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Sample records for acetylene reduction activities

  1. Immediate Acetylene Reduction by Excised Grass Roots Not Previously Preincubated at Low Oxygen Tensions 1

    PubMed Central

    van Berkum, Peter; Sloger, Charles

    1979-01-01

    Excised roots of Spartina alterniflora Loisel. and corn reduced acetylene in air without the previously reported period of zero activity lasting 8 to 18 hours. The profiles of acetylene-dependent ethylene accumulation by excised roots and intact plants of S. alterniflora were similar. No significant change in the number of bacteria associated with the roots was detectable during the assay. Most of the nitrogenase activity was detected in the roots and rhizomes of the plants. The salt marsh sediment also was capable of reducing acetylene. Additional damage to roots by washing and cutting increased the rate of acetylene reduction with samples incubated in air. Low concentrations of nitrate significantly inhibited the nitrogenase activity associated with the sediment and excised roots, but not with intact plants. Rates of acetylene reduction by excised corn roots were low. Oxidation and endogenous production of ethylene in the absence of acetylene were negligible. Measurements made with excised grass roots as described probably reflect the occurrence and magnitude of nitrogenase activity associated with the plants in the field. PMID:16661045

  2. Aquatic acetylene-reduction techniques: solutions to several problems.

    PubMed

    Flett, R J; Hamilton, R D; Campbell, N E

    1976-01-01

    Previous methods of performing aquatic acetylene-reduction assays are described and several problems associated with them are discussed. A refinement of these older techniques is introduced and problems that it overcomes are also discussed. A depth profile of nitrogen fixation (C2H4 production), obtained by the refined technique, is shown for a fertilized Canadian Shield lake in the Experimental Lakes Area of northwestern Ontario. PMID:814983

  3. Aquatic acetylene-reduction techniques: solutions to several problems.

    PubMed

    Flett, R J; Hamilton, R D; Campbell, N E

    1976-01-01

    Previous methods of performing aquatic acetylene-reduction assays are described and several problems associated with them are discussed. A refinement of these older techniques is introduced and problems that it overcomes are also discussed. A depth profile of nitrogen fixation (C2H4 production), obtained by the refined technique, is shown for a fertilized Canadian Shield lake in the Experimental Lakes Area of northwestern Ontario.

  4. Effect of polynuclear hydrocarbons on algal nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction)

    SciTech Connect

    Bastian, M.V.; Toetz, D.W.

    1985-08-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the effects of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) on N/sub 2/ fixation by the alga, Anabaena flos-aquea. The reduction of acetylene (C/sub 2/H/sub 2/) to ethylene (C/sub 2/H/sub 4/) was measured as a measure of the capacity of an organism to fix atmospheric N/sub 2/ and reduce it to an assimilable form. The primary advantage of this assay is its speed since chemical exposure and quantitative chromatographic analysis can be completed in a few hours.

  5. Limitation of Acetylene Reduction (Nitrogen Fixation) by Photosynthesis in Soybean Having Low Water Potentials 1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chi-Ying; Boyer, John S.; Vanderhoef, Larry N.

    1975-01-01

    The role of photosynthesis and transpiration in the desiccation-induced inhibition of acetylene reduction (nitrogen fixation) was investigated in soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. var. Beeson) using an apparatus that permitted simultaneous measurements of acetylene reduction, net photosynthesis, and transpiration. The inhibition of acetylene reduction caused by low water potentials and their aftereffects could be reproduced by depriving shoots of atmospheric CO2 even though the soil remained at water potentials that should have favored rapid acetylene reduction. The inhibition of acetylene reduction at low water potentials could be partially reversed by exposing the shoots to high CO2 concentrations. When transpiration was varied independently of photosynthesis and dark respiration in plants having high water potentials, no effects on acetylene reduction could be observed. There was no correlation between transpiration and acetylene reduction in the CO2 experiments. Therefore, the correlation that was observed between transpiration and acetylene reduction during desiccation was fortuitous. We conclude that the inhibition of shoot photosynthesis accounted for the inhibition of nodule acetylene reduction at low water potentials. PMID:16659277

  6. Application of the photoacoustic method to the measurement of acetylene reduction by nitrogenase enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, D. U.; Sthel, M. S.; Carneiro, L. O.; Franco, A. A.; Campos, A. C.; Vargas, H.

    2005-06-01

    Nitrogenase is an enzyme responsible for the reduction of the atmospheric N2 into NH4^+, which represents the key entry point of the molecular nitrogen into the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen. This enzyme is present in the rhizobial bacteroids, which are symbionts in a Leguminosae plant (Acacia Holosericea), and also reduces acetylene into ethylene at the same rate as the nitrogen reduction. Therefore, a CO2 Laser Photoacoustic system was used for detecting and monitoring the ethylene emission by the nitrogenase activity, in the rhizobial symbionts in Acacia Holosericea, when they are confined in test tubes with acetylene at two different volumes (0.1 and 0.5 ml). Ethylene concentrations are also determined in the ppm range.

  7. Simultaneous Measurement of Acetylene Reduction and Respiratory Gas Exchange of Attached Root Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Winship, Lawrence J.; Tjepkema, John D.

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed for the simultaneous measurement of acetylene reduction, carbon dioxide evolution and oxygen uptake by individual root nodules of intact nitrogen-fixing plants (Alnus rubra Bong.). The nodules were enclosed in a temperature-controlled leak-tight cuvette. Assay gas mixtures were passed through the cuvette at a constant, known flow rate and gas exchange was measured by the difference between inlet and outlet gas compositions. Gas concentrations were assayed by a combination of an automated gas chromatograph and a programmable electronic integrator. Carbon dioxide and ethylene evolution were determined with a coefficient of variation which was less than 2%, whereas the coefficient of variation for oxygen uptake measurements was less than 5%. Nodules subjected to repeated removal from and reinsertion into the cuvette and to long exposures of 10% v/v acetylene showed no irreversible decline in respiration or acetylene reduction. This system offers long-term stability and freedom from disturbance artifacts plus the ability to monitor continuously, rapidly and specifically the changes in root nodule activity caused by environmental perturbation. PMID:16662496

  8. Examining the impact of acetylene on N-fixation and the active sediment microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Fulweiler, Robinson W.; Heiss, Elise M.; Rogener, Mary Kate; Newell, Silvia E.; LeCleir, Gary R.; Kortebein, Sarah M.; Wilhelm, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Here we examined the impact of a commonly employed method used to measure nitrogen fixation, the acetylene reduction assay (ARA), on a marine sediment community. Historically, the ARA technique has been broadly employed for its ease of use, in spite of numerous known artifacts. To gauge the severity of these effects in a natural environment, we employed high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing to detect differences in acetylene-treated sediments vs. non-treated control sediments after a 7 h incubation. Within this short time period, significant differences were seen across all activity of microbes identified in the sediment, implying that the changes induced by acetylene occur quickly. The results have important implications for our understanding of marine nitrogen budgets. Moreover, because the ARA technique has been widely used in terrestrial and freshwater habitats, these results may be applicable to other ecosystems. PMID:26029177

  9. Highly enantioselective reductive cyclization of acetylenic aldehydes via rhodium catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jong Uk; Krische, Michael J

    2006-08-23

    Catalytic hydrogenation of acetylenic aldehydes 1a-12a using chirally modified cationic rhodium catalysts enables highly enantioselective reductive cyclization to afford cyclic allylic alcohols 1b-12b. Using an achiral hydrogenation catalyst, the chiral racemic acetylenic aldehydes 13a-15a engage in highly syn-diastereoselective reductive cyclizations to afford cyclic allylic alcohols 13b-15b. Ozonolysis of cyclization products 7b and 9b allows access to optically enriched alpha-hydroxy ketones 7c and 9c. Reductive cyclization of enyne 7a under a deuterium atmosphere provides the monodeuterated product deuterio-7b, consistent with a catalytic mechanism involving alkyne-carbonyl oxidative coupling followed by hydrogenolytic cleavage of the resulting oxametallacycle. These hydrogen-mediated transformations represent the first examples of the enantioselective reductive cyclization of acetylenic aldehydes. PMID:16910650

  10. Acetylene fuels reductive dechlorination of TCE by Dehalococcoides/Pelobacter-containing microbial consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Mao, X.; Mahandra, C.; Baesman, S. M.; Gushgari, S.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.; Liu, T.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater contamination by trichloroethene (TCE) poses a threat to health and leads to the generation of vinyl chloride (VC), a carcinogen. Dehalococcoides mccartyi is the only bacterium that can completely dechlorinate TCE to ethene (C2H4). Acetylene (C2H2) occurs in TCE-contaminated sites as a consequence of chemical degradation of TCE. Yet acetylene inhibits a variety of microbial processes including methanogesis and reductive dechlorination. Pelobacter acetylenicus and related species can metabolize acetylene via acetylene hydratase and acetaldehyde dismutatse thereby generating acetate and H2 as endproducts, which could serve as electron donor and carbon source for growth of D. mccartyi. We found that 1mM acetylene (aqueous) inhibits growth of D. mccartyi strain 195 on 0.3 mM TCE, but that the inhibition was removed after 12 days with the addition of an acetylene-utilizing isolate from San Francisco Bay, Pelobacter strain SFB93. TCE did not inhibit the growth of this Pelobacter at the concentrations tested (0.1-0.5 mM) and TCE was not consumed by strain SFB93. Co-cultures of strain 195 with strain SFB93 at 5% inoculation were established in 120 mL serum bottles containing 40 mL defined medium. TCE was supplied at a liquid concentration of 0.1 mM, with 0.1 mM acetylene and N2/CO2 (90:10 v/v) headspace at 34 °C. Co-cultures were subsequently transferred (5% vol/vol inoculation) to generate subcultures after 20 μmol TCE was reduced to VC and 36 μmol acetylene was depleted. Aqueous H2 ranged from 114 to 217 nM during TCE-dechlorination, and the cell yield of strain 195 was 3.7 ±0.3 × 107 cells μmol-1 Cl- released. In a D. mccartyi-containing enrichment culture (ANAS) under the same conditions as above, it was found that inhibition of dechlorination by acetylene was reversed after 19 days by adding SFB93. Thus we showed that a co-culture of Pelobacter SFB93 and D. mccartyi 195 could be maintained with C2H2 as the electron donor and carbon source while TCE

  11. Endorhizal and Exorhizal Acetylene-reducing Activity in a Grass (Spartina alterniflora Loisel.)-Diazotroph Association.

    PubMed

    Boyle, C D; Patriquin, D G

    1980-08-01

    Earlier studies indicated that bacteria responsible for nitrogenase activity of some grasses are located inside the roots. Those studies were conducted with excised roots in which a long, unexplained "lag phase" occurred before initiation of nitrogenase activity. When hydroponically maintained Spartina alterniflora Loisel. was incubated in a two-compartment system with acetylene, ethylene was produced following, at most, a 2-hour lag in both the upper (shoot) and lower (roots + water) phases. Ethylene production in the upper phase not attributable to leaf-associated acetylene-reducing activity or to diffusion of ethylene from around the roots is considered to represent "endorhizal acetylene-reducing activity," the internally produced ethylene diffusing into the upper phase via the lacunae. Ethylene produced in the lower phase is designated "exorhizal acetylene-reducing activity." The endorhizal acetylene-reducing activity, in comparison to exorhizal activity, was relatively insensitive to additions of HgCl(2), NH(4)Cl, or carbon sources to the lower phase. Post-lag acetylene-reducing activity of roots excised from plants growing in soil responded to additions in a manner similar to that of endorhizal acetylene-reducing activity, whereas post-lag acetylene-reducing activity of rhizosphere soil responded in a manner similar to that of exorhizal acetylene-reducing activity. PMID:16661421

  12. Towards Structural-Functional Mimics of Acetylene Hydratase: Reversible Activation of Acetylene using a Biomimetic Tungsten Complex.

    PubMed

    Peschel, Lydia M; Belaj, Ferdinand; Mösch-Zanetti, Nadia C

    2015-10-26

    The synthesis and characterization of a biomimetic system that can reversibly bind acetylene (ethyne) is reported. The system has been designed to mimic catalytic intermediates of the tungstoenzyme acetylene hydratase. The thiophenyloxazoline ligand S-Phoz (2-(4',4'-dimethyloxazolin-2'-yl)thiophenolate) is used to generate a bioinspired donor environment around the W center, facilitating the stabilization of W-acetylene adducts. The featured complexes [W(C2 H2 )(CO)(S-Phoz)2 ] (2) and [WO(C2 H2 )(S-Phoz)2 ] (3) are extremely rare from a synthetic and structural point of view as very little is known about W-C2 H2 adducts. Upon exposure to visible light, 3 can release C2 H2 from its coordination sphere to yield the 14-electron species [WO(S-Phoz)2 ] (4). Under light-exclusion 4 re-activates C2 H2 making this the first fully characterized system for the reversible activation of acetylene.

  13. Root and nodule respiration in relation to acetylene reduction in intact nodulated peas.

    PubMed

    Mahon, J D

    1977-12-01

    Inoculated pea plants (Pisum sativum L.) were grown with N-free nutrients in a controlled environment room and rates of respiratory CO(2) evolution and C(2)H(2) reduction by the intact nodulated roots were determined. Experiments followed changes related to diurnal cycles, light and dark treatments, partial defoliation, aging of plants and NH(4)NO(3) addition. In all experiments, changes in C(2)H(2) reduction were associated with parallel changes in the respiration rate, although in all but the defoliation experiment there was a basal level of respiration which was independent of the rate of C(2)H(2) reduction. In conditions which affected growth or plant size as well as C(2)H(2) reduction, respiration changed by an average of 0.42 mg CO(2) (mumol C(2)H(2) reduced)(-1). However, some treatments decreased C(2)H(2) reduction without greatly changing the growth and in these conditions respiration was decreased by an average of 0.27 mg CO(2) (mumol C(2)H(2) reduced)(-1). While this value may also include some respiration associated with other processes, it is proposed that it more closely estimates respiration directly associated with energy utilization for acetylene reduction; whereas the higher value includes respiration related to maintenance and growth processes as well.

  14. Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase. Mechanism of acetylene reduction and its inhibition by carbon monoxide.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, D J; Fisher, K; Thorneley, R N

    1990-01-01

    The electron flux through the MoFe-protein of nitrogenase from Klebsiella pneumoniae determines the absolute and relative rates of 2H+ reduction to H2 and acetylene (C2H2) reduction to ethylene (C2H4) at saturating levels of reductant (Na2S2O4) and MgATP. High electron flux, induced by a high Fe-protein (Kp2)/MoFe protein (Kp1) ratio, favours C2H2 reduction. These data can be explained if ethylene, the two-electron reduction product of C2H2, is not released until three electrons have been transferred from Kp2 to Kp1. This explanation is also consistent with a pre-steady-state lag phase for C2H4 formation of 250 ms observed when functioning enzyme is quenched with acid. Electron flux through nitrogenase is inhibited by C2H2 at high protein concentrations. This is because the association rate between Kp1 and oxidized Kp2 is enhanced by C2H2, leading to an increased steady-state concentration of the inhibitory complex Kp2oxKp1C2H2. This effect is not relieved by CO. Thus CO and C2H2 (or C2H4) must be bound at the same time to distinct sites, presumably at Mo or Fe centres, on the enzyme. PMID:2268290

  15. Metabolic activation of acetylenic substituents to derivatives in the rat causing the loss of hepatic cytochrome P-450 and haem

    PubMed Central

    White, Ian N. H.

    1978-01-01

    1. A number of acetylenic-substituted steroidal and non-steroidal compounds, including 2,2-dipropargylacetamide, pregna-2,4-dien-20-yno[2,3-d]isoxazol-17-ol (Danazol) and acetylene gas, when administered to rats in vivo brought about a decrease in the concentrations of hepatic microsomal cytochrome P-450 and haem. Abnormal haem-breakdown products, `green pigments', and porphyrins accumulated in the livers of these animals. 2. For loss of microsomal cytochrome P-450 to occur in vitro, metabolic activation of the acetylenic substituent was necessary. The enzyme system responsible required NADPH and air, and was induced by pretreatment of rats with phenobarbitone; these are characteristics typical of the microsomal mixed-function oxidases. 3. When rats were dosed with 17α-ethynyl-17β-hydroxyandrost-4-en-3-one (ethynyltestosterone, 1mmol/kg) the pattern of green pigments extracted from the liver 4h after dosing and separated by t.l.c. was quite different from that in rats given 17β-hydroxy-17α-vinylandrost-4-en-3-one (vinyltestosterone), suggesting that reduction of the unsaturated triple bond to a double bond is not normally part of the metabolic activation pathway of the acetylenic substituent. 4. The green pigments extracted from the livers of rats 4h after the administration of the acetylenic-substituted compounds (1mmol/kg) when separated by silica-gel t.l.c. had variable RF values. The number and distribution of green pigments was characteristic for each compound examined. There was little correlation between the total loss of hepatic microsomal haem and the apparent intensity of the green pigments seen on the thin-layer chromatograms. 5. After incubation of [14C]acetylene in vitro with microsomal preparations from phenobarbitone-pretreated rats and a NADPH-generating system, no significant covalent binding to microsomal protein was detected over a 30min incubation period, although under similar conditions there was a significant loss of cytochrome P-450

  16. Elimination kinetics of acetylene and Freon 22 in resting and active lungless salamanders.

    PubMed

    Feder, M E; Full, R J; Piiper, J

    1988-05-01

    To quantify diffusion limitation in cutaneous gas exchange, the elimination of two inert gases of different diffusivity, Freon 22 (CHC1F2) and acetylene (C2H2), was measured simultaneously in exclusively skin-breathing lungless salamanders, Desmognathus quadramaculatus. In resting salamanders, elimination of both gases could be described as the sum of three exponential terms. For both the medium and the slow exponential component, the ratio of the respective rate constants (k) for acetylene and Freon averaged 1.77. This value is between the values expected for perfusion limitation (1.00) and diffusion limitation (1.94), indicating combined diffusion and perfusion limitation. In salamanders stimulated to run on a treadmill, the elimination rates and the rate constants increased more for Freon than for acetylene. During spontaneous activity, the increase in elimination of Freon was larger than that of acetylene. These findings suggest an increase in the diffusing capacity of the skin during exercise. Thus the diffusing capacity of salamander skin for gases appears to be variable and to be adjusted to meet the increased O2 requirement during exercise.

  17. Acetylene hydratase: a non-redox enzyme with tungsten and iron-sulfur centers at the active site.

    PubMed

    Kroneck, Peter M H

    2016-03-01

    In living systems, tungsten is exclusively found in microbial enzymes coordinated by the pyranopterin cofactor, with additional metal coordination provided by oxygen and/or sulfur, and/or selenium atoms in diverse arrangements. Prominent examples are formate dehydrogenase, formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase, and aldehyde oxidoreductase all of which catalyze redox reactions. The bacterial enzyme acetylene hydratase (AH) stands out of its class as it catalyzes the conversion of acetylene to acetaldehyde, clearly a non-redox reaction and a reaction distinct from the reduction of acetylene to ethylene by nitrogenase. AH harbors two pyranopterins bound to W, and a [4Fe-4S] cluster. W is coordinated by four dithiolene sulfur atoms, one cysteine sulfur, and one oxygen ligand. AH activity requires a strong reductant suggesting W(IV) as the active oxidation state. Two different types of reaction pathways have been proposed. The 1.26 Å structure reveals a water molecule coordinated to W which could gain a partially positive net charge by the adjacent protonated Asp-13, enabling a direct attack of C2H2. To access the W-Asp site, a substrate channel was evolved distant from where it is found in other members of the DMSOR family. Computational studies of this second shell mechanism led to unrealistically high energy barriers, and alternative pathways were proposed where C2H2 binds directly to W. The architecture of the catalytic cavity, the specificity for C2H2 and the results from site-directed mutagenesis do not support this first shell mechanism. More investigations including structural information on the binding of C2H2 are needed to present a conclusive answer.

  18. A potential plant-derived antifungal acetylenic acid mediates its activity by interfering with fatty acid homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    6-Nonadecynoic acid (6-NDA), a plant-derived acetylenic acid, exhibits strong inhibitory activity against the human fungal pathogens Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. In the present study, transcriptional profiling coupled with mutant and biochemical analyses...

  19. Nitrogen fixation (Acetylene Reduction) by annual winter legumes on a coal surface mine

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielson, F.C.

    1982-01-01

    The winter annuals, crimson clover, rose clover, subterranean clover and hairy vetch, were evaluated for nitrogen fixing capacity on coal surface mine substrates by measuring their ability to reduce acetylene to ethylene. The effects of fertilizer, Abruzzi rye, Kentucky 31 fescue grass and a phytotoxic plant Chenopodium album on nitrogen fixation were also assessed. Crimson clover was recommended as the best legume to use on topsoil and shale in the south. Hairy vetch gave good results on shale and subterranean clover did well on topsoil. The use of these species for revegetation is discussed. Overall, no correlation between substrate pH and ethylene levels was found and effects of substrate depended upon the legume species. Super phosphate fertilizer supported less nitrogen fixation than 13-13-13. Abruzzi rye in some unknown way inhibited plant density and nitrogen fixation by legumes but not by free living substrate micro-organisms. Shale from under dead Chenopodium plants in both field and greehouse experiments did not inhibit nitrogen fixation. 7 tables.

  20. Nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction) by annual winter legumes on a coal surface mine

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielson, F.C.

    1982-01-01

    The winter annuals, crimson clover, rose clover, subterranean clover and hairy vetch, were evaluated for their ability to fix nitrogen on coal surface mine substrates by measuring their ability to reduce acetylene to ethylene. The effects of fertilizer, Abruzzi ryegrass, Kentucky 31 fescue grass and a phytotoxic plant Chenopodium album on nitrogen fixation was also assessed. Crimson clover was recommended as the best legume to use on topsoil and shale in the South. Hairy vetch gave good results on shale and subterranean clover did well on topsoil. The use of these species for revegetation is discussed. Overall, no correlation between substrate pH and ethylene levels was found and effects of substrate depended upon the legume species. Super phosphate fertilizer supported less nitrogen fixation than 13-13-13. Abruzzi ryegrass in some unknown way inhibited plant density and nitrogen fixation by legumes but not by free living substrate micro-organisms. Shale from under dead Chenopodium plants in both field and greenhouse experiments did not inhibit nitrogen fixation. 11 references, 7 tables.

  1. Synthesis, structure and cytotoxic activity of acetylenic derivatives of betulonic and betulinic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bębenek, Ewa; Chrobak, Elwira; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Kadela, Monika; Chrobak, Artur; Kusz, Joachim; Książek, Maria; Jastrzębska, Maria; Boryczka, Stanisław

    2016-02-01

    A series of acetylenic derivatives of betulonic and betulinic acids has been synthesized and characterized by 1H and 13C NMR, IR and MS spectroscopy. The structure of propargyl betulonate 4 and propargyl betulinate-DMF solvate 8A was solved by X-ray diffraction. Thermal properties were examined using a DSC technique. The resulting alkynyl derivatives, as well as betulin 1 and betulinic acid 3, were evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxic activity against human T47D breast cancer, CCRF/CEM leukemia, SW707 colorectal, murine P388 leukemia and BALB3T3 normal fibroblasts cell lines. Several of the obtained compounds have a favorable cytotoxic profile than betulin 1. Propargyl betulinate 8 was the most active derivative, being up to 3-fold more potent than betulin 1 against the human leukemia (CCRF/CEM) cell line, with an IC50 value of 3.9 μg/mL.

  2. Synthesis, structure and cytotoxic activity of acetylenic derivatives of betulonic and betulinic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bębenek, Ewa; Chrobak, Elwira; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Kadela, Monika; Chrobak, Artur; Kusz, Joachim; Książek, Maria; Jastrzębska, Maria; Boryczka, Stanisław

    2016-02-01

    A series of acetylenic derivatives of betulonic and betulinic acids has been synthesized and characterized by 1H and 13C NMR, IR and MS spectroscopy. The structure of propargyl betulonate 4 and propargyl betulinate-DMF solvate 8A was solved by X-ray diffraction. Thermal properties were examined using a DSC technique. The resulting alkynyl derivatives, as well as betulin 1 and betulinic acid 3, were evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxic activity against human T47D breast cancer, CCRF/CEM leukemia, SW707 colorectal, murine P388 leukemia and BALB3T3 normal fibroblasts cell lines. Several of the obtained compounds have a favorable cytotoxic profile than betulin 1. Propargyl betulinate 8 was the most active derivative, being up to 3-fold more potent than betulin 1 against the human leukemia (CCRF/CEM) cell line, with an IC50 value of 3.9 μg/mL.

  3. Effect of the detonation nanodiamond surface on the catalytic activity of deposited nickel catalysts in the hydrogenation of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveritinova, E. A.; Kulakova, I. I.; Zhitnev, Yu. N.; Kharlanov, A. N.; Fionov, A. V.; Chen, W.; Buyanova, I.; Lunin, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    A comparative study is performed of the catalytic activity of nanosized nickel deposited on detonation synthesis nanodiamond (DND) and coal (CSUG) produced by burning sugar and crystalline quartz in the hydrogenation of acetylene. Nanosized nickel is obtained through the thermal decomposition of nickel formate under a dynamic vacuum. The catalysts are studied by means of scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and pulse microcatalytic method. It is shown that Ni/DND is an active catalyst of acetylene hydrogenation, considerably surpassing Ni/quartz and Ni/CSUG. The apparent activation energy of the hydrogenation of acetylene is calculated, and the region of the reaction are determined for all catalysts. It is found that the influence of the structure and nature of a functional coating of nanodiamond on the catalytic activity of Ni/DND deposited catalyst in the hydrogenation of acetylene. The ability of Ni/DND to hold active hydrogen is detected.

  4. Short-term influence of nitrate on acetylene reduction, photosynthesis and nodule respiration of black alder seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Cazell, B.H.; Samuelson, L.J.; Seiler, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Black alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaernt.) has shown significant benefits in several silvicultural applications such as nurse-trees. However, little is known concerning the nitrate/N-fixing interactions. Our objections were to examine the effects of three nitrate levels on acetylene reduction (AR), net photosynthesis (Ps) and nodule respiration (NR). Fifteen month-old black alder rooted cuttings were inoculated with one strain of Frankia inoculum (ARgN22D) at six months, maintained under 16h photoperiod at ambient greenhouse conditions, and fertilized for two months prior to study with a modified Crone's N-free solution. At study initiation seedlings were fertilized for six days with 0, 7.5 or 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Measurements of AR, Ps and NR were collected on the second, fourth and sixth day of NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} application. By day four AR was significantly lowered by 75% for the 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} treatment when compared with the controls. On day six, Ps and NR were lowered significantly by 29% and 59%, respectively, for the 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} treatments when compared to control values. Results suggest any benefit from black alder N-fixation might be negated by nitrate fertilization.

  5. Importance of surface carbide formation on the activity and selectivity of Pd surfaces in the selective hydrogenation of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Burch, Robbie; Hardacre, Christopher; Hu, P.; Hughes, Philip

    2016-04-01

    A recent experimental investigation (Kim et al. J. Catal. 306 (2013) 146-154) on the selective hydrogenation of acetylene over Pd nanoparticles with different shapes concluded that Pd(100) showed higher activity and selectivity than Pd(111) for acetylene hydrogenation. However, our recent density functional calculations (Yang et al. J. Catal. 305 (2013) 264-276) observed that the clean Pd(111) surface should result in higher activity and ethylene selectivity compared with the clean Pd(100) surface for acetylene hydrogenation. In the current work, using density functional theory calculations, we find that Pd(100) in the carbide form gives rise to higher activity and selectivity than Pd(111) carbide. These results indicate that the catalyst surface is most likely in the carbide form under the experimental reaction conditions. Furthermore, the adsorption energies of hydrogen atoms as a function of the hydrogen coverage at the surface and subsurface sites over Pd(100) are compared with those over Pd(111), and it is found that the adsorption of hydrogen atoms is always less favoured on Pd(100) over the whole coverage range. This suggests that the Pd(100) hydride surface will be less stable than the Pd(111) hydride surface, which is also in accordance with the experimental results reported.

  6. Comparison of N2 Fixation and Yields in Cajanus cajan between Hydrogenase-Positive and Hydrogenase-Negative Rhizobia by In Situ Acetylene Reduction Assays and Direct 15N Partitioning 1

    PubMed Central

    La Favre, Jeffrey S.; Focht, Dennis D.

    1983-01-01

    Pigeon peas [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.] were grown in soil columns containing 15N-enriched organic matter. Seasonal N2 fixation activity was determined by periodically assaying plants for reduction of C2H2. N2 fixation rose sharply from the first assay period at 51 days after planting to a peak of activity between floral initiation and fruit set. N2 fixation (acetylene reduction) activity dropped concomitantly with pod maturation but recovered after pod harvests. Analysis of 15N content of plant shoots revealed that approximately 91 to 94% of plant N was derived from N2 fixation. The effect of inoculation with hydrogenase-positive and hydrogenase-negative rhizobia was examined. Pigeon peas inoculated with strain P132 (hydrogenase-positive) yielded significantly more total shoot N than other inoculated or uninoculated treatments. However, two other hydrogenase-positive strains did not yield significantly more total shoot N than a hydrogenase-negative strain. The extent of nodulation by inoculum strains compared to indigenous rhizobia was determined by typing nodules according to intrinsic antibiotic resistance of the inoculum strains. The inoculum strains were detected in almost all typed nodules of inoculated plants. Gas samples were taken from soil columns several times during the growth cycle of the plants. H2 was never detected, even in columns containing pigeon peas inoculated with hydrogenase-negative rhizobia. This was attributed to H2 consumption by soil bacteria. Estimation of N2 fixation by acetylene reduction activity was closest to the direct 15N method when ethylene concentrations in the gas headspace (between the column lid and soil surface) were extrapolated to include the soil pore space as opposed solely to measurement in the headspace. There was an 8-fold difference between the two acetylene reduction assay methods of estimation. Based on a planting density of 15,000 plants per hectare, the direct 15N fixation rates ranged from 67 (noninoculated

  7. Discovery of acetylene hydratase activity of the iron–sulphur protein IspH

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weixue; Zhang, Yonghui; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Li, Kai; Schulz, Charles; Oldfield, Eric; Groll, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The final step of the methylerythritol phosphate isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway is catalysed by the iron–sulphur enzyme IspH, producing the universal precursors of terpenes: isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. Here we report an unforeseen reaction discovered during the investigation of the interaction of IspH with acetylene inhibitors by X-ray crystallography, Mößbauer, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition to its role as a 2H+/2e− reductase, IspH can hydrate acetylenes to aldehydes and ketones via anti-Markovnikov/Markovnikov addition. The reactions only occur with the oxidised protein and proceed via η1-O-enolate intermediates. One of these is characterized crystallographically and contains a C4 ligand oxygen bound to the unique, fourth iron in the 4Fe-4S cluster: this intermediate subsequently hydrolyzes to produce an aldehyde product. This unexpected side to IspH reactivity is of interest in the context of the mechanism of action of other acetylene hydratases, as well as in the design of antiinfectives targeting IspH. PMID:22948824

  8. Active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, J.

    1984-01-01

    Active Noise Reduction (ANR) techniques, singly and in combination with passive hearing protectors, offer the potential for increased sound protection, enhanced voice communications and improved wearability features for personnel exposed to unacceptable noise conditions. An enhanced closed loop active noise reduction system was miniaturized and incorporated into a standard Air Force flight helmet (HGU-26/P). This report describes the theory of design and operation, prototype configuration and operation, and electroacoustic performance and specifications for the ANR system. This system is theoretically capable of producing in excess of 30 decibels of active noise reduction. Electroacoustic measurements on a flat plate coupler demonstrated approximately 20 decibels of active noise reduction with the prototype unit. A performance evaluation of the integrated ANR unit will be conducted under laboratory and field conditions by government personnel to determine the feasibility of the system for use in military applications.

  9. Atom-economic catalytic amide synthesis from amines and carboxylic acids activated in situ with acetylenes

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Thilo; Baader, Sabrina; Erb, Benjamin; Gooßen, Lukas J.

    2016-01-01

    Amide bond-forming reactions are of tremendous significance in synthetic chemistry. Methodological research has, in the past, focused on efficiency and selectivity, and these have reached impressive levels. However, the unacceptable amounts of waste produced have led the ACS GCI Roundtable to label ‘amide bond formation avoiding poor atom economy' as the most pressing target for sustainable synthetic method development. In response to this acute demand, we herein disclose an efficient one-pot amide coupling protocol that is based on simple alkynes as coupling reagents: in the presence of a dichloro[(2,6,10-dodecatriene)-1,12-diyl]ruthenium catalyst, carboxylate salts of primary or secondary amines react with acetylene or ethoxyacetylene to vinyl ester intermediates, which undergo aminolysis to give the corresponding amides along only with volatile acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate, respectively. The new amide synthesis is broadly applicable to the synthesis of structurally diverse amides, including dipeptides. PMID:27282773

  10. Atom-economic catalytic amide synthesis from amines and carboxylic acids activated in situ with acetylenes.

    PubMed

    Krause, Thilo; Baader, Sabrina; Erb, Benjamin; Gooßen, Lukas J

    2016-01-01

    Amide bond-forming reactions are of tremendous significance in synthetic chemistry. Methodological research has, in the past, focused on efficiency and selectivity, and these have reached impressive levels. However, the unacceptable amounts of waste produced have led the ACS GCI Roundtable to label 'amide bond formation avoiding poor atom economy' as the most pressing target for sustainable synthetic method development. In response to this acute demand, we herein disclose an efficient one-pot amide coupling protocol that is based on simple alkynes as coupling reagents: in the presence of a dichloro[(2,6,10-dodecatriene)-1,12-diyl]ruthenium catalyst, carboxylate salts of primary or secondary amines react with acetylene or ethoxyacetylene to vinyl ester intermediates, which undergo aminolysis to give the corresponding amides along only with volatile acetaldehyde or ethyl acetate, respectively. The new amide synthesis is broadly applicable to the synthesis of structurally diverse amides, including dipeptides. PMID:27282773

  11. Estimation of nitrogenase activity in the presence of ethylene biosynthesis by use of deuterated acetylene as a substrate.

    PubMed Central

    Lin-Vien, D; Fateley, W G; Davis, L C

    1989-01-01

    Nitrogenase reduces deuterated acetylene primarily to cis dideuterated ethylene. This can be distinguished from undeuterated ethylene by the use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Characteristic bands in the region from 800 to 3,500 cm-1 can be used to identify and quantitate levels of these products. This technique is applicable to field studies of nitrogen fixation where ethylene biosynthesis by plants or bacteria is occurring. We have verified the reaction stoichiometry by using Klebsiella pneumoniae and Bradyrhizobium japonicum in soybeans. The most useful bands for quantitation of substrate purity and product distribution are as follows: acetylene-d0, 3,374 cm-1; acetylene-d1, 2,584 cm-1; acetylene-d2, 2,439 cm-1; cis-ethylene-d2, 843 cm-1; trans-ethylene-d2, 988 cm-1; ethylene-d1, 943 cm-1; ethylene-d0, 949 cm-1. (The various deuterated ethylenes and acetylenes are designated by a lowercase d and subscript to indicate the number, but not the position, of deuterium atoms in the molecule.) Mass spectrometry coupled to a gas chromatograph system has been used to assist in quantitation of the substrate and product distributions. Significant amounts of trans-ethylene-d2 were produced by both wild-type and nifV mutant K. pneumoniae. Less of this product was observed with the soybean system. PMID:2655535

  12. Estimation of nitrogenase activity in the presence of ethylene biosynthesis by use of deuterated acetylene as a substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Vien, D.; Fateley, W.G.; Davis, L.C. )

    1989-02-01

    Nitrogenase reduces deuterated acetylene primarily to cis dideuterated ethylene. This can be distinguished from undeuterated ethylene by the use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Characteristic bands in the region from 800 to 3,500 cm-1 can be used to identify and quantitate levels of these products. This technique is applicable to field studies of nitrogen fixation where ethylene biosynthesis by plants or bacteria is occurring. We have verified the reaction stoichiometry by using Klebsiella pneumoniae and Bradyrhizobium japonicum in soybeans. The most useful bands for quantitation of substrate purity and product distribution are as follows: acetylene-d0, 3,374 cm-1; acetylene-d1, 2,584 cm-1; acetylene-d2, 2,439 cm-1; cis-ethylene-d2, 843 cm-1; trans-ethylene-d2, 988 cm-1; ethylene-d1, 943 cm-1; ethylene-d0, 949 cm-1. (The various deuterated ethylenes and acetylenes are designated by a lowercase d and subscript to indicate the number, but not the position, of deuterium atoms in the molecule.) Mass spectrometry coupled to a gas chromatograph system has been used to assist in quantitation of the substrate and product distributions. Significant amounts of trans-ethylene-d2 were produced by both wild-type and nifV mutant K. pneumoniae. Less of this product was observed with the soybean system.

  13. Indole synthesis by conjugate addition of anilines to activated acetylenes and an unusual ligand-free copper(II)-mediated intramolecular cross-coupling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Detian; Back, Thomas G

    2012-11-12

    A versatile new synthesis of indoles was achieved by the conjugate addition of N-formyl-2-haloanilines to acetylenic sulfones, ketones, and esters followed by a copper-catalyzed intramolecular C-arylation. The conjugate addition step was conducted under exceptionally mild conditions at room temperature in basic, aqueous DMF. Surprisingly, the C-arylation was performed most effectively by employing copper(II) acetate as the catalyst in the absence of external ligands, without the need for protection from air or water. An unusual feature of this process, for the case of acetylenic ketones, is the ability of the initial conjugate-addition product to serve as a ligand for the catalyst, which enables it to participate in the catalysis of its further transformation to the final indole product. Mechanistic studies, including EPR experiments, indicated that copper(II) is reduced to the active copper(I) species by the formate ion that is produced by the base-catalyzed hydrolysis of DMF. This process also served to recycle any copper(II) that was produced by the adventitious oxidation of copper(I), thereby preventing deactivation of the catalyst. Several examples of reactions involving acetylenic sulfones attached to a modified Merrifield resin demonstrated the feasibility of solid-phase synthesis of indoles by using this protocol, and tricyclic products were obtained in one pot by employing acetylenic sulfones that contain chloroalkyl substituents. PMID:23019064

  14. Active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Carolyn R.

    Active noise reduction (ANR) techniques are described with reference to their application to crewmembers during aircraft operation to enhance productivity and safety. ANR concepts and theory are explained, and the development of protective ANR systems for direct implementation are described. Sound attenuation testing was conducted to study the feasibility of aircraft-powered ANR systems, and the positive results spurred their development for compatibility with flight helmets. The Helmets Limited ANR system uses a bypass mode at times of limited available power and complements the use of passive sound attenuation. Subjective testing results show that the device is effective, and a planned program of intensive evaluation is discussed. The aircraft that require an ANR system are listed, and key areas of implementation include battery power and the combination of ANR circuitry and helmet oxygen masks. It is suggested that ANR techniques can positively impact the efficiency and performance of crewmembers in high-noise-level aircraft.

  15. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, Richard J.

    1998-01-01

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

  16. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

  17. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, R.J.

    1998-02-10

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein. 17 figs.

  18. Effect of Nitrate and Acetylene on nirS, cnorB, and nosZ Expression and Denitrification Activity in Pseudomonas mandelii▿

    PubMed Central

    Saleh-Lakha, Saleema; Shannon, Kelly E.; Henderson, Sherri L.; Zebarth, Bernie J.; Burton, David L.; Goyer, Claudia; Trevors, Jack T.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrate acts as an electron acceptor in the denitrification process. The effect of nitrate in the range of 0 to 1,000 mg/liter on Pseudomonas mandelii nirS, cnorB, and nosZ gene expression was studied, using quantitative reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Denitrification activity was measured by using the acetylene blockage method and gas chromatography. The effect of acetylene on gene expression was assessed by comparing denitrification gene expression in P. mandelii culture grown in the presence or absence of acetylene. The higher the amount of NO3− present, the greater the induction and the longer the denitrification genes remained expressed. nirS gene expression reached a maximum at 2, 4, 4, and 6 h in cultures grown in the presence of 0, 10, 100, and 1,000 mg of KNO3/liter, respectively, while induction of nirS gene ranged from 12- to 225-fold compared to time zero. cnorB gene expression also followed a similar trend. nosZ gene expression did not respond to NO3− treatment under the conditions tested. Acetylene decreased nosZ gene expression but did not affect nirS or cnorB gene expression. These results showed that nirS and cnorB responded to nitrate concentrations; however, significant denitrification activity was only observed in culture with 1,000 mg of KNO3/liter, indicating that there was no relationship between gene expression and denitrification activity under the conditions tested. PMID:19525277

  19. Acetylene inhibition of N2O reduction in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays: evaluation by 15N tracer and 15N site preference of N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymann, Daniel; Well, Reinhard; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Lena, Rohe

    2013-04-01

    The measurement of denitrification in soils and aquifers is still challenging and often enough associated with considerable experimental effort and high costs. Against this background, the acetylene inhibition technique (AIT) applied in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays is by far the most effective approach. However, this method has been largely criticized, as it is susceptible to underestimate denitrification rates and adds an additional carbon source to the substrates to be investigated. Here we provide evidence that the AIT is not necessarily an inappropriate approach to measure denitrification, that its reliability depends on the drivers governing the process, and that the 15N site preference of N2O (SP) may serve as a tool to assess this reliability. Two laboratory batch experiments were conducted, where sandy aquifer material and a peat soil were incubated as slurries. We established (i) a standard anaerobic treatment by adding KNO3 (10 mg N L-1), (ii) an oxygen treatment by adding KNO3 and O2 (5 mg L-1), and (iii) a glucose treatment by adding KNO3 supplemented with glucose (200 mg C L-1). Both experiments were run under 10 % (v/v) acetylene atmosphere and as 15N tracer treatments using labeled K15NO3 (60 atom % 15N). In the case of the standard anaerobic treatments, we found a very good agreement of denitrification potential obtained by the AIT and 15N tracer methods. SP of N2O of the AIT samples from this treatment ranged between -4.8 and 2.6 ‰ which is indicative for N2O production during bacterial denitrification but not for N2O reduction to N2. In contrast, we observed substantial underestimation of denitrification by AIT for the glucose treatments compared to the 15N method, i.e. denitrification was underestimated by 36 % (sandy aquifer material) and 47 % (peat soil). SP of N2O of the AIT samples from this treatment ranged between 4.5 and 9.6 ‰, which suggests occurrence of bacterial N2O reduction. In the case of the oxygen

  20. Mechanism-based inactivation of cytochrome P-450 dependent benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase activity by acetylenic and olefinic polycyclic arylhydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    A series of aryl acetylenes and aryl olefins have been examined as substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P-450 dependent monooxygenases in liver microsomes from 5,6-benzoflavone or phenobarbital pretreated rats. 1-Ethynylpyrene (EP), 3-ethynylperylene (EPL), cis- and trans-1-(2-bromo-vinyl)pyrene (c-BVP and t-BVP), and 1-allylpyrene (AP) serve as mechanism-based irreversible inactivators (suicide inhibitors) of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) hydroxylase, while 1-vinyl-pyrene (VP) and phenyl 1-pyrenyl acetylene (PPA) do not cause a detectable suicide inhibition of the BP hydroxylase. The mechanism-based loss of BP hydroxylase activity caused by the aryl acetylenes is not accompanied by a corresponding loss of the P-450 content of the microsomes. In the presence of NADPH, /sup 3/H-labeled EP covalently attached to P-450 isozymes with a measured stoichiometry of one mole of EP per mole of the P-450 heme. The results of the effects of these aryl derivatives in the mammalian cell-mediated mutagenesis assay and toxicity assay show that none of the compounds examined nor any of the their metabolites produced in the incubation system are cytotoxic to V79 cells.

  1. Biologically Active Acetylenic Amino Alcohol and N-Hydroxylated 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydro-β-carboline Constituents of the New Zealand Ascidian Pseudodistoma opacum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiayi; Pearce, A Norrie; Chan, Susanna T S; Taylor, Richard B; Page, Michael J; Valentin, Alexis; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Dalton, James P; Wiles, Siouxsie; Copp, Brent R

    2016-03-25

    The first occurrence of an acetylenic 1-amino-2-alcohol, distaminolyne A (1), isolated from the New Zealand ascidian Pseudodistoma opacum, is reported. The isolation and structure elucidation of 1 and assignment of absolute configuration using the exciton coupled circular dichroism technique are described. In addition, a new N-9 hydroxy analogue (2) of the known P. opacum metabolite 7-bromohomotrypargine is also reported. Antimicrobial screening identified modest activity of 1 toward Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Mycobacterim tuberculosis, while 2 exhibited a moderate antimalarial activity (IC50 3.82 μM) toward a chloroquine-resistant strain (FcB1) of Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:26670413

  2. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathode contamination - Acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Y.; St-Pierre, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Acetylene adsorption on PEMFC electrodes and contamination in single cells are investigated with 300 ppm acetylene at a cathode held at 80 °C. The results of adsorption experiments suggest that acetylene adsorbs readily on electrodes and is reduced to ethylene and ethane under an open circuit potential of H2/N2, as the adsorbates can be electro-oxidized at high potentials. The cell voltage response shows that 300 ppm acetylene results in a cell performance loss of approximately 88%. The voltage degradation curve is divided into two stages by an inflection point, which suggests that potential-dependent processes are involved in acetylene poisoning. These potential-dependent processes may include acetylene oxidation and reduction as well as accumulation of intermediates on the electrode surface. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis suggests that acetylene affects the oxygen reduction reaction and may also affect mass transport processes. Acetylene also may be reduced in the steady poisoning state of the operating cell. After neat air operation, the cyclic voltammetry results imply that the cathode catalyst surface is almost completely restored, with no contaminant residues remaining in the MEA. Linear scanning voltammetry measurements show no change in hydrogen crossover caused by contamination, and polarization curves confirm complete recovery of cell performance.

  3. Anaerobic oxidation of acetylene by estuarine sediments and enrichment cultures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culbertson, Charles W.; Zehnder, Alexander J. B.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    1981-01-01

    Acetylene disappeared from the gas phase of anaerobically incubated estuarine sediment slurries, and loss was accompanied by increased levels of carbon dioxide. Acetylene loss was inhibited by chloramphenicol, air, and autoclaving. Addition of 14C2H2 to slurries resulted in the formation of 14CO2 and the transient appearance of 14C-soluble intermediates, of which acetate was a major component. Acetylene oxidation stimulated sulfate reduction; however, sulfate reduction was not required for the loss of C2H2 to occur. Enrichment cultures were obtained which grew anaerobically at the expense of C2H2.

  4. Acetylene terminated matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfarb, I. J.; Lee, Y. C.; Arnold, F. E.; Helminiak, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of resins with terminal acetylene groups has provided a promising technology to yield high performance structural materials. Because these resins cure through an addition reaction, no volatile by-products are produced during the processing. The cured products have high thermal stability and good properties retention after exposure to humidity. Resins with a wide variety of different chemical structures between the terminal acetylene groups are synthesized and their mechanical properties studied. The ability of the acetylene cured polymers to give good mechanical properties is demonstrated by the resins with quinoxaline structures. Processibility of these resins can be manipulated by varying the chain length between the acetylene groups or by blending in different amounts of reactive deluents. Processing conditions similar to the state-of-the-art epoxy can be attained by using backbone structures like ether-sulfone or bis-phenol-A. The wide range of mechanical properties and processing conditions attainable by this class of resins should allow them to be used in a wide variety of applications.

  5. Acylamidation of acetylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Gridnev, I.D.; Balenkova, E.S.

    1989-01-10

    The reactions of phenylacetylene, 1-heptyne, and diphenylacetylene with the complexes of acetylfluoroborate with acetonitrile and with chloroacetonitrile take place regiospecifically and stereospecifically as syn-addition of the acetyl group and nitrile at the triple bond of the acetylene and lead to previously unknown Z-N-acyl-/beta/-amino, /alpha/,/beta/-unsaturated ketones.

  6. Design, synthesis, anticancer, antimicrobial activities and molecular docking studies of theophylline containing acetylenes and theophylline containing 1,2,3-triazoles with variant nucleoside derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ruddarraju, Radhakrishnam Raju; Murugulla, Adharvana Chari; Kotla, Ravindar; Chandra Babu Tirumalasetty, Muni; Wudayagiri, Rajendra; Donthabakthuni, Shobha; Maroju, Ravichandar; Baburao, K; Parasa, Lakshmana Swamy

    2016-11-10

    A new series of theophylline containing acetylene derivatives (6a-6b and 7-13) and theophylline containing 1,2,3-triazoles with variant nucleoside derivatives (20-32) have been designed and synthesized. These compounds were screened for anticancer and antimicrobial activity. Further the computational docking and 2D QSAR were performed using MOE software to identify novel scaffolds. The results showed that compound 29 and 30 exhibit significant cytotoxic effect on all four cancer cells such as lung (A549), colon (HT-29), breast (MCF-7) and melanoma (A375) with IC50 values of 2.56, 2.19, 1.89, 4.89 μM and 3.57, 2.90, 2.10, 5.81 μM respectively. Whereas quite different results were observed for these compounds in antimicrobial studies. Compounds 11, 21 and 26 have exhibited significant minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The docking studies demonstrate that compound 27, 28, 29 and 30 have good dock score and binding affinities with various therapeutic targets in cancer cell proliferation. In addition these compounds have shown acceptable correlation with bioassay results in the regression plots generated in 2D QSAR models. This is the first report to demonstrate the theophylline containing acetylene derivatives and theophylline containing 1,2,3-triazole nucleoside hybrids as potential anticancer and antimicrobial agents with comprehensive in silico analysis.

  7. Oxygen transport through polyethylene terephthalate (PET) coated with plasma-polymerized acetylene at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wemlinger, Erik; Pedrow, Patrick; Garcia-Pérez, Manuel; Sablani, Shyam

    2011-10-01

    Moser et al. have shown that oxygen transport through polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) is reduced by a factor of up to 120 when, at reduced pressure, hydrogenated amorphous carbon film with thickness less than 100 nm is applied to the PET substrate. Our work includes using atmospheric pressure cold plasma to grow a plasma-polymerized acetylene film on PET substrate and measuring reductions in oxygen transport. The reactor utilizes corona discharges and is operated at 60 Hz with a maximum voltage of 10 kV RMS. Corona streamers emanate from an array of needles with an average radius of curvature of 50 μm. The reactor utilizes a cylindrical reaction chamber with a vertical orientation such that argon carrier gas and acetylene precursor gas are introduced at the top then pass through the cold plasma activation zone and then through a grounded stainless steel mesh. Acetylene radicals are incident on the PET substrate and form plasma-polymerized acetylene film. Moser et al. have shown that oxygen transport through polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) is reduced by a factor of up to 120 when, at reduced pressure, hydrogenated amorphous carbon film with thickness less than 100 nm is applied to the PET substrate. Our work includes using atmospheric pressure cold plasma to grow a plasma-polymerized acetylene film on PET substrate and measuring reductions in oxygen transport. The reactor utilizes corona discharges and is operated at 60 Hz with a maximum voltage of 10 kV RMS. Corona streamers emanate from an array of needles with an average radius of curvature of 50 μm. The reactor utilizes a cylindrical reaction chamber with a vertical orientation such that argon carrier gas and acetylene precursor gas are introduced at the top then pass through the cold plasma activation zone and then through a grounded stainless steel mesh. Acetylene radicals are incident on the PET substrate and form plasma-polymerized acetylene film. E.M. Moser, R. Urech, E. Hack, H. Künzli, E. Müller, Thin

  8. Measuring Substantial Reductions in Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Charles; Evans, Meredyth; Jason, Leonard A.; So, Suzanna; Brown, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The case definitions for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) each include a disability criterion requiring substantial reductions in activity in order to meet diagnostic criteria. Difficulties have been encountered in defining and operationalizing the substantial reduction disability criterion within these various illness definitions. The present study sought to relate measures of past and current activities in several domains including the SF-36, an objective measure of activity (e.g. actigraphy), a self-reported quality of life scale, and measures of symptom severity. Results of the study revealed that current work activities had the highest number of significant associations with domains such as the SF-36 subscales, actigraphy, and symptom scores. As an example, higher self-reported levels of current work activity were associated with better health. This suggests that current work related activities may provide a useful domain for helping operationalize the construct of substantial reductions in activity. PMID:25584524

  9. Acetylene removal process

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Farland, C.G.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a vapor phase process for the preparation of unsaturated hydrocarbon monoolefins in diolefins comprising oxidative dehydrogenation of stream of C/sub 3/ to C/sub 9/ hydrocarbon compounds to produce a product stream comprising 3.5 to 80 mol percent of unsaturated hydrocarbon product and of about or from 0.0001 to 2.5 mol percent acetylenic compound impurity, about or from 0.0005 to 2.5 mol percent carbonyl compounds and 5 to 93 mol percent non-condensable gases. The improvement described here comprises contacting the product stream in vapor phase at a temperature in the range of 250/sup 0/ to 900/sup 0/C. and containing less than 5 mol percent fee oxygen with a solid catalyst for reducing the acetylenic compounds in the product stream. The catalyst consists essentially of a mixture of oxides, carbonates or hydroxides of Fe and Ni, Fe being present as the major metal component and Ni being present in the range of about 0.25 to 20 weight percent based on total catalyst, an alkaline earth metal oxide, carbonate or hydroxide of Mg, Ca, Sr or Ba, and about 0.5 to 30 weight percent of an alkali metal oxide, carbonate or hydroxide of Li, Na, K or Rb determined as metal and based on the other metallic elements, and recovering the stream having the amount of acetylenic compounds therein reduced.

  10. Living on acetylene. A primordial energy source.

    PubMed

    Ten Brink, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The tungsten iron-sulfur enzyme acetylene hydratase catalyzes the conversion of acetylene to acetaldehyde by addition of one water molecule to the C-C triple bond. For a member of the dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase family this is a rather unique reaction, since it does not involve a net electron transfer. The acetylene hydratase from the strictly anaerobic bacterium Pelobacter acetylenicus is so far the only known and characterized acetylene hydratase. With a crystal structure solved at 1.26 Å resolution and several amino acids around the active site exchanged by site-directed mutagenesis, many key features have been explored to understand the function of this novel tungsten enzyme. However, the exact reaction mechanism remains unsolved. Trapped in the reduced W(IV) state, the active site consists of an octahedrally coordinated tungsten ion with a tightly bound water molecule. An aspartate residue in close proximity, forming a short hydrogen bond to the water molecule, was shown to be essential for enzyme activity. The arrangement is completed by a small hydrophobic pocket at the end of an access funnel that is distinct from all other enzymes of the DMSO reductase family.

  11. Flavin reduction activates Drosophila cryptochrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Anand T.; Top, Deniz; Manahan, Craig C.; Tokuda, Joshua M.; Zhang, Sheng; Pollack, Lois; Young, Michael W.; Crane, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Entrainment of circadian rhythms in higher organisms relies on light-sensing proteins that communicate to cellular oscillators composed of delayed transcriptional feedback loops. The principal photoreceptor of the fly circadian clock, Drosophila cryptochrome (dCRY), contains a C-terminal tail (CTT) helix that binds beside a FAD cofactor and is essential for light signaling. Light reduces the dCRY FAD to an anionic semiquinone (ASQ) radical and increases CTT proteolytic susceptibility but does not lead to CTT chemical modification. Additional changes in proteolytic sensitivity and small-angle X-ray scattering define a conformational response of the protein to light that centers at the CTT but also involves regions remote from the flavin center. Reduction of the flavin is kinetically coupled to CTT rearrangement. Chemical reduction to either the ASQ or the fully reduced hydroquinone state produces the same conformational response as does light. The oscillator protein Timeless (TIM) contains a sequence similar to the CTT; the corresponding peptide binds dCRY in light and protects the flavin from oxidation. However, TIM mutants therein still undergo dCRY-mediated degradation. Thus, photoreduction to the ASQ releases the dCRY CTT and promotes binding to at least one region of TIM. Flavin reduction by either light or cellular reductants may be a general mechanism of CRY activation. PMID:24297896

  12. Quantification and removal of some contaminating gases from acetylene used to study gas-utilizing enzymes and microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Hyman, M R; Arp, D J

    1987-02-01

    Acetylene generated from various grades of calcium carbide and obtained from commercial- and purified-grade acetylene cylinders was shown to contain high concentrations of various contaminants. Dependent on the source of acetylene, these included, at maximal values, H(2) (0.023%), O(2) (0.779%), N(2) (3.78%), PH(3) (0.06%), CH(4) (0.073%), and acetone (1 to 10%). The concentration of the contaminants in cylinder acetylene was highly dependent on the extent of cylinder discharge. Several conventional methods used to partially purify cylinder acetylene were compared. A small-scale method for extensively purifying acetylene is described. An effect of acetylene quality on acetylene reduction assays conducted with purified nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii was demonstrated.

  13. Quantification and Removal of Some Contaminating Gases from Acetylene Used to Study Gas-Utilizing Enzymes and Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Michael R.; Arp, Daniel J.

    1987-01-01

    Acetylene generated from various grades of calcium carbide and obtained from commercial- and purified-grade acetylene cylinders was shown to contain high concentrations of various contaminants. Dependent on the source of acetylene, these included, at maximal values, H2 (0.023%), O2 (0.779%), N2 (3.78%), PH3 (0.06%), CH4 (0.073%), and acetone (1 to 10%). The concentration of the contaminants in cylinder acetylene was highly dependent on the extent of cylinder discharge. Several conventional methods used to partially purify cylinder acetylene were compared. A small-scale method for extensively purifying acetylene is described. An effect of acetylene quality on acetylene reduction assays conducted with purified nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii was demonstrated. PMID:16347278

  14. Azotobacter vinelandii nitrogenases containing altered MoFe proteins with substitutions in the FeMo-cofactor environment: effects on the catalyzed reduction of acetylene and ethylene.

    PubMed

    Fisher, K; Dilworth, M J; Kim, C H; Newton, W E

    2000-03-21

    Altered MoFe proteins of Azotobacter vinelandii Mo-nitrogenase, with amino acid substitutions in the FeMo-cofactor environment, were used to probe interactions among C(2)H(2), C(2)H(4), CO, and H(2). The altered MoFe proteins used were the alpha-195(Asn) or alpha-195(Gln) MoFe proteins, which have either asparagine or glutamine substituting for alpha-histidine-195, and the alpha-191(Lys) MoFe protein, which has lysine substituting for alpha-glutamine-191. On the basis of K(m) determinations, C(2)H(2) was a particularly poor substrate for the nitrogenase containing the alpha-191(Lys) MoFe protein. Using C(2)D(2), a correlation was shown between the stereospecificity of proton addition to give the products, cis- and trans-C(2)D(2)H(2), and the propensity of nitrogenase to produce ethane. The most extensive loss of stereospecificity occurred with nitrogenases containing either the alpha-195(Asn) or the alpha-191(Lys) MoFe proteins, which also exhibited the highest rate of ethane production from C(2)H(2). These data are consistent with the presence of a common ethylenic intermediate on the enzyme, which is responsible for both ethane production and loss of proton-addition stereochemistry. C(2)H(4) was not a substrate of the nitrogenase with the alpha-191(Lys) MoFe protein and was a poor substrate of the nitrogenases incorporating either the wild-type or the alpha-195(Gln) MoFe protein, both of which had a low V(max) and high K(m) (120 kPa). Ethylene was a somewhat better substrate for the nitrogenase with the alpha-195(Asn) MoFe protein, which exhibited a K(m) of 48 kPa and a specific activity for C(2)H(6) formation from C(2)H(4) 10-fold higher than the others. Neither the wild-type nitrogenase nor the nitrogenase containing the alpha-195(Asn) MoFe protein produced cis-C(2)D(2)H(2) when turned over under trans-C(2)D(2)H(2). These results suggest that the C(2)H(4)-reduction site is affected by substitution at residue alpha-195, although whether the effect is related to

  15. Acetylene on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sandeep; McCord, Thomas B.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Cornet, Thomas; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Clark, Roger Nelson; Maltagliati, Luca; Chevrier, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's moon Titan possesses a thick atmosphere that is mainly composed of N2 (98%), CH4 (2 % overall, but 4.9% close to the surface) and less than 1% of minor species, mostly hydrocarbons [1]. A dissociation of N2 and CH4 forms complex hydrocarbons in the atmsophere and acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6) are produced most abundently. Since years, C2H2 has been speculated to exist on the surface of Titan based on its high production rate in the stratosphere predicted by photochemical models [2,3] and from its detection as trace gas sublimated/evaporated from the surface after the landing of the Huygens probe by the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) [1]. Here we show evidence of acetylene (C2H2) on the surface of Titan by detecting absorption bands at 1.55 µm and 4.93 µm using Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) [4] at equatorial areas of eastern Shangri-La, and Fensal-Aztlan/Quivira.An anti-correlation of absorption band strength with albedo indicates greater concentrations of C2H2 in the dark terrains, such as sand dunes and near the Huygens landing site. The specific location of the C2H2 detections suggests that C2H2 is mobilized by surface processes, such as surface weathering by liquids through dissolution/evaporation processes.References:[1]Niemann et al., Nature 438, 779–784 (2005).[2]Lavvas et al., Planetary and Space Science 56, 67 – 99 (2008).[3]Lavvas et al., Planetary and Space Science 56, 27 – 66 (2008).[4] Brown et al., The Cassini-Huygens Mission 111–168 (Springer, 2004).

  16. 29 CFR 1910.102 - Acetylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...., 2003). (b) Piped systems. (1) Employers must comply with Chapter 9 (“Acetylene Piping”) of NFPA 51A..., 2006, these employers may comply with the provisions of Chapter 7 (“Acetylene Piping”) of NFPA 51A-2001... (fill) acetylene cylinders comply with the provisions of NFPA 51A-2006 (“Standard for Acetylene...

  17. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of orally administered acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone), a highly potent Nrf2 activator with a reversible covalent mode of action

    PubMed Central

    Kostov, Rumen V.; Knatko, Elena V.; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J.; Zheng, Suqing; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Honda, Tadashi; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.

    2015-01-01

    The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone) TBE-31 is a highly potent cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action; its best-characterized target being Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1), the cellular sensor for oxidants and electrophiles. TBE-31 reacts with cysteines of Keap1, impairing its ability to target nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) for degradation. Consequently, Nrf2 accumulates and orchestrates cytoprotective gene expression. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of TBE-31 in C57BL/6 mice. After a single oral dose of 10 μmol/kg (∼200 nmol/animal), the concentration of TBE-31 in blood exhibited two peaks, at 22.3 nM and at 15.5 nM, 40 min and 4 h after dosing, respectively, as determined by a quantitative stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method. The AUC0–24h was 195.5 h/nmol/l, the terminal elimination half-life was 10.2 h, and the kel was 0.068 h−1. To assess the pharmacodynamics of Nrf2 activation by TBE-31, we determined the enzyme activity of its prototypic target, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and found it elevated by 2.4- and 1.5-fold in liver and heart, respectively. Continuous feeding for 18 days with diet delivering the same daily doses of TBE-31 under conditions of concurrent treatment with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine had a similar effect on Nrf2 activation without any indications of toxicity. Together with previous reports showing the cytoprotective effects of TBE-31 in animal models of carcinogenesis, our results demonstrate the high potency, efficacy and suitability for chronic administration of cysteine targeting reversible covalent drugs. PMID:26265043

  18. Acetylene removal process

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Farland, C.G.

    1987-04-14

    This patent describes a vapor phase process for the preparation of hydrocarbon monoolefins and diolefins comprising oxidative dehydrogenation of a stream of C/sub 3/ to C/sub 9/ hydrocarbon compounds to produce a product stream comprising, exclusive of any water present, 3.5 to 80 mol percent hydrocarbon monoolefins and diolefins and about from 0.0001 to 2.5 mol percent carbonyl compounds and 5 to 93 mol percent non-condensable gases. The improvement described here comprises contacting the product stream in vapor phase at a temperature in the range of 250/sup 0/ to 900/sup 0/C and containing less than 5 mol percent free oxygen with a solid catalyst for reducing the acetylene compounds in the product stream, the catalyst consisting essentially of zinc ferrite and nickel oxide. The Fe is the major metal component by weight, an alkaline earth metal oxide, carbonate or hydroxide of Mg, Ca, Sr or Ba, and about 0.5 to 30 weight percent of an alkali metal oxide, carbonate or hydroxide, based on the other metallic elements of Li, Na, K or Rh.

  19. Cyclopolymerization of Acetylene to Benzyne and Naphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewage, Dilrukshi; Silva, Ruchira; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2012-06-01

    Reactions of acetylene (C_2H_2) with laser-vaporized La atoms produced La(C_6H_4) and La (C10H_8) in supersonic molecular beams. The organic fragments in these complexes were benzyne and naphthalene. The benzyne species was produced by the La-mediated cyclotrimerization of three acetylene molecules, whereas naphthalene was formed likely by the cyclization of the transient benzyne with two additional acetylene molecules. These cyclized products were identified by mass-analyzed threshold ionization mass spectroscopy, which measured adiabatic ionization energies and several vibrational frequencies. The measured ionization energies were 40875 (5) cm-1 for La(C_6H_4) and 36767 (5) cm-1 for La(C10H_8). The most active vibrational transitions of both complexes were metal-ligand stretching with 326 cm-1 for La(C_6H_4) and 286 cm-1 for La (C10H_8). By combining the spectra with theoretical calculations, the ground electronic states of the neutral complexes were determined to be ^2A_1 (C2v) and ^2A' (C_s) and those of the corresponding ions were ^1A_1 (C2v) and ^1A' (C_s) for La (C_6H_4) and La(C10H_8), respectively.

  20. Electron ionization of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Simon J.; Price, Stephen D.

    2007-11-01

    Relative partial ionization cross sections and precursor specific relative partial ionization cross sections for fragment ions formed by electron ionization of C2H2 have been measured using time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with a 2D ion-ion coincidence technique. We report data for the formation of H+, H2+, C2+, C+/C22+, CH +/C2H22+, CH2+, C2+, and C2H + relative to the formation of C2H2+, as a function of ionizing electron energy from 30-200eV. While excellent agreement is found between our data and one set of previously published absolute partial ionization cross sections, some discrepancies exist between the results presented here and two other recent determinations of these absolute partial ionization cross sections. We attribute these differences to the loss of some translationally energetic fragment ions in these earlier studies. Our relative precursor-specific partial ionization cross sections enable us, for the first time, to quantify the contribution to the yield of each fragment ion from single, double, and triple ionization. Analysis shows that at 50eV double ionization contributes 2% to the total ion yield, increasing to over 10% at an ionizing energy of 100eV. From our ion-ion coincidence data, we have derived branching ratios for charge separating dissociations of the acetylene dication. Comparison of our data to recent ab initio/RRKM calculations suggest that close to the double ionization potential C2H22+ dissociates predominantly on the ground triplet potential energy surface (Σg-3) with a much smaller contribution from dissociation via the lowest singlet potential energy surface (Δg1). Measurements of the kinetic energy released in the fragmentation reactions of C2H22+ have been used to obtain precursor state energies for the formation of product ion pairs, and are shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data and with theory.

  1. Research in acetylene containing monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogliaruso, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The preparation of precursor bisbenzils with pendant acetylene linkages for use in the synthesis of new aromatic poly (phenyl quinoxalines) was investigated. Attempts to condense para, para prime-dibromo benzil and potassium acetylide in liquid ammonia and in toluene, to prepare 4-phenyl acetyl phenyl ether, 4-(paraacetylphenyl) acetyl phenyl ether, 4-phenyl acetyl-4 primeacetyl phenyl acetyl phenyl ether, the reaction of 4-phenyl acetyl phenyl ether with Villsmeier reagent to prepare 4-(beta-chloro cinnamaldehyde) phenyl ether, the reaction of 4-(para-acetyl phenyl) acetyl phenyl ether with Villsmeier reagent, and the oxidation of bibenzil to prepare benzil are described. The reactions of phenyl acetylene with oxidizing agent, of phenyl acetylene with bromine, of 1,1,2,2-tetrabromo ethyl benzene with zinc and with oxidizing agent are described.

  2. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of orally administered acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone), a highly potent Nrf2 activator with a reversible covalent mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Kostov, Rumen V.; Knatko, Elena V.; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J.; Zheng, Suqing; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Honda, Tadashi; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.

    2015-09-25

    The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone) TBE-31 is a highly potent cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action; its best-characterized target being Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1), the cellular sensor for oxidants and electrophiles. TBE-31 reacts with cysteines of Keap1, impairing its ability to target nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) for degradation. Consequently, Nrf2 accumulates and orchestrates cytoprotective gene expression. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of TBE-31 in C57BL/6 mice. After a single oral dose of 10 μmol/kg (∼200 nmol/animal), the concentration of TBE-31 in blood exhibited two peaks, at 22.3 nM and at 15.5 nM, 40 min and 4 h after dosing, respectively, as determined by a quantitative stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method. The AUC{sub 0–24h} was 195.5 h/nmol/l, the terminal elimination half-life was 10.2 h, and the k{sub el} was 0.068 h{sup −1}. To assess the pharmacodynamics of Nrf2 activation by TBE-31, we determined the enzyme activity of its prototypic target, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and found it elevated by 2.4- and 1.5-fold in liver and heart, respectively. Continuous feeding for 18 days with diet delivering the same daily doses of TBE-31 under conditions of concurrent treatment with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine had a similar effect on Nrf2 activation without any indications of toxicity. Together with previous reports showing the cytoprotective effects of TBE-31 in animal models of carcinogenesis, our results demonstrate the high potency, efficacy and suitability for chronic administration of cysteine targeting reversible covalent drugs. - Highlights: • TBE-31 is a cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action. • After a single oral dose, the blood concentration of TBE-31 exhibits two peaks. • Oral TBE-31 is a potent activator of Nrf2-dependent enzymes in

  3. 29 CFR 1910.102 - Acetylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... acetylene piping systems, see CGA G-1.2-2006, part 3 (“Acetylene piping”) (Compressed Gas Association, Inc., 3rd ed., 2006). (c) Generators and filling cylinders. (1) Employers must ensure that...

  4. 29 CFR 1910.102 - Acetylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...). (b) Piped systems. (1) Employers must comply with Chapter 9 (“Acetylene Piping”) of NFPA 51A-2006... may comply with the provisions of Chapter 7 (“Acetylene Piping”) of NFPA 51A-2001 (“Standard for... comply with the provisions of NFPA 51A-2006 (“Standard for Acetylene Charging Plants”) (National...

  5. 29 CFR 1910.102 - Acetylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...). (b) Piped systems. (1) Employers must comply with Chapter 9 (“Acetylene Piping”) of NFPA 51A-2006... may comply with the provisions of Chapter 7 (“Acetylene Piping”) of NFPA 51A-2001 (“Standard for... comply with the provisions of NFPA 51A-2006 (“Standard for Acetylene Charging Plants”) (National...

  6. 41 CFR 50-204.66 - Acetylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Acetylene. 50-204.66 Section 50-204.66 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts...) Plants for the generation of acetylene and the charging (filling) of acetylene cylinders shall...

  7. Preparation of 1,7- and 3,9-dideazapurines from 2-amino-3-iodo- and 3-amino-4-iodopyridines and activated acetylenes by conjugate addition and copper-catalyzed intramolecular arylation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Back, Thomas G

    2014-11-21

    The conjugate addition of N-formyl derivatives of 2-amino-3-iodo- and 3-amino-4-iodopyridines to acetylenes activated by sulfone, ester, or ketone groups, followed by intramolecular arylation, affords variously substituted 1,7- and 3,9-dideazapurines. The method employs DMF-water as the solvent and copper(II) acetate as the catalyst for the cyclization step. Neither added ligands nor the exclusion of oxygen is necessary. The process therefore provides a simple, convenient, and inexpensive route to this biologically interesting class of products. PMID:25333726

  8. Active{sup 3} noise reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Holzfuss, J.

    1996-06-01

    Noise reduction is a problem being encountered in a variety of applications, such as environmental noise cancellation, signal recovery and separation. Passive noise reduction is done with the help of absorbers. Active noise reduction includes the transmission of phase inverted signals for the cancellation. This paper is about a threefold active approach to noise reduction. It includes the separation of a combined source, which consists of both a noise and a signal part. With the help of interaction with the source by scanning it and recording its response, modeling as a nonlinear dynamical system is achieved. The analysis includes phase space analysis and global radial basis functions as tools for the prediction used in a subsequent cancellation procedure. Examples are given which include noise reduction of speech. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Effect of Au nano-particle aggregation on the deactivation of the AuCl3/AC catalyst for acetylene hydrochlorination

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Bin; Wang, Qinqin; Yu, Feng; Zhu, Mingyuan

    2015-01-01

    A detailed study of the valence state and distribution of the AuCl3/AC catalyst during the acetylene hydrochlorination deactivation process is described and discussed. Temperature-programmed reduction and X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis indicate that the active Au3+ reduction to metallic Au0 is one reason for the deactivation of AuCl3/AC catalyst. Transmission electron microscopy characterization demonstrated that the particle size of Au nano-particles increases with increasing reaction time. The results indicated that metallic Au0 exhibits considerable catalytic activity and that Au nano-particle aggregation may be another reason for the AuCl3/AC catalytic activity in acetylene hydrochlorination. PMID:25994222

  10. Acetylene-based materials in organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Fabio; Marrocchi, Assunta

    2010-04-08

    Fossil fuel alternatives, such as solar energy, are moving to the forefront in a variety of research fields. Organic photovoltaic systems hold the promise of a lightweight, flexible, cost-effective solar energy conversion platform, which could benefit from simple solution-processing of the active layer. The discovery of semiconductive polyacetylene by Heeger et al. in the late 1970s was a milestone towards the use of organic materials in electronics; the development of efficient protocols for the palladium catalyzed alkynylation reactions and the new conception of steric and conformational advantages of acetylenes have been recently focused the attention on conjugated triple-bond containing systems as a promising class of semiconductors for OPVs applications. We review here the most important and representative (poly)arylacetylenes that have been used in the field. A general introduction to (poly)arylacetylenes, and the most common synthetic approaches directed toward making these materials will be firstly given. After a brief discussion on working principles and critical parameters of OPVs, we will focus on molecular arylacetylenes, (co)polymers containing triple bonds, and metallopolyyne polymers as p-type semiconductor materials. The last section will deal with hybrids in which oligomeric/polymeric structures incorporating acetylenic linkages such as phenylene ethynylenes have been attached onto C(60), and their use as the active materials in photovoltaic devices.

  11. Thermal Conversion of Methane to Acetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, James Russell; Anderson, Raymond Paul; Hyde, Timothy Allen; Wright, Randy Ben; Bewley, Randy Lee; Haggard, Delon C; Swank, William David

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the experimental demonstration of a process for the direct thermal conversion of methane to acetylene. The process utilizes a thermal plasma heat source to dissociation products react to form a mixture of acetylene and hydrogen. The use of a supersonic expansion of the hot gas is investigated as a method of rapidly cooling (quenching) the product stream to prevent further reaction or thermal decomposition of the acetylene which can lower the overall efficiency of the process.

  12. Acetylene terminated aspartimides and resins therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Havens, Stephen J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Acetylene terminated aspartimides are prepared using two methods. In the first, an amino-substituted aromatic acetylene is reacted with an aromatic bismaleimide in a solvent of glacial acetic acid and/or m-cresol. In the second method, an aromatic diamine is reacted with an ethynyl containing maleimide, such an N-(3-ethynyl phenyl) maleimide, in a solvent of glacial acetic acid and/or m-cresol. In addition, acetylene terminated aspartimides are blended with various acetylene terminated oligomers and polymers to yield composite materials exhibiting improved mechanical properties.

  13. Analog VLSI system for active drag reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.; Goodman, R.; Jiang, F.; Tai, Y.C.; Tung, S.; Ho, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    In today`s cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to reduce costs. Even a 5% reduction in drag translates into estimated savings of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Drawing inspiration from the structure of shark skin, the authors are building a system to reduce drag along a surface. Our analog VLSI system interfaces with microfabricated, constant-temperature shear stress sensors. It detects regions of high shear stress and outputs a control signal to activate a microactuator. We are in the process of verifying the actual drag reduction by controlling microactuators in wind tunnel experiments. We are encouraged that an approach similar to one that biology employs provides a very useful contribution to the problem of drag reduction. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  14. Evaluation of Sorbents for Acetylene Separation in Atmosphere Revitalization Loop Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee A.; Barton, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    State-of-the-art carbon dioxide reduction technology uses a Sabatier reactor to recover water from metabolic carbon dioxide. In order to maximize oxygen loop closure, a byproduct of the system, methane, must be reduced to recover hydrogen. NASA is currently exploring a microwave plasma methane pyrolysis system for this purpose. The resulting product stream of this technology includes unreacted methane, product hydrogen, and acetylene. The hydrogen and the small amount of unreacted methane resulting from the pyrolysis process can be returned to the Sabatier reactor thereby substantially improving the overall efficiency of the system. However, the acetylene is a waste product that must be removed from the pyrolysis product. Two materials have been identified as potential sorbents for acetylene removal: zeolite 4A, a commonly available commercial sorbent, and HKUST-1, a newly developed microporous metal. This paper provides an explanation of the rationale behind acetylene removal and the results of separation testing with both materials

  15. Evaluation of Sorbents for Acetylene Separation in Atmosphere Revitalization Loop Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee A.; Barton, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    State-of-the-art carbon dioxide reduction technology uses a Sabatier reactor to recover water from metabolic carbon dioxide. In order to maximize oxygen loop closure, a byproduct of the system, methane, must be reduced to recover hydrogen. NASA is currently exploring a microwave plasma methane pyrolysis system for this purpose. The resulting product stream of this technology includes unreacted methane, product hydrogen, and acetylene. The hydrogen and the small amount of unreacted methane resulting from the pyrolysis process can be returned to the Sabatier reactor thereby substantially improving the overall efficiency of the system. However, the acetylene is a waste product that must be removed from the pyrolysis product. Two materials have been identified as potential sorbents for acetylene removal: zeolite 4A, a commonly available commercial sorbent, and HKUST-1, a newly developed microporous metal. This paper provides an explanation of the rationale behind acetylene removal and the results of separation testing with both materials.

  16. Reduction of bromate by granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kirisits, M.J.; Snoeyink, V.L.; Kruithof, J.C.

    1998-07-01

    Ozonation of waters containing bromide can lead to the formation of bromate, a probable human carcinogen. Since bromate will be regulated at 10 {micro}g/L by the Stage 1 Disinfectants/Disinfection By-Products Rule, there is considerable interest in finding a suitable method of bromate reduction. Granular activated carbon (GAC) can be used to chemically reduce bromate to bromide, but interference from organic matter and anions present in natural water render this process inefficient. In an effort to improve bromate reduction by GAC, several modifications were made to the GAC filtration process. The use of a biologically active carbon (BAC) filter ahead of a fresh GAC filter with and without preozonation, to remove the biodegradable organic matter, did not substantially improve the bromate removal of the GAC filter. The use of the BAC filter for biological bromate reduction proved to be the most encouraging experiment. By lowering the dissolved oxygen in the influent to the BAC from 8.0 mg/L to 2.0 mg/L, the percent bromate removal increased from 42% to 61%.

  17. Characterization of the Minimum Energy Paths and Energetics for the Reaction of Vinylidene with Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    The reaction of vinylidene (CH2C) with acetylene may be an initiating reaction in soot formation. We report minimum energy paths and accurate energetics for a pathway leading to vinyl-acetylene and for a number of isomers of C4H4. The calculations use complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) derivative methods to characterize the stationary points and internally contacted configuration interaction (ICCI) and/or coupled cluster singles and doubles with a perturbational estimate of triple excitations (CCSD(T)) to determine the energetics. We find an entrance channel barrier of about 5 kcal/mol for the addition of vinylidene to acetylene, but no barriers above reactants for the reaction pathway leading to vinyl-acetylene.

  18. Enumeration and Relative Importance of Acetylene-Reducing (Nitrogen-Fixing) Bacteria in a Delaware Salt Marsh

    PubMed Central

    Dicker, Howard J.; Smith, David W.

    1980-01-01

    Three groups of N2-fixing bacteria were enumerated from the top 1 cm of the surface in four vegetational areas in a Delaware salt marsh. The results over the 9-month sampling period showed that there were no discernible seasonal patterns for any of the groups enumerated (Azotobacter sp., Clostridium sp., and Desulfovibrio sp.). Azotobacter sp. was present in numbers of 107 per g of dry mud, whereas the two anaerobic fixers were present in much lower numbers (103 to 104 per g of dry mud). There were no differences in the numbers of each group among the different vegetational areas, indicating that there was a heterogeneous population of N2 fixers present. Additional studies indicate that the activity of sulfate reducers (Desulfovibrio sp.) may account for as much as 50% of the total observed acetylene reduction activity. Oxygen was found to exert little effect on the observed acetylene reduction activity, indicating that stable aerobic and anaerobic microenvironments exist in the surface layer of marsh sediments. PMID:16345564

  19. Liquor Activity Reduction (LAR) Programme - 12397

    SciTech Connect

    Pether, Colin; Carrol, Phil; Birkett, Eddie; Kibble, Matthew

    2012-07-01

    Waste material from the reprocessing of irradiated fuel has been stored under water for several decades leading to the water becoming highly radioactive. As a critical enabler to the decommissioning strategy for the Sellafield site, the Liquor Activity Reduction (LAR) programme has been established to provide a processing route for this highly radioactive liquor. This paper reviews the progress that has been made since the start of routine LAR transfer cycles (July 2010) and follows on from the earlier paper presented at WM2011. The paper focuses on the learning from the first full year of routine LAR transfer cycles and the application of this learning to the wider strategies for the treatment of further radioactive liquid effluents on the Sellafield site. During this period over 100,000 Curies of radioactivity has been safely removed and treated. The past year has witnessed the very successful introduction of the LAR programme. This has lead to hazard reduction at MSSS and demonstration that the SIXEP facility can meet the significantly increased challenge that the LAR programme represents. Part of the success has been the ability to predict and deliver a realistic production schedule with the availability of the MSSS, EDT and SIXEP facilities being central to this. Most importantly, the LAR programme has been successful in bringing together key stakeholders to deliver this work while integrating with the existing, day to day, demands of the Sellafield site. (authors)

  20. Assessing the efficacy of active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylands, Julia M.

    Active noise reduction (ANR) is an electronic technique, based on reverse phase cancellation, for reducing low frequency noise reaching an operators ears. This report discussed the basic concept, its capabilities and some approaches to assessing its efficacy. The technique provides a great enhancement to hearing protection and also enhances signal detection and communications capabilities. Tests of detectibility of pure tones at frequencies ranging up to 1750 Hz using ANR systems which had maximum noise attenuation between 300 and 600 Hz and masking noise typical of the SeaKing helicopter showed that improvements in detection performance extend up to 1000 Hz. ANR systems also offer improved speech intelligibility in high noise environments by reducing the upward spread of masking and adding speech pre-emphasis.

  1. International Space Station (ISS) Risk Reduction Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fodroci, Michael

    2011-01-01

    As the assembly of the ISS nears completion, it is worthwhile to step back and review some of the actions pursued by the Program in recent years to reduce risk and enhance the safety and health of ISS crewmembers, visitors, and space flight participants. While the ISS requirements and initial design were intended to provide the best practicable levels of safety, it is always possible to reduce risk -- given the determination and commitment to do so. The following is a summary of some of the steps taken by the ISS Program Manager, by our International Partners, by hardware and software designers, by operational specialists, and by safety personnel to continuously enhance the safety of the ISS. While decades of work went into developing the ISS requirements, there are many things in a Program like the ISS that can only be learned through actual operational experience. These risk reduction activities can be divided into roughly three categories: (1) Areas that were initially noncompliant which have subsequently been brought into compliance or near compliance (i.e., Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris [MMOD] protection, acoustics) (2) Areas where initial design requirements were eventually considered inadequate and were subsequently augmented (i.e., Toxicity Level 4 materials, emergency hardware and procedures) (3) Areas where risks were initially underestimated, and have subsequently been addressed through additional mitigation (i.e., Extravehicular Activity [EVA] sharp edges, plasma shock hazards) Due to the hard work and cooperation of many parties working together across the span of nearly a decade, the ISS is now a safer and healthier environment for our crew, in many cases exceeding the risk reduction targets inherent in the intent of the original design. It will provide a safe and stable platform for utilization and discovery.

  2. Mechanism-based inactivation of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase by aryl acetylenes and aryl olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, L.S.; Lu, J.Y.L.; Alworth, W.L.

    1986-05-01

    A series of aryl acetylenes and aryl olefins have been examined as substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P-450 dependent monooxgenases in liver microsomes from 5,6-benzoflavone or phenobarbital pretreated rats. 1-Ethynylpyrene, 3-ethynylperylene, 2-ethynylfluorene, methyl 1-pyrenyl acetylene, cis- and trans-1-(2-bromovinyl)pyrene, and 1-allylpyrene serve as mechanism-based irreversible inactivators (suicide inhibitors) of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase, while 1-vinylpyrene and phenyl 1-pyrenyl acetylene do not cause a detectable suicide inhibition of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase. The mechanism-based loss of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase caused by the aryl acetylenes is not accompanied by a corresponding loss of the P-450 content of the microsomes (suicide destruction). The suicide inhibition by these aryl acetylenes therefore does not involve covalent binding to the heme moiety of the monooxygenase. Nevertheless, in the presence of NADPH, /sup 3/H-labeled 1-ethynylpyrene becomes covalently attached to the cytochrome P-450 protein; the measured stoichiometry of binding is one 1-ethynylpyrene per P-450 heme unit. The authors conclude that the inhibition of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase produced by 1-ethynylpyrene may be related to the mechanism of suicide inhibition of P-450 activity by chloramphenicol rather than the mechanism of suicide destruction of P-450 previously described for acetylene and propyne.

  3. Assay of the deuterium enrichment of water via acetylene.

    PubMed

    Previs, S F; Hazey, J W; Diraison, F; Beylot, M; David, F; Brunengraber, H

    1996-06-01

    A technique is presented for measuring the 2H enrichment of water in biological samples when this enrichment is greater than 0.2%. The sample is reacted with calcium carbide to form acetylene gas, which is determined by gas chromatography electron impact ionization mass spectrometry. Ion-molecule reactions, resulting in proton abstraction, are minimized by lowering the electron ionization energy from the usual 70 eV to 45 eV. This technique is much more rapid and economical than the classical isotope ratio mass spectrometric assay of the enrichment of hydrogen gas derived from reduction of water.

  4. Acetylene fermentation: An Earth-based analog of biological carbon cycling on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. G.; Baesman, S. M.; Hoeft, S. E.; Kirshtein, J.; Wolf, K.; Voytek, M. A.; Oremland, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    Acetylene (C2H2) is present in part per million quantities in the atmosphere of Titan; conceivably as an intermediate product of methane photolysis. Currently, Earth’s atmosphere contains only trace amounts of C2H2 (~40 pptv), however higher concentrations likely prevailed during the Hadean and early Archean eons (4.5 - 3.5 Ga). We isolated C2H2-fermenting microbes from various aquatic and sedimentary environments. Acetylene fermentation proceeds via acetylene hydratase (AH) through acetaldehyde, which dismutates to ethanol and acetate, and if oxidants are present (e.g., sulfate) eventually to CO2. Thus, the remnants of a C2H2 cycle exists today on Earth but may also occur on Titan and/or Enceladus, both being planetary bodies hypothesized to have liquid water underlying their frozen surfaces. We developed a molecular method for AH by designing PCR primers to target the functional gene in Pelobacter acetylenicus. We used this method to scan new environments for the presence of AH and we employed DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in order to positively identify pelobacters in environmental samples. Acetylene fermentation was documented in five diverse salt-, fresh-, and ground-water sites. Pelobacter was identified as the genus responsible for acetylene fermentation in some, but not all, of these sites. Successful probing for AH preceded the discovery of acetylene consumption in a contaminated groundwater site, demonstrating the utility of functional gene probing. A pure culture of a C2H2-fermenting pelobacter was obtained from an intertidal mudflat. We also obtained an enrichment culture (co-cultured with a sulfate reducer) from freshwater lake sediments, but neither was pelobacter nor AH detected in this sample, suggesting that an alternative pathway may be involved here. Slurry experiments using these lake sediments either with or without added C2H2 or sulfate showed that sulfate reduction and acetylene fermentation were independent processes. In general, the

  5. 29 CFR 4043.23 - Active participant reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Active participant reduction. 4043.23 Section 4043.23 Labor... Active participant reduction. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs when the number of active participants under a plan is reduced to less than 80 percent of the number of active participants at...

  6. 29 CFR 4043.23 - Active participant reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Active participant reduction. 4043.23 Section 4043.23 Labor... Active participant reduction. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs when the number of active participants under a plan is reduced to less than 80 percent of the number of active participants at...

  7. Vapor pressures of acetylene at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masterson, C. M.; Allen, John E., Jr.; Kraus, G. F.; Khanna, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The atmospheres of many of the outer planets and their satellites contain a large number of hydrocarbon species. In particular, acetylene (C2H2) has been identified at Jupiter, Saturn and its satellite Titan, Uranus and Neptune. In the lower atmospheres of these planets, where colder temperatures prevail, the condensation and/or freezing of acetylene is probable. In order to obtain accurate models of the acetylene in these atmospheres, it is necessary to have a complete understanding of its vapor pressures at low temperatures. Vapor pressures at low temperatures for acetylene are being determined. The vapor pressures are measured with two different techniques in order to cover a wide range of temperatures and pressures. In the first, the acetylene is placed in a sample tube which is immersed in a low temperature solvent/liquid nitrogen slush bath whose temperature is measured with a thermocouple. The vapor pressure is then measured directly with a capacitance manometer. For lower pressures, a second technique which was called the thin-film infrared method (TFIR) was developed. It involves measuring the disappearance rate of a thin film of acetylene at a particular temperature. The spectra are then analyzed using previously determined extinction coefficient values, to determine the disappearance rate R (where R = delta n/delta t, the number of molecules that disappear per unit time). This can be related to the vapor pressure directly. This technique facilitates measurement of the lower temperatures and pressures. Both techniques have been calibrated using CO2, and have shown good agreement with the existing literature data.

  8. Acetylene Fermentation: Relevance to Primordial Biogeochemistry and the Search for Life in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    Acetylene is a highly reactive component of planet(oid)s with anoxic, methane-rich atmospheres, such as Jupiter, Saturn, Titan, and perhaps the primordial Earth. Included in this group is Enceladus, although it is not clear if the acetylene detected within its jets by Cassini was formed by photolysis of methane, from thermo-catalysis of organic matter in the orb's interior, or a fragmentation artifact of the mass spectrum of a larger hydrocarbon. Acetylene inhibits many microbial processes (e.g., methanogenesis, methane oxidation, hydrogen metabolism, denitrification) yet a number of anaerobes can use it as a carbon and energy source to support growth. The best studied is Pelobacter acetylenicus, which carries out a two-step reaction involving the enzymes acetylene hydratase and acetaldehyde dismutase. The former, a low potential W-containing enzyme, forms acetaldehyde while the latter produces ethanol and acetate. Metabolism of acetylene by mixed microbial communities (sediments and/or enrichment cultures) produces these intermediates, and when coupled with sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis respectively forms CO2 or an equal mixtures of CO2 plus CH4. It is not inconceivable that such an anaerobic, microbial food chain could exist in the waters beneath the ice cap of Enceladus, Titan, or even in the mesothermal atmospheric regions of the gas giants. Detection of the identified intermediate products of acetylene fermentation, namely acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetate and formate in the atmospheres of these planet(oid)s would constitute evidence for a microbial life signature. This evidence would be strongly reinforced if a stable carbon isotope fractionation was identified as well, whereby the products of acetylene fermentation were enriched in 12C relative to 13C (i.e., had a lighter δ13C signal) when compared to that of the starting acetylene. The most practical target to test this hypothesis would be Enceladus (if the detected acetylene is shown to be a real

  9. Microporous metal–organic framework with dual functionalities for highly efficient removal of acetylene from ethylene/acetylene mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tong-Liang; Wang, Hailong; Li, Bin; Krishna, Rajamani; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Han, Yu; Wang, Xue; Zhu, Weidong; Yao, Zizhu; Xiang, Shengchang; Chen, Banglin

    2015-01-01

    The removal of acetylene from ethylene/acetylene mixtures containing 1% acetylene is a technologically very important, but highly challenging task. Current removal approaches include the partial hydrogenation over a noble metal catalyst and the solvent extraction of cracked olefins, both of which are cost and energy consumptive. Here we report a microporous metal–organic framework in which the suitable pore/cage spaces preferentially take up much more acetylene than ethylene while the functional amine groups on the pore/cage surfaces further enforce their interactions with acetylene molecules, leading to its superior performance for this separation. The single X-ray diffraction studies, temperature dependent gas sorption isotherms, simulated and experimental column breakthrough curves and molecular simulation studies collaboratively support the claim, underlying the potential of this material for the industrial usage of the removal of acetylene from ethylene/acetylene mixtures containing 1% acetylene at room temperature through the cost- and energy-efficient adsorption separation process. PMID:26041691

  10. 46 CFR 154.1735 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture. 154.1735 Section... Operating Requirements § 154.1735 Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture. (a) The composition of the methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture at loading must be within the following limits or specially approved by...

  11. 46 CFR 154.1735 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture. 154.1735 Section... Operating Requirements § 154.1735 Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture. (a) The composition of the methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture at loading must be within the following limits or specially approved by...

  12. 46 CFR 154.1735 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture. 154.1735 Section... Operating Requirements § 154.1735 Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture. (a) The composition of the methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture at loading must be within the following limits or specially approved by...

  13. 46 CFR 154.1735 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture. 154.1735 Section... Operating Requirements § 154.1735 Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture. (a) The composition of the methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture at loading must be within the following limits or specially approved by...

  14. Designing supported palladium-on-gold bimetallic nano-catalysts for controlled hydrogenation of acetylene in large excess of ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malla, Pavani

    Ethylene is used as a starting point for many chemical intermediates in the petrochemical industry. It is predominantly produced through steam cracking of higher hydrocarbons (ethane, propane, butane, naphtha, and gas oil). During the cracking process, a small amount of acetylene is produced as a side product. However, acetylene must be removed since it acts as a poison for ethylene polymerization catalysts at even ppm concentrations (>5 ppm). Thus, the selective hydrogenation of acetylene to ethylene is an important process for the purification of ethylene. Conventional, low weight loading Pd catalysts are used for this selective reaction in high concentration ethylene streams. Gold was initially considered to be catalytically inactive for a long time. This changed when gold was seen in the context of the nanometric scale, which has indeed shown it to have excellent catalytic activity as a homogeneous or a heterogeneous catalyst. Gold is proved to have high selectivity to ethylene but poor at conversion. Bimetallic Au and Pd catalysts have exhibited superior activity as compared to Pd particles in semi-hydrogenation. Hydrogenation of acetylene was tested using this bimetallic combination. The Pd-on-Au bimetallic catalyst structure provides a new synthesis approach in improving the catalytic properties of monometallic Pd materials. TiO 2 as a support material and 0.05%Pd loading on 1%Au on titania support and used different treatment methods like washing plasma and reduction between the two metal loadings and was observed under 2:1 ratio. In my study there were two set of catalysts which were prepared by a modified incipient wetness impregnation technique. Out of all the reaction condition the catalyst which was reduced after impregnating gold and then impregnating palladium which was further treated in non-thermal hydrogen plasma and then pretreated in hydrogen till 250°C for 1 hour produced the best activity of 76% yield at 225°C. Stability tests were conducted

  15. Influence of and additives on acetylene detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakon, A.; Emelianov, A.; Eremin, A.

    2014-03-01

    The influence of and admixtures (known as detonation suppressors for combustible mixtures) on the development of acetylene detonation was experimentally investigated in a shock tube. The time-resolved images of detonation wave development and propagation were registered using a high-speed streak camera. Shock wave velocity and pressure profiles were measured by five calibrated piezoelectric gauges and the formation of condensed particles was detected by laser light extinction. The induction time of detonation development was determined as the moment of a pressure rise at the end plate of the shock tube. It was shown that additive had no influence on the induction time. For , a significant promoting effect was observed. A simplified kinetic model was suggested and characteristic rates of diacetylene formation were estimated as the limiting stage of acetylene polymerisation. An analysis of the obtained data indicated that the promoting species is atomic chlorine formed by pyrolysis, which interacts with acetylene and produces radical, initiating a chain mechanism of acetylene decomposition. The results of kinetic modelling agree well with the experimental data.

  16. Hydration of Acetylene: A 125th Anniversary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponomarev, Dmitry A.; Shevchenko, Sergey M.

    2007-01-01

    The year 2006 is the 125th anniversary of a chemical reaction, the discovery of which by Mikhail Kucherov had a profound effect on the development of industrial chemistry in the 19-20th centuries. This was the hydration of alkynes catalyzed by mercury ions that made possible industrial production of acetaldehyde from acetylene. Historical…

  17. Identification of Acetylene on Titan's Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; McCord, T. B.; Rodriguez, S.; Combe, J. P.; Cornet, T.; Le Mouelic, S.; Maltagliati, L.; Chevrier, V.; Clark, R. N.

    2015-12-01

    Titan's atmosphere is opaque in the near infrared due to gaseous absorptions, mainly by methane, and scattering by aerosols, except in a few "transparency windows" (e.g., Sotin et al., 2005). Thus, the composition of Titan surface remains difficult to access from space and is still poorly constrained, limited to ethane in the polar lakes (Brown et al., 2008) and a few possible organic molecules on the surface (Clark et al., 2010). Photochemical models suggest that most of the organic compounds formed in the atmosphere are heavy enough to condense and build up at the surface in liquid and solid states over geological timescale (Cordier et al., 2009, 2011). Acetylene (C2H2) is one of the most abundant organic molecules in the atmosphere and thus thought to present on the surface as well. Here we report direct evidence of solid C2H2 on Titan's surface using Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) data. By comparing VIMS observations and laboratory measurements of solid and liquid C2H2, we identify a specific absorption at 1.55 µm that is widespread over Titan but is particularly strong in the brightest terrains. This surface variability suggests that C2H2 is mobilized by surface processes, such as surface weathering, topography, and dissolution/evaporation. The detection of C2H2 on the surface of Titan opens new paths to understand and constrain Titan's surface activity. Since C2H2 is highly soluble in Titan liquids (Singh et al. 2015), it can easily dissolve in methane/ethane and may play an important role in carving of fluvial channels and existence of karstic lakes at higher latitudes on Titan. These processes imply the existence of a dynamic surface with a continued history of erosion and deposition of C2H2 on Titan.

  18. An active noise reduction system for aircrew helmets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, P. D.; Rawlinson, D.; Pelc, S. F.; Dorey, T. P.

    1978-01-01

    An active noise reduction system was developed for use in aircrew flying helmets in which the acoustic noise field inside the ear defender is detected using a miniature microphone and an antiphase signal is fed back to a communications telephone within the ear defender. Performance of the active noise reduction system in a laboratory trial simulating flight conditions is shown to be satisfactory.

  19. Two new acetylenic compounds from Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Mei; Cai, Jin-Long; Wang, Wen-Xiang; Ai, Hong-Lian; Mao, Zi-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Two new acetylenic compounds, asparoffins A (1) and B (2), together with two known compounds, nyasol (3) and 3″-methoxynyasol (4), were isolated from stems of Asparagus officinalis. The structures of two new compounds were elucidated on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analyses (UV, IR, MS, 1D, and 2D NMR). All compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxicities against three human cancer cell lines. PMID:26558641

  20. Two new acetylenic compounds from Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Mei; Cai, Jin-Long; Wang, Wen-Xiang; Ai, Hong-Lian; Mao, Zi-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Two new acetylenic compounds, asparoffins A (1) and B (2), together with two known compounds, nyasol (3) and 3″-methoxynyasol (4), were isolated from stems of Asparagus officinalis. The structures of two new compounds were elucidated on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analyses (UV, IR, MS, 1D, and 2D NMR). All compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxicities against three human cancer cell lines.

  1. Annual waste reduction activities report. Issue 1

    SciTech Connect

    1991-03-18

    This report discusses the waste minimization activities for the Pinellas Plant. The Pinellas Plant deals with low-level radioactive wastes, solvents, scrap metals and various other hazardous materials. This program has realized cost savings through recycling and reuse of materials.

  2. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  3. High temperature polymer from maleimide-acetylene terminated monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, Margaret K. (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Thermally stable, glassy polymeric materials were prepared from maleimide-acetylene terminated monomeric materials by several methods. The monomers were heated to self-polymerize. The A-B structure of the monomer allowed it to polymerize with either bismaleimide monomers/oligomers or bis-acetylene monomers/oligomers. Copolymerization can also take place by mixing bismaleimide and bisacetylene monomers/oligomers with the maleimide-acetylene terminated monomers to yield homogenous glassy polymers.

  4. Mechanism of tungsten-dependent acetylene hydratase from quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Liao, Rong-Zhen; Yu, Jian-Guo; Himo, Fahmi

    2010-12-28

    Acetylene hydratase is a tungsten-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the nonredox hydration of acetylene to acetaldehyde. Density functional theory calculations are used to elucidate the reaction mechanism of this enzyme with a large model of the active site devised on the basis of the native X-ray crystal structure. Based on the calculations, we propose a new mechanism in which the acetylene substrate first displaces the W-coordinated water molecule, and then undergoes a nucleophilic attack by the water molecule assisted by an ionized Asp13 residue at the active site. This is followed by proton transfer from Asp13 to the newly formed vinyl anion intermediate. In the subsequent isomerization, Asp13 shuttles a proton from the hydroxyl group of the vinyl alcohol to the α-carbon. Asp13 is thus a key player in the mechanism, but also W is directly involved in the reaction by binding and activating acetylene and providing electrostatic stabilization to the transition states and intermediates. Several other mechanisms are also considered but the energetic barriers are found to be very high, ruling out these possibilities.

  5. Purification and characterization of acetylene hydratase of Pelobacter acetylenicus, a tungsten iron-sulfur protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, B M; Schink, B

    1995-01-01

    Acetylene hydratase of the mesophilic fermenting bacterium Pelobacter acetylenicus catalyzes the hydration of acetylene to acetaldehyde. Growth of P. acetylenicus with acetylene and specific acetylene hydratase activity depended on tungstate or, to a lower degree, molybdate supply in the medium. The specific enzyme activity in cell extract was highest after growth in the presence of tungstate. Enzyme activity was stable even after prolonged storage of the cell extract or of the purified protein under air. However, enzyme activity could be measured only in the presence of a strong reducing agent such as titanium(III) citrate or dithionite. The enzyme was purified 240-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation, anion-exchange chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, and a second anion-exchange chromatography step, with a yield of 36%. The protein was a monomer with an apparent molecular mass of 73 kDa, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric point was at pH 4.2. Per mol of enzyme, 4.8 mol of iron, 3.9 mol of acid-labile sulfur, and 0.4 mol of tungsten, but no molybdenum, were detected. The Km for acetylene as assayed in a coupled photometric test with yeast alcohol dehydrogenase and NADH was 14 microM, and the Vmax was 69 mumol.min-1.mg of protein-1. The optimum temperature for activity was 50 degrees C, and the apparent pH optimum was 6.0 to 6.5. The N-terminal amino acid sequence gave no indication of resemblance to any enzyme protein described so far. PMID:7592321

  6. Spectroscopic study of acetylene and hydrogen cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozario, Hoimonti Immaculata

    High-resolution molecular spectroscopy has been used to study acetylene line parameters and emission spectra of hydrogen cyanide. All acetylene spectra were recorded in our laboratory at the University of Lethbridge using a 3-channel tuneable diode laser spectrometer. N2-broadened line widths and N2-pressure induced line shifts have been measured for transitions in the v1+v3 band of acetylene at seven temperatures in the range 213-333K to obtain the temperature dependences of broadening and shift coefficients. The Voigt and hard-collision line profile models were used to retrieve the line parameters. The line-broadening and line-shift coefficients as well as their temperature-dependent parameters have been also evaluated theoretically, in the frame work of a semi-classical approach based on an exponential representation of the scattering operator, an intermolecular potential composed of electrostatic quadrupole--quadrupole and pairwise atom--atom interactions as well as on exact trajectories driven by an effective isotropic potential. The experimental results for both N2-broadening and shifting show good agreement with the theoretical results. We have studied the line intensities of the 1vl 20←0v120 band system from the HCN emission spectrum. The infrared emission spectrum of H12C 14N was measured at the Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany. The emission spectrum was analyzed with the spectrum analysis software Symath running using Mathematica as a platform. This approach allowed us to retrieve information on band intensity parameters.

  7. Acetylenic polymers for hair styling products.

    PubMed

    Martiny, S

    2002-06-01

    This paper looks at the basic requirements of hair styling products from a consumer's perspective before moving onto a very brief outline of the various chemistries available to the formulator. It then discusses the manufacture of vinyl pyrrolidone from acetylene. The properties of polyvinyl pyrrolidone are described, followed by the features and benefits of some vinyl pyrrolidone copolymers and terpolymers. The instrumental analysis of the hold, flexibility, tack and combing properties of polymer films is discussed in some detail, along with the effect of application type on these measurable properties concentrating upon vinyl caprolactam/vinyl pyrrolidone/dimethylaminopropyl methacrylamide acrylates copolymer.

  8. Laboratory astrochemistry: catalytic conversion of acetylene to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons over SiC grains.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T Q; Li, Q; Liu, B S; Gover, R K E; Sarre, P J; Cheung, A S-C

    2016-02-01

    Catalytic conversion reactions of acetylene on a solid SiC grain surface lead to the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and are expected to mimic chemical processes in certain astrophysical environments. Gas-phase PAHs and intermediates were detected in situ using time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and their formation was confirmed using GC-MS in a separate experiment by flowing acetylene gas through a fixed-bed reactor. Activation of acetylene correlated closely with the dangling bonds on the SiC surface which interact with and break the C-C π bond. The addition of acetylene to the resulting radical site forms a surface ring structure which desorbs from the surface. The results of HRTEM and TG indicate that soot and graphene formation on the SiC surface depends strongly on reaction temperature. We propose that PAHs as seen through the 'UIR' emission bands can be formed through decomposition of a graphene-like material, formed on the surface of SiC grains in carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes. PMID:26752613

  9. Chromium Isotope Behaviour During Aerobic Microbial Reduction Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Amor, K.; Porcelli, D.; Thompson, I.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial activity is a very important, and possibly even the dominant, reduction mechanism for many metals in natural water systems. Isotope fractionations during microbial metal reduction can reflect one major mechanism in metal cycling in the environment, and isotopic signatures can be used to identify and quantify reduction processes during biogeochemical cycling in the present environment as well as in the past. There are many Cr (VI)-reducing bacteria that have been discovered and isolated from the environment, and Cr isotopes were found to be fractionated during microbial reduction processes. In this study, Cr reduction experiments have been undertaken to determine the conditions under which Cr is reduced and the corresponding isotope signals that are generated. The experiments have been done with a facultative bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens LB 300, and several parameters that have potential impact on reduction mechanisms have been investigated. Electron donors are important for bacteria growth and metabolism. One factor that can control the rate of Cr reduction is the nature of the electron donor. The results show that using citrate as an electron donor can stimulate bacteria reduction activity to a large extent; the reduction rate is much higher (15.10 mgˑL-1hour-1) compared with experiments using glucose (6.65 mgˑL-1ˑhour-1), acetate (4.88 mgˑL-1hour-1) or propionate (4.85 mgˑL-1hour-1) as electron donors. Groups with higher electron donor concentrations have higher reduction rates. Chromium is toxic, and when increasing Cr concentrations in the medium, the bacteria reduction rate is also higher, which reflects bacteria adapting to the toxic environment. In the natural environment, under different pH conditions, bacteria may metabolise in different ways. In our experiments with pH, bacteria performed better in reducing Cr (VI) when pH = 8, and there are no significant differences between groups with pH = 4 or pH = 6. To investigate this further, Cr

  10. RECRYSTALLIZATION OF PMDA AND SYNTHESIS OF AN ACETYLENIC DIAMINE

    SciTech Connect

    Sanner, R; Cook, R C

    2004-09-21

    This memo provides documentation for the method of recrystallization of pyromeletic dianhydride (PMDA), the dianhydride used in the vapor deposition of Kapton-like polyimide for ICF shell ablators and for the synthesis of bis(3-aminophenyl) acetylene, a unique acetylenic diamine developed for vapor deposition testing.

  11. Chemistry of acetylene on platinum (111) and (100) surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Muetterties, E. L.; Tasi, M.-C.; Kelemen, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    An ultra-high vacuum experimental study of acetylene chemisorption on Pt(111) and Pt(100) and of the reaction of hydrogen with the acetylene adsorbate has established distinguishing features of carbon-hydrogen bond breaking and making processes as a function of pressure, temperature, and surface crystallography. The rates for both processes are substantially higher on the Pt(100) surface. Net acetylene-hydrogen processes, in the temperature range of 20°C to ≈130°C, are distinctly different on the two surfaces: on Pt(100) the net reaction is hydrogen exchange (1H-2H exchange) and on Pt(111) the only detectable reaction is hydrogenation. Stereochemical differences in the acetylene adsorbate structure are considered to be a contributing factor to the differences in acetylene chemistry on these two surfaces. Images PMID:16593110

  12. Epigenetic modifier-induced biosynthesis of novel acetylenic sterols from Cladosporium colocasiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Ze; Liang, Bo-Wen; Li, Xiao-Fei; Yu, Zhi-Yuan

    2014-09-01

    The addition of an HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SBHA), to the culture medium of Cladosporium colocasiae, dramatically altered its metabolic profiles. Analysis of the culture broth extract led to the isolation of two new acetylenic sterols (1-2). The isolated compounds were further evaluated for their cytotoxic and antibacterial activities. Compound 1 showed activity against Bacillus subtilis, affording a zone of inhibition of 12mm at 100μg/disk. However, none of them showed noticeable growth inhibitory effects.

  13. Acetylene: Synergy between theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, James K.; Field, Robert W.; Sherrill, C. David; Seidl, Edward T.; Xie, Yaoming; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    1993-06-01

    Six anomalous vibronic feature states [˜2 cm-1 full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), each consisting of ˜20 partially resolved eigenstates] have been observed in stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra of C2D2. Of the two plausible assignments for these features, the one most consistent with spectroscopic observations would imply that the lowest energy cis-bent triplet state of acetylene has T0≤25 820 cm-1, which is inconsistent with previous ab initio predictions. New higher level ab initio quantum mechanical methods have been used to predict the energy difference between X˜ 1Σg+ ground state and the cis-bent ã 3B2 lowest triplet state of acetylene. In conjunction with a triple zeta plus double polarization plus f function (TZ2Pf) basis set, the coupled cluster including single, double, and linearized triple excitations CCSD(T) method yields T0=ΔE(ã 3B2-X˜ 1Σg+)=30 500 cm-1. The true value of T0 for the ã 3B2 state is estimated to be ˜500 cm-1 higher. At the same level of theory the zero-point levels of the lowest triplet state of the trans-bent (ã 3Bu) and vinylidene (ã 3B2) isomers lie at still higher energies. This result conclusively rules out any triplet assignment for the anomalous feature states. The alternative assignment, as highly excited vibrational levels of the X˜ 1Σg+ state, is surprising in view of the Franck-Condon selectivity, dynamical stability, and nonselective relaxation of this special class of ``bright states'' observed in the SEP spectra. Such an assignment would be implausible in the absence of the present ab initio calculations. Previous experimental observations [Lisy and Klemperer, J. Chem. Phys. 72, 3880 (1980) and Wendt, Hippler, and Hunziker, J. Chem. Phys. 70, 4044 (1979)] of acetylene triplet states are discussed and shown to be completely consistent with each other and with the present ab initio ordering of the cis and trans isomeric minima on the T1 potential energy surface: cis ã 3B2 below trans ã 3Bu .

  14. Active flow control for Aeolian tone noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.; Pope, D. Stuart

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the use of active flow control for the purpose of noise reduction. As a simple demonstration of such techniques, several methods for controlling the wake and resulting noise production by a cylinder in a uniform stream are evaluated numerically.

  15. High pressure chemistry of substituted acetylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Chellappa, Raja; Dattelbaum, Dana; Sheffield, Stephen; Robbins, David

    2011-01-25

    High pressure in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments were performed on substituted polyacetylenes: tert-butyl acetylene [TBA: (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}-C{triple_bond}CH] and ethynyl trimethylsilane [ETMS: (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}-Si{triple_bond}CH] to investigate pressure-induced chemical reactions. The starting samples were the low temperature crystalline phases which persisted metastably at room temperature and polymerized beyond 11 GPa and 26 GPa for TBA and ETMS respectively. These reaction onset pressures are considerably higher than what we observed in the shockwave studies (6.1 GPa for TBA and 6.6 GPa for ETMS). Interestingly, in the case of ETMS, it was observed with fluid ETMS as starting sample, reacts to form a semi-crystalline polymer (crystalline domains corresponding to the low-T phase) at pressures less than {approx}2 GPa. Further characterization using vibrational spectroscopy is in progress.

  16. 46 CFR 151.50-79 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture. 151.50-79 Section... acetylene-propadiene mixture. (a) The composition of the methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture at loading must... acetylene-propadiene mixture must have a refrigeration system that does not compress the cargo vapor or...

  17. 46 CFR 151.50-79 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture. 151.50-79 Section... acetylene-propadiene mixture. (a) The composition of the methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture at loading must... acetylene-propadiene mixture must have a refrigeration system that does not compress the cargo vapor or...

  18. 46 CFR 151.50-79 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture. 151.50-79 Section... acetylene-propadiene mixture. (a) The composition of the methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture at loading must... acetylene-propadiene mixture must have a refrigeration system that does not compress the cargo vapor or...

  19. Active viscoelastic matter: from bacterial drag reduction to turbulent solids.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, E J; Maitra, A; Banerjee, S; Marchetti, M C; Ramaswamy, S; Fielding, S M; Cates, M E

    2015-03-01

    A paradigm for internally driven matter is the active nematic liquid crystal, whereby the equations of a conventional nematic are supplemented by a minimal active stress that violates time-reversal symmetry. In practice, active fluids may have not only liquid-crystalline but also viscoelastic polymer degrees of freedom. Here we explore the resulting interplay by coupling an active nematic to a minimal model of polymer rheology. We find that adding a polymer can greatly increase the complexity of spontaneous flow, but can also have calming effects, thereby increasing the net throughput of spontaneous flow along a pipe (a "drag-reduction" effect). Remarkably, active turbulence can also arise after switching on activity in a sufficiently soft elastomeric solid. PMID:25793858

  20. Active Viscoelastic Matter: From Bacterial Drag Reduction to Turbulent Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemingway, E. J.; Maitra, A.; Banerjee, S.; Marchetti, M. C.; Ramaswamy, S.; Fielding, S. M.; Cates, M. E.

    2015-03-01

    A paradigm for internally driven matter is the active nematic liquid crystal, whereby the equations of a conventional nematic are supplemented by a minimal active stress that violates time-reversal symmetry. In practice, active fluids may have not only liquid-crystalline but also viscoelastic polymer degrees of freedom. Here we explore the resulting interplay by coupling an active nematic to a minimal model of polymer rheology. We find that adding a polymer can greatly increase the complexity of spontaneous flow, but can also have calming effects, thereby increasing the net throughput of spontaneous flow along a pipe (a "drag-reduction" effect). Remarkably, active turbulence can also arise after switching on activity in a sufficiently soft elastomeric solid.

  1. Active viscoelastic matter: from bacterial drag reduction to turbulent solids.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, E J; Maitra, A; Banerjee, S; Marchetti, M C; Ramaswamy, S; Fielding, S M; Cates, M E

    2015-03-01

    A paradigm for internally driven matter is the active nematic liquid crystal, whereby the equations of a conventional nematic are supplemented by a minimal active stress that violates time-reversal symmetry. In practice, active fluids may have not only liquid-crystalline but also viscoelastic polymer degrees of freedom. Here we explore the resulting interplay by coupling an active nematic to a minimal model of polymer rheology. We find that adding a polymer can greatly increase the complexity of spontaneous flow, but can also have calming effects, thereby increasing the net throughput of spontaneous flow along a pipe (a "drag-reduction" effect). Remarkably, active turbulence can also arise after switching on activity in a sufficiently soft elastomeric solid.

  2. In situ spectroscopic characterization of Ni1-xZnx/ZnO catalysts and their selectivity for acetylene semihydrogenation in excess ethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Spanjers, Charles S.; Sim, Richard S.; Sturgis, Nicholas P.; Kabius, Bernd; Rioux, Robert M.

    2015-10-30

    The structures of ZnO-supported Ni catalysts were explored with in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, temperature-programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Calcination of nickel nitrate on a nanoparticulate ZnO support at 450 °C results in the formation of Zn-doped NiO (ca. N₀̣̣₈₅ Zn₀̣̣₁₅O) nanoparticles with the rock salt crystal structure. Subsequent in situ reduction monitored by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) at the Ni K edge reveals a direct transformation of the Zn-doped NiO nanoparticles to a face-centered cubic alloy, Ni1-xZnx, at ~400 °C with x increasing with increasing temperature. Both in situ XANES and ex situ HRTEM provide evidence for intermetallic β₁-NiZn formation at ~550 °C. In comparison to a Ni/SiO₂ catalyst, Ni/ZnO necessitates a higher temperature for the reduction of NiII to Ni⁰, which highlights the strong interaction between Ni and the ZnO support. The catalytic activity for acetylene removal from an ethylene feed stream is decreased by a factor of 20 on Ni/ZnO in comparison to Ni/SiO₂. The decrease in catalytic activity of Ni/ZnO is accompanied by a reduced absolute selectivity to ethylene. H–D exchange measurements demonstrate a reduced ability of Ni/ZnO to dissociate hydrogen in comparison to Ni/SiO₂.These results of the catalytic experiments suggest that the catalytic properties are controlled, in part, by the zinc oxide support and stress the importance of reporting absolute ethylene selectivity for the catalytic semihydrogenation of acetylene in excess ethylene.

  3. Characterization of the Minimum Energy Paths and Energetics for the reaction of Vinylidene with Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    The reaction of vinylidene (CH2C) with acetylene may be an initiating reaction in soot formation. We report minimum energy paths and accurate energetics for a pathway leading to vinylacetylene and for a number of isomers Of C4H4. The calculations use complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) derivative methods to characterize the stationary points and internally contacted configuration interaction (ICCI) and/or coupled cluster singles and doubles with a perturbational estimate of triple excitations (CCSD(T)) to determine the energetics. We find an entrance channel barrier of about 5 kcal/mol for the addition of vinylidene to acetylene, but no barriers above reactants for the reaction pathway leading to vinylacetylene.

  4. Reductive activation of mitomycins A and C by vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Paz, Manuel M

    2013-06-01

    The anticancer drug mitomycin C produces cytotoxic effects after being converted to a highly reactive bis-electrophile by a reductive activation, a reaction that a number of 1-electron or 2-electron oxidoreductase enzymes can perform in cells. Several reports in the literature indicate that ascorbic acid can modulate the cytotoxic effects of mitomycin C, either potentiating or inhibiting its effects. As ascorbic acid is a reducing agent that is known to be able to reduce quinones, it could be possible that the observed modulatory effects are a consequence of a direct redox reduction between mitomycin C and ascorbate. To determine if this is the case, the reaction between mitomycin C and ascorbate was studied using UV/Vis spectroscopy and LC/MS. We also studied the reaction of ascorbate with mitomycin A, a highly toxic member of the mitomycin family with a higher redox potential than mitomycin C. We found that ascorbate is capable to reduce mitomycin A efficiently, but it reduces mitomycin C rather inefficiently. The mechanisms of activation have been elucidated based on the kinetics of the reduction and on the analysis of the mitosene derivatives formed after the reaction. We found that the activation occurs by the interplay of three different mechanisms that contribute differently, depending on the pH of the reaction. As the reduction of mitomycin C by ascorbate is rather inefficiently at physiologically relevant pH values we conclude that the modulatory effect of ascorbate on the cytotoxicity of mitomycin C is not the result of a direct redox reaction and therefore this modulation must be the consequence of other biochemical mechanisms.

  5. Acetylene on Titan’s Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; McCord, T. B.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Rodriguez, S.; Cornet, T.; Le Mouélic, S.; Clark, R. N.; Maltagliati, L.; Chevrier, V. F.

    2016-09-01

    Titan’s atmosphere is opaque in the near-infrared due to gaseous absorptions, mainly by methane, and scattering by aerosols, except in a few “transparency windows.” Thus, the composition of Titan’s surface remains difficult to access from space and is still poorly constrained. Photochemical models suggest that most of the organic compounds formed in the atmosphere are heavy enough to condense and build up at the surface in liquid and solid states over geological timescales. Acetylene (C2H2) net production in the atmosphere is predicted to be larger than any other compound and C2H2 has been speculated to exist on the surface of Titan. C2H2 was detected as a trace gas sublimated/evaporated from the surface using the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer after the landing of the Huygens probe. Here we show evidence of C2H2 on the surface of Titan by detecting absorption bands at 1.55 and 4.93 μm using the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer at three different equatorial areas—Tui Regio, eastern Shangri La, and Fensal-Aztlan/Quivira. We found that C2H2 is preferentially detected in low-albedo areas, such as sand dunes and near the Huygens landing site. The specific location of the C2H2 detections suggests that C2H2 is mobilized by surface processes, such as surface weathering by liquids through dissolution/evaporation processes.

  6. Electron impact induced anion production in acetylene.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Ewelina; Čadež, Iztok; Krishnakumar, E; Mason, Nigel J

    2014-02-28

    A detailed experimental investigation of electron induced anion production in acetylene, C2H2, in the energy range between 1 and 90 eV is presented. The anions are formed by two processes in this energy range: dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and dipolar dissociation (DD). DEA in C2H2 is found to lead to the formation of H(-) and C2(-)/C2H(-) through excitation of resonances in the electron energy range 1-15 eV. These anionic fragments are formed with super thermal kinetic energy and reveal no anisotropy in the angular distributions. DD in C2H2 leads to the formation of H(-), C(-)/CH(-) and C2(-)/C2H(-) with threshold energies of 15.7, 20.0 and 16.5 eV respectively. The measured anion yields have been used to calculate anion production rates for H(-), C(-)/CH(-) and C2(-)/C2H(-) in Titan's ionosphere. PMID:24343432

  7. Acetylene on Titan’s Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; McCord, T. B.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Rodriguez, S.; Cornet, T.; Le Mouélic, S.; Clark, R. N.; Maltagliati, L.; Chevrier, V. F.

    2016-09-01

    Titan’s atmosphere is opaque in the near-infrared due to gaseous absorptions, mainly by methane, and scattering by aerosols, except in a few “transparency windows.” Thus, the composition of Titan’s surface remains difficult to access from space and is still poorly constrained. Photochemical models suggest that most of the organic compounds formed in the atmosphere are heavy enough to condense and build up at the surface in liquid and solid states over geological timescales. Acetylene (C2H2) net production in the atmosphere is predicted to be larger than any other compound and C2H2 has been speculated to exist on the surface of Titan. C2H2 was detected as a trace gas sublimated/evaporated from the surface using the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer after the landing of the Huygens probe. Here we show evidence of C2H2 on the surface of Titan by detecting absorption bands at 1.55 and 4.93 μm using the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer at three different equatorial areas—Tui Regio, eastern Shangri La, and Fensal–Aztlan/Quivira. We found that C2H2 is preferentially detected in low-albedo areas, such as sand dunes and near the Huygens landing site. The specific location of the C2H2 detections suggests that C2H2 is mobilized by surface processes, such as surface weathering by liquids through dissolution/evaporation processes.

  8. Mortality of workers at acetylene production plants.

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, M L; Matthews, G; Sheikh, K; Knight, K L; Oakes, D; Sullivan, K R

    1988-01-01

    To reduce the risk of explosion oxyacetylene cylinders are filled with a spongy mass, acetone is added to saturate the mass, and acetylene is pumped into the cylinder. The first cylinders manufactured before 1936 used a kapok filling topped off with about 16 oz of crocidolite asbestos, with a metal gauze thimble inserted to reduce risk of flash back. Cylinders must be examined annually. The use of crocidolite ceased in 1972 and other fillings have been adopted since 1970; kapok cylinders now constitute less than 5% of the total stock. To assess possible hazards, a mortality study of workers first employed between 1935 and 1975 and followed up to December 1984 was undertaken. Simulation tests showed low concentrations of asbestos in the air even in the earliest period. The population studied consisted of 370 workers at the Bilston plant in the West Midlands, 611 at the 14 other plants in England and Wales, and 120 in Scotland. No deaths occurred from mesothelial tumours but there was an excess of deaths from cancer, particularly lung cancer, cancer of the stomach, and cancer of the pancreas, the latter accounting for eight deaths. Risks appeared to be concentrated at the Bilston plant. The importance of these findings is discussed. PMID:3342189

  9. Process hydrogenates unwanted diolefins and acetylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Vora, B.V. )

    1988-12-05

    Diolefins and actetylenes in C/sub 3//C/sub 4/ olefin streams can be selectively hydrogenated to produce high-purity mono-olefins for downstream polyolefin production. C/sub 3//C/sub 4/ olefin sources, fluid catalytic cracking (FCC), steam crackers, and dehydrogenation of C/sub 3//C/sub 4/ paraffins, all contain these undesirable polyunsaturated compounds. Hydrogenation of these compounds in alkylation unit feeds can also improve the economics of the alkylation process. Production of high-purity mono-olefins for downstream polyolefins production requires a feedstock that is essentially free of dienes and acetylenes to minimize undesirable side reactions. Although alkylation units can tolerate some diolefins in the feed, economics dictate that these diolefins should be minimized. The selective hydrogenation process (SHP) developed by others at its Marl, West Germany, plant, has undergone additional development work since commercialization of the process in 1980. The unit was designed to feed 160,000 metric tons/year of clean C/sub 4/ raffinate from a steam cracker, with a maximum polyunsaturated content of 0.8 wt%.

  10. Ion-induced dissociation dynamics of acetylene

    SciTech Connect

    De, Sankar; Rajput, Jyoti; Roy, A.; Safvan, C. P.; Ghosh, P. N.

    2008-02-15

    We report on the results of dissociation dynamics of multiple charged acetylene molecules formed in collision with 1.2 MeV Ar{sup 8+} projectiles. Using the coincidence map, we can separate out the different dissociation pathways between carbon and hydrogen ionic fragments as well as complete two-body breakup events. From the measured slopes of the coincidence islands for carbon atomic fragments and theoretical values determined from the charge and momentum distribution of the correlated particles, we observe a diatom like behavior of the C-C charged complex during dissociation of multiply charged C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. We conclude that this behavior in breakup dynamics is a signature of sequentiality in dissociation of this multiply charged molecular species. The shape and orientation of the islands give further information about the momentum balance in the fragmentation process of two- or many-body dissociation pathways. Kinetic energy release of different breakup channels are reported here and compared with values calculated from the pure Coulomb explosion model.

  11. Tuning the catalytic activity of graphene nanosheets for oxygen reduction reaction via size and thickness reduction.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Xu, Qian; Wang, Peng; Shen, Yuting; Sun, Litao; Wang, Tanyuan; Li, Meixian; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2014-11-26

    Currently, the fundamental factors that control the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of graphene itself, in particular, the dependence of the ORR activity on the number of exposed edge sites remain elusive, mainly due to limited synthesis routes of achieving small size graphene. In this work, the synthesis of low oxygen content (<2.5±0.2 at. %), few layer graphene nanosheets with lateral dimensions smaller than a few hundred nanometers were achieved using a combination of ionic liquid assisted grinding of high purity graphite coupled with sequential centrifugation. We show for the first time that the graphene nanosheets possessing a plethora of edges exhibited considerably higher electron transfer numbers compared to the thicker graphene nanoplatelets. This enhanced ORR activity was accomplished by successfully exploiting the plethora of edges of the nanosized graphene as well as the efficient electron communication between the active edge sites and the electrode substrate. The graphene nanosheets were characterized by an onset potential of -0.13 V vs Ag/AgCl and a current density of -3.85 mA/cm2 at -1 V, which represent the best ORR performance ever achieved from an undoped carbon based catalyst. This work demonstrates how low oxygen content nanosized graphene synthesized by a simple route can considerably impact the ORR catalytic activity and hence it is of significance in designing and optimizing advanced metal-free ORR electrocatalysts. PMID:25334050

  12. Tuning the catalytic activity of graphene nanosheets for oxygen reduction reaction via size and thickness reduction.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Xu, Qian; Wang, Peng; Shen, Yuting; Sun, Litao; Wang, Tanyuan; Li, Meixian; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2014-11-26

    Currently, the fundamental factors that control the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of graphene itself, in particular, the dependence of the ORR activity on the number of exposed edge sites remain elusive, mainly due to limited synthesis routes of achieving small size graphene. In this work, the synthesis of low oxygen content (<2.5±0.2 at. %), few layer graphene nanosheets with lateral dimensions smaller than a few hundred nanometers were achieved using a combination of ionic liquid assisted grinding of high purity graphite coupled with sequential centrifugation. We show for the first time that the graphene nanosheets possessing a plethora of edges exhibited considerably higher electron transfer numbers compared to the thicker graphene nanoplatelets. This enhanced ORR activity was accomplished by successfully exploiting the plethora of edges of the nanosized graphene as well as the efficient electron communication between the active edge sites and the electrode substrate. The graphene nanosheets were characterized by an onset potential of -0.13 V vs Ag/AgCl and a current density of -3.85 mA/cm2 at -1 V, which represent the best ORR performance ever achieved from an undoped carbon based catalyst. This work demonstrates how low oxygen content nanosized graphene synthesized by a simple route can considerably impact the ORR catalytic activity and hence it is of significance in designing and optimizing advanced metal-free ORR electrocatalysts.

  13. Can Analysis of Acetylene and Its Biodegradation Products in Enceladus Plumes be Used to Detect the Presence of Sub-Surface Life?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. G.; Baesman, S. M.; Oremland, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    The search for biosignatures of life on Earth includes measurement of the stable isotope fractionation of reactants and products attributed to enzymatic processes and comparison with the often smaller chemical (abiotic) fractionation. We propose that this approach might be applied to study the origin and fate of organic compounds contained in water vapor plumes emanating from Enceladus or other icy bodies, perhaps revealing information about the potential for biology occurring within a sub-surface "habitable" zone. Methanol and C2-hydrocarbons including ethylene, ethane and acetylene (C2H2) have been identified in the plumes of Enceladus. Biological degradation of acetylene proceeds by anaerobic fermentation via acetylene hydratase through acetaldehyde, with a second enzyme (acetaldehyde dismutase) forming acetate and ethanol. We found that incubation of cultures of acetylene-fermenting bacteria exhibit a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with the net removal of C2H2. Consumption of acetylene by both growing and washed-cell cultures of bacteria closely related to Pelobacter acetylenicus (e.g, strain SFB93) was accompanied by a carbon isotopic fractionation of about 2 per mil (KIE = 1.8-2.7 ‰), a result we are examining with other cultures of acetylene fermenters. In addition, we are measuring the carbon isotopic composition of acetaldehyde, ethanol and acetate during fermentation to learn whether these products are fractionated sufficiently, relative to their substrate, to warrant measurement of their isotopic composition in Enceladus (or Europa) plumes to indicate enzymatic activity in liquid environments below the crust of these moons.

  14. Management of hypertension by reduction in sympathetic activity.

    PubMed

    Mathias, C J

    1991-04-01

    The sympathetic nervous system may initiate or maintain hypertension, and a range of approaches that reduce sympathetic activity is often of value in management. These may include nonpharmacological methods, such as the various forms of behavioral therapy (e.g., meditation, relaxation, and biofeedback techniques); weight reduction and avoidance of particular foods and agents that stimulate sympathetic activity (including caffeine and alcohol), and regular physical exercise. Pharmacological therapy includes centrally acting drugs such as alpha-methyldopa, clonidine, and reserpine; ganglionic blockers such as hexamethonium; agents acting on sympathetic nerve terminals such as guanethidine and debrisoquine; and drugs that may act at multiple sites, such as the beta-adrenergic blockers. The role of reducing sympathetic activity in the current management of hypertension and its complications is considered in this overview.

  15. Discovery, Development, and Commercialization of Gold Catalysts for Acetylene Hydrochlorination.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Peter; Carthey, Nicholas; Hutchings, Graham J

    2015-11-25

    Vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is a major chemical intermediate for the manufacture of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which is the third most important polymer in use today. Hydrochlorination of acetylene is a major route for the production of vinyl chloride, since production of the monomer is based in regions of the world where coal is abundant. Until now, mercuric chloride supported on carbon is used as the catalyst in the commercial process, and this exhibits severe problems associated with catalyst lifetime and mercury loss. It has been known for over 30 years that gold is a superior catalyst, but it is only now that it is being commercialized. In this Perspective we discuss the use and disadvantages of the mercury catalyst and the advent of the gold catalysts for this important reaction. The nature of the active site and the possible reaction mechanism are discussed. Recent advances in the design and preparation of active gold catalysts containing ultralow levels of gold are described. In the final part, a view to the future of this chemistry will be discussed as well as the possible avenues for the commercial potential of gold catalysis.

  16. Dehalogenative Homocoupling of Terminal Alkynyl Bromides on Au(111): Incorporation of Acetylenic Scaffolding into Surface Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Cai, Liangliang; Ma, Honghong; Yuan, Chunxue; Xu, Wei

    2016-07-26

    On-surface C-C coupling reactions of molecular precursors with alkynyl functional groups demonstrate great potential for the controllable fabrication of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures/nanomaterials, such as carbyne, graphyne, and graphdiyne, which demand the incorporation of highly active sp-hybridized carbons. Recently, through a dehydrogenative homocoupling reaction of alkynes, the possibility was presented to fabricate surface nanostructures involving acetylenic linkages, while problems lie in the fact that different byproducts are inevitably formed when triggering the reactions at elevated temperatures. In this work, by delicately designing the molecular precursors with terminal alkynyl bromide, we introduce the dehalogenative homocoupling reactions on the surface. As a result, we successfully achieve the formation of dimer structures, one-dimensional molecular wires and two-dimensional molecular networks with acetylenic scaffoldings on an inert Au(111) surface, where the unexpected C-Au-C organometallic intermediates are also observed. This study further supplements the database of on-surface dehalogenative C-C coupling reactions, and more importantly, it provides us an alternative efficient way for incorporating the acetylenic scaffolding into low-dimensional surface nanostructures. PMID:27326451

  17. Dehalogenative Homocoupling of Terminal Alkynyl Bromides on Au(111): Incorporation of Acetylenic Scaffolding into Surface Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Cai, Liangliang; Ma, Honghong; Yuan, Chunxue; Xu, Wei

    2016-07-26

    On-surface C-C coupling reactions of molecular precursors with alkynyl functional groups demonstrate great potential for the controllable fabrication of low-dimensional carbon nanostructures/nanomaterials, such as carbyne, graphyne, and graphdiyne, which demand the incorporation of highly active sp-hybridized carbons. Recently, through a dehydrogenative homocoupling reaction of alkynes, the possibility was presented to fabricate surface nanostructures involving acetylenic linkages, while problems lie in the fact that different byproducts are inevitably formed when triggering the reactions at elevated temperatures. In this work, by delicately designing the molecular precursors with terminal alkynyl bromide, we introduce the dehalogenative homocoupling reactions on the surface. As a result, we successfully achieve the formation of dimer structures, one-dimensional molecular wires and two-dimensional molecular networks with acetylenic scaffoldings on an inert Au(111) surface, where the unexpected C-Au-C organometallic intermediates are also observed. This study further supplements the database of on-surface dehalogenative C-C coupling reactions, and more importantly, it provides us an alternative efficient way for incorporating the acetylenic scaffolding into low-dimensional surface nanostructures.

  18. Long-Term International Space Station (ISS) Risk Reduction Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forroci, Michael P.; Gafka, George K.; Lutomski, Michael G.; Maher, Jacilyn S.

    2011-01-01

    As the assembly of the ISS nears completion, it is worthwhile to step back and review some of the actions pursued by the Program in recent years to reduce risk and enhance the safety and health of ISS crewmembers, visitors, and space flight participants. While the initial ISS requirements and design were intended to provide the best practicable levels of safety, it is always possible to further reduce risk given the determination, commitment, and resources to do so. The following is a summary of some of the steps taken by the ISS Program Manager, by our International Partners, by hardware and software designers, by operational specialists, and by safety personnel to continuously enhance the safety of the ISS, and to reduce risk to all crewmembers. While years of work went into the development of ISS requirements, there are many things associated with risk reduction in a Program like the ISS that can only be learned through actual operational experience. These risk reduction activities can be divided into roughly three categories: Areas that were initially noncompliant which have subsequently been brought into compliance or near compliance (i.e., Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris [MMOD] protection, acoustics) Areas where initial design requirements were eventually considered inadequate and were subsequently augmented (i.e., Toxicity hazard level-4 materials, emergency procedures, emergency equipment, control of drag-throughs) Areas where risks were initially underestimated, and have subsequently been addressed through additional mitigation (i.e., Extravehicular Activity [EVA] sharp edges, plasma shock hazards). Due to the hard work and cooperation of many parties working together across the span of more than a decade, the ISS is now a safer and healthier environment for our crew, in many cases exceeding the risk reduction targets inherent in the intent of the original design. It will provide a safe and stable platform for utilization and discovery for years to come.

  19. Propulsion Risk Reduction Activities for Non-Toxic Cryogenic Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy D.; Klem, Mark D.; Fisher, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development (PCAD) Project s primary objective is to develop propulsion system technologies for non-toxic or "green" propellants. The PCAD project focuses on the development of non-toxic propulsion technologies needed to provide necessary data and relevant experience to support informed decisions on implementation of non-toxic propellants for space missions. Implementation of non-toxic propellants in high performance propulsion systems offers NASA an opportunity to consider other options than current hypergolic propellants. The PCAD Project is emphasizing technology efforts in reaction control system (RCS) thruster designs, ascent main engines (AME), and descent main engines (DME). PCAD has a series of tasks and contracts to conduct risk reduction and/or retirement activities to demonstrate that non-toxic cryogenic propellants can be a feasible option for space missions. Work has focused on 1) reducing the risk of liquid oxygen/liquid methane ignition, demonstrating the key enabling technologies, and validating performance levels for reaction control engines for use on descent and ascent stages; 2) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for liquid oxygen/liquid methane ascent engines; and 3) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for deep throttling liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen descent engines. The progress of these risk reduction and/or retirement activities will be presented.

  20. Propulsion Risk Reduction Activities for Nontoxic Cryogenic Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy D.; Klem, Mark D.; Fisher, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    The Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development (PCAD) Project s primary objective is to develop propulsion system technologies for nontoxic or "green" propellants. The PCAD project focuses on the development of nontoxic propulsion technologies needed to provide necessary data and relevant experience to support informed decisions on implementation of nontoxic propellants for space missions. Implementation of nontoxic propellants in high performance propulsion systems offers NASA an opportunity to consider other options than current hypergolic propellants. The PCAD Project is emphasizing technology efforts in reaction control system (RCS) thruster designs, ascent main engines (AME), and descent main engines (DME). PCAD has a series of tasks and contracts to conduct risk reduction and/or retirement activities to demonstrate that nontoxic cryogenic propellants can be a feasible option for space missions. Work has focused on 1) reducing the risk of liquid oxygen/liquid methane ignition, demonstrating the key enabling technologies, and validating performance levels for reaction control engines for use on descent and ascent stages; 2) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for liquid oxygen/liquid methane ascent engines; and 3) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for deep throttling liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen descent engines. The progress of these risk reduction and/or retirement activities will be presented.

  1. Guided cobalamin biosynthesis supports Dehalococcoides mccartyi reductive dechlorination activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Im, Jeongdae; Yang, Yi; Löffler, Frank E.

    2013-01-01

    Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains are corrinoid-auxotrophic Bacteria and axenic cultures that require vitamin B12 (CN-Cbl) to conserve energy via organohalide respiration. Cultures of D. mccartyi strains BAV1, GT and FL2 grown with limiting amounts of 1 µg l−1 CN-Cbl quickly depleted CN-Cbl, and reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated ethenes was incomplete leading to vinyl chloride (VC) accumulation. In contrast, the same cultures amended with 25 µg l−1 CN-Cbl exhibited up to 2.3-fold higher dechlorination rates, 2.8–9.1-fold increased growth yields, and completely consumed growth-supporting chlorinated ethenes. To explore whether known cobamide-producing microbes supply Dehalococcoides with the required corrinoid cofactor, co-culture experiments were performed with the methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri strain Fusaro and two acetogens, Sporomusa ovata and Sporomusa sp. strain KB-1, as Dehalococcoides partner populations. During growth with H2/CO2, M. barkeri axenic cultures produced 4.2 ± 0.1 µg l−1 extracellular cobamide (factor III), whereas the Sporomusa cultures produced phenolyl- and p-cresolyl-cobamides. Neither factor III nor the phenolic cobamides supported Dehalococcoides reductive dechlorination activity suggesting that M. barkeri and the Sporomusa sp. cannot fulfil Dehalococcoides' nutritional requirements. Dehalococcoides dechlorination activity and growth occurred in M. barkeri and Sporomusa sp. co-cultures amended with 10 µM 5′,6′-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB), indicating that a cobalamin is a preferred corrinoid cofactor of strains BAV1, GT and FL2 when grown with chlorinated ethenes as electron acceptors. Even though the methanogen and acetogen populations tested did not produce cobalamin, the addition of DMB enabled guided biosynthesis and generated a cobalamin that supported Dehalococcoides' activity and growth. Guided cobalamin biosynthesis may offer opportunities to sustain and enhance Dehalococcoides activity in contaminated

  2. Reduction of selenite to elemental selenium nanoparticles by activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohan; Matassa, Silvio; Singh, Satyendra; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2016-01-01

    Total selenium removal by the activated sludge process, where selenite is reduced to colloidal elemental selenium nanoparticles (BioSeNPs) that remain entrapped in the activated sludge flocs, was studied. Total selenium removal efficiencies with glucose as electron donor (2.0 g chemical oxygen demand (COD) L(-1)) at neutral pH and 30 °C gave 2.9 and 6.8 times higher removal efficiencies as compared to the electron donors lactate and acetate, respectively. Total selenium removal efficiencies of 79 (±3) and 86 (±1) % were achieved in shake flasks and fed batch reactors, respectively, at dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations above 4.0 mg L(-1) and 30 °C when fed with 172 mg L(-1) (1 mM) Na2SeO3 and 2.0 g L(-1) COD of glucose. Continuously operated reactors operating at neutral pH, 30 °C and a DO >3 mg L(-1) removed 33.98 and 36.65 mg of total selenium per gram of total suspended solids (TSS) at TSS concentrations of 1.3 and 3.0 g L(-1), respectively. However, selenite toxicity to the activated sludge led to failure of a continuously operating activated sludge reactor at the applied loading rates. This suggests that a higher hydraulic retention time (HRT) or different reactor configurations need to be applied for selenium-removing activated sludge processes. Graphical Abstract Scheme representing the possible mechanisms of selenite reduction at high and low DO levels in the activated sludge process. PMID:26351196

  3. Contribution of microbial activity to virus reduction in saturated soil.

    PubMed

    Nasser, A M; Glozman, R; Nitzan, Y

    2002-05-01

    Application of wastewater to soil may result in the contamination of groundwater and soil with pathogenic microorganisms and other biological and chemical agents. This study was performed to determine the antiviral microbial activity of soil saturated with secondary effluent. Low concentrations (0.05mg/ml) of protease pronase resulted in the inactivation of more than 90% of seeded Cox-A9 virus, whereas Poliovirus type 1, Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and MS2 bacteriophages were found to be insensitive to the enzyme activity. Exposure of Cox A9 virus to P. aeruginosa extracellular enzymes resulted in 99% inactivation of the seeded virus. Hepatitis A virus was found to be as sensitive as the Cox A9 virus, whereas Poliovirus 1 and MS2 were found to be insensitive to P. aeruginosa extracellular enzymatic activity. Furthermore, the time required for 99% reduction (T99) of Cox A9 and MS-2 Bacteriophage, at 15 degrees C, in soil saturated with secondary effluent was found to be 7 and 21 days, respectively. Faster inactivation was observed for MS2 and Cox A9 in soil saturated with secondary effluent incubated at 30 degrees C, T99 of 2 and 0.3 days, respectively. Although the concentration of the total bacterial count in the soil samples increased from 10(3) cfu/g to 10(5) cfu/g after 20 days of incubation at 30 degrees C, the proteolytic activity was below the detection level. The results of this study indicate that the virucidal effect of microbial activity is virus type dependent. Furthermore microbial activity in the soil material can be enhanced by the application of secondary effluent at higher temperature. The results also showed that MS2 bacteriophage can be used to predict viral contamination of soil and groundwater.

  4. Reduction of selenite to elemental selenium nanoparticles by activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohan; Matassa, Silvio; Singh, Satyendra; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2016-01-01

    Total selenium removal by the activated sludge process, where selenite is reduced to colloidal elemental selenium nanoparticles (BioSeNPs) that remain entrapped in the activated sludge flocs, was studied. Total selenium removal efficiencies with glucose as electron donor (2.0 g chemical oxygen demand (COD) L(-1)) at neutral pH and 30 °C gave 2.9 and 6.8 times higher removal efficiencies as compared to the electron donors lactate and acetate, respectively. Total selenium removal efficiencies of 79 (±3) and 86 (±1) % were achieved in shake flasks and fed batch reactors, respectively, at dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations above 4.0 mg L(-1) and 30 °C when fed with 172 mg L(-1) (1 mM) Na2SeO3 and 2.0 g L(-1) COD of glucose. Continuously operated reactors operating at neutral pH, 30 °C and a DO >3 mg L(-1) removed 33.98 and 36.65 mg of total selenium per gram of total suspended solids (TSS) at TSS concentrations of 1.3 and 3.0 g L(-1), respectively. However, selenite toxicity to the activated sludge led to failure of a continuously operating activated sludge reactor at the applied loading rates. This suggests that a higher hydraulic retention time (HRT) or different reactor configurations need to be applied for selenium-removing activated sludge processes. Graphical Abstract Scheme representing the possible mechanisms of selenite reduction at high and low DO levels in the activated sludge process.

  5. Surface characterization of the interfaces from plasma-polymerized acetylene films deposited onto cold-rolled steel for rubber-to-metal bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales Lombardi, Pablo I.

    results showed the presence of amino groups at the early steps of the vulcanization process. Activator products such as sulfenamide groups were found at the rubber/plasma-polymerized acetylene interface, the absorption bands near 1560 cm-1 in the RAIR spectra was due to the C=N stretching mode of the sulfenamide fragments of the accelerator. The band found in the RAIR spectra near 1143 cm -1 is characteristic from aliphatic secondary amines. Similarly, the presence of zinc was also found in the early stages of the vulcanization of natural rubber onto acetylene films. Zinc stearate reacted with accelerator and sulfur to form an accelerator complex. The zinc complex eventually reacted with natural rubber, sulfur, and the plasma-polymerized acetylene film to form rubber-bound intermediates.

  6. The anomalous behavior of the Zeeman anticrossing spectra of à 1Au acetylene: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, George; Sherrill, C. David; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    1996-02-01

    P. Dupré, R. Jost, M. Lombardi, P. G. Green, E. Abramson, and R. W. Field have observed anomalous behavior of the anticrossing density in the Zeeman anticrossing (ZAC) spectra of gas phase à 1Au acetylene in the 42 200 to 45 300 cm-1 energy range. To best explain this result, they hypothesize a large singlet-triplet coupling due to the existence of a linear isomerization barrier connecting a triplet-excited cis- and trans-acetylene in the vicinity of the studied energy range (˜45 500 cm-1). Theoretically such a linear stationary point, however, must have two different degenerate bending vibrational frequencies which are either imaginary or exactly zero. Neither case has yet been experimentally detected. Here, we have studied the two lowest-lying linear triplet-excited-state stationary points of acetylene, 3Σ+u and 3Δu, to see if they fit Dupré et al.'s hypothesis. We have completed geometry optimization and harmonic vibrational frequency analysis using complete-active-space self-consistent field (CASSCF) wave functions as well as determined energy points at those geometries using the second-order configuration interaction (SOCI) method. Harmonic vibrational analyses of both stationary points reveal two different doubly degenerate vibrational modes with imaginary vibrational frequencies (or negative force constants) indicating that they are indeed saddle points with a Hessian index of four. At the DZP SOCI//CASSCF level of theory with zero-point vibrational energy (ZPVE) correction, the 3Σ+u stationary point lies 35 840 cm-1 above the ground state of acetylene. This is much too low in energy to contribute to the ZAC spectral anomaly. At the same level of theory with ZPVE correction, the 3Δu stationary point lies 44 940 cm-1 above the ground state consistent with Dupré et al.'s hypothesis. Several solutions to the anomalous ZAC spectra are discussed. We propose that the anomaly may also be due to coupling with a nearly linear structure on the T3 surface of

  7. Microgravity Superagglomerates Produced By Silane And Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman (Technical Monitor); Bundy, Matthew; Mulholland, George W.; Manzello, Samuel; Yang, Jiann; Scott, John Henry; Sivathanu, Yudaya

    2003-01-01

    The size of the agglomerates produced in the upper portion of a flame is important for a variety of applications. Soot particle size and density effect the amount of radiative heat transfer from a fire to its surroundings. Particle size determines the lifetime of smoke in a building or in the atmosphere, and exposure hazard for smoke inhaled and deposited in the lungs. The visibility through a smoke layer and dectectability of the smoke are also greatly affected by agglomerate size. Currently there is limited understanding of soot growth with an overall dimension of 10 m and larger. In the case of polystyrene, smoke agglomerates in excess of 1 mm have been observed raining out from large fires. Unlike hydrocarbon fuels, silane has the advantage that silica particles are the major combustion product resulting in a particle volume fraction a factor of ten greater than that for a carbonaceous smoke. There are two very desirable properties of silica aero-gels that are important for both space and earth based applications. The first important property is its inertness to most oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. Therefore, silica aero-gels make excellent fire ablatives and can be used in very demanding applications. The second important property is that silica aero-gels are expected to have very high porosity (greater than 0.999), making them lightweight and ideal for aerospace applications. The added benefit of the high porosity is that they can be used as extremely efficient filters for many earth based applications as well. Evidence of the formation of superagglomerates in a laminar acetylene/air diffusion flame was found by Sorensen et al. [1]. An interconnecting web of super-agglomerates was observed to span the width of the soot plume in the region just above the flame tip and described as a gel state. It was observed that this gel state immediately breaks up into agglomerates as larges as 100 m due to buoyancy induced turbulence. Large soot agglomerates were

  8. Synthesis of functional acetylene derivatives from calcium carbide.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhewang; Yu, Dingyi; Sum, Yin Ngai; Zhang, Yugen

    2012-04-01

    AHA Erlebnis: CaC(2), used to produce acetylene until several decades ago, is re-emerging as a cheap, sustainable resource synthesized from coal and lignocellulosic biomass. We report efficient catalytic protocols for the synthesis of functional acetylene derivatives from CaC(2) through aldehyde, alkyne, and amine (AAA) as well as alkyne, haloalkane, and amine (AHA) couplings, and in addition demonstrate its use in click and Sonogashira chemistry, showing that calcium carbide is a sustainable and cost-efficient carbon source.

  9. Theoretical determination of the structure of acetylene on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Alfred B.; Hubbard, Arthur T.

    1980-09-01

    An atom superposition and electron delocalization technique applied to acetylene chemisorption on small cluster models for the Pt(111) surface shows preference for the triangular site as deduced from electron energy loss analyses by Ibach and Lehwald. This confirms the applicability of Badger's and related rules in this instance. Calculations on CCH 3 produce a structure in agreement with a dynamic LEED analysis at 400 K by Kesmodel, Dubois and Somorjai. Structures of CCH 2 and CHCH 2 are calculated and these species are found to be less stable than acetylene and CCH 3, respectively, when chemisorbed on Pt(111).

  10. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  11. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  12. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  13. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  14. 46 CFR 56.50-103 - Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. 56.50-103... oxygen-acetylene distribution piping. (a) This section applies to fixed piping installed for the distribution of oxygen and acetylene carried in cylinders as vessels stores. (b) The distribution piping...

  15. Structure and Function of the Unusual Tungsten Enzymes Acetylene Hydratase and Class II Benzoyl-Coenzyme A Reductase.

    PubMed

    Boll, Matthias; Einsle, Oliver; Ermler, Ulrich; Kroneck, Peter M H; Ullmann, G Matthias

    2016-01-01

    In biology, tungsten (W) is exclusively found in microbial enzymes bound to a bis-pyranopterin cofactor (bis-WPT). Previously known W enzymes catalyze redox oxo/hydroxyl transfer reactions by directly coordinating their substrates or products to the metal. They comprise the W-containing formate/formylmethanofuran dehydrogenases belonging to the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase (DMSOR) family and the aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) families, which form a separate enzyme family within the Mo/W enzymes. In the last decade, initial insights into the structure and function of two unprecedented W enzymes were obtained: the acetaldehyde forming acetylene hydratase (ACH) belongs to the DMSOR and the class II benzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) reductase (BCR) to the AOR family. The latter catalyzes the reductive dearomatization of benzoyl-CoA to a cyclic diene. Both are key enzymes in the degradation of acetylene (ACH) or aromatic compounds (BCR) in strictly anaerobic bacteria. They are unusual in either catalyzing a nonredox reaction (ACH) or a redox reaction without coordinating the substrate or product to the metal (BCR). In organic chemical synthesis, analogous reactions require totally nonphysiological conditions depending on Hg2+ (acetylene hydration) or alkali metals (benzene ring reduction). The structural insights obtained pave the way for biological or biomimetic approaches to basic reactions in organic chemistry.

  16. A biogeochemical and genetic survey of acetylene fermentation by environmental samples and bacterial isolates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Laurence G.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Kirshtein, Julie; Voytek, Mary A.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Anoxic samples (sediment and groundwater) from 13 chemically diverse field sites were assayed for their ability to consume acetylene (C2H2). Over incubation periods ranging from ˜ 10 to 80 days, selected samples from 7 of the 13 tested sites displayed significant C2H2 removal. No significant formation of ethylene was noted in these incubations; therefore, C2H2 consumption could be attributed to acetylene hydratase (AH) rather than nitrogenase activity. This putative AH (PAH) activity was observed in only 21% of the total of assayed samples, while amplification of AH genes from extracted DNA using degenerate primers derived from Pelobacter acetylenicus occurred in even fewer (9.8%) samples. Acetylene-fermenting bacteria were isolated as a pure culture from the sediments of a tidal mudflat in San Francisco Bay (SFB93) and as an enrichment culture from freshwater Searsville Lake (SV7). Comparison of 16S rDNA clone libraries revealed that SFB93 was closely related to P. carbolinicus, while SV7 consisted of several unrelated bacteria. AH gene was amplified from SFB93 but not SV7. The inability of the primers to generate amplicons in the SV7 enrichment, as well as from several of the environmental samples that displayed PAH activity, implied that either the primers were too highly constrained in their specificity or that there was a different type of AH gene in these environmental samples than occurs in P. acetylenicus. The significance of this work with regard to the search for life in the outer Solar System, where C2HL2 is abundant, is discussed.

  17. Fatal carbon monoxide intoxication after acetylene gas welding of pipes.

    PubMed

    Antonsson, Ann-Beth; Christensson, Bengt; Berge, Johan; Sjögren, Bengt

    2013-06-01

    Acetylene gas welding of district heating pipes can result in exposure to high concentrations of carbon monoxide. A fatal case due to intoxication is described. Measurements of carbon monoxide revealed high levels when gas welding a pipe with closed ends. This fatality and these measurements highlight a new hazard, which must be promptly prevented.

  18. 76 FR 75840 - Revising Standards Referenced in the Acetylene Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... language from outdated standards published by standards developing organizations (``SDO standards'') (69 FR... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... rulemaking, the Agency is proposing to revise its Acetylene Standard for general industry by updating...

  19. 76 FR 75782 - Revising Standards Referenced in the Acetylene Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... on November 9, 2009. See 74 FR 57883. The Compressed Gas Association published a new edition of CGA G... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... is revising its Acetylene Standard for general industry by updating a reference to a...

  20. 77 FR 13969 - Revising Standards Referenced in the Acetylene Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... Association (GGA) acetylene standard (see 76 FR 75782). In the DFR, OSHA deleted reference to CGA G-1-2003 and... final rule published on December 5, 2011 (76 FR 75782), is effective on March 5, 2012. For the purposes....C. 553, Secretary of Labor's Order 1-2012 (77 FR 3912), and 29 CFR part 1911. Signed at...

  1. 46 CFR 154.1735 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture. 154.1735 Section 154.1735 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Special Design...

  2. Acetylene absorption and binding in nonporous crystal lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Thallapally, Praveen K.; Dobrzanska, Liliana B.; Gingrich, Todd R.; Wirsig, Trevor B.; Barbour, Leonard J.; Atwood, Jerry L.

    2006-09-01

    Unusual storage: An organic nonporous material, p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene, sorbs acetylene with high storage density under ambient conditions. It is presumed that gas molecules diffuse through the seemingly nonporous lattice without disrupting the arrangement of the host molecules (see picture; red O, blue C, gray H, yellow void space).

  3. Interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene welding: a case report.

    PubMed

    Brvar, Miran

    2014-01-01

    Acetylene is a colorless gas commonly used for welding. It acts mainly as a simple asphyxiant. In this paper, however, we present a patient who developed a severe interstitial pneumonitis after acetylene exposure during aluminum welding. A 44-year old man was welding with acetylene, argon and aluminum electrode sticks in a non-ventilated aluminum tank for 2 h. Four hours after welding dyspnea appeared and 22 h later he was admitted at the Emergency Department due to severe respiratory insufficiency with pO2 = 6.7 kPa. Chest X-ray showed diffuse interstitial infiltration. Pulmonary function and gas diffusion tests revealed a severe restriction (55% of predictive volume) and impaired diffusion capacity (47% of predicted capacity). Toxic interstitial pneumonitis was diagnosed and high-dose systemic corticosteroid methylprednisolone and inhalatory corticosteroid fluticasone therapy was started. Computed Tomography (CT) of the lungs showed a diffuse patchy ground-glass opacity with no signs of small airway disease associated with interstitial pneumonitis. Corticosteroid therapy was continued for the next 8 weeks gradually reducing the doses. The patient's follow-up did not show any deterioration of respiratory function. In conclusion, acetylene welding might result in severe toxic interstitial pneumonitis that improves after an early systemic and inhalatory corticosteroid therapy.

  4. Diazotrophy and Nitrogenase Activity in the Archaebacterium Methanosarcina barkeri 227

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Anthony L.; Zinder, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation (diazotrophy) has recently been demonstrated in several methanogenic archaebacteria. To compare the process in an archaebacterium with that in eubacteria, we examined the properties of diazotrophic growth and nitrogenase activity in Methanosarcina barkeri 227. Growth yields with methanol or acetate as a growth substrate were significantly lower in N2-grown cultures than in NH4+-grown cultures, and the culture doubling times were increased, indicating that diazotrophy was energetically costly, as it is in eubacteria. Growth of nitrogen-fixing cells was inhibited when molybdenum was omitted from the medium; addition of 10 nM molybdate stimulated growth, while 1 μM molybdate restored maximum diazotrophic growth. Omission of molybdenum did not inhibit growth of ammonia-grown cells. Tungstate (100 μM) strongly inhibited growth of molybdenum-deficient diazotrophic cells, while ammonia-grown cells were unaffected. The addition of 100 nM vanadate or chromate did not stimulate diazotrophic growth of molybdenum-starved cells. These results are consistent with the presence of a molybdenum-containing nitrogenase in M. barkeri. Acetylene, the usual substrate for assaying nitrogenase activity, inhibited methanogenesis by M. barkeri and consequently needed to be used at a low partial pressure (0.3% of the headspace) when acetylene reduction by whole cells was assayed. Whole cells reduced 0.3% acetylene to ethylene at a very low rate (1 to 2 nmol h−1 mg of protein−1), and they “switched off” acetylene reduction in response to added ammonia or glutamine. Crude extracts from diazotrophic cells reduced 10% acetylene at a rate of 4 to 5 nmol of C2H4 formed h−1 mg of protein−1 when supplied with ATP and reducing power, while extracts of Klebsiella pneumoniae prepared by the same procedures had rates 100-fold higher. Acetylene reduction by extracts required ATP and was completely inhibited by 1 mM ADP in the presence of 5 mM ATP. The low rates of C2H2

  5. Exploration of Allosteric Agonism Structure-Activity Relationships within an Acetylene Series of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 (mGlu5) Positive Allosteric Modulators (PAMs): discovery of 5-((3-fluorophenyl)ethynyl)-N-(3-methyloxetan-3-yl)picolinamide (ML254)

    PubMed Central

    Turlington, Mark; Noetzel, Meredith J.; Chun, Aspen; Zhou, Ya; Gogliotti, Rocco D.; Nguyen, Elizabeth D.; Gregory, Karen J.; Vinson, Paige N.; Rook, Jerri M.; Gogi, Kiran K.; Xiang, Zixiu; Bridges, Thomas M.; Daniels, J. Scott; Jones, Carrie; Niswender, Colleen M.; Meiler, Jens; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.; Stauffer, Shaun R.

    2014-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of schizophrenia. Both allosteric agonism and high glutamate fold-shift have been implicated in the neurotoxic profile of some mGlu5 PAMs; however, these hypotheses remain to be adequately addressed. To develop tool compounds to probe these hypotheses, the structure-activity relationship of allosteric agonism was examined within an acetylenic series of mGlu5 PAMs exhibiting allosteric agonism in addition to positive allosteric modulation (ago-PAMs). PAM 38t, a low glutamate fold-shift allosteric ligand (maximum fold-shift ~3.0), was selected as a potent PAM with no agonism in the in vitro system used for compound characterization and in two native electrophysiological systems using rat hippocampal slices. PAM 38t (ML254) will be useful to probe the relative contribution of cooperativity and allosteric agonism to the adverse effect liability and neurotoxicity associated with this class of mGlu5 PAMs. PMID:24050755

  6. Treatment of activated carbon to enhance catalytic activity for reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, B.J.; Rhee, H.K. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Lee, J.K.; Park, D. )

    1994-11-01

    Catalytic activity of activated carbon treated with various techniques was examined in a fixed bed reactor for the reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia at 150 C. Activated carbon derived from coconut shell impregnated with an aqueous solution of ammonium sulfate, further treated with sulfuric acid, dried at 120 C, and then heated in an inert gas stream at 400 C, showed the highest catalytic activity within the range of experimental conditions. The enhancement of catalytic activity of modified activated carbon could be attributed to the increase in the amount of oxygen function groups which increased the adsorption site for ammonia. Catalytic activity of activated carbons depended on the surface area and the oxygen content as well.

  7. Synthesis of (iso)quinoline, (iso)coumarin and (iso)chromene derivatives from acetylene compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabukhin, D. S.; Vasilyev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Published data on the methods of synthesis of quinoline, isoquinoline, coumarin, isocoumarin, chromene and isochromene derivatives from acetylene compounds are summarized. The reactions catalyzed by metal complexes (Pd, Pt, Ru, Rh, Au, Ag, Ni, Cu, etc.) and transformations induced by various electrophilic reagents (Brynsted and Lewis acids) are considered. Moieties of the mentioned heterocyclic systems are present in many biologically active natural products and pharmaceutical agents. Besides, derivatives of these heterocycles are used in the manufacture of catalysts, dyes, perfumery and cosmetic products, corrosion inhibitors and so on. The bibliography includes 211 references.

  8. Lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of TG containing acetylenic FA.

    PubMed

    Jie, Marcel S F Lie Ken; Fua, Xun; Lau, Maureen M L; Chye, M L

    2002-10-01

    Hydrolysis of symmetrical acetylenic TG of type AAA [viz., glycerol tri-(4-decynoate), glycerol tri-(6-octadecynoate), glycerol tri-(9-octadecynoate), glycerol tri-(10-undecynoate), and glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate)] in the presence of eight microbial lipases was studied. Novozyme 435 (Candida antarctica), an efficient enzyme for esterification, showed a significant resistance in the hydrolysis of glycerol tri-(9-octadecynoate) and glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate). Hydrolysis of acetylenic TG with Lipolase 100T (Humicola lanuginosa) was rapidly accomplished. Lipase PS-D (Pseudomonas cepacia) showed a fair resistance toward the hydrolysis of glycerol tri-(6-octadecynoate) only, which reflected its ability to recognize the delta6 positional isomer of 18:1. Lipase CCL (Candida cylindracea, syn. C. rugosa) and AY-30 (C. rugosa) were able to catalyze the release of 10-undecynoic acid and 9-octadecynoic acid from the corresponding TG, but less readily the 13-docosynoic acid in the case of glycerol tri-(13-docosynoate). The two lipases CCL and AY-30 were able to distinguish the small difference in structure of fatty acyl moieties in the TG substrate. To confirm this trend, three regioisomers of mixed acetylenic TG of type ABC (containing one each of delta6, delta9, and delta13 acetylenic FA in various positions) were prepared and hydrolyzed with CCL and AY-40. The results reconfirmed the observation that AY-30 and CCL were able to distinguish the slight differences in the molecular structure (position of the acetylenic bond and chain length) of the acyl groups in the TG during the hydrolysis of such TG substrates.

  9. Evaluating the effectiveness of active noise reduction in flight helmets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forshaw, S. E.; Rylands, J. M.; Crabtree, R. B.

    1988-08-01

    The advent of high powered fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft and tracked armoured fighting vehicles has increased the level of noise to which crews are exposed. Active noise reduction (ANR) offers a means of increasing the attenuation at low and mid frequencies. It relies on sensing the sound inside a circumaural device and cancelling it by means of negative feedback through a miniature speaker inside the enclosed volume. This study was carried out to investigate laboratory procedures appropriate for measuring the effectiveness of ANR devices. The procedures were: ear-canal measurements using an acoustic test fixture (an objective procedure), and masked threshold and loudness balance tests (psycho-physical procedures). In addition, the effect of ANR on signal detection and speech reception was investigated. The results do not clearly permit one procedure to be recommended for the evaluation of ANR systems. Signal detection performance and speech intelligibility may be used, but the results are specific to the acoustic environment of the listener and the detection task or speech-system parameters of the evaluation. When the attenuation of the ANR system is measured objectively with a transducer inside the earmuff/ear-canal volume, the location of the transducer affects the observed ANR attenuations.

  10. Effects of acido-basic support properties on the catalytic hydrogenation of acetylene on gold nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manda, Abdullah Ahmed

    Metallic gold nanoparticles supported on gamma-Al2O 3 and magnesia-alumina mixed oxide, with different magnesia content have been prepared by sol-gel method and characterized by different techniques (inductive coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), XRD, BET surface area analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), CO2 and NH 3 temperature programmed desorption (TPD), H2 temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and FTIR of adsorbed CO2). Such systems were found to produce catalysts with controllable acidity, varying from catalyst possessing large density of acidic and low density of basic sites, others with acidic and basic sites of equal strength and density, and others with large basic and low acid sites densities, respectively. The catalytic assessment of the generated acidity was carried out using 2-propanol decomposition as a test reaction. The results obtained indicate that the presence of magnesia and reduced gold nanopartilces has imparted the catalysts, 1%Au/4%Mg-Al 2O3 and 1%Au/8%Mg-Al2O3, with significant base-catalytic properties. Acetylene hydrogenation and formation of coke deposits were investigated on a gold catalyst supported on gamma-Al2O3 and gold supported on alumina-magnisia mixed oxide with different gold content; 1%Au/gamma-Al 2O3, 1%Au/15%Mg-Al2O3, 2%Au/15%Mg-Al 2O3 and 4%Au/15%Mg-Al2O3. The effect of the H2/C2H2 ratio was studied over a range of values. The catalytic activity and selectivity towards ethylene and other products were investigated at different reaction temperatures. Acetylene hydrogenation was investigated in the presence and absence of ethylene in stream. It is investigated that the adsorption of the triple bond is preferred over the double bond and during selective catalytic (SCR) of C2H2 the two hydrocarbons do not compete for the same adsorption sites. The deactivation of catalysts was studied by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO). Higher content of coke over 1%Au/Al2O3 catalyst was investigated in contrast to

  11. Transient responses of nitrogenase to acetylene and oxygen in actinorhizal nodules and cultured Frania

    SciTech Connect

    Silvester, W.B.; Winship, L.J. )

    1990-02-01

    Nitrogenase activity in root nodules of four species of actinorhizal plants showed varying declines in response to exposure to acetylene (10% v/v). Gymnostoma papuanum (S.Moore) L. Johnson. and Casuarina equisetifolia L. nodules showed a small decline (5-15%) with little or no recovery over 15 minutes. Myrica gale L. nodules showed a sharp decline followed by a rapid return to peak activity. Alnus incana ssp. rugosa (Du Roi) Clausen. nodules usually showed varying degrees of decline followed by a slower return to peak or near-peak activity. We call these effects acetylene-induced transients. Rapid increases in oxygen tension also caused dramatic transient decreases in nitrogenase activity in all species. The magnitude of the transient decrease was related to the size of the O{sub 2} partial pressure (pO{sub 2}) rise, to the proximity of the starting and ending oxygen tensions to the pO{sub 2} optimum, and to the time for which the plant was exposed to the lower pO{sub 2}. Oxygen-induced transients, induced both by step jumps in pO{sub 2} and by O{sub 2} pulses, were also observed in cultures of Frankia. The effects seen in nodules are purely a response by the bacterium and not a nodule effect per se. Oxygen-induced nitrogenase transients in actinorhizal nodules from the plant genera tested here do not appear to be a result of changes in nodule diffusion resistance.

  12. 77 FR 38397 - Agency Information Collection (Interest Rate Reduction Refinancing Loan Worksheet) Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Interest Rate Reduction Refinancing Loan Worksheet) Activities....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Interest Rate Reduction Refinancing Loan Worksheet, VA Form 26-8923....

  13. Study of acetylene poisoning of Pt cathode on proton exchange membrane fuel cell spatial performance using a segmented cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetenko, Tatyana V.; St-Pierre, Jean

    2015-08-01

    Acetylene is a welding fuel and precursor for organic synthesis, which requires considering it to be a possible air pollutant. In this work, the spatial performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell exposed to 300 ppm C2H2 and different operating currents was studied with a segmented cell system. The injection of C2H2 resulted in a cell performance decrease and redistribution of segments' currents depending on the operating conditions. Performance loss was 20-50 mV at 0.1-0.2 A cm-2 and was accompanied by a rapid redistribution of localized currents. Acetylene exposure at 0.4-1.0 A cm-2 led to a sharp voltage decrease to 0.07-0.13 V and significant changes in current distribution during a transition period, when the cell reached a voltage of 0.55-0.6 V. A recovery of the cell voltage was observed after stopping the C2H2 injection. Spatial electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data showed different segments' behavior at low and high currents. It was assumed that acetylene oxidation occurs at high cell voltage, while it reduces at low cell potential. A detailed analysis of the current density distribution, its correlation with EIS data and possible C2H2 oxidation/reduction mechanisms are presented and discussed.

  14. Influence of External Nitrogen on Nitrogenase Enzyme Activity and Auxin Production in Herbaspirillum seropedicae (Z78)

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Tan Tzy; Pin, Ui Li; Ghazali, Amir Hamzah Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The production of nitrogenase enzyme and auxins by free living diazotrophs has the potential to influence the growth of host plants. In this study, diazotrophs were grown in the presence of various concentrations of nitogen (N) to determine the optimal concentration of N for microbial growth stimulation, promotion of gaseous N (N2) fixation, and phytohormone production. Therefore, we investigate whether different levels of N supplied to Herbaspirillum seropedicae (Z78) have significant effects on nitrogenase activity and auxin production. The highest nitrogenase activity and the lowest auxin production of H. seropedicae (Z78) were both recorded at 0 gL−1 of NH4Cl. Higher levels of external N caused a significant decrease in the nitrogenase activity and an increased production of auxins. In a subsequent test, two different inoculum sizes of Z78 (106 and 1012 cfu/ml) were used to study the effect of different percentages of acetylene on nitrogenase activity of the inoculum via the acetylene reduction assay (ARA). The results showed that the optimal amount of acetylene required for nitrogenase enzyme activity was 5% for the 106 cfu/ml inoculum, whereas the higher inoculum size (1012 cfu/ml) required at least 10% of acetylene for optimal nitrogenase activity. These findings provide a clearer understanding of the effects of N levels on diazotrophic nitrogenase activity and auxin production, which are important factors influencing plant growth. PMID:26868594

  15. Rapid Rather than Gradual Weight Reduction Impairs Hemorheological Parameters of Taekwondo Athletes through Reduction in RBC-NOS Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Woo Hwi; Heine, Oliver; Pauly, Sebastian; Kim, Pilsang; Bloch, Wilhelm; Mester, Joachim; Grau, Marijke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Rapid weight reduction is part of the pre-competition routine and has been shown to negatively affect psychological and physiological performance of Taekwondo (TKD) athletes. This is caused by a reduction of the body water and an electrolyte imbalance. So far, it is unknown whether weight reduction also affects hemorheological properties and hemorheology-influencing nitric oxide (NO) signaling, important for oxygen supply to the muscles and organs. Methods For this purpose, ten male TKD athletes reduced their body weight by 5% within four days (rapid weight reduction, RWR). After a recovery phase, athletes reduced body weight by 5% within four weeks (gradual weight reduction, GWR). Each intervention was preceded by two baseline measurements and followed by a simulated competition. Basal blood parameters (red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean cellular hemoglobin and mean cellular hemoglobin concentration), RBC-NO synthase activation, RBC nitrite as marker for NO synthesis, RBC deformability and aggregation parameters were determined on a total of eight investigation days. Results Basal blood parameters were not affected by the two interventions. In contrast to GWR, RWR decreased activation of RBC-NO synthase, RBC nitrite, respective NO concentration and RBC deformability. Additionally, RWR increased RBC aggregation and disaggregation threshold. Conclusion The results point out that a rapid weight reduction negatively affects hemorheological parameters and NO signaling in RBC which might limit performance capacity. Thus, GWR should be preferred to achieve the desired weight prior to a competition to avoid these negative effects. PMID:25875585

  16. The Extension-Reduction Strategy: Activating Prior Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloyer, Cliff W.

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical problem is solved using the extension-reduction or build it up-tear it down tactic. This technique is implemented in reviving students' earlier knowledge to enable them to apply this knowledge to solving new problems.

  17. Characterization and anti-inflammatory effects of iodinated acetylenic acids isolated from the marine sponges Suberites mammilaris and Suberites japonicus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Buyng Su; Lee, Kyung; Yang, Cao; Jeong, Eun Ju; Rho, Jung-Rae

    2013-12-27

    The previously unknown compounds 1-4, acetylenic acids with one or two iodine atom(s), were isolated from the marine sponges Suberites mammilaris and Suberites japonicus. Their complete structures were determined using NMR and mass spectrometry. The methylated compounds 1a and 2a exhibited a strong NO inhibitory effect on RAW264.7 cells, while methylated 3a and 4a were inactive in RAW264.7 cells, but highly active in BV2 microglia cells.

  18. Enhanced Photoluminescence in Acetylene-Treated ZnO Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Jäppinen, Luke; Jalkanen, Tero; Sieber, Brigitte; Addad, Ahmed; Heinonen, Markku; Kukk, Edwin; Radevici, Ivan; Paturi, Petriina; Peurla, Markus; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Santos, Hélder A; Boukherroub, Rabah; Santos, Hellen; Lastusaari, Mika; Salonen, Jarno

    2016-12-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were manufactured using the aqueous chemical growth (ACG) method, and the effect of thermal acetylene treatment on their morphology, chemical composition, and optical properties was investigated. Changes in the elemental content of the treated rods were found to be different than in previous reports, possibly due to the different defect concentrations in the samples, highlighting the importance of synthesis method selection for the process. Acetylene treatment resulted in a significant improvement of the ultraviolet photoluminescence of the rods. The greatest increase in emission intensity was recorded on ZnO rods treated at the temperature of 825 °C. The findings imply that the changes brought on by the treatment are limited to the surface of the ZnO rods.

  19. Detonation engine fed by acetylene-oxygen mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, N. N.; Betelin, V. B.; Nikitin, V. F.; Phylippov, Yu. G.; Koo, Jaye

    2014-11-01

    The advantages of a constant volume combustion cycle as compared to constant pressure combustion in terms of thermodynamic efficiency has focused the search for advanced propulsion on detonation engines. Detonation of acetylene mixed with oxygen in various proportions is studied using mathematical modeling. Simplified kinetics of acetylene burning includes 11 reactions with 9 components. Deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) is obtained in a cylindrical tube with a section of obstacles modeling a Shchelkin spiral; the DDT takes place in this section for a wide range of initial mixture compositions. A modified ka-omega turbulence model is used to simulate flame acceleration in the Shchelkin spiral section of the system. The results of numerical simulations were compared with experiments, which had been performed in the same size detonation chamber and turbulent spiral ring section, and with theoretical data on the Chapman-Jouguet detonation parameters.

  20. Enhanced Photoluminescence in Acetylene-Treated ZnO Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäppinen, Luke; Jalkanen, Tero; Sieber, Brigitte; Addad, Ahmed; Heinonen, Markku; Kukk, Edwin; Radevici, Ivan; Paturi, Petriina; Peurla, Markus; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Santos, Hélder A.; Boukherroub, Rabah; Santos, Hellen; Lastusaari, Mika; Salonen, Jarno

    2016-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were manufactured using the aqueous chemical growth (ACG) method, and the effect of thermal acetylene treatment on their morphology, chemical composition, and optical properties was investigated. Changes in the elemental content of the treated rods were found to be different than in previous reports, possibly due to the different defect concentrations in the samples, highlighting the importance of synthesis method selection for the process. Acetylene treatment resulted in a significant improvement of the ultraviolet photoluminescence of the rods. The greatest increase in emission intensity was recorded on ZnO rods treated at the temperature of 825 °C. The findings imply that the changes brought on by the treatment are limited to the surface of the ZnO rods.

  1. Enhanced Photoluminescence in Acetylene-Treated ZnO Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Jäppinen, Luke; Jalkanen, Tero; Sieber, Brigitte; Addad, Ahmed; Heinonen, Markku; Kukk, Edwin; Radevici, Ivan; Paturi, Petriina; Peurla, Markus; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Santos, Hélder A; Boukherroub, Rabah; Santos, Hellen; Lastusaari, Mika; Salonen, Jarno

    2016-12-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were manufactured using the aqueous chemical growth (ACG) method, and the effect of thermal acetylene treatment on their morphology, chemical composition, and optical properties was investigated. Changes in the elemental content of the treated rods were found to be different than in previous reports, possibly due to the different defect concentrations in the samples, highlighting the importance of synthesis method selection for the process. Acetylene treatment resulted in a significant improvement of the ultraviolet photoluminescence of the rods. The greatest increase in emission intensity was recorded on ZnO rods treated at the temperature of 825 °C. The findings imply that the changes brought on by the treatment are limited to the surface of the ZnO rods. PMID:27644239

  2. Acetylene bubble-powered autonomous capsules: towards in situ fuel.

    PubMed

    Moo, James Guo Sheng; Wang, Hong; Pumera, Martin

    2014-12-28

    A fuel-free autonomous self-propelled motor is illustrated. The motor is powered by the chemistry of calcium carbide and utilising water as a co-reactant, through a polymer encapsulation strategy. Expulsion of acetylene bubbles powers the capsule motor. This is an important step, going beyond the toxic hydrogen peroxide fuel used normally, to find alternative propellants for self-propelled machines.

  3. Tuning the Electronic Properties of Acetylenic Fluorenes by Phosphaalkene Incorporation.

    PubMed

    Svyaschenko, Yurii V; Orthaber, Andreas; Ott, Sascha

    2016-03-14

    Versatile synthetic protocols for 2,7- and 3,6-diacetylenic fluorene-9-ylidene phosphanes (F9Ps) were developed. Protodesilylation of trimethylsilyl-protected acetylenic F9Ps affords terminal acetylenes that can be employed in Sonogashira and Glaser-type C-C coupling reactions to give thienyl-decorated and butadiyne-bridged fluorene-9-ylidene phosphanes, respectively. As evidenced by UV/Vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry and corroborated by ab initio calculations, the presence of the P center in the F9Ps induces a significantly reduced HOMO-LUMO splitting that originates from stabilization of the LUMO levels. Variation of the acetylene substitution pattern is an additional tool to influence the optical and electronic properties. Whereas 3,6-disubstituted F9Ps have strong absorptions around 400 nm, mainly due to π-π* transitions, 2,7-diacetylenic F9Ps exhibit longest-wavelength absorptions that have significant charge-transfer character with an onset around 520 nm. PMID:26833389

  4. Retrievals of the Abundances of Acetylene and other Hydrocarbons in Titan's Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Siteng; Shemansky, D. E.; Yung, Yuk

    2016-10-01

    Acetylene abundance in the Titan upper atmosphere has been extracted from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) stellar occultations. The data reduction process is based on simulation of the discrete spectral absorption in the far ultraviolet (FUV) region between 110 and 190 nm. Pointing drift is corrected by instrument simulation of the stellar image location on the instrument detector. Latitude and seasonal dependence of the vertical profiles has been examined. The observed spectra have been compared to atmospheric chemical model calculations (KINETICS) by predicting the occultation spectra, allowing the imposition of constraints on the model, and directly establishing the level of uncertainty in the extraction process. Hydrocarbon and nitrile vertical profiles have been extracted, with limits set on the precursors to aerosols. Aerosol continuum spectral structure is recognized in the extinction spectra, but physical chemistry modeling of aerosol precursors to date indicate higher abundances than the upper limits set by observation.

  5. Just Click It: Undergraduate Procedures for the Copper(I)-Catalyzed Formation of 1,2,3-Triazoles from Azides and Terminal Acetylenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpless, William D.; Peng Wu; Hansen, Trond Vidar; Lindberg, James G.

    2005-01-01

    The click chemistry uses only the most reliable reactions to build complex molecules from olefins, electrophiles and heteroatom linkers. A variation on Huisgen's azide-alkyne 1,2,3-triazole synthesis, the addition of the copper (I), the premium example of the click reaction, catalyst strongly activates terminal acetylenes towards the 1,3-dipole in…

  6. A Model for Self-Assembly of Carbon Nanotubes from Acetylene Based on Real-Time Studies of Vertically Aligned Growth Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Eres, Gyula

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved optical reflectivity was used to study the kinetics in the early stages of vertically aligned carbon nanotube array growth from a molecular beam of acetylene. The molecular beam environment was used to suppress gas phase reaction pathways and limit the growth to surface reactions specific to the molecular structure of acetylene. The observed acetylene flux dependent induction delay and the threshold for vertically aligned growth are characteristic features of heterogeneous chain reactions. Propagation of chain reactions requires regeneration of the active sites that can occur only if catalytic activity is transferred from the metal catalyst film to surface carbon species. After the active site transformation, acetylene self-assembles into carbon structures of progressively increasing size such as chains, graphene fragments, and nanotubes. In this paper we show that a conceptual framework supported by ab initio density functional theory calculations in which active carbon species facilitate incorporation of new carbon readily explains recent results in vertically aligned nanotube growth that are puzzling in the context of the diffusion/precipitation model.

  7. Nonoxidative methane conversion to acetylene over zeolite in a low temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Mallinson, R.; Lobban, L.

    1998-10-01

    Previous investigations have found that the plasma catalytic conversion of methane is a low-temperature process for the activation of methane, the major component of natural gas. In this paper, the production of acetylene via plasma catalytic conversion of methane over NaY zeolite is discussed. Hydrogen is produced as a by-product during this plasma catalytic methane conversion. A methane/hydrogen feed with oxygen as an additive and helium as a diluent has been studied in this investigation. The CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} system is found to be more selective for the production of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons, compared to the CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}H{sub 2}O, and CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} systems reported previously. A higher hydrogen concentration feed is more favorable for acetylene formation. The selectivity and yield of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons are related to the hydrogen feed rate, gas temperature, concentration of oxygen additive, and flowrate. The highest yield of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons (32%) is obtained at the lowest flowrate used (10 cm{sup 3}/s; residence time {approximately}2.3 s). A reaction mechanism is also presented to explain the experimental results.

  8. Thermodynamic study on the formation of acetylene during coal pyrolysis in the arc plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, W.; Li, F.; Cai, G.; Lu, Y.; Chang, L.

    2009-07-01

    Based on the principle of minimizing the Gibbs free energy, the composition of C-H-O-N-S equilibrium system about acetylene formation during the pyrolysis in arc plasma jet for four kinds of different rank-ordered coals such as Datong, Xianfeng, Yangcheng, and Luan was analyzed and calculated. The results indicated that hydrogen, as the reactive atmosphere, was beneficial to the acetylene formation. The coal ranks and the hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur in coal all could obviously affect the acetylene yield. The mole fraction of acetylene is the maximum when the ratio value of atom H/C was 2. The content of oxygen was related to the acetylene yield, but it does not compete with CO formation. These agreed with the experimental results, and they could help to select the coal type for the production of acetylene through plasma pyrolysis process.

  9. Kinetics and Structure of Superagglomerates Produced by Silane and Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, G. W.; Hamins, A.; Sivathanu, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of smoke in a laminar diffusion flame involves several steps. The first step is particle inception/nucleation in the high-temperature fuel-rich region of the flame followed by surface growth and coagulation/coalescence of the small particles. As the primary spheres grow in size and lose hydrogen, the colliding particles no longer coalesce but retain their identity as a cluster of primary spheres, termed an agglomerate. Finally, in the upper portion of the flame, the particles enter an oxidizing environment which may lead to partial or complete burnout of the agglomerates. Currently there is no quantitative model for describing the growth of smoke agglomerates up to superagglomerates with an overall dimension of 10 microns and greater. Such particles are produced during the burning of acetylene and fuels containing benzene rings such as toluene and polystyrene. In the case of polystyrene, smoke agglomerates in excess of 1 mm have been observed "raining" out from large fires. Evidence of the formation of superagglomerates in a laminar acetylene/air diffusion flame has been recently reported. Acetylene was chosen as the fuel since the particulate loading in acetylene/air diffusion flames is very high. Photographs were obtained by Sorensen using a microsecond xenon lamp of the "stream" of soot just above the flame. For low flow rates of acetylene, only submicrometer soot clusters are produced and they give rise to the homogeneous appearance of the soot stream. When the flow rate is increased to 1.7 cu cm/s, soot clusters up to 10 microns are formed and they are responsible for the graininess and at a flow rate of 3.4 cu cm/s, a web of interconnected clusters as large as the width of the flame is seen. This interconnecting web of superagglomerates is described as a gel state by Sorensen et al (1998). This is the first observation of a gel for a gas phase system. It was observed that this gel state immediately breaks up into agglomerates due to buoyancy

  10. Reduction of beta activity from depleted derbies, ingots and crucibles

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, G.G.; Schonegg, E.; Kato, T.R.

    1984-09-01

    The reduction of beta radiation on uranium ingot and crucible surfaces was demonstrated in the production casting operation by adding a mixture of slag liner material (MgF/sub 2/) and calcium fluoride to the remelt charge. The beta emitters (/sup 234/Th and /sup 234/Pa) are largely discharged with the fluorides into drums during a remote crucible burnout operation; thereby, reducing operator exposure to beta radiation. A production test showed that very low beta radiation from uranium flat castings can be achieved by using derbies recently prepared by reduction. Plant tests with fluoride addition indicate that pickling of derbies may not be necessary for casting uranium flats from a plasma sprayed (ZrO/sub 2/) crucible. Also, ingots produced with fluoride additions had less pipe as compared to standard production technique. 2 references, 5 tables.

  11. Acetylene-derived polymers and their applications in hair and skin care.

    PubMed

    Petter, P J

    1989-02-01

    Synopsis Since the introduction over 30 years ago of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as the first synthetic hairspray resin, acetylene-derived polymers have found wide and increasing applications in the cosmetics and toiletries industry. This review covers the two main classes of acetylenic polymers. In the first class, in which the chemistry may be traced back to reaction of acetylene with formaldehyde, are included PVP homopolymers and copolymers of VP with vinyl acetate, dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate, vinylcaprolactam and styrene. In the second class, stemming from reaction of acetylene with methanol, are the poly (vinyl methyl ether/maleic acid) monoester resins.

  12. Acetylene-derived polymers and their applications in hair and skin care.

    PubMed

    Petter, P J

    1989-02-01

    Synopsis Since the introduction over 30 years ago of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as the first synthetic hairspray resin, acetylene-derived polymers have found wide and increasing applications in the cosmetics and toiletries industry. This review covers the two main classes of acetylenic polymers. In the first class, in which the chemistry may be traced back to reaction of acetylene with formaldehyde, are included PVP homopolymers and copolymers of VP with vinyl acetate, dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate, vinylcaprolactam and styrene. In the second class, stemming from reaction of acetylene with methanol, are the poly (vinyl methyl ether/maleic acid) monoester resins. PMID:19456933

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-12-01

    This project was directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction on carbonaceous supports at low temperatures. The experimental work was conducted primarily in a packed bed reactor/gas flow system that was constructed for this work. The analytical techniques employed were mass spectrometry, NO{sub x} chemiluminescence, and gas chromatography. The experimental plan was focused on steady-state reactivity experiments, followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of surface intermediates, and also selected temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) experiments. Both uncatalyzed and catalyzed (potassium-promoted) phenolic resin char, were investigated as well as the catalytic effect of additional CO in the gas phase.

  14. Iran’s Activities on Prevention, Treatment and Harm Reduction of Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Saberi Zafarghandi, Mohammad Bagher; Jadidi, Mohsen; Khalili, Narjes

    2015-01-01

    Context: In the present review study, authors investigated Iran’s activities regarding prevention, abuse and harm reduction of drugs nationwide. The issue appears to be important in order to show the trend of activities in the country. Evidence Acquisition: In this report, authors gathered data from different Farsi/English peer review journals issued both in printed and online versions. These journals have been indexed in PubMed, ISI, ISC, SID, Magiran, UN, etc. These are among the most referred and cited databases. Results: Summarizing the data led to three distinguished sections: 1) drug supply reduction activities; 2) drug demand reduction activities; 3) harm reduction activities. Conclusions: As the results showed, the trend of activities was encouraging and some additional activities could be included to future programs relying on early-onset preventions. PMID:26870709

  15. Hydrogenase activity in the thermophile mastigocladus laminosus

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J.R.; Miyamoto, K.; Hallenbeck, P.C.; Murry, M.A.

    1982-06-30

    Hydrogenase activity in the thermophilic cyanobacterium, Mastigocladus laminosus was studied both in vivo and in vitro. In vivo hydrogen consumption required oxygen but not light, was about ten-fold higher than in mesophilic cyanobacteria, and was relatively insensitive to carbon monoxide. H/sub 2/-supported acetylene reduction in reductant-limited cultures was a light-dependent, but O/sub 2/-independent reaction. In vitro hydrogen evolution was unaffected by carbon monoxide, and this activity could be partially purified using a procedure developed for Anabaena cylindrica.

  16. Activity and Stability of Nanoscale Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-07-28

    Design of highly active and stable nanoscale catalysts for electro-oxidation of small organic molecules is of great importance to the development of efficient fuel cells. The amount and instability of Pt-based catalysts in the cathode limits the cost, efficiency and lifetime of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We developed a microscopic understanding of the factors governing activity and stability in Pt and PtM alloys. Experimental efforts were focused on probing the size and shape dependence of ORR activity of Pt-based nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. A microscopic understanding of the activity was achieved by correlating voltammetry and rotating ring disk electrodes to surface atomic and electronic structures, which were elucidated predominantly by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS).

  17. Autoxidation and acetylene-accelerated oxidation of NO in a 2-phase system; implications for the expression of denitrification in ex situ experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, Shahid; Dörsch, Peter; Bakken, Lars

    2013-04-01

    flasks (with and without C2H2), and monitored for O2, NO, N2O and N2 production while depleting the oxygen and switching to anoxic respiration. Acetylene effectively scavenged NO from the cultures until oxygen concentration reached below ~0.19 mL L-1, and the estimated rate of acetylene-accelerated NO oxidation was more than sufficient to explain an observed reduction of the N2O production induced by acetylene. When [O2] reached below 0.19 mL L-1, the NO concentrations increased and stabilized at the same level as in the treatments without acetylene, but the rate of denitrification was much lower than without acetylene. The results indicate that the early accumulation of 10-20 nM NO during oxygen depletion has a significant effect on the expression of denitrification in soil communities. This warrants a greater interest in NO as a regulator of denitrification in soils and shows that the acetylene inhibition method may be problematic even for intentionally anoxic incubations, unless precautions are taken to secure initial O2-concentrations below 0.19 mL O2 L-1.

  18. Reductive alkylation of active methylene compounds with carbonyl derivatives, calcium hydride and a heterogeneous catalyst.

    PubMed

    Guyon, Carole; Duclos, Marie-Christine; Sutter, Marc; Métay, Estelle; Lemaire, Marc

    2015-07-01

    A one-pot two-step reaction (Knoevenagel condensation - reduction of the double bond) has been developed using calcium hydride as a reductant in the presence of a supported noble metal catalyst. The reaction between carbonyl compounds and active methylene compounds such as methylcyanoacetate, 1,3-dimethylbarbituric acid, dimedone and the more challenging dimethylmalonate, affords the corresponding monoalkylated products in moderate to good yields (up to 83%) with minimal reduction of the starting carbonyl compounds. PMID:26053131

  19. Appetite suppression and weight reduction by a centrally active aminosterol.

    PubMed

    Ahima, Rexford S; Patel, Hiralben R; Takahashi, Nobuhiko; Qi, Yong; Hileman, Stanley M; Zasloff, Michael A

    2002-07-01

    The rise in obesity and its complications has generated enormous interest in the regulation of feeding and body weight. We show that a spermine metabolite of cholesterol (MSI-1436) decreases body weight, specifically fat, by suppressing feeding and preventing the reduction in energy expenditure, hormonal changes, and patterns of neuropeptide expression normally associated with weight loss. MSI-1436 enters the brain after peripheral injection and is more potent when injected into the cerebral ventricle (intracerebroventricular [ICV]). Systemic or ICV MSI-1436 administration induced similar patterns of Fos immunoreactivity in the brain, especially the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN). This brain region integrates neural signals from hypothalamic and brain stem nuclei and regulates feeding behavior, autonomic function, and neuroendocrine function. Microinjection of MSI-1436 into the PVN potently suppressed feeding and reduced body weight for several days. Unlike caloric restriction, MSI-1436 decreased mRNA levels of agouti-related peptide and neuropeptide Y in the hypothalamus. These findings indicate that MSI-1436 acts in the brain to regulate food intake and energy expenditure, likely through suppression of orexigenic hypothalamic pathways. PMID:12086938

  20. Acetylene Fermentation: Relevance to Primordial Biogeochemistry and the Search for Life in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2014-02-01

    Acetylene supports the growth of some terrestrial anaerobes. The reaction is highly exothermic. The abundance of acetylene in the methane-rich planet(oid)s of the outer solar system could represent a means of nourishment for resident alien microbes.

  1. 46 CFR 151.50-79 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... suction line. (c) The piping system, including the cargo refrigeration system, for tanks to be loaded with methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture must be completely separate from piping and refrigeration systems for other tanks. If the piping system for the tanks to be loaded with methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture...

  2. 46 CFR 151.50-79 - Methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... suction line. (c) The piping system, including the cargo refrigeration system, for tanks to be loaded with methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture must be completely separate from piping and refrigeration systems for other tanks. If the piping system for the tanks to be loaded with methyl acetylene-propadiene mixture...

  3. Actively Controlled Landing Gear for Aircraft Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Martinson, Veloria J.

    1999-01-01

    Concepts for long-range air travel are characterized by airframe designs with long, slender, relatively flexible fuselages. One aspect often overlooked is ground induced vibration of these aircraft. This paper presents an analytical and experimental study of reducing ground-induced aircraft vibration loads using actively controlled landing gears. A facility has been developed to test various active landing gear control concepts and their performance. The facility uses a NAVY A6-intruder landing gear fitted with an auxiliary hydraulic supply electronically controlled by servo valves. An analytical model of the gear is presented including modifications to actuate the gear externally and test data is used to validate the model. The control design is described and closed-loop test and analysis comparisons are presented.

  4. Real-Time Active Cosmic Neutron Background Reduction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray-induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the low-energy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of man-made neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux

  5. Real-time active cosmic neutron background reduction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray‒induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the lowenergy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of manmade neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux

  6. Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) initial effort to provide information and analysis on the potential impacts on petroleum product markets from reductions in Northeast petroleum refining activity.

  7. Reduction of interior sound fields in flexible cylinders by active vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms of interior sound reduction through active control of a thin flexible shell's vibrational response are presently evaluated in view of an analytical model. The noise source is a single exterior acoustic monopole. The active control model is evaluated for harmonic excitation; the results obtained indicate spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 20 dB over the source plane, for acoustic resonant conditions inside the cavity.

  8. ACTINIC MASK INSPECTION AT THE ALS: RISK REDUCTION ACTIVITIES FOR 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Levesque, R; Ayers, J; Liu, Y; Gullikson, E; Barale, P

    2004-01-05

    This document reports on risk reduction activities performed at the VNL during CY2003 as a part of the Lith-343 actinic inspection project funded by International SEMATECH. The risk reduction activities described in this document comprise deliverable items 3.1.3, 3.1.4, 3.1.5 and 3.1.6 of Amendment 6 to the VNL EUV mask blank technology transfer contract.

  9. Development of High Activity, Coal-Derived, Promoted Catalytic Systems for NOx Reduction at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Calo

    1998-05-01

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics.

  10. Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets

    EIA Publications

    2012-01-01

    Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets is an update to a previous Energy Information Administration (EIA) report, Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets, released in December 2011. This update analyzes possible market responses and impacts in the event Sunoco's Philadelphia refinery closes this summer, in addition to the recently idled refineries on the East Coast and in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  11. Revealing the Origin of Activity in Nitrogen-Doped Nanocarbons towards Electrocatalytic Reduction of Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junyuan; Kan, Yuhe; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Bingsen; Wang, Bolun; Wu, Kuang-Hsu; Lin, Yangming; Sun, Xiaoyan; Li, Qingfeng; Centi, Gabriele; Su, Dangsheng

    2016-05-23

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are functionalized with nitrogen atoms for reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 ). The investigation explores the origin of the catalyst's activity and the role of nitrogen chemical states therein. The catalysts show excellent performances, with about 90 % current efficiency for CO formation and stability over 60 hours. The Tafel analyses and density functional theory calculations suggest that the reduction of CO2 proceeds through an initial rate-determining transfer of one electron to CO2 , which leads to the formation of carbon dioxide radical anion (CO2 (.-) ). The initial reduction barrier is too high on pristine CNTs, resulting in a very high overpotentials at which the hydrogen evolution reaction dominates over CO2 reduction. The doped nitrogen atoms stabilize the radical anion, thereby lowering the initial reduction barrier and improving the intrinsic activity. The most efficient nitrogen chemical state for this reaction is quaternary nitrogen, followed by pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen.

  12. Dissimilatory sulfate reduction in hypersaline coastal pans: Activity across a salinity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Donovan; Roychoudhury, Alakendra N.; Cowan, Donald

    2007-11-01

    The impact of salinity on the metabolic activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria in five highly saline to hypersaline coastal pans was studied using a radioactive tracer (35SO42-) technique. We recorded sulfate reduction at in situ porewater salinities of up to 422. Furthermore, enumeration of sulfate reduction rates in whole core incubations conducted under in situ conditions suggested a high variability in the activity of sulfate-reducers. Average reduction rates (27-3685 nmol cm -3 d -1) varied according to depth, season and site sampled. The highest reduction rates measured in the hypersaline pan were comparable to the highest reported rates from highly productive salt marsh and microbial mat ecosystems. Correspondingly, the depth-integrated rates (integrated to 12 cm) varied from 6 to 241 mmol m -2 d -1 and were also among the highest ever reported rates. The reduction rates decreased down-core and, surprisingly, were highest in the winter season when the lowest sediment temperatures were encountered. High salt concentrations did not inhibit sulfate reduction rates. Rather, higher rates were measured at pans with higher in situ salinities. In laboratory slurry incubation experiments, sediments from the saltpans were treated with increasing salt concentrations. Regression analysis suggested that the short term response of microbial consortia to up-shock was an increase in sulfate reduction activity up to salinities of 272-311 and 134-244, in hypersaline and highly saline pans, respectively. Beyond these salinities, the cells showed evidence of reduced activities.

  13. RFI Risk Reduction Activities Using New Goddard Digital Radiometry Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Damon; Kim, Ed; Young, Peter; Miles, Lynn; Wong, Mark; Morris, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The Goddard Radio-Frequency Explorer (GREX) is the latest fast-sampling radiometer digital back-end processor that will be used for radiometry and radio-frequency interference (RFI) surveying at Goddard Space Flight Center. The system is compact and deployable, with a mass of about 40 kilograms. It is intended to be flown on aircraft. GREX is compatible with almost any aircraft, including P-3, twin otter, C-23, C-130, G3, and G5 types. At a minimum, the system can function as a clone of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) ground-based development unit [1], or can be a completely independent system that is interfaced to any radiometer, provided that frequency shifting to GREX's intermediate frequency is performed prior to sampling. If the radiometer RF is less than 200MHz, then the band can be sampled and acquired directly by the system. A key feature of GREX is its ability to simultaneously sample two polarization channels simultaneously at up to 400MSPS, 14-bit resolution each. The sampled signals can be recorded continuously to a 23 TB solid-state RAID storage array. Data captures can be analyzed offline using the supercomputing facilities at Goddard Space Flight Center. In addition, various Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) - amenable radiometer signal processing and RFI detection algorithms can be implemented directly on the GREX system because it includes a high-capacity Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA prototyping system that is user customizable.

  14. Microbial Activity in Aquatic Environments Measured by Dimethyl Sulfoxide Reduction and Intercomparison with Commonly Used Methods

    PubMed Central

    Griebler, Christian; Slezak, Doris

    2001-01-01

    A new method to determine microbial (bacterial and fungal) activity in various freshwater habitats is described. Based on microbial reduction of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to dimethyl sulfide (DMS), our DMSO reduction method allows measurement of the respiratory activity in interstitial water, as well as in the water column. DMSO is added to water samples at a concentration (0.75% [vol/vol] or 106 mM) high enough to compete with other naturally occurring electron acceptors, as determined with oxygen and nitrate, without stimulating or inhibiting microbial activity. Addition of NaN3, KCN, and formaldehyde, as well as autoclaving, inhibited the production of DMS, which proves that the reduction of DMSO is a biotic process. DMSO reduction is readily detectable via the formation of DMS even at low microbial activities. All water samples showed significant DMSO reduction over several hours. Microbially reduced DMSO is recovered in the form of DMS from water samples by a purge and trap system and is quantified by gas chromatography and detection with a flame photometric detector. The DMSO reduction method was compared with other methods commonly used for assessment of microbial activity. DMSO reduction activity correlated well with bacterial production in predator-free batch cultures. Cell-production-specific DMSO reduction rates did not differ significantly in batch cultures with different nutrient regimes but were different in different growth phases. Overall, a cell-production-specific DMSO reduction rate of 1.26 × 10−17 ± 0.12 × 10−17 mol of DMS per produced cell (mean ± standard error; R2 = 0.78) was calculated. We suggest that the relationship of DMSO reduction rates to thymidine and leucine incorporation is linear (the R2 values ranged from 0.783 to 0.944), whereas there is an exponential relationship between DMSO reduction rates and glucose uptake, as well as incorporation (the R2 values ranged from 0.821 to 0.931). Based on our results, we conclude that

  15. Detection of acetylene in the infrared spectrum of comet Hyakutake.

    PubMed

    Brooke, T Y; Tokunaga, A T; Weaver, H A; Crovisier, J; Bockelée-Morvan, D; Crisp, D

    1996-10-17

    Comets are rich in volatile materials, of which roughly 80% (by number) are water molecules. Considerable progress is being made in identifying the other volatile species, the abundances of which should enable us to determine whether comets formed primarily from ice-covered interstellar grains, or from material that was chemically processed in the early solar nebula. Here we report the detection of acetylene (C2H2) in the infrared spectrum of comet C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake). The estimated abundance is 0.3-0.9%, relative to water, which is comparable to the predicted solid-phase abundance in cold interstellar clouds. This suggests that the volatiles in comet Hyakotake may have come from ice-covered interstellar grains, rather than material processed in the accretion disk out of which the Solar System formed.

  16. Organogermanium Chemistry: Germacyclobutanes and digermane Additions to Acetylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Michael Chubb

    2003-12-12

    This dissertation comprises two main research projects. The first project, presented in Chapter 1, involves the synthesis and thermochemistry of germacyclobutanes (germetanes). Four new germetanes (spirodigermetane, diallylgermetane, dichlorogermetane, and germacyclobutane) have been synthesized using a modified di-Grignard synthesis. Diallylgermetane is shown to be a useful starting material for obtaining other germetanes, particularly the parent germetane, germacyclobutane. The gas-phase thermochemistries of spirodigermetane, diallylgermetane and germacyclobutane have been explored via pulsed stirred-flow reactor (SFR) studies, showing remarkable differences in decomposition, depending on the substitution at the germanium atom. The second project investigates the thermochemical, photochemical, and catalytic additions of several digermanes to acetylenes. The first examples of thermo- and photochemical additions of Ge-Ge bonds to C{triple_bond}C are demonstrated. Mechanistic investigations are described and comparisons are made to analogous disilane addition reactions, previously studied in their group.

  17. Adhesive and composite evaluation of acetylene-terminated phenylquinoxaline resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    A series of acetylene-terminated phenylquinoxaline (ATPQ) oligomers of various molecular weights were prepared and subsequently chain extended by the thermally induced reaction of the ethynyl groups. The processability and thermal properties of these oligomers and their cured resins were compared with that of a relatively high molecular weight linear polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) with the same chemical backbone. The ATPQ oligomers exhibited significantly better processability than the linear PPQ but the PPQ displayed substantially better thermooxidative stability. Adhesive (Ti/Ti) and composite (graphite filament reinforcement) work was performed to evaluate the potential of these materials for structural applications. The PPQ exhibited better retention of adhesive and laminate properties than the ATPQ resins at 260 C after aging for 500 hr at 260 C in circulating air.

  18. Ultrafast Extreme Ultraviolet Induced Isomerization of Acetylene Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Y.; Rudenko, Artem; Herrwerth, O.; Foucar, L.; Kurka, M.; Kuhnel, K.; Lezius, M.; Kling, Matthias; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Belkacem, Ali; Ueda, K.; Dusterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Schroter, Claus-Dieter; Moshammer, Robbert; Ullrich, Joachim

    2011-06-17

    Ultrafast isomerization of acetylene cations ([HC = CH]{sup +}) in the low-lying excited A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} state, populated by the absorption of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) photons (38 eV), has been observed at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg, (FLASH). Recording coincident fragments C{sup +} + CH{sub 2}{sup +} as a function of time between XUV-pump and -probe pulses, generated by a split-mirror device, we find an isomerization time of 52 {+-} 15 fs in a kinetic energy release (KER) window of 5.8 < KER < 8 eV, providing clear evidence for the existence of a fast, nonradiative decay channel.

  19. Acetylene fuel from atmospheric CO2 on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Linne, Diane L.

    1992-01-01

    The Mars mission scenario proposed by Baker and Zubrin (1990) intended for an unmanned preliminary mission is extended to maximize the total impulse of fuel produced with a minimum mass of hydrogen from Earth. The hydrogen along with atmospheric carbon dioxide is processed into methane and oxygen by the exothermic reaction in an atmospheric processing module. Use of simple chemical reactions to produce acetylene/oxygen rocket fuel on Mars from hydrogen makes it possible to produce an amount of fuel that is nearly 100 times the mass of hydrogen brought from earth. If such a process produces the return propellant for a manned Mars mission, the required mission mass in LEO is significantly reduced over a system using all earth-derived propellants.

  20. Ultrafast Extreme Ultraviolet Induced Isomerization of Acetylene Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Y. H.; Kurka, M.; Kuehnel, K. U.; Schroeter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Rudenko, A.; Foucar, L.; Herrwerth, O.; Lezius, M.; Kling, M. F.; Tilborg, J. van; Belkacem, A.; Ueda, K.; Duesterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2010-12-31

    Ultrafast isomerization of acetylene cations ([HC=CH]{sup +}) in the low-lying excited A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +} state, populated by the absorption of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) photons (38 eV), has been observed at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg, (FLASH). Recording coincident fragments C{sup +}+CH{sub 2}{sup +} as a function of time between XUV-pump and -probe pulses, generated by a split-mirror device, we find an isomerization time of 52{+-}15 fs in a kinetic energy release (KER) window of 5.8

  1. Acetylene as fast food: Implications for development of life on anoxic primordial earth and in the outer solar system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Voytek, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Acetylene occurs, by photolysis of methane, in the atmospheres of jovian planets and Titan. In contrast, acetylene is only a trace component of Earth's current atmosphere. Nonetheless, a methane-rich atmosphere has been hypothesized for early Earth; this atmosphere would also have been rich in acetylene. This poses a paradox, because acetylene is a potent inhibitor of many key anaerobic microbial processes, including methanogenesis, anaerobic methane oxidation, nitrogen fixation, and hydrogen oxidation. Fermentation of acetylene was discovered 25 years ago, and Pelobacter acetylenicus was shown to grow on acetylene by virtue of acetylene hydratase, which results in the formation of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde subsequently dismutates to ethanol and acetate (plus some hydrogen). However, acetylene hydratase is specific for acetylene and does not react with any analogous compounds. We hypothesize that microbes with acetylene hydratase played a key role in the evolution of Earth's early biosphere by exploiting an available source of carbon from the atmosphere and in so doing formed protective niches that allowed for other microbial processes to flourish. Furthermore, the presence of acetylene in the atmosphere of a planet or planetoid could possibly represent evidence for an extraterrestrial anaerobic ecosystem. ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  2. Acetylene as Fast Food: Implications for Development of Life on Anoxic Primordial Earth and in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Voytek, Mary A.

    2008-02-01

    Acetylene occurs, by photolysis of methane, in the atmospheres of jovian planets and Titan. In contrast, acetylene is only a trace component of Earth's current atmosphere. Nonetheless, a methane-rich atmosphere has been hypothesized for early Earth; this atmosphere would also have been rich in acetylene. This poses a paradox, because acetylene is a potent inhibitor of many key anaerobic microbial processes, including methanogenesis, anaerobic methane oxidation, nitrogen fixation, and hydrogen oxidation. Fermentation of acetylene was discovered 25 years ago, and Pelobacter acetylenicus was shown to grow on acetylene by virtue of acetylene hydratase, which results in the formation of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde subsequently dismutates to ethanol and acetate (plus some hydrogen). However, acetylene hydratase is specific for acetylene and does not react with any analogous compounds. We hypothesize that microbes with acetylene hydratase played a key role in the evolution of Earth's early biosphere by exploiting an available source of carbon from the atmosphere and in so doing formed protective niches that allowed for other microbial processes to flourish. Furthermore, the presence of acetylene in the atmosphere of a planet or planetoid could possibly represent evidence for an extraterrestrial anaerobic ecosystem.

  3. Acetylene as fast food: implications for development of life on anoxic primordial Earth and in the outer solar system.

    PubMed

    Oremland, Ronald S; Voytek, Mary A

    2008-02-01

    Acetylene occurs, by photolysis of methane, in the atmospheres of jovian planets and Titan. In contrast, acetylene is only a trace component of Earth's current atmosphere. Nonetheless, a methane-rich atmosphere has been hypothesized for early Earth; this atmosphere would also have been rich in acetylene. This poses a paradox, because acetylene is a potent inhibitor of many key anaerobic microbial processes, including methanogenesis, anaerobic methane oxidation, nitrogen fixation, and hydrogen oxidation. Fermentation of acetylene was discovered approximately 25 years ago, and Pelobacter acetylenicus was shown to grow on acetylene by virtue of acetylene hydratase, which results in the formation of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde subsequently dismutates to ethanol and acetate (plus some hydrogen). However, acetylene hydratase is specific for acetylene and does not react with any analogous compounds. We hypothesize that microbes with acetylene hydratase played a key role in the evolution of Earth's early biosphere by exploiting an available source of carbon from the atmosphere and in so doing formed protective niches that allowed for other microbial processes to flourish. Furthermore, the presence of acetylene in the atmosphere of a planet or planetoid could possibly represent evidence for an extraterrestrial anaerobic ecosystem.

  4. Acetylene as fast food: implications for development of life on anoxic primordial Earth and in the outer solar system.

    PubMed

    Oremland, Ronald S; Voytek, Mary A

    2008-02-01

    Acetylene occurs, by photolysis of methane, in the atmospheres of jovian planets and Titan. In contrast, acetylene is only a trace component of Earth's current atmosphere. Nonetheless, a methane-rich atmosphere has been hypothesized for early Earth; this atmosphere would also have been rich in acetylene. This poses a paradox, because acetylene is a potent inhibitor of many key anaerobic microbial processes, including methanogenesis, anaerobic methane oxidation, nitrogen fixation, and hydrogen oxidation. Fermentation of acetylene was discovered approximately 25 years ago, and Pelobacter acetylenicus was shown to grow on acetylene by virtue of acetylene hydratase, which results in the formation of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde subsequently dismutates to ethanol and acetate (plus some hydrogen). However, acetylene hydratase is specific for acetylene and does not react with any analogous compounds. We hypothesize that microbes with acetylene hydratase played a key role in the evolution of Earth's early biosphere by exploiting an available source of carbon from the atmosphere and in so doing formed protective niches that allowed for other microbial processes to flourish. Furthermore, the presence of acetylene in the atmosphere of a planet or planetoid could possibly represent evidence for an extraterrestrial anaerobic ecosystem. PMID:18199006

  5. Acetylene as a substrate in the development of primordial bacterial communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culbertson, C.W.; Strohmaier, F.E.; Oremland, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The fermentation of atmospheric acetylene by anaerobic bacteria is proposed as the basis of a primordial heterotrophic food chain. The accumulation of fermentation products (acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetate and hydrogen) would create niches for sulfate-respiring bacteria as well as methanogens. Formation of acetylene-free environments in soils and sediments would also alter the function of nitrogenase from detoxification to nitrogen-fixation. The possibility of an acetylene-based anaerobic food chain in Jovian-type atmospheres is discussed. ?? 1988 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  6. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits.

    PubMed

    Frank, Kiana L; Rogers, Karyn L; Rogers, Daniel R; Johnston, David T; Girguis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, [Formula: see text], DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits.

  7. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Kiana L.; Rogers, Karyn L.; Rogers, Daniel R.; Johnston, David T.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, SO42−, DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits. PMID:26733984

  8. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits.

    PubMed

    Frank, Kiana L; Rogers, Karyn L; Rogers, Daniel R; Johnston, David T; Girguis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, [Formula: see text], DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits. PMID:26733984

  9. KISS: Kinetics and Structure of Superagglomerates Produced by Silane and Acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, G. W.; Yang, J. C.; Scott, J. H.; Sivithanu, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the process of gas phase agglomeration leading to superagglomerates and a gel-like structure for microgravity (0-g) silane and acetylene flames. Ultimately one would apply this understanding to predicting flame conditions that could lead to the gas phase production of an aero-gel. The approach is to burn acetylene and silane and to analyze the evolution of the soot and silica agglomerates. Acetylene is chosen because it has one of the highest soot volume fractions and there is evidence of super agglomerates being formed in laminar acetylene flames. Silane has the advantage that silica particles are the major combustion product resulting in a particle volume fraction a factor of ten greater than that for a carbonaceous smoke.

  10. Silyl-acetylene polymers for use as precursors to silicon carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, M.K.

    1991-12-20

    The steps involved in production of silicon carbide fiber using silyl acetylene polymer precursors can be separated into four processing steps: polymer synthesis, fiber spinning, fiber crosslinking, and pyrolysis. Practical experimental considerations in each step are discussed.

  11. Influence of nanoparticle formation on discharge properties in argon-acetylene capacitively coupled radio frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Th.; Hinz, A. M.; Faupel, F.; Strunskus, T.; Kersten, H.; Meichsner, J.

    2016-02-01

    This contribution presents experimental results regarding the influence of nanoparticle formation in capacitively coupled radio frequency (13.56 MHz) argon-acetylene plasmas. The discharge is studied using non-invasive 160 GHz Gaussian beam microwave interferometry and optical emission spectroscopy. Particularly, the temporal behavior of the electron density from microwave interferometry is analyzed and compared with the changing plasma emission and self-bias voltage caused by nanoparticle formation. The periodic particle formation with a cycle duration between 30 s and 140 s starts with an electron density drop over more than one order of magnitude below the detection limit (8 × 1014 m-3). The electron density reduction is the result of electron attachment processes due to negative ions and nanoparticle formation. The onset time constant of nanoparticle formation is five times faster compared to the expulsion of the particles from the plasma due to multi-disperse size distribution. Moreover, the intensity of the argon transition lines increases and implies a rising effective electron temperature. The cycle duration of the particle formation is affected by the total gas flow rate and exhibits an inverse proportionality to the square of the total gas flow rate. The variation in the total gas flow rate influences the force balance, which determines the confinement time of the nanoparticles. As a further result, the cycle duration is dependent on the axial position of the powered electrode, which also corresponds to different distances relative to the fixed optical axis of the microwave interferometer.

  12. Diameter control of carbon nanotubes using argon-acetylene mixture and their application as IR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Rana Arslan; Afrin, Rahat; Manzoor, Umair; Bhatti, Arshad Saleem; Islam, Mohammad; Amin, Muhammad T.; Alazba, Abdulrahman A.

    2015-08-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown via pyrolytic chemical vapor deposition technique and explored for their infrared sensing behavior. CNT synthesis was carried out over cobalt zinc ferrite (Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4) catalyst nanoparticles under different gas flow conditions to control outside diameter of the nanotubes. It was found that a progressive decrease in the carbon precursor gas (acetylene in this case) from 5:1 to 9:1 (v/v) causes reduction of average CNT diameter from 85 nm to 635 nm. Growth conditions involving higher temperatures yield nanotubes/nanofibers with outer diameter of >500 nm, presumably due to surface aggregation of nanoparticles or increased flux of carbonaceous species at the catalyst surface or both. Current-voltage characteristics of the nanotubes depending on the CNT diameter, revealed linear or nonlinear behavior. When incorporated as sensing layer, the sensitivity of ˜5.3 was noticed with response time of ˜4.1 s. It is believed that IR sensing characteristics of such CNT-based detectors can be further enhanced through post-synthesis purification and chemical functionalization treatments.

  13. Statistical approach to evaluating active reduction of crack propagation in aluminum panels with piezoelectric actuator patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, R.; Stapp, C.; Hanselka, H.

    2011-08-01

    Fatigue cracks in light-weight shell or panel structures may lead to major failures when used for sealing or load-carrying purposes. This paper describes investigations into the potential of piezoelectric actuator patches that are applied to the surface of an already cracked thin aluminum panel to actively reduce the propagation of fatigue cracks. With active reduction of fatigue crack propagation, uncertainties in the cracked structure's strength, which always remain present even when the structure is used under damage tolerance conditions, e.g. airplane fuselages, could be lowered. The main idea is to lower the cyclic stress intensity factor near the crack tip with actively induced mechanical compression forces using thin low voltage piezoelectric actuator patches applied to the panel's surface. With lowering of the cyclic stress intensity, the rate of crack propagation in an already cracked thin aluminum panel will be reduced significantly. First, this paper discusses the proper placement and alignment of thin piezoelectric actuator patches near the crack tip to induce the mechanical compression forces necessary for reduction of crack propagation by numerical simulations. Second, the potential for crack propagation reduction will be investigated statistically by an experimental sample test examining three cases: a cracked aluminum host structure (i) without, (ii) with but passive, and (iii) with activated piezoelectric actuator patches. It will be seen that activated piezoelectric actuator patches lead to a significant reduction in crack propagation.

  14. Nitrous oxide reduction in nodules: denitrification or N/sub 2/ fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, M.S.; Focht, D.D.

    1987-05-01

    Detached cowpea nodules that contained a nitrous oxide reductase-positive (Nor/sup +/) rhizobium strain (8A55) and a nitrous oxide reductase-negative (Nor/sup -/) rhizobium strain (32H1) were incubated with 1% /sup 15/N/sub 2/O (95 atom% /sup 15/N) in the following three atmospheres: aerobic with C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ (10%), aerobic without C/sub 2/H/sub 2/, and anaerobic (argon atmosphere) without C/sub 2/H/sub 2/. The greatest production of /sup 15/N/sub 2/ occurred anaerobically with 8A55, yet very little was formed with 32H1. Although acetylene reduction activity was slightly higher with 32H1, about 10 times more /sup 15/N/sub 2/ was produced aerobically by 8A55 than by 32H1 in the absence of acetylene. The major reductive pathway of N/sub 2/O reduction by denitrifying rhizobium strain 8A55 is by nitrous oxide reductase rather than nitrogenase.

  15. NOx reduction Activity over Phosphate-supported Platinum Catalysts with Hydrogen under Oxygen-rich Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, M.; Takehara, M.; Saito, M.; Machida, K.

    2011-10-01

    The phosphate supported Pt catalysts (Pt/AlPO4, Pt/CePO4, Pt/CeP2O7, Pt/SnP2O7, Pt/TiP2O7, Pt/Zn3(PO4)2) were prepared by a conventional impregnation method to evaluate their selective catalytic reduction activity of NOx under excess oxygen condition. Among them, good NOx reduction activity was obtained on the Pt/AlPO4 catalyst. Specific adsorption species during the NOx reduction were checked by a diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrum (DRIFTs) measurement to examine the reaction mechanism. Also NH3 temperature programmed desorption measurements were performed for all catalysts and their catalytic properties were discussed from the viewpoints of solid acidity.

  16. An active control system for helicopter vibration reduction by higher harmonic pitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. B.; Farrar, F. A.; Miao, W.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical study defining the basic configuration of an active control system to reduce helicopter vibrations is presented. Theoretical results for a nonlinear four-bladed single rotor helicopter simulation are discussed, showing that vibration reductions on the order of 80-90% for airspeeds up to 150 kn can be expected when using a higher harmonic pitch in an active feedback control system. The rotor performance penalty associated with this level of vibration reduction is about 1-3% and the increase in rotor blade stresses is considered to be low. The location of sensor accelerometers proved to be significant for vibration reductions, and it is noted that the RTSA controller is tolerant of sensor signal noise.

  17. Enhancement of sludge reduction and methane production by removing extracellular polymeric substances from waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Tuan; Mohd Yasin, Nazlina Haiza; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Maeda, Toshinari

    2014-12-01

    The management of waste activated sludge (WAS) recycling is a concern that affects the development of the future low-carbon society, particularly sludge reduction and biomass utilization. In this study, we investigated the effect of removing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which play important roles in the adhesion and flocculation of WAS, on increased sludge disintegration, thereby enhancing sludge reduction and methane production by anaerobic digestion. EPS removal from WAS by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) significantly enhanced sludge reduction, i.e., 49 ± 5% compared with 27 ± 1% of the control at the end the digestion process. Methane production was also improved in WAS without EPS by 8881 ± 109 CH4 μmol g(-1) dry-weight of sludge. Microbial activity was determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time polymerase chain reaction, which showed that the hydrolysis and acetogenesis stages were enhanced by pretreatment with 2% EDTA, with a larger methanogenic community and better methane production.

  18. A porous metal-organic framework with ultrahigh acetylene uptake capacity under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Jiandong; Jiang, Feilong; Wu, Mingyan; Liu, Caiping; Su, Kongzhao; Lu, Weigang; Yuan, Daqiang; Hong, Maochun

    2015-06-01

    Acetylene, an important petrochemical raw material, is very difficult to store safely under compression because of its highly explosive nature. Here we present a porous metal-organic framework named FJI-H8, with both suitable pore space and rich open metal sites, for efficient storage of acetylene under ambient conditions. Compared with existing reports, FJI-H8 shows a record-high gravimetric acetylene uptake of 224 cm3 (STP) g-1 and the second-highest volumetric uptake of 196 cm3 (STP) cm-3 at 295 K and 1 atm. Increasing the storage temperature to 308 K has only a small effect on its acetylene storage capacity (~200 cm3 (STP) g-1). Furthermore, FJI-H8 exhibits an excellent repeatability with only 3.8% loss of its acetylene storage capacity after five cycles of adsorption-desorption tests. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation reveals that not only open metal sites but also the suitable pore space and geometry play key roles in its remarkable acetylene uptake.

  19. A porous metal-organic framework with ultrahigh acetylene uptake capacity under ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jiandong; Jiang, Feilong; Wu, Mingyan; Liu, Caiping; Su, Kongzhao; Lu, Weigang; Yuan, Daqiang; Hong, Maochun

    2015-01-01

    Acetylene, an important petrochemical raw material, is very difficult to store safely under compression because of its highly explosive nature. Here we present a porous metal-organic framework named FJI-H8, with both suitable pore space and rich open metal sites, for efficient storage of acetylene under ambient conditions. Compared with existing reports, FJI-H8 shows a record-high gravimetric acetylene uptake of 224 cm3 (STP) g−1 and the second-highest volumetric uptake of 196 cm3 (STP) cm−3 at 295 K and 1 atm. Increasing the storage temperature to 308 K has only a small effect on its acetylene storage capacity (∼200 cm3 (STP) g−1). Furthermore, FJI-H8 exhibits an excellent repeatability with only 3.8% loss of its acetylene storage capacity after five cycles of adsorption–desorption tests. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation reveals that not only open metal sites but also the suitable pore space and geometry play key roles in its remarkable acetylene uptake. PMID:26123775

  20. Reduction of Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise by Active Rotor Control Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Brooks, Thomas F.; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  1. RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES FOR EXISTING DETACHED HOUSES - TECHNICAL GUIDANCE (THIRD EDITION) FOR ACTIVE SOIL DEPRESSURIZATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical guidance document is designed to aid in the selection, design, installation and operation of indoor radon reduction techniques using soil depressurization in existing houses. Its emphasis is on active soil depressurization; i.e., on systems that use a fan to depre...

  2. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-06-21

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction.

  3. Active breathing control (ABC): Determination and reduction of breathing-induced organ motion in the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Gagel, Bernd . E-mail: BGagel@UKAachen.de; Demirel, Cengiz M.P.; Kientopf, Aline; Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc; Stanzel, Sven; Breuer, Christian; Asadpour, Branka; Jansen, Thomas; Holy, Richard; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Eble, Michael J.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Extensive radiotherapy volumes for tumors of the chest are partly caused by interfractional organ motion. We evaluated the feasibility of respiratory observation tools using the active breathing control (ABC) system and the effect on breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with unresectable tumors of the chest were selected for evaluation of the ABC system. Computed tomography scans were performed at various respiratory phases starting at the same couch position without patient movement. Threshold levels were set at minimum and maximum volume during normal breathing cycles and at a volume defined as shallow breathing, reflecting the subjective maximal tolerable reduction of breath volume. To evaluate the extent of organ movement, 13 landmarks were considering using commercial software for image coregistration. In 4 patients, second examinations were performed during therapy. Results: Investigating the differences in a normal breathing cycle versus shallow breathing, a statistically significant reduction of respiratory motion in the upper, middle, and lower regions of the chest could be detected, representing potential movement reduction achieved through reduced breath volume. Evaluating interfraction reproducibility, the mean displacement ranged between 0.24 mm (chest wall/tracheal bifurcation) to 3.5 mm (diaphragm) for expiration and shallow breathing and 0.24 mm (chest wall) to 5.25 mm (diaphragm) for normal inspiration. Conclusions: By modifying regularity of the respiratory cycle through reduction of breath volume, a significant and reproducible reduction of chest and diaphragm motion is possible, enabling reduction of treatment planning margins.

  4. Mechanism of Oxygen Reduction in Cytochrome c Oxidase and the Role of the Active Site Tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Margareta R A

    2016-01-26

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme in the respiratory chain, reduces molecular oxygen to water and stores the released energy through electrogenic chemistry and proton pumping across the membrane. Apart from the heme-copper binuclear center, there is a conserved tyrosine residue in the active site (BNC). The tyrosine delivers both an electron and a proton during the O-O bond cleavage step, forming a tyrosyl radical. The catalytic cycle then occurs in four reduction steps, each taking up one proton for the chemistry (water formation) and one proton to be pumped. It is here suggested that in three of the reduction steps the chemical proton enters the center of the BNC, leaving the tyrosine unprotonated with radical character. The reproprotonation of the tyrosine occurs first in the final reduction step before binding the next oxygen molecule. It is also suggested that this reduction mechanism and the presence of the tyrosine are essential for the proton pumping. Density functional theory calculations on large cluster models of the active site show that only the intermediates with the proton in the center of the BNC and with an unprotonated tyrosyl radical have a high electron affinity of similar size as the electron donor, which is essential for the ability to take up two protons per electron and thus for the proton pumping. This type of reduction mechanism is also the only one that gives a free energy profile in accordance with experimental observations for the amount of proton pumping in the working enzyme.

  5. Prevention and Reduction of Obesity through Active Living (PROACTIVE): rationale, design and methods.

    PubMed

    Ross, R; Blair, S N; Godwin, M; Hotz, S; Katzmarzyk, P T; Lam, M; Lévesque, L; Macdonald, S

    2009-01-01

    The Prevention and Reduction of Obesity through Active Living (PROACTIVE) is a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a behaviourally based physical activity and diet composition programme to prevent and reduce obesity and related comorbidities in a primary healthcare setting. 491 abdominally obese men and women 25-75 years of age who were patients of primary care physicians were randomly assigned to either a usual care group (N = 242) or a behavioural intervention group (N = 249). Those in usual care received general advice from the physician regarding the merits of physical activity and a healthy diet as a strategy for obesity reduction. Those in the behavioural intervention group received an individually designed counselling programme from a specially trained health educator, with respect to physical activity, diet and obesity reduction. The study was designed to provide 95% power in both men and women to detect a 2% (2 cm) difference in waist circumference and 80% power to identify a 15% reduction in the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, the two primary outcomes. PROACTIVE is the first behavioural intervention study to assess the effects of physical activity and diet on abdominal obesity and associated metabolic risk factors in a primary healthcare setting, include a generalised sample of men and women and examine long-term (24 months) effects. PROACTIVE has the potential to provide the basis for changing clinical practice (primary care) with respect to the prevention and reduction of obesity and related health risks. The purpose of this report is to present and discuss the rationale, design and methods of PROACTIVE.

  6. An improved processible acetylene-terminated polyimide for composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, A. L.; Naselow, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    The newest member of a family of thermosetting acetylene-substituted polyimide oligomers is HR600P. This oligomer is the isoimide version of the oligomer known as HR600P and Thermid 600. Although both types of material yield the same heat resistant end products after cure, HR600P has much superior processing characteristics. This attributed to its lower melting temperature (160 + or - 10 C, 320 + or - 20 F) in contrast to 202 C (396 F) for Thermid MC-600, its longer gel time at its processing temperature (16 to 30 minutes bvs 3 minutes), and its excellent solubility in low boiling solvents such as tetrahydrofuran, glymes, or 4:1 methyl ethyl ketone/toluene mixtures. These advantages provide more acceptable coating and impregnation procedures, allow for more complete removal at lower temperatures, provide a longer pot life or working time, and allow composite structure fabrication in conventional autoclaves used for epoxy composite curing. The excellent processing characteristics of HR600P allow its use in large area laminated structures, structural composites, and molding compositions.

  7. Copper-catalyzed chlorination and condensation of acetylene and dichloroacetylene.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P H; Wehrmeier, A; Sidhu, S S; Lenoir, D; Schramm, K W; Kettrup, A

    2000-06-01

    The chlorination and condensation of acetylene at low temperatures is demonstrated using copper chlorides as chlorinated agents coated to model borosilicate surfaces. Experiments with and without both a chlorine source and borosilicate surfaces indicate the absence of gas-phase and gas-surface reactions. Chlorination and condensation occur only in the presence of the copper catalyst. C2 through C8 organic products were observed in the effluent; PCDD/F were only observed from extraction of the borosilicate surfaces. A global reaction model is proposed that is consistent with the observed product distributions. Similar experiments with dichloroacetylene indicate greater reactivity in the absence of the copper catalyst. Reaction is observed in the gas-phase and in the presence of borosilicate surfaces at low temperatures. The formation of hexachlorobenzene is only observed in the presence of a copper catalyst. PCDD/F were only observed from extraction of the borosilicate surfaces. A global reaction model is proposed for the formation of hexachlorobenzene from dichloroacetylene. PMID:10789968

  8. Reductive activation of mitomycin C by thiols: kinetics, mechanism, and biological implications.

    PubMed

    Paz, Manuel M

    2009-10-01

    The clinically used antitumor antibiotic mitomycin C requires a reductive activation to be converted to a bis-electrophile that forms several covalent adducts with DNA, including an interstrand cross-link which is considered to be the lesion responsible for the cytotoxic effects of the drug. Enzymes such as cytochrome P450 reductase and DT-diaphorase have traditionally been implicated in the bioreduction of mitomycin C, but recent reports indicate that enzymes containing a dithiol active site are also involved in the metabolism of mitomycin C. The reductive activation can also be effected in vitro with chemical reductants, but until now, mitomycin C was considered to be inert to thiols. We report here that mitomycin C can, in fact, be reductively activated by thiols. We show that the reaction is autocatalytic and that the end product is a relatively stable aziridinomitosene that can be trapped by adding several nucleophiles after the activation reaction. Kinetic studies show that the reaction is highly sensitive to pH and does not proceed or proceeds very slowly at neutral pH, an observation that explains the unsuccessful results on previous attempts to activate mitomycin C with thiols. The optimum pH for the reactions is around the pK(a) values of the thiols used in the activation. A mechanism for the reaction is hypothesized, involving the initial formation of a thiolate-mitomycin adduct, that then evolves to give the hydroquinone of mitomycin C and disulfide. The results presented here provide a chemical mechanism to explain how some biological dithiols containing an unusually acidic thiol group (deprotonated at physiological pH) participate in the modulation of mitomycin C cytotoxicity.

  9. Intracellular reduction/activation of a disulfide switch in thiosemicarbazone iron chelators

    PubMed Central

    Akam, Eman A.; Chang, Tsuhen M.; Astashkin, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Iron scavengers (chelators) offer therapeutic opportunities in anticancer drug design by targeting the increased demand for iron in cancer cells as compared to normal cells. Prochelation approaches are expected to avoid systemic iron depletion as chelators are liberated under specific intracellular conditions. In the strategy described herein, a disulfide linkage is employed as a redox-directed switch within the binding unit of an antiproliferative thiosemicarbazone prochelator, which is activated for iron coordination following reduction to the thiolate chelator. In glutathione redox buffer, this reduction event occurs at physiological concentrations and half-cell potentials. Consistent with concurrent reduction and activation, higher intracellular thiol concentrations increase cell susceptibility to prochelator toxicity in cultured cancer cells. The reduction of the disulfide switch and intracellular iron chelation are confirmed in cell-based assays using calcein as a fluorescent probe for paramagnetic ions. The resulting low-spin Fe(III) complex is identified in intact Jurkat cells by EPR spectroscopy measurements, which also document a decreased concentration of active ribonucleotide reductase following exposure to the prochelator. Cell viability and fluorescence-based assays show that the iron complex presents low cytotoxicity and does not participate in intracellular redox chemistry, indicating that this antiproliferative chelation strategy does not rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:25100578

  10. Trend in the Catalytic Activity of Transition Metals for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction by Lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Shelton Jr, William Allison; Xu, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the intrinsic activity of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Ir, and Ru for the oxygen reduction reaction by Li (Li-ORR) forms a volcano-like trend with respect to the adsorption energy of oxygen, with Pt and Pd being the most active. The trend is based on two mechanisms: the reduction of molecular O{sub 2} on Au and Ag and of atomic O on the remaining metals. Step edges are found to be more active for catalyzing the Li-ORR than close-packed surfaces. Our findings identify important considerations in the design of catalyst-promoted air cathodes for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

  11. Trends in the Catalytic Activity of Transition Metals for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction by Lithium.

    PubMed

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Shelton, William A; Xu, Ye

    2012-04-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the intrinsic activity of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Ir, and Ru for the oxygen reduction reaction by Li (Li-ORR) forms a volcano-like trend with respect to the adsorption energy of oxygen, with Pt and Pd being the most active. The trend is based on two mechanisms: the reduction of molecular O2 on Au and Ag and of atomic O on the remaining metals. Step edges are found to be more active for catalyzing the Li-ORR than close-packed surfaces. Our findings identify important considerations in the design of catalyst-promoted air cathodes for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

  12. Antitrypanosomal Acetylene Fatty Acid Derivatives from the Seeds of Porcelia macrocarpa (Annonaceae).

    PubMed

    de Á Santos, Luciana; Cavalheiro, Alberto J; Tempone, Andre G; Correa, Daniela S; Alexandre, Tatiana R; Quintiliano, Natalia F; Rodrigues-Oliveira, André F; Oliveira-Silva, Diogo; Martins, Roberto Carlos C; Lago, João Henrique G

    2015-05-07

    Chagas' disease is caused by a parasitic protozoan and affects the poorest population in the world, causing high mortality and morbidity. As a result of the toxicity and long duration of current treatments, the discovery of novel and more efficacious drugs is crucial. In this work, the hexane extract from seeds of Porcelia macrocarpa R.E. Fries (Annonaceae) displayed in vitro antitrypanosomal activity against trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi by the colorimetric MTT assay (IC50 of 65.44 μg/mL). Using chromatographic fractionation over SiO2, this extract afforded a fraction composed by one active compound (IC50 of 10.70 µg/mL), which was chemically characterized as 12,14-octadecadiynoic acid (macrocarpic acid). Additionally, two new inactive acetylene compounds (α,α'-dimacro-carpoyl-β-oleylglycerol and α-macrocarpoyl-α'-oleylglycerol) were also isolated from the hexane extract. The complete characterization of the isolated compounds was performed by analysis of NMR and MS data as well as preparation of derivatives.

  13. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aspartame and their catalytic activity for p-nitrophenol reduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shufen; Yan, Songjing; Qi, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Cui, Jing; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a facile and environmental-friendly approach to form gold nanoparticles through the reduction of HAuCl4 by aspartame. The single-crystalline structure was illustrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results indicated that aspartame played a pivotal role in the reduction and stabilization of the gold crystals. The crystals were stabilized through the successive hydrogen-bonding network constructed between the water and aspartame molecules. Additionally, gold nanoparticles synthesized through aspartame were shown to have good catalytic activity for the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH4. PMID:25991916

  14. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aspartame and their catalytic activity for p-nitrophenol reduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shufen; Yan, Songjing; Qi, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Cui, Jing; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a facile and environmental-friendly approach to form gold nanoparticles through the reduction of HAuCl4 by aspartame. The single-crystalline structure was illustrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results indicated that aspartame played a pivotal role in the reduction and stabilization of the gold crystals. The crystals were stabilized through the successive hydrogen-bonding network constructed between the water and aspartame molecules. Additionally, gold nanoparticles synthesized through aspartame were shown to have good catalytic activity for the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH4.

  15. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aspartame and their catalytic activity for p-nitrophenol reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shufen; Yan, Songjing; Qi, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Cui, Jing; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrated a facile and environmental-friendly approach to form gold nanoparticles through the reduction of HAuCl4 by aspartame. The single-crystalline structure was illustrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results indicated that aspartame played a pivotal role in the reduction and stabilization of the gold crystals. The crystals were stabilized through the successive hydrogen-bonding network constructed between the water and aspartame molecules. Additionally, gold nanoparticles synthesized through aspartame were shown to have good catalytic activity for the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH4.

  16. Catalytic activity trends of oxygen reduction reaction for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Chun; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2011-11-30

    We report the intrinsic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline palladium, platinum, ruthenium, gold, and glassy carbon surfaces in 0.1 M LiClO(4) 1,2-dimethoxyethane via rotating disk electrode measurements. The nonaqueous Li(+)-ORR activity of these surfaces primarily correlates to oxygen adsorption energy, forming a "volcano-type" trend. The activity trend found on the polycrystalline surfaces was in good agreement with the trend in the discharge voltage of Li-O(2) cells catalyzed by nanoparticle catalysts. Our findings provide insights into Li(+)-ORR mechanisms in nonaqueous media and design of efficient air electrodes for Li-air battery applications.

  17. Reductive dehalogenation of disinfection byproducts by an activated carbon-based electrode system.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanqing; Kemper, Jerome M; Datuin, Gwen; Akey, Ann; Mitch, William A; Luthy, Richard G

    2016-07-01

    Low molecular weight, uncharged, halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are poorly removed by the reverse osmosis and advanced oxidation process treatment units often applied for further treatment of municipal wastewater for potable reuse. Granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment effectively sorbed 22 halogenated DBPs. Conversion of the GAC to a cathode within an electrolysis cell resulted in significant degradation of the 22 halogenated DBPs by reductive electrolysis at -1 V vs. Standard Hydrogen Electrode (SHE). The lowest removal efficiency over 6 h electrolysis was for trichloromethane (chloroform; 47%) but removal efficiencies were >90% for 13 of the 22 DBPs. In all cases, DBP degradation was higher than in electrolysis-free controls, and degradation was verified by the production of halides as reduction products. Activated carbons and charcoal were more effective than graphite for electrolysis, with graphite featuring poor sorption for the DBPs. A subset of halogenated DBPs (e.g., haloacetonitriles, chloropicrin) were degraded upon sorption to the GAC, even without electrolysis. Using chloropicrin as a model, experiments indicated that this loss was attributable to the partial reduction of sorbed chloropicrin from reducing equivalents in the GAC. Reducing equivalents depleted by these reactions could be restored when the GAC was treated by reductive electrolysis. GAC treatment of an advanced treatment train effluent for potable reuse effectively reduced the concentrations of chloroform, bromodichloromethane and dichloroacetonitrile measured in the column influent to below the method detection limits. Treatment of the GAC by reductive electrolysis at -1 V vs. SHE over 12 h resulted in significant degradation of the chloroform (63%), bromodichloromethane (96%) and dichloroacetonitrile (99%) accumulated on the GAC. The results suggest that DBPs in advanced treatment train effluents could be captured and degraded continuously by reductive electrolysis

  18. Characterization of Microbial Activities and U Reduction in a Shallow Aquifer Contaminated by Uranium Mill Tailing

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Krumholz, Lee R.; Wong, D; Long, Philip E.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2003-05-21

    A Characterization of the Shiprock, NM, uranium mill tailing site focused on the geochemical and microbiological factors governing in-situ uranium-redox reactions. Groundwater and aqueous extracts of sediment samples contained a wide concentration range of sulfate, nitrate, and U(VI) with median values of 21.2 mM, 16.1um, and 2.7 um, respectively. Iron (III) was not detected in groundwater, but a median value of 0.3 mM in sediment extracts was measured. Bacterial diversity down gradient from the disposal pile reflected the predominant geochemistry with relatively high numbers of sulfate-and nitrate-reducing microorganisms, and smaller numbers of acetogenic, methanogenic, nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfide oxidizing bacteria. In aquifer slurry incubations, nitrate reduction was always preferred and had a negative impact on sulfate-, Fe(III)-, and U-reduction rates. We also found that sulfate-reduction rates decreased sharply in the presence of clay, while Fe(III)-reduction increased with no clear impact on U reduction. In the absence of clay, iron and sulfate reduction correlated with concentrations of Fe(III) and sulfate, respectively. Rates of U(VI) loss did not correlate with the concentration of any electron acceptor. With the exception of Fe(III), electron donor amendment was largely unsuccessful in stimulating electron acceptor loss over a 1-week incubation period, suggesting that endogenous forms of organic matter were sufficient to support microbial activity. Our findings suggest that efforts to accelerate biological U reduction should initially focus on stimulating nitrate removal.

  19. Suppression of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Pt-based electrocatalysts from ionomer incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Morimoto, Yu; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of Nafion on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is studied for Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C catalysts using thin-film rotating disk electrode (TF-RDE) methods in 0.1 M HClO4. Ultrathin uniform catalyst layers and standardized activity measurement protocols are employed to obtain accurate and reproducible ORR activity. Nafion lowers the ORR activity which plateaus with increasing loading on Pt catalysts. Pt particle size is found not to have significant influence on the extent of the SA decrease upon Nafion incorporation. Catalysts using high surface area carbon (HSC) support exhibit attenuated activity loss resulting from lower ionomer coverage on catalyst particles located within the deep pores. The impact of metallic composition on the activity loss due to Nafion incorporation is also discussed.

  20. Experimental evaluation of leaky least-mean-square algorithms for active noise reduction in communication headsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartes, David A.; Ray, Laura R.; Collier, Robert D.

    2002-04-01

    An adaptive leaky normalized least-mean-square (NLMS) algorithm has been developed to optimize stability and performance of active noise cancellation systems. The research addresses LMS filter performance issues related to insufficient excitation, nonstationary noise fields, and time-varying signal-to-noise ratio. The adaptive leaky NLMS algorithm is based on a Lyapunov tuning approach in which three candidate algorithms, each of which is a function of the instantaneous measured reference input, measurement noise variance, and filter length, are shown to provide varying degrees of tradeoff between stability and noise reduction performance. Each algorithm is evaluated experimentally for reduction of low frequency noise in communication headsets, and stability and noise reduction performance are compared with that of traditional NLMS and fixed-leakage NLMS algorithms. Acoustic measurements are made in a specially designed acoustic test cell which is based on the original work of Ryan et al. [``Enclosure for low frequency assessment of active noise reducing circumaural headsets and hearing protection,'' Can. Acoust. 21, 19-20 (1993)] and which provides a highly controlled and uniform acoustic environment. The stability and performance of the active noise reduction system, including a prototype communication headset, are investigated for a variety of noise sources ranging from stationary tonal noise to highly nonstationary measured F-16 aircraft noise over a 20 dB dynamic range. Results demonstrate significant improvements in stability of Lyapunov-tuned LMS algorithms over traditional leaky or nonleaky normalized algorithms, while providing noise reduction performance equivalent to that of the NLMS algorithm for idealized noise fields.

  1. On the occurrence of anoxic microniches, denitrification, and sulfate reduction in aerated activated sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, A.; Santegoeds, C.M.; Nielsen, H.K.; Ploug, H.; Wagner, M.; Pribyl, M.; Wanner, J.; Amann, R.; De Beer, D.

    1999-09-01

    A combination of different methods was applied to investigate the occurrence of anaerobic processes in aerated activated sludge. Microsensor measurements (O{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and H{sub 2}S) were performed on single sludge flocs to detect anoxic niches, nitrate reduction, or sulfate reduction on a microscale. Incubations of activated sludge with {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} were used to determine denitrification and sulfate reduction rates on a batch scale. In four of six investigated sludges, no anoxic zones developed during aeration, and consequently denitrification rates were very low. However, in two sludges anoxia in flocs coincided with significant denitrification rates. Sulfate reduction could not be detected in any sludge in either the microsensor or the batch investigation, not even under short-term anoxic conditions. In contrast, the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria was shown by fluorescence in situ hybridization with 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes and by PCR-based detection of genes coding for the dissimilatory sulfite reductase. A possible explanation for the absence of advection, i.e., facilitated by flow through pores and channels. This possibility is suggested by the irregularity of some oxygen profiles and by confocal laser scanning microscopy of the three-dimensional floc structures, which showed that flocs from the two sludges in which anoxic zones were found were apparently denser than flocs from the other sludges.

  2. Highly active Pd-In/mesoporous alumina catalyst for nitrate reduction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenwei; Zhang, Yonggang; Li, Deyi; Werth, Charles J; Zhang, Yalei; Zhou, Xuefei

    2015-04-01

    The catalytic reduction of nitrate is a promising technology for groundwater purification because it transforms nitrate into nitrogen and water. Recent studies have mainly focused on new catalysts with higher activities for the reduction of nitrate. Consequently, metal nanoparticles supported on mesoporous metal oxides have become a major research direction. However, the complex surface chemistry and porous structures of mesoporous metal oxides lead to a non-uniform distribution of metal nanoparticles, thereby resulting in a low catalytic efficiency. In this paper, a method for synthesizing the sustainable nitrate reduction catalyst Pd-In/Al2O3 with a dimensional structure is introduced. The TEM results indicated that Pd and In nanoparticles could efficiently disperse into the mesopores of the alumina. At room temperature in CO2-buffered water and under continuous H2 as the electron donor, the synthesized material (4.9 wt% Pd) was the most active at a Pd-In ratio of 4, with a first-order rate constant (k(obs) = 0.241 L min(-1) g(cata)(-1)) that was 1.3× higher than that of conventional Pd-In/Al2O3 (5 wt% Pd; 0.19 L min(-1) g(cata)(-1)). The Pd-In/mesoporous alumina is a promising catalyst for improving the catalytic reduction of nitrate. PMID:25600582

  3. Key amino acids of arabidopsis VKOR in the activity of phylloquinone reduction and disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Jian; Cui, Hao-Ran; Yu, Zhi-Bo; Du, Jia-Jia; Xu, Jia-Ning; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins in chloroplast are regulated through the disulfide bond/thiol transformation to realize their activities. A homologue of VKOR (Vitamin K epoxide reductase) in Arabidopsis chloroplast is found to catalyze the disulfide bond formation in vivo and to mediate the specific phylloquinone reduction in vitro. It is also called LTO1 (Lumen Thiol Oxidoreductase 1). Investigations about functions and essential amino acid residues of AtVKOR have important theoretical significance to clarify the chloroplast redox regulation mechanism. In this study, several amino acids in the VKOR domain of AtVKOR were identified to be involved in binding of phylloquinone. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to study the function of these positions. The results suggested that residues Ser77, Leu87, Phe137 and Leu141 were quite important in the binding and catalyzing the reduction of phylloquinone. These residues were also involved in the electron transferring and disulfide bond formation of substrate proteins by motility assays in vivo, suggesting that the binding of phylloquinone not only affected the delivery of electrons to phylloquinone but also affected the whole electron transfer process. The conserved cysteines in the AtVKOR domain also played critical roles in phylloquinone reduction. When each of the four conserved cysteines was mutated to alanine, the mutants lost reduction activity entirely, suggesting that the four conserved cysteines played crucial roles in the electron transfer process. PMID:25267254

  4. The kinetics and QSAR of abiotic reduction of mononitro aromatic compounds catalyzed by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenwen; Liu, Xinhui; Gao, Ding; Yu, Yanjun; Fu, Wenjun; Cheng, Dengmiao; Cui, Baoshan; Bai, Junhong

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of abiotic reduction of mono-nitro aromatic compounds (mono-NACs) catalyzed by activated carbon (AC) in an anaerobic system were examined. There were 6 types of substituent groups on nitrobenzene, including methyl, chlorine, amino, carboxyl, hydroxyl and cyanogen groups, at the ortho, meta or para positions. Our results showed that reduction followed pseudo-first order reaction kinetics, and that the rate constant (logkSA) varied widely, ranging between -4.77 and -2.82, depending upon the type and position of the substituent. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model using 15 theoretical molecular descriptors and partial-least-squares (PLS) regression was developed for the reduction rates of mono-NACs catalyzed by AC. The cross-validated regression coefficient (Qcum(2), 0.861) and correlation coefficient (R(2), 0.898) indicated significantly high robustness of the model. The VIP (variable importance in the projection) values of energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (ELUMO) and the maximum net atomic charge on the aromatic carbon bound to the nitro group (QC(-)) were 1.15 and 1.01, respectively. These values indicated that the molecular orbital energies and the atomic net charges might play important roles in the reduction of mono-NACs catalyzed by AC in anaerobic systems.

  5. Effects of Extrinsic and Intrinsic Proton Activity on The Mechanism of Oxygen Reduction in Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Robert August

    Mechanisms for oxygen reduction are proposed for three distinct cases covering two ionic liquids of fundamentally different archetypes and almost thirty orders of magnitude of proton activity. Proton activity is treated both extrinsically by varying the concentration and intrinsically by selecting proton donors with a wide range of aqueous pKa values. The mechanism of oxygen reduction in ionic liquids is introduced by way of the protic ionic liquid (pIL) triethylammonium triflate (TEATf) which shares some similarities with aqueous acid solutions. Oxygen reduction in TEATf begins as the one electron rate limited step to form superoxide, O2 *-, which is then rapidly protonated by the pIL cation forming the perhydroxyl radical, HO2*. The perhydroxyl radical is further reduced to peroxidate (HO2-) and hydrogen peroxide in proportions in accordance with their pKa. The reaction does not proceed beyond this point due to the adsorption of the conjugate base triethylammine interfering with the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide. This work demonstrates that this mechanism is consistent across Pt, Au, Pd, and Ag electrodes. Two related sets of experiments were performed in the inherently aprotic ionic liquid 1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium triflate (C4dMImTf). The first involved the titration of acidic species of varying aqueous pKa into the IL while monitoring the extent of oxygen reduction as a function of pKa and potential on Pt and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. These experiments confirmed the greater propensity of Pt to reduce oxygen by its immediate and abrupt transition from one electron reduction to four electron reduction, while oxygen reduction on GC gradually approaches four electron reduction as the potentials were driven more cathodic. The potential at which oxygen reduction initiates shows general agreement with the Nernst equation and the acid's tabulated aqueous pKa value, however at the extremely acidic end, a small deviation is observed. The second set

  6. The reduction of rotorcraft power and vibration using optimally controlled active gurney flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Eui Sung

    The main topic of the present study is the application of active control scheme for the reduction of rotorcraft main rotor power reduction and vibratory load. When the helicopter is operated near its flight boundary, the required power and vibratory loads rapidly increases which impose a limit on the helicopter operation. Various methods were proposed and studied in order to achieve performance improvement under such operating condition. The effect of active control scheme was examined for its impact on the performance improvement and vibration reduction in the present study. Numerical simulations are based on the UH-60A Blackhawk helicopter with an active Gurney flap spanning from 70%R to 80%R of the main rotor. For obtaining the aeroelastic response of the rotor blade, finite element method was used to represent elastic blade. The aerodynamic loads acting on the blade are provided by CFD based 2D lookup table. Prescribed wake model was used to resolve the induced inflow over the rotor disk. The unsteady aerodynamic behavior due to the higher harmonic actuation of active Gurney flap was resolved by the time-domain unsteady aerodynamic model. The first part of preliminary study covers parametric study using Gurney flap. Starting with simple rigid blade representation of the rotor blade, the effect of 1/rev Gurney flap actuation was examined on three different gross weights. The effect of active Gurney flap width, the chordwise location of active Gurney flap, the effect of unsteady aerodynamic model, and the effect of 2/rev actuation frequency were examined. The second part of preliminary study was conducted with the elastic blade model to include the effect of torsion dynamics. Performance improvement using active Gurney flap was examined for maximizing thrust capability at two flight speeds. 1/rev Gurney flap actuation increased the gross weight capability up to 1,000 lbs. Also, 1/rev actuation of Gurney flap increased maximum altitude limit of baseline rotor by 1

  7. INVITED PAPER: Application of an active device for helicopter noise reduction in JAXA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shigeru; Kobiki, Noboru; Tanabe, Yasutada

    2010-02-01

    Important issues in noise problems for current helicopters are described. An active tab (AT) was developed as a new active device for noise/vibration reduction under research cooperation between Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Kawada Industries, Inc. The wind tunnel test was conducted in order to investigate the effectiveness of the AT on the aeroacoustic characteristics of a helicopter. From the wind tunnel test, the capability of reducing blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise by an AT was verified. A new control law using instantaneous pressure change on a blade during BVI phenomena was introduced and applied to the wind tunnel testing. This new control law shows reasonable controllability for helicopter noise reduction. Furthermore, in order to analyze noise characteristics, the advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code named JAXA_ov3d was developed in JAXA and extended to include CFD-CSD (computational structure dynamics) coupling by using the beam theory for blade deformation.

  8. Enhanced Oxygen Reduction Activity In Acid By Tin-Oxide Supported Au Nanoparticle Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Baker,W.; Pietron, J.; Teliska, M.; Bouwman, P.; Ramaker, D.; Swider-Lyons, K.

    2006-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles supported on hydrous tin-oxide (Au-SnO{sub x}) are active for the four-electron oxygen reduction reaction in an acid electrolyte. The unique electrocatalytic of the Au-SnO is confirmed by the low amount of peroxide detected with rotating ring-disk electrode voltammetry and Koutecky-Levich analysis. In comparison, 10 wt % Au supported on Vulcan carbon and SnO{sub x} catalysts both produce significant peroxide in the acid electrolyte, indicating only a two-electron reduction reaction. Characterization of the Au-SnO{sub x} catalyst reveals a high-surface area, amorphous support with 1.7 nm gold metal particles. The high catalytic activity of the Au-SnO is attributed to metal support interactions. The results demonstrate a possible path to non-Pt catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathodes.

  9. Electrically rechargeable anionically active reduction-oxidation electrical storage-supply system

    SciTech Connect

    Remick, R.J.; Ang, P.G.P.

    1984-11-27

    An electrically rechargeable anionically active reduction-oxidation electric storage-supply system and process is disclosed using a sodium or potassium sulfidepolysulfide anolyte reaction and an iodide-polyiodide, chloride-chlorine or bromide-bromine species catholyte reaction. The catholyte and anolyte are separated by an ion selective membrane permeable to positive sodium and potassium ions and substantially impermeable to negative bromide, chloride, iodide, sulfide and polysulfide ions. A flowing electrolyte system is disclosed with external electrolyte storage vessels. The apparatus and process provide an electrically rechargeable anionically active reduction-oxidation system in which the electrolytes may be maintained at near neutral or slightly basic pH, with virtually no parasitic side reactions upon charging, such as hydrogen or oxygen evolution, and the disclosed storage and supply system provides higher energy densities than referenced prior art systems.

  10. Synthesis of Iron Nanoparticles Using Azadirachta indica Extract and Its Catalytic Activity Toward Nitrophenol Reduction.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, C; Ranjani, M; Kim, Ae Rhan; Yoo, Dong Jin; Kumar, G Gnana

    2016-03-01

    A simple, hasty and eco-friendly approach for the synthesis of iron nanoparticles has been developed using the medicinally important Azadirachta indica extract, which act as both reducing and stabilizing agent. The formation and morphological properties of iron nanoparticles as a function of metallic precursor and Azadirachta indica extract concentration have been investigated. The influence of solvent over the size and texture of iron nanoparticles has also been evaluated in detail. The thermal behavior of prepared nanoparticles was identified from thermogravimetric analysis. Furthermore, the catalytic activity of prepared iron nanoparticles toward the reduction of p-nitrophenol was analyzed and the reduction process was occurred within 30 sec. The cost and time efficient biosynthesis process and excellent catalytic activity of the prepared iron nanoparticles construct this protocol attractive.

  11. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Acetylene and Ethane Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Marla H.; Ferrante, R. F.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, W. J.

    2012-10-01

    Hydrocarbon-containing ices have characteristic absorption bands in both the mid- and near-infrared spectral regions, yet accurate optical constants are not available for most of these molecules. Ices with a hydrocarbon component have been identified on several TNOs (1) and the presence of volatiles, such as hydrocarbons, is inferred for intermediate or large TNOs based on sublimation models (2, 3). In our laboratory we recently have undertaken low-temperature spectroscopic studies of C2 hydrocarbons. We report IR spectra for acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6) ice in both the amorphous and crystalline phases at multiple temperatures. We include measurements of the refractive index at 670 nm for both the amorphous and crystalline phases of each ice. The optical constants, the real (n) and imaginary (k) components of the complex index of refraction, were determined from 7000 - 400 cm-1 (1.4 - 25 microns) at multiple temperatures using a Kramers-Kronig analysis. A goal of the present work is to provide a data base of optical constants of C2 molecules similar to that of Hudgins et al. (4) and Moore et al. (5). These values, as well as our calculated individual band strengths, will have great practical importance for the ongoing analysis of TNO spectra. (1) Brown, M.E. et al., Astron J., 133, 284, 2007. (2) Delsanti, A. et al., A&A, 52, A40, 2010. (3) Schaller, E. L. & Brown, M. E., ApJ, 659, L61, 2007. (4) Hudgins, D. M. et al., ApJS, 86, 713, 1993. (5) Moore, M. H. et al., ApJS, 191, 96, 2010. This work is supported by NASA’s Planetary Atmospheres, Outer Planets, and Cassini Data Analysis programs, and The Goddard Center for Astrobiology.

  12. Ionization of large homogeneous and heterogeneous clusters generated in acetylene-Ar expansions: Cluster ion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kocisek, J.; Lengyel, J.; Farnik, M.

    2013-03-28

    Pure acetylene and mixed Ar-acetylene clusters are formed in supersonic expansions of acetylene/argon mixtures and analysed using reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer with variable electron energy ionization source. Acetylene clusters composed of more than a hundred acetylene molecules are generated at the acetylene concentration of Almost-Equal-To 8%, while mixed species are produced at low concentrations ( Almost-Equal-To 0.7%). The electron energy dependence of the mass spectra revealed the ionization process mechanisms in clusters. The ionization above the threshold for acetylene molecule of 11.5 eV results in the main ionic fragment progression (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub n}{sup +}. At the electron energies Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 21.5 eV above the CH+CH{sup +} dissociative ionization limit of acetylene the fragment ions nominally labelled as (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub n}CH{sup +}, n Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 2, are observed. For n Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 7 these fragments correspond to covalently bound ionic structures as suggested by the observed strong dehydrogenation [(C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub n}-k Multiplication-Sign H]{sup +} and [(C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub n}CH -k Multiplication-Sign H]{sup +}. The dehydrogenation is significantly reduced in the mixed clusters where evaporation of Ar instead of hydrogen can stabilize the nascent molecular ion. The C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +} ion was previously assigned to originate from the benzene molecular ion; however, the low appearance energy of Almost-Equal-To 13.7 eV indicates that a less rigid covalently bound structure of C{sub 6}H{sub 6}{sup +} ion must also be formed upon the acetylene cluster electron ionization. The appearance energy of Ar{sub n}(C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sup +} fragments above Almost-Equal-To 15.1 eV indicates that the argon ionization is the first step in the fragment ion production, and the appearance energy of Ar{sub n{>=}2}(C{sub 2}H{sub 2}){sub m{>=}2}{sup +} at Almost-Equal-To 13

  13. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-01-01

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water. PMID:23389344

  14. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  15. Oxidative folding and reductive activities of EhPDI, a protein disulfide isomerase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Mares, Rosa E; Magaña, Paloma D; Meléndez-López, Samuel G; Licea, Alexei F; Cornejo-Bravo, José M; Ramos, Marco A

    2009-09-01

    PDI enzymes are oxidoreductases that catalyze oxidation, reduction and isomerization of disulfide bonds in polypeptide substrates. We have previously identified an E. histolytica PDI enzyme (EhPDI) that exhibits oxidase activity in vivo. However, little is known about the specific role of its redox-related structural features on the enzymatic activity. Here, we have studied the in vivo oxidative folding of EhPDI by mutagenic analysis and functional complementation assays as well as the in vitro oxidative folding and reductive activities by comparative kinetics using functional homologues in standard assays. We have found that the active-site cysteine residues of the functional domains (Trx-domains) are essential for catalysis of disulfide bond formation in polypeptides and proteins, such as the bacterial alkaline phosphatase. Furthermore, we have shown that the recombinant EhPDI enzyme has some typical properties of PDI enzymes: oxidase and reductase activities. These activities were comparable to those observed for other functional equivalents, such as bovine PDI or bacterial thioredoxin, under the same experimental conditions. These findings will be helpful for further studies intended to understand the physiological role of EhPDI.

  16. A General Method for Multimetallic Platinum Alloy Nanowires as Highly Active and Stable Oxygen Reduction Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Yao, Jianlin; Guo, Jun; Lu, Gang; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2015-11-25

    An unconventional class of high-performance Pt alloy multimetallic nanowires (NWs) is produced by a general method. The obtained PtNi NWs exhibit amazingly specific and mass oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities with improvement factors of 51.1 and 34.6 over commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively, and are also stable in ORR conditions, making them among the most efficient electrocatalysts for ORR.

  17. Flexible band gap tuning of hexagonal boron nitride sheets interconnected by acetylenic bonds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyu; Luo, Youhua; Feng, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Lixia; Zhang, Meng

    2015-08-21

    The energetic and electronic properties of acetylenic-bond-interconnected hexagonal boron nitride sheets (BNyne), in which the number of rows of BN hexagonal rings (denoted as BN width) between neighboring arrays of acetylenic linkages increases consecutively, have been explored using first-principles calculations. Depending on the spatial position of B/N atoms with respect to the acetylenic linkages, there are two different types of configurations. The band structure features and band gap evolutions of BNyne structures as a function of the BN width can be categorized into two families, corresponding to two distinct types of configurations. In particular, for both types of BNyne structures, the band gap variations exhibit odd-even oscillating behavior depending on the BN width, which is related to the different symmetries of acetylenic chains in the unit cell. These results suggest that the embedded linear acetylenic chains can provide more flexibility for manipulation of the atomic and electronic properties of hexagonal boron nitride. These sp-sp(2) hybrid structures might promise importantly potential applications for developing nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. PMID:26194068

  18. [Photodissociation of Acetylene and Acetone using Step-Scan Time-Resolved FTIR Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaren, Ian A.; Wrobel, Jacek D.

    1997-01-01

    The photodissociation of acetylene and acetone was investigated as a function of added quenching gas pressures using step-scan time-resolved FTIR emission spectroscopy. Its main components consist of Bruker IFS88, step-scan Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer coupled to a flow cell equipped with Welsh collection optics. Vibrationally excited C2H radicals were produced from the photodissociation of acetylene in the unfocused experiments. The infrared (IR) emission from these excited C2H radicals was investigated as a function of added argon pressure. Argon quenching rate constants for all C2H emission bands are of the order of 10(exp -13)cc/molecule.sec. Quenching of these radicals by acetylene is efficient, with a rate constant in the range of 10(exp -11) cc/molecule.sec. The relative intensity of the different C2H emission bands did not change with the increasing argon or acetylene pressure. However, the overall IR emission intensity decreased, for example, by more than 50% when the argon partial pressure was raised from 0.2 to 2 Torr at fixed precursor pressure of 160mTorr. These observations provide evidence for the formation of a metastable C2H2 species, which are collisionally quenched by argon or acetylene. Problems encountered in the course of the experimental work are also described.

  19. Infrared spectroscopy and Mie scattering of acetylene aerosols formed in a low temperature diffusion cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunder, T.; Miller, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming and spectroscopically characterizing cryogenic aerosols formed in a low temperature gas cell. By adjusting the cell pressure, gas composition and flow rate, the size distribution of aerosol particles can be varied over a wide range. The combination of pressure and flow rate determine the residence time of the aerosols in the cell and hence the time available for the particles to grow. FTIR spectroscopy, over the range from 600/cm to 6000/cm, is used to characterize the aerosols. The particle size distribution can be varied so that, at one extreme, the spectra show only absorption features associated with the infrared active vibrational bands and, at the other, they display both absorption and Mie scattering. In the latter case, Mie scattering theory is used to obtain semiquantitative aerosol size distributions, which can be understood in terms of the interplay between nucleation and condensation. In the case of acetylene aerosols, the infrared spectra suggest that the particles exist in the high temperature cubic phase of the solid.

  20. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm(-2)) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  1. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm-2) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  2. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm(-2)) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst. PMID:25229121

  3. Enhanced Activity of Nanocrystalline Zeolites for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah C. Larson; Vicki H. Grassian

    2006-12-31

    Nanocrystalline zeolites with discrete crystal sizes of less than 100 nm have different properties relative to zeolites with larger crystal sizes. Nanocrystalline zeolites have improved mass transfer properties and very large internal and external surface areas that can be exploited for many different applications. The additional external surface active sites and the improved mass transfer properties of nanocrystalline zeolites offer significant advantages for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysis with ammonia as a reductant in coal-fired power plants relative to current zeolite based SCR catalysts. Nanocrystalline NaY was synthesized with a crystal size of 15-20 nm and was thoroughly characterized using x-ray diffraction, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Copper ions were exchanged into nanocrystalline NaY to increase the catalytic activity. The reactions of nitrogen dioxides (NO{sub x}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) on nanocrystalline NaY and CuY were investigated using FT-IR spectroscopy. Significant conversion of NO{sub 2} was observed at room temperature in the presence of NH{sub 3} as monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy. Copper-exchanged nanocrystalline NaY was more active for NO{sub 2} reduction with NH{sub 3} relative to nanocrystalline NaY.

  4. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Sphaerotilus natans a filamentous micro-organism present in activated sludges.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, Alejandro H; Giannuzzi, Leda; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2008-08-15

    Wastewaters produced by various industries may contain undesirable amounts of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), as chromate and dichromate, a hazardous metal affecting flora and animals of aquatic ecosystems as well as human health. One removal strategy comprises the microbial reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), a less soluble chemical species that is less toxic than Cr(VI). In this work, the ability to reduce Cr(VI) of Sphaerotilus natans, a filamentous bacterium usually found in activated sludge systems, was evaluated. In aerobic conditions, S. natans was able to efficiently reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) from dichromate solutions ranging between 4.5 and 80 mg Cr(VI)l(-1) in the presence of a carbonaceous source. A simultaneous evaluation of the microbial respiratory activity inhibition was also carried out to analyze the toxic effect of Cr(VI). Cr(VI) reduction by S. natans was mathematically modeled; chromium(VI) reduction rate depended on both Cr(VI) concentration and active biomass concentration. Although it is known that S. natans removes heavy metal cations such as Cr(III) by biosorption, the ability of this micro-organism to reduce Cr(VI), which behaves as an oxyanion in aqueous solutions, is a novel finding. The distinctive capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) than remain soluble or precipitated becomes S. natans a potential micro-organism to decontaminate wastewaters.

  5. Catalytic Activity of Platinum Monolayer on Iridium and Rhenium Alloy Nanoparticles for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karan, Hiroko I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Kuttiyiel, Kurian; Farberow, Carrie A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2012-05-04

    A new type of electrocatalyst with a core–shell structure that consists of a platinum monolayer shell placed on an iridium–rhenium nanoparticle core or platinum and palladium bilayer shell deposited on that core has been prepared and tested for electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. Carbon-supported iridium–rhenium alloy nanoparticles with several different molar ratios of Ir to Re were prepared by reducing metal chlorides dispersed on Vulcan carbon with hydrogen gas at 400 °C for 1 h. These catalysts showed specific electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction comparable to that of platinum. The activities of PtML/PdML/Ir2Re1, PtML/Pd2layers/Ir2Re1, and PtML/Pd2layers/Ir7Re3 catalysts were, in fact, better than that of conventional platinum electrocatalysts, and their mass activities exceeded the 2015 DOE target. Our density functional theory calculations revealed that the molar ratio of Ir to Re affects the binding strength of adsorbed OH and, thereby, the O2 reduction activity of the catalysts. The maximum specific activity was found for an intermediate OH binding energy with the corresponding catalyst on the top of the volcano plot. The monolayer concept facilitates the use of much less platinum than in other approaches. Finally, the results with the PtML/PdML/Ir2Re electrocatalyst indicate that it is a promising alternative to conventional Pt electrocatalysts in low-temperature fuel cells.

  6. Ag–Fe2O3 nanocomposites with enhanced catalytic activity for reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shiben; Chen, Yingjie; Dong, Lifeng

    2016-07-01

    Hybrid nanostructures can be multifunctional and even possess enhanced properties. Ag–Fe2O3 nanocomposites and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were fabricated and applied to catalyze the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. Compared with Ag NPs, Ag–Fe2O3 nanocomposites demonstrated enhanced catalytic activities. Furthermore, due to their magnetic properties, Ag–Fe2O3 nanocomposites could be easily separated from the reaction mixture and recycled through an external magnetic field. These findings will help us design hybrid nanostructures with catalytic activity and explore other potential applications of magnetic nanocomposites.

  7. New stereoselective titanium reductive amination synthesis of 3-amino and polyaminosterol derivatives possessing antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Salmi, Chanaz; Loncle, Celine; Vidal, Nicolas; Letourneux, Yves; Brunel, Jean Michel

    2008-03-01

    A series of 3-amino and polyaminosterol analogues of squalamine and trodusquemine were synthesized involving a new stereoselective titanium reductive amination reaction in high chemical yields of up to 95% in numerous cases. These derivatives were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial properties against human pathogens. Activity was highly dependent on the different compounds' structures involved and best results have been obtained with aminosterol derivatives 4b, 4e and 6i exhibiting activities against yeasts, Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria at average concentrations of 6.25-12.5 microg/mL. PMID:17566609

  8. Hexagonal 2H-MoSe2 broad spectrum active photocatalyst for Cr(VI) reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Haipeng; Liu, Xinjuan; Liu, Baibai; Zhu, Guang; Lei, Wenyan; Du, Huigang; Liu, Junying; Li, Jianwei; Li, Can; Sun, Changqing

    2016-10-01

    To make full use of the solar energy, exploring broad spectrum active photocatalysts has become one of the core issues for photocatalysis. Here we report a novel hexagonal 2H-MoSe2 photocatalyst with ultraviolet (UV)-visible-near infrared (NIR) light response for the first time. The results indicate that the MoSe2 displays excellent photo-absorption and photocatalytic activity in the reduction of Cr(VI) under UV and visible even NIR light irradiation. MoSe2 synthesized at pH value of 2 achieves the highest Cr(VI) reduction rates of 99%, 91% and 100% under UV, visible and NIR light irradiation, respectively, which should be attributed to its comparatively higher light absorption, efficient charge separation and transfer as well as relatively large number of surface active sites. The excellent broad spectrum active photocatalytic activity makes the MoSe2 to be a promising photocatalyst for the effective utilization of solar energy.

  9. Vibratory Loads Reduction Testing of the NASA/Army/MIT Active Twist Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Matthew; Mirick, Paul H.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Langston, Chester W.; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Shin, SangJoon

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that controlled strain-induced blade twisting can be attained using piezoelectric active fiber composite technology, and that such advancement may provide a mechanism for reduced rotorcraft vibrations and increased rotor performance. In order to validate these findings experimentally, a cooperative effort between the NASA Langley Research Center, the Army Research Laboratory, and the MIT Active Materials and Structures Laboratory has been developed. As a result of this collaboration a four-bladed, aeroelastically-scaled, active-twist model rotor has been designed and fabricated for testing in the heavy gas test medium of the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Initial wind tunnel testing has been conducted to assess the impact of active blade twist on both fixed- and rotating-system vibratory loads in forward flight. The active twist control was found to have a pronounced effect on all system loads and was shown to generally offer reductions in fixed-system loads of 60% to 95%, depending upon flight condition, with 1.1 to 1.4 of dynamic blade twist observed. A summary of the systems developed and the vibratory loads reduction results obtained are presented in this paper.

  10. Enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activities by Pt nanoclusters decorated on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons

    DOE PAGES

    Sun-Mi Hwang; Choi, YongMan; Kim, Min Gyu; Sohn, Young-Jun; Cheon, Jae Yeong; Joo, Sang Hoon; Yim, Sung-Dae; Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Adzic, Radoslav R.; et al

    2016-03-08

    The high cost of Pt-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is a critical hurdle for the commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Recently, non-precious metal-based catalysts (NPMCs) have demonstrated much enhanced activity but their oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is still inferior to that of Pt-based catalysts resulting in a much thicker electrode in the MEA. For the reduction of mass transport and ohmic overpotential we adopted a new concept of catalyst that combines an ultra-low amount of Pt nanoclusters with metal–nitrogen (M–Nx) doped ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbon (FeCo–OMPC(L)). The 5 wt% Pt/FeCo–OMPC(L) showed a 2-fold enhancement in activities comparedmore » to a higher loading of Pt. Our experimental results supported by first-principles calculations indicate that a trace amount of Pt nanoclusters on FeCo–OMPC(L) significantly enhances the ORR activity due to their electronic effect as well as geometric effect from the reduced active sites. Finally, in terms of fuel cell commercialization, this class of catalysts is a promising candidate due to the limited use of Pt in the MEA.« less

  11. The Validation of an Active Control Intervention for Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR)

    PubMed Central

    MacCoon, Donal G.; Imel, Zac E.; Rosenkranz, Melissa A.; Sheftel, Jenna G.; Weng, Helen Y.; Sullivan, Jude C.; Bonus, Katherine A.; Stoney, Catherine M.; Salomons, Tim V.; Davidson, Richard J.; Lutz, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Most of the extant literature investigating the health effects of mindfulness interventions relies on wait-list control comparisons. The current article specifies and validates an active control condition, the Health Enhancement Program (HEP), thus providing the foundation necessary for rigorous investigations of the relative efficacy of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and for testing mindfulness as an active ingredient. 63 participants were randomized to either MBSR (n=31) or HEP (n=32). Compared to HEP, MBSR led to reductions in thermal pain ratings in the mindfulness- but not the HEP-related instruction condition (η2=.18). There were significant improvements over time for general distress (η2=.09), anxiety (η2=.08), hostility (η2=.07), and medical symptoms (η2=.14), but no effects of intervention. Practice was not related to change. HEP is an active control condition for MBSR while remaining inert to mindfulness. These claims are supported by results from a pain task. Participant-reported outcomes (PROs) replicate previous improvements to well-being in MBSR, but indicate that MBSR is no more effective than a rigorous active control in improving these indices. These results emphasize the importance of using an active control condition like HEP in studies evaluating the effectiveness of MBSR. PMID:22137364

  12. An ene reductase from Clavispora lusitaniae for asymmetric reduction of activated alkenes.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan; Yu, Hui-Lei; Lin, Guo-Qiang; Xu, Jian-He

    2014-03-01

    A putative ene reductase gene from Clavispora lusitaniae was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the encoded protein (ClER) was purified and characterized for its biocatalytic properties. This NADPH-dependent flavoprotein was identified with reduction activities toward a diverse range of activated alkenes including conjugated enones, enals, maleimide derivative and α,β-unsaturated carboxylic esters. The purified ClER exhibited a relatively high activity of 7.3 U mg(prot)⁻¹ for ketoisophorone while a remarkable catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)=810 s⁻¹ mM⁻¹) was obtained for 2-methyl-cinnamaldehyde due to the high affinity. A series of prochiral activated alkenes were stereoselectively reduced by ClER furnishing the corresponding saturated products in up to 99% ee. The practical applicability of ClER was further evaluated for the production of (R)-levodione, a valuable chiral compound, from ketoisophorone. Using the crude enzyme of ClER and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH), 500 mM of ketoisophorone was efficiently converted to (R)-levodione with excellent stereoselectivity (98% ee) within 1h. All these positive features demonstrate a high synthetic potential of ClER in the asymmetric reduction of activated alkenes. PMID:24564901

  13. Enhancing Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene by Active Sites Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Leiyu; Yang, Lanqin; Huang, Zujing; Luo, Jingyang; Li, Mu; Wang, Dongbo; Chen, Yinguang

    2013-01-01

    The shortage of nitrogen active sites and relatively low nitrogen content result in unsatisfying eletrocatalytic activity and durability of nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here we report a novel approach to substantially enhance electrocatalytic oxygen reduction on NG electrode by the implantation of nitrogen active sites with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4). Electrochemical characterization revealed that in neutral electrolyte the resulting NG (I-NG) exhibited super electrocatalytic activity (completely 100% of four-electron ORR pathway) and durability (nearly no activity change after 100000 potential cyclings). When I-NG was used as cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), power density and its drop percentage were also much better than the NG and Pt/C ones, demonstrating that the current I-NG was a perfect alternative to Pt/C and offered a new potential for constructing high-performance and less expensive cathode which is crucial for large-scale application of MFC technology. PMID:24264379

  14. The validation of an active control intervention for Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR).

    PubMed

    MacCoon, Donal G; Imel, Zac E; Rosenkranz, Melissa A; Sheftel, Jenna G; Weng, Helen Y; Sullivan, Jude C; Bonus, Katherine A; Stoney, Catherine M; Salomons, Tim V; Davidson, Richard J; Lutz, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Most of the extant literature investigating the health effects of mindfulness interventions relies on wait-list control comparisons. The current article specifies and validates an active control condition, the Health Enhancement Program (HEP), thus providing the foundation necessary for rigorous investigations of the relative efficacy of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and for testing mindfulness as an active ingredient. 63 participants were randomized to either MBSR (n = 31) or HEP (n = 32). Compared to HEP, MBSR led to reductions in thermal pain ratings in the mindfulness- but not the HEP-related instruction condition (η(2) = .18). There were significant improvements over time for general distress (η(2) = .09), anxiety (η(2) = .08), hostility (η(2) = .07), and medical symptoms (η(2) = .14), but no effects of intervention. Practice was not related to change. HEP is an active control condition for MBSR while remaining inert to mindfulness. These claims are supported by results from a pain task. Participant-reported outcomes (PROs) replicate previous improvements to well-being in MBSR, but indicate that MBSR is no more effective than a rigorous active control in improving these indices. These results emphasize the importance of using an active control condition like HEP in studies evaluating the effectiveness of MBSR.

  15. Enhancing Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene by Active Sites Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Leiyu; Yang, Lanqin; Huang, Zujing; Luo, Jingyang; Li, Mu; Wang, Dongbo; Chen, Yinguang

    2013-11-01

    The shortage of nitrogen active sites and relatively low nitrogen content result in unsatisfying eletrocatalytic activity and durability of nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here we report a novel approach to substantially enhance electrocatalytic oxygen reduction on NG electrode by the implantation of nitrogen active sites with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4). Electrochemical characterization revealed that in neutral electrolyte the resulting NG (I-NG) exhibited super electrocatalytic activity (completely 100% of four-electron ORR pathway) and durability (nearly no activity change after 100000 potential cyclings). When I-NG was used as cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), power density and its drop percentage were also much better than the NG and Pt/C ones, demonstrating that the current I-NG was a perfect alternative to Pt/C and offered a new potential for constructing high-performance and less expensive cathode which is crucial for large-scale application of MFC technology.

  16. Hexagonal 2H-MoSe2 broad spectrum active photocatalyst for Cr(VI) reduction

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Haipeng; Liu, Xinjuan; Liu, Baibai; Zhu, Guang; Lei, Wenyan; Du, Huigang; Liu, Junying; Li, Jianwei; Li, Can; Sun, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    To make full use of the solar energy, exploring broad spectrum active photocatalysts has become one of the core issues for photocatalysis. Here we report a novel hexagonal 2H-MoSe2 photocatalyst with ultraviolet (UV)-visible-near infrared (NIR) light response for the first time. The results indicate that the MoSe2 displays excellent photo-absorption and photocatalytic activity in the reduction of Cr(VI) under UV and visible even NIR light irradiation. MoSe2 synthesized at pH value of 2 achieves the highest Cr(VI) reduction rates of 99%, 91% and 100% under UV, visible and NIR light irradiation, respectively, which should be attributed to its comparatively higher light absorption, efficient charge separation and transfer as well as relatively large number of surface active sites. The excellent broad spectrum active photocatalytic activity makes the MoSe2 to be a promising photocatalyst for the effective utilization of solar energy. PMID:27734974

  17. Worldwide activities on the reduction of occupational exposure at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1988-06-01

    This report is based on analysis of an informational data base set up at the Brookhaven National Laboratory ALARA Center. It is part of a project sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor and evaluate research on dose reduction at nuclear power plants in the US and abroad. The main benefits to be expected from reducing occupational exposures are highlighted in the report, the chief causes of elevated doses are identified, and effective approaches to minimize radiation exposures are proposed. A wide range of research activity is covered, including plant chemistry, cobalt reduction techniques, stress corrosion cracking, decontamination, remote tools and devices, and robotics. Advanced reactors, which are designed for low radiation exposures, are examined, and health physics technology programs which have been effective in reducing occupational exposure at various utilities are discussed. The highlights of the programs on dose reduction conducted by a number of countries are described, and comparisons are made of the collective occupational radiation dose equivalents for selected countries. The short and long term trends such studies are pointing to are evaluated. It is concluded that the efforts to improve dose reduction, both in the US and abroad, remain in a healthy state but require continuing encouragement and further development.

  18. Pd-Pt Bimetallic Nanodendrites with High Activity for Oxygen Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, B.; Tao, J.; Jiang, M.; Camargo, P.H.C.; Cho, E.C.; Lu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Xia, Y.

    2009-06-05

    Controlling the morphology of Pt nanostructures can provide a great opportunity to improve their catalytic properties and increase their activity on a mass basis. We synthesized Pd-Pt bimetallic nanodendrites consisting of a dense array of Pt branches on a Pd core by reducing K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4} with L-ascorbic acid in the presence of uniform Pd nanocrystal seeds in an aqueous solution. The Pt branches supported on faceted Pd nanocrystals exhibited relatively large surface areas and particularly active facets toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the rate-determining step in a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell. The Pd-Pt nanodendrites were two and a half times more active on the basis of equivalent Pt mass for the ORR than the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst and five times more active than the first-generation supportless Pt-black catalyst.

  19. Deactivation mechanisms for Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} acetylene hydrogenation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.B.; Huggins, B.J.; Meyers, B.L.; Kaminsky, M.P.

    1994-12-31

    The selective hydrogenation of acetylenic impurities to ethylene is a crucial purification step in the production of olefins by steam cracking. This hydrogenation is done catalytically using a Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst in a fixed bed reactor. The designed lifetime of the catalyst in a front end acetylene converter is about 4 years. Accelerated catalyst deactivation and thermal runaways caused by loss in catalyst selectivity are common problems which plague acetylene converters. Such problems result in unscheduled shutdowns and increased costs to replace deactivated catalyst. This presentation outlines several deactivation mechanisms of the catalyst and discusses how they affect catalyst lifetime and performance. Catalyst characterization using electron microscopy and CO chemisorption provides information on how poisons deteriorate the catalyst and Pd particle size changes produced by use and regeneration. Thermal gravimetric analysis was also used to determine the extent of coke burn-off using less severe regeneration procedures.

  20. Quantum Dynamics of Vinylidene Photodetachment on an Accurate Global Acetylene-Vinylidene Potential Energy Surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lifen; Han, Huixian; Ma, Jianyi; Guo, Hua

    2015-08-01

    Vinylidene is a high-energy isomer of acetylene, and the rearrangement of bonds in the two species serves as a prototype for isomerization reactions. Here, a full-dimensional quantum mechanical study of the vinylidene vibration is carried out on a recently developed global acetylene-vinylidene potential energy surface by simulating the photodetachment dynamics of the vinylidene anion. Several low-lying vibrational levels of the anion were first determined on a new ab initio based potential energy surface, and their photoelectron spectra were obtained within the Condon approximation. The vibrational features of the vinylidene isomer are found to agree well with the experiment in both positions and intensities, validating the global acetylene-vinylidene potential energy surface.

  1. Electronic properties and strain sensitivity of CVD-grown graphene with acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Sasaki, Shinichirou; Ohnishi, Masato; Suzuki, Ken; Miura, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    Although many studies have shown that large-area monolayer graphene can be formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using methane gas, the growth of monolayer graphene using highly reactive acetylene gas remains a big challenge. In this study, we synthesized a uniform monolayer graphene film by low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) with acetylene gas. On the base of Raman spectroscopy measurements, it was found that up to 95% of the as-grown graphene is monolayer. The electronic properties and strain sensitivity of the LPCVD-grown graphene with acetylene were also evaluated by testing the fabricated field-effect transistors (FETs) and strain sensors. The derived carrier mobility and gauge factor are 862-1150 cm2/(V·s) and 3.4, respectively, revealing the potential for high-speed FETs and strain sensor applications. We also investigated the relationship between the electronic properties and the graphene domain size.

  2. Enhancement of sludge reduction and methane production by removing extracellular polymeric substances from waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Tuan; Mohd Yasin, Nazlina Haiza; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Maeda, Toshinari

    2014-12-01

    The management of waste activated sludge (WAS) recycling is a concern that affects the development of the future low-carbon society, particularly sludge reduction and biomass utilization. In this study, we investigated the effect of removing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which play important roles in the adhesion and flocculation of WAS, on increased sludge disintegration, thereby enhancing sludge reduction and methane production by anaerobic digestion. EPS removal from WAS by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) significantly enhanced sludge reduction, i.e., 49 ± 5% compared with 27 ± 1% of the control at the end the digestion process. Methane production was also improved in WAS without EPS by 8881 ± 109 CH4 μmol g(-1) dry-weight of sludge. Microbial activity was determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time polymerase chain reaction, which showed that the hydrolysis and acetogenesis stages were enhanced by pretreatment with 2% EDTA, with a larger methanogenic community and better methane production. PMID:25277968

  3. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  4. Reduction and mutagenic activation of nitroaromatic compounds by a Mycobacterium sp.

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, F; Selby, A L; Newton, R K; Cerniglia, C E

    1994-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain Pyr-1 cells, which were grown to the stationary phase in media with and without pyrene, were centrifuged and resuspended in a medium containing 1-nitropyrene. Cells that had been grown with pyrene oxidized up to 20% of the added 1-nitropyrene to 1-nitropyrene-cis-9,10- and 4,5-dihydrodiols. However, cells that had been grown without pyrene reduced up to 70% of the 1-nitropyrene to 1-aminopyrene but did not produce dihydrodiols. The nitroreductase activity was oxygen insensitive, intracellular, and inducible by nitro compounds. Nitroreductase activity was inhibited by p-chlorobenzoic acid, o-iodosobenzoic acid, menadione, dicumarol, and antimycin A. Extracts from cells that had been grown without pyrene activated 1-nitropyrene, 1-amino-7-nitrofluorene, 2,7-dinitro-9-fluorenone, 1,3-dinitropyrene, 1,6-dinitropyrene, and 6-nitrochrysene to DNA-damaging products, as shown in Salmonella typhimurium tester strains by the reversion assay and by induction of the umuC gene. Activation of nitro compounds, as shown by the umu test, was enhanced by NADPH. This study shows that Mycobacterium sp. strain Pyr-1 metabolizes nitroaromatic compounds by both oxidative and reductive pathways. During reduction, it generates products that are mutagenic. PMID:7811065

  5. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-09-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank.

  6. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank. PMID:26350761

  7. Visible-light-driven CO2 reduction with carbon nitride: enhancing the activity of ruthenium catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kuriki, Ryo; Sekizawa, Keita; Ishitani, Osamu; Maeda, Kazuhiko

    2015-02-16

    A heterogeneous photocatalyst system that consists of a ruthenium complex and carbon nitride (C3N4), which act as the catalytic and light-harvesting units, respectively, was developed for the reduction of CO2 into formic acid. Promoting the injection of electrons from C3N4 into the ruthenium unit as well as strengthening the electronic interactions between the two units enhanced its activity. The use of a suitable solvent further improved the performance, resulting in a turnover number of greater than 1000 and an apparent quantum yield of 5.7% at 400 nm. These are the best values that have been reported for heterogeneous photocatalysts for CO2 reduction under visible-light irradiation to date.

  8. Heats of Formation of Triplet Ethylene, Ethylidene, and Acetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.T.; Matus, M.H.; Lester Jr, W.A.; Dixon, David A.

    2007-06-28

    Heats of formation of the lowest triplet state of ethylene and the ground triplet state of ethylidene have been predicted by high level electronic structure calculations. Total atomization energies obtained from coupled-cluster CCSD(T) energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit using correlation consistent basis sets (CBS), plus additional corrections predict the following heats of formation in kcal/mol: Delta H0f(C2H4,3A1) = 80.1 at 0 K and 78.5 at 298 K, and Delta H0f(CH3CH,3A") = 86.8 at 0 K and 85.1 at 298 K, with an error of less than +-1.0 kcal/mol. The vertical and adiabatic singlet-triplet separation energies of ethylene were calculated as Delta ES-T,vert = 104.1 and Delta ES-T,adia = 65.8 kcal/mol. These results are in excellent agreement with recent quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) values of 103.5 +- 0.3 and 66.4 +- 0.3 kcal/mol. Both sets of computational values differ from the experimental estimate of 58 +- 3 kcal/mol for the adiabatic splitting. The computed singlet-triplet gap at 0 K for acetylene is Delta ES-T,adia(C2H2) = 90.5 kcal/mol, which is in notable disagreement with the experimental value of 82.6 kcal/mol. The heat of formation of the triplet is Delta H0f(C2H2,3B2) = 145.3 kcal/mol. There is a systematic underestimation of the singlet-triplet gaps in recent photodecomposition experiments by ~;;7 to 8 kcal/mol. For vinylidene, we predict Delta H0f(H2CC,1A1) = 98.8 kcal/mol at 298 K (exptl. 100.3 +- 4.0), Delta H0f(H2CC,3B2) = 146.2 at 298 K, and an energy gap Delta ES-T-adia(H2CC) = 47.7 kcal/mol.

  9. Drag and lift reduction of a 3D bluff-body using active vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aider, Jean-Luc; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    In this study, a passive flow control experiment on a 3D bluff-body using vortex generators (VGs) is presented. The bluff-body is a modified Ahmed body (Ahmed in J Fluids Eng 105:429-434 1983) with a curved rear part, instead of a slanted one, so that the location of the flow separation is no longer forced by the geometry. The influence of a line of non-conventional trapezoïdal VGs on the aerodynamic forces (drag and lift) induced on the bluff-body is investigated. The high sensitivity to many geometric (angle between the trapezoïdal element and the wall, spanwise spacing between the VGs, longitudinal location on the curved surface) and physical (freestream velocity) parameters is clearly demonstrated. The maximum drag reduction is -12%, while the maximum global lift reduction can reach more than -60%, with a strong dependency on the freestream velocity. For some configurations, the lift on the rear axle of the model can be inverted (-104%). It is also shown that the VGs are still efficient even downstream of the natural separation line. Finally, a dynamic parameter is chosen and a new set-up with motorized vortex generators is proposed. Thanks to this active device. The optimal configurations depending on two parameters are found more easily, and a significant drag and lift reduction (up to -14% drag reduction) can be reached for different freestream velocities. These results are then analyzed through wall pressure and velocity measurements in the near-wake of the bluff-body with and without control. It appears that the largest drag and lift reduction is clearly associated to a strong increase of the size of the recirculation bubble over the rear slant. Investigation of the velocity field in a cross-section downstream the model reveals that, in the same time, the intensity of the longitudinal trailing vortices is strongly reduced, suggesting that the drag reduction is due to the breakdown of the balance between the separation bubble and the longitudinal vortices

  10. Simulations of shock-induced mixing& combustion of an acetylene cloud in a chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J B; Day, M S; Beckner, V E; Kuhl, A L; Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H

    2001-02-06

    In this paper we present numerical simulations of the interaction of a blast wave with an acetylene bubble in a closed chamber. We model the system using the inviscid Euler equations for a mixture of ideal gases. The formulation specifies the thermodynamic behavior of the system using a Chemkin interface and includes the capability to model combustion as the ambient air mixes with the acetylene. The simulations are performed using a three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement algorithm based on a second-order Godunov integration scheme. Simulations are compared with experimental measurements for the same configuration.

  11. Synthesis of micro- and nanodiamonds by the method of oxy- acetylene combustion flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabitov, S.; Mansurov, B.; Medyanova, B.; Partizan, G.; Koshanova, A.; Merkibayev, Ye; Mansurova, M.; Lesbayev, B.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents the results of experiments on synthesis of micro- and nanodiamonds by the method of oxy-acetylene torch on the surface of pre-deposited copper thin films. The influence of the thickness of the buffer copper film and the concentration ratio of oxygen and acetylene on the structure formation of the deposited samples was investigated during performed experiments. Studies by Raman scattering and scanning electron microscopy showed that the synthesis of micro- and nano-diamonds occurs under certain experimental conditions.

  12. Acetylene- and Phenylacetylene-Terminated Poly(Arylene Ether Benzimidazole)s (PAEBI's)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Polymers prepared by first synthesizing polymers terminated with hydroxy groups, then reacting them with either 4-ethynylbenzoyl chloride or 4-fluoro-4'-phenylethynylbenzophenone. Endcapped polymers thermally cured to yield materials with attractive combination of properties. Cured acetylene-and phenylacetylene-terminated PAEBI's exhibit higher glass-transition temperatures and better retention of mechanical properties at high temperatures. Cured acetylene- and phenylacetylene-terminated polymers exhibit excellent adhesion to copper foil and polyimide film. Potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, composite matrices, fibers, films, membranes, and moldings.

  13. Application of an oxygen-shielded air-acetylene flame to atomic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stephens, R

    1973-08-01

    A burner has been designed which provides an oxygen-shielded air-acetylene flame for atomic-absorption work. The chemical reducing properties of the oxygen-shielded flame operated under fuel-rich conditions are enhanced by the higher C: O ratio obtainable in the flame and by the higher flame temperature just above the reaction zone. The flame is inherently essentially free from the risk of flashback, and is offered as an alternative to the nitrous oxide-acetylene flame for use with certain types of equipment and for particular applications.

  14. Indenyl effect due to metal slippage? Computational exploration of rhodium-catalyzed acetylene [2+2+2] cyclotrimerization.

    PubMed

    Orian, Laura; Swart, Marcel; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2014-01-13

    The mechanism of CpRh (Cp=cyclopentadienyl) and IndRh (Ind=indenyl)-catalyzed acetylene [2+2+2] cyclotrimerization has been revisited aiming at finding an explanation for the better performance of the latter catalyst found experimentally. The hypothesis that an ancillary ligand of the precatalyst remains bonded to the metal center throughout the whole catalytic cycle, based on the experimental evidence that the nature of this ligand can exert some control in cocyclotrimerization of different alkynes, is considered. Strong hapticity variations occur in both the CpRh- and IndRh-catalyzed processes. As the Ind ligand undergoes a more facile slippage than Cp, the energy profile is far smoother in the IndRh-catalyzed cyclotrimerization. This difference in the energetics of the process translates into an enhanced activity of the IndRh catalyst, in nice agreement with experiment. PMID:24273097

  15. Elucidating the activity of stepped Pt single crystals for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Bandarenka, Aliaksandr S; Hansen, Heine A; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan E L

    2014-07-21

    The unexpectedly high measured activity of Pt[n(111) × (111)] and Pt[n(111) × (100)] stepped single crystal surfaces towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is explained utilizing the hydroxyl binding energy as the activity descriptor. Using this descriptor (estimated using experimental data obtained by different groups), a well-defined Sabatier-type volcano is observed for the activities measured for the Pt[n(111) × (111)] and Pt[n(111) × (100)] stepped single crystals, in remarkable agreement with earlier theoretical studies. We propose that the observed destabilisation of *OH species at these surfaces is due to the decreased solvation of the adsorbed hydroxyl intermediates on adjacent terrace sites. PMID:24643715

  16. Palladium–platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T.; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2015-07-02

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can be attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. Ultimately, these results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability.

  17. Thermal Noise Reduction of Mechanical Oscillators by Actively Controlled External Dissipative Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shoudan; Medich, David; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Sheng, Sitong; Yuan, Jian-Yang; Shao, Zhifeng

    1999-01-01

    We show that the thermal fluctuations of very soft mechanical oscillators, such as the cantilever in an atomic force microscope (AFM), can be reduced without changing the stiffness of the spring or having to lower the environment temperature. We derive a theoretical relationship between the thermal fluctuations of an oscillator and an actively external-dissipative force. This relationship is verified by experiments with an AFM cantilever where the external active force is coupled through a magnetic field. With simple instrumentation, we have reduced the thermal noise amplitude of the cantilever by a factor of 3.4, achieving an apparent temperature of 25 K with the environment at 295K. This active noise reduction approach can significantly improve the accuracy of static position or static force measurements in a number of practical applications.

  18. Oxygen reduction activity of N-doped carbon-based films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakoda, Teruyuki; Yamamoto, Shunya; Kawaguchi, Kazuhiro; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Yoshikawa, Masahito

    2010-12-01

    Carbon-based films with nitrogen species on their surface were prepared on a glassy carbon (GC) substrate for application as a non-platinum cathode catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Cobalt and carbon were deposited in the presence of N 2 gas using a pulsed laser deposition method and then the metal Co was removed by HCl-washing treatment. Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity was electrochemically determined using a rotating disk electrode system in which the film samples on the GC substrate were replaceable. The ORR activity increased with the temperature of the GC substrate during deposition. A carbon-based film prepared at 600 °C in the presence of N 2 at 66.7 Pa showed the highest ORR activity among the tested samples (0.66 V vs. NHE). This film was composed of amorphous carbons doped with pyridine type nitrogen atoms on its surface.

  19. Controlled reduction of red mud waste to produce active systems for environmental applications: heterogeneous Fenton reaction and reduction of Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Costa, Regina C C; Moura, Flávia C C; Oliveira, Patrícia E F; Magalhães, Fabiano; Ardisson, José D; Lago, Rochel M

    2010-02-01

    In this work, controlled reduction of red mud with H(2) was used to produce active systems for two different environmental applications, i.e. the heterogeneous Fenton reaction and the reduction of Cr(VI). Mössbauer, powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analyses and scanning electron microscopy analyses showed that at different temperatures, i.e. 300, 400, 500 and 600 degrees C, H(2) reduces red mud to different phases, mainly Fe(3)O(4), Fe(0)/Fe(3)O(4) and Fe(0). These Fe phases are dispersed on Al, Si and Ti oxides present in the red mud and show high reactivity towards two environmental applications, i.e. the heterogeneous Fenton reaction and the reduction of Cr(VI). Reduction with H(2) at 400 degrees C showed the best results for the oxidation of the model dye methylene blue with H(2)O(2) at neutral pH due to the presence of the composite Fe(0)/Fe(3)O(4). The reduced red mud at 500-600 degrees C produced Fe(0) highly active for the reduction of Cr(VI) in aqueous medium. Another feature of these red mud based system is that after deactivation due to extensive use they can be completely regenerated by simple treatment with H(2).

  20. Reduction of Urease Activity by Interaction with the Flap Covering the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Macomber, Lee; Minkara, Mona S.; Hausinger, Robert P.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing appreciation for the human microbiome coupled with the global rise of antibiotic resistant organisms, it is imperative that new methods be developed to specifically target pathogens. To that end, a novel computational approach was devised to identify compounds that reduce the activity of urease, a medically important enzyme of Helicobacter pylori, Proteus mirabilis, and many other microorganisms. Urease contains a flexible loop that covers its active site; Glide was used to identify small molecules predicted to lock this loop in an open conformation. These compounds were screened against the model urease from Klebsiella aerogenes and the natural products epigallocatechin and quercetin were shown to inhibit at low and high micromolar concentrations, respectively. These molecules exhibit a strong time-dependent inactivation of urease that was not due to their oxygen sensitivity. Rather, these compounds appear to inactivate urease by reacting with a specific Cys residue located on the flexible loop. Substitution of this cysteine by alanine in the C319A variant increased the urease resistance to both epigallocatechin and quercetin, as predicted by the computational studies. Protein dynamics are integral to the function of many enzymes; thus, identification of compounds that lock an enzyme into a single conformation presents a useful approach to define potential inhibitors. PMID:25594724

  1. Impact of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity for Platinum Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Wang, H.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-30

    The impact of model membrane degradation compounds on the relevant electrochemical parameters for the oxygen reduction reaction (i.e. electrochemical surface area and catalytic activity), was studied for both polycrystalline Pt and carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts. Model compounds, representing previously published, experimentally determined polymer electrolyte membrane degradation products, were in the form of perfluorinated organic acids that contained combinations of carboxylic and/or sulfonic acid functionality. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids of carbon chain length C1 – C6 were found to have an impact on electrochemical surface area (ECA). The longest chain length acid also hindered the observed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance, resulting in a 17% loss in kinetic current (determined at 0.9 V). Model compounds containing sulfonic acid functional groups alone did not show an effect on Pt ECA or ORR activity. Lastly, greater than a 44% loss in ORR activity at 0.9V was observed for diacid model compounds DA-Naf (perfluoro(2-methyl-3-oxa-5-sulfonic pentanoic) acid) and DA-3M (perfluoro(4-sulfonic butanoic) acid), which contained both sulfonic and carboxylic acid functionalities.

  2. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  3. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-10

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  4. Enhanced photocatalytic CO₂-reduction activity of electrospun mesoporous TiO₂ nanofibers by solvothermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Fu, Junwei; Cao, Shaowen; Yu, Jiaguo; Low, Jingxiang; Lei, Yongpeng

    2014-06-28

    Photocatalytic reduction of CO2 into renewable hydrocarbon fuels using semiconductor photocatalysts is considered as a potential solution to the energy deficiency and greenhouse effect. In this work, mesoporous TiO2 nanofibers with high specific surface areas and abundant surface hydroxyl groups are prepared using an electrospinning strategy combined with a subsequent calcination process, followed by a solvothermal treatment. The solvothermally treated mesoporous TiO2 nanofibers exhibit excellent photocatalytic performance on CO2 reduction into hydrocarbon fuels. The significantly improved photocatalytic activity can be attributed to the enhanced CO2 adsorption capacity and the improved charge separation after solvothermal treatment. The highest activity is achieved for the sample with a 2-h solvothermal treatment, showing 6- and 25-fold higher CH4 production rate than those of TiO2 nanofibers without solvothermal treatment and P25, respectively. This work may also provide a prototype for studying the effect of solvothermal treatment on the structure and photocatalytic activity of semiconductor photocatalysts. PMID:24809306

  5. Activity reductions in perirhinal cortex predict conceptual priming and familiarity-based recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-chun; Ranganath, Charan; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    Although it is well established that regions in the medial temporal lobes are critical for explicit memory, recent work has suggested that one medial temporal lobe subregion – the perirhinal cortex (PRC) – may also support conceptual priming, a form of implicit memory. Here, we sought to investigate whether activity reductions in PRC, previously linked to familiarity-based recognition, might also support conceptual implicit memory retrieval. Using a free association priming task, the current study tested the prediction that PRC indexes conceptual priming independent of contributions from perceptual and response repetition. Participants first completed an incidental semantic encoding task outside of the MRI scanner. Next, they were scanned during performance of a free association priming task, followed by a recognition memory test. Results indicated successful conceptual priming was associated with decreased PRC activity, and that an overlapping region within the PRC also exhibited activity reductions that covaried with familiarity during the recognition memory test. Our results demonstrate that the PRC contributes to both conceptual priming and familiarity-based recognition, which may reflect a common role of this region in implicit and explicit memory retrieval. PMID:24157537

  6. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  7. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal–nitrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon–nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  8. Impact of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity for Platinum Electrocatalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Wang, H.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-30

    The impact of model membrane degradation compounds on the relevant electrochemical parameters for the oxygen reduction reaction (i.e. electrochemical surface area and catalytic activity), was studied for both polycrystalline Pt and carbon supported Pt electrocatalysts. Model compounds, representing previously published, experimentally determined polymer electrolyte membrane degradation products, were in the form of perfluorinated organic acids that contained combinations of carboxylic and/or sulfonic acid functionality. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids of carbon chain length C1 – C6 were found to have an impact on electrochemical surface area (ECA). The longest chain length acid also hindered the observed oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performance, resultingmore » in a 17% loss in kinetic current (determined at 0.9 V). Model compounds containing sulfonic acid functional groups alone did not show an effect on Pt ECA or ORR activity. Lastly, greater than a 44% loss in ORR activity at 0.9V was observed for diacid model compounds DA-Naf (perfluoro(2-methyl-3-oxa-5-sulfonic pentanoic) acid) and DA-3M (perfluoro(4-sulfonic butanoic) acid), which contained both sulfonic and carboxylic acid functionalities.« less

  9. Activity reductions in perirhinal cortex predict conceptual priming and familiarity-based recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Chun; Ranganath, Charan; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well established that regions in the medial temporal lobes are critical for explicit memory, recent work has suggested that one medial temporal lobe subregion--the perirhinal cortex (PRC)--may also support conceptual priming, a form of implicit memory. Here, we sought to investigate whether activity reductions in PRC, previously linked to familiarity-based recognition, might also support conceptual implicit memory retrieval. Using a free association priming task, the current study tested the prediction that PRC indexes conceptual priming independent of contributions from perceptual and response repetition. Participants first completed an incidental semantic encoding task outside of the MRI scanner. Next, they were scanned during performance of a free association priming task, followed by a recognition memory test. Results indicated successful conceptual priming was associated with decreased PRC activity, and that an overlapping region within the PRC also exhibited activity reductions that covaried with familiarity during the recognition memory test. Our results demonstrate that the PRC contributes to both conceptual priming and familiarity-based recognition, which may reflect a common role of this region in implicit and explicit memory retrieval.

  10. Near-infrared spectra of liquid/solid acetylene under Titan relevant conditions and implications for Cassini/VIMS detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Cornet, T.; Chevrier, V. F.; Combe, J.-Ph.; McCord, T. B.; Roe, L. A.; Le Mouélic, S.; Le Menn, E.; Wasiak, F. C.

    2016-05-01

    Acetylene is thought to be abundant on Titan according to most photochemical models. While detected in the atmosphere, its likely presence at the surface still lacks physical evidence. It is thought that solid acetylene could be a major component of Titan's lakes shorelines and dry lakebed, detected as the 5 μm-bright deposits with the Cassini/VIMS instrument. Acetylene could also be present under its liquid form as dissolved solids in Titan's methane-ethane lakes, as emphasized by thermodynamics studies. This paper is devoted to the near-infrared spectroscopy study of acetylene under solid and liquid phases between 1 and 2.2 μm, synthesized in a Titan simulation chamber that is able to reproduce extreme temperature conditions. From experiments, we observed a ∼10% albedo increase between liquid acetylene at 193-188 K and solid acetylene at 93 K. Using the NIR spectroscopy technique we successfully calculated the reflectivity ratio of solid/liquid acetylene as 1.13. The second difference we observed between liquid and solid acetylene is a shift in the major absorption band detected at 1.54 μm, the shift of ∼0.01 μm occurring toward higher wavelength. In order to assess the detectability of acetylene on Titan using the Cassini/VIMS instrument, we adapted our spectra to the VIMS spectral resolution. The spectral band at 1.55 μm and a negative slope at 2.0 μm falls in the Cassini/VIMS atmospheric windows over several VIMS infrared spectels, thus Cassini/VIMS should be able to detect acetylene.

  11. An active-shield method for the reduction of surface contamination in CUORE

    SciTech Connect

    Pedretti, M.; Foggetta, L.; Giuliani, A.; Salvioni, C.; Sangiorgio, S.; Alessandria, F.; Ardito, R.; Arnaboldi, C.; Brofferio, C.; Capelli, S.; Carbone, L.; Clemenza, M.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E.; Nones, C.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Pessina, G.

    2007-03-28

    The main goal of the CUORE experiment is to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 130Te. As it is a rare nuclear decay, the sensitivity of the experiment strongly depends on the background level in the transition energy region. In this paper we describe the R and D work performed to develop an active method for the reduction of radioactive background in CUORE. The idea is to reject events originated by surface contamination in large mass bolometric detectors by using bolometers sensitive to surface events. Results obtained with the first prototypes and tests made with large mass surface sensitive bolometers will be reported.

  12. An ultrastable bimetallic carbide as platinum electrocatalyst support for highly active oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zaoxue; Zhang, Mingmei; Xie, Jimin; Shen, Pei Kang

    2015-11-01

    Stable bimetallic carbide (Fe2MoC) with graphitized carbon (GC) as matrix has been synthesized through an ion-exchange method. The Pt nanoparticles are loaded on the GC-Fe2MoC composite to form Pt/GC-Fe2MoC electrocatalyst which shows much higher activity and stability than those of commercial Pt/C for oxygen reduction reaction in acidic media. The excellent performances of Pt/GC-Fe2MoC are mainly due to the inherent stability of GC-Fe2MoC and the promotion effect between Fe2MoC and Pt.

  13. Hybrid feedforward-feedback active noise reduction for hearing protection and communication.

    PubMed

    Ray, Laura R; Solbeck, Jason A; Streeter, Alexander D; Collier, Robert D

    2006-10-01

    A hybrid active noise reduction (ANR) architecture is presented and validated for a circumaural earcup and a communication earplug. The hybrid system combines source-independent feedback ANR with a Lyapunov-tuned leaky LMS filter (LyLMS) improving gain stability margins over feedforward ANR alone. In flat plate testing, the earcup demonstrates an overall C-weighted total noise reduction of 40 dB and 30-32 dB, respectively, for 50-800 Hz sum-of-tones noise and for aircraft or helicopter cockpit noise, improving low frequency (<100 Hz) performance by up to 15 dB over either control component acting individually. For the earplug, a filtered-X implementation of the LyLMS accommodates its nonconstant cancellation path gain. A fast time-domain identification method provides a high-fidelity, computationally efficient, infinite impulse response cancellation path model, which is used for both the filtered-X implementation and communication feedthrough. Insertion loss measurements made with a manikin show overall C-weighted total noise reduction provided by the ANR earplug of 46-48 dB for sum-of-tones 80-2000 Hz and 40-41 dB from 63 to 3000 Hz for UH-60 helicopter noise, with negligible degradation in attenuation during speech communication. For both hearing protectors, a stability metric improves by a factor of 2 to several orders of magnitude through hybrid ANR. PMID:17069300

  14. Active Vibration Control for Helicopter Interior Noise Reduction Using Power Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, J.; Chevva, K.; Sun, F.; Blanc, A.; Kim, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work performed by United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) for NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) under Contract NNL11AA06C. The objective of this program is to develop technology to reduce helicopter interior noise resulting from multiple gear meshing frequencies. A novel active vibration control approach called Minimum Actuation Power (MAP) is developed. MAP is an optimal control strategy that minimizes the total input power into a structure by monitoring and varying the input power of controlling sources. MAP control was implemented without explicit knowledge of the phasing and magnitude of the excitation sources by driving the real part of the input power from the controlling sources to zero. It is shown that this occurs when the total mechanical input power from the excitation and controlling sources is a minimum. MAP theory is developed for multiple excitation sources with arbitrary relative phasing for single or multiple discrete frequencies and controlled by a single or multiple controlling sources. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of MAP for structural vibration reduction of a realistic rotorcraft interior structure. MAP control resulted in significant average global vibration reduction of a single frequency and multiple frequency excitations with one controlling actuator. Simulations also demonstrate the potential effectiveness of the observed vibration reductions on interior radiated noise.

  15. Risk reduction activities for an F-1-based advanced booster for NASA's Space Launch System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, A. M.; Doering, K. B.; Cook, S. A.; Meadows, R. G.; Lariviere, B. W.; Bachtel, F. D.

    For NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction (ABEDRR) procurement, Dynetics, Inc. and Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) formed a team to offer a wide-ranging set of risk reduction activities and full-scale, system-level demonstrations that support NASA's goal of enabling competition on an affordable booster that meets the evolved capabilities of the SLS. During the ABEDRR effort, the Dynetics Team will apply state-of-the-art manufacturing and processing techniques to the heritage F-1, resulting in a low recurring cost engine while retaining the benefits of Apollo-era experience. ABEDRR will use NASA test facilities to perform full-scale F-1 gas generator and powerpack hot-fire test campaigns for engine risk reduction. Dynetics will also fabricate and test a tank assembly to verify the structural design. The Dynetics Team is partnered with NASA through Space Act Agreements (SAAs) to maximize the expertise and capabilities applied to ABEDRR.

  16. Effects of a TiC substrate on the catalytic activity of Pt for NO reduction.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xingli; Fu, Zhaoming; Li, Shasha; Zhang, Xilin; Yang, Zongxian

    2016-05-11

    Density functional theory calculations are used to elucidate the catalytic properties of a Pt monolayer supported on a TiC(001) substrate (Pt/TiC) toward NO reduction. It is found that the compound system of Pt/TiC has a good stability due to the strong Pt-TiC interaction. The diverse dissociation paths (namely the direct dissociation mechanism and the dimeric mechanism) are investigated. The transition state searching calculations suggest that NO has strong diffusion ability and small activation energy for dissociation on the Pt/TiC. For NO reduction on the Pt/TiC surface, we have found that the direct dissociation mechanisms (NO + N + O → NO2 + N and NO + N + O → N2 + O + O) are easier with a smaller dissociation barrier than those on the Pt(111) surface; and the dimeric process (NO + NO → (NO)2 → N2O + O → N2 + O + O) is considered to be dominant or significant with even a lower energy barrier than that of the direct dissociation. The results show that Pt/TiC can serve as an efficient catalyst for NO reduction.

  17. Mechanisms of Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffler, Norman W.; Allan, Brian G.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.; Mace, W. Derry; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of the aerodynamic load that acts on a generic rotorcraft fuselage by the application of active flow control was investigated in a wind tunnel test conducted on an approximately 1/3-scale powered rotorcraft model simulating forward flight. The aerodynamic mechanisms that make these reductions, in both the drag and the download, possible were examined in detail through the use of the measured surface pressure distribution on the fuselage, velocity field measurements made in the wake directly behind the ramp of the fuselage and computational simulations. The fuselage tested was the ROBIN-mod7, which was equipped with a series of eight slots located on the ramp section through which flow control excitation was introduced. These slots were arranged in a U-shaped pattern located slightly downstream of the baseline separation line and parallel to it. The flow control excitation took the form of either synthetic jets, also known as zero-net-mass-flux blowing, and steady blowing. The same set of slots were used for both types of excitation. The differences between the two excitation types and between flow control excitation from different combinations of slots were examined. The flow control is shown to alter the size of the wake and its trajectory relative to the ramp and the tailboom and it is these changes to the wake that result in a reduction in the aerodynamic load.

  18. Segregated Pt on Pd nanotubes for enhanced oxygen reduction activity in alkaline electrolyte.

    PubMed

    St John, Samuel; Atkinson, Robert W; Dyck, Ondrej; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Zawodzinski, Thomas A; Papandrew, Alexander B

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscaled Pt domains were integrated with Pd nanotubes via vapor deposition to yield a highly active electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. The surface-area-normalized ORR activity of these bi-metallic Pt-on-Pd nanotubes (PtPdNTs) was nearly 6× the corresponding carbon-supported Pt nanoparticle (Pt/C) activity at 0.9 V vs. RHE (1.5 vs. 0.24 mA cmmetal(-2), respectively). Furthermore, the high specific activity of the PtPdNTs was achieved without sacrificing mass-normalized activity, which is more than twice that of Pt/C (0.333 A mgPtPdNT(-1)vs. 0.141 A mgPt/C(-1)) and also greater than that of Pd/C (0.221 A mgPd/C(-1)). We attribute the enhancements in specific and mass activity to modifications of the segregated Pt electronic structure and to nanoscale porosity, respectively. PMID:26553367

  19. Implementation of activity-based costing (ABC) to drive cost reduction efforts in a semiconductor manufacturing operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naguib, Hussein; Bol, Igor I.; Lora, J.; Chowdhry, R.

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents a case study on the implementation of ABC to calculate the cost per wafer and to drive cost reduction efforts for a new IC product line. The cost reduction activities were conducted through the efforts of 11 cross-functional teams which included members of the finance, purchasing, technology development, process engineering, equipment engineering, production control, and facility groups. The activities of these cross functional teams were coordinated by a cost council. It will be shown that these activities have resulted in a 57% reduction in the wafer manufacturing cost of the new product line. Factors contributed to successful implementation of an ABC management system are discussed.

  20. Progress Towards Fuselage Drag Reduction via Active Flow Control: A Combined CFD and Experimental Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefler, Norman W.; Allan, Brian G.; Lienard, Caroline; LePape, Arnaud

    2010-01-01

    A combined computational and experimental effort has been undertaken to study fuselage drag reduction on a generic, non-proprietary rotorcraft fuselage by the application of active ow control. Fuselage drag reduction is an area of research interest to both the United States and France and this area is being worked collaboratively as a task under the United States/France Memorandum of Agreement on Helicopter Aeromechanics. In the first half of this task, emphasis is placed on the US generic fuselage, the ROBIN-mod7, with the experimental work being conducted on the US side and complementary US and French CFD analysis of the baseline and controlled cases. Fuselage simulations were made using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes ow solvers and with multiple turbulence models. Comparisons were made to experimental data for numerical simulations of the isolated fuselage and for the fuselage as installed in the tunnel, which includes modeling of the tunnel contraction, walls, and support fairing. The numerical simulations show that comparisons to the experimental data are in good agreement when the tunnel and model support are included. The isolated fuselage simulations compare well to each other, however, there is a positive shift in the centerline pressure when compared to the experiment. The computed flow separation locations on the rear ramp region had only slight differences with and without the tunnel walls and model support. For the simulations, the flow control slots were placed at several locations around the flow separation lines as a series of eight slots that formed a nearly continuous U-shape. Results from the numerical simulations resulted in an estimated 35% fuselage drag reduction from a steady blowing flow control configuration and a 26% drag reduction for unsteady zero-net-mass flow control configuration. Simulations with steady blowing show a delayed flow separation at the rear ramp of the fuselage that increases the surface pressure acting on the ramp

  1. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiuli; Zhang, Peng; Li, Shuang; Liu, Wei

    2016-08-17

    Developing inexpensive and non-precious metal electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is among the major goals in fuel cells. Herein, by using density-functional theory calculations, we show that N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids exhibit unexpectedly high ORR catalytic activity-even comparable to that of the Pt(111) surface. Both graphitic-type and pyridine-type N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids are highly active for the ORR and have good CO tolerance. The formation of the second H2O molecule is the rate-determining step for the ORR with the graphitic-type hybrid, whereas on the pyridine-type hybrid, it is the formation of OOH. Note that N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrid materials combine the high reactivity of olympicene and the high electrical conductivity of graphene, which allows them to be potentially used as low-cost and non-precious-metal ORR catalysts.

  2. Enhanced oxygen reduction activity and solid oxide fuel cell performance with a nanoparticles-loaded cathode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Liu, Li; Zhao, Zhe; Tu, Baofeng; Ou, Dingrong; Cui, Daan; Wei, Xuming; Chen, Xiaobo; Cheng, Mojie

    2015-03-11

    Reluctant oxygen-reduction-reaction (ORR) activity has been a long-standing challenge limiting cell performance for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in both centralized and distributed power applications. We report here that this challenge has been tackled with coloading of (La,Sr)MnO3 (LSM) and Y2O3 stabilized zirconia (YSZ) nanoparticles within a porous YSZ framework. This design dramatically improves ORR activity, enhances fuel cell output (200-300% power improvement), and enables superior stability (no observed degradation within 500 h of operation) from 600 to 800 °C. The improved performance is attributed to the intimate contacts between nanoparticulate YSZ and LSM particles in the three-phase boundaries in the cathode.

  3. Understanding Iron-based catalysts with efficient Oxygen reduction activity from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz, Hasnain; Barbiellini, B.; Jia, Q.; Tylus, U.; Strickland, K.; Bansil, A.; Mukerjee, S.

    2015-03-01

    Catalysts based on Fe/N/C clusters can support the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) without the use of expensive metals such as platinum. These systems can also prevent some poisonous species to block the active sites from the reactant. We have performed spin-polarized calculations on various Fe/N/C fragments using the Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) code. Some results are compared to similar calculations obtained with the Gaussian code. We investigate the partial density of states (PDOS) of the 3d orbitals near the Fermi level and calculate the binding energies of several ligands. Correlations of the binding energies with the 3d electronic PDOS's are used to propose electronic descriptors of the ORR associated with the 3d states of Fe. We also suggest a structural model for the most active site with a ferrous ion (Fe2+) in the high spin state or the so-called Doublet 3 (D3).

  4. New mechanistically based model for predicting reduction of biosolids waste by ozonation of return activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Isazadeh, Siavash; Feng, Min; Urbina Rivas, Luis Enrique; Frigon, Dominic

    2014-04-15

    Two pilot-scale activated sludge reactors were operated for 98 days to provide the necessary data to develop and validate a new mathematical model predicting the reduction of biosolids production by ozonation of the return activated sludge (RAS). Three ozone doses were tested during the study. In addition to the pilot-scale study, laboratory-scale experiments were conducted with mixed liquor suspended solids and with pure cultures to parameterize the biomass inactivation process during exposure to ozone. The experiments revealed that biomass inactivation occurred even at the lowest doses, but that it was not associated with extensive COD solubilization. For validation, the model was used to simulate the temporal dynamics of the pilot-scale operational data. Increasing the description accuracy of the inactivation process improved the precision of the model in predicting the operational data.

  5. New mechanistically based model for predicting reduction of biosolids waste by ozonation of return activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Isazadeh, Siavash; Feng, Min; Urbina Rivas, Luis Enrique; Frigon, Dominic

    2014-04-15

    Two pilot-scale activated sludge reactors were operated for 98 days to provide the necessary data to develop and validate a new mathematical model predicting the reduction of biosolids production by ozonation of the return activated sludge (RAS). Three ozone doses were tested during the study. In addition to the pilot-scale study, laboratory-scale experiments were conducted with mixed liquor suspended solids and with pure cultures to parameterize the biomass inactivation process during exposure to ozone. The experiments revealed that biomass inactivation occurred even at the lowest doses, but that it was not associated with extensive COD solubilization. For validation, the model was used to simulate the temporal dynamics of the pilot-scale operational data. Increasing the description accuracy of the inactivation process improved the precision of the model in predicting the operational data. PMID:24572272

  6. The Origin of the Catalytic Activity of a Metal Hydride in CO2 Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke; Matam, Santhosh Kumar; Kerger, Philipp; Bernard, Laetitia; Battaglia, Corsin; Vogel, Dirk; Rohwerder, Michael; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-05-10

    Atomic hydrogen on the surface of a metal with high hydrogen solubility is of particular interest for the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. In a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, methane was markedly formed on the metal hydride ZrCoHx in the course of the hydrogen desorption and not on the pristine intermetallic. The surface analysis was performed by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy and near-ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, for the in situ analysis. The aim was to elucidate the origin of the catalytic activity of the metal hydride. Since at the initial stage the dissociation of impinging hydrogen molecules is hindered by a high activation barrier of the oxidised surface, the atomic hydrogen flux from the metal hydride is crucial for the reduction of carbon dioxide and surface oxides at interfacial sites. PMID:27061237

  7. Selective nitrogen doping in graphene: Enhanced catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianlong; Hou, Zhufeng; Ikeda, Takashi; Huang, Sheng-Feng; Terakura, Kiyoyuki; Boero, Mauro; Oshima, Masaharu; Kakimoto, Masa-Aki; Miyata, Seizo

    2011-12-01

    The structural and electronic properties of N-doped zigzag graphene ribbons with various ratios of dihydrogenated to monohydrogenated edge carbons are investigated within the density functional theory framework. We find that the stability of graphitic N next to the edge, which is claimed to play important roles in the catalytic activity in our previous work, will be enhanced with increasing the concentration of dihydrogenated carbons. Furthermore, the dihydrogenated edge carbons turn out to be easily converted into monohydrogenated ones in the presence of oxygen molecules at room temperature. Based on our results, we propose a possible way to enhance the oxygen reduction catalytic activity of N-doped graphene by controlling the degrees of hydrogenation of edge carbons. The characteristic features in the x-ray absorption and emission spectra for each specific N site considered here will also be given.

  8. RF probe recovery time reduction with a novel active ringing suppression circuit

    PubMed Central

    Peshkovsky, A.S.; Forguez, J.; Cerioni, L.; Pusiol, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    A simple Q-damper device for active probe recovery time reduction is introduced along with a straightforward technique for the circuit's component value optimization. The device is inductively coupled to a probe through a coupling transformer positioned away from the main coil, which makes the design independent of the coil type being used. The Q-damper is a tuned circuit, which is resonant at the same frequency as the probe and can be actively interrupted. When the circuit is interrupted, it is detuned and, thereby, is uncoupled from the probe, which operates normally. Turning the device on leads to re-coupling of the circuits and causes splitting of the probe's resonance line, which can be observed through its drive port. A resistance of an appropriate value is introduced into the Q-damper circuit, resulting in smoothing of the resonance splitting into one broad line, representing the coupled system's low-Q state, in which the energy stored in the main coil is efficiently dissipated. The circuit's component values are optimized by monitoring the shape of this low-Q state. Probe recovery time reduction by, approximately, an order of magnitude has been obtained with this device. Application of the device during an NQR experiment led to an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 4.9. PMID:16111906

  9. Aircraft panel with sensorless active sound power reduction capabilities through virtual mechanical impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulandet, R.; Michau, M.; Micheau, P.; Berry, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with an active structural acoustic control approach to reduce the transmission of tonal noise in aircraft cabins. The focus is on the practical implementation of the virtual mechanical impedances method by using sensoriactuators instead of conventional control units composed of separate sensors and actuators. The experimental setup includes two sensoriactuators developed from the electrodynamic inertial exciter and distributed over an aircraft trim panel which is subject to a time-harmonic diffuse sound field. The target mechanical impedances are first defined by solving a linear optimization problem from sound power measurements before being applied to the test panel using a complex envelope controller. Measured data are compared to results obtained with sensor-actuator pairs consisting of an accelerometer and an inertial exciter, particularly as regards sound power reduction. It is shown that the two types of control unit provide similar performance, and that here virtual impedance control stands apart from conventional active damping. In particular, it is clear from this study that extra vibrational energy must be provided by the actuators for optimal sound power reduction, mainly due to the high structural damping in the aircraft trim panel. Concluding remarks on the benefits of using these electrodynamic sensoriactuators to control tonal disturbances are also provided.

  10. Classic Maya civilization collapse associated with reduction in tropical cyclone activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, M. A.; Polanco-Martinez, J. M.; Lases-Hernández, F.; Bradley, R. S.; Burns, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    In light of the increased destructiveness of tropical cyclones observed over recent decades one might assume that an increase and not a decrease in tropical cyclone activity would lead to societal stress and perhaps collapse of ancient cultures. In this study we present evidence that a reduction in the frequency and intensity of tropical Atlantic cyclones could have contributed to the collapse of the Maya civilization during the Terminal Classic Period (TCP, AD. 800-950). Statistical comparisons of a quantitative precipitation record from the Yucatan Peninsula (YP) Maya lowlands, based on the stalagmite known as Chaac (after the Mayan God of rain and agriculture), relative to environmental proxy records of El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs), and tropical Atlantic cyclone counts, suggest that these records share significant coherent variability during the TCP and that summer rainfall reductions between 30 and 50% in the Maya lowlands occurred in association with decreased Atlantic tropical cyclones. Analysis of modern instrumental hydrological data suggests cyclone rainfall contributions to the YP equivalent to the range of rainfall deficits associated with decreased tropical cyclone activity during the collapse of the Maya civilization. Cyclone driven precipitation variability during the TCP, implies that climate change may have triggered Maya civilization collapse via freshwater scarcity for domestic use without significant detriment to agriculture. Pyramid in Tikal, the most prominent Maya Kingdom that collapsed during the Terminal Classic Period (circa C.E. 800-950) Rainfall feeding stalagmites inside Rio Secreto cave system, Yucatan, Mexico.

  11. Acetylene measurement in flames by chirp-based quantum cascade laser spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Quine, Zachary R; McNesby, Kevin L

    2009-06-01

    We have designed and characterized a mid-IR spectrometer built around a pulsed distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser using the characteristic frequency down-chirp to scan through the spectral region 6.5 cm(-1) spectral region. The behavior of this chirp is extensively measured. The accuracy and detection limits of the system as an absorption spectrometer are demonstrated first by measuring spectra of acetylene through a single pass 16 cm absorption cell in real time at low concentrations and atmospheric pressure. The smallest detectable peak is measured to be approximately 1.5 x 10(-4) absorbance units, yielding a minimum detectable concentration length product of 2.4 parts per million meter at standard temperature and pressure. This system is then used to detect acetylene within an ethylene-air opposed flow flame. Measurements of acetylene content as a function of height above the fuel source are presented, as well as measurements of acetylene produced in fuel breakdown as a function of preinjection fuel temperature. PMID:19488121

  12. Methane emissions measured at two California landfills by OTM-10 and an acetylene tracer method

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methane emissions were measured at two municipal solid waste landfills in California using static flux chambers, an optical remote sensing approach known as vertical radial plume mapping (VRPM) using a tunable diode laser (TDL) and a novel acetylene tracer method. The tracer meth...

  13. Association Mechanisms of Unsaturated C2 Hydrocarbons with Their Cations: Acetylene and Ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bera, Partha P.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    The ion-molecule association mechanism of acetylene and ethylene with their cations is investigated by ab initio quantum chemical methods to understand the structures, association energies, and the vibrational and electronic spectra of the products. Stable puckered cyclic isomers are found as the result of first forming less stable linear and bridge isomers. The puckered cyclic complexes are calculated to be strongly bound, by 87, 35 and 56 kcal/mol for acetylene-acetylene cation, ethylene-ethylene cation and acetylene-ethylene cation, respectively. These stable complexes may be intermediates that participate in further association reactions. There are no association barriers, and no significant inter-conversion barriers, so the initial linear and bridge encounter complexes are unlikely to be observable. However, the energy gap between the bridged and cyclic puckered isomers greatly differs from complex to complex: it is 44 kcal/mol in C4H4 +, but only 6 kcal/mol in C4H8 +. The accurate CCSD(T) calculations summarized above are also compared against less computationally expensive MP2 and density functional theory (DFT) calculations for structures, relative energies, and vibrational spectra. Calculated vibrational spectra are compared against available experiments for cyclobutadiene cation. Electronic spectra are also calculated using time-dependent DFT.

  14. A Safe and Easy Classroom Demonstration of the Generation of Acetylene Gas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Marilyn Blagg; Krause, Paul

    1994-01-01

    In this demonstration of the generation and combustion of acetylene, calcium carbide and water are allowed to react in a latex examination glove. Two student volunteers perform the demonstration with instructor guidance. This safe, popular demonstration, originally intended to illustrate the alkyne family of compounds, can be used with a variety…

  15. Technical opportunities for converting natural gas to acetylene-based chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, N.E.; Ashraf, F.A.; Divanji, H.

    1987-01-01

    Canada has abundant natural gas and in some provinces such as Quebec, cheap and surplus electricity is also available. A techno-economic study has been carried out which indicates that it is economically attractive to manufacture acetylene via the electric-arc process from natural gas and electricity at the cost of raw materials prevailing at present in the Province of Quebec, Canada.

  16. Acetylene measurement in flames by chirp-based quantum cascade laser spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Quine, Zachary R; McNesby, Kevin L

    2009-06-01

    We have designed and characterized a mid-IR spectrometer built around a pulsed distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser using the characteristic frequency down-chirp to scan through the spectral region 6.5 cm(-1) spectral region. The behavior of this chirp is extensively measured. The accuracy and detection limits of the system as an absorption spectrometer are demonstrated first by measuring spectra of acetylene through a single pass 16 cm absorption cell in real time at low concentrations and atmospheric pressure. The smallest detectable peak is measured to be approximately 1.5 x 10(-4) absorbance units, yielding a minimum detectable concentration length product of 2.4 parts per million meter at standard temperature and pressure. This system is then used to detect acetylene within an ethylene-air opposed flow flame. Measurements of acetylene content as a function of height above the fuel source are presented, as well as measurements of acetylene produced in fuel breakdown as a function of preinjection fuel temperature.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, COAL-DERIVED, PROMOTED CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph M. Calo

    2000-07-21

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics. During the reporting period, the following has been accomplished: (1) Steady-state reactivity studies in the packed bed reactor were extended to the NO/CO-carbon reaction system as a function of temperature and NO and CO concentrations. It was found that the NO reaction rate increased in the presence of CO, and the apparent activation energy decreased to about 75 {+-} 8 kJ/mol. In addition, the influence of mass transfer limitations were noted at low NO and CO concentrations. (2) The packed bed reactor/gas flow system has been applied to performing post-reaction temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies of intermediate surface complexes following steady-state reaction. It was found that the amount of CO-evolving intermediate surface complexes exceeded that of the N{sub 2}-evolving surface complexes, and that both increased with reaction temperature. The TPD spectra indicates that both types of complexes desorb late, suggesting that they have high desorption activation energies. Plans for the next reporting period include extending the temperature programmed desorption studies in the packed bed reactor system to the NO/CO reaction system, including exposure to just CO, as well as NO/CO mixtures.

  18. Tau reduction prevents Aβ-induced axonal transport deficits by blocking activation of GSK3β

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jordan C.; Fomenko, Vira; Miyamoto, Takashi; Suberbielle, Elsa; Knox, Joseph A.; Ho, Kaitlyn; Kim, Daniel H.; Yu, Gui-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Axonal transport deficits in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are attributed to amyloid β (Aβ) peptides and pathological forms of the microtubule-associated protein tau. Genetic ablation of tau prevents neuronal overexcitation and axonal transport deficits caused by recombinant Aβ oligomers. Relevance of these findings to naturally secreted Aβ and mechanisms underlying tau’s enabling effect are unknown. Here we demonstrate deficits in anterograde axonal transport of mitochondria in primary neurons from transgenic mice expressing familial AD-linked forms of human amyloid precursor protein. We show that these deficits depend on Aβ1–42 production and are prevented by tau reduction. The copathogenic effect of tau did not depend on its microtubule binding, interactions with Fyn, or potential role in neuronal development. Inhibition of neuronal activity, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor function, or glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activity or expression also abolished Aβ-induced transport deficits. Tau ablation prevented Aβ-induced GSK3β activation. Thus, tau allows Aβ oligomers to inhibit axonal transport through activation of GSK3β, possibly by facilitating aberrant neuronal activity. PMID:25963821

  19. Composition-controlled PtCo alloy nanocubes with tuned electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang-Il; Lee, Su-Un; Kim, Woo Youn; Choi, Ran; Hong, Kwangwoo; Nam, Ki Min; Han, Sang Woo; Park, Joon T

    2012-11-01

    Modification of the electronic structure and lattice contraction of Pt alloy nanocatalysts through control over their morphology and composition has been a crucial issue for improving their electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity. In the present work, we synthesized PtCo alloy nanocubes with controlled compositions (Pt(x)Co NCs, x = 2, 3, 5, 7, and 9) by regulating the ratio of surfactants and the amount of Co precursor to elucidate the effect of the composition of nanocatalysts on their ORR activity. Pt(x)Co NCs had a Pt-skin structure after electrochemical treatment. The electrocatalysis experiments revealed a strong correlation between ORR activity and Co composition. Pt₃Co NCs exhibited the best ORR performance among the various Pt(x)Co NCs. From density functional theory calculations, a typical volcano-type relationship was established between ORR activity and oxygen binding energy (E(OB)) on NC surfaces, which showed that Pt₃Co NCs had the optimal E(OB) to achieve the maximum ORR activity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements demonstrated that the electronic structure and lattice contraction of the Pt(x)Co NCs could be tuned by controlling the composition of NCs, which are highly correlated with the trends of E(OB) change.

  20. Microtubules accelerate the kinase activity of Aurora-B by a reduction in dimensionality.

    PubMed

    Noujaim, Michael; Bechstedt, Susanne; Wieczorek, Michal; Brouhard, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    Aurora-B is the kinase subunit of the Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC), a key regulator of mitotic progression that corrects improper kinetochore attachments and establishes the spindle midzone. Recent work has demonstrated that the CPC is a microtubule-associated protein complex and that microtubules are able to activate the CPC by contributing to Aurora-B auto-phosphorylation in trans. Aurora-B activation is thought to occur when the local concentration of Aurora-B is high, as occurs when Aurora-B is enriched at centromeres. It is not clear, however, whether distributed binding to large structures such as microtubules would increase the local concentration of Aurora-B. Here we show that microtubules accelerate the kinase activity of Aurora-B by a "reduction in dimensionality." We find that microtubules increase the kinase activity of Aurora-B toward microtubule-associated substrates while reducing the phosphorylation levels of substrates not associated to microtubules. Using the single molecule assay for microtubule-associated proteins, we show that a minimal CPC construct binds to microtubules and diffuses in a one-dimensional (1D) random walk. The binding of Aurora-B to microtubules is salt-dependent and requires the C-terminal tails of tubulin, indicating that the interaction is electrostatic. We show that the rate of Aurora-B auto-activation is faster with increasing concentrations of microtubules. Finally, we demonstrate that microtubules lose their ability to stimulate Aurora-B when their C-terminal tails are removed by proteolysis. We propose a model in which microtubules act as scaffolds for the enzymatic activity of Aurora-B. The scaffolding activity of microtubules enables rapid Aurora-B activation and efficient phosphorylation of microtubule-associated substrates.

  1. Microtubules Accelerate the Kinase Activity of Aurora-B by a Reduction in Dimensionality

    PubMed Central

    Noujaim, Michael; Bechstedt, Susanne; Wieczorek, Michal; Brouhard, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Aurora-B is the kinase subunit of the Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC), a key regulator of mitotic progression that corrects improper kinetochore attachments and establishes the spindle midzone. Recent work has demonstrated that the CPC is a microtubule-associated protein complex and that microtubules are able to activate the CPC by contributing to Aurora-B auto-phosphorylation in trans. Aurora-B activation is thought to occur when the local concentration of Aurora-B is high, as occurs when Aurora-B is enriched at centromeres. It is not clear, however, whether distributed binding to large structures such as microtubules would increase the local concentration of Aurora-B. Here we show that microtubules accelerate the kinase activity of Aurora-B by a “reduction in dimensionality.” We find that microtubules increase the kinase activity of Aurora-B toward microtubule-associated substrates while reducing the phosphorylation levels of substrates not associated to microtubules. Using the single molecule assay for microtubule-associated proteins, we show that a minimal CPC construct binds to microtubules and diffuses in a one-dimensional (1D) random walk. The binding of Aurora-B to microtubules is salt-dependent and requires the C-terminal tails of tubulin, indicating that the interaction is electrostatic. We show that the rate of Aurora-B auto-activation is faster with increasing concentrations of microtubules. Finally, we demonstrate that microtubules lose their ability to stimulate Aurora-B when their C-terminal tails are removed by proteolysis. We propose a model in which microtubules act as scaffolds for the enzymatic activity of Aurora-B. The scaffolding activity of microtubules enables rapid Aurora-B activation and efficient phosphorylation of microtubule-associated substrates. PMID:24498282

  2. Cu-SSZ-39, an active and hydrothermally stable catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx.

    PubMed

    Moliner, Manuel; Franch, Cristina; Palomares, Eduardo; Grill, Marie; Corma, Avelino

    2012-08-25

    A Cu-exchanged SSZ-39 zeolite has been synthesized and tested for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx. This material shows an excellent catalytic activity, and most importantly, an extraordinary hydrothermal stability.

  3. ESTIMATION OF MICROBIAL REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION RATES FOR CHLORINATED BENZENES AND PHENOLS USING A QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A set of literature data was used to derive several quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) to predict the rate constants for the microbial reductive dehalogenation of chlorinated aromatics. Dechlorination rate constants for 25 chloroaromatics were corrected for th...

  4. Removal of micropollutants and reduction of biological activity in a full scale reclamation plant using ozonation and activated carbon filtration.

    PubMed

    Reungoat, J; Macova, M; Escher, B I; Carswell, S; Mueller, J F; Keller, J

    2010-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds are found in secondary treated effluents up to microg L(-1) levels and therefore discharged into surface waters. Since the long term effects of these compounds on the environment and human health are, to date, largely unknown, implementation of advanced treatment of wastewaters is envisaged to reduce their discharge. This is of particular relevance where surface waters are used as drinking water sources and when considering indirect potable reuse. This study aimed at assessing the removal of organic micropollutants and the concurrent reduction of their biological activity in a full scale reclamation plant treating secondary effluent. The treatment consists of 6 stages: denitrification, pre-ozonation, coagulation/flocculation/dissolved air flotation and filtration (DAFF), main ozonation, activated carbon filtration and final ozonation for disinfection. For that purpose, representative 24-hour composite samples were collected after each stage. The occurrence of 85 compounds was monitored by LC/MS-MS. A battery of 6 bioassays was also used as a complementary tool to evaluate non-specific toxicity and 5 specific toxic modes of action. Results show that, among the 54 micropollutants quantified in the influent water, 50 were removed to below their limit of quantification representing more than 90% of concentration reduction. Biological activity was reduced, depending on the specific response that was assessed, from a minimum of 62% (AhR response) to more than 99% (estrogenicity). The key processes responsible for the plant's performances were the coagulation/flocculation/DAFF, main ozonation and activated carbon filtration. The effect of these 3 processes varied from one compound or bioassay to another but their combination was almost totally responsible for the overall observed reduction. Bioassays yielded complementary information, e.g. estrogenic compounds were not detected in the secondary effluent by chemical analysis, but the samples had an

  5. Seasonal Variations of Temperature, Acetylene and Ethane in Saturn's Stratosphere from 2005 to 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, James; Irwin, P. G. J.; Fletcher, L. N.; Moses, J. I.; Greathouse, T. K.; Friedson, A. J.; Hesman, B.; Hurley, J.; Merlet, C.

    2012-10-01

    Acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6) exemplify by-products of complex photochemistry in Saturn’s stratosphere. Their relative stability together with their strong vertical gradients in concentration allow for their use as tracers of vertical motion in Saturn’s lower stratosphere. Earlier studies of Saturn's hydrocarbons have provided only a snapshot of their behaviour with temporal variations remaining to be determined. In this study, we investigate how the thermal structure and concentrations of acetylene and ethane have evolved on Saturn with the changing season. We use FIRMAP (15.5 cm-1 spectral resolution) Cassini-CIRS observations, initially retrieve temperature and subsequently retrieve the abundances of acetylene and ethane. In comparing 2005, 2009 and 2010 results, we observe the disappearance of Saturn's southern warm polar hood with cooling of up to 18.6 K ± 0.9 K at 1.1 mbar south of 75°S (planetographic). This suggests dissipation of Saturn's south polar vortex in addition to an autumnal cooling. We observe a 20% ± 9% enrichment of acetylene and a 30% ± 10% enrichment of ethane at 2.1 mbar at 25°N, together with a 14% ± 9% depletion of acetylene and an 18% ± 7% depletion of ethane at the same altitude at 15°S. This suggests the presence of localised downwelling and upwelling at these latitudes, respectively. These vertical motions are consistent with a recently-developed GCM (global circulation model) of Saturn's tropopause and stratosphere, which predicts this pattern of upwelling and downwelling as a result of seasonally-reversing Hadley circulation.

  6. Uptake of acetylene on cosmic dust and production of benzene in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankland, Victoria L.; James, Alexander D.; Sánchez, Juan Diego Carrillo; Mangan, Thomas P.; Willacy, Karen; Poppe, Andrew R.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-11-01

    A low-temperature flow tube and ultra-high vacuum apparatus were used to explore the uptake and heterogeneous chemistry of acetylene (C2H2) on cosmic dust analogues over the temperature range encountered in Titan's atmosphere below 600 km. The uptake coefficient, γ, was measured at 181 K to be (1.6 ± 0.4) × 10-4, (1.9 ± 0.4) × 10-4 and (1.5 ± 0.4) × 10-4 for the uptake of C2H2 on Mg2SiO4, MgFeSiO4 and Fe2SiO4, respectively, indicating that γ is independent of Mg or Fe active sites. The uptake of C2H2 was also measured on SiO2 and SiC as analogues for meteoric smoke particles in Titan's atmosphere, but was found to be below the detection limit (γ < 6 × 10-8 and < 4 × 10-7, respectively). The rate of cyclo-trimerization of C2H2 to C6H6 was found to be 2.6 × 10-5 exp(-741/T) s-1, with an uncertainty ranging from ± 27 % at 115 K to ± 49 % at 181 K. A chemical ablation model was used to show that the bulk of cosmic dust particles (radius 0.02-10 μm) entering Titan's atmosphere do not ablate (< 1% mass loss through sputtering), thereby providing a significant surface for heterogeneous chemistry. A 1D model of dust sedimentation shows that the production of C6H6via uptake of C2H2 on cosmic dust, followed by cyclo-trimerization and desorption, is probably competitive with gas-phase production of C6H6 between 80 and 120 km.

  7. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Amy C; Andrusiv, Lubov P; Courtney, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of modular, oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes. Such tools are needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. The pressure-time profiles measured at 1 MHz using high-speed piezoelectric pressure sensors have relevant durations and show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of free-field blast waves. Descriptions are included for shock tube diameters of 27-79 mm. A range of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 1187 kPa (with 0.5-5.6% standard error of the mean) were produced by selection of the driver section diameter and distance from the shock tube opening. The peak pressures varied predictably with distance from the shock tube opening while maintaining both a true blast wave profile and relevant pulse duration for distances up to about one diameter from the shock tube opening. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current compression-driven shock tubes, and it does not have a large jet effect. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven shock tubes, which reduces operating costs and effort and permits greater throughput and accessibility. It is expected to be useful in assessing the response of various sensors to shock wave loading; assessing the reflection, transmission, and absorption properties of candidate armor materials; assessing material properties at high rates of loading; assessing the response of biological materials to shock wave exposure; and providing a means to validate numerical models of the interaction of shock waves with structures. All of these activities have been difficult to pursue in a laboratory setting due in part to lack of appropriate means to produce a realistic blast loading profile. PMID:22559580

  8. Clickable Photoaffinity Ligands for Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Based on Select Acetylenic Negative Allosteric Modulators.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Karen J; Velagaleti, Ranganadh; Thal, David M; Brady, Ryan M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lapinsky, David J

    2016-07-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest class of current drug targets. In particular, small-molecule allosteric modulators offer substantial potential for selectively "tuning" GPCR activity. However, there remains a critical need for experimental strategies that unambiguously determine direct allosteric ligand-GPCR interactions, to facilitate both chemical biology studies and rational structure-based drug design. We now report the development and use of first-in-class clickable allosteric photoprobes for a GPCR based on metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) negative allosteric modulator (NAM) chemotypes. Select acetylenic mGlu5 NAM lead compounds were rationally modified to contain either a benzophenone or an aryl azide as a photoreactive functional group, enabling irreversible covalent attachment to mGlu5 via photoactivation. Additionally, a terminal alkyne or an aliphatic azide was incorporated as a click chemistry handle, allowing chemoselective attachment of fluorescent moieties to the irreversibly mGlu5-bound probe via tandem photoaffinity labeling-bioorthogonal conjugation. These clickable photoprobes retained submicromolar affinity for mGlu5 and negative cooperativity with glutamate, interacted with the "common allosteric-binding site," displayed slow binding kinetics, and could irreversibly label mGlu5 following UV exposure. We depleted the number of functional mGlu5 receptors using an irreversibly bound NAM to elucidate and delineate orthosteric agonist affinity and efficacy. Finally, successful conjugation of fluorescent dyes via click chemistry was demonstrated for each photoprobe. In the future, these clickable photoprobes are expected to aid our understanding of the structural basis of mGlu5 allosteric modulation. Furthermore, tandem photoaffinity labeling-bioorthogonal conjugation is expected to be a broadly applicable experimental strategy across the entire GPCR superfamily. PMID:27115427

  9. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Amy C.; Andrusiv, Lubov P.; Courtney, Michael W.

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of modular, oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes. Such tools are needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. The pressure-time profiles measured at 1 MHz using high-speed piezoelectric pressure sensors have relevant durations and show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of free-field blast waves. Descriptions are included for shock tube diameters of 27-79 mm. A range of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 1187 kPa (with 0.5-5.6% standard error of the mean) were produced by selection of the driver section diameter and distance from the shock tube opening. The peak pressures varied predictably with distance from the shock tube opening while maintaining both a true blast wave profile and relevant pulse duration for distances up to about one diameter from the shock tube opening. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current compression-driven shock tubes, and it does not have a large jet effect. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven shock tubes, which reduces operating costs and effort and permits greater throughput and accessibility. It is expected to be useful in assessing the response of various sensors to shock wave loading; assessing the reflection, transmission, and absorption properties of candidate armor materials; assessing material properties at high rates of loading; assessing the response of biological materials to shock wave exposure; and providing a means to validate numerical models of the interaction of shock waves with structures. All of these activities have been difficult to pursue in a laboratory setting due in part to lack of appropriate means to produce a realistic blast loading profile.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, COAL-DERIVED, PROMOTED CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph M. Calo

    2000-07-19

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics. During the reporting period, the following has been accomplished: (1) A packed bed reactor/gas flow system has been tested and applied to performing NO-carbon reactivity studies. This system employs a Kin-Tek gas calibration/mixing system for varying NO and CO concentrations in the feed gas to the packed bed, a NO{sub x} chemiluminescence analyzer (ThermoElectron, Model 10), and a quadrupole mass spectrometer (Ametek). This system is used for both steady-state reactivity studies, as well as mechanistic studies on the effects of NO and CO in the gas phase on intermediate oxygen surface complex populations on the carbon substrates. (2) Reactivity studies of the NO-carbon system have been performed as a function of temperature and NO concentration. It was found that apparent activation energy in the ''high temperature'' regime of 180 {+-} 10 kJ/mol agrees well with corresponding values reported in the literature. At the low NO concentrations used, it was observed that the reaction is not strictly first order in NO. In addition, the influence of mass transfer limitations were noted at high temperatures and low NO concentrations. Plans for the next reporting period include applications of the packed bed reactor system to perform temperature programmed desorption studies of the reaction of the NO-carbon reaction, and to reactivity studies of the NO/CO reaction system.

  11. Effects of combining biological treatment and activated carbon on hexavalent chromium reduction.

    PubMed

    Orozco, A M Ferro; Contreras, E M; Zaritzky, N E

    2011-02-01

    The objectives of the present work were: (a) to analyze the Cr(VI) removal by combining activated sludge (AS) with powdered activated carbon (PAC), (b) to analyze the effect of PAC and Cr(VI) on the growth kinetics of activated sludge, and (c) to determine if the combined method (AS-PAC) for Cr(VI) removal can be considered additive or synergistic with respect to the individual processes. Chromate removal was improved by increasing PAC concentrations in both PAC and AS-PAC systems. Cr(VI) removal using the AS-PAC system was higher than using AS or PAC. The increase of Cr(VI) caused longer lag phase and lower observed specific growth rate (μ(obs)), biomass yield (Y(X/S)), and specific growth substrate consumption rate (q(S)) of activated sludge; additionally, PAC did not enhance the growth kinetic parameters (μ(obs), Y(X/S), q(S)). Cr(VI) reduction in AS-PAC system was the result of the additive effect of each individual Cr(VI) removal process. PMID:21123053

  12. Nitrogen-Rich Manganese Oxynitrides with Enhanced Catalytic Activity in the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Miura, Akira; Rosero-Navarro, Carolina; Masubuchi, Yuji; Higuchi, Mikio; Kikkawa, Shinichi; Tadanaga, Kiyoharu

    2016-07-01

    The catalytic activity of manganese oxynitrides in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was investigated in alkaline solutions to clarify the effect of the incorporated nitrogen atoms on the ORR activity. These oxynitrides, with rock-salt-like structures with different nitrogen contents, were synthesized by reacting MnO, Mn2 O3 , or MnO2 with molten NaNH2 at 240-280 °C. The anion contents and the Mn valence states were determined by combustion analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, and X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis. An increase in the nitrogen content of rock-salt-based manganese oxynitrides increases the valence of the manganese ions and reinforces the catalytic activity for the ORR in 1 m KOH solution. Nearly single-electron occupancy of the antibonding eg states and highly covalent Mn-N bonding thus enhance the ORR activity of nitrogen-rich manganese oxynitrides. PMID:27193352

  13. Size effect of silver nanoclusters on their catalytic activity for oxygen electro-reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yizhong; Chen, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Two different sized silver nanoclusters are prepared by two different synthetic routs. First, a small nanocluster (NC) which is 0.7 nm in diameter was synthesized by using meso-2, 3-dimercapto-succinic acid (DMSA) as a capping ligand, and second a larger nanoparticle (NP) which is 3.3 nm in diameter was prepared by chemical reduction and coated with DMSA. The as-prepared silver nanoclusters or nanoparticles are then loaded onto a glassy carbon electrode and the size effect on their electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is investigated with electrochemical techniques in alkaline electrolyte. The cyclic voltammetric (CV) studies show that the onset potential of ORR on 0.7 nm silver nanoclusters is 150 mV more positive than that from 3.3 nm silver nanoparticles. And compared to the larger nanoparticles, five times higher current density of ORR at -0.80 V is obtained from the 0.7 nm silver nanoclusters. These CV results indicate that the smaller Ag nanoclusters exhibit higher catalytic performance for ORR. Rotating disk voltammetric studies show ORR on both DMSA monolayer-protected silver clusters is dominated first by a two-electron transfer pathway to produce H2O2 and then peroxide is reduced by 2 more electrons to produce water.

  14. Achieving Selective and Efficient Electrocatalytic Activity for CO2 Reduction Using Immobilized Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheonghee; Jeon, Hyo Sang; Eom, Taedaehyeong; Jee, Michael Shincheon; Kim, Hyungjun; Friend, Cynthia M; Min, Byoung Koun; Hwang, Yun Jeong

    2015-11-01

    Selective electrochemical reduction of CO2 is one of the most sought-after processes because of the potential to convert a harmful greenhouse gas to a useful chemical. We have discovered that immobilized Ag nanoparticles supported on carbon exhibit enhanced Faradaic efficiency and a lower overpotential for selective reduction of CO2 to CO. These electrocatalysts were synthesized directly on the carbon support by a facile one-pot method using a cysteamine anchoring agent resulting in controlled monodispersed particle sizes. These synthesized Ag/C electrodes showed improved activities, specifically decrease of the overpotential by 300 mV at 1 mA/cm(2), and 4-fold enhanced CO Faradaic efficiency at -0.75 V vs RHE with the optimal particle size of 5 nm compared to polycrystalline Ag foil. DFT calculations enlightened that the specific interaction between Ag nanoparticle and the anchoring agents modified the catalyst surface to have a selectively higher affinity to the intermediate COOH over CO, which effectively lowers the overpotential. PMID:26447349

  15. Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects: A CFD Validation Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    A rotorcraft fuselage is typically designed with an emphasis on operational functionality with aerodynamic efficiency being of secondary importance. This results in a significant amount of drag during high-speed forward flight that can be a limiting factor for future high-speed rotorcraft designs. To enable higher speed flight, while maintaining a functional fuselage design (i.e., a large rear cargo ramp door), the NASA Rotary Wing Project has conducted both experimental and computational investigations to assess active flow control as an enabling technology for fuselage drag reduction. This paper will evaluate numerical simulations of a flow control system on a generic rotorcraft fuselage with a rotor in forward flight using OVERFLOW, a structured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver developed at NASA. The results are compared to fuselage forces, surface pressures, and PN flow field data obtained in a wind tunnel experiment conducted at the NASA Langley 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel where significant drag and download reductions were demonstrated using flow control. This comparison showed that the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver was unable to predict the fuselage forces and pressure measurements on the ramp for the baseline and flow control cases. While the CFD was able to capture the flow features, it was unable to accurately predict the performance of the flow control.

  16. Reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene catalyzed by vitamin B{sub 12} in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, D.R.; Smith, M.H.; Delcomyn, C.A.; Roberts, A.L.

    1996-10-01

    The reduction of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) catalyzed by vitamin B{sub 12} was examined in homogeneous and heterogeneous (B{sub 12} bound to agarose) batch systems using titanium(III) citrate as the bulk reductant. The solution and surface-mediated reaction rates at similar B{sub 12} loadings were comparable, indicating that binding vitamin B{sub 12} to a surface did not lower catalytic activity. No loss in PCE reducing activity was observed with repeated usage of surface-bound vitamin B{sub 12}. Carbon mass recoveries were 81-84% for PCE reduction and 89% for TCE reduction, relative to controls. In addition to sequential hydrogenolysis, a second competing reaction mechanism for the reduction of PCE and TCE by B{sub 12}, reductive {beta}-elimination, is proposed to account for the observation of acetylene as a significant reaction intermediate. Reductive {beta}-elimination should be considered as a potential pathway in other reactive systems involving the reduction of vicinal polyhaloethenes. Surface-bound catalysts such as vitamin B{sub 12} may have utility in the engineered degradation of aqueous phase chlorinated ethenes. 19 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. N2O reduction by the mu4-sulfide-bridged tetranuclear CuZ cluster active site.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Gorelsky, Serge I; Ghosh, Somdatta; Solomon, Edward I

    2004-08-13

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) reduction is a chemical challenge both in the selective oxidation of organic substrates by N2O and in the removal of N2O as a green-house gas. The reduction of N2O is thermodynamically favorable but kinetically inert, and requires activating transition-metal centers. In biological systems, N2O reduction is the last step in the denitrification process of the bacterial nitrogen cycle and is accomplished by the enzyme nitrous oxide reductase, whose active site consists of a micro4-sulfide-bridged tetranuclear CuZ cluster which has many unusual spectroscopic features. Recent studies have developed a detailed electronic-structure description of the resting CuZ cluster, determined its catalytically relevant state, and provided insight into the role of this tetranuclear copper cluster in N2O activation and reduction.

  18. Concentration Effects of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Activity for Three Platinum Catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-04

    A rotating disk electrode (RDE) along with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), were used to investigate the impact of two model compounds representing degradation products of Nafion and 3M perfluorinated sulfonic acid membranes on the electrochemical surface area (ECA) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline Pt, nano-structured thin film (NSTF) Pt (3M), and Pt/Vulcan carbon (Pt/Vu) (TKK) electrodes. ORR kinetic currents (measured at 0.9 V and transport corrected) were found to decrease linearly with the log of concentration for both model compounds on all Pt surfaces studied. Ultimately, model compound adsorption effects on ECA weremore » more abstruse due to competitive organic anion adsorption on Pt surfaces superimposing with the hydrogen underpotential deposition (HUPD) region.« less

  19. Superior Catalytic Activity of Electrochemically Reduced Graphene Oxide Supported Iron Phthalocyanines toward Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-11-01

    Structure and surface properties of supporting materials are of great importance for the catalytic performance of the catalysts. Herein, we prepared the iron phthalocyanine (FePc) functionalized electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) by the electrochemical reduction of FePc/GO. The resultant FePc/ERGO exhibits higher catalytic activity toward ORR than that of FePc/graphene. More importantly, the onset potential for ORR at FePc/ERGO positively shifts by 45 mV compared with commercial Pt/C in alkaline media. Besides, FePc/ERGO displays enhanced durability and selectivity toward ORR. The superior catalytic performance of FePc/ERGO for ORR are ascribed to the self-supported structure of ERGO, uniformly morphology and size of FePc nanoparticles.

  20. Concentration Effects of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Degradation Products on Oxygen Reduction Activity for Three Platinum Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, J. M.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Richards, R.; Dinh, H. N.

    2014-10-04

    A rotating disk electrode (RDE) along with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), were used to investigate the impact of two model compounds representing degradation products of Nafion and 3M perfluorinated sulfonic acid membranes on the electrochemical surface area (ECA) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline Pt, nano-structured thin film (NSTF) Pt (3M), and Pt/Vulcan carbon (Pt/Vu) (TKK) electrodes. ORR kinetic currents (measured at 0.9 V and transport corrected) were found to decrease linearly with the log of concentration for both model compounds on all Pt surfaces studied. Ultimately, model compound adsorption effects on ECA were more abstruse due to competitive organic anion adsorption on Pt surfaces superimposing with the hydrogen underpotential deposition (HUPD) region.

  1. NASA Propulsion Concept Studies and Risk Reduction Activities for Resource Prospector Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Williams, Hunter; Burnside, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The Resource Prospector mission is to investigate the Moon's polar regions in search of volatiles. The government-version lander concept for the mission is composed of a braking stage and a liquid-propulsion lander stage. A propulsion trade study concluded with a solid rocket motor for the braking stage while using the 4th-stage Peacekeeper (PK) propulsion components for the lander stage. The mechanical design of the liquid propulsion system was conducted in concert with the lander structure design. A propulsion cold-flow test article was fabricated and integrated into a lander development structure, and a series of cold flow tests were conducted to characterize the fluid transient behavior and to collect data for validating analytical models. In parallel, RS-34 PK thrusters to be used on the lander stage were hot-fire tested in vacuum conditions as part of risk reduction activities.

  2. Repetition-Related Reductions in Neural Activity during Emotional Simulations of Future Events

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Simulations of future experiences are often emotionally arousing, and the tendency to repeatedly simulate negative future outcomes has been identified as a predictor of the onset of symptoms of anxiety. Nonetheless, next to nothing is known about how the healthy human brain processes repeated simulations of emotional future events. In this study, we present a paradigm that can be used to study repeated simulations of the emotional future in a manner that overcomes phenomenological confounds between positive and negative events. The results show that pulvinar nucleus and orbitofrontal cortex respectively demonstrate selective reductions in neural activity in response to frequently as compared to infrequently repeated simulations of negative and positive future events. Implications for research on repeated simulations of the emotional future in both non-clinical and clinical populations are discussed. PMID:26390294

  3. Reduction of Free Edge Peeling Stress of Laminated Composites Using Active Piezoelectric Layers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Kim, Heung Soo

    2014-01-01

    An analytical approach is proposed in the reduction of free edge peeling stresses of laminated composites using active piezoelectric layers. The approach is the extended Kantorovich method which is an iterative method. Multiterms of trial function are employed and governing equations are derived by taking the principle of complementary virtual work. The solutions are obtained by solving a generalized eigenvalue problem. By this approach, the stresses automatically satisfy not only the traction-free boundary conditions, but also the free edge boundary conditions. Through the iteration processes, the free edge stresses converge very quickly. It is found that the peeling stresses generated by mechanical loadings are significantly reduced by applying a proper electric field to the piezoelectric actuators. PMID:25025088

  4. Early reduction in toe flexor strength is associated with physical activity in elderly men

    PubMed Central

    Suwa, Masataka; Imoto, Takayuki; Kida, Akira; Yokochi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the toe flexor, hand grip and knee extensor strengths of young and elderly men, and to examine the association between toe flexor strength and physical activity or inactivity levels. [Subjects and Methods] Young (n=155, 18–23 years) and elderly (n=60, 65–88 years) men participated in this study. Toe flexor, hand grip, and knee extensor strength were measured. Physical activity (time spent standing/walking per day) and inactivity (time spent sitting per day) were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. [Results] Toe flexor, hand grip, and knee extensor strength of the elderly men were significantly lower than those of the young men. Standing/walking and sitting times of the elderly men were lower than those of the young men. Toe flexor strength correlated with hand grip and knee extensor strength in both groups. In elderly men, toe flexor strength correlated with standing/walking time. In comparison to the young men’s mean values, toe flexor strength was significantly lower than knee extensor and hand grip strength in the elderly group. [Conclusion] The results suggest that age-related reduction in toe flexor strength is greater than those of hand grip and knee extensor strengths. An early loss of toe flexor strength is likely associated with reduced physical activity in elderly men. PMID:27313353

  5. Highly active trialkoxymolybdenum(VI) alkylidyne catalysts synthesized by a reductive recycle strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Kraft, Stefan; Moore, Jeffrey S

    2004-01-14

    A systematic study of alkyne metathesis catalyzed by trialkoxymolybdenum(VI) alkylidyne complexes is reported, in which substrate functional groups, alkynyl substituents, and catalyst ligands are varied. Sterically hindered trisamidomolybdenum(VI) propylidyne complex 5 was prepared conveniently through a previously communicated reductive recycle strategy. Alcoholysis of 5 with various phenols/alcohols provides a set of active catalysts for alkyne metathesis at room temperature, among which the catalyst with p-nitrophenol as ligand shows the highest catalytic activity and is compatible with a variety of functional groups and solvents. A key finding that enabled the use of highly active molybdenum(VI) catalysts is replacement of the commonly used propynyl substituents on the starting alkyne substrates with butynyl groups. Under reduced pressure using 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene as an involatile solvent, the alkyne metathesis of butynyl substituted compounds proceeds well at 30 degrees C providing high yields (83%-97%) of dimers. Rationalization of the special role played by butynyl substrates is discussed.

  6. Isolated metal active site concentration and stability control catalytic CO2 reduction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Matsubu, John C; Yang, Vanessa N; Christopher, Phillip

    2015-03-01

    CO2 reduction by H2 on heterogeneous catalysts is an important class of reactions that has been studied for decades. However, atomic scale details of structure-function relationships are still poorly understood. Particularly, it has been suggested that metal particle size plays a unique role in controlling the stability of CO2 hydrogenation catalysts and the distribution of active sites, which dictates reactivity and selectivity. These studies often have not considered the possible role of isolated metal active sites in the observed dependences. Here, we utilize probe molecule diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) with known site-specific extinction coefficients to quantify the fraction of Rh sites residing as atomically dispersed isolated sites (Rhiso), as well as Rh sites on the surface of Rh nanoparticles (RhNP) for a series of TiO2 supported Rh catalysts. Strong correlations were observed between the catalytic reverse water gas shift turn over frequency (TOF) and the fraction of Rhiso sites and between catalytic methanation TOF and the fraction of RhNP sites. Furthermore, it was observed that reaction condition-induced disintegration of Rh nanoparticles, forming Rhiso active sites, controls the changing reactivity with time on stream. This work demonstrates that isolated atoms and nanoparticles of the same metal on the same support can exhibit uniquely different catalytic selectivity in competing parallel reaction pathways and that disintegration of nanoparticles under reaction conditions can play a significant role in controlling stability.

  7. Cerebral Activity Associated with Transient Sleep-Facilitated Reduction in Motor Memory Vulnerability to Interference

    PubMed Central

    Albouy, Geneviève; King, Bradley R.; Schmidt, Christina; Desseilles, Martin; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Balteau, Evelyne; Phillips, Christophe; Degueldre, Christian; Orban, Pierre; Benali, Habib; Peigneux, Philippe; Luxen, André; Karni, Avi; Doyon, Julien; Maquet, Pierre; Korman, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Motor memory consolidation is characterized, in part, by a sleep-facilitated decrease in susceptibility to subsequent interfering experiences. Surprisingly, the cerebral substrates supporting this phenomenon have never been examined. We used fMRI to investigate the neural correlates of the influence of sleep on interference to motor memory consolidation. Healthy young adults were trained on a sequential motor task, and subsequently practiced a second competing sequence after an interval including diurnal sleep or wakefulness. Participants were then retested on the initial sequence 8 h and 24 h (including nocturnal sleep) after training. Results demonstrated that a post-training nap significantly protected memory against interference at 8 h and modulated the link between cerebral activity and behavior, such that a smaller post-interference decrease in cortico-striatal activity was associated with better performance. Interestingly, the protective effect of a nap was only transitory, as both groups performed similarly at 24 h. Activity in cortico-striatal areas that was disrupted during the day, presumably due to interference and accentuated in the absence of a nap, was restored overnight. Altogether, our findings offer the first evidence that cortico-striatal areas play a critical role in the transient sleep-facilitated reduction in motor memory vulnerability and in the overnight restoration of previously degraded memories. PMID:27725727

  8. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M.; Crooks, Richard M.; et al

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) core–shell Pt~Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shownmore » to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.« less

  9. Palladium–platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T.; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2015-01-01

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can be attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. These results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability. PMID:26133469

  10. Palladium–platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T.; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A.; et al

    2015-07-02

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can bemore » attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. Ultimately, these results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability.« less

  11. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M.; Crooks, Richard M.; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Liu, Ping

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) core–shell Pt~Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shown to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.

  12. Photocatalytic reduction synthesis of SrTiO3-graphene nanocomposites and their enhanced photocatalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SrTiO3-graphene nanocomposites were prepared via photocatalytic reduction of graphene oxide by UV light-irradiated SrTiO3 nanoparticles. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy analysis indicates that graphene oxide is reduced into graphene. Transmission electron microscope observation shows that SrTiO3 nanoparticles are well assembled onto graphene sheets. The photocatalytic activity of as-prepared SrTiO3-graphene composites was evaluated by the degradation of acid orange 7 (AO7) under a 254-nm UV irradiation, revealing that the composites exhibit significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity compared to the bare SrTiO3 nanoparticles. This can be explained by the fact that photogenerated electrons are captured by graphene, leading to an increased separation and availability of electrons and holes for the photocatalytic reaction. Hydroxyl (·OH) radicals were detected by the photoluminescence technique using terephthalic acid as a probe molecule and were found to be produced over the irradiated SrTiO3 nanoparticles and SrTiO3-graphene composites; especially, an enhanced yield is observed for the latter. The influence of ethanol, KI, and N2 on the photocatalytic efficiency was also investigated. Based on the experimental results, ·OH, h+, and H2O2 are suggested to be the main active species in the photocatalytic degradation of AO7 by SrTiO3-graphene composites. PACS 61.46. + w; 78.67.Bf; 78.66.Sq PMID:25050089

  13. Isolated metal active site concentration and stability control catalytic CO2 reduction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Matsubu, John C; Yang, Vanessa N; Christopher, Phillip

    2015-03-01

    CO2 reduction by H2 on heterogeneous catalysts is an important class of reactions that has been studied for decades. However, atomic scale details of structure-function relationships are still poorly understood. Particularly, it has been suggested that metal particle size plays a unique role in controlling the stability of CO2 hydrogenation catalysts and the distribution of active sites, which dictates reactivity and selectivity. These studies often have not considered the possible role of isolated metal active sites in the observed dependences. Here, we utilize probe molecule diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) with known site-specific extinction coefficients to quantify the fraction of Rh sites residing as atomically dispersed isolated sites (Rhiso), as well as Rh sites on the surface of Rh nanoparticles (RhNP) for a series of TiO2 supported Rh catalysts. Strong correlations were observed between the catalytic reverse water gas shift turn over frequency (TOF) and the fraction of Rhiso sites and between catalytic methanation TOF and the fraction of RhNP sites. Furthermore, it was observed that reaction condition-induced disintegration of Rh nanoparticles, forming Rhiso active sites, controls the changing reactivity with time on stream. This work demonstrates that isolated atoms and nanoparticles of the same metal on the same support can exhibit uniquely different catalytic selectivity in competing parallel reaction pathways and that disintegration of nanoparticles under reaction conditions can play a significant role in controlling stability. PMID:25671686

  14. Electrochemical activation of commercial polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haibo; Xia, Guangsen; Liu, Haining; Xia, Shuwei; Lu, Yonghong

    2015-03-28

    Nitrogen (N)-doped carbon and its non-noble metal composite replacing platinum-based oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts still have some fundamental problems that remain. Here the micron-sized commercial polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber (PAN-CF) electrode was modified using an electrochemical method, converting its inherent pyridinic-N into 2-pyridone (or 2-hydroxyl pyridine) functional group existing in three-dimensional active layers with remarkable ORR catalytic activity and stability. The carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen and oxygen atoms is prone to act as an active site to efficiently catalyze a two-electron ORR process. However, after coordinating pyridone to the Cu(2+) ion, together with the electrochemical reaction, the chemical redox between Cu(+) and ORR intermediates synergistically tends towards a four-electron pathway in alkaline solution. In different medium, the complexation and dissociation can induce the charge transfer and reconstruction among proton, metal ion and pyridone functionalities, eventually leading to the changes of ORR performance. PMID:25712410

  15. Early reduction in toe flexor strength is associated with physical activity in elderly men.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Masataka; Imoto, Takayuki; Kida, Akira; Yokochi, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] To compare the toe flexor, hand grip and knee extensor strengths of young and elderly men, and to examine the association between toe flexor strength and physical activity or inactivity levels. [Subjects and Methods] Young (n=155, 18-23 years) and elderly (n=60, 65-88 years) men participated in this study. Toe flexor, hand grip, and knee extensor strength were measured. Physical activity (time spent standing/walking per day) and inactivity (time spent sitting per day) were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. [Results] Toe flexor, hand grip, and knee extensor strength of the elderly men were significantly lower than those of the young men. Standing/walking and sitting times of the elderly men were lower than those of the young men. Toe flexor strength correlated with hand grip and knee extensor strength in both groups. In elderly men, toe flexor strength correlated with standing/walking time. In comparison to the young men's mean values, toe flexor strength was significantly lower than knee extensor and hand grip strength in the elderly group. [Conclusion] The results suggest that age-related reduction in toe flexor strength is greater than those of hand grip and knee extensor strengths. An early loss of toe flexor strength is likely associated with reduced physical activity in elderly men. PMID:27313353

  16. Synthesis of highly active and dual-functional electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Geng; Xu, Guangran; Li, Yingjun; Liu, Baocang; Gong, Xia; Zheng, Dafang; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Qin

    2016-12-01

    The promising Pt-based ternary catalyst is crucial for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) due to improving catalytic activity and durability for both methanol oxidation reaction and oxygen reduction reaction. In this work, a facile strategy is used for the synthesis ternary RuMPt (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) nanodendrities catalysts. The ternary RuMPt alloys exhibit enhanced specific and mass activity, positive half-wave potential, and long-term stability, compared with binary Pt-based alloy and the commercial Pt/C catalyst, which is attributed to the high electron density and upshifting of the d-band center for Pt atoms, and synergistic catalytic effects among Pt, M, and Ru atoms by introducing a transition metal. Impressively, the ternary RuCoPt catalyst exhibits superior mass activity (801.59 mA mg-1) and positive half-wave potential (0.857 V vs. RHE) towards MOR and ORR, respectively. Thus, the RuMPt nanocomposite is a very promising material to be used as dual electrocatalyst in the application of PEMFCs.

  17. Update on Risk Reduction Activities for a Liquid Advanced Booster for NASA's Space Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, Andrew M.; Doering, Kimberly B; Meadows, Robert G.; Lariviere, Brian W.; Graham, Jerry B.

    2015-01-01

    The stated goals of NASA's Research Announcement for the Space Launch System (SLS) Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction (ABEDRR) are to reduce risks leading to an affordable Advanced Booster that meets the evolved capabilities of SLS; and enable competition by mitigating targeted Advanced Booster risks to enhance SLS affordability. Dynetics, Inc. and Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) formed a team to offer a wide-ranging set of risk reduction activities and full-scale, system-level demonstrations that support NASA's ABEDRR goals. For NASA's SLS ABEDRR procurement, Dynetics and AR formed a team to offer a series of full-scale risk mitigation hardware demonstrations for an affordable booster approach that meets the evolved capabilities of the SLS. To establish a basis for the risk reduction activities, the Dynetics Team developed a booster design that takes advantage of the flight-proven Apollo-Saturn F-1. Using NASA's vehicle assumptions for the SLS Block 2, a two-engine, F-1-based booster design delivers 150 mT (331 klbm) payload to LEO, 20 mT (44 klbm) above NASA's requirements. This enables a low-cost, robust approach to structural design. During the ABEDRR effort, the Dynetics Team has modified proven Apollo-Saturn components and subsystems to improve affordability and reliability (e.g., reduce parts counts, touch labor, or use lower cost manufacturing processes and materials). The team has built hardware to validate production costs and completed tests to demonstrate it can meet performance requirements. State-of-the-art manufacturing and processing techniques have been applied to the heritage F-1, resulting in a low recurring cost engine while retaining the benefits of Apollo-era experience. NASA test facilities have been used to perform low-cost risk-reduction engine testing. In early 2014, NASA and the Dynetics Team agreed to move additional large liquid oxygen/kerosene engine work under Dynetics' ABEDRR contract. Also led by AR, the

  18. Stability and activity of alcohol dehydrogenases in W/O-microemulsions: enantioselective reduction including cofactor regeneration.

    PubMed

    Orlich, B; Berger, H; Lade, M; Schomäcker, R

    2000-12-20

    Microemulsions provide an interesting alternative to classical methods for the conversion of less water-soluble substrates by alcohol dehydrogenase, but until now stability and activity were too low for economically useful processes. The activity and stability of the enzymes are dependent on the microemulsion composition, mostly the water and the surfactant concentration. Therefore, it is necessary to know the exact phase behavior of a given microemulsion reaction system and the corresponding enzyme behavior therein. Because of their economic and ecologic suitability polyethoxylated fatty alcohols were investigated concerning their phase behavior and their compatibility with enzymes in ternary mixtures. The phase behavior of Marlipal O13-60 (C13EO6 in industrial quality)/cyclohexane/water and its effect on the activity and stability of alcohol dehydrogenase from Yeast (YADH) and horse liver (HLADH) and the carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis (CPCR) is presented in this study. Beside the macroscopic phase behavior of the reaction system, the viscosity of the system indicates structural changes of aggregates in the microemulsion. The changes of the enzyme activities with the composition are discussed on the basis of transitions from reverse micelles to swollen reverse micelles and finally, the transition to the phase separation. The formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii was used for the NADH-regeneration during reduction reactions. While the formate dehydrogenase did not show any kinetic effect on the microemulsion composition, the other enzymes show significant changes of activity and stability varying the water or surfactant concentration of the microemulsion. Under certain conditions, stability could be maintained with HLADH for several weeks. Successful experiments with semi-batch processes including cofactor regeneration and product separation were performed.

  19. Reprint of: Active subspaces for sensitivity analysis and dimension reduction of an integrated hydrologic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferson, Jennifer L.; Gilbert, James M.; Constantine, Paul G.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2016-05-01

    Integrated hydrologic models coupled to land surface models require several input parameters to characterize the land surface and to estimate energy fluxes. Uncertainty of input parameter values is inherent in any model and the sensitivity of output to these uncertain parameters becomes an important consideration. To better understand these connections in the context of hydrologic models, we use the ParFlow-Common Land Model (PF-CLM) to estimate energy fluxes given variations in 19 vegetation and land surface parameters over a 144-hour period of time. Latent, sensible and ground heat fluxes from bare soil and grass vegetation were estimated using single column and tilted-v domains. Energy flux outputs, along with the corresponding input parameters, from each of the four scenario simulations were evaluated using active subspaces. The active subspace method considers parameter sensitivity by quantifying a weight for each parameter. The method also evaluates the potential for dimension reduction by identifying the input-output relationship through the active variable - a linear combination of input parameters. The aerodynamic roughness length was the most important parameter for bare soil energy fluxes. Multiple parameters were important for energy fluxes from vegetated surfaces and depended on the type of energy flux. Relationships between land surface inputs and output fluxes varied between latent, sensible and ground heat, but were consistent between domain setup (i.e., with or without lateral flow) and vegetation type. A quadratic polynomial was used to describe the input-output relationship for these energy fluxes. The reduced-dimension model of land surface dynamics can be compared to observations or used to solve the inverse problem. Considering this work as a proof-of-concept, the active subspace method can be applied and extended to a range of domain setups, land cover types and time periods to obtain a reduced-form representation of any output of interest

  20. Density Functional Theory Study of Oxygen Reduction Activity on Ultrathin Platinum Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Matanovic, Ivana; Kent, Paul; Garzon, Fernando; Henson, Neil J.

    2012-07-13

    The structure, stability, and catalytic activity of a number of single- and double-wall platinum (n,m) nanotubes ranging in diameter from 0.3 to 2.0 nm were studied using plane-wave based density functional theory in the gas phase and water environment. The change in the catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with the size and chirality of the nanotube was studied by calculating equilibrium adsorption potentials for ORR intermediates and by constructing free energy diagrams in the ORR dissociative mechanism network. In addition, the stability of the platinum nanotubes is investigated in terms of electrochemical dissolution potentials and by determining the most stable state of the material as a function of pH and potential, as represented in Pourbaix diagrams. Our results show that the catalytic activity and the stability toward electrochemical dissolution depend greatly on the diameter and chirality of the nanotube. On the basis of the estimated overpotentials for ORR, we conclude that smaller, approximately 0.5 nm in diameter single-wall platinum nanotubes consistently show a huge, up to 400 mV larger overpotential than platinum, indicating very poor catalytic activity toward ORR. This is the result of substantial structural changes induced by the adsorption of any chemical species on these tubes. Single-wall n = m platinum nanotubes with a diameter larger than 1 nm have smaller ORR overpotentials than bulk platinum for up to 180 mV and thus show improved catalytic activity relative to bulk. We also predict that these nanotubes can endure the highest cell potentials but dissolution potentials are still for 110 mV lower than for the bulk, indicating a possible corrosion problem.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, COAL DERIVED, PROMOTED CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph M. Calo

    1998-12-31

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics. During the reporting period, the following has been accomplished: (1) A MS-TGA (mass spectrometric-thermogravimetric analysis) apparatus, which is one of the primary instruments that will be used in these studies, has been refurbished and modified to meet the requirements of this project. A NO{sub x} chemiluminescence analyzer (ThermoElectron, Model 10) has been added to the instrument to monitor NO{sub x} concentrations in the feed and product streams. Computer control and data acquisition system has been updated and modified to accommodate the requirements of the specific types of experiments planned. The diffusion pumps used to maintain vacuum for the mass spectrometer system have been replaced with turbomolecular pumps (Varian 300 HT). (2) A packed bed reactor/gas flow system has been assembled for performing reactivity studies. This system employs a Kin-Tek gas calibration/mixing system for varying NO and CO concentrations in the feed gas to the packed bed, a NO{sub x} chemiluminescence analyzer (ThermoElectron, Model 10), and a quadrupole mass spectrometer (Dycor). This system is required for steady-state reactivity studies, as well as mechanistic studies on the effects of NO and CO in the gas phase on intermediate oxygen surface complex populations on the carbon substrates. (3) Work has continued on the application of contrast matching, small angle neutron scattering to the characterization and development of char porosity. Contrast matching with perdeuterated toluene has

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, COAL-DERIVED, PROMOTED CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph M. Calo

    2000-07-24

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics. During the reporting period, TPD studies were conducted following steady-state reaction in NO/CO mixtures in helium. From these studies, the following points have been concluded: (1) The total amount of CO and N{sub 2} evolved following reaction in NO increases with reaction temperature. The TPD spectra are skewed to high temperatures, indicating more stable surface complexes with high desorption activation energies. (2) The total amount of CO evolved following exposure of the char sample to CO at reaction temperatures decreases with reaction temperature, similar to chemisorption behavior. The CO TPD spectra are shifted to lower temperatures, indicating more labile oxygen surface complexes with lower desorption activation energies. (3) The total amount of CO evolved following reaction in NO/CO mixtures decreases with reaction temperature, while the evolved N{sub 2} still increases with reaction temperature. The CO TPD spectra appear more similar to those obtained following exposure to pure CO, while the N{sub 2} TPD spectra are more similar to those obtained followed reaction in just CO. Based on the preceding observations, a simple mechanism was formulated whereby two different types of surface complexes are formed by NO and CO; the former are more stable, and the latter more labile. This produces two parallel routes for the NO-carbon reaction: (a) the C(O) complexes formed directly by NO desorb as CO; and (b) The C(CO) complexes formed by CO, react with NO to produce CO{sub 2

  3. Influence of pulsed mechanical activation of hematite-graphite-aluminum powder mixtures on the reduction of iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodrova, L. E.; Vatolin, N. A.; Pastukhov, E. A.; Petrova, S. A.; Popova, E. A.; Zakharov, R. G.

    2011-11-01

    To decrease the temperature of direct iron reduction by carbon and aluminum, short-term pulsed mechanical activation (PMA) of an Fe2O3 + Cgr + Al powder mixture is perfumed during sound-frequency shock loading by a flat activating plunger. The PMA efficiency for powders in comparable with mechanical activation in high-energy ball mills in a decrease in the activation time and retaining the chemical purity of a powder composition.

  4. Highly active PtAu alloy nanoparticle catalysts for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianming; Chen, Guozhu; Guay, Daniel; Chaker, Mohamed; Ma, Dongling

    2014-02-21

    To enhance the catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the hydrogenation of nitro-aromatic chemicals, Pt was introduced into AuNPs to form "bare" PtAu alloy NPs using a physical approach, pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL), on single metal-mixture targets. These PLAL-NPs are deemed to favor catalysis due to the absence of any surfactant molecules on their unique "bare and clean" surface. The PLAL-NPs were facilely assembled onto CeO2 nanotubes (NTs) by simply mixing them without conducting any surface functionalization, representing another advantage of these NPs. Their catalytic activity was assessed in 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) hydrogenation. The reaction catalyzed by alloy-NP/CeO2-NT catalysts demonstrates a remarkably higher reaction rate in comparison with that catalyzed by pure Au and Pt NPs, and other similar Au and Pt containing catalysts reported recently. A "volcano-like" catalytic activity dependence of the alloy NPs on their chemical composition suggests a strong synergistic effect between Au and Pt in the 4-NP reduction, far beyond the simple sum of their individual contributions. It leads to the significantly enhanced catalytic activity of Pt30Au70 and Pt50Au50 alloy NPs, outperforming not only each single constituent, but also their physical mixtures and most recently reported AuNP based nanocatalysts. The favorable d-band center shift of Pt after alloying, and co-operative actions between Pt clusters and nearby Au (or mixed PtAu) sites were proposed as possible mechanisms to explain such a strong synergistic effect on catalysis.

  5. Night Activity Reduction is a Signature Physiological Biomarker for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Chady H.; Peters, Austin A.; Feng, Feng; Yao, Gang; Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease. Dystrophic dogs are excellent models to test novel therapies for DMD. However, the use of the dog model has been hindered by the lack of an effective method to evaluate whole-body mobility. We recently showed that night activity is a good indicator of dog mobility. However, our published method relies on frame-by-frame manual processing of a 12-hour video for each dog. This labor-intensive and time-consuming approach makes it unrealistic to use this assay as a routine outcome measurement. Objective To solve this problem, we developed an automatic video-capturing/imaging processing system. The new system reduces the data analysis time over 1,000 fold and also provides a more detailed activity profile of the dog. Methods Using the new system, we analyzed more than 120 twelve-hour recordings from 12 normal and 22 affected dogs. Results We observed similar activity profiles during repeated recording of the same dog. Throughout the night, normal dogs were in motion 10.4 ± 0.9% of the time while affected dogs were in motion 4.6 ± 0.2% of the time (p < 0.0001). Further, normal dogs made significantly more movements (p < 0.0001) while affected dogs rested significantly longer (p < 0.0001) during the period of recording (from 6 pm to 6 am next day). Importantly, statistical significance persisted irrespective of the coat color, gender and mutation type. Conclusions Our results suggest that night activity reduction is a robust, quantitative physiological biomarker for dystrophic dogs. The new system may be applicable to study mobility in other species.

  6. Active Vitamin D Treatment for Reduction of Residual Proteinuria: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    de Borst, Martin H.; Hajhosseiny, Reza; Tamez, Hector; Wenger, Julia; Thadhani, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Despite renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade, which retards progression of CKD by reducing proteinuria, many patients with CKD have residual proteinuria, an independent risk factor for disease progression. We aimed to address whether active vitamin D analogs reduce residual proteinuria. We systematically searched for trials published between 1950 and September of 2012 in the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases. All randomized controlled trials of vitamin D analogs in patients with CKD that reported an effect on proteinuria with sample size≥50 were selected. Mean differences of proteinuria change over time and odds ratios for reaching ≥15% proteinuria decrease from baseline to last measurement were synthesized under a random effects model. From 907 citations retrieved, six studies (four studies with paricalcitol and two studies with calcitriol) providing data for 688 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Most patients (84%) used an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker throughout the study. Active vitamin D analogs reduced proteinuria (weighted mean difference from baseline to last measurement was −16% [95% CI, −13% to −18%]) compared with controls (+6% [95% CI, 0% to +12%]; P<0.001). Proteinuria reduction was achieved more commonly in patients treated with an active vitamin D analog (204/390 patients) than control patients (86/298 patients; OR, 2.72 [95% CI, 1.82 to 4.07]; P<0.001). Thus, active vitamin D analogs may further reduce proteinuria in CKD patients in addition to current regimens. Future studies should address whether vitamin D therapy also retards progressive renal functional decline. PMID:23929770

  7. Synthesis of Pt-Ni/graphene via in situ reduction and its enhanced catalyst activity for methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Lihong; Wu, Yuen; Lu, Jun; Nan, Caiyun; Li, Yadong

    2013-09-01

    A simple in situ reduction approach was used to obtain Pt3Ni/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with dominant {111} facets. The catalytic activity of Pt-Ni/rGO toward methanol electro-oxidation was studied by performing cyclic voltammetry. The Pt3Ni/rGO nanocatalysts exhibited improved catalytic activity and durability. PMID:23863973

  8. Reduction-responsive multifunctional hyperbranched polyaminoglycosides with excellent antibacterial activity, biocompatibility and gene transfection capability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yajun; Ding, Xiaokang; Qi, Yu; Yu, Bingran; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2016-11-01

    There is an increasing demand in developing of multifunctional materials with good antibacterial activity, biocompatibility and drug/gene delivery capability for next-generation biomedical applications. To achieve this purpose, in this work series of hydroxyl-rich hyperbranched polyaminoglycosides of gentamicin, tobramycin, and neomycin (HP and SS-HP with redox-responsive disulfide bonds) were readily synthesized via ring-opening reactions in a one-pot manner. Both HP and SS-HP exhibit high antibacterial activity toward Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Meanwhile, the hemolysis assay of the above materials shows good biocompatibility. Moreover, SS-HPs show excellent gene transfection efficiency in vitro due to the breakdown of reduction-responsive disulfide bonds. For an in vivo anti-tumor assay, the SS-HP/p53 complexes exhibit potent inhibition capability to the growth of tumors. This study provides a promising approach for the design of next-generation multifunctional biomedical materials. PMID:27561884

  9. Reduction of COD in refinery wastewater through adsorption on date-pit activated carbon.

    PubMed

    El-Naas, Muftah H; Al-Zuhair, Sulaiman; Abu Alhaija, Manal

    2010-01-15

    Experiments were carried out to evaluate the batch adsorption of COD from petroleum refinery wastewater on a locally prepared date-pit activated carbon (DP-AC), and its adsorption effectiveness was compared to that of commercially available BDH activated carbon (BDH-AC). Adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data were determined for both adsorbents and fitted to several adsorption isotherm and kinetics models, respectively. The Langmuir monolayer isotherm fitted well the equilibrium data of COD on both adsorbents; whereas, the kinetics data were best fitted by the pseudo-second order model. Modeling of the controlling mechanisms indicated that both intrinsic kinetics and mass transfer contributed to controlling the adsorption process. Mass transfer seemed to be the dominant mechanism at low COD content, while intrinsic kinetics dominates at high concentrations. In general, the adsorption effectiveness of locally prepared DP-AC was proven to be comparable to that of BDH-AC. Therefore, DP-AC can be utilized as an effective and less expensive adsorbent for the reduction of COD in refinery wastewater.

  10. Active noise reduction systems: Their interaction with very low frequency acoustical energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, R. Brian

    1994-08-01

    Active noise reduction (ANR) is used for reducing noise at the ears of an observer through the action of interfering sound waves. Noise sensed by a microphone built into the observer's headset or helmet is processed and reintroduced into the ear cup cavity out of phase with the original sound, thus cancelling the noise at the ear. Recent field experience has shown that system exposure to very high amplitude low-frequency sound, such as during the operation of helicopters, can lead to saturation or overload of the ANR electronics. Experiments using acoustical maniquins were conducted to assess the low-frequency behavior of ANR equipment. Results of measurement of the threshold of overload indicated large differences in the saturation thresholds among systems tested. Performance strongly depended on the integrity of the ear seal. Those systems offering active attenuation into the infrasound region tended to saturate most easily, but did create the best listening condition for the user when operated below the saturation threshold.

  11. Proteolytic activity of Enterococcus faecalis VB63F for reduction of allergenicity of bovine milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Biscola, V; Tulini, F L; Choiset, Y; Rabesona, H; Ivanova, I; Chobert, J-M; Todorov, S D; Haertlé, T; Franco, B D G M

    2016-07-01

    With the aim of screening proteolytic strains of lactic acid bacteria to evaluate their potential for the reduction of allergenicity of the major bovine milk proteins, we isolated a new proteolytic strain of Enterococcus faecalis (Ent. faecalis VB63F) from raw bovine milk. The proteases produced by this strain had strong activity against caseins (αS1-, αS2-, and β-casein), in both skim milk and sodium caseinate. However, only partial hydrolysis of whey proteins was observed. Proteolysis of Na-caseinate and whey proteins, observed after sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE, was confirmed by analysis of peptide profiles by reversed-phase HPLC. Inhibition of proteolysis with EDTA indicated that the proteases produced by Ent. faecalis VB63F belonged to the group of metalloproteases. The optimal conditions for their activity were 42°C and pH 6.5. The majority of assessed virulence genes were absent in Ent. faecalis VB63F. The obtained results suggest that Ent. faecalis VB63F could be efficient in reducing the immunoreactivity of bovine milk proteins. PMID:27179865

  12. Electrocatalytic activity of various types of h-BN for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Elumalai, Ganesan; Noguchi, Hidenori; Uosaki, Kohei

    2014-07-21

    The electrocatalytic activities of various types of h-BN, i.e., spin coated BN nanotubes (BNNTs) and BN nanosheets (BNNSs) and sputter deposited BN, on Au electrodes as well as those of BNNS modified glassy carbon (GC) and Pt electrodes for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were examined in O2 saturated 0.5 M H2SO4 solution based on the theoretical prediction that monolayered BN on a metal substrate may act as an electrocatalyst for ORR even though bulk BN is an insulator with a wide band gap. The overpotential for ORR at Au electrodes was reduced by ca. 100, ca. 270, and ca. 150 mV by spin coating of the dispersion of BNNT and liquid exfoliated BNNS, and sputter deposition of BN, respectively, proving the theoretical prediction. On the other hand, no change in the overpotential was observed at the glassy carbon electrode with BNNS modification and the overpotential even increased at the Pt electrode, suggesting that the interaction between BN and Au plays an important role in BN becoming ORR active.

  13. Ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons with very high electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jae Yeong; Kim, Taeyoung; Choi, YongMan; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Min Gyu; Sa, Young Jin; Kim, Jaesik; Lee, Zonghoon; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Kwon, Kyungjung; Terasaki, Osamu; Park, Gu-Gon; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The high cost of the platinum-based cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has impeded the widespread application of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. We report on a new family of non-precious metal catalysts based on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons (M-OMPC; M = Fe, Co, or FeCo) with high surface areas and tunable pore structures, which were prepared by nanocasting mesoporous silica templates with metalloporphyrin precursors. The FeCo-OMPC catalyst exhibited an excellent ORR activity in an acidic medium, higher than other non-precious metal catalysts. It showed higher kinetic current at 0.9 V than Pt/C catalysts, as well as superior long-term durability and MeOH-tolerance. Density functional theory calculations in combination with extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis revealed a weakening of the interaction between oxygen atom and FeCo-OMPC compared to Pt/C. This effect and high surface area of FeCo-OMPC appear responsible for its significantly high ORR activity. PMID:24056308

  14. Proteolytic Activity in Soybean Root Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Nancy E.; Torres, Cecilia M.; Wagner, Fred W.

    1983-01-01

    Root nodules were harvested from chamber-grown soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill cv Woodworth) plants throughout development. Apparent nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction) peaked before seeds began to develop, but a significant amount of activity remained as the seeds matured. Nodule senescence was defined as the period in which residual nitrogenase activity was lost. During this time, soluble protein and leghemoglobin levels in the host cell cytosol decreased, and proteolytic activity against azocasein increased. Degradative changes were not detected in bacteroids during nodule senescence. Total soluble bacteroid protein per gram of nodule remained constant, and an increase in proteolytic activity in bacteroid extracts was not observed. These results are consistent with the view that soybean nodule bacteroids are capable of redifferentiation into free-living bacteria upon deterioration of the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. PMID:16662910

  15. Mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction via micro-electrolysis at the powdered zero-valent iron/activated carbon interface.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinghuan; Song, Guangyu; Liu, Jianyong; Qian, Guangren; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) powder always works well only at controlled pH lower than 4 due to the formation of iron (hydr)oxides on its surface. Fe(0) powder combined with activated carbon (AC), i.e., Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis system, was first introduced to enhance nitrate reduction in aqueous solution. Comparative study was carried out to investigate nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC system and Fe(0) under near-neutral conditions, showing that the Fe(0)/AC system successfully reduced nitrate even at initial pH 6 with the reduction efficiency of up to 73%, whereas for Fe(0) only ∼10%. The effect of Fe(0) to AC mass ratio on nitrate reduction efficiency was examined. Easier nitrate reduction was achieved with more contact between Fe(0) and AC as the result of decreasing Fe(0) to AC mass ratio. Ferrous ion and oxidation-reduction potential were measured to understand the mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis. The results suggest that a relative potential difference drives much more electrons from Fe(0) to AC, thus generating adsorbed atomic hydrogen which makes it possible for nitrate to be reduced at near-neural pH. Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis thus presents a great potential for practical application in nitrate wastewater treatment without excessive pH adjustment. PMID:25217726

  16. Low pressure R.F. plasma reactions in light hydrocarbons. Ethylene and acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepa, Pietro; Castello, Gianrico; Nicchia, Mario; Munari, Stelio

    The results obtained in the plasmolysis of ethylene and acetylene in an inductively coupled radiofrequency glow discharge are reported. A static system at a constant initial pressure of 0.5 torr and input power of 50 W was used; the gaseous and polymeric products were evaluated and compared with previous data on ethane plasmolysis and other available literature data. The decomposition products of ethylene were similar to those obtained during the plasmolysis of ethane, with a different distribution and a smaller initial increase of the total pressure. The total pressure of acetylene quickly decreased to near zero value at small specific energy, due to rapid polymerization. No gaseous products were detected, except hydrogen and traces of diacetylene.

  17. Carbide sludge management in acetylene producing plants by using vacuum filtration.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Palanisamy; Periathamby, Agamuthu; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2002-12-01

    Carbide sludge (10.4-11.5 tonnes day(-1)) is generated from the reaction of calcium carbide (900 kg) and water (6,000 L) in the production of acetylene (2,400 m3), in three selected acetylene manufacturing plants. The sludge (of pH 12.2 and containing Cu, Pb, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn ions whose concentrations exceed the Department of Environment limits for industrial wastewater) was treated by vacuum filtration as a substitute for the ponding system, which is environmentally less acceptable. A similar system by flocculation was also developed. The filtration system represents an improvement over the ponding method, as shown by a pH of 7 for the clear filtrate; the solid cake, which contains 98% of the metals, can be conveniently disposed at an integrated scheduled waste treatment centre.

  18. Formation of Large Ag Clusters with Shells of Methane, Ethylene, and Acetylene in He Droplets.

    PubMed

    Loginov, Evgeny; Gomez, Luis F; Sartakov, Boris G; Vilesov, Andrey F

    2016-09-01

    Helium droplets were used to assemble composite metal-molecular clusters. Produced clusters have several hundreds of silver atoms in the core, immersed in a shell consisting of methane, ethylene, or acetylene molecules. The structure of the clusters was studied via infrared spectra of the C-H stretches of the hydrocarbon molecules. The spectra of the clusters containing methane and acetylene show two distinct features due to molecules on the interface with silver core and those in the volume of the neat molecular part of the clusters. The relative intensities of the peaks are in good agreement with the estimates based on the number of the captured particles. Experiments also suggest that selection rules for infrared transitions for molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces are also valid for silver clusters as small as 300 atoms. PMID:27500443

  19. Isotope effect in normal-to-local transition of acetylene bending modes

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Jianyi; Xu, Dingguo; Guo, Hua; Tyng, Vivian; Kellman, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The normal-to-local transition for the bending modes of acetylene is considered a prelude to its isomerization to vinylidene. Here, such a transition in fully deuterated acetylene is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum model. It is found that the local benders emerge at much lower energies and bending quantum numbers than in the hydrogen isotopomer HCCH. This is accompanied by a transition to a second kind of bending mode called counter-rotator, again at lower energies and quantum numbers than in HCCH. These transitions are also investigated using bifurcation analysis of two empirical spectroscopic fitting Hamiltonians for pure bending modes, which helpsmore » to understand the origin of the transitions semiclassically as branchings or bifurcations out of the trans and normal bend modes when the latter become dynamically unstable. The results of the quantum model and the empirical bifurcation analysis are in very good agreement.« less

  20. Theoretical and Experimental Evidence of Hydrogen Migration rather than Isomerization in the Acetylene Dication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liekhus-Schmaltz, Chelsea; Li, Zheng; Petrovic, Vladimir; Martinez, Todd; Bucksbaum, Phil; AMO75113 Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical calculations and experimental results in the acetylene dication have long agreed that isomerization after x-ray excitation occurs in the first singlet state, where the carbon-carbon bond lives long enough for isomerization to complete. These same calculations predict that a large barrier to isomerization exists that would cause isomerization to occur in about a picosecond, while there is some evidence for ultrafast isomerization in under 100 fs. However, new ab initio calculations of the acetylene dication reveal that ultrafast isomerization after x-ray excitation is unlikely. In this talk, we present evidence that signatures of hydrogen migration observed in recent time resolved LCLS data are mostly due to hydrogen migration in an excited state which dissociates too quickly for isomerization to complete. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-0649578.

  1. A detailed kinetic modeling study of aromatics formation in laminar premixed acetylene and ethylene flames

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Frenklach, M.

    1997-07-01

    A computational study was performed for the formation and growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in laminar premixed acetylene and ethylene flames. A new detailed reaction mechanism describing fuel pyrolysis and oxidation, benzene formation, and PAH mass growth and oxidation is presented and critically tested. It is shown that the reaction model predicts reasonably well the concentration profiles of major and intermediate species and aromatic molecules in a number of acetylene and ethylene flames reported in the literature. It is demonstrated that reactions of n-C{sub 4}H{sub x} + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} leading to the formation of one-ring aromatics are as important as the propargyl recombination, and hence must be included in kinetic modeling of PAH formation in hydrocarbon flames. It is further demonstrated that the mass growth of PAHs can be accounted for by the previously proposed H-abstraction-C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-addiction mechanism.

  2. Groundwater remediation engineering sparging using acetylene--study on the flow distribution of air.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Mei; Zhang, Ying; Huang, Guo-Qiang; Jiang, Bin; Li, Xin-Gang

    2005-01-01

    Air sparging (AS) is an emerging method to remove VOCs from saturated soils and groundwater. Air sparging performance highly depends on the air distribution resulting in the aquifer. In order to study gas flow characterization, a two-dimensional experimental chamber was designed and installed. In addition, the method by using acetylene as the tracer to directly image the gas distribution results of AS process has been put forward. Experiments were performed with different injected gas flow rates. The gas flow patterns were found to depend significantly on the injected gas flow rate, and the characterization of gas flow distributions in porous media was very different from the acetylene tracing study. Lower and higher gas flow rates generally yield more irregular in shape and less effective gas distributions.

  3. Enhancement of activity of RuSex electrocatalyst by modification with nanostructured iridium towards more efficient reduction of oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembinska, Beata; Kiliszek, Malgorzata; Elzanowska, Hanna; Pisarek, Marcin; Kulesza, Pawel J.

    2013-12-01

    Electrocatalytic activity of carbon (Vulcan XC-72) supported selenium-modified ruthenium, RuSex/C, nanoparticles for reduction of oxygen was enhanced through intentional decoration with iridium nanostructures (dimensions, 2-3 nm). The catalytic materials were characterized in oxygenated 0.5 mol dm-3 H2SO4 using cyclic and rotating ring disk voltammetric techniques as well as using transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy equipped with X-ray dispersive analyzer. Experiments utilizing gas diffusion electrode aimed at mimicking conditions existing in the low-temperature fuel cell. Upon application of our composite catalytic system, the reduction of oxygen proceeded at more positive potentials, and higher current densities were observed when compared to the behavior of the simple iridium-free system (RuSex/C) investigated under the analogous conditions. The enhancement effect was more pronounced than that one would expect from simple superposition of voltammetric responses for the oxygen reduction at RuSex/C and iridium nanostructures studied separately. Nanostructured iridium acted here as an example of a powerful catalyst for the reduction of H2O2 (rather than O2) and, when combined with such a moderate catalyst as ruthenium-selenium (for O2 reduction), it produced an integrated system of increased electrocatalytic activity in the oxygen reduction process. The proposed system retained its activity in the presence of methanol that could appear in a cathode compartment of alcohol fuel cell.

  4. Aging enhances a mechanically-induced reduction in tendon strength by an active process involving matrix metalloproteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Dudhia, Jayesh; Scott, Charlotte M; Draper, Edward R C; Heinegård, Dick; Pitsillides, Andrew A; Smith, Roger K

    2007-08-01

    Age-associated and degenerative loss of functional integrity in soft tissues develops from effects of cumulative and subtle changes in their extracellular matrix (ECM). The highly ordered tendon ECM provides the tissue with its tensile strength during loading. As age and exercise collide in the high incidence of tendinopathies, we hypothesized that aged tendons fail due to cumulative damage resulting from a combination of diminished matrix repair and fragmentation of ECM proteins induced by prolonged cyclical loading, and that this is an active cell-mediated process. We developed an equine tendon explant model to examine the effect of age on the influence of prolonged cyclical loading at physiologically relevant strain rates (5% strain, 1 Hz for 24 h) on tissue mechanical properties, loss of ECM protein and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. We show significantly diminished mechanical strength of cyclically loaded tissue compared to controls (39.7 +/- 12%, P reduction was dependent on the presence of both viable cells and metalloproteinase activity. Furthermore, tendon from older specimens was more susceptible to weakening (11-30 years, 50%P active process, and that MMPs may contribute to loss of functional competence, exaggerated by age, via load-induced proteolytic disruption of the ECM.

  5. Control of the nucleation and quality of graphene grown by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition with acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Sasaki, Shinichirou; Suzuki, Ken; Miura, Hideo

    2016-03-01

    Although many studies have reported the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of large-area monolayer graphene from methane, synthesis of graphene using acetylene as the source gas has not been fully explored. In this study, the low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) growth of graphene from acetylene was systematically investigated. We succeeded in regulating the domain size, defects density, layer number and the sheet resistance of graphene by changing the acetylene flow rates. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were employed to confirm the layer number, uniformity and quality of the graphene films. It is found that a low flow rate of acetylene (0.28 sccm) is required to form high-quality monolayer graphene in our system. On the other hand, the high acetylene flow rate (7 sccm) will induce the growth of the bilayer graphene domains with high defects density. On the basis of selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern, the as-grown monolayer graphene domains were analyzed to be polycrystal. We also discussed the relation between the sheet resistacne and defects density in graphene. Our results provide great insights into the understanding of the CVD growth of monolayer and bilayer graphene from acetylene.

  6. Probing Ionic Complexes of Ethylene and Acetylene with Vacuum-Ultraviolet Radiation.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Stein, Tamar; Fang, Yigang; Kostko, Oleg; White, Alec; Head-Gordon, Martin; Ahmed, Musahid

    2016-07-14

    Mixed complexes of acetylene-ethylene are studied using vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry and theoretical calculations. These complexes are produced and ionized at different distances from the exit of a continuous nozzle followed by reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection. Acetylene, with a higher ionization energy (11.4 eV) than ethylene (10.6 eV), allows for tuning the VUV energy and initializing reactions either from a C2H2(+) or a C2H4(+) cation. Pure acetylene and ethylene expansions are separately carried out to compare, contrast, and hence identify products from the mixed expansion: these are C3H3(+) (m/z = 39), C4H5(+) (m/z = 53), and C5H5(+) (m/z = 65). Intensity distributions of C2H2, C2H4, their dimers and reactions products are plotted as a function of ionization distance. These distributions suggest that association mechanisms play a crucial role in product formation closer to the nozzle. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves of the mixed complexes demonstrate rising edges closer to both ethylene and acetylene ionization energies. We use density functional theory (ωB97X-V/aug-cc-pVTZ) to study the structures of the neutral and ionized dimers, calculate their adiabatic and vertical ionization energies, as well as the energetics of different isomers on the potential energy surface (PES). Upon ionization, vibrationally excited clusters can use the extra energy to access different isomers on the PES. At farther ionization distances from the nozzle, where the number densities are lower, unimolecular decay is expected to be the dominant mechanism. We discuss the possible decay pathways from the different isomers on the PES and examine the ones that are energetically accessible. PMID:26983013

  7. Effect of acetylene and ammonia as reburn fuel additions to methane in nitric oxide reburning

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpaty, S.K.; Nokku, V.P.; Subramanian, K.

    1996-12-31

    Presented in this paper are the computational results of NO reburning with (a) a combination of methane and acetylene and (b) a combination of methane and ammonia. An updated reaction mechanism that was more comprehensive in terms of predicting the ammonia and isocyanic acid oxidation chemistry was employed to run the CKINTERP program. Using the binary file created by executing the above program and the input stoichiometric ratio conditions, the CHEMKIN package predicted the exit concentrations of various species involved in NO reburning.

  8. Phase-vanishing method with acetylene evolution and its utilization in several organic syntheses.

    PubMed

    Matake, Ryosuke; Niwa, Yuki; Matsubara, Hiroshi

    2015-05-15

    A novel quadraphasic phase-vanishing system in which acetylene is evolved from calcium carbide and directly applied in situ to the Sonogashira coupling reaction was developed. This method, which provides a safe, convenient, and one-pot means to utilize gaseous reagents without special equipment, was also applied to a Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction and a three-component aldehyde-alkyne-amine (A(3)) coupling reaction with excellent results.

  9. Theoretical study of the C-H bond dissociation energy of acetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Peter R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a theoretical study of the convergence of the C-H bond dissociation energy (D sub o) of acetylene with respect to both the one- and n-particle spaces. Their best estimate for D sub o of 130.1 plus or minus 1.0 kcal/mole is slightly below previous theoretical estimates, but substantially above the value determined using Stark anticrossing spectroscopy that is asserted to be an upper bound.

  10. Soot formation in pyrolysis of acetylene, allene and 1,3-butadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, M.; Durgaprasad, M. B.; Matula, R. A.; Taki, S.

    1983-01-01

    The formation of soot behind reflected shock waves in argon-diluted mixtures of acetylene, allene, and 1,3-butadiene was investigated by monitoring the attenuation of a laser beam in both the visible (632.8 nm) and the infrared (3.39 microns) regions of the spectrum. The experiments utilized temperatures ranging from 1500-3100 K, reflected shock pressures of 0.3-7.0 bar, and total carbon atom concentrations of 2-20 x 10 to the 17th atoms/cu cm. A bell-shaped dependence of soot yield on temperature was observed during the pyrolysis of all three compounds, which was similar to that previously found for toluene. For acetylene, the decrese in total pressure was found to shift the soot bell to higher temperatures with a significant increase in the maximum soot yield. A computer simulation for acetylene pyrolysis suggested that the reactions between C2H3, C4H3, and C4H4 may be those which lead to the formation of aromatic structures. In addition, it was found that soot is formed much faster and in much larger quantities from allene than from 1,3-butadiene.

  11. Toward spectroscopically accurate global ab initio potential energy surface for the acetylene-vinylidene isomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Huixian; Li, Anyang; Guo, Hua

    2014-12-28

    A new full-dimensional global potential energy surface (PES) for the acetylene-vinylidene isomerization on the ground (S{sub 0}) electronic state has been constructed by fitting ∼37 000 high-level ab initio points using the permutation invariant polynomial-neural network method with a root mean square error of 9.54 cm{sup −1}. The geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies of acetylene, vinylidene, and all other stationary points (two distinct transition states and one secondary minimum in between) have been determined on this PES. Furthermore, acetylene vibrational energy levels have been calculated using the Lanczos algorithm with an exact (J = 0) Hamiltonian. The vibrational energies up to 12 700 cm{sup −1} above the zero-point energy are in excellent agreement with the experimentally derived effective Hamiltonians, suggesting that the PES is approaching spectroscopic accuracy. In addition, analyses of the wavefunctions confirm the experimentally observed emergence of the local bending and counter-rotational modes in the highly excited bending vibrational states. The reproduction of the experimentally derived effective Hamiltonians for highly excited bending states signals the coming of age for the ab initio based PES, which can now be trusted for studying the isomerization reaction.

  12. Bio-inspired electron-delivering system for reductive activation of dioxygen at metal centres towards artificial flavoenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Yoann; Ricoux, Rémy; Avenier, Frédéric; Mahy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Development of artificial systems, capable of delivering electrons to metal-based catalysts for the reductive activation of dioxygen, has been proven very difficult for decades, constituting a major scientific lock for the elaboration of environmentally friendly oxidation processes. Here we demonstrate that the incorporation of a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in a water-soluble polymer, bearing a locally hydrophobic microenvironment, allows the efficient reduction of the FMN by NADH. This supramolecular entity is then capable of catalysing a very fast single-electron reduction of manganese(III) porphyrin by splitting the electron pair issued from NADH. This is fully reminiscent of the activity of natural reductases such as the cytochrome P450 reductases with kinetic parameters, which are three orders of magnitude faster compared with other artificial systems. Finally, we show as a proof of concept that the reduced manganese porphyrin activates dioxygen and catalyses the oxidation of organic substrates in water. PMID:26419885

  13. Voice communications in the cockpit noise environment: The role of active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Peter David

    The topic of voice communications in the cockpit noise environment of modern fast-jet aircraft and helicopters is addressed, and in particular, research undertaken in support of the development of a system for reducing the noise level at the operators' ear is described by acoustic cancellation within the ear defender, known as active noise reduction (ANR). The internal noise spectra of today's high performance fast-jet aircraft and military helicopters is described, and the complex interaction of acoustic noise transmission, speech, and microphone noise pick-up, which produces the total acoustic environment at the aircrews' ears, is discussed. Means of mathematically modelling the audio channel, quantifying the components identified above, and identifying areas of shortfall in performance are derived, leading to a procedure for the development of attenuation requirements, described as the communications audit. A model of the electroacoustic characteristics of the ANR ear defender assembly is presented and the sound field distribution within the ear defender/ear cavity, and its effect upon cancellation performance, is discussed. The extensive laboratory and flight testing of the ANR system that was undertaken is reviewed, paying particular attention to the measurement and analysis techniques employed in such testing. Finally, the performance characteristics of ANR are discussed and compared with the requirements previously established. Design limitations placed upon the system by the constraints of its area of application are described, and the scope for future improvements is considered.

  14. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell, Charlette M.; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A.; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-08-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material’s -0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 106 mol-1s-1 was observed for the polydopamine-coated material-over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells.

  15. Structure-preserving model reduction of passive and quasi-active neurons.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Kathryn R; Cox, Steven J

    2013-02-01

    The spatial component of input signals often carries information crucial to a neuron's function, but models mapping synaptic inputs to the transmembrane potential can be computationally expensive. Existing reduced models of the neuron either merge compartments, thereby sacrificing the spatial specificity of inputs, or apply model reduction techniques that sacrifice the underlying electrophysiology of the model. We use Krylov subspace projection methods to construct reduced models of passive and quasi-active neurons that preserve both the spatial specificity of inputs and the electrophysiological interpretation as an RC and RLC circuit, respectively. Each reduced model accurately computes the potential at the spike initiation zone (SIZ) given a much smaller dimension and simulation time, as we show numerically and theoretically. The structure is preserved through the similarity in the circuit representations, for which we provide circuit diagrams and mathematical expressions for the circuit elements. Furthermore, the transformation from the full to the reduced system is straightforward and depends on intrinsic properties of the dendrite. As each reduced model is accurate and has a clear electrophysiological interpretation, the reduced models can be used not only to simulate morphologically accurate neurons but also to examine computations performed in dendrites. PMID:22714391

  16. Enhancing pyridinic nitrogen level in graphene to promote electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaguang; Wang, Lan; Song, Ranran; Yanga, Shubin

    2016-02-01

    We develop an efficient approach to fabricate nitrogen-doped graphene with tunable pyridinic nitrogen levels (from 1.1 to 1.8 at.%), abundant in-plane holes and high surface areas (623 m(2) g(-1)) via a hydrothermal treatment of graphene oxide with hydrogen peroxide and subsequent annealing under ammonia gas. It is found that the chemical etching is beneficial to the formation of pyridinic nitrogen in graphene during the nitrogen-doping process, which is crucial to enhancing the electrocatalytic properties of graphene for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Hence, the optimized NG exhibits good electrocatalytic activity, more positive onset potential than Pt-C (-0.08 V versus -0.09 V), good durability, and high selectivity when it is employed as a metal-free catalyst for ORR. This approach may uncover a mechanism in escalation of pyridinic N atoms doped on the graphene basal edge and provide an efficient platform for the synthesis of a series of heteroatom-doped graphene with tunable heteroatom content for broad applications. PMID:26752043

  17. Molecular determinants of azo reduction activity in the strain Pseudomonas putida MET94.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Sónia; Pereira, Luciana; Batista, Carlos; Martins, Lígia O

    2011-10-01

    Azo dyes are the major group of synthetic colourants used in industry and are serious environmental pollutants. In this study, Pseudomonas putida MET94 was selected from 48 bacterial strains on the basis of its superior ability to degrade a wide range of structurally diverse azo dyes. P. putida is a versatile microorganism with a well-recognised potential for biodegradation or bioremediation applications. P. putida MET94 removes, in 24 h and under anaerobic growing conditions, more than 80% of the majority of the structurally diverse azo dyes tested. Whole cell assays performed under anaerobic conditions revealed up to 90% decolourisation in dye wastewater bath models. The involvement of a FMN dependent NADPH: dye oxidoreductase in the decolourisation process was suggested by enzymatic measurements in cell crude extracts. The gene encoding a putative azoreductase was cloned from P. putida MET94 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified P. putida azoreductase is a 40 kDa homodimer with broad substrate specificity for azo dye reduction. The presence of dioxygen leads to the inhibition of the decolourisation activity in agreement with the results of cell cultures. The kinetic mechanism follows a ping-pong bi-bi reaction scheme and aromatic amine products were detected in stoichiometric amounts by high-performance liquid chromatography. Overall, the results indicate that P. putida MET94 is a promising candidate for bioengineering studies aimed at generating more effective dye-reducing strains.

  18. Stimulation of reductive dechlorination of hexachlorobenzene in soil by inducing the native microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörfler, Ulrike; Brahushi, Ferdi; Schroll, Reiner

    2010-05-01

    The reductive dechlorination and degradation of 14C-hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was investigated in an agricultural soil. The activity of the native anaerobic microbial community could be induced by saturating the soil with water. Under these conditions high rates of dechlorination were observed. After 20 weeks of incubation only 1% of the applied 14C-HCB could be detected in the fraction of extractable residues. Additionally organic substances, like wheat straw and lucerne straw, however considerably delayed and reduced the dechlorination process in soil. The decline of HCB was not only caused by dechlorination but also by the formation of non-extractable residues, whereby their amounts varied with time depending on the experimental conditions. Several dechlorination products were detected, indicating the following main HCB transformation pathway: HCB - PCB - 1,2,3,5-TeCB - 1,3,5-TCB - 1,3-DCB, with 1,3,5-TCB as main intermediate dechlorination product. The other TeCB-, TCB- and DCB-isomers were also detected in low amount, showing the presence of more than one dechlorination pathway. Since the methane production rates were lowest when the dechlorination rates were highest, it can be assumed that methanogenic bacteria were not involved in the dechlorination process of HCB. The established 14C-mass balance show, that with increasing dechlorination and incubation times, the 14C-recoveries decreased, which is a indication that highly volatile metabolites where formed in an increasing amount..

  19. Physiological selectivity and activity reduction of insecticides by rainfall to predatory wasps of Tuta absoluta.

    PubMed

    Barros, Emerson C; Bacci, Leandro; Picanco, Marcelo C; Martins, Júlio C; Rosado, Jander F; Silva, Gerson A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we carried out three bioassays with nine used insecticides in tomato crops to identify their efficiency against tomato leaf miner Tuta absoluta, the physiological selectivity and the activity reduction of insecticides by three rain regimes to predatory wasps Protonectarina sylveirae and Polybia scutellaris. We assessed the mortality caused by the recommended doses of abamectin, beta-cyfluthrin, cartap, chlorfenapyr, etofenprox, methamidophos, permethrin, phenthoate and spinosad to T. absoluta and wasps at the moment of application. In addition, we evaluated the wasp mortality due to the insecticides for 30 days on plants that did not receive rain and on plants that received 4 or 125 mm of rain. Spinosad, cartap, chlorfenapyr, phenthoate, abamectin and methamidophos caused mortality higher than 90% to T. absoluta, whereas the pyrethroids beta-cyfluthrin, etofenprox and permethrin caused mortality between 8.5% and 46.25%. At the moment of application, all the insecticides were highly toxic to the wasps, causing mortality higher than 80%. In the absence of rain, all the insecticides continued to cause high mortality to the wasps for 30 days after the application. The toxicity of spinosad and methamidophos on both wasp species; beta-cyfluthrin on P. sylveirae and chlorfenapyr and abamectin on P. scutellaris, decreased when the plants received 4 mm of rain. In contrast, the other insecticides only showed reduced toxicity on the wasps when the plants received 125 mm of rain.

  20. Screening of catalytic oxygen reduction reaction activity of metal-doped graphene by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Chen, Shuangjing; Wang, Jinyu

    2016-08-01

    Graphene doping is a promising direction for developing effective oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts. In this paper, we computationally investigated the ORR performance of 10 kinds of metal-doped graphene (M-G) catalysts, namely, Al-, Si-, Mn-, Fe-, Co-, Ni-, Pd-, Ag-, Pt-, and Au-G. The results shown that the binding energies of the metal atoms incorporated into the graphene vacancy are higher than their bulk cohesive energies, indicating the formed M-G catalysts are even more stable than the corresponding bulk metal surfaces, and thus avoid the metals dissolution in the reaction environment. We demonstrated that the linear relation among the binding energies of the ORR intermediates that found on metal-based materials does not hold for the M-G catalysts, therefore a single binding energy of intermediate alone is not sufficient to evaluate the ORR activity of an arbitrary catalyst. By analysis of the detailed ORR processes, we predicted that the Au-, Co-, and Ag-G materials can be used as the ORR catalysts.

  1. Gold-doped graphene: A highly stable and active electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbov, Sergey; Alcántara Ortigoza, Marisol

    2015-04-01

    In addressing the growing need of renewable and sustainable energy resources, hydrogen-fuel-cells stand as one of the most promising routes to transform the current energy paradigm into one that integrally fulfills environmental sustainability. Nevertheless, accomplishing this technology at a large scale demands to surpass the efficiency and enhance the cost-effectiveness of platinum-based cathodes, which catalyze the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this work, our first-principles calculations show that Au atoms incorporated into graphene di-vacancies form a highly stable and cost-effective electrocatalyst that is, at the same time, as or more (dependently of the dopant concentration) active toward ORR than the best-known Pt-based electrocatalysts. We reveal that partial passivation of defected-graphene by gold atoms reduces the reactivity of C dangling bonds and increases that of Au, thus optimizing them for catalyzing the ORR and yielding a system of high thermodynamic and electrochemical stabilities. We also demonstrate that the linear relation among the binding energies of the reaction intermediates assumed in computational high-throughput material screening does not hold, at least for this non-purely transition-metal material. We expect Au-doped graphene to finally overcome the cathode-related challenge hindering the realization of hydrogen-fuel cells as the leading means of powering transportation and portable devices.

  2. Growth and Deposition of Au Nanoclusters on Polymer-wrapped Graphene and Their Oxygen Reduction Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Kim, Chaerin; Hamasaki, Yuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2016-02-01

    The development of a non-Pt electrocatalyst with a high performance for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is one of the central issues in polymer electrolyte fuel cells science. Au-nanoparticles (Au-NPs) with a diameter of <2 nm are one of the promising substitutes of Pt-NPs; however, it is still a challenge to synthesize such a small-sized Au-NPs with a narrow diameter distribution on a carbon support without using capping agents. We here describe a facile method to deposit uniform Au-NPs (diameter = 1.6 nm and 3.3 nm) on the stacked-graphene (<10 layers) coated with poly[2,2‧-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5‧-bibenzimidazole] without using any capping agents. The obtained Au-NPs exhibit an excellent ORR activity with the onset potential at -0.11 V and -0.09 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for 1.6 nm and 3.3 nm, respectively. On the other hand, inhomogeneous Au-NPs with 4.6 nm in average diameter shows the onset potential at -0.15 V (vs. Ag/AgCl).

  3. False alarm reduction in BSN-based cardiac monitoring using signal quality and activity type information.

    PubMed

    Tanantong, Tanatorn; Nantajeewarawat, Ekawit; Thiemjarus, Surapa

    2015-01-01

    False alarms in cardiac monitoring affect the quality of medical care, impacting on both patients and healthcare providers. In continuous cardiac monitoring using wireless Body Sensor Networks (BSNs), the quality of ECG signals can be deteriorated owing to several factors, e.g., noises, low battery power, and network transmission problems, often resulting in high false alarm rates. In addition, body movements occurring from activities of daily living (ADLs) can also create false alarms. This paper presents a two-phase framework for false arrhythmia alarm reduction in continuous cardiac monitoring, using signals from an ECG sensor and a 3D accelerometer. In the first phase, classification models constructed using machine learning algorithms are used for labeling input signals. ECG signals are labeled with heartbeat types and signal quality levels, while 3D acceleration signals are labeled with ADL types. In the second phase, a rule-based expert system is used for combining classification results in order to determine whether arrhythmia alarms should be accepted or suppressed. The proposed framework was validated on datasets acquired using BSNs and the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. For the BSN dataset, acceleration and ECG signals were collected from 10 young and 10 elderly subjects while they were performing ADLs. The framework reduced the false alarm rate from 9.58% to 1.43% in our experimental study, showing that it can potentially assist physicians in diagnosing a vast amount of data acquired from wireless sensors and enhance the performance of continuous cardiac monitoring. PMID:25671512

  4. Formulation and particle size reduction improve bioavailability of poorly water-soluble compounds with antimalarial activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxing; Li, Qigui; Reyes, Sean; Zhang, Jing; Xie, Lisa; Melendez, Victor; Hickman, Mark; Kozar, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Decoquinate (DQ) is highly effective at killing malaria parasites in vitro; however, it is extremely insoluble in water. In this study, solid dispersion method was used for DQ formulation which created a suitable physical form of DQ in aqueous phase for particle manipulation. Among many polymers and surfactants tested, polyvinylpyrrolidone 10, a polymer, and L- α -phosphatidylcholine or polysorbate, two surfactants, were chosen as DQ formulation components. The formulation particles were reduced to a mean size between 200 to 400 nm, which was stable in aqueous medium for at least three weeks. Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies showed that compared to DQ microparticle suspension, a nanoparticle formulation orally dosed to mice showed a 14.47-fold increase in area under the curve (AUC) of DQ plasma concentration and a 4.53-fold increase in AUC of DQ liver distribution. WR 299666, a poorly water-soluble compound with antimalarial activity, was also tested and successfully made into nanoparticle formulation without undergoing solid dispersion procedure. We concluded that nanoparticles generated by using appropriate formulation components and sufficient particle size reduction significantly increased the bioavailability of DQ and could potentially turn this antimalarial agent to a therapeutic drug.

  5. Enhancing pyridinic nitrogen level in graphene to promote electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiaguang; Wang, Lan; Song, Ranran; Yanga, Shubin

    2016-02-01

    We develop an efficient approach to fabricate nitrogen-doped graphene with tunable pyridinic nitrogen levels (from 1.1 to 1.8 at.%), abundant in-plane holes and high surface areas (623 m2 g-1) via a hydrothermal treatment of graphene oxide with hydrogen peroxide and subsequent annealing under ammonia gas. It is found that the chemical etching is beneficial to the formation of pyridinic nitrogen in graphene during the nitrogen-doping process, which is crucial to enhancing the electrocatalytic properties of graphene for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Hence, the optimized NG exhibits good electrocatalytic activity, more positive onset potential than Pt-C (-0.08 V versus -0.09 V), good durability, and high selectivity when it is employed as a metal-free catalyst for ORR. This approach may uncover a mechanism in escalation of pyridinic N atoms doped on the graphene basal edge and provide an efficient platform for the synthesis of a series of heteroatom-doped graphene with tunable heteroatom content for broad applications.

  6. Gold-doped graphene: A highly stable and active electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stolbov, Sergey Alcántara Ortigoza, Marisol

    2015-04-21

    In addressing the growing need of renewable and sustainable energy resources, hydrogen-fuel-cells stand as one of the most promising routes to transform the current energy paradigm into one that integrally fulfills environmental sustainability. Nevertheless, accomplishing this technology at a large scale demands to surpass the efficiency and enhance the cost-effectiveness of platinum-based cathodes, which catalyze the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this work, our first-principles calculations show that Au atoms incorporated into graphene di-vacancies form a highly stable and cost-effective electrocatalyst that is, at the same time, as or more (dependently of the dopant concentration) active toward ORR than the best-known Pt-based electrocatalysts. We reveal that partial passivation of defected-graphene by gold atoms reduces the reactivity of C dangling bonds and increases that of Au, thus optimizing them for catalyzing the ORR and yielding a system of high thermodynamic and electrochemical stabilities. We also demonstrate that the linear relation among the binding energies of the reaction intermediates assumed in computational high-throughput material screening does not hold, at least for this non-purely transition-metal material. We expect Au-doped graphene to finally overcome the cathode-related challenge hindering the realization of hydrogen-fuel cells as the leading means of powering transportation and portable devices.

  7. An Overview of Propulsion Concept Studies and Risk Reduction Activities for Robotic Lunar Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Story, George; Burnside, Chris; Kudlach, Al

    2010-01-01

    In support of designing robotic lunar lander concepts, the propulsion team at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), with participation from industry, conducted a series of trade studies on propulsion concepts with an emphasis on light-weight, advanced technology components. The results suggest a high-pressure propulsion system may offer some benefits in weight savings and system packaging. As part of the propulsion system, a solid rocket motor was selected to provide a large impulse to reduce the spacecraft s velocity prior to the lunar descent. In parallel to this study effort, the team also began technology risk reduction testing on a high thrust-to-weight descent thruster and a high-pressure regulator. A series of hot-fire tests was completed on the descent thruster in vacuum conditions at NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) in New Mexico in 2009. Preparations for a hot-fire test series on the attitude control thruster at WSTF and for pressure regulator testing are now underway. This paper will provide an overview of the concept trade study results along with insight into the risk mitigation activities conducted to date.

  8. Catechin-capped gold nanoparticles: green synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity toward 4-nitrophenol reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yoonho; Choi, Myung-Jin; Cha, Song-Hyun; Kim, Yeong Shik; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2014-03-01

    An eco-friendly approach is described for the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using catechin as a reducing and capping agent. The reaction occurred at room temperature within 1 h without the use of any external energy and an excellent yield (99%) was obtained, as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Various shapes of gold nanoparticles with an estimated diameter of 16.6 nm were green-synthesized. Notably, the capping of freshly synthesized gold nanoparticles by catechin was clearly visualized with the aid of microscopic techniques, including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Strong peaks in the X-ray diffraction pattern of the as-prepared gold nanoparticles confirmed their crystalline nature. The catalytic activity of the as-prepared gold nanoparticles was observed in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH4. The results suggest that the newly prepared gold nanoparticles have potential uses in catalysis.

  9. Physiological selectivity and activity reduction of insecticides by rainfall to predatory wasps of Tuta absoluta.

    PubMed

    Barros, Emerson C; Bacci, Leandro; Picanco, Marcelo C; Martins, Júlio C; Rosado, Jander F; Silva, Gerson A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we carried out three bioassays with nine used insecticides in tomato crops to identify their efficiency against tomato leaf miner Tuta absoluta, the physiological selectivity and the activity reduction of insecticides by three rain regimes to predatory wasps Protonectarina sylveirae and Polybia scutellaris. We assessed the mortality caused by the recommended doses of abamectin, beta-cyfluthrin, cartap, chlorfenapyr, etofenprox, methamidophos, permethrin, phenthoate and spinosad to T. absoluta and wasps at the moment of application. In addition, we evaluated the wasp mortality due to the insecticides for 30 days on plants that did not receive rain and on plants that received 4 or 125 mm of rain. Spinosad, cartap, chlorfenapyr, phenthoate, abamectin and methamidophos caused mortality higher than 90% to T. absoluta, whereas the pyrethroids beta-cyfluthrin, etofenprox and permethrin caused mortality between 8.5% and 46.25%. At the moment of application, all the insecticides were highly toxic to the wasps, causing mortality higher than 80%. In the absence of rain, all the insecticides continued to cause high mortality to the wasps for 30 days after the application. The toxicity of spinosad and methamidophos on both wasp species; beta-cyfluthrin on P. sylveirae and chlorfenapyr and abamectin on P. scutellaris, decreased when the plants received 4 mm of rain. In contrast, the other insecticides only showed reduced toxicity on the wasps when the plants received 125 mm of rain. PMID:25421627

  10. An active structural acoustic control approach for the reduction of the structure-borne road noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douville, Hugo; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2002-11-01

    The reduction of the structure-borne road noise generated inside the cabin of an automobile is investigated using an Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) approach. First, a laboratory test bench consisting of a wheel/suspension/lower suspension A-arm assembly has been developed in order to identify the vibroacoustic transfer paths (up to 250 Hz) for realistic road noise excitation of the wheel. Frequency Response Function (FRF) measurements between the excitation/control actuators and each suspension/chassis linkage are used to characterize the different transfer paths that transmit energy through the chassis of the car. Second, a FE/BE model (Finite/Boundary Elements) was developed to simulate the acoustic field of an automobile cab interior. This model is used to predict the acoustic field inside the cabin as a response to the measured forces applied on the suspension/chassis linkages. Finally, an experimental implementation of ASAC is presented. The control approach relies on the use of inertial actuators to modify the vibration behavior of the suspension and the automotive chassis such that its noise radiation efficiency is decreased. The implemented algorithm consists of a MIMO (Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output) feedforward configuration with a filtered-X LMS algorithm using an advanced reference signal (width FIR filters) using the Simulink/Dspace environment for control prototyping.

  11. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Charlette M.; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A.; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material’s −0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 106 mol−1s−1 was observed for the polydopamine-coated material–over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells. PMID:27528439

  12. Recent Status of SIM Lite Astrometric Observatory Mission: Flight Engineering Risk Reduction Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goullioud, Renaud; Dekens, Frank; Nemati, Bijan; An, Xin; Carson, Johnathan

    2010-01-01

    The SIM Lite Astrometric Observatory is a mission concept for a space-borne instrument to perform micro-arc-second narrow-angle astrometry to search 60 to 100 nearby stars for Earth-like planets, and to perform global astrometry for a broad astrophysics program. The instrument consists of two Michelson stellar interferometers and a telescope. The first interferometer chops between the target star and a set of reference stars. The second interferometer monitors the attitude of the instrument in the direction of the target star. The telescope monitors the attitude of the instrument in the other two directions. The main enabling technology development for the mission was completed during phases A & B. The project is currently implementing the developed technology onto flight-ready engineering models. These key engineering tasks will significantly reduce the implementation risks during the flight phases C & D of the mission. The main optical interferometer components, including the astrometric beam combiner, the fine steering optical mechanism, the path-length-control and modulation optical mechanisms, focal-plane camera electronics and cooling heat pipe, are currently under development. Main assemblies are built to meet flight requirements and will be subjected to flight qualification level environmental testing (random vibration and thermal cycling) and performance testing. This paper summarizes recent progress in engineering risk reduction activities.

  13. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Charlette M; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A; Mudalige, Thilak K; Biris, Alexandru S; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material's -0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 10(6) mol(-1)s(-1) was observed for the polydopamine-coated material-over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells. PMID:27528439

  14. Growth and Deposition of Au Nanoclusters on Polymer-wrapped Graphene and Their Oxygen Reduction Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Kim, ChaeRin; Hamasaki, Yuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2016-01-01

    The development of a non-Pt electrocatalyst with a high performance for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is one of the central issues in polymer electrolyte fuel cells science. Au-nanoparticles (Au-NPs) with a diameter of <2 nm are one of the promising substitutes of Pt-NPs; however, it is still a challenge to synthesize such a small-sized Au-NPs with a narrow diameter distribution on a carbon support without using capping agents. We here describe a facile method to deposit uniform Au-NPs (diameter = 1.6 nm and 3.3 nm) on the stacked-graphene (<10 layers) coated with poly[2,2′-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5′-bibenzimidazole] without using any capping agents. The obtained Au-NPs exhibit an excellent ORR activity with the onset potential at −0.11 V and −0.09 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for 1.6 nm and 3.3 nm, respectively. On the other hand, inhomogeneous Au-NPs with 4.6 nm in average diameter shows the onset potential at −0.15 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). PMID:26899591

  15. Denitrification and nitric oxide reduction in an aerobic toluene-treating biofilter

    SciTech Connect

    Plessis, C.A. du; Kinney, K.A.; Schroeder, E.D.; Chang, D.P.Y.; Scow, K.M.

    1998-05-20

    The presence of significant denitrification activity in an aerobic toluene-treating biofilter was demonstrated under batch and flow-through conditions. N{sub 2}O concentrations of 9.2 ppm{sub v} were produced by denitrifying bacteria in the presence of 15% acetylene, in a flow-through system with a bulk gas phase O{sub 2} concentration of >17%. The carbon source for denitrification was not toluene but a byproduct or metabolite of toluene catabolism. Denitrification conditions were successfully used for the reduction of 60 ppm{sub v} nitric oxide to 15 ppm{sub v} at a flow rate of 3 L/min (EBRT of 3 min) in a fully aerated, 17%/v/v O{sub 2} (superficially aerobic) biofilter. Higher NO removal efficiency (97%) was obtained by increasing the toluene supply to the biofilter.

  16. L-Malate dehydrogenase activity in the reductive arm of the incomplete citric acid cycle of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Charles E

    2013-11-01

    The autotrophic nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea does not synthesize 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase under aerobic conditions and so has an incomplete citric acid cycle. L-malate (S-malate) dehydrogenase (MDH) from N. europaea was predicted to show similarity to the NADP(+)-dependent enzymes from chloroplasts and was separated from the NAD(+)-dependent proteins from most other bacteria or mitochondria. MDH activity in a soluble fraction from N. europaea ATCC 19718 was measured spectrophotometrically and exhibited simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the reductive direction, activity with NADH increased from pH 6.0 to 8.5 but activity with NADPH was consistently lower and decreased with pH. At pH 7.0, the K m for oxaloacetate was 20 μM; the K m for NADH was 22 μM but that for NADPH was at least 10 times higher. In the oxidative direction, activity with NAD(+) increased with pH but there was very little activity with NADP(+). At pH 7.0, the K m for L-malate was 5 mM and the K m for NAD(+) was 24 μM. The reductive activity was quite insensitive to inhibition by L-malate but the oxidative activity was very sensitive to oxaloacetate. MDH activity was not strongly activated or inhibited by glycolytic or citric acid cycle metabolites, adenine nucleotides, NaCl concentrations, or most metal ions, but increased with temperature up to about 55 °C. The reductive activity was consistently 10-20 times higher than the oxidative activity. These results indicate that the L-malate dehydrogenase in N. europaea is similar to other NAD(+)-dependent MDHs (EC 1.1.1.37) but physiologically adapted for its role in a reductive biosynthetic sequence.

  17. Myopathic lamin mutations cause reductive stress and activate the nrf2/keap-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Dialynas, George; Shrestha, Om K; Ponce, Jessica M; Zwerger, Monika; Thiemann, Dylan A; Young, Grant H; Moore, Steven A; Yu, Liping; Lammerding, Jan; Wallrath, Lori L

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in the human LMNA gene cause muscular dystrophy by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. The LMNA gene encodes A-type lamins, intermediate filaments that form a network underlying the inner nuclear membrane, providing structural support for the nucleus and organizing the genome. To better understand the pathogenesis caused by mutant lamins, we performed a structural and functional analysis on LMNA missense mutations identified in muscular dystrophy patients. These mutations perturb the tertiary structure of the conserved A-type lamin Ig-fold domain. To identify the effects of these structural perturbations on lamin function, we modeled these mutations in Drosophila Lamin C and expressed the mutant lamins in muscle. We found that the structural perturbations had minimal dominant effects on nuclear stiffness, suggesting that the muscle pathology was not accompanied by major structural disruption of the peripheral nuclear lamina. However, subtle alterations in the lamina network and subnuclear reorganization of lamins remain possible. Affected muscles had cytoplasmic aggregation of lamins and additional nuclear envelope proteins. Transcription profiling revealed upregulation of many Nrf2 target genes. Nrf2 is normally sequestered in the cytoplasm by Keap-1. Under oxidative stress Nrf2 dissociates from Keap-1, translocates into the nucleus, and activates gene expression. Unexpectedly, biochemical analyses revealed high levels of reducing agents, indicative of reductive stress. The accumulation of cytoplasmic lamin aggregates correlated with elevated levels of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, which also binds Keap-1, abrogating Nrf2 cytoplasmic sequestration, allowing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and target gene activation. Elevated p62/SQSTM1 and nuclear enrichment of Nrf2 were identified in muscle biopsies from the corresponding muscular dystrophy patients, validating the disease relevance of our Drosophila model. Thus, novel connections were made

  18. Myopathic Lamin Mutations Cause Reductive Stress and Activate the Nrf2/Keap-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dialynas, George; Shrestha, Om K.; Ponce, Jessica M.; Zwerger, Monika; Thiemann, Dylan A.; Young, Grant H.; Moore, Steven A.; Yu, Liping; Lammerding, Jan; Wallrath, Lori L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the human LMNA gene cause muscular dystrophy by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. The LMNA gene encodes A-type lamins, intermediate filaments that form a network underlying the inner nuclear membrane, providing structural support for the nucleus and organizing the genome. To better understand the pathogenesis caused by mutant lamins, we performed a structural and functional analysis on LMNA missense mutations identified in muscular dystrophy patients. These mutations perturb the tertiary structure of the conserved A-type lamin Ig-fold domain. To identify the effects of these structural perturbations on lamin function, we modeled these mutations in Drosophila Lamin C and expressed the mutant lamins in muscle. We found that the structural perturbations had minimal dominant effects on nuclear stiffness, suggesting that the muscle pathology was not accompanied by major structural disruption of the peripheral nuclear lamina. However, subtle alterations in the lamina network and subnuclear reorganization of lamins remain possible. Affected muscles had cytoplasmic aggregation of lamins and additional nuclear envelope proteins. Transcription profiling revealed upregulation of many Nrf2 target genes. Nrf2 is normally sequestered in the cytoplasm by Keap-1. Under oxidative stress Nrf2 dissociates from Keap-1, translocates into the nucleus, and activates gene expression. Unexpectedly, biochemical analyses revealed high levels of reducing agents, indicative of reductive stress. The accumulation of cytoplasmic lamin aggregates correlated with elevated levels of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, which also binds Keap-1, abrogating Nrf2 cytoplasmic sequestration, allowing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and target gene activation. Elevated p62/SQSTM1 and nuclear enrichment of Nrf2 were identified in muscle biopsies from the corresponding muscular dystrophy patients, validating the disease relevance of our Drosophila model. Thus, novel connections were made

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Cell-Permeable Oligonucleotides Bearing Reduction-Activated Protecting Groups on the Internucleotide Linkages.

    PubMed

    Saneyoshi, Hisao; Iketani, Koichi; Kondo, Kazuhiko; Saneyoshi, Takeo; Okamoto, Itaru; Ono, Akira

    2016-09-21

    Cell-permeable oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) bearing reduction-activated protecting groups were synthesized as oligonucleotide pro-drugs. Although these oligonucleotides were amenable to solid-phase DNA synthesis and purification, the protecting group on their phosphodiester moiety could be readily cleaved by nitroreductase and NADH. Moreover, these compounds exhibited good nuclease resistance against 3'-exonuclease and endonuclease and good stability in human serum. Fluorescein-labeled ODNs modified with reduction-activated protecting groups showed better cellular uptake compared with that of naked ODNs. PMID:27598574

  20. Effect of reduction treatment on copper modified activated carbons on NO(x) adsorption at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Levasseur, Benoit; Gonzalez-Lopez, Eugene; Rossin, Joseph A; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2011-05-01

    Activated carbon was impregnated with copper salt and then exposed to reductive environment using hydrazine hydrate or heat treatment under nitrogen at 925 °C. On the obtained samples, adsorption of NO(2) was carried out at dynamic conditions at ambient temperature. The adsorbents before and after exposure to nitrogen dioxide were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N(2)-sorption at -196 °C, and potentiometric titration. Copper loading improved the adsorption capacity of NO(2) as well as the retention of NO formed in the process of NO(2) reduction on the carbon surface. That improvement is linked to the presence of copper metal and its high dispersion on the surface. Even though both reduction methods lead to the reduction of copper, different reactions with the carbon surface take place. Heat treatment results in a significant percentage of metallic copper and a reduction of oxygen functional groups of the carbon matrix, whereas hydrazine, besides reduction of copper, leads to an incorporation of nitrogen. The results suggest that NO(2) mainly is converted to copper nitrates although the possibility to its reduction to N(2) is not ruled out. A high capacity on hydrazine treated samples is linked to the high dispersion of metallic copper on the surface of this carbon.

  1. Aerobic Reduction of Arsenate by a Bacterium Isolated From Activated Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, N.; Ohnuki, T.; Hanada, S.; Nakamura, K.; Francis, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Microlunatus phosphovorus strain NM-1 is a polyphosphate-accumulating bacterium isolated from activated sludge. This bacterium takes up a large amount of polyphosphate under aerobic conditions and release phosphate ions by hydrolysis of polyphosphate to orthophosphate under anaerobic conditions to derive energy for taking up substrates. To understand the nature of this strain, especially, influence of potential contaminants in sewage and wastewater on growth, we have been investigating behavior of this bacterium in media containing arsenic. The present paper mainly reports reduction of arsenate by this bacterium under aerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 (JCM 9379) was aerobically cultured at 30 °C in a nutrient medium containing 2.5 g/l peptone, 0.5 g/l glucose, 1.5 g/l yeast extract, and arsenic [Na2HAsO4 (As(V)) or Na3AsO3 (As(III))] at concentrations between 0 and 50 mM. The cells collected from arsenic-free media were dispersed in buffer solutions containing 2mM HEPES, 10mM NaCl, prescribed concentrations of As(V), and 0-0.2 percent glucose. Then, this cell suspension was kept at 20 °C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The speciation of arsenic was carried out by ion chromatography and ICP-MS. The growth of the strain under aerobic conditions was enhanced by the addition of As(V) at the concentration between 1 and 10 mM. The maximum optical density of the culture in the medium containing 5mM As(V) was 1.4 times greater than that of the control culture. Below the As(V) concentration of 10mM, most of the As(V) was reduced to As(III). The growth of the strain under anaerobic conditions has not been observed so far. The cells in the buffer solutions reduced As(V) under aerobic condition. The reduction was enhanced by the addition of glucose. However, the cell did not reduce As(V) under anaerobic conditions. The strain NM-1 showed high resistance to As(V) and As(III). The maximum optical density of the culture grown in a medium containing 50 mM As(V) was only

  2. Report on INL Activities for Uncertainty Reduction Analysis of FY11

    SciTech Connect

    G. Plamiotti; H. Hiruta; M. Salvatores

    2011-09-01

    This report presents the status of activities performed at INL under the ARC Work Package on 'Uncertainty Reduction Analyses' that has a main goal the reduction of uncertainties associated with nuclear data on neutronic integral parameters of interest for the design of advanced fast reactors under consideration by the ARC program. First, an analysis of experiments was carried out. For both JOYO (the first Japanese fast reactor) and ZPPR-9 (a large size zero power plutonium fueled experiment performed at ANL-W in Idaho) the performance of ENDF/B-VII.0 is quite satisfying except for the sodium void configurations of ZPPR-9, but for which one has to take into account the approximation of the modeling. In fact, when one uses a more detailed model (calculations performed at ANL in a companion WP) more reasonable results are obtained. A large effort was devoted to the analysis of the irradiation experiments, PROFIL-1 and -2 and TRAPU, performed at the French fast reactor PHENIX. For these experiments a pre-release of the ENDF/B-VII.1 cross section files was also used, in order to provide validation feedback to the CSWEG nuclear data evaluation community. In the PROFIL experiments improvements can be observed for the ENDF/B-VII.1 capture data in 238Pu, 241Am, 244Cm, 97Mo, 151Sm, 153Eu, and for 240Pu(n,2n). On the other hand, 240,242Pu, 95Mo, 133Cs and 145Nd capture C/E results are worse. For the major actinides 235U and especially 239Pu capture C/E's are underestimated. For fission products, 105,106Pd, 143,144Nd and 147,149Sm are significantly underestimated, while 101Ru and 151Sm are overestimated. Other C/E deviations from unity are within the combined experimental and calculated statistical uncertainty. From the TRAPU analysis, the major improvement is in the predicted 243Cm build-up, presumably due to an improved 242Cm capture evaluation. The COSMO experiment was also analyzed in order to provide useful feedback on fission cross sections. It was found out that ENDF

  3. Risk Reduction Activities for the Near-Earth Object Surveillance Satellite Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bédard, D.; Scott, L.; Wallace, B.; Harvey, W.

    every three minutes, for an average of 288 images for every 24 hours of operation. To ensure both science teams can employ the NEOSSat spacecraft to its full potential, the Mission Planning System (MPS) will automate the scheduling of both the HEOSS and NESS observation tasks. In another risk reduction effort for the NEOSSat project, a prototype of the MPS software has been developed to help in the definition of the system requirements as well as to identify and reduce the risks associated with the development of this software system. The paper will first provide an update on the status and schedule of the NEOSSat project. Then, we will present the results achieved (metrics and photometry) from the two tracked GPS spacecraft as well as the lessons learned that are being applied during the development of the joint DRDC and CSA NEOSSat micro-satellite. Finally, results obtained from the MPS prototype development will be presented with a special emphasis on the final system to be designed including a description of the functions judged to be critical based upon the risk reduction activity.

  4. Simultaneous BVI noise and vibration reduction in rotorcraft using actively-controlled flaps and including performance considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, Daniel A.

    This work presents the development and application of an active control approach for reduction of both vibration and noise induced by helicopter rotor blade vortex interaction (BVI). Control is implemented through single or dual actively controlled flaps (ACFs) on each blade. Low-speed helicopter flight is prone to severe BVI, resulting in elevated vibration and noise levels. Existing research has suggested that when some form of active control is used to reduce vibration, noise will increase and vice versa. The present research achieves simultaneous reduction of noise and vibration, and also investigates the physical sources of the observed reduction. The initial portion of this work focused on developing a tool for simulating helicopter noise and vibrations in the BVI flight regime. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades was developed and combined with an enhanced free-wake model and an acoustic prediction tool with provisions for blade flexibility. These elements were incorporated within an aeroelastic analysis featuring fully coupled flap-lag-torsional blade dynamics. Subsequently, control algorithms were developed that were effective for reducing noise and vibration even in the nonlinear BVI flight regime; saturation limits were incorporated constraining flap deflections to specified limits. The resulting simulation was also validated with a wide range of experimental data, achieving excellent correlation. Finally, a number of active control studies were performed. Multi-component vibration reductions of 40--80% could be achieved, while incurring a small noise penalty. Noise was reduced using an onboard feedback microphone; reductions of 4--10 dB on the advancing side were observed on a plane beneath the rotor when using dual flaps. Finally, simultaneous noise and vibration reduction was studied. A reduction of about 5 dB in noise on the advancing side combined with a 60% reduction in vibration was

  5. Interpretation of PAN, acetone and acetylene measurements from the MIPAS-E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. P.; Remedios, J. J.; Parker, R. J.

    2009-04-01

    Emissions of anthropogenic pollution, from biomass burning events in particular, result in the injection of a wide range of carbon compounds into the atmosphere. Carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released in significant amounts, affecting both the oxidation capacity of the troposphere and ozone production. Upper troposphere (UT) measurements of PAN, acetone and acetylene have, in the past, been generally limited to sporadic in situ sampling during specialised campaign periods. The recent rapid progress in both the detection and retrieval of many VOC species from spaceborne instrumentation has been large. It has recently been established that the observation of the global distribution of VOCs in the UT can be made by measurements provided by instruments such as the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding onboard ENVISAT (MIPAS-E) or the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) onboard SCISAT-1. In this work, we discuss the ability of MIPAS-E to provide new global measurements of acetone in the UT. We also describe both the distribution and seasonality observed in UT PAN volume mixing ratios (vmrs). From the MIPAS-E acetylene measurements, we analyse the extent and magnitude of the chemical isolation observed over the Middle East during August 2003. We show that this enhancement is due to fast westward transport from Asia via the Easterly Jet associated with the Asian monsoon anticyclone. A full error analysis is carried out for each of the three gases we analyse. Previous work has shown that characteristic infrared signatures of PAN, acetone and acetylene can be detected in MIPAS-E thermal emission spectra, with the 787-790 cm-1, 1216-1218 cm-1 and 776.0-776.15 cm-1 spectral ranges respectively being particularly sensitive to changes in each of the gases. We invert the measured MIPAS-E spectra into vmrs using an independent offline-retrieval scheme based on the optimal estimation approach which was

  6. A new APE1/Ref-1-dependent pathway leading to reduction of NF-kappaB and AP-1, and activation of their DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kozue; Hirao, Satoshi; Kabe, Yasuaki; Ogura, Yuji; Sato, Iwao; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Wada, Tadashi; Handa, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    APE1/Ref-1 is thought to be a multifunctional protein involved in reduction-oxidation (redox) regulation and base excision DNA repair, and is required for early embryonic development in mice. APE1/Ref-1 has redox activity and AP endonuclease activity, and is able to enhance DNA-binding activity of several transcription factors, including NF-kappaB, AP-1 and p53, through reduction of their critical cysteine residues. However, it remains elusive exactly how APE1/Ref-1 carries out its essential functions in vivo. Here, we show that APE1/Ref-1 not only reduces target transcription factors directly but also facilitates their reduction by other reducing molecules such as glutathione or thioredoxin. The new activity of APE1/Ref-1, termed redox chaperone activity, is exerted at concentration significantly lower than that required for its redox activity and is neither dependent on its redox activity nor on its AP endonuclease activity. We also show evidence that redox chaperone activity of APE1/Ref-1 is critical to NF-kappaB-mediated gene expression in human cells and is mediated through its physical association with target transcription factors. Thus, APE1/Ref-1 may play multiple roles in an antioxidative stress response pathway through its different biochemical activities. These findings also provide new insight into the mechanism of intracellular redox regulation.

  7. Facet-Dependent Catalytic Activity of Platinum Nanocrystals for Triiodide Reduction in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Dong; Hou, Yu; Yang, Shuang; Yang, Xiao Hua; Zhong, Ju Hua; Liu, Jian; Wang, Hai Feng; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Yang, Hua Gui

    2013-01-01

    Platinum (Pt) nanocrystals have demonstrated to be an effective catalyst in many heterogeneous catalytic processes. However, pioneer facets with highest activity have been reported differently for various reaction systems. Although Pt has been the most important counter electrode material for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), suitable atomic arrangement on the exposed crystal facet of Pt for triiodide reduction is still inexplicable. Using density functional theory, we have investigated the catalytic reaction processes of triiodide reduction over {100}, {111} and {411} facets, indicating that the activity follows the order of Pt(111) > Pt(411) > Pt(100). Further, Pt nanocrystals mainly bounded by {100}, {111} and {411} facets were synthesized and used as counter electrode materials for DSCs. The highest photovoltaic conversion efficiency of Pt(111) in DSCs confirms the predictions of the theoretical study. These findings have deepened the understanding of the mechanism of triiodide reduction at Pt surfaces and further screened the best facet for DSCs successfully. PMID:23670438

  8. Effect of chloroethene concentrations and granular activated carbon on reductive dechlorination rates and growth of Dehalococcoides spp.

    PubMed

    Aktaş, Özgür; Schmidt, Kathrin R; Mungenast, Sarah; Stoll, Claudia; Tiehm, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the investigation of (i) the tetrachloroethene (PCE) toxicity threshold of a reductively dechlorinating mixed culture containing Dehalococcoides spp., (ii) the adsorption of PCE on different types of granular activated carbon (GAC), and (iii) the bioavailability and reductive dechlorination in the presence of GAC. The abundance of Dehalococcoides spp. detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was found to increase by 2-4 orders of magnitude during degradation of PCE. No degradation occurred at dissolved concentrations beyond 420 μM (70 mg/L). Different adsorption isotherms were determined for thermally and chemically activated carbons. The addition of GAC to biological assays reduced the dissolved PCE concentration below the toxicity threshold. The combination of microbial reductive dechlorination with GAC adsorption proved to be a promising method for remediation of groundwater contaminated by high concentrations of chloroethenes.

  9. Structure-guided unravelling: Phenolic hydroxyls contribute to reduction of acrylamide using multiplex quantitative structure-activity relationship modelling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Huang, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiao; Cheng, Jun

    2016-05-15

    We reported a structure-activity relationship study on unravelling phenolic hydroxyls instead of alcoholic hydroxyls contribute to the reduction of acrylamide formation by flavonoids. The dose-dependent study shows a close correlation between the number of phenolic hydroxyls of flavonoids and their reduction effects. In view of positions of hydroxyls, the 3',4'(ortho)-dihydroxyls in B cycle, 3-hydroxyl or hydroxyls of 3-gallate in C cycle, and 5,7(meta)-dihydroxyls in A cycle of flavonoid structures play an important role in the reduction of acrylamide. Flavone C-glycosides are more effective at reducing the formation of acrylamide than flavone O-glycosides when sharing the same aglycone. The current multiplex quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) equations effectively predict the inhibitory rates of acrylamide using selected chemometric parameters (R(2): 0.835-0.938). This pioneer study opens a broad understanding on the chemoprevention of acrylamide contaminants on a structural basis.

  10. Extraordinary Separation of Acetylene-Containing Mixtures with Microporous Metal-Organic Frameworks with Open O Donor Sites and Tunable Robustness through Control of the Helical Chain Secondary Building Units.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zizhu; Zhang, Zhangjing; Liu, Lizhen; Li, Ziyin; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Han, Yu; Chen, Banglin; Krishna, Rajamani; Xiang, Shengchang

    2016-04-11

    Acetylene separation is a very important but challenging industrial separation task. Here, through the solvothermal reaction of CuI and 5-triazole isophthalic acid in different solvents, two metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, FJU-21 and FJU-22) with open O donor sites and controllable robustness have been obtained for acetylene separation. They contain the same paddle-wheel {Cu2(COO2)4} nodes and metal-ligand connection modes, but with different helical chains as secondary building units (SBUs), leading to different structural robustness for the MOFs. FJU-21 and FJU-22 are the first examples in which the MOFs' robustness is controlled by adjusting the helical chain SBUs. Good robustness gives the activated FJU-22 a, which has higher surface area and gas uptakes than the flexible FJU-21 a. Importantly, FJU-22 a shows extraordinary separation of acetylene mixtures under ambient conditions. The separation capacity of FJU-22 a for 50:50 C2H2/CO2 mixtures is about twice that of the high-capacity HOF-3, and its actual separation selectivity for C2H2/C2H4 mixtures containing 1% acetylene is the highest among reported porous materials. Based on first-principles calculations, the extraordinary separation performance of C2H2 for FJU-22 a was attributed to hydrogen-bonding interactions between the C2H2 molecules with the open O donors on the wall, which provide better recognition ability for C2H2 than other functional sites, including open metal sites and amino groups.

  11. Formation of Complex Organics by Gas Phase and Intracluster Ion-Molecule Reactions Involving Acetylene and Hydrogen Cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shall, S.; Hamed, A.; Soliman, A. R.; Momoh, P. O.

    2011-05-01

    Many complex organics including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are present in flames and combustion processes as well as in interstellar clouds and solar nebulae. Here, we present evidence for the formation of complex covalent organics by gas phase and intracluster reactions of the benzene, phenylium, pyridine, pyrimidine, phenylacetylene and benzonitrile cations with acetylene and hydrogen cyanide molecules. These reactions are studied using mass-selected ion mobility, chemical reactivity, collisional dissociation, and ab initio calculations. Measurements of collision cross sections in helium provide structural information on the adducts and allow probing structural changes at different temperatures (isomerization). We observed multiple additions of five acetylene molecules on the pyridine cation at room temperature. This is a remarkable result considering that only two acetylene molecules were added to the phenyl cation and no addition was observed on the benzene cation at room temperature. The experimental results are in full agreement with the ab initio calculations which predict that the first and second acetylenes add to the pyridine ion in barrierless, highly exothermic reactions. Similar reactions have been observed for the pyrimidine radical cation although the extent of the addition reactions is limited to only two acetylene molecules at room temperature. The results provide the first evidence for the incorporation of nitrogen in the formation cyclic hydrocarbons via the gas phase reactions of pyridine and pyrimidine ions with acetylene molecules. In addition, the formation of covalent adducts in the ionized acetylene/HCN system will be reported for the first time. Sequential reactions leading to the formation of pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations and higher adducts are observed over a wide range of temperature and pressure. The formation of these covalent adducts may represent a general class of addition reactions that can form complex

  12. Development of bioelectrocatalytic activity stimulates mixed-culture reduction of glycerol in a bioelectrochemical system

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mi; Freguia, Stefano; Dennis, Paul G; Keller, Jürg; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-01-01

    In a microbial bioelectrochemical system (BES), organic substrate such as glycerol can be reductively converted to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) by a mixed population biofilm growing on the cathode. Here, we show that 1,3-PDO yields positively correlated to the electrons supplied, increasing from 0.27 ± 0.13 to 0.57 ± 0.09 mol PDO mol−1 glycerol when the cathodic current switched from 1 A m−2 to 10 A m−2. Electrochemical measurements with linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) demonstrated that the biofilm was bioelectrocatalytically active and that the cathodic current was greatly enhanced only in the presence of both biofilm and glycerol, with an onset potential of −0.46 V. This indicates that glycerol or its degradation products effectively served as cathodic electron acceptor. During long-term operation (> 150 days), however, the yield decreased gradually to 0.13 ± 0.02 mol PDO mol−1 glycerol, and the current–product correlation disappeared. The onset potentials for cathodic current decreased to −0.58 V in the LSV tests at this stage, irrespective of the presence or absence of glycerol, with electrons from the cathode almost exclusively used for hydrogen evolution (accounted for 99.9% and 89.5% of the electrons transferred at glycerol and glycerol-free conditions respectively). Community analysis evidenced a decreasing relative abundance of Citrobacter in the biofilm, indicating a community succession leading to cathode independent processes relative to the glycerol. It is thus shown here that in processes where substrate conversion can occur independently of the electrode, electroactive microorganisms can be outcompeted and effectively disconnected from the substrate. PMID:25817314

  13. Further Examination of the Vibratory Loads Reduction Results from the NASA/ARMY/MIT Active Twist Rotor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Matthew L.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2002-01-01

    The vibration reduction capabilities of a model rotor system utilizing controlled, strain-induced blade twisting are examined. The model rotor blades, which utilize piezoelectric active fiber composite actuators, were tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel using open-loop control to determine the effect of active-twist on rotor vibratory loads. The results of this testing have been encouraging, and have demonstrated that active-twist rotor designs offer the potential for significant load reductions in future helicopter rotor systems. Active twist control was found to use less than 1% of the power necessary to operate the rotor system and had a pronounced effect on both rotating- and fixed-system loads, offering reductions in individual harmonic loads of up to 100%. A review of the vibration reduction results obtained is presented, which includes a limited set of comparisons with results generated using the second-generation version of the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD II) rotorcraft comprehensive analysis.

  14. A feasibility study on assessing public health impacts of cumulative air pollution reduction activities in a small geographic area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background and Objective: The rnain objective ofthis study was to examine the feasibility ofconducting a local (e.g., city level) assessment ofthe public health impacts ofcumulative air pollution reduction activities (a.k.a. accountability) from the federal, state, local and vo...

  15. Aligned carbon nanotubes with built-in FeN{sub 4} active sites for electrocatalytic reduction of oxygen.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Liu, D. J.; Chemical Engineering

    2008-01-01

    The electrocatalytic site FeN{sub 4}, which is active towards the oxygen reduction reaction, is incorporated into the graphene layer of aligned carbon nanotubes prepared through a chemical vapor deposition process, as is confirmed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and other characterization techniques.

  16. Report on INL Activities for Uncertainty Reduction Analysis of FY12

    SciTech Connect

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores

    2012-09-01

    The work scope of this project related to the Work Packages of “Uncertainty Reduction Analyses” with the goal of reducing nuclear data uncertainties is to produce a set of improved nuclear data to be used both for a wide range of validated advanced fast reactor design calculations, and for providing guidelines for further improvements of the ENDF/B files (i.e. ENDF/B-VII, and future releases). Recent extensive sensitivity/uncertainty studies, performed within an international OECD-NEA initiative, have quantified for the first time the impact of current nuclear data uncertainties on design parameters of the major FCR&D and GEN-IV systems, and in particular on Na-cooled fast reactors with different fuels (oxide or metal), fuel composition (e.g. different Pu/TRU ratios) and different conversion ratios. These studies have pointed out that present uncertainties on the nuclear data should be significantly reduced, in order to get full benefit from the advanced modeling and simulation initiatives. Nuclear data plays a fundamental role in performance calculations of advanced reactor concepts. Uncertainties in the nuclear data propagate into uncertainties in calculated integral quantities, driving margins and costs in advanced system design, operation and safeguards. This package contributes to the resolution of technical, cost, safety, security and proliferation concerns in a multi-pronged, systematic, science-based R&D approach. The Nuclear Data effort identifies and develops small scale, phenomenon-specific experiments informed by theory and engineering to reduce the number of large, expensive integral experiments. The Nuclear Data activities are leveraged by effective collaborations between experiment and theory, between DOE programs and offices, at national laboratories and universities, both domestic and international. The primary objective is to develop reactor core sensitivity and uncertainty analyses that identify the improvement needs of key nuclear data which

  17. Waste Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Marilyn; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities that focus on waste reduction in the school and community. The ideas are divided into grade level categories. Sample activities include Techno-Trash, where children use tools to take apart broken appliances or car parts, then reassemble them or build new creations. Activities are suggested for areas including language arts and…

  18. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an actively controlled partial span trailing edge flap located on the blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes an analytical study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap located on the blade. The vibration reduction produced by the actively controlled flap (ACF) is compared with that obtained using individual blade control (IBC), in which the entire blade is oscillated in pitch. For both cases a deterministic feedback controller is implemented to reduce the 4/rev hub loads. For all cases considered, the ACF produced vibration reduction comparable with that obtained using IBC, but consumed only 10-30% of the power required to implement IBC. A careful parametric study is conducted to determine the influence of blade torsional stiffness, spanwise location of the control flap, and hinge moment correction on the vibration reduction characteristics of the ACF. The results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach to vibration reduction. It should be emphasized than the ACF, used together with a conventional swashplate, is completely decoupled from the primary flight control system and thus it has no influence on the airworthiness of the helicopter. This attribute is potentially a significant advantage when compared to IBC.

  19. Synthesis of chitosan supported palladium nanoparticles and its catalytic activity towards 2-nitrophenol reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanavel, S.; Nivethaa, E. A. K.; Esther, G.; Narayanan, V.; Stephen, A.

    2016-05-01

    Chitosan supported Palladium nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple cost effective chemical reduction method using NaBH4. The prepared nanocomposite was characterized by X-Ray diffraction analysis, FESEM and Energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis of X-rays (EDAX). The catalytic performance of the nanocomposite was evaluated on the reduction of 2-Nitrophenol to the 2-Amino phenol with rate constant 1.08 × 10-3 S-1 by NaBH4 using Spectrophotometer.

  20. Binding of nitrite and its reductive activation to nitric oxide at biomimetic copper centers.

    PubMed

    Monzani, E; Anthony, G J; Koolhaas, A; Spandre, A; Leggieri, E; Casella, L; Gullotti, M; Nardin, G; Randaccio, L; Fontani, M; Zanello, P; Reedijk, J

    2000-04-01

    analyzed. The mechanism of reductive activation of nitrite to nitric oxide by the Cu(I) complexes of 1-bb, 2-bb, and ddah has been studied. The reaction requires two protons per molecule of nitrite and Cu(I). Kinetic experiments show that the reaction is first order in [Cu(I)] and [H+] and exhibits saturation behavior with respect to nitrite concentration. The kinetic data show that [Cu(2-bb)]+ is more efficient than [Cu(1-bb)]+ and [Cu(ddah)]+ in reducing nitrite. PMID:10819470

  1. Electrochemical reduction of carbon fluorine bond in 4-fluorobenzonitrile Mechanistic analysis employing Marcus Hush quadratic activation-driving force relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukrishnan, A.; Sangaranarayanan, M. V.

    2007-10-01

    The reduction of carbon-fluorine bond in 4-fluorobenzonitrile in acetonitrile as the solvent, is analyzed using convolution potential sweep voltammetry and the dependence of the transfer coefficient on potential is investigated within the framework of Marcus-Hush quadratic activation-driving force theory. The validity of stepwise mechanism is inferred from solvent reorganization energy estimates as well as bond length calculations using B3LYP/6-31g(d) method. A novel method of estimating the standard reduction potential of the 4-fluorobenzonitrile in acetonitrile is proposed.

  2. A new cytotoxic brominated acetylenic hydrocarbon from the marine sponge Haliclona sp. with a selective effect against human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Alarif, Walied M; Abdel-Lateff, Ahmed; Al-Lihaibi, Sultan S; Ayyad, Seif-Eldin N; Badria, Farid A

    2013-01-01

    Three acetylenic brominated derivatives were isolated from a Red Sea sponge, Haliclona sp. One of them, 18-bromooctadeca-9(E),17(E)-dien-7,15-diynoic acid (3), is a known metabolite, and the other two are new compounds, (1E,5E,12E,19E)-1,22-dibromodocosa-1,5,12,19-tetraen-3,14,21-triyne (1) and methyl 18-bromooctadeca-9(E),17(E)-dien-7,15-diynoate (2) which was isolated for the first time as a natural metabolite. Structures of all compounds were determined based on extensive spectroscopic measurements [1D (1H, 13C and DEPT) and 2D (HSQC, HMBC and NOESY) NMR, MS, UV, and IR]. All compounds, except 3, were evaluated for their cytotoxicity employing four cancer cell lines, i.e. MCF-7 (human breast cancer), HepG2 (human hepatocellular carcinoma), WI-38 (skin carcinoma), and Vero (African green monkey kidney). Compounds 1 and 2 had potent selective antitumour activity towards MCF-7 cells with IC50 values of 32.5 and 50.8 microM, respectively.

  3. A stunning example for a spontaneous reaction with a complex mechanism: the vinylidene-acetylene cycloaddition reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraka, Elfi; Joo, Hyun; Cremer, Dieter

    2010-10-01

    The chelotropic addition reaction (1): singlet vinylidene + acetylene → methylenecyclopropene (MCP), was investigated using different levels of theory (B3LYP, CASSCF, CCSD(T), G2M) and different basis sets (6-31G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p), 6-311++G(3df,3pd), cc-pVTZ). The concerted reaction is spontaneous at room temperature (activation enthalpy of 3 kcal mol-1) and strongly exothermic (ΔE = -64 kcal mol-1; ΔH(298) = -59 kcal mol-1). Analysis of the reaction mechanism with the help of the Unified Reaction Valley approach reveals a complicated sequence of structural and electronic changes, which can be best described by partitioning the mechanism into seven phases: (1) van der Waals, (2) electrophilic attack, (3) biradical, (4) allene, (5) carbene, (6) ring closure, and (7) MCP formation phase. In the transient regions from one phase to the next, structures are located that possess properties of hidden transition states (TSs) or hidden intermediates, i.e. by variation of the electronic nature or the environment of the reaction complex, real TSs and/or real intermediates can be generated. There is indication that a given sequence of reaction phases is fixed for a wide variation in the electronic nature of the reaction complex and that other than just orbital symmetry principles play a decisive role for the reaction mechanism.

  4. Optimization of Acetylene Black Conductive Additive andPolyvinylidene Difluoride Composition for High Power RechargeableLithium-Ion Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.; Zheng, H.; Battaglia, V.S.; Simens, A.S.; Minor, A.M.; Song, X.

    2007-07-01

    Fundamental electrochemical methods were applied to study the effect of the acetylene black (AB) and the polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) polymer binder on the performance of high-power designed rechargeable lithium ion cells. A systematic study of the AB/PVDF long-range electronic conductivity at different weight ratios is performed using four-probe direct current tests and the results reported. There is a wide range of AB/PVDF ratios that satisfy the long-range electronic conductivity requirement of the lithium-ion cathode electrode; however, a significant cell power performance improvement is observed at small AB/PVDF composition ratios that are far from the long-range conductivity optimum of 1 to 1.25. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests indicate that the interfacial impedance decreases significantly with increase in binder content. The hybrid power pulse characterization results agree with the EIS tests and also show improvement for cells with a high PVDF content. The AB to PVDF composition plays a significant role in the interfacial resistance. We believe the higher binder contents lead to a more cohesive conductive carbon particle network that results in better overall all local electronic conductivity on the active material surface and hence reduced charge transfer impedance.

  5. Synthesis of Highly Stable Silver-Loaded Vertical ZnO Nanowires Array and its Acetylene Sensing Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Abu Sadat Mohammad Iftekhar; Chung, Gwiy-Sang

    2016-09-01

    A silver-loaded one-dimensional (1D) vertical ZnO nanowires (NWs) array synthesized by a facile seed mediated hydrothermal-RF magnetron sputtering method has been investigated for the fabrication of a highly stable and reproducible acetylene (C2H2) gas sensor. Successful immobilization of silver nanoparticles (NPs) as a sensitizer on the ZnO NWs array significantly enhanced the C2H2 sensing properties and showed a stable sensing performance. The grown structure exhibited high response magnitude (30.8 at 1000ppm), short response time (43s) and excellent selectivity at 220∘C. The enhanced performance can probably be accounted for the effect of combining the highly orientated ZnO NWs and catalytically active silver-based network. The superior sensing features toward C2H2 along with broad detection range (1-1000ppm), outstanding stability and excellent reproducibility indicate that the sensor is a promising candidate for practical applications.

  6. Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial evaluation of some new schiff, mannich and acetylenic Mannich bases incorporating a 1,2,4-triazole nucleus.

    PubMed

    Aouad, Mohamed R

    2014-01-01

    A series of Schiff and Mannich bases derived from 4-amino-5-(3-fluoro-phenyl)-2,4-dihydro-3H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thione were synthesized. The alkylation of 4-phenyl-5-(3-fluorophenyl)-2,4-dihydro-3H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thione with propargyl bromide afforded the corresponding thiopropargylated derivative which upon treatment with the appropriate secondary amines in the presence of CuCl2 furnished the desired acetylenic Mannich bases. The synthesized compounds were characterized on the basis of their spectral (IR, 1H- and 13C-NMR) data and evaluated for their biological activities. Some of the compounds were found to exhibit significant antimicrobial activity.

  7. Status of Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Activities Underway to Address Major Domestic Radiological Security Challenges - 12105

    SciTech Connect

    Cuthbertson, Abigail; Jennison, Meaghan

    2012-07-01

    During their service lives, radioactive sealed sources are used for a wide variety of essential purposes. However, each year, thousands of radioactive sealed sources that pose a potential risk to national security, health, and safety become disused and unwanted in the United States. Due to their concentrated activity and portability, these sources could be used in radiological dispersal devices ('dirty bombs'). For more than a decade, the National Nuclear Security Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy, through the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Offsite Source Recovery Project (GTRI/OSRP), have facilitated the removal and disposition of thousands of disused/unwanted sources worldwide. However, the ability of GTRI/OSRP to continue its work is critically dependent on the ability to transport and appropriately dispose of these sources. On that front, GTRI/OSRP progress includes development of two prototype Type B transport containers and significant efforts toward certification, increased commercial disposal access for risk-significant sealed sources at commercial sites, and cooperation through the International Atomic Energy Agency to increase source repatriation. Disused sealed sources continue to pose a national security concern. The impact of a dirty bomb detonation could be costly both financially and to those exposed to the resulting radiation. However, significant progress has been made since 2008 on each of the challenges identified in the DHS Sealed Source Security Workshop. Not only will there be increased opportunity for commercial disposal of many sizes and types of sealed sources, but also stakeholders are studying front-end solutions to the problem of disused sealed sources, such as financial assurance and recycle. The lack of sealed source transport containers is also likely to be mitigated with the development and certification by NNSA of two new Type B models. Internationally, increased efforts at source repatriation will mitigate the

  8. Pre-Launch GOES-R Risk Reduction Activities for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Boccippio, D. J.; Christian, H. J.; Koshak, W. J.; Petersen, W. A.

    2005-01-01

    The GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) is a new instrument planned for GOES-R that will greatly improve storm hazard nowcasting and increase warning lead time day and night. Daytime detection of lightning is a particularly significant technological advance given the fact that the solar illuminated cloud-top signal can exceed the intensity of the lightning signal by a factor of one hundred. Our approach is detailed across three broad themes which include: Data Processing Algorithm Readiness, Forecast Applications, and Radiance Data Mining. These themes address how the data will be processed and distributed, and the algorithms and models for developing, producing, and using the data products. These pre-launch risk reduction activities will accelerate the operational and research use of the GLM data once GOES-R begins on-orbit operations. The GLM will provide unprecedented capabilities for tracking thunderstorms and earlier warning of impending severe and hazardous weather threats. By providing direct information on lightning initiation, propagation, extent, and rate, the GLM will also capture the updraft dynamics and life cycle of convective storms, as well as internal ice precipitation processes. The GLM provides information directly from the heart of the thunderstorm as opposed to cloud-top only. Nowcasting applications enabled by the GLM data will expedite the warning and response time of emergency management systems, improve the dispatch of electric power utility repair crews, and improve airline routing around thunderstorms thereby improving safety and efficiency, saving fuel and reducing delays. The use of GLM data will assist the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Forest Service in quickly detecting lightning ground strikes that have a high probability of causing fires. Finally, GLM data will help assess the role of thunderstorms and deep convection in global climate, and will improve regional air quality and global chemistry/climate modeling

  9. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-03-24

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than

  10. Characterization of nitrogen-fixing bacteria from a temperate saltmarsh lagoon, including isolates that produce ethane from acetylene.

    PubMed

    Tibbles, B J; Rawlings, D E

    1994-01-01

    Nitrogen-fixing bacteria were isolated from sediments and water of a saltmarsh lagoon on the west coast of South Africa, and characterized according to factors that regulate nitrogen fixation in the marine environment. The majority of isolates were assigned to the Photobacterium or Vibrio genera on the basis of physiological and biochemical characteristics. One isolate was further assigned to the species Vibrio diazotrophicus. Carbohydrate utilization by each diazotrophic isolate was examined. Abilities of the isolates to utilize a range of mono-, di-, and polysaccharides largely reflected the predicted availability of organic carbon and energy in the lagoon, except that chitin was not utilized. Biochemical tests on the utilization of combined nitrogen showed that one isolate could utilize nitrate, and that this strain was susceptible to full repression of nitrogenase activity by 10mM nitrate. Urease activity was not detected in any of the isolates. In the absence of molybdenum two of the isolates, a Photobacterium spp. and V. diazotrophicus, reduced acetylene to ethylene and ethane, a property frequently associated with the activity of alternative nitrogenases. Addition of 25µM molybdenum inhibited ethane production by V. diazotrophicus, but stimulated ethylene and ethane production by the Photobacterium isolate. Addition of 28µM vanadium did not appear to regulate ethane production by either strain. Assays of nitrogenase activity in sediments from which some isolates were obtained indicated that molybdenum was not limiting nitrogenase activity at naturally-occurring concentrations. Southern hybridizations of the chromosomes of these strains with the anfH and vnfH genes of Azotobacter vinelandii and the nifH gene of Klebsiella pneumoniae indicated the presence of only one nitrogenase in these isolates.

  11. Why is silver catalytically active for NO reduction? A unique pathway via an inverted (NO)2 dimer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Pan; Jenkins, Stephen J; King, David A

    2004-06-16

    NO reduction on the noble metal Ag has been studied using density functional theory calculations. It was found that monomeric NO dissociation is subject to prohibitive barriers on Ag metal and is thus unlikely to account for the experimental observations for NO reduction over Ag-based catalysts. For the first time, a mechanism via an inverted (NO)(2) dimer is identified, which can explain both the high activity and the selectivity of this catalytic system. N(2)O is the major reduction product of the inverted (NO)(2) dimer, in accord with experiment. The physical origin of the Ag metallic state as a good catalyst is furthermore identified: Ag surfaces, including small clusters, have little or no covalent bonding ability but can bond ionically with adsorbates. We conclude that the variation of the ionic bonding strength of Ag toward different reactants determines its catalytic selectivity.

  12. Investigation of catalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reaction of Pt dispersed on boron doped graphene in acid medium.

    PubMed

    Pullamsetty, Ashok; Sundara, Ramaprabhu

    2016-10-01

    Boron doped graphene was prepared by a facile method and platinum (Pt) decoration over boron doped graphene was done in various chemical reduction methods such as sodium borohydride (NaBH4), polyol and modified polyol. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the synthesized catalyst particles are present in a nanocrystalline structure and transmission and scanning electron microscopy were employed to investigate the morphology and particle distribution. The electrochemical properties were investigated with the help of the rotating disk electrode (RDE) technique and cyclic voltammetry. The results show that the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) takes place by a four-electron process. The kinetics of the ORR was evaluated using K-L and Tafel plots. The electrocatalyst obtained in modified polyol reduction method has shown the better catalytic activity compared to other two electrocatalysts. PMID:27393888

  13. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation--O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  14. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  15. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  16. Rotational spectroscopy and molecular structure of the 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene-acetylene complex.

    PubMed

    Leung, Helen O; Marshall, Mark D; Grimes, David D

    2011-01-21

    Guided by ab initio calculations, Fourier transform microwave spectra in the 6-21 GHz region are obtained for seven isotopomers of the complex formed between 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene and acetylene. These include the four possible combinations of (35)Cl- and (37)Cl-containing CH(2)CClF with the most abundant acetylene isotopic modification, HCCH, and its H(13)C(13)CH analogue, as well as three singly substituted deuterated isotopomers. Analysis of the spectra determines the rotational constants and additionally, the complete chlorine quadrupole hyperfine coupling tensors in both the inertial and principal electric field gradient axis systems, and where appropriate, the diagonal components of the deuterium quadrupole coupling tensors. The inertial information contained in the rotational constants provides the structure for CH(2)CClF-HCCH: a primary, hydrogen bonding interaction existing between the HCCH donor and the F atom acceptor on the 1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene moiety, while a secondary interaction occurs between the acetylenic bond on the HCCH molecule and the H atom cis to the hydrogen-bonded F atom on the substituted ethylene, which causes the hydrogen bond to deviate from linearity. This is similar to the structure obtained for 1,1-difluoroethylene-HCCH [H. O. Leung and M. D. Marshall, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 154301 (2006)], and indeed, to within experimental uncertainty, the intermolecular interactions in CH(2)CClF-HCCH and its 1,1-difluoroethylene counterpart are practically indistinguishable, even though ab initio calculations at the MP2∕6-311G++(2d, 2p) level suggest that the former complex is more strongly bound. PMID:21261349

  17. Mechanisms of. pi. -bond oxidation by cytochrome p-450: acetylenes as probes

    SciTech Connect

    Komives, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    Phenylacetylene and biphenylacetylene are oxidized by microsomal and purified P-450 to the corresponding arylacetic acids. During this transformation, the acetylenic hydrogen undergoes a 1,2 shift which causes a kinetic isotope effect of 1.8 on the overall enzymatic rate. The same products and kinetic isotope effects are observed when the arylacetylenes are oxidized by m-chloroperbenzoic acid. Suicide inactivation of P-450 by the arylacetylenes, which occurs simultaneously with metabolite formation, is insensitive to isotopic substitution so the partition ratio changes from 26 for phenylacetylene of 14 for (1-/sup 2/H) phenylacetylene.

  18. (-)-Duryne and its homologues, cytotoxic acetylenes from a marine Sponge Petrosia sp.

    PubMed

    Hitora, Yuki; Takada, Kentaro; Okada, Shigeru; Ise, Yuji; Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2011-05-27

    Six linear acetylenes, (-)-duryne (1) and (-)-durynes B-F (2-6), were isolated from the marine sponge Petrosia sp. Their structures were elucidated by NMR and tandem FABMS analyses. The positions of the olefinic bonds were confirmed by ozonolysis experiments, and the absolute configurations were determined by the modified Mosher's method. Compound 1 was found to be the enantiomer of duryne, a previously reported sponge metabolite. Compounds 1-6 show cytotoxicity against HeLa cells with IC50 values between 0.08 and 0.50 μM. PMID:21534590

  19. Second hyperpolarizability of delta shaped disubstituted acetylene complexes of beryllium, magnesium, and calcium.

    PubMed

    Hatua, Kaushik; Nandi, Prasanta K

    2015-10-01

    Present theoretical study involves the delta shape complexes of beryllium, magnesium, and calcium where the metal atom interacts perpendicularly with disubstituted acetylene. Most of the complexes are found to be fairly stable. The dependence of second-hyperpolarizability on the basis set with increasing polarization and diffuse functions has been examined which showed the importance of 'f-type' type polarization function for heavy metal (Mg, Ca) and 'd-type' polarization function for beryllium. Larger second hyperpolarizability has been predicted for complexes having significant ground state polarization and low lying excited states favoring strong electronic coupling. Transition energy plays the most significant role in modulating the second hyperpolarizability.

  20. The 2Πg shape resonance of acetylene anion: an investigation with the RAC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čurík, Roman; Paidarová, Ivana; Horáček, Jiří

    2016-07-01

    Recently developed method of regularized analytic continuation (RAC) is applied to determination of the 2Πg resonance of acetylene anion. The method is based on continuation of the electron affinities calculated for the anion in presence of an external perturbation field. Its independence on the correlation treatment of the many-electron system allows application of accurate coupled-clusters methods for electronic structure calculations utilized in determination of the resonance position and width. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.