymes must interact with the architectural hierarchy of chromatin. The challenge of finding damaged DNA complexed with histone proteins in nucleosomes is complicated by the need to maintain local chromatin structures involved in regulating other DNA processing events. The heterogeneity of lesions induced by DNA-damaging agents has led us to design homogeneously damaged substrates to directly compare repair of naked DNA with that of nucleosomes. Here we report that nucleotide excision repair in Xenopus nuclear extracts can effectively repair a single UV radiation photoproduct located 5 bases from the dyad center of a positioned nucleosome, although the nucleosome is repaired at about half the rate at which the naked DNA fragment is. Extract repair within the nucleosome is > 50-fold more rapid than either enzymatic photoreversal or endonuclease cleavage of the lesion in vitro. Furthermore, nucleosome formation occurs (after repair) only on damaged naked DNA ( 165-bp fragments) during a 1-h incubation in these extracts, even in the presence of a large excess of undamaged DNA. This is an example of selective nucleosome assembly by Xenopus nuclear extracts on a short linear DNA fragment containing a DNA lesion.

  10. RSC remodeling of oligo-nucleosomes: an atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Montel, Fabien; Castelnovo, Martin; Menoni, Hervé; Angelov, Dimitar; Dimitrov, Stefan; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine

    2011-04-01

    The 'remodels structure of chromatin' (RSC) complex is an essential chromatin remodeling factor that is required for the control of several processes including transcription, repair and replication. The ability of RSC to relocate centrally positioned mononucleosomes at the end of nucleosomal DNA is firmly established, but the data on RSC action on oligo-nucleosomal templates remains still scarce. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we have quantitatively studied the RSC-induced mobilization of positioned di- and trinucleosomes as well as the directionality of mobilization on mononucleosomal template labeled at one end with streptavidin. AFM imaging showed only a limited set of distinct configurational states for the remodeling products. No stepwise or preferred directionality of the nucleosome motion was observed. Analysis of the corresponding reaction pathways allows deciphering the mechanistic features of RSC-induced nucleosome relocation. The final outcome of RSC remodeling of oligosome templates is the packing of the nucleosomes at the edge of the template, providing large stretches of DNA depleted of nucleosomes. This feature of RSC may be used by the cell to overcome the barrier imposed by the presence of nucleosomes.

  11. Caspase-dependent cell death-associated release of nucleosome and damage-associated molecular patterns

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, S; Park, S J; Han, J H; Kang, J H; Kim, J-h; Lee, J; Park, S; Shin, H-J; Kim, K; Yun, M; Chwae, Y-J

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis, which is anti-inflammatory, and necrosis, which is pro-inflammatory, represent the extremes of the cell death spectrum. Cell death is complex and both apoptosis and necrosis can be observed in the same cells or tissues. Here, we introduce a novel combined mode of cellular demise – caspase-dependent regulated necrosis. Most importantly, it is mainly characterized with release of marked amount of oligo- or poly-nucleosomes and their attached damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and initiated by caspase activation. Caspase-activated DNase has dual roles in nucleosomal release as it can degrade extracellularly released chromatin into poly- or oligo-nucleosomes although it prohibits release of nucleosomes. In addition, osmotically triggered water movement following Cl− influx and subsequent Na+ influx appears to be the major driving force for nucleosomal and DAMPs release. Finally, Ca2+-activated cysteine protease, calpain, is an another essential factor in nucleosomal and DAMPs release because of complete reversion to apoptotic morphology from necrotic one and blockade of nucleosomal and DAMPs release by its inhibition. PMID:25356863

  12. FSAP-mediated nucleosome release from late apoptotic cells is inhibited by autoantibodies present in SLE.

    PubMed

    Marsman, Gerben; Stephan, Femke; de Leeuw, Karina; Bulder, Ingrid; Ruinard, Jessica T; de Jong, Jan; Westra, Johanna; Bultink, Irene E M; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Aarden, Lucien A; Luken, Brenda M; Kallenberg, Cees G M; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2016-03-01

    Inefficient clearance of apoptotic cells and the subsequent exposure of the immune system to nuclear contents are crucially involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Factor VII-activating protease (FSAP) is activated in serum upon contact with dead cells, and releases nucleosomes from late apoptotic cells into the extracellular environment. We investigated whether FSAP-mediated nucleosome release from late apoptotic cells is affected in SLE patients. Nucleosome release in sera of 27 SLE patients and 30 healthy controls was investigated by incubating late apoptotic Jurkat cells with serum and analyzing the remaining DNA content by flow cytometry. We found that nucleosome release in sera of SLE patients with high disease activity was significantly decreased when compared with that in SLE sera obtained during low disease activity or from healthy individuals. Upon removal of IgG/IgM antibodies from SLE sera, nucleosome release was restored. Similarly, monoclonal antinuclear antibodies inhibited nucleosome release in healthy donor serum or by plasma-purified FSAP. This inhibition was lost when Fab fragments were used, suggesting that antigen cross-linking is involved. In conclusion, FSAP-mediated nucleosome release from late apoptotic cells is greatly impaired in SLE patient sera, possibly hampering the clearance of these cells and thereby propagating inflammation.

  13. Evaluation of the protective capabilities of nucleosome STRs obtained by large-scale sequencing.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chunnan; Yang, Yadong; Yan, Jiangwei; Fu, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Cong, Bin; Li, Shujin

    2015-07-01

    Partial DNA profiles are often obtained from degraded forensic samples and are hard to analyze and interpret. With in-depth studies on degraded DNA, an increasing number of forensic scientists have focused on the intrinsic structural properties of DNA. In theory, nucleosomes offer protection to the bound DNA by limiting access to enzymes. In our study, we performed large-scale DNA sequencing on nucleosome core DNA of human leucocytes. Five nucleosome short tandem repeats (STRs) were selected (including three forensic common STRs (i.e. TPOX, TH01, and D10S1248) and two unpublished STRs (i.e. AC012568.7 and AC007160.3)). We performed a population genetic investigation and forensic genetic statistical analysis of these two unpublished loci on 108 healthy unrelated individuals of the HeBei Han population in China. We estimated the protective capabilities of five selected nucleosome loci and MiniFiler™ loci with artificial degraded DNA and case samples. We also analyzed differences between sequencing results and software predicted results. Our findings showed that nucleosome STRs were more likely to be detected than MiniFiler™ loci. They were well protected from degradation by nucleosomes and could be candidates for further nucleosome multiplex construction, which would increase the chances of obtaining a better balanced profile with fewer allelic drop-outs.

  14. Comparative Genomics Reveals Chd1 as a Determinant of Nucleosome Spacing in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Amanda L; Rando, Oliver J

    2015-07-14

    Packaging of genomic DNA into nucleosomes is nearly universally conserved in eukaryotes, and many features of the nucleosome landscape are quite conserved. Nonetheless, quantitative aspects of nucleosome packaging differ between species because, for example, the average length of linker DNA between nucleosomes can differ significantly even between closely related species. We recently showed that the difference in nucleosome spacing between two Hemiascomycete species-Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis-is established by trans-acting factors rather than being encoded in cis in the DNA sequence. Here, we generated several S. cerevisiae strains in which endogenous copies of candidate nucleosome spacing factors are deleted and replaced with the orthologous factors from K. lactis. We find no change in nucleosome spacing in such strains in which H1 or Isw1 complexes are swapped. In contrast, the K. lactis gene encoding the ATP-dependent remodeler Chd1 was found to direct longer internucleosomal spacing in S. cerevisiae, establishing that this remodeler is partially responsible for the relatively long internucleosomal spacing observed in K. lactis. By analyzing several chimeric proteins, we find that sequence differences that contribute to the spacing activity of this remodeler are dispersed throughout the coding sequence, but that the strongest spacing effect is linked to the understudied N-terminal end of Chd1. Taken together, our data find a role for sequence evolution of a chromatin remodeler in establishing quantitative aspects of the chromatin landscape in a species-specific manner.

  15. Shearing of the CENP-A dimerization interface mediates plasticity in the octameric centromeric nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Winogradoff, David; Zhao, Haiqing; Dalal, Yamini; Papoian, Garegin A

    2015-11-25

    The centromeric nucleosome is a key epigenetic determinant of centromere identity and function. Consequently, deciphering how CENP-A containing nucleosomes contribute structurally to centromere function is a fundamental question in chromosome biology. Here, we performed microsecond timescale all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of CENP-A and H3 nucleosomes, and report that the octameric CENP-A core particles and nucleosomes display different dynamics from their canonical H3-containing counterparts. The most significant motion observed is within key interactions at the heart of the CENP-A octameric core, wherein shearing of contacts within the CENP-A:CENP-A' dimerization interface results in a weaker four helix bundle, and an extrusion of 10-30 bp of DNA near the pseudo-dyad. Coupled to other local and global fluctuations, the CENP-A nucleosome occupies a more rugged free energy landscape than the canonical H3 nucleosome. Taken together, our data suggest that CENP-A encodes enhanced distortability to the octameric nucleosome, which may allow for enhanced flexing of the histone core in vivo.

  16. Shearing of the CENP-A dimerization interface mediates plasticity in the octameric centromeric nucleosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winogradoff, David; Zhao, Haiqing; Dalal, Yamini; Papoian, Garegin A.

    2015-11-01

    The centromeric nucleosome is a key epigenetic determinant of centromere identity and function. Consequently, deciphering how CENP-A containing nucleosomes contribute structurally to centromere function is a fundamental question in chromosome biology. Here, we performed microsecond timescale all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of CENP-A and H3 nucleosomes, and report that the octameric CENP-A core particles and nucleosomes display different dynamics from their canonical H3-containing counterparts. The most significant motion observed is within key interactions at the heart of the CENP-A octameric core, wherein shearing of contacts within the CENP-A:CENP-A’ dimerization interface results in a weaker four helix bundle, and an extrusion of 10-30 bp of DNA near the pseudo-dyad. Coupled to other local and global fluctuations, the CENP-A nucleosome occupies a more rugged free energy landscape than the canonical H3 nucleosome. Taken together, our data suggest that CENP-A encodes enhanced distortability to the octameric nucleosome, which may allow for enhanced flexing of the histone core in vivo.

  17. Role of transcription factor-mediated nucleosome disassembly in PHO5 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kharerin, Hungyo; Bhat, Paike J; Marko, John F; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    Studying nucleosome dynamics in promoter regions is crucial for understanding gene regulation. Nucleosomes regulate gene expression by sterically occluding transcription factors (TFs) and other non-histone proteins accessing genomic DNA. How the binding competition between nucleosomes and TFs leads to transcriptionally compatible promoter states is an open question. Here, we present a computational study of the nucleosome dynamics and organization in the promoter region of PHO5 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Introducing a model for nucleosome kinetics that takes into account ATP-dependent remodeling activity, DNA sequence effects, and kinetics of TFs (Pho4p), we compute the probability of obtaining different "promoter states" having different nucleosome configurations. Comparing our results with experimental data, we argue that the presence of local remodeling activity (LRA) as opposed to basal remodeling activity (BRA) is crucial in determining transcriptionally active promoter states. By modulating the LRA and Pho4p binding rate, we obtain different mRNA distributions-Poisson, bimodal, and long-tail. Through this work we explain many features of the PHO5 promoter such as sequence-dependent TF accessibility and the role of correlated dynamics between nucleosomes and TFs in opening/coverage of the TATA box. We also obtain possible ranges for TF binding rates and the magnitude of LRA. PMID:26843321

  18. Shearing of the CENP-A dimerization interface mediates plasticity in the octameric centromeric nucleosome

    PubMed Central

    Winogradoff, David; Zhao, Haiqing; Dalal, Yamini; Papoian, Garegin A.

    2015-01-01

    The centromeric nucleosome is a key epigenetic determinant of centromere identity and function. Consequently, deciphering how CENP-A containing nucleosomes contribute structurally to centromere function is a fundamental question in chromosome biology. Here, we performed microsecond timescale all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of CENP-A and H3 nucleosomes, and report that the octameric CENP-A core particles and nucleosomes display different dynamics from their canonical H3-containing counterparts. The most significant motion observed is within key interactions at the heart of the CENP-A octameric core, wherein shearing of contacts within the CENP-A:CENP-A’ dimerization interface results in a weaker four helix bundle, and an extrusion of 10–30 bp of DNA near the pseudo-dyad. Coupled to other local and global fluctuations, the CENP-A nucleosome occupies a more rugged free energy landscape than the canonical H3 nucleosome. Taken together, our data suggest that CENP-A encodes enhanced distortability to the octameric nucleosome, which may allow for enhanced flexing of the histone core in vivo. PMID:26602160

  19. Nucleosomes inhibit phagocytosis of apoptotic thymocytes by peritoneal macrophages from MRL+/+ lupus-prone mice.

    PubMed

    Laderach, D; Bach, J F; Koutouzov, S

    1998-12-01

    The nucleosome, the basic structure of chromatin and normal product of cell apoptosis, plays a pivotal role both in the induction and the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Nucleosomes have been found to circulate at high levels in patients with SLE and apoptosis of lymphoid cells is increased during human and murine lupus. In this study, we examined the presence of possible defects in clearance mechanisms of apoptotic cells in murine lupus, and questioned further whether nucleosomes could compromise this phagocytic process. There did not appear to be any intrinsic functional defect of macrophages from young MRL+/+ lupus-prone mice to recognize and phagocytose apoptotic thymocytes. Nucleosomes, as a mimic of increased cell apoptotsis in vivo, induced a strong, dose-dependent, inhibition of phagocytosis of apoptotic thymocytes by young, pre-autoimmune, macrophages of MRL+/+ mice, whereas macrophages of non-autoimmune C3H mice only exhibited a trend to inhibition. The nucleosome-elicited inhibitory effect persisted during the development of the autoimmune response and appeared to be specific for the molecular mechanisms involved in macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Our data suggest that nucleosome elicited inhibition of phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by MRL+/+ macrophages before the onset of the autoimmune response contribute, in a positive loop, to sustain and/or augment the levels of circulating (and potentially immunogenic) nucleosomes in lupus.

  20. Role of transcription factor-mediated nucleosome disassembly in PHO5 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Kharerin, Hungyo; Bhat, Paike J.; Marko, John F.; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    Studying nucleosome dynamics in promoter regions is crucial for understanding gene regulation. Nucleosomes regulate gene expression by sterically occluding transcription factors (TFs) and other non–histone proteins accessing genomic DNA. How the binding competition between nucleosomes and TFs leads to transcriptionally compatible promoter states is an open question. Here, we present a computational study of the nucleosome dynamics and organization in the promoter region of PHO5 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Introducing a model for nucleosome kinetics that takes into account ATP-dependent remodeling activity, DNA sequence effects, and kinetics of TFs (Pho4p), we compute the probability of obtaining different “promoter states” having different nucleosome configurations. Comparing our results with experimental data, we argue that the presence of local remodeling activity (LRA) as opposed to basal remodeling activity (BRA) is crucial in determining transcriptionally active promoter states. By modulating the LRA and Pho4p binding rate, we obtain different mRNA distributions—Poisson, bimodal, and long-tail. Through this work we explain many features of the PHO5 promoter such as sequence-dependent TF accessibility and the role of correlated dynamics between nucleosomes and TFs in opening/coverage of the TATA box. We also obtain possible ranges for TF binding rates and the magnitude of LRA. PMID:26843321

  1. Histone H3 N-terminal acetylation sites especially K14 are important for rDNA silencing and aging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng-hao; Su, Trent; Xue, Yong

    2016-02-24

    Histone variants and histone modifications are essential components in the establishment and maintenance of the repressed status of heterochromatin. Among these histone variants and modifications, acetylation at histone H4K16 is uniquely important for the maintenance of silencing at telomere and mating type loci but not at the ribosomal DNA locus. Here we show that mutations at H3 N-terminal acetylation site K14 specifically disrupt rDNA silencing. However, the mutant ion at H3K14R doesn't affect the recruitment of Pol II repressor RENT (regulator of nucleolar silencing and telophase exit) complex at the rDNA region. Instead, the CAF-1(chromatin assembly factor I) subunit Cac2 level decreased in the H3K14R mutant. Further experiments revealed that the single mutation at H3K14 and multi-site mutations at H3 N-terminus including K14 also delayed replication-depend nucleosome assembly and advanced replicative life span. In conclusion, our data suggest that histone H3 N-terminal acetylation sites especially at K14 are important for rDNA silencing and aging.

  2. Histone H3 N-terminal acetylation sites especially K14 are important for rDNA silencing and aging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Heng-hao; Su, Trent; Xue, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Histone variants and histone modifications are essential components in the establishment and maintenance of the repressed status of heterochromatin. Among these histone variants and modifications, acetylation at histone H4K16 is uniquely important for the maintenance of silencing at telomere and mating type loci but not at the ribosomal DNA locus. Here we show that mutations at H3 N-terminal acetylation site K14 specifically disrupt rDNA silencing. However, the mutant ion at H3K14R doesn’t affect the recruitment of Pol II repressor RENT (regulator of nucleolar silencing and telophase exit) complex at the rDNA region. Instead, the CAF-1(chromatin assembly factor I) subunit Cac2 level decreased in the H3K14R mutant. Further experiments revealed that the single mutation at H3K14 and multi-site mutations at H3 N-terminus including K14 also delayed replication-depend nucleosome assembly and advanced replicative life span. In conclusion, our data suggest that histone H3 N-terminal acetylation sites especially at K14 are important for rDNA silencing and aging. PMID:26906758

  3. Nucleosome Assembly Alters the Accessibility of the Antitumor Agent Duocarmycin B2 to Duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tingting; Kizaki, Seiichiro; Pandian, Ganesh N; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-06-20

    To evaluate the reactivity of antitumor agents in a nucleosome architecture, we conducted in vitro studies to assess the alkylation level of duocarmycin B2 on nucleosomes with core and linker DNA using sequencing gel electrophoresis. Our results suggested that the alkylating efficiencies of duocarmycin B2 were significantly decreased in core DNA and increased at the histone-free linker DNA sites when compared with naked DNA conditions. Our finding that nucleosome assembly alters the accessibility of duocarmycin B2 to duplex DNA could advance its design as an antitumor agent.

  4. Selective removal of promoter nucleosomes by the RSC chromatin-remodeling complex.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Boeger, Hinrich; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2011-08-01

    Purified chromatin rings, excised from the PHO5 locus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in transcriptionally repressed and activated states, were remodeled with RSC and ATP. Nucleosomes were translocated, and those originating on the promoter of repressed rings were removed, whereas those originating on the open reading frame (ORF) were retained. Treatment of the repressed rings with histone deacetylase diminished the removal of promoter nucleosomes. These findings point to a principle of promoter chromatin remodeling for transcription, namely that promoter specificity resides primarily in the nucleosomes rather than in the remodeling complex that acts upon them.

  5. Acetylation modulates the STAT signaling code.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Martin; Ginter, Torsten; Brand, Peter; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2012-12-01

    A fascinating question of modern biology is how a limited number of signaling pathways generate biological diversity and crosstalk phenomena in vivo. Well-defined posttranslational modification patterns dictate the functions and interactions of proteins. The signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) are physiologically important cytokine-induced transcription factors. They are targeted by a multitude of posttranslational modifications that control and modulate signaling responses and gene expression. Beyond phosphorylation of serine and tyrosine residues, lysine acetylation has recently emerged as a critical modification regulating STAT functions. Interestingly, acetylation can determine STAT signaling codes by various molecular mechanisms, including the modulation of other posttranslational modifications. Here, we provide an overview on the acetylation of STATs and how this protein modification shapes cellular cytokine responses. We summarize recent advances in understanding the impact of STAT acetylation on cell growth, apoptosis, innate immunity, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we discuss how STAT acetylation can be targeted by small molecules and we consider the possibility that additional molecules controlling STAT signaling are regulated by acetylation. Our review also summarizes evolutionary aspects and we show similarities between the acetylation-dependent control of STATs and other important molecules. We propose the concept that, similar to the 'histone code', distinct posttranslational modifications and their crosstalk orchestrate the functions and interactions of STAT proteins. PMID:22795479

  6. Akt-dependent metabolic reprogramming regulates tumor cell histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Nathaniel W.; Wei, Shuanzeng; Venneti, Sriram; Worth, Andrew J.; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Lim, Hee-Woong; Liu, Shichong; Jackson, Ellen; Aiello, Nicole M.; Haas, Naomi B.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Judkins, Alexander; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Stanger, Ben Z.; Feldman, Michael D.; Blair, Ian A.; Wellen, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone acetylation plays important roles in gene regulation, DNA replication, and the response to DNA damage, and it is frequently deregulated in tumors. We postulated that tumor cell histone acetylation levels are determined in part by changes in acetyl-CoA availability mediated by oncogenic metabolic reprogramming. Here, we demonstrate that acetyl-CoA is dynamically regulated by glucose availability in cancer cells and that the ratio of acetyl-CoA: coenzyme A within the nucleus modulates global histone acetylation levels. In vivo, expression of oncogenic Kras or Akt stimulates histone acetylation changes that precede tumor development. Furthermore, we show that Akt's effects on histone acetylation are mediated through the metabolic enzyme ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), and that pAkt(Ser473) levels correlate significantly with histone acetylation marks in human gliomas and prostate tumors. The data implicate acetyl-CoA metabolism as a key determinant of histone acetylation levels in cancer cells. PMID:24998913

  7. Histone chaperones: assisting histone traffic and nucleosome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Quivy, Jean-Pierre; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2014-01-01

    The functional organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin uses histones as components of its building block, the nucleosome. Histone chaperones, which are proteins that escort histones throughout their cellular life, are key actors in all facets of histone metabolism; they regulate the supply and dynamics of histones at chromatin for its assembly and disassembly. Histone chaperones can also participate in the distribution of histone variants, thereby defining distinct chromatin landscapes of importance for genome function, stability, and cell identity. Here, we discuss our current knowledge of the known histone chaperones and their histone partners, focusing on histone H3 and its variants. We then place them into an escort network that distributes these histones in various deposition pathways. Through their distinct interfaces, we show how they affect dynamics during DNA replication, DNA damage, and transcription, and how they maintain genome integrity. Finally, we discuss the importance of histone chaperones during development and describe how misregulation of the histone flow can link to disease.

  8. Design of synthetic yeast promoters via tuning of nucleosome architecture.

    PubMed

    Curran, Kathleen A; Crook, Nathan C; Karim, Ashty S; Gupta, Akash; Wagman, Allison M; Alper, Hal S

    2014-01-01

    Model-based design of biological parts is a critical goal of synthetic biology, especially for eukaryotes. Here we demonstrate that nucleosome architecture can have a role in defining yeast promoter activity and utilize a computationally-guided approach that can enable both the redesign of endogenous promoter sequences and the de novo design of synthetic promoters. Initially, we use our approach to reprogram native promoters for increased expression and evaluate their performance in various genetic contexts. Increases in expression ranging from 1.5- to nearly 6-fold in a plasmid-based system and up to 16-fold in a genomic context were obtained. Next, we demonstrate that, in a single design cycle, it is possible to create functional, purely synthetic yeast promoters that achieve substantial expression levels (within the top sixth percentile among native yeast promoters). In doing so, this work establishes a unique DNA-level specification of promoter activity and demonstrates predictive design of synthetic parts. PMID:24862902

  9. Exploration of nucleosome positioning patterns in transcription factor function

    PubMed Central

    Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The binding of transcription factors (TFs) triggers activation of specific chromatin regions through the recruitment and activation of RNA polymerase. Unique nucleosome positioning (NP) occurs during gene expression and has been suggested to be involved in various other chromatin functions. However, the diversity of NP that can occur for each function has not been clarified. Here we used MNase-Seq data to evaluate NP around 258 cis-regulatory elements in the mouse genome. Principal component analysis of the 258 elements revealed that NP consisted of five major patterns. Furthermore, the five NP patterns had predictive power for the level of gene expression. We also demonstrated that selective NP patterns appeared around TF binding sites. These results suggest that the NP patterns are correlated to specific functions on chromatin. PMID:26790608

  10. Dnmt1-independent CG methylation contributes to nucleosome positioning in diverse eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Huff, Jason T; Zilberman, Daniel

    2014-03-13

    Dnmt1 epigenetically propagates symmetrical CG methylation in many eukaryotes. Their genomes are typically depleted of CG dinucleotides because of imperfect repair of deaminated methylcytosines. Here, we extensively survey diverse species lacking Dnmt1 and show that, surprisingly, symmetrical CG methylation is nonetheless frequently present and catalyzed by a different DNA methyltransferase family, Dnmt5. Numerous Dnmt5-containing organisms that diverged more than a billion years ago exhibit clustered methylation, specifically in nucleosome linkers. Clustered methylation occurs at unprecedented densities and directly disfavors nucleosomes, contributing to nucleosome positioning between clusters. Dense methylation is enabled by a regime of genomic sequence evolution that enriches CG dinucleotides and drives the highest CG frequencies known. Species with linker methylation have small, transcriptionally active nuclei that approach the physical limits of chromatin compaction. These features constitute a previously unappreciated genome architecture, in which dense methylation influences nucleosome positions, likely facilitating nuclear processes under extreme spatial constraints.

  11. A RSC/nucleosome complex determines chromatin architecture and facilitates activator binding.

    PubMed

    Floer, Monique; Wang, Xin; Prabhu, Vidya; Berrozpe, Georgina; Narayan, Santosh; Spagna, Dan; Alvarez, David; Kendall, Jude; Krasnitz, Alexander; Stepansky, Asya; Hicks, James; Bryant, Gene O; Ptashne, Mark

    2010-04-30

    How is chromatin architecture established and what role does it play in transcription? We show that the yeast regulatory locus UASg bears, in addition to binding sites for the activator Gal4, sites bound by the RSC complex. RSC positions a nucleosome, evidently partially unwound, in a structure that facilitates Gal4 binding to its sites. The complex comprises a barrier that imposes characteristic features of chromatin architecture. In the absence of RSC, ordinary nucleosomes encroach over the UASg and compete with Gal4 for binding. Taken with our previous work, the results show that both prior to and following induction, specific DNA-binding proteins are the predominant determinants of chromatin architecture at the GAL1/10 genes. RSC/nucleosome complexes are also found scattered around the yeast genome. Higher eukaryotic RSC lacks the specific DNA-binding determinants found on yeast RSC, and evidently Gal4 works in those organisms despite whatever obstacle broadly positioned nucleosomes present.

  12. Influence of DNA methylation on positioning and DNA flexibility of nucleosomes with pericentric satellite DNA.

    PubMed

    Osakabe, Akihisa; Adachi, Fumiya; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-10-01

    DNA methylation occurs on CpG sites and is important to form pericentric heterochromatin domains. The satellite 2 sequence, containing seven CpG sites, is located in the pericentric region of human chromosome 1 and is highly methylated in normal cells. In contrast, the satellite 2 region is reportedly hypomethylated in cancer cells, suggesting that the methylation status may affect the chromatin structure around the pericentric regions in tumours. In this study, we mapped the nucleosome positioning on the satellite 2 sequence in vitro and found that DNA methylation modestly affects the distribution of the nucleosome positioning. The micrococcal nuclease assay revealed that the DNA end flexibility of the nucleosomes changes, depending on the DNA methylation status. However, the structures and thermal stabilities of the nucleosomes are unaffected by DNA methylation. These findings provide new information to understand how DNA methylation functions in regulating pericentric heterochromatin formation and maintenance in normal and malignant cells.

  13. nuMap: a web platform for accurate prediction of nucleosome positioning.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Bader A; Alshammari, Thamir H; Felton, Nathan L; Zhurkin, Victor B; Cui, Feng

    2014-10-01

    Nucleosome positioning is critical for gene expression and of major biological interest. The high cost of experimentally mapping nucleosomal arrangement signifies the need for computational approaches to predict nucleosome positions at high resolution. Here, we present a web-based application to fulfill this need by implementing two models, YR and W/S schemes, for the translational and rotational positioning of nucleosomes, respectively. Our methods are based on sequence-dependent anisotropic bending that dictates how DNA is wrapped around a histone octamer. This application allows users to specify a number of options such as schemes and parameters for threading calculation and provides multiple layout formats. The nuMap is implemented in Java/Perl/MySQL and is freely available for public use at http://numap.rit.edu. The user manual, implementation notes, description of the methodology and examples are available at the site. PMID:25220945

  14. The CENP-A nucleosome: a battle between Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.

    PubMed

    Bui, Minh; Walkiewicz, Marcin P; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Dalal, Yamini

    2013-01-01

    The structure of the centromere-specific histone centromeric protein A (CENP-A) nucleosome has been a hot topic of debate for the past five years. Structures proposed include octamers, hexamers, homotypic and heterotypic tetramers. This controversy has led to the proposal that CENP-A nucleosomes undergo cell-cycle dependent transitions between the multiple states previously documented to exist in vivo and in vitro. In recent work from our laboratory, we sought to test this hypothesis. We discovered that CENP-A nucleosomes undergo unique oscillations in human cells, a finding mirrored in a parallel study performed in budding yeast. This review provides additional insights into the potential mechanisms for the interconversion of CENP-A nucleosomal species, and speculates on a biological role for oscillations in vivo. PMID:23324462

  15. Novel Gene Discovery in the Human Malaria Parasite using Nucleosome Positioning Data

    PubMed Central

    Pokhriyal, N.; Ponts, N.; Harris, E. Y.; Le Roch, K. G.; Lonardi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent genome-wide studies on nucleosome positioning in model organisms have shown strong evidence that nucleosome landscapes in the proximity of protein-coding genes exhibit regular characteristic patterns. Here, we propose a computational framework to discover novel genes in the human malaria parasite genome P. falciparum using nucleosome positioning inferred from MAINE-seq data. We rely on a classifier trained on the nucleosome landscape profiles of experimentally verified genes, and then used to discover new genes (without considering the primary DNA sequence). Cross-validation experiments show that our classifier is very accurate. About two thirds of the locations reported by the classifier match experimentally determined expressed sequence tags in GenBank, for which no gene has been annotated in the human malaria parasite. PMID:25076982

  16. Nucleosome assembly depends on the torsion in the DNA molecule: a magnetic tweezers study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pooja; Zlatanova, Jordanka; Tomschik, Miroslav

    2009-12-16

    We have used magnetic tweezers to study nucleosome assembly on topologically constrained DNA molecules. Assembly was achieved using chicken erythrocyte core histones and histone chaperone protein Nap1 under constant low force. We have observed only partial assembly when the DNA was topologically constrained and much more complete assembly on unconstrained (nicked) DNA tethers. To verify our hypothesis that the lack of full nucleosome assembly on topologically constrained tethers was due to compensatory accumulation of positive supercoiling in the rest of the template, we carried out experiments in which we mechanically relieved the positive supercoiling by rotating the external magnetic field at certain time points of the assembly process. Indeed, such rotation did lead to the same nucleosome saturation level as in the case of nicked tethers. We conclude that levels of positive supercoiling in the range of 0.025-0.051 (most probably in the form of twist) stall the nucleosome assembly process.

  17. Histone hyperacetylation can induce unfolding of the nucleosome core particle.

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, R; Bazett-Jones, D P; Locklear, L; Dixon, G H

    1990-01-01

    A direct correlation exists between the level of histone H4 hyperacetylation induced by sodium butyrate and the extent to which nucleosomes lose their compact shape and become elongated (62.0% of the particles have a length/width ratio over 1.6; overall mean in the length/width ratio = 1.83 +/- 0.48) when bound to electron microscope specimen grids at low ionic strength (1mM EDTA, 10mM Tris, pH 8.0). A marked proportion of elongated core particles is also observed in the naturally occurring hyperacetylated chicken testis chromatin undergoing spermatogenesis when analyzed at low ionic strength (36.8% of the particles have a length/width ratio over 1.6). Core particles of elongated shape (length/width ratio over 1.6) generated under low ionic strength conditions are absent in the hypoacetylated chicken erythrocyte chromatin and represent only 2.3% of the untreated Hela S3 cell core particles containing a low proportion of hyperacetylated histones. The marked differences between control and hyperacetylated core particles are absent if the particles are bound to the carbon support film in the presence of 0.2 M NaCl, 6mM MgCl2 and 10mM Tris pH 8.0, conditions known to stabilize nucleosomes. A survey of the published work on histone hyperacetylation together with the present results indicate that histone hyperacetylation does not produce any marked disruption of the core particle 'per se', but that it decreases intranucleosomal stabilizing forces as judged by the lowered stability of the hyperacetylated core particle under conditions of shearing stress such as cationic competition by the carbon support film of the EM grid for DNA binding. Images PMID:2339060

  18. Soft skills turned into hard facts: nucleosome remodelling at developmental switches.

    PubMed

    Chioda, M; Becker, P B

    2010-07-01

    Nucleosome remodelling factors are regulators of DNA accessibility in chromatin and lubricators of all major functions of eukaryotic genomes. Their action is transient and reversible, yet can be decisive for irreversible cell-fate decisions during development. In addition to the well-known local actions of nucleosome remodelling factors during transcription initiation, more global and fundamental roles for remodelling complexes in shaping the epigenome during development are emerging.

  19. Soft skills turned into hard facts: nucleosome remodelling at developmental switches.

    PubMed

    Chioda, M; Becker, P B

    2010-07-01

    Nucleosome remodelling factors are regulators of DNA accessibility in chromatin and lubricators of all major functions of eukaryotic genomes. Their action is transient and reversible, yet can be decisive for irreversible cell-fate decisions during development. In addition to the well-known local actions of nucleosome remodelling factors during transcription initiation, more global and fundamental roles for remodelling complexes in shaping the epigenome during development are emerging. PMID:20372184

  20. Circulating nucleosomes are associated with mortality in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yehya, Nadir; Thomas, Neal J; Margulies, Susan S

    2016-06-01

    Mechanisms underlying pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS) are poorly understood. The recent implication of circulating nucleosomes as pathogenic in sepsis and trauma-associated ARDS in adults led us to investigate the significance of nucleosomes in PARDS. We conducted a prospective, observational study on children with PARDS at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia between July 2014 and September 2015. Plasma was collected within 48 h of PARDS onset and nucleosomes quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Samples from 76 children with PARDS (11 deaths, 14%) were collected early [median 15 (IQR 7, 21) h] after PARDS onset. Nucleosome levels were higher in nonsurvivors [0.59 AU (IQR 0.46, 0.84)] relative to survivors [0.21 AU (IQR 0.08, 0.33), rank sum P < 0.001]. Nucleosome levels were not associated with either Berlin (P = 0.845) or PALICC (P = 0.886) oxygenation categories, nor with etiology of PARDS (P = 0.527). Nucleosomes were correlated with increasing numbers of nonpulmonary organ failures (P = 0.009 for trend), and were higher in patients whose PaO2 /FiO2 worsened (P = 0.012) over the first 72 h of PARDS. In regression analysis, nucleosome levels were independently associated with mortality after adjusting for either age, severity of illness score, number of nonpulmonary organ failures, vasopressor score, or PaO2 /FiO2 (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, plasma nucleosome levels in early PARDS were associated with increased mortality, correlated with number of nonpulmonary organ failures, and preceded worsening oxygenation. The potential utility of this biomarker for prognostication, risk stratification, and mechanistic insight should be investigated further. PMID:27130528

  1. Acetylator phenotypes in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Penketh, R J A; Gibney, S F A; Nurse, G T; Hopkinson, D A

    1983-01-01

    Acetylator phenotypes have been determined in 139 unrelated subjects from the hitherto untested populations of Papua New Guinea, and their relevance to current antituberculous isoniazid chemotherapy is discussed. PMID:6842533

  2. Histone deacetylase 3 indirectly modulates tubulin acetylation.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Travis; Seiler, Caroline; Wolny, Marcin; Hughes, Ruth; Watson, Peter; Schwabe, John; Grigg, Ronald; Peckham, Michelle

    2015-12-15

    Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), a member of the Class I subfamily of HDACs, is found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Its roles in the nucleus have been well characterized, but its cytoplasmic roles are still not elucidated fully. We found that blocking HDAC3 activity using MI192, a compound specific for HDAC3, modulated tubulin acetylation in the human prostate cancer cell line PC3. A brief 1 h treatment of PC3 cells with MI192 significantly increased levels of tubulin acetylation and ablated the dynamic behaviour of microtubules in live cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown (KD) of HDAC3 in PC3 cells, significantly increased levels of tubulin acetylation, and overexpression reduced it. However, the active HDAC3-silencing mediator of retinoic and thyroid receptors (SMRT)-deacetylase-activating domain (DAD) complex did not directly deacetylate tubulin in vitro. These data suggest that HDAC3 indirectly modulates tubulin acetylation.

  3. Nucleosome Repositioning: A Novel Mechanism for Nicotine- and Cocaine-Induced Epigenetic Changes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Amber N; Vied, Cynthia; Dennis, Jonathan H; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2015-01-01

    Drugs of abuse modify behavior by altering gene expression in the brain. Gene expression can be regulated by changes in DNA methylation as well as by histone modifications, which alter chromatin structure, DNA compaction and DNA accessibility. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms directing drug-induced changes in chromatin structure, we examined DNA-nucleosome interactions within promoter regions of 858 genes in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) exposed to nicotine or cocaine. Widespread, drug- and time-resolved repositioning of nucleosomes was identified at the transcription start site and promoter region of multiple genes. Nicotine and cocaine produced unique and shared changes in terms of the numbers and types of genes affected, as well as repositioning of nucleosomes at sites which could increase or decrease the probability of gene expression based on DNA accessibility. Half of the drug-induced nucleosome positions approximated a theoretical model of nucleosome occupancy based on physical and chemical characteristics of the DNA sequence, whereas the basal or drug naïve positions were generally DNA sequence independent. Thus we suggest that nucleosome repositioning represents an initial dynamic genome-wide alteration of the transcriptional landscape preceding more selective downstream transcriptional reprogramming, which ultimately characterizes the cell- and tissue-specific responses to drugs of abuse. PMID:26414157

  4. Theoretical estimates of exposure timescales of protein binding sites on DNA regulated by nucleosome kinetics.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Jyotsana J; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2016-02-29

    It is being increasingly realized that nucleosome organization on DNA crucially regulates DNA-protein interactions and the resulting gene expression. While the spatial character of the nucleosome positioning on DNA has been experimentally and theoretically studied extensively, the temporal character is poorly understood. Accounting for ATPase activity and DNA-sequence effects on nucleosome kinetics, we develop a theoretical method to estimate the time of continuous exposure of binding sites of non-histone proteins (e.g. transcription factors and TATA binding proteins) along any genome. Applying the method to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the exposure timescales are determined by cooperative dynamics of multiple nucleosomes, and their behavior is often different from expectations based on static nucleosome occupancy. Examining exposure times in the promoters of GAL1 and PHO5, we show that our theoretical predictions are consistent with known experiments. We apply our method genome-wide and discover huge gene-to-gene variability of mean exposure times of TATA boxes and patches adjacent to TSS (+1 nucleosome region); the resulting timescale distributions have non-exponential tails. PMID:26553807

  5. Single-Molecule Studies of the Linker Histone H1 Binding to DNA and the Nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hongjun; Fang, He; Wei, Sijie; Hayes, Jeffrey J; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2016-04-12

    Linker histone H1 regulates chromatin structure and gene expression. Investigating the dynamics and stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is crucial to elucidating its functions. Because of the abundant positive charges and the strong self-affinity of H1, quantitative in vitro studies of its binding to DNA and the nucleosome have generated results that vary widely and, therefore, should be interpreted in a system specific manner. We sought to overcome this limitation by developing a specially passivated microscope slide surface to monitor binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome at a single-molecule level. According to our measurements, the stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is very heterogeneous with a wide distribution whose averages are in reasonable agreement with previously published values. Our study also revealed that H1 does not dissociate from DNA or the nucleosome on a time scale of tens of minutes. We found that histone chaperone Nap1 readily dissociates H1 from DNA and superstoichiometrically bound H1 from the nucleosome, supporting a hypothesis whereby histone chaperones contribute to the regulation of the H1 profile in chromatin. PMID:27010485

  6. RSC-dependent constructive and destructive interference between opposing arrays of phased nucleosomes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, Dwaipayan; Chereji, Răzvan V; Iben, James R; Cole, Hope A; Clark, David J

    2014-10-01

    RSC and SWI/SNF are related ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling machines that move nucleosomes, regulating access to DNA. We addressed their roles in nucleosome phasing relative to transcription start sites in yeast. SWI/SNF has no effect on phasing at the global level. In contrast, RSC depletion results in global nucleosome repositioning: Both upstream and downstream nucleosomal arrays shift toward the nucleosome-depleted region (NDR), with no change in spacing, resulting in a narrower and partly filled NDR. The global picture of RSC-depleted chromatin represents the average of a range of chromatin structures, with most genes showing a shift of the +1 or the -1 nucleosome into the NDR. Using RSC ChIP data reported by others, we show that RSC occupancy is highest on the coding regions of heavily transcribed genes, though not at their NDRs. We propose that RSC has a role in restoring chromatin structure after transcription. Analysis of gene pairs in different orientations demonstrates that phasing patterns reflect competition between phasing signals emanating from neighboring NDRs. These signals may be in phase, resulting in constructive interference and a regular array, or out of phase, resulting in destructive interference and fuzzy positioning. We propose a modified barrier model, in which a stable complex located at the NDR acts as a bidirectional phasing barrier. In RSC-depleted cells, this barrier has a smaller footprint, resulting in narrower NDRs. Thus, RSC plays a critical role in organizing yeast chromatin.

  7. CENPT bridges adjacent CENPA nucleosomes on young human α-satellite dimers

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Jitendra; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes containing the CenH3 (CENPA or CENP-A) histone variant replace H3 nucleosomes at centromeres to provide a foundation for kinetochore assembly. CENPA nucleosomes are part of the constitutive centromere associated network (CCAN) that forms the inner kinetochore on which outer kinetochore proteins assemble. Two components of the CCAN, CENPC and the histone-fold protein CENPT, provide independent connections from the ∼171-bp centromeric α-satellite repeat units to the outer kinetochore. However, the spatial relationship between CENPA nucleosomes and these two branches remains unclear. To address this issue, we use a base-pair resolution genomic readout of protein–protein interactions, comparative chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with sequencing, together with sequential ChIP, to infer the in vivo molecular architecture of the human CCAN. In contrast to the currently accepted model in which CENPT associates with H3 nucleosomes, we find that CENPT is centered over the CENPB box between two well-positioned CENPA nucleosomes on the most abundant centromeric young α-satellite dimers and interacts with the CENPB/CENPC complex. Upon cross-linking, the entire CENPA/CENPB/CENPC/CENPT complex is nuclease-protected over an α-satellite dimer that comprises the fundamental unit of centromeric chromatin. We conclude that CENPA/CENPC and CENPT pathways for kinetochore assembly are physically integrated over young α-satellite dimers. PMID:27384170

  8. Conformational selection and dynamic adaptation upon linker histone binding to the nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Mehmet Ali; Pachov, Georgi V; Wade, Rebecca C; Cojocaru, Vlad

    2016-08-19

    Linker histones are essential for DNA compaction in chromatin. They bind to nucleosomes in a 1:1 ratio forming chromatosomes. Alternative configurations have been proposed in which the globular domain of the linker histone H5 (gH5) is positioned either on- or off-dyad between the nucleosomal and linker DNAs. However, the dynamic pathways of chromatosome assembly remain elusive. Here, we studied the conformational plasticity of gH5 in unbound and off-dyad nucleosome-bound forms with classical and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the unbound gH5 converts between open and closed conformations, preferring the closed form. However, the open gH5 contributes to a more rigid chromatosome and restricts the motion of the nearby linker DNA through hydrophobic interactions with thymidines. Moreover, the closed gH5 opens and reorients in accelerated simulations of the chromatosome. Brownian dynamics simulations of chromatosome assembly, accounting for a range of amplitudes of nucleosome opening and different nucleosome DNA sequences, support the existence of both on- and off-dyad binding modes of gH5 and reveal alternative, sequence and conformation-dependent chromatosome configurations. Taken together, these findings suggest that the conformational dynamics of linker histones and nucleosomes facilitate alternative chromatosome configurations through an interplay between induced fit and conformational selection. PMID:27270081

  9. Nucleotide excision repair of the 5 S ribosomal RNA gene assembled into a nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Smerdon, M J

    2000-08-01

    A-175-base pair fragment containing the Xenopus borealis somatic 5 S ribosomal RNA gene was used as a model system to determine the effect of nucleosome assembly on nucleotide excision repair (NER) of the major UV photoproduct (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD)) in DNA. Xenopus oocyte nuclear extracts were used to carry out repair in vitro on reconstituted, positioned 5 S rDNA nucleosomes. Nucleosome structure strongly inhibits NER at many CPD sites in the 5 S rDNA fragment while having little effect at a few sites. The time course of CPD removal at 35 different sites indicates that >85% of the CPDs in the naked DNA fragment have t(12) values <2 h, whereas <26% of the t(12) values in nucleosomes are <2 h, and 15% are >8 h. Moreover, removal of histone tails from these mononucleosomes has little effect on the repair rates. Finally, nucleosome inhibition of repair shows no correlation with the rotational setting of a 14-nucleotide-long pyrimidine tract located 30 base pairs from the nucleosome dyad. These results suggest that inhibition of NER by mononucleosomes is not significantly influenced by the rotational orientation of CPDs on the histone surface, and histone tails play little (or no) role in this inhibition. PMID:10821833

  10. Free-energy landscape of mono- and dinucleosomes: Enhanced rotational flexibility of interconnected nucleosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Gi-Moon; Arya, Gaurav

    2016-03-01

    The nucleosome represents the basic unit of eukaryotic genome organization, and its conformational fluctuations play a crucial role in various cellular processes. Here we provide insights into the flipping transition of a nucleosome by computing its free-energy landscape as a function of the linking number and nucleosome orientation using the density-of-states Monte Carlo approach. To investigate how the energy landscape is affected by the presence of neighboring nucleosomes in a chromatin fiber, we also compute the free-energy landscape for a dinucleosome array. We find that the mononucleosome is bistable between conformations with negatively and positively crossed linkers while the conformation with open linkers appears as a transition state. The dinucleosome exhibits a markedly different energy landscape in which the conformation with open linkers populates not only the transition state but also the global minimum. This enhanced stability of the open state is attributed to increased rotational flexibility of nucleosomes arising from their mechanical coupling with neighboring nucleosomes. Our results provide a possible mechanism by which chromatin may enhance the accessibility of its DNA and facilitate the propagation and mitigation of DNA torsional stresses.

  11. The Flexible Ends of CENP-A Nucleosome Are Required for Mitotic Fidelity.

    PubMed

    Roulland, Yohan; Ouararhni, Khalid; Naidenov, Mladen; Ramos, Lorrie; Shuaib, Muhammad; Syed, Sajad Hussain; Lone, Imtiaz Nizar; Boopathi, Ramachandran; Fontaine, Emeline; Papai, Gabor; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Gautier, Thierry; Skoufias, Dimitrios; Padmanabhan, Kiran; Bednar, Jan; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Schultz, Patrick; Angelov, Dimitar; Hamiche, Ali; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2016-08-18

    CENP-A is a histone variant, which replaces histone H3 at centromeres and confers unique properties to centromeric chromatin. The crystal structure of CENP-A nucleosome suggests flexible nucleosomal DNA ends, but their dynamics in solution remains elusive and their implication in centromere function is unknown. Using electron cryo-microscopy, we determined the dynamic solution properties of the CENP-A nucleosome. Our biochemical, proteomic, and genetic data reveal that higher flexibility of DNA ends impairs histone H1 binding to the CENP-A nucleosome. Substituting the 2-turn αN-helix of CENP-A with the 3-turn αN-helix of H3 results in compact particles with rigidified DNA ends, able to bind histone H1. In vivo replacement of CENP-A with H3-CENP-A hybrid nucleosomes leads to H1 recruitment, delocalization of kinetochore proteins, and significant mitotic and cytokinesis defects. Our data reveal that the evolutionarily conserved flexible ends of the CENP-A nucleosomes are essential to ensure the fidelity of the mitotic pathway. PMID:27499292

  12. Nucleosome Repositioning: A Novel Mechanism for Nicotine- and Cocaine-Induced Epigenetic Changes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Amber N; Vied, Cynthia; Dennis, Jonathan H; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2015-01-01

    Drugs of abuse modify behavior by altering gene expression in the brain. Gene expression can be regulated by changes in DNA methylation as well as by histone modifications, which alter chromatin structure, DNA compaction and DNA accessibility. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms directing drug-induced changes in chromatin structure, we examined DNA-nucleosome interactions within promoter regions of 858 genes in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) exposed to nicotine or cocaine. Widespread, drug- and time-resolved repositioning of nucleosomes was identified at the transcription start site and promoter region of multiple genes. Nicotine and cocaine produced unique and shared changes in terms of the numbers and types of genes affected, as well as repositioning of nucleosomes at sites which could increase or decrease the probability of gene expression based on DNA accessibility. Half of the drug-induced nucleosome positions approximated a theoretical model of nucleosome occupancy based on physical and chemical characteristics of the DNA sequence, whereas the basal or drug naïve positions were generally DNA sequence independent. Thus we suggest that nucleosome repositioning represents an initial dynamic genome-wide alteration of the transcriptional landscape preceding more selective downstream transcriptional reprogramming, which ultimately characterizes the cell- and tissue-specific responses to drugs of abuse.

  13. Relationship between nucleosome positioning and progesterone-induced alternative splicing in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Iannone, Camilla; Pohl, Andy; Papasaikas, Panagiotis; Soronellas, Daniel; Vicent, Guillermo P; Beato, Miguel; ValcáRcel, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Splicing of mRNA precursors can occur cotranscriptionally and it has been proposed that chromatin structure influences splice site recognition and regulation. Here we have systematically explored potential links between nucleosome positioning and alternative splicing regulation upon progesterone stimulation of breast cancer cells. We confirm preferential nucleosome positioning in exons and report four distinct profiles of nucleosome density around alternatively spliced exons, with RNA polymerase II accumulation closely following nucleosome positioning. Hormone stimulation induces switches between profile classes, correlating with a subset of alternative splicing changes. Hormone-induced exon inclusion often correlates with higher nucleosome occupancy at the exon or the preceding intronic region and with higher RNA polymerase II accumulation. In contrast, exons skipped upon hormone stimulation display low nucleosome densities even before hormone treatment, suggesting that chromatin structure primes alternative splicing regulation. Skipped exons frequently harbor binding sites for hnRNP AB, a hormone-induced splicing regulator whose knock down prevents some hormone-induced skipping events. Collectively, our results argue that a variety of chromatin architecture mechanisms can influence alternative splicing decisions.

  14. AFM studies in diverse ionic environments of nucleosomes reconstituted on the 601 positioning sequence.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Igor; Chekliarova, Iana; Rychkov, Georgy; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Tomilin, Alexey

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study mononucleosomes reconstituted from a DNA duplex of 353 bp containing the strong 601 octamer positioning sequence, together with recombinant human core histone octamers. Three parameters were measured: 1) the length of DNA wrapped around the core histones; 2) the number of superhelical turns, calculated from the total angle through which the DNA is bent, and 3) the volume of the DNA-histone core. This approach allowed us to define in detail the structural diversity of nucleosomes caused by disassembly of the octasome to form subnucleosomal structures containing hexasomes, tetrasomes and disomes. At low ionic strength (TE buffer) and in the presence of physiological concentrations of monovalent cations, the majority of the particles were subnucleosomal, but physiological concentrations of bivalent cations resulted in about half of the nucleosomes being canonical octasomes in which the exiting DNA duplexes cross orthogonally. The dominance of this last species explains why bivalent but not monovalent cations can induce the initial step towards compaction and convergence of neighboring nucleosomes in nucleosomal arrays to form the chromatin fiber in the absence of linker histone. The observed nucleosome structural diversity may reflect the functional plasticity of nucleosomes under physiological conditions.

  15. GAA triplet-repeats cause nucleosome depletion in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Xing, Yongqiang; Liu, Guoqing; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Xiujuan; Li, Guohong; Cai, Lu

    2015-08-01

    Although there have been many investigations into how trinucleotide repeats affect nucleosome formation and local chromatin structure, the nucleosome positioning of GAA triplet-repeats in the human genome has remained elusive. In this work, the nucleosome occupancy around GAA triplet-repeats across the human genome was computed statistically. The results showed a nucleosome-depleted region in the vicinity of GAA triplet-repeats in activated and resting CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, the A-tract was frequently adjacent to the upstream region of GAA triplet-repeats and could enhance the depletion surrounding GAA triplet-repeats. In vitro chromatin reconstitution assays with GAA-containing plasmids also demonstrated that the inserted GAA triplet-repeats destabilized the ability of recombinant plasmids to assemble nucleosomes. Our results suggested that GAA triplet-repeats have lower affinity to histones and can change local nucleosome positioning. These findings may be helpful for understanding the mechanism of Friedreich's ataxia, which is associated with GAA triplet-repeats at the chromatin level.

  16. Single-Molecule Studies of the Linker Histone H1 Binding to DNA and the Nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hongjun; Fang, He; Wei, Sijie; Hayes, Jeffrey J; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2016-04-12

    Linker histone H1 regulates chromatin structure and gene expression. Investigating the dynamics and stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is crucial to elucidating its functions. Because of the abundant positive charges and the strong self-affinity of H1, quantitative in vitro studies of its binding to DNA and the nucleosome have generated results that vary widely and, therefore, should be interpreted in a system specific manner. We sought to overcome this limitation by developing a specially passivated microscope slide surface to monitor binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome at a single-molecule level. According to our measurements, the stoichiometry of binding of H1 to DNA and the nucleosome is very heterogeneous with a wide distribution whose averages are in reasonable agreement with previously published values. Our study also revealed that H1 does not dissociate from DNA or the nucleosome on a time scale of tens of minutes. We found that histone chaperone Nap1 readily dissociates H1 from DNA and superstoichiometrically bound H1 from the nucleosome, supporting a hypothesis whereby histone chaperones contribute to the regulation of the H1 profile in chromatin.

  17. Theoretical estimates of exposure timescales of protein binding sites on DNA regulated by nucleosome kinetics.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Jyotsana J; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2016-02-29

    It is being increasingly realized that nucleosome organization on DNA crucially regulates DNA-protein interactions and the resulting gene expression. While the spatial character of the nucleosome positioning on DNA has been experimentally and theoretically studied extensively, the temporal character is poorly understood. Accounting for ATPase activity and DNA-sequence effects on nucleosome kinetics, we develop a theoretical method to estimate the time of continuous exposure of binding sites of non-histone proteins (e.g. transcription factors and TATA binding proteins) along any genome. Applying the method to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the exposure timescales are determined by cooperative dynamics of multiple nucleosomes, and their behavior is often different from expectations based on static nucleosome occupancy. Examining exposure times in the promoters of GAL1 and PHO5, we show that our theoretical predictions are consistent with known experiments. We apply our method genome-wide and discover huge gene-to-gene variability of mean exposure times of TATA boxes and patches adjacent to TSS (+1 nucleosome region); the resulting timescale distributions have non-exponential tails.

  18. Mechanism of nucleosome dissociation produced by transcription elongation in a short chromatin template.

    PubMed

    Gallego, F; Fernandez-Busquets, X; Daban, J R

    1995-05-23

    We have used a linear DNA template (239 bp) containing a nucleosome positioning sequence (NX1) downstream of the T7 RNA polymerase promoter to study the mechanism of transcription elongation through a nucleosome. Under ionic strength approaching physiological conditions we have observed that transcription causes nucleosome dissociation and histone redistribution within the template. We have examined the role of the different elements that, in principle, could induce nucleosome dissociation during transcription. The high affinity of histones for single-stranded DNA observed in titration experiments performed using the purified (+) and (-) strands of the NX1 fragment suggests that nucleosome dissociation is not due to the formation of segments of single-stranded DNA by RNA polymerase in the elongation process. Furthermore, our results show that although RNA can interact with core histones, the synthesized RNA is not bound to the histones dissociated by transcription. Our results indicate that core histones released during transcription can be bound to naked DNA and chromatin (with or without histones H1-H5). From the dynamic properties of excess histones bound to chromatin, we suggest a nucleosome transcription mechanism in which displaced histones are transiently bound to chromatin and finally are reassembled with DNA after the passage of the polymerase.

  19. Nucleosomal occupancy changes locally over key regulatory regions during cell differentiation and reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    West, Jason A.; Cook, April; Alver, Burak H.; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Deaton, Aimee M.; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Park, Peter J.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Kingston, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin structure determines DNA accessibility. We compare nucleosome occupancy in mouse and human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced-pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and differentiated cell types using MNase-seq. To address variability inherent in this technique, we developed a bioinformatic approach to identify regions of difference (RoD) in nucleosome occupancy between pluripotent and somatic cells. Surprisingly, most chromatin remains unchanged; a majority of rearrangements appear to affect a single nucleosome. RoDs are enriched at genes and regulatory elements, including enhancers associated with pluripotency and differentiation. RoDs co-localize with binding sites of key developmental regulators, including the reprogramming factors Klf4, Oct4/Sox2 and c-Myc. Nucleosomal landscapes in ESC enhancers are extensively altered, exhibiting lower nucleosome occupancy in pluripotent cells than in somatic cells. Most changes are reset during reprogramming. We conclude that changes in nucleosome occupancy are a hallmark of cell differentiation and reprogramming and likely identify regulatory regions essential for these processes. PMID:25158628

  20. Unified physical model for statistical nucleosome positioning in different yeast species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möbius, Wolfram; Osberg, Brendan; Tsankov, Alexander M.; Rando, Oliver J.; Gerland, Ulrich

    2012-02-01

    Recent genome-wide maps of nucleosome positions in different eukaryotes have revealed a common pattern around transcription start sites, involving a nucleosome-free region flanked by a pronounced periodic pattern in the average nucleosome density. For the yeast S. cerevisiae, a gas of hard rods, known as Tonks gas and equivalent to the statistical positioning mechanism of Kornberg and Stryer, can be used to describe the experimentally observed pattern. Here, we consider 12 Hemiascomycota yeast species, each of which displays a distinct nucleosome pattern. Since the mechanisms underlying the formation of the patterns are expected to be related, we undertake a data-driven search for a unified quantitative description. We find that the simple one-dimensional gas model needs to be extended to take into account transient unwrapping of short segments of nucleosomal DNA, such that the particles no longer have a fixed size. Chromatin behavior in all but one species is well described by this generalized gas model, with a single unified set of model parameters where only the average nucleosome density is a species-dependent variable.

  1. AFM studies in diverse ionic environments of nucleosomes reconstituted on the 601 positioning sequence.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Igor; Chekliarova, Iana; Rychkov, Georgy; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Tomilin, Alexey

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study mononucleosomes reconstituted from a DNA duplex of 353 bp containing the strong 601 octamer positioning sequence, together with recombinant human core histone octamers. Three parameters were measured: 1) the length of DNA wrapped around the core histones; 2) the number of superhelical turns, calculated from the total angle through which the DNA is bent, and 3) the volume of the DNA-histone core. This approach allowed us to define in detail the structural diversity of nucleosomes caused by disassembly of the octasome to form subnucleosomal structures containing hexasomes, tetrasomes and disomes. At low ionic strength (TE buffer) and in the presence of physiological concentrations of monovalent cations, the majority of the particles were subnucleosomal, but physiological concentrations of bivalent cations resulted in about half of the nucleosomes being canonical octasomes in which the exiting DNA duplexes cross orthogonally. The dominance of this last species explains why bivalent but not monovalent cations can induce the initial step towards compaction and convergence of neighboring nucleosomes in nucleosomal arrays to form the chromatin fiber in the absence of linker histone. The observed nucleosome structural diversity may reflect the functional plasticity of nucleosomes under physiological conditions. PMID:26586109

  2. A quantitative investigation of linker histone interactions with nucleosomes and chromatin

    PubMed Central

    White, Alison E.; Hieb, Aaron R.; Luger, Karolin

    2016-01-01

    Linker histones such as H1 are abundant basic proteins that bind tightly to nucleosomes, thereby acting as key organizers of chromatin structure. The molecular details of linker histone interactions with the nucleosome, and in particular the contributions of linker DNA and of the basic C-terminal tail of H1, are controversial. Here we combine rigorous solution-state binding assays with native gel electrophoresis and Atomic Force Microscopy, to quantify the interaction of H1 with chromatin. We find that H1 binds nucleosomes and nucleosomal arrays with very tight affinity by recognizing a specific DNA geometry minimally consisting of a solitary nucleosome with a single ~18 base pair DNA linker arm. The association of H1 alters the conformation of trinucleosomes so that only one H1 can bind to the two available linker DNA regions. Neither incorporation of the histone variant H2A.Z, nor the presence of neighboring nucleosomes affects H1 affinity. Our data provide a comprehensive thermodynamic framework for this ubiquitous chromatin architectural protein. PMID:26750377

  3. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Swi/Snf complex can catalyze formation of dimeric nucleosome structures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Wladyslaw A; Vassiliev, Oleg L

    2010-08-10

    The Swi/Snf chromatin-remodeling complexes, human BAF/PBAF and yeast RSC, can catalyze formation of stably altered dimeric forms of nucleosomes. However, the ability to create remodeled dimers has not yet been reported for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Swi/Snf complex. Despite its similarity with the other Swi/Snf proteins, the yeast Swi/Snf complex features certain structural and functional differences. This raises the question of whether ySwi/Snf can in fact catalyze formation of dimeric nucleosomes. Dimer formation was proposed to have a specific impact on chromatin regulatory effects. Thus, the answer to the above question may be helpful in clarifying the ySwi/Snf functions in vivo and generalizing the notions of the regulatory principles of Swi/Snf family proteins. Here we describe ySwi/Snf-catalyzed formation of nucleosome dimers using mono- and dinucleosome templates assembled from purified histones and DNA of the high-affinity (601) nucleosome positioning sequence. We evaluated effects of nucleosome template geometry on the formation of altered dimers and assayed formation of altered nucleosome pairs on reconstituted dinucleosomes.

  4. The SWI/SNF tumor suppressor complex: Regulation of promoter nucleosomes and beyond.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Roberts, Charles W M

    2013-01-01

    Nucleosomes, octamers of histones wrapped in 147 bp of DNA, are the basic unit of chromatin. In eukaryotic cells, the placement of nucleosomes along the genome is highly organized, and modulation of this ordered arrangement contributes to regulation of gene expression. The SWI/SNF complex utilizes the energy of ATP hydrolysis to mobilize nucleosomes and remodel chromatin structure. Recently, the complex has also been implicated in oncogenesis as genes encoding multiple SWI/SNF subunits have been found mutated at high frequency across a wide spectrum of cancers. Given that epigenetic aberrations are now characterized as a hallmark of human cancer, hypotheses have been put forth that the SWI/SNF complex inhibits tumor formation by regulating key chromatin functions. To understand how the SWI/SNF complex contributes to nucleosome organization in vivo we performed a genome-wide study in mammalian cells. We found that inactivation of SWI/SNF subunits leads to disruptions of specific nucleosome patterning and a loss of nucleosome occupancy at a large number of promoters. These findings define a direct relationship between the SWI/SNF complex, chromatin structure, and transcriptional regulation. In this extra view, we discuss our findings, their relevance to gene regulation, and possible links to the tumor suppression activities of the SWI/SNF complex.

  5. Herpes simplex virus 1 DNA is in unstable nucleosomes throughout the lytic infection cycle, and the instability of the nucleosomes is independent of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Lacasse, Jonathan J; Schang, Luis M

    2012-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) DNA is chromatinized during latency and consequently regularly digested by micrococcal nuclease (MCN) to nucleosome-size fragments. In contrast, MCN digests HSV-1 DNA in lytically infected cells to mostly heterogeneous sizes. Yet HSV-1 DNA coimmunoprecipitates with histones during lytic infections. We have shown that at 5 h postinfection, most nuclear HSV-1 DNA is in particularly unstable nucleoprotein complexes and consequently is more accessible to MCN than DNA in cellular chromatin. HSV-1 DNA was quantitatively recovered at this time in complexes with the biophysical properties of mono- to polynucleosomes following a modified MCN digestion developed to detect potential unstable intermediates. We proposed that most HSV-1 DNA is in unstable nucleosome-like complexes during lytic infections. Physiologically, nucleosome assembly typically associates with DNA replication, although DNA replication transiently disrupts nucleosomes. It therefore remained unclear whether the instability of the HSV-1 nucleoprotein complexes was related to the ongoing viral DNA replication. Here we tested whether HSV-1 DNA is in unstable nucleosome-like complexes before, during, or after the peak of viral DNA replication or when HSV-1 DNA replication is inhibited. HSV-1 DNA was quantitatively recovered in complexes fractionating as mono- to polynucleosomes from nuclei harvested at 2, 5, 7, or 9 h after infection, even if viral DNA replication was inhibited. Therefore, most HSV-1 DNA is in unstable nucleosome-like complexes throughout the lytic replication cycle, and the instability of these complexes is surprisingly independent of HSV-1 DNA replication. The specific accessibility of nuclear HSV-1 DNA, however, varied at different times after infection.

  6. Levels of histone acetylation in thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Puppin, Cinzia; Passon, Nadia; Lavarone, Elisa; Di Loreto, Carla; Frasca, Francesco; Vella, Veronica; Vigneri, Riccardo; Damante, Giuseppe

    2011-08-12

    Histone acetylation is a major mechanism to regulate gene transcription. This post-translational modification is modified in cancer cells. In various tumor types the levels of acetylation at several histone residues are associated to clinical aggressiveness. By using immunohistochemistry we show that acetylated levels of lysines at positions 9-14 of H3 histone (H3K9-K14ac) are significantly higher in follicular adenomas (FA), papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC), follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTC) and undifferentiated carcinomas (UC) than in normal tissues (NT). Similar data have been obtained when acetylated levels of lysine 18 of H3 histone (H3K18ac) were evaluated. In this case, however, no difference was observed between NT and UC. When acetylated levels of lysine 12 of H4 histone (H4K12ac) were evaluated, only FA showed significantly higher levels in comparison with NT. These data indicate that modification histone acetylation is an early event along thyroid tumor progression and that H3K18 acetylation is switched off in the transition between differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid tumors. By using rat thyroid cell lines that are stably transfected with doxycyclin-inducible oncogenes, we show that the oncoproteins RET-PTC, RAS and BRAF increase levels of H3K9-K14ac and H3K18ac. In the non-tumorigenic rat thyroid cell line FRTL-5, TSH increases levels of H3K18ac. However, this hormone decreases levels of H3K9-K14ac and H4K12ac. In conclusion, our data indicate that neoplastic transformation and hormonal stimulation can modify levels of histone acetylation in thyroid cells. PMID:21763277

  7. Acetyl-L-carnitine increases mitochondrial protein acetylation in the aged rat heart.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Janos; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Lee, Kwangwon; Virmani, Ashraf; Koverech, Aleardo; Cavazza, Claudio; Chance, Mark R; Hoppel, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Previously we showed that in vivo treatment of elderly Fisher 344 rats with acetylcarnitine abolished the age-associated defect in respiratory chain complex III in interfibrillar mitochondria and improved the functional recovery of the ischemic/reperfused heart. Herein, we explored mitochondrial protein acetylation as a possible mechanism for acetylcarnitine's effect. In vivo treatment of elderly rats with acetylcarnitine restored cardiac acetylcarnitine content and increased mitochondrial protein lysine acetylation and increased the number of lysine-acetylated proteins in cardiac subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar mitochondria. Enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, mitochondrial β-oxidation, and ATP synthase of the respiratory chain showed the greatest acetylation. Acetylation of isocitrate dehydrogenase, long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, complex V, and aspartate aminotransferase was accompanied by decreased catalytic activity. Several proteins were found to be acetylated only after treatment with acetylcarnitine, suggesting that exogenous acetylcarnitine served as the acetyl-donor. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that acetylcarnitine treatment also induced changes in mitochondrial protein amount; a two-fold or greater increase/decrease in abundance was observed for thirty one proteins. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the first time that in the aged rat heart in vivo administration of acetylcarnitine provides acetyl groups for protein acetylation and affects the amount of mitochondrial proteins. PMID:25660059

  8. Acetylation Reader Proteins: Linking Acetylation Signaling to Genome Maintenance and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kyle M.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin-based DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are fundamental for preventing genome and epigenome instability, which are prevalent in cancer. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the addition and removal of acetyl groups on lysine residues, a post-translational modification important for the DDR. Acetylation can alter chromatin structure as well as function by providing binding signals for reader proteins containing acetyl-lysine recognition domains, including the bromodomain (BRD). Acetylation dynamics occur upon DNA damage in part to regulate chromatin and BRD protein interactions that mediate key DDR activities. In cancer, DDR and acetylation pathways are often mutated or abnormally expressed. DNA damaging agents and drugs targeting epigenetic regulators, including HATs, HDACs, and BRD proteins, are used or are being developed to treat cancer. Here, we discuss how histone acetylation pathways, with a focus on acetylation reader proteins, promote genome stability and the DDR. We analyze how acetylation signaling impacts the DDR in the context of cancer and its treatments. Understanding the relationship between epigenetic regulators, the DDR, and chromatin is integral for obtaining a mechanistic understanding of genome and epigenome maintenance pathways, information that can be leveraged for targeting acetylation signaling, and/or the DDR to treat diseases, including cancer. PMID:27631103

  9. Acetylation Reader Proteins: Linking Acetylation Signaling to Genome Maintenance and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fade; Chiu, Li-Ya; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-09-01

    Chromatin-based DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are fundamental for preventing genome and epigenome instability, which are prevalent in cancer. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the addition and removal of acetyl groups on lysine residues, a post-translational modification important for the DDR. Acetylation can alter chromatin structure as well as function by providing binding signals for reader proteins containing acetyl-lysine recognition domains, including the bromodomain (BRD). Acetylation dynamics occur upon DNA damage in part to regulate chromatin and BRD protein interactions that mediate key DDR activities. In cancer, DDR and acetylation pathways are often mutated or abnormally expressed. DNA damaging agents and drugs targeting epigenetic regulators, including HATs, HDACs, and BRD proteins, are used or are being developed to treat cancer. Here, we discuss how histone acetylation pathways, with a focus on acetylation reader proteins, promote genome stability and the DDR. We analyze how acetylation signaling impacts the DDR in the context of cancer and its treatments. Understanding the relationship between epigenetic regulators, the DDR, and chromatin is integral for obtaining a mechanistic understanding of genome and epigenome maintenance pathways, information that can be leveraged for targeting acetylation signaling, and/or the DDR to treat diseases, including cancer.

  10. Protein acetylation in metabolism - metabolites and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Keir J; Zhang, Hongbo; Katsyuba, Elena; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Reversible acetylation was initially described as an epigenetic mechanism regulating DNA accessibility. Since then, this process has emerged as a controller of histone and nonhistone acetylation that integrates key physiological processes such as metabolism, circadian rhythm and cell cycle, along with gene regulation in various organisms. The widespread and reversible nature of acetylation also revitalized interest in the mechanisms that regulate lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and deacetylases (KDACs) in health and disease. Changes in protein or histone acetylation are especially relevant for many common diseases including obesity, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, as well as for some rare diseases such as mitochondrial diseases and lipodystrophies. In this Review, we examine the role of reversible acetylation in metabolic control and how changes in levels of metabolites or cofactors, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, coenzyme A, acetyl coenzyme A, zinc and butyrate and/or β-hydroxybutyrate, directly alter KAT or KDAC activity to link energy status to adaptive cellular and organismal homeostasis. PMID:26503676

  11. A single night of sleep curtailment increases plasma acylcarnitines: Novel insights in the relationship between sleep and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Rosa; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke; van Dijk, J Gert; Lammers, Gert-Jan; van Kralingen, Klaas W; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; Romijn, Johannes A; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Corssmit, Eleonora P M; Rensen, Patrick C N; Biermasz, Nienke R

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that acute sleep curtailment induces insulin resistance, both in healthy individuals as well as in patients with type 1 diabetes, suggesting a causal role for sleep disturbances in pathogenesis of insulin resistance, independent of endogenous insulin production. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study aimed to explore the metabolic pathways affected by sleep loss using targeted metabolomics in human fasting plasma samples. Healthy individuals (n = 9) and patients with type 1 diabetes (n = 7) were studied after a single night of short sleep (4 h) versus normal sleep (8 h) in a cross-over design. Strikingly, one night of short sleep specifically increased the plasma levels of acylcarnitines, essential intermediates in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Specifically, short sleep increased plasma levels of tetradecenoyl-l-carnitine (C14:1) (+32%, p = 2.67*10(-4)), octadecanoyl-l-carnitine (C18:1) (+22%, p = 1.92*10(-4)) and octadecadienyl-l-carnitine (C18:2) (+27%, p = 1.32*10(-4)). Since increased plasma acylcarnitine levels could be a sign of disturbed FAO, it is possible that sleep curtailment acutely induces inefficient mitochondrial function. Our observations provide a basis for further research into the role of acylcarnitines as a potential mechanistic pathway by which sleep deprivation - even short term - causes adverse metabolic effects, such as insulin resistance.

  12. Increased Nucleosomes and Neutrophil Activation Link to Disease Progression in Patients with Scrub Typhus but Not Murine Typhus in Laos.

    PubMed

    Paris, Daniel H; Stephan, Femke; Bulder, Ingrid; Wouters, Diana; van der Poll, Tom; Newton, Paul N; Day, Nicholas P J; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is essential in protection against rickettsial illnesses, but the role of neutrophils in these intracellular vasculotropic infections remains unclear. This study analyzed the plasma levels of nucleosomes, FSAP-activation (nucleosome-releasing factor), and neutrophil activation, as evidenced by neutrophil-elastase (ELA) complexes, in sympatric Lao patients with scrub typhus and murine typhus. In acute scrub typhus elevated nucleosome levels correlated with lower GCS scores, raised respiratory rate, jaundice and impaired liver function, whereas neutrophil activation correlated with fibrinolysis and high IL-8 plasma levels, a recently identified predictor of severe disease and mortality. Nucleosome and ELA complex levels were associated with a 4.8-fold and 4-fold increased risk of developing severe scrub typhus, beyond cut off values of 1,040 U/ml for nucleosomes and 275 U/ml for ELA complexes respectively. In murine typhus, nucleosome levels associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines and the duration of illness, while ELA complexes correlated strongly with inflammation markers, jaundice and increased respiratory rates. This study found strong correlations between circulating nucleosomes and neutrophil activation in patients with scrub typhus, but not murine typhus, providing indirect evidence that nucleosomes could originate from neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) degradation. High circulating plasma nucleosomes and ELA complexes represent independent risk factors for developing severe complications in scrub typhus. As nucleosomes and histones exposed on NETs are highly cytotoxic to endothelial cells and are strongly pro-coagulant, neutrophil-derived nucleosomes could contribute to vascular damage, the pro-coagulant state and exacerbation of disease in scrub typhus, thus indicating a detrimental role of neutrophil activation. The data suggest that increased neutrophil activation relates to disease progression and severe complications, and

  13. Increased Nucleosomes and Neutrophil Activation Link to Disease Progression in Patients with Scrub Typhus but Not Murine Typhus in Laos

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Daniel H.; Stephan, Femke; Bulder, Ingrid; Wouters, Diana; van der Poll, Tom; Newton, Paul N.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is essential in protection against rickettsial illnesses, but the role of neutrophils in these intracellular vasculotropic infections remains unclear. This study analyzed the plasma levels of nucleosomes, FSAP-activation (nucleosome-releasing factor), and neutrophil activation, as evidenced by neutrophil-elastase (ELA) complexes, in sympatric Lao patients with scrub typhus and murine typhus. In acute scrub typhus elevated nucleosome levels correlated with lower GCS scores, raised respiratory rate, jaundice and impaired liver function, whereas neutrophil activation correlated with fibrinolysis and high IL-8 plasma levels, a recently identified predictor of severe disease and mortality. Nucleosome and ELA complex levels were associated with a 4.8-fold and 4-fold increased risk of developing severe scrub typhus, beyond cut off values of 1,040 U/ml for nucleosomes and 275 U/ml for ELA complexes respectively. In murine typhus, nucleosome levels associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines and the duration of illness, while ELA complexes correlated strongly with inflammation markers, jaundice and increased respiratory rates. This study found strong correlations between circulating nucleosomes and neutrophil activation in patients with scrub typhus, but not murine typhus, providing indirect evidence that nucleosomes could originate from neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) degradation. High circulating plasma nucleosomes and ELA complexes represent independent risk factors for developing severe complications in scrub typhus. As nucleosomes and histones exposed on NETs are highly cytotoxic to endothelial cells and are strongly pro-coagulant, neutrophil-derived nucleosomes could contribute to vascular damage, the pro-coagulant state and exacerbation of disease in scrub typhus, thus indicating a detrimental role of neutrophil activation. The data suggest that increased neutrophil activation relates to disease progression and severe complications, and

  14. Butyrate mediates decrease of histone acetylation centered on transcription start sites and down-regulation of associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro; Enroth, Stefan; Ameur, Adam; Koch, Christoph M.; Clelland, Gayle K.; Respuela-Alonso, Patricia; Wilcox, Sarah; Dovey, Oliver M.; Ellis, Peter D.; Langford, Cordelia F.; Dunham, Ian; Komorowski, Jan; Wadelius, Claes

    2007-01-01

    Butyrate is a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) with anti-neoplastic properties, which theoretically reactivates epigenetically silenced genes by increasing global histone acetylation. However, recent studies indicate that a similar number or even more genes are down-regulated than up-regulated by this drug. We treated hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells with butyrate and characterized the levels of acetylation at DNA-bound histones H3 and H4 by ChIP-chip along the ENCODE regions. In contrast to the global increases of histone acetylation, many genomic regions close to transcription start sites were deacetylated after butyrate exposure. In order to validate these findings, we found that both butyrate and trichostatin A treatment resulted in histone deacetylation at selected regions, while nucleosome loss or changes in histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) did not occur in such locations. Furthermore, similar histone deacetylation events were observed when colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells were treated with butyrate. In addition, genes with deacetylated promoters were down-regulated by butyrate, and this was mediated at the transcriptional level by affecting RNA polymerase II (POLR2A) initiation/elongation. Finally, the global increase in acetylated histones was preferentially localized to the nuclear periphery, indicating that it might not be associated to euchromatin. Our results are significant for the evaluation of HDACi as anti-tumourogenic drugs, suggesting that previous models of action might need to be revised, and provides an explanation for the frequently observed repression of many genes during HDACi treatment. PMID:17567991

  15. A Non-Homogeneous Hidden-State Model on First Order Differences for Automatic Detection of Nucleosome Positions

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Pei Fen; Huebert, Dana; Gasch, Audrey; Keles, Sunduz

    2009-01-01

    The ability to map individual nucleosomes accurately across genomes enables the study of relationships between dynamic changes in nucleosome positioning/occupancy and gene regulation. However, the highly heterogeneous nature of nucleosome densities across genomes and short linker regions pose challenges in mapping nucleosome positions based on high-throughput microarray data of micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digested DNA. Previous works rely on additional detrending and careful visual examination to detect low-signal nucleosomes, which may exist in a subpopulation of cells. We propose a non-homogeneous hidden-state model based on first order differences of experimental data along genomic coordinates that bypasses the need for local detrending and can automatically detect nucleosome positions of various occupancy levels. Our proposed approach is applicable to both low and high resolution MNase-Chip and MNase-Seq (high throughput sequencing) data, and is able to map nucleosome-linker boundaries accurately. This automated algorithm is also computationally efficient and only requires a simple preprocessing step. We provide several examples illustrating the pitfalls of existing methods, the difficulties of detrending the observed hybridization signals and demonstrate the advantages of utilizing first order differences in detecting nucleosome occupancies via simulations and case studies involving MNase-Chip and MNase-Seq data of nucleosome occupancy in yeast S. cerevisiae. PMID:19572828

  16. Genome-Wide Nucleosome Occupancy and Positioning and Their Impact on Gene Expression and Evolution in Plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Wenli; Jiang, Jiming

    2015-08-01

    The fundamental unit of chromatin is the nucleosome that consists of a protein octamer composed of the four core histones (Hs; H3, H4, H2A, and H2B) wrapped by 147 bp of DNA. Nucleosome occupancy and positioning have proven to be dynamic and have a critical impact on expression, regulation, and evolution of eukaryotic genes. We developed nucleosome occupancy and positioning data sets using leaf tissue of rice (Oryza sativa) and both leaf and flower tissues of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We show that model plant and animal species share the fundamental characteristics associated with nucleosome dynamics. Only 12% and 16% of the Arabidopsis and rice genomes, respectively, were occupied by well-positioned nucleosomes. The cores of positioned nucleosomes were enriched with G/C dinucleotides and showed a lower C→T mutation rate than the linker sequences. We discovered that nucleosomes associated with heterochromatic regions were more spaced with longer linkers than those in euchromatic regions in both plant species. Surprisingly, different nucleosome densities were found to be associated with chromatin in leaf and flower tissues in Arabidopsis. We show that deep MNase-seq data sets can be used to map nucleosome occupancy of specific genomic loci and reveal gene expression patterns correlated with chromatin dynamics in plant genomes.

  17. Increasing Nucleosome Occupancy Is Correlated with an Increasing Mutation Rate so Long as DNA Repair Machinery Is Intact.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Puya G; Pedersen, Brian A; Taylor, Jared F; Khattab, Omar S; Chen, Yu-Han; Chen, Yumay; Jacobsen, Steven E; Wang, Ping H

    2015-01-01

    Deciphering the multitude of epigenomic and genomic factors that influence the mutation rate is an area of great interest in modern biology. Recently, chromatin has been shown to play a part in this process. To elucidate this relationship further, we integrated our own ultra-deep sequenced human nucleosomal DNA data set with a host of published human genomic and cancer genomic data sets. Our results revealed, that differences in nucleosome occupancy are associated with changes in base-specific mutation rates. Increasing nucleosome occupancy is associated with an increasing transition to transversion ratio and an increased germline mutation rate within the human genome. Additionally, cancer single nucleotide variants and microindels are enriched within nucleosomes and both the coding and non-coding cancer mutation rate increases with increasing nucleosome occupancy. There is an enrichment of cancer indels at the theoretical start (74 bp) and end (115 bp) of linker DNA between two nucleosomes. We then hypothesized that increasing nucleosome occupancy decreases access to DNA by DNA repair machinery and could account for the increasing mutation rate. Such a relationship should not exist in DNA repair knockouts, and we thus repeated our analysis in DNA repair machinery knockouts to test our hypothesis. Indeed, our results revealed no correlation between increasing nucleosome occupancy and increasing mutation rate in DNA repair knockouts. Our findings emphasize the linkage of the genome and epigenome through the nucleosome whose properties can affect genome evolution and genetic aberrations such as cancer.

  18. Mutation bias, rather than binding preference, underlies the nucleosome-associated G+C% variation in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Xing, Ke; He, Xionglei

    2015-03-18

    The effects of genetic content on epigenetic status have been extensively studied, but how epigenetic status affects genetic content is not well understood. As a key epigenetic factor the nucleosome structure is highly correlated with local G+C% in eukaryotic genomes. The prevailing explanation to the pattern is that nucleosome occupancy favors higher G+C% sequences more than lower G+C% sequences. However, recent observation of a biased mutation spectrum caused by nucleosome occupancy suggests that the higher G+C% of nucleosomal DNA might be the evolutionary consequence of nucleosome occupancy. To distinguish the two explanations, we examined data from an in vitro nucleosome reconstitution experiment in which histones are incubated with yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli genomic DNA, the former has been shaped by nucleosome structure while the latter has not. There is a strong positive correlation between nucleosome density and G+C% for the yeast DNA, an observation consistent with in vivo data, and such a pattern nearly vanishes for E. coli genomic DNA, suggesting that biased mutation, rather than biased occupancy, explains the most nucleosome-associated G+C% variation in eukaryotic genomes.

  19. Nucleosome transactions on the Hypocrea jecorina (Trichoderma reesei) cellulase promoter cbh2 associated with cellulase induction.

    PubMed

    Zeilinger, S; Schmoll, M; Pail, M; Mach, R L; Kubicek, C P

    2003-10-01

    The 5' regulatory region of the cbh2 gene of Hypocrea jecorina contains the cbh2 activating element (CAE) which is essential for induction of cbh2 gene expression by sophorose and cellulose. The CAE consists of two motifs, a CCAAT box on the template strand and a GTAATA box on the coding strand, which cooperate during induction. Northern analyses of cbh2 gene expression has revealed an absolute dependence on induction, but no direct effect of Cre1-mediated carbon catabolite repression. Investigation of the chromatin structure in the wild-type strain showed that, under repressing conditions, there is a nucleosome free region (nfr) around the CAE, which is flanked by strictly positioned nucleosomes. Induction results in a loss of positioning of nucleosomes -1 and -2 downstream of the CAE, thus making the TATA box accessible. Simultaneous mutation of both motifs of the CAE, or of the CCAAT-box alone, also leads to shifting of nucleosome -1, which normally covers the TATA-box under repressing conditions, whereas mutation of the GTAATA element results in a narrowing of the nfr, indicating that the proteins that bind to both motifs in the CAE interact with chromatin, although in different ways. A cellulase-negative mutant strain, which has previously been shown to be altered in protein binding to the CAE, still displayed the induction-specific changes in nucleosome structure, indicating that none of the proteins that directly interact with CAE are affected, and that nucleosome rearrangement and induction of cbh2 expression are uncoupled. Interestingly, the carbon catabolite repressor Cre1 is essential for strict nucleosome positioning in the 5' regulatory sequences of cbh2 under all of the conditions tested, and induction can occur in a promoter that lacks positioned nucleosomes. These data suggest that Cre1, the Hap2/3/5 complex and the GTAATA-binding protein are all involved in nucleosome assembly on the cbh2 promoter, and that the latter two respond to inducing

  20. Dynamics of interaction of RNA polymerase II with nucleosomes. I. Effect of salts.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, P

    1993-12-01

    Mononucleosomes were labeled with the sulfhydryl-specific fluorescence probe 1,5-IAEDANS (5-(2-((iodoacetyl)amino)ethyl)amino-naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) by attaching the dye to the single cysteine of H3 through a covalent linkage. The enzyme RNA polymerase II (pol II) utilized the native and the reconstituted fluorescent nucleosomes as templates with greatest efficiency when 0.2 M potassium acetate (AcOK) was used as the supporting salt; 0.2 M NaCl was found to be very much inhibitory. Measurement of polarity of the microenvironment of the dye at its binding site in the nucleosome showed the conformation to be more open in the presence of AcOK, compared to that in 0.1 or 0.2 M NaCl. The binding of pol II to the nucleosome resulted in a relatively more compact structure when measured in terms of the polarity of the microenvironment of the dye in various salt-dependent conformations of the nucleosomes. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the probe molecule at its binding site undergoes certain excited-state processes, and the presence/absence or rate of these excited-state processes depends on the conformation of nucleosomes, which in turn depends on the type and concentration of the ion present in the medium. Time-resolved emission spectra showed that binding of nucleosomes by pol II established some new contacts that resulted in inaccessibility of the dye to the bulk solvent, reflecting a more hydrophobic environment for the dye in the steady-state spectra. Thus, binding or transcription of nucleosomes by pol II did not break open their structure. Rather, some transient internal adjustments within the histone octamer may take place to accommodate the bulky pol II molecule.

  1. Structural, Kinetic and Proteomic Characterization of Acetyl Phosphate-Dependent Bacterial Protein Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Alexandria; Sorensen, Dylan; Minasov, George; Lima, Bruno P.; Scholle, Michael; Mrksich, Milan; Anderson, Wayne F.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Schilling, Birgit; Wolfe, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    The emerging view of Nε-lysine acetylation in eukaryotes is of a relatively abundant post-translational modification (PTM) that has a major impact on the function, structure, stability and/or location of thousands of proteins involved in diverse cellular processes. This PTM is typically considered to arise by the donation of the acetyl group from acetyl-coenzyme A (acCoA) to the ε-amino group of a lysine residue that is reversibly catalyzed by lysine acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Here, we provide genetic, mass spectrometric, biochemical and structural evidence that Nε-lysine acetylation is an equally abundant and important PTM in bacteria. Applying a recently developed, label-free and global mass spectrometric approach to an isogenic set of mutants, we detected acetylation of thousands of lysine residues on hundreds of Escherichia coli proteins that participate in diverse and often essential cellular processes, including translation, transcription and central metabolism. Many of these acetylations were regulated in an acetyl phosphate (acP)-dependent manner, providing compelling evidence for a recently reported mechanism of bacterial Nε-lysine acetylation. These mass spectrometric data, coupled with observations made by crystallography, biochemistry, and additional mass spectrometry showed that this acP-dependent acetylation is both non-enzymatic and specific, with specificity determined by the accessibility, reactivity and three-dimensional microenvironment of the target lysine. Crystallographic evidence shows acP can bind to proteins in active sites and cofactor binding sites, but also potentially anywhere molecules with a phosphate moiety could bind. Finally, we provide evidence that acP-dependent acetylation can impact the function of critical enzymes, including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, triosephosphate isomerase, and RNA polymerase. PMID:24756028

  2. Proteomic analysis of acetylation in thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Woo; Kim, Dooil; Lee, Yong-Jik; Kim, Jung-Ae; Choi, Ji Young; Kang, Sunghyun; Pan, Jae-Gu

    2013-08-01

    Recent analysis of prokaryotic N(ε)-lysine-acetylated proteins highlights the posttranslational regulation of a broad spectrum of cellular proteins. However, the exact role of acetylation remains unclear due to a lack of acetylated proteome data in prokaryotes. Here, we present the N(ε)-lysine-acetylated proteome of gram-positive thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus. Affinity enrichment using acetyl-lysine-specific antibodies followed by LC-MS/MS analysis revealed 253 acetylated peptides representing 114 proteins. These acetylated proteins include not only common orthologs from mesophilic Bacillus counterparts, but also unique G. kaustophilus proteins, indicating that lysine acetylation is pronounced in thermophilic bacteria. These data complement current knowledge of the bacterial acetylproteome and provide an expanded platform for better understanding of the function of acetylation in cellular metabolism.

  3. The uni chromosome of Chlamydomonas: histone genes and nucleosome structure.

    PubMed

    Walther, Z; Hall, J L

    1995-09-25

    The uni linkage group (ULG) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains many genes involved in the basal body-flagellar system. Recent evidence suggests that the corresponding uni chromosome is located in close proximity to the basal body complex. In the course of studies into its molecular organization, we have found a cluster of four histone genes on the ULG. The genes are arranged as divergently-transcribed pairs: H3-H4 and H2B-H2A. Genomic sequencing reveals that these genes lack introns and contain characteristic 3' palindromes similar to those of animals. The predicted amino acid sequences are highly conserved across species, with greatest similarities to the histone genes of Volvox. Southern analysis shows that each histone gene is present in 15-20 copies in Chlamydomonas and suggests a dispersed genomic organization. Northern analysis of mitotically-synchronized cells shows that, like the replication-dependent histones of higher eukaryotes, Chlamydomonas histone genes are expressed during S-phase. Using a gene-specific probe on Northern blots, we provide evidence that the ULG H4 gene is regulated in the same manner as other Chlamydomonas histone genes. Finally, micrococcal nuclease protection experiments show that the uni chromosome itself associates with histone proteins and displays a conventional nucleosomal banding pattern. PMID:7479007

  4. Accelerated Chromatin Biochemistry Using DNA-Barcoded Nucleosome Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Uyen T. T.; Bittova, Lenka; Müller, Manuel M.; Fierz, Beat; David, Yael; Houck-Loomis, Brian; Feng, Vanessa; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Muir, Tom W.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular details of how chromatin-associated factors deposit, remove and recognize histone posttranslational modification (‘PTM’) signatures remains a daunting task in the epigenetics field. Here, we introduce a versatile platform that greatly accelerates biochemical investigations into chromatin recognition and signaling. This technology is based on the streamlined semi-synthesis of DNA-barcoded nucleosome libraries with distinct combinations of PTMs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of these libraries treated with purified chromatin effectors or the combined chromatin recognizing and modifying activities of the nuclear proteome is followed by multiplexed DNA-barcode sequencing. This ultrasensitive workflow allowed us to collect thousands of biochemical data points revealing the binding preferences of various nuclear factors for PTM patterns and how pre-existing PTMs, alone or synergistically, affect further PTM deposition via crosstalk mechanisms. We anticipate that the high-throughput and -sensitivity of the technology will help accelerate the decryption of the diverse molecular controls that operate at the level of chromatin. PMID:24997861

  5. Nucleosome: a major immunogen for pathogenic autoantibody-inducing T cells of lupus

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Only a fraction (12%) of 268 "autoreactive" T cell clones derived from lupus-prone mice can selectively induce the production of pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibodies in vitro and accelerate the development of lupus nephritis when transferred in vivo. The CDR3 loops of T cell receptor beta chains expressed by these pathogenic T helper (Th) clones contain a recurrent motif of anionic residues suggesting that they are selected by autoantigens with cationic residues. Herein, we found that approximately 50% of these pathogenic Th clones were specific for nucleosomal antigens, but none of them responded to cationic idiopeptides shared by variable regions of pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibodies. Nucleosomes did not stimulate the T cells as a nonspecific mitogen or superantigen. Only the pathogenic Th cells of lupus responded to nucleosomal antigens that were processed and presented via the major histocompatibility class II pathway. Although the presentation of purified mononucleosomes to the Th clones could be blocked by inhibitors of endosomal proteases, neither of the two components of the nucleosomes--free DNA or histones by themselves-- could stimulate the Th clones. Thus critical peptide epitopes for the Th cells were probably protected during uptake and processing of the nucleosome particle as a whole. The nucleosome-specific Th clones preferentially augmented the production of IgG autoantibodies to histone-DNA complex in vitro. In vivo, nucleosome-specific, CD4+ T cells were not detectable in normal mice, but they were found in the spleens of lupus-prone mice as early as 1 mo of age, long before other autoimmune manifestations. Immunization of young, preautoimmune lupus mice with nucleosomes augmented the production of autoantibodies and markedly accelerated the development of severe glomerulonephritis. Previously, crude preparations containing nucleosomes were shown by others to have polyclonal mitogenic activity for B cells from normal as well as lupus mice

  6. Health Outcomes of Information System Use Lifestyles among Adolescents: Videogame Addiction, Sleep Curtailment and Cardio-Metabolic Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Obesity is a rising problem among adolescents in modern societies; it results in long-term cardio-metabolic problems. Possible overlooked drivers of obesity and its consequent cardio-metabolic deficits include videogame addiction and the resulting curtailed sleep; both are growing problems among adolescents. The objective of this study is to examine possible associations among these concepts in adolescents, as a means to point to plausible interventions. Methods Data were collected from 94 adolescents who play videogames and are enrolled in outpatient clinics, using surveys, wearable sleep monitors (FitBit), physical exams, and blood tests at three points in time. These data were subjected to structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses and bootstrapping-based mediation testing procedures. Results Videogame addiction among adolescents was negatively associated with sleep duration (β = -0.24). Sleep duration was negatively associated with obesity (β = -0.30), which in turn was associated with elevated blood pressure (β = 0.26), low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (β = -0.18), high triglycerides (β = 0.61), and high insulin resistance (β = 0.39). The model explained 36.2% of the variation in sleep duration, 32.7% of the variation in obesity, and between 12.8% and 28.1% of the variation in cardio-metabolic indicators. Post-hoc analyses indicated that curtailed sleep is a possible full mediator of the association between videogame addiction, abdominal obesity and the associated cardio-metabolic deficits. Conclusion The findings point to possible information systems use lifestyle-health links, which behooves researchers and practitioners to pay closer attention to possible adverse health outcomes of technology-related addictions. Interventions that target problematic video-gaming and sleep should be devised as a possible means for improving adolescents’ long-term cardio-metabolic health. PMID:27149512

  7. Distinct Roles of Histone H3 and H2A Tails in Nucleosome Stability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhai; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome breathing potentially increases the DNA exposure, which in turn recruits DNA-binding protein and regulates gene transcription. Numerous studies have shown the critical roles of N-terminal tails of histones H3 and H4 in gene expression; however, few studies have focused on the H2A C-terminal tail. Here we present thorough computational studies on a single nucleosome particle showing the linker DNA closing and opening, which is thought to be nucleosome breathing. With our simulation, the H2A C-terminal and H3 N-terminal tails were found to modulate the nucleosome conformation differently. The H2A C-terminal tail regulates nucleosome conformation by binding to linker DNA at different locations, whereas the H3 N-terminal tail regulates linker DNA by binding to it in different patterns. Further MD simulation on tail truncated structures corroborates this analysis. These findings replenish our understanding of the histone tail regulation mechanism on atomic level. PMID:27527579

  8. Nucleosome assembly dynamics involve spontaneous fluctuations in the handedness of tetrasomes.

    PubMed

    Vlijm, Rifka; Lee, Mina; Lipfert, Jan; Lusser, Alexandra; Dekker, Cees; Dekker, Nynke H

    2015-01-13

    DNA wrapping around histone octamers generates nucleosomes, the basic compaction unit of eukaryotic chromatin. Nucleosome stability is carefully tuned to maintain DNA accessibility in transcription, replication, and repair. Using freely orbiting magnetic tweezers, which measure the twist and length of single DNA molecules, we monitor the real-time loading of tetramers or complete histone octamers onto DNA by Nucleosome Assembly Protein-1 (NAP1). Remarkably, we find that tetrasomes exhibit spontaneous flipping between a preferentially occupied left-handed state (ΔLk = -0.73) and a right-handed state (ΔLk = +1.0), separated by a free energy difference of 2.3 kBT (1.5 kcal/mol). This flipping occurs without concomitant changes in DNA end-to-end length. The application of weak positive torque converts left-handed tetrasomes into right-handed tetrasomes, whereas nucleosomes display more gradual conformational changes. Our findings reveal unexpected dynamical rearrangements of the nucleosomal structure, suggesting that chromatin can serve as a "twist reservoir," offering a mechanistic explanation for the regulation of DNA supercoiling in chromatin. PMID:25578730

  9. Cell-cycle-coupled structural oscillation of centromeric nucleosomes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Shivaraju, Manjunatha; Unruh, Jay R; Slaughter, Brian D; Mattingly, Mark; Berman, Judith; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2012-07-20

    The centromere is a specialized chromosomal structure that regulates chromosome segregation. Centromeres are marked by a histone H3 variant. In budding yeast, the histone H3 variant Cse4 is present in a single centromeric nucleosome. Experimental evidence supports several different models for the structure of centromeric nucleosomes. To investigate Cse4 copy number in live yeast, we developed a method coupling fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and calibrated imaging. We find that centromeric nucleosomes have one copy of Cse4 during most of the cell cycle, whereas two copies are detected at anaphase. The proposal of an anaphase-coupled structural change is supported by Cse4-Cse4 interactions, incorporation of Cse4, and the absence of Scm3 in anaphase. Nucleosome reconstitution and ChIP suggests both Cse4 structures contain H2A/H2B. The increase in Cse4 intensity and deposition at anaphase are also observed in Candida albicans. Our experimental evidence supports a cell-cycle-coupled oscillation of centromeric nucleosome structure in yeast. PMID:22817893

  10. A one-dimensional statistical mechanics model for nucleosome positioning on genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Tesoro, S; Ali, I; Morozov, A N; Sulaiman, N; Marenduzzo, D

    2016-02-01

    The first level of folding of DNA in eukaryotes is provided by the so-called '10 nm chromatin fibre', where DNA wraps around histone proteins (∼10 nm in size) to form nucleosomes, which go on to create a zig-zagging bead-on-a-string structure. In this work we present a one-dimensional statistical mechanics model to study nucleosome positioning within one such 10 nm fibre. We focus on the case of genomic sheep DNA, and we start from effective potentials valid at infinite dilution and determined from high-resolution in vitro salt dialysis experiments. We study positioning within a polynucleosome chain, and compare the results for genomic DNA to that obtained in the simplest case of homogeneous DNA, where the problem can be mapped to a Tonks gas. First, we consider the simple, analytically solvable, case where nucleosomes are assumed to be point-like. Then, we perform numerical simulations to gauge the effect of their finite size on the nucleosomal distribution probabilities. Finally we compare nucleosome distributions and simulated nuclease digestion patterns for the two cases (homogeneous and sheep DNA), thereby providing testable predictions of the effect of sequence on experimentally observable quantities in experiments on polynucleosome chromatin fibres reconstituted in vitro. PMID:26871546

  11. Coordinated Action of Nap1 and RSC in Disassembly of Tandem Nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rashmi; D'Arcy, Sheena; Hada, Arjan; Luger, Karolin; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2016-09-01

    The SWI/SNF and RSC family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers disassembles nucleosomes by moving nucleosomes into the vicinity of adjoining nucleosomes. We found that the histone chaperone Nap1 efficiently promotes disassembly of adjacent nucleosomes with which RSC collides and not the disassembly of nucleosomes mobilized by RSC. Nap1 is specific to RSC, as it does not target SWI/SNF, its paralog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Extensive mutational analysis of Nap1 has revealed that Nap1 affinity for histones H2A-H2B and H3-H4 and its ability to displace histones from DNA are required for Nap1 to enhance RSC-mediated disassembly. Other histone chaperones, such as Vps75, that also bind histones are not able to enhance RSC-mediated disassembly. Our study suggests a mechanism by which Nap1 is recruited to actively transcribed regions and assists in the passage of the transcription complex through chromatin, and it provides a novel mechanism for the coordinated action of RSC and Nap1.

  12. The role of Nucleosome Positions on Chromatin Structure: A multi-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lequieu, Joshua; Cordoba, Andres; de Pablo, Juan J.

    Nucleosomes compose the basic unit of chromatin, and their locations are central to the regulation and compaction of eukaryotic genomes. In this work, we examine the coupling between different length scales within chromatin by examining the influence of nucleosome positions on three-dimensional chromatin structure. First, using a detailed molecular model of DNA and proteins, we predict the one-dimensional positioning of nucleosomes and the repositioning mechanisms of nucleosomal DNA. We demonstrate that this mechanism is strongly dependent on DNA sequence and that DNA slides around the histone proteins by either a screw-like or loop-like rearrangement. Next, we couple this detailed model to a coarsened model of chromatin and examine the impact of DNA sequence on chromatin's three-dimensional structure. We show that both the locations of nucleosomes and the mechanisms by which they move have a significant impact on higher-order chromatin structure and that variations in DNA sequence lead to ''open'' or ''closed'' regions of chromatin. This approach represents an efficient tool towards understanding the higher order structure of chromatin and how various aspects of chromatin structure are coupled together.

  13. Nucleosome assembly dynamics involve spontaneous fluctuations in the handedness of tetrasomes.

    PubMed

    Vlijm, Rifka; Lee, Mina; Lipfert, Jan; Lusser, Alexandra; Dekker, Cees; Dekker, Nynke H

    2015-01-13

    DNA wrapping around histone octamers generates nucleosomes, the basic compaction unit of eukaryotic chromatin. Nucleosome stability is carefully tuned to maintain DNA accessibility in transcription, replication, and repair. Using freely orbiting magnetic tweezers, which measure the twist and length of single DNA molecules, we monitor the real-time loading of tetramers or complete histone octamers onto DNA by Nucleosome Assembly Protein-1 (NAP1). Remarkably, we find that tetrasomes exhibit spontaneous flipping between a preferentially occupied left-handed state (ΔLk = -0.73) and a right-handed state (ΔLk = +1.0), separated by a free energy difference of 2.3 kBT (1.5 kcal/mol). This flipping occurs without concomitant changes in DNA end-to-end length. The application of weak positive torque converts left-handed tetrasomes into right-handed tetrasomes, whereas nucleosomes display more gradual conformational changes. Our findings reveal unexpected dynamical rearrangements of the nucleosomal structure, suggesting that chromatin can serve as a "twist reservoir," offering a mechanistic explanation for the regulation of DNA supercoiling in chromatin.

  14. Abo1, a conserved bromodomain AAA-ATPase, maintains global nucleosome occupancy and organisation.

    PubMed

    Gal, Csenge; Murton, Heather E; Subramanian, Lakxmi; Whale, Alex J; Moore, Karen M; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Codlin, Sandra; Bähler, Jürg; Creamer, Kevin M; Partridge, Janet F; Allshire, Robin C; Kent, Nicholas A; Whitehall, Simon K

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of the correct level and organisation of nucleosomes is crucial for genome function. Here, we uncover a role for a conserved bromodomain AAA-ATPase, Abo1, in the maintenance of nucleosome architecture in fission yeast. Cells lacking abo1(+) experience both a reduction and mis-positioning of nucleosomes at transcribed sequences in addition to increased intragenic transcription, phenotypes that are hallmarks of defective chromatin re-establishment behind RNA polymerase II. Abo1 is recruited to gene sequences and associates with histone H3 and the histone chaperone FACT. Furthermore, the distribution of Abo1 on chromatin is disturbed by impaired FACT function. The role of Abo1 extends to some promoters and also to silent heterochromatin. Abo1 is recruited to pericentromeric heterochromatin independently of the HP1 ortholog, Swi6, where it enforces proper nucleosome occupancy. Consequently, loss of Abo1 alleviates silencing and causes elevated chromosome mis-segregation. We suggest that Abo1 provides a histone chaperone function that maintains nucleosome architecture genome-wide.

  15. Zelda overcomes the high intrinsic nucleosome barrier at enhancers during Drosophila zygotic genome activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujia; Nien, Chung-Yi; Chen, Kai; Liu, Hsiao-Yun; Johnston, Jeff; Zeitlinger, Julia; Rushlow, Christine

    2015-11-01

    The Drosophila genome activator Vielfaltig (Vfl), also known as Zelda (Zld), is thought to prime enhancers for activation by patterning transcription factors (TFs). Such priming is accompanied by increased chromatin accessibility, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are poorly understood. Here, we analyze the effect of Zld on genome-wide nucleosome occupancy and binding of the patterning TF Dorsal (Dl). Our results show that early enhancers are characterized by an intrinsically high nucleosome barrier. Zld tackles this nucleosome barrier through local depletion of nucleosomes with the effect being dependent on the number and position of Zld motifs. Without Zld, Dl binding decreases at enhancers and redistributes to open regions devoid of enhancer activity. We propose that Zld primes enhancers by lowering the high nucleosome barrier just enough to assist TFs in accessing their binding motifs and promoting spatially controlled enhancer activation if the right patterning TFs are present. We envision that genome activators in general will utilize this mechanism to activate the zygotic genome in a robust and precise manner.

  16. Coordinated Action of Nap1 and RSC in Disassembly of Tandem Nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rashmi; D'Arcy, Sheena; Hada, Arjan; Luger, Karolin; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2016-09-01

    The SWI/SNF and RSC family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers disassembles nucleosomes by moving nucleosomes into the vicinity of adjoining nucleosomes. We found that the histone chaperone Nap1 efficiently promotes disassembly of adjacent nucleosomes with which RSC collides and not the disassembly of nucleosomes mobilized by RSC. Nap1 is specific to RSC, as it does not target SWI/SNF, its paralog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Extensive mutational analysis of Nap1 has revealed that Nap1 affinity for histones H2A-H2B and H3-H4 and its ability to displace histones from DNA are required for Nap1 to enhance RSC-mediated disassembly. Other histone chaperones, such as Vps75, that also bind histones are not able to enhance RSC-mediated disassembly. Our study suggests a mechanism by which Nap1 is recruited to actively transcribed regions and assists in the passage of the transcription complex through chromatin, and it provides a novel mechanism for the coordinated action of RSC and Nap1. PMID:27273866

  17. A one-dimensional statistical mechanics model for nucleosome positioning on genomic DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesoro, S.; Ali, I.; Morozov, A. N.; Sulaiman, N.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2016-02-01

    The first level of folding of DNA in eukaryotes is provided by the so-called ‘10 nm chromatin fibre’, where DNA wraps around histone proteins (∼10 nm in size) to form nucleosomes, which go on to create a zig-zagging bead-on-a-string structure. In this work we present a one-dimensional statistical mechanics model to study nucleosome positioning within one such 10 nm fibre. We focus on the case of genomic sheep DNA, and we start from effective potentials valid at infinite dilution and determined from high-resolution in vitro salt dialysis experiments. We study positioning within a polynucleosome chain, and compare the results for genomic DNA to that obtained in the simplest case of homogeneous DNA, where the problem can be mapped to a Tonks gas [1]. First, we consider the simple, analytically solvable, case where nucleosomes are assumed to be point-like. Then, we perform numerical simulations to gauge the effect of their finite size on the nucleosomal distribution probabilities. Finally we compare nucleosome distributions and simulated nuclease digestion patterns for the two cases (homogeneous and sheep DNA), thereby providing testable predictions of the effect of sequence on experimentally observable quantities in experiments on polynucleosome chromatin fibres reconstituted in vitro.

  18. A one-dimensional statistical mechanics model for nucleosome positioning on genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Tesoro, S; Ali, I; Morozov, A N; Sulaiman, N; Marenduzzo, D

    2016-02-01

    The first level of folding of DNA in eukaryotes is provided by the so-called '10 nm chromatin fibre', where DNA wraps around histone proteins (∼10 nm in size) to form nucleosomes, which go on to create a zig-zagging bead-on-a-string structure. In this work we present a one-dimensional statistical mechanics model to study nucleosome positioning within one such 10 nm fibre. We focus on the case of genomic sheep DNA, and we start from effective potentials valid at infinite dilution and determined from high-resolution in vitro salt dialysis experiments. We study positioning within a polynucleosome chain, and compare the results for genomic DNA to that obtained in the simplest case of homogeneous DNA, where the problem can be mapped to a Tonks gas. First, we consider the simple, analytically solvable, case where nucleosomes are assumed to be point-like. Then, we perform numerical simulations to gauge the effect of their finite size on the nucleosomal distribution probabilities. Finally we compare nucleosome distributions and simulated nuclease digestion patterns for the two cases (homogeneous and sheep DNA), thereby providing testable predictions of the effect of sequence on experimentally observable quantities in experiments on polynucleosome chromatin fibres reconstituted in vitro.

  19. Nucleosome compaction facilitates HP1γ binding to methylated H3K9

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Yuichi; Jayasinghe, Chanika D.; Lu, Kai; Otani, Junji; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Kawakami, Toru; Kimura, Hironobu; Hojo, Hironobu; Carlton, Peter; Tajima, Shoji; Suetake, Isao

    2015-01-01

    The α, β and γ isoforms of mammalian heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) selectively bind to methylated lysine 9 of histone H3 via their chromodomains. Although the phenotypes of HP1-knockout mice are distinct for each isoform, the molecular mechanisms underlying HP1 isoform-specific function remain elusive. In the present study, we found that in contrast to HP1α, HP1γ could not bind tri-methylated H3 lysine 9 in a reconstituted tetra-nucleosomes when the nucleosomes were in an uncompacted state. The hinge region connecting HP1's chromodomain and chromoshadow domain contributed to the distinct recognition of the nucleosomes by HP1α and HP1γ. HP1γ, but not HP1α, was strongly enhanced in selective binding to tri-methylated lysine 9 in histone H3 by the addition of Mg2+ or linker histone H1, which are known to induce compaction of nucleosomes. We propose that this novel property of HP1γ recognition of lysine 9 in the histone H3 tail in different nucleosome structures plays a role in reading the histone code. PMID:26319017

  20. Perturbation of nucleosome structure by the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1.

    PubMed

    Boyes, J; Omichinski, J; Clark, D; Pikaart, M; Felsenfeld, G

    1998-06-12

    The ability of transcription factors to gain access to their sites in chromatin requires the disruption or displacement of nucleosomes covering the promoter, signalled by the generation of a nuclease hypersensitive site. We characterise here the alterations in nucleosome structure caused by binding of the erythroid factor GATA-1 to a nucleosome carrying GATA-1 sites. DNase I and micrococcal nuclease probes show that GATA-1 binding causes extensive, cooperative breakage of the histone/DNA contacts to generate a complex very similar to that formed by the factor with free DNA. The only region which differs is confined to about 50 bp surrounding the nucleosome dyad axis which appears to be the domain of residual contact between the DNA and histone octamer. Despite considerable breakage of the histone/DNA contacts, the complex is completely stable in solution, and disruption of the nucleosome is entirely reversible: it is regenerated quantitatively upon removal of the transcription factor. Moreover, the histone 2A/2B component of the octamer does not exchange to external competitor. We suggest that formation of this complex may be a step in the generation of a fully hypersensitive site in vivo over regulatory elements containing GATA family binding sites. PMID:9641976

  1. Phosphorylation of histone H3 Thr 118 converts nucleosomes into a higher-mass complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, Justin; Poirier, Michael; Ferdinand, Michelle; Ottesen, Jennifer

    2009-03-01

    The nucleosome is the fundamental unit of DNA compaction in eukaryotes by which 147 base pairs of DNA wrap 1.7 times around a protein complex called the histone octamer. Numerous chemical modifications are found in vivo that alter octamer surface charge and shape. One such modification is phosphorylation of histone H3 residue Thr 118 located in the dyad region of the nucleosome. We find that phosphorylated H3 T118 (H3 pT118) octamer, when reconstituted with DNA of about 200bp, suppresses nucleosome formation and promotes formation of a higher-mass DNA-protein complex. Coordinately, dephosphorylation of H3 pT118 octamer by phosphatase results in reconstitution of normal nucleosomes. DNAse I foot printing reveals that while DNA contacting the octamer surface in nucleosomes is less accessible than free DNA, the entire DNA strand is equally accessible in the higher-mass complex and is digested at one-third the rate of free DNA.

  2. Computer modeling reveals that modifications of the histone tail charges define salt-dependent interaction of the nucleosome core particles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Korolev, Nikolay; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2009-03-18

    Coarse-grained Langevin molecular dynamics computer simulations were conducted for systems that mimic solutions of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP was modeled as a negatively charged spherical particle representing the complex of DNA and the globular part of the histones combined with attached strings of connected charged beads modeling the histone tails. The size, charge, and distribution of the tails relative to the core were built to match real NCPs. Three models of NCPs were constructed to represent different extents of covalent modification on the histone tails: (nonmodified) recombinant (rNCP), acetylated (aNCP), and acetylated and phosphorylated (paNCP). The simulation cell contained 10 NCPs in a dielectric continuum with explicit mobile counterions and added salt. The NCP-NCP interaction is decisively dependent on the modification state of the histone tails and on salt conditions. Increasing the monovalent salt concentration (KCl) from salt-free to physiological concentration leads to NCP aggregation in solution for rNCP, whereas NCP associates are observed only occasionally in the system of aNCPs. In the presence of divalent salt (Mg(2+)), rNCPs form dense stable aggregates, whereas aNCPs form aggregates less frequently. Aggregates are formed via histone-tail bridging and accumulation of counterions in the regions of NCP-NCP contacts. The paNCPs do not show NCP-NCP interaction upon addition of KCl or in the presence of Mg(2+). Simulations for systems with a gradual substitution of K(+) for Mg(2+), to mimic the Mg(2+) titration of an NCP solution, were performed. The rNCP system showed stronger aggregation that occurred at lower concentrations of added Mg(2+), compared to the aNCP system. Additional molecular dynamics simulations performed with a single NCP in the simulation cell showed that detachment of the tails from the NCP core was modest under a wide range of salt concentrations. This implies that salt-induced tail dissociation of the

  3. Nucleosome structural changes induced by binding of non-histone chromosomal proteins HMGN1 and HMGN2☆

    PubMed Central

    Shimahara, Hideto; Hirano, Takaaki; Ohya, Kouichi; Matsuta, Shun; Seeram, Sailaja S.; Tate, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between the nucleosome and the non-histone chromosomal proteins (HMGN1 and HMGN2) were studied by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to elucidate structural changes in the nucleosome induced by HMGN binding. Unlike previous studies that used a nucleosome extracted from living cells, in this study we utilized a nucleosome reconstituted from unmodified recombinant histones synthesized in Escherichia coli and a 189-bp synthetic DNA fragment harboring a nucleosome positioning sequence. This DNA fragment consists of 5′-TATAAACGCC-3′ repeats that has a high affinity to the histone octamer. A nucleosome containing a unique octamer-binding sequence at a specific location on the DNA was produced at sufficiently high yield for spectroscopic analysis. CD data have indicated that both HMGN1 and HMGN2 can increase the winding angle of the nucleosome DNA, but the extent of the structural changes induced by these proteins differs significantly. This suggests HMGN1 and HMGN2 would have different abilities to facilitate nucleosome remodeling. PMID:23772392

  4. HUMAN SWI/SNF DRIVES SEQUENCE-DIRECTED REPOSITIONING OF NUCLEOSOMES ON C-MYC PROMOTER DNA MINICIRCLES†

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Hillel I.; Lane, Jacqueline M.; Ulyanova, Natalia P.; Schnitzler, Gavin R.

    2008-01-01

    The human SWI/SNF (hSWI/SNF) ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex is a tumor suppressor and essential transcriptional coregulator. SWI/SNF complexes have been shown to alter nucleosome positions, and this activity is likely to be important for their functions. However, previous studies have largely been unable to determine the extent to which DNA sequence might control nucleosome repositioning by SWI/SNF complexes. Here, we employ a minicircle remodeling approach to provide the first evidence that hSWI/SNF moves nucleosomes in a sequence dependent manner, away from nucleosome positioning sequences favored during nucleosome assembly. This repositioning is unaffected by the presence of DNA nicks, and can occur on closed-circular DNAs in the absence of topoisomerases. We observed directed nucleosome movement on minicircles derived from the human SWI/SNF-regulated c-myc promoter, which may contribute to the previously-observed “disruption” of two promoter nucleosomes during c-myc activation in vivo. Our results suggest a model wherein hSWI/SNF-directed nucleosome movement away from default positioning sequences results in sequence-specific regulatory effects. PMID:17877373

  5. Structural Basis of Silencing: Sir3 BAH Domain in Complex with a Nucleosome at 3.0 Å Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Armache, Karim-Jean; Garlick, Joseph D.; Canzio, Daniele; Narlikar, Geeta J.; Kingston, Robert E.

    2011-11-30

    Gene silencing is essential for regulating cell fate in eukaryotes. Altered chromatin architectures contribute to maintaining the silenced state in a variety of species. The silent information regulator (Sir) proteins regulate mating type in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One of these proteins, Sir3, interacts directly with the nucleosome to help generate silenced domains. We determined the crystal structure of a complex of the yeast Sir3 BAH (bromo-associated homology) domain and the nucleosome core particle at 3.0 angstrom resolution. We see multiple molecular interactions between the protein surfaces of the nucleosome and the BAH domain that explain numerous genetic mutations. These interactions are accompanied by structural rearrangements in both the nucleosome and the BAH domain. The structure explains how covalent modifications on H4K16 and H3K79 regulate formation of a silencing complex that contains the nucleosome as a central component.

  6. Site-specific aflatoxin B sub 1 adduction of sequence-positioned nucleosome core particles

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The question of how the presence of nucleosomal packing of DNA modifies carcinogen interaction at specific sites cannot be answered by studies on whole chromatin or bulk nucleosomes because of the heterogeneity of DNA sequences in the particles. This problem was circumvented by constructing nucleosomes that are homogenous in DNA-histone contact points. A cloned DNA fragment, containing a sea urchin 5S gene which precisely positions a histone octamer was employed. By using {sup 32}P end-labeled DNA and genotoxins that allow cleavage at sites of attack, the frequency of adduction at every susceptible nucleotide can be determined on sequencing gels. The small methylating agent dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and the bulky alkylating agent afatoxin B{sub 1}-dichloride (AFB{sub 1}-Cl{sub 2}) were used to probe the influence of DNA-histone interactions on DNA alkylation patterns in sequence-positioned core particles.

  7. Nucleosome Binding Alters the Substrate Bonding Environment of Histone H3 Lysine 36 Methyltransferase NSD2.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Myles B; Schneck, Jessica L; Matico, Rosalie E; Hou, Wangfang; McDevitt, Patrick J; Holbert, Marc; Schramm, Vern L

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear receptor-binding SET domain protein 2 (NSD2) is a histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36)-specific methyltransferase enzyme that is overexpressed in a number of cancers, including multiple myeloma. NSD2 binds to S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) and nucleosome substrates to catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from SAM to the ε-amino group of histone H3K36. Equilibrium binding isotope effects and density functional theory calculations indicate that the SAM methyl group is sterically constrained in complex with NSD2, and that this steric constraint is released upon nucleosome binding. Together, these results show that nucleosome binding to NSD2 induces a significant change in the chemical environment of enzyme-bound SAM. PMID:27183271

  8. New insights into nucleosome and chromatin structure: an ordered state or a disordered affair?

    PubMed Central

    Luger, Karolin; Dechassa, Mekonnen L.; Tremethick, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The compaction of genomic DNA into chromatin has profound implications for the regulation of key processes such as transcription, replication and DNA repair. Nucleosomes, the repeating building blocks of chromatin, vary in the composition of their histone protein components. This is the result of the incorporation of variant histones and post-translational modifications of histone amino acid side chains. The resulting changes in nucleosome structure, stability and dynamics affect the compaction of nucleosomal arrays into higher-order structures. It is becoming clear that chromatin structures are not nearly as uniform and regular as previously assumed. This implies that chromatin structure must also be viewed in the context of specific biological functions. PMID:22722606

  9. Ultraviolet damage and nucleosome folding of the 5S ribosomal RNA gene.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X; Mann, David B.; Suquet, C; Springer, David L. ); Smerdon, Michael J.

    2000-01-25

    The Xenopus borealis somatic 5S ribosomal RNA gene was used as a model system to determine the mutual effects of nucleosome folding and formation of ultraviolet (UV) photoproducts (primarily cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, or CPDs) in chromatin. We analyzed the preferred rotational and translational settings of 5S rDNA on the histone octamer surface after induction of up to 0.8 CPD/nucleosome core (2.5 kJ/m(2) UV dose). DNase I and hydroxyl radical footprints indicate that UV damage at these levels does not affect the average rotational setting of the 5S rDNA molecules. Moreover, a combination of nuclease trimming and restriction enzyme digestion indicates the preferred translational positions of the histone octamer are not affected by this level of UV damage. We also did not observe differences in the UV damage patterns of irradiated 5S rDNA before or after nucleosome formation, indicating there is little difference in the inhibition of nucleosome folding by specific CPD sites in the 5S rRNA gene. Conversely, nucleosome folding significantly restricts CPD formation at all sites in the three helical turns of the nontranscribed strand located in the dyad axis region of the nucleosome, where DNA is bound exclusively by the histone H3-H4 tetramer. Finally, modulation of the CPD distribution in a 14 nt long pyrimidine tract correlates with its rotational setting on the histone surface, when the strong sequence bias for CPD formation in this tract is minimized by normalization. These results help establish the mutual roles of histone binding and UV photoproducts on their formation in chromatin.

  10. Depletion of histone H4 and nucleosomes activates the PHO5 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Han, M; Kim, U J; Kayne, P; Grunstein, M

    1988-01-01

    We have previously constructed a yeast strain (UKY403) whose sole histone H4 gene is under control of the GAL1 promoter. This yeast arrests in G2 upon glucose treatment as a result of histone H4 depletion. The yeast PHO5 gene contains phase nucleosomes covering promoter (UAS) sequences in the PHO5 repressed state and it has been suggested that nucleosomes prevent the binding of positively acting factors to these UAS sequences. Using UKY403 we examined the length of polynucleosomes and nucleosome phasing in the PHO5 upstream region by the use of micrococcal nuclease and indirect end-labeling. It was found that glucose arrest led to a severe disruption in PHO5 chromatin structure and that most nucleosomes had their position altered or were lost from the PHO5 promoter region. Cell undergoing nucleosome depletion synthesized large quantities of accurate PHO5 transcripts even under repressive, high inorganic phosphate conditions. Histone H4 depletion did not appear to affect the repression or activation of another inducible yeast gene, CUP1. Arrest with landmarks in early G1 (in the cell division cycle mutant cdc28) or in various stages of G2 (in cdc15, cdc17 and cdc20) does not activate PHO5; nor does arrest due to chromosome topology changes (in top2 or the top1top2 topoisomerase mutants). cdc14, which has its arrest landmark at a similar point in the cell cycle as cdc15, does derepress PHO5. However, since it also leads to derepression of CUP1 it is probably functioning through an independent mechanism. Therefore, our data suggest that nucleosomes regulate PHO5 transcription. Images PMID:3046934

  11. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  12. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  13. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  14. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  15. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  16. Histone deacetylase 3 indirectly modulates tubulin acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Travis; Seiler, Caroline; Wolny, Marcin; Hughes, Ruth; Watson, Peter; Schwabe, John; Grigg, Ronald; Peckham, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), a member of the Class I subfamily of HDACs, is found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Its roles in the nucleus have been well characterized, but its cytoplasmic roles are still not elucidated fully. We found that blocking HDAC3 activity using MI192, a compound specific for HDAC3, modulated tubulin acetylation in the human prostate cancer cell line PC3. A brief 1 h treatment of PC3 cells with MI192 significantly increased levels of tubulin acetylation and ablated the dynamic behaviour of microtubules in live cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown (KD) of HDAC3 in PC3 cells, significantly increased levels of tubulin acetylation, and overexpression reduced it. However, the active HDAC3–silencing mediator of retinoic and thyroid receptors (SMRT)–deacetylase-activating domain (DAD) complex did not directly deacetylate tubulin in vitro. These data suggest that HDAC3 indirectly modulates tubulin acetylation. PMID:26450925

  17. Nucleosome distortion as a possible mechanism of transcription activation domain function.

    PubMed

    Erkina, Tamara Y; Erkine, Alexandre M

    2016-01-01

    After more than three decades since the discovery of transcription activation domains (ADs) in gene-specific activators, the mechanism of their function remains enigmatic. The widely accepted model of direct recruitment by ADs of co-activators and basal transcriptional machinery components, however, is not always compatible with the short size yet very high degree of sequence randomness and intrinsic structural disorder of natural and synthetic ADs. In this review, we formulate the basis for an alternative and complementary model, whereby sequence randomness and intrinsic structural disorder of ADs are necessary for transient distorting interactions with promoter nucleosomes, triggering promoter nucleosome translocation and subsequently gene activation. PMID:27679670

  18. Property enhancement of optically transparent bionanofiber composites by acetylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogi, Masaya; Abe, Kentaro; Handa, Keishin; Nakatsubo, Fumiaki; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2006-12-01

    The authors studied acetylation of bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers to widen the applications of BC nanocomposites in optoelectronic devices. The slight acetylation of BC nanofibers significantly reduces the hygroscopicity of BC nanocomposites, while maintaining their high optical transparency and thermal stability. Furthermore, the degradation in optical transparency at elevated temperature (200°C) was significantly reduced by acetylation treatment. Therefore, the acetylation of bionanofibers has an extraordinary potential as treatment for property enhancement of bionanofiber composites.

  19. 40 CFR 721.10520 - Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acetylated fatty acid glycerides... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10520 Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... acetylated fatty acid glycerides (PMN P-11-160) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10520 - Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acetylated fatty acid glycerides... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10520 Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... acetylated fatty acid glycerides (PMN P-11-160) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. MeCP2 binds to nucleosome free (linker DNA) regions and to H3K9/H3K27 methylated nucleosomes in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Thambirajah, Anita A.; Ng, Marlee K.; Frehlick, Lindsay J.; Li, Andra; Serpa, Jason J.; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V.; Silva-Moreno, Begonia; Missiaen, Kristal K.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Adam Hall, J.; Mackie, Ryan; Lutz, Frank; Gowen, Brent E.; Hendzel, Michael; Georgel, Philippe T.; Ausió, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a chromatin-binding protein that mediates transcriptional regulation, and is highly abundant in brain. The nature of its binding to reconstituted templates has been well characterized in vitro. However, its interactions with native chromatin are less understood. Here we show that MeCP2 displays a distinct distribution within fractionated chromatin from various tissues and cell types. Artificially induced global changes in DNA methylation by 3-aminobenzamide or 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, do not significantly affect the distribution or amount of MeCP2 in HeLa S3 or 3T3 cells. Most MeCP2 in brain is chromatin-bound and localized within highly nuclease-accessible regions. We also show that, while in most tissues and cell lines, MeCP2 forms stable complexes with nucleosome, in brain, a fraction of it is loosely bound to chromatin, likely to nucleosome-depleted regions. Finally, we provide evidence for novel associations of MeCP2 with mononucleosomes containing histone H2A.X, H3K9me2 and H3K27me3 in different chromatin fractions from brain cortex and in vitro. We postulate that the functional compartmentalization and tissue-specific distribution of MeCP2 within different chromatin types may be directed by its association with nucleosomes containing specific histone variants, and post-translational modifications. PMID:22144686

  2. A role for the nucleosome assembly proteins TAF-Iβ and NAP1 in the activation of BZLF1 expression and Epstein-Barr virus reactivation.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Sheila; Wang, Shan; Frappier, Lori

    2013-01-01

    The reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) from latent to lytic infection begins with the expression of the viral BZLF1 gene, leading to a subsequent cascade of viral gene expression and amplification of the EBV genome. Using RNA interference, we show that nucleosome assembly proteins NAP1 and TAF-I positively contribute to EBV reactivation in epithelial cells through the induction of BZLF1 expression. In addition, overexpression of NAP1 or the β isoform of TAF-I (TAF-Iβ) in AGS cells latently infected with EBV was sufficient to induce BZLF1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments performed in AGS-EBV cells showed that TAF-I associated with the BZLF1 promoter upon lytic induction and affected local histone modifications by increasing H3K4 dimethylation and H4K8 acetylation. MLL1, the host protein known to dimethylate H3K4, was found to associate with the BZLF1 promoter upon lytic induction in a TAF-I-dependent manner, and MLL1 depletion decreased BZLF1 expression, confirming its contribution to lytic reactivation. The results indicate that TAF-Iβ promotes BZLF1 expression and subsequent lytic infection by affecting chromatin at the BZLF1 promoter. PMID:23691099

  3. Time between onset of apoptosis and release of nucleosomes from apoptotic cells: putative implications for systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    van Nieuwenhuijze, A E M; van Lopik, T; Smeenk, R; Aarden, L

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the kinetics of nucleosome leakage from apoptotic cells in an in vitro system and extrapolate the results to autoimmune disease, in particular systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods: A sensitive nucleosome enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed, using a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against histone 3 and an mAb against nucleosomes. Nucleosome release during apoptotic cell death was studied in Jurkat cells. AnnexinV binding (early apoptosis) and propidium iodide positivity (late apoptosis) of the cells were compared with nucleosome release at different times after apoptosis induction. Results: Nucleosomes appeared in culture supernatant of Jurkat cells 24 to 48 hours after apoptosis induction, when the cells had been late apoptotic for more than 12 hours. Conclusion: Nucleosomes are released from late apoptotic Jurkat cells, with a 12 hour delay from the appearance of AnnexinV binding cells. This result suggests that in vivo scavenger mechanisms have 12 hours to remove apoptotic material from the circulation. PMID:12480662

  4. The docking domain of histone H2A is required for H1 binding and RSC-mediated nucleosome remodeling.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Manu Shubhdarshan; Syed, Sajad Hussain; Goutte-Gattat, Damien; Richard, John Lalith Charles; Montel, Fabien; Hamiche, Ali; Travers, Andrew; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Bednar, Jan; Hayes, Jeffrey J; Angelov, Dimitar; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2011-04-01

    Histone variants within the H2A family show high divergences in their C-terminal regions. In this work, we have studied how these divergences and in particular, how a part of the H2A COOH-terminus, the docking domain, is implicated in both structural and functional properties of the nucleosome. Using biochemical methods in combination with Atomic Force Microscopy and Electron Cryo-Microscopy, we show that the H2A-docking domain is a key structural feature within the nucleosome. Deletion of this domain or replacement with the incomplete docking domain from the variant H2A.Bbd results in significant structural alterations in the nucleosome, including an increase in overall accessibility to nucleases, un-wrapping of ∼10 bp of DNA from each end of the nucleosome and associated changes in the entry/exit angle of DNA ends. These structural alterations are associated with a reduced ability of the chromatin remodeler RSC to both remodel and mobilize the nucleosomes. Linker histone H1 binding is also abrogated in nucleosomes containing the incomplete docking domain of H2A.Bbd. Our data illustrate the unique role of the H2A-docking domain in coordinating the structural-functional aspects of the nucleosome properties. Moreover, our data suggest that incorporation of a 'defective' docking domain may be a primary structural role of H2A.Bbd in chromatin.

  5. Robustness of nucleosome patterns in the presence of DNA sequence-specific free energy landscapes and active remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuebler, Johannes; Obermayer, Benedikt; Möbius, Wolfram; Wolff, Michael; Gerland, Ulrich

    Proper positioning of nucleosomes in eukaryotic cells is important for transcription regulation. When averaged over many genes, nucleosome positions in coding regions follow a simple oscillatory pattern, which is described to a surprising degree of accuracy by a simple one-dimensional gas model for particles interacting via a soft-core repulsion. The quantitative agreement is surprising given that nucleosome positions are known to be determined by a complex interplay of mechanisms including DNA sequence-specific nucleosome stability and active repositioning of nucleosomes by remodeling enzymes. We rationalize the observed robustness of the simple oscillatory pattern by showing that the main effect of several known nucleosome positioning mechanisms is a renormalization of the particle interaction. For example, ``disorder'' from sequence-specific affinities leads to an apparent softening, while active remodeling can result in apparent softening for directional sliding or apparent stiffening for clamping mechanisms. We suggest that such parameter renormalization can explain the apparent difference of nucleosome properties in two yeast species, S. cerevisiae and S. pombe.

  6. Solution scattering and FRET studies on nucleosomes reveal DNA unwrapping effects of H3 and H4 tail removal.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Kurt; Jimenez-Useche, Isabel; Howell, Steven C; Yuan, Chongli; Qiu, Xiangyun

    2013-01-01

    Using a combination of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements we have determined the role of the H3 and H4 histone tails, independently, in stabilizing the nucleosome DNA terminal ends from unwrapping from the nucleosome core. We have performed solution scattering experiments on recombinant wild-type, H3 and H4 tail-removed mutants and fit all scattering data with predictions from PDB models and compared these experiments to complementary DNA-end FRET experiments. Based on these combined SAXS and FRET studies, we find that while all nucleosomes exhibited DNA unwrapping, the extent of this unwrapping is increased for nucleosomes with the H3 tails removed but, surprisingly, decreased in nucleosomes with the H4 tails removed. Studies of salt concentration effects show a minimum amount of DNA unwrapping for all complexes around 50-100mM of monovalent ions. These data exhibit opposite roles for the positively-charged nucleosome tails, with the ability to decrease access (in the case of the H3 histone) or increase access (in the case of the H4 histone) to the DNA surrounding the nucleosome. In the range of salt concentrations studied (0-200mM KCl), the data point to the H4 tail-removed mutant at physiological (50-100mM) monovalent salt concentration as the mononucleosome with the least amount of DNA unwrapping. PMID:24265699

  7. Solution Scattering and FRET Studies on Nucleosomes Reveal DNA Unwrapping Effects of H3 and H4 Tail Removal

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Kurt; Jimenez-Useche, Isabel; Howell, Steven C.; Yuan, Chongli; Qiu, Xiangyun

    2013-01-01

    Using a combination of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements we have determined the role of the H3 and H4 histone tails, independently, in stabilizing the nucleosome DNA terminal ends from unwrapping from the nucleosome core. We have performed solution scattering experiments on recombinant wild-type, H3 and H4 tail-removed mutants and fit all scattering data with predictions from PDB models and compared these experiments to complementary DNA-end FRET experiments. Based on these combined SAXS and FRET studies, we find that while all nucleosomes exhibited DNA unwrapping, the extent of this unwrapping is increased for nucleosomes with the H3 tails removed but, surprisingly, decreased in nucleosomes with the H4 tails removed. Studies of salt concentration effects show a minimum amount of DNA unwrapping for all complexes around 50-100mM of monovalent ions. These data exhibit opposite roles for the positively-charged nucleosome tails, with the ability to decrease access (in the case of the H3 histone) or increase access (in the case of the H4 histone) to the DNA surrounding the nucleosome. In the range of salt concentrations studied (0-200mM KCl), the data point to the H4 tail-removed mutant at physiological (50-100mM) monovalent salt concentration as the mononucleosome with the least amount of DNA unwrapping. PMID:24265699

  8. The CentO satellite confers translational and rotational phasing on cenH3 nucleosomes in rice centromeres

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Talbert, Paul B.; Zhang, Wenli; Wu, Yufeng; Yang, Zujun; Henikoff, Jorja G.; Henikoff, Steven; Jiang, Jiming

    2013-01-01

    Plant and animal centromeres comprise megabases of highly repeated satellite sequences, yet centromere function can be specified epigenetically on single-copy DNA by the presence of nucleosomes containing a centromere-specific variant of histone H3 (cenH3). We determined the positions of cenH3 nucleosomes in rice (Oryza sativa), which has centromeres composed of both the 155-bp CentO satellite repeat and single-copy non-CentO sequences. We find that cenH3 nucleosomes protect 90–100 bp of DNA from micrococcal nuclease digestion, sufficient for only a single wrap of DNA around the cenH3 nucleosome core. cenH3 nucleosomes are translationally phased with 155-bp periodicity on CentO repeats, but not on non-CentO sequences. CentO repeats have an ∼10-bp periodicity in WW dinucleotides and in micrococcal nuclease cleavage, providing evidence for rotational phasing of cenH3 nucleosomes on CentO and suggesting that satellites evolve for translational and rotational stabilization of centromeric nucleosomes. PMID:24191062

  9. The docking domain of histone H2A is required for H1 binding and RSC-mediated nucleosome remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Manu Shubhdarshan; Syed, Sajad Hussain; Goutte-Gattat, Damien; Richard, John Lalith Charles; Montel, Fabien; Hamiche, Ali; Travers, Andrew; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Bednar, Jan; Hayes, Jeffrey J.; Angelov, Dimitar; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Histone variants within the H2A family show high divergences in their C-terminal regions. In this work, we have studied how these divergences and in particular, how a part of the H2A COOH-terminus, the docking domain, is implicated in both structural and functional properties of the nucleosome. Using biochemical methods in combination with Atomic Force Microscopy and Electron Cryo-Microscopy, we show that the H2A-docking domain is a key structural feature within the nucleosome. Deletion of this domain or replacement with the incomplete docking domain from the variant H2A.Bbd results in significant structural alterations in the nucleosome, including an increase in overall accessibility to nucleases, un-wrapping of ∼10 bp of DNA from each end of the nucleosome and associated changes in the entry/exit angle of DNA ends. These structural alterations are associated with a reduced ability of the chromatin remodeler RSC to both remodel and mobilize the nucleosomes. Linker histone H1 binding is also abrogated in nucleosomes containing the incomplete docking domain of H2A.Bbd. Our data illustrate the unique role of the H2A-docking domain in coordinating the structural-functional aspects of the nucleosome properties. Moreover, our data suggest that incorporation of a ‘defective’ docking domain may be a primary structural role of H2A.Bbd in chromatin. PMID:21131284

  10. Comparative analysis of the nucleosome structure of cell nuclei by small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.; Lebedev, D. V.; Lauter, H.; Pantina, R. A.; Kuklin, A. I.; Islamov, A. Kh.; Filatov, M. V.

    2010-05-01

    The nucleosome structure in native nuclei of normal (chicken erythrocyte and rat leukocyte nuclei) and anomalously proliferating (the human cervical adenocarcinoma cell line HeLa and the Chinese hamster fibroblast cell line A238) cells has been investigated using small-angle neutron scattering. The experimental results obtained allow one to make the inference that the parameters of the nucleosome structure for the chicken erythrocyte and rat leukocyte nuclei (on average over the nucleus) are close to the universally accepted values and that the distance distribution function is bimodal. The bimodality of the distance distribution function reflects a narrow distribution of distances between nucleosomes (on average over the nucleus) at the fibril level of the chromatin organization. The histone core of the nucleosome structure in the nuclei of the HeLa and A238 cells (on average over the nucleus) is considerably less compact than that in the chicken erythrocyte and rat leukocyte nuclei, and the distance distribution function does not exhibit indications of the bimodality.

  11. Stereochemical control of nucleosome targeting by platinum-intercalator antitumor agents

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Eugene Y.D.; Davey, Gabriela E.; Chin, Chee Fei; Dröge, Peter; Ang, Wee Han; Davey, Curt A.

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs act therapeutically by forming DNA adducts, but suffer from severe toxicity and resistance problems, which have not been overcome in spite of decades of research. And yet defined chromatin targets have generally not been considered in the drug development process. Here we designed novel platinum-intercalator species to target a highly deformed DNA site near the nucleosome center. Between two seemingly similar structural isomers, we find a striking difference in DNA site selectivity in vitro, which comes about from stereochemical constraints that limit the reactivity of the trans isomer to special DNA sequence elements while still allowing the cis isomer to efficiently form adducts at internal sites in the nucleosome core. This gives the potential for controlling nucleosome site targeting in vivo, which would engender sensitivity to epigenetic distinctions and in particular cell type/status-dependent differences in nucleosome positioning. Moreover, while both compounds yield very similar DNA-adduct structures and display antitumor cell activity rivalling that of cisplatin, the cis isomer, relative to the trans, has a much more rapid cytotoxic effect and distinct impact on cell function. The novel stereochemical principles for controlling DNA site selectivity we discovered could aid in the design of improved site discriminating agents. PMID:25916851

  12. DNA methylation and nucleosome occupancy regulate the cancer germline antigen gene MAGEA11

    PubMed Central

    James, Smitha R; Cedeno, Carlos D; Sharma, Ashok; Zhang, Wa; Mohler, James L; Odunsi, Kunle; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Karpf, Adam R

    2013-01-01

    MAGEA11 is a cancer germline (CG) antigen and androgen receptor co-activator. Its expression in cancers other than prostate, and its mechanism of activation, has not been reported. In silico analyses reveal that MAGEA11 is frequently expressed in human cancers, is increased during tumor progression, and correlates with poor prognosis and survival. In prostate and epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC), MAGEA11 expression was associated with promoter and global DNA hypomethylation, and with activation of other CG genes. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and/or histone deacetylases (HDACs) activated MAGEA11 in a cell line specific manner. MAGEA11 promoter activity was directly repressed by DNA methylation, and partially depended on Sp1, as pharmacological or genetic targeting of Sp1 reduced MAGEA11 promoter activity and endogenous gene expression. Importantly, DNA methylation regulated nucleosome occupancy specifically at the -1 positioned nucleosome of MAGEA11. Methylation of a single Ets site near the transcriptional start site (TSS) correlated with -1 nucleosome occupancy and, by itself, strongly repressed MAGEA11 promoter activity. Thus, DNA methylation regulates nucleosome occupancy at MAGEA11, and this appears to function cooperatively with sequence-specific transcription factors to regulate gene expression. MAGEA11 regulation is highly instructive for understanding mechanisms regulating CG antigen genes in human cancer. PMID:23839233

  13. High-resolution biophysical analysis of the dynamics of nucleosome formation

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Akiko; Hartmann, Brigitte; Travers, Andrew; Nogues, Claude; Buckle, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    We describe a biophysical approach that enables changes in the structure of DNA to be followed during nucleosome formation in in vitro reconstitution with either the canonical “Widom” sequence or a judiciously mutated sequence. The rapid non-perturbing photochemical analysis presented here provides ‘snapshots’ of the DNA configuration at any given moment in time during nucleosome formation under a very broad range of reaction conditions. Changes in DNA photochemical reactivity upon protein binding are interpreted as being mainly induced by alterations in individual base pair roll angles. The results strengthen the importance of the role of an initial (H3/H4)2 histone tetramer-DNA interaction and highlight the modulation of this early event by the DNA sequence. (H3/H4)2 binding precedes and dictates subsequent H2A/H2B-DNA interactions, which are less affected by the DNA sequence, leading to the final octameric nucleosome. Overall, our results provide a novel, exciting way to investigate those biophysical properties of DNA that constitute a crucial component in nucleosome formation and stabilization. PMID:27263658

  14. In Vitro and in Vivo nucleosome positioning on the ovine beta-lactoglobulin gene are related.

    PubMed

    Gencheva, Marieta; Boa, Simon; Fraser, Ross; Simmen, Martin W; A Whitelaw, C Bruce; Allan, James

    2006-08-11

    Although positioned nucleosomes are known to play a direct, localised role in regulating access to DNA sequence, they also have the potential, through their long-range distribution, to affect the detailed structure of the higher-order chromatin fibre. To investigate this possibility, we firstly mapped, in vitro, the sequence-dependent positions that the core histone octamer adopts when reconstituted onto DNA containing the ovine beta-lactoglobulin gene. These positioning sites are discussed in terms of their relative affinity for the histone octamer, their locations with respect to the gene sequence and their periodic distribution throughout the gene region. Secondly, we mapped, in vivo, the sites that nucleosomes occupy on the same sequence in liver nuclei, where the gene is transcriptionally inactive. Although the sequence is largely packaged into regularly spaced nucleosomes, reflecting a fibre of uniform higher-order structure, this organisation is disrupted by a number of unusual chromatin structures in a region stretching from the second to the third introns of the gene. A comparison of the in vitro and in vivo nucleosome positioning data shows that they are qualitatively and quantitatively related, suggesting that the structure of the higher-order chromatin fibre containing the beta-lactoglobulin gene is determined, in part, by the long-range organisation of the non-coding sequences within which the gene is embedded.

  15. Regulation of Nucleosome Architecture and Factor Binding Revealed by Nuclease Footprinting of the ESC Genome.

    PubMed

    Hainer, Sarah J; Fazzio, Thomas G

    2015-10-01

    Functional interactions between gene regulatory factors and chromatin architecture have been difficult to directly assess. Here, we use micrococcal nuclease (MNase) footprinting to probe the functions of two chromatin-remodeling complexes. By simultaneously quantifying alterations in small MNase footprints over the binding sites of 30 regulatory factors in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we provide evidence that esBAF and Mbd3/NuRD modulate the binding of several regulatory proteins. In addition, we find that nucleosome occupancy is reduced at specific loci in favor of subnucleosomes upon depletion of esBAF, including sites of histone H2A.Z localization. Consistent with these data, we demonstrate that esBAF is required for normal H2A.Z localization in ESCs, suggesting esBAF either stabilizes H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes or promotes subnucleosome to nucleosome conversion by facilitating H2A.Z deposition. Therefore, integrative examination of MNase footprints reveals insights into nucleosome dynamics and functional interactions between chromatin structure and key gene-regulatory factors.

  16. Nucleosome assembly in mammalian cell extracts before and after DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Gruss, C; Gutierrez, C; Burhans, W C; DePamphilis, M L; Koller, T; Sogo, J M

    1990-01-01

    Protein-free DNA in a cytosolic extract supplemented with SV40 large T-antigen (T-Ag), is assembled into chromatin structure when nuclear extract is added. This assembly was monitored by topoisomer formation, micrococcal nuclease digestion and psoralen crosslinking of the DNA. Plasmids containing SV40 sequences (ori- and ori+) were assembled into chromatin with similar efficiencies whether T-Ag was present or not. Approximately 50-80% of the number of nucleosomes in vivo could be assembled in vitro; however, the kinetics of assembly differed on replicated and unreplicated molecules. In replicative intermediates, nucleosomes were observed on both the pre-replicated and post-replicated portions. We conclude that the extent of nucleosome assembly in mammalian cell extracts is not dependent upon DNA replication, in contrast to previous suggestions. However, the highly sensitive psoralen assay revealed that DNA replication appears to facilitate precise folding of DNA in the nucleosome. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:2167837

  17. Dynamics of interaction of RNA polymerase II with nucleosomes. II. During read-through and elongation.

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, P.

    1993-01-01

    The sulfhydryl-specific fluorescence probe 1,5-IAEDANS (5-(2-((iodoacetyl)amino)ethyl)amino-naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) was attached to the single cysteine of H3, and reconstituted fluorescent mononucleosomes were used as the template for in vitro transcription by the yeast RNA polymerase II (pol II). DNase I digestion analysis revealed that transcription of nucleosomes by pol II resulted in an overall loosening of the structure. Monitoring the transcription event by steady-state fluorescence analysis showed that nucleosomes only partially open during transcription. This opening is transient in nature, and nucleosomes close back as soon as the pol II falls off the template. Thus, using the technique of fluorescence spectroscopy, partial opening of nucleosome structure could be differentiated from complete dissociation into free DNA and histone octamer, a distinction that may not be possible by techniques like gel electrophoresis. Time-resolved fluorescence emission spectroscopy suggested that during read-through of the template by the pol II, histone octamers do not fall off the DNA. Only minor conformational changes within the histone octamer take place to accommodate the transcribing polymerase. PMID:8298468

  18. TRF1 and TRF2 binding to telomeres is modulated by nucleosomal organization.

    PubMed

    Galati, Alessandra; Micheli, Emanuela; Alicata, Claudia; Ingegnere, Tiziano; Cicconi, Alessandro; Pusch, Miriam Caroline; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Gilson, Eric; Cacchione, Stefano

    2015-07-13

    The ends of eukaryotic chromosomes need to be protected from the activation of a DNA damage response that leads the cell to replicative senescence or apoptosis. In mammals, protection is accomplished by a six-factor complex named shelterin, which organizes the terminal TTAGGG repeats in a still ill-defined structure, the telomere. The stable interaction of shelterin with telomeres mainly depends on the binding of two of its components, TRF1 and TRF2, to double-stranded telomeric repeats. Tethering of TRF proteins to telomeres occurs in a chromatin environment characterized by a very compact nucleosomal organization. In this work we show that binding of TRF1 and TRF2 to telomeric sequences is modulated by the histone octamer. By means of in vitro models, we found that TRF2 binding is strongly hampered by the presence of telomeric nucleosomes, whereas TRF1 binds efficiently to telomeric DNA in a nucleosomal context and is able to remodel telomeric nucleosomal arrays. Our results indicate that the different behavior of TRF proteins partly depends on the interaction with histone tails of their divergent N-terminal domains. We propose that the interplay between the histone octamer and TRF proteins plays a role in the steps leading to telomere deprotection.

  19. Changes in the molecular structure of mouse fetal astrocyte nucleosomes produced in vitro by methylmercuric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, B.H.; Simpkins, H.

    1986-04-01

    The fluorescent probe N-(3-pyrene)maleimide, which specifically labels the cysteine residues of histone H3 within the nucleosome, was used to monitor changes in the nucleosomal structure of mouse fetal astrocytes exposed to varying concentrations of methylmercuric chloride. Methylmercuric chloride treatment (10 ..mu..m) for 6 hr produced a significant decrease in the degree of fluorescence of the probe. The decrease was much smaller following a 4-hr incubation period. These results correlate with recent observations showing that significant changes in the thymidine labeling index occur following 4-6 hr of exposure to methylmercury (MeHg). It is hypothesized that MeHg enters the cells during the growth phase and attaches to the protein moiety of the nucleosome in or near the cysteine groups of histone H3, thus diminishing the binding capacity of the fluorescent probe. Addition of a detergent (sodium dodecyl sulfate) resulted in only a small increase in the degree of fluorescence of the treated nucleosomes as compared to controls, showing that the interaction of MeHg with the nuclear proteins was not dissociated by detergent. In view of the strong interaction between DNA and the histone dimer H3-H4 and the potential importance of the latter in gene regulation, these results suggest an additional means by which MeHg may exert its toxic effects.

  20. Suppressed catalytic activity of base excision repair enzymes on rotationally positioned uracil in nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Beard, Brian C; Wilson, Samuel H; Smerdon, Michael J

    2003-06-24

    The majority of DNA in eukaryotic cells exists in the highly condensed structural hierarchy of chromatin, which presents a challenge to DNA repair enzymes in that recognition, incision, and restoration of the original sequence at most sites must take place within these structural constraints. To test base excision repair (BER) activities on chromatin substrates, an in vitro system was developed that uses human uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG), apyrimidinic/apurinic endonuclease (APE), and DNA polymerase beta (pol beta) on homogeneously damaged, rotationally positioned DNA in nucleosomes. We find that UDG and APE carry out their combined catalytic activities with reduced efficiency on nucleosome substrates ( approximately 10% of that on naked DNA). Furthermore, these enzymes distinguish between two different rotational settings of the lesion on the histone surface, showing a 2- to 3-fold difference in activity between uracil facing "toward" and "away from" the histones. However, UDG and APE will digest such substrates to completion in a concentration-dependent manner. Conversely, the synthesis activity of pol beta is inhibited completely by nucleosome substrates and is independent of enzyme concentration. These results suggest that the first two steps of BER, UDG and APE, may occur "unassisted" in chromatin, whereas downstream factors in this pathway (i.e., pol beta) may require nucleosome remodeling for efficient DNA BER in at least some regions of chromatin in eukaryotic cells.

  1. Acetylation and characterization of banana (Musa paradisiaca) starch.

    PubMed

    Bello-Pérez, L A; Contreras-Ramos, S M; Jìmenez-Aparicio, A; Paredes-López, O

    2000-01-01

    Banana native starch was acetylated and some of its functional properties were evaluated and compared to corn starch. In general, acetylated banana starch presented higher values in ash, protein and fat than corn acetylated starch. The modified starches had minor tendency to retrogradation assessed as % transmittance of starch pastes. At high temperature acetylated starches presented a water retention capacity similar to their native counterpart. The acetylation considerably increased the solubility of starches, and a similar behavior was found for swelling power. When freeze-thaw stability was studied, acetyl banana starch drained approximately 60% of water in the first and second cycles, but in the third and fourth cycles the percentage of separated water was low. However, acetyl corn starch showed lower freeze-thaw stability than the untreated sample. The modification increased the viscosity of banana starch pastes.

  2. Dynamic Protein Acetylation in Plant–Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gaoyuan; Walley, Justin W.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen infection triggers complex molecular perturbations within host cells that results in either resistance or susceptibility. Protein acetylation is an emerging biochemical modification that appears to play central roles during host–pathogen interactions. To date, research in this area has focused on two main themes linking protein acetylation to plant immune signaling. Firstly, it has been established that proper gene expression during defense responses requires modulation of histone acetylation within target gene promoter regions. Second, some pathogens can deliver effector molecules that encode acetyltransferases directly within the host cell to modify acetylation of specific host proteins. Collectively these findings suggest that the acetylation level for a range of host proteins may be modulated to alter the outcome of pathogen infection. This review will focus on summarizing our current understanding of the roles of protein acetylation in plant defense and highlight the utility of proteomics approaches to uncover the complete repertoire of acetylation changes triggered by pathogen infection. PMID:27066055

  3. Fragrance material review on acetyl cedrene.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, J; Letizia, C S; Politano, V T; Api, A M

    2013-12-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of acetyl cedrene when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Acetyl cedrene is a member of the fragrance structural group Alkyl Cyclic Ketones. The generic formula for this group can be represented as (R1)(R2)CO. These fragrances can be described as being composed of an alkyl, R1, and various substituted and bicyclic saturated or unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons, R2, in which one of the rings may include up to 12 carbons. Alternatively, R2 may be a carbon bridge of C2-C4 carbon chain length between the ketone and cyclic hydrocarbon. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for acetyl cedrene were evaluated then summarized and includes physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, skin sensitization, elicitation, phototoxicity, photoallergy, toxicokinetics, repeated dose, reproductive toxicity, and genotoxicity data. A safety assessment of the entire Alkyl Cyclic Ketones will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2013) (Belsito, D., Bickers, D., Bruze, M., Calow, P., Dagli, M., Fryer, A.D., Greim, H., Miyachi, Y., Saurat, J.H., Sipes, I.G., 2013. A Toxicologic and Dermatologic Assessment of Alkyl Cyclic Ketones When Used as Fragrance Ingredients. Submitted with this manuscript.) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all Alkyl Cyclic Ketones in fragrances.

  4. Fragrance material review on acetyl carene.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, J; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2013-12-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of acetyl carene when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Acetyl carene is a member of the fragrance structural group Alkyl Cyclic Ketones. These fragrances can be described as being composed of an alkyl, R1, and various substituted and bicyclic saturated or unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons, R2, in which one of the rings may include up to 12 carbons. Alternatively, R2 may be a carbon bridge of C2-C4 carbon chain length between the ketone and cyclic hydrocarbon. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for acetyl carene were evaluated then summarized and includes physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, and skin sensitization data. A safety assessment of the entire Alkyl Cyclic Ketones will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (Belsito, D., Bickers, D., Bruze, M., Calow, P., Dagli, M., Fryer, A.D., Greim, H., Miyachi, Y., Saurat, J.H., Sipes, I.G., 2013A Toxicologic and dermatologic assessment of alkyl cyclic ketones when used as fragrance ingredients. (submitted for publication).) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all Alkyl Cyclic Ketones in fragrances.

  5. Human tNASP promotes in vitro nucleosome assembly with histone H3.3.

    PubMed

    Kato, Daiki; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-02-10

    Nuclear autoantigenic sperm proteins (NASPs) are members of the acidic histone chaperones, which promote nucleosome assembly. In humans, two splicing variants proposed for the somatic and testicular isoforms, sNASP and tNASP, respectively, have been found, and the shorter form, sNASP, reportedly promotes nucleosome assembly with the histone H3 isoforms, H3.1, H3.2, and H3.3. However, the biochemical properties of the longer form, tNASP, have not been reported. tNASP is considered to exist specifically in the testis. Our present results revealed that the tNASP protein is ubiquitously produced in various human tissues, in addition to testis. Unexpectedly, we found that the nucleosome assembly activity of purified tNASP was extremely low with the canonical histone H3.1 or H3.2, but was substantially detected with the replacement histone H3.3 variant. A mutational analysis revealed that the H3.3 Ile89 residue, corresponding to the H3.1 Val89 residue, is responsible for the tNASP-mediated nucleosome assembly with H3.3. A histone deposition assay showed that the H3.3-H4 complex is more efficiently deposited onto DNA by tNASP than the H3.1-H4 complex. These results provide evidence that tNASP is ubiquitously produced in various types of human tissues and promotes in vitro nucleosome assembly with H3 variant specificity.

  6. Identification of two independent nucleosome-binding domains in the transcriptional co-activator SPBP.

    PubMed

    Darvekar, Sagar; Johnsen, Sylvia Sagen; Eriksen, Agnete Bratsberg; Johansen, Terje; Sjøttem, Eva

    2012-02-15

    Transcriptional regulation requires co-ordinated action of transcription factors, co-activator complexes and general transcription factors to access specific loci in the dense chromatin structure. In the present study we demonstrate that the transcriptional co-regulator SPBP [stromelysin-1 PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor)-responsive element binding protein] contains two independent chromatin-binding domains, the SPBP-(1551-1666) region and the C-terminal extended PHD [ePHD/ADD (extended plant homeodomain/ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L)] domain. The region 1551-1666 is a novel core nucleosome-interaction domain located adjacent to the AT-hook motif in the DNA-binding domain. This novel nucleosome-binding region is critically important for proper localization of SPBP in the cell nucleus. The ePHD/ADD domain associates with nucleosomes in a histone tail-dependent manner, and has significant impact on the dynamic interaction between SPBP and chromatin. Furthermore, SPBP and its homologue RAI1 (retinoic-acid-inducible protein 1), are strongly enriched on chromatin in interphase HeLa cells, and both proteins display low nuclear mobility. RAI1 contains a region with homology to the novel nucleosome-binding region SPBP-(1551-1666) and an ePHD/ADD domain with ability to bind nucleosomes. These results indicate that the transcriptional co-regulator SPBP and its homologue RAI1 implicated in Smith-Magenis syndrome and Potocki-Lupski syndrome both belong to the expanding family of chromatin-binding proteins containing several domains involved in specific chromatin interactions. PMID:22081970

  7. Antibodies specific to acetylated histones document the existence of deposition- and transcription-related histone acetylation in Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    In this study, we have constructed synthetic peptides which are identical to hyperacetylated amino termini of two Tetrahymena core histones (tetra-acetylated H4 and penta-acetylated hv1) and used them to generate polyclonal antibodies specific for acetylated forms (mono-, di-, tri-, etc.) of these histones. Neither of these antisera recognizes histone that is unacetylated. Immunoblotting analyses demonstrate that both transcription-related and deposition-related acetate groups on H4 are recognized by both antisera. In addition, the antiserum raised against penta-acetylated hv1 also recognizes acetylated forms of this variant. Immunofluorescent analyses with both antisera demonstrate that, as expected, histone acetylation is specific to macronuclei (or new macronuclei) at all stages of the life cycle except when micronuclei undergo periods of rapid replication and chromatin assembly. During this time micronuclear staining is also detected. Our results also suggest that transcription-related acetylation begins selectively in new macronuclei immediately after the second postzygotic division. Acetylated histone is not observed in new micronuclei during stages corresponding to anlagen development and, therefore, histone acetylation can be distributed asymmetrically in development. Equally striking is the rapid turnover of acetylated histone in parental macronuclei during the time of their inactivation and elimination from the cell. Taken together, these data lend strong support to the idea that modulation of histone acetylation plays an important role in gene activation and in chromatin assembly. PMID:2654136

  8. Curtail Accountability, Cultivate Attainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wraga, William G.

    2011-01-01

    The current test-driven accountability movement, codified in the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 ([NCLB] 2002), was a misguided idea that will have the effect not of improving the education of children and youth, but of indicting the public school system of the United States. To improve education in the United States, politicians, policy makers,…

  9. O-Acetylation of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Gille, Sascha; Pauly, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Plant cell walls are composed of structurally diverse polymers, many of which are O-acetylated. How plants O-acetylate wall polymers and what its function is remained elusive until recently, when two protein families were identified in the model plant Arabidopsis that are involved in the O-acetylation of wall polysaccharides – the reduced wall acetylation (RWA) and the trichome birefringence-like (TBL) proteins. This review discusses the role of these two protein families in polysaccharide O-acetylation and outlines the differences and similarities of polymer acetylation mechanisms in plants, fungi, bacteria, and mammals. Members of the TBL protein family had been shown to impact pathogen resistance, freezing tolerance, and cellulose biosynthesis. The connection of TBLs to polysaccharide O-acetylation thus gives crucial leads into the biological function of wall polymer O-acetylation. From a biotechnological point understanding the O-acetylation mechanism is important as acetyl-substituents inhibit the enzymatic degradation of wall polymers and released acetate can be a potent inhibitor in microbial fermentations, thus impacting the economic viability of, e.g., lignocellulosic based biofuel production. PMID:22639638

  10. Alterations in sleep architecture in response to experimental sleep curtailment are associated with signs of positive energy balance.

    PubMed

    Shechter, Ari; O'Keeffe, Majella; Roberts, Amy L; Zammit, Gary K; RoyChoudhury, Arindam; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre

    2012-11-01

    Sleep reduction is associated with increased energy intake and weight gain, though few studies have explored the relationship between sleep architecture and energy balance measures in the context of experimental sleep restriction. Fourteen males and 13 females (body mass index: 22-26 kg/m(2)) participated in a crossover sleep curtailment study. Participants were studied under two sleep conditions: short (4 h/night; 0100-0500 h) and habitual (9 h/night; 2200-0700 h), for 5 nights each. Sleep was polysomnographically recorded nightly. Outcome measures included resting metabolic rate (RMR), feelings of appetite-satiety, and ad libitum food intake. Short sleep resulted in reductions in stage 2 sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep duration (P < 0.001), as well as decreased percentage of stage 2 sleep and REM sleep and increased slow wave sleep (SWS) percentage (P < 0.05). Linear mixed model analysis demonstrated a positive association between stage 2 sleep duration and RMR (P = 0.051). Inverse associations were observed between REM sleep duration and hunger (P = 0.031) and between stage 2 sleep duration and appetite for sweet (P = 0.015) and salty (P = 0.046) foods. Stage 2 sleep percentage was inversely related to energy consumed (P = 0.024). Stage 2 sleep (P = 0.005), SWS (P = 0.008), and REM sleep (P = 0.048) percentages were inversely related to fat intake, and SWS (P = 0.040) and REM sleep (P = 0.050) were inversely related to carbohydrate intake. This study demonstrates that changes in sleep architecture are associated with markers of positive energy balance and indicate a means by which exposure to short sleep duration and/or an altered sleep architecture profile may lead to excess weight gain over time.

  11. DNA-protein interactions in nucleosomes and in chromatin. Structural studies of chromatin stabilized by ultraviolet-light induced crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Mandel, R; Kolomijtseva, G; Brahms, J G

    1979-05-15

    Crosslinking induced by ultraviolet light irradiation at 254 nm has been utilized to investigate the structure of chromatin and isolated nucleosomes. The results presented here imply that the four core histones, as well as histone H1, have reactive groups within a bond length of the DNA bases. In nucleosomes depleted of H1, all of the core histones react similarly with the DNA and form crosslinks. In chromatin, the rate of crosslinking of all histones to DNA is essentially similar. Comparison of mononucleosomes, dinucleosomes and whole chromatin shows that the rate of crosslinking increases significantly with increasing number of connected nucleosomes. These differences in the rate of crosslinking are interpreted in terms of interactions between neighbouring nucleosomes on the chromatin fiber, which are absent in an isolated mononucleosome.

  12. Reconfiguration of nucleosome-depleted regions at distal regulatory elements accompanies DNA methylation of enhancers and insulators in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taberlay, Phillippa C.; Statham, Aaron L.; Kelly, Theresa K.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that cancer-associated epigenetic repression occurs concomitant with CpG island hypermethylation and loss of nucleosomes at promoters, but the role of nucleosome occupancy and epigenetic reprogramming at distal regulatory elements in cancer is still poorly understood. Here, we evaluate the scope of global epigenetic alterations at enhancers and insulator elements in prostate and breast cancer cells using simultaneous genome-wide mapping of DNA methylation and nucleosome occupancy (NOMe-seq). We find that the genomic location of nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs) is mostly cell type specific and preferentially found at enhancers in normal cells. In cancer cells, however, we observe a global reconfiguration of NDRs at distal regulatory elements coupled with a substantial reorganization of the cancer methylome. Aberrant acquisition of nucleosomes at enhancer-associated NDRs is associated with hypermethylation and epigenetic silencing marks, and conversely, loss of nucleosomes with demethylation and epigenetic activation. Remarkably, we show that nucleosomes remain strongly organized and phased at many facultative distal regulatory elements, even in the absence of a NDR as an anchor. Finally, we find that key transcription factor (TF) binding sites also show extensive peripheral nucleosome phasing, suggesting the potential for TFs to organize NDRs genome-wide and contribute to deregulation of cancer epigenomes. Together, our findings suggest that “decommissioning” of NDRs and TFs at distal regulatory elements in cancer cells is accompanied by DNA hypermethylation susceptibility of enhancers and insulator elements, which in turn may contribute to an altered genome-wide architecture and epigenetic deregulation in malignancy. PMID:24916973

  13. Preparation, physicochemical characterization and application of acetylated lotus rhizome starches.

    PubMed

    Sun, Suling; Zhang, Ganwei; Ma, Chaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Acetylated lotus rhizome starches were prepared, physicochemically characterized and used as food additives in puddings. The percentage content of the acetyl groups and degree of substitution increased linearly with the amount of acetic anhydride used. The introduction of acetyl groups was confirmed via Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The values of the pasting parameters were lower for acetylated starch than for native starch. Acetylation was found to increase the light transmittance (%), the freeze-thaw stability, the swelling power and the solubility of the starch. Sensorial scores for puddings prepared using native and acetylated lotus rhizome starches as food additives indicated that puddings produced from the modified starches with superior properties over those prepared from native starch. PMID:26453845

  14. The structural basis of modified nucleosome recognition by 53BP1.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Marcus D; Benlekbir, Samir; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Sherker, Alana; Julien, Jean-Philippe; McEwan, Andrea; Noordermeer, Sylvie M; Sicheri, Frank; Rubinstein, John L; Durocher, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) elicit a histone modification cascade that controls DNA repair. This pathway involves the sequential ubiquitination of histones H1 and H2A by the E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168, respectively. RNF168 ubiquitinates H2A on lysine 13 and lysine 15 (refs 7, 8) (yielding H2AK13ub and H2AK15ub, respectively), an event that triggers the recruitment of 53BP1 (also known as TP53BP1) to chromatin flanking DSBs. 53BP1 binds specifically to H2AK15ub-containing nucleosomes through a peptide segment termed the ubiquitination-dependent recruitment motif (UDR), which requires the simultaneous engagement of histone H4 lysine 20 dimethylation (H4K20me2) by its tandem Tudor domain. How 53BP1 interacts with these two histone marks in the nucleosomal context, how it recognizes ubiquitin, and how it discriminates between H2AK13ub and H2AK15ub is unknown. Here we present the electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) structure of a dimerized human 53BP1 fragment bound to a H4K20me2-containing and H2AK15ub-containing nucleosome core particle (NCP-ubme) at 4.5 Å resolution. The structure reveals that H4K20me2 and H2AK15ub recognition involves intimate contacts with multiple nucleosomal elements including the acidic patch. Ubiquitin recognition by 53BP1 is unusual and involves the sandwiching of the UDR segment between ubiquitin and the NCP surface. The selectivity for H2AK15ub is imparted by two arginine fingers in the H2A amino-terminal tail, which straddle the nucleosomal DNA and serve to position ubiquitin over the NCP-bound UDR segment. The structure of the complex between NCP-ubme and 53BP1 reveals the basis of 53BP1 recruitment to DSB sites and illuminates how combinations of histone marks and nucleosomal elements cooperate to produce highly specific chromatin responses, such as those elicited following chromosome breaks.

  15. Quantitative determination of binding of ISWI to nucleosomes and DNA shows allosteric regulation of DNA binding by nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Al-Ani, Gada; Briggs, Koan; Malik, Shuja Shafi; Conner, Michael; Azuma, Yoshiaki; Fischer, Christopher J

    2014-07-15

    The regulation of chromatin structure is controlled by a family of molecular motors called chromatin remodelers. The ability of these enzymes to remodel chromatin structure is dependent on their ability to couple ATP binding and hydrolysis into the mechanical work that drives nucleosome repositioning. The necessary first step in determining how these essential enzymes perform this function is to characterize both how they bind nucleosomes and how this interaction is regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis. With this goal in mind, we monitored the interaction of the chromatin remodeler ISWI with fluorophore-labeled nucleosomes and DNA through associated changes in fluorescence anisotropy of the fluorophore upon binding of ISWI to these substrates. We determined that one ISWI molecule binds to a 20 bp double-stranded DNA substrate with an affinity of 18 ± 2 nM. In contrast, two ISWI molecules can bind to the core nucleosome with short linker DNA with stoichiometric macroscopic equilibrium constants: 1/β1 = 1.3 ± 0.6 nM, and 1/β2 = 13 ± 7 nM(2). Furthermore, to improve our understanding of the mechanism of DNA translocation by ISWI, and hence nucleosome repositioning, we determined the effect of nucleotide analogues on substrate binding by ISWI. While the affinity of ISWI for the nucleosome substrate with short lengths of flanking DNA was not affected by the presence of nucleotides, the affinity of ISWI for the DNA substrate is weakened in the presence of nonhydrolyzable ATP analogues but not by ADP.

  16. The Chp1 chromodomain binds the H3K9me tail and the nucleosome core to assemble heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Zocco, Manuel; Marasovic, Mirela; Pisacane, Paola; Bilokapic, Silvija; Halic, Mario

    2016-01-01

    To maintain genome stability, cells pack large portions of their genome into silent chromatin or heterochromatin. Histone H3 lysine 9 methylation, a hallmark of heterochromatin, is recognized by conserved readers called chromodomains. But how chromodomains interact with their actual binding partner, the H3K9 methylated nucleosome, remains elusive. We have determined the structure of a nucleosome trimethylated at lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me3 Nucleosome) in a complex with the chromodomain of Chp1, a protein required for RNA interference-dependent heterochromatin formation in fission yeast. The cryo-electron microscopy structure reveals that the chromodomain of Chp1 binds the histone H3 lysine 9 methylated tail and the core of the nucleosome, primarily histones H3 and H2B. Mutations in chromodomain of Chp1 loops, which interact with the nucleosome core, abolished this interaction in vitro. Moreover, fission yeast cells with Chp1 loop mutations have a defect in Chp1 recruitment and heterochromatin formation. This study reveals the structural basis for heterochromatic silencing and suggests that chromodomains could read histone code in the H3 tail and the nucleosome core, which would provide an additional layer of regulation. PMID:27462451

  17. Nucleosome adaptability conferred by sequence and structural variations in histone H2A-H2B dimers.

    PubMed

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2015-06-01

    Nucleosome variability is essential for their functions in compacting the chromatin structure and regulation of transcription, replication and cell reprogramming. The DNA molecule in nucleosomes is wrapped around an octamer composed of four types of core histones (H3, H4, H2A, H2B). Nucleosomes represent dynamic entities and may change their conformation, stability and binding properties by employing different sets of histone variants or by becoming post-translationally modified. There are many variants of histones H2A and H2B. Specific H2A and H2B variants may preferentially associate with each other resulting in different combinations of variants and leading to the increased combinatorial complexity of nucleosomes. In addition, the H2A-H2B dimer can be recognized and substituted by chaperones/remodelers as a distinct unit, can assemble independently and is stable during nucleosome unwinding. In this review we discuss how sequence and structural variations in H2A-H2B dimers may provide necessary complexity and confer the nucleosome functional variability.

  18. Nucleosome adaptability conferred by sequence and structural variations in histone H2A-H2B dimers

    PubMed Central

    Shaytan, Alexey K.; Landsman, David

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosome variability is essential for their functions in compacting the chromatin structure and regulation of transcription, replication and cell reprogramming. The DNA molecule in nucleosomes is wrapped around an octamer composed of four types of core histones (H3, H4, H2A, H2B). Nucleosomes represent dynamic entities and may change their conformation, stability and binding properties by employing different sets of histone variants or by becoming post-translationally modified. There are many variants of histones H2A and H2B. Specific H2A and H2B variants may preferentially associate with each other resulting in different combinations of variants and leading to the increased combinatorial complexity of nucleosomes. In addition, the H2A-H2B dimer can be recognized and substituted by chaperones/remodelers as a distinct unit, can assemble independently and is stable during nucleosome unwinding. In this review we discuss how sequence and structural variations in H2A-H2B dimers may provide necessary complexity and confer the nucleosome functional variability. PMID:25731851

  19. Structural basis of pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproduct recognition by UV-DDB in the nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kagawa, Wataru; Horikoshi, Naoki; Matsumoto, Syota; Hasegawa, Mayu; Matsumoto, Naoyuki; Toga, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Junpei; Hanaoka, Fumio; Thomä, Nicolas H; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Iwai, Shigenori; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    UV-DDB, an initiation factor for the nucleotide excision repair pathway, recognizes 6-4PP lesions through a base flipping mechanism. As genomic DNA is almost entirely accommodated within nucleosomes, the flipping of the 6-4PP bases is supposed to be extremely difficult if the lesion occurs in a nucleosome, especially on the strand directly contacting the histone surface. Here we report that UV-DDB binds efficiently to nucleosomal 6-4PPs that are rotationally positioned on the solvent accessible or occluded surface. We determined the crystal structures of nucleosomes containing 6-4PPs in these rotational positions, and found that the 6-4PP DNA regions were flexibly disordered, especially in the strand exposed to the solvent. This characteristic of 6-4PP may facilitate UV-DDB binding to the damaged nucleosome. We present the first atomic-resolution pictures of the detrimental DNA cross-links of neighboring pyrimidine bases within the nucleosome, and provide the mechanistic framework for lesion recognition by UV-DDB in chromatin. PMID:26573481

  20. A Novel ‘Roll-and-Slide’ Mechanism of DNA Folding in Chromatin. Implications for Nucleosome Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Colasanti, Andrew V.; McCandlish, David; Olson, Wilma K.; Zhurkin, Victor B.

    2007-01-01

    How eukaryotic genomes encode the folding of DNA into nucleosomes and how this intrinsic organization of chromatin guides biological function are questions of wide interest. The physical basis of nucleosome positioning lies in the sequence-dependent propensity of DNA to adopt the tightly bent configuration imposed by the binding of the histone proteins. Traditionally, only DNA bending and twisting deformations are considered, while the effects of the lateral displacements of adjacent base pairs are neglected. We demonstrate, however, that these displacements play a much more important structural role than ever imagined. Specifically, the lateral Slide deformations observed at sites of local anisotropic bending of DNA define its superhelical trajectory in chromatin. Furthermore, the computed cost of deforming DNA on the nucleosome is sequence specific: in optimally positioned sequences the most easily deformed base-pair steps (CA:TG and TA) occur at sites of large positive Slide and negative Roll (where the DNA bends into the minor groove). These conclusions rest upon a treatment of DNA that goes beyond the conventional ribbon model, incorporating all essential degrees of freedom of ‘real’ duplexes in the estimation of DNA deformation energies. Indeed, only after lateral Slide displacements are considered, are we able to account for the sequence-specific folding of DNA found in nucleosome structures. The close correspondence between the predicted and observed nucleosome locations demonstrates the potential advantage of our 'structural' approach in the computer mapping of nucleosome positioning. PMID:17585938

  1. 2-Acetyl­pyridinium bromanilate

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Lynne H.; Boyle, Bryan; Clive, Lesley A.; Collins, Anna; Currie, Lynsey D.; Gogol, Malgorzata; Hastings, Claire; Jones, Andrew O. F.; Kennedy, Jennifer L.; Kerr, Graham B.; Kidd, Alastair; Lawton, Lorreta M.; Macintyre, Susan J.; MacLean, Niall M.; Martin, Alan R. G.; McGonagle, Kate; Melrose, Samantha; Rew, Gaius A.; Robinson, Colin W.; Schmidtmann, Marc; Turnbull, Felicity B.; Williams, Lewis G.; Wiseman, Alan Y.; Wocial, Malgorzata H.; Wilson, Chick C.

    2009-01-01

    In the crystal of the title mol­ecular salt (systematic name: 2-acetyl­pyridinium 2,5-dibromo-4-hydr­oxy-3,6-dioxocyclo­hexa-1,4-dienolate), C7H8NO+·C6HBr2O4 −, centrosymmetric rings consisting of two cations and two anions are formed, with the components linked by alternating O—H⋯O and N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Short O⋯Br contacts [3.243 (2) and 3.359 (2) Å] may help to consolidate the packing. PMID:21583087

  2. Survey of the human acetylator polymorphism in spontaneous disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D A

    1984-01-01

    There is ample evidence that the human acetylator phenotypes are associated with drug induced phenomena. It is principally the slow acetylators who exhibit toxic adverse effects because of their relative inability to detoxify the original drug compounds. In rare instances, however, it is the rapid acetylators who are at a disadvantage. In the matter of association of spontaneous disease with either acetylator phenotype, there are two groups of disorders to consider. First, disorders in which carcinogenic amines are known to be an aetiological factor. This is because these amines are substrates for the polymorphic N-acetyltransferase activity and hence there is a possible rational basis for searching for an association. Secondly, other disorders where searches for associations are based more on hunches. In the first group there is a definite statistical association between cancer of the bladder and the slow acetylator phenotype. In prevalence studies the slow phenotype is 39% more associated with bladder cancer than is the rapid phenotype. On the basis of the evidence now available it is not possible to say whether this association is because slow acetylators develop the disease more frequently or whether they survive longer. In the second group the relevant studies show (1) a greatly increased prevalence of slow acetylators in Gilbert's disease; (2) a confirmed association between the rapid acetylator phenotype and diabetes; (3) a possible association between the rapid acetylator phenotype and breast cancer; (4) a possible association between the slow acetylator phenotype and leprosy in Chinese patients; (5) an earlier age of onset of thyrotoxicosis (Graves' disease) in slow acetylators than in rapid acetylators; (6) no evidence of an association between either phenotype and spontaneous systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:6387123

  3. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of acetylated EGCG and antioxidant properties of the acetylated derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) acetylated derivatives were prepared by lipase catalyzed acylation of EGCG with vinyl acetate to improve its lipophilicity and expand its application in lipophilic media. The immobilized lipase, Lipozyme RM IM, was found to be the optimum catalyst. The optimiz...

  4. Determination of Acetylation of the Gli Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Coni, Sonia; Di Magno, Laura; Canettieri, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The Gli transcription factors (Gli1, Gli2, and Gli3) are the final effectors of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling and play a key role in development and cancer. The activity of the Gli proteins is finely regulated by covalent modifications, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and acetylation. Both Gli1 and Gli2 are acetylated at a conserved lysine, and this modification causes the inhibition of their transcriptional activity. Thus, the acetylation status of these proteins represents a useful marker to monitor Hh activation in pathophysiological conditions. Herein we describe the techniques utilized to detect in vitro and intracellular acetylation of the Gli transcription factors. PMID:26179046

  5. Nucleosome-specific, time-dependent changes in histone modifications during activation of the early growth response 1 (Egr1) gene.

    PubMed

    Riffo-Campos, Ángela L; Castillo, Josefa; Tur, Gema; González-Figueroa, Paula; Georgieva, Elena I; Rodríguez, José L; López-Rodas, Gerardo; Rodrigo, M Isabel; Franco, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications and nucleosome remodeling are coordinate events involved in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation. There are relatively few data on the time course with which these events occur in individual nucleosomes. As a contribution to fill this gap, we first describe the nature and time course of structural changes in the nucleosomes -2, -1, and +1 of the murine Egr1 gene upon induction. To initiate the transient activation of the gene, we used the stimulation of MLP29 cells with phorbol esters and the in vivo activation after partial hepatectomy. In both models, nucleosomes -1 and +1 are partially evicted, whereas nucleosomes +1 and -2 slide downstream during transcription. The sliding of the latter nucleosome allows the EGR1 protein to bind its site, resulting in the repression of the gene. To decide whether EGR1 is involved in the sliding of nucleosome -2, Egr1 was knocked down. In the absence of detectable EGR1, the nucleosome still slides and remains downstream longer than in control cells, suggesting that the product of the gene may be rather involved in the returning of the nucleosome to the basal position. Moreover, the presence of eight epigenetic histone marks has been determined at a mononucleosomal level in that chromatin region. H3S10phK14ac, H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and H3K27me3 are characteristic of nucleosome +1, and H3K9ac and H4K16ac are mainly found in nucleosome -1, and H3K27ac predominates in nucleosomes -2 and -1. The temporal changes in these marks suggest distinct functions for some of them, although changes in H3K4me3 may result from histone turnover.

  6. Alternative Computational Analysis Shows No Evidence for Nucleosome Enrichment at Repetitive Sequences in Mammalian Spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Royo, Hélène; Stadler, Michael Beda; Peters, Antoine Hendrik Felix Marie

    2016-04-01

    Samans et al. (2014) reported the enrichment of nucleosomes in human and bovine spermatozoa at centromere repeats and retrotransposon sequences such as LINE-1 and SINE. We demonstrate here that nucleosomal enrichments at repetitive sequences as reported result from bioinformatic analyses that make redundant use of sequencing reads that map to multiple locations in the genome. To illustrate that this computational approach is flawed, we observed comparable artificial enrichments at repetitive sequences when aligning control genomic DNA or simulated reads of uniform genome coverage. These results imply that the main conclusions of the article by Samans et al. (2014) are confounded by an inappropriate computational methodology used to analyze the primary data. PMID:27046835

  7. Transcription factor access is mediated by accurately positioned nucleosomes on the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, T K; Cordingley, M G; Wolford, R G; Hager, G L

    1991-01-01

    A fragment of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter was reconstituted from pure histones into a dinucleosome with uniquely positioned octamer cores. Core boundaries for the in vitro-assembled dinucleosome corresponded to the observed in vivo phasing pattern for long terminal repeat nucleosomes A and B. Nuclear factor 1 (NF1), a constituent of the MMTV transcription initiation complex, was excluded from the assembled dinucleosome, whereas the glucocorticoid receptor was able to bind. During transcription of MMTV in vivo, displacement of nucleosome B was necessary to permit assembly of the initiation complex. These results indicate that the nucleoprotein structure of the promoter can provide differential access to sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins and that active chromatin remodeling can occur during transcription activation. Images PMID:1846670

  8. The H1 linker histones: multifunctional proteins beyond the nucleosomal core particle

    PubMed Central

    Hergeth, Sonja P; Schneider, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The linker histone H1 family members are a key component of chromatin and bind to the nucleosomal core particle around the DNA entry and exit sites. H1 can stabilize both nucleosome structure and higher-order chromatin architecture. In general, H1 molecules consist of a central globular domain with more flexible tail regions at both their N- and C-terminal ends. The existence of multiple H1 subtypes and a large variety of posttranslational modifications brings about a considerable degree of complexity and makes studying this protein family challenging. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the function of linker histones and their subtypes beyond their role as merely structural chromatin components. We summarize current findings on the role of H1 in heterochromatin formation, transcriptional regulation and embryogenesis with a focus on H1 subtypes and their specific modifications. PMID:26474902

  9. Genome-wide analysis reveals positional-nucleosome-oriented binding pattern of pioneer factor FOXA1

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhenqing; Chen, Zhong; Sunkel, Benjamin; Frietze, Seth; Huang, Tim H.-M.; Wang, Qianben; Jin, Victor X.

    2016-01-01

    The compaction of nucleosomal structures creates a barrier for DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) to access their cognate cis-regulatory elements. Pioneer factors (PFs) such as FOXA1 are able to directly access these cis-targets within compact chromatin. However, how these PFs interplay with nucleosomes remains to be elucidated, and is critical for us to understand the underlying mechanism of gene regulation. Here, we have conducted a computational analysis on a strand-specific paired-end ChIP-exo (termed as ChIP-ePENS) data of FOXA1 in LNCaP cells by our novel algorithm ePEST. We find that FOXA1 chromatin binding occurs via four distinct border modes (or footprint boundary patterns), with a preferential footprint boundary patterns relative to FOXA1 motif orientation. In addition, from this analysis three fundamental nucleotide positions (oG, oS and oH) emerged as major determinants for blocking exo-digestion and forming these four distinct border modes. By integrating histone MNase-seq data, we found an astonishingly consistent, ‘well-positioned’ configuration occurs between FOXA1 motifs and dyads of nucleosomes genome-wide. We further performed ChIP-seq of eight chromatin remodelers and found an increased occupancy of these remodelers on FOXA1 motifs for all four border modes (or footprint boundary patterns), indicating the full occupancy of FOXA1 complex on the three blocking sites (oG, oS and oH) likely produces an active regulatory status with well-positioned phasing for protein binding events. Together, our results suggest a positional-nucleosome-oriented accessing model for PFs seeking target motifs, in which FOXA1 can examine each underlying DNA nucleotide and is able to sense all potential motifs regardless of whether they face inward or outward from histone octamers along the DNA helix axis. PMID:27458208

  10. BAF250a Protein Regulates Nucleosome Occupancy and Histone Modifications in Priming Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ienglam; West, Jason; Yan, Zhijiang; Gao, Xiaolin; Fang, Peng; Dennis, Jonathan H; Gnatovskiy, Leonid; Wang, Weidong; Kingston, Robert E; Wang, Zhong

    2015-07-31

    The unique chromatin signature of ES cells is fundamental to the pluripotency and differentiation of ES cells. One key feature is the poised chromatin state of master developmental genes that are transcriptionally repressed in ES cells but ready to be activated in response to differentiation signals. Poised chromatin in ES cells contains both H3 Lys-4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) and H3 Lys-27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) methylation, indicating activating and repressing potential. However, the contribution of non-covalent chromatin structure to the poised state is not well understood. To address whether remodeling of nucleosomes is important to the poised state, we characterized the function of BAF250a, a key regulatory subunit of the ES cell ATP-dependent Brahma-associated factor (BAF) chromatin remodeling complex (esBAF). Acute deletion of BAF250a disrupted the differentiation potential of ES cells by altering the expression timing of key developmental genes and pluripotent genes. Our genome-wide nucleosome and histone modification analyses indicated that the disruption of gene expression timing was largely due to changes of chromatin structures at poised genes, particularly those key developmental genes mediated by BAF250a. Specifically, BAF250a deletion caused a nucleosome occupancy increase at H3K4me3- and/or H3K27me3-associated promoters. Moreover, H3K27me3 levels and the number of bivalent promoter genes were reduced in BAF250a KO ES cells. We revealed that BAF250a ablation led to elevated Brg1 but reduced Suz12 recruitment at nucleosome occupancy-increased regions, indicating an unexpected and complicated role of BAF250a in regulating esBAF and Polycomb repressive complex (PRC) activities. Together, our studies identified that BAF250a mediates esBAF and PRC functions to establish the poised chromatin configuration in ES cells, which is essential for the proper differentiation of ES cells.

  11. Enzymatic Excision of Uracil Residues in Nucleosomes Depends on Local DNA Structure and Dynamics†

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yu; Stahley, Mary R.; Xu, Jianqing; Friedman, Joshua I.; Sun, Yan; McKnight, Jeffrey N.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Bowman, Gregory D.; Stivers, James T.

    2012-01-01

    The excision of uracil bases from DNA is accomplished by the enzyme uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG). Recognition of uracil bases in free DNA is facilitated by uracil base pair dynamics, but it is not known whether this same mechanistic feature is relevant for detection and excision of uracil residues embedded in nucleosomes. Here we investigate this question using nucleosome core particles (NCPs) generated from X. laevis histones and the high-affinity “Widom 601” positioning sequence. The reactivity of uracil residues in NCPs under steady-state multiple turnover conditions was generally decreased as compared to free 601 DNA, mostly due to anticipated steric effects of histones. However, some sites in NCPs had equal or even greater reactivity than free DNA, and the observed reactivities were not readily explained by simple steric considerations, or by global DNA unwrapping models for nucleosome invasion. In particular, some reactive uracils were found in occluded positions, while some unreactive uracils were found in exposed positions. One feature of many exposed reactive sites is a wide DNA minor groove, which allows penetration of a key active site loop of the enzyme. In single-turnover kinetic measurements, multi-phasic reaction kinetics were observed for several uracil sites, where each kinetic transient was independent of the UNG concentration. These kinetic measurements, and supporting structural analyses, support a mechanism where some uracils are transiently exposed to UNG by local, rate-limiting nucleosome conformational dynamics, followed by rapid trapping of the exposed state by the enzyme. We present structural models and plausible reaction mechanisms for the reaction of UNG at three distinct uracil sites in the NCP. PMID:22784353

  12. N-acetylaspartate catabolism determines cytosolic acetyl-CoA levels and histone acetylation in brown adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Prokesch, A.; Pelzmann, H. J.; Pessentheiner, A. R.; Huber, K.; Madreiter-Sokolowski, C. T.; Drougard, A.; Schittmayer, M.; Kolb, D.; Magnes, C.; Trausinger, G.; Graier, W. F.; Birner-Gruenberger, R.; Pospisilik, J. A.; Bogner-Strauss, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation depends on the abundance of nucleo-cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA. Here, we present a novel route for cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA production in brown adipocytes. N-acetylaspartate (NAA) is a highly abundant brain metabolite catabolized by aspartoacylase yielding aspartate and acetate. The latter can be further used for acetyl-CoA production. Prior to this work, the presence of NAA has not been described in adipocytes. Here, we show that accumulation of NAA decreases the brown adipocyte phenotype. We increased intracellular NAA concentrations in brown adipocytes via media supplementation or knock-down of aspartoacylase and measured reduced lipolysis, thermogenic gene expression, and oxygen consumption. Combinations of approaches to increase intracellular NAA levels showed additive effects on lipolysis and gene repression, nearly abolishing the expression of Ucp1, Cidea, Prdm16, and Ppara. Transcriptome analyses of aspartoacylase knock-down cells indicate deficiencies in acetyl-CoA and lipid metabolism. Concordantly, cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA levels and global histone H3 acetylation were decreased. Further, activating histone marks (H3K27ac and H3K9ac) in promoters/enhancers of brown marker genes showed reduced acetylation status. Taken together, we present a novel route for cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA production in brown adipocytes. Thereby, we mechanistically connect the NAA pathway to the epigenomic regulation of gene expression, modulating the phenotype of brown adipocytes. PMID:27045997

  13. Binding of the transcription factor Atf1 to promoters serves as a barrier to phase nucleosome arrays and avoid cryptic transcription

    PubMed Central

    García, Patricia; Paulo, Esther; Gao, Jun; Wahls, Wayne P.; Ayté, José; Lowy, Ernesto; Hidalgo, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe displays a large transcriptional response common to several stress conditions, regulated primarily by the transcription factor Atf1. Atf1-dependent promoters contain especially broad nucleosome depleted regions (NDRs) prior to stress imposition. We show here that basal binding of Atf1 to these promoters competes with histones to create wider NDRs at stress genes. Moreover, deletion of atf1 results in nucleosome disorganization specifically at stress coding regions and derepresses antisense transcription. Our data indicate that the transcription factor binding to promoters acts as an effective barrier to fix the +1 nucleosome and phase downstream nucleosome arrays to prevent cryptic transcription. PMID:25122751

  14. Binding of the transcription factor Atf1 to promoters serves as a barrier to phase nucleosome arrays and avoid cryptic transcription.

    PubMed

    García, Patricia; Paulo, Esther; Gao, Jun; Wahls, Wayne P; Ayté, José; Lowy, Ernesto; Hidalgo, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe displays a large transcriptional response common to several stress conditions, regulated primarily by the transcription factor Atf1. Atf1-dependent promoters contain especially broad nucleosome depleted regions (NDRs) prior to stress imposition. We show here that basal binding of Atf1 to these promoters competes with histones to create wider NDRs at stress genes. Moreover, deletion of atf1 results in nucleosome disorganization specifically at stress coding regions and derepresses antisense transcription. Our data indicate that the transcription factor binding to promoters acts as an effective barrier to fix the +1 nucleosome and phase downstream nucleosome arrays to prevent cryptic transcription. PMID:25122751

  15. Binding of the transcription factor Atf1 to promoters serves as a barrier to phase nucleosome arrays and avoid cryptic transcription.

    PubMed

    García, Patricia; Paulo, Esther; Gao, Jun; Wahls, Wayne P; Ayté, José; Lowy, Ernesto; Hidalgo, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe displays a large transcriptional response common to several stress conditions, regulated primarily by the transcription factor Atf1. Atf1-dependent promoters contain especially broad nucleosome depleted regions (NDRs) prior to stress imposition. We show here that basal binding of Atf1 to these promoters competes with histones to create wider NDRs at stress genes. Moreover, deletion of atf1 results in nucleosome disorganization specifically at stress coding regions and derepresses antisense transcription. Our data indicate that the transcription factor binding to promoters acts as an effective barrier to fix the +1 nucleosome and phase downstream nucleosome arrays to prevent cryptic transcription.

  16. Lysine Acetylation Activates Mitochondrial Aconitase in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Jolyn; Weddle, Alexis; Kinter, Caroline S.; Humphries, Kenneth M.; Mather, Timothy; Szweda, Luke I.; Kinter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    High throughput proteomics studies have identified several thousand acetylation sites on over one thousand proteins. Mitochondrial aconitase, the Krebs cycle enzyme that converts citrate to isocitrate, has been identified in many of these reports. Acetylated mitochondrial aconitase has also been identified as a target for sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) catalyzed deacetylation. However, the functional significance of mitochondrial aconitase acetylation has not been determined. Using in vitro strategies, mass spectrometric analyses, and an in vivo mouse model of obesity, we found a significant acetylation-dependent activation of aconitase. Isolated heart mitochondria subjected to in vitro chemical acetylation with either acetic anhydride or acetyl-CoA resulted in increased aconitase activity that was reversed with SIRT3 treatment. Quantitative mass spectrometry was used to measure acetylation at 21 lysine residues and found significant increases with both in vitro treatments. A high fat diet (60% kcal from fat) was used as an in vivo model and also showed significantly increased mitochondrial aconitase activity without changes in protein level. The high fat diet also produced increased aconitase acetylation at multiple sites as measured by the quantitative mass spectrometry assays. Treatment of isolated mitochondria from these mice with SIRT3 abolished the high fat diet-induced activation of aconitase and reduced acetylation. Finally, kinetic analyses found that the increase in activity was a result of increased maximal velocity and molecular modeling suggests the potential for acetylation at K144 to perturb the tertiary structure of the enzyme. The results of this study reveal a novel activation of mitochondrial aconitase by acetylation. PMID:26061789

  17. Arabidopsis meiotic crossover hotspots overlap with H2A.Z nucleosomes at gene promoters

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyuha; Zhao, Xiaohui; Kelly, Krystyna A.; Venn, Oliver; Higgins, James D.; Yelina, Nataliya E.; Hardcastle, Thomas J.; Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Copenhaver, Gregory P.; Franklin, F. Chris H.; McVean, Gil; Henderson, Ian R.

    2013-01-01

    PRDM9 directs human meiotic crossover hotspots to intergenic sequence motifs, whereas budding yeast hotspots overlap low nucleosome density regions in gene promoters. To investigate hotspots in plants, which lack PRDM9, we used coalescent analysis of Arabidopsis genetic variation. Crossovers increase towards gene promoters and terminators, and hotspots are associated with active chromatin modifications, including H2A.Z, histone H3K4me3, low nucleosome density and low DNA methylation. Hotspot-enriched A-rich and CTT-repeat DNA motifs occur upstream and downstream of transcriptional start respectively. Crossovers are asymmetric around promoters and highest over CTT-motifs and H2A.Z-nucleosomes. Pollen-typing, segregation and cytogenetic analysis show decreased crossovers in the arp6 H2A.Z deposition mutant, at multiple scales. During meiosis H2A.Z and DMC1/RAD51 recombinases form overlapping chromosomal foci. As arp6 reduces DMC1/RAD51 foci, H2A.Z may promote formation or processing of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks. We propose that gene chromatin ancestrally designates hotspots within eukaryotes and PRDM9 is a derived state within vertebrates. PMID:24056716

  18. Influence of Rotational Nucleosome Positioning on Transcription Start Site Selection in Animal Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment of RNA-Pol-II to the transcription start site (TSS) is an important step in gene regulation in all organisms. Core promoter elements (CPE) are conserved sequence motifs that guide Pol-II to the TSS by interacting with specific transcription factors (TFs). However, only a minority of animal promoters contains CPEs. It is still unknown how Pol-II selects the TSS in their absence. Here we present a comparative analysis of promoters’ sequence composition and chromatin architecture in five eukaryotic model organisms, which shows the presence of common and unique DNA-encoded features used to organize chromatin. Analysis of Pol-II initiation patterns uncovers that, in the absence of certain CPEs, there is a strong correlation between the spread of initiation and the intensity of the 10 bp periodic signal in the nearest downstream nucleosome. Moreover, promoters’ primary and secondary initiation sites show a characteristic 10 bp periodicity in the absence of CPEs. We also show that DNA natural variants in the region immediately downstream the TSS are able to affect both the nucleosome-DNA affinity and Pol-II initiation pattern. These findings support the notion that, in addition to CPEs mediated selection, sequence–induced nucleosome positioning could be a common and conserved mechanism of TSS selection in animals. PMID:27716823

  19. Two distinct promoter architectures centered on dynamic nucleosomes control ribosomal protein gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Britta; Kubik, Slawomir; Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Geertz, Marcel; Martin, Victoria; Dénervaud, Nicolas; Jacquet, Philippe; Ozkan, Burak; Rougemont, Jacques; Maerkl, Sebastian J.; Naef, Félix

    2014-01-01

    In yeast, ribosome production is controlled transcriptionally by tight coregulation of the 138 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs). RPG promoters display limited sequence homology, and the molecular basis for their coregulation remains largely unknown. Here we identify two prevalent RPG promoter types, both characterized by upstream binding of the general transcription factor (TF) Rap1 followed by the RPG-specific Fhl1/Ifh1 pair, with one type also binding the HMG-B protein Hmo1. We show that the regulatory properties of the two promoter types are remarkably similar, suggesting that they are determined to a large extent by Rap1 and the Fhl1/Ifh1 pair. Rapid depletion experiments allowed us to define a hierarchy of TF binding in which Rap1 acts as a pioneer factor required for binding of all other TFs. We also uncovered unexpected features underlying recruitment of Fhl1, whose forkhead DNA-binding domain is not required for binding at most promoters, and Hmo1, whose binding is supported by repeated motifs. Finally, we describe unusually micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-sensitive nucleosomes at all RPG promoters, located between the canonical +1 and −1 nucleosomes, which coincide with sites of Fhl1/Ifh1 and Hmo1 binding. We speculate that these “fragile” nucleosomes play an important role in regulating RPG transcriptional output. PMID:25085421

  20. CHD4 Is a Peripheral Component of the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase Complex.

    PubMed

    Low, Jason K K; Webb, Sarah R; Silva, Ana P G; Saathoff, Hinnerk; Ryan, Daniel P; Torrado, Mario; Brofelth, Mattias; Parker, Benjamin L; Shepherd, Nicholas E; Mackay, Joel P

    2016-07-22

    Chromatin remodeling enzymes act to dynamically regulate gene accessibility. In many cases, these enzymes function as large multicomponent complexes that in general comprise a central ATP-dependent Snf2 family helicase that is decorated with a variable number of regulatory subunits. The nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex, which is essential for normal development in higher organisms, is one such macromolecular machine. The NuRD complex comprises ∼10 subunits, including the histone deacetylases 1 and 2 (HDAC1 and HDAC2), and is defined by the presence of a CHD family remodeling enzyme, most commonly CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4). The existing paradigm holds that CHD4 acts as the central hub upon which the complex is built. We show here that this paradigm does not, in fact, hold and that CHD4 is a peripheral component of the NuRD complex. A complex lacking CHD4 that has HDAC activity can exist as a stable species. The addition of recombinant CHD4 to this nucleosome deacetylase complex reconstitutes a NuRD complex with nucleosome remodeling activity. These data contribute to our understanding of the architecture of the NuRD complex. PMID:27235397

  1. CHD4 Is a Peripheral Component of the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase Complex.

    PubMed

    Low, Jason K K; Webb, Sarah R; Silva, Ana P G; Saathoff, Hinnerk; Ryan, Daniel P; Torrado, Mario; Brofelth, Mattias; Parker, Benjamin L; Shepherd, Nicholas E; Mackay, Joel P

    2016-07-22

    Chromatin remodeling enzymes act to dynamically regulate gene accessibility. In many cases, these enzymes function as large multicomponent complexes that in general comprise a central ATP-dependent Snf2 family helicase that is decorated with a variable number of regulatory subunits. The nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex, which is essential for normal development in higher organisms, is one such macromolecular machine. The NuRD complex comprises ∼10 subunits, including the histone deacetylases 1 and 2 (HDAC1 and HDAC2), and is defined by the presence of a CHD family remodeling enzyme, most commonly CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4). The existing paradigm holds that CHD4 acts as the central hub upon which the complex is built. We show here that this paradigm does not, in fact, hold and that CHD4 is a peripheral component of the NuRD complex. A complex lacking CHD4 that has HDAC activity can exist as a stable species. The addition of recombinant CHD4 to this nucleosome deacetylase complex reconstitutes a NuRD complex with nucleosome remodeling activity. These data contribute to our understanding of the architecture of the NuRD complex.

  2. Dynamic Conformations of Nucleosome Arrays in Solution from Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steven C.

    Chromatin conformation and dynamics remains unsolved despite the critical role of the chromatin in fundamental genetic functions such as transcription, replication, and repair. At the molecular level, chromatin can be viewed as a linear array of nucleosomes, each consisting of 147 base pairs (bp) of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) wrapped around a protein core and connected by 10 to 90 bp of linker dsDNA. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we investigated how the conformations of model nucleosome arrays in solution are modulated by ionic condition as well as the effect of linker histone proteins. To facilitate ensemble modeling of these SAXS measurements, we developed a simulation method that treats coarse-grained DNA as a Markov chain, then explores possible DNA conformations using Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) sampling. This algorithm extends the functionality of SASSIE, a program used to model intrinsically disordered biological molecules, adding to the previous methods for simulating protein, carbohydrates, and single-stranded DNA. Our SAXS measurements of various nucleosome arrays together with the MC generated models provide valuable solution structure information identifying specific differences from the structure of crystallized arrays.

  3. Genome-wide nucleosome map and cytosine methylation levels of an ancient human genome

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Valen, Eivind; Velazquez, Amhed M. Vargas; Parker, Brian J.; Rasmussen, Morten; Lindgreen, Stinus; Lilje, Berit; Tobin, Desmond J.; Kelly, Theresa K.; Vang, Søren; Andersson, Robin; Jones, Peter A.; Hoover, Cindi A.; Tikhonov, Alexei; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Rubin, Edward M.; Sandelin, Albin; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Krogh, Anders; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic information is available from contemporary organisms, but is difficult to track back in evolutionary time. Here, we show that genome-wide epigenetic information can be gathered directly from next-generation sequence reads of DNA isolated from ancient remains. Using the genome sequence data generated from hair shafts of a 4000-yr-old Paleo-Eskimo belonging to the Saqqaq culture, we generate the first ancient nucleosome map coupled with a genome-wide survey of cytosine methylation levels. The validity of both nucleosome map and methylation levels were confirmed by the recovery of the expected signals at promoter regions, exon/intron boundaries, and CTCF sites. The top-scoring nucleosome calls revealed distinct DNA positioning biases, attesting to nucleotide-level accuracy. The ancient methylation levels exhibited high conservation over time, clustering closely with modern hair tissues. Using ancient methylation information, we estimated the age at death of the Saqqaq individual and illustrate how epigenetic information can be used to infer ancient gene expression. Similar epigenetic signatures were found in other fossil material, such as 110,000- to 130,000-yr-old bones, supporting the contention that ancient epigenomic information can be reconstructed from a deep past. Our findings lay the foundation for extracting epigenomic information from ancient samples, allowing shifts in epialleles to be tracked through evolutionary time, as well as providing an original window into modern epigenomics. PMID:24299735

  4. Whole genome nucleosome sequencing identifies novel types of forensic markers in degraded DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chun-nan; Yang, Ya-dong; Li, Shu-jin; Yang, Ya-ran; Zhang, Xiao-jing; Fang, Xiang-dong; Yan, Jiang-wei; Cong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In the case of mass disasters, missing persons and forensic caseworks, highly degraded biological samples are often encountered. It can be a challenge to analyze and interpret the DNA profiles from these samples. Here we provide a new strategy to solve the problem by taking advantage of the intrinsic structural properties of DNA. We have assessed the in vivo positions of more than 35 million putative nucleosome cores in human leukocytes using high-throughput whole genome sequencing, and identified 2,462 single nucleotide variations (SNVs), 128 insertion-deletion polymorphisms (indels). After comparing the sequence reads with 44 STR loci commonly used in forensics, five STRs (TH01, TPOX, D18S51, DYS391, and D10S1248)were matched. We compared these “nucleosome protected STRs” (NPSTRs) with five other non-NPSTRs using mini-STR primer design, real-time PCR, and capillary gel electrophoresis on artificially degraded DNA. Moreover, genotyping performance of the five NPSTRs and five non-NPSTRs was also tested with real casework samples. All results show that loci located in nucleosomes are more likely to be successfully genotyped in degraded samples. In conclusion, after further strict validation, these markers could be incorporated into future forensic and paleontology identification kits, resulting in higher discriminatory power for certain degraded sample types. PMID:27189082

  5. Whole genome nucleosome sequencing identifies novel types of forensic markers in degraded DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Nan; Yang, Ya-Dong; Li, Shu-Jin; Yang, Ya-Ran; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Fang, Xiang-Dong; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Cong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In the case of mass disasters, missing persons and forensic caseworks, highly degraded biological samples are often encountered. It can be a challenge to analyze and interpret the DNA profiles from these samples. Here we provide a new strategy to solve the problem by taking advantage of the intrinsic structural properties of DNA. We have assessed the in vivo positions of more than 35 million putative nucleosome cores in human leukocytes using high-throughput whole genome sequencing, and identified 2,462 single nucleotide variations (SNVs), 128 insertion-deletion polymorphisms (indels). After comparing the sequence reads with 44 STR loci commonly used in forensics, five STRs (TH01, TPOX, D18S51, DYS391, and D10S1248)were matched. We compared these "nucleosome protected STRs" (NPSTRs) with five other non-NPSTRs using mini-STR primer design, real-time PCR, and capillary gel electrophoresis on artificially degraded DNA. Moreover, genotyping performance of the five NPSTRs and five non-NPSTRs was also tested with real casework samples. All results show that loci located in nucleosomes are more likely to be successfully genotyped in degraded samples. In conclusion, after further strict validation, these markers could be incorporated into future forensic and paleontology identification kits, resulting in higher discriminatory power for certain degraded sample types. PMID:27189082

  6. Inhibition of N-Terminal Lysines Acetylation and Transcription Factor Assembly by Epirubicin Induced Deranged Cell Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahper N.; Danishuddin, Mohd; Varshney, Bhavna; Lal, Sunil K.; Khan, Asad U.

    2012-01-01

    Epirubicin (EPI), an anthracycline antitumour antibiotic, is a known intercalating and DNA damaging agent. Here, we study the molecular interaction of EPI with histones and other cellular targets. EPI binding with histone core protein was predicted with spectroscopic and computational techniques. The molecular distance r, between donor (histone H3) and acceptor (EPI) was estimated using Förster’s theory of non-radiation energy transfer and the detailed binding phenomenon is expounded. Interestingly, the concentration dependent reduction in the acetylated states of histone H3 K9/K14 was observed suggesting more repressed chromatin state on EPI treatment. Its binding site near N-terminal lysines is further characterized by thermodynamic determinants and molecular docking studies. Specific DNA binding and inhibition of transcription factor (Tf)-DNA complex formation implicates EPI induced transcriptional inhibition. EPI also showed significant cell cycle arrest in drug treated cells. Chromatin fragmentation and loss of membrane integrity in EPI treated cells is suggestive of their commitment to cell death. This study provides an analysis of nucleosome dynamics during EPI treatment and provides a novel insight into its action. PMID:23251640

  7. An Alternative Strategy for Pan-acetyl-lysine Antibody Generation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiongyi; Tang, Hui; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Pan, Hong; Karnani, Neerja; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in cell signaling. In acetylome studies, a high-quality pan-acetyl-lysine antibody is key to successful enrichment of acetylated peptides for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we show an alternative method to generate polyclonal pan-acetyl-lysine antibodies using a synthesized random library of acetylated peptides as the antigen. Our antibodies are tested to be specific for acetyl-lysine peptides/proteins via ELISA and dot blot. When pooled, five of our antibodies show broad reactivity to acetyl-lysine peptides, complementing a commercial antibody in terms of peptide coverage. The consensus sequence of peptides bound by our antibody cocktail differs slightly from that of the commercial antibody. Lastly, our antibodies are tested in a proof-of-concept to analyze the acetylome of HEK293 cells. In total we identified 1557 acetylated peptides from 416 proteins. We thus demonstrated that our antibodies are well-qualified for acetylome studies and can complement existing commercial antibodies. PMID:27606599

  8. Effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine acetylation in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tahir, I M; Iqbal, T; Saleem, S; Mehboob, H; Akhter, N; Riaz, M

    2016-03-01

    The effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine N-acetylation by human N-acetyltrasferase-2 (NAT2) was studied in 19 (n=19) healthy male volunteers in two different phases. In the first phase of the study the volunteers were given an oral dose of sulfamethazine 500 mg alone and blood and urine samples were collected. After the 10-day washout period the same selected volunteers were again administered sulfamethazine 500 mg along with 1000 mg acetaminophen. The acetylation of sulfamethazine by human NAT2 in both phases with and without acetaminophen was determined by HPLC to establish their respective phenotypes. In conclusion obtained statistics of present study revealed that acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) decreased sulfamethazine acetylation in plasma of both slow and fast acetylator male volunteers. A highly significant (P<0.0001) decrease in plasma-free and total sulfamethazine concentration was also observed when acetaminophen was co-administered. Urine acetylation status in both phases of the study was found not to be in complete concordance with that of plasma. Acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) increased the acetyl, free and total sulfamethazine concentration in urine of both slow and fast acetylators. Urine acetylation analysis has not been found to be a suitable approach for phenotypic studies.

  9. An Alternative Strategy for Pan-acetyl-lysine Antibody Generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Yee; Sim, Choon Kiat; Zhang, Qiongyi; Tang, Hui; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Pan, Hong; Karnani, Neerja; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in cell signaling. In acetylome studies, a high-quality pan-acetyl-lysine antibody is key to successful enrichment of acetylated peptides for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we show an alternative method to generate polyclonal pan-acetyl-lysine antibodies using a synthesized random library of acetylated peptides as the antigen. Our antibodies are tested to be specific for acetyl-lysine peptides/proteins via ELISA and dot blot. When pooled, five of our antibodies show broad reactivity to acetyl-lysine peptides, complementing a commercial antibody in terms of peptide coverage. The consensus sequence of peptides bound by our antibody cocktail differs slightly from that of the commercial antibody. Lastly, our antibodies are tested in a proof-of-concept to analyze the acetylome of HEK293 cells. In total we identified 1557 acetylated peptides from 416 proteins. We thus demonstrated that our antibodies are well-qualified for acetylome studies and can complement existing commercial antibodies.

  10. Global analysis of lysine acetylation in strawberry leaves.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Wenyue; Zhao, Yun; Ruan, Songlin; Zhang, Hengmu; Yan, Chengqi; Jin, Liang; Cao, Lingling; Zhu, Jun; Ma, Huasheng; Cheng, Zhongyi

    2015-01-01

    Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and dynamic post-translational modification. It plays an important role in regulating diverse cellular processes including chromatin dynamic, metabolic pathways, and transcription in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although studies of lysine acetylome in plants have been reported, the throughput was not high enough, hindering the deep understanding of lysine acetylation in plant physiology and pathology. In this study, taking advantages of anti-acetyllysine-based enrichment and high-sensitive-mass spectrometer, we applied an integrated proteomic approach to comprehensively investigate lysine acetylome in strawberry. In total, we identified 1392 acetylation sites in 684 proteins, representing the largest dataset of acetylome in plants to date. To reveal the functional impacts of lysine acetylation in strawberry, intensive bioinformatic analysis was performed. The results significantly expanded our current understanding of plant acetylome and demonstrated that lysine acetylation is involved in multiple cellular metabolism and cellular processes. More interestingly, nearly 50% of all acetylated proteins identified in this work were localized in chloroplast and the vital role of lysine acetylation in photosynthesis was also revealed. Taken together, this study not only established the most extensive lysine acetylome in plants to date, but also systematically suggests the significant and unique roles of lysine acetylation in plants. PMID:26442052

  11. 21 CFR 172.372 - N-Acetyl-L-methionine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.372 N-Acetyl-L-methionine. The food additive N-acetyl-L... section. The minimum amount of the additive to achieve the desired effect must be used, and the...

  12. An Alternative Strategy for Pan-acetyl-lysine Antibody Generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Yee; Sim, Choon Kiat; Zhang, Qiongyi; Tang, Hui; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Pan, Hong; Karnani, Neerja; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in cell signaling. In acetylome studies, a high-quality pan-acetyl-lysine antibody is key to successful enrichment of acetylated peptides for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we show an alternative method to generate polyclonal pan-acetyl-lysine antibodies using a synthesized random library of acetylated peptides as the antigen. Our antibodies are tested to be specific for acetyl-lysine peptides/proteins via ELISA and dot blot. When pooled, five of our antibodies show broad reactivity to acetyl-lysine peptides, complementing a commercial antibody in terms of peptide coverage. The consensus sequence of peptides bound by our antibody cocktail differs slightly from that of the commercial antibody. Lastly, our antibodies are tested in a proof-of-concept to analyze the acetylome of HEK293 cells. In total we identified 1557 acetylated peptides from 416 proteins. We thus demonstrated that our antibodies are well-qualified for acetylome studies and can complement existing commercial antibodies. PMID:27606599

  13. A facile and practical synthesis of N-acetyl enamides.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenjun; Capacci, Andrew; Sarvestani, Max; Wei, Xudong; Yee, Nathan K; Senanayake, Chris H

    2009-12-18

    A facile and practical method for the synthesis of N-acetyl alpha-arylenamides has been developed from corresponding ketoximes as the starting materials with ferrous acetate as the reducing reagent. This methodology offers mild reaction conditions, simple purification procedures, and high yields for a variety of N-acetyl enamides. PMID:19921804

  14. Medial temporal N-acetyl aspartate in pediatric major depression

    PubMed Central

    MacMaster, Frank P.; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S. Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R.

    2008-01-01

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD-case control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  15. Medial temporal N-acetyl-aspartate in pediatric major depression.

    PubMed

    MacMaster, Frank P; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R

    2008-10-30

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD case-control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in the left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  16. Promiscuous presentation and recognition of nucleosomal autoepitopes in lupus: role of autoimmune T cell receptor alpha chain.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Kaliyaperumal, A; Lu, L; Southwood, S; Sette, A; Michaels, M A; Datta, S K

    1998-02-01

    T cells specific for nucleosomal autoepitopes are selectively expanded in lupus mice and these Th cells drive autoimmune B cells to produce pathogenic antinuclear antibodies. We transfected the TCR-alpha and -beta chain genes of a representative, pathogenic autoantibody-inducing Th clone specific for the nucleosomal core histone peptide H471-94 into TCR-negative recipient cells. Although the autoimmune TCRs were originally derived from SNF1 (I-Ad/q) mice, the transfectants could recognize the nucleosomal autoepitope presented by APC-bearing I-A molecules of all haplotypes tested, as well as human DR molecules. Competition assays indicated that the autoepitopes bound to the MHC class II groove. Most remarkably, MHC-unrestricted recognition of the nucleosomal peptide epitope was conferred by the lupus TCR-alpha chain even when it paired with a TCR-beta chain of irrelevant specificity. Several other disease-relevant Th clones and splenic T cells of lupus mice had similar properties. The TCR-alpha chains of these murine lupus Th clones shared related motifs and charged residues in their CDRs, and similar motifs were apparent even in TCR-alpha chains of human lupus Th clones. The lupus TCR-alpha chains probably contact the nucleosomal peptide complexed with MHC with relatively high affinity/avidity to sustain TCR signaling, because CD4 coreceptor was not required for promiscuous recognition. Indeed, pathogenic autoantibody-inducing, CD4-negative, TCR-alphabeta+ Th cells are expanded in systemic lupus erythematosus. These results have implications regarding thymic selection and peripheral expansion of nucleosome-specific T cells in lupus. They also suggest that universally tolerogenic epitopes could be designed for therapy of lupus patients with diverse HLA alleles. We propose to designate nucleosomes and other antigens bearing universal epitopes "Pantigens" (for promiscuous antigens).

  17. Study on Dendrobium officinale O-acetyl-glucomannan (Dendronan®): part II. Fine structures of O-acetylated residues.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiaohui; Cui, Steve W; Nie, Shaoping; Phillips, Glyn O; Goff, H Douglas; Wang, Qi

    2015-03-01

    Main objective of this study was to investigate the detailed structural information about O-acetylated sugar residues in Dendronan(®). A water solution (2%, w/w) of Dendronan(®) was treated with endo-β-mannanase to produce oligosaccharides rich in O-acetylated sugar residues. The oligosaccharides were partly recovered by ethanol precipitation (70%, w/w). The recovered sample (designated Hydrolyzed Dendrobium officinale Polysaccharide, HDOP) had a yield of 24.7% based on the dry weight of Dendronan(®) and was highly O-acetylated. A D2O solution of HDOP (6%, w/w) generated strong signals in (1)H, (13)C, 2D (1)H-(1)H COSY, 2D (1)H-(1)H TOCSY, 2D (1)H-(1)H NOESY, 2D (1)H-(13)C HMQC, and 2D (1)H-(13)C HMBC NMR spectra. Results of NMR analyses showed that the majority of O-acetylated mannoses were mono-substituted with acetyl groups at O-2 or O-3 position. There were small amounts of mannose residues with di-O-acetyl substitution at both O-2 and O-3 positions. Minor levels of mannoses with 6-O-acetyl, 2,6-di-O-acetyl, and 3,6-di-O-acetyl substitutions were also identified. Much information about sugar residue sequence was extracted from 2D (1)H-(13)C HMBC and 2D (1)H-(1)H NOESY spectra. (1)J(C-H) coupling constants of major sugar residues were obtained. Evidences for the existence of branches or O-acetylated glucoses in HDOP were not found. The major structure of Dendronan(®) is shown as follows: [Formula: see text] M: β-D-mannopyranose; G: β-D-glucopyranose; a: O-acetyl group.

  18. Cell biology (Communication arising): Tubulin acetylation and cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, Alexander; Ackerman, Brian; Gundersen, Gregg G.

    2003-01-01

    Although the protein tubulin is known to undergo several post-translational modifications that accumulate in stable but not dynamic microtubules inside cells, the function of these modifications is unknown. Hubbert et al. have shown that the enzyme HDAC6 (for histone deacetylase 6) reverses the post-translational acetylation of tubulin, and provide evidence that reducing tubulin acetylation enhances cell motility. They also suggest that decreasing tubulin acetylation reduces microtubule stability. However, we find that microtubule stabilization is not promoted by tubulin acetylation. We conclude that the alteration in cell motility observed by Hubbert et al. in cells overexpressing HDAC6 results not from changes in the formation of stable microtubules, but from alterations in the degree of tubulin acetylation.

  19. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylation suggests the widespread function is regulated by protein acetylation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zuoming; Zhu, Honglin; Zhou, Yong; Wu, Chengcheng; Liu, Yue; Sheng, Qing; Lv, Zhengbing; Zhang, Wenping; Yu, Wei; Jiang, Caiying; Xie, Longfei; Zhang, Yaozhou; Yao, Juming

    2015-09-01

    Lysine acetylation in proteins is a dynamic and reversible PTM and plays an important role in diverse cellular processes. In this study, using lysine-acetylation (Kac) peptide enrichment coupled with nano HPLC/MS/MS, we initially identified the acetylome in the silkworms. Overall, a total of 342 acetylated proteins with 667 Kac sites were identified in silkworm. Sequence motifs analysis around Kac sites revealed an enrichment of Y, F, and H in the +1 position, and F was also enriched in the +2 and -2 positions, indicating the presences of preferred amino acids around Kac sites in the silkworm. Functional analysis showed the acetylated proteins were primarily involved in some specific biological processes. Furthermore, lots of nutrient-storage proteins, such as apolipophorin, vitellogenin, storage proteins, and 30 K proteins, were highly acetylated, indicating lysine acetylation may represent a common regulatory mechanism of nutrient utilization in the silkworm. Interestingly, Ser2 proteins, the coating proteins of larval silk, were found to contain many Kac sites, suggesting lysine acetylation may be involved in the regulation of larval silk synthesis. This study is the first to identify the acetylome in a lepidoptera insect, and expands greatly the catalog of lysine acetylation substrates and sites in insects.

  20. High-resolution analysis of DNA synthesis start sites and nucleosome architecture at efficient mammalian replication origins.

    PubMed

    Lombraña, Rodrigo; Almeida, Ricardo; Revuelta, Isabel; Madeira, Sofia; Herranz, Gonzalo; Saiz, Néstor; Bastolla, Ugo; Gómez, María

    2013-10-01

    DNA replication origins are poorly characterized genomic regions that are essential to recruit and position the initiation complex to start DNA synthesis. Despite the lack of specific replicator sequences, initiation of replication does not occur at random sites in the mammalian genome. This has lead to the view that DNA accessibility could be a major determinant of mammalian origins. Here, we performed a high-resolution analysis of nucleosome architecture and initiation sites along several origins of different genomic location and firing efficiencies. We found that mammalian origins are highly variable in nucleosome conformation and initiation patterns. Strikingly, initiation sites at efficient CpG island-associated origins always occur at positions of high-nucleosome occupancy. Origin recognition complex (ORC) binding sites, however, occur at adjacent but distinct positions marked by labile nucleosomes. We also found that initiation profiles mirror nucleosome architecture, both at endogenous origins and at a transgene in a heterologous system. Our studies provide a unique insight into the relationship between chromatin structure and initiation sites in the mammalian genome that has direct implications for how the replication programme can be accommodated to diverse epigenetic scenarios.