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Sample records for acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis

  1. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ying; Naito, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-11-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with 70 µM polaprezinc for 24 h, and then stimulated with or without 15 mM acetylsalicylic acid for a further 15 h. Subsequent cellular viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced cell death was also qualified by fluorescent microscopy of Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide. Heat shock proteins 70 protein expression after adding polaprezinc or acetylsalicylic acid was assessed by western blotting. To investigate the role of Heat shock protein 70, Heat shock protein 70-specific small interfering RNA was applied. Cell viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining and apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that acetylsalicylic acid significantly induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Polaprezinc significantly suppressed acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells at its late phase. At the same time, polaprezinc increased Heat shock protein 70 expressions of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. However, in Heat shock protein 70-silenced rat intestinal epithelial cells, polaprezinc could not suppress acetylsalicylic acid -induced apoptosis at its late phase. We conclude that polaprezinc-increased Heat shock protein 70 expression might be an important mechanism by which polaprezinc suppresses acetylsalicylic

  2. Effects of β-glucan pretreatment on acetylsalicylic acid-induced gastric damage: An experimental study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Orhan Veli; Ozturk, Oktay Hasan; Aydin, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Nigar; Yetim, Ibrahim; Nacar, Ahmet; Oktar, Suleyman; Sogut, Sadik

    2010-01-01

    Background: NSAIDs have been found to induce gastrointestinal tract damage. Recently, it has been suggested that this might be mediated by lipid peroxidation. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the potential protective effects of β-glucan against acetylsalicylic acid (ASA-induced gastric damage by means of its antioxidant capacity in an experimental rat model. Methods: Thirty-two male Wistar albino rats (200–250 g) were randomized into 4 groups consisting of 8 rats each. The β-glucan group received 50 mg/kg β-glucan once a day for 10 days and 30 minutes before anesthesia. The ASA group received saline once a day for 10 days and 300 mg/kg (20 mg/mL) ASA as a single dose, 4 hours before anesthesia. The ASA+β-glucan group was administered 50 mg/kg β-glucan once a day for 10 days and 30 minutes before anesthesia. Additionally, 300 mg/kg (20 mg/mL) ASA was administered as a single dose, 4 hours before anesthesia. The control group received saline once a day for 10 days and 30 minutes before anesthesia. All medications were administered by intragastric gavage. The stomach from each rat was dissected and divided into 2 parts for histologic and biochemical analysis. Gastric tissue malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) levels, catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were determined for oxidative parameter analysis. Results: The gastroprotective and antioxidant effects of β-glucan appeared to attenuate the ASA-induced gastric tissue damage. Compared with the control group, MDA and NO levels and CAT and GSH-Px activities were significantly increased in the stomachs of ASA-treated rats (MDA, 4.12 [0.44] to 13.41 [1.05] μmol/L; NO, 8.04 [7.25–9.10] vs 30.35 [22.34–37.95] μmol/g protein; CAT, 0.050 [0.004] to 0.083 [0.003] k/g protein; GSH-Px, 0.57 [0.42–0.66] to 1.55 [1.19–1.76] U/L; all, P < 0.001), whereas SOD activity was significantly decreased in the same group (291 [29] to 124 [6] U/mL; P

  3. Lysophosphatidic acid induces necrosis and apoptosis in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Holtsberg, F W; Steiner, M R; Keller, J N; Mark, R J; Mattson, M P; Steiner, S M

    1998-01-01

    A diverse body of evidence indicates a role for the lipid biomediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the CNS. This study identifies and characterizes the induction of neuronal death by LPA. Treatment of cultured hippocampal neurons from embryonic rat brains with 50 microM LPA resulted in neuronal necrosis, as determined morphologically and by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. A concentration of LPA as low as 10 microM led to the release of lactate dehydrogenase. In contrast, treatment of neurons with 0.1 or 1.0 microM LPA resulted in apoptosis, as determined by chromatin condensation. In addition, neuronal death induced by 1 microM LPA was characterized as apoptotic on the basis of terminal dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining, externalization of phosphatidylserine, and protection against chromatin condensation, TUNEL staining, and phosphatidylserine externalization by treatment with N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of caspases, i.e., members of the interleukin-1beta converting enzyme family. Studies with antagonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors did not indicate a significant role for these receptors in apoptosis induced by 1 microM LPA. LPA (1 microM) also induced a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Moreover, pretreatment of neurons with cyclosporin A protected against the LPA-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and neuronal apoptosis. Thus, LPA, at pathophysiological levels, can induce neuronal apoptosis and could thereby participate in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:9422348

  4. Ursodeoxycholic acid induces apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Xu, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Zhen; Huang, Ya; Han, Guo-Qing; Liang, Tie-Jun; Wei, Li-Li; Qin, Cheng-Yong; Qin, Cheng-Kun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: BALB/c nude mice were randomized into four groups 24 h before subcutaneous injection of hepatocarcinoma BEL7402 cells suspended in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) into the right flank. The control group (n = 10) was fed a standard diet while treatment groups (n = 10 each) were fed a standard daily diet supplemented with different concentrations of UDCA (30, 50 and 70 mg/kg per day) for 21 d. Tumor growth was measured once each week, and tumor volume (V) was calculated with the following equation: V = (L × W2) × 0.52, where L is the length and W is the width of the xenograft. After 21 d, mice were killed under ether anesthesia, and tumors were excised and weighed. Apoptosis was evaluated through detection of DNA fragmentation with gel electrophoresis and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the expression of apoptosis-related proteins BAX, BCL2, APAF1, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved caspase-3. RESULTS: UDCA suppressed tumor growth relative to controls. The mean tumor volumes were the following: control, 1090 ± 89 mm3; 30 mg/kg per day, 612 ± 46 mm3; 50 mg/kg per day, 563 ± 38 mm3; and 70 mg/kg per day, 221 ± 26 mm3. Decreased tumor volumes reached statistical significance relative to control xenografts (30 mg/kg per day, P < 0.05; 50 mg/kg per day, P < 0.05; 70 mg/kg per day, P < 0.01). Increasing concentrations of UDCA led to increased DNA fragmentation observed on gel electrophoresis and in the TUNEL assay (control, 1.6% ± 0.3%; 30 mg/kg per day, 2.9% ± 0.5%; 50 mg/kg per day, 3.15% ± 0.7%, and 70 mg/kg per day, 4.86% ± 0.9%). Western blot analysis revealed increased expression of BAX, APAF1, cleaved-caspase-9 and cleaved-caspase-3 proteins, which induce apoptosis, but decreased expression of BCL2

  5. Dihydrolipoic acid induces cytotoxicity in mouse blastocysts through apoptosis processes.

    PubMed

    Houng, Wei-Li; Lin, Cheng-An J; Shen, Ji-Lin; Yeh, Hung-I; Wang, Hsueh-Hsiao; Chang, Walter H; Chan, Wen-Hsiung

    2012-01-01

    α-Lipoic acid (LA) is a thiol with antioxidant properties that protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. LA is absorbed from the diet, taken up by cells and tissues, and subsequently reduced to dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA). In view of the recent application of DHLA as a hydrophilic nanomaterial preparation, determination of its biosafety profile is essential. In the current study, we examined the cytotoxic effects of DHLA on mouse embryos at the blastocyst stage, subsequent embryonic attachment and outgrowth in vitro, in vivo implantation by embryo transfer, and early embryonic development in an animal model. Blastocysts treated with 50 μM DHLA exhibited significantly increased apoptosis and a corresponding decrease in total cell number. Notably, the implantation success rates of blastocysts pretreated with DHLA were lower than that of their control counterparts. Moreover, in vitro treatment with 50 μM DHLA was associated with increased resorption of post-implantation embryos and decreased fetal weight. Data obtained using an in vivo mouse model further disclosed that consumption of drinking water containing 100 μM DHLA led to decreased early embryo development, specifically, inhibition of development to the blastocyst stage. However, it appears that concentrations of DHLA lower than 50 μM do not exert a hazardous effect on embryonic development. Our results collectively indicate that in vitro and in vivo exposure to concentrations of DHLA higher than 50 μM DHLA induces apoptosis and retards early pre- and post-implantation development, and support the potential of DHLA to induce embryonic cytotoxicity. PMID:22489194

  6. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Apoptosis in Primary Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gyan, Emmanuel; Tournilhac, Olivier; Halty, Christelle; Veyrat-Masson, Richard; Akil, Saïda; Berger, Marc; Hérault, Olivier; Callanan, Mary; Bay, Jacques-Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an indolent disorder with an increased infectious risk remaining one of the main causes of death. Development of therapies with higher safety profile is thus a challenging issue. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6) is an omega-3 fatty acid, a natural compound of normal cells, and has been shown to display antitumor potency in cancer. We evaluated the potential in vitro effect of DHA in primary CLL cells. DHA induces high level of in vitro apoptosis compared to oleic acid in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Estimation of IC50 was only of 4.813 µM, which appears lower than those reported in solid cancers. DHA is highly active on CLL cells in vitro. This observation provides a rationale for further studies aiming to understand its mechanisms of action and its potent in vivo activity. PMID:26734128

  7. Anacardic acid induces apoptosis-like cell death in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Muzaffar, Suhail; Bose, Chinchu; Banerji, Ashok; Nair, Bipin G; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2016-01-01

    Anacardic acid (6-pentadecylsalicylic acid), extracted from cashew nut shell liquid, is a natural phenolic lipid well known for its strong antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities. Its effect has been well studied in bacterial and mammalian systems but remains largely unexplored in fungi. The present study identifies antifungal, cytotoxic, and antioxidant activities of anacardic acid in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. It was found that anacardic acid causes inhibition of conidial germination and mycelial growth in this ascomycetous fungus. Phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin condensation, DNA degradation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential suggest that growth inhibition of fungus is mainly caused by apoptosis-like cell death. Broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK treatment indicated that anacardic acid induces caspase-independent apoptosis in M. oryzae. Expression of a predicted ortholog of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was upregulated during the process of apoptosis, suggesting the possibility of mitochondria dependent apoptosis via activation of apoptosis-inducing factor. Anacardic acid treatment leads to decrease in reactive oxygen species rather than increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation normally observed during apoptosis, confirming the antioxidant properties of anacardic acid as suggested by earlier reports. Our study also shows that anacardic acid renders the fungus highly sensitive to DNA damaging agents like ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Treatment of rice leaves with anacardic acid prevents M. oryzae from infecting the plant without affecting the leaf, suggesting that anacardic acid can be an effective antifungal agent. PMID:26381667

  8. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced changes in the chemical coding of extrinsic sensory neurons supplying the prepyloric area of the porcine stomach.

    PubMed

    Rytel, L; Calka, J

    2016-03-23

    Acetylsalicylic acid is a popular drug that is commonly used to treat fever and inflammation, but which can also negativity affect the mucosal layer of the stomach, although knowledge concerning its influence on gastric innervation is very scarce. Thus, the aim of the present study was to study the influence of prolonged acetylsalicylic acid supplementation on the extrinsic primary sensory neurons supplying the porcine stomach prepyloric region. Fast Blue (FB) was injected into the above-mentioned region of the stomach. Acetylsalicylic acid was then given orally to the experimental gilts from the seventh day after FB injection to the 27th day of the experiment. After euthanasia, the nodose ganglia (NG) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were collected. Sections of these ganglia were processed for routine double-labelling immunofluorescence technique for substance P (SP), calcitonine gene related peptide (CGRP), galanin (GAL), neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Under physiological conditions within the nodose ganglia, the percentage of the FB-labeled neurons immunoreactive to particular substances ranged between 17.9±2.7% (VIP-like immunoreactive (LI) neurons in the right NG) and 60.4±1.7% (SP-LI cells within the left NG). Acetylsalicylic acid supplementation caused a considerable increase in the expression of all active substances studied within both left and right NG and the percentage of neurons positive to particular substances fluctuated from 47.2±3.6% (GAL-LI neurons in the right NG) to 67.2±2.0% (cells immunoreactive to SP in the left NG). All studied substances were also observed in DRG neurons supplying the prepyloric region of the stomach, but the number of immunoreactive neurons was too small to conduct a statistical analysis. The obtained results show that ASA may influence chemical coding of the sensory neurons supplying the porcine stomach, but the exact mechanisms of this action still remain

  9. Quinolinic acid induces cell apoptosis in PC12 cells through HIF-1-dependent RTP801 activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaojia; Yang, Kaiyong; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Qiang; Li, Yongjin

    2016-04-01

    Neurological disease comprises a series of disorders featuring brain dysfunction and neuronal cell death. Among the factors contributing to neuronal death, excitotoxicity induced by excitatory amino acids, such as glutamate, plays a critical role. However, the mechanisms about how the excitatory amino acids induce neuronal death remain elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of HIF-1α (hypoxia inducible factor-1α) and RTP801 in cell apoptosis induced by quinolinic acid (QUIN), a glutamatergic agonist, in PC12 cells. We found that QUIN at 5 μM increased the expression of HIF-1α significantly with a peak at 24 h. After the treatment with QUIN (5-20 μM) for 24 h, the cells exhibited decreased viability and cell apoptosis with a concomitant increased expression of apoptosis related proteins. QUIN treatment also induced the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and RTP801 up-regulation in a HIF-1α-dependent manner that were inhibited by 2-methoxyestradiol, a HIF-1α inhibitor. Importantly, HIF-1 or RTP801 invalidation by siRNA rescued the cell apoptosis induced by QUIN or cobalt chloride, a chemical inducer of HIF-1. Taken together, these findings support the concept that neurotoxicity induced by QUIN is associated with HIF-1-dependent RTP801 activation and provide insight into the potential of RTP801 inhibitor in treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:26738727

  10. Proteomic Investigation into Betulinic Acid-Induced Apoptosis of Human Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Pang, Qiuying; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Aiqin; Luo, Shaman; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that exhibits anticancer functions in human cancer cells. This study provides evidence that betulinic acid is highly effective against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by inducing dose- and time-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic process was further investigated using a proteomics approach to reveal protein expression changes in HeLa cells following betulinic acid treatment. Proteomic analysis revealed that there were six up- and thirty down-regulated proteins in betulinic acid-induced HeLa cells, and these proteins were then subjected to functional pathway analysis using multiple analysis software. UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decarboxylating, chain A Horf6-a novel human peroxidase enzyme that involved in redox process, was found to be down-regulated during the apoptosis process of the oxidative stress response pathway. Consistent with our results at the protein level, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in betulinic acid-treated cells. The proteins glucose-regulated protein and cargo-selection protein TIP47, which are involved in the endoplasmic reticulum pathway, were up-regulated by betulinic acid treatment. Meanwhile, 14-3-3 family proteins, including 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε, were down-regulated in response to betulinic acid treatment, which is consistent with the decrease in expression of the target genes 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε. Furthermore, it was found that the antiapoptotic bcl-2 gene was down-regulated while the proapoptotic bax gene was up-regulated after betulinic acid treatment in HeLa cells. These results suggest that betulinic acid induces apoptosis of HeLa cells by triggering both the endoplasmic reticulum pathway and the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway. PMID:25148076

  11. Decreased apoptosis during CAR-mediated hepatoprotection against lithocholic acid-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Beilke, Lisa D; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Olson, Erik R; Besselsen, David G; Klaassen, Curtis D; Dvorak, Katerina; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2009-07-10

    Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) is an anti-apoptotic protein that is regulated by the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Activation of CAR can protect the liver against bile acid-induced toxicity and it may have a role in cell death via apoptosis by altering expression of Bcl-2 family proteins such as myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1). Our aim was to determine if activation of CAR reduces hepatocellular apoptosis during cholestasis as a mechanism of hepatoprotection. CAR(+/+) (WT) and CAR(-/-) (CAR-null) mice were pre-treated with compounds known to activate CAR prior to induction of intrahepatic cholestasis using the secondary bile acid lithocholic acid (LCA). Pre-treatment with the CAR activators phenobarbital (PB) and TCPOBOP (TC), as well as the non-CAR activator pregnenolone 16alpha-carbontrile (PCN), protected against LCA-induced liver injury in WT mice, whereas liver injury was more extensive without CAR (CAR-null). Unexpectedly, expression of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 and Bcl-x(L) was not increased in hepatoprotected mice. Compared to unprotected groups, apoptosis was decreased in hepatoprotected mice as evidenced by the absence of cleaved caspase 3 (cCasp3). In contrast to the cytoplasmic localization in the injured livers (LCA and oltipraz), Mcl-1 protein was localized in the nucleus of hepatoprotected livers to potentially promote cell survival. This study demonstrates that although apoptosis is reduced in hepatoprotected mice pre-treated with CAR and non-CAR activators; hepatoprotection is not directly a result of CAR-induced Mcl-1 expression. PMID:19433268

  12. PDIA3 Knockdown Exacerbates Free Fatty Acid-Induced Hepatocyte Steatosis and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao-hui; Xu, Cheng-fu; Xu, Lei; Li, You-ming; Chen, Wei-xing

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as one of the most common chronic liver disease over the past decades. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) plays a pivotal role during the development of NAFLD. This study aims to analyze the potential role of protein disulfide isomerase A3 precursor (PDIA3), one of the ER chaperones, in free fatty acid-induced cell model of NAFLD. Human liver L02 cell line was treated with sodium palmitate for 24 hours, which developed severe intracellular lipid accumulation. The increased protein level of PDIA3 was detected via immunoblotting analysis in the fat loaded cell models of NAFLD. siRNA-mediated knockdown of PDIA3 in L02 cells not only increased the cellular lipid accumulation, but also exacerbated hepatocytes apoptosis induced by sodium palmitate. Further investigation revealed that knockdown of PDIA3 up-regulated protein expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS), a key enzyme involved in fatty acid synthesis. PDIA3 knockdown also up-regulated key molecules of ERS pathway, including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), phospho-PKR-like ER kinase (p-PERK), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Our results suggested that ER chaperone PDIA3 plays a pivotal role in FFA-induced hepatocyte steatosis and apoptosis. PMID:26214517

  13. Carnosic Acid Induces Apoptosis Through Reactive Oxygen Species-mediated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Induction in Human Renal Carcinoma Caki Cells

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyoung-jin; Jung, Kyong-Jin; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Carnosic acid, which is one of extract components of rosemary, has anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and anti-cancer effects. However, the anti-cancer effect of carnosic acid in human renal carcinoma cells is unknown. Methods: Flow cytometry analysis was used to examine the effects of carnosic acid on apoptosis, and Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-ase activity assay kit was used to investigate the involvement of caspase activation. To determine protein expression of apoptotic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related proteins, we used Western blotting. Intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using the fluorescent probes 2’, 7’-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCFDA). Results: Carnosic acid induced sub-diploid DNA content, sub-G1, population and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and activated caspase-3. A pan-caspase inhibitor, a benzyloxycarbonylvalyl-alanyl-aspartyl fluoromethyl ketone, markedly reduced apoptosis in carnosic acid-treated cells. Carnosic acid promoted intracellular ROS production, and pretreatment with the ROS scavengers (N-acetyl-L-cysteine and glutathione ethyl ester) inhibited carnosic acid-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, carnosic acid also induced expression of ER stress marker proteins, including activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein (CHOP), in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Down-regulation of ATF4 and CHOP by small interfering RNA (siRNA) markedly reduced carnosic acid-induced sub-G1 population and PARP cleavage. In addition, carnosic acid induced apoptosis in human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-361 and human hepatocellular carcinoma SK-HEP1 cells, but not in normal human skin fibroblast cells and normal mouse kidney epithelial TMCK-1 cells. Conclusion: Carnosic acid induced apoptosis through production of ROS and induction of ER stress in human renal carcinoma Caki cells. PMID:25337586

  14. Acid-induced autophagy protects human lung cancer cells from apoptosis by activating ER stress.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen-Yue; Zhou, Xiang-Dong; Li, Qi; Chen, Ling-Xiu; Ran, Dan-Hua

    2015-12-10

    An acidic tumor microenvironment exists widely in solid tumors. However, the detailed mechanism of cell survival under acidic stress remains unclear. The aim of this study is to clarify whether acid-induced autophagy exists and to determine the function and mechanism of autophagy in lung cancer cells. We have found that acute low pH stimulated autophagy by increasing LC3-positive punctate vesicles, increasing LC3 II expression levels and reducing p62 protein levels. Additionally, autophagy was inhibited by the addition of Baf or knockdown of Beclin 1, and cell apoptosis was increased markedly. In mouse tumors, the expression of cleaved caspase3 and p62 was enhanced by oral treatment with sodium bicarbonate, which can raise the intratumoral pH. Furthermore, the protein levels of ER stress markers, including p-PERK, p-eIF2α, CHOP, XBP-1s and GRP78, were also increased in response to acidic pH. The antioxidant NAC, which reduces ROS accumulation, alleviated acid-mediated ER stress and autophagy, and knocking down GRP78 reduced autophagy activation under acidic conditions, which suggests that autophagy was induced by acidic pH through ER stress. Taken together, these results indicate that the acidic microenvironment in non-small cell lung cancer cells promotes autophagy by increasing ROS-ER stress, which serves as a survival adaption in this setting. PMID:26559141

  15. Salicylic acid induces apoptosis in colon carcinoma cells grown in-vitro: Influence of oxygen and salicylic acid concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Zitta, Karina; Meybohm, Patrick; Bein, Berthold; Huang, Ying; Heinrich, Christin; Scholz, Jens; Steinfath, Markus; Albrecht, Martin

    2012-04-15

    In solid tumors the hypoxic environment can promote tumor progression and resistance to therapy. Recently, acetylsalicylic acid a major component of analgesic drugs and its metabolite salicylic acid (SA) have been shown to reduce the risk of colon cancer, but the mechanisms of action remain still unclear. Here we elucidate the effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of SA on colon carcinoma cells (CaCo-2) grown under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Western blotting, caspase-3/7 apoptosis assays, MTS cell-proliferation assays, LDH cytotoxicity assays and hydrogen peroxide measurements were performed to investigate the effects of 1 and 10 {mu}M SA on CaCo-2 cells grown under normoxic conditions and cells exposed to hypoxia. Under normoxic conditions, SA did not influence cell proliferation or LDH release of CaCo-2 cells. However, caspase-3/7 activity was significantly increased. Under hypoxia, cell proliferation was reduced and LDH release and caspase-3/7 activities were increased. None of these parameters was altered by the addition of SA under hypoxic conditions. Hypoxia increased hydrogen peroxide concentrations 300-fold and SA significantly augmented the release of hydrogen peroxide under normoxic, but not under hypoxic conditions. Phosphorylation of the pro-survival kinases akt and erk1/2 was not changed by SA under hypoxic conditions, whereas under normoxia SA reduced phosphorylation of erk1/2 after 2 hours. We conclude that in colon carcinoma cells effects of SA on apoptosis and cellular signaling are dependent on the availability of oxygen. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of salicylic acid on colon carcinoma cells grown under normoxic and hypoxic conditions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid increases caspase-3/7 activity and hydrogen peroxide release under normoxia Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid decreases pro-survival erk-1/2 phosphorylation under normoxia Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid does

  16. Abscisic-acid-induced cellular apoptosis and differentiation in glioma via the retinoid acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan; Yao, Yu; Ye, Hongxing; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Liang; Mao, Ying

    2016-04-15

    Retinoid acid (RA) plays critical roles in regulating differentiation and apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells. Abscisic acid (ABA) and RA are direct derivatives of carotenoids and share structural similarities. Here we proposed that ABA may also play a role in cellular differentiation and apoptosis by sharing a similar signaling pathway with RA that may be involved in glioma pathogenesis. We reported for the first time that the ABA levels were twofold higher in low-grade gliomas compared with high-grade gliomas. In glioma tissues, there was a positive correlation between the ABA levels and the transcription of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2 (CRABP2) and a negative correlation between the ABA levels and transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5). ABA treatment induced a significant increase in the expression of CRABP2 and a decrease in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) in glioblastoma cells. Remarkably, both cellular apoptosis and differentiation were increased in the glioblastoma cells after ABA treatment. ABA-induced cellular apoptosis and differentiation were significantly reduced by selectively silencing RAR-α, while RAR-α overexpression exaggerated the ABA-induced effects. These results suggest that ABA may play a role in the pathogenesis of glioma by promoting cellular apoptosis and differentiation through the RA signaling pathway. PMID:26594836

  17. Taurochenodeoxycholic acid induces NR8383 cells apoptosis via PKC/JNK-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Zhang, Ziying; He, Xiuling; Mao, Wei; Zhou, Lei; Li, Peifeng

    2016-09-01

    Our former studies have suggested that taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA) as a signaling molecule shows obvious anti-inflammatory and immune regulation properties. In this research, we tentatively explored the potential effects and the possible mechanism that involve in the apoptotic process in NR8383 cells induced by TCDCA. Using flow cytometry analysis, we evaluated the apoptosis rate. Gene expression levels were determined by qPCR. The expressions of protein kinase C (PKC), Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and their phosphorylation were measured by Western Blot. We observed the activities of caspase-3 and caspase-8 with Caspase-Glo® regent. The results demonstrated that TCDCA dramatically improved the apoptosis rate of NR8383 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In the meantime, PKC mRNA levels and activities were significantly augmented by TCDCA treatments. In addition, JNK, caspase-3 and caspase-8 mRNA expression levels and activities were increased by TCDCA, while they were markedly decreased by specific inhibitors. We conclude that TCDCA contributes to the apoptosis through the activation of the caspase cascade in NR8383 cells, and the PKC/JNK signaling pathway may be involved in this process. These results indicate that TCDCA may be a latent effective pharmaceutical product for apoptosis-related diseases. PMID:27268718

  18. Epithelial MUC1 promotes cell migration, reduces apoptosis and affects levels of mucosal modulators during acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin)-induced gastropathy.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Debashish; Fernandez, Harvey Robert; Patil, Pradeep Bhatu; Premaratne, Pushpa; Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne; Lindén, Sara Katarina

    2015-02-01

    MUC1 is a transmembrane mucin highly expressed in the stomach. Although extensive research has uncovered many of its roles in cancer, knowledge about the functions of MUC1 in normal tissues is limited. In the present study, we showed that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; aspirin) up-regulated MUC1/Muc1 expression in the gastric mucosa of humans and wild-type (WT) mice. ASA induced mucosal injury in all mice to a similar extent; however, WT animals and those chimaeras with Muc1 on the epithelia recovered faster than Muc1-knockout (KO) mice and chimaeras carrying Muc1 on haemopoietic but not epithelial cells. MUC1 enhanced proliferation and migration of the human gastric cell line MKN-7 and increased resistance to apoptosis. The repeated treatment regime used caused a reduction in cyclo-oxygenase-1 (Cox-1) expression, though WT animals returned faster towards pre-treatment levels and had increased Cox-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels during recovery. Thus we found that epithelial Muc1 is more important for the healing process than haemopoietic Muc1 and Muc1/MUC1 facilitates wound healing by enhancing cell migration and proliferation, protecting against apoptosis and mediating expression of mucosal modulators. Thus MUC1 plays essential roles during wound healing and development of treatment modalities targeting enhanced expression of MUC1 may be beneficial to treat mucosal wounds. PMID:25387004

  19. Mitochondrial genome depletion in human liver cells abolishes bile acid-induced apoptosis: role of the Akt/mTOR survival pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jose J G; Hernandez, Alicia; Revuelta, Isabel E; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ester; Gonzalez-Buitrago, Jose M; Perez, Maria J

    2013-08-01

    Acute accumulation of bile acids in hepatocytes may cause cell death. However, during long-term exposure due to prolonged cholestasis, hepatocytes may develop a certain degree of chemoresistance to these compounds. Because mitochondrial adaptation to persistent oxidative stress may be involved in this process, here we have investigated the effects of complete mitochondrial genome depletion on the response to bile acid-induced hepatocellular injury. A subline (Rho) of human hepatoma SK-Hep-1 cells totally depleted of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was obtained, and bile acid-induced concentration-dependent activation of apoptosis/necrosis and survival signaling pathways was studied. In the absence of changes in intracellular ATP content, Rho cells were highly resistant to bile acid-induced apoptosis and partially resistant to bile acid-induced necrosis. In Rho cells, both basal and bile acid-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion, was decreased. Bile acid-induced proapoptotic signals were also decreased, as evidenced by a reduction in the expression ratios Bax-α/Bcl-2, Bcl-xS/Bcl-2, and Bcl-xS/Bcl-xL. This was mainly due to a downregulation of Bax-α and Bcl-xS. Moreover, in these cells the Akt/mTOR pathway was constitutively activated in a ROS-independent manner and remained similarly activated in the presence of bile acid treatment. In contrast, ERK1/2 activation was constitutively reduced and was not activated by incubation with bile acids. In conclusion, these results suggest that impaired mitochondrial function associated with mtDNA alterations, which may occur in liver cells during prolonged cholestasis, may activate mechanisms of cell survival accounting for an enhanced resistance of hepatocytes to bile acid-induced apoptosis. PMID:23597504

  20. Melatonin reduces bacterial translocation and apoptosis in trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis of rats

    PubMed Central

    Akcan, Alper; Kucuk, Can; Sozuer, Erdogan; Esel, Duygu; Akyildiz, Hizir; Akgun, Hulya; Muhtaroglu, Sabahattin; Aritas, Yucel

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of exogenous melatonin on bacterial translocation and apoptosis in a rat ulcerative colitis model. METHODS: Rats were randomly assigned to three groups: groupI: control, group II: experimental colitis, group III: colitis plus melatonin treatment. On d 11 after colitis, plasma tumor necrosis factor-α, portal blood endotoxin levels, colon tissue myeloperoxidase and caspase-3 activity were measured. Bacterial translocation was quantified by blood, lymph node, liver and spleen culture. RESULTS: We observed a significantly reduced incidence of bacterial translocation to the liver, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, portal and systemic blood in animals treated with melatonin. Treatment with melatonin significantly decreased the caspase-3 activity in colonic tissues compared to that in trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid- treated rats (16.11 ± 2.46 vs 32.97 ± 3.91, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Melatonin has a protective effect on bacterial translocation and apoptosis. PMID:18240350

  1. Anacardic acid induces mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yeong-Ae; Shin, Pyung-Gyun; Kim, Gun-Do

    2013-03-01

    Anacardic acid (AA) is a constituent of the cashew nut shell and is known as an inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). We investigated the cytotoxicity of AA on cancer cells and more experiments to reveal the cell death mechanism focused on A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells for our interest in lung cancer. To examine the molecular mechanism of cell death in AA treated A549 cells, we performed experiments such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), western blot analysis, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), genomic DNA extraction and staining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). For the first time we revealed that AA induces caspase-independent apoptosis with no inhibition of cytotoxicity by pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-fmk, in A549 cells. Our results showed the possibility of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis through the activation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and an intrinsic pathway executioner such as cytochrome c. This study will be helpful in revealing the cell death mechanisms and in developing potential drugs for lung cancer using AA. PMID:23314312

  2. Gambogic acid induces apoptosis and inhibits colorectal tumor growth via mitochondrial pathways

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guang-Ming; Sun, Yu; Ge, Xin; Wan, Xin; Li, Chun-Bo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of gambogic acid (GA) on apoptosis in the HT-29 human colon cancer cell line. METHODS: H-29 cells were used for in vitro experiments in this study. Relative cell viability was assessed using MTT assays. Cell apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and Hoechst 33342 staining, and quantified by flow cytometry. Cellular ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to evaluate gene and protein expression levels. For in vivo experiments, BALB/c nude mice received subcutaneous injections of HT-29 cells in the right armpit. When well-established xenografts were palpable with a tumor size of 75 mm3, mice were randomly assigned to a vehicle (negative) control, positive control or GA treatment group (n = 6 each). The animals in the treatment group received one of three dosages of GA (in saline; 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg) via the caudal vein twice weekly, whereas animals in the negative and positive control groups were given equal volumes of 0.9% saline or 10 mg/kg docetaxel, respectively, via the caudal vein once weekly. RESULTS: The cell viability assay showed that GA inhibited proliferation of HT-29 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with GA (0.00, 0.31, 0.62, 1.25, 2.50, 5.00 or 10.00 μmol/L) for 24, 48 or 72 h. After 48 h, the percentage of apoptotic cells in cells treated with 0.00, 1.25, 2.50 and 5.00 μmol/L GA was 1.4% ± 0.3%, 9.8% ± 1.2%, 25.7% ± 3.3% and 49.3% ± 5.8%, respectively. Ultrastructural analysis of HT-29 cells treated for 48 h with 2.5μmol/L GA revealed apoptotic bodies and condensed and fragmented nuclei. Levels of caspase-8, -9 and -3 mRNAs were significantly increased after treatment with GA (1.25, 2.50 or 5.00 μmol/L) for 48 h (P < 0.05 for all). Protein levels of apoptosis-related factors Fas, FasL, FADD, cytochrome c, and Apaf-1 were increased in GA-treated cells, whereas levels

  3. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells’ molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  4. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells' molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  5. Gallic acid induces apoptosis in human cervical epithelial cells containing human papillomavirus type 16 episomes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lin; Lei, Yanjun; Srivastava, Ranjana; Qin, Weihua; Chen, Jason J

    2016-01-01

    The high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) that infect the anogenital tract are strongly associated with the development of cervical carcinoma, which is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Therapeutic drugs specifically targeting HPV are not available. Polyphenolic compounds have gained considerable attention because of their cytotoxic effects against a variety of cancers and certain viruses. In this study, we examined the effects of several polyphenols on cellular proliferation and death of the human cervical cancer cells and human cervical epithelial cells containing stable HPV type 16 episomes (HPVep). Our results show that three polyphenols inhibited proliferation of HeLa cells dose-dependently. Furthermore, one of the examined polyphenols, gallic acid (GA), also inhibited the proliferation of HPVep cells and exhibited significant specificity towards HPV-positive cells. The anti-proliferative effect of GA on HPVep and HeLa cells was associated with apoptosis and upregulation of p53. These results suggest that GA can be a potential candidate for the development of anti-HPV agents. PMID:26059022

  6. Gallic Acid Induces a Reactive Oxygen Species-Provoked c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase-Dependent Apoptosis in Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiu-Yuan; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Liu, Hsiang-Chun; Hsu, Shih-Lan

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic lung disorder characterized by fibroblasts proliferation and extracellular matrix accumulation. Induction of fibroblast apoptosis therefore plays a crucial role in the resolution of this disease. Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid), a common botanic phenolic compound, has been reported to induce apoptosis in tumor cell lines and renal fibroblasts. The present study was undertaken to examine the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in lung fibroblasts apoptosis induced by gallic acid. We found that treatment with gallic acid resulted in activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and protein kinase B (PKB, Akt), but not p38MAPK, in mouse lung fibroblasts. Inhibition of JNK using pharmacologic inhibitor (SP600125) and genetic knockdown (JNK specific siRNA) significantly inhibited p53 accumulation, reduced PUMA and Fas expression, and abolished apoptosis induced by gallic acid. Moreover, treatment with antioxidants (vitamin C, N-acetyl cysteine, and catalase) effectively diminished gallic acid-induced hydrogen peroxide production, JNK and p53 activation, and cell death. These observations imply that gallic acid-mediated hydrogen peroxide formation acts as an initiator of JNK signaling pathways, leading to p53 activation and apoptosis in mouse lung fibroblasts. PMID:23533505

  7. Oxidative stress-driven mechanisms of nordihydroguaiaretic acid-induced apoptosis in FL5.12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, Vaidehee S. . E-mail: vaidehee@hotmail.com; Kehrer, James P.

    2006-08-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a general lipoxygenase (LOX) enzyme inhibitor, induces apoptosis independently of its activity as a LOX inhibitor in murine pro-B lymphocytes (FL.12 cells) by a mechanism that is still not fully understood. Glutathione depletion, oxidative processes and mitochondrial depolarization appear to contribute to the apoptosis induced by NDGA. The current data demonstrate that NDGA (20 {mu}M)-induced apoptosis in FL5.12 cells is partially protected by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) (10 mM) and dithiothreitol (DTT) (500 {mu}M) pretreatment, confirming a role for oxidative processes. In addition, the treatment of FL5.12 cells with NDGA led to an increase in phosphorylation and activation of the MAP kinases ERK, JNK and p38. Although pretreatment with ERK inhibitors (PD98059 or U0126) abolished ERK phosphorylation in response to NDGA, neither inhibitor had any effect on NDGA-induced apoptosis. SP600125, a JNK inhibitor, did not have any effect on NDGA-induced phosphorylation of JNK nor apoptosis. Pretreatment with the p38 inhibitor SB202190 attenuated NDGA-induced apoptosis by 30% and also abolished p38 phosphorylation, compared to NDGA treatment alone. NAC, but not DTT, also decreased the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK supporting a role for oxidative processes in activating these kinases. Neither NAC nor DTT blocked the phosphorylation of ERK suggesting that this activation is not related to oxidative stress. The release of cytochrome c and activation of caspase-3 induced by NDGA were inhibited by NAC. SB202190 slightly attenuated caspase-3 activation and had no effect on the release of cytochrome c. These data suggest that several independent mechanisms, including oxidative reactions, activation of p38 kinase and cytochrome c release contribute to NDGA-induced apoptosis.

  8. Antibody-targeted horseradish peroxidase associated with indole-3-acetic acid induces apoptosis in vitro in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Dalmazzo, Leandro F F; Santana-Lemos, Bárbara A; Jácomo, Rafael H; Garcia, Aglair B; Rego, Eduardo M; da Fonseca, Luiz M; Falcão, Roberto P

    2011-05-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), when oxidized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP), is transformed into cytotoxic molecules capable of inducing cell injury. The aim of this study was to test if, by targeting hematopoietic tumors with HRP-conjugated antibodies in association with IAA treatment, there is induction of apoptosis. We used two lineages of hematologic tumors: NB4, derived from acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and Granta-519 from mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). We also tested cells from 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and from 10 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). HRP targeting was performed with anti-CD33 or anti-CD19 antibodies (depending on the origin of the cell), followed by incubation with goat anti-mouse antibody conjugated with HRP. Eight experimental groups were analyzed: control, HRP targeted, HRP targeted and incubated with 1, 5 and 10mM IAA, and cells not HRP targeted but incubated with 1, 5 and 10mM IAA. Apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide labeling. Results showed that apoptosis was dependent on the dose of IAA utilized, the duration of exposure to the prodrug and the origin of the neoplasia. Targeting HRP with antibodies was efficient in activating IAA and inducing apoptosis. PMID:21168913

  9. Dihydrobetulinic Acid Induces Apoptosis in Leishmania donovani by Targeting DNA Topoisomerase I and II: Implications in Antileishmanial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Arnab Roy; Mandal, Suparna; Goswami, Anindya; Ghosh, Monidipa; Mandal, Labanya; Chakraborty, Debabani; Ganguly, Agneyo; Tripathi, Gayatri; Mukhopadhyay, Sibabrata; Bandyopadhyay, Santu; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2003-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is the second-most dreaded parasitic disease in the modern world, behind malaria. The lack of effective vaccines demand improved chemotherapy along with the development of lead compounds and newer targets. We report here that the pentacyclic triterpenoid, dihydrobetulinic acid (DHBA), is a novel lead compound for antileishmanial therapy. It acts by targeting DNA topoisomerases. DNA topoisomerase I and II activity was studied using relaxation and decatenation assays. Mechanistic studies were based on the decreased mobility of enzyme-bound DNA compared with free DNA and the differential mobility of nicked and supercoiled monomers in 1% agarose gel. Pulsed field gradient gel electrophoresis, confocal microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were performed to assess cytotoxicity of the compound and ultrastructural damage of the parasite. Apoptosis was studied by the isolation of DNA from DHBA-treated parasites and subsequent electrophoresis in 1% agarose gel. DHBA inhibits growth of Leishmania donovani promastigotes and amastigotes with an IC50 of 2.6 and 4.1 μM respectively. The compound is a dual inhibitor of DNA topoisomerases that fails to induce DNA cleavage and acts by preventing the formation of enzyme-DNA binary complex, ultimately inducing apoptosis. Treatment of infected golden hamsters with the compound markedly reduces (> 92%) parasitic burden, both in spleen and liver. Interestingly, the 17-decarboxylated analogue, dihydrolupeol, does not inhibit DNA topoisomerase I and II, has no effect on parasitic growth, and also fails to induce apoptosis. DHBA is a potent antileishmanial agent that induces apoptosis by primarily targeting DNA topoisomerases. Therefore it is a strong candidate for use in designing new antileishmanial drugs. PMID:12765337

  10. Protective Effects of Oleic Acid Against Palmitic Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic AR42J Cells and Its Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Joung Hoon; Kim, Min Hye; Kwon, Hyung Joo; Choi, Soo Young

    2013-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PAM), one of the most common saturated fatty acid (SFA) in animals and plants, has been shown to induce apoptosis in exocrine pancreatic AR42J cells. In this study, we investigated cellular mechanisms underlying protective effects of oleic acid (OLA) against the lipotoxic actions of PAM in AR42J cells. Exposure of cells to long-chain SFA induced apoptotic cell death determined by MTT cell viability assay and Hoechst staining. Co-treatment of OLA with PAM markedly protected cells against PAM-induced apoptosis. OLA significantly attenuated the PAM-induced increase in the levels of pro-apoptotic Bak protein, cleaved forms of apoptotic proteins (caspase-3, PARP). On the contrary, OLA restored the decreased levels of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1) in PAM-treated cells. OLA also induced up-regulation of the mRNA expression of Dgat2 and Cpt1 genes which are involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis and mitochondrial β-oxidation, respectively. Intracellular TAG accumulation was increased by OLA supplementation in accordance with enhanced expression of Dgat2 gene. These results indicate that restoration of anti-apoptotic/pro-apoptotic protein balance from apoptosis toward cell survival is involved in the cytoprotective effects of OLA against PAM-induced apoptosis in pancreatic AR42J cells. In addition, OLA-induced increase in TAG accumulation and up-regulation of Dgat2 and Cpt1 gene expressions may be possibly associated in part with the ability of OLA to protect cells from deleterious actions of PAM. PMID:23440052

  11. Pathways through which a regimen of melatonin and retinoic acid induces apoptosis in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Eck-Enriquez, K; Kiefer, T L; Spriggs, L L; Hill, S M

    2000-06-01

    It has been established that melatonin (Mlt) and retinoic acid, individually, inhibit the proliferation of the estrogen receptor-alpha (ER alpha)-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that Mlt and all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) not only inhibit the proliferation, but also induce apoptosis of MCF-7 cells when used in a sequential regimen of Mlt followed 24 h later by atRA. Using this same MCF-7 breast cancer cell line, we investigated the potential pathways through which apoptosis is being induced. We found that treatment of MCF-7 cells with Mlt for 24 h before the addition of atRA decreased the protein levels of the death suppressor, Bcl-2, and increased, although with different time courses, the levels of the death promoters, Bax and Bak; however, there was no change in the levels of the tumor suppressor gene, p53. MCF-7 cells treated sequentially with Mlt and atRA also demonstrated an enhanced sensitivity to the apoptotic effects of atRA, which did not appear to be due to increased expression of the retinoic acid receptors, RAR alpha or RXR alpha, but rather to enhanced transcriptional activity of the RAR alpha. These data suggest that the sequential treatment regimen of Mlt and atRA may induce apoptosis by modulation of members of the Bcl-2 family of proteins. Thus, this combinatorial regimen, which reduces the concentration of atRA needed for clinical efficacy while enhancing its anti-tumorigenic activity, could be of great therapeutic benefit, and may, in fact, specifically induce the regression of established breast tumors due to its apoptosis-promoting effects. PMID:10965999

  12. Eicosapentaenoic acid induced SKOV-3 cell apoptosis through ERK1/2-mTOR-NF-κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Han, Lirong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Meng, Meng; Cheng, Dai; Wang, Chunling

    2016-08-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a typical kind of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, has been considered to be a potent antitumor adjuvant. However, the mechanism related to EPA-induced SKOV-3 cell apoptosis has not been investigated. In this study, we elucidated the anticancer effect of EPA on SKOV-3 cells and its molecular mechanisms. The results of fluorescence microscopy showed that EPA induced typical apoptotic morphological features in SKOV-3 cells. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that EPA induced apoptosis of SKOV-3 cells through cells arrested at the S phase. Western blotting results showed that EPA could inhibit the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt, which restrained mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) phosphorylated. Simultaneously, EPA downregulated the phosphorylation status of mTOR, which may act as an upstream regulator of EPA-blocked nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65 translocation from the cytoplasm into the nucleus; the apoptotic mechanism of SKOV-3 cells induced by EPA was associated with the release of cytochrome c, Bax-to-Bcl-2 expression ratio, and activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. The results suggested that EPA induced SKOV-3 cell apoptosis through ERK1/2, Akt-mTOR-NF-κB pathways. PMID:27176035

  13. 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoic Acid Induces Apoptosis in Human Keratinocyte: Potential Application for Psoriasis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Chong-Fai; Xie, Chuan-Ming; Sham, Kathy Wai-Yan; Lin, Zhi-Xiu; Cheng, Christopher Hon-Ki

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis, which affects approximately 1–3% of the population worldwide, is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder characterized by epidermal keratinocytes hyperproliferation, abnormal differentiation, and inflammatory infiltration. Decrease in keratinocyte apoptosis is a specific pathogenic phenomenon in psoriasis. Chinese herbs have been used for the treatment of psoriasis in China showing promising effect in clinical trials. A traditional Chinese medicine has relatively fewer side effects with longer remission time and lower recurrence rate. The extract of Rubia cordifolia L. (EA) was previously found by us to induce HaCaT keratinocytes apoptosis. In this study we identified one of the components in Rubia cordifolia L., the anthraquinone precursor 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (DHNA), induces HaCaT keratinocytes apoptosis through G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. We have also demonstrated that DHNA acts through both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways. Besides, cytotoxicity and IL-1α release assays indicate that DHNA causes less irritation problems than dithranol, which is commonly employed to treat psoriasis in many countries. Since DHNA possesses similar apoptotic effects on keratinocytes as dithranol but causes less irritation, DHNA therefore constitutes a promising alternative agent for treating psoriasis. Our studies also provide an insight on the potential of using EA and DHNA, alternatively, as a safe and effective treatment modality for psoriasis. PMID:23690852

  14. Oleanolic acid induces mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis and G0/G1 phase arrest in gallbladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huai-Feng; Wang, Xu-An; Xiang, Shan-Shan; Hu, Yun-Ping; Jiang, Lin; Shu, Yi-Jun; Li, Mao-Lan; Wu, Xiang-Song; Zhang, Fei; Ye, Yuan-Yuan; Weng, Hao; Bao, Run-Fa; Cao, Yang; Lu, Wei; Dong, Qian; Liu, Ying-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA), a naturally occurring triterpenoid, exhibits potential antitumor activity in many tumor cell lines. Gallbladder carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the biliary tract, and is a highly aggressive tumor with an extremely poor prognosis. Unfortunately, the effects of OA on gallbladder carcinoma are unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of OA on gallbladder cancer cells and the underlying mechanism. The results showed that OA inhibits proliferation of gallbladder cancer cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner on MTT and colony formation assay. A flow cytometry assay revealed apoptosis and G0/G1 phase arrest in GBC-SD and NOZ cells. Western blot analysis and a mitochondrial membrane potential assay demonstrated that OA functions through the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Moreover, this drug inhibited tumor growth in nude mice carrying subcutaneous NOZ tumor xenografts. These data suggest that OA inhibits proliferation of gallbladder cancer cells by regulating apoptosis and the cell cycle process. Thus, OA may be a promising drug for adjuvant chemotherapy in gallbladder carcinoma. PMID:26109845

  15. c9, t11- conjugated linoleic acid induces HCC cell apoptosis and correlation with PPAR-γ signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guozhong; Zhang, Guoqing; Zheng, Xing; Zeng, Yan; Xu, Ziqi; Zeng, Weichi; Wang, Kebing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Cis9, trans11 conjugated linoleic acid (c9, t11-CLA.) is one of the most important isomers of conjugated linoleic acid, which have a strong anti-tumor effects. Based on previous studies, we further explored the molecular mechanism of inducing cells apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 and Hep3B. Methods: Cell Counting Kit 8 (CCK-8) assay was used to investigate the effects of c9, t11-CLA on cell viability and cell proliferation ability; The effects of c9, t11-CLA on cell apoptosis was analyzed by DNA ladder assay, immuno-fluorescence and flow cytometry, respectively. Apoptotic related gene (Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bcl-w, Mcl-1, Bax, Bak, Bad, Bid and Bim), PPAR family member (PPAR-α, PPAR-β and PPAR-γ), and Cox2 mRNA and protein expression were analyzed by RT-PCR and western blotting. ELISA assay was used to detect the content of Caspase-3. Results: Our data were confirmed that c9, t11-CLA could inhibit the HCC cells proliferation ability and decrease the cells viability. RT-PCR and western blotting assay verified that c9, t11-CLA obviously increased the transcription and protein expression levels of PPAR-γ. The synchronism and correlation between PPAR-γ and apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3 were found with a dose- and time-dependent manner. PPAR-γ inhibitor GW9662 and activator Rosilitazone were further verified that there was cooperative relation between them. Conclusion: In our study, we first report that c9, t11-CLA induces apoptosis in HCC cells by activation of PPARγ-Bcl-2-Caspase-3 signal pathway. These results indicated that c9, t11-CLA will be useful for clinic therapy of anti-tumor and as a new regulator of PPAR-γ in the future. PMID:26885272

  16. Aristolochic acid-induced apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest depends on ROS generation and MAP kinases activation.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Victor; Whyard, Terry C; Waltzer, Wayne C; Grollman, Arthur P; Rosenquist, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ingestion of aristolochic acids (AAs) contained in herbal remedies results in a renal disease and, frequently, urothelial malignancy. The genotoxicity of AA in renal cells, including mutagenic DNA adducts formation, is well documented. However, the mechanisms of AA-induced tubular atrophy and renal fibrosis are largely unknown. To better elucidate some aspects of this process, we studied cell cycle distribution and cell survival of renal epithelial cells treated with AAI at low and high doses. A low dose of AA induces cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase via activation of DNA damage checkpoint pathway ATM-Chk2-p53-p21. DNA damage signaling pathway is activated more likely via increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by AA treatment then via DNA damage induced directly by AA. Higher AA concentration induced cell death partly via apoptosis. Since mitogen-activated protein kinases play an important role in cell survival, death and cell cycle progression, we assayed their function in AA-treated renal tubular epithelial cells. ERK1/2 and p38 but not JNK were activated in cells treated with AA. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 and p38 as well as suppression of ROS generation with N-acetyl-L-cysteine resulted in the partial relief of cells from G2/M checkpoint and a decline of apoptosis level. Cell cycle arrest may be a mechanism for DNA repair, cell survival and reprogramming of epithelial cells to the fibroblast type. An apoptosis of renal epithelial cells at higher AA dose might be necessary to provide space for newly reprogrammed fibrotic cells. PMID:24792323

  17. The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid induces apoptosis, down-regulates the CXCR4 chemokine receptor and impairs migration of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Stamatopoulos, Basile; Meuleman, Nathalie; De Bruyn, Cécile; Delforge, Alain; Bron, Dominique; Lagneaux, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a neoplastic disorder that arises largely as a result of defective apoptosis leading to chemoresistance. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor, CXCR4, have been shown to play an important role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell trafficking and survival. Design and Methods Since histone acetylation is involved in the modulation of gene expression, we evaluated the effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells and in particular on cell survival, CXCR4 expression, migration, and drug sensitization. Results Here, we showed that treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (20 μM) for 48 hours induced a decrease in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell viability via apoptosis (n=20, P=0.0032). Using specific caspase inhibitors, we demonstrated the participation of caspases-3, -6 and -8, suggesting an activation of the extrinsic pathway. Additionally, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid significantly decreased CXCR4 mRNA (n=10, P=0.0010) and protein expression (n=40, P<0.0001). As a result, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell migration in response to stromal cell-derived factor-1 (n=23, P<0.0001) or through bone marrow stromal cells was dramatically impaired. Consequently, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid reduced the protective effect of the microenvironment and thus sensitized chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to chemotherapy such as fludarabine. Conclusions In conclusion, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid induces apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells via the extrinsic pathway and down-regulates CXCR4 expression leading to decreased cell migration. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in combination with other drugs represents a promising therapeutic approach to inhibiting migration, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell survival and potentially overcoming drug resistance. PMID:20145270

  18. Down-Regulation of AKT Signalling by Ursolic Acid Induces Intrinsic Apoptosis and Sensitization to Doxorubicin in Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Victor Hugo; Vögler, Oliver; Barceló, Francisca; Martín-Broto, Javier; Martínez-Serra, Jordi; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Alemany, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Several important biological activities have been attributed to the pentacyclic triterpene ursolic acid (UA), being its antitumoral effect extensively studied in human adenocarcinomas. In this work, we focused on the efficacy and molecular mechanisms involved in the antitumoral effects of UA, as single agent or combined with doxorubicin (DXR), in human soft tissue sarcoma cells. UA (5–50 μM) strongly inhibited (up to 80%) the viability of STS cells at 24 h and its proliferation in soft agar, with higher concentrations increasing apoptotic death up to 30%. UA treatment (6–9 h) strongly blocked the survival AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin signalling pathway, which led to a concomitant reduction of the anti-apoptotic proteins c-Myc and p21, altogether resulting in the activation of intrinsic apoptosis. Interestingly, UA at low concentrations (10–15 μM) enhanced the antitumoral effects of DXR by up to 2-fold, while in parallel inhibiting DXR-induced AKT activation and p21 expression, two proteins implicated in antitumoral drug resistance and cell survival. In conclusion, UA is able to induce intrinsic apoptosis in human STS cells and also to sensitize these cells to DXR by blocking the AKT signalling pathway. Therefore, UA may have beneficial effects, if used as nutraceutical adjuvant during standard chemotherapy treatment of STS. PMID:27219337

  19. Effect of taurine on oxidative stress and apoptosis-related protein expression in trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Giriş, M; Depboylu, B; Doğru-Abbasoğlu, S; Erbil, Y; Olgaç, V; Alış, H; Aykaç-Toker, G; Uysal, M

    2008-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a multi-factorial inflammatory disease of the colon and rectum. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of taurine, an anti-oxidant amino acid, on oxidative stress and the expression of apoptosis-related proteins, pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) in colon tissue in rats with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. Rats received taurine (1·5% w/v) in drinking water for 15 days before and 15 days after administration of TNBS solution. Then, colonic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels, and Bax and Bcl-2 expression were measured. TNBS-induced colitis caused significantly increased MPO activity and MDA levels and decreased GSH levels in colon tissue compared to controls. Increase in Bax expression and decrease in Bcl-2 expression were detected in colon of rats with TNBS-induced colitis. Taurine treatment was associated with amelioration in macroscopic and microscopic colitis scores, decreased colonic MPO activity and MDA levels and increased GSH levels in TNBS-induced colitis. In addition, taurine reduced the expression of Bax and prevented the loss of Bcl-2 proteins in colon tissue of rats with TNBS-induced colitis. The results of this study show that taurine administration may exert beneficial effects in UC by decreasing inflammatory reactions, oxidative stress and apoptosis. PMID:18241224

  20. Down-Regulation of AKT Signalling by Ursolic Acid Induces Intrinsic Apoptosis and Sensitization to Doxorubicin in Soft Tissue Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Villar, Victor Hugo; Vögler, Oliver; Barceló, Francisca; Martín-Broto, Javier; Martínez-Serra, Jordi; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Alemany, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Several important biological activities have been attributed to the pentacyclic triterpene ursolic acid (UA), being its antitumoral effect extensively studied in human adenocarcinomas. In this work, we focused on the efficacy and molecular mechanisms involved in the antitumoral effects of UA, as single agent or combined with doxorubicin (DXR), in human soft tissue sarcoma cells. UA (5-50 μM) strongly inhibited (up to 80%) the viability of STS cells at 24 h and its proliferation in soft agar, with higher concentrations increasing apoptotic death up to 30%. UA treatment (6-9 h) strongly blocked the survival AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin signalling pathway, which led to a concomitant reduction of the anti-apoptotic proteins c-Myc and p21, altogether resulting in the activation of intrinsic apoptosis. Interestingly, UA at low concentrations (10-15 μM) enhanced the antitumoral effects of DXR by up to 2-fold, while in parallel inhibiting DXR-induced AKT activation and p21 expression, two proteins implicated in antitumoral drug resistance and cell survival. In conclusion, UA is able to induce intrinsic apoptosis in human STS cells and also to sensitize these cells to DXR by blocking the AKT signalling pathway. Therefore, UA may have beneficial effects, if used as nutraceutical adjuvant during standard chemotherapy treatment of STS. PMID:27219337

  1. Carnosic acid induces apoptosis associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and Akt inactivation in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qisen; Ma, Yunfang; Dong, Jilin; Shen, Ruiling

    2015-02-01

    Carnosic acid (CA), a phenolic diterpene isolated from rosemary, shows potential benefits in health promotion and disease prevention. In the present study, the cytotoxic and apoptotic-inducing effects of CA on human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells were investigated. The MTT assay results indicated that CA decreased cell viability in HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with CA caused a rapid Caspase-3 activation and subsequently proteolytic cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), both of which were markers of cells undergoing apoptosis. CA also dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax protein, which mediated cytosolic translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Furthermore, CA reduced the phosphorylation of Akt, which was partially inhibited by insulin, an activator of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signalling pathway. In conclusion, our data suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction and deactivation of Akt may contribute to the apoptosis-inducing effects of CA. PMID:25265205

  2. Carnosic acid induces apoptosis through inactivation of Src/STAT3 signaling pathway in human renal carcinoma Caki cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Eun; Park, Byoungduck; Chae, In Gyeong; Kim, Do-Hee; Kundu, Juthika; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Chun, Kyung-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Carnosic acid (CA), the major bioactive compound of Rosmarinus officinalis L., has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the anticancer effects of CA remain poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated that CA significantly reduced the viability of human renal carcinoma Caki cells. CA-induced apoptosis was connected with the cleavage of caspase-9, -7 and -3, and that of PARP. Moreover, CA increased the expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax and diminished the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, thereby releasing cytochrome c into the cytosol. Treatment with CA in Caki cells also induced the expression of p53 and its target gene product, p27, through down-regulation of Murine double minute-2 (Mdm2). Furthermore, CA generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), and pretreatment with ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) abrogated CA-induced cleavage of PARP and expression of p53. One of the key oncogenic signals is mediated through signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), which promotes abnormal cell proliferation. Incubation of cells with CA markedly diminished the phosphorylation of STAT3 and its upstream, Src, and reduced the expression of STAT3 responsive gene products, such as D-series of cyclins and survivin. Taken together, the present study revealed that CA induced apoptosis in Caki cells by induction of p53 and suppression of STAT3 signaling. PMID:26936454

  3. Perillyl alcohol and perillic acid induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in non small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Laxmi; Pierre, Keon J; Elegbede, Abiodun; Wang, Robert C; Carper, Stephen W

    2007-11-18

    Plant products such as perillyl alcohol have been reported to possess anti-tumor activities against a number of human cancers though the mechanism of action has not yet been elucidated. The effects of perillyl alcohol (POH) and its metabolite perillic acid (PA) on the proliferation of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, A549, and H520) cells were investigated. Both POH and PA elicited dose-dependent cytotoxicity, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis with increasing expression of bax, p21 and caspase-3 activity in both the cell lines. Combination studies revealed that exposing the cells to an IC50 concentration of POH or PA sensitized the cells to cisplatin and radiation in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that POH and PA in combination therapy may have chemotherapeutic value against NSCLC. PMID:17888568

  4. The omega-hydroxy palmitic acid induced apoptosis in human lung carcinoma cell lines H596 and A549.

    PubMed

    Abe, Akihisa; Yamane, Mototeru; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Sugawara, Isamu

    2002-02-01

    We have found that omega-hydroxy palmitic acid (16-hydroxy palmitic acid, omega-HPA) has both cell growth inhibiting and cell death inducing actions on human lung adenosquamous carcinoma cell line H596 and adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Further, these effects were dose- and time-dependent in both cell lines. However, in squamous carcinoma cell line H226, omega-HPA had no cytotoxic effect. On the other hand, in the human small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cell line H128, this compound showed weak cytotoxicity. The sensitivity toward omega-HPA was higher in H596 cells than in A549 cells. In both H596 and A549 cells, cell growth was inhibited to 24.4 and 9.4%, respectively, by treatment with 100 microM omega-HPA for 12 h. In the 24 h treatment cells, growth inhibition was increased to 100 and 38.1%, respectively. In cytotoxicity experiments, the number of dead cells increased with incubation times in the presence of omega-HPA: on three days incubation with 100 microM omega-HPA, viability was 0 and 13.5%, respectively, in H596 and A549 cells. Further, the fragmentation of DNA to oligonucleosomal-sized ladder fragments, which is an index of apoptosis, was observed in both cell lines on treatment with omega-HPA. Therefore, it is assumed that these cell deaths induced by omega-HPA, were apoptosis in these cell lines. Since the number of dead cells following treatment with omega-HPA decreased by treatment with omega-HPA in combination with Z-VAD-fmk, a caspase family inhibitor, it is thought that apoptotic cell death was related to caspase activity. PMID:12186781

  5. Gambogic acid induces apoptosis and sensitizes TRAIL-mediated apoptosis through downregulation of cFLIPL in renal carcinoma Caki cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji Hoon; Kim, Joo-Young; Sung, Eon-Gi; Kim, Eun-Ae; Lee, Tae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Gambogic acid (GA) is a natural compound derived from brownish gamboge resin that shows a range of bioactivity, such as antitumor and antimicrobial properties. Although, GA is already known to induce cell death in a variety of cancer cells, the molecular basis for GA-induced cell death in renal cancer cells is unclear. In this study, a treatment with GA induced cell death in human renal carcinoma Caki cells in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of Caki cells with GA decreased the levels of antiapoptotic proteins, such as Bcl-2 and XIAP in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, GA decreased the expression of the cFLIPL protein, which was downregulated at the transcriptional level without any change in the levels of cFLIPs expression. z-VAD (pan-caspase inhibitor) partially blocked GA-mediated cell death. GA-induced apoptotic cell death in Caki cells is mediated partly by the AIF translocation from the mitochondria into the nucleus via a caspase-independent pathway. In contrast, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, had no effect on GA-induced cell death. The restoration of cFLIPL attenuated GA-induced cell death in Caki cells. Furthermore, a sub-toxic dose of GA sensitized TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in Caki cells. Pretreatment with z-VAD completely blocked GA plus TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. On the contrary, pretreatment with NAC partially inhibited GA plus TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Our findings suggested that GA induces apoptosis via the downregulation of cFLIPL and sensitized TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in Caki cells. PMID:26648023

  6. Protection against methoxyacetic-acid-induced spermatocyte apoptosis with calcium channel blockers in cultured rat seminiferous tubules: possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, L H; Wine, R N; Miller, D S; Reece, J M; Smith, M; Chapin, R E

    1997-05-01

    A calcium-mediated mechanism underlying spermatocyte apoptosis induced by 2-methoxyethanol (2-ME) has been previously proposed. This hypothesis was tested in vitro in the present study using cultured juvenile (25 days old) and adult rat seminiferous tubules (JRST and ARST, respectively) with methoxyacetic acid (MAA, the active metabolite of 2-ME). In JRST, spermatocyte degeneration was morphologically obvious 19 hr after a 5-hr exposure to 5 mM MAA. The lesion was unaffected by the presence or absence of extratubular Ca2+. However, MAA-induced cell death was significantly prevented by cotreatment with the dihydropyridines (DHP) nifedipine (50 microM) and nicardipine (20 microM), as well as verapamil (50 microM) and TMB-8 (50 microM), all of which are able to inhibit calcium movement through plasma membranes. However, neither ryanodine, dantrolene, nor cyclosporin A and ruthenium red, which inhibit Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores (endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria), affected the MAA-induced cell death. Inhibition of calcium mobilization through IP3-sensitive pathways by blocking the product of IP3 with manoalide, neomycin, and U73122 did not block the MAA-induced lesion. The protective effects of 50 microM nifedipine and 50 microM TMB-8 were also observed in ARSTs treated with 10 mM MAA for 5 hr. However, when rat testicular sections were immunohistochemically stained with monoclonal antibodies specific for the alpha 1 (the DHP receptor) or the alpha 2 subunits of DHP-sensitive calcium channels, no positive staining was found. Finally, in an attempt to see whether the intracellular free calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) in germ cells were increased after the MAA treatment, intact seminiferous tubules were loaded with indo-1 and were measured using laser-scanning confocal microscopy. No detectable increase in the signal in MA A-sensitive spermatocytes was observed, while a 34-54% increase in the signal could be detected in the same cell types when

  7. Urea derivates of ursolic, oleanolic and maslinic acid induce apoptosis and are selective cytotoxic for several human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sommerwerk, Sven; Heller, Lucie; Kuhfs, Julia; Csuk, René

    2016-08-25

    2,3-Di-O-acetyl-maslinic acid benzylamide (5) has previously been shown to possess high cytotoxicity for a variety of human tumor cell lines while being of low cytotoxicity to non-malignant cells. Structural modifications performed on 5 revealed that the presence of these acetyl groups in 5 and the presence of (2β,3β)-configurated centers seems necessary for obtaining high cytotoxicity combined with best selectivity between malignant cells and non-malignant mouse fibroblasts. Compounds carrying an ursane skeleton showed weaker cytotoxicity than their oleanane derived analogs. In addition, the benzylamide function in compound 5 should be replaced by a phenylurea moiety to gain better cytotoxicity while retaining and improving the selectivity. Thus, maslinic acid derived N-[2β,3β-di-O-acetyl-17β-amino-28-norolean-12-en-17-yl]phenylurea (45) gave best results showing EC50 = 0.9 μM (for A2780 ovarian cancer cells) with EC50 > 120 μM for fibroblasts (NIH 3T3) and triggered apoptosis while caspase-3 was not activated by this compound. PMID:27149037

  8. [Acetlysalicylic acid, protective antacid effect and lesions of the gastric mucosa. Effect of acetylsalicylic acid and an antacid drug (Gastropulgit Tabs) on the transmural electric potential in the human stomach].

    PubMed

    Caspary, W F; Kausch, H

    1979-08-16

    Antacids are able to prevent acetylsalicylic acid-induced functional and morphological changes of the gastric mucosa. In order to test whether a new antacid in chewing-tablet form (Gastropulgit Tabs) might be able to protect the gastric mucosa from acetylsalicylic acid-induced functional changes similarly to liquid antacids the effect of this antacid on acetylsalicylic acid-induced changes of transmural gastric potential difference was measured in healthy volunteers. The decrease of transmural potential differences induced by 640 mg acetylsalicylic acid could be prevented by simultaneous addition of 2 tablets of Gastropulgit Tabs. Thus the antacid in tablet form is able-like liquid antacids-to protect the gastric mucosa against acetylsalicylic acid-induced functional changes. PMID:468096

  9. microRNA-34a-Upregulated Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene-I Promotes Apoptosis and Delays Cell Cycle Transition in Cervical Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Hua; Zhang, Le; Ma, Yu-Wei; Xiao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Min; Tang, Hua

    2016-06-01

    The function of retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) in viral replication is well documented, but its function in carcinogenesis and malignancies as well as relationship with microRNAs (miRNAs) remain poorly understood. miR-34a is an antioncogene in multiple tumors. In our study, RIG-I and miR-34a suppressed cell growth, proliferation, migration, and invasion in cervical cancer cells in vitro. miR-34a was validated as a new regulator of RIG-I by binding to its 3' untranslated region and upregulating its expression level. Furthermore, we revealed that RIG-I and miR-34a enhanced apoptosis, delayed the G1/S/G2 transition of the cell cycle, and inhibited the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process to modulate malignancies in cervical cancer cells. Phenotypic rescue experiments indicated that RIG-I mediates the effects of miR-34a in HeLa and C33A cells. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms that underlie carcinogenesis and may provide new biomarkers for the diagnosis and therapy of cervical cancer. PMID:26910120

  10. Ameliorative effects of bombesin and neurotensin on trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis, oxidative damage and apoptosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Akcan, Alper; Muhtaroglu, Sebahattin; Akgun, Hulya; Akyildiz, Hizir; Kucuk, Can; Sozuer, Erdogan; Yurci, Alper; Yilmaz, Namik

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of bombesin (BBS) and neurotensin (NTS) on apoptosis and colitis in an ulcerative colitis model. METHODS: In this study, a total of 50 rats were divided equally into 5 groups. In the control group, no colitis induction or drug administration was performed. Colitis was induced in all other groups. Following the induction of colitis, BBS, NTS or both were applied to three groups of rats. The remaining group (colitis group) received no treatment. On the 11th d after induction of colitis and drug treatment, blood samples were collected for TNF-α and IL-6 level studies. Malondialdehyde (MDA), carbonyl, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and caspase-3 activities, as well as histopathological findings, evaluated in colonic tissues. RESULTS: According to the macroscopic and microscopic findings, the study groups treated with BBS, NTS and BBS + NTS showed significantly lower damage and inflammation compared with the colitis group (macroscopic score, 2.1 ± 0.87, 3.7 ± 0.94 and 2.1 ± 0.87 vs 7.3 ± 0.94; microscopic score, 2.0 ± 0.66, 3.3 ± 0.82 and 1.8 ± 0.63 vs 5.2 ± 0.78, P < 0.01). TNF-α and IL-6 levels were increased significantly in all groups compared with the control group. These increases were significantly smaller in the BBS, NTS and BBS + NTS groups compared with the colitis group (TNF-α levels, 169.69 ± 53.56, 245.86 ± 64.85 and 175.54 ± 42.19 vs 556.44 ± 49.82; IL-6 levels, 443.30 ± 53.99, 612.80 ± 70.39 and 396.80 ± 78.43 vs 1505.90 ± 222.23, P < 0.05). The colonic MPO and MDA levels were significantly lower in control, BBS, NTS and BBS + NTS groups than in the colitis group (MPO levels, 24.36 ± 8.10, 40.51 ± 8.67 and 25.83 ± 6.43 vs 161.47 ± 38.24; MDA levels, 4.70 ± 1.41, 6.55 ± 1.12 and 4.51 ± 0.54 vs 15.60 ± 1.88, P < 0.05). Carbonyl content and caspase-3 levels were higher in the colitis and NTS groups than in control, BBS and BBS + NTS groups (carbonyl levels, 553.99 ± 59.58 and 336.26 ± 35.72 vs 209.76 ± 30

  11. Branched Chain Amino Acids Induce Apoptosis in Neural Cells without Mitochondrial Membrane Depolarization or Cytochrome c Release: Implications for Neurological Impairment Associated with Maple Syrup Urine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jouvet, Philippe; Rustin, Pierre; Taylor, Deanna L.; Pocock, Jennifer M.; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Mazarakis, Nicholas D.; Sarraf, Catherine; Joashi, Umesh; Kozma, Mary; Greenwood, Kirsty; Edwards, A. David; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2000-01-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency in branched chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase that can result in neurodegenerative sequelae in human infants. In the present study, increased concentrations of MSUD metabolites, in particular α-keto isocaproic acid, specifically induced apoptosis in glial and neuronal cells in culture. Apoptosis was associated with a reduction in cell respiration but without impairment of respiratory chain function, without early changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and without cytochrome c release into the cytosol. Significantly, α-keto isocaproic acid also triggered neuronal apoptosis in vivo after intracerebral injection into the developing rat brain. These findings suggest that MSUD neurodegeneration may result, at least in part, from an accumulation of branched chain amino acids and their α-keto acid derivatives that trigger apoptosis through a cytochrome c-independent pathway. PMID:10793161

  12. Lipopolysaccharide prevents valproic acid-induced apoptosis via activation of nuclear factor-κB and inhibition of p53 activation.

    PubMed

    Tsolmongyn, Bilegtsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Odkhuu, Erdenezaya; Haque, Abedul; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Komatsu, Takayuki; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on valproic acid (VPA)-induced cell death was examined by using mouse RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS inhibited the activation of caspase 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. LPS inhibited VPA-induced p53 activation and pifithrin-α as a p53 inhibitor as well as LPS prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. LPS abolished the increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, which is a critical indicator of p53-mediated mitochondrial damage, in response to VPA. The nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitors, Bay 11-7082 and parthenolide, abolished the preventive action of LPS on VPA-induced apoptosis. A series of toll-like receptor ligands, Pam3CSK4, poly I:C, and CpG DNA as well as LPS prevented VPA-induced apoptosis. Taken together, LPS was suggested to prevent VPA-induced apoptosis via activation of anti-apoptotic NF-κB and inhibition of pro-apoptotic p53 activation. The detailed inhibitory mechanism of VPA-induced apoptosis by LPS is discussed. PMID:23770718

  13. Resistance to ursolic acid-induced apoptosis through involvement of melanogenesis and COX-2/PGE2 pathways in human M4Beu melanoma cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Lama; Pinon, Aline; Limami, Youness; Seeman, Josiane; Fidanzi-Dugas, Chloe; Martin, Frederique; Badran, Bassam; Simon, Alain; Liagre, Bertrand

    2016-07-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer with a continuously growing incidence worldwide and is usually resistant to chemotherapy agents, which is due in part to a strong resistance to apoptosis. Previously, we had showed that B16-F0 murine melanoma cells undergoing apoptosis are able to delay their own death induced by ursolic acid (UA), a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid compound. We had demonstrated that tyrosinase and TRP-1 up-regulation in apoptotic cells and the subsequent production of melanin were implicated in an apoptosis resistance mechanism. Several resistance mechanisms to apoptosis have been characterized in melanoma such as hyperactivation of DNA repair mechanisms, drug efflux systems, and reinforcement of survival signals (PI3K/Akt, NF-κB and Raf/MAPK pathways). Otherwise, other mechanisms of apoptosis resistance involving different proteins, such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), have been described in many cancer types. By using a strategy of specific inhibition of each ways, we suggested that there was an interaction between melanogenesis and COX-2/PGE2 pathway. This was characterized by analyzing the COX-2 expression and activity, the expression of tyrosinase and melanin production. Furthermore, we showed that anti-proliferative and proapoptotic effects of UA were mediated through modulation of multiple signaling pathways including Akt and ERK-1/2 proteins. Our study not only uncovers underlying molecular mechanisms of UA action in human melanoma cancer cells but also suggest its great potential as an adjuvant in treatment and cancer prevention. PMID:27262506

  14. Dihydroceramide-desaturase-1-mediated caspase 9 activation through ceramide plays a pivotal role in palmitic acid-induced HepG2 cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qun; Yang, Jianjun; Zhu, Rongping; Jiang, Xin; Li, Wanlian; He, Songqing; Jin, Junfei

    2016-09-01

    In this study, results showed that the inhibition of PA-induced HepG2 cell growth takes place in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, that activation of caspase 9 is necessary for PA-induced HepG2 cell apoptosis, that dihydroceramide desaturase 1 (DES1) plays a key role in PA-mediated caspase 9 and caspase 3 activation, and that palmitoleic acid (POA), an omega-7 monounsaturated fatty acid, reverses PA-induced apoptosis through DES1 → Ceramide → Caspase 9 → Caspase 3 signaling. PMID:27364952

  15. Plasma levels of acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid after oral ingestion of plain and buffered acetylsalicylic acid in relation to bleeding time and thrombocyte function.

    PubMed

    Proost, J H; Van Imhoff, G W; Wesseling, H

    1983-02-25

    Buffered acetylsalicylic acid (Alka Seltzer, B-ASA) and plain aspirin (P-ASA) tablets were compared as to their effects on bleeding time and platelet function in eight healthy male volunteers. Two doses (500 and 1000 mg) of each preparation were investigated in a cross-over design, each volunteer being his own control in each dose group (n=4). Both preparations disturbed platelet aggregation to the same extent. Bleeding time increased after both preparations, though significantly more after the buffered preparation than after plain acetylsalicylic acid, irrespective of the dosage. The 1000 mg dose prolonged bleeding time significantly more than the 500 mg dose, irrespective of the preparation. Kinetic analysis showed that B-ASA gave higher peak plasma levels of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and accordingly salicylic acid peak levels were also higher after the buffered preparation. It is concluded that B-ASA in equi-analgesic doses prolongs bleeding time more than the plain preparation. Since it is less agressive on the gastro-intestinal mucosa, its use may be advantageous in situations where acetylsalicylic acid induced loss of platelet aggregation is desired. However, the risk of prolonged bleeding--e.g. after tooth extractions--is probably higher after the buffered preparation. PMID:6844122

  16. The BH3-mimetic gossypol and noncytotoxic doses of valproic acid induce apoptosis by suppressing cyclin-A2/Akt/FOXO3a signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hao; Lin, Qiu-Ru; Huang, Mei-Yun; Cai, Ji-Ye; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Previously we reported that valproic acid (VPA) acts in synergy with GOS to enhance cell death in human DU145 cells. However, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we observed that such synergistic cytotoxicity of GOS and VPA could be extended to human A375, HeLa, and PC-3 cancer cells. GOS and VPA co-treatment induced robust apoptosis as evidenced by caspase-8/-9/-3 activation, PARP cleavage, and nuclear fragmentation. GOS and VPA also markedly decreased cyclin A2 protein expression. Owing to the reduction of cyclin A2, Akt signaling was suppressed, leading to dephosphorylation of FOXO3a. Consequently, FOXO3a was activated and the expression of its target genes, including pro-apoptotic FasL and Bim, was upregulated. Supporting this, FOXO3a knockdown attenuated FasL and Bim upregulation and apoptosis induction in GOS+VPA-treated cells. Furthermore, blocking proteasome activity by MG132 prevented the downregulation of cyclin A2, dephosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a, and induction of apoptosis in cells co-treated with GOS and VPA. In mouse model, GOS and VPA combination significantly inhibited the growth of A375 melanoma xenografts. Our findings indicate that GOS and VPA co-treatment induces apoptosis in human cancer cells by suppressing the cyclin-A2/Akt/FOXO3a pathway. PMID:26517515

  17. Gambogic acid induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis by modulation of Bcl-2 and Bax in mantle cell lymphoma JeKo-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingyan; Zhou, Min; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Qiguo; Xu, Yong; Xu, Yueyi; Zhang, Qian; Xu, Xihui; Zeng, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the mechanisms in gambogic acid (GA) -induced JeKo-1 human Mantle Cell Lymphoma cell apoptosis in vitro. Methods The proliferation of GA-treated JeKo-1 cells was measured by CCK-8 assay and Ki-67 immunocytochemical detection. Apoptosis, cell cycle and mitochondrial membrane potential were measured by flow cytometric analysis. Caspase-3, -8 and -9 were detected by colorimetric assay. Bcl-2 and Bax were analyzed by Western blotting. Results GA inhibited cell growth in a time- and dose- dependent manner. GA induces apoptosis in JeKo-1 cells but not in normal bone marrow cells, which was involved in reducing the membrane potential of mitochondria, activating caspases-3, -8 and -9 and decreasing the ratio of Bcl-2 and Bax without cell cycle arresting. Conclusions GA induced apoptosis in human MCL JeKo-1 cells by regulating Bcl-2/Bax and activating caspase-3, -8 and -9 via mitochondrial pathway without affecting cell cycle. PMID:23592899

  18. A weakly acidic solution containing deoxycholic acid induces esophageal epithelial apoptosis and impairs integrity in an in vivo perfusion rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Pardon, Nicolas A; Vicario, Maria; Vanheel, Hanne; Vanuytsel, Tim; Ceulemans, Laurens J; Vieth, Michael; Jimenez, Marcel; Tack, Jan; Farré, Ricard

    2016-04-01

    Impaired esophageal mucosal integrity may be an important contributor in the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Nevertheless, the effect of potentially harmful agents on epithelial integrity is mainly evaluated in vitro for a short period of time and the possible induction of epithelial apoptosis has been neglected. Our objective was to assess the effect of an acidic and weakly acidic solution containing deoxycholic acid (DCA) on the esophageal epithelium in an in vivo rabbit model of esophageal perfusion and to evaluate the role of the epithelial apoptosis. The esophagus of 55 anesthetized rabbits was perfused for 30 min with different solutions at pH 7.2, pH 5.0, pH 1.0, and pH 5.0 containing 200 and 500 μM DCA. Thereafter, animals were euthanized immediately or at 24 or 48 h after the perfusion. Transepithelial electrical resistance, epithelial dilated intercellular spaces, and apoptosis were assessed in Ussing chambers, by transmission electron microscopy, and by TUNEL staining, respectively. No macroscopic or major microscopic alterations were observed after the esophageal perfusions. The acidic and weakly acidic solution containing DCA induced similar long-lasting functional impairment of the epithelial integrity but different ultrastructural morphological changes. Only the solution containing DCA induced epithelial apoptosis in vivo and in vitro in rabbit and human tissue. In contrast to acid, a weakly acidic solution containing DCA induces epithelial apoptosis and a long-lasting impaired mucosal integrity. The presence of apoptotic cells in the esophageal epithelium may be used as a marker of impaired integrity and/or bile reflux exposure. PMID:26797397

  19. Structurally related ganoderic acids induce apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells: Involvement of oxidative stress and antioxidant protective system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ru-Ming; Li, Ying-Bo; Liang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Hui-Zhou; Xiao, Jian-Hui; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2015-10-01

    Ganoderic acids (GAs) produced by Ganoderma lucidum possess anticancer activities with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the role of oxidative stress in apoptotic process induced by GAs is still undefined. In this study, the effects of four structurally related GAs, i.e. GA-T, GA-Mk, and two deacetylated derivatives of GA-T (GA-T1 and GA-T2) on the antioxidant defense system and induced apoptosis in cervical cancer cells HeLa were investigated in vitro. Our results indicated that the tested GAs (5-40 μM) induced apoptotic cell death through mitochondrial membrane potential decrease and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Furthermore, GAs increased the generation of intracellular ROS and attenuated antioxidant defense system by decreasing glutathione (GSH) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities. The above effects were remarkably blocked by the exogenous antioxidants, i.e. N-acetylcysteine, catalase and diphenyleneiodonium chloride. The potency of the four GAs toward induced apoptosis, generation of ROS and suppression of antioxidant defense system was in the order of: GA-T > GA-Mk ≈ GA-T1 > GA-T2 in HeLa cells. These findings suggest that GAs induced mitochondria-dependent cell apoptosis in HeLa cells are mediated via enhancing oxidative stress and depressing antioxidant defense. Additionally, the acetylation of hydroxyl groups in GAs may contribute to their pro-oxidant activities and cytotoxicity, which is helpful to the development of novel chemotherapy agents. PMID:26282491

  20. Rice bran phytic acid induced apoptosis through regulation of Bcl-2/Bax and p53 genes in HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Fatlawi, Atheer Abbas; Al-Fatlawi, Anees Abbas; Irshad, Md; Zafaryab, Md; Rizvi, M Moshahid Alam; Ahmad, Ayaz

    2014-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been reported to have positive nutritional benefits and prevent cancer formation. This study investigated the anticancer activity of rice bran PA against hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. Cytotoxicty of PA (0.5 to 4mM) was examined by MTT and LDH assays after 24 and 48 h treatment. Apoptotic activity was evaluated by expression analysis of apoptosis-regulatory genes [i.e. p53, Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3 and -9] by reverse transcriptase-PCR and DNA fragmentation assay. The results showed antioxidant activity of PA in Fe3+ reducing power assay (p ≤ 0.03). PA inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells in a concentration dependent manner (p ≤ 0.04). After 48h treatment, cell viability was recorded 84.7, 74.4, 65.6, 49.6, 36.0 and 23.8% in MTT assay and 92.6, 77.0%, 66.8%, 51.2, 40.3 and 32.3% in LDH assay at concentrations of 1, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5mM, respectively. Hence, treatment of PA for 24h, recorded viability of cells 93.5, 88.6, 55.5, 34.6 and 24.4% in MTT assay and 94.2, 86.1%, 59.7%, 42.3 and 31.6%, in LDH assay at concentrations of 1, 2.2, 3.0, 3.6 and 4.0mM, respectively. PA treated HepG2 cells showed up-regulation of p53, Bax, Caspase-3 and -9, and down- regulation of Bcl-2 gene (p ≤ 0.01). At the IC50 (2.49 mM) of PA, the p53, Bax, Caspase-3 and-9 genes were up- regulated by 6.03, 7.37, 19.7 and 14.5 fold respectively. Also, the fragmented genomic DNA in PA treated cells provided evidence of apoptosis. Our study confirmed the biological activity of PA and demonstrated growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis in HepG2 cells with modulation of the expression of apoptosis-regulatory genes. PMID:24870784

  1. Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid Induces Apoptosis via Reduction of COX-2 Expression in TPA-Induced HT-29 Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun Ju; Sung, Mi Jeong; Park, Jae Ho; Yang, Hye Jeong; Kim, Myung Sunny; Hur, Haeng Jeon; Hwang, Jin-Taek

    2015-01-01

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) is one of the bioactive compounds found in cheonggukjang, a fast-fermented soybean paste widely utilized in Korean cooking. PGA is reported to have a number of beneficial health effects, and interestingly, it has been identified as a possible anti-cancer compound through its ability to promote apoptosis in cancer cells, although the precise molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Our findings demonstrate that PGA inhibits the pro-proliferative functions of the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a known chemical carcinogen in HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells. This inhibition was accompanied by hallmark apoptotic phenotypes, including DNA fragmentation and the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase 3. In addition, PGA treatment reduced the expression of genes known to be overexpressed in colorectal cancer cells, including cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Lastly, PGA promoted activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein (AMPK) in HT-29 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that PGA treatment enhances apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells, in part by modulating the activity of the COX-2 and AMPK signaling pathways. These anti-cancer functions of PGA make it a promising compound for future study. PMID:25854428

  2. Fenofibrate, a PPARα agonist, protect proximal tubular cells from albumin-bound fatty acids induced apoptosis via the activation of NF-kB

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Nan; Zheng, Xiaoyu; Liu, Hanzhe; Ma, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Albumin-bound fatty acids is the main cause of renal damage, PPARα is responsible in the metabolism of fatty acids. Previous study found that PPARα played a protective role in fatty acids overload associated tubular injury. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether fenofibrate, a PPARα ligands, could contribute to the renoprotective action in fatty acids overload proximal tubule epithelial cells. We observed in HK-2 cells that fenofibrate significantly inhibited fatty acids bound albumin (FA-BSA) induced up-regulation of MCP-1 and IL-8. Treatment with fenofibrate attenuated renal oxidative stress induced by FA-BSA as evidenced by decreased MDA level, increased SOD activity and catalase, GPx-1 expression. FA-BSA induced apoptosis of HK-2 cells were also obviously prevented by fenofibrate. Furthermore, fenofibrate significantly increased the expression of PPARα mRNA and protein in FA-BSA treated cells. Finally, the activation of NF-kB induced by FA-BSA was markedly suppressed by fenofibrate. Taken together, our study describes a renoprotective role of fenofibrate in fatty acids associated tubular toxicity, and the transcriptional activation of PPARα and suppression of NF-kB were at least partially involved. PMID:26617775

  3. Fenofibrate, a PPARα agonist, protect proximal tubular cells from albumin-bound fatty acids induced apoptosis via the activation of NF-kB.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Nan; Zheng, Xiaoyu; Liu, Hanzhe; Ma, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Albumin-bound fatty acids is the main cause of renal damage, PPARα is responsible in the metabolism of fatty acids. Previous study found that PPARα played a protective role in fatty acids overload associated tubular injury. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether fenofibrate, a PPARα ligands, could contribute to the renoprotective action in fatty acids overload proximal tubule epithelial cells. We observed in HK-2 cells that fenofibrate significantly inhibited fatty acids bound albumin (FA-BSA) induced up-regulation of MCP-1 and IL-8. Treatment with fenofibrate attenuated renal oxidative stress induced by FA-BSA as evidenced by decreased MDA level, increased SOD activity and catalase, GPx-1 expression. FA-BSA induced apoptosis of HK-2 cells were also obviously prevented by fenofibrate. Furthermore, fenofibrate significantly increased the expression of PPARα mRNA and protein in FA-BSA treated cells. Finally, the activation of NF-kB induced by FA-BSA was markedly suppressed by fenofibrate. Taken together, our study describes a renoprotective role of fenofibrate in fatty acids associated tubular toxicity, and the transcriptional activation of PPARα and suppression of NF-kB were at least partially involved. PMID:26617775

  4. Retinoic Acid Induced-Autophagic Flux Inhibits ER-Stress Dependent Apoptosis and Prevents Disruption of Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yulong; Zhang, Hongyu; Zheng, Binbin; Ye, Libing; Zhu, Sipin; Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Zhouguang; Wei, Xiaojie; Chen, Daqing; Cao, Guodong; Fu, Xiaobing; Li, Xiaokun; Xu, Hua-Zi; Xiao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces the disruption of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) which leads to infiltration of blood cells, an inflammatory response, and neuronal cell death, resulting spinal cord secondary damage. Retinoic acid (RA) has a neuroprotective effect in both ischemic brain injury and SCI, however the relationship between BSCB disruption and RA in SCI is still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that autophagy and ER stress are involved in the protective effect of RA on the BSCB. RA attenuated BSCB permeability and decreased the loss of tight junction (TJ) molecules such as P120, β-catenin, Occludin and Claudin5 after injury in vivo as well as in Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells (BMECs). Moreover, RA administration improved functional recovery in the rat model of SCI. RA inhibited the expression of CHOP and caspase-12 by induction of autophagic flux. However, RA had no significant effect on protein expression of GRP78 and PDI. Furthermore, combining RA with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) partially abolished its protective effect on the BSCB via exacerbated ER stress and subsequent loss of tight junctions. Taken together, the neuroprotective role of RA in recovery from SCI is related to prevention of of BSCB disruption via the activation of autophagic flux and the inhibition of ER stress-induced cell apoptosis. These findings lay the groundwork for future translational studies of RA for CNS diseases, especially those related to BSCB disruption. PMID:26722220

  5. Activation of Notch1 inhibits medial edge epithelium apoptosis in all-trans retinoic acid-induced cleft palate in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yadong; Dong, Shiyi; Wang, Weicai; Wang, Jianning; Wang, Miao; Chen, Mu; Hou, Jinsong; Huang, Hongzhang

    2016-08-26

    Administration of all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) on E12.0 (embryonic day 12.0) leads to failure of medial edge epithelium (MEE) disappearance and cleft palate. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the relationship between atRA and MEE remains to be identified. In this study, atRA (200 mg/kg) administered by gavage induced a 75% incidence of cleft palate in C57BL/6 mice. Notch1 was up-regulated in MEE cells in the atRA-treated group compared with the controls at E15.0, together with reduced apoptosis and elevated proliferation. Next, we investigated the mechanisms underlying atRA, Notch1 and MEE degradation in palate organ culture. Our results revealed that down-regulation of Notch1 partially rescued the inhibition of atRA-induced palate fusion. Molecular analysis indicated that atRA increased the expression of Notch1 and Rbpj and decreased the expression of P21. In addition, depletion of Notch1 expression decreased the expression of Rbpj and increased the expression of P21. Moreover, inhibition of Rbpj expression partially reversed atRA-induced MEE persistence and increased P21 expression. These findings demonstrate that atRA inhibits MEE degradation, which in turn induces a cleft palate, possibly through the Notch1/RBPjk/P21 signaling pathway. PMID:27343556

  6. c-Jun N-terminal Kinase-Dependent Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway is Critically Involved in Arjunic Acid Induced Apoptosis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Joo, HyeEun; Lee, Hyun Joo; Shin, Eun Ah; Kim, Hangil; Seo, Kyeong-Hwa; Baek, Nam-In; Kim, Bonglee; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2016-04-01

    Though arjunic acid, a triterpene isolated from Terminalia arjuna, was known to have antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and cytotoxic effects, its underlying antitumor mechanism still remains unclear so far. Thus, in the present study, the molecular antitumor mechanism of arjunic acid was examined in A549 and H460 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Arjunic acid exerted cytotoxicity by 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and significantly increased sub-G1 population in A549 and H460 cells by cell cycle analysis. Consistently, arjunic acid cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), activated Bax, and phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), and also attenuated the expression of pro-caspase-3 and Bcl-2 in A549 and H460 cells. Furthermore, arjunic acid upregulated the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress proteins such as IRE1 α, ATF4, p-eIF2α, and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in A549 and H460 cells. Conversely, CHOP depletion attenuated the increase of sub-G1 population by arjunic acid, and also JNK inhibitor SP600125 blocked the cytotoxicity and upregulation of IRE1 α and CHOP induced by arjunic acid in A549 and H460 cells. Overall, our findings suggest that arjunic acid induces apoptosis in NSCLC cells via JNK mediated ER stress pathway as a potent chemotherapeutic agent for NSCLC. PMID:26787261

  7. Stimulation of Anterior Thalamic Nuclei Protects Against Seizures and Neuronal Apoptosis in Hippocampal CA3 Region of Kainic Acid-induced Epileptic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Da-Wei; Liu, Huan-Guang; Yang, An-Chao; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The antiepileptic effect of the anterior thalamic nuclei (ANT) stimulation has been demonstrated; however, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic ANT stimulation on hippocampal neuron loss and apoptosis. Methods: Sixty-four rats were divided into four groups: The control group, the kainic acid (KA) group, the sham-deep brain stimulation (DBS) group, and the DBS group. KA was used to induce epilepsy. Seizure count and latency to the first spontaneous seizures were calculated. Nissl staining was used to analyze hippocampal neuronal loss. Polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were conducted to assess the expression of caspase-3 (Casp3), B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl2), and Bcl2-associated X protein (Bax) in the hippocampal CA3 region. One-way analysis of variance was used to determine the differences between the four groups. Results: The latency to the first spontaneous seizures in the DBS group was significantly longer than that in the KA group (27.50 ± 8.05 vs. 16.38 ± 7.25 days, P = 0.0005). The total seizure number in the DBS group was also significantly reduced (DBS vs. KA group: 11.75 ± 6.80 vs. 23.25 ± 7.72, P = 0.0002). Chronic ANT-DBS reduced neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA3 region (DBS vs. KA group: 23.58 ± 6.34 vs. 13.13 ± 4.00, P = 0.0012). After chronic DBS, the relative mRNA expression level of Casp3 was decreased (DBS vs. KA group: 1.18 ± 0.37 vs. 2.09 ± 0.46, P = 0.0003), and the relative mRNA expression level of Bcl2 was increased (DBS vs. KA group: 0.92 ± 0.21 vs. 0.48 ± 0.16, P = 0.0004). The protein expression levels of CASP3 (DBS vs. KA group: 1.25 ± 0.26 vs. 2.49 ± 0.38, P < 0.0001) and BAX (DBS vs. KA group: 1.57 ± 0.49 vs. 2.80 ± 0.63, P = 0.0012) both declined in the DBS group whereas the protein expression level of BCL2 (DBS vs. KA group: 0.78 ± 0.32 vs. 0.36 ± 0.17, P = 0.0086) increased in the DBS group. Conclusions: This study demonstrated

  8. Inhibition of phosphotidylinositol-3 kinase pathway by a novel naphthol derivative of betulinic acid induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells of different origin

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, R; Hamid, A; Sangwan, P L; Chinthakindi, P K; Koul, S; Rayees, S; Singh, G; Mondhe, D M; Mintoo, M J; Singh, S K; Rath, S K; Saxena, A K

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid (BA) is a pentacyclic triterpenoid natural product reported to inhibit cell growth in a variety of cancers. However, the further clinical development of BA got hampered because of poor solubility and pharmacological properties. Interestingly, this molecule offer several hotspots for structural modifications in order to address its associated issues. In our endeavor, we selected C-3 position for the desirable chemical modification in order to improve its cytotoxic and pharmacological potential and prepared a library of different triazoline derivatives of BA. Among them, we previously reported the identification of a potential molecule, that is, 3{1N(5-hydroxy-naphth-1yl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4yl}methyloxy betulinic acid (HBA) with significant inhibition of cancer cell growth and their properties. In the present study, we have shown for the first time that HBA decreased the expression of phosphotidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) p110α and p85α and caused significant downregulation of pAKT and of NFκB using human leukemia and breast cancer cells as in vitro models. Further it was revealed that PI3K inhibition by HBA induced cell cycle arrest via effects on different cell cycle regulatory proteins that include CDKis cyclins and pGSK3β. Also, this target-specific inhibition was associated with mitochondrial apoptosis as was reflected by the increased expression of mitochondrial bax, downregulated bcl2 and decreased mitochondrial levels of cytochrome c, together with reactive oxygen species generation and decline in mitochondrial membrane potential. The apoptotic effectors such as caspase 8, caspase 9 and caspase 3 were found to be upregulated besides DNA repair-associated enzyme, that is, PARP cleavage caused cancer cell death. Pharmacodynamic evaluation revealed that both HBA and BA were safe upto the dose of 2000 mg/kg body weight and with acceptable pharmacodynamic parameters. The in vitro data corroborated with in vivo anticancer activity wherein Ehrlich

  9. DNA damage and oxidative stress induced by acetylsalicylic acid in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Islas-Flores, Hariz; García-Medina, Sandra; SanJuan-Reyes, Nely

    2014-08-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory widely used due to its low cost and high effectiveness. This compound has been found in water bodies worldwide and is toxic to aquatic organisms; nevertheless its capacity to induce oxidative stress in bioindicators like Daphnia magna remains unknown. This study aimed to evaluate toxicity in D. magna induced by acetylsalicylic acid in water, using oxidative stress and DNA damage biomarkers. An acute toxicity test was conducted in order to determine the median lethal concentration (48-h LC50) and the concentrations to be used in the subsequent subacute toxicity test in which the following biomarkers were evaluated: lipid peroxidation, oxidized protein content, activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, and level of DNA damage. Lipid peroxidation level and oxidized protein content were significantly increased (p<0.05), and antioxidant enzymes significantly altered with respect to controls; while the DNA damage were significantly increased (p<0.05) too. In conclusion, acetylsalicylic acid induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in D. magna. PMID:24747829

  10. Acetylsalicylic acid treatment improves differentiation and immunomodulation of SHED.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Chen, C; Liu, S; Liu, D; Xu, X; Chen, X; Shi, S

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) possess multipotent differentiation and immunomodulatory properties. They have been used for orofacial bone regeneration and autoimmune disease treatment. In this study, we show that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) treatment is able to significantly improve SHED-mediated osteogenic differentiation and immunomodulation. Mechanistically, ASA treatment upregulates the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT)/Wnt/β-catenin cascade, leading to improvement of SHED-mediated bone regeneration, and also upregulates TERT/FASL signaling, leading to improvement of SHED-mediated T-cell apoptosis and ameliorating disease phenotypes in dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis mice. These data indicate that ASA treatment is a practical approach to improving SHED-based cell therapy. PMID:25394850

  11. [The forensic chemical investigation of acetylsalicylic acid].

    PubMed

    Shormanov, V K; Chupak, V V; Pobedonstseva, M N; Maslov, S V; Kibets, N A; Tikhopoeva, N N

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop the universal approach to the quantitative determination of acetylsalicylic acid in biological tissues and fluids to be applied in the practice of forensic chemical expertise with the use of thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, low-pressure column chromatography, and spectrophotometry. A system of solvents consisting of acetone and ethyl acetate (7:3) was proposed as a universal agent for extracting acetylsalicylic acid from the cadaveric tissues and blood. It was shown that acetylsalicylic acid and its principal metabolite, salicylic acid, can be purified from the endogenous admixtures present in the biological materials by column chromatography on silica gel L 40/100 mcm. Salicylic acid in extracts from biological materials was identified and quantified with the use of thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and electronic spectrophotometry. The method for forensic chemical investigation of acetylsalicylic acid has been developed and applied in the analysis of the material provided for expertise. PMID:26856059

  12. Pharmacokinetic study of copper (II) acetylsalicylate.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mohammad S; Sher, Muhammad; Pervez, Humayun; Saeed, Maryiam

    2008-09-01

    This study was aimed at determination of pharmacokinetic parameters of copper (II) acetylsalicylate (CAS). Ten volunteers received a 60-mg dose of CAS. Blood samples were collected just before and after 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.5, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.5, 7.0, 10, and 12.0 h of administration of the drug. The plasma samples were analyzed for CAS and its metabolites by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method having a suitable lower limit of quantification. The dose of 60 mg was well tolerated without any adverse effect. The maximum plasma concentration of CAS was found to be 0.38 mg L(-1) with t (max) of 0.72 h. The plasma half-life, clearance, and volume of distribution of CAS were 8.67 h, 66.30 L h(-1) and 829 L kg(-1), respectively. The elimination of CAS, acetylsalicylic acid, copper salicylate, and salicylic acid follows the first order kinetics with r (2) 0.979, 0.880, 0.991, and 0.998, respectively. The study provided for the first time the pharmacokinetic data for CAS after oral administration of CAS. The data were found to be useful in understanding the claimed enhanced anti-inflammatory activity of the drug as compared with that of acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:18478192

  13. Serum albumin complexation of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Wiktor; Porebski, Grzegorz; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Roterman, Irena

    2009-06-01

    One possible origin of the type I hypersensitivity reaction is reaction of drugs such as acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolites being complexed with human serum albumin. Albumin, being transporting molecule abundant in blood plasma is able to bind large array of ligands varying from small single carbon particles to long hydrophobic tailed lipidic acids (e.g. myristic acid). This non specificity is possible because of multi domain scaffold and large flexibility of inter-domain loops, which results in serious reorientation of domains. Hypothesis that acetylsalicylic acid metabolites may play indirect role in activation of allergic reaction has been tested. Binding of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites in intra-domain space causes significant increase of liability of domains IIIA and IIIB. One of metabolites, salicyluric acid, once is bound causes distortion and partial unfolding of helices in domains IA, IIB and IIIB. Changed are both directions and amplitude of relative motions as well as intra-domain distances. In result albumin is able to cross-link of adjacent IgE receptors which subsequently starts allergic reaction. PMID:19689242

  14. Gallic acid induces apoptosis and enhances the anticancer effects of cisplatin in human small cell lung cancer H446 cell line via the ROS-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruixuan; Ma, Lijie; Weng, Dan; Yao, Jiahui; Liu, Xueying; Jin, Faguang

    2016-05-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is the most aggressive lung cancer subtype and accounts for more than 15% of all lung cancer cases. Cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (CDDP)]-based combination chemotherapy is the cornerstone for all stages of SCLC. However, acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) and intolerable toxicities lead to a high mortality rate in SCLC patients. Gallic acid [3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid (GA)] is a natural botanic phenolic compound which can induce cell apoptosis in several types of cancers. In the present study, we aimed to explore the anticancer effects of GA on human SCLC H446 cells and its promotive effects on the anticancer activities of cisplatin. The viability of the H446 cells was analyzed by MTT assay. Morphological changes in the H446 cells were observed under an inverted microscope. Apoptosis induction was determined by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide (PI) staining. The level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was assessed by 2'7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH‑DA), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by JC-1, and western blotting was used to examine the expression of mitochondrial apoptosis-related proteins. The results showed that both GA and cisplatin changed the morphology, inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis in the H446 cells by inducing generation of ROS, disruption of MMP, downregulation of XIAP expression, and upregulation of Bax, Apaf-1, DIABLO and p53 expression. More importantly, GA combined with cisplatin exhibited synergistic effects on inducing of these pro-apoptotic mediators and modulating the activation of apoptosis-related molecules. However, inhibition of the generation of ROS by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), a specific ROS inhibitor, reversed the cell apoptosis induced by cisplatin combined with GA. In conclusion, the results from the present study revealed that GA exhibited an anticancer effect on human SCLC H446 cells and enhanced the antitumor activities of cisplatin

  15. Chlorogenic acid induces apoptosis to inhibit inflammatory proliferation of IL-6-induced fibroblast-like synoviocytes through modulating the activation of JAK/STAT and NF-κB signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    LOU, LIXIA; ZHOU, JINGWEI; LIU, YUJUN; WEI, YI; ZHAO, JIULI; DENG, JIAGANG; DONG, BIN; ZHU, LINGQUN; WU, AIMING; YANG, YINGXI; CHAI, LIMIN

    2016-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is the primary constituent of Caulis Lonicerae, a Chinese herb used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The present study aimed to investigate whether CGA was able to inhibit the proliferation of the fibroblast-like synoviocyte cell line (RSC-364), stimulated by interleukin (IL)-6, through inducing apoptosis. Following incubation with IL-6 or IL-6 and CGA, the cellular proliferation of RSC-364 cells was detected by MTT assay. The ratio of apoptosed cells were detected by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to observe protein expression levels of key molecules involved in the Janus-activated kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway [phosphorylated (p)-STAT3, JAK1 and gp130] and the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway [phosphorylated (p)-inhibitor of κB kinase subunit α/β and NF-κB p50). It was revealed that CGA was able to inhibit the inflammatory proliferation of RSC-364 cells mediated by IL-6 through inducing apoptosis. CGA was also able to suppress the expression levels of key molecules in the JAK/STAT and NF-κB signaling pathways, and inhibit the activation of these signaling pathways in the inflammatory response through IL-6-mediated signaling, thereby resulting in the inhibition of the inflammatory proliferation of synoviocytes. The present results indicated that CGA may have potential as a novel therapeutic agent for inhibiting inflammatory hyperplasia of the synovium through inducing synoviocyte apoptosis in patients with RA. PMID:27168850

  16. Chrysophanic Acid Induces Necrosis but not Necroptosis in Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Caki-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chrysophanic acid, also known as chrysophanol, has a number of biological activities. It enhances memory and learning abilities, raises superoxide dismutase activity, and has anti-cancer effects in several model systems. According to previous reports, chrysophanic acid-induced cell death shares features of necrotic cell death. However, the molecular and cellular processes underlying chrysophanic acid-induced cell death remain poorly understood. Methods: Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was monitored by cell viability assay and Annexin V-propidium iodide (PI) staining of renal cell carcinoma Caki-2 cells. The induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by chrysophanic acid and the suppression of ROS by anti-oxidants were evaluated by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate staining. The expression and phosphorylation of proteins that are involved in apoptosis and necroptosis were detected by immunoblotting. Results: The extent of chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was concentration and time dependent, and dead cells mainly appeared in the PI-positive population, which is a major feature of necrosis, upon fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was associated with the generation of intracellular ROS, and this effect was reversed by pretreatment with N-acetyl cysteine. Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was not associated with changes in apoptotic or necroptotic marker proteins. Conclusions: The cell death induced by chrysophanic acid resembled neither apoptotic nor necroptotic cell death in human renal cell carcinoma Caki-2 cells. PMID:27390736

  17. Anti-MDR and antitumoral action of acetylsalicylic acid on leukaemic cells.

    PubMed

    Carrett-Dias, Michele; Votto, Ana Paula de Souza; Filgueira, Daza de Moraes Vaz Batista; Almeida, Daniela Volcan; Vallochi, Adriana Lima; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes; Marins, Luis Fernando; Trindade, Gilma Santos

    2011-10-01

    ASA (acetylsalicylic acid) is an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug). ASA has gained attention as a potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for several neoplasms. The aim of this study was to analyse the possible antitumoural effects of ASA in two erythroleukaemic cell lines, with or without the MDR (multidrug resistance) phenotype. The mechanism of action of different concentrations of ASA were compared in K562 (non-MDR) and Lucena (MDR) cells by analysing cell viability, apoptosis and necrosis, intracellular ROS (reactive oxygen species) formation and bcl-2, p53 and cox-2 gene expression. ASA inhibited the cellular proliferation or induced toxicity in K562 and Lucena cell lines, irrespective of the MDR phenotype. The ASA treatment provoked death by apoptosis and necrosis in K562 cells and only by necrosis in Lucena cells. ASA also showed antioxidant activity in both cell lines. The bcl-2, p53 and cox-2 genes in both cell lines treated with ASA seem to exhibit different patterns of expression. However, normal lymphocytes treated with the same ASA concentrations were more resistant than tumoral cells. The results of this work show that both cell lines responded to treatment with ASA, demonstrating a possible antitumoral and anti-MDR role for this drug. PMID:21361874

  18. Effects of microgravity on the binding of acetylsalicylic acid by Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, James E.; Gerren, Richard; Zoelle, Jeffery

    1995-07-01

    Bacteroids can be induced in vitro by treating growing Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii with succinic acid or succinic acid structural analogs like acetylsalicylic acid. Quantitating bacteroid induction by measuring acetylsalicylic binding under normal (1 g) conditions showed two forms of binding to occur. In one form of binding cells immediately bound comparatively high levels of acetylsalicylic acid, but the binding was quickly reversed. The second form of binding increased with time by first-order kinetics, and reached saturation in 40 s. Similar experiments performed in the microgravity environment aboard the NASA 930 aircraft showed only one form of binding and total acetylsalicylic acid bound was 32% higher than at 1 g.

  19. Superiority of zinc complex of acetylsalicylic acid to acetylsalicylic acid in preventing postischemic myocardial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Sevil; Atmanli, Ayhan; Li, Shiliang; Radovits, Tamás; Hegedűs, Peter; Barnucz, Enikő; Hirschberg, Kristóf; Loganathan, Sivakkanan; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2015-09-01

    The pathophysiology of ischemic myocardial injury involves cellular events, reactive oxygen species, and an inflammatory reaction cascade. The zinc complex of acetylsalicylic acid (Zn(ASA)2) has been found to possess higher anti-inflammatory and lower ulcerogenic activities than acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Herein, we studied the effects of both ASA and Zn(ASA)2 against acute myocardial ischemia. Rats were pretreated with ASA (75 mg/kg) or Zn(ASA)2 (100 mg/kg) orally for five consecutive days. Isoproterenol (85 mg/kg, subcutaneously [s.c.]) was applied to produce myocardial infarction. After 17-22 h, animals were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]) and both electrical and mechanical parameters of cardiac function were evaluated in vivo. Myocardial histological and gene expression analyses were performed. In isoproterenol-treated rats, Zn(ASA)2 treatment normalized significantly impaired left-ventricular contractility index (Emax 2.6 ± 0.7 mmHg/µL vs. 4.6 ± 0.5 mmHg/µL, P < 0.05), increased stroke volume (30 ± 3 µL vs. 50 ± 6 µL, P < 0.05), decreased systemic vascular resistance (7.2 ± 0.7 mmHg/min/mL vs. 4.2 ± 0.5 mmHg/min/mL, P < 0.05) and reduced inflammatory infiltrate into the myocardial tissues. ECG revealed a restoration of elevated ST-segment (0.21 ± 0.03 mV vs. 0.09 ± 0.02 mV, P < 0.05) and prolonged QT-interval (79.2 ± 3.2 ms vs. 69.5 ± 2.5 ms, P < 0.05) by Zn(ASA)2. ASA treatment did not result in an improvement of these parameters. Additionally, Zn(ASA)2 significantly increased the mRNA-expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (+73 ± 15%), glutathione peroxidase 4 (+44 ± 12%), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 (+102 ± 22%). In conclusion, our data demonstrate that oral administration of zinc and ASA in the form of bis(aspirinato)zinc(II) complex is superior to ASA in preventing electrical

  20. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of acetylsalicylic acid after intravenous and oral administration to healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Nagelschmitz, J; Blunck, M; Kraetzschmar, J; Ludwig, M; Wensing, G; Hohlfeld, T

    2014-01-01

    Background The pharmacology of single doses of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administered intravenously (250 or 500 mg) or orally (100, 300, or 500 mg) was evaluated in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Methods Blood and urine samples were collected before and up to 24 hours after administration of ASA in 22 healthy volunteers. Pharmacokinetic parameters and measurements of platelet aggregation were determined using validated techniques. Results A comparison between administration routes showed that the geometric mean dose-corrected peak concentrations (Cmax/D) and the geometric mean dose-corrected area under the curve (AUC0–∞/D) were higher following intravenous administration of ASA 500 mg compared with oral administration (estimated ratios were 11.23 and 2.03, respectively). Complete inhibition of platelet aggregation was achieved within 5 minutes with both intravenous ASA doses, reflecting a rapid onset of inhibition that was not observed with oral dosing. At 5 minutes after administration, the mean reduction in arachidonic acid-induced thromboxane B2 synthesis ex vivo was 99.3% with ASA 250 mg intravenously and 99.7% with ASA 500 mg intravenously. In exploratory analyses, thromboxane B2 synthesis was significantly lower after intravenous versus oral ASA 500 mg (P<0.0001) at each observed time point up to the first hour after administration. Concentrations of 6-keto-prostaglandin1α at 5 and 20 minutes after dosing were also significantly lower with ASA 500 mg intravenously than with ASA 500 mg orally. Conclusion This study demonstrates that intravenous ASA provides more rapid and consistent platelet inhibition than oral ASA within the first hour after dosing. PMID:24672263

  1. Dual effects of acetylsalicylic acid on ERK signaling and Mitf transcription lead to inhibition of melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Takashi; Usami, Mai; Awaji, Mizuki; Shinohara, Sumire; Sato, Kazuomi

    2016-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is widely used as an analgesic/antipyretic drug. It exhibits a wide range of biological effects, including preventative effects against heart attack and stroke, and the induction of apoptosis in various cancer cells. We previously found that ASA inhibits melanogenesis in B16 melanoma cells. However, the mechanisms of how ASA down-regulates melanin synthesis remain unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of ASA on melanogenic pathways, such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) transcription. ASA significantly inhibited melanin synthesis in a dose-dependent manner without oxidative stress and cell death. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the inhibitory effect of ASA might be due to the inhibition of Mitf gene transcription. Interestingly, ASA also induced ERK phosphorylation. Additionally, treatment with PD98059, a specific ERK phosphorylation inhibitor, abolished the anti-melanogenic effect of ASA. These results suggest that the depigmenting effect of ASA results from down-regulation of Mitf, which is induced by both the induction of ERK phosphorylation and the inhibition of Mitf transcription. PMID:26699907

  2. Acidosis, magnesium and acetylsalicylic acid: Effects on thrombin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, Nikolaj; Loznikova, Svetlana; Sukhodola, Aleksandr; Halets, Inessa; Bryszewska, Maria; Shcharbin, Dzmitry

    2013-03-01

    Thrombin, an enzyme from the hydrolase family, is the main component of the blood coagulation system. In ischemic stroke it acts as a serine protease that converts soluble fibrinogen into insoluble strands of fibrin forming blood clots in the brain. It has been found to phosphoresce at room temperature in the millisecond and microsecond ranges. The phosphorescence of thrombin was studied under physiological conditions, in acidosis (decrease of pH from 8.0 to 5.0) and on the addition of salts (magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride) and of acetylsalicylic acid, and its connection with thrombin function is discussed. Acidosis significantly increased the internal dynamics of thrombin. We propose that lactate-acidosis plays a protective role in stroke, preventing the formation of clots. The addition of NaCl and MgSO4 in different concentrations increased the internal dynamics of thrombin. Also, the addition of MgSO4 decreased thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. However, magnesium sulfate and acetylsalicylic acid in the therapeutic concentrations used for treatment of ischemic stroke had no effect on thrombin internal dynamics. The data obtained will help to elucidate the conformational stability of thrombin under conditions modulating lactate-acidosis and in the presence of magnesium sulfate.

  3. Acetylsalicylic Acid Daily vs Acetylsalicylic Acid Every 3 Days in Healthy Volunteers: Effect on Platelet Aggregation, Gastric Mucosa, and Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Plinio Minghin Freitas; Gagliano-Jucá, Thiago; Zaminelli, Tiago; Sampaio, Marinalva Ferreira; Blackler, Rory Willian; Trevisan, Miriam da Silva; Novaes Magalhães, Antônio Frederico; De Nucci, Gilberto

    2016-07-01

    Substantial platelet inhibition was observed 3 days after a single administration of acetylsalicylic acid 81 mg to healthy volunteers. Here we investigate prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) antrum concentrations and gastrointestinal symptoms in two treatment groups: one receiving losartan and acetylsalicylic acid every day and the other receiving losartan every day and acetylsalicylic acid every 3 days. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers from both sexes received either 50 mg losartan and acetylsalicylic acid 81 mg daily or 50 mg losartan and acetylsalicylic acid 81 every 3 days with placebo on the other days. Therapy was delivered for 30 days for both groups. Gastric endoscopy was performed before and after treatment period. Biopsies were collected for PGE2 quantification. Platelet function tests were carried out before and during treatment and TXB2 release on platelet rich plasma was measured. The every 3 day low-dose acetylsalicylic acid regimen produced complete inhibition of platelet aggregation compared to the daily treatment. Thromboxane B2 release was substantially abolished for both groups during treatment. There was no significant difference on the endoscopic score of both treatment groups after the 30-day treatment (P = .215). There was over 50% suppression of antrum PGE2 content on volunteers receiving acetylsalicylic acid daily (P = .0016), while for the every 3 day dose regimen there was no significant difference between pre and post-treatment antrum PGE2 dosages (P = .4193). Since PGE2 is involved in gastric healing, we understand that this new approach could be safer and as efficient as the standard daily therapy on a long-term basis. PMID:26634419

  4. Hepatoprotective effect of vitamin C on lithocholic acid-induced cholestatic liver injury in Gulo(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Su Jong; Bae, Seyeon; Kang, Jae Seung; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Cho, Eun Ju; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Yoon Jun; Lee, Wang Jae; Kim, Chung Yong; Lee, Hyo-Suk

    2015-09-01

    Prevention and restoration of hepatic fibrosis from chronic liver injury is essential for the treatment of patients with chronic liver diseases. Vitamin C is known to have hepatoprotective effects, but their underlying mechanisms are unclear, especially those associated with hepatic fibrosis. Here, we analyzed the impact of vitamin C on bile acid induced hepatocyte apoptosis in vitro and lithocholic acid (LCA)-induced liver injury in vitamin C-insufficient Gulo(-/-) mice, which cannot synthesize vitamin C similarly to humans. When Huh-BAT cells were treated with bile acid, apoptosis was induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress-related JNK activation but vitamin C attenuated bile acid-induced hepatocyte apoptosis in vitro. In our in vivo experiments, LCA feeding increased plasma marker of cholestasis and resulted in more extensive liver damage and hepatic fibrosis by more prominent apoptotic cell death and recruiting more intrahepatic inflammatory CD11b(+) cells in the liver of vitamin C-insufficient Gulo(-/-) mice compared to wild type mice which have minimal hepatic fibrosis. However, when vitamin C was supplemented to vitamin C-insufficient Gulo(-/-) mice, hepatic fibrosis was significantly attenuated in the liver of vitamin C-sufficient Gulo(-/-) mice like in wild type mice and this hepatoprotective effect of vitamin C was thought to be associated with both decreased hepatic apoptosis and necrosis. These results suggested that vitamin C had hepatoprotective effect against cholestatic liver injury. PMID:26057690

  5. High-pressure polymorphism of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin): Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, Ethan L.; Dreger, Zbigniew A.; Gupta, Yogendra M.

    2015-02-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to elucidate the high-pressure polymorphic behavior of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), an important pharmaceutical compound known as aspirin. Using a diamond anvil cell (DAC), single crystals of the two polymorphic phases of aspirin existing at ambient conditions (ASA-I and ASA-II) were compressed to 10 GPa. We found that ASA-I does not transform to ASA-II, but instead transforms to a new phase (ASA-III) above ∼2 GPa. It is demonstrated that this transformation primarily introduces structural changes in the bonding and arrangement of the acetyl groups and is reversible upon the release of pressure. In contrast, a less dense ASA-II shows no transition in the pressure range studied, though it appears to exhibit a disordered structure above 7 GPa. Our results suggest that ASA-III is the most stable polymorph of aspirin at high pressures.

  6. Central effects of acetylsalicylic acid on trigeminal-nociceptive stimuli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acetylsalicylic acid is one of the most used analgesics to treat an acute migraine attack. Next to the inhibitory effects on peripheral prostaglandin synthesis, central mechanisms of action have also been discussed. Methods Using a standardized model for trigeminal-nociceptive stimulation during fMRI scanning, we investigated the effect of acetylsalicylic acid on acute pain compared to saline in 22 healthy volunteers in a double-blind within-subject design. Painful stimulation was applied using gaseous ammonia and presented in a pseudo-randomized order with several control stimuli. All participants were instructed to rate the intensity and unpleasantness of every stimulus on a VAS scale. Based on previous results, we hypothesized to find an effect of ASA on central pain processing structures like the ACC, SI and SII as well as the trigeminal nuclei and the hypothalamus. Results Even though we did not find any differences in pain ratings between saline and ASA, we observed decreased BOLD signal changes in response to trigemino-nociceptive stimulation in the ACC and SII after administration of ASA compared to saline. This finding is in line with earlier imaging results investigating the effect of ASA on acute pain. Contrary to earlier findings from animal studies, we could not find an effect of ASA on the trigeminal nuclei in the brainstem or within the hypothalamic area. Conclusion Taken together our study replicates earlier findings of an attenuating effect of ASA on pain processing structures, which adds further evidence to a possibly central mechanism of action of ASA. PMID:25201152

  7. Comparative study of the efficacy of lysine acetylsalicylate, indomethacin and pethidine in acute renal colic.

    PubMed

    al-Sahlawi, K S; Tawfik, O M

    1996-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of intravenous lysine acetylsalicylate 1.8 g, indomethacin 100 mg and pethidine 100 mg in acute renal colic in a randomized double-blind clinical trial. One hundred and fifty patients with acute renal colic were divided into three groups. The first group received lysine acetylsalicylate 1.8 g, the second group received indomethacin 100 mg and the third group received pethidine 100 mg. The degree of pain relief was recorded 5, 15, 30 and 60 min after intravenous administration of the drugs. There was no statistically significant difference between the degree of analgesia provided by pethidine and indomethacin. Lysine acetylsalicylate was less effective than indomethacin and pethidine. It is concluded that intravenous indomethacin is an effective alternative to intravenous pethidine in the treatment of acute renal colic. Intravenous lysine acetylsalicylate is inferior to intravenous indomethacin in treatment of acute renal colic. PMID:9023498

  8. [The blood anticoagulant system in rats perorally administered a heparin-acetylsalicylic acid complex].

    PubMed

    Kudriashov, B A; Liapina, L A; Pastorova, V E; Kondashevskaia, M V

    1991-01-01

    Heparin/acetylsalicylate complexes (1:9 and 10:1) were obtained in vitro. Single or chronic (7-8 days) per os administration to white rats of 0.1% solution of the heparin/acetylsalicylate complex (0.3 ml/200 g body weight) enhanced anticoagulative properties of blood plasma, increased the fibrinolytic activity in respect of stabilized fibrin, and diminished the thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. PMID:1787232

  9. Effects of acetylsalicylic acid and paracetamol alone and in combination on prostanoid synthesis in man.

    PubMed Central

    Bippi, H; Frölich, J C

    1990-01-01

    1. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of acetylsalicylic acid and paracetamol given separately and in combination on total body and renal PGE2 synthesis in healthy volunteers. 2. In a randomized four-way cross-over study eleven female volunteers received for two consecutive days 3 g day-1 acetylsalicylic acid or 3 g day-1 paracetamol or a combination of 1.5 g day-1 acetylsalicylic acid and 1.5 g day-1 paracetamol, or 1.5 g day-1 acetylsalicylic acid separated by washout phases of at least 5 days. Urinary excretion of the major urinary metabolite of PGE2 (PGE-MUM), PGE2 and creatinine clearance were measured before and on day 2 of each treatment period. Compliance was tested by measuring metabolites of the two drugs in urine. 3. Paracetamol did not reduce urinary excretion of PGE2 whereas both dosages of acetylsalicylic acid caused a significant reduction. 4. The combination of both drugs did not reduce PGE2 excretion more than acetylsalicylic acid alone. 5. All four drug schedules reduced urinary excretion of PGE-MUM significantly. PMID:2310655

  10. Effects of nocloprost clathrate on absorption of acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, W; Zschiesche, M; Franke, G; Amon, I

    1994-01-01

    The cytoprotective prostaglandin E2 analog nocloprost clathrate (NOCLO) is tested as a prophylactic for gastrointestinal lesions of NSAID. The effects of 400 micrograms NOCLO versus respective placebos with and without equivalent amounts of beta-cyclodextrin on the pharmacokinetic behavior of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), given 30 min after NOCLO, were studied in two single-blind, parallel-group trials. The trials were performed in 15 male healthy volunteers (age 21-25 years, body weight 62-94 kg, body height 172-187 cm) with known N-acetylation and debrisoquine type hydroxylation phenotype. ASA, salicylic acid (SA), and salicyluric acid (SU) in plasma and SA and SU in urine were measured by HPLC. NOCLO delayed the absorption of ASA (increased tmax, lower Cmax) significantly in comparison with both placebos. AUC and clearance values were not changed by NOCLO premedication. There were neither differences between the two placebo groups nor between the two groups pretreated with NOCLO with regard to any pharmacokinetic parameter. The changes in drug absorption are caused by the sum of those cytoprotective effects of prostaglandin which are also determinants of drug absorption. PMID:8199752

  11. Acetylsalicylic acid as a potential pediatric health hazard: legislative aspects concerning accidental intoxications in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Mund, Menen E; Gyo, Christoph; Brüggmann, Dörthe; Quarcoo, David; Groneberg, David A

    2016-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid is a frequently used medication worldwide. It is not used in pediatrics due its association with Reye syndrome. However, in case of pediatric intoxication, children are more fragile to salicylate poisoning because of their reduced ability of buffer the acid stress. Intoxication leads to a decoupling of oxidative phosphorylation and subsequently to a loss in mitochondrial function. Symptoms of poisoning are diverse; eventually they can lead to the death of the patient. Governmental websites of various EU countries were searched for legal information on acetylsalicylic acid availability in pharmacies and non-pharmacy stores. Various EU countries permit prescription-free sales of acetylsalicylic acid in pharmacies and non-pharmacy stores. In Sweden acetylsalicylic acid 500 mg may be sold in a maximum package size of 20 tablets or effervescent tablets in a non-pharmacy. In the UK a maximum of 16 tablets of acetylsalicylic acid 325 mg is allowed to sell in non-pharmacies. In Ireland acetylsalicylic acid is classified as S2 medication. Subsequently, acetylsalicylic acid is allowed to be sold prescription-free in pharmacies and non-pharmacy stores. In the Netherlands acetylsalicylic acid may only be sold in drug stores or pharmacies. A maximum of 24 tablets of 500 mg is allowed to purchase in a drug store. Several countries in the European Union are permitted to offer acetylsalicylic acid prescription-free in pharmacies and non-pharmacy stores without legal guidance on the storage position within the store. Further research is needed to investigate whether acetylsalicylic acid is located directly accessible to young children within the stores in EU countries which permit prescription-free sales of acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:27418941

  12. Acetylsalicylic Acid and Eflornithine in Treating Patients at High Risk for Colorectal Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This phase II trial is studying how well giving acetylsalicylic acid together with eflornithine works in treating patients at high risk for colorectal cancer. Chemoprevention is the use of certain drugs to keep cancer from forming. The use of acetylsalicylic acid and eflornithine may prevent colorectal cancer. |

  13. Modified MCM-41 as a drug delivery system for acetylsalicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyskočilová, Eliška; Luštická, Ivana; Paterová, Iva; Machová, Libuše; Červený, Libor

    2014-12-01

    The modification of prepared MCM-41 by different groups (amino, chloro and oxo) was studied. Prepared materials were treated by acetylsalicylic acid and hybrid materials were characterized, compared from the point of view of immobilized amount of active substance. The highest amount of acetylsalicylic acid was detected using methyl-tert- butyl ether as a solvent and MCM-41 without modification after 1 h (0.35 g per 1 g of the support) or MCM modified by amino group after 5 h (0.37 g per 1 g of the support) as a support. Using amino modified MCM, the longer treatment by acetylsalicylic acid converged to the equilibrium and after 24 h the immobilized amount was 0.3 g per 1 g. A dissolution in vitro study was carried out, comparing the stability of formed interactions. The slowest dissolution was detected using non-modified MCM-41 and oxo modified material.

  14. Amoxicillin/Clavulanic Acid-Induced Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Aline; Azar, Marina; Khoueiry, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and Objective: Drug-induced thrombocytopenia is a common adverse effect reported in the literature. Typically patients present with a low platelet count with signs and symptoms ranging from bruising to bleeding, and major organ damage. Penicillin-induced thrombocytopenia previously reported in the literature is explained primarily through the hapten-dependent antibody process. The goal of this report is to present a case of an amoxicillin/clavulanic acid-induced thrombocytopenia. Case Presentation: A 23-year-old male presented to the emergency department with bruises on his arms and legs after completing a full course of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid of 625 mg twice a day for 5 days for tonsillitis. After several tests, the patient was diagnosed with thrombocytopenia induced by amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. The patient was treated with a corticosteroids taper regimen for 3 weeks. He was discharged after 3 days of inpatient treatment with instructions to avoid physical activity for 2 weeks. Two weeks post discharge, the follow-up showed that the platelet count had increased. Discussion: Penicillin-induced thrombocytopenia has been previously reported in the inpatient setting where bleeding was observed. However, the patient in this case report presented with bruises on his arms and legs. The diagnosis was made by the process of elimination; not all possible tests were conducted. The patient was prescribed corticosteroids that are not indicated for drug-induced thrombocytopenia. The Naranjo scale showed that this is a probable adverse event of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Conclusion: This is a unique case where amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was reported to be a probable cause of thrombocytopenia in an outpatient setting without signs of bleeding and without concomitant medications. PMID:25477568

  15. Effect of transdermic acetylsalicylic acid on hemostasis in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Adriana B; Funosas, Esteban; Maestri, Lorella; Lucena, Perla Hermida

    2007-01-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) exerts an antiaggregatory effect on platelets by irreversible inhibition of the enzyme thrombocyte cyclooxigenase when it is administered orally at doses above 80 mg/day. For several years ASA has been available as a solution that can be topically applied on the skin. It is widely used by athletes and individuals with chronic rheumatic disorders. However, it has not been established to date whether the plasma levels that result from these doses of ASA affect hemostasis during odontological procedures that involve bleeding, causing platelet dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether topical application is capable of affecting hemostasis. Three studies were conducted: A, B y C. Each of the 3 groups included 12 healthy volunteers of both sexes. The aim of study A was to evaluate if the formulation for topical application resulted in plasma levels of ASA that resembled those observed for the oral formulation and affect hemostasis. In experiment A, plasma levels of salicylic acid (SA) were assessed for each volunteer at 30 minutes, 60 minutes, 6 hours, 12 hours and 24 hours after oral administration of a dose of 500 mg ASA. Experiment B was identical to experiment A except for the fact that ASA was topically applied employing a commercial preparation Aspirub in a predetermined area at a rate of 2 ml/day over a period of 15 days. Experiment C was designed in the same way as experiment B, for a higher dose and a longer period of time (4 ml/day over a period of 30 days). One of the volunteers exhibited detectable salicylemia that could affect hemostasis as occurs with the oral formulation. The following two studies (C1 and C2) employed doses of Aspirub of 8 and 16 ml/day respectively, over a period of 30 days. We measured biochemical parameters associated to platelet function. The dose of 8 ml/day induced moderate alterations in all the parameters related to platelet function and the daily dose of 16 ml inhibited platelet

  16. Use of acetylsalicylic acid by physicians and in the community.

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, J; Steel, K; Feagan, B G; Laupacis, A; Pederson, L L

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine physicians' attitudes toward prescribing acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), physicians' own use of ASA and the prevalence of ASA use in the community following the trials of ASA for primary prevention of coronary heart disease. DESIGN: Random sample surveys of physicians and the general public by mail and telephone respectively and a mail survey of a selected panel of expert cardiologists and neurologists. SETTING: London, Ont., and surrounding Middlesex County. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 210 physicians (77% of eligible subjects), including family practitioners and most types of specialists, with an active medical licence and 666 English-speaking people (75% of eligible subjects) aged 18 years or more living in a household with active, listed telephone service. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Long-term ASA use (at least 80 mg on alternate days for 4 or more consecutive weeks) for the treatment of atherosclerosis. MAIN RESULTS: Sampled physicians and experts agreed that long-term ASA therapy was indicated in patients with unstable angina, a transient ischemic episode or recent myocardial infarction but not for primary prevention in healthy middle-aged men and women at low risk for ischemic vascular disease. Both groups were uncertain about the role of ASA in primary prevention in asymptomatic people with risk factors for atherosclerosis. Nine (16%) of the 55 male physicians aged 50 years or more took ASA routinely for primary prevention. In the community survey almost all those who used ASA routinely were 50 years or older. The proportions of men and women in this age group who used ASA routinely for any reason were 19% (95% confidence limits [CLs] 11 and 28) and 14% (95% CLs 8 and 19) respectively; the proportions of men and women who used ASA routinely and apparently for primary prevention were 8% and 1% respectively. A total of 43% (95% CLs 30 and 57) of those with apparent ischemic vascular disease took ASA routinely. Medically unsupervised long-term ASA

  17. Endoscopic evaluation of the comparative effects of acetylsalicylic acid and choline magnesium trisalicylate on human gastric and duodenal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kilander, A; Dotevall, G

    1983-02-01

    A new salicylate product, choline magnesium trisalicylate (Trilisate tablets), and acetylsalicylic acid were compared for their local effects in equipotent doses on the gastroduodenal mucosa in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study, using 10 healthy volunteers. After five-day periods of administration, gastroduodenoscopy was performed and photographs were obtained. All subjects given acetylsalicylic acid developed multiple mucosal lesions, but in only four subjects given choline magnesium trisalicylate were slight mucosal changes noted. Mean serum salicylate levels were similar in the two groups. Our data suggest that the risk of developing mucosal lesions is much less during treatment with choline magnesium trisalicylate than with acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:6337663

  18. Acetylsalicylic Acid Compared to Placebo in Treating High-Risk Patients With Subsolid Lung Nodules | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase II trial studies acetylsalicylic acid compared to placebo in treating high-risk patients with subsolid lung nodules. A nodule is a growth or lump that may be malignant (cancer) or benign (not cancer). Chemoprevention is the use of drugs to keep cancer from forming or coming back. The use of acetylsalicylic acid may keep cancer from forming in patients with subsolid lung nodules. |

  19. Icariin, a major constituent from Epimedium brevicornum, attenuates ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zong, Nan; Li, Fei; Deng, Yuanyuan; Shi, Jingshan; Jin, Feng; Gong, Qihai

    2016-10-15

    Excitotoxicity is one of the most extensively studied causes of neuronal death and plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Icariin is a flavonoid component of a traditional Chinese medicine reported to possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of icariin against learning and memory impairment induced by excitotoxicity. Here, we demonstrated that rats receiving intracerebroventricular injection of excitatory neurotoxin ibotenic acid exhibited impaired learning and memory. Oral administration of icariin at doses of 20 and 40mg/kg rescued behavioral performance and protected against neurotoxicity in rat hippocampus by suppressing ibotenic acid induced pro-apoptosis. Furthermore, Western blott of hippocampal specimens revealed that icariin up-regulated the expression of calbindin-D28k protein following ibotenic acid administration. Additionally, icariin inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family phosphorylation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling, implicating the MAPK signaling and NF-κB signaling pathways were involved in the mechanism underlying icariin-mediated neuroprotection against ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity. These data suggested that icariin could be a potential agent for treatment of excitotoxicity-related diseases, including AD. PMID:27368415

  20. [Acetylsalicylic acid desensitization in the new era of percutaneous coronary intervention].

    PubMed

    Fuertes Ferre, Georgina; Ferrer Gracia, Maria Cruz; Calvo Cebollero, Isabel

    2015-09-21

    Dual antiplatelet therapy is essential in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation. Hypersensitivity to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) limits treatment options. Desensitization to ASA has classically been studied in patients with respiratory tract disease. Over the last years, many protocols have been described about ASA desensitization in patients with ischemic heart disease, including acute coronary syndrome and the need for coronary stent implantation. It is important to know the efficacy and safety of ASA desensitization in these patients. PMID:25577589

  1. Determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its major metabolites in bovine urine using ultra performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Castillo-García, M L; Aguilar-Caballos, M P; Gómez-Hens, A

    2015-03-15

    A new method based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with photometric and fluorometric detection for the determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its main metabolites, namely gentisic, salicylic and salicyluric acids, in bovine urine samples is reported. Photometric detection was used for acetylsalicylic acid determination, whereas the native fluorescence of the metabolites was monitored using fluorometric detection. The separation was performed under isocratic conditions, using acetonitrile-phosphate solution (3.5mM, pH 3.5) (26:74, v/v) as the mobile phase. The retention times of the four compounds were lower than 2min, which are shorter than those achieved using conventional HPLC. Under the optimum separation conditions, the dynamic ranges and detection limits (ngmL(-1)) were: 0.2-2500, 0.09 for gentisic acid; 0.2-2500, 0.08 for salicylic acid and 2.5-15,000, 1.1 for salicyluric acid, using fluorescence detection, and 10-25,000, 2.2 for acetylsalicylic acid, using UV detection. Intra-day and inter-day precision data were assessed at two levels of concentration of each analyte using both detection systems. The selectivity of the method was checked by assaying different drugs of veterinary use showing that most of them did not interfere with the determination of the analytes. The method has been applied to the analysis of bovine urine samples, which only required a simple clean up step of the samples prior to injection in the UPLC system. A recovery study was performed, which provided values in the range of 80-100%. This fact proves the practical usefulness of this method as an ultrafast analytical tool for the therapeutic control of acetylsalicylic acid administration in bovine animals intended for food production. PMID:25660719

  2. [Antithrombotic therapy after myocardial infarction: arguments for the use of acetylsalicylic acid and coumarin derivatives].

    PubMed

    Waskowsky, W M; Brouwer, A; Verheugt, F W A

    2005-01-01

    Patients who survived myocardial infarction and who are being treated with the current optimal therapy (antithrombotics, statins and beta-blockers), have a 10-20% chance of death, re-infarction and stroke within in the first year. A possible explanation for this could be an increased activation and generation ofthrombin for at least 6 months following the cardiovascular event preceding preventative therapy. Acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel do not affect activation by thrombin of the platelet aggregation and the clotting cascade. The additional use of cumarin derivatives could therefore reduce the chance of recurring thrombotic events, and subsequently improve prognosis. Since the nineteen-nineties several randomised trials have been conducted to study the clinical relevance ofcumarin derivatives both with and without acetylsalicylic acid, in patients who had had a myocardial infarction. The conclusions of these studies were not unambiguous. If the international normalized ratio (INR) was kept > 2 for a long period, by means of frequent check-ups and effective dosage adjustment, the chance of death, recurrent myocardial infarction or stroke was 30-50% lower than when acetylsalicylic acid only was used. The risk of bleeding was raised by 2-4 times, but there were no life-threatening episodes of bleeding. In view of the recent development of anticoagulant agents, for which monitoring seems to be becoming unnecessary, identification of patients who would benefit most from a combined antithrombotic strategy is warranted. PMID:15688836

  3. Determination of acetylsalicylic acid in commercial tablets by SERS using silver nanoparticle-coated filter paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallum, Loriz Francisco; Soares, Frederico Luis Felipe; Ardila, Jorge Armando; Carneiro, Renato Lajarim

    2014-12-01

    In this work, filter paper was used as a low cost substrate for silver nanoparticles in order to perform the detection and quantification of acetylsalicylic acid by SERS in a commercial tablet. The reaction conditions were 150 mM of ammonium hydroxide, 50 mM of silver nitrate, 500 mM of glucose, 12 min of the reaction time, 45 °C temperature, pretreatment with ammonium hydroxide and quantitative filter paper (1-2 μm). The average size of silver nanoparticles deposited on the paper substrate was 180 nm. Adsorption time of acetylsalicylic acid on the surface of the silver-coated filter paper was studied and an adsorption time of 80 min was used to build the analytical curve. It was possible to obtain a calibration curve with good precision with a coefficient of determination of 0.933. The method proposed in this work was capable to quantify acetylsalicylic acid in commercial tablets, at low concentration levels, with relative error of 2.06% compared to the HPLC. The preparation of filter paper coated with silver nanoparticles using Tollen's reagent presents several advantages such as low cost of synthesis, support and reagents; minimum amount of residuals, which are easily treated, despite the SERS spectroscopy presenting fast analysis, with low sample preparation and low amount of reactants as in HPLC analysis.

  4. DFT studies on the vibrational and electronic spectra of acetylsalicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yunfeng; Tang, Guodong; Han, Yonghong; Culnane, Lance F.; Zhao, Jianyin; Zhang, Yu

    2016-05-01

    The following is a theoretical and experimental study on the vibrational and electronic properties of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Vibrational information was obtained by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy which agree well with harmonic vibrational frequency calculations. The calculations were carried out using density functional theory B3LYP methods with 6-311G** and LANL2DZ basis sets. The vibrational assignments were calculated by Gaussview. Absorption UV-Vis experiments of ASA reveal three maximum peaks at 203, 224 and 277 nm, which are in agreement with calculated electronic transitions using TD-B3LYP/6-311G**.

  5. IR spectroscopic investigation of the inhibition of the glycation process by acetylsalicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero de Joshi, Virginia; Gil, Herminia; Contreras, Silvia; Velasquez, William; Joshi, Narahari V.

    2000-05-01

    An IR spectroscopic study was carried out at room temperature for Human Serum albumin (HSA) glycated with fructose and glucose and inhibited with acetylsalicylic acid. The glycation process was carried out in our laboratory by a conventional method to confirm earlier reported observation of the effect of glycation on the intensity variation of the IR spectra, particularly, in the range 1500 cm-1 to 1700 cm-1 and around 3300 cm-1. IR spectra reveal that the effects of glycation of HSA by fructose are more intense than with glucose, which is the expected. Bovine serum albumin was also glycated using Glucose-6-phosphate disodium salt, and gamma-globulin was glycate with glucose, As expected, the glycation process was more intense with glucose-t-phosphate disodium salt. Acetyl salicylic acid was also used and its inhibitor effects could be observed in both cases, with glucose and with glucose-6-phosphate disodium salt even though, to a smaller extent with the latter. This is consistent with the earlier data and is explained on the basis of the attachment of macromolecules to (epsilon) -NH2 groups of lysines. The experimental results confirm that acetylsalicylic acid, indeed, acts as an inhibitor by acetylation of the (epsilon) -NG2 group where the sugars are supposed to be attached.

  6. Quantitative determination of acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen in tablets by FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Szostak, Roman; Mazurek, Sylwester

    2002-01-01

    A procedure for quantitative determination of acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen in pharmaceuticals by PLS (partial least squares) and PCR (principal component regression) treatment of FT (Fourier transform)-Raman spectroscopic data is proposed. The proposed method was tested on powdered samples. Three chemometric models were built: the first, for samples consisting of an active substance diluted by lactose, starch and talc; the second, in which a simple inorganic salt was applied as an internal standard and additions were not taken into account; and the third, in which a model was constructed for a commercial pharmaceutical, where all constituents of the tablet were known. By utilising selected spectral ranges and by changing the chemometric conditions it is possible to carry out fast and precise analysis of the active component content in medicines on the basis of the simplified chemometric models. The proposed method was tested on five commercial tablets. The results were compared with data obtained by intensity ratio and pharmacopoeial methods. To appraise the quality of the models, the relative standard error of predictions (RSEPs) were calculated for calibration and prediction data sets. These were 0.7-2.0% and 0.8-2.3%, respectively, for the different PLS models. Application of these models to the Raman spectra of commercial tablets containing acetylsalicylic acid gave RSEP values of 1.3-2.0% and a mean accuracy of 1.2-1.7% with a standard deviation of 0.6-1.2%. PMID:11827382

  7. Numerical simulation of the solvate structures of acetylsalicylic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide containing polar co-solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, V. E.; Antipova, M. L.; Gurina, D. L.; Odintsova, E. G.; Kumeev, R. S.; Golubev, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen-bonded complexes of acetylsalicylic acid with polar co-solvents in supercritical carbon dioxide, modified by methanol, ethanol, and acetone of 0.03 mole fraction concentration, are studied by numerical methods of classical molecular dynamics simulation and quantum chemical calculations. The structure, energy of formation, and lifetime of hydrogen-bonded complexes are determined, along with their temperature dependences (from 318 to 388 K at constant density of 0.7 g cm-3). It is shown that the hydrogen bonds between acetylsalicylic acid and methanol are most stable at 318 K and are characterized by the highest value of absolute energy. At higher supercritical temperatures, however, the longest lifetime is observed for acetylsalicylic acid-ethanol complexes. These results correlate with the known literature experimental data showing that the maximum solubility of acetylsalicylic acid at density values close to those considered in this work and at temperatures of 318 and 328 K is achieved when using methanol and ethanol as co-solvents, respectively.

  8. Identification and Quantitative Analysis of Acetaminophen, Acetylsalicylic Acid, and Caffeine in Commercial Analgesic Tablets by LC-MS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenk, Christopher J.; Hickman, Nicole M.; Fincke, Melissa A.; Motry, Douglas H.; Lavine, Barry

    2010-01-01

    An undergraduate LC-MS experiment is described for the identification and quantitative determination of acetaminophen, acetylsalicylic acid, and caffeine in commercial analgesic tablets. This inquiry-based experimental procedure requires minimal sample preparation and provides good analytical results. Students are provided sufficient background…

  9. Enteric coating can lead to reduced antiplatelet effect of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Haastrup, Peter Fentz; Grønlykke, Thor; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg

    2015-03-01

    Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is widely used as antithrombotic prophylaxis. Enteric-coated ASA has been developed to decrease the risk of gastrointestinal side effects. The consequences of enteric coating on pharmacokinetics and antiplatelet effect of ASA have not systematically been assessed. This MiniReview demonstrates that data from clinical trials indicate that enteric coating can reduce the antiplatelet effect of ASA compared to plain ASA. This is possibly due to decreased bioavailability of ASA caused by prolonged solvation and absorption of the enteric-coated formulations. Therefore, low-dose enteric-coated ASA might not be bioequivalent to plain ASA, entailing the risk of insufficient cardiovascular prophylaxis. PMID:25469781

  10. Acetylsalicylic-acid-containing drugs and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs available in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Brigden, M; Smith, R E

    1997-01-01

    A large number of drugs containing acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are available by prescription and over the counter in Canada. The possibility of serious side effects and drug interactions is therefore high. The authors have compiled a comprehensive list of products containing these drugs from information supplied by pharmaceutical databases, independent marketing researchers and Health Canada's Drug Directorate. Physicians should ensure that additional ASA-containing drugs or NSAIDs are not inadvertently taken by patients, especially those receiving oral anticoagulant therapy or those with a qualitative platelet defect. Patients at risk should be cautioned to check with their physician before taking any new medication, even over-the-counter products. PMID:9099173

  11. Quality and antioxidant properties on sweet cherries as affected by preharvest salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids treatments.

    PubMed

    Giménez, María José; Valverde, Juan Miguel; Valero, Daniel; Guillén, Fabián; Martínez-Romero, Domingo; Serrano, María; Castillo, Salvador

    2014-10-01

    The effects of salicylic acid (SA) or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) treatments during on-tree cherry growth and ripening on fruit quality attributes, especially those related with the content on bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity were analysed in this research. For this purpose, two sweet cherry cultivars, 'Sweet Heart' and 'Sweet Late', were used and SA or ASA treatments, at 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0mM concentrations, were applied at three key points of fruit development (pit hardening, initial colour changes and onset of ripening). These treatments increased fruit weight and ameliorated quality attributes at commercial harvest, and led to cherries with higher concentration in total phenolics and in total anthocyanins, as well as higher antioxidant activity, in both hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions. Thus, preharvest treatments with SA or ASA could be promising tools to improve sweet cherry quality and health beneficial effects for consumers. PMID:24799232

  12. Voltammetric determination of salicylic acid in pharmaceuticals formulations of acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Torriero, Angel A J; Luco, Juan M; Sereno, Leonides; Raba, Julio

    2004-02-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of salicylic acid (SA) has been studied on a glassy carbon electrode using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) method. SA gives a single irreversible oxidation wave over the wide pH range studied. The irreversibility of the electrode process was verified by different criteria. The mechanism of oxidation is discussed. Using differential pulse voltammetry, SA yielded a well-defined voltammetric response in Britton-Robinson buffer solution, pH 2.37 at 1.088V (versus Ag/AgCl). The method was linear over the SA concentration range: 1-60mugml(-1). The method was successfully applied for the analysis of SA as a hydrolysis product, in solid pharmaceutical formulations containing acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). PMID:18969288

  13. The absorption of acetylsalicylic acid from the stomach in relation to intragastric pH.

    PubMed

    Dotevall, G; Ekenved, G

    1976-01-01

    A comparative study on the effect of a buffered (pH 6.5) and an unbuffered (pH 2.9) solution of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on gastric pH, gastric emptying, and gastric absorption of ASA was performed in 10 healthy volunteers. Gastric pH was recorded using radiotelemetry. Gastric emptying and gastric absorption was studied with an aspiration technique and phenol red as nonabsorbable marker. Administration of the unbuffered solution to the fasting subjects resulted in a gastric pH of about 2 and absorption of ASA from the stomach was found to occur. The buffered solution of ASA increased gastric pH to above 5 and gastric absorption of ASA was found to be significantly less than after the unbuffered solution. The buffered solution was emptied from the stomach more rapidly than the unbuffered one. PMID:12558

  14. Controlled release of acetylsalicylic acid from polythiophene/carrageenan hydrogel via electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pairatwachapun, Sanita; Paradee, Nophawan; Sirivat, Anuvat

    2016-02-10

    Blends between polythiophene (PTh) and a carrageenan hydrogel were fabricated as the matrix for the electric field assisted drug release. The pristine carrageenan and the blend films were prepared by the solution casting using acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) as the anionic model drug and Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Ba(2+) as the crosslinking agents. The ASA was released by the Fickian diffusion mechanism. The diffusion coefficient decreased with increasing crosslinking ratio or decreasing crosslinking ionic radii. The diffusion coefficients were greater with the applied electrical potentials by an order of magnitude relative to those without electric field. Moreover, the diffusion coefficients with PTh as the drug carrier were higher than those without PTh. Thus, the presence of the conductive polymer in the hydrogel blend coupled with applied electric field is shown here to drastically enhance the drug delivery rate. PMID:26686123

  15. Copper(II) interactions with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents. I. Salicylic acid and acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Brumas, V; Brumas, B; Berthon, G

    1995-02-15

    Recently a growing body of evidence has accumulated on the beneficial effects of copper compounds toward various models of inflammation, and copper complexes of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to be more effective in this respect than the parent agents. However, the origin of this activity remains unclear: The ability of NSAIDs to influence copper metabolism is still questionable, and apart from the claimed SOD-like activity of copper salts in vivo, relatively little is known about how copper-NSAID interactions may help regulate the inflammatory process. Before the potential role of copper-NSAID complexes versus inflammation can be elucidated, speciation studies are necessary (i) to analyze the overall influence of these drugs on copper metabolism and (ii) to discriminate the individual complexes likely to represent the active form of the drug in vivo. In this paper, copper(II) complex equilibria with salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids--and benzoic acid used as a reference--as well as the mixed-ligand complex equilibria generated by these binary systems and L-histidine [main low-molar-mass ligand of copper(II) in blood plasma] have been investigated under physiological conditions (37 degrees C; 0.15-M NaCl). Confirming previous observations by others, resulting simulated plasma copper distributions virtually rule out any quantitative influence of salicylate on copper tissue diffusion at therapeutic levels. Even though, as is presently shown, both salicylate and acetylsalicylate may favor the gastrointestinal absorption of copper, it seems unlikely that salicylate can exert its antinflammatory activity predominantly through copper complexation. The assertion that copper-NSAID complexes represent the active forms of NSAIDs therefore seems to be of limited significance for salicylate. PMID:7876837

  16. [Absolute bioavailability of a special sustained-release acetylsalicylic acid formulation].

    PubMed

    Lücker, P W; Swoboda, M; Wetzelsberger, N

    1989-03-01

    Absolute Bioavailability of a Special Acetylsalicylic Acid Sustained Release Formulation. The absolute bioavailability of an acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) sustained release formulation (Contrheuma retard), containing 300 mg ASA as initial dose and 350 mg in a retard formulation, was determined in comparison to a standard ASA solution for intravenous administration in a two-treatment, two-period cross-over trial with 6 healthy male volunteers by comparing the areas under the plasma-fluctuation-time curves of the primary metabolite. In addition, it was examined by comparison of the mean times after administration of both formulations, whether the test formulation meets the requirements of a sustained release formulation. The investigations led to the following results: The absolute bioavailability of the test formulation was 95%. The statistical comparison of the areas under the concentration-time courses allowed no decision (neither for equivalence nor difference). The maximal concentration of SA after intravenous administration of the standard formulation was reached after 0.4 h on an average and amounted to 62 micrograms/ml. After oral administration of the test formulation, a mean concentration maximum of 28 micrograms/ml was calculated, which had been reached after about 2 h. The differences are statistically significant. The mean time for SA was 6 h after the standard formulation, whereas after administration of the test compound, a mean of 11.5 h was calculated. 24 h following administration, the concentration of SA was 1.3 micrograms/ml after intravenous administration of the standard formulation and 5.5 micrograms/ml after administration of the test formulation. These differences, too, are statistically significant. From the comparison of the mean time for SA, a retard factor of 1.9 was calculated. PMID:2757664

  17. [Chronic refractory pain in cancer patients. Value of the spinal injection of lysine acetylsalicylate. 60 cases].

    PubMed

    Pellerin, M; Hardy, F; Abergel, A; Boule, D; Palacci, J H; Babinet, P; Wingtin, L N; Glowinski, J; Amiot, J F; Mechali, D

    1987-09-19

    Several animal studies have demonstrated that pain is modulated by spinal mechanisms involving prostaglandins and that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administered intrathecally has an analgesic effect. We report our experience of this treatment in 60 patients with proven and advanced cancer. An isobaric solution of lysine acetylsalicylate was administered by lumbar puncture in doses ranging from 120 to 720 mg of ASA. The results were evaluated using the habitual criteria: scoring system, behaviour, consumption of analgesic drugs. In this trial the method proved astonishingly effective (78% of the cases). Analgesia was strong, almost immediate and without influence on motricity. No thermic or neurovegetative changes were noted. The effect of one injection lasted from 3 weeks to 1 month on average; it was reproduced and often more prolonged after a repeat injection. Pain associated with bone metastases seems to constitute the best indication, notably in breast and lung cancer and in myeloma. Visceral (pancreas) or neural pain requires higher doses to respond. Failures (22%) were due to such factors as insufficient dosage at the very beginning of our experience or severe depressive syndrome. The perineal and sphincteral pain of rectal cancer often resists treatment. This simple, inexpensive and very effective method with no other complication than a frequent tendency to fatigue should rank among other analgesic measures in cancer. The lack of respiratory depression is a major advantage over catheter spinal opiate analgesia. We consider that its main indications are pain associated with osteolytic metastases of adenocarcinomas, and myelomas. Owing to the absence of formal toxicological data, its use must be limited to cancer pain and to patients with a life expectancy of less than 2 years. PMID:2957675

  18. γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid-Induced Electrographic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Joseph; Lucey, Brendan P.; Duntley, Stephen P.; Darken, Rachel S.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of absence-like electrographic seizures during NREM sleep in a patient who was taking sodium oxybate, a sodium salt of γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). An overnight full montage electroencephalography (EEG) study revealed numerous frontally predominant rhythmic 1.5-2 Hz sharp waves and spike-wave activity during stage N2 and N3 sleep at the peak dose time for sodium oxybate, resembling atypical absence-like electrographic seizures. The patient was later weaned off sodium oxybate, and a repeat study did not show any such electrographic seizures. Absence-like seizures induced by GHB had previously been described in experimental animal models. We present the first reported human case of absence-like electrographic seizure associated with sodium oxybate. Citation: Cheung J, Lucey BP, Duntley SP, Darken RS. γ-hydroxybutyric acid-induced electrographic seizures. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(7):811-812. PMID:25024661

  19. [Sunitinib and zoledronic acid induced osteonecrosis of the jaw].

    PubMed

    Soós, Balázs; Vajta, László; Szalma, József

    2015-11-15

    The tendency for bisphosphonate and non-bisphosphonate (eg.: antiresorptive or anti-angiogenesis drugs) induced osteonecrosis is increasing. Treatment of these patients is a challenge both for dentists and for oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Cooperation with the drug prescribing general medicine colleagues to prevent osteonecrosis is extremely important. Furthermore, prevention should include dental focus elimination, oral hygienic instructions and education, dental follow-up and, in case of manifest necrosis, referral to maxillofacial departments. Authors outline the difficulties of conservative and surgical treatment of a patient with sunitinib and zoledronic acid induced osteonecrosis. The patient became symptomless and the operated area healed entirely six and twelve months postoperatively. A long term success further follow-up is necessary to verify long-term success. PMID:26548471

  20. Increased isoprostane levels in oleic acid-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Koichi; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Tsushima, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yokoyama, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Rikimaru; Obata, Toru

    2009-10-16

    The present study was performed to examine a role of oxidative stress in oleic acid-induced lung injury model. Fifteen anesthetized sheep were ventilated and instrumented with a lung lymph fistula and vascular catheters for blood gas analysis and measurement of isoprostanes (8-epi prostaglandin F2{alpha}). Following stable baseline measurements, oleic acid (0.08 ml/kg) was administered and observed 4 h. Isoprostane was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with the isotope dilution method. Isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph were significantly increased 2 h after oleic acid administration and then decreased at 4 h. The percent increases in isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph at 2 h were significantly correlated with deteriorated oxygenation at the same time point, respectively. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of the pulmonary fat embolism-induced acute lung injury model in sheep and that the increase relates with the deteriorated oxygenation.

  1. [Pharmacokinetics after oral and intravenous administration of d,l-monolysine acetylsalicylate and an oral dose of acetylsalicylic acid in healthy volunteers].

    PubMed

    Raschka, C; Koch, H J

    2001-01-01

    We studied the ASA pharmacokinetics of single doses of 500 mg and 1000 mg of D,L-lysine-monoacetylsalicylate (Lys-ASA) administered both orally (Delgesic) and 500 mg parenterally (Aspisol) as well as 500 mg acetylsalicylate (ASA, Aspirin) in 13 healthy volunteers. Blood samples were taken before and at defined times up to 48 h after application of Lys-ASA and ASA. Analysis for ASA and its metabolite salicylic acid were performed by HPLC. All concentration versus time data were presented descriptively. As far as ASA was concerned, differences were assessed by means of ANOVA according to Friedman including post hoc Wilcoxon tests for each time point. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated based on a one-compartment model. The concentration vs. time curves after oral intake of 500 mg of ASA and Lys-ASA differed significantly (p < 0.001). Peak serum ASA concentrations (Cmax) were 6.8 mg/l for oral Lys-ASA and 2.7 mg/l for ASA per os. The corresponding tmax-values were 14.2 and 38.0 min. Absolute bioavailabilities for 500 mg doses were 75.4 and 63.4 pour cent, respectively. After intake of 100 mg and 1000 mg oral doses of Lys-ASA Cmax was 2.7 mg/l and 15.9 mg/l, tmax being 14.2 min for the 1000 mg dose. The shortest half-life was found after i.v. injection with 7.5 min. Metabolism was fast with maximum rise of salicylic acid concentration after injection of Lys-ASS. We conclude that concerning time dimension oral administration of Lys-ASA is almost equivalent to i.v. Lys-ASA and may be an alternative for i.v. administration in cases of acute heart attacks. PMID:11878089

  2. Effect of tocopherol and acetylsalicylic acid on the biochemical indices of blood in dioxin-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Rosińczuk, Joanna; Całkosiński, Ireneusz

    2015-07-01

    New sources of dioxins and increased dioxin concentrations in the environment, coupled with their increased bioavailability along the food chain and accumulation in adipose tissues, contribute to various adverse long-term biological effects. The purpose of the study was to determine whether tocopherol protects the CNS by decreasing the pro-inflammatory influence of free radicals generated by TCDD; whether acetylsalicylic acid inhibits the production of inflammatory mediators; and whether the combined administration of tocopherol and acetylsalicylic acid to TCDD-exposed rats has a potential CNS-protective effect. The study included 117 rats divided into 8 groups: 75 female and 12 male Buffalo rats aged 8-10 weeks, weighing 140-160 g; as well as 30 female rats aged 6 weeks and weighing 120 g, which were the offspring of females from each study group. In the experiment, the following substances were used: 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), dosed at 5 μg/kg BW and 12.5 μg/kg BW, diluted in a 1% DMSO solution at the concentration of 1 μg/ml; α-tocopherol acetate, dosed at 30 mg/kg BW, in 0.2 ml of oil solution; and acetylsalicylic acid, 50mg/kg BW, suspended in 0.5 ml of starch solution, administered orally using a feeding tube. Pleurisy was induced by an injection of 0.15 ml of 1% carrageenin solution. The use of tocopherol reduces the adverse effects of the inflammatory reaction induced by TCDD. Administering tocopherol improves protein metabolism by reducing protein catabolism, and raises γ-globulin fraction levels. Combined acetylsalicylic acid and tocopherol suppress catabolic processes accompanying inflammation. PMID:26056971

  3. Anchoring of both PKA-RIIα and 14-3-3θ regulates retinoic acid induced 16 mediated phosphorylation of heat shock protein 70

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hai-Lin; Zhu, Shi-Ying; Zhao, Lan-Juan; Ren, Hao; Zhao, Ping; Qi, Zhong-Tian; Wang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study reported that retinoic acid induced 16 (RAI16) could enhance tumorigenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the cellular functions of RAI16 are still unclear. In this study, by immunoprecipitation and tandem (MS/MS) mass spectrometry analysis, we identified that RAI16 interacted with the type II regulatory subunit of PKA (PKA-RIIα), acting as a novel protein kinase A anchoring protein (AKAP). In addition, RAI16 also interacted with heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and 14-3-3θ. Further studies indicated that RAI16 mediated PKA phosphorylation of HSP70 at serine 486, resulting in anti-apoptosis events. RAI16 was also phosphorylated by the anchored PKA at serine 325, which promoted the recruitment of 14-3-3θ, which, in turn, inhibited RAI16 mediated PKA phosphorylation of HSP70. These findings offer mechanism insight into RAI16 mediated anti-apoptosis signaling in HCC. PMID:25900241

  4. Computerized image analysis for acetic acid induced intraepithelial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Ferris, Daron G.; Lieberman, Rich W.

    2008-03-01

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) exhibits certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Immature and dysphasic cervical squamous epithelium turns white after application of acetic acid during the exam. The whitening process occurs visually over several minutes and subjectively discriminates between dysphasic and normal tissue. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician analyzing the acetic acid induced lesions (acetowhite region) in a fully automatic way. This paper reports a study designed to measure multiple parameters of the acetowhitening process from two images captured with a digital colposcope. One image is captured before the acetic acid application, and the other is captured after the acetic acid application. The spatial change of the acetowhitening is extracted using color and texture information in the post acetic acid image; the temporal change is extracted from the intensity and color changes between the post acetic acid and pre acetic acid images with an automatic alignment. The imaging and data analysis system has been evaluated with a total of 99 human subjects and demonstrate its potential to screening underserved women where access to skilled colposcopists is limited.

  5. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products. PMID:25300299

  6. The cumulus cell layer protects the bovine maturing oocyte against fatty acid-induced lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lolicato, Francesca; Brouwers, Jos F; de Lest, Chris H A van; Wubbolts, Richard; Aardema, Hilde; Priore, Paola; Roelen, Bernard A J; Helms, J Bernd; Gadella, Bart M

    2015-01-01

    Mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue during metabolic stress increases the amount of free fatty acids in blood and follicular fluid and is associated with impaired female fertility. In a previous report, we described the effects of the three predominant fatty acids in follicular fluid (saturated palmitate and stearate and unsaturated oleate) on oocyte maturation and quality. In the current study, the effects of elevated fatty acid levels on cumulus cells were investigated. In a dose-dependent manner, the three fatty acids induced lipid storage in cumulus cells accompanied by an enhanced immune labeling of perilipin-2, a marker for lipid droplets. Lipidomic analysis confirmed incorporation of the administered fatty acids into triglyceride, resulting in a 3- to 6-fold increase of triglyceride content. In addition, palmitate selectively induced ceramide formation, which has been implicated in apoptosis. Indeed, of the three fatty acids tested, palmitate induced reactive oxygen species formation, caspase 3 activation, and mitochondria deterioration, leading to degeneration of the cumulus cell layers. This effect could be mimicked by addition of the ceramide-C2 analog and could be inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin-B1. Interfering with the intactness of the cumulus cell layers, either by mechanical force or by palmitate treatment, resulted in enhanced uptake of lipids in the oocyte and increased radical formation. Our results show that cumulus cells act as a barrier, protecting oocytes from in vitro induced lipotoxic effects. We suggest that this protective function of the cumulus cell layers is important for the developmental competence of the oocyte. The relevance of our findings for assisted reproduction technologies is discussed. PMID:25297544

  7. A dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase protects against kainic acid-induced brain injury.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Marini, Herbert; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Bitto, Alessandra; Irrera, Natasha; Pizzino, Gabriele; Pallio, Giovanni; Calò, Margherita; Adamo, Elena Bianca; Trichilo, Vincenzo; Interdonato, Monica; Galfo, Federica; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2015-06-01

    Systemic administration of kainic acid causes inflammation and apoptosis in the brain, resulting in neuronal loss. Dual cyclooxygenase/5-lipoxygenase (COX/5-LOX) inhibitors could represent a possible neuroprotective approach in preventing glutamate excitotoxicity. Consequently, we investigated the effects of a dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX following intraperitoneal administration of kainic acid (KA, 10 mg/kg) in rats. Animals were randomized to receive either the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX (flavocoxid, 20 mg/kg i.p.) or its vehicle (1 ml/kg i.p.) 30 min after KA administration. Sham brain injury rats were used as controls. We evaluated protein expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK1/2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as well as levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in the hippocampus. Animals were also observed for monitoring behavioral changes according to Racine Scale. Finally, histological analysis and brain edema evaluation were carried out. Treatment with the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX decreased protein expression of p-ERK1/2 and TNF-α in hippocampus, markedly reduced MDA, LTB4 and PGE2 hippocampal levels, and also ameliorated brain edema. Histological analysis showed a reduction in cell damage in rats treated with the dual inhibitor of COX/5-LOX, particularly in hippocampal subregion CA3c. Moreover, flavocoxid significantly improved behavioral signs following kainic acid administration. Our results suggest that dual inhibition of COX/5-LOX by flavocoxid has neuroprotective effects during kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity. PMID:25893744

  8. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    SciTech Connect

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  9. OSTEOCYTE APOPTOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Jilka, Robert L.; Noble, Brendon; Weinstein, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Apoptotic death of osteocytes was recognized over 15 years ago, but its significance for bone homeostasis has remained elusive. A new paradigm has emerged that invokes osteocyte apoptosis as a critical event in the recruitment of osteoclasts to a specific site in response to skeletal unloading, fatigue damage, estrogen deficiency and perhaps in other states where bone must be removed. This is accomplished by yet to be defined signals emanating from dying osteocytes, which stimulate neighboring viable osteocytes to produce osteoclastogenic cytokines. The osteocyte apoptosis caused by chronic glucocorticoid administration does not increase osteoclasts; however, it does negatively impact maintenance of bone hydration, vascularity, and strength. PMID:23238124

  10. Local sustained delivery of acetylsalicylic acid via hybrid stent with biodegradable nanofibers reduces adhesion of blood cells and promotes reendothelialization of the denuded artery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Hung; Lin, Yu-Huang; Chang, Shang-Hung; Tai, Chun-Der; Liu, Shih-Jung; Chu, Yen; Wang, Chao-Jan; Hsu, Ming-Yi; Chang, Hung; Chang, Gwo-Jyh; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Hsieh, Ming-Jer; Lin, Fen-Chiung; Hsieh, I-Chang; Wen, Ming-Shien; Huang, Yenlin

    2014-01-01

    Incomplete endothelialization, blood cell adhesion to vascular stents, and inflammation of arteries can result in acute stent thromboses. The systemic administration of acetylsalicylic acid decreases endothelial dysfunction, potentially reducing thrombus, enhancing vasodilatation, and inhibiting the progression of atherosclerosis; but, this is weakened by upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This study proposes a hybrid stent with biodegradable nanofibers, for the local, sustained delivery of acetylsalicylic acid to injured artery walls. Biodegradable nanofibers are prepared by first dissolving poly(D,L)-lactide-co-glycolide and acetylsalicylic acid in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol. The solution is then electrospun into nanofibrous tubes, which are then mounted onto commercially available bare-metal stents. In vitro release rates of pharmaceuticals from nanofibers are characterized using an elution method, and a highperformance liquid chromatography assay. The experimental results suggest that biodegradable nanofibers release high concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid for three weeks. The in vivo efficacy of local delivery of acetylsalicylic acid in reducing platelet and monocyte adhesion, and the minimum tissue inflammatory reaction caused by the hybrid stents in treating denuded rabbit arteries, are documented. The proposed hybrid stent, with biodegradable acetylsalicylic acid-loaded nanofibers, substantially contributed to local, sustained delivery of drugs to promote re-endothelialization and reduce thrombogenicity in the injured artery. The stents may have potential applications in the local delivery of cardiovascular drugs. Furthermore, the use of hybrid stents with acetylsalicylic acid-loaded nanofibers that have high drug loadings may provide insight into the treatment of patients with high risk of acute stent thromboses. PMID:24421640

  11. Platelets induce apoptosis via membrane-bound FasL

    PubMed Central

    Schleicher, Rebecca I.; Reichenbach, Frank; Kraft, Peter; Kumar, Anil; Lescan, Mario; Todt, Franziska; Göbel, Kerstin; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Geisler, Tobias; Bauer, Axel; Olbrich, Marcus; Schaller, Martin; Wesselborg, Sebastian; O’Reilly, Lorraine; Meuth, Sven G.; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Gawaz, Meinrad; Li, Xuri; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Edlich, Frank

    2015-01-01

    After tissue injury, both wound sealing and apoptosis contribute to restoration of tissue integrity and functionality. Although the role of platelets (PLTs) for wound closure and induction of regenerative processes is well established, the knowledge about their contribution to apoptosis is incomplete. Here, we show that PLTs present the death receptor Fas ligand (FasL) on their surface after activation. Activated PLTs as well as the isolated membrane fraction of activated PLTs but not of resting PLTs induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in primary murine neuronal cells, human neuroblastoma cells, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Membrane protein from PLTs lacking membrane-bound FasL (FasL△m/△m) failed to induce apoptosis. Bax/Bak-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis signaling in target cells was not required for PLT-induced cell death, but increased the apoptotic response to PLT-induced Fas signaling. In vivo, PLT depletion significantly reduced apoptosis in a stroke model and an inflammation-independent model of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-induced retinal apoptosis. Furthermore, experiments using PLT-specific PF4Cre+ FasLfl/fl mice demonstrated a role of PLT-derived FasL for tissue apoptosis. Because apoptosis secondary to injury prevents inflammation, our findings describe a novel mechanism on how PLTs contribute to tissue homeostasis. PMID:26232171

  12. Simultaneous quantification of paracetamol, acetylsalicylic acid and papaverine with a validated HPLC method.

    PubMed

    Kalmár, Eva; Gyuricza, Anett; Kunos-Tóth, Erika; Szakonyi, Gerda; Dombi, György

    2014-01-01

    Combined drug products have the advantages of better patient compliance and possible synergic effects. The simultaneous application of several active ingredients at a time is therefore frequently chosen. However, the quantitative analysis of such medicines can be challenging. The aim of this study is to provide a validated method for the investigation of a multidose packed oral powder that contained acetylsalicylic acid, paracetamol and papaverine-HCl. Reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography was used. The Agilent Zorbax SB-C18 column was found to be the most suitable of the three different stationary phases tested for the separation of the components of this sample. The key parameters in the method development (apart from the nature of the column) were the pH of the aqueous phase (set to 3.4) and the ratio of the organic (acetonitrile) and the aqueous (25 mM phosphate buffer) phases, which was varied from 7:93 (v/v) to 25:75 (v/v) in a linear gradient, preceded by an initial hold. The method was validated: linearity, precision (repeatability and intermediate precision), accuracy, specificity and robustness were all tested, and the results met the ICH guidelines. PMID:24344050

  13. Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid and bleeding risks with ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement.

    PubMed

    Kamenova, Maria; Croci, Davide; Guzman, Raphael; Mariani, Luigi; Soleman, Jehuda

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement is a common procedure for the treatment of hydrocephalus following diverse neurosurgical conditions. Most of the patients present with other comorbidities and receive antiplatelet therapy, usually acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Despite its clinical relevance, the perioperative management of these patients has not been sufficiently investigated. The aim of this study was to compare the peri- and postoperative bleeding complication rates associated with ASA intake in patients undergoing VP shunt placement. METHODS Of 172 consecutive patients undergoing VP shunt placement between June 2009 and December 2015, 40 (23.3%) patients were receiving low-dose ASA treatment. The primary outcome measure was bleeding events in ASA users versus nonusers, whereas secondary outcome measures were postoperative cardiovascular events, hematological findings, morbidity, and mortality. A subgroup analysis was conducted in patients who discontinued ASA treatment for < 7 days (n = 4, ASA Group 1) and for ≥ 7 days (n = 36, ASA Group 2). RESULTS No statistically significant difference for bleeding events was observed between ASA users and nonusers (p = 0.30). Cardiovascular complications, surgical morbidity, and mortality did not differ significantly between the groups either. Moreover, there was no association between ASA discontinuation regimens (< 7 days and ≥ 7 days) and hemorrhagic events. CONCLUSIONS Given the lack of guidelines regarding perioperative management of neurosurgical patients with antiplatelet therapy, these findings elucidate one issue, showing comparable bleeding rates in ASA users and nonusers undergoing VP shunt placement. PMID:27581316

  14. Influence of cellulose powder structure on moisture-induced degradation of acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Mihranyan, A; Strømme, M; Ek, R

    2006-02-01

    The stability of crystalline acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) powder in binary mixtures with cellulose powders was investigated to reveal information about the influence of the cellulose structural properties on the moisture-induced ASA degradation. Different cellulose powder samples were manufactured and characterized by X-ray diffraction and N2 BET gas adsorption. The degradation patterns in ASA/cellulose mixtures were monitored as a function of salicylic acid increase versus time under various relative humidity conditions at 50 degrees C. The crystallinity index of cellulose samples varied between approximately 49 and 95%. The results indicated that cellulose powder with the lowest crystallinity index exhibited lower degradation rates than the samples with the higher crystallinity index. It should be noted that higher ASA degradation rates were observed in the samples with comparably lower moisture contents. This effect was most pronounced in the 1:3 (w/w), ASA/cellulose mixtures, whereas in 3:1 (w/w), ASA/cellulose mixtures the effect was less obvious. The findings emphasise the importance of cellulose structural organisation when governing the moisture's partition between cellulose and ASA during the hydrolytic degradation. PMID:16311024

  15. Acetylsalicylic Acid Inhibits IL-18-Induced Cardiac Fibroblast Migration Through the Induction of RECK

    PubMed Central

    SIDDESHA, JALAHALLI M.; VALENTE, ANTHONY J.; SAKAMURI, SIVA S.V.P.; GARDNER, JASON D.; DELAFONTAINE, PATRICE; NODA, MAKOTO; CHANDRASEKAR, BYSANI

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis and adverse remodeling is thought to involve the ROS-dependent induction of inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and the activation and migration of cardiac fibroblasts (CF). Here we investigated the role of RECK (reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs), a unique membrane-anchored MMP regulator, on IL-18 induced CF migration, and the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on this response. In a Matrigel invasion assay, IL-18 induced migration of primary mouse CF was dependent on both IKK/NF-κB- and JNK/AP-1-mediated MMP9 induction and Spl-mediated RECK suppression, mechanisms that required Nox4-dependent H2O2 generation. Notably, forced expression of RECK attenuated IL-18 induced MMP9 activation and CF migration. Further, therapeutic concentrations of ASA inhibited IL-18 induced H2O2 generation, MMP9 activation, RECK suppression, and CF migration. The salicylic acid moiety of ASA similarly attenuated IL-18 induced CF migration. Thus, ASA may exert potential beneficial effect in cardiac fibrosis through multiple protective mechanisms. PMID:24265116

  16. Acacia-gelatin microencapsulated liposomes: preparation, stability, and release of acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Rogers, J A

    1993-01-01

    Liposomes of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) containing acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) have been microencapsulated by acacia-gelatin using the complex coacervation technique as a potential oral drug delivery system. The encapsulation efficiency of ASA was unaltered by the microencapsulation process. The stability of the microencapsulated liposomes in sodium cholate solutions at pH 5.6 was much greater than the corresponding liposomes. The optimum composition and conditions for stability and ASA release were 3.0% acacia-gelatin and a 1- to 2-hr formaldehyde hardening time. Approximately 25% ASA was released in the first 6 hr from microencapsulated liposomes at 23 degrees C and the kinetics followed matrix-controlled release (Q varies; is directly proportional to t1/2). At 37 degrees C, this increased to 75% released in 30 min followed by a slow constant release, likely due to lowering of the phase transition temperature of DPPC by the acacia-gelatin to near 37 degrees C. At both temperatures, the release from control liposomes was even more rapid. Hardening times of 4 hr and an acacia-gelatin concentration of 5% resulted in a lower stability of liposomes and a faster release of ASA. It is concluded that under appropriate conditions the microencapsulation of liposomes by acacia-gelatin may increase their potential as an oral drug delivery system. PMID:8430052

  17. Synovial distribution of “systemically” administered acetylsalicylic acid in the isolated perfused equine distal limb

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated synovial concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and its metabolite salicylic acid (SA) in the equine fetlock joint following systemic administration of ASA. Salicylates were chosen because SA is the only nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug for which threshold levels exist for plasma and urine in equine sports. To avoid animal experiments, the study was conducted using an ex vivo model of the isolated perfused equine distal limb in combination with plasma concentrations obtained from literature. Salicylate concentrations in the joint were determined using microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Any anti-inflammatory effect of synovial ASA concentrations was assessed using an ASA EC50 (half maximal effective concentration) determined in equine whole blood. Results The ASA concentration in the synovial fluid (n = 6) reached a maximum of 4 μg/mL, the mean concentration over the entire perfusion period was 2 μg/mL. Maximum SA concentration was 17 μg/mL, the average was 14 μg/mL. ASA and SA concentration in the synovial fluid exceeded systemic concentrations 2 h and 3.5 h after “systemic” administration, respectively. Conclusions ASA and SA accumulated in the in the synovial fluid of the ex vivo model despite decreasing systemic concentrations. This suggests a prolonged anti-inflammatory effect within the joint that remains to be further elucidated. PMID:23531229

  18. Severe nose bleeding after intake of acetylsalicylic acid: von Willebrand disease type 2A. Case 9.

    PubMed

    von der Weid, N X; Mansouri Taleghani, B; Wuillemin, W A

    2003-08-01

    This case report of a school boy with a history of severe and repeated episodes of epistaxis presents a short overview of the clinical and laboratory findings which lead to confirm the suspected diagnosis of von Willebrand disease (vWD). Suspicion of defective primary haemostasis should arise when unusual (because of their number or duration) mucosal bleeds appear in an otherwise normal and healthy patient. Because of its definitive inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation, acetylsalicylic acid (more than other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs exerting unselective inhibition of cyclooxygenase) is a strong factor in triggering or sustaining the bleeding disorders in these patients. Among the congenital disorder of primary haemostasis, vWD is by far the most frequent one. The difficulties of laboratory diagnosis of vWD are stressed; the promises and pitfalls of new in vitro methods for measuring primary haemostasis (PFA-100 analyzer) are discussed. An accurate diagnosis of the specific type of vWD is of critical importance for correct patient management as well as for genetic counseling. PMID:12923584

  19. Effects of single oral doses of lysine clonixinate and acetylsalicylic acid on platelet functions in man.

    PubMed

    Pallapies, D; Muhs, A; Bertram, L; Rohleder, G; Nagyiványi, P; Peskar, B A

    1996-01-01

    Lysine clonixinate is an analgesic drug with a so far unknown mechanism of action. We have determined its effect on platelet cyclooxygenase in man. Biosynthesis of thromboxane (TX)B2 and prostaglandin (PG)F2 alpha in clotting whole blood ex vivo as well as collagen-induced platelet aggregation measured before and at various time points after oral administration of 125 mg lysine clonixinate were compared to results obtained with 500 mg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). While biosynthesis of both TXB2 and PGF2 alpha measured radioimmunologically was inhibited significantly 2.5 h, but not 6 h, after administration of lysine clonixinate, inhibition by ASA was much greater and still highly significant after 48 h. Similarly, collagen-induced aggregation of platelet-rich plasma was inhibited for a longer period and to a greater extent after administration of ASA than after lysine clonixinate. Our results indicate that lysine clonixinate is a cyclooxygenase inhibitor of moderate potency. It remains to be investigated whether mechanisms other than inhibition of cyclooxygenase contribute to the analgesic activity of lysine clonixinate. PMID:8866627

  20. Acetylsalicylic acid inhibits IL-18-induced cardiac fibroblast migration through the induction of RECK.

    PubMed

    Siddesha, Jalahalli M; Valente, Anthony J; Sakamuri, Siva S V P; Gardner, Jason D; Delafontaine, Patrice; Noda, Makoto; Chandrasekar, Bysani

    2014-07-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis and adverse remodeling is thought to involve the ROS-dependent induction of inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and the activation and migration of cardiac fibroblasts (CF). Here we investigated the role of RECK (reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs), a unique membrane-anchored MMP regulator, on IL-18-induced CF migration, and the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on this response. In a Matrigel invasion assay, IL-18-induced migration of primary mouse CF was dependent on both IKK/NF-κB- and JNK/AP-1-mediated MMP9 induction and Sp1-mediated RECK suppression, mechanisms that required Nox4-dependent H(2)O(2) generation. Notably, forced expression of RECK attenuated IL-18-induced MMP9 activation and CF migration. Further, therapeutic concentrations of ASA inhibited IL-18-induced H(2)O(2) generation, MMP9 activation, RECK suppression, and CF migration. The salicylic acid moiety of ASA similarly attenuated IL-18-induced CF migration. Thus, ASA may exert potential beneficial effect in cardiac fibrosis through multiple protective mechanisms. PMID:24265116

  1. The healing effect of TGF-alpha on gastric ulcer induced by acetylsalicylic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Yetkin, G; Celebi, N; Ozer, C; Gönül, B; Ozoğul, C

    2004-06-11

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of microemulsion and aqueous solution containing transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) and/or aprotinin administered intragastrically (i.g.) on healing of acute gastric ulcers induced by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). The microemulsion was prepared by modification of the microemulsion formulation described in our previous study. Acute gastric lesions were induced by the application of ASA (150 mg/kg in 1.5 ml of 0.2N HCl i.g.). TGF-alpha in solution or microemulsion formulations were administered at a dose of 10 microg/kg per 24h i.g. for 2 days. The effects of TGF-alpha on the healing was evaluated with the measurement of ulcer score, basal gastric acid secretion, total protein content of gastric fluid, gastric mucus level and histological analysis. The results indicated that the highest decrease in ulcer area was observed in group treated with microemulsion containing TGF-alpha plus aprotinin (TA-ME). TGF-alpha in microemulsion formulation was more effective than TGF-alpha in solution formulation in the increase of gastric mucus secretion, in the decrease of gastric acid secretions and ulcer scores. Histological evaluation of the gastric mucosa samples revealed that, best recovery was obtained in the TA-ME treated group. PMID:15158979

  2. Glycyrrhetinic acid-induced permeability transition in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Mauro; Fiore, Cristina; Armanini, Decio; Toninello, Antonio

    2003-12-15

    Glycyrrhetinic acid, a hydrolysis product of one of the main constituents of licorice, the triterpene glycoside of glycyrrhizic acid, when added to rat liver mitochondria at micromolar concentrations induces swelling, loss of membrane potential, pyridine nucleotide oxidation, and release of cytochrome c and apoptosis inducing factor. These changes are Ca(2+) dependent and are prevented by cyclosporin A, bongkrekic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide. All these observations indicate that glycyrrhetinic acid is a potent inducer of mitochondrial permeability transition and can trigger the pro-apoptotic pathway. PMID:14637195

  3. Development and validation of a liquid chromatographic method for purity control of clopidogrel-acetylsalicylic acid in combined oral dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Kahsay, Getu; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2012-03-01

    A reversed phase liquid chromatographic method with UV detection for the simultaneous determination of clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid and their related substances in combined oral formulations was developed and validated. Good separation was achieved on a Luna C18 column (150 mm × 4.6 mm, 3 μm) using gradient elution at a flow rate of 1 mL/min and a column temperature of 35 °C. UV detection was performed at 220 nm. The validation was performed according to the ICH guidelines. The method proved to be specific, sensitive (LOQ=0.975 μg/mL and 0.0384 μg/mL for clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid, respectively), linear in the concentration range from LOQ to 325 μg/mL for clopidogrel and from LOQ to 650 μg/mL for acetylsalicylic acid, precise (RSD values for intermediate precision <1%) and accurate with mean recovery values of 100.7% and 100.2% for clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid, respectively. Moreover, the solution stability and method robustness were examined. The method gives satisfactory separation of impurities of clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid and so it is suitable for quantification of the related substances as well as for the assay of the actives. PMID:22226416

  4. Orexin A attenuates palmitic acid-induced hypothalamic cell death.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Cayla M; Nixon, Joshua P; Butterick, Tammy A

    2016-09-01

    Palmitic acid (PA), an abundant dietary saturated fatty acid, contributes to obesity and hypothalamic dysregulation in part through increase in oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and neuroinflammation. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of PA exposure contributes to the onset of neuronal apoptosis. Additionally, high fat diets lead to changes in hypothalamic gene expression profiles including suppression of the anti-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 associated X protein (Bax). Orexin A (OXA), a hypothalamic peptide important in obesity resistance, also contributes to neuroprotection. Prior studies have demonstrated that OXA attenuates oxidative stress induced cell death. We hypothesized that OXA would be neuroprotective against PA induced cell death. To test this, we treated an immortalized hypothalamic cell line (designated mHypoA-1/2) with OXA and PA. We demonstrate that OXA attenuates PA-induced hypothalamic cell death via reduced caspase-3/7 apoptosis, stabilization of Bcl-2 gene expression, and reduced Bax/Bcl-2 gene expression ratio. We also found that OXA inhibits ROS production after PA exposure. Finally, we show that PA exposure in mHypoA-1/2 cells significantly reduces basal respiration, maximum respiration, ATP production, and reserve capacity. However, OXA treatment reverses PA-induced changes in intracellular metabolism, increasing basal respiration, maximum respiration, ATP production, and reserve capacity. Collectively, these results support that OXA protects against PA-induced hypothalamic dysregulation, and may represent one mechanism through which OXA can ameliorate effects of obesogenic diet on brain health. PMID:27449757

  5. Acetylsalicylate reduces endothelial and platelet-derived microparticles in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Daniel; Becker, Vanessa; Mügge, Andreas

    2011-04-01

    Previous studies suggest that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to vascular repair processes. In contrast, circulating microparticles (MPs) are reported to be part of a process that is damaging to vascular cells. Numerous studies suggest that the "balance" between EPCs and MPs is important for the integrity of vascular cells and preservation of endothelial function. In the present study, we assess the impact of acetylsalicylate (ASA) - which is, beside statins and physical exercise, a third basic column in the preventive therapy of coronary artery disease (CAD) - on EPCs and MPs in patients with CAD. We investigated the effect of treatment (8 weeks) with ASA (100 mg/d) on endothelial function (flow-mediated vasodilation, FMD), number of circulating EPCs, and endothelial- and platelet-derived microparticles (eMP, pMP) in 15 male patients (age 59.5 ± 12.3 years) with CAD but nonsignificant stenosis. The number of pMPs and eMPs decreased by 62.7% (p < 0.05) and 28.4% (p < 0.05), respectively. The number of circulating EPCs (VEGFR2(+)CD34(+)), expressed as ‰ of circulating polymorphonuclear leukocytes, remained unchanged. Despite the reduced number of pMPs and eMPs in response to the ASA therapy, the FMD responses and the maximal dilator effects of nitroglycerin were unaffected. In a control experiment, patients (n = 6) treated with the selective COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib (90 mg/day) for 8 weeks showed no changes in the number of pMPs, eMPs, and EPCs and in FMD. We report on a novel effect of ASA treatment on the number of circulating endothelial- and platelet-derived microparticles in patients with cardiovascular disease. The mechanism remains elusive, and appears not to be associated with the COX-2 pathway. PMID:21539467

  6. [Acetylsalicylic acid for the prevention of primary myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Samorodskaya, I V; Bolotova, E V; Boytsov, S A

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is effective in preventing events in a number of cardiovascular diseases. However, there is a number of unresolved problems concerning the efficiency and suitability of its use as an agent for the prevention of cardiovascular events (CVEs) (myocardial infarction (Ml) and/or ischemic stroke (IS) and/or death) in subjects without any clinical manifestations and/or diagnosed coronary heart disease (primary prevention of CVEs). The aim of the review is to compare the current recommendations of, professional communities for the.use of ASA as an agent for the primary prevention of CVEs, to analyze cohort studies and meta-analyses that are not included in the above recommendations (2013-2014), and to consider particular issues on ASA administration (resistance to ASA; barriers to its preventive use). The analysis performed suggests that there is no convincing evidence that it is reasonable to use ASA as a population-wide prevention strategy. The studies and meta-analyses often show conflicting data, which is likely to be associated with the clinical features of population groups included in the studies, with the presence or absence of ASA resistance and motivation for therapy. According to the current clinical recommendations, the results of studies and meta-analysis, and expert's opinions, deciding whether it is expedient to use ASA as an agent for the prevention of primary MI and/or IS and death from atherosclerostic vascular events should be based on the assessment of an individual's risks for the above disorders, which are related to a risk for hemorrhages due to ASA intake. PMID:26591559

  7. Repercussion of acetylsalicylic acid during fetal development on later renal hemodynamics of rats.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Filho, Leucio D; Lucena-Júnior, José M; Barreto, Izabel S S; Angelim, José L C; Paixão, Ana D O

    2008-08-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) during pregnancy reaches the fetus. It seems important to know possible repercussions of ASA on later renal function of the offspring, as well as repercussions of this drug on factors that may influence fetal development, such as maternal plasma volume and placental oxidative stress. It was evaluated whether ASA changes maternal plasma volume and/or placental oxidative stress, fetal weight and renal function of the offspring at adult life. ASA (100 mg/kg/day, p.o., dissolved in ETOH 10%) or ETOH 10% was administered to Wistar rat dams, from the day 7 to day 20 of pregnancy/parturition. Plasma volume and the placental oxidative stress were evaluated on day 20 of pregnancy, using, respectively, the Evans blue dye and the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances methods. Mean arterial pressure, renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were evaluated in the anesthetized offspring, at the age of 90 days, using a blood pressure transducer, a flow probe and inulin clearance respectively. Plasma volume was 76% (P < 0.05) higher in ASA compared with that in control dams, but placental oxidative stress was the same for both groups. Fetal body weight, the number of nephrons, GFR, RBF and renal vascular resistance were similar for the same gender among the offspring of the two groups. However, reduced hematocrit (9.8%, P < 0.05), increased renal plasma flow (27%, P < 0.05) and reduced filtration fraction (32%, P < 0.05) were seen in the female offspring. In conclusion, although ASA had increased maternal plasma volume, it did not change nephrogenesis nor GFR in the adult offspring. The changes in renal plasma flow and filtration fraction seen in the ASA female offspring might partially be due to the reduced hematocrit. PMID:18705748

  8. Impact of Acetylsalicylic Acid on the Clinicopathological Characteristics and Prognosis of Patients with Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sendur, Mehmet A.N.; Aksoy, Sercan; Ozdemir, Nuriye Y.; Zengin, Nurullah; Altundag, Kadri

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The impact of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on the clinicopathological characteristics of breast cancer has not yet been elucidated in detail; we therefore aimed to investigate the effects of ASA on the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients diagnosed with breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Breast cancer patients who were taking ASA at the time of breast cancer diagnosis were enrolled as ASA users (n = 84); matching patients with the same age who were not taking ASA were included as control group (n = 890). Results The median age was 56 (range 34–82) years in both groups. ASA users had a significantly lower incidence of grade II–III tumors compared to non-users (P = 0.02). The other clinicopathological characteristics and treatment histories were similar in both groups. In patients using ASA, the disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 97.3%, 89.4%, and 79.9% and in non-users it was 94.1%, 81.8%, and 70.9% in the 1rst, 3rd, and 5th year, respectively (P = 0.01). In aspirin users, the overall survival rate was 95.0%, 90.6%, and 87.6% and in non-users it was 98.1%, 91.2%, and 85.5% in the 1rst, 3rd, and 5th year, respectively (P = 0.50). Conclusion Using ASA at the time of breast cancer diagnosis was associated with significantly improved DFS in breast cancer patients. PMID:25404885

  9. [Responses of isolated hepatic artery segments to barium in the presence of a flavonoid (4-methylesculetin), indomethacin and acetylsalicylate].

    PubMed

    Bettini, V; Gamba, G; Legrenzi, E; Mayellaro, F; Santoni, G

    1983-05-30

    The aim of this work is to study the mechanism by which 4-methylesculetin (4-Me) inhibits the Ba++ induced contraction in smooth muscle. The effect of 4-Me, alone or associated with ascorbic acid, on basal tone and Ba++ induced contraction of isolated hepatic artery strips have been studied. Experiments have been carried out in the presence of lysine acetylsalicylate (LAS) and indomethacin (IN), specific inhibitors of prostaglandin-synthetase. Both LAS and IN suppressed the depressive effect of 4-Me on the Ba++ dependent contraction. Therefore, it seems reasonable to conclude that the 4-Me influence could be mediated by prostaglandins release smooth muscle. PMID:6411101

  10. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis: A rare side effect of a common over-the-counter drug, Acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Bahuguna, Amit

    2013-07-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis is an uncommon cutaneous reaction characterized by sudden onset of generalized non-follicular aseptic pustules. It is most often secondary to drugs but causes as varied from viral infection to insect bites are reported. A case report of a 48-year-old male who developed pustular eruptions after taking acetylsalicylic acid is reported here. Clinicians need to be aware of this entity when dealing with pustular rash as this rare side effect of a very common drug is both, easy to miss and easy to manage. PMID:23984244

  11. Differential roles of unsaturated and saturated fatty acids on autophagy and apoptosis in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mei, Shuang; Ni, Hong-Min; Manley, Sharon; Bockus, Abigail; Kassel, Karen M; Luyendyk, James P; Copple, Bryan L; Ding, Wen-Xing

    2011-11-01

    Fatty acid-induced lipotoxicity plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic liver disease. Saturated fatty acids and unsaturated fatty acids have differential effects on cell death and steatosis, but the mechanisms responsible for these differences are not known. Using cultured HepG2 cells and primary mouse hepatocytes, we found that unsaturated and saturated fatty acids differentially regulate autophagy and apoptosis. The unsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid, promoted the formation of triglyceride-enriched lipid droplets and induced autophagy but had a minimal effect on apoptosis. In contrast, the saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid, was poorly converted into triglyceride-enriched lipid droplets, suppressed autophagy, and significantly induced apoptosis. Subsequent studies revealed that palmitic acid-induced apoptosis suppressed autophagy by inducing caspase-dependent Beclin 1 cleavage, indicating cross-talk between apoptosis and autophagy. Moreover, our data suggest that the formation of triglyceride-enriched lipid droplets and induction of autophagy are protective mechanisms against fatty acid-induced lipotoxicity. In line with our in vitro findings, we found that high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis was associated with autophagy in the mouse liver. Potential modulation of autophagy may be a novel approach that has therapeutic benefits for obesity-induced steatosis and liver injury. PMID:21856859

  12. Characterization of retinoic acid-induced neurobehavioral effects in developing zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujiang; Chen, Jiangfei; Du, Changchun; Li, Chunqi; Huang, Changjiang; Dong, Qiaoxiang

    2014-02-01

    Retinoic signaling plays an important role in cell proliferation and differentiation. Disruption of retinoic signaling via excessive or deficient retinoic acid can cause teratogenic effects on developing embryos. Similar to retinoic acid, many xenobiotic environmental pollutants have been found to disrupt retinoic signaling through binding and eliciting agonistic activity on retinoic acid receptors. Currently, studies of retinoic acid or retinoic acid-like compounds in aquatic organisms have mainly focused on teratogenicity and few studies have explored their neurobehavioral toxicity. In the present study, the authors used retinoic acid as an example to explore the neurobehavioral toxicity associated with developmental exposure of retinoic acid-like compounds in zebrafish. The findings confirmed retinoic acid's teratogenic effects such as bent spine, malformed tail, and pericardial edema in developing zebrafish with a median effective concentration of 2.47 nM. Retinoic acid-induced cell apoptosis at 24 h postfertilization was consistently found in the eye and tail regions of embryos. Spontaneous movement as characterized by tail bend frequency was significantly increased in zebrafish embryos following exposure to 2 nM and 8 nM retinoic acid. Relatively low-dose retinoic acid exposure of 2 nM led to fast locomotion behavior in the dark period and hyperactivity during light-dark photoperiod stimulation. The 2-nM retinoic acid exposure also led to alterations of neurobehavior- and optic nerve-related genes, with the transforming growth factor-β signal transduction inhibitor noggin (nog) and the spinal cord marker homeobox c3a (hox) being underexpressed and the retinal G protein-coupled receptor a (rgr), the photoreceptor cell marker rhodopsin (rho), and the short wave-sensitive cone pigment opsin 1 (opn1sw1) being overexpressed. Increased expression of opn1sw1 and rho was confirmed by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Whether the misexpression of these genes leads

  13. Effects of acetylsalicylic acid on fresh weight pigment and protein content of bean leaf discs (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Canakçi, S

    2003-01-01

    The effects of 100, 250, and 500 ppm acetylsalicylic acid solutions treatments on weight alteration, pigment and protein amounts in discs from the primary leaves of one month old bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seedlings produced tinder greenhouse conditions are presented. The experiments show that: 100 ppm ASA had no significant influence (P > 0.05) but 250 and 500 ppm ASA caused an increase on weight loss (P < 0.01); ASA at higher concentrations (250 and 500 ppm), generally, caused a decrease on pigment amounts (P < 0.05-P < 0.01) but 100 ppm ASA had no considerably significant influence on them (P > 0.05), none of the ASA treatments caused a statistically significant influence on carotenoid amount (P > 0.05); 100 and 250 ppm ASA treatments did not cause a significant influence on protein amount (P > 0.05). however 500 ppm ASA treatment caused an increase on protein injury (P < 0.05). Consequently, it is supposed that wet weight loss, pigment and protein injury have somewhat increased on leaf discs. depending on the toxic effect of high acetylsalicylic acid concentrations. PMID:14711042

  14. Retinoids induce Nur77-dependent apoptosis in mouse thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Beáta; Tóth, Katalin; Sarang, Zsolt; Garabuczi, Éva; Szondy, Zsuzsa

    2015-03-01

    Nur77 is a transcription factor, which plays a determinant role in mediating T cell receptor-induced cell death of thymocytes. In addition to regulation of transcription, Nur77 contributes to apoptosis induction by targeting mitochondria, where it can convert Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein into a proapoptotic molecule. Previous studies have demonstrated that retinoids are actively produced in the mouse thymus and can induce a transcription-dependent apoptosis in mouse thymocytes. Here we show that retinoic acids induce the expression of Nur77, and retinoid-induced apoptosis is completely dependent on Nur77, as retinoids were unable to induce apoptosis in Nur77 null thymocytes. In wild-type thymocytes retinoids induced enhanced expression of the apoptosis-related genes FasL, TRAIL, NDG-1, Gpr65 and Bid, all of them in a Nur77-dependent manner. The combined action of these proteins led to Caspase 8-dependent Bid cleavage in the mitochondria. In addition, we could demonstrate the Nur77-dependent induction of STAT1 leading to enhanced Bim expression, and the mitochondrial translocation of Nur77 leading to the exposure of the Bcl-2/BH3 domain. The retinoid-induced apoptosis was dependent on both Caspase 8 and STAT1. Our data together indicate that retinoids induce a Nur77-dependent cell death program in thymocytes activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. PMID:25576519

  15. Standardized Extract of Bacopa monniera Attenuates Okadaic Acid Induced Memory Dysfunction in Rats: Effect on Nrf2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Rajasekar; Hanif, Kashif; Siddiqui, Hefazat Husain; Nath, Chandishwar

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of standardized extract of Bacopa monnieri (memory enhancer) and Melatonin (an antioxidant) on nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway in Okadaic acid induced memory impaired rats. OKA (200 ng) was administered intracerebroventricularly (ICV) to induce memory impairment in rats. Bacopa monnieri (BM-40 and 80 mg/kg) and Melatonin (20 mg/kg) were administered 1 hr before OKA injection and continued daily up to day 13. Memory functions were assessed by Morris water maze test on days 13–15. Rats were sacrificed for biochemical estimations of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, apoptosis, and molecular studies of Nrf2, HO1, and GCLC expressions in cerebral cortex and hippocampus brain regions. OKA caused a significant memory deficit with oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and neuronal loss which was concomitant with attenuated expression of Nrf2, HO1, and GCLC. Treatment with BM and Melatonin significantly improved memory dysfunction in OKA rats as shown by decreased latency time and path length. The treatments also restored Nrf2, HO1, and GCLC expressions and decreased oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and neuronal loss. Thus strengthening the endogenous defense through Nrf2 modulation plays a key role in the protective effect of BM and Melatonin in OKA induced memory impairment in rats. PMID:24078822

  16. Pharmacokinetics and plasma concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid after intravenous, rectal, and intragastric administration to horses.

    PubMed

    Broome, Ted A; Brown, Murray P; Gronwall, Ronald R; Casey, Matthew F; Meritt, Kelly A

    2003-10-01

    Six healthy adult horses (5 mares and 1 stallion) were given a single dose of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 20 mg/kg of body weight, by intravenous (IV), rectal, and intragastric (IG) routes. Serial blood samples were collected via jugular venipuncture over a 36-h period, and plasma ASA and salicylic acid (SA) concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. After IV administration, the mean elimination rate constant of ASA (+/- the standard error of the mean) was 1.32 +/- 0.09 h(-1), the mean elimination half-life was 0.53 +/- 0.04 h, the area under the plasma concentration-versus-time curve (AUC) was 2555 +/- 98 microg x min/mL, the plasma clearance was 472 +/- 18.9 mL/h/kg, and the volume of distribution at steady state was 0.22 +/- 0.01 L/kg. After rectal administration, the plasma concentration of ASA peaked at 5.05 +/- 0.80 microg/mL at 0.33 h, then decreased to undetectable levels by 4 h; the plasma concentration of SA peaked at 17.39 +/- 5.46 microg/mL at 2 h, then decreased to 1.92 +/- 0.25 microg/mL by 36 h. After rectal administration, the AUC for ASA was 439.4 +/- 94.55 microg x min/mL and the bioavailability was 0.17 +/- 0.037. After IG administration, the plasma concentration of ASA peaked at 1.26 +/- 0.10 microg/mL at 0.67 h, then declined to 0.37 +/- 0.37 microg/mL by 36 h; the plasma concentration of SA peaked at 23.90 +/- 4.94 microg/mL at 4 h and decreased to 0.85 +/- 0.31 microg/mL by 36 h. After IG administration, the AUC for ASA was 146.70 +/- 24.90 microg x min/mL and the bioavailability was 0.059 +/- 0.013. Administration of a single rectal dose of ASA of 20 mg/kg to horses results in higher peak plasma ASA concentrations and greater bioavailability than the same dose given IG. Plasma ASA concentrations after rectal administration should be sufficient to inhibit platelet thromboxane production, and doses lower than those suggested for IG administration may be adequate. PMID:14620867

  17. Promoting endothelial recovery and reducing neointimal hyperplasia using sequential-like release of acetylsalicylic acid and paclitaxel-loaded biodegradable stents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Hung; Yu, Chia-Ying; Chang, Shang-Hung; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Liu, Shih-Jung; Wang, Chao-Jan; Hsu, Ming-Yi; Hsieh, I-Chang; Chen, Wei-Jan; Ko, Yu-Shien; Wen, Ming-Shien

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This work reports on the development of a biodegradable dual-drug-eluting stent with sequential-like and sustainable drug-release of anti-platelet acetylsalicylic acid and anti-smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferative paclitaxel. Methods To fabricate the biodegradable stents, poly-L-lactide strips are first cut from a solvent-casted film. They are rolled onto the surface of a metal pin to form spiral stents. The stents are then consecutively covered by acetylsalicylic acid and paclitaxel-loaded polylactide-polyglycolide nanofibers via electrospinning. Results Biodegradable stents exhibit mechanical properties that are superior to those of metallic stents. Biodegradable stents sequentially release high concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid and paclitaxel for more than 30 and 60 days, respectively. In vitro, the eluted drugs promote endothelial cell numbers on days 3 and 7, and reduce the proliferation of SMCs in weeks 2, 4, and 8. The stents markedly inhibit the adhesion of platelets on days 3, 7, and 14 relative to a non-drug-eluting stent. In vivo, the implanted stent is intact, and no stent thrombosis is observed in the stent-implanted vessels without the administration of daily oral acetylsalicylic acid. Promotion of endothelial recovery and inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia are also observed on the stented vessels. Conclusion The work demonstrates the efficiency and safety of the biodegradable dual-drug-eluting stents with sequential and sustainable drug release to diseased arteries. PMID:25206303

  18. Valproic acid-induced pancreatitis in a 15-year-old boy with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Veri, Kadi; Uibo, Oivi; Talvik, Inga; Talvik, Tiina

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced acute pancreatitis is a rare condition in childhood, and information about the incidence of valproic acid-induced acute pancreatitis in the pediatric population is scarce. In this clinical case, we report a first documented pediatric case of valproic acid-induced pancreatitis in Estonia. A 15-year-old boy with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy developed acute pancreatitis after 2-month therapy with valproic acid. The symptoms of pancreatitis subsided within 1 week after the discontinuation of treatment with valproic acid. Acute pancreatitis should be suspected in any pediatric patient with gastrointestinal symptoms during valproate treatment. PMID:24823930

  19. Antiplatelet drugs induce apoptosis in cultured cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, W H; Yin, H L; Chang, Y Y; Lan, M Y; Hsu, H Y; Liu, J S

    1997-10-01

    In order to understand if antiplatelet drugs possess direct antineoplastic property, we tested the apoptotic effect of 5 popularly marketed antiplatelet drugs in Taiwan in 6 cultured cancer cell lines (Hep 3B hepatocarcinoma, U87-MG malignant glioma, PC-3 prostate adenocarcinoma, HeLa cervical adenocarcinoma, HL-60 preleukemia and K-562 chronic myelogenous leukemia). While acetylsalicylate and flunarizine exerted no effect on these cancer cells, pentoxifyline (PTX), dipyridamole (DYA) and ticlopidine hydrochloride (T. HCl) displayed a time and dose-dependent apoptotic effect on them except for HL-60 and K-562 cells. PTX induced apoptosis in U87-MG, Hep 3B and HeLa cells, DYA in HeLa cells, while T. HCl in U87-MG, Hep 3B, PC-3 and HeLa cells. Adriamycin also provoked apoptotic effect in all 6 cell lines but neither PTX, DYA nor T. HCl acted synergy with adriamycin to HeLa cells, implicating that they may share a similar pathway for inducing apoptosis. Therefore, our results show that the antiplatelet drugs do possess antineoplastic property in vitro. A co-administration of antiplatelet drugs is noteworthy for an alternative adjunctive therapy in cancer patients. PMID:9385774

  20. Comparison of single-dose ibuprofen lysine, acetylsalicylic acid, and placebo for moderate-to-severe postoperative dental pain.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S L; Brahim, J S; Korn, S H; Greene, S S; Suchower, L J

    1994-01-01

    In a single-dose, double-blind, parallel-group, single-site study, ibuprofen lysine 200 mg (IBL 200) was compared with acetylsalicylic acid 500 mg (ASA 500) and placebo in 183 patients with moderate-to-severe postoperative dental pain. The relative onset of analgesic response, duration and degree of analgesia, and safety were assessed over a 6-hour postdose period. Analgesic efficacy was assessed by patient self-rating of pain intensity, pain relief, time to meaningful pain relief, global evaluation, and requirement for additional analgesic medication; both IBL 200 and ASA 500 were significantly more effective than placebo. IBL 200 also had a significantly faster onset of action, greater peak and overall analgesic effect, and longer duration of analgesia than ASA 500. All treatments were generally well tolerated. PMID:7923312

  1. [Effect of acetylsalicylic acid on immunologically induced morphologic changes after experimental lung transplantation (light and electron microscopic study)].

    PubMed

    Hoyer, J; Garbe, L; Sicardi, F; Noirclerc, M

    1976-01-01

    In 3 comparing series the behavior of platelets after experimental lung transplantation was examined in 33 dogs. After allogenic transplantations (21 animals) the ultrastructural findings were pathologic changes of the platelets, such as hyperaggregability with irreversible aggregation prevailing, as well as capillary wall alterations. X-rays showed considerable reduction of functioning parenchyma. Since these findings were absent in animals which underwent merely pulmonary re-implantation (4 animals) and can be considered a controll group, the authors conclude that these alterations are caused by mainly immunologic reactions. Acetylsalicylic acid given to animals with grafted lungs significantly inhibited is specific and certainly immuneinduced pathologic development. Absolutely necessary, therefore, appears the application of such aggregation inhibitor as additional treatment in lung transplantations. PMID:793217

  2. Intraoperative 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced fluorescence in primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Rachel; Nossek, Erez; Shimony, Nir; Raz, Michal; Ram, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a case of primary CNS lymphoma located in the floor of the fourth ventricle that showed intense fluorescence after preoperative administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid. The authors believe that this is the first demonstration of a 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced fluorescence pattern in primary CNS lymphoma. PMID:24138204

  3. MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory


    MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA in rodents when administered in dri...

  4. GPR109A (PUMA-G/HM74A) mediates nicotinic acid-induced flushing.

    PubMed

    Benyó, Zoltán; Gille, Andreas; Kero, Jukka; Csiky, Marion; Suchánková, Marie Catherine; Nüsing, Rolf M; Moers, Alexandra; Pfeffer, Klaus; Offermanns, Stefan

    2005-12-01

    Nicotinic acid (niacin) has long been used as an antidyslipidemic drug. Its special profile of actions, especially the rise in HDL-cholesterol levels induced by nicotinic acid, is unique among the currently available pharmacological tools to treat lipid disorders. Recently, a G-protein-coupled receptor, termed GPR109A (HM74A in humans, PUMA-G in mice), was described and shown to mediate the nicotinic acid-induced antilipolytic effects in adipocytes. One of the major problems of the pharmacotherapeutical use of nicotinic acid is a strong flushing response. This side effect, although harmless, strongly affects patient compliance. In the present study, we show that mice lacking PUMA-G did not show nicotinic acid-induced flushing. In addition, flushing in response to nicotinic acid was also abrogated in the absence of cyclooxygenase type 1, and mice lacking prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) receptors had reduced flushing responses. The mouse orthologue of GPR109A, PUMA-G, is highly expressed in macrophages and other immune cells, and transplantation of wild-type bone marrow into irradiated PUMA-G-deficient mice restored the nicotinic acid-induced flushing response. Our data clearly indicate that GPR109A mediates nicotinic acid-induced flushing and that this effect involves release of PGE(2) and PGD(2), most likely from immune cells of the skin. PMID:16322797

  5. Luteolin prevents uric acid-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Shi, Xuhui; Shuai, Xuanyu; Xu, Yuemei; Liu, Yun; Liang, Xiubin; Wei, Dong; Su, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Elevated uric acid causes direct injury to pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined the effects of luteolin, an important antioxidant, on uric acid-induced β-cell dysfunction. We first evaluated the effect of luteolin on nitric oxide (NO) formation in uric acid-stimulated Min6 cells using the Griess method. Next, we performed transient transfection and reporter assays to measure transcriptional activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Western blotting assays were also performed to assess the effect of luteolin on the expression of MafA and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in uric acid-treated cells. Finally, we evaluated the effect of luteolin on uric acid-induced inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in Min6 cells and freshly isolated mouse pancreatic islets. We found that luteolin significantly inhibited uric acid-induced NO production, which was well correlated with reduced expression of iNOS mRNA and protein. Furthermore, decreased activity of NF-κB was implicated in inhibition by luteolin of increased iNOS expression induced by uric acid. Besides, luteolin significantly increased MafA expression in Min6 cells exposed to uric acid, which was reversed by overexpression of iNOS. Moreover, luteolin prevented uric acid-induced inhibition of GSIS in both Min6 cells and mouse islets. In conclusion, luteolin protects pancreatic β-cells from uric acid-induced dysfunction and may confer benefit on the protection of pancreatic β-cells in hyperuricemia-associated diabetes. PMID:25050113

  6. The restrained expression of NF-kB in renal tissue ameliorates folic acid induced acute kidney injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dev; Singla, Surinder K; Puri, Veena; Puri, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kB) represent family of structurally-related eukaryotic transcription factors which regulate diverse array of cellular processes including immunological responses, inflammation, apoptosis, growth & development. Increased expression of NF-kB has often been seen in many diverse diseases, suggesting the importance of genomic deregulation to disease pathophysiology. In the present study we focused on acute kidney injury (AKI), which remains one of the major risk factor showing a high rate of mortality and morbidity. The pathology associated with it, however, remains incompletely known though inflammation has been reported to be one of the major risk factor in the disease pathophysiology. The role of NF-kB thus seemed pertinent. In the present study we show that high dose of folic acid (FA) induced acute kidney injury (AKI) characterized by elevation in levels of blood urea nitrogen & serum creatinine together with extensive tubular necrosis, loss of brush border and marked reduction in mitochondria. One of the salient observations of this study was a coupled increase in the expression of renal, relA, NF-kB2, and p53 genes and proteins during folic acid induced AKI (FA AKI). Treatment of mice with NF-kB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithio-carbamate ammonium (PDTC) lowered the expression of these transcription factors and ameliorated the aberrant renal function by decreasing serum creatinine levels. In conclusion, our results suggested that NF-kB plays a pivotal role in maintaining renal function that also involved regulating p53 levels during FA AKI. PMID:25559736

  7. The Restrained Expression of NF-kB in Renal Tissue Ameliorates Folic Acid Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dev; Singla, Surinder K.; Puri, Veena; Puri, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kB) represent family of structurally-related eukaryotic transcription factors which regulate diverse array of cellular processes including immunological responses, inflammation, apoptosis, growth & development. Increased expression of NF-kB has often been seen in many diverse diseases, suggesting the importance of genomic deregulation to disease pathophysiology. In the present study we focused on acute kidney injury (AKI), which remains one of the major risk factor showing a high rate of mortality and morbidity. The pathology associated with it, however, remains incompletely known though inflammation has been reported to be one of the major risk factor in the disease pathophysiology. The role of NF-kB thus seemed pertinent. In the present study we show that high dose of folic acid (FA) induced acute kidney injury (AKI) characterized by elevation in levels of blood urea nitrogen & serum creatinine together with extensive tubular necrosis, loss of brush border and marked reduction in mitochondria. One of the salient observations of this study was a coupled increase in the expression of renal, relA, NF-kB2, and p53 genes and proteins during folic acid induced AKI (FA AKI). Treatment of mice with NF-kB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithio-carbamate ammonium (PDTC) lowered the expression of these transcription factors and ameliorated the aberrant renal function by decreasing serum creatinine levels. In conclusion, our results suggested that NF-kB plays a pivotal role in maintaining renal function that also involved regulating p53 levels during FA AKI. PMID:25559736

  8. Excitation of afferent fibres in the cardiac sympathetic nerves induced by coronary occlusion and injection of bradykinin. The influence of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyron.

    PubMed

    Vogt, A; Vetterlein, F; dal Ri, H; Schmidt, G

    1979-05-01

    Afferent impulse activity was recorded in single fibres of the inferior cardiac sympathetic nerve of the cat. When the descending branch of the left coronary artery was ligated for 60 sec an enhancement of afferent impulses was recorded. Elevations in discharge frequency were also induced by injecting bradykinin, epinephrine, and isoprenaline or by general hypoxia due to interruption of the artificial ventilation. When these procedures were after pretreatment with the analgesic agents, acetylsalicylic acid or dipyron a reduction in spike discharge was observed only with bradykinin after application of acetylsalicylic acid. No influence of these pretreatments on the effects of coronary occlusion, general hypoxia and injection of epinephrine and isoprenaline could be observed. These results suggest that bradykinin does not predominate as mediator substance in eliciting ischemic heart pain. PMID:485722

  9. Acid-induced exchange of the imino proton in G.C pairs.

    PubMed Central

    Nonin, S; Leroy, J L; Gueron, M

    1996-01-01

    Acid-induced catalysis of imino proton exchange in G.C pairs of DNA duplexes is surprisingly fast, being nearly as fast as for the isolated nucleoside, despite base-pair dissociation constants in the range of 10(-5) at neutral or basic pH. It is also observed in terminal G.C pairs of duplexes and in base pairs of drug-DNA complexes. We have measured imino proton exchange in deoxyguanosine and in the duplex (ATATAGATCTATAT) as a function of pH. We show that acid-induced exchange can be assigned to proton transfer from N7-protonated guanosine to cytidine in the open state of the pair. This is faster than transfer from neutral guanosine (the process of intrinsic catalysis previously characterized at neutral ph) due to the lower imino proton pK of the protonated form, 7.2 instead of 9.4. Other interpretations are excluded by a study of exchange catalysis by formiate and cytidine as exchange catalysts. The cross-over pH between the regimes of pH-independent and acid-induced exchange rates is more basic in the case of base pairs than in the mononucleoside, suggestive of an increase by one to two decades in the dissociation constant of the base pair upon N7 protonation of G. Acid-induced catalysis is much weaker in A.T base pairs, as expected in view of the low pK for protonation of thymidine. PMID:8604298

  10. Sphingosine in apoptosis signaling.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier

    2002-12-30

    The sphingolipid metabolites ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate contribute to controlling cell proliferation and apoptosis. Ceramide and its catabolite sphingosine act as negative regulators of cell proliferation and promote apoptosis. Conversely, sphingosine 1-phosphate, formed by phosphorylation of sphingosine by a sphingosine kinase, has been involved in stimulating cell growth and inhibiting apoptosis. As the phosphorylation of sphingosine diminishes apoptosis, while dephosphorylation of sphingosine 1-phosphate potentiates it, the role of sphingosine as a messenger of apoptosis is of importance. Herein, the effects of sphingosine on diverse signaling pathways implicated in the apoptotic process are reviewed. PMID:12531549

  11. Protective effect of hispidulin on kainic acid-induced seizures and neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Su Jane; Huang, Shu Kuei

    2015-05-15

    Hispidulin is a flavonoid compound which is an active ingredient in a number of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, and it has been reported to inhibit glutamate release. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hispidulin protects against seizures induced by kainic acid, a glutamate analog with excitotoxic properties. The results indicated that intraperitoneally administering hispidulin (10 or 50mg/kg) to rats 30 min before intraperitoneally injecting kainic acid (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and decreased seizure score. In addition, hispidulin substantially attenuated kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the suppression of microglial activation and the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, hispidulin reduced kainic acid-induced c-Fos expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the hippocampus. These data suggest that hispidulin has considerable antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and antiinflammatory effects on kainic acid-induced seizures in rats. PMID:25746462

  12. Houttuyniae Herba Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Neurotoxicity via Calcium Response Modulation in the Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Jeong, Hyun Uk; Hong, Sung In; Oh, Myung Sook

    2015-12-01

    Epilepsy is a complex neurological disorder characterized by the repeated occurrence of electrical activity known as seizures. This activity induces increased intracellular calcium, which ultimately leads to neuronal damage. Houttuyniae Herba, the aerial part of Houttuynia cordata, has various pharmacological effects and is widely used as a traditional herb. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of Houttuyniae Herba water extract on kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. Kainic acid directly acts on calcium release, resulting in seizure behavior, neuronal damage, and cognitive impairment. In a rat primary hippocampal culture system, Houttuyniae Herba water extract significantly protected neuronal cells from kainic acid toxicity. In a seizure model where mice received intracerebellar kainic acid injections, Houttuyniae Herba water extract treatment resulted in a lower seizure stage score, ameliorated cognitive impairment, protected neuronal cells against kainic acid-induced toxicity, and suppressed neuronal degeneration in the hippocampus. In addition, Houttuyniae Herba water extract regulated increases in the intracellular calcium level, its related downstream pathways (reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction), and calcium/calmodulin complex kinase type II immunoreactivity in the mouse hippocampus, which resulted from calcium influx stimulation induced by kainic acid. These results demonstrate the neuroprotective effects of Houttuyniae Herba water extract through inhibition of calcium generation in a kainic acid-induced epileptic model. PMID:26366753

  13. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism. PMID:26551768

  14. Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Oxidative Damage in the Lung Tissue: May Acetylsalicylic Acid Have a Positive Role?

    PubMed

    Demirel, Can; Kilciksiz, Sevil Cagiran; Gurgul, Serkan; Erdal, Nurten; Yigit, Seyran; Tamer, Lulufer; Ayaz, Lokman

    2016-02-01

    The lung is relatively sensitive to irradiation. It is shown that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) might reduce oxidative injury and that it has a place in protection from cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential radioprotective effects of ASA. Whole-body irradiation (6 Gy, single dose) was applied to the rats. Glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and nitric oxide (NO) levels in the lung tissue were measured. Control (C), Radiation (R), Radiation + ASA (R + ASA; received irradiation and 25 mg/kg of ASA intraperitoneally (i.p.)), and Radiation + Amifostine (R + WR-2721; received irradiation and 200 mg/kg of WR-2721 i.p.) groups were used. The MPO levels decreased statistically significantly in the group administered ASA. Histopathologically, a radioprotective effect of ASA was more evident in the R + ASA group. ASA is an agent which has not been used as a radioprotector in the clinic yet, and it is worth supporting with more advanced studies. PMID:26276129

  15. Prophylactic acetylsalicylic acid attenuates the inflammatory response but fails to protect exercise-induced liver damage in exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Chin; Chiu, Yi-Han; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Ke, Chun-Yen; Lee, Chung-Jen; Chao, Yann-Fen C; Lee, Ru-Ping

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the effects of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on exercise-induced inflammatory response, muscle damage, and liver injury in rats. Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were divided into six groups: control (C), exercise (E), C+20mg ASA, E+20mg ASA, C+100mg/kg ASA, and E+100mg ASA groups. ASA or a vehicle was orally administered through gavage 1h before a treadmill test. Upon trial completion, blood was drawn at 1, 12, and 24h for biochemical analysis, and livers were excised at 24h for a histological assessment. Our results revealed that 100mg/kg ASA significantly reduced interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels in the E groups; however, the IL-10 level was considerably increased. Moreover, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and histological hepatic damage increased significantly in the E+100mg ASA group compared with the corresponding changes in the E group. These results suggest that the prophylactic administration of particularly high-dose ASA alleviates exercise-induced inflammatory response but exacerbates liver injury. PMID:27262381

  16. On the origin of surface imposed anisotropic growth of salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids crystals during droplet evaporation.

    PubMed

    Przybyłek, Maciej; Cysewski, Piotr; Pawelec, Maciej; Ziółkowska, Dorota; Kobierski, Mirosław

    2015-03-01

    In this paper droplet evaporative crystallization of salicylic acid (SA) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) crystals on different surfaces, such as glass, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and paraffin was studied. The obtained crystals were analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) technique. In order to better understand the effect of the surface on evaporative crystallization, crystals deposited on glass were scraped off. Moreover, evaporative crystallization of a large volume of solution was performed. As we found, paraffin which is non-polar surface promotes formation of crystals morphologically similar to those obtained via bulk evaporative crystallization. On the other hand, when crystallization is carried out on the polar surfaces (glass and PVA), there is a significant orientation effect. This phenomenon is manifested by the reduction of the number of peaks in PXRD spectrum recorded for deposited on the surface crystals. Noteworthy, reduction of PXRD signals is not observed for powder samples obtained after scraping crystals off the glass. In order to explain the mechanism of carboxylic crystals growth on the polar surfaces, quantum-chemical computations were performed. It has been found that crystal faces of the strongest orientation effect can be characterized by the highest surface densities of intermolecular interactions energy (IIE). In case of SA and ASA crystals formed on the polar surfaces the most dominant faces are characterized by the highest adhesive and cohesive properties. This suggests that the selection rules of the orientation effect comes directly from surface IIE densities. PMID:25690367

  17. Acetylsalicylic Acid Resistance in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Prediabetes & Non-Diabetic Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Mustafa; Kiziltunc, Emrullah; Cetin, Zehra Guven; Cicekcioglu, Hulya; Sahin, Muslum; Isik, Serhat; Kurtul, Alparslan; Ornek, Ender; Ulusoy, Feridun Vasfi

    2014-01-01

    Objective : Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial role of antiplatelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) at atherosclerotic vascular disease. Antiaggregant effect of ASA is not uniform in all patients. Purpose of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence of ASA resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), pre-diabetes and non-diabetic coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: Effect of ASA was assessed using the platelet function analyzer (PFA-100) system. Resistance to ASA was defined as a normal collagen/epinephrine induced closure time after one week of ASA therapy. Patients with non-diabetic CAD, pre-diabetes and T2DM were compared. Results: ASA resistance was found in 26 (37.1%), 6 (17.6%) and 41 (26.5%) patients in the groups, respectively (p=0.154). ASA resistance was found to be significantly higher in men, smokers and insulin users, besides this it was found to be significantly lower in beta blocker (BB) users, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) users with univariate analysis. However insulin usage was found to be the single effective parameter on ASA resistance in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: There was no difference with regard to ASA resistance between groups. While ASA resistance was higher in men, smokers and insulin users, it was lower in patients using BBs and ACEIs. PMID:24948975

  18. Simultaneous quantitation of acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel along with their metabolites in human plasma using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chhonker, Yashpal S; Pandey, Chandra P; Chandasana, Hardik; Laxman, Tulsankar Sachin; Prasad, Yarra Durga; Narain, V S; Dikshit, Madhu; Bhatta, Rabi S

    2016-03-01

    The interest in therapeutic drug monitoring has increased over the last few years. Inter- and intra-patient variability in pharmacokinetics, plasma concentration related toxicity and success of therapy have stressed the need of frequent therapeutic drug monitoring of the drugs. A sensitive, selective and rapid liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the simultaneous quantification of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), salicylic acid, clopidogrel and carboxylic acid metabolite of clopidogrel in human plasma. The chromatographic separations were achieved on Waters Symmetry Shield(TM) C18 column (150 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) using 3.5 mm ammonium acetate (pH 3.5)-acetonitrile (10:90, v/v) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.75 mL/min. The present method was successfully applied for therapeutic drug monitoring of aspirin and clopidogrel in 67 patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:26230053

  19. Polysaccharide arabinogalactan from larch Larix sibirica as carrier for molecules of salicylic and acetylsalicylic acid: preparation, physicochemical and pharmacological study.

    PubMed

    Chistyachenko, Yulia S; Dushkin, Alexandr V; Polyakov, Nikolay E; Khvostov, Mikhail V; Tolstikova, Tatyana G; Tolstikov, Genrikh A; Lyakhov, Nikolay Z

    2015-05-01

    Inclusion complexes of salicylic acid (SA) and acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA) with polysaccharide arabinogalactan (AG) from larch wood Larix sibirica and Larix gmelinii were synthesized using mechanochemical technology. In the present study, we have investigated physicochemical properties of the synthesized complexes in solid state and in aqueous solutions as well as their anti-aggregation and ulcerogenic activity. The evidence of the complexes formation was obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation technique. It was shown that in aqueous solution the molecules of SA and ASA are in fast exchange between the complex with AG macromolecules and solution. The stability constant of aspirin complex was calculated. It was shown that mechanochemically synthesized complexes are more stable when compared to the complex obtained by mixing solutions of the components. Complexes of ASA show two-fold increase of anti-platelet effect. It allows to reduce the dose of the antithrombotic drug and its ulcerogenic activity. These results substantiate the possibility to design new preparations on the basis of ASA with increased activity and safety. PMID:24517849

  20. Influence of buffered and unbuffered acetylsalicylic acid on dental enamel and dentine in human teeth: an in vitro pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rogalla, K; Finger, W; Hannig, M

    1992-06-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to investigate the erosive effect of buffered and unbuffered acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on dental enamel and dentine in human teeth by scanning electron microscopy. In order to standardize the specimens and to improve comparability the dental enamel and dentine were superficially abraded. The enamel and dentine specimens were therefore particularly sensitive to the influences of acid agents. Concentrated solution of buffered chewable ASA tablets (500 mg ASA and 300 mg calcium carbonate in 5 ml water) showed no changes in the enamel surface structure after exposure times of 1 min, 5 min and 60 min. In contrast, minimal corrosive effects were already seen after exposure of the enamel surface to the unbuffered ASA solutions for 1 min. After exposure times of 5 min and 60 min erosion of the enamel was more pronounced. Immersion in the unbuffered ASA solution led to clearly visible micromorphological changes on the dentine surfaces even after exposure for 1 min. Exposure of the dentine specimens to the buffered ASA solutions led to only very slight changes in the surface morphology. Therefore, the scanning electron micrograph after exposure to buffered ASA is comparable to the picture of untreated dentine. PMID:1513188

  1. Acetylsalicylic acid does not alter thermo-effector responses during mild whole-body passive heat stress in young men.

    PubMed

    Carter, Stephen J; Herron, Robert L; Akers, S Zeb; Bishop, Phillip A

    2015-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), aspirin, exerts potent systemic effects that may interfere with normal thermo-effector responses. We investigated the influence of commonly ingested ASA doses on measures of skin blood flow (SkBF) and local sweat rate (SR) during whole-body, passive heat stress. Seven male participants completed counter-balanced trials to compare ASA treatments (single dose 325 mg or 4 consecutive days 81 mg (4-d 81 mg)) to control (no ASA). Laser-Doppler flowmetry provided an index of SkBF. A ventilated capsule measured local sweat rate via capacitance hygrometry. Mean body temperature ([Formula: see text]) was increased by 1 °C above baseline using a water-perfused suit. [Formula: see text] was similar at the onset of cutaneous vasodilation among trials. Cutaneous vascular conductance, expressed as a percentage change from baseline, was not different among trials. Additionally, [Formula: see text] at the onset of local SR and SR sensitivity did not differ among trials. While ASA has previously been shown to influence SkBF during heat stress, it is possible our cohort's relatively young age may have contributed to our dissimilar results. PMID:25697227

  2. Treadmill exercise enhances spatial learning ability through suppressing hippocampal apoptosis in Huntington’s disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, You-Mi; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Kim, Kijeong; Ha, Jonglin; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, and characterized as involuntary movement. Quinolinic acid has been used to produce an animal model of Huntington’s disease. In the present study, the effect of treadmill exercise on spatial-learning ability and motor coordination focusing on the apoptosis in the hippocampus was investigated using quinolinic acid-induced Huntington’s disease rats. Huntington’s disease was induced by unilateral intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid (2 μL of 100 nmol) using stereotaxic instrument. The rats in the treadmill exercise groups were subjected to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day during 14 days. Spatial learning ability and motor coordination were determined by radial 8-arm maze test and rota-rod test. Immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 and western blot for Bax and Bcl-2 were also conducted for the detection of apoptosis. In the present results, spatial learning ability and motor coordination were deteriorated by intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid. In contrast, treadmill exercise exerted ameliorating effect on quinolinic acid-induced deterioration of spatial learning ability and motor coordination. Bcl-2 expression in the hippocampus was de-creased and expressions of casepase-3 and Bax in the hippocampus were increased in the quinolinic acid-induced Huntington’s disease rats. Treadmill exercise increased Bcl-2 expression and decreased expressions of casepase-3 and Bax in the Huntington’s disease rats. The present results showed that treadmill exercise might ameliorate quinolinic acid-induced loss of spatial learning ability and motor coordination by suppressing apoptosis in the hippocampus. PMID:26171378

  3. Treadmill exercise enhances spatial learning ability through suppressing hippocampal apoptosis in Huntington's disease rats.

    PubMed

    Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, You-Mi; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Kim, Kijeong; Ha, Jonglin; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2015-06-01

    Huntington's disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, and characterized as involuntary movement. Quinolinic acid has been used to produce an animal model of Huntington's disease. In the present study, the effect of treadmill exercise on spatial-learning ability and motor coordination focusing on the apoptosis in the hippocampus was investigated using quinolinic acid-induced Huntington's disease rats. Huntington's disease was induced by unilateral intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid (2 μL of 100 nmol) using stereotaxic instrument. The rats in the treadmill exercise groups were subjected to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day during 14 days. Spatial learning ability and motor coordination were determined by radial 8-arm maze test and rota-rod test. Immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 and western blot for Bax and Bcl-2 were also conducted for the detection of apoptosis. In the present results, spatial learning ability and motor coordination were deteriorated by intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid. In contrast, treadmill exercise exerted ameliorating effect on quinolinic acid-induced deterioration of spatial learning ability and motor coordination. Bcl-2 expression in the hippocampus was de-creased and expressions of casepase-3 and Bax in the hippocampus were increased in the quinolinic acid-induced Huntington's disease rats. Treadmill exercise increased Bcl-2 expression and decreased expressions of casepase-3 and Bax in the Huntington's disease rats. The present results showed that treadmill exercise might ameliorate quinolinic acid-induced loss of spatial learning ability and motor coordination by suppressing apoptosis in the hippocampus. PMID:26171378

  4. Benfotiamine attenuates nicotine and uric acid-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Sharma, Ramica; Singh, Manjeet

    2008-01-01

    The study has been designed to investigate the effect of benfotiamine, a thiamine derivative, in nicotine and uric acid-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. Nicotine (2 mg kg(-1)day(-1), i.p., 4 weeks) and uric acid (150 mg kg(-1)day(-1), i.p., 3 weeks) were administered to produce VED in rats. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating serum and aortic concentration of nitrite/nitrate. Further, the integrity of vascular endothelium was assessed using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of thoracic aorta. Moreover, the oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and aortic superoxide anion generation. The administration of nicotine and uric acid produced VED by impairing the integrity of vascular endothelium and subsequently decreasing serum and aortic concentration of nitrite/nitrate and attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation. Further, nicotine and uric acid produced oxidative stress, which was assessed in terms of increase in serum TBARS and aortic superoxide generation. However, treatment with benfotiamine (70 mg kg(-1)day(-1), p.o.) or atorvastatin (30 mg kg(-1)day(-1) p.o., a standard agent) markedly prevented nicotine and uric acid-induced VED and oxidative stress by improving the integrity of vascular endothelium, increasing the concentration of serum and aortic nitrite/nitrate, enhancing the acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation and decreasing serum TBARS and aortic superoxide anion generation. Thus, it may be concluded that benfotiamine reduces the oxidative stress and consequently improves the integrity of vascular endothelium and enhances the generation of nitric oxide to prevent nicotine and uric acid-induced experimental VED. PMID:18951979

  5. Statins induce apoptosis in rat and human myotube cultures by inhibiting protein geranylgeranylation but not ubiquinone.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy E; Zhang, Xiaohua; Bleicher, Kimberly B; Dysart, Gary; Loughlin, Amy F; Schaefer, William H; Umbenhauer, Diane R

    2004-11-01

    Statins are widely used to treat lipid disorders. These drugs are safe and well tolerated; however, in <1% of patients, myopathy and/or rhabdomyolysis can develop. To better understand the mechanism of statin-induced myopathy, we examined the ability of structurally distinct statins to induce apoptosis in an optimized rat myotube model. Compound A (a lactone) and Cerivastatin (an open acid) induced apoptosis, as measured by TUNEL and active caspase 3 staining, in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, an epimer of Compound A (Compound B) exhibited a much weaker apoptotic response. Statin-induced apoptosis was completely prevented by mevalonate or geranylgeraniol, but not by farnesol. Zaragozic acid A, a squalene synthase inhibitor, caused no apoptosis on its own and had no effect on Compound-A-induced myotoxicity, suggesting the apoptosis was not a result of cholesterol synthesis inhibition. The geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitors GGTI-2133 and GGTI-2147 caused apoptosis in myotubes; the farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277 exhibited a much weaker effect. In addition, the prenylation of rap1a, a geranylgeranylated protein, was inhibited by Compound A in myotubes at concentrations that induced apoptosis. A similar statin-induced apoptosis profile was seen in human myotube cultures but primary rat hepatocytes were about 200-fold more resistant to statin-induced apoptosis. Although the statin-induced hepatotoxicity could be attenuated with mevalonate, no effect was found with either geranylgeraniol or farnesol. In studies assessing ubiquinone levels after statin treatment in rat and human myotubes, there was no correlation between ubiquinone levels and apoptosis. Taken together, these observations suggest that statins cause apoptosis in myotube cultures in part by inhibiting the geranylgeranylation of proteins, but not by suppressing ubiquinone concentration. Furthermore, the data from primary hepatocytes suggests a cell-type differential

  6. Effects of nimesulide, acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen and nabumetone on cyclooxygenase-1- and cyclooxygenase-2-mediated prostanoid production in healthy volunteers ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Kerola, Markku; Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Kosonen, Outi; Kankaanranta, Hannu; Sarna, Seppo; Moilanen, Eeva

    2009-01-01

    : The beneficial actions of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), whereas some of their adverse effects are associated mainly with inhibition of COX-1. Selective COX-2 inhibitors reduce the risk of gastrointestinal adverse events, but increase the risk of thromboembolic events pointing to importance of optimal COX-1/COX-2 inhibition in drug safety. We compared the effects of acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen, nabumetone and nimesulide on COX-1 and COX-2 pathways in healthy volunteers in an ex vivo set-up using single oral doses commonly used to treat acute pain. In a randomized, double-blind four-phase cross-over study, 15 healthy volunteers were given orally a single dose of either acetylsalicylic acid 500 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, nabumetone 1 g or nimesulide 100 mg. Blood samples were drawn before and 1, 3, 6, 24 and 48 hr after the drug for the assessment of COX-1 and COX-2 activity. COX-1 activity was measured as thromboxane(2) production during blood clotting and COX-2 activity as endotoxin-induced prostaglandin E(2) synthesis in blood leucocytes. The data show that after a single oral dose these four NSAIDs have different profiles of action on COX-1 and COX-2. As expected, acetylsalicylic acid appeared to be COX-1-selective and ibuprofen effectively inhibited both COX-1 and COX-2. Nabumetone showed only a slight inhibitory effect on COX-1 and COX-2. Nimesulide caused almost complete suppression of COX-2 activity and a partial reduction of COX-1 activity. This confirms the relative COX-2 selectivity of nimesulide. PMID:19152549

  7. [Comparative evaluation of antiplatelet efectiveness drugs of original and reproduced enteric forms of acetylsalicylic acid (clinical study ICAR))].

    PubMed

    Martsevich, S Iu; Tolpygina, S N; Lukina, Iu V; Voronina, V P; Kiseleva, N V; Boĭchenko, E S; Dubinskaia, R É; Khoseva, E N

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was a comparative study of antiplatelet activity of acetylsalicylic acid drugs, produced in gastro-resistant form trombopol 75 mg and aspirin cardio 100 mg in patients with high risk of cardiovascular events. Effect of trombopol 75 mg versus 100 mg aspirin cardio on platelet aggregation in 30 patients with high risk of cardiovascular events during 3 week treatment period was studied. Design method: blind, randomized, crossover method. Three weeks before the initial therapy, for those patients, who received antiplatelet platelet therapy at the time of inclusion in the study, this therapy was withdrew ("wash-out period"), after which patient was given one of the study drug (sequence of courses was s determined according to the scheme of randomization) with the recommendation of taking it daily in the morning at the same time. At each visit, before the next dose of the drug, blood samples for determination of ADP-induced platelet aggregation were taken, physical examination, measurement of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate were recorded, adverse events were recorded. Follow-up visit was performed 3 weeks later. 21 days after first study drug withdrawal, a second similar course of therapy with another drug was performed. Antiplatelet efficacy of aspirin was assessed by its effect on spontaneous and ADP- induced platelet aggregation. Aggregation activity was determined by turbidometric method by changing of translucent ability of the blood sample during the formation of aggregates after 2 minutes of exposure. As an inducer of aggregation ADP solutions of three concentrations (0.5, 1 and 2 mM) were used. No significant difference between compared drugs in influence on aggregation ability of platelets after 3 weeks of daily intake was found. No adverse events associated with taking of studied drugs were registered. It was concluded that, generic APD - trombopol 75 mg and aspirin cardio 100 mg were equivalent on antiplatelet efficacy and

  8. UV erythema reducing capacity of mizolastine compared to acetylsalicylic acid or both combined in comparison to indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Grundmann, J U; Böckelmann, R; Bonnekoh, B; Gollnick, H P

    2001-10-01

    UV light exerts hazardous effects such as induction of skin cancer and premature skin aging. In this study we evaluated an assumptive anti-inflammatory effect of the nonsedative histamine H1-receptor antagonist, mizolastine, on UV-induced acute sunburn reaction. Therefore, a clinical, randomized, double-blind, four-arm, crossover study was conducted in healthy young female volunteers (skin type II) comparing the UV sensitivity under mizolastine, acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA), indomethacin or a mizolastine/ASA combination. Moreover, HaCaT keratinocytes were incubated with mizolastine under various UV treatment modalities in vitro to study its effect on the release of inflammatory cytokines, i.e. interleukin (IL)-1 alpha, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). All three drugs were effective in suppressing the UVB-, UVA- and combined UVA/UVB-erythema. However, the strongest effects were observed using the combined treatment with both 250 mg ASA and 10 mg mizolastine. An inhibitory effect in vitro of 10 nM mizolastine upon UV-induced cytokine release from HaCaT keratinocytes was observed for IL-1 alpha at 24 h after 10 J/cm2 UVA1, for IL-6 at 48 h after 10 J/cm2 UVA1 and 30 mJ/cm2 UVB, and also for TNF-alpha at 4 h after 10 J/cm2 UVA, 10 J/cm2 UVA1 and 30 mJ/cm2 UVB, respectively. The combination of mizolastine and ASA can be strongly recommended as a protective measure against UV erythema development with a lower unwanted side effect profile than that of the hitherto treatment modality, i.e. indomethacin. PMID:11683039

  9. Next-generation re-sequencing of genes involved in increased platelet reactivity in diabetic patients on acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Postula, Marek; Janicki, Piotr K; Eyileten, Ceren; Rosiak, Marek; Kaplon-Cieslicka, Agnieszka; Sugino, Shigekazu; Wilimski, Radosław; Kosior, Dariusz A; Opolski, Grzegorz; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Mirowska-Guzel, Dagmara

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether rare missense genetic variants in several genes related to platelet functions and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) response are associated with the platelet reactivity in patients with diabetes type 2 (T2D) on ASA therapy. Fifty eight exons and corresponding introns of eight selected genes, including PTGS1, PTGS2, TXBAS1, PTGIS, ADRA2A, ADRA2B, TXBA2R, and P2RY1 were re-sequenced in 230 DNA samples from T2D patients by using a pooled PCR amplification and next-generation sequencing by Illumina HiSeq2000. The observed non-synonymous variants were confirmed by individual genotyping of 384 DNA samples comprising of the individuals from the original discovery pools and additional verification cohort of 154 ASA-treated T2DM patients. The association between investigated phenotypes (ASA induced changes in platelets reactivity by PFA-100, VerifyNow and serum thromboxane B2 level [sTxB2]), and accumulation of rare missense variants (genetic burden) in investigated genes was tested using statistical collapsing tests. We identified a total of 35 exonic variants, including 3 common missense variants, 15 rare missense variants, and 17 synonymous variants in 8 investigated genes. The rare missense variants exhibited statistically significant difference in the accumulation pattern between a group of patients with increased and normal platelet reactivity based on PFA-100 assay. Our study suggests that genetic burden of the rare functional variants in eight genes may contribute to differences in the platelet reactivity measured with the PFA-100 assay in the T2DM patients treated with ASA. PMID:26599574

  10. Efficacy of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) in skin B16-F0 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Vad, Nikhil M; Kudugunti, Shashi K; Wang, Hezhen; Bhat, G Jayarama; Moridani, Majid Y

    2014-05-01

    Several epidemiological studies show that aspirin can act as a chemopreventive agent and decrease the incidences of various cancers including melanoma. In this work, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) as an antimelanoma agent in B16-F0 cells and skin B16-F0 melanoma tumor mouse model. Our findings indicate that the IC50 (48 h) for ASA in B16-F0 melanoma cells was 100 μM and that ASA caused a dose- and time-dependent GSH depletion and increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in B16-F0 melanoma cells. Male C57BL/6 mice were inoculated s.c. with 1 × 10(6) B16-F0 melanoma cells. ASA (80, 100, and 150 mg/kg) was initiated on day 1 or day 7, or day 9 after cell inoculation and continued daily for 13, 7, and 5 days, respectively. Animals were weighed daily and sacrificed on day 13. The tumors were excised and weighed. The animals receiving 13 days of ASA therapy at 80, 100, and 150 mg/kg demonstrated tumor growth inhibition by 1 ± 12%, 19 ± 22%, and 50 ± 29%, respectively. Animals receiving 7 days of therapy at 80, 100, and 150 mg/kg demonstrated tumor growth inhibition by 12 ± 14%, 27 ± 14%, and 40 ± 14%, respectively. No significant tumor growth inhibition was observed with 5 days of therapy. ASA at 100 and 150 mg/kg caused significant tumor growth inhibition in C57BL/6 mice when administered for 13 and 7 days, respectively. The results obtained in this study are consistent with the recent epidemiologically based report that aspirin is associated with lower melanoma risk in humans. PMID:24492939

  11. Calpains, mitochondria, and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew A.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial activity is critical for efficient function of the cardiovascular system. In response to cardiovascular injury, mitochondrial dysfunction occurs and can lead to apoptosis and necrosis. Calpains are a 15-member family of Ca2+-activated cysteine proteases localized to the cytosol and mitochondria, and several have been shown to regulate apoptosis and necrosis. For example, in endothelial cells, Ca2+ overload causes mitochondrial calpain 1 cleavage of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger leading to mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation. Also, activated calpain 1 cleaves Bid, inducing cytochrome c release and apoptosis. In renal cells, calpains 1 and 2 promote apoptosis and necrosis by cleaving cytoskeletal proteins, which increases plasma membrane permeability and cleavage of caspases. Calpain 10 cleaves electron transport chain proteins, causing decreased mitochondrial respiration and excessive activation, or inhibition of calpain 10 activity induces mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. In cardiomyocytes, calpain 1 activates caspase 3 and poly-ADP ribose polymerase during tumour necrosis factor-α-induced apoptosis, and calpain 1 cleaves apoptosis-inducing factor after Ca2+ overload. Many of these observations have been elucidated with calpain inhibitors, but most calpain inhibitors are not specific for calpains or a specific calpain family member, creating more questions. The following review will discuss how calpains affect mitochondrial function and apoptosis within the cardiovascular system. PMID:22581845

  12. Comparison of the concentration-effect relationship of a local antiinflammatory agent and oral acetylsalicylic acid: the value of local application.

    PubMed

    Poisson, M; Ralambosoa, C; Blehaut, H; Astoin, J

    1985-01-01

    Using a pharmacological model, the comparison between acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), administered orally, and a solution combining two salicylate derivatives (ethyl 5-methoxy-salicylate and 3-phenyl-propyl-salicylate), applied locally, demonstrated the value of the local application. Indeed, the pharmacological activity was highly significant and directly related to the tissue concentration of salicyl ions, which was higher after local application of the solution than after oral administration of ASA. The local solution also resulted in a lower plasma concentration of salicylate ions, allowing high plasma salicylate concentrations to be avoided. PMID:4074414

  13. Properties of acid-induced currents in mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    PubMed

    Ergonul, Zuhal; Yang, Lei; Palmer, Lawrence G

    2016-05-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are cation channels that are activated by protons (H(+)). They are expressed in neurons throughout the nervous system and may play important roles in several neurologic disorders including inflammation, cerebral ischemia, seizures, neurodegeneration, anxiety, depression, and migraine. ASICs generally produce transient currents that desensitize in response to a decrease in extracellular pH Under certain conditions, the inactivation of ASICs can be incomplete and allow them to produce sustained currents. Here, we characterize the properties of both transient and sustained acid-induced currents in cultured mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. At pH levels between 7.3 and 7.1 they include "window currents" through ASICs. With stronger acid signals sustained currents are maintained in the absence of extracellular Na(+) or the presence of the ASIC blockers amiloride and Psalmotoxin-1(PcTx1). These sustained responses may have several different origins in these cells, including acid-induced stimulation of inward Cl(-) currents, block of outward K(+) currents, and augmentation of inward H(+) currents, properties that distinguish these novel sustained currents from the well-characterized transient currents. PMID:27173673

  14. Polyunsaturated Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Geranylgeranoic Acid Induces Unfolded Protein Response in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwao, Chieko; Shidoji, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    The acyclic diterpenoid acid geranylgeranoic acid (GGA) has been reported to induce autophagic cell death in several human hepatoma-derived cell lines; however, the molecular mechanism for this remains unknown. In the present study, several diterpenoids were examined for ability to induce XBP1 splicing and/or lipotoxicity for human hepatoma cell lines. Here we show that three groups of diterpenoids emerged: 1) GGA, 2,3-dihydro GGA and 9-cis retinoic acid induce cell death and XBP1 splicing; 2) all-trans retinoic acid induces XBP1 splicing but little cell death; and 3) phytanic acid, phytenic acid and geranylgeraniol induce neither cell death nor XBP1 splicing. GGA-induced ER stress/ unfolded protein response (UPR) and its lipotoxicity were both blocked by co-treatment with oleic acid. The blocking activity of oleic acid for GGA-induced XBP1 splicing was not attenuated by methylation of oleic acid. These findings strongly suggest that GGA at micromolar concentrations induces the so-called lipid-induced ER stress response/UPR, which is oleate-suppressive, and shows its lipotoxicity in human hepatoma cells. PMID:26186544

  15. Acid-induced hyperalgesia and anxio-depressive comorbidity in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Shao, Yen-Wen; Yen, Chen-Tung; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-05-28

    Fibromyalgia is a prevalent disorder characterized by chronic widespread pain (CWP) and complex comorbid symptoms. A CWP model is developed through repeated unilateral intramuscular injections of acid saline resulting in bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia in rats. The present study aims to evaluate whether both anxious and depressive comorbidities exist in this acid-induced pain model, similarly to patients with CWP syndromes. The anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated using the open field and elevated plus maze tests, and depression-like behaviors were measured by the forced swimming, sucrose consumption, and sucrose preference tests. The pain group receiving acidic saline displayed significantly lower paw withdrawal thresholds for 4weeks than animals in the vehicle group after repetitive intramuscular injections. The pain group showed a significantly shorter duration of exploring the central zone of the open field and the open arms of the elevated plus maze compared to the vehicle group. The pain group had a significantly lower preference for and consumption of the hedonic sucrose. Moreover, rats with chronic pain showed significantly longer immobility than the vehicle group in the forced swimming test. The results indicate that psychiatric behaviors are exacerbated in the CWP model. This study provides evidence for the validity of the acid-induced pain model analogous to patients with CWP syndromes. PMID:24726391

  16. Expression in the human brain of retinoic acid induced 1, a protein associated with neurobehavioural disorders.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Yara Dadalti; Stoney, Patrick N; Shearer, Kirsty D; Sementilli, Angelo; Nanescu, Sonia E; Sementilli, Pietro; McCaffery, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Retinoic acid induced 1 (RAI1) is a protein of uncertain mechanism of action which nevertheless has been the focus of attention because it is a major contributing factor in several human developmental disorders including Smith-Magenis and Potocki-Lupski syndromes. Further, RAI1 may be linked to adult neural disorders with developmental origins such as schizophrenia and autism. The protein has been extensively examined in the rodent but very little is known about its distribution in the human central nervous system. This study demonstrated the presence of RAI1 transcript in multiple regions of the human brain. The cellular expression of RAI1 protein in the human brain was found to be similar to that described in the mouse, with high levels in neurons, but not glia, of the dentate gyrus and cornus ammonis of the hippocampus. In the cerebellum, a second region of high expression, RAI1 was present in Purkinje cells, but not granule cells. RAI1 was also found in neurons of the occipital cortex. The expression of this retinoic acid-induced protein matched well in the hippocampus with expression of the retinoic acid receptors. The subcellular distribution of human neuronal RAI1 indicated its presence in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Overall, human RAI1 protein was found to be a highly expressed neuronal protein whose distribution matches well with its role in cognitive and motor skills. PMID:24519454

  17. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis. PMID:27598133

  18. Salicylic acid induces mitochondrial injury by inhibiting ferrochelatase heme biosynthesis activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipul; Liu, Shujie; Ando, Hideki; Ishii, Ryohei; Tateno, Shumpei; Kaneko, Yuki; Yugami, Masato; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Nureki, Osamu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid is a classic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although salicylic acid also induces mitochondrial injury, the mechanism of its antimitochondrial activity is not well understood. In this study, by using a one-step affinity purification scheme with salicylic acid-immobilized beads, ferrochelatase (FECH), a homodimeric enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, was identified as a new molecular target of salicylic acid. Moreover, the cocrystal structure of the FECH-salicylic acid complex was determined. Structural and biochemical studies showed that salicylic acid binds to the dimer interface of FECH in two possible orientations and inhibits its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis confirmed that Trp301 and Leu311, hydrophobic amino acid residues located at the dimer interface, are directly involved in salicylic acid binding. On a gel filtration column, salicylic acid caused a shift in the elution profile of FECH, indicating that its conformational change is induced by salicylic acid binding. In cultured human cells, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis, whereas salicylic acid did not exert its inhibitory effect in FECH knockdown cells. Concordantly, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, the salicylic acid-induced effect in zebrafish was partially rescued by FECH overexpression. Taken together, these findings illustrate that FECH is responsible for salicylic acid-induced inhibition of heme synthesis, which may contribute to its antimitochondrial and anti-inflammatory function. This study establishes a novel aspect of the complex pharmacological effects of salicylic acid. PMID:24043703

  19. STRUCTURAL REMODELING OF PROTEOGLYCANS UPON RETINOIC ACID-INDUCED DIFFERENTIATION OF NCCIT CELLS*

    PubMed Central

    Gasimli, Leyla; Stansfield, Hope E.; Nairn, Alison V.; Liu, Haiying; Paluh, Janet L.; Yang, Bo; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Moremen, Kelley W.; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Pluripotent and multipotent cells become increasingly lineage restricted through differentiation. Alterations to the cellular proteoglycan composition and structure should accompany these changes to influence cell proliferation, delineation of tissues and acquisition of cell migration capabilities. Retinoic acid plays an important role in pre-patterning of the early embryo. Retinoic acid can be used in vitro to induce differentiation, causing pluripotent and multipotent cells to become increasingly lineage restricted. We examined retinoic acid-induced changes in the cellular proteoglycan composition of the well-characterized teratocarcinoma line NCCIT. Our analysis revealed changes in the abundance of transcripts for genes encoding core proteins, enzymes that are responsible for early and late linkage region biosynthesis, as well as enzymes for GAG chain extension and modification. Transcript levels for genes encoding core proteins used as backbones for polysaccharide synthesis revealed highly significant increases in expression of lumican and decorin, 1500-fold and 2800-fold, respectively. Similarly, glypican 3, glypican 5, versican and glypican 6 showed increases between 5 and 70-fold. Significant decreases in biglycan, serglycin, glypican 4, aggrecan, neurocan, CD74 and glypican 1 were observed. Disaccharide analysis of the glycans in heparin/heparan sulfate and chondroitin/dermatan sulfate revealed retinoic acid-induced changes restricted to chondroitin/dermatan sulfate glycans. Our study provides the first detailed analysis of changes in the glycosaminoglycan profile of human pluripotent cells upon treatment with the retinoic acid morphogen. PMID:23053635

  20. Structural remodeling of proteoglycans upon retinoic acid-induced differentiation of NCCIT cells.

    PubMed

    Gasimli, Leyla; Stansfield, Hope E; Nairn, Alison V; Liu, Haiying; Paluh, Janet L; Yang, Bo; Dordick, Jonathan S; Moremen, Kelley W; Linhardt, Robert J

    2013-07-01

    Pluripotent and multipotent cells become increasingly lineage restricted through differentiation. Alterations to the cellular proteoglycan composition and structure should accompany these changes to influence cell proliferation, delineation of tissues and acquisition of cell migration capabilities. Retinoic acid plays an important role in pre-patterning of the early embryo. Retinoic acid can be used in vitro to induce differentiation, causing pluripotent and multipotent cells to become increasingly lineage restricted. We examined retinoic acid-induced changes in the cellular proteoglycan composition of the well-characterized teratocarcinoma line NCCIT. Our analysis revealed changes in the abundance of transcripts for genes encoding core proteins, enzymes that are responsible for early and late linkage region biosynthesis, as well as enzymes for GAG chain extension and modification. Transcript levels for genes encoding core proteins used as backbones for polysaccharide synthesis revealed highly significant increases in expression of lumican and decorin, 1,500-fold and 2,800-fold, respectively. Similarly, glypican 3, glypican 5, versican and glypican 6 showed increases between 5 and 70-fold. Significant decreases in biglycan, serglycin, glypican 4, aggrecan, neurocan, CD74 and glypican 1 were observed. Disaccharide analysis of the glycans in heparin/heparan sulfate and chondroitin/dermatan sulfate revealed retinoic acid-induced changes restricted to chondroitin/dermatan sulfate glycans. Our study provides the first detailed analysis of changes in the glycosaminoglycan profile of human pluripotent cells upon treatment with the retinoic acid morphogen. PMID:23053635

  1. Obestatin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Konturek, Peter; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide derived from the proghrelin, has been shown to exhibit some protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of obestatin administration on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Obestatin was administered intraperitoneally twice a day at a dose of 8 nmol/kg, starting 24 h after the induction of colitis. Seven or 14 days after the induction of colitis, the healing rate of the colon was evaluated. Results. Treatment with obestatin after induction of colitis accelerated the healing of colonic wall damage and this effect was associated with a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase and content of interleukin-1β. Moreover, obestatin administration significantly reversed the colitis-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous obestatin exhibits therapeutic effects in the course of acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect is related, at least in part, to the obestatin-evoked anti-inflammatory effect, an improvement of local blood flow, and an increase in cell proliferation in colonic mucosa. PMID:26798415

  2. Effects of trimetazidine in ethanol- and acetic acid-induced colitis: oxidant/anti-oxidant status.

    PubMed

    Girgin; Karaoglu; Tüzün; Erkus; Ozütemiz; Dinçer; Batur; Tanyalçin

    1999-11-01

    There is overwhelming evidence in favour of a significant role of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in man and in experimental animal models. This study was undertaken to investigate the possible protective effects of pretreatment with trimetazidine (TMZ) on the oxidant-anti-oxidant balance in ethanol- and acetic acid-induced colonic damage in rats. TMZ was chosen because of its various cytoprotective features (preserving cellular ATP levels, limiting intracellular acidosis and limiting inorganic phosphate, Na(+) and Ca(2+) accumulation) and anti-oxy characteristics which were previously reported. A total of 80 rats were randomized into eight major groups each consisting of 10 animals. Animals in groups 1, 2 and 3 served as models of ethanol-induced colitis (0.25 ml of 30% (v/v) ethanol), while group 4 served as their control. Animals in groups 5, 6 and 7 served as models of acetic acid-induced colitis (1 ml of 4% (v/v) acetic acid), while group 8 served as their control. TMZ was administered 5 mg/kg by intrarectal (i.r.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) routes to groups 1, 2, 5 and 6. Intraperitoneal administration of TMZ was used in order to evaluate its systemic effect while i.r. administration was used to determine its local effect. After decapitation, colon mucosa samples were obtained and evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities as markers for inflammation, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as markers for oxidant stress and reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels as markers for anti-oxidant status were determined. Acute colitis was observed in macroscopic and microscopic evaluation in ethanol- and acetic acid-administered groups compared with controls (P = 0.000). The macroscopic and microscopic scores in colitis groups were correlated with MPO activities (r = 0.5365, P = 0.000 and r = 0.5499, P = 0.000, respectively). MDA

  3. Dasatinib accelerates valproic acid-induced acute myeloid leukemia cell death by regulation of differentiation capacity.

    PubMed

    Heo, Sook-Kyoung; Noh, Eui-Kyu; Yoon, Dong-Joon; Jo, Jae-Cheol; Park, Jae-Hoo; Kim, Hawk

    2014-01-01

    Dasatinib is a compound developed for chronic myeloid leukemia as a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor against wild-type BCR-ABL and SRC family kinases. Valproic acid (VPA) is an anti-epileptic drug that also acts as a class I histone deacetylase inhibitor. The aim of this research was to determine the anti-leukemic effects of dasatinib and VPA in combination and to identify their mechanism of action in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Dasatinib was found to exert potent synergistic inhibitory effects on VPA-treated AML cells in association with G1 phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction involving the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and caspase-3, -7 and -9. Dasatinib/VPA-induced cell death thus occurred via caspase-dependent apoptosis. Moreover, MEK/ERK and p38 MAPK inhibitors efficiently inhibited dasatinib/VPA-induced apoptosis. The combined effect of dasatinib and VPA on the differentiation capacity of AML cells was more powerful than the effect of each drug alone, being sufficiently strong to promote AML cell death through G1 cell cycle arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis. MEK/ERK and p38 MAPK were found to control dasatinib/VPA-induced apoptosis as upstream regulators, and co-treatment with dasatinib and VPA to contribute to AML cell death through the regulation of differentiation capacity. Taken together, these results indicate that combined dasatinib and VPA treatment has a potential role in anti-leukemic therapy. PMID:24918603

  4. Formation of molecular complexes of salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, and methyl salicylate in a mixture of supercritical carbon dioxide with a polar cosolvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, V. E.; Antipova, M. L.; Gurina, D. L.; Odintsova, E. G.

    2015-08-01

    The solvate structures formed by salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, and methyl salicylate in supercritical (SC) carbon dioxide with a polar cosolvent (methanol, 0.03 mole fractions) at a density of 0.7 g/cm3 and a temperature of 318 K were studied by the molecular dynamics method. Salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids were found to form highly stable hydrogen-bonded complexes with methanol via the hydrogen atom of the carboxyl group. For methyl salicylate in which the carboxyl hydrogen is substituted by a methyl radical, the formation of stable hydrogen bonds with methanol was not revealed. The contribution of other functional groups of the solute to the interactions with the cosolvent was much smaller. An analysis of correlations between the obtained data and the literature data on the cosolvent effect on the solubility of the compounds in SC CO2 showed that the dissolving ability of SC CO2 with respect to a polar organic substance in the presence of a cosolvent increased only when stable hydrogen-bonded complexes are formed between this substance and the cosolvent.

  5. Food sensitivity reported by patients with asthma and hay fever. A relationship between food sensitivity and birch pollen-allergy and between food sensitivity and acetylsalicylic acid intolerance.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, N E

    1978-08-01

    Among adult patients with bronchial asthma and/or allergic rhinitis undergoing allergological investigation with skin test, nasal provocation test and RAST, 1129 answered a questionaire regarding food sensitivity (FS). 276 (24%) of the patients reported some kind of allergic symptoms on eating or handling various foods, of which hazel nut, apple and shell fish were the most often named. Females reported FS more often than males. A correlation was found between birch pollen allergy and FS with nuts, apple, peach, cherry, pear, plum, carrot and new potato. The higher the degree of birch pollen allergy, according to skin test, RAST or provocation test, the higher the frequency of FS. A correlation was found too between acetylsalicylic acid intolerance and FS with some foods, e.g. nuts, strawberry, almond, green pepper, hip, chocolate, egg, cabbage, milk and wine. The connection between birch pollen allergy and FS is probably explained by the structural relationship between birch pollen allergen and some allergens of the foodstuffs, whereas the high incidence of FS in acetylsalicylic acid-intolerant patients is probably explained by additives in foods as well as salicylates or benzoates naturally occurring in some food. PMID:717703

  6. Alpha-eleostearic acid and its dihydroxy derivative are major apoptosis-inducing components of bitter gourd.

    PubMed

    Kobori, Masuko; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Akimoto, Yukari; Yukizaki, Chizuko; Yoshida, Mitsuru

    2008-11-26

    Bitter gourd ( Momordica charantia L.) pericarp, placenta, and seed extracts were previously shown to induce apoptosis in HL60 human leukemia cells. To determine the active component that induces apoptosis in cancer cells, bitter gourd ethanol extract was fractionated by liquid-liquid partition and silica gel column chromatography. Several fractions obtained by silica gel column chromatography inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in HL60 cells. Among them, fraction 7 had the strongest activity in inhibiting growth and inducing apoptosis in HL60 cells. A component that induced apoptosis in HL60 cells was then isolated from fraction 7 by another silica gel column chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using a C18 column and was identified as (9Z,11E,13E)-15,16-dihydroxy-9,11,13-octadecatrienoic acid (15,16-dihydroxy alpha-eleostearic acid). 15,16-Dihydroxy alpha-eleostearic acid induced apoptosis in HL60 cells within 5 h at a concentration of 160 microM (50 microg/mL). (9Z,11E,13E)-9,11,13-Octadecatrienoic acid (alpha-eleostearic acid) is known to be the major conjugated linolenic acid in bitter gourd seeds. Therefore, the effect of alpha-eleostearic acid on the growth of some cancer and normal cell lines was examined. alpha-Eleostearic acid strongly inhibited the growth of some cancer and fibroblast cell lines, including those of HL60 leukemia and HT29 colon carcinoma. alpha-Eleostearic acid induced apoptosis in HL60 cells after a 24 h incubation at a concentration of 5 microM. Thus, alpha-eleostearic acid and the dihydroxy derivative from bitter gourd were suggested to be the major inducers of apoptosis in HL60 cells. PMID:18959405

  7. Valproic Acid-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis with Pseudocyst Formation: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sukanta; Khamrui, Sujan; Kataria, Mohnish; Biswas, Jayanta; Saha, Suman

    2015-08-01

    Valproic acid is the most widely used anti-epilep-tic drug in children, and it is probably the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. Outcomes for patients with valproic acid-associated pancreatitis vary from full recovery after discontinuation of the drug to severe acute pancreatitis and death. Here, we present a case of valproic acid-induced severe acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation in a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no resolution of the pseudocyst after discontinuation of valproic acid. The patient became symptomatic with a progressive increase in the size of the pseudocyst. She was successfully treated with cystogastrostomy and was well at 12-month follow-up. PMID:26366333

  8. A stochastic model featuring acid-induced gaps during tumor progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athni Hiremath, Sandesh; Surulescu, Christina

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we propose a phenomenological model for the formation of an interstitial gap between the tumor and the stroma. The gap is mainly filled with acid produced by the progressing edge of the tumor front. Our setting extends existing models for acid-induced tumor invasion models to incorporate several features of local invasion like formation of gaps, spikes, buds, islands, and cavities. These behaviors are obtained mainly due to the random dynamics at the intracellular level, the go-or-grow-or-recede dynamics on the population scale, together with the nonlinear coupling between the microscopic (intracellular) and macroscopic (population) levels. The wellposedness of the model is proved using the semigroup technique and 1D and 2D numerical simulations are performed to illustrate model predictions and draw conclusions based on the observed behavior.

  9. CA3 Synaptic Silencing Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Seizures and Hippocampal Network Oscillations123

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lily M. Y.; Wintzer, Marie E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Epilepsy is a neurological disorder defined by the presence of seizure activity, manifest both behaviorally and as abnormal activity in neuronal networks. An established model to study the disorder in rodents is the systemic injection of kainic acid, an excitatory neurotoxin that at low doses quickly induces behavioral and electrophysiological seizures. Although the CA3 region of the hippocampus has been suggested to be crucial for kainic acid-induced seizure, because of its strong expression of kainate glutamate receptors and its high degree of recurrent connectivity, the precise role of excitatory transmission in CA3 in the generation of seizure and the accompanying increase in neuronal oscillations remains largely untested. Here we use transgenic mice in which CA3 pyramidal cell synaptic transmission can be inducibly silenced in the adult to demonstrate CA3 excitatory output is required for both the generation of epileptiform oscillatory activity and the progression of behavioral seizures. PMID:27022627

  10. Valproic Acid-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis with Pseudocyst Formation: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Khamrui, Sujan; Kataria, Mohnish; Biswas, Jayanta; Saha, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid is the most widely used anti-epilep­tic drug in children, and it is probably the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. Outcomes for patients with valproic acid-associated pancreatitis vary from full recovery after discontinuation of the drug to severe acute pancreatitis and death. Here, we present a case of valproic acid-induced severe acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation in a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no resolution of the pseudocyst after discontinuation of valproic acid. The patient became symptomatic with a progressive increase in the size of the pseudocyst. She was successfully treated with cystogastrostomy and was well at 12-month follow-up. PMID:26366333

  11. Study of dynamic process of acetic acid induced-whitening in epithelial tissues at cellular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao T.; Qu, Jianan Y.; Cheung, Tak Hong; Yim, So Fan; Wong, Yick Fu

    2005-06-01

    Acetic acid, inducing transient whitening (acetowhitening) when applied to epithelial tissues, is a commonly used contrast agent for detecting early cervical cancer. The goals of this research are to investigate the temporal characteristics of acetowhitening process in cervical epithelial tissue at cellular level and develop a clear understanding of the diagnostic information carried in the acetowhitening signal. A system measuring time-resolved reflectance was built to study the rising and decay processes of acetowhitening signal from the monolayered cell cultures of normal and cancerous cervical squamous cells. It is found that the dynamic processes of acetowhitening in normal and cancerous cells are significantly different. The results of this study provide insight valuable to further understand the acetowhitening process in epithelial cells and to encourage the development of an objective procedure to detect the early cervical cancers based on quantitative monitoring of the dynamic process of acetowhitening

  12. Photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced photosensitization: current clinical status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Stuart L.; Golub, Allyn L.; Shulman, D. Geoffrey

    1995-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced photosensitization (ALA PDT) via endogenous protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) synthesis has been reported as efficacious, using topical formulations, in the treatment of a variety of dermatologic diseases including superficial basal cell carcinoma, Bowen's disease, and actinic (solar) keratoses. Application of ALA PDT to the detection and treatment of both malignant and non-malignant diseases of internal organs has recently been reported. Local internal application of ALA has been used for the detection, via PpIX fluorescence, of pathological conditions of the human urinary bladder and for selective endometrial ablation in animal model systems. Systemic, oral administration of ALA has been used for ALA PDT of superficial head and neck cancer and of colorectal cancer. This paper reviews the current clinical status of ALA PDT.

  13. Effects of paracetamol and propacetamol on gastric mucosal damage and gastric lipid peroxidation caused by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in rats.

    PubMed

    Galunska, B; Marazova, K; Tankova, T; Popov, A; Frangov, P; Krushkov, I; Di Massa, A

    2002-08-01

    We have studied the effect of paracetamol and its pro-drug propacetamol on gastric mucosal damage induced by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and its possible relation to changes in gastric lipid peroxidation status in rats. Paracetamol or propacetamol were administered intragastrically 1h before ASA (300 mg kg(-1)) in the following equivalent doses: 62.5, 125.0 and 250.0 mg kg(-1) or 125.0, 250.0 and 500.0 mg kg(-1), respectively. The effects of the tested agents were compared to that of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) 15, 30 and 60 mg kg(-1). Gastric ulcer formation was estimated morphometrically 4h after ASA administration. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (reduced, GSH, and oxidized, GSSG) and uric acid (UA) were determined in gastric mucosa and blood plasma and used as biochemical markers of the oxidative status. The results showed that paracetamol (250, 125, 62.5 mg kg(-1)) and propacetamol (500, 250, 125 mg kg(-1)) diminished the area of ASA-induced gastric lesions. The effect of propacetamol was more pronounced than that of paracetamol and similar to that of PGE2. Gastric MDA increased 3-fold in the ASA-group. The tested agents reduced it by a range of 30-70%. In all pretreated groups gastric glutathione and UA levels were found higher than that of control group and lower than that of ASA-group. Paracetamol and propacetamol, as well as PGE2, diminished the lipid peroxidation in plasma to a lesser extent than in gastric mucosa, but maintained elevated levels of the selective plasma antioxidant UA. These results show that the ASA-induced gastric mucosal damage is accompanied by the development of oxidative stress, evidenced by the accumulation of MDA, and concomitant initial activation of cell antioxidant defences. As paracetamol and propacetamol tend to decrease gastric lesions caused by ASA and alter gastric mucosal MDA, glutathione and UA values in a favorable manner, it could be suggested that their effects on the gastric mucosa could be related to interference with

  14. Histamine H2 receptor antagonists for decreasing gastrointestinal harms in adults using acetylsalicylic acid: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tricco, Andrea C; Alateeq, Abdullah; Tashkandi, Mariam; Mamdani, Muhammad; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Straus, Sharon E

    2012-01-01

    Background It is unclear if histamine H2 receptor antagonists (H2 blockers) prevent a variety of gastrointestinal harms among patients taking acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) over long periods. Methods Electronic databases (e.g., MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; from inception to November 2010) and reference lists of retrieved articles were searched. Randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of H2 blockers in reducing gastrointestinal harms (bleeding, ulcers) among adults taking ASA for 2 weeks or longer were included. Two reviewers independently abstracted study and patient characteristics and appraised study quality using the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. Peto odds ratio (OR) meta-analysis was performed, 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated, and statistical heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 and χ2 statistics. Results Six RCTs (4 major publications and 2 companion reports) with a total of 498 participants (healthy volunteers or patients with arthritis, cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease, or diabetes mellitus) were included. One trial adequately reported allocation concealment and sequence generation, with the other 3 trials being judged as unclear for both aspects. In one RCT, no statistically significant differences for gastrointestinal hemorrhage requiring admission to hospital (p = 0.14) or blood transfusion (p = 0.29) were observed between the group receiving concomitant famotidine and ASA and the group receiving concomitant placebo and ASA. After a median of 8 weeks’ follow-up, H2 blockers were more effective than placebo in reducing gastrointestinal hemorrhage (2 RCTs, total of 447 patients, OR 0.07, 95% CI 0.02–0.23) and peptic ulcers (3 RCTs, total of 465 patients, OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.12–0.36) among patients taking ASA for 2 weeks or longer. Despite substantial clinical heterogeneity across the studies, including types of H2 blockers, dosing of ASA and underlying conditions, no

  15. Esophageal Submucosal Injection of Capsaicin but Not Acid Induces Symptoms in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert H; Korsapati, Hariprasad; Bhalla, Vikas; Varki, Nissi; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is a candidate for mediating acid-induced symptoms in the esophagus. We conducted studies to determine if the presence of acid in the mucosa/submucosa and direct activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin elicited symptoms in normal healthy subjects. We also studied the presence of TRPV1 receptors in the esophagus. Methods Unsedated endoscopy was performed on healthy subjects with no symptoms. Using a sclerotherapy needle, normal saline (pH 2.0–7.5) was injected into the mucosa/submucosa, 5 cm above the Z line. In a separate group of healthy subjects, injection of capsaicin and vehicle was also studied. Quality of symptoms was reported using the McGill Pain Questionnaire, and symptom intensity using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Immunohistochemistry was performed on 8 surgical esophagus specimens using TRPV1 antibody. Results Acid injection either did not elicit or elicited mild symptoms in subjects at all pH solutions. Capsaicin but not the vehicle elicited severe heartburn/chest pain in all subjects. Mean VAS for capsaicin was 91 ± 3 and symptoms lasted for 25 ± 1 minutes. Immunohistochemistry revealed a linear TRPV1 staining pattern between the epithelial layer and the submucosa that extended into the papillae. Eighty-five percent of papillae stained positive for TRPV1 with a mean 1.1 positive papillae per high-powered field. Conclusions The mechanism of acid-induced heartburn and chest pain is not the simple interaction of hydrogen ions with afferents located in the esophageal mucosa and submucosa. TRPV1 receptors are present in the lamina propria and their activation induces heartburn and chest pain. PMID:26932896

  16. Gallic acid induced apoptotic events in HCT-15 colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Aruna Priyadharshni; Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Mandal, Mahitosh; Supriyanto, Eko; Muhamad, Ida Idayu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory action of diet-derived phenolic compound gallic acid (GA) against HCT-15 colon cancer cells. METHODS: The antiproliferative effect of GA against colon cancer cells was determined by performing thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The colony forming ability of GA treated colon cancer cells was evaluated using the colony forming assay. The cell cycle changes induced by GA in HCT-15 cells were analyzed by propidium iodide staining. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential of HCT-15 exposed to GA was assessed using 2’,7’-dichlorfluorescein-diacetate and rhodamine-123 respectively, with the help of flow cytometry. Morphological changes caused by GA treatment in the colon cancer cells were identified by scanning electron microscope and photomicrograph examination. Apoptosis was confirmed using flow cytometric analysis of GA treated HCT-15 cells after staining with Yo-Pro-1. RESULTS: MTT assay results illustrated that GA has an inhibitory effect on HCT-15 cells with IC50 value of 740 μmol/L. A time-dependent inhibition of colony formation was evident with GA treatment. Cell cycle arrest was evident from the accumulation of GA treated HCT-15 cells at sub-G1 phase (0.98 ± 1.03 vs 58.01 ± 2.05) with increasing exposure time. Flow cytometric analysis of GA treated HCT-15 cells depicted early events associated with apoptosis like lipid layer breakage and fall in mitochondrial membrane potential apart from an increase in the generation of ROS which were in a time dependent manner. SEM and photomicrograph images of the GA-treated cells displayed membrane blebbing and cell shrinking characteristics of apoptosis. Further apoptosis confirmation by Yo-Pro-1 staining also showed the time-dependent increase of apoptotic cells after treatment. CONCLUSION: These results show that GA induced ROS dependent apoptosis and inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells. PMID:27099438

  17. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS IN CIRCULATING ESTRADIOL: EFFECTS IN BOTH CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMIZED/STEROID-PRIMED FEMALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    RTD-03-031
    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations in Circulating Estradiol: Effects in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized/Steroid-primed Female Rats. Reproductive Toxicology (in press).

    Abstract

    Oral exposures to high concentrations of th...

  18. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS OF ESTRADIOL IN THE CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMOZED/ESTRADIOL-IMPLANTED FEMALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations of Estradiol in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized / Estradiol-implanted Female Rats

    ABSTRACT
    Haloacetic acids are one of the principal classes of disinfection by-products generated by the chlorination of mun...

  19. Apoptosis in Anthracycline Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianjian; Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Wei, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is a tightly regulated physiologic process of programmed cell death that occurs in both normal and pathologic tissues. Numerous in vitro or in vivo studies have indicated that cardiomyocyte death through apoptosis and necrosis is a primary contributor to the progression of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy. There are now several pieces of evidence to suggest that activation of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways contribute to anthracycline-induced apoptosis in the heart. Novel strategies were developed to address a wide variety of cardiotoxic mechanisms and apoptotic pathways by which anthracycline influences cardiac structure and function. Anthracycline-induced apoptosis provides a very valid representation of cardiotoxicity in the heart, an argument which has implications for the most appropriate animal models of damaged heart plus diverse pharmacological effects. In this review we describe various aspects of the current understanding of apoptotic cell death triggered by anthracycline. Differences in the sensitivity to anthracycline-induced apoptosis between young and adult hearts are also discussed. PMID:22212952

  20. Rho Kinase ROCK2 Mediates Acid-Induced NADPH Oxidase NOX5-S Expression in Human Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weibiao

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of the progression from Barrett’s esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) are not fully understood. We have shown that NOX5-S may be involved in this progression. However, how acid upregulates NOX5-S is not well known. We found that acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression was significantly decreased by the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y27632 in BE mucosal biopsies and FLO-1 EA cells. In addition, acid treatment significantly increased the Rho kinase activity in FLO-1 cells. The acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production was significantly decreased by knockdown of Rho kinase ROCK2, but not by knockdown of ROCK1. Conversely, the overexpression of the constitutively active ROCK2, but not the constitutively active ROCK1, significantly enhanced the NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production. Moreover, the acid-induced increase in Rho kinase activity and in NOX5-S mRNA expression was blocked by the removal of calcium in both FLO-1 and OE33 cells. The calcium ionophore A23187 significantly increased the Rho kinase activity and NOX5-S mRNA expression. We conclude that acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production may depend on the activation of ROCK2, but not ROCK1, in EA cells. The acid-induced activation of Rho kinase may be mediated by the intracellular calcium increase. It is possible that persistent acid reflux present in BE patients may increase the intracellular calcium, activate ROCK2 and thereby upregulate NOX5-S. High levels of reactive oxygen species derived from NOX5-S may cause DNA damage and thereby contribute to the progression from BE to EA. PMID:26901778

  1. Multiple copies of a bile acid-inducible gene in Eubacterium sp. strain VPI 12708.

    PubMed Central

    Gopal-Srivastava, R; Mallonee, D H; White, W B; Hylemon, P B

    1990-01-01

    Eubacterium sp. strain VPI 12708 is an anaerobic intestinal bacterium which possesses inducible bile acid 7-dehydroxylation activity. Several new polypeptides are produced in this strain following induction with cholic acid. Genes coding for two copies of a bile acid-inducible 27,000-dalton polypeptide (baiA1 and baiA2) have been previously cloned and sequenced. We now report on a gene coding for a third copy of this 27,000-dalton polypeptide (baiA3). The baiA3 gene has been cloned in lambda DASH on an 11.2-kilobase DNA fragment from a partial Sau3A digest of the Eubacterium DNA. DNA sequence analysis of the baiA3 gene revealed 100% homology with the baiA1 gene within the coding region of the 27,000-dalton polypeptides. The baiA2 gene shares 81% sequence identity with the other two genes at the nucleotide level. The flanking nucleotide sequences associated with the baiA1 and baiA3 genes are identical for 930 bases in the 5' direction from the initiation codon and for at least 325 bases in the 3' direction from the stop codon, including the putative promoter regions for the genes. An additional open reading frame (occupying from 621 to 648 bases, depending on the correct start codon) was found in the identical 5' regions associated with the baiA1 and baiA3 clones. The 5' sequence 930 bases upstream from the baiA1 and baiA3 genes was totally divergent. The baiA2 gene, which is part of a large bile acid-inducible operon, showed no homology with the other two genes either in the 5' or 3' direction from the polypeptide coding region, except for a 15-base-pair presumed ribosome-binding site in the 5' region. These studies strongly suggest that a gene duplication (baiA1 and baiA3) has occurred and is stably maintained in this bacterium. Images PMID:2376563

  2. Spaceflight Associated Apoptosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichiki, Albert T.; Gibson, Linda A.; Allebban, Zuhair

    1996-01-01

    Lymphoid tissues have been shown to atrophy in rats flown on Russian spaceflights. Histological examination indicated evidence for cell degradation. Lymphoid tissues from rats flown on Spacelab Life Sciences-2 mission were analyzed for apoptosis by evidence of fragmented lymphocytes, which could be engulfed by macrophages, or DNA strand breaks using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Apoptosis was not detected in the thymus and spleen collected inflight or from the synchronous ground rats but was detected in the thymus, spleen and inguinal lymph node of the flight animals on recovery. These results indicate that the apoptosis observed in the lymphatic tissues of the rats on recovery could have been induced by the gravitational stress of reentry, corroborating the findings from the early space-flight observations.

  3. Effects of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), ASA plus L-glutamine and L-glutamine on healing of chronic gastric ulcer in the rat.

    PubMed

    Okabe, S; Takeuchi, K; Honda, K; Takagi, K

    1976-01-01

    A chronic gastric ulcer model was produced in rats by the subserosal injection of 20% acetic acid solution (0.015 ml) in order to examine whether (1) acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) irritates the chronic gastric ulcer in active or healed or diminished stage, (2) L-glutamine, given together with ASA, inhibits the adverse effect of ASA. Oral ASA 200 mg/kg/day, given in two divided doses for 10 consecutive days, apparently delayed the healing of the gastric ulcer and irritated the healed ulcer to reulcerate. L-Glutamine, 1,500 mg/kg/day, which was given together with ASA in two divided doses, markedly protected the gastric ulcer both in active and healed stages from the deleterious activity of ASA. PMID:955326

  4. Editorial on low-dose acetylsalicylic acid treatment and impact on short-term mortality in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection: a propensity score-matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Schoergenhofer, Christian; Schwameis, Michael; Lagler, Heimo; Jilma, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    The manuscript "Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid Treatment and Impact on Short-Term Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) Bloodstream Infection: A propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study" published in Critical Care Medicine by Osthoff et al. reported an association of aspirin intake with a reduced short-term mortality. Direct anti-microbial effects of aspirin and its metabolite salicylate were suggested in preclinical studies. Especially intriguing is the inclusion of a control group with Escherichia coli (E. coli) blood stream infections in this study, in which aspirin was not associated with an improved outcome. However, as other observational studies also reported benefits of aspirin in critically ill patients, randomized trials are needed to confirm the effects of low-dose aspirin. PMID:27294095

  5. Editorial on low-dose acetylsalicylic acid treatment and impact on short-term mortality in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection: a propensity score-matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Schoergenhofer, Christian; Schwameis, Michael; Lagler, Heimo

    2016-01-01

    The manuscript “Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid Treatment and Impact on Short-Term Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) Bloodstream Infection: A propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study” published in Critical Care Medicine by Osthoff et al. reported an association of aspirin intake with a reduced short-term mortality. Direct anti-microbial effects of aspirin and its metabolite salicylate were suggested in preclinical studies. Especially intriguing is the inclusion of a control group with Escherichia coli (E. coli) blood stream infections in this study, in which aspirin was not associated with an improved outcome. However, as other observational studies also reported benefits of aspirin in critically ill patients, randomized trials are needed to confirm the effects of low-dose aspirin. PMID:27294095

  6. [Sphingolipid and apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Hu, Xiao-Song; Shi, Jie-Ping

    2003-07-01

    Over the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the study of sphingolipids with the development of biological techniques. Sphingolipids play important roles in diverse physiological process, including cytoskeleton migration, angiogenesis, embryonic development and signal transduction. Except for this, the lastest evidence has suggested that sphingolipids and their metabolite (ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine 1-phosphate) can induce apoptosis in a wide variety of tumor cell lines such as LoVo HT29, Bel7402, A549, CNE2 cells. This paper is attempted to review the recent advances of investigation into the relationship between sphingolipids and apoptosis. PMID:14628466

  7. [Apoptosis during embryo development].

    PubMed

    Jezek, Davor; Kozina, Viviana

    2009-10-01

    The development of human embryo includes two essential processes, i.e., rapid mitotic activity of cells and gradual differentiation of tissues and organs. The latter process is very often characterized by extensive migration of cells from their site of origin to the site of definitive location, inductive action of the neighboring germ layers and programmed cell death (apoptosis). This paper describes examples of proliferative and apoptotic processes during the development of human embryo. The development of trilaminar germ disk, skin, gonads, central and peripheral nerve system as well as limbs provides instructive examples of how apoptosis regulates the development and differentiation of cells. PMID:19999545

  8. Extracellularly secreted APE1/Ref-1 triggers apoptosis in triple-negative breast cancer cells via RAGE binding, which is mediated through acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kim, Ki Mo; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Choi, Sunga

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the mechanism of apoptosis caused by post-translational modification, hyperacetylation in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. We previously showed that trichostatin A (TSA) induced secretion of acetylated apurinic apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (Ac-APE1/Ref-1). This is the first report showing that Ac-APE1/Ref-1 initiates apoptosis in TNBC cells by binding to the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). The functional significance of secreted Ac-APE1/Ref-1 was studied by induction of intracellular hyperacetylation through co-treatment with acetylsalicylic acid and TSA in MDA-MB-231 cells. In response to hyperacetylation, secretion of Ac-APE1/Ref-1 in vesicles was observed, resulting in significantly decreased cell viability and induction of apoptosis with increased expression of RAGE. The hyperacetylation-induced apoptosis was similar in two other TNBC cell lines: BT-459 and MDA-MB-468. Therefore, hyperacetylation may be a therapeutic target for treatment of TNBCs. This study introduces a novel paradigm whereby post-translational modification induces apoptotic cell death in breast cancer cells resistant to standard chemotherapeutic agents through secretion of auto- or paracrine molecules such as Ac-APE1/Ref-1. PMID:26125438

  9. The nitric oxide-donating derivative of acetylsalicylic acid, NCX 4016, stimulates glucose transport and glucose transporters translocation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kaddai, V; Gonzalez, T; Bolla, M; Le Marchand-Brustel, Y; Cormont, M

    2008-07-01

    NCX 4016 is a nitric oxide (NO)-donating derivative of acetylsalicylic acid. NO and salicylate, in vivo metabolites of NCX 4016, were shown to be potential actors in controlling glucose homeostasis. In this study, we evaluated the action of NCX 4016 on the capacity of 3T3-L1 adipocytes to transport glucose in basal and insulin-stimulated conditions. NCX 4016 induced a twofold increase in glucose uptake in parallel with the translocation of the glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4 to the plasma membrane, leaving unaffected their total expression levels. Importantly, NCX 4016 further increased glucose transport induced by a physiological concentration of insulin. The stimulatory effect of NCX 4016 on glucose uptake appears to be mediated by its NO moiety. Indeed, it is inhibited by a NO scavenger and treatment with acetylsalicylic or salicylic acid had no effect. Although NO is involved in the action of NCX 4016, it did not mainly depend on the soluble cGMP cyclase/protein kinase G pathway. Furthermore, NCX 4016-stimulated glucose transport did not involve the insulin-signaling cascade required to stimulate glucose transport. NCX 4016 induces a small activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase and no activation of other stress-activated signaling molecules, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase, inhibitory factor kappaB, or AMP-activated kinases. Interestingly, NCX 4016 modified the content of S-nitrosylated proteins in adipocytes. Taken together, our results indicate that NCX 4016 induced glucose transport in adipocytes through a novel mechanism possibly involving S-nitrosylation. NCX 4016 thus possesses interesting characteristics to be considered as a candidate molecule for the treatment of patients suffering from metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. PMID:18492771

  10. Oleic acid-induced lung injury in rabbits: effect of fibrinogen depletion with Arvin

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, M.F.; Doerschuk, C.M.; Brumwell, M.L.; Belzberg, A.; Hogg, J.C.

    1988-03-01

    The role of fibrinogen in the evolution of the increased permeability after oleic acid-induced lung injury was studied in New Zealand White rabbits. Animals depleted of fibrinogen by treatment with Malayan pit viper venom were compared with untreated rabbits immediately and at 1 and 24 h after injury. The increased permeability to albumin and elevated extravascular lung water (EVLW) associated with lung injury returned to control values by 24 h in untreated animals. Fibrinogen-depleted animals had a higher mortality (10/25 vs. 2/17, P less than 0.02) and showed a greater immediate increase in permeability to albumin that returned to control values at 1 and 24 h after injury, as well as trends toward elevated blood-free dry lung weight and larger increases in EVLW that persisted for 24 h. These findings indicate that fibrinogen-related proteins play an important role in controlling the microvascular injury that is produced by oleic acid. However, when these proteins are depleted, other mechanisms partially control the leak at later stages of the repair process.

  11. Saturated phosphatidic acids mediate saturated fatty acid-induced vascular calcification and lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Masashi; Miyazaki-Anzai, Shinobu; Keenan, Audrey L; Okamura, Kayo; Kendrick, Jessica; Chonchol, Michel; Offermanns, Stefan; Ntambi, James M; Kuro-O, Makoto; Miyazaki, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that saturated fatty acid-induced (SFA-induced) lipotoxicity contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms that underlie SFA-induced lipotoxicity remain unclear. Here, we have shown that repression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) enzymes, which regulate the intracellular balance of SFAs and unsaturated FAs, and the subsequent accumulation of SFAs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), are characteristic events in the development of vascular calcification. We evaluated whether SMC-specific inhibition of SCD and the resulting SFA accumulation plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification and generated mice with SMC-specific deletion of both Scd1 and Scd2. Mice lacking both SCD1 and SCD2 in SMCs displayed severe vascular calcification with increased ER stress. Moreover, we employed shRNA library screening and radiolabeling approaches, as well as in vitro and in vivo lipidomic analysis, and determined that fully saturated phosphatidic acids such as 1,2-distearoyl-PA (18:0/18:0-PA) mediate SFA-induced lipotoxicity and vascular calcification. Together, these results identify a key lipogenic pathway in SMCs that mediates vascular calcification. PMID:26517697

  12. Protective effect of Dillenia indica L. on acetic acid induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Somani, S J; Badgujar, L B; Sutariya, B K; Saraf, M N

    2014-09-01

    The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an idiopathic, immune mediated and chronic inflammation of the intestine. The study aimed to elucidate the ameliorative effect of methanolic extract of Dillenia indica (DIME), hexane fraction (HFDI) and chloroform fraction (CFDI) of Dillenia indica in acetic acid induced experimental colitis in mice. Macroscopic score, colon weight, colonic catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), and histological changes were recorded after the treatment regimen of 7 days. Intra-rectal instillation of acetic acid caused enhanced macroscopic score, colon weight, colonic MPO, MDA, and TNF-alpha level. It caused significant decreased level of CAT, SOD and GSH. DIME (800 mg/kg), HFDI (200 mg/kg) and CFDI (200 mg/kg) treatment exhibited significant effect in lowering macroscopic score, colon weight, MPO, MDA, TNF-alpha levels and elevation of CAT, GSH and SOD levels. The results suggest that D. indica has ameliorating effects on experimental colitis by inhibiting the proinflammatory mediators like TNF-alpha production. PMID:25241587

  13. Acid-induced changes in DOC quality in an experimental whole-lake manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, W.F.; Schindler, D.W.; Page, S.J.; Stainton, M.P.

    1998-10-01

    Fluorescence analyses of archived water samples were used to typify dissolved organic carbon (DOC) quality in experimentally acidified lakes and reference lakes at the Experimental Lakes Area, in northwestern Ontario. Carbon-specific DOC fluorescence (CSF) during peak acidification was 40--50% of that for a high-DOC reference lake and similar to a low-DOC reference lake. Reference lakes showed similar but smaller decreases in CSF during several years of prolonged drought in the late 1980s. During the 1990s, recovery from acidification resulted in increased CSF, whereas reference lakes remained unchanged during the same time period. In addition to causing decreased [DOC], acidification causes changes in fluorescence-peak geometry that indicate a switch in DOC quality from allochthonous to autochthonous-like during acidification. The acid-induced change in DOC quality was likely due to increased chemical oxidation or precipitation of the UV-absorbent aromatic portions of allochthonous DOC molecules, leaving more UV-transparent aliphatic chains. The change in the nature of DOC following acidification and drought may have an important role in physical, biological, and chemical processes within these lakes. With recovery from acidification, DOC quality has also recovered.

  14. The 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced porphyrin biosynthesis in benign and malignant cells of the skin.

    PubMed

    Lang, K; Bolsen, K; Stahl, W; Ruzicka, T; Sies, H; Lehmann, P; Fritsch, C

    2001-12-01

    In fluorescence diagnosis and photodynamic therapy of neoplastic tissues 5-aminolevulinic acid is used to synthesize endogenous porphyrins as photosensitizers. The efficacy of neoplastic tissues to fluorescence diagnosis and photodynamic therapy is thought to be dependent on the total level of intralesional formed porphyrins. The available profiles of porphyrin metabolites in normal and in neoplastic cell lines after administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid vary considerably. Thus, this is the first in-vitro study which compares the porphyrin biosynthesis in normal skin cells (HaCaT, fibroblasts) with melanoma cells (Bro, SKMel-23, SKMel-28). After incubation with 1 mM 5-aminolevulinic acid, kinetics of porphyrin levels and metabolites were determined in the cells and the corresponding supernatants. Exogenous 5-aminolevulinic acid induced porphyrin formation in all cells with maximum values after an incubation period of 16-36 h. Increase of porphyrin levels varied from 10- to 80-fold (SKMel-28>HaCaT>fibroblasts>SKMel-23>Bro) with minimum 1.5 times higher levels of porphyrins in the supernatants than in the cells. In cells and supernatants protoporphyrin and coproporphyrin were the predominantly formed porphyrin metabolites. Metastatic melanoma cells (SKMel-23, SKMel-28) accumulated much higher porphyrin levels than primary melanoma cells (Bro). In conclusion, by optimizing the treatment modalities, especially the light source, topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) could become a treatment alternative of melanoma metastases in progressive disease. PMID:11748002

  15. Ulcer healing activity of Mumijo aqueous extract against acetic acid induced gastric ulcer in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shahrokhi, Nader; Keshavarzi, Zakieh; Khaksari, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Gastric ulcer is an important clinical problem, chiefly due to extensive use of some drugs. The aim was to assess the activity of Mumijo extract (which is used in traditional medicine) against acetic acid induced gastric ulcer in rats. Materials and Methods: The aqueous extract of Mumijo was prepared. Animals were randomly (n = 10) divided into four groups: Control, sham-operated group (received 0.2 ml of acetic acid to induce gastric ulcer), Mumijo (100 mg/kg/daily) were given for 4 days postacetic acid administration, and ranitidine group (20 mg/kg). The assessed parameters were pH and pepsin levels (by Anson method) of gastric contents and gastric histopathology. Ranitidine was used as reference anti-ulcer drug. Results: The extract (100 mg/kg/daily, p.o.) inhibited acid acetic-induced gastric ulceration by elevating its pH versus sham group (P < 0.01) and decreasing the pepsin levels compared to standard drug, ranitidine (P < 0.05). The histopathology data showed that the treatment with Mumijo extract had a significant protection against all mucosal damages. Conclusion: Mumijo extract has potent antiulcer activity. Its anti-ulcer property probably acts via a reduction in gastric acid secretion and pepsin levels. The obtained results support the use of this herbal material in folk medicine. PMID:25709338

  16. The saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid, induces anxiety-like behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Morgan L.; Joesting, Jennifer J.; Lawson, Marcus A.; Chiu, Gabriel S.; Blevins, Neil A.; Kwakwa, Kristin A.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Excess fat in the diet can impact neuropsychiatric functions by negatively affecting cognition, mood and anxiety. We sought to show that the free fatty acid (FFA), palmitic acid, can cause adverse biobehaviors in mice that lasts beyond an acute elevation in plasma FFAs. Methods Mice were administered palmitic acid or vehicle as a single intraperitoneal (IP) injection. Biobehaviors were profiled 2 and 24 hrs after palmitic acid treatment. Quantification of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), serotonin (5-HT) and their major metabolites was performed in cortex, hippocampus and amygdala. FFA concentration was determined in plasma. Relative fold change in mRNA expression of unfolded protein response (UPR)-associated genes was determined in brain regions. Results In a dose-dependent fashion, palmitic acid rapidly reduced mouse locomotor activity by a mechanism that did not rely on TLR4, MyD88, IL-1, IL-6 or TNFα but was dependent on fatty acid chain length. Twenty-four hrs after palmitic acid administration mice exhibited anxiety-like behavior without impairment in locomotion, food intake, depressive-like behavior or spatial memory. Additionally, the serotonin metabolite 5-HIAA was increased by 33% in the amygdala 24 hrs after palmitic acid treatment. Conclusions Palmitic acid induces anxiety-like behavior in mice while increasing amygdala-based serotonin metabolism. These effects occur at a time point when plasma FFA levels are no longer elevated. PMID:25016520

  17. Effect of galactose on acid induced molten globule state of Soybean Agglutinin: Biophysical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Parvez; Naseem, Farha; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2015-11-01

    In the present study the formation of molten globule-like unfolding intermediate Soybean Agglutinin (SBA) in acidic pH range has been established with the help of acrylamide quenching, intrinsic fluorescence, ANS fluorescence measurement, far UV CD and dynamic light scattering measurement. A marked increase in ANS fluorescence was observed at pH 2.2. Ksv of acrylamide quenching was found to be higher at pH 2.2 than that of native SBA at pH 7. Far UV CD spectra of pH induced state suggest that SBA shows significant retention of secondary structure closure to native. Hydrodynamic radius of SBA at pH 2.2 was found be more as compared to native state and also in other pH induced states. Further we checked the effect of galactose on the molten globule state of SBA. This study suggests that SBA exist as molten globule at pH 2.2 and this study will help in acid induced molten globule state of other proteins.

  18. Tauroursodeoxycholate improves 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced experimental acute ulcerative colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; He, Jiao; Suo, Yuan; Zheng, Zongwei; Wang, Jingjing; Lv, Le; Huo, Chuanchuan; Wang, Ziye; Li, Jing; Sun, Wenji; Zhang, Yongmin

    2016-07-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic nonspecific inflammatory disease of unknown cause. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of tauroursodeoxycholate in 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced experimental colitis in mice. After the induction of colitis for 24h, the mice were administrated orally with tauroursodeoxycholate (20, 40 and 60mg/kg) and sulfasalazine (500mg/kg) by gavage for 7 consecutive days. The inhibition effects were evaluated by the body of weight change, survival rate, macroscopical and histological evaluations. Besides, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, interleukin (IL)-1β, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in colon tissue were also determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with different doses of tauroursodeoxycholate (20, 40 and 60mg/kg) significantly improved the body weight change, decreased the macroscopic and histopathological scores. Compared with the model group, the accumulation of MPO activity, the colonic tissue levels of IL-1β, IFN-γ and TNF-α were significantly reduced in the tauroursodeoxycholate treated groups. Moreover, tauroursodeoxycholate assuaged the symptoms of colitis. These results suggested that tauroursodeoxycholate has an anti-inflammatory effect in TNBS-induced ulcerative colitis in mice. PMID:27179450

  19. Apoptosis in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Stoian, M; State, N; Stoica, V; Radulian, G

    2014-06-15

    Apoptosis is an inborn process that has been preserved during evolution; it allows the cells to systematically inactivate, destroy and dispose of their own components thus leading to their death. This programme can be activated by both intra and extracellular mechanisms. The intracellular components involve a genetically defined development programme while the extracellular aspects regard endogenous proteins, cytokines and hormones as well as xenobiotics, radiations, oxidative stress and hypoxia. The ability of a cell to enter apoptosis as a response to a "death" signal depends on its proliferative status, the position in the cell cycle and also on the controlled expression of those genes that have the capacity of promoting and inhibiting cell death. The fine regulation of these parameters needs to be maintained in order to ensure the physiological environment required for the induction of apoptosis. Any malfunction in any of the steps of controlled cellular death can lead to dysfunctions and, as a consequence, to different pathological conditions. The importance of apoptosis lies in its active nature and in the potential of controlling biological systems. PMID:25408720

  20. Excitotoxic neuronal death in the immature brain is an apoptosis-necrosis morphological continuum.

    PubMed

    Portera-Cailliau, C; Price, D L; Martin, L J

    1997-02-01

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity is a clinically relevant degenerative process that causes selective neuronal death by mechanisms that remain unclear. Cell death is usually classified as apoptotic or necrotic based on biochemical and morphological criteria. Excitotoxic lesions in the adult rat striatum result in neuronal death associated with apoptotic DNA laddering despite a necrotic appearance of neurons ultrastructurally. This suggests that apoptosis and necrosis may not be mutually exclusive modes of cell death. Here, we characterized normal developmental cell death in the newborn rat brain with respect to DNA fragmentation patterns and ultrastructural morphology to establish a standard for apoptosis in the nervous system, and we concluded that it is essentially indistinguishable from apoptosis described in other tissues. We then investigated whether brain maturity could influence the morphology of neuronal death in vivo in the excitotoxically lesioned newborn rat forebrain. Kainic acid induced DNA laddering and death of neurons exhibiting a variety of morphologies, ranging from necrosis to apoptosis. In neurons that were dying by apoptosis, morphologic changes were characterized by a highly ordered sequence of organelle abnormalities, with swelling of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi vesiculation preceding most nuclear changes and mitochondrial disruption. We concluded that brain maturity influences the morphologic phenotype of neurodegeneration and that excitotoxic neuronal death in the immature brain is not a uniform event but, rather, a continuum of apoptotic, necrotic, and overlapping morphologies. This excitotoxic paradigm might prove useful for analyzing the mechanisms that govern cell death under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:9120055

  1. Cinnamic acid induces apoptotic cell death and cytoskeleton disruption in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Anticancer activities of cinnamic acid derivatives include induction of apoptosis by irreversible DNA damage leading to cell death. The present work aimed to compare the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of cinnamic acid in human melanoma cell line (HT-144) and human melanocyte cell line derived from blue nevus (NGM). Viability assay showed that the IC50 for HT-144 cells was 2.4 mM, while NGM cells were more resistant to the treatment. The growth inhibition was probably associated with DNA damage leading to DNA synthesis inhibition, as shown by BrdU incorporation assay, induction of nuclear aberrations and then apoptosis. The frequency of cell death caused by cinnamic acid was higher in HT-144 cells. Activated-caspase 3 staining showed apoptosis after 24 hours of treatment with cinnamic acid 3.2 mM in HT-144 cells, but not in NGM. We observed microtubules disorganization after cinnamic acid exposure, but this event and cell death seem to be independent according to M30 and tubulin labeling. The frequency of micronucleated HT-144 cells was higher after treatment with cinnamic acid (0.4 and 3.2 mM) when compared to the controls. Cinnamic acid 3.2 mM also increased the frequency of micronucleated NGM cells indicating genotoxic activity of the compound, but the effects were milder. Binucleation and multinucleation counting showed similar results. We conclude that cinnamic acid has effective antiproliferative activity against melanoma cells. However, the increased frequency of micronucleation in NGM cells warrants the possibility of genotoxicity and needs further investigation. PMID:23701745

  2. Tachykinin inhibition of acid-induced gastric hyperaemia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, A.; Jocic, M.; Herzeg, G.; Holzer, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. Primary afferent neurones releasing the vasodilator, calcitonin gene-related peptide, mediate the gastric hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion. The tachykinins neurokinin A (NKA) and substance P (SP) are located in the same neurones and are co-released with calcitonin gene-related peptide. In this study we investigated the effect and possible role of tachykinins in the acid-evoked gastric vasodilatation in urethane-anaesthetized rats. 2. Gastric acid back-diffusion, induced by perfusing the stomach with 15% ethanol in the presence of 0.05 M HCl, increased gastric mucosal blood flow by 60-90%, as determined by the hydrogen clearance technique. NKA and SP (0.14-3.78 nmol min-1 kg-1, infused intra-aortically) inhibited the gastric mucosal hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion in a dose-dependent manner, an effect that was accompanied by aggravation of ethanol/acid-induced macroscopic haemorrhagic lesions. 3. The inhibitory effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) on the acid-induced gastric mucosal vasodilatation was prevented by the tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonists, MEN 10,627 (200 nmol kg-1) but left unaltered by the NK1 receptor antagonist, SR 140,333 (300 nmol kg-1) and the mast-cell stabilizer, ketotifen (4.6 mumol kg-1). 4. Under basal conditions, with 0.05 M HCl being perfused through the stomach, NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) reduced gastric mucosal blood flow by about 25%, an effect that was abolished by SR 140,333 but not MEN 10,627 or ketotifen. 5. SR 140,333, MEN 10,627 or ketotifen had no significant effect on basal gastric mucosal blood flow nor did they modify the gastric mucosal hyperaemic reaction to acid back-diffusion. 6. The effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) in causing vasoconstriction and inhibiting the vasodilator response to acid back-diffusion was also seen when blood flow in the left gastric artery was measured with the ultrasonic transit time shift technique. 7. Arginine vasopressin (AVP, 0.1 nmol min-1 kg-1) induced gastric

  3. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ruisanchez, Éva; Dancs, Péter; Kerék, Margit; Németh, Tamás; Faragó, Bernadett; Balogh, Andrea; Patil, Renukadevi; Jennings, Brett L.; Liliom, Károly; Malik, Kafait U.; Smrcka, Alan V.; Tigyi, Gabor; Benyó, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been implicated as a mediator of several cardiovascular functions, but its potential involvement in the control of vascular tone is obscure. Here, we show that both LPA (18:1) and VPC31143 (a synthetic agonist of LPA1–3 receptors) relax intact mouse thoracic aorta with similar Emax values (53.9 and 51.9% of phenylephrine-induced precontraction), although the EC50 of LPA- and VPC31143-induced vasorelaxations were different (400 vs. 15 nM, respectively). Mechanical removal of the endothelium or genetic deletion of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) not only diminished vasorelaxation by LPA or VPC31143 but converted it to vasoconstriction. Freshly isolated mouse aortic endothelial cells expressed LPA1, LPA2, LPA4 and LPA5 transcripts. The LPA1,3 antagonist Ki16425, the LPA1 antagonist AM095, and the genetic deletion of LPA1, but not that of LPA2, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation. Inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3 kinase–protein kinase B/Akt pathway by wortmannin or MK-2206 failed to influence the effect of LPA. However, pharmacological inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) by U73122 or edelfosine, but not genetic deletion of PLCε, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation and indicated that a PLC enzyme, other than PLCε, mediates the response. In summary, the present study identifies LPA as an endothelium-dependent vasodilator substance acting via LPA1, PLC, and eNOS.—Ruisanchez, É., Dancs, P., Kerék, M., Németh, T., Faragó, B., Balogh, A., Patil, R., Jennings, B. L., Liliom, K., Malik, K. U., Smrcka, A. V., Tigyi, G., Benyó, Z. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. PMID:24249637

  4. Human sweet taste receptor mediates acid-induced sweetness of miraculin

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Ayako; Tsuchiya, Asami; Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Ito, Keisuke; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Briand, Loïc; Asakura, Tomiko; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    Miraculin (MCL) is a homodimeric protein isolated from the red berries of Richadella dulcifica. MCL, although flat in taste at neutral pH, has taste-modifying activity to convert sour stimuli to sweetness. Once MCL is held on the tongue, strong sweetness is sensed over 1 h each time we taste a sour solution. Nevertheless, no molecular mechanism underlying the taste-modifying activity has been clarified. In this study, we succeeded in quantitatively evaluating the acid-induced sweetness of MCL using a cell-based assay system and found that MCL activated hT1R2-hT1R3 pH-dependently as the pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.8, and that the receptor activation occurred every time an acid solution was applied. Although MCL per se is sensory-inactive at pH 6.7 or higher, it suppressed the response of hT1R2-hT1R3 to other sweeteners at neutral pH and enhanced the response at weakly acidic pH. Using human/mouse chimeric receptors and molecular modeling, we revealed that the amino-terminal domain of hT1R2 is required for the response to MCL. Our data suggest that MCL binds hT1R2-hT1R3 as an antagonist at neutral pH and functionally changes into an agonist at acidic pH, and we conclude this may cause its taste-modifying activity. PMID:21949380

  5. Human sweet taste receptor mediates acid-induced sweetness of miraculin.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Ayako; Tsuchiya, Asami; Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Ito, Keisuke; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Briand, Loïc; Asakura, Tomiko; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2011-10-01

    Miraculin (MCL) is a homodimeric protein isolated from the red berries of Richadella dulcifica. MCL, although flat in taste at neutral pH, has taste-modifying activity to convert sour stimuli to sweetness. Once MCL is held on the tongue, strong sweetness is sensed over 1 h each time we taste a sour solution. Nevertheless, no molecular mechanism underlying the taste-modifying activity has been clarified. In this study, we succeeded in quantitatively evaluating the acid-induced sweetness of MCL using a cell-based assay system and found that MCL activated hT1R2-hT1R3 pH-dependently as the pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.8, and that the receptor activation occurred every time an acid solution was applied. Although MCL per se is sensory-inactive at pH 6.7 or higher, it suppressed the response of hT1R2-hT1R3 to other sweeteners at neutral pH and enhanced the response at weakly acidic pH. Using human/mouse chimeric receptors and molecular modeling, we revealed that the amino-terminal domain of hT1R2 is required for the response to MCL. Our data suggest that MCL binds hT1R2-hT1R3 as an antagonist at neutral pH and functionally changes into an agonist at acidic pH, and we conclude this may cause its taste-modifying activity. PMID:21949380

  6. Bile Acid-Induced Necrosis in Primary Human Hepatocytes and in Patients with Obstructive Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth; Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I.; Gholami, Parviz; Li, Feng; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson; Fan, Fang; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. PMID:25636263

  7. Role of ion transporters in the bile acid-induced esophageal injury.

    PubMed

    Laczkó, Dorottya; Rosztóczy, András; Birkás, Klaudia; Katona, Máté; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Tiszlavicz, László; Róka, Richárd; Wittmann, Tibor; Hegyi, Péter; Venglovecz, Viktória

    2016-07-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is considered to be the most severe complication of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), in which the prolonged, repetitive episodes of combined acidic and biliary reflux result in the replacement of the squamous esophageal lining by columnar epithelium. Therefore, the acid-extruding mechanisms of esophageal epithelial cells (EECs) may play an important role in the defense. Our aim was to identify the presence of acid/base transporters on EECs and to investigate the effect of bile acids on their expressions and functions. Human EEC lines (CP-A and CP-D) were acutely exposed to bile acid cocktail (BAC) and the changes in intracellular pH (pHi) and Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) were measured by microfluorometry. mRNA and protein expression of ion transporters was investigated by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. We have identified the presence of a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE), Na(+)/HCO3 (-) cotransporter (NBC), and a Cl(-)-dependent HCO3 (-) secretory mechanism in CP-A and CP-D cells. Acute administration of BAC stimulated HCO3 (-) secretion in both cell lines and the NHE activity in CP-D cells by an inositol triphosphate-dependent calcium release. Chronic administration of BAC to EECs increased the expression of ion transporters compared with nontreated cells. A similar expression pattern was observed in biopsy samples from BE compared with normal epithelium. We have shown that acute administration of bile acids differently alters ion transport mechanisms of EECs, whereas chronic exposure to bile acids increases the expression of acid/base transporters. We speculate that these adaptive processes of EECs represent an important mucosal defense against the bile acid-induced epithelial injury. PMID:27198194

  8. Intrarenal renin-angiotensin system mediates fatty acid-induced ER stress in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunling; Lin, Yu; Luo, Renfei; Chen, Shaoming; Wang, Feifei; Zheng, Peili; Levi, Moshe; Yang, Tianxin; Wang, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    Obesity-related kidney disease is related to caloric excess promoting deleterious cellular responses. Accumulation of saturated free fatty acids in tubular cells produces lipotoxicity involving significant cellular dysfunction and injury. The objectives of this study were to elucidate the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation in saturated fatty acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in cultured human proximal tubule epithelial cells (HK2) and in mice fed with a high-fat diet. Treatment with saturated fatty acid palmitic acid (PA; 0.8 mM) for 24 h induced ER stress in HK2, leading to an unfolded protein response as reflected by increased expressions of the ER chaperone binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and proapoptotic transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) protein as evaluated by immunoblotting. PA treatment also induced increased protein expression of inositol requiring protein 1α (IRE1α), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor-α (eIF2α), and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) as well as activation of caspase-3. PA treatment was associated with increased angiotensin II levels in cultured medium. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker valsartan or renin inhibitor aliskiren dramatically suppressed PA-induced upregulation of BiP, CHOP, IRE1α, p-eIF2α, and ATF4 in HK2 cells. In contrast, valsartan or aliskiren did not prevent ER stress induced by tunicamycin. C57BL/6 mice fed with a high-fat diet for 14 wk exhibited increased protein expressions of BiP and CHOP compared with control mice, which were significantly attenuated by the valsartan treatment. Increased angiotensin II levels in serum and urine were observed in mice fed with a high-fat diet when compared with controls. It is suggested that the intrarenal RAS activation may play an important role in diabetic kidney injury via mediating ER stress induced by saturated fatty acid. PMID:26672616

  9. Reduction of sodium deoxycholic acid-induced scratching behaviour by bradykinin B2 receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Izumi; Majima, Masataka

    1999-01-01

    Subcutaneous injection of sodium deoxycholic acid into the anterior of the back of male ddY mice elicited dose-dependent scratching of the injected site with the forepaws and hindpaws.Up to 100 μg of sodium deoxycholic acid induced no significant increase in vascular permeability at the injection site as assessed by a dye leakage method.Bradykinin (BK) B2 receptor antagonists, FR173657 and Hoe140, significantly decreased the frequency of scratching induced by sodium deoxycholic acid.Treatment with aprotinin to inhibit tissue kallikrein reduced the scratching behaviour induced by sodium deoxycholic acid, whereas treatment with soybean trypsin inhibitor to inhibit plasma kallikrein did not.Although injection of kininase II inhibitor, lisinopril together with sodium deoxycholic acid did not alter the scratching behaviour, phosphoramidon, a neutral endopeptidase inhibitor, significantly increased the frequency of scratching.Homogenates of the skin excised from the backs of mice were subjected to gel-filtration column chromatography followed by an assay of kinin release by trypsin from each fraction separated. Less kinin release from the fractions containing kininogen of low molecular weight was observed in the skin injected with sodium deoxycholic acid than in normal skin.The frequency of scratching after the injection of sodium deoxycholic acid in plasma kininogen-deficient Brown Norway Katholiek rats was significantly lower than that in normal rats of the same strain, Brown Norway Kitasato rats.These results indicate that BK released from low-molecular-weight kininogen by tissue kallikrein, but not from high-molecular-weight kininogen by plasma kallikrein, may be involved in the scratching behaviour induced by the injection of sodium deoxycholic acid in the rodent. PMID:10051136

  10. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of woodchuck retinoic acid-inducible gene I.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qi; Liu, Qin; Li, Meng-Meng; Li, Fang-Hui; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Jun-Zhong; Lu, Yin-Ping; Liu, Jia; Wu, Jun; Zheng, Xin; Lu, Meng-Ji; Wang, Bao-Ju; Yang, Dong-Liang

    2016-06-01

    Cytosolic retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) is an important innate immune RNA sensor and can induce antiviral cytokines, e.g., interferon-β (IFN-β). Innate immune response to hepatitis B virus (HBV) plays a pivotal role in viral clearance and persistence. However, knowledge of the role that RIG-I plays in HBV infection is limited. The woodchuck is a valuable model for studying HBV infection. To characterize the molecular basis of woodchuck RIG-I (wRIG-I), we analyzed the complete coding sequences (CDSs) of wRIG-I, containing 2778 base pairs that encode 925 amino acids. The deduced wRIG-I protein was 106.847 kD with a theoretical isoelectric point (pI) of 6.07, and contained three important functional structures [caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs), DExD/H-box helicases, and a repressor domain (RD)]. In woodchuck fibroblastoma cell line (WH12/6), wRIG-I-targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA) down-regulated RIG-I and its downstrean effector-IFN-β transcripts under RIG-I' ligand, 5'-ppp double stranded RNA (dsRNA) stimulation. We also measured mRNA levels of wRIG-I in different tissues from healthy woodchucks and in the livers from woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV)-infected woodchucks. The basal expression levels of wRIG-I were abundant in the kidney and liver. Importantly, wRIG-I was significantly up-regulated in acutely infected woodchuck livers, suggesting that RIG-I might be involved in WHV infection. These results may characterize RIG-I in the woodchuck model, providing a strong basis for further study on RIG-I-mediated innate immunity in HBV infection. PMID:27376800

  11. Effect of baicalin on hippocampal damage in kainic acid-induced epileptic mice

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zheng-Jian; Liang, Ri-Sheng; Shi, Song-Sheng; Wang, Chun-Hua; Yang, Wei-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of baicalin on the expression of miR-497 and its target B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) in the hippocampus of kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptic mice. To establish status epilepticus (SE), 0.1 µg/5 µl KA was injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle in mice, which then received an intraperitoneal injection of baicalin (100 mg/kg) after 1 and 8 h. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to observe the pathological changes in morphology and neuronal apoptosis was determined by terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling staining. Western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 proteins in the hippocampus, while reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify hippocampal miR-497 expression. The results showed that baicalin significantly attenuated neuronal damage and apoptosis in the hippocampus 72 h after SE. In addition, baicalin decreased SE-induced expression of miR-497 and cleaved caspase-3 protein, while upregulating the expression of Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, the present results suggest that baicalin possesses potent antiapoptotic properties and attenuates hippocampal injury in mice after SE, which may be associated with the downregulation of miR-497 and cleaved caspase-3 and the upregulation of Bcl-2. PMID:27588062

  12. Mortalin, Apoptosis, and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Londono, Carolina; Osorio, Cristina; Gama, Vivian; Alzate, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Mortalin is a highly conserved heat-shock chaperone usually found in multiple subcellular locations. It has several binding partners and has been implicated in various functions ranging from stress response, control of cell proliferation, and inhibition/prevention of apoptosis. The activity of this protein involves different structural and functional mechanisms, and minor alterations in its expression level may lead to serious biological consequences, including neurodegeneration. In this article we review the most current data associated with mortalin’s binding partners and how these protein-protein interactions may be implicated in apoptosis and neurodegeneration. A complete understanding of the molecular pathways in which mortalin is involved is important for the development of therapeutic strategies for cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24970131

  13. Protective effects of N-acetylcysteine on acetic acid-induced colitis in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease and involves multiple etiological factors. Acetic acid (AA)-induced colitis is a reproducible and simple model, sharing many characteristics with human colitis. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has been widely used as an antioxidant in vivo and in vitro. NAC can affect several signaling pathways involving in apoptosis, angiogenesis, cell growth and arrest, redox-regulated gene expression, and inflammatory response. Therefore, NAC may not only protect against the direct injurious effects of oxidants, but also beneficially alter inflammatory events in colitis. This study was conducted to investigate whether NAC could alleviate the AA-induced colitis in a porcine model. Methods Weaned piglets were used to investigate the effects of NAC on AA-induced colitis. Severity of colitis was evaluated by colon histomorphology measurements, histopathology scores, tissue myeloperoxidase activity, as well as concentrations of malondialdehyde and pro-inflammatory mediators in the plasma and colon. The protective role of NAC was assessed by measurements of antioxidant status, growth modulator, cell apoptosis, and tight junction proteins. Abundances of caspase-3 and claudin-1 proteins in colonic mucosae were determined by the Western blot method. Epidermal growth factor receptor, amphiregulin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) mRNA levels in colonic mucosae were quantified using the real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR. Results Compared with the control group, AA treatment increased (P < 0.05) the histopathology scores, intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) numbers and density in the colon, myeloperoxidase activity, the concentrations of malondialdehyde and pro-inflammatory mediators in the plasma and colon, while reducing (P < 0.05) goblet cell numbers and the protein/DNA ratio in the colonic mucosa. These adverse effects of AA were partially ameliorated (P < 0.05) by dietary

  14. Uric Acid Promotes Apoptosis in Human Proximal Tubule Cells by Oxidative Stress and the Activation of NADPH Oxidase NOX 4

    PubMed Central

    Verzola, Daniela; Ratto, Elena; Villaggio, Barbara; Parodi, Emanuele Luigi; Pontremoli, Roberto; Garibotto, Giacomo; Viazzi, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Mild hyperuricemia has been linked to the development and progression of tubulointerstitial renal damage. However the mechanisms by which uric acid may cause these effects are poorly explored. We investigated the effect of uric acid on apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms in a human proximal tubule cell line (HK-2). Increased uric acid concentration decreased tubule cell viability and increased apoptotic cells in a dose dependent manner (up to a 7-fold increase, p<0.0001). Uric acid up-regulated Bax (+60% with respect to Ctrl; p<0.05) and down regulated X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein. Apoptosis was blunted by Caspase-9 but not Caspase-8 inhibition. Uric acid induced changes in the mitochondrial membrane, elevations in reactive oxygen species and a pronounced up-regulation of NOX 4 mRNA and protein (p<0.05). In addition, both reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis was prevented by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI as well as by Nox 4 knockdown. URAT 1 transport inhibition by probenecid and losartan and its knock down by specific siRNA, blunted apoptosis, suggesting a URAT 1 dependent cell death. In summary, our data show that uric acid increases the permissiveness of proximal tubule kidney cells to apoptosis by triggering a pathway involving NADPH oxidase signalling and URAT 1 transport. These results might explain the chronic tubulointerstitial damage observed in hyperuricaemic states and suggest that uric acid transport in tubular cells is necessary for urate-induced effects. PMID:25514209

  15. Valproic acid-induced pancreatitis in childhood epilepsy: case series and review.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, D Barry; Berg, Marjorie; Breault, Rene

    2004-07-01

    In the past 6 years, 11 children on valproic acid have developed pancreatitis in our children's hospital. Valproic acid has been used as one of the primary anticonvulsants for generalized seizures in children for the past 25 years. A literature review reveals mostly singular reports of pancreatitis over the past decade. The charts of the 11 patients with valproic acid-induced pancreatitis were reviewed. Dosage, valproic acid serum levels, duration of therapy, and concomitant medications were examined. Families were contacted by telephone to determine the formulation (brand name vs generic) of valproic acid at the time of diagnosis. Six girls and five boys were studied. The ages ranged from 4 to 16 years. Eight of 11 children presented with an acute abdomen. Unexpectedly, three children presented with a flulike illness. Serum lipase values ranged from 341 to 5576 U/L (normal range < 190 U/L). The dose of valproic acid ranged from 20 to 50 mg/kg. Serum levels ranged from 334 to 884 micromol/L (therapeutic range 350-800 micromol/L). Six of the patients were on monotherapy. Seven children were on brand-name drugs. Four of the children had an abnormal neurologic syndromic diagnosis (West syndrome, Rett syndrome, Lowe syndrome, and Angelman's syndrome). Six of the children had a history of drug allergies with a skin rash. Valproic acid was reintroduced in one child and resulted in a second episode of pancreatitis. Resolution of symptoms usually took several weeks following discontinuation of the drug. No association was found with valproic acid dosage, type of preparation, serum levels, duration of therapy, or presence of concomitant medications. Pancreatitis is a severe adverse effect of valproic acid use in children. Dose, duration of treatment, serum valproic acid levels, generic preparation, and the presence of concomitant antiepileptic drugs do not appear to be risk factors. Children with known drug sensitivity might be at risk. Lipase levels at the time of an acute

  16. Interactions between the Influenza A Virus RNA Polymerase Components and Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene I

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weizhong; Chen, Hongjun; Sutton, Troy; Obadan, Adebimpe

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The influenza A virus genome possesses eight negative-strand RNA segments in the form of viral ribonucleoprotein particles (vRNPs) in association with the three viral RNA polymerase subunits (PB2, PB1, and PA) and the nucleoprotein (NP). Through interactions with multiple host factors, the RNP subunits play vital roles in replication, host adaptation, interspecies transmission, and pathogenicity. In order to gain insight into the potential roles of RNP subunits in the modulation of the host's innate immune response, the interactions of each RNP subunit with retinoic acid-inducible gene I protein (RIG-I) from mammalian and avian species were investigated. Studies using coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP), bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFc), and colocalization using confocal microscopy provided direct evidence for the RNA-independent binding of PB2, PB1, and PA with RIG-I from various hosts (human, swine, mouse, and duck). In contrast, the binding of NP with RIG-I was found to be RNA dependent. Expression of the viral NS1 protein, which interacts with RIG-I, did not interfere with the association of RNA polymerase subunits with RIG-I. The association of each individual virus polymerase component with RIG-I failed to significantly affect the interferon (IFN) induction elicited by RIG-I and 5′ triphosphate (5′ppp) RNA in reporter assays, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and IRF3 phosphorylation tests. Taken together, these findings indicate that viral RNA polymerase components PB2, PB1, and PA directly target RIG-I, but the exact biological significance of these interactions in the replication and pathogenicity of influenza A virus needs to be further clarified. IMPORTANCE RIG-I is an important RNA sensor to elicit the innate immune response in mammals and some bird species (such as duck) upon influenza A virus infection. Although the 5′-triphosphate double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) panhandle structure at the end of viral genome RNA is

  17. Involvement of Aif1 in apoptosis triggered by lack of Hxk2 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Amigoni, Loredana; Frigerio, Gianluca; Martegani, Enzo; Colombo, Sonia

    2016-05-01

    We recently showed that in hxk2Δ cells, showing constitutive localization of active Ras at the mitochondria, addition of acetic acid caused an increase of both apoptotic and necrotic cells compared with the wild-type strain, providing a new role for hexokinase 2 (EC 2.7.1.1) as an anti-apoptotic factor, besides its known role as a glycolytic enzyme and as a regulator of gene transcription of several Mig1-regulated genes. We also demonstrated that apoptosis induced by lack of Hxk2 may not require the activation of Yca1. Here, we show that deletion of HXK2 causes hypersensitivity to H2O2 and that addition of this well-known apoptotic stimulus to hxk2Δ cells causes an increase in the level ROS, apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential. We also show that deletion of AIF1 in hxk2Δ cells enhances survival after induction of apoptosis with both H2O2 and acetic acid, rescues the reduction of both growth rate and cell size, abrogates both H2O2 and acetic acid-induced ROS accumulation and decreases cell death, suggesting that Aif1 might be involved in both H2O2 and acetic acid-induced cell death in hxk2Δ cells. Moreover, we show that active Ras proteins relocalize to the plasma membrane and to the nucleus in hxk2Δ aif1Δ cells. PMID:26895787

  18. Gambogic acid induces apoptotic cell death in T98G glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Thida, Mya; Kim, Dae Won; Tran, Thi Thu Thuy; Pham, Minh Quan; Lee, Heesu; Kim, Inki; Lee, Jae Wook

    2016-02-01

    Gambogic acid (GA), a natural product with a xanthone structure, has a broad range of anti-proliferative effects on cancer cell lines. We evaluated GA for its cytotoxic effects on T98G glioblastoma cells. GA exhibited potent anti-proliferative activity and induced apoptosis in T98G glioblastoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Incubation of cells with GA revealed apoptotic features including increased Bax and AIF expression, cytochrome c release, and cleavage of caspase-3, -8, -9, and PARP, while Bcl-2 expression was downregulated. Furthermore, GA induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in T98G cells. Our results indicate that GA increases Bax- and AIF-associated apoptotic signaling in glioblastoma cells. PMID:26631318

  19. Alleviating Effects of Bushen-Yizhi Formula on Ibotenic Acid-Induced Cholinergic Impairments in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xue-Qin; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Cong; Rong, Cui-Ping; He, Wen-Qing; Zhang, Chun-Xia; Li, Shi; Su, Ru-Yu; Chang, Xiang; Qin, Ji-Huan; Chen, Yun-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study explored the curative effect and underlying mechanisms of a traditional Chinese medicine compound prescription, Bushen-Yizhi formula (BSYZ), in ibotenic acid (IBO)-induced rats. Morris water maze and novel object recognition tests showed that BSYZ significantly improved spatial and object memory. Brain immunohistochemistry staining showed that BSYZ significantly up-regulated expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in the hippocampus and cortex. The protein tyrosine kinase high-affinity receptor TrkA was slightly increased in the hippocampus and cortex, and significantly enhanced in the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM) after BSYZ intervention. The immunoreactivity of the p75 low-affinity receptor in BSYZ-treated rats was significantly strengthened in the cortex. Similar expression trends of nerve growth factor (NGF), TrkA, and p75 mRNA were observed in the hippocampus and cortex. Additionally, BSYZ reversed IBO-induced disorders of acetylcholine (ACh) levels, ChAT, and cholinesterase (ChE) in the cortex, which was consistent with the changes in mRNA levels of ChAT and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Expression of ChAT and AChE proteins and mRNA in the hippocampus was up-regulated, whereas the apoptosis-relative protein cleaved caspase-3 was decreased after administration of BSYZ. Moreover, changes in cell death were confirmed by histological morphology. Thus, the results indicated that the BSYZ formula could ameliorate memory impairments in IBO-induced rats, and it exerted its therapeutic action probably by modulating cholinergic pathways, NGF signaling, and anti-apoptosis. Overall, it is suggested that the BSYZ formula might be a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other cholinergic impairment-related diseases. PMID:25482164

  20. Comparative molecular pathology of cadmium- and all-trans-retinoic acid-induced postaxial forelimb ectrodactyly

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Xiaoyan; Lee, Grace S.; Shimizu, Hirohito; Collins, Michael D.

    2007-11-15

    Cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}) and all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) induce postaxial forelimb ectrodactyly in C57BL/6N mice when administered during early limb development, and co-administration yields a synergistic response suggesting a common final pathway to the defect. In the current study, forelimb buds from embryos given high maternal teratogenic doses of CdCl{sub 2} or RA, or the combination of both agents at low doses were collected at various time points after treatment on GD 9.5 and examined for cellular apoptosis, proliferation, and patterning genes. Some cellular perturbations detected in the developing limb bud were similar for both teratogens, whereas other alterations were unique to each agent. For example, at 12 and 18 h, CdCl{sub 2} treatment increased apoptotic cells in the mesenchyme underneath the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), whereas RA caused apoptosis in the AER and proximal mesenchyme. Further, the combined low-dose treatment increased cell death synergistically in all three regions. CdCl{sub 2} and the low-dose combined treatment inhibited mesenchymal proliferation at 12 h, which was associated with induction of p21{sup cip1} and inhibition of phospho-c-Jun. In contrast, RA did not inhibit mesenchymal proliferation and did not induce p21{sup cip1} expression or change c-Jun phosphorylation. All three treatment groups showed a delay in the patterning of distal chondrogenesis centers as indicated by Sox9 expression. There was also common inhibition in the expression of AER markers, Fgf8 and Fgf4, and the mesenchymal marker Msx1 involved in the maintenance of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Collectively, a model is hypothesized where limb patterning can be perturbed by insults to both ectoderm and mesoderm.

  1. Non-enzymatic modifications of prostaglandin H synthase 1 affect bifunctional enzyme activity - Implications for the sensitivity of blood platelets to acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Kassassir, Hassan; Siewiera, Karolina; Talar, Marcin; Stec-Martyna, Emilia; Pawlowska, Zofia; Watala, Cezary

    2016-06-25

    Due to its ability to inhibit the blood platelet PGHS-1, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, Aspirin(®)) is widely used as a preventive agent in atherothrombotic diseases. However, its beneficial effects seem to be lower in diabetic patients, suggesting that protein glycation may impair effective ASA-mediated acetylation process. On the other hand, it is proposed that ASA can prevent some of the late complications of diabetes by lowering the extent of glycation at protein free amino groups. The aim of this work was to evaluate the extents of non-enzymatic N-glycosylation (glycation) and acetylation of blood platelet PGHS-1 (COX-1) and the competition between glycation and acetylation was investigated in order to demonstrate how these two reactions may compete against platelet PGHS-1. When PGHS-1 was incubated with glycating/acetylating agents (glucose, Glu; 1,6-bisphosphofructose, 1,6-BPF; methylglyoxal, MGO, acetylsalicylic acid, ASA), the enzyme was modified in 13.4 ± 1.6, 5.3 ± 0.5, 10.7 ± 1.2 and 6.4 ± 1.1 mol/mol protein, respectively, and its activity was significantly reduced. The prior glycation/carbonylation of PGHS-1 with Glu, 1,6-BPF or MGO decreased the extent of acetylation from 6.4 ± 1.1 down to 2.5 ± 0.2, 3.6 ± 0.3 and 5.2 ± 0.2 mol/mol protein, respectively, but the enzyme still remained susceptible to the subsequent inhibition of its activity with ASA. When PGHS-1 was first acetylated with ASA and then incubated with glycating/carbonylating agents, we observed the following reductions in the enzyme modifications: from 13.4 ± 1.6 to 8.7 ± 0.6 mol/mol protein for Glu, from 5.3 ± 0.5 to 3.9 ± 0.3 mol/mol protein for 1,6-BPF and from 10.7 ± 1.2 to 7.5 ± 0.5 mol/mol protein for MGO, however subsequent glycation/carbonylation did not significantly affect PGHS-1 function. Overall, our outcomes allow to better understand the structural aspects of the chemical competition between glycation and acetylation of PGHS-1

  2. Effects of L-glutamine on acetylsalycylic acid induced gastric lesions and acid back diffusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hung, C R; Takeuchi, K; Okabe, S; Murata, T; Takagi, K

    1976-12-01

    Effects of L-glutamine on acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)-induced gastric mucosal lesions were studied in mongrel dogs. It was confirmed that when oral ASA at 1.0 or 2.0 g per dog is given in two divided doses, there is severe and consistent dose-dependent mucosal damage in the glandular portion of the stomach in fasted dogs. However, when L-glutamine 2.0 or 4.0 g per dog in two divided doses is given concomitantly with ASA 2.0 g per dog orally, the gastric irritation is significantly inhibited. Instillation of 20 mM of ASA in 100 mM HCl solution into the Heidenhain pouch of Beagle dogs produced a significant loss of H+ from the pouch and a gain of Na+ in the lumen compared with ASA-free controls. When L-glutamine (100 mM) was given concomitantly with ASA (20 mM) into the pouch, changes of electrolyte fluxes in response to ASA alone were significantly suppressed. However, 50 mM of L-glutamine had no appreciable effect on acid back diffusion caused by ASA 20 mM. The amino acid itself had little effect on the ionic movement in the pouch. Gross bleeding from the pouch treated with ASA was never observed with the concomitant dosing of ASA and L-glutamine 50 or 100 mM. PMID:15154

  3. Role of Calpain in Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Hamid Reza

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death that occurs under physiological as well as pathological conditions, is characterized by morphological and biochemical features. While the importance of caspases in apoptosis is established, several noncaspase proteases (Ca2+-dependent proteases) such as calpain may play a role in the execution of apoptosis. The calpain family consists of two major isoforms, calpain I and calpain II which require µM and mM Ca2+ concentrations to initiate their activity. An increase in intracellular Ca2+ level is thought to trigger a cascade of biochemical processes including calpain activation. Once activated, calpains degrade membrane, cytoplasmic and nuclear substrates, leading to the breakdown of cellular architecture and finally apoptosis. The activation of calpain has been implicated in neuronal apoptosis following spinal cord injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on calpain with an emphasis on its key role in the proteolysis of cellular protein substrates following apoptosis. PMID:23507938

  4. Pathophysiological Significance of Hepatic Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kewei; Lin, Bingliang

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis is a classical pathological feature in liver diseases caused by various etiological factors such as drugs, viruses, alcohol, and cholestasis. Hepatic apoptosis and its deleterious effects exacerbate liver function as well as involvement in fibrosis/cirrhosis and carcinogenesis. An imbalance between apoptotic and antiapoptotic capabilities is a prominent characteristic of liver injury. The regulation of apoptosis and antiapoptosis can be a pivotal step in the treatment of liver diseases. PMID:27335822

  5. Carnosic acid sensitized TRAIL-mediated apoptosis through down-regulation of c-FLIP and Bcl-2 expression at the post translational levels and CHOP-dependent up-regulation of DR5, Bim, and PUMA expression in human carcinoma caki cells

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jae Hoon; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Carnosic acid is a phenolic diterpene from rosmarinus officinalis, and has multiple functions, such as anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, and anti-tumor activity. In this study, we examined whether carnosic acid could sensitize TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in human renal carcinoma Caki cells. We found that carnosic acid markedly induced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in human renal carcinoma (Caki, ACHN, and A498), and human hepatocellular carcinoma (SK-HEP-1), and human breast carcinoma (MDA-MB-231) cells, but not normal cells (TMCK-1 and HSF). Carnosic acid induced down-regulation of c-FLIP and Bcl-2 expression at the post-translational levels, and the over-expression of c-FLIP and Bcl-2 markedly blocked carnosic acid-induced TRAIL sensitization. Furthermore, carnosic acid induced death receptor (DR)5, Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death (Bim), and p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) expression at the transcriptional levels via CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein (CHOP). Down-regulation of CHOP expression by siRNA inhibited DR5, Bim, and PUMA expression, and attenuated carnosic acid plus TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our study demonstrates that carnosic acid enhances sensitization against TRAIL-mediated apoptosis through the down-regulation of c-FLIP and Bcl-2 expression, and up-regulation of ER stress-mediated DR5, Bim, and PUMA expression at the transcriptional levels. PMID:25596735

  6. JNK Signaling in Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Dhanasekaran, Danny N.; Reddy, E. Premkumar

    2011-01-01

    Jun N-terminal kinases or JNKs play a critical role in death receptor-initiated extrinsic as well as mitochondrial intrinsic apoptotic pathways. JNKs activate apoptotic signaling by the upregulation pro-apoptotic genes via the transactivation of specific transcription factors or by directly modulating the activities of mitochondrial pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins through distinct phosphorylation events. This review analyzes our present understanding of the role of JNK in apoptotic signaling and the various mechanisms by which JNK promotes apoptosis PMID:18931691

  7. Ascorbic acid-induced chondrocyte terminal differentiation: the role of the extracellular matrix and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, C; Berry, J L; Mawer, E B; Seawright, E; Whitehead, C C

    1998-06-01

    Chondrocyte terminal differentiation is associated with cellular hypertrophy increased activity of plasma membrane alkaline phosphatase and the synthesis of collagen type X. The hypertrophic phenotype of cultured chondrocytes can be stimulated by ascorbic acid but the underlying mechanisms for this phenotypic change are unclear. As ascorbic acid is central to many hydroxylation reactions, the possibility was examined that its pro-differentiating effects are mediated by its effects on collagen and vitamin D metabolite formation. In vitro studies indicated that ascorbic acid-induced chondrocyte alkaline phosphatase activity was inhibited by the addition of both collagen and proteoglycan synthesis inhibitors. The addition of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD)-containing peptides also resulted in lower alkaline phosphatase activity. Chicks supplemented with dietary ascorbic acid had higher concentrations of both collagen and proteoglycans within their growth plates but the chondrocyte maturation rate was unaltered. No evidence was obtained to suggest that ascorbic acid-induced collagen production was mediated by lipid peroxidation. In addition, supplementation with dietary ascorbic acid resulted in higher serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations and increased chondrocyte vitamin D receptor number. Ascorbic acid-treated chondrocytes maintained in vitro also had increased vitamin D receptor numbers but chondrocyte receptor affinity for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 was unaltered. These results indicate that ascorbic acid promotes both chondrocyte matrix production and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 synthesis, accompanied by upregulation of the vitamin D receptor. Thus, ascorbic acid may be causing amplification of the vitamin D receptor-dependent genomic response to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, resulting in promotion of terminal differentiation. Strong evidence is provided to support the hypothesis that ascorbic acid-induced chondrocyte terminal differentiation is mediated by

  8. Inhibitory effect of schisandrin B on free fatty acid-induced steatosis in L-02 cells

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jian-Hong; Wang, Hui; Ye, Yan; Chan, Ping-Kei; Pan, Si-Yuan; Fong, Wang-Fun; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of schisandrin B (Sch B) on free fatty acid (FFA)-induced steatosis in L-02 cells. METHODS: Cellular steatosis was induced by incubating L-02 cells with a FFA mixture (oleate and palmitate at the ratio of 2:1) for 24 h. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were evaluated by 3-(4, 5-dmethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and Annexin V/propidium iodide staining, respectively. Cellular total lipid was determined using a photocolorimetric method after Nile red staining, and triglyceride content was measured using an enzymatic kit. To study the effects of Sch B on steatosis, L-02 cells were treated with Sch B (1-100 μmol/L) in the absence or presence of 1 mmol/L FFA for 24 h, and cellular total lipid and triglyceride levels were measured. To explore the mechanisms of action of Sch B in the steatotic L-02 cells, mRNA levels of several regulators of hepatic lipid metabolism including adipose differentiation related protein (ADRP), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α and PPAR-γ were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and protein levels of ADRP and SREBP-1 were measured by immunoblotting. RESULTS: Treatment with 1 mmol/L FFA for 24 h induced intracellular lipid accumulation in L-02 cells comparable to that in human steatotic livers without causing apparent apoptosis and cytotoxicity. Sch B mitigated cellular total lipid and triglyceride accumulations in the steatotic L-02 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analyses revealed that treatment of L-02 cells with 100 μmol/L Sch B reverted the FFA-stimulated up-regulation of ADRP and SREBP-1. CONCLUSION: Sch B inhibits FFA-induced steatosis in L-02 cells by, at least in part, reversing the up-regulation of ADRP and SREBP-1. PMID:21633637

  9. Acetylsalicylic Acid Reduces the Severity of Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colitis and Increases the Formation of Anti-Inflammatory Lipid Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Köhnke, Thomas; Bilal, Süleyman; Zhou, Xiangzhi; Rothe, Michael; Baumgart, Daniel C.; Weylandt, Karsten H.

    2013-01-01

    The role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in inflammatory bowel disease is controversial, as they have been implicated in disease aggravation. Different from other cyclooxygenase inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) enhances the formation of anti-inflammatory and proresolution lipoxins derived from arachidonic acid as well as resolvins from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). In this study, we examined the effect of ASA on murine dextran sodium sulfate colitis. A mouse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol and post mortem assessment were used to assess disease severity, and lipid metabolites were measured using liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry. Decreased colitis activity was demonstrated by phenotype and MRI assessment in mice treated with ASA, and confirmed in postmortem analysis. Analysis of lipid mediators showed sustained formation of lipoxin A4 and an increase of DHA-derived 17-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA) after treatment with ASA. Furthermore, in vitro experiments in RAW264.7 murine macrophages demonstrated significantly increased phagocytosis activity after incubation with 17-HDHA, supporting its proresolution effect. These results show a protective effect of ASA in a murine colitis model and could give a rationale for a careful reassessment of ASA therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and particularly ulcerative colitis, possibly combined with DHA supplementation. PMID:24083240

  10. Acetylsalicylic Acid reduces the severity of dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and increases the formation of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    Köhnke, Thomas; Gomolka, Beate; Bilal, Süleyman; Zhou, Xiangzhi; Sun, Yanping; Rothe, Michael; Baumgart, Daniel C; Weylandt, Karsten H

    2013-01-01

    The role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in inflammatory bowel disease is controversial, as they have been implicated in disease aggravation. Different from other cyclooxygenase inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) enhances the formation of anti-inflammatory and proresolution lipoxins derived from arachidonic acid as well as resolvins from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). In this study, we examined the effect of ASA on murine dextran sodium sulfate colitis. A mouse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol and post mortem assessment were used to assess disease severity, and lipid metabolites were measured using liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry. Decreased colitis activity was demonstrated by phenotype and MRI assessment in mice treated with ASA, and confirmed in postmortem analysis. Analysis of lipid mediators showed sustained formation of lipoxin A4 and an increase of DHA-derived 17-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA) after treatment with ASA. Furthermore, in vitro experiments in RAW264.7 murine macrophages demonstrated significantly increased phagocytosis activity after incubation with 17-HDHA, supporting its proresolution effect. These results show a protective effect of ASA in a murine colitis model and could give a rationale for a careful reassessment of ASA therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and particularly ulcerative colitis, possibly combined with DHA supplementation. PMID:24083240

  11. Topical application of a film-forming emulgel dressing that controls the release of stratifin and acetylsalicylic acid and improves/prevents hypertrophic scarring.

    PubMed

    Rahmani-Neishaboor, Elham; Jallili, Reza; Hartwell, Ryan; Leung, Victor; Carr, Nicholas; Ghahary, Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Here, we evaluate the efficacy of an emulgel dressing to control the release of an antifibrogenic factor, stratifin (SFN), along with an anti-inflammatory drug, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), to be used as a wound dressing with hypertrophic scar reducing features. Emulgel dressings were prepared by dispersing positively charged submicron vesicles in carboxymethyl cellulose gel. Release kinetics of SFN/ASA and toxicity for primary skin cells were assessed in vitro. Antifibrogenic efficacy of medicated emulgel dressings was tested on a rabbit ear fibrotic model. Following topical application on the wounds, emulgels formed an occlusive film and controlled the release of SFN and ASA for 7 and 24 hours, respectively. Wounds treated with SFN/ASA-containing emulgel dressings showed an 80% reduction in scar elevation compared with untreated controls. Topical formulations were nontoxic for cultured human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Inflammation was significantly controlled in treated wounds, as shown by a reduced number of infiltrated CD3(+) T cells (p < 0.001) and macrophages. SFN/ASA-treated wounds showed a significantly higher (p < 0.001) expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1, resulting in reduced collagen deposition and less scarring. Film-forming emulgel dressings that control the release of antifibrogenic and anti-inflammatory factors provide an excellent treatment option for postburn hypertrophic scar management. PMID:23126516

  12. Histopathological, Ultrastructural, and Immunohistochemical Assessment of Hippocampus Structures of Rats Exposed to TCDD and High Doses of Tocopherol and Acetylsalicylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Rosińczuk, Joanna; Całkosiński, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    The effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on central nervous system consists of changing expression of estrogen receptors, whereas the result of chronic inflammatory reaction caused by dioxin is occurrence of destructive changes in various organs connected with disturbed metabolism of connective tissue and damage of cells. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of dioxins on function, ultrastructure, and cytological and histological structure of hippocampus, particularly on expression of estrogen receptors in central nervous system as well as to define protective influence of tocopherol (TCP) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on the decrease in activity of proinflammatory effects in central nervous system. It was shown that TCDD contributes to destructive and inflammatory changes along with demyelization of myelin sheaths and atrophy of estrogen receptors in hippocampus. Dioxin contributes to atrophy of estrogen receptors in hippocampus, in which also destructive and inflammatory changes were found along with demyelination of myelin sheaths. Histopathological and ultrastructural image of hippocampus areas in rats, in which both TCP and ASA were used, is characterized by poorly expressed degenerative changes and smaller inflammatory reactivity. Using both TCP and ASA has a protective effect on functions of central nervous system. PMID:25879034

  13. The monitoring of antiaggregation effect of acetylsalicylic acid therapy by measuring serum thromboxane B2 in patients with coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Klasic, Anita; Lakusic, Nenad; Gaspar, Ludovit; Kruzliak, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular patients take acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) for preventing myocardial infarction and other thromboembolic complications. It is already known that in some patients this therapy is not effective. The aim of this study was to assess the percentage of ASA resistance on the sample of patients with coronary artery bypass grafting. Our study included 105 patients with coronary artery bypass grafting treated with ASA 150 mg/day or lesser. Platelet aggregation was measured by serum thromboxane B2 level as well as impedance aggregometry from whole blood to determine ASA antiaggregation effect. The percentage of ASA resistance was 41.9% with impedance aggregometry, and after determining the serum thromboxane B2 level this percentage was only 8.6%. The correlation between these two methods was weak (r = 0.443; P < 0.0001). Thromboembolic complications still occur in ASA-treated patients because some patients are resistant to ASA therapy. It would be useful to monitor the effectiveness of ASA therapy and give another antiaggregation drug to these patients to reduce adverse events. The problem is which test is ideal because different tests show different percentages of ASA resistance. PMID:26575493

  14. The effect of microcrystalline cellulose crystallinity on the hydrophilic property of tablets and the hydrolysis of acetylsalicylic acid as active pharmaceutical ingredient inside tablets.

    PubMed

    Awa, Kimie; Shinzawa, Hideyuki; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2015-08-01

    The crystal structures of active pharmaceutical ingredients and excipients should be strictly controlled because they influence pharmaceutical properties of products which cause the change in the quality or the bioavailability of the products. In this study, we investigated the effects of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) crystallinity on the hydrophilic properties of tablets and the hydrolysis of active pharmaceutical ingredient, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), inside tablets by using tablets containing 20% MCC as an excipient. Different levels of grinding were applied to MCC prior to tablet formulation, to intentionally cause structural variation in the MCC. The water penetration and moisture absorbability of the tablets increased with decreasing the crystallinity of MCC through higher level of grinding. More importantly, the hydrolysis of ASA inside tablets was also accelerated. These results indicate that the crystallinity of MCC has crucial effects on the pharmaceutical properties of tablets even when the tablets contain a relatively small amount of MCC. Therefore, controlling the crystal structure of excipients is important for controlling product qualities. PMID:25583304

  15. Effect of low dose acetylsalicylic acid on the frequency and hematologic activity of left ventricular thrombus in anterior wall acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Kuepper, A.J.V.; Verheugt, F.W.; Peels, C.H.; Galema, T.W.; den Hollander, W.; Roos, J.P.

    1989-04-15

    In this prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial the effect of 100 mg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) once daily on the incidence, hematologic activity and embolic potential of left ventricular (LV) thrombosis was studied in 100 consecutive patients with a first anterior wall acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Patients were randomized to ASA or placebo less than 12 hours after onset of symptoms. Heparin, 5,000 IU subcutaneously twice daily, was given to all patients during immobilization. Echocardiography was performed less than 24 hours, 48 to 72 hours and 1, 2, and 12 weeks after AMI. LV thrombosis was detected by echocardiography in 30 (33%) of the 92 evaluable patients (15 patients given ASA and 15 given placebo). Indium-111 platelet scintigraphy was done in 17 of the 22 patients with an LV thrombus at the second week echocardiogram. Among 7 ASA-treated patients, 4 had positive images; among 10 placebo patients, 5 had positive images. LV thrombus resolution was noted in 3 of 9 patients with a positive scan and in 5 of 8 patients with a negative platelet scan. In 7 of 10 ASA-treated patients and 5 of 12 placebo-treated patients thrombus resolution was observed (difference not significant). Systemic embolism occurred in 2 patients, both given ASA, during the first week after AMI. Thus, low dose ASA has no effect on the incidence, hematologic activity and embolic potential of LV thrombosis in anterior wall AMI.

  16. Histopathological, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical assessment of hippocampus structures of rats exposed to TCDD and high doses of tocopherol and acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Rosińczuk, Joanna; Dymarek, Robert; Całkosiński, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    The effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on central nervous system consists of changing expression of estrogen receptors, whereas the result of chronic inflammatory reaction caused by dioxin is occurrence of destructive changes in various organs connected with disturbed metabolism of connective tissue and damage of cells. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of dioxins on function, ultrastructure, and cytological and histological structure of hippocampus, particularly on expression of estrogen receptors in central nervous system as well as to define protective influence of tocopherol (TCP) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on the decrease in activity of proinflammatory effects in central nervous system. It was shown that TCDD contributes to destructive and inflammatory changes along with demyelization of myelin sheaths and atrophy of estrogen receptors in hippocampus. Dioxin contributes to atrophy of estrogen receptors in hippocampus, in which also destructive and inflammatory changes were found along with demyelination of myelin sheaths. Histopathological and ultrastructural image of hippocampus areas in rats, in which both TCP and ASA were used, is characterized by poorly expressed degenerative changes and smaller inflammatory reactivity. Using both TCP and ASA has a protective effect on functions of central nervous system. PMID:25879034

  17. Binary mixtures of diclofenac with paracetamol, ibuprofen, naproxen, and acetylsalicylic acid and these pharmaceuticals in isolated form induce oxidative stress on Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Neri-Cruz, Nadia; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Islas-Flores, Hariz; García-Medina, Sandra

    2014-11-01

    Toxicity in natural ecosystems is usually not due to exposure to a single substance, but is rather the result of exposure to mixtures of toxic substances. Knowing the effects of contaminants as a mixture compared to their effects in isolated form is therefore important. This study aimed to evaluate the oxidative stress induced by binary mixtures of diclofenac with paracetamol, ibuprofen, naproxen, and acetylsalicylic acid and by these nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in isolated form, using Hyalella azteca as a bioindicator. The median lethal concentration (LC50) and the lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) of each NSAID were obtained. Amphipods were exposed for 72 h to the latter value in isolated form and as binary mixtures. The following biomarkers were evaluated: lipid peroxidation (LPX), protein carbonyl content (PCC), and activity of the antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Significant increases in LPX and PCC with respect to the control group (p ≤ 0.05) were induced by NSAIDs both in isolated form and as binary mixtures. Changes in SOD, CAT, and GPx activity likewise occurred with NSAIDs in isolated form and as binary mixtures. In conclusion, NSAIDs used in this study induce oxidative stress on H. azteca both in isolated form and as binary mixtures, and the interactions occurring between these pharmaceuticals are probably antagonistic in type. PMID:25004860

  18. Biomarkers of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ward, T H; Cummings, J; Dean, E; Greystoke, A; Hou, J M; Backen, A; Ranson, M; Dive, C

    2008-01-01

    Within the era of molecularly targeted anticancer agents, it has become increasingly important to provide proof of mechanism as early on as possible in the drug development cycle, especially in the clinic. Selective activation of apoptosis is often cited as one of the major goals of cancer chemotherapy. Thus, the present minireview focuses on a discussion of the pros and cons of a variety of methodological approaches to detect different components of the apoptotic cascade as potential biomarkers of programmed cell death. The bulk of the discussion centres on serological assays utilising the technique of ELISA, since here there is an obvious advantage of sampling multiple time points. Potential biomarkers of apoptosis including circulating tumour cells, cytokeratins and DNA nucleosomes are discussed at length. However, accepting that a single biomarker may not have the power to predict proof of concept and patient outcome, it is clear that in the future more emphasis will be placed on technologies that can analyse panels of biomarkers in small volumes of samples. To this end the increased throughput afforded by multiplex ELISA technologies is discussed. PMID:19238626

  19. Multi-omics profile of the mouse dentate gyrus after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Marijn; Bielefeld, Pascal; Fratantoni, Silvina A; Hubens, Chantal J; Piersma, Sander R; Pham, Thang V; Voskuyl, Rob A; Lucassen, Paul J; Jimenez, Connie R; Fitzsimons, Carlos P

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) can develop from alterations in hippocampal structure and circuit characteristics, and can be modeled in mice by administration of kainic acid (KA). Adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) contributes to hippocampal functions and has been reported to contribute to the development of TLE. Some of the phenotypical changes include neural stem and precursor cells (NPSC) apoptosis, shortly after their birth, before they produce hippocampal neurons. Here we explored these early phenotypical changes in the DG 3 days after a systemic injection of KA inducing status epilepticus (KA-SE), in mice. We performed a multi-omics experimental setup and analyzed DG tissue samples using proteomics, transcriptomics and microRNA profiling techniques, detecting the expression of 2327 proteins, 13401 mRNAs and 311 microRNAs. We here present a description of how these data were obtained and make them available for further analysis and validation. Our data may help to further identify and characterize molecular mechanisms involved in the alterations induced shortly after KA-SE in the mouse DG. PMID:27529540

  20. Multi-omics profile of the mouse dentate gyrus after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Schouten, Marijn; Bielefeld, Pascal; Fratantoni, Silvina A.; Hubens, Chantal J.; Piersma, Sander R.; Pham, Thang V.; Voskuyl, Rob A.; Lucassen, Paul J.; Jimenez, Connie R.; Fitzsimons, Carlos P.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) can develop from alterations in hippocampal structure and circuit characteristics, and can be modeled in mice by administration of kainic acid (KA). Adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) contributes to hippocampal functions and has been reported to contribute to the development of TLE. Some of the phenotypical changes include neural stem and precursor cells (NPSC) apoptosis, shortly after their birth, before they produce hippocampal neurons. Here we explored these early phenotypical changes in the DG 3 days after a systemic injection of KA inducing status epilepticus (KA-SE), in mice. We performed a multi-omics experimental setup and analyzed DG tissue samples using proteomics, transcriptomics and microRNA profiling techniques, detecting the expression of 2327 proteins, 13401 mRNAs and 311 microRNAs. We here present a description of how these data were obtained and make them available for further analysis and validation. Our data may help to further identify and characterize molecular mechanisms involved in the alterations induced shortly after KA-SE in the mouse DG. PMID:27529540

  1. Protective role of miR-23b-3p in kainic acid-induced seizure.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Lianbo; Yao, Yi; Fu, Huajun; Li, Zhenghui; Wang, Fengpeng; Zhang, Xiaobin; He, Wencan; Zheng, Weihong; Zhang, Yunwu; Zheng, Honghua

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulation of microRNAs has been proposed to contribute toward epilepsy. The miRNA miR-23b-3p has been found to protect against neuronal apoptosis and the production of reactive oxygen species. In this study, we assessed the potential role of miR-23b-3p in the kainic acid (KA)-induced seizure model. We found that miR-23b-3p levels were significantly decreased in the brain cortex of mice and in cultured mouse primary neurons treated with KA. Importantly, supplement of miR-23b-3p agomir by an intacerebroventricular injection alleviated seizure behaviors and abnormal cortical electroencephalogram recordings in KA-treated mice. Together, these results indicate that miR-23b-3p plays a crucial role in suppressing seizure formation in experimental models of epilepsy and that miR-23b-3p supplement may be a potential anabolic strategy for ameliorating seizure. PMID:27232518

  2. Fusaric acid induces mitochondrial stress in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells.

    PubMed

    Sheik Abdul, Naeem; Nagiah, Savania; Chuturgoon, Anil A

    2016-09-01

    Fusarium spp are common contaminants of maize and produce many mycotoxins, including the fusariotoxin fusaric acid (FA). FA is a niacin related compound, chelator of divalent cations, and mediates toxicity via oxidative stress and possible mitochondrial dysregulation. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) is a stress response deacetylase that maintains proper mitochondrial function. We investigated the effect of FA on SIRT3 and oxidative and mitochondrial stress pathways in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell line. We determined FA toxicity (24 h incubation; IC50 = 104 μg/ml) on mitochondrial output, cellular and mitochondrial stress responses, mitochondrial biogenesis and markers of cell death using spectrophotometry, luminometry, qPCR and western blots. FA caused a dose dependent decrease in metabolic activity along with significant depletion of intracellular ATP. FA induced a significant increase in lipid peroxidation, despite up-regulation of the antioxidant transcription factor, Nrf2. FA significantly decreased expression of SIRT3 mRNA with a concomitant decrease in protein expression. Lon protease was also significantly down-regulated. FA induced aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis as evidenced by significantly decreased protein expressions of: PGC-1α, p-CREB, NRF1 and HSP70. Finally, FA activated apoptosis as noted by the significantly increased activity of caspases 3/7 and also induced cellular necrosis. This study provides insight into the molecular mechanisms of FA (a neglected mycotoxin) induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:27390038

  3. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  4. Allicin alleviates inflammation of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced rats and suppresses P38 and JNK pathways in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Lun, Weijian; Zhao, Xinmei; Lei, Shan; Guo, Yandong; Ma, Jiayi; Zhi, Fachao

    2015-01-01

    Background. Allicin has anti-inflammatory, antioxidative and proapoptotic properties. Aims. To evaluate the effects and investigate the mechanism of allicin on trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced colitis, specifically with mesalazine or sulfasalazine. Methods. 80 rats were divided equally into 8 groups: control; trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid; allicin prevention; allicin; mesalazine; sulfasalazine; allicin + sulfasalazine, and mesalazine + allicin. Systemic and colonic inflammation parameters were analysed. In addition, protein and culture medium of Caco-2 cells treated with various concentrations of IL-1β or allicin were collected for investigation of IL-8, NF-κB p65 P38, ERK, and JNK. One-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis H test were used for parametric and nonparametric tests, respectively. Results. Allicin reduced the body weight loss of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced rats, histological score, serum TNF-α and IL-1β levels, and colon IL-1β mRNA level and induced serum IL-4 level, particularly in combination with mesalazine. In addition, 1 ng/mL IL-1β stimulated the P38, ERK, and JNK pathways, whereas pretreatment with allicin depressed this phenomenon, except for the ERK pathway. Conclusions. The inflammation induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid is mitigated significantly by allicin treatment, particularly combined with mesalazine. Allicin inhibits the P38 and JNK pathways and the expression of NF-κB which explained the potential anti-inflammatory mechanisms of allicin. PMID:25729217

  5. Mouse GATA-4: a retinoic acid-inducible GATA-binding transcription factor expressed in endodermally derived tissues and heart.

    PubMed Central

    Arceci, R J; King, A A; Simon, M C; Orkin, S H; Wilson, D B

    1993-01-01

    We report the cDNA cloning and characterization of mouse GATA-4, a new member of the family of zinc finger transcription factors that bind a core GATA motif. GATA-4 cDNA was identified by screening a 6.5-day mouse embryo library with oligonucleotide probes corresponding to a highly conserved region of the finger domains. Like other proteins of the family, GATA-4 is approximately 50 kDa in size and contains two zinc finger domains of the form C-X-N-C-(X17)-C-N-X-C. Cotransfection assays in heterologous cells demonstrate that GATA-4 trans activates reporter constructs containing GATA promoter elements. Northern (RNA) analysis and in situ hybridization show that GATA-4 mRNA is expressed in the heart, intestinal epithelium, primitive endoderm, and gonads. Retinoic acid-induced differentiation of mouse F9 cells into visceral or parietal endoderm is accompanied by increased expression of GATA-4 mRNA and protein. In vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells into embryoid bodies is also associated with increased GATA-4 expression. We conclude that GATA-4 is a tissue-specific, retinoic acid-inducible, and developmentally regulated transcription factor. On the basis of its tissue distribution, we speculate that GATA-4 plays a role in gene expression in the heart, intestinal epithelium, primitive endoderm, and gonads. Images PMID:8455608

  6. MicroRNA gene expression during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of human acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Garzon, R; Pichiorri, F; Palumbo, T; Visentini, M; Aqeilan, R; Cimmino, A; Wang, H; Sun, H; Volinia, S; Alder, H; Calin, G A; Liu, C-G; Andreeff, M; Croce, C M

    2007-06-14

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs of 19-25 nucleotides that are involved in the regulation of critical cell processes such as apoptosis, cell proliferation and differentiation. However, little is known about the role of miRNAs in granulopoiesis. Here, we report the expression of miRNAs in acute promyelocytic leukemia patients and cell lines during all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment by using a miRNA microarrays platform and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). We found upregulation of miR-15a, miR-15b, miR-16-1, let-7a-3, let-7c, let-7d, miR-223, miR-342 and miR-107, whereas miR-181b was downregulated. Among the upregulated miRNAs, miR-107 is predicted to target NFI-A, a gene that has been involved in a regulatory loop involving miR-223 and C/EBPa during granulocytic differentiation. Indeed, we have confirmed that miR-107 targets NF1-A. To get insights about ATRA regulation of miRNAs, we searched for ATRA-modulated transcription factors binding sites in the upstream genomic region of the let-7a-3/let-7b cluster and identified several putative nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) consensus elements. The use of reporter gene assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that one proximal NF-kappaB binding site is essential for the transactivation of the let-7a-3/let-7b cluster. Finally, we show that ATRA downregulation of RAS and Bcl2 correlate with the activation of known miRNA regulators of those proteins, let-7a and miR-15a/miR-16-1, respectively. PMID:17260024

  7. Dual Role of Endogenous Serotonin in 2,4,6-Trinitrobenzene Sulfonic Acid-Induced Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Rapalli, Alberto; Bertoni, Simona; Arcaro, Valentina; Saccani, Francesca; Grandi, Andrea; Vivo, Valentina; Cantoni, Anna M.; Barocelli, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Changes in gut serotonin (5-HT) content have been described in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and in different experimental models of colitis: the critical role of this monoamine in the pathogenesis of chronic gastrointestinal inflammation is gradually emerging. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the contribution of endogenous 5-HT through the activation of its specific receptor subtypes to the local and systemic inflammatory responses in an experimental model of IBD. Materials and Methods: Colitis was induced by intrarectal 2,4,6-TriNitroBenzene Sulfonic acid in mice subacutely treated with selective antagonists of 5-HT1A (WAY100135), 5-HT2A (Ketanserin), 5-HT3 (Ondansetron), 5-HT4 (GR125487), 5-HT7 (SB269970) receptors and with 5-HT1A agonist 8-Hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin. Results: Blockade of 5-HT1A receptors worsened TNBS-induced local and systemic neutrophil recruitment while 5-HT1A agonist delayed and mitigated the severity of colitis, counteracting the increase in colonic 5-HT content. On the contrary, blockade of 5-HT2A receptors improved global health conditions, reduced colonic morphological alterations, down-regulated neutrophil recruitment, inflammatory cytokines levels and colonic apoptosis. Antagonism of 5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7 receptor sites did not remarkably affect the progression and outcome of the pathology or only slightly improved it. Conclusion: The prevailing deleterious contribution given by endogenous 5-HT to inflammation in TNBS-induced colitis is seemingly mediated by 5-HT2A and, to a lesser extent, by 5-HT4 receptors and coexists with the weak beneficial effect elicited by 5-HT1A stimulation. These findings suggest how only a selective interference with 5-HT pro-inflammatory actions may represent an additional potential therapeutic option for intestinal inflammatory disorders. PMID:27047383

  8. 3-Nitropropionic acid induces ovarian oxidative stress and impairs follicle in mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Qing; Shen, Ming; Zhu, Cheng-Cheng; Yu, Feng-Xiang; Liu, Ze-Qun; Ally, Nazim; Sun, Shao-Chen; Li, Kui; Liu, Hong-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress induces many serious reproductive diseases in female mammals and thus poses a serious threat to reproductive health. However, the relationship between reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative stress and follicular development, oocyte and embryo quality is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ovarian oxidative stress on the health of follicle and oocyte development. Female ICR mice were dosed with 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) at three different concentrations (6.25, 12.5 and 25 mg/kg) and saline (control) via continuous intraperitoneal injection for 7 days. The treatment with 12.5 mg/kg reduced the weight of mouse ovaries, and significantly increased ROS levels and the activities of antioxidant enzymes--total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT)--in granulosa cells and ovarian tissues, but not in other tissues (brain, liver, kidney and spleen). The same treatment significantly increased the percentage of atretic large follicles, and reduced the number of large follicles, the number of ovulated oocytes, and the capacity for early embryonic development compared with controls. It also significantly decreased the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax, while causing an increase in the mRNA expression of (SOD2, CAT and GP X) and ROS levels in granulosa cells. Collectively, these data indicate that 3-NPA induces granulosa cell apoptosis, large follicle atresia, and an increase of ROS levels in the ovary. Therefore, we have established an in vivo model of ovarian oxidative stress for studying the mechanism of resulting damage induced by free radicals and for the screening of novel antioxidants. PMID:24505260

  9. Gallic Acid Induces Necroptosis via TNF–α Signaling Pathway in Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ya Ju; Hsu, Shih Lan; Liu, Yi Ting; Lin, Yu Hsuan; Lin, Ming Hui; Huang, Shu Jung; Ho, Ja-an Annie; Wu, Li-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Gallic acid (3, 4, 5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA), a natural phenolic acid widely found in gallnuts, tea leaves and various fruits, possesses several bioactivities against inflammation, oxidation, and carcinogenicity. The beneficial effect of GA on the reduction of animal hepatofibrosis has been indicated due to its antioxidative property. However, the cytotoxicity of GA autoxidation causing cell death has also been reported. Herein, we postulated that GA might target activated hepatic stellate cells (aHSCs), the cell type responsible for hepatofibrosis, to mitigate the process of fibrosis. The molecular cytotoxic mechanisms that GA exerted on aHSCs were then analyzed. The results indicated that GA elicited aHSC programmed cell death through TNF–α–mediated necroptosis. GA induced significant oxidative stress through the suppression of catalase activity and the depletion of glutathione (GSH). Elevated oxidative stress triggered the production of TNF–α facilitating the undergoing of necroptosis through the up-regulation of key necroptotic regulatory proteins TRADD and receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3), and the inactivation of caspase–8. Calmodulin and calpain–1 activation were engaged, which promoted subsequent lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). The TNF–α antagonist (SPD–304) and the RIP1 inhibitor (necrostatin–1, Nec–1) confirmed GA-induced TNFR1–mediated necroptosis. The inhibition of RIP1 by Nec–1 diverted the cell death from necroptosis to apoptosis, as the activation of caspase 3 and the increase of cytochrome c. Collectively, this is the first report indicating that GA induces TNF signaling–triggered necroptosis in aHSCs, which may offer an alternative strategy for the amelioration of liver fibrosis. PMID:25816210

  10. 3-Nitropropionic Acid Induces Ovarian Oxidative Stress and Impairs Follicle in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-Qing; Shen, Ming; Zhu, Cheng-Cheng; Yu, Feng-Xiang; Liu, Ze-Qun; Ally, Nazim; Sun, Shao-Chen; Li, Kui; Liu, Hong-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress induces many serious reproductive diseases in female mammals and thus poses a serious threat to reproductive health. However, the relationship between reactive oxygen species (ROS)—induced oxidative stress and follicular development, oocyte and embryo quality is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ovarian oxidative stress on the health of follicle and oocyte development. Female ICR mice were dosed with 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) at three different concentrations (6.25, 12.5 and 25 mg/kg) and saline (control) via continuous intraperitoneal injection for 7 days. The treatment with 12.5 mg/kg reduced the weight of mouse ovaries, and significantly increased ROS levels and the activities of antioxidant enzymes—total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT) — in granulosa cells and ovarian tissues, but not in other tissues (brain, liver, kidney and spleen). The same treatment significantly increased the percentage of atretic large follicles, and reduced the number of large follicles, the number of ovulated oocytes, and the capacity for early embryonic development compared with controls. It also significantly decreased the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax, while causing an increase in the mRNA expression of (SOD2, CAT and GPX) and ROS levels in granulosa cells. Collectively, these data indicate that 3-NPA induces granulosa cell apoptosis, large follicle atresia, and an increase of ROS levels in the ovary. Therefore, we have established an in vivo model of ovarian oxidative stress for studying the mechanism of resulting damage induced by free radicals and for the screening of novel antioxidants. PMID:24505260

  11. [Apoptosis and its biomedical significance].

    PubMed

    Ortega-Camarillo, C; Díaz-Flores, M; Avalos-Rodríguez, A; Vergara-Onofre, M; Rosales-Torres, A M

    2001-01-01

    Cell death can occur through apoptotic or necrotic death pathways. Membrane disruption leads to inflammation, a typical feature of necrosis. Apoptosis constitutes a genetically controlled physiologic process of cell removal. It is characterized by cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and DNA cleavage. Apoptotic cells are rapidly recognized and engulfed by phagocytes thus inhibiting an inflammatory response following necrosis. Apoptosis has been proposed as a basic event to protect tissue homeostasis. This paper analyzes the genetic, biochemical, and morphologic characteristics related to apoptosis, as well as its relationship to certain illnesses. PMID:11766462

  12. A rapid method for the simultaneous determination of L-ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid in aspirin C effervescent tablet by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; Alothman, Zeid Abdullah; Khan, Mohammad Rizwan

    2013-05-01

    In present study, a rapid and sensitive method using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of L-ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid in aspirin C effervescent tablet. The optimum chromatographic separation was carried out on a reversed phase Waters® Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column (1.7 μm particle size, 100 mm × 2.1 mm ID) with an isocratic elution profile and mobile phase consisting of 0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile (75:25, v/v, pH 3.5) at flow rate of 0.5 mL min-1. The influences of mobile phase composition, flow rate and pH on chromatographic resolution were investigated. The total chromatographic analysis time was as short as 2 min with excellent resolution. Detection and quantification of the target compounds were carried out with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer using negative electrospray ionization (ESI) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) modes. The performance of the method was evaluated and very low limits of detection less than 0.09 μg g-1, excellent coefficient correlation (r2 > 0.999) with liner range over a concentration range of 0.1-1.0 μg g-1 for both L-ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid, and good intraday and interday precisions (relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) <3%), were obtained. Comparison of system performance with traditional liquid chromatography-photo diode array detector (HPLC-PDA) was made with respect to analysis time, sensitivity, linearity and precisions. The proposed UPLC-MS/MS method was found to be reproducible and appropriate for quantitative analysis of L-ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid in aspirin C effervescent tablet.

  13. Reduced mucosal side-effects of acetylsalicylic acid after conjugation with tris-hydroxymethyl-aminomethane. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a new anti-inflammatory compound.

    PubMed

    Varga, Gabriella; Lajkó, Norbert; Ugocsai, Melinda; Érces, Dániel; Horváth, Gyöngyi; Tóth, Gábor; Boros, Mihály; Ghyczy, Miklós

    2016-06-15

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) causes adverse haemorrhagic reactions in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and previous results have suggested that combination therapy with 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (Tris) could provide protection in this scenario. Based on this hypothesis, our aim was to develop a new compound from ASA and Tris precursors and to characterize the biological effects of ASA-Tris and the derivatives ASA-bis- and mono-hydroxymethyl-aminomethane (ASA-Bis, ASA-Mono, respectively) using in vivo and in vitro test systems. ASA or ASA conjugates (0.55mmol/kg, each) were administered intragastrically to Sprague-Dawley rats. Changes in the mucosal structure and in the serosal microcirculation were detected by in vivo imaging techniques, the plasma TNF-alpha, tissue xanthine oxidoreductase and myeloperoxidase activities, and liver cytochrome c changes were also determined. In two separate series, platelet aggregation and carrageenan arthritis-induced inflammatory pain were measured in control, ASA and ASA-Tris-treated groups. Severe mucosal injury and a significant decrease in serosal red blood cell velocity developed in the ASA-treated group and an ~2-fold elevation in proinflammatory mediator levels evolved. ASA-Tris did not cause bleeding, microcirculatory dysfunction, mucosal injury or an elevation in proinflammatory markers. The ASA-Mono and ASA-Bis conjugates did not cause macroscopic bleeding, but the inflammatory activation was apparent. ASA-Tris did not influence the cyclooxygenase-induced platelet aggregation significantly, but the inflammatory pain was reduced as effectively as in the case of equimolar ASA doses. ASA-Tris conjugation is an effective approach through which the GI side-effects of ASA are controlled by decreasing the cytokine-mediated progression of pro-inflammatory events. PMID:27079640

  14. Modulation of phenytoin teratogenicity and embryonic covalent binding by acetylsalicylic acid, caffeic acid, and alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone: implications for bioactivation by prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, P.G.; Zubovits, J.T.; Wong, S.T.; Molinari, L.M.; Ali, S.

    1989-02-01

    Teratogenicity of the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin is thought to involve its bioactivation by cytochromes P-450 to a reactive arene oxide intermediate. We hypothesized that phenytoin also may be bioactivated to a teratogenic free radical intermediate by another enzymatic system, prostaglandin synthetase. To evaluate the teratogenic contribution of this latter pathway, an irreversible inhibitor of prostaglandin synthetase, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally (ip), was administered to pregnant CD-1 mice at 9:00 AM on Gestational Days 12 and 13, 2 hr before phenytoin, 65 mg/kg ip. Other groups were pretreated 2 hr prior to phenytoin administration with either the antioxidant caffeic acid or the free radical spin trapping agent alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN). Caffeic acid and PBN were given ip in doses that respectively were up to 1.0 to 0.05 molar equivalents to the dose of phenytoin. Dams were killed on Day 19 and the fetuses were assessed for teratologic anomalies. A similar study evaluated the effect of ASA on the in vivo covalent binding of radiolabeled phenytoin administered on Day 12, in which case dams were killed 24 hr later on Day 13. ASA pretreatment produced a 50% reduction in the incidence of fetal cleft palates induced by phenytoin (p less than 0.05), without significantly altering the incidence of resorptions or mean fetal body weight. Pretreatment with either caffeic acid or PBN resulted in dose-related decreases in the incidence of fetal cleft palates produced by phenytoin, with maximal respective reductions of 71 and 82% at the highest doses of caffeic acid and PBN (p less than 0.05).

  15. Simultaneous determination of salicylic, 3-methyl salicylic, 4-methyl salicylic, acetylsalicylic and benzoic acids in fruit, vegetables and derived beverages by SPME-LC-UV/DAD.

    PubMed

    Aresta, Antonella; Zambonin, Carlo

    2016-03-20

    Salicylic and benzoic acid are phenolic acids occurring in plant cells, thus they can be present in fruit and vegetables at various levels. They possess anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties, however they may induce symptoms and health problems in a small percentage of the population. Therefore, a low phenolic acid diet may be of clinical benefit to such individuals. In order to achieve this goal, the concentration of these substances in different food and beverages should be assessed. The present work describes for the first time a new method, based on solid phase microextraction (polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene fiber) coupled to liquid chromatography with UV diode array detection, for the simultaneous determination of salicylic acid, 3-methyl salicylic acid, 4-methyl salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid and benzoic acid in selected fruit, vegetables and beverages. All the aspects influencing fiber adsorption (time, temperature, pH, salt addition) and desorption (desorption and injection time, desorption solvent mixture composition) of the analytes have been investigated. An isocratic separation was performed using an acetonitrile-phosphate buffer (pH 2.8; 2 mM) mixture (70:30, v/v) as the mobile phase. The estimated LOD and LOQ values (μg/mL) were in the range 0.002-0.028 and 0.007-0.095. The within-day and day-to-day precision values (RSD%) were between 4.7-6.1 and 6.6-9.4, respectively. The method has been successfully applied to the analysis of fava beans, blueberries, kiwi, tangerines, lemons, oranges and fruit juice (lemon and blueberry) samples. The major advantage of the method is that it only requires simple homogenization and/or centrifugation and dilution steps prior to SPME and injection in the LC system. PMID:26775020

  16. Protective role of acetylsalicylic acid in experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infection: evidence of a 15-epi-lipoxin A₄-mediated effect.

    PubMed

    Molina-Berríos, Alfredo; Campos-Estrada, Carolina; Henriquez, Natalia; Faúndez, Mario; Torres, Gloria; Castillo, Christian; Escanilla, Sebastián; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Morello, Antonio; López-Muñoz, Rodrigo A; Maya, Juan D

    2013-01-01

    Chagas' disease, produced by Trypanosoma cruzi, affects more than 8 million people, producing approximately 10,000 deaths each year in Latin America. Migration of people from endemic regions to developed countries has expanded the risk of infection, transforming this disease into a globally emerging problem. PGE₂ and other eicosanoids contribute to cardiac functional deficits after infection with T. cruzi. Thus, the inhibition of host cyclooxygenase (COX) enzyme emerges as a potential therapeutic target. In vivo studies about the effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) upon T. cruzi infection are controversial, and always report the effect of ASA at a single dose. Therefore, we aimed to analyze the effect of ASA at different doses in an in vivo model of infection and correlate it with the production of arachidonic acid metabolites. ASA decreased mortality, parasitemia, and heart damage in T. cruzi (Dm28c) infected mice, at the low doses of 25 and 50 mg/Kg. However, this effect disappeared when the high ASA doses of 75 and 100 mg/Kg were used. We explored whether this observation was related to the metabolic shift toward the production of 5-lipoxygenase derivatives, and although we did not observe an increase in LTB4 production in infected RAW cells and mice infected, we did find an increase in 15-epi-LXA₄ (an ASA-triggered lipoxin). We also found high levels of 15-epi-LXA₄ in T. cruzi infected mice treated with the low doses of ASA, while the high ASA doses decreased 15-epi-LXA₄ levels. Importantly, 15-epi-LXA₄ prevented parasitemia, mortality, and cardiac changes in vivo and restored the protective role in the treatment with a high dose of ASA. This is the first report showing the production of ASA-triggered lipoxins in T. cruzi infected mice, which demonstrates the role of this lipid as an anti-inflammatory molecule in the acute phase of the disease. PMID:23638194

  17. A comparative study between conventional pan coater and quasi-continuous small batch coater on the stability of tablets containing acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Cahyadi, Christine; Chan, Lai Wah; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2015-02-01

    The Supercell coater was developed as an in-line small batch tablet coater which uses air-fluidization for tablet coating. Coating time is very much reduced, with improved heat and mass transfer. It was hypothesized that the quasi-continuous Supercell coating process was more suitable for the aqueous coating of tablets containing moisture-sensitive drugs. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) was used as the model drug in this study. The extent of ASA degradation in Supercell coating was compared against that of tablets coated using the conventional pan coater. Less than 0.3% of ASA was degraded at the end of the coating process using either coater. The extent of ASA degradation was found to be more pronounced during storage. The Supercell coated tablets exhibited comparable or smaller percentage of ASA degradation than the pan coated tablets at the end of a storage period of 6 months under accelerated stability conditions (40°C/75% RH) and 3 years under ambient conditions (25°C/50% RH). The extent and rate of ASA degradation during storage were dependent on the processing conditions employed during Supercell coating. Increase in temperature generally led to a reduction in ASA degradation, while increase in spray rate and coating level caused more degradation. Greater extent of ASA degradation was observed on the surface of pan coated tablets compared with Supercell coated tablets due to greater moisture contact and the slower and wetter coating process. Changes to the processing conditions also influenced the residual moisture content (0.55-2.86%) of the tablets. However, no direct correlation between the residual moisture content of the tablets after coating and the extent of ASA degradation during storage was found. PMID:25448074

  18. Mitochondria and apoptosis: emerging concepts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mark Xiang

    2015-01-01

    As mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell, their damage during the cell suicide process of apoptosis is essentially responsible for cellular demise in most cells. A key family of proteins, the B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2) family, determines the integrity of mitochondria in the face of apoptotic insult. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular details of how apoptosis is initiated and how it culminates is essential if apoptosis is to fulfil its undoubted potential as a therapeutic target to treat diseases ranging from cancer to neurodegenerative conditions. Recent advances have provided significant insight into the control of this fundamental process while prompting a re-evaluation of what was considered dogma in the field. Emerging evidence also points to a potential overarching control network that governs not only apoptosis but other fundamental mitochondrial processes, including mitochondrial fission/fusion and quality control. PMID:26097715

  19. Beyond Apoptosis in Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Colonna, Lucrezia; Lood, Christian; Elkon, Keith B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by autoantibodies directed against nuclear autoantigens normally concealed from immune recognition in healthy individuals. Here we summarize recently identified mechanisms of abnormal cell death leading to exposure and aberrant processing of nucleoprotein self antigens, and discuss their role in the SLE pathogenesis. Recent findings During the past few years, the unveiling of several new forms of cell death has expanded our understanding beyond the simple view of “apoptotic” versus “necrotic” cell death. SLE patients show abnormalities in cell death at several levels, including increased rates of apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy, as well as reduced clearance of dying cells. These abnormalities lead to an increased autoantigen burden and also antigen modifications, such as nucleic acid oxidation that increase the inflammatory properties of self antigens. Recent investigations have highlighted the role of opsonins in determining the immunogenic versus tolerogenic characteristics of self antigens. Summary Dysregulation of different forms of programmed cell death contributes to increased exposure, availability, and immunogenic characteristic of intracellular self antigens, which all participate in development of lupus autoimmunity. As our understanding of abnormalities of cell death in SLE advances, potential therapeutic opportunities await human implementation. PMID:25036095

  20. Cytoskeleton and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ndozangue-Touriguine, Olivia; Hamelin, Jocelyne; Bréard, Jacqueline

    2008-07-01

    Apoptosis is a genetically programmed and physiological mode of cell death that leads to the removal of unwanted or abnormal cells. Cysteine-proteases called caspases are responsible for the apoptotic execution phase which is characterized by specific biochemical events as well as morphological changes. These changes, which lead to the orderly dismantling of the apoptotic cell, include cell contraction, dynamic membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation, nuclear disintegration, cell fragmentation followed by phagocytosis of the dying cell. They involve major modifications of the cytoskeleton which are largely mediated by cleavage of several of its components by caspases. For example, dynamic membrane blebbing is due to the increased contractility of the acto-myosin system following myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation. MLC phosphorylation is a consequence of the cleavage of a Rho GTPase effector, the kinase ROCK I, by caspase-3. This cleavage induces a constitutive kinase activity by removal of an inhibitory domain. Chromatin condensation is facilitated by the processing of lamins by caspases. Collapse of the cytokeratin network is mediated by cleavage of keratin 18. On another hand, the actin cytoskeleton rearrangement needed in the phagocyte for engulfment of the dying cell is due to the activation of the small GTPase Rac, a GTPase of the Rho family that induces actin polymerisation and formation of lamellipodia. In addition to mediating the morphological modifications of the apoptotic cell, several proteins of the cytoskeleton such as actin and keratins are also involved in the regulation of apoptotic signaling. PMID:18462707

  1. Regulation of Retinoic Acid Inducible Gene-I (RIG-I) Activation by the Histone Deacetylase 6.

    PubMed

    Liu, Helene Minyi; Jiang, Fuguo; Loo, Yueh Ming; Hsu, ShuZhen; Hsiang, Tien-Ying; Marcotrigiano, Joseph; Gale, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) is a cytosolic pathogen recognition receptor that initiates the immune response against many RNA viruses. Upon RNA ligand binding, RIG-I undergoes a conformational change facilitating its homo-oligomerization and activation that results in its translocation from the cytosol to intracellular membranes to bind its signaling adaptor protein, mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS). Here we show that RIG-I activation is regulated by reversible acetylation. Acetyl-mimetic mutants of RIG-I do not form virus-induced homo-oligomers, revealing that acetyl-lysine residues of the RIG-I repressor domain prevent assembly to active homo-oligomers. During acute infection, deacetylation of RIG-I promotes its oligomerization upon ligand binding. We identify histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) as the deacetylase that promotes RIG-I activation and innate antiviral immunity to recognize and restrict RNA virus infection. PMID:27372014

  2. Combinatorial localized dissolution analysis: Application to acid-induced dissolution of dental enamel and the effect of surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alexander S; Al Botros, Rehab; Kinnear, Sophie L; Snowden, Michael E; McKelvey, Kim; Ashcroft, Alexander T; Carvell, Mel; Joiner, Andrew; Peruffo, Massimo; Philpotts, Carol; Unwin, Patrick R

    2016-08-15

    A combination of scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to quantitatively study the acid-induced dissolution of dental enamel. A micron-scale liquid meniscus formed at the end of a dual barrelled pipette, which constitutes the SECCM probe, is brought into contact with the enamel surface for a defined period. Dissolution occurs at the interface of the meniscus and the enamel surface, under conditions of well-defined mass transport, creating etch pits that are then analysed via AFM. This technique is applied to bovine dental enamel, and the effect of various treatments of the enamel surface on acid dissolution (1mM HNO3) is studied. The treatments investigated are zinc ions, fluoride ions and the two combined. A finite element method (FEM) simulation of SECCM mass transport and interfacial reactivity, allows the intrinsic rate constant for acid-induced dissolution to be quantitatively determined. The dissolution of enamel, in terms of Ca(2+) flux ( [Formula: see text] ), is first order with respect to the interfacial proton concentration and given by the following rate law: [Formula: see text] , with k0=0.099±0.008cms(-1). Treating the enamel with either fluoride or zinc ions slows the dissolution rate, although in this model system the partly protective barrier only extends around 10-20nm into the enamel surface, so that after a period of a few seconds dissolution of modified surfaces tends towards that of native enamel. A combination of both treatments exhibits the greatest protection to the enamel surface, but the effect is again transient. PMID:27209395

  3. The role of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in acetic acid-induced colonic inflammation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kolgazi, Meltem; Uslu, Unal; Yuksel, Meral; Velioglu-Ogunc, Ayliz; Ercan, Feriha; Alican, Inci

    2013-09-01

    The "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway" provides neurological modulation of cytokine synthesis to limit the magnitude of the immune response. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway on the extent of tissue integrity, oxidant-antioxidant status and neutrophil infiltration to the inflamed organ in a rat model of acetic acid-induced colitis. Colitis was induced by intrarectal administration of 5% acetic acid (1ml) to Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250g; n=7-8 per group). Control group received an equal volume of saline intrarectally. The rats were treated with either nicotine (1mg/kg/day) or huperzine A (0.1mg/kg/day) intraperitoneally for 3 days. After decapitation, the distal colon was scored macroscopically and microscopically. Tissue samples were used for the measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Formation of reactive oxygen species was monitored by using chemiluminescence (CL). Nuclear factor (NF)-κB expression was evaluated in colonic samples via immunohistochemical analysis. Trunk blood was collected for the assessment of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-10, resistin and visfatin levels. Both nicotine and huperzine A reduced the extent of colonic lesions, increased colonic MDA level, high MPO activity and NF-κB expression in the colitis group. Elevation of serum IL-1β level due to colitis was also attenuated by both treatments. Additionally, huperzine A was effective to reverse colitis-induced high lucigenin-enhanced CL values and serum TNF-α levels. Colitis group revealed decreased serum visfatin levels compared to control group which was completely reversed by nicotine. In conclusion, modulation of the cholinergic system either by nicotine or ACh esterase inhibition improved acetic acid-induced colonic inflammation as confirmed by macroscopic and microscopic examination and biochemical assays. PMID:23810507

  4. Acid-induced molten globule state of a prion protein: crucial role of Strand 1-Helix 1-Strand 2 segment.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ryo P; Yamaguchi, Kei-ichi; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2014-10-31

    The conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to its pathogenic isoform (PrP(Sc)) is a critical event in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. Pathogenic conversion is usually associated with the oligomerization process; therefore, the conformational characteristics of the pre-oligomer state may provide insights into the conversion process. Previous studies indicate that PrP(C) is prone to oligomer formation at low pH, but the conformation of the pre-oligomer state remains unknown. In this study, we systematically analyzed the acid-induced conformational changes of PrP(C) and discovered a unique acid-induced molten globule state at pH 2.0 termed the "A-state." We characterized the structure of the A-state using far/near-UV CD, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate fluorescence, size exclusion chromatography, and NMR. Deuterium exchange experiments with NMR detection revealed its first unique structure ever reported thus far; i.e. the Strand 1-Helix 1-Strand 2 segment at the N terminus was preferentially unfolded, whereas the Helix 2-Helix 3 segment at the C terminus remained marginally stable. This conformational change could be triggered by the protonation of Asp(144), Asp(147), and Glu(196), followed by disruption of key salt bridges in PrP(C). Moreover, the initial population of the A-state at low pH (pH 2.0-5.0) was well correlated with the rate of the β-rich oligomer formation, suggesting that the A-state is the pre-oligomer state. Thus, the specific conformation of the A-state would provide crucial insights into the mechanisms of oligomerization and further pathogenic conversion as well as facilitating the design of novel medical chaperones for treating prion diseases. PMID:25217639

  5. Ferulic acid inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis via blockage of PI3K/Akt pathway in osteosarcoma cell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Gong, Xia; Jiang, Rong; Li, Hongzhong; Du, Weimin; Kuang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid, a ubiquitous phenolic acid abundant in corn, wheat and flax, has potent anti-tumor effect in various cancer cell lines. However, the anti-tumor effect of ferulic acid on osteosarcoma remains unclear. Therefore, we conduct current study to examine the effect of ferulic acid on osteosarcoma cells and explore the underlying mechanisms. In present study, ferulic acid inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in both 143B and MG63 osteosarcoma cells dose-dependently, indicated by MTT assay and Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection. Additionally, ferulic acid induced G0/G1 phase arrest and down-regulated the expression of cell cycle-related protein, CDK 2, CDK 4, CDK 6, confirmed by flow cytometry assay and western blotting. Moreover, ferulic acid upregulated Bax, downregulated Bcl-2, and subsequently enhanced caspase-3 activity. More importantly, ferulic acid dose-dependently inhibited PI3K/Akt activation. Using adenoviruses expressing active Akt, the anti-proliferation and pro-apoptosis of ferulic acid were reverted. Our results demonstrated that ferulic acid might inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis via inhibiting PI3K/Akt pathway in osteosarcoma cells. Ferulic acid is a novel therapeutic agent for osteosarcoma. PMID:27158383

  6. Stimulation of proximal tubular cell apoptosis by albumin-bound fatty acids mediated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma.

    PubMed

    Arici, Mustafa; Chana, Ravinder; Lewington, Andrew; Brown, Jez; Brunskill, Nigel John

    2003-01-01

    In nephrotic syndrome, large quantities of albumin enter the kidney tubule. This albumin carries with it a heavy load of fatty acids to which the proximal tubule cells are exposed at high concentration. It is postulated that exposure to fatty acids in this way is injurious to proximal tubule cells. This study has examined the ability of fatty acids to interact with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) in primary cultures of human proximal tubule cells. Luciferase reporter assays in transiently transfected human proximal tubule cells were used to show that albumin bound fatty acids and other agonists activate PPARgamma in a dose-dependent manner. One of the consequences of this activation is apoptosis of the cells as determined by changes in cell morphology, evidence of PARP cleavage, and appearance of DNA laddering. Overexpression of PPARgamma in these cells also results in enhanced apoptosis. Both fatty acid-induced PPAR activation and apoptosis in these cells can be blocked by PPAR response element decoy oligonucleotides. Activation of PPARgamma by the specific agonist PGJ(2) is associated with inhibition of cell proliferation, whereas activation by albumin bound fatty acids is accompanied by increased proliferation. However, the net balance of apoptosis/proliferation favors deletion of cells. These results implicate albumin-bound fatty acids as important mediators of tubular injury in nephrosis and provide fresh impetus for pursuit of lipid-lowering strategies in proteinuric renal disease. PMID:12506134

  7. Ferulic acid inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis via blockage of PI3K/Akt pathway in osteosarcoma cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Gong, Xia; Jiang, Rong; Li, Hongzhong; Du, Weimin; Kuang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid, a ubiquitous phenolic acid abundant in corn, wheat and flax, has potent anti-tumor effect in various cancer cell lines. However, the anti-tumor effect of ferulic acid on osteosarcoma remains unclear. Therefore, we conduct current study to examine the effect of ferulic acid on osteosarcoma cells and explore the underlying mechanisms. In present study, ferulic acid inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in both 143B and MG63 osteosarcoma cells dose-dependently, indicated by MTT assay and Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection. Additionally, ferulic acid induced G0/G1 phase arrest and down-regulated the expression of cell cycle-related protein, CDK 2, CDK 4, CDK 6, confirmed by flow cytometry assay and western blotting. Moreover, ferulic acid upregulated Bax, downregulated Bcl-2, and subsequently enhanced caspase-3 activity. More importantly, ferulic acid dose-dependently inhibited PI3K/Akt activation. Using adenoviruses expressing active Akt, the anti-proliferation and pro-apoptosis of ferulic acid were reverted. Our results demonstrated that ferulic acid might inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis via inhibiting PI3K/Akt pathway in osteosarcoma cells. Ferulic acid is a novel therapeutic agent for osteosarcoma. PMID:27158383

  8. Spontaneous apoptosis in human thymocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Tiso, M.; Gangemi, R.; Bargellesi Severi, A.; Pizzolitto, S.; Fabbi, M.; Risso, A.

    1995-01-01

    Apoptosis seems to be involved in different stages of immune cell development. In particular, experimental evidence suggests that it is a major form of cell death in the thymus. The present analysis of human thymocytes reveals that a fraction of these cells, cultured in vitro, undergoes spontaneous apoptosis. This observation is based both on molecular (DNA fragmentation) and morphological (electron microscopic) investigations of the cells. The apoptotic thymocytes are CD3- or CD3lo, CD4lo, and CD8lo and do not express Bcl-2 protein. Furthermore, thymocytes die by apoptosis when exposed to pharmacological stimuli, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, dexamethasone, ATP, or Ca++ ionophore. Thus the apoptotic machinery in thymocytes can be triggered by an imbalance in growth factors in the in vitro culture media and can be modulated by various biochemical signals. The process of spontaneous apoptosis is independent of mRNA or protein synthesis, as actinomycin D and cycloheximide fail to inhibit this phenomenon. Furthermore, apoptosis seems to require active oxidative phosphorylation, as it is prevented by incubation of the cells with inhibitors of the respiratory chain. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7639336

  9. Akt-dependent NF-kappaB activation is required for bile acids to rescue colon cancer cells from stress-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shant, Jasleen; Cheng, Kunrong; Marasa, Bernard S; Wang, Jian-Ying; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2009-02-01

    Conjugated secondary bile acids promote human colon cancer cell proliferation by activating EGF receptors (EGFR). We hypothesized that bile acid-induced EGFR activation also mediates cell survival by downstream Akt-regulated activation of NF-kappaB. Deoxycholyltaurine (DCT) treatment attenuated TNF-alpha-induced colon cancer cell apoptosis, and stimulated rapid and sustained NF-kappaB nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity (detected by NF-kappaB binding to an oligonucleotide consensus sequence and by activation of luciferase reporter gene constructs). Both DCT-induced NF-kappaB nuclear translocation and attenuation of TNF-alpha-stimulated apoptosis were dependent on EGFR activation. Inhibitors of nuclear translocation, proteosome activity, and IkappaBalpha kinase attenuated NF-kappaB transcriptional activity. Cell transfection with adenoviral vectors encoding a non-degradable IkappaBalpha 'super-repressor' blocked the actions of DCT on both NF-kappaB activation and TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis. Likewise, transfection with mutant akt and treatment with a chemical inhibitor of Akt attenuated effects of DCT on NF-kappaB transcriptional activity and TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis. Chemical inhibitors of Akt and NF-kappaB activation also attenuated DCT-induced rescue of H508 cells from ultraviolet radiation-induced apoptosis. Collectively, these observations indicate that, downstream of EGFR, bile acid-induced colon cancer cell survival is mediated by Akt-dependent NF-kappaB activation. These findings provide a mechanism whereby bile acids increase resistance of colon cancer to chemotherapy and radiation. PMID:19056378

  10. Akt-dependent NF-{kappa}B activation is required for bile acids to rescue colon cancer cells from stress-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shant, Jasleen; Cheng, Kunrong; Marasa, Bernard S.; Wang Jianying; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2009-02-01

    Conjugated secondary bile acids promote human colon cancer cell proliferation by activating EGF receptors (EGFR). We hypothesized that bile acid-induced EGFR activation also mediates cell survival by downstream Akt-regulated activation of NF-{kappa}B. Deoxycholyltaurine (DCT) treatment attenuated TNF-{alpha}-induced colon cancer cell apoptosis, and stimulated rapid and sustained NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity (detected by NF-{kappa}B binding to an oligonucleotide consensus sequence and by activation of luciferase reporter gene constructs). Both DCT-induced NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and attenuation of TNF-{alpha}-stimulated apoptosis were dependent on EGFR activation. Inhibitors of nuclear translocation, proteosome activity, and I{kappa}B{alpha} kinase attenuated NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. Cell transfection with adenoviral vectors encoding a non-degradable I{kappa}B{alpha} 'super-repressor' blocked the actions of DCT on both NF-{kappa}B activation and TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis. Likewise, transfection with mutant akt and treatment with a chemical inhibitor of Akt attenuated effects of DCT on NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity and TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis. Chemical inhibitors of Akt and NF-{kappa}B activation also attenuated DCT-induced rescue of H508 cells from ultraviolet radiation-induced apoptosis. Collectively, these observations indicate that, downstream of EGFR, bile acid-induced colon cancer cell survival is mediated by Akt-dependent NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings provide a mechanism whereby bile acids increase resistance of colon cancer to chemotherapy and radiation.

  11. Homocysteine is a novel risk factor for suboptimal response of blood platelets to acetylsalicylic acid in coronary artery disease: a randomized multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Karolczak, Kamil; Kamysz, Wojciech; Karafova, Anna; Drzewoski, Jozef; Watala, Cezary

    2013-08-01

    The incomplete inhibition of platelet function by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), despite the patients are receiving therapeutic doses of the drug ('aspirin-resistance'), is caused by numbers of risk factors. In this study we verified the idea that plasma homocysteine (Hcy) contributes to 'aspirin-resistance' in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A cross-designed randomized controlled intervention study has been performed (126 CAD pts incl. 26 with T2DM) to determine whether increasing ASA dose from 75mg to 150mg daily may result in the increased antiplatelet effect, in the course of four-week treatment. Platelet response to collagen (coll) or arachidonic acid (AA) was monitored with whole blood aggregometry, plasma thromboxane (Tx), and Hcy levels were determined immunochemically. The ASA-mediated reductions in platelet response to coll (by 12±3%) or AA (by 10±3%) and in plasma Tx (by 20±9%; p<0.02 or less) were significantly greater for higher ASA dose and significantly correlated with plasma Hcy, which was significantly lower in "good" ASA responders compared to "poor" responders (p<0.001). Higher plasma Hcy appeared a significant risk factor for blood platelet refractoriness to low ASA dose (OR=1.11; ±95%CI: 1.02-1.20, p<0.02, adjusted to age, sex and CAD risk factors). Hcy diminished in vitro antiplatelet effect of low ASA concentration and augmented platelet aggregation (by up to 62% (p<0.005) for coll and up to 15% (p<0.005) for AA), whereas its acetyl derivative acted oppositely. Otherwise, Hcy intensified antiplatelet action of high ASA. Hyperhomocysteinaemia may be a novel risk factor for the suppressed blood platelet response to ASA, and homocysteine may act as a specific sensitizer of blood platelets to some agonists. While homocysteine per se acts as a proaggregatory agent to blood platelets, its acetylated form is able to reverse this effect. Thus, these findings reveal a possibly new

  12. Apoptosis deregulation in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Tognon, Raquel; Nunes, Natália de Souza; de Castro, Fabíola Attié

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Philadelphia-chromosome negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms are clonal hematologic diseases characterized by hematopoietic progenitor independence from or hypersensitivity to cytokines. The cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of myeloproliferative neoplasms have not yet been fully clarified. Pathophysiologic findings relevant for myeloproliferative neoplasms are associated with genetic alterations, such as, somatic mutation in the gene that codifies JAK-2 (JAK V617F). Deregulation of the process of programmed cellular death, called apoptosis, seems to participate in the pathogenesis of these disorders. It is known that expression deregulation of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes promotes cell resistance to apoptosis, culminating with the accumulation of myeloid cells and establishing neoplasms. This review will focus on the alterations in apoptosis regulation in myeloproliferative neoplasms, and the importance of a better understanding of this mechanism for the development of new therapies for these diseases. PMID:24488400

  13. Molecular mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is a prominent feature of liver diseases. Causative factors such as alcohol, viruses, toxic bile acids, fatty acids, drugs, and immune response, can induce apoptotic cell death via membrane receptors and intracellular stress. Apoptotic signaling network, including membrane death receptor-mediated cascade, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, lysosomal permeabilization, and mitochondrial dysfunction, is intermixed each other, but one mechanism may dominate at a particular stage. Mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis are complicated by multiple signaling pathways. The progression of liver disease is affected by the balance between apoptotic and antiapoptotic capabilities. Therapeutic options of liver injury are impacted by the clear understanding toward mechanisms of hepatic apoptosis. PMID:24434519

  14. Olodaterol attenuates citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wex, Eva; Bouyssou, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Excessive coughing is a common feature of airway diseases. Different G-protein coupled receptors, including β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AR), have been implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cough reflex. However, the potential antitussive property of β2-AR agonists in patients with respiratory disease is a matter of ongoing debate. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy of the long-acting β2-AR agonist olodaterol with regard to its antitussive property in a pre-clinical model of citric acid-induced cough in guinea pigs and to compare the results to different clinically relevant β2-AR agonists. In our study β2-AR agonists were intratracheally administered, as dry powder, into the lungs of naïve or ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs 15 minutes prior to induction of cough by exposure to citric acid. Cough events were counted over 15 minutes during the citric acid exposure. Olodaterol dose-dependently inhibited the number of cough events in naïve and even more potently and with a greater maximal efficacy in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs (p < 0.01). Formoterol and salmeterol showed a trend towards reducing cough. On the contrary, indacaterol demonstrated pro-tussive properties as it significantly increased the number of coughs, both in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized animals (p < 0.001). In conclusion, olodaterol, at doses eliciting bronchodilation, showed antitussive properties in a model of citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. This is in agreement with pre-clinical and clinical studies showing antitussive efficacy of β2-AR agonists. Indacaterol increased the number of coughs in this model, which concurs with clinical data where a transient cough has been observed after indacaterol inhalation. While the antitussive properties of β2-AR agonists can be explained by their ability to lead to the cAMP-induced hyperpolarization of the neuron membrane thereby inhibiting sensory nerve activation and the

  15. Olodaterol Attenuates Citric Acid-Induced Cough in Naïve and Ovalbumin-Sensitized and Challenged Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wex, Eva; Bouyssou, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Excessive coughing is a common feature of airway diseases. Different G-protein coupled receptors, including β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AR), have been implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cough reflex. However, the potential antitussive property of β2-AR agonists in patients with respiratory disease is a matter of ongoing debate. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy of the long-acting β2-AR agonist olodaterol with regard to its antitussive property in a pre-clinical model of citric acid-induced cough in guinea pigs and to compare the results to different clinically relevant β2-AR agonists. In our study β2-AR agonists were intratracheally administered, as dry powder, into the lungs of naïve or ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs 15 minutes prior to induction of cough by exposure to citric acid. Cough events were counted over 15 minutes during the citric acid exposure. Olodaterol dose-dependently inhibited the number of cough events in naïve and even more potently and with a greater maximal efficacy in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs (p < 0.01). Formoterol and salmeterol showed a trend towards reducing cough. On the contrary, indacaterol demonstrated pro-tussive properties as it significantly increased the number of coughs, both in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized animals (p < 0.001). In conclusion, olodaterol, at doses eliciting bronchodilation, showed antitussive properties in a model of citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. This is in agreement with pre-clinical and clinical studies showing antitussive efficacy of β2-AR agonists. Indacaterol increased the number of coughs in this model, which concurs with clinical data where a transient cough has been observed after indacaterol inhalation. While the antitussive properties of β2-AR agonists can be explained by their ability to lead to the cAMP-induced hyperpolarization of the neuron membrane thereby inhibiting sensory nerve activation and the

  16. Monitoring apoptosis in real time.

    PubMed

    Green, Allan M; Steinmetz, Neil D

    2002-01-01

    Many therapeutically active anticancer treatments exert their effect by the induction of apoptosis and necrosis. Serial biopsies in breast cancer patients have suggested that response to therapy correlates with early posttreatment increases in tumor apoptotic index. Radiolabeled technetium Tc 99m-recombinant human (rh) annexin V provides a noninvasive technique for imaging treatment-induced cell death. Annexin V is a naturally occurring human protein that binds avidly to membrane-associated phosphatidylserine (PS). PS is normally found only on the inner leaflet of the cell membrane double layer, but it is actively transported to the outer layer as an early event in apoptosis and becomes available for annexin binding. Annexin also gains access to PS as a result of the membrane fragmentation associated with necrosis. In vitro studies of apoptosis using fluorescein annexin have shown good correlation with assessments of apoptosis documented by nuclear DNA degradation and caspase activation. In vivo localization of intravenously administered Tc 99m-annexin V has been demonstrated in numerous preclinical models of apoptosis, including anti-Fas-mediated hepatic apoptosis, rejection of allogeneic heterotopic cardiac allografts, cyclophosphamide treatment of murine lymphoma, cyclophosphamide-induced apoptosis in bone marrow, and leukocyte apoptosis associated with abscess formation. Scintigraphic studies in humans using Tc 99m-rh annexin V have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging cell death in acute myocardial infarction, in tumors with a high apoptotic index, and in response to anti-tumor chemotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer, small-cell lung cancer, breast cancer, lymphoma, and sarcoma. Increased localization of Tc 99m-rh annexin V within 1 to 3 days of chemotherapy has been noted in some, but not all, subjects with these tumors. To date, most subjects showing increased Tc 99m-rh annexin V uptake after the first course of chemotherapy have shown objective

  17. Biocontrol agents-mediated suppression of oxalic acid induced cell death during Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-pea interaction.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akansha; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Surendra; Sarma, Birinchi Kumar; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2015-05-01

    Oxalic acid (OA) is an important pathogenic factor during early Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-host interaction and might work by reducing hydrogen peroxide production (H2 O2 ). In the present investigation, oxalic acid-induced cell death in pea was studied. Pea plants treated with biocontrol agents (BCAs) viz., Pseudomonas aeruginosa PJHU15, Bacillus subtilis BHHU100, and Trichoderma harzianum TNHU27 either singly and/or in consortium acted on S. sclerotiorum indirectly by enabling plants to inhibit the OA-mediated suppression of oxidative burst via induction of H2 O2 . Our results showed that BCA treated plants upon treatment with culture filtrate of the pathogen, conferred the resistance via. significantly decreasing relative cell death of pea against S. sclerotiorum compared to control plants without BCA treatment but treated with the culture filtrate of the pathogen. The results obtained from the present study indicate that the microbes especially in consortia play significant role in protection against S. sclerotiorum by modulating oxidative burst and partially enhancing tolerance by increasing the H2 O2 generation, which is otherwise suppressed by OA produced by the pathogen. PMID:24920251

  18. Antitussive Activity of the Water-Extracted Carbohydrate Polymer from Terminalia chebula on Citric Acid-Induced Cough

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Udipta Ranjan; Majee, Sujay Kumar; Ray, Bimalendu

    2013-01-01

    Terminalia chebula, a medicinal plant, is widely used in the management of various diseases. As the water extract of its dried ripe fruit is a frequently used preparation, we decided to look for bioactive polysaccharide in this extract. We demonstrate that the obtained polysaccharide fraction, CP, contained a highly branched arabinogalactan protein having a (1 → 3)-, (1 → 6)- and (1 → 3, 6)-linked β-D-Galp together with (1 → 5)- and (1 → 3)-linked α-L-Araf and nonreducing end units of α-L-Araf. This polymer possesses strong antitussive property. Our results showed that the number of citric acid-induced cough efforts decreased significantly after the oral application of polysaccharide fraction in a dose of 50 mg kg−1 body weight. Its antitussive efficacy was higher than cough suppressive effect of standard drug codeine. Therefore, traditional aqueous extraction method provides a major polysaccharide, which induces a pharmacological effect: this could represent an attractive approach in phytotherapeutic managements. PMID:23878602

  19. Possible protective role of pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile in lithocholic acid-induced hepatotoxicity through enhanced hepatic lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Nomoto, Masahiro; Sotodate, Fumiaki; Mizuki, Tomohiro; Hori, Wataru; Nagayasu, Miho; Yokokawa, Shinya; Ninomiya, Shin-ichi; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2010-06-25

    Lithocholic acid (LCA) feeding causes both liver parenchymal and cholestatic damages in experimental animals. Although pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile (PCN)-mediated protection against LCA-induced hepatocyte injury may be explained by induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, the protection from the delayed cholestasis remains incompletely understood. Thus, the PCN-mediated protective mechanism has been studied from the point of modification of lipid metabolism. At an early stage of LCA feeding, an imbalance of biliary bile acid and phospholipid excretion was observed. Co-treatment with PCN reversed the increase in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities and hepatic hydrophobic bile acid levels. LCA feeding decreased hepatic mRNA levels of several fatty acid- and phospholipid-related genes before elevation of serum ALT and ALP activities. On the other hand, PCN co-treatment reversed the decrease in the mRNA levels and hepatic levels of phospholipids, triglycerides and free fatty acids. PCN co-treatment also reversed the decrease in biliary phospholipid output in LCA-fed mice. Treatment with PCN alone increased hepatic phospholipid, triglyceride and free fatty acid concentrations. Hepatic fatty acid and phosphatidylcholine synthetic activities increased in mice treated with PCN alone or PCN and LCA, compared to control mice, whereas these activities decreased in LCA-fed mice. These results suggest the possibility that PCN-mediated stimulation of lipogenesis contributes to the protection from lithocholic acid-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:20359477

  20. TGF-β-SMAD3 signaling mediates hepatic bile acid and phospholipid metabolism following lithocholic acid-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Naoki; Sato, Misako; Kang, Dong Wook; Krausz, Kristopher W; Flanders, Kathleen C; Ikeda, Kazuo; Luecke, Hans; Wakefield, Lalage M; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2012-12-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) is activated as a result of liver injury, such as cholestasis. However, its influence on endogenous metabolism is not known. This study demonstrated that TGFβ regulates hepatic phospholipid and bile acid homeostasis through MAD homolog 3 (SMAD3) activation as revealed by lithocholic acid-induced experimental intrahepatic cholestasis. Lithocholic acid (LCA) induced expression of TGFB1 and the receptors TGFBR1 and TGFBR2 in the liver. In addition, immunohistochemistry revealed higher TGFβ expression around the portal vein after LCA exposure and diminished SMAD3 phosphorylation in hepatocytes from Smad3-null mice. Serum metabolomics indicated increased bile acids and decreased lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) after LCA exposure. Interestingly, in Smad3-null mice, the metabolic alteration was attenuated. LCA-induced lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 4 (LPCAT4) and organic solute transporter β (OSTβ) expression were markedly decreased in Smad3-null mice, whereas TGFβ induced LPCAT4 and OSTβ expression in primary mouse hepatocytes. In addition, introduction of SMAD3 enhanced the TGFβ-induced LPCAT4 and OSTβ expression in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. In conclusion, considering that Smad3-null mice showed attenuated serum ALP activity, a diagnostic indicator of cholangiocyte injury, these results strongly support the view that TGFβ-SMAD3 signaling mediates an alteration in phospholipid and bile acid metabolism following hepatic inflammation with the biliary injury. PMID:23034213

  1. Phenylbutyric acid induces the cellular senescence through an Akt/p21{sup WAF1} signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hag Dong; Jang, Chang-Young; Choe, Jeong Min; Sohn, Jeongwon; Kim, Joon

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenylbutyric acid induces cellular senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenylbutyric acid activates Akt kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The knockdown of PERK also can induce cellular senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt/p21{sup WAF1} pathway activates in PERK knockdown induced cellular senescence. -- Abstract: It has been well known that three sentinel proteins - PERK, ATF6 and IRE1 - initiate the unfolded protein response (UPR) in the presence of misfolded or unfolded proteins in the ER. Recent studies have demonstrated that upregulation of UPR in cancer cells is required to survive and proliferate. Here, we showed that long exposure to 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA), a chemical chaperone that can reduce retention of unfolded and misfolded proteins in ER, induced cellular senescence in cancer cells such as MCF7 and HT1080. In addition, we found that treatment with PBA activates Akt, which results in p21{sup WAF1} induction. Interestingly, the depletion of PERK but not ATF6 and IRE1 also induces cellular senescence, which was rescued by additional depletion of Akt. This suggests that Akt pathway is downstream of PERK in PBA induced cellular senescence. Taken together, these results show that PBA induces cellular senescence via activation of the Akt/p21{sup WAF1} pathway by PERK inhibition.

  2. Effect of marine mangrove Avicennia marina (Forssk.) Vierh against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in experimental mice.

    PubMed

    Rise, C L Victoria; Prabhu, V Vinod; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekharan

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are two conditions that have many features in common and are referred as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Patients with IBD are predisposed to colorectal cancer. This investigation evaluates the effect of marine mangrove Avicennia marina against acetic acid-induced colitis. The treatment of A marina extract significantly decreased the colonic lipid peroxides, glutathione peroxidase, and serum nitric oxide and significantly increased the colonic and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and glutathione levels compared with colitis control. In addition, A marina extract significantly decreased the lesion score and wet colon weight compared with colitis control. Treatment with A marina extract reflects its therapeutic activity against UC by minimal damage of colonic epithelial cells compared with colitis control during histopathologic examination. These protective role of A marina extract against UC could be attributed to the presence of higher levels of decanoic acid, diethylhydroxylamine (DEHA), pentanoic acid, pyrrolidine, 4-chlorophenyl, thiazolidinones, and arabinopyranoside (flavonoid). These findings suggest that A marina extract could be useful as a potential (natural) therapeutic agent for IBD. PMID:23216642

  3. Effect of ethanolic extract of leaves of Paederia foetida Linn. on acetic acid induced colitis in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swarnamoni; Kanodia, Lalit; Mukherjee, Apurba; Hakim, Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of ethanolic extract of leaves of Paederia foetida on acetic acid induced colitis in albino rats. Materials and Methods: Ethanolic extract of Paederia foetida (EEPF) was prepared by percolation method. Acute toxicity test was done by using Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development guidelines. Albino rats were divided into four groups of five animals each. Groups A and B received 3% gum acacia. Groups C and D received EEPF 500 mg/kg body weight (BW) and 5-aminosalisylic acid 100 mg/kg BW respectively. Colitis was induced by transrectal administration of 4% acetic acid on 5th day. All animals were sacrificed after 48 h of colitis induction and distal 10 cm of the colon was dissected. Colon was weighed for disease activity index (DAI) and scored macroscopically and microscopically. Biochemical assessment of tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was done in colonic tissue homogenate and malondialdehyde (MDA) was estimated in serum. Results: P. foetida showed significant (P < 0.05) reduction in DAI, macroscopic and microscopic lesion score as well as significant (P < 0.05) improvement in MPO, MDA, CAT, and SOD level as compared to Group B. Conclusions: The ethanolic extract of leaves of P. foetida showed significant amelioration of experimentally induced colitis, which may be attributed to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant property. PMID:24130378

  4. Swelling-activated and arachidonic acid-induced currents are TREK-1 in rat bladder smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fukasaku, Mitsuko; Kimura, Junko; Yamaguchi, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    Using the perforated patch voltage clamp, we investigated swelling-activated ionic channels (SACs) in rat urinary bladder smooth muscle cells. Hypo-osmotic (60%) bath solution increased a membrane current which was inhibited by the SAC inhibitor, gadolinium. The reversal potential of the hypotonicity-induced current shifted in the positive direction by increasing external K(+) concentration. The hypotonicity-induced current was inhibited by extracellular acidic pH, phorbol ester and forskolin. These pharmacological properties are identical to those of arachidonic acid-induced current present in these cells, suggesting the presence of TREK-1, a four-transmembrane two pore domain K(+) channel. Using RT-PCR we screened rat bladder smooth muscles and cerebellum for expression of TREK-1, TREK-2 and TRAAK mRNAs. Only TREK-1 mRNA was expressed in the bladder, while all three were expressed in the cerebellum. We conclude that a mechanosensitive K(+) channel is present in rat bladder myocytes, which is activated by arachidonic acid and most likely is TREK-1. This K(+) channel may have an important role in the regulation of bladder smooth muscle tone during urine storage. PMID:26911303

  5. Protective Effect of Cod (Gadus macrocephalus) Skin Collagen Peptides on Acetic Acid-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huina; Wang, Zhicong; Hou, Hu; Zhang, Zhaohui; Li, Bafang

    2016-07-01

    This research was performed to explore the protective effect of cod skin collagen peptides (CCP) on gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid. The CCP were fractionated into low molecular CCP (LMCCP, Mw < 3 kDa) and high molecular CCP (HMCCP, Mw > 3 kDa). In HMCCP and LMCCP, glycine of accounted for about one-third of the total amino acids without cysteine and tryptophan, and hydrophobic amino acids accounted for about 50%. After 21 d CCP treatment (60 or 300 mg/kg, p.o./daily), the healing effects on acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers were evaluated by macroscopic measure, microscopic measure, and immune histochemistry. Moreover, the expression levels of the growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), and the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was detected. The results showed that both LMCCP and HMCCP could significantly decrease the ulcer areas and promote the healing of the lesions. They also could improve the levels of hexosamine, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, and reduce the content of malondialdehyde and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In addition, the expression level of TGFβ1 gene and HSP70 mRNA was significantly improved by the treatment. It suggested that CCP could be able to improve symptoms of gastric ulcer and probably be used in the treatment of gastric ulcer. PMID:27219644

  6. Neuroprotective effects of trans-caryophyllene against kainic acid induced seizure activity and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Song, Zhi; Liao, Daguang; Zhang, Tianyi; Liu, Feng; Zhuang, Kai; Luo, Kui; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Trans-caryophyllene (TC), a component of essential oil found in many flowering plants, has shown its neuroprotective effects in various neurological disorders. However, the effects of TC on epilepsy haven't been reported before. In this study, we investigated the effect of TC on kainic acid-induced seizure activity caused by oxidative stress and pro-inflammation. We found that TC pretreatment significantly decreased seizure activity score compared to kainic acid treated group. Importantly, TC pretreatment leads to lowering the mortality in kainic acid treated mice. In addition, TC was found to significantly inhibit KA-induced generation of malondialdehyde. TC pretreatment also preserved the activity of GPx, SOD, and CAT. Notably, our data shows that an important property of TC is its capacity to exert cerebral anti-inflammatory effects by mitigating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β. These data suggest that TC has a potential protective effect on chemical induced seizure and brain damage. PMID:25417010

  7. Rabbit gastric ulcer models: comparison and evaluation of acetic acid-induced ulcer and mucosectomy-induced ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Jin Hee; Lee, Eunhye

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined rabbit gastric ulcer models that can serve as more clinically relevant models. Two types of ulcer model were studied: acetic acid-induced ulcers (AAU) and mucosal resection-induced ulcers (MRU). For AAU, rabbit gastric mucosa was exposed by median laparotomy and treated with bottled acetic acid. MRU was examined as a model for endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Normal saline was injected into the submucosal layer and the swollen mucosa was resected with scissors. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is frequently performed for treatment of early gastric cancers. This procedure inevitably leads to ulcers and bleeding. Bleeding control is the major concern in endoscopic mucosectomy, and some endoscopic hemostatic agents are currently under clinical and preclinical studies. MRU was developed as a model for these induced ulcers and the evaluation of the healing process. The clinical relevancy of those models was compared with that of rat models. Progressive healing was observed for 7 days based on histology. Rabbit models demonstrate round, deep ulcers with clear margins and well-defined healing stages that were difficult to define in rat models. PMID:23825482

  8. Stearic acid induces proinflammatory cytokine production partly through activation of lactate-HIF1α pathway in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Hongming; Chen, Liang; Hao, Lijun; Zhang, Xuan; Chen, Yujuan; Ruan, Zhihua; Liang, Houjie

    2015-01-01

    The biomechanics stress and chronic inflammation in obesity are causally linked to osteoarthritis. However, the metabolic factors mediating obesity-related osteoarthritis are still obscure. Here we scanned and identified at least two elevated metabolites (stearic acid and lactate) from the plasma of diet-induced obese mice. We found that stearic acid potentiated LDH-a-dependent production of lactate, which further stabilized HIF1α protein and increased VEGF and proinflammatory cytokine expression in primary mouse chondrocytes. Treatment with LDH-a and HIF1α inhibitors notably attenuated stearic acid-or high fat diet-stimulated proinflammatory cytokine production in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, positive correlation of plasma lactate, cartilage HIF1α and cytokine levels with the body mass index was observed in subjects with osteoarthritis. In conclusion, saturated free fatty acid induced proinflammatory cytokine production partly through activation of a novel lactate-HIF1α pathway in chondrocytes. Our findings hold promise of developing novel clinical strategies for the management of obesity-related diseases such as osteoarthritis. PMID:26271607

  9. The BRPF2/BRD1-MOZ complex is involved in retinoic acid-induced differentiation of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hye In; Kim, Min Seong; Jang, Yeun Kyu

    2016-08-01

    The scaffold protein BRPF2 (also called BRD1), a key component of histone acetyltransferase complexes, plays an important role in embryonic development, but its function in the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether BRPF2 is involved in mouse ESC differentiation. BRPF2 depletion resulted in abnormal formation of embryoid bodies, downregulation of differentiation-associated genes, and persistent maintenance of alkaline phosphatase activity even after retinoic acid-induced differentiation, indicating impaired differentiation of BRPF2-depleted ESCs. We also found reduced global acetylation of histone H3 lysine 14 (H3K14) in BRPF2-depleted ESCs, irrespective of differentiation status. Further, co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed a physical association between BRPF2 and the histone acetyltransferase MOZ in differentiated ESCs, suggesting the role of BRPF2-MOZ complexes in ESC differentiation. Together, these results suggest that BRPF2-MOZ complexes play an important role in the differentiation of ESCs via H3K14 acetylation. PMID:27256846

  10. Resistance of Young Rat Hepatic Mitochondria to Bile Acid-Induced Permeability Transition: Potential Role of Alpha Tocopherol

    PubMed Central

    Gumpricht, Eric; Devereaux, Michael W.; Dahl, Rolf; Soden, Jason S.; Sparagna, Genevieve C.; Leonard, Scott W.; Traber, Maret G.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2008-01-01

    Retention of bile acids within the liver is a primary factor in the pathogenesis of cholestatic liver disorders, which are more common in human infants. The objective of this study was to evaluate developmental changes in mitochondrial factors involved in bile acid-induced hepatocyte injury. Hepatic mitochondria from adult rats (aged 9 weeks) underwent a mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) and release of cytochrome c upon exposure to glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). In contrast, mitochondria from young rats (age 6–36 days) were resistant to MPT induction and cytochrome c release. Neither mitochondrial levels of MPT-associated proteins (voltage-dependent anion channel, cyclophilin D, or adenine nucleotide translocase), Bcl-2 family proteins, nor antioxidant enzymes explained this resistance. Mitochondria from young rats contained 2–3-fold higher α-tocopherol (α-TH). In vivo α-TH enrichment of adult hepatic mitochondria increased their MPT resistance. Tetra-linoleoyl cardiolipin (TL-CL), the primary molecular species of cardiolipin (CL), was reduced in mitochondria of the young rat; however, enrichment with CL and TL-CL only modestly increased their MPT susceptibility. In conclusion, we observed an unexpected resistance in young rats to bile acid induction of mitochondrial cell death pathways, which may be related to developmental differences in membrane composition. PMID:18596569

  11. MicroRNA-1290 promotes asiatic acid‑induced apoptosis by decreasing BCL2 protein level in A549 non‑small cell lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Bbeum; Kim, Karam; Bae, Seunghee; Choi, Yeonghmin; Cha, Hwa Jun; Kim, Soo Yeon; Lee, Jae Ho; Jeon, So Hyeon; Jung, Ho Jung; Ahn, Kyu Joong; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan

    2014-09-01

    Asiatic acid, a triterpenoid derived from Centella asiatica, is a putative anticancer agent in several types of cancer cells. Investigations of its biological role in negative regulation of cell growth have focused on the extent of induction of apoptosis in a cell-type-specific manner. In this study, we identified an important regulator of asiatic acid-induced cell death, microRNA (miR)-1290, which sensitizes cells to asiatic acid-induced cytotoxicity and negatively regulates BCL2 expression. Asiatic acid significantly upregulated miR-1290, and asiatic acid-induced cell death was shown to be dependent on miR-1290 activity. Molecular assays demonstrated that BCL2 mRNA is a direct target of miR-1290-mediated RNA interference. The results of functional studies suggest that miR-1290 suppresses cell viability and cell cycle progression. These data provide insight into miR-1290-mediated cellular mechanisms in asiatic acid-treated A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. PMID:25016979

  12. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future. PMID:15084979

  13. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Annie; Gibbons, Anne E.; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically-encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporters are powerful tools to analyze cell signaling and function at single cell resolution in standard two-dimensional cell cultures, but these reporters rarely have been applied to three-dimensional environments. FRET interactions between donor and acceptor molecules typically are determined by changes in relative fluorescence intensities, but wavelength-dependent differences in absorption of light complicate this analysis method in three-dimensional settings. Here we report fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with phasor analysis, a method that displays fluorescence lifetimes on a pixel-wise basis in real time, to quantify apoptosis in breast cancer cells stably expressing a genetically encoded FRET reporter. This microscopic imaging technology allowed us to identify treatment-induced apoptosis in single breast cancer cells in environments ranging from two-dimensional cell culture, spheroids with cancer and bone marrow stromal cells, and living mice with orthotopic human breast cancer xenografts. Using this imaging strategy, we showed that combined metabolic therapy targeting glycolysis and glutamine pathways significantly reduced overall breast cancer metabolism and induced apoptosis. We also determined that distinct subpopulations of bone marrow stromal cells control resistance of breast cancer cells to chemotherapy, suggesting heterogeneity of treatment responses of malignant cells in different bone marrow niches. Overall, this study establishes FLIM with phasor analysis as an imaging tool for apoptosis in cell-based assays and living mice, enabling real-time, cellular-level assessment of treatment efficacy and heterogeneity. PMID:26771007

  14. APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE MOUSE OVARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis in Whole Mouse Ovaries
    Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffay and Sally D. Perreault
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27711.

  15. Calmodulin antagonists induce platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhicheng; Li, Suping; Shi, Quanwei; Yan, Rong; Liu, Guanglei; Dai, Kesheng

    2010-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) antagonists induce apoptosis in various tumor models and inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis, thus some of which have been extensively used as anti-cancer agents. In platelets, CaM has been found to bind directly to the cytoplasmic domains of several platelet receptors. Incubation of platelets with CaM antagonists impairs the receptors-related platelet functions. However, it is still unknown whether CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. Here we show that CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W7), tamoxifen (TMX), and trifluoperazine (TFP) induce apoptotic events in human platelets, including depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. CaM antagonists did not incur platelet activation as detected by P-selectin surface expression and PAC-1 binding. However, ADP-, botrocetin-, and alpha-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, platelet adhesion and spreading on von Willebrand factor surface were significantly reduced in platelets pre-treated with CaM antagonists. Furthermore, cytosolic Ca(2+) levels were obviously elevated by both W7 and TMX, and membrane-permeable Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM significantly reduced apoptotic events in platelets induced by W7. Therefore, these findings indicate that CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. The elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) levels may be involved in the regulation of CaM antagonists-induced platelet apoptosis. PMID:20172594

  16. Increasing the endogenous NO level causes catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis signaling specifically in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl- and NO/peroxynitrite signaling through the expression of membrane-associated catalase. This enzyme decomposes H2O2 and thus prevents HOCl synthesis. It efficiently interferes with NO/peroxynitrite signaling through oxidation of NO and decomposition of peroxynitrite. The regulatory potential of catalase at the crosspoint of ROS and RNS chemical biology, as well as its high local concentration on the outside of the cell membrane of tumor cells, establish tight control of intercellular signaling and thus prevent tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of catalase or its inactivation by singlet oxygen reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are connected with catalase in multiple and meaningful ways, as (i) NO can be oxidated by compound I of catalase, (ii) NO can reversibly inhibit catalase, (iii) peroxynitrite can be decomposed by catalase and (iv) the interaction between peroxynitrite and H2O2 leads to the generation of singlet oxygen that inactivates catalase. Therefore, modulation of the concentration of free NO through addition of arginine, inhibition of arginase, induction of NOS expression or inhibition of NO dioxygenase triggers an autoamplificatory biochemical cascade that is based on initial formation of singlet oxygen, amplification of superoxide anion/H2O2 and NO generation through singlet oxygen dependent stimulation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8. Finally, singlet oxygen is generated at sufficiently high concentration to inactivate protective catalase and to reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. This regulatory network allows to establish several pathways for synergistic interactions, like the combination of modulators of NO metabolism with enhancers of superoxide anion generation, modulators of NO metabolism that act at different targets and between modulators of

  17. Increasing the endogenous NO level causes catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis signaling specifically in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl- and NO/peroxynitrite signaling through the expression of membrane-associated catalase. This enzyme decomposes H2O2 and thus prevents HOCl synthesis. It efficiently interferes with NO/peroxynitrite signaling through oxidation of NO and decomposition of peroxynitrite. The regulatory potential of catalase at the crosspoint of ROS and RNS chemical biology, as well as its high local concentration on the outside of the cell membrane of tumor cells, establish tight control of intercellular signaling and thus prevent tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of catalase or its inactivation by singlet oxygen reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are connected with catalase in multiple and meaningful ways, as (i) NO can be oxidated by compound I of catalase, (ii) NO can reversibly inhibit catalase, (iii) peroxynitrite can be decomposed by catalase and (iv) the interaction between peroxynitrite and H2O2 leads to the generation of singlet oxygen that inactivates catalase. Therefore, modulation of the concentration of free NO through addition of arginine, inhibition of arginase, induction of NOS expression or inhibition of NO dioxygenase triggers an autoamplificatory biochemical cascade that is based on initial formation of singlet oxygen, amplification of superoxide anion/H2O2 and NO generation through singlet oxygen dependent stimulation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8. Finally, singlet oxygen is generated at sufficiently high concentration to inactivate protective catalase and to reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. This regulatory network allows to establish several pathways for synergistic interactions, like the combination of modulators of NO metabolism with enhancers of superoxide anion generation, modulators of NO metabolism that act at different targets and between modulators of

  18. Polyglycolic acid induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ceonzo, Kathleen; Gaynor, Anne; Shaffer, Lisa; Kojima, Koji; Vacanti, Charles A.; Stahl, Gregory L.

    2005-01-01

    Tissue and organ replacement have quickly outpaced available supply. Tissue bioengineering holds the promise for additional tissue availability. Various scaffolds are currently used, whereas polyglycolic acid (PGA), which is currently used in absorbable sutures and orthopedic pins, provides an excellent support for tissue development. Unfortunately, PGA can induce a local inflammatory response following implantation, so we investigated the molecular mechanism of inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Degraded PGA induced an acute peritonitis, characterized by neutrophil (PMN) infiltration following intraperitoneal injection in mice. Similar observations were observed using the metabolite of PGA, glycolide. Dissolved PGA or glycolide, but not native PGA, activated the classical complement pathway in human sera, as determined by classical complement pathway hemolytic assays, C3a and C5a production, C3 and immunoglobulin deposition. To investigate whether these in vitro observations translated to in vivo findings, we used genetically engineered mice. Intraperitoneal administration of glycolide or dissolved PGA in mice deficient in C1q, factor D, C1q and factor D or C2 and factor B demonstrated significantly reduced PMN infiltration compared to congenic controls (WT). Mice deficient in C6 also demonstrated acute peritonitis. However, treatment of WT or C6 deficient mice with a monoclonal antibody against C5 prevented the inflammatory response. These data suggest that the hydrolysis of PGA to glycolide activates the classical complement pathway. Further, complement is amplified via the alternative pathway and inflammation is induced by C5a generation. Inhibition of C5a may provide a potential therapeutic approach to limit the inflammation associated with PGA derived materials following implantation. PMID:16548688

  19. Lack of influence of low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg daily) on platelet survival time, beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    SciTech Connect

    Minar, E.; Ehringer, H.; Jung, M.; Koppensteiner, R.; Stuempflen, A.

    1988-11-01

    In this study we investigated the influence of low-dose (100 mg daily) acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on In-platelet survival time (PST) and on plasma levels of beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) and platelet factor 4 (PF 4) in 30 patients (median age: 60 years) with arteriographically proven peripheral arterial occlusive disease in a chronic stable phase. We observed no significant changes of PST during therapy with ASA (weighted mean: 169.8----166 (median) hours; multiple hit: 168.3----170.6 hours), and also the plasma levels of beta-TG (median: 31.8----32.3 ng/ml) and of PF 4 (3.6----3.9 ng/ml) remained unchanged.

  20. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Verhaag, Esther M.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Koehorst, Martijn; Groen, Albert K.; Moshage, Han; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be explained by a hormetic response in hepatocytes that limits cell death during cholestasis. Aim To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the hormetic response that protect hepatocytes against experimental cholestatic conditions. Methods HepG2.rNtcp cells were preconditioned (24 h) with sub-apoptotic concentrations (0.1–50 μM) of various bile acids, the superoxide donor menadione, TNF-α or the Farsenoid X Receptor agonist GW4064, followed by a challenge with the apoptosis-inducing bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA; 200 μM for 4 h), menadione (50 μM, 6 h) or cytokine mixture (CM; 6 h). Levels of apoptotic and necrotic cell death, mRNA expression of the bile salt export pump (ABCB11) and bile acid sensors, as well as intracellular GCDCA levels were analyzed. Results Preconditioning with the pro-apoptotic bile acids GCDCA, taurocholic acid, or the protective bile acids (tauro)ursodeoxycholic acid reduced GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity in HepG2.rNtcp cells. Bile acid preconditioning did not induce significant levels of necrosis in GCDCA-challenged HepG2.rNtcp cells. In contrast, preconditioning with cholic acid, menadione or TNF-α potentiated GCDCA-induced apoptosis. GCDCA preconditioning specifically reduced GCDCA-induced cell death and not CM- or menadione-induced apoptosis. The hormetic effect of GCDCA preconditioning was concentration- and time-dependent. GCDCA-, CDCA- and GW4064- preconditioning enhanced ABCB11 mRNA levels, but in contrast to the bile acids, GW4064 did not significantly reduce GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity. The GCDCA challenge strongly increased intracellular levels of this bile acid, which was not lowered by GCDCA

  1. Protective Effect of the Methanolic Extract of Malva parviflora L. leaves on Acetic Acid-induced Ulcerative Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dugani, Aisha; Dakhil, Bushra; Treesh, Soad

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a general term describing chronic, idiopathic relapsing, inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract of unknown etiology. Previous studies have indicated that Malva parviflora leaf extract possesses anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiulcerogenic activity. activity. This work aimed to investigatee the anti-inflammatory effect of the methanolic (MEMP) and aqueous (AEMP) extracts of M. parviflora leaves on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods: 42 male Wistar albino rats were divided into seven groups (n = 6). Group I: Normal saline control group with no colitis; Group II: Acetic acid colitis group; Group III: 100 mg/kg/5 d MEMP; Group IV: 200 mg/kg/5 d.MEMP; Group V: 100 mg/kg/5 d AEMP; Group VI: 200 mg/kg/5 d AEMP; Group VII: Prednisolone group (2 mg/kg/5 d). Treatments were followed by induction of colitis using intrarectal instillation of 2 mL of 4% acetic acid. Colon damage was evaluated macroscopically (spleen weight/body weight, colon weight/length ratio) and the histological changes were also recorded. Results: The results of this study showed that acetic acid caused severe inflammation of the colon and a significant increase in spleen weight/body weight, and an increase in colon weight/length ratio compared with normal control group. Pretreatment with MEMP and AEMP for 5 days followed by induction of colitis resulted in a significant attenuation of spleen weight and colon weight/length ratio compared with acetic acid control group. Methanolic extract provided better anticolitic effect than aqueous extract; the effect was prominent at the dose of 200 mg/kg. Histopathological findings confirmed the protective effect of the MEMP. Conclusion: In conclusion, MEMP could ameliorate mucosal damage in experimentally induced colitis when given orally. PMID:27184642

  2. Dietary interesterified fat enriched with palmitic acid induces atherosclerosis by impairing macrophage cholesterol efflux and eliciting inflammation.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Milessa Silva; Lavrador, Maria Silvia Ferrari; Koike, Marcia Kiyomi; Cintra, Dennys Esper; Ferreira, Fabiana Dias; Nunes, Valeria Sutti; Castilho, Gabriela; Gioielli, Luiz Antonio; Paula Bombo, Renata; Catanozi, Sergio; Caldini, Elia Garcia; Damaceno-Rodrigues, Nilsa Regina; Passarelli, Marisa; Nakandakare, Edna Regina; Lottenberg, Ana Maria

    2016-06-01

    Interesterified fats are currently being used to replace trans fatty acids. However, their impact on biological pathways involved in the atherosclerosis development was not investigated. Weaning male LDLr-KO mice were fed for 16weeks on a high-fat diet (40% energy as fat) containing polyunsaturated (PUFA), TRANS, palmitic (PALM), palmitic interesterified (PALM INTER), stearic (STEAR) or stearic interesterified (STEAR INTER). Plasma lipids, lipoprotein profile, arterial lesion area, macrophage infiltration, collagen content and inflammatory response modulation were determined. Macrophage cholesterol efflux and the arterial expression of cholesterol uptake and efflux receptors were also performed. The interesterification process did not alter plasma lipid concentrations. Although PALM INTER did not increase plasma cholesterol concentration as much as TRANS, the cholesterol enrichment in the LDL particle was similar in both groups. Moreover, PALM INTER induced the highest IL-1β, MCP-1 and IL-6 secretion from peritoneal macrophages as compared to others. This inflammatory response elicited by PALM INTER was confirmed in arterial wall, as compared to PALM. These deleterious effects of PALM INTER culminate in higher atherosclerotic lesion, macrophage infiltration and collagen content than PALM, STEAR, STEAR INTER and PUFA. These events can partially be attributed to a macrophage cholesterol accumulation, promoted by apoAI and HDL2-mediated cholesterol efflux impairment and increased Olr-1 and decreased Abca1 and Nr1h3 expressions in the arterial wall. Interesterified fats containing palmitic acid induce atherosclerosis development by promoting cholesterol accumulation in LDL particles and macrophagic cells, activating the inflammatory process in LDLr-KO mice. PMID:27142741

  3. Stability of the Acetic Acid-Induced Bladder Irritation Model in Alpha Chloralose-Anesthetized Female Cats

    PubMed Central

    Kullmann, F. Aura; Wells, Grace I.; Langdale, Christopher L.; Zheng, Jihong; Thor, Karl B.

    2013-01-01

    Time- and vehicle-related variability of bladder and urethral rhabdosphincter (URS) activity as well as cardiorespiratory and blood chemistry values were examined in the acetic acid-induced bladder irritation model in α-chloralose-anesthetized female cats. Additionally, bladder and urethra were evaluated histologically using Mason trichrome and toluidine blue staining. Urodynamic, cardiovascular and respiratory parameters were collected during intravesical saline infusion followed by acetic acid (0.5%) to irritate the bladder. One hour after starting acetic acid infusion, a protocol consisting of a cystometrogram, continuous infusion-induced rhythmic voiding contractions, and a 5 min “quiet period” (bladder emptied without infusion) was precisely repeated every 30 minutes. Administration of vehicle (saline i.v.) occurred 15 minutes after starting each of the first 7 cystometrograms and duloxetine (1mg/kg i.v.) after the 8th. Acetic acid infusion into the bladder increased URS-EMG activity, bladder contraction frequency, and decreased contraction amplitude and capacity, compared to saline. Bladder activity and URS activity stabilized within 1 and 2 hours, respectively. Duloxetine administration significantly decreased bladder contraction frequency and increased URS-EMG activity to levels similar to previous reports. Cardiorespiratory parameters and blood gas levels remained consistent throughout the experiment. The epithelium of the bladder and urethra were greatly damaged and edema and infiltration of neutrophils in the lamina propria of urethra were observed. These data provide an ample evaluation of the health of the animals, stability of voiding function and appropriateness of the model for testing drugs designed to evaluate lower urinary tract as well as cardiovascular and respiratory systems function. PMID:24040064

  4. Priming by Hexanoic Acid Induce Activation of Mevalonic and Linolenic Pathways and Promotes the Emission of Plant Volatiles.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Eugenio; Camañes, Gemma; Lapeña, Leonor; García-Agustín, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Hexanoic acid (Hx) is a short natural monocarboxylic acid present in some fruits and plants. Previous studies reported that soil drench application of this acid induces effective resistance in tomato plants against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae and in citrus against Alternaria alternata and Xanthomonas citri. In this work, we performed an in deep study of the metabolic changes produced in citrus by the application of Hx in response to the challenge pathogen A. alternata, focusing on the response of the plant. Moreover, we used (13)C labeled hexanoic to analyze its behavior inside the plants. Finally, we studied the volatile emission of the treated plants after the challenge inoculation. Drench application of (13)C labeled hexanoic demonstrated that this molecule stays in the roots and is not mobilized to the leaves, suggesting long distance induction of resistance. Moreover, the study of the metabolic profile showed an alteration of more than 200 molecules differentially induced by the application of the compound and the inoculation with the fungus. Bioinformatics analysis of data showed that most of these altered molecules could be related with the mevalonic and linolenic pathways suggesting the implication of these pathways in the induced resistance mediated by Hx. Finally, the application of this compound showed an enhancement of the emission of 17 volatile metabolites. Taken together, this study indicates that after the application of Hx this compound remains in the roots, provoking molecular changes that may trigger the defensive response in the rest of the plant mediated by changes in the mevalonic and linolenic pathways and enhancing the emission of volatile compounds, suggesting for the first time the implication of mevalonic pathway in response to hexanoic application. PMID:27148319

  5. Priming by Hexanoic Acid Induce Activation of Mevalonic and Linolenic Pathways and Promotes the Emission of Plant Volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Llorens, Eugenio; Camañes, Gemma; Lapeña, Leonor; García-Agustín, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Hexanoic acid (Hx) is a short natural monocarboxylic acid present in some fruits and plants. Previous studies reported that soil drench application of this acid induces effective resistance in tomato plants against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae and in citrus against Alternaria alternata and Xanthomonas citri. In this work, we performed an in deep study of the metabolic changes produced in citrus by the application of Hx in response to the challenge pathogen A. alternata, focusing on the response of the plant. Moreover, we used 13C labeled hexanoic to analyze its behavior inside the plants. Finally, we studied the volatile emission of the treated plants after the challenge inoculation. Drench application of 13C labeled hexanoic demonstrated that this molecule stays in the roots and is not mobilized to the leaves, suggesting long distance induction of resistance. Moreover, the study of the metabolic profile showed an alteration of more than 200 molecules differentially induced by the application of the compound and the inoculation with the fungus. Bioinformatics analysis of data showed that most of these altered molecules could be related with the mevalonic and linolenic pathways suggesting the implication of these pathways in the induced resistance mediated by Hx. Finally, the application of this compound showed an enhancement of the emission of 17 volatile metabolites. Taken together, this study indicates that after the application of Hx this compound remains in the roots, provoking molecular changes that may trigger the defensive response in the rest of the plant mediated by changes in the mevalonic and linolenic pathways and enhancing the emission of volatile compounds, suggesting for the first time the implication of mevalonic pathway in response to hexanoic application. PMID:27148319

  6. Stability of the acetic acid-induced bladder irritation model in alpha chloralose-anesthetized female cats.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, F Aura; Wells, Grace I; Langdale, Christopher L; Zheng, Jihong; Thor, Karl B

    2013-01-01

    Time- and vehicle-related variability of bladder and urethral rhabdosphincter (URS) activity as well as cardiorespiratory and blood chemistry values were examined in the acetic acid-induced bladder irritation model in α-chloralose-anesthetized female cats. Additionally, bladder and urethra were evaluated histologically using Mason trichrome and toluidine blue staining. Urodynamic, cardiovascular and respiratory parameters were collected during intravesical saline infusion followed by acetic acid (0.5%) to irritate the bladder. One hour after starting acetic acid infusion, a protocol consisting of a cystometrogram, continuous infusion-induced rhythmic voiding contractions, and a 5 min "quiet period" (bladder emptied without infusion) was precisely repeated every 30 minutes. Administration of vehicle (saline i.v.) occurred 15 minutes after starting each of the first 7 cystometrograms and duloxetine (1mg/kg i.v.) after the 8(th). Acetic acid infusion into the bladder increased URS-EMG activity, bladder contraction frequency, and decreased contraction amplitude and capacity, compared to saline. Bladder activity and URS activity stabilized within 1 and 2 hours, respectively. Duloxetine administration significantly decreased bladder contraction frequency and increased URS-EMG activity to levels similar to previous reports. Cardiorespiratory parameters and blood gas levels remained consistent throughout the experiment. The epithelium of the bladder and urethra were greatly damaged and edema and infiltration of neutrophils in the lamina propria of urethra were observed. These data provide an ample evaluation of the health of the animals, stability of voiding function and appropriateness of the model for testing drugs designed to evaluate lower urinary tract as well as cardiovascular and respiratory systems function. PMID:24040064

  7. Functional and cellular characterization of human Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1) mutations associated with Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Smith-Magenis Syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome in which the dosage sensitive gene has been identified: the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1). Little is known about the function of human RAI1. Results We generated the full-length cDNA of the wild type protein and five mutated forms: RAI1-HA 2687delC, RAI1-HA 3103delC, RAI1 R960X, RAI1-HA Q1562R, and RAI1-HA S1808N. Four of them have been previously associated with SMS clinical phenotype. Molecular weight, subcellular localization and transcription factor activity of the wild type and mutant forms were studied by western blot, immunofluorescence and luciferase assays respectively. The wild type protein and the two missense mutations presented a higher molecular weight than expected, localized to the nucleus and activated transcription of a reporter gene. The frameshift mutations generated a truncated polypeptide with transcription factor activity but abnormal subcellular localization, and the same was true for the 1-960aa N-terminal half of RAI1. Two different C-terminal halves of the RAI1 protein (1038aa-end and 1229aa-end) were able to localize into the nucleus but had no transactivation activity. Conclusion Our results indicate that transcription factor activity and subcellular localization signals reside in two separate domains of the protein and both are essential for the correct functionality of RAI1. The pathogenic outcome of some of the mutated forms can be explained by the dissociation of these two domains. PMID:20738874

  8. Retinoic Acid Induced 1, RAI1: A Dosage Sensitive Gene Related to Neurobehavioral Alterations Including Autistic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Mora, Paulina; Walz, Katherina

    2010-01-01

    Genomic structural changes, such as gene Copy Number Variations (CNVs) are extremely abundant in the human genome. An enormous effort is currently ongoing to recognize and catalogue human CNVs and their associations with abnormal phenotypic outcomes. Recently, several reports related neuropsychiatric diseases (i.e. autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, mental retardation, behavioral problems, epilepsy) with specific CNV. Moreover, for some conditions, both the deletion and duplication of the same genomic segment are related to the phenotype. Syndromes associated with CNVs (microdeletion and microduplication) have long been known to display specific neurobehavioral traits. It is important to note that not every gene is susceptible to gene dosage changes and there are only a few dosage sensitive genes. Smith-Magenis (SMS) and Potocki-Lupski (PTLS) syndromes are associated with a reciprocal microdeletion and microduplication within chromosome 17p11.2. in humans. The dosage sensitive gene responsible for most phenotypes in SMS has been identified: the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1). Studies on mouse models and humans suggest that RAI1 is likely the dosage sensitive gene responsible for clinical features in PTLS. In addition, the human RAI1 gene has been implicated in several neurobehavioral traits as spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA2), schizophrenia and non syndromic autism. In this review we discuss the evidence of RAI1 as a dosage sensitive gene, its relationship with different neurobehavioral traits, gene structure and mutations, and what is known about its molecular and cellular function, as a first step in the elucidation of the mechanisms that relate dosage sensitive genes with abnormal neurobehavioral outcomes. PMID:21629438

  9. The Healing Effect of Teucrium polium in Acetic Acid-Induced Ulcerative Colitis in the Dog as an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabani, Davood; Bahrami, Faranak; Hosseini, Seyed Vahid; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad; Tanideh, Nader; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Amini, Masoud; Amini, Afshin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which include ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD), are debilitating and chronic disorders with unpredictable courses and complicated treatment measures. Therefore, an efficient treatment protocol seems necessary as therapeutic prophylaxis for these disorders. This study aims to determine the healing effect of Teucrium polium (T. polium) in acetic acid-induced UC in an experimental dog model. METHODS From September to December 2010, eight male (20-25 kg) crossbred dogs were used for induction of UC by 6% acetic acid, transrectally. After one week, three biopsies (10, 20 and 30 cm proximal to the anal verge) were taken from the colon of each animal for histological studies. In the presence of UC, 400 mg/kg/day of T. polium extract was administered orally and transrectally (via enema) for 30 days in six of the dogs. The remaining two dogs were used as controls and did not receive T. polium. Multiple biopsies were taken 7, 14, and 30 days after discontinuation of T. polium in the same manner as before treatment. RESULTS After administration of acetic acid, we noted the presence of multiple ulcers, diffuse inflammation, PMN infiltration in the lamina propria, glandular destruction and goblet cell depletion. Treatment with T. polium restored the colonic architecture with an increased number of healthy cells and a reduction in inflammatory cells. Damage of the surface epithelial cells and mucosal layer of the lumen were reversed, which lead to faster ulcer healing. CONCLUSION T. polium may be a treatment choice for UC and can broaden the current therapy options for UC. PMID:24829634

  10. Subchronic treatment of donepezil rescues impaired social, hyperactive, and stereotypic behavior in valproic acid-induced animal model of autism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Woon; Seung, Hana; Kwon, Kyung Ja; Ko, Mee Jung; Lee, Eun Joo; Oh, Hyun Ah; Choi, Chang Soon; Kim, Ki Chan; Gonzales, Edson Luck; You, Jueng Soo; Choi, Dong-Hee; Lee, Jongmin; Han, Seol-Heui; Yang, Sung Min; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Shin, Chan Young; Bahn, Geon Ho

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of pervasive developmental disorders with core symptoms such as sociability deficit, language impairment, and repetitive/restricted behaviors. Although worldwide prevalence of ASD has been increased continuously, therapeutic agents to ameliorate the core symptoms especially social deficits, are very limited. In this study, we investigated therapeutic potential of donepezil for ASD using valproic acid-induced autistic animal model (VPA animal model). We found that prenatal exposure of valproic acid (VPA) induced dysregulation of cholinergic neuronal development, most notably the up-regulation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the prefrontal cortex of affected rat and mouse offspring. Similarly, differentiating cortical neural progenitor cell in culture treated with VPA showed increased expression of AChE in vitro. Chromatin precipitation experiments revealed that acetylation of histone H3 bound to AChE promoter region was increased by VPA. In addition, other histone deacetyalse inhibitors (HDACIs) such as trichostatin A and sodium butyrate also increased the expression of AChE in differentiating neural progenitor cells suggesting the essential role of HDACIs in the regulation of AChE expression. For behavioral analysis, we injected PBS or donepezil (0.3 mg/kg) intraperitoneally to control and VPA mice once daily from postnatal day 14 all throughout the experiment. Subchronic treatment of donepezil improved sociability and prevented repetitive behavior and hyperactivity of VPA-treated mice offspring. Taken together, these results provide evidence that dysregulation of ACh system represented by the up-regulation of AChE may serve as an effective pharmacological therapeutic target against autistic behaviors in VPA animal model of ASD, which should be subjected for further investigation to verify the clinical relevance. PMID:25133713

  11. Anti-inflammatory effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. seeds on acetic acid-induced acute colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Asghari, Gholamreza; Taheri, Diana; Saeidi, Mozhgan; Nasr-Esfahani, Salar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Anti-inflammatory, immuno-modulatory, and antioxidant properties of Moringa oleifera Lam. suggest that it might have beneficial effects on colitis. The present study was performed to investigate the anticolitis effect of Moringa oleifera seeds hydro-alcoholic extract (MSHE) and its chloroform fraction (MCF) on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods: Both MSHE and MCF with three increasing doses (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) were administered orally to separate groups of male Wistar rats, 2 h before ulcer induction (using acetic acid 4%) and continued for 5 days. Prednisolone (4 mg/kg) and normal saline (1 ml/kg) were used in reference and control groups, respectively. All rats were sacrificed 24 h after the last dose (at day 6) and tissue injuries were assessed macroscopically and pathologically. Results: Extracts with three doses mentioned before were effective to reduce weight of distal colon (8 cm) as a marker for inflammation and tissue edema. Three doses of MSHE and two greater doses of MCF (100 and 200 mg/kg) were effective to reduce ulcer severity, area, and index as well as mucosal inflammation severity and extent, crypt damage, invasion involvement, total colitis index, and MPO activity compared with controls. MCF (50 mg/kg) was not significantly effective in reducing evaluated parameters of colitis compared with controls. Conclusion: It is concluded that MSHE and MCF were both effective to treat experimental colitis and this might be attributed to their similar major components, biophenols and flavonoids. Since the efficacy was evident even in low doses of MSHE, presence of active constituents with high potency in seeds is persuasive. PMID:25050310

  12. Palmitic acid induces interleukin-1β secretion via NLRP3 inflammasomes and inflammatory responses through ROS production in human placental cells.

    PubMed

    Shirasuna, Koumei; Takano, Hiroki; Seno, Kotomi; Ohtsu, Ayaka; Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Suzuki, Hirotada; Matsubara, Shigeki; Iwata, Hisataka; Kuwayama, Takehito

    2016-08-01

    Maternal obesity, a major risk factor for adverse pregnancy complications, results in inflammatory cytokine release in the placenta. Levels of free fatty acids are elevated in the plasma of obese human. These fatty acids include obesity-related palmitic acids, which is a major saturated fatty acid, that promotes inflammatory responses. Increasing evidence indicates that nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes mediate inflammatory responses induced by endogenous danger signals. We hypothesized that inflammatory responses associated with gestational obesity cause inflammation. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of palmitic acid on the activation of NLRP3 inflammasomes and inflammatory responses in a human Sw.71 trophoblast cell line. Palmitic acid stimulated caspase-1 activation and markedly increased interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in Sw.71 cells. Treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor diminished palmitic acid-induced IL-1β release. In addition, NLRP3 and caspase-1 genome editing using a CRISPR/Cas9 system in Sw.71 cells suppressed IL-1β secretion, which was stimulated by palmitic acid. Moreover, palmitic acid stimulated caspase-3 activation and inflammatory cytokine secretion (e.g., IL-6 and IL-8). Palmitic acid-induced cytokine secretion were dependent on caspase-3 activation. In addition, palmitic acid-induced IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 secretion was depended on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. In conclusion, palmitic acid caused activation of NLRP3 inflammasomes and inflammatory responses, inducing IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 secretion, which is associated with ROS generation, in human Sw.71 placental cells. We suggest that obesity-related palmitic acid induces placental inflammation, resulting in association with pregnancy complications. PMID:27300134

  13. Role of intracellular calcium and NADPH oxidase NOX5-S in acid-induced DNA damage in Barrett's cells and Barrett's esophageal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms whereby acid reflux may accelerate the progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) are not fully understood. Acid and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported to cause DNA damage in Barrett's cells. We have previously shown that NADPH oxidase NOX5-S is responsible for acid-induced H2O2 production in Barrett's cells and in EA cells. In this study we examined the role of intracellular calcium and NADPH oxidase NOX5-S in acid-induced DNA damage in a Barrett's EA cell line FLO and a Barrett's cell line CP-A. We found that pulsed acid treatment significantly increased tail moment in FLO and CP-A cells and histone H2AX phosphorylation in FLO cells. In addition, acid treatment significantly increased intracellular Ca2+ in FLO cells, an increase that is blocked by Ca2+-free medium with EGTA and thapsigargin. Acid-induced increase in tail moment was significantly decreased by NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium in FLO cells, and by blockade of intracellular Ca2+ increase or knockdown of NOX5-S with NOX5 small-interfering RNA (siRNA) in FLO and CP-A cells. Acid-induced increase in histone H2AX phosphorylation was significantly decreased by NOX5 siRNA in FLO cells. Conversely, overexpression of NOX5-S significantly increased tail moment and histone H2AX phosphorylation in FLO cells. We conclude that pulsed acid treatment causes DNA damage via increase of intracellular calcium and activation of NOX5-S. It is possible that in BE acid reflux increases intracellular calcium, activates NOX5-S, and increases ROS production, which causes DNA damage, thereby contributing to the progression from BE to EA. PMID:24699332

  14. PAR-2 activation enhances weak acid-induced ATP release through TRPV1 and ASIC sensitization in human esophageal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liping; Oshima, Tadayuki; Shan, Jing; Sei, Hiroo; Tomita, Toshihiko; Ohda, Yoshio; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Miwa, Hiroto

    2015-10-15

    Esophageal visceral hypersensitivity has been proposed to be the pathogenesis of heartburn sensation in nonerosive reflux disease. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is expressed in human esophageal epithelial cells and is believed to play a role in inflammation and sensation. PAR-2 activation may modulate these responses through adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release, which is involved in transduction of sensation and pain. The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are both acid-sensitive nociceptors. However, the interaction among these molecules and the mechanisms of heartburn sensation are still not clear. We therefore examined whether ATP release in human esophageal epithelial cells in response to acid is modulated by TRPV1 and ASICs and whether PAR-2 activation influences the sensitivity of TRPV1 and ASICs. Weak acid (pH 5) stimulated the release of ATP from primary human esophageal epithelial cells (HEECs). This effect was significantly reduced after pretreatment with 5-iodoresiniferatoxin (IRTX), a TRPV1-specific antagonist, or with amiloride, a nonselective ASIC blocker. TRPV1 and ASIC3 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection also decreased weak acid-induced ATP release. Pretreatment of HEECs with trypsin, tryptase, or a PAR-2 agonist enhanced weak acid-induced ATP release. Trypsin treatment led to the phosphorylation of TRPV1. Acid-induced ATP release enhancement by trypsin was partially blocked by IRTX, amiloride, or a PAR-2 antagonist. Conversely, acid-induced ATP release was augmented by PAR-2 activation through TRPV1 and ASICs. These findings suggested that the pathophysiology of heartburn sensation or esophageal hypersensitivity may be associated with the activation of PAR-2, TRPV1, and ASICs. PMID:26294672

  15. Pin1 in Neuronal Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Esther B.E.; Bonni, Azad

    2009-01-01

    While the role of the prolyl isomerase Pin1 in dividing cells has long been recognized, Pin1’s function in postmitotic neurons is poorly understood. We have identified a novel mechanism by which Pin1 mediates activation of the mitochondrial cell death machinery specifically in neurons. This perspective presents a sophisticated signaling pathway that triggers neuronal apoptosis upon JNK-mediated phosphorylation of the BH3-only protein BIMEL at serine 65. Pin1 is enriched at the mitochondria in neurons together with BIMEL and components of a neuron-specific JNK signaling complex and functions as a molecular switch that couples the phosphorylation of BIMEL by JNK to apoptosis specifically in neurons. We discuss how these findings relate to our understanding of the development of the nervous system and the pathogenesis of neurologic disorders. PMID:17568190

  16. Inhibitors of apoptosis catch ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Rajalingam, Krishnaraj; Dikic, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    IAP (inhibitor of apoptosis) proteins are a class of anti-apoptotic regulators characterized by the presence of BIR (baculoviral IAP repeat) domains. Some of the IAPs also possess a RING (really interesting new gene) domain with E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Blankenship et al. unveil the presence of an UBA (ubiquitin-associated domain) in several IAPs. UBAs in c-IAPs (cellular IAPs) bind to monoubiquitin and ubiquitin chains and are implicated in degradation of c-IAPs by promoting their interaction with proteasomes as well as in regulation of TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha)-induced apoptosis. These novel observations establish IAPs as ubiquitin-interacting proteins and opens up new lines of investigation. PMID:19061481

  17. Human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60) express a membrane receptor for estrogen that signals and modulates retinoic acid-induced cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kauss, M. Ariel; Reiterer, Gudrun; Bunaciu, Rodica P.; Yen, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    Estrogen receptors are historically perceived as nuclear ligand activated transcription factors. An estrogen receptor has now been found localized to the plasma membrane of human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60). Its expression occurs throughout the cell cycle, progressively increasing as cells mature from G{sub 1} to S to G{sub 2}/M. To ascertain that the receptor functioned, the effect of ligands, including a non-internalizable estradiol-BSA conjugate and tamoxifen, an antagonist of nuclear estrogen receptor function, were tested. The ligands caused activation of the ERK MAPK pathway. They also modulated the effect of retinoic acid, an inducer of MAPK dependent terminal differentiation along the myeloid lineage in these cells. In particular the ligands inhibited retinoic acid-induced inducible oxidative metabolism, a functional marker of terminal myeloid cell differentiation. To a lesser degree they also diminished retinoic acid-induced earlier markers of cell differentiation, namely CD38 and CD11b. However, they did not regulate retinoic acid-induced G{sub 0} cell cycle arrest. There is thus a membrane localized estrogen receptor in HL-60 myeloblastic leukemia cells that can cause ERK activation and modulates the response of these cells to retinoic acid, indicating crosstalk between the membrane estrogen and retinoic acid evoked pathways relevant to propulsion of cell differentiation.

  18. Human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60) express a membrane receptor for estrogen that signals and modulates retinoic acid-induced cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kauss, M Ariel; Reiterer, Gudrun; Bunaciu, Rodica P; Yen, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    Estrogen receptors are historically perceived as nuclear ligand activated transcription factors. An estrogen receptor has now been found localized to the plasma membrane of human myeloblastic leukemia cells (HL-60). Its expression occurs throughout the cell cycle, progressively increasing as cells mature from G(1) to S to G(2)/M. To ascertain that the receptor functioned, the effect of ligands, including a non-internalizable estradiol-BSA conjugate and tamoxifen, an antagonist of nuclear estrogen receptor function, were tested. The ligands caused activation of the ERK MAPK pathway. They also modulated the effect of retinoic acid, an inducer of MAPK dependent terminal differentiation along the myeloid lineage in these cells. In particular the ligands inhibited retinoic acid-induced inducible oxidative metabolism, a functional marker of terminal myeloid cell differentiation. To a lesser degree they also diminished retinoic acid-induced earlier markers of cell differentiation, namely CD38 and CD11b. However, they did not regulate retinoic acid-induced G(0) cell cycle arrest. There is thus a membrane localized estrogen receptor in HL-60 myeloblastic leukemia cells that can cause ERK activation and modulates the response of these cells to retinoic acid, indicating crosstalk between the membrane estrogen and retinoic acid evoked pathways relevant to propulsion of cell differentiation. PMID:18692045

  19. EGFR Inhibition Blocks Palmitic Acid-induced inflammation in cardiomyocytes and Prevents Hyperlipidemia-induced Cardiac Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Weixin; Fang, Qilu; Zhong, Peng; Chen, Lingfeng; Wang, Lintao; Zhang, Yali; Wang, Jun; Li, Xiaokun; Wang, Yi; Wang, Jingying; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is often associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Previous studies suggest that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antagonism may be effective for the treatment of angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy and diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study was performed to demonstrate if EGFR plays a role in the pathogenesis of hyperlipidemia/obesity-related cardiac injuries. The in vivo studies using both wild type (WT) and apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high fat diet (HFD) showed the beneficial effects of small-molecule EGFR inhibitors, AG1478 and 542, against obesity-induced myocardial injury. Administration of AG1478 and 542 significantly reduced myocardial inflammation, fibrosis, apoptosis, and dysfunction in both two obese mouse models. In vitro, EGFR signaling was blocked by either siRNA silencing or small-molecule EGFR inhibitors in palmitic acid (PA)-stimulated cardiomyocytes. EGFR inhibition attenuated PA-induced inflammatory response and apoptosis in H9C2 cells. Furthermore, we found that PA-induced EGFR activation was mediated by the upstream TLR4 and c-Src. This study has confirmed the detrimental effect of EGFR activation in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced cardiac inflammatory injuries in experimental mice, and has demonstrated the TLR4/c-Src-mediated mechanisms for PA-induced EGFR activation. Our data suggest that EGFR may be a therapeutic target for obesity-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27087279

  20. Oleic acid induces specific alterations in the morphology, gene expression and steroid hormone production of cultured bovine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Yenuganti, Vengala Rao; Viergutz, Torsten; Vanselow, Jens

    2016-06-01

    After parturition, one of the major problems related to nutritional management that is faced by the majority of dairy cows is negative energy balance (NEB). During NEB, excessive lipid mobilization takes place and hence the levels of free fatty acids, among them oleic acid, increase in the blood, but also in the follicular fluid. This accumulation can be associated with serious metabolic and reproductive disorders. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of physiological concentrations of oleic acid on cell morphology, apoptosis, necrosis, proliferation and steroid production, and on the abundance of selected transcripts in cultured bovine granulosa cells. Increasing oleic acid concentrations induced intracellular lipid droplet accumulation, thus resulting in a foam cell-like morphology, but had no effects on apoptosis, necrosis or proliferation. Oleic acid also significantly reduced the transcript abundance of the gonadotropin hormone receptors, FSHR and LHCGR, steroidogenic genes STAR, CYP11A1, HSD3B1 and CYP19A1, the cell cycle regulator CCND2, but not of the proliferation marker PCNA. In addition, treatment increased the transcript levels of the fatty acid transporters CD36 and SLC27A1, and decreased the production of 17-beta-estradiol and progesterone. From these data it can be concluded that oleic acid specifically affects morphological and physiological features and gene expression levels thus altering the functionality of granulosa cells. Suggestively, these effects might be partly due to the reduced expression of FSHR and thus the reduced responsiveness to FSH stimulation. PMID:27118706

  1. Lipid-induced up-regulation of human acyl-CoA synthetase 5 promotes hepatocellular apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Reinartz, Andrea; Ehling, Josef; Leue, Andrea; Liedtke, Christian; Schneider, Ursula; Kopitz, Jürgen; Weiss, Thomas; Hellerbrand, Claus; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Knüchel, Ruth; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2010-09-01

    In the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, accumulation of lipids in hepatocytes and hepatocyte apoptosis are strongly implicated in disease progression from the potentially reversible condition of steatosis to severe acute and chronic liver injury. Acyl-CoA synthetase 5, a member of the ACSL gene family that catalyzes the activation of long-chain fatty acids for lipid biosynthesis, is the only ACSL isoform that is both, located on mitochondria and functionally involved in enterocyte apoptosis. In this study, the regulation of human ACSL5 in hepatocellular fatty acid degeneration and its involvement in hepatocyte apoptosis was investigated using models of in vitro and in vivo steatosis as well as plasmid-mediated stable gene transfer and RNAi-mediated gene silencing. ACSL5 mRNA and protein were strongly increased by uptake of dietary derived fatty acids in primary human hepatocytes, HepG2 cells and human steatotic liver. Over-expression of ACSL5 decreased HepG2 cell viability and increased susceptibility to TRAIL- and TNFalpha-, but not FAS- induced apoptosis, whereas knock down of ACSL5 reduced apoptosis susceptibility. High ACSL5 activity resulted in enhanced caspase-3/7 activity, but was not accompanied by up-regulation of death receptors, DR4, DR5 or TNF-R1. This study gives evidence that hepatocyte steatosis is associated with ACSL5 up-regulation resulting in increased susceptibility to hepatic cell death. We propose that ACSL5 could play a role in promoting fatty acid-induced lipoapoptosis in hepatocytes as important mechanism in fatty liver-related disorders. PMID:20470896

  2. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors. PMID:1886987

  3. Medium and Long Chain Fatty Acids Differentially Modulate Apoptosis and Release of Inflammatory Cytokines in Human Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Lumin; Wang, Baogui; Yu, Ping; Wen, Xuefang; Gong, Deming; Zeng, Zheling

    2016-06-01

    Medium chain fatty acids (MCFA) can be more easily absorbed and supply energy more rapidly than long chain fatty acids (LCFA). However, little is known about the inflammatory response by the treatment of MCFA in human liver cells. Thus this study used human liver cells (LO2) to evaluate the effects of MCFA on apoptosis and inflammatory response. Tetrazolim-based colorimetric assay and lactate dehydrogenase assay were used to measure the viability of LO2 cells, isolated spleens and liver cells from BALB/C mice. Inverted fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry were used to assess the cell apoptosis. Activity of superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde level were measured to determine the oxidative damage. mRNA or protein levels of classical pro-inflammatory cytokines were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting. The results showed that the liver cells treated with the fatty acids at 200 μM for 24 h exhibited good viability. Fatty acids induced inflammatory cytokines at transcriptional and translational levels to a lesser extent than lipopolysaccharide. LCFA (oleic acid) up-regulated tumor necrosis fator-α, monocyte chemoattractant-1 and interleukin-1β while down-regulated IL-6 and IL-8 secretion to a higher extent than MCFA in mRNA and protein levels. These findings suggested that MCFA may induce apoptosis to a less extent and exert more gentle inflammation than LCFA in human liver cells. PMID:27145239

  4. Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Differentially Affects the Virus-Induced Type I Interferon Response and Mitochondrial Apoptosis Mediated by RIG-I/MAVS

    PubMed Central

    Pythoud, Christelle; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenaviruses are important emerging human pathogens maintained by noncytolytic persistent infection in their rodent reservoir hosts. Despite high levels of viral replication, persistently infected carrier hosts show only mildly elevated levels of type I interferon (IFN-I). Accordingly, the arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) has been identified as a potent IFN-I antagonist capable of blocking activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via the retinoic acid inducible gene (RIG)-I/mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. Another important mechanism of host innate antiviral defense is represented by virus-induced mitochondrial apoptosis via RIG-I/MAVS and IRF3. In the present study, we investigated the ability of the prototypic Old World arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) to interfere with RIG-I/MAVS-dependent apoptosis. We found that LCMV does not induce apoptosis at any time during infection. While LCMV efficiently blocked induction of IFN-I via RIG-I/MAVS in response to superinfection with cytopathic RNA viruses, virus-induced mitochondrial apoptosis remained fully active in LCMV-infected cells. Notably, in LCMV-infected cells, RIG-I was dispensable for virus-induced apoptosis via MAVS. Our study reveals that LCMV infection efficiently suppresses induction of IFN-I but does not interfere with the cell's ability to undergo virus-induced mitochondrial apoptosis as a strategy of innate antiviral defense. The RIG-I independence of mitochondrial apoptosis in LCMV-infected cells provides the first evidence that arenaviruses can reshape apoptotic signaling according to their needs. IMPORTANCE Arenaviruses are important emerging human pathogens that are maintained in their rodent hosts by persistent infection. Persistent virus is able to subvert the cellular interferon response, a powerful branch of the innate antiviral defense. Here, we investigated the ability of the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) to

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of nesfatin-1 in rats with acetic acid - induced colitis and underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, C C; Oktay, S; Yuksel, M; Akakin, D; Yarat, A; Kasimay Cakir, O

    2015-10-01

    Mucosal balance impairment, bacterial over-proliferation, cytokines, inflammatory mediators are known as responsible for inflammatory bowel disease. Besides known anorexigenic, neuroprotective, and anti-apoptotic effects, the major effect of nesfatin-1 on colitis is unknown. Our aim was to investigate the possible anti-inflammatory effects of nesfatin-1 in acetic acid induced colitis model and potential underlying mechanisms. Male Spraque-Dawley rats were anesthetized by intraperitoneal ketamine (100 mg/kg) and chlorpromazine (0.75 mg/kg). For nesfatin-1 and antagonist applications some of the rats were intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) cannulated. In colitis group, intrarectally (i.r.) 4% acetic acid solution (1 ml) and 10 minutes later i.c.v. nesfatin-1 (0.05 μg/5 μl) or vehicle (5 μl) were administered. Treatments continued for 3 days. In control group, physiological saline solution was used intrarectally. To identify the underlying effective mechanism of nesfatin-1, rats were divided into 3 subgroups, 5 minutes following colitis induction; i.c.v. atosiban (oxytocin receptor antagonist), SHU9119 (melanocortin receptor antagonist) or GHSR-1a antagonist (ghrelin receptor antagonist) were administered, 5 minutes later nesfatin-1 was administered for 3 days. On the fourth day, rats were decapitated, and colon tissues were sampled. Macroscopic and microscopic damage scores of distal colon, and colonic tissue malondialdehyde, glutathione, myeloperoxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, luminol and lucigenin chemiluminescence measurements were analysed. The increased myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde levels, luminol and lucigenin chemiluminescence measurements, macroscopic and microscopic damage scores with colitis induction (P < 0.05 - 0.001) were decreased with nesfatin-1 treatment (P < 0.05 - 0.001). Nesfatin-1 may show this effect by inhibiting neutrophil infiltration through tissues and by decreasing formation of free oxygen radicals. Atosiban and

  6. Blueberry polyphenols attenuate kainic acid-induced decrements in cognition and alter inflammatory gene expression in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Lau, Francis C.; Carey, Amanda N.; Galli, Rachel L.; Spangler, Edward L.; Ingram, Donald K.; Joseph, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease may be partly due to long-term exposure and increased susceptibility to inflammatory insults. In the current study, we investigated whether polyphenols in blueberries can reduce the deleterious effects of inflammation induced by central administration of kainic acid by altering the expression of genes associated with inflammation. To this end, 4-month-old male Fischer-344 (F344) rats were fed a control, 0.015% piroxicam (an NSAID) or 2% blueberry diet for 8 weeks before either Ringer's buffer or kainic acid was bilaterally micro-infused into the hippocampus. Two weeks later, following behavioral evaluation, the rats were killed and total RNA from the hippocampus was extracted and used in real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) to analyze the expression of inflammation-related genes. Kainic acid had deleterious effects on cognitive behavior as kainic acid-injected rats on the control diet exhibited increased latencies to find a hidden platform in the Morris water maze compared to Ringer's buffer-injected rats and utilized non-spatial strategies during probe trials. The blueberry diet, and to a lesser degree the piroxicam diet, was able to improve cognitive performance. Immunohistochemical analyses of OX-6 expression revealed that kainic acid produced an inflammatory response by increasing the OX-6 positive areas in the hippocampus of kainic acid-injected rats. Kainic acid up-regulated the expression of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α, the neurotrophic factor IGF-1, and the transcription factor NF-κB. Blueberry and piroxicam supplementations were found to attenuate the kainic acid-induced increase in the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and NF-κB, while only blueberry was able to augment the increased IGF-1 expression. These results indicate that blueberry polyphenols attenuate learning impairments following neurotoxic insult and exert anti-inflammatory actions

  7. Myristic acid potentiates palmitic acid-induced lipotoxicity and steatohepatitis associated with lipodystrophy by sustaning de novo ceramide synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Laura; Torres, Sandra; Baulies, Anna; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Elena, Montserrat; Fabriàs, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Caballeria, Joan; Fernandez-Checa, Jose C.; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA) induces hepatocyte apoptosis and fuels de novo ceramide synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Myristic acid (MA), a free fatty acid highly abundant in copra/palmist oils, is a predictor of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and stimulates ceramide synthesis. Here we investigated the synergism between MA and PA in ceramide synthesis, ER stress, lipotoxicity and NASH. Unlike PA, MA is not lipotoxic but potentiated PA-mediated lipoapoptosis, ER stress, caspase-3 activation and cytochrome c release in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). Moreover, MA kinetically sustained PA-induced total ceramide content by stimulating dehydroceramide desaturase and switched the ceramide profile from decreased to increased ceramide 14:0/ceramide16:0, without changing medium and long-chain ceramide species. PMH were more sensitive to equimolar ceramide14:0/ceramide16:0 exposure, which mimics the outcome of PA plus MA treatment on ceramide homeostasis, than to either ceramide alone. Treatment with myriocin to inhibit ceramide synthesis and tauroursodeoxycholic acid to prevent ER stress ameliorated PA plus MA induced apoptosis, similar to the protection afforded by the antioxidant BHA, the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-Fmk and JNK inhibition. Moreover, ruthenium red protected PMH against PA and MA-induced cell death. Recapitulating in vitro findings, mice fed a diet enriched in PA plus MA exhibited lipodystrophy, hepatosplenomegaly, increased liver ceramide content and cholesterol levels, ER stress, liver damage, inflammation and fibrosis compared to mice fed diets enriched in PA or MA alone. The deleterious effects of PA plus MA-enriched diet were largely prevented by in vivo myriocin treatment. These findings indicate a causal link between ceramide synthesis and ER stress in lipotoxicity, and imply that the consumption of diets enriched in MA and PA can cause NASH associated with lipodystrophy. PMID:26539645

  8. A new coumarin derivative, IMM-H004, attenuates okadaic acid-induced spatial memory impairment in rats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiu-yun; Wang, Ying-ying; Chu, Shi-feng; Hu, Jin-feng; Yang, Peng-fei; Zuo, Wei; Song, Lian-kun; Zhang, Shuai; Chen, Nai-hong

    2016-01-01

    Aim: A novel coumarin derivative 7-hydroxy-5-methoxy-4-methyl-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-coumarin (IMM-H004) has shown anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. In this study we investigated the effects of IMM-H004 on spatial memory in rats treated with okadaic acid (OKA), which was used to imitate Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like symptoms. Methods: SD rats were administered IMM-H004 (8 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) or donepezil (positive control, 1 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 25 d. On d 8 and 9, OKA (200 ng) was microinjected into the right ventricle. Morris water maze test was used to evaluate the spatial memory impairments. Tau and β-amyloid (Aβ) pathology in the hippocampus was detected using Western blot and immunohistochemistry. TUNEL staining was used to detect cell apoptosis. Results: OKA-treated rats showed significant impairments of spatial memory in Morris water maze test, which were largely reversed by administration of IMM-H004 or donepezil. Furthermore, OKA-treated rats exhibited significantly increased phosphorylation of tau, deposits of Aβ protein and cell apoptosis in the hippocampus, which were also reversed by administration of IMM-H004 or donepezil. Conclusion: Administration of IMM-H004 or donepezil protects rats against OKA-induced spatial memory impairments via attenuating tau or Aβ pathology. Thus, IMM-H004 may be developed as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of AD. PMID:26838073

  9. Optogenetic apoptosis: light-triggered cell death.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Robert M; Freeman, David J; Lamb, Kelsey N; Pollet, Rebecca M; Smith, Weston J; Lawrence, David S

    2015-10-01

    An optogenetic Bax has been designed that facilitates light-induced apoptosis. We demonstrate that mitochondrial recruitment of a genetically encoded light-responsive Bax results in the release of mitochondrial proteins, downstream caspase-3 cleavage, changes in cellular morphology, and ultimately cell death. Mutagenesis of a key phosphorylatable residue or modification of the C-terminus mitigates background (dark) levels of apoptosis that result from Bax overexpression. The mechanism of optogenetic Bax-mediated apoptosis was explored using a series of small molecules known to interfere with various steps in programmed cell death. Optogenetic Bax appears to form a mitochondrial apoptosis-induced channel analogous to that of endogenous Bax. PMID:26418181

  10. Apoptosis and Molecular Targeting Therapy in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed; Watari, Hidemichi; AbuAlmaaty, Ali; Ohba, Yusuke; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is the programmed cell death which maintains the healthy survival/death balance in metazoan cells. Defect in apoptosis can cause cancer or autoimmunity, while enhanced apoptosis may cause degenerative diseases. The apoptotic signals contribute into safeguarding the genomic integrity while defective apoptosis may promote carcinogenesis. The apoptotic signals are complicated and they are regulated at several levels. The signals of carcinogenesis modulate the central control points of the apoptotic pathways, including inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins and FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP). The tumor cells may use some of several molecular mechanisms to suppress apoptosis and acquire resistance to apoptotic agents, for example, by the expression of antiapoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2 or by the downregulation or mutation of proapoptotic proteins such as BAX. In this review, we provide the main regulatory molecules that govern the main basic mechanisms, extrinsic and intrinsic, of apoptosis in normal cells. We discuss how carcinogenesis could be developed via defective apoptotic pathways or their convergence. We listed some molecules which could be targeted to stimulate apoptosis in different cancers. Together, we briefly discuss the development of some promising cancer treatment strategies which target apoptotic inhibitors including Bcl-2 family proteins, IAPs, and c-FLIP for apoptosis induction. PMID:25013758

  11. Death-Defining Immune Responses After Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, L.; Cummings, R. J.; Blander, J. Magarian

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is a programmed form of cell death whereby characteristic internal cellular dismantling is accompanied by the preservation of plasma membrane integrity. Maintaining this order during apoptosis prevents the release of cellular contents and ensures a noninflammatory death. Here, we consider examples of apoptosis in different contexts and discuss how the same form of cell death could have different immunological consequences. Multiple parameters such as cell death as a result of microbial infection, the nature of the inflammatory microenvironment, the type of responding phagocytic cells and the genetic background of the host organism all differentially influence the immunological consequences of apoptosis. PMID:24903539

  12. Schistosoma mansoni: possible involvement of protein kinase C in linoleic acid-induced proteolytic enzyme release from cercariae.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, K; Mitsui, Y; Sato, K; Sakamoto, M; Aoki, Y

    1991-04-01

    antagonist, trifluoperazine (TFP), a better calmodulin antagonist on schistosome, or by verapamil, a Ca2+ channel blocker. Linoleic acid-induced release of enzyme was partially inhibited by 0.5 and 5 mM of EGTA and by 1 to 100 microM of H-7. While it was not inhibited by N-[2-(methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-8) and N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA-1004), inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase which were used as negative controls of H-7, W-7, TFP, 8-(N,N-diethylamino)octyl 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate (TMB-8), an intracellular Ca2+ antagonist, and verapamil.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2015870

  13. Inhibition of COX-2 and induction of apoptosis: two determinants of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs' chemopreventive efficacies in mouse lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, R; Rioux, N; Castonguay, A; You, M

    2000-12-01

    Recent studies suggested that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit lung tumorigenesis under conditions that are immunosuppressive. We hypothesized that this inhibition of mouse lung tumorigenesis requires induction of apoptosis and inhibition of COX (cyclooxygenase)-1, COX-2, and the incidence of K-ras mutation. The NSAIDs used in this study include acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) that is anti-inflammatory with COX-1 and COX-2 inhibition and N-[2-(cyclohexyloxy)-4-nitrophenyl]-methanesulfonamide (NS398) that is a specific COX-2 inhibitor. We have previously demonstrated that ASA (147 and 294 mg/kg diet) and NS398 (7 mg/kg diet) inhibited lung tumorigenesis by 31%, 44%, and 34%, respectively, in 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)-treated A/J mice. No difference in the incidence and types of K-ras mutations was found between the lung tumors treated with NNK and those treated with NNK/ASA and NNK/NS398. In NNK-treated mice, ASA (394 mg/kg diet) or NS398 significantly increased the apoptotic index, from 0.07 to 0.30 or to 0.33, respectively. ASA (294 mg/kg diet) and NS398 also inhibited the expression of COX-2. Finally, modulation of gene expression by NS398 and ASA (294 mg/kg diet) was determined using Atlas cDNA expression arrays. Expression of cyclin B2 was decreased and expression of Fas-L and BAD were increased in lung tissues treated with both NS398 and ASA. Treatment with NS398 also increased expression of p57kip2 and myosin. These genes modulated by NSAIDs may play a role in mediating the observed chemopreventive effects of the NSAIDs in the mouse lung. Our results demonstrate that lung tumor prevention with NSAIDs involve both the induction of apoptosis and the inhibition of COX-2 expression. PMID:11195467

  14. The role of amino acid-induced mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1(mTORC1) signaling in insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Choi, Cheol Soo

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) controls cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrients, energy, and growth factors. Recent findings have placed the lysosome at the core of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) regulation by amino acids. Two parallel pathways, Rag GTPase-Ragulator and Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1), regulate mTOR activation on the lysosome. This review describes the recent advances in understanding amino acid-induced mTOR signaling with a particular focus on the role of mTOR in insulin resistance. PMID:27534530

  15. Neuronal acid-induced [Zn²⁺]i elevations calibrated using the low-affinity ratiometric probe FuraZin-1.

    PubMed

    Kiedrowski, Lech

    2015-11-01

    The experiments were carried out on primary cultures of murine cortical neurons from cryopreserved preparations obtained from embryonic-day-16 fetuses. To calibrate acid-induced intracelluar [Zn(2+) ] ([Zn(2+) ]i ) elevations, a low affinity (Kd = 39 μM at pH 6.1) ratiometric Zn(2+) probe, FuraZin-1, was used. A pHi drop from 7.2 to 6.1 caused [Zn(2+) ]i elevations reaching 2 μM; when the thiol-reactive agent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) was subsequently applied, [Zn(2+) ]i increased further to 5.6 μM; analogous acid- and NEM-induced [Zn(2+) ]i elevations could also be detected but not calibrated, using the high affinity Zn(2+) probe FluoZin-3. The data indicate that NEM causes Zn(2+) release from ligands that chelate Zn(2+) at pH 6.1. ATP could also chelate Zn(2+) at pH 6.1 because its pKa is about 6.8. Therefore, it was tested whether an ATP depletion affects the acid-induced [Zn(2+) ]i elevations. The ATP depletion was induced by inhibiting mitochondrial and glycolytic ATP production. Interestingly, an almost complete ATP depletion (confirmed using a luciferin/luciferase assay) failed to affect the acid-induced [Zn(2+) ]i increases. These data suggest that the total amount of Zn(2+) accumulated in intracellular ATP-dependent stores (Zn(2+) -ATP complexes and organelles that accumulate Zn(2+) in an ATP-dependent manner) is negligible compared to the amount of Zn(2+) accumulated in the acid-sensitive intracellular ligands. In vitro, upon acidification, Zn(2+) -cysteine complexes release Zn(2+) and ATP chelates the released Zn(2+) . However, in vivo (cultured neurons), an ATP depletion failed to enhance acid-induced [Zn(2+) ]i elevations. These [Zn(2+) ]i elevations were calibrated using a low affinity ratiometric probe FuraZin-1; they reached 2 µM levels and increased to 5 µM when a thiol-reactive agent, N-ethylmaleimide, compromised Zn(2+) binding by cysteines. PMID:26263185

  16. The role of amino acid-induced mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1(mTORC1) signaling in insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Choi, Cheol Soo

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) controls cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrients, energy, and growth factors. Recent findings have placed the lysosome at the core of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) regulation by amino acids. Two parallel pathways, Rag GTPase-Ragulator and Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1), regulate mTOR activation on the lysosome. This review describes the recent advances in understanding amino acid-induced mTOR signaling with a particular focus on the role of mTOR in insulin resistance. PMID:27534530

  17. Differences in acid-induced currents between oxytocin-mRFP1 and vasopressin-eGFP neurons isolated from the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Jun-ichi; Ohbuchi, Toyoaki; Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Matsuura, Takanori; Suzuki, Hideaki; Ueta, Yoichi

    2014-11-01

    The hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) consists of two types of magnocellular neurosecretory cells, oxytocin (OXT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP). We generated and characterized rats that express an OXT-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) and an AVP-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) fusion transgene. These transgenic rats enable the visualization of OXT or AVP neurons. Taking advantage of this, we examined the differences between OXT-mRFP1 neurons and AVP-eGFP neurons in response to acid. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are neuronal voltage-insensitive cationic channels that are activated by extracellular acidification. Although functional ASICs have been identified in AVP neurons, differences in acid-induced currents between OXT and AVP neurons in SON have not been reported. In the present study, we used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to investigate differences between OXT-mRFP1 neurons and AVP-eGFP neurons reaction to acid in SON and PVN. In voltage clamp mode, lowering extracellular pH evoked inward currents in both OXT-mRFP1 neurons and AVP-eGFP neurons. In our findings, the acid-induced currents in the OXT-mRFP1 neurons were significantly smaller than those in the AVP-eGFP neurons. These acid-induced currents were inhibited by amiloride, a known blocker of ASICs. Further, to compare the response to acid between OXT-mRFP1 and AVP-eGFP neurons in the same transgenic rat, we used a double transgenic rat by mating an OXT-mRFP1 transgenic rat with an AVP-eGFP transgenic rat. The acid-induced currents of OXT-mRFP1 neurons were significantly smaller than those of AVP-eGFP neurons from the double transgenic rats. These currents were almost completely inhibited by amiloride. The difference of acid-sensitivity between OXT and AVP neurons might contribute to maintaining systematic order in hypothalamic function. PMID:25220704

  18. C-terminal Binding Proteins are Essential Pro-survival Factors that Undergo Caspase-dependent Downregulation during Neuronal Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kelsey, Natalie A.; Bouchard, Ron J.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    C-terminal binding proteins (CtBPs) are transcriptional co-repressors that are subject to proteasome-dependent downregulation during apoptosis. Alternative mechanisms that regulate CtBP expression are currently under investigation and the role of CtBPs in neuronal survival is largely unexplored. Here, we show that CtBPs are downregulated in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) induced to undergo apoptosis by a variety of stressors. Moreover, antisense-mediated downregulation of CtBP1 is sufficient to cause CGN apoptosis. Similarly, the CtBP inhibitor, 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyric acid, induces expression of the CtBP target Noxa and causes actinomycin-sensitive CGN apoptosis. Unexpectedly, we found that the mechanism of CtBP downregulation in CGNs undergoing apoptosis varies in a stimulus-specific manner involving either the proteasome or caspases. In the case of CGNs deprived of depolarizing potassium (5K apoptotic condition), caspases appear to play a dominant role in CtBP downregulation. However, incubation in 5K does not enhance the kinetics of CtBP1 degradation and recombinant CtBP1 is not cleaved in vitro by caspase-3. In addition, 5K has no significant effect on CtBP transcript expression. Finally, mouse embryonic stem cells display caspase-dependent downregulation of CtBP1 following exposure to staurosporine, an effect that is not observed in DGCR8 knockout cells which are deficient in miRNA processing. These data identify caspase-dependent downregulation of CtBPs as an alternative mechanism to the proteasome for regulation of these transcriptional co-repressors in neurons undergoing apoptosis. Moreover, caspases appear to regulate CtBP expression indirectly, at a post-transcriptional level, and via a mechanism that is dependent upon miRNA processing. We conclude that CtBPs are essential pro-survival proteins in neurons and their downregulation contributes significantly to neuronal apoptosis via the de-repression of pro-apoptotic genes. PMID:23859824

  19. C-terminal binding proteins are essential pro-survival factors that undergo caspase-dependent downregulation during neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Trisha R; Schroeder, Emily K; Kelsey, Natalie A; Bouchard, Ron J; Linseman, Daniel A

    2013-09-01

    C-terminal binding proteins (CtBPs) are transcriptional co-repressors that are subject to proteasome-dependent downregulation during apoptosis. Alternative mechanisms that regulate CtBP expression are currently under investigation and the role of CtBPs in neuronal survival is largely unexplored. Here, we show that CtBPs are downregulated in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) induced to undergo apoptosis by a variety of stressors. Moreover, antisense-mediated downregulation of CtBP1 is sufficient to cause CGN apoptosis. Similarly, the CtBP inhibitor, 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyric acid, induces expression of the CtBP target Noxa and causes actinomycin-sensitive CGN apoptosis. Unexpectedly, we found that the mechanism of CtBP downregulation in CGNs undergoing apoptosis varies in a stimulus-specific manner involving either the proteasome or caspases. In the case of CGNs deprived of depolarizing potassium (5K apoptotic condition), caspases appear to play a dominant role in CtBP downregulation. However, incubation in 5K does not enhance the kinetics of CtBP1 degradation and recombinant CtBP1 is not cleaved in vitro by caspase-3. In addition, 5K has no significant effect on CtBP transcript expression. Finally, mouse embryonic stem cells display caspase-dependent downregulation of CtBP1 following exposure to staurosporine, an effect that is not observed in DGCR8 knockout cells which are deficient in miRNA processing. These data identify caspase-dependent downregulation of CtBPs as an alternative mechanism to the proteasome for regulation of these transcriptional co-repressors in neurons undergoing apoptosis. Moreover, caspases appear to regulate CtBP expression indirectly, at a post-transcriptional level, and via a mechanism that is dependent upon miRNA processing. We conclude that CtBPs are essential pro-survival proteins in neurons and their downregulation contributes significantly to neuronal apoptosis via the de-repression of pro-apoptotic genes. PMID:23859824

  20. Therapeutic approaches to the modulation of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Finbarr J; Seery, Liam T; Hayes, Ian

    2003-01-01

    The appreciation of the role of apoptosis in the vast majority of diseases affecting humans has revolutionized the discovery and development of drugs targeting inflammation and oncology. Novel therapeutic approaches to modulate disease by regulating apoptosis are currently being tested in preclinical and clinical settings. Enthusiasm for some of these therapies is reflected in the fact that they have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval in record time. Approaches include the traditional use of small molecules to target specific players in the apoptosis cascade. They also include radical new approaches such as using antisense molecules to inhibit production of the Bcl-2 protein or antibodies that ligate either death receptors, such as TRAIL (tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), or the MHC (HLA-DR), resulting in the initiation of apoptosis of target cells. Antibodies targeting cell-specific antigens are being used in conjunction with radioactive isotopes to deliver a more specific chemotherapy, particularly in the case of B-cell lymphomas. Other therapies target mitochondria, a key organelle in the apoptosis cascade. This diverse range of therapies includes photodynamic therapy, retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide, all of which induce apoptosis by generating reactive oxygen species. As our understanding of apoptosis increases, further opportunities will arise for tailor-made therapies that will result in improved clinical outcome without the devastating side effects of current interventions. PMID:14585079

  1. Apoptosis in mammalian oocytes: a review.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Meenakshi; Prasad, Shilpa; Tripathi, Anima; Pandey, Ashutosh N; Ali, Irfan; Singh, Arvind K; Shrivastav, Tulsidas G; Chaube, Shail K

    2015-08-01

    Apoptosis causes elimination of more than 99% of germ cells from cohort of ovary through follicular atresia. Less than 1% of germ cells, which are culminated in oocytes further undergo apoptosis during last phases of oogenesis and depletes ovarian reserve in most of the mammalian species including human. There are several players that induce apoptosis directly or indirectly in oocytes at various stages of meiotic cell cycle. Premature removal of encircling granulosa cells from immature oocytes, reduced levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, increased levels of calcium (Ca(2+)) and oxidants, sustained reduced level of maturation promoting factor, depletion of survival factors, nutrients and cell cycle proteins, reduced meiotic competency, increased levels of proapoptotic as well as apoptotic factors lead to oocyte apoptosis. The BH3-only proteins also act as key regulators of apoptosis in oocyte within the ovary. Both intrinsic (mitochondria-mediated) as well as extrinsic (cell surface death receptor-mediated) pathways are involved in oocyte apoptosis. BID, a BH3-only protein act as a bridge between both apoptotic pathways and its cleavage activates cell death machinery of both the pathways inside the follicular microenvironment. Oocyte apoptosis leads to the depletion of ovarian reserve that directly affects reproductive outcome of various mammals including human. In this review article, we highlight some of the important players and describe the pathways involved during oocyte apoptosis in mammals. PMID:25958165

  2. CHCHD2 connects mitochondrial metabolism to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yanping

    2015-01-01

    As the powerhouse of cells and gatekeeper for apoptosis, mitochondria control life and death. CHCHD2, a mitochondrial protein previously known to regulate metabolism, has recently been identified as an apoptosis inhibitor. New data suggest a model in which CHCHD2 performs a prosurvival function by acting as both a reactive oxygen species scavenger and BCL-XL activator. PMID:27308501

  3. THE ROLE OF APOPTOSIS IN NEUROTOXICOLOGY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of apoptosis in neurodegeneration in developing animals and in adults has become increasingly apparent in the past ten years. Normal apoptosis occurs in the CNS from the embryonic stage through senescence, with different cells in each region of the nervous system having ...

  4. Carnosic acid induces autophagic cell death through inhibition of the Akt/mTOR pathway in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qilong; Liu, Huaimin; Yao, Yamin; Geng, Liang; Zhang, Xinfeng; Jiang, Lifeng; Shi, Bian; Yang, Feng

    2015-05-01

    The therapeutic goal of cancer treatment is now geared towards triggering tumour-selective cell death with autophagic cell death being required for the chemotherapy of apoptosis-resistant cancer. In this study, Carnosic acid (CA), a polyphenolic diterpene isolated from Rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis), significantly induced autophagic cell death in HepG2 cells. Ca treatment caused the formation of autophagic vacuoles produced an increasing ratio of LC3-II to LC3-I in a time- and dose-dependent manner but had no effect on the levels of autophagy-related protein ATG6 and ATG13 expression. Autophagy inhibitors, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), chloroquine and bafilomycin A1, or ATG genes silencing in HepG2 cells significantly inhibited CA-induced autophagic cell death. The CA treatment decreased the levels of phosphorylated Akt and mTOR without any effects on PI3K or PTEN. Most importantly, overexpression of Akt and knockdown of PTEN attenuated autophagy induction in CA-treated cells. Taken together, our results indicated that CA induced autophagic cell death through inhibition of the Akt/mTOR pathway in human hepatoma cells. These findings suggest that CA has a great potential for the treatment of hepatoma via autophagic induction. PMID:25178877

  5. Analysis of apoptosis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lant, Benjamin; Derry, W Brent

    2014-05-01

    The nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans has provided researchers with a wealth of information on the molecular mechanisms controlling programmed cell death (apoptosis). Its genetic tractability, optical clarity, and relatively short lifespan are key advantages for rapid assessment of apoptosis in vivo. The use of forward and reverse genetics methodology, coupled with in vivo imaging, has provided deep insights into how a multicellular organism orchestrates the self-destruction of specific cells during development and in response to exogenous stresses. Strains of C. elegans carrying mutations in the core elements of the apoptotic pathway, or in tissue-specific regulators of apoptosis, can be used for genetic analyses to reveal conserved mechanisms by which apoptosis is regulated in the somatic and reproductive (germline) tissue. Here we present an introduction to the study of apoptosis in C. elegans, including current techniques for visualization, analysis, and screening. PMID:24786497

  6. Induction of apoptosis by Shiga toxins

    PubMed Central

    Tesh, Vernon L

    2010-01-01

    Shiga toxins comprise a family of structurally and functionally related protein toxins expressed by Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 and multiple serotypes of Escherichia coli. While the capacity of Shiga toxins to inhibit protein synthesis by catalytic inactivation of eukaryotic ribosomes has been well described, it is also apparent that Shiga toxins trigger apoptosis in many cell types. This review presents evidence that Shiga toxins induce apoptosis of epithelial, endothelial, leukocytic, lymphoid and neuronal cells. Apoptotic signaling pathways activated by the toxins are reviewed with an emphasis on signaling mechanisms that are shared among different cell types. Data suggesting that Shiga toxins induce apoptosis through the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and clinical evidence demonstrating apoptosis in humans infected with Shiga toxin-producing bacteria are briefly discussed. The potential for use of Shiga toxins to induce apoptosis in cancer cells is briefly reviewed. PMID:20210553

  7. Apoptosis inducers in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Billard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by a typical defect in apoptosis and is still an incurable disease. Numerous apoptosis inducers have been described. These synthetic compounds and natural products (mainly derived from plants) display antileukemic properties in vitro and in vivo and some have even been tested in the clinic in CLL. They act through several different mechanisms. Most of them involve proteins of the Bcl-2 family, which are the key regulators in triggering the mitochondrial pathway of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Thus, the Mcl-1/Noxa axis appeared as a target. Here I overview natural and synthetic apoptosis inducers and their mechanisms of action in CLL cells. Opportunities for developing novel, apoptosis-based therapeutics are presented. PMID:24525395

  8. Lymphocyte apoptosis in murine Pneumocystis pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xin; LeCapitaine, Nicole J; Rudner, Xiaowen L; Ruan, Sanbao; Shellito, Judd E

    2009-01-01

    Background Apoptosis of lymphocytes is important in the termination of an immune response to infection but has also been shown to have detrimental effects in animal models of systemic infection and sepsis. We sought to characterize lymphocyte apoptosis in an animal model of pneumonia due to Pneumocystis murina, an infection localized to the lungs. Methods Control mice and mice depleted of CD4+ lymphocytes were inoculated with Pneumocystis. Apoptosis of lung and spleen lymphocytes was assayed by flow cytometry and PCR assay of apoptotic proteins. Results In control mice, apoptosis of lung lymphocytes was maximal just after the infection was cleared from lung tissue and then declined. However, in CD4-depleted mice, apoptosis was also upregulated in recruited lymphocytes in spite of progressive infection. In splenic lymphocytes, apoptosis was observed early at 1 week after inoculation and then declined. Apoptosis of lung lymphocytes in control mice was associated with a decrease in mRNA for Bcl-2 and an increase in mRNA for Bim. In CD4-depleted mice, lavaged CD8+ cells did change intracellular Bcl-2 but showed increased mRNA for Bim. Conclusion Apoptosis of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary lymphocytes is part of the normal host response to Pneumocystis but is also triggered in CD4-deficient animals with progressive infection. In normal mice apoptosis of pulmonary lymphocytes may serve to terminate the immune response in lung tissue. Apoptosis of lung lymphocytes takes place via both the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways and is associated with changes in both pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. PMID:19558669

  9. Morphology controls of GeO 2 particles precipitated by a facile acid-induced decomposition of germanate ions in aqueous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Chengbin; Hou, Jinxia; Zhang, Yongheng

    2008-01-01

    GeO 2 single crystals with various morphologies were synthesized at room temperature by an acid-induced homogenous liquid phase precipitation technique without using any surfactants as studied previously. With addition of aqueous ammonia, the solubility of hexagonal GeO 2 in water was significantly increased by formation of soluble germanate ions as confirmed by IR spectra analyses. Supersaturated GeO 2 solution could be produced by adding acid into the GeO 2-ammonia solution through the acid-induced transformation of germinate ions into GeO 2. GeO 2 spheres were obtained with phosphoric acid addition. Truncated cubic-like and cubic-like GeO 2 single crystals could be produced in the solutions with hydrochloric acid and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) additions, respectively. The morphology developments of the GeO 2 particles induced by various acids were discussed and the growth mechanism conforms to BFDH and HP crystal growth models.

  10. Protective effect of marine mangrove Rhizophora apiculata on acetic acid induced experimental colitis by regulating anti-oxidant enzymes, inflammatory mediators and nuclear factor-kappa B subunits.

    PubMed

    V, Vinod Prabhu; C, Guruvayoorappan

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a disease that causes inflammation and ulcer in the lining of the large intestine. In this study we investigate the effect of Rhizophora apiculata (R. apiculata) on acetic acid induced colitis in mouse model. Experimental animals were randomized into four groups: normal untreated, colitis control, R. apiculata treated group and sulfasalazine treated group. R. apiculata significantly (p<0.01) decreased macroscopic score and wet weight of damaged colon compared to colitis control. This effect was confirmed biochemically by significant (p<0.01) reduction of colitis associated increase in myeloperoxidase activity. R. apiculata significantly (p<0.05) increased anti-oxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) levels compared to colitis control. R. apiculata significantly (p<0.01) reduced lipid peroxides (LPO), nitric oxide (NO) and inflammatory mediators such as myeloperoxidase (MPO), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expressions compared to colitis control. R. apiculata treatment significantly (p<0.01) inhibits the translocation of NF-kB p65 and p50 subunits. Taken together these findings suggest that R. apiculata prevents acetic acid induced colitis in experimental mouse model and may serve as an excellent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory agent that could potentially be useful as a (natural) therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PMID:24269623

  11. Use of Activated Carbon in Packaging to Attenuate Formaldehyde-Induced and Formic Acid-Induced Degradation and Reduce Gelatin Cross-Linking in Solid Dosage Forms.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Stephen T; Zelesky, Todd C; Chen, Raymond; Likar, Michael D; MacDonald, Bruce C; Hawkins, Joel M; Carroll, Sophia C; Johnson, Gail M; Space, J Sean; Jensen, James F; DeMatteo, Vincent A

    2016-07-01

    Formaldehyde and formic acid are reactive impurities found in commonly used excipients and can be responsible for limiting drug product shelf-life. Described here is the use of activated carbon in drug product packaging to attenuate formaldehyde-induced and formic acid-induced drug degradation in tablets and cross-linking in hard gelatin capsules. Several pharmaceutical products with known or potential vulnerabilities to formaldehyde-induced or formic acid-induced degradation or gelatin cross-linking were subjected to accelerated stability challenges in the presence and absence of activated carbon. The effects of time and storage conditions were determined. For all of the products studied, activated carbon attenuated drug degradation or gelatin cross-linking. This novel use of activated carbon in pharmaceutical packaging may be useful for enhancing the chemical stability of drug products or the dissolution stability of gelatin-containing dosage forms and may allow for the 1) extension of a drug product's shelf-life when the limiting attribute is a degradation product induced by a reactive impurity, 2) marketing of a drug product in hotter and more humid climatic zones than currently supported without the use of activated carbon, and 3) enhanced dissolution stability of products that are vulnerable to gelatin cross-linking. PMID:27262203

  12. Synergic Interaction of Rifaximin and Mutaflor (Escherichia coli Nissle 1917) in the Treatment of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Dembiński, Marcin; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bulanda, Małgorzata; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Gałązka, Krystyna; Konturek, Peter Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background. Inflammatory bowel disease results from the dysregulation of immune response to environmental and microbial agents in genetically susceptible individuals. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of rifaximin and/or Mutaflor (Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, EcN) administration on the healing of acetic acid-induced colitis. Methods. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats by rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Rifaximin (50 mg/kg/dose) and/or Mutaflor (109 CFU/dose) were given intragastrically once a day. The severity of colitis was assessed at the 8th day after induction of inflammation. Results. Treatment with rifaximin significantly accelerated the healing of colonic damage. This effect was associated with significant reversion of the acetic acid-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Moreover, administration of rifaximin significantly reduced concentration of proinflammatory TNF-α and activity of myeloperoxidase in colonic mucosa. Mutaflor given alone was without significant effect on activity of colitis. In contrast, Mutaflor given in combination with rifaximin significantly enhanced therapeutic effect of rifaximin. Moreover, Mutaflor led to settle of the colon by EcN and this effect was augmented by pretreatment with rifaximin. Conclusion. Rifaximin and Mutaflor exhibit synergic anti-inflammatory and therapeutic effect in acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. PMID:27433160

  13. Oncologic Doses of Zoledronic Acid Induce Osteonecrosis of the Jaw-Like Lesions in Rice Rats (Oryzomys Palustris) with Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, J. I.; Akhter, M. P.; Kimmel, D. B.; Pingel, J. E.; Williams, A.; Jorgensen, M.; Kesavalu, L.; Wronski, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    Though osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is temporally-associated with the use of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs), a cause/effect relationship has not yet been established. We hypothesize that ONJ is a two-stage process in which: a) risk factors initiate pathologic processes in the oral cavity that lead to a supranormal rate of hard tissue necrosis, and b) powerful anti-resorptives reduce the rate of removal of necrotic bone sufficiently to allow its net accumulation in the jaw. To test this hypothesis, we used the rice rat model of periodontitis. At age 28 days, rats (n=15/group) were placed on a high sucrose and casein diet to exacerbate the development of periodontitis. Animals were injected SC biweekly with vehicle or alendronate (ALN, 15μg/kg), or IV once monthly with vehicle, a low dose (LD), or a high dose (HD) of zoledronic acid (ZOL) and sacrificed after 6, 12, 18, and 24 wks. Mandibles and maxillae were analyzed to determine the effects on the: a) progression of periodontitis, b) integrity of alveolar bone, c) status of bone resorption and formation, d) vascularity, and e) osteocyte viability. We found that only HD-ZOL induced ONJ-like lesions in mandibles of rice rats after 18 and 24 wks of treatment. These lesions were characterized by areas of exposed necrotic alveolar bone, osteolysis, a honey comb-like appearance of the alveolar bone, presence of bacterial colonies, and periodontal tissue destruction. In addition, inhibition of bone formation, a paradoxical abolition of the antiresorptive effect of only HD-ZOL, increased osteocyte necrosis/apoptosis, and decreased blood vessel number were found after 18 and/or 24 wks. Our study suggests that only HD-ZOL exacerbates the inflammatory response and periodontal tissue damage in rice rats, inducing bone lesions that resemble ONJ. PMID:22623376

  14. Protective effect of nitric oxide in aristolochic acid-induced toxic acute kidney injury: an old friend with new assets.

    PubMed

    Declèves, Anne-Émilie; Jadot, Inès; Colombaro, Vanessa; Martin, Blanche; Voisin, Virginie; Nortier, Joëlle; Caron, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) nephropathy (AAN), a progressive tubulointerstitial injury of toxic origin, is characterized by early and transient acute tubular necrosis. This process has been demonstrated to be associated with reduced nitric oxide (NO) production, which can disrupt the regulation of renal function. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that L-arginine (L-Arg) supplementation could restore renal function and reduce renal injury after AA intoxication. C57BL/6 J male mice were randomly subjected to daily i.p. injection of either sterile saline solution or AA (2.5 mg kg(-1)) for 4 days. To determine whether AA-induced renal injuries were linked to reduced NO production, L-Arg, a substrate for NO synthase, was supplemented (5%) in drinking water. Mice intoxicated with AA exhibited features of rapid-onset acute kidney injury, including polyuria, significantly increased plasma creatinine concentrations, proteinuria and fractional excretion of sodium (P < 0.05), along with severe proximal tubular cell injury and increased NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2)-derived oxidative stress (P < 0.05). This was associated with a significant reduction in NO bioavailability. L-Arg supplementation in AA-treated mice significantly increased NO bioavailability, which in turn improved renal function (creatininaemia, polyuria, proteinuria, fractional excreted sodium and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase enzymuria) and renal structure (tubular necrosis and tubular cell apoptosis). These changes were associated with significant reductions in Nox2 expression and in production of reactive oxygen species and with an increase in antioxidant concentrations. Our results demonstrate that preservation of NO bioavailability leads to renal protection in AA-induced acute kidney injury by reducing oxidative stress and maintaining renal function. PMID:26442795

  15. Mice with hepatocyte-specific FXR deficiency are resistant to spontaneous but susceptible to cholic acid-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Bo; Zhu, Yan; Li, Guodong; Williams, Jessica A; Buckley, Kyle; Tawfik, Ossama; Luyendyk, James P; Guo, Grace L

    2016-03-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily with its endogenous ligands bile acids. Mice with whole body FXR deficiency develop liver tumors spontaneously, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Moreover, it is unknown whether FXR deficiency in liver alone serves as a tumor initiator or promoter during liver carcinogenesis. This study aims to evaluate the effects of hepatocyte-specific FXR deficiency (FXR(hep-/-)) in liver tumor formation. The results showed that FXR(hep-/-) mice did not show spontaneous liver tumorigenesis with aging (up to 24 mo of age). Therefore FXR(hep-/-) mice were fed a bile acid (cholic acid)-containing diet alone or along with a liver tumor initiator, diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Thirty weeks later, no tumors were found in wild-type or FXR(hep-/-) mice without any treatment or with DEN only. However, with cholic acid, while only some wild-type mice developed tumors, all FXR(hep-/-) mice presented with severe liver injury and tumors. Interestingly, FXR(hep-/-) mouse livers increased basal expression of tumor suppressor p53 protein, apoptosis, and decreased basal cyclin D1 expression, which may prevent tumor development in FXR(hep-/-) mice. However, cholic acid feeding reversed these effects in FXR(hep-/-) mice, which is associated with an increased cyclin D1 and decreased cell cycle inhibitors. More in-depth analysis indicates that the increased in cell growth might result from disturbance of the MAPK and JAK/Stat3 signaling pathways. In conclusion, this study shows that hepatic FXR deficiency may only serve as a tumor initiator, and increased bile acids is required for tumor formation likely by promoting cell proliferation. PMID:26744468

  16. Mechanisms of omega-3 fatty acid-induced growth inhibition in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schley, Patricia D; Jijon, Humberto B; Robinson, Lindsay E; Field, Catherine J

    2005-07-01

    The omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), inhibit the growth of human breast cancer cells in animal models and cell lines, but the mechanism by which this occurs is not well understood. In order to explore possible mechanisms for the modulation of breast cancer cell growth by omega-3 fatty acids, we examined the effects of EPA and DHA on the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Omega-3 fatty acids (a combination of EPA and DHA) inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 cells by 30-40% (p<0.05) in both the presence and absence of linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid. When provided individually, DHA was more potent than EPA in inhibiting the growth of MDA-MB-231 cells (p<0.05). EPA and DHA treatment decreased tumor cell proliferation (p<0.05), as estimated by decreased [methyl-(3)H]-thymidine uptake and expression of proliferation-associated proteins (proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA, and proliferation-related kinase, PRK). In addition, EPA and DHA induced apoptosis, as indicated by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, increased caspase activity and increased DNA fragmentation (p<0.05). Cells incubated with omega-3 fatty acids demonstrated decreased Akt phosphorylation, as well as NFkappaB DNA binding activity (p<0.05). The results of this study indicate that omega-3 fatty acids decrease cell proliferation and induce apoptotic cell death in human breast cancer cells, possibly by decreasing signal transduction through the Akt/NFkappaB cell survival pathway. PMID:15986129

  17. Honey and Apoptosis in Human Gastric Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Aida; Somi, Mohammad H; Safaiyan, Abdolrasoul; Modaresi, Jabiz; Ostadrahimi, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Background: Gastric cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the world. Honey is a complex mixture of special biological active constituents. Honey possesses antioxidant and antitumor properties. Nutritional studies have indicated that consumption of honey modulates the risk of developing gastric cancer. On the other hand, apoptosis has been reported to play a decisive role in precancerous changes. Our chief study was conducted to assess the relationship between consumption of honey and apoptosis in human gastric mucosa. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 98 subjects over 18 years old, referred to two hospitals in Tabriz, Iran. Subjects were undergone an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, 62 subjects were finally enrolled. Honey consumption was assessed by a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and apoptosis was detected by TUNEL technique. We tested polynomial curve to find the best fit between honey consumption and apoptosis. Results: A positive relation between honey consumption and apoptosis was found (P=0.024). Our results indicated that the final and the best fit curve was: apoptosis = 1.714+1.648(honey amount) - 0.533(honey amount)2 +1.833×10-5(honey amount)7. Conclusion: Honey consumption had positive effects on gastric cancer by inducing apoptosis in gastric mucosa. PMID:24688918

  18. Determination of acetylsalicylic acid and its major metabolite, salicylic acid, in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: application to pharmacokinetic study of Astrix in Korean healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Kyung; Seo, Kyung Ah; Jung, Eun Ji; Kim, Ho-Sook; Yeo, Chang-Woo; Shon, Ji-Hong; Park, Kyung-Mi; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Shin, Jae-Gook

    2008-06-01

    The first liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for determination of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA) and one of its major metabolites, salicylic acid (SA), in human plasma using simvastatin as an internal standard has been developed and validated. For ASA analysis, a plasma sample containing potassium fluoride was extracted using a mixture of ethyl acetate and diethyl ether in the presence of 0.5% formic acid. SA, a major metabolite of ASA, was extracted from plasma using protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The compounds were separated on a reversed-phase column with an isocratic mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and water containing 0.1% formic acid (8:2, v/v). The ion transitions recorded in multiple reaction monitoring mode were m/z 179 --> 137, 137 --> 93 and 435 --> 319 for ASA, SA and IS, respectively. The coefficient of variation of the assay precision was less than 9.3%, and the accuracy exceeded 86.5%. The lower limits of quantification for ASA and SA were 5 and 50 ng/mL, respectively. The developed assay method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of ASA and SA after single oral administration of Astrix (entero-coated pellet, 100 mg of aspirin) to 10 Korean healthy male volunteers. PMID:18254152

  19. Low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylate) prevents increases in brain PGE2, 15-epi-lipoxin A4 and 8-isoprostane concentrations in 9 month-old HIV-1 transgenic rats, a model for HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Helene C.; Taha, Ameer Y.; Rapoport, Stanley I; Yuan, Zhi-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background Older human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 transgenic rats are a model for HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). They show behavioral changes, neuroinflammation, neuronal loss, and increased brain arachidonic acid (AA) enzymes. Aspirin (acetylsalicylate, ASA) inhibits AA oxidation by cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2. Hypothesis Chronic low-dose ASA will downregulate brain AA metabolism in HIV-1 transgenic rats. Methods Nine month-old HIV-1 transgenic and wildtype rats were given 42 days of 10 mg/kg/day ASA or nothing in drinking water; eicosanoids were measured using ELISAs on microwaved brain extracts. Results Brain 15-epi-lipoxin A4 and 8-isoprostane concentrations were significantly higher in HIV-1 transgenic than wildtype rats; these differences were prevented by ASA. ASA reduced prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4 concentrations in HIV-1 Tg but not wildtype rats. Thromboxane B2, 15-HETE, lipoxin A4 and resolvin D1 concentrations were unaffected by genotype or treatment. Conclusion Chronic low-dose ASA reduces AA-metabolite markers of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in a rat model for HAND. PMID:25638779

  20. Acetylsalicylic acid enhances the anti-inflammatory effect of fluoxetine through inhibition of NF-κB, p38-MAPK and ERK1/2 activation in lipopolysaccharide-induced BV-2 microglia cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, J M; Rui, B B; Chen, C; Chen, H; Xu, T J; Xu, W P; Wei, W

    2014-09-01

    The latest advancements in neurobiological research provide increasing evidence that inflammatory and neurodegenerative pathways play an important role in depression. According to the cytokine hypothesis, depression could be due to the increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by microglia activation. Thus, using the BV-2 microglial cell line, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether fluoxetine (FLX) or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) could inhibit this microglia activation and could achieve better results in combination. Our results showed that FLX could attenuate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), the expression of the indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme and the depletion of 5-HT. Moreover, FLX could inhibit phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and the combined use with ASA could enhance these effects. Notably, the adjunctive agent ASA could also inhibit phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Taken together, our results suggest that FLX may have some anti-inflammatory effects by modulating microglia activation and that ASA served as an effective adjunctive agent by enhancing these therapeutic effects. PMID:24952332

  1. GSK-3β promotes PA-induced apoptosis through changing β-arrestin 2 nucleus location in H9c2 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fen; Liu, Jing; Fu, Hui; Wang, Jinlan; Li, Fang; Yue, Hongwei; Li, Wenjing; Zhao, Jing; Yin, Deling

    2016-09-01

    Palmitic acid (PA), a type of saturated fatty acids, induces cardiovascular diseases by causing cardiomyocyte apoptosis with unclear mechanisms. Akt participates in PA-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. GSK-3β is a substrate of Akt, we investigated its role in PA-induced apoptosis. We reveal that PA inhibits GSK-3β phosphorylation accompanied by inactivation of Akt in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. We also reveal that inhibition the activity of GSK-3β by its inhibitor LiCl or knockdown by siRNA significantly attenuates PA-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, this suggesting that GSK-3β plays a pro-apoptotic role. To detect its downstream factors, we analyzed the roles of JNK, p38 MAPK and β-arrestin 2 (β-Arr2). Here, we report that GSK-3β regulate PA-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by affecting the distribution of β-Arr2. PA diminishes the protein level of β-Arr2 and changes its distribution from nucleus to cytoplasm. Either inhibition of β-Arr2 by its siRNA or overexpression of its protein level by transfection of β-Arr2 full-length plasmid promotes PA-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, which remind us to focus on the changes of its location. β-Arr2 siRNA decreased the background level of β-Arr2 in nucleus in normal H9c2 cells. Overexpression of β-Arr2 increased cytoplasm level of β-Arr2 as PA did. While LiCl, the inhibitor of GSK-3β decreased PA-induced apoptosis, accompany with increased nucleus level of β-Arr2. Then we concluded that GSK-3β is closely associated with cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by PA, it performs its pro-apoptotic function by affecting the location of β-Arr2. LiCl inhibits PA-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, which might provide novel therapeutic for cardiovascular diseases induced by metabolic syndrome. PMID:27431999

  2. The Role of Mitochondria in Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunxin; Youle, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria play key roles in activating apoptosis in mammalian cells. Bcl-2 family members regulate the release of proteins from the space between the mitochondrial inner and outer membrane that, once in the cytosol, activate caspase proteases that dismantle cells and signal efficient phagocytosis of cell corpses. Here we review the extensive literature on proteins released from the intermembrane space and consider genetic evidence for and against their roles in apoptosis activation. We also compare and contrast apoptosis pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and mammals that indicate major mysteries remaining to be solved. PMID:19659442

  3. Asiatic acid induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptotic death in glioblastoma multiforme cells both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Chandagirikoppal V; Jain, Anil K; Agarwal, Chapla; Pierce, Angela; Keating, Amy; Huber, Kendra M; Serkova, Natalie J; Wempe, Michael F; Agarwal, Rajesh; Deep, Gagan

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an untreatable malignancy. Existing therapeutic options are insufficient, and adversely affect functional and non-cancerous cells in the brain impairing different functions of the body. Therefore, there is an urgent need for additional preventive and therapeutic non-toxic drugs against GBM. Asiatic acid (AsA; 2,3,23-trihydroxy-12-ursen-28-oic acid, C30 H48 O5 ) is a natural small molecule widely used to treat various neurological disorders, and the present research investigates AsA's efficacy against GBM both in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that AsA treatment (10-100 µM) decreased the human GBM cell (LN18, U87MG, and U118MG) viability, with better efficacy than temozolomide at equimolar doses. Orally administered AsA (30 mg/kg/d) strongly decreased tumor volume in mice when administered immediately after ectopic U87MG xenograft implantation (54% decrease, P ≤ 0.05) or in mice with established xenografts (48% decrease, P ≤ 0.05) without any apparent toxicity. Importantly, AsA feeding (30 mg/kg/twice a day) also decreased the orthotopic U87MG xenografts growth in nude mice as measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Using LC/MS-MS methods, AsA was detected in mice plasma and brain tissue, confirming that AsA crosses blood-brain barrier. Mechanistic studies showed that AsA induces apoptotic death by modulating the protein expression of several apoptosis regulators (caspases, Bcl2 family members, and survivin) in GBM cells. Furthermore, AsA induced ER stress (increased GRP78 and Calpain, and decreased Calnexin and IRE1α expression), enhanced free intra-cellular calcium, and damaged cellular organization in GBM cells. These experimental results demonstrate that AsA is effective against GBM, and advocate further pre-clinical and clinical evaluations of AsA against GBM. PMID:25252179

  4. Cytosolic DNA triggers mitochondrial apoptosis via DNA damage signaling proteins independently of AIM2 and RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Michael; Wunderlich, Michael; Besch, Robert; Poeck, Hendrik; Willms, Simone; Schwantes, Astrid; Kremer, Melanie; Sutter, Gerd; Endres, Stefan; Schmidt, Andreas; Rothenfusser, Simon

    2012-01-01

    A key host response to limit microbial spread is the induction of cell death when foreign nucleic acids are sensed within infected cells. In mouse macrophages, transfected DNA or infection with modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) can trigger cell death via the absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) inflammasome. In this article, we show that nonmyeloid human cell types lacking a functional AIM2 inflammasome still die in response to cytosolic delivery of different DNAs or infection with MVA. This cell death induced by foreign DNA is independent of caspase-8 and carries features of mitochondrial apoptosis: dependence on BAX, APAF-1, and caspase-9. Although it does not require the IFN pathway known to be triggered by infection with MVA or transfected DNA via polymerase III and retinoid acid-induced gene I-like helicases, it shows a strong dependence on components of the DNA damage signaling pathway: cytosolic delivery of DNA or infection with MVA leads to phosphorylation of p53 (serines 15 and 46) and autophosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM); depleting p53 or ATM with small interfering RNA or inhibiting the ATM/ATM-related kinase family by caffeine strongly reduces apoptosis. Taken together, our findings suggest that a pathway activating DNA damage signaling plays an important independent role in detecting intracellular foreign DNA, thereby complementing the induction of IFN and activation of the AIM2 inflammasome. PMID:22140256

  5. [The comeback of mitochondria in Drosophila apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Clavier, Amandine; Rincheval-Arnold, Aurore; Mignotte, Bernard; Guénal, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    The role of the mitochondrion in mammalian cell apoptosis has been established since the mid-1990s. However, the importance of this organelle in non-mammalian apoptosis has long been regarded as minor, notably because of the absence of a crucial role for cytochrome c in caspase activation. Recent results indicate that the control of caspase activation and apoptosis in Drosophila cell death occurs at the mitochondrial level. Numerous proteins that appear key for Drosophila apoptosis regulation constitutively or transiently bind to mitochondria. They participate in the cell death process at different levels such as degradation of an IAP caspase inhibitor, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or stimulation of the mitochondrial fission machinery. The aim of this review is to take stock of these events that might have their counterpart in humans. PMID:27225920

  6. Autophagy and apoptosis in liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a primary characteristic in the pathogenesis of liver disease. Hepatic apoptosis is regulated by autophagic activity. However, mechanisms mediating their interaction remain to be determined. Basal level of autophagy ensures the physiological turnover of old and damaged organelles. Autophagy also is an adaptive response under stressful conditions. Autophagy can control cell fate through different cross-talk signals. A complex interplay between hepatic autophagy and apoptosis determines the degree of hepatic apoptosis and the progression of liver disease as demonstrated by pre-clinical models and clinical trials. This review summarizes recent advances on roles of autophagy that plays in pathophysiology of liver. The autophagic pathway can be a novel therapeutic target for liver disease. PMID:25927598

  7. Noninvasive real-time imaging of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Laxman, Bharathi; Hall, Daniel E; Bhojani, Mahaveer Swaroop; Hamstra, Daniel A; Chenevert, Thomas L; Ross, Brian D; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2002-12-24

    Strict coordination of proliferation and programmed cell death (apoptosis) is essential for normal physiology. An imbalance in these two opposing processes results in various diseases including AIDS, neurodegenerative disorders, myelodysplastic syndromes, ischemiareperfusion injury, cancer, autoimmune disease, among others. Objective and quantitative noninvasive imaging of apoptosis would be a significant advance for rapid and dynamic screening as well as validation of experimental therapeutic agents. Here, we report the development of a recombinant luciferase reporter molecule that when expressed in mammalian cells has attenuated levels of reporter activity. In cells undergoing apoptosis, a caspase-3-specific cleavage of the recombinant product occurs, resulting in the restoration of luciferase activity that can be detected in living animals with bioluminescence imaging. The ability to image apoptosis noninvasively and dynamically over time provides an opportunity for high-throughput screening of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic compounds and for target validation in vivo in both cell lines and transgenic animals. PMID:12475931

  8. Autophagy and apoptosis in liver injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a primary characteristic in the pathogenesis of liver disease. Hepatic apoptosis is regulated by autophagic activity. However, mechanisms mediating their interaction remain to be determined. Basal level of autophagy ensures the physiological turnover of old and damaged organelles. Autophagy also is an adaptive response under stressful conditions. Autophagy can control cell fate through different cross-talk signals. A complex interplay between hepatic autophagy and apoptosis determines the degree of hepatic apoptosis and the progression of liver disease as demonstrated by pre-clinical models and clinical trials. This review summarizes recent advances on roles of autophagy that plays in pathophysiology of liver. The autophagic pathway can be a novel therapeutic target for liver disease. PMID:25927598

  9. An AIF orthologue regulates apoptosis in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wissing, Silke; Ludovico, Paula; Herker, Eva; Büttner, Sabrina; Engelhardt, Silvia M.; Decker, Thorsten; Link, Alexander; Proksch, Astrid; Rodrigues, Fernando; Corte-Real, Manuela; Fröhlich, Kai-Uwe; Manns, Joachim; Candé, Céline; Sigrist, Stephan J.; Kroemer, Guido; Madeo, Frank

    2004-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), a key regulator of cell death, is essential for normal mammalian development and participates in pathological apoptosis. The proapoptotic nature of AIF and its mode of action are controversial. Here, we show that the yeast AIF homologue Ynr074cp controls yeast apoptosis. Similar to mammalian AIF, Ynr074cp is located in mitochondria and translocates to the nucleus of yeast cells in response to apoptotic stimuli. Purified Ynr074cp degrades yeast nuclei and plasmid DNA. YNR074C disruption rescues yeast cells from oxygen stress and delays age-induced apoptosis. Conversely, overexpression of Ynr074cp strongly stimulates apoptotic cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide and this effect is attenuated by disruption of cyclophilin A or the yeast caspase YCA1. We conclude that Ynr074cp is a cell death effector in yeast and rename it AIF-1 (Aif1p, gene AIF1). PMID:15381687

  10. Regulation of apoptosis by peroxisome proliferators.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ruth A; Michel, Cecile; Coyle, Beth; Freathy, Caroline; Cain, Kelvin; Boitier, Eric

    2004-04-01

    Peroxisome proliferators (PPs) constitute a large and chemically diverse family of non-genotoxic rodent hepatocarcinogens that activate the PP-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). In order to investigate the hypothesis that PPs elicit their carcinogenic effects through the suppression of apoptosis, we established an in vitro assay for apoptosis using both primary rat hepatocytes and the FaO rat hepatoma cell line. Apoptosis was induced by transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1), the physiological negative regulator of liver growth. In this system, PPs could suppress both spontaneous and TGFbeta1-induced apoptosis. In order to understand the mechanisms of this regulation of apoptosis, we conducted microarray analysis followed by pathway-specific gene clustering in TGFbeta1-treated cells. After treatment, 76 genes were up-regulated and 185 were down-regulated more than 1.5-fold. Cluster analysis of up-regulated genes revealed three clusters, A-C. Cluster A (4h) was associated with 12% apoptosis and consisted of genes mainly of the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix such as troponin and the proteoglycan SDC4. In cluster B (8h; 25% apoptosis), there were many pro- and anti-apoptotic genes such as XIAP, BAK1 and BAD, whereas at 16h (40% apoptosis) the regulated genes were mainly those of the cellular stress pathways such as the genes implicated in the activation of the transcription factor NFkappab. Genes found down-regulated in response to TGFbeta1 were mainly those associated with oxidative stress and several genes implicated in glutathione production and maintenance. Thus, TGFbeta1 may induce apoptosis via a down regulation of oxidant defence leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species. The ability of PPs to impact on these apoptosis pathways remains to be determined. To approach this question, we have developed a technique using laser capture microdissection of livers treated with the PP, clofibric acid coupled with gene expression array analysis

  11. Human mature erythroblasts are resistant to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hristoskova, Sashka; Holzgreve, Wolfgang; Hahn, Sinuhe; Rusterholz, Corinne

    2007-03-10

    Apoptosis plays an important role in red blood cell development, notably by regulating the fate of early erythroid progenitors. We show here that, by contrast, mature erythroblasts are resistant to apoptosis. Treatment of these cells with several apoptosis-inducing agents failed to trigger caspase activation and oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Interestingly, we find that cytochrome c levels are dramatically reduced even though the cells contain mitochondria. Supplementation of cytosolic extracts from mature erythroblasts with cytochrome c, however, did not rescue caspase activation. This was not due to the presence of inhibitors of apoptosis, as these proteins were also missing in these cells. We also show that cytochrome c depletion is a normal event during erythroblast differentiation, which follows transient, developmentally induced caspase activation and correlates with the loss of response to cytokine withdrawal or drug-induced apoptosis. Our data therefore suggest that erythroblasts acquire resistance to apoptosis during maturation through the developmentally induced depletion of cytochrome c and other crucial regulators of the apoptotic machinery. PMID:17289021

  12. Umbelliprenin Induces Apoptosis in CLL Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ziai, Seyed Ali; Gholami, Omid; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Zamani, Amir Hassan; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains an incurable disease that requires innovative new approaches to improve therapeutic outcome. Many Ferula species, including F. asa-foetida, synthesize terpenyloxy coumarins. One of these coumarins is umbelliprenin, which has been implicated with induction of apoptosis in some cancer cell lines. In this study induction of apoptosis by umbelliprenin on Jurkat T-CLL and Raji B-CLL cell lines was studied. In this regard, cells were incubated with various concentrations of umbelliprenin in-vitro for different times and assayed for apoptosis with annexin V–FITC/PI double staining flowcytometry method. Results showed that umbelliprenin induced apoptosis in leukemic cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner and that CLL cells were more susceptible to umbelliprenin induced cell death than normal peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs). Moreover, we study the induction of apoptosis in Jurkat cells by umbelliprenin in the presence of interleukin 4 (IL-4) as an agent that causes resistance to apoptosis in CLL cells, was also student. We showed that IL-4 can not reduce apoptotic effect of umbelliprenin. The preferential toxicity of umbelliprenin for CLL cells, supports the hypothesis that oral administration of umbelliprenin in the form of foods or folk medicines containing this coumarin, might enhance protection against the development of CLL in man with little side effects. In conclusion, umbelliprenin may be an effective therapeutic agent in the treatment of CLL, and thus clinical studies with umbelliprenin may be appropriate. PMID:24250490

  13. Ultrastructural definition of apoptosis in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Arbustini, Eloisa; Brega, Agnese; Narula, Jagat

    2008-06-01

    Cardiac myocytes die through apoptosis, oncosis, and autophagy. Apoptosis affects single cells and is morphologically characterized by nuclear fragmentation with generation of apoptotic bodies that can be seen either within dying cells or free in the interstitial spaces. Dead myocytes are removed by macrophages through phagocytosis without triggering inflammation. The circulating markers of myocyte necrosis are not increased by apoptosis. The morphologic changes of the induction and early execution phases are seen at electron microscopy while late fragmentation is visible on both light and electron microscopy. Immunoelectron microscopy provides combined functional and structural information showing cytochrome c immuno-labelling release from mitochondria, TUNEL labelling of apoptotic nuclei, annexin V translocation in the outer plasma cell layer. Oncosis is characterized by specific morphologic features that may coexist with apoptosis, especially in ischemic myocardium. Autophagy is a defense process that is associated with significant myocardial damage and necrosis when removal of the lysosomal content is impaired. Morphological features of apoptosis, oncosis, and autophagocytosis may coexist at the same time. Although dead myocytes showing characteristics of autophagy and apoptosis are rarely observed in human decompensated hearts, autophagic vacuoles, and early apoptotic changes may be seen more often in morphologically viable myocytes. Such features may occur in failing hearts of both ischemic and non-ischemic etiology. The shared mode of cardiac myocyte death in failing human hearts of different etiologies suggests that preservation of myocyte integrity may be possible by similar therapeutic strategies. PMID:18172761

  14. Confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy for rapid and label-free detection of maleic acid-induced variations in human sperm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Chen, Diling; Xu, Yan; Liu, Songhao; Zhang, Heming

    2014-01-01

    Confocal Raman microspectroscopy is a valuable analytical tool in biological and medical research, allowing the detection of sample variations without external labels or extensive preparation. To determine whether this method can assess the effect of maleic acid on sperm, we prepared human sperm samples incubated in different concentrations of maleic acid, after which Raman spectra from the various regions of sperm cells were recorded. Following the maleic acid treatment, Raman spectra indicated significant changes. Combined with other means, we found that the structures and chemical compositions of sperm membranes were damaged, and even the sperm DNA was damaged by the incorporation of maleic acid. Thus, this technique can be used for detection and identification of maleic acid-induced changes in human sperm at a molecular level. Although this particular application of Raman microspectroscopy still requires further validation, it has potentially promise as a diagnostic tool for reproductive medicine. PMID:24877025

  15. [The influence of high pressure on the 3-indoleacetic-acid-induced curvature of Avena coleoptiles in the Went-test].

    PubMed

    Chrometzka, P

    1967-12-01

    1. High atmospheric pressure causes an increase of the 3-indoleacetic-acid-induced curvature of Avena coleoptiles in the Went-test, regardless of whether the applied gas is nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, or air. 2. The highest increase was caused by high pressure of oxygen, the lowest by lack of oxygen. 3. The high pressure effect was also observed with coleoptiles which were treated 20 hours prior to the test and which were then kept under normal pressure. 4. High pressure of oxygen for a long period (20 hours) had a poisonous effect on the coleoptiles. They ceased to grow. Preliminary studies have shown that the respiration is enhanced if the coleoptiles have been kept under high pressure. PMID:24554325

  16. Chemometrics-assisted Spectrofluorimetric Determination of Two Co-administered Drugs of Major Interaction, Methotrexate and Aspirin, in Human Urine Following Acid-induced Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Maher, Hadir M; Ragab, Marwa A A; El-Kimary, Eman I

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), mostly along with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the most common of which is aspirin or acetyl salicylic acid (ASA). Since NSAIDs impair MTX clearance and increase its toxicity, it was necessary to develop a simple and reliable method for the monitoring of MTX levels in urine samples, when coadministered with ASA. The method was based on the spectrofluorimetric measurement of the acid-induced hydrolysis product of MTX, 4-amino-4-deoxy-10-methylpteroic acid (AMP), along with the strongly fluorescent salicylic acid (SA), a product of acid-induced hydrolysis of aspirin and its metabolites in urine. The overlapping emission spectra were resolved using the derivative method (D method). In addition, the corresponding derivative emission spectra were convoluted using discrete Fourier functions, 8-points sin xi polynomials, (D/FF method) for better elimination of interferences. Validation of the developed methods was carried out according to the ICH guidelines. Moreover, the data obtained using derivative and convoluted derivative spectra were treated using the non-parametric Theil's method (NP), compared with the least-squares parametric regression method (LSP). The results treated with Theil's method were more accurate and precise compared with LSP since the former is less affected by the outliers. This work offers the potential of both derivative and convolution using discrete Fourier functions in addition to the effectiveness of using the NP regression analysis of data. The high sensitivity obtained by the proposed methods was promising for measuring low concentration levels of the two drugs in urine samples. These methods were efficiently used to measure the drugs in human urine samples following their co-administration. PMID:26234512

  17. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Gelsolin in Acetic Acid Induced Writhing, Tail Immersion and Carrageenan Induced Paw Edema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Parasar, Devraj; Sagar, Amin; Choudhary, Vikas; Chopra, Bhupinder Singh; Garg, Renu; Ashish; Khatri, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Plasma gelsolin levels significantly decline in several disease conditions, since gelsolin gets scavenged when it depolymerizes and caps filamentous actin released in the circulation following tissue injury. It is well established that our body require/implement inflammatory and analgesic responses to protect against cell damage and injury to the tissue. This study was envisaged to examine analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of exogenous gelsolin (8 mg/mouse) in mice models of pain and acute inflammation. Administration of gelsolin in acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests not only demonstrated a significant reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhing effects, but also exhibited an analgesic activity in tail immersion test in mice as compared to placebo treated mice. Additionally, anti-inflammatory function of gelsolin (8 mg/mouse) compared with anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium (10 mg/kg)] was confirmed in the carrageenan injection induced paw edema where latter was measured by vernier caliper and fluorescent tomography imaging. Interestingly, results showed that plasma gelsolin was capable of reducing severity of inflammation in mice comparable to diclofenac sodium. Analysis of cytokines and histo-pathological examinations of tissue revealed administration of gelsolin and diclofenac sodium significantly reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6. Additionally, carrageenan groups pretreated with diclofenac sodium or gelsolin showed a marked decrease in edema and infiltration of inflammatory cells in paw tissue. Our study provides evidence that administration of gelsolin can effectively reduce the pain and inflammation in mice model. PMID:26426535

  18. Deoxycholic acid induces the overexpression of intestinal mucin, MUC2, via NF-kB signaling pathway in human esophageal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, JianTao; Gong, Jun; Geng, Juan; Song, YinXue

    2008-01-01

    Background Mucin alterations are a common feature of esophageal neoplasia, and alterations in MUC2 mucin have been associated with tumor progression in the esophagus. Bile acids have been linked to esophageal adenocarcinoma and mucin secretion, but their effects on mucin gene expression in human esophageal adenocarcinoma cells is unknown. Methods Human esophageal adenocarcinoma cells were treated 18 hours with 50–300 μM deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, or taurocholic acid. MUC2 transcription was assayed using a MUC2 promoter reporter luciferase construct and MUC2 protein was assayed by Western blot analysis. Transcription Nuclear factor-κB activity was measured using a Nuclear factor-κB reporter construct and confirmed by Western blot analysis for Nuclear factor-κB p65. Results MUC2 transcription and MUC2 protein expression were increased four to five fold by bile acids in a time and dose-dependent manner with no effect on cell viability. Nuclear factor-κB activity was also increased. Treatment with the putative chemopreventive agent aspirin, which decreased Nuclear factor-κB activity, also decreased MUC2 transcription. Nuclear factor-κB p65 siRNA decreased MUC2 transcription, confirming the significance of Nuclear factor-κB in MUC2 induction by deoxycholic acid. Calphostin C, a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), greatly decreased bile acid induced MUC2 transcription and Nuclear factor-κB activity, whereas inhibitors of MAP kinase had no effect. Conclusion Deoxycholic acid induced MUC2 overexpression in human esophageal adenocarcinoma cells by activation of Nuclear factor-κB transcription through a process involving PKC-dependent but not PKA, independent of activation of MAP kinase. PMID:19014523

  19. Morphologic criteria and detection of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Saraste, A

    1999-05-01

    Apoptosis is an organized, energy dependent process, which leads to cell death. Its definition is based on distinct morphological features [10] and demonstration of internucleosomal DNA degradation [27], executed by selectively activated DNAses [4, 22]. The morphologic hallmarks of apoptosis include chromatic margination, nuclear condensation and fragmentation, and condensation of the cell with preservation of organelles. The process is followed by fragmentation of the cell into membrane-bound apoptotic bodies, which undergo phagocytosis by nearby cells without associated inflammation [10, 11]. Apoptosis characteristically occurs in insolated single cells. The duration of apoptosis is estimated to be from 12 to 24 hours, but in cell culture visible morphologic changes are accomplished in less than two hours [10, 16]. Non-apoptotic cell death, a prototype of which is cell death due to ischemia (oncosis), is characterized by depletion of intracellular ATP stores, swelling of the cell with disruption of organelles and rupture of the plasma membrane [15]. Groups of necrotic cells and inflammation are found in tissues [10, 15]. The significance of apoptosis has mostly been studied using the TUNEL assay that detects DNA strand breaks in tissue sections and allows quantification of apoptotic cells by light microscopy [6]. Common experience seems to be that the TUNEL assay is prone to false positive or negative findings. This has been explained by the dependence of the staining kinetics on the reagent concentration [17], fixation of the tissue [2] and the extent of proteolysis [17]. Active RNA synthesis [12] and DNA damage in necrotic cells [17, 19] may cause non-specific staining. To obtain reliable and reproducible results, TUNEL assay should be carefully standardized by using tissue sections treated with DNAse (positive control of apoptosis). Quantification of apoptosis should include enough microscopic fields and identification of the cell type undergoing apoptosis

  20. Trauma patients’ elevated Tumor Necrosis Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) contributes to increased T cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Gautam; Bankey, Paul E.; Miller-Graziano, Carol L.

    2012-01-01

    Immunosuppression resulting from excessive post-trauma apoptosis of hyperactivated Tcells is controversial. TRAIL mediated Tcell apoptosis decreases highly activated Tcells’ responses. Caspase-10, a particular TRAIL target, was increased in trauma patients’ Tcells with concomitantly elevated plasma TRAIL levels. These patients’ Tcells developed anergy, implicating increased TRAIL-mediated Tcell apoptosis in post-trauma Tcell anergy. Control Tcells cultured with patients’ sera containing high TRAIL levels increased their Caspase-10 activity and apoptosis. Stimulated primary Tcells are TRAIL apoptosis resistant. Increased plasma Thrombospondin-1 and Tcell expression of CD47, a Thrombospondin-1 receptor, preceded patients’ Tcell anergy. CD47 triggering of Tcells increased their sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Augmentation of Tcell TRAIL-induced apoptosis was secondary to CD47 triggered activation of the Src homology-containing phosphatase-1(SHP-1) and was partially blocked by a SHP-1 inhibitor. We suggest that combined post-trauma CD47 triggering, SHP-1 mediated NFκB suppression, and elevated TRAIL levels increase patients’ CD47 expressing Tcell apoptosis, thus contributing to subsequent Tcell anergy. PMID:22926077

  1. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  2. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  3. Solamargine triggers hepatoma cell death through apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    XIE, XIAODONG; ZHU, HAITAO; YANG, HUIJIAN; HUANG, WENSI; WU, YINGYING; WANG, YING; LUO, YANLING; WANG, DONGQING; SHAO, GENBAO

    2015-01-01

    Solamargine (SM), a steroidal alkaloid glycoside extracted from the traditional Chinese herb Solanum incanum, has been evidenced to inhibit the growth and induce apoptosis in a number of human cancer cell lines. In the present study, the anticancer effect of SM and underlying molecular mechanism of SM-induced apoptosis were investigated on the human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, SMMC7721 and HepG2. The proliferation effects of SM on the SMMC7721 and HepG2 cell lines were evaluated using MTT and colony formation assays. In addition, the percentage of apoptosis was measured using an Annexin V/propidium iodide staining method and the cell cycle distribution mediated by SM was analyzed using flow cytometry. The expression levels of B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), caspase-3, caspase-9, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (pcna) and Ki67 proteins were examined to further demonstrate the proliferate and apoptosis effects of SM on the hepatoma cells. The results indicated that SM effectively inhibited hepatoma cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. SM resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in the two cell lines. In addition, SM downregulated the levels of proliferation-associated (Ki67 and pcna) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2) proteins, and promoted the activity of apoptosis-associated proteins (Bax, caspase-3 and caspase-9). Therefore, the activation of the Bcl-2/Bax and caspase signaling pathways may be involved in the SM-induced apoptosis of hepatoma cells. PMID:26170994

  4. Training-induced apoptosis in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Boffi, F M; Cittar, J; Balskus, G; Muriel, M; Desmaras, E

    2002-09-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a genetically controlled response of cells to commit suicide and is associated with DNA fragmentation or laddering. The common inducers of apoptosis include Ca2+i and oxygen free radicals/oxidative stress, which are also implicated in the pathogenesis of exercise-induced myopathies. To examine training-induced apoptosis, Thoroughbred horses were subjected to 3 months training programme on a treadmill. At the end of the training programme venous blood samples were taken for a creatine kinase (CK) assay. In addition, muscle biopsy samples were obtained for a membrane lipid peroxidation measurement by malondialdehyde (MDA) assay and for apoptosis detection. Apoptosis was studied by visualising the apoptotic myocytes on the paraffin sections by the modified TUNEL method. DNA laddering was evaluated by subjecting the DNA obtained from the biopsies to 1.5% agarose gel electrophoresis. There was a significant increase (P<0.05) of protein-bound MDA, and a nonsignificant trend (P = 0.14) for the control group to have higher levels of CK compared to the trained group. Under light microscopy, percentage of the TUNEL positive cells was higher (P<0.001) in the training group. This result was corroborated with the findings of DNA fragmentation by gel electrophoresis, which showed higher ladders of DNA band at the same group. In conclusion, these results clearly demonstrate that there is training-induced apoptosis in skeletal muscle. It is probable that apoptosis allows the work/recovery/rebound/supercompensation cycle, when unaccustomed muscle cells activate programmed cell death and are replaced by new and stronger cells, which is the mechanism for training-induced increases in fitness. PMID:12405700

  5. Simultaneous extraction of acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid from human plasma and simultaneous estimation by liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/tandem mass spectrometry detection. Application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Kandikere, Vishwottam; Mudigonda, Koteshwara; Ajjala, Devender; Suraneni, Ramakrishna; Thoddi, Parthasarathi

    2011-01-01

    A simple analytical method using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in atmospheric chemical ionization mode (APCI) for the simultaneous estimation of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, CAS 50-78-2) and its active metabolite salicylic acid (SA, CAS 69-72-7) in human plasma has been developed and validated. ASA and SA were analyzed simultaneously despite differences in plasma concentration ranges of ASA and SA after oral administration of ASA. In spite of having different chemical, ionization and chromatographic properties, ASA and SA were extracted simultaneously from the plasma sample using acetonitrile protein precipitation followed by liquid-liquid extraction. The analytes were separated on a reversed phase column with rapid gradient program using mobile phase consisting of ammonium acetate buffer and methanol. The structural analogue diclofenac was used as an internal standard. The multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions m/z 179 --> 137 for ASA, m/z 137 --> 65 for SA and m/z 294 --> 250 for IS were used. The assay exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.02-10 microg/mL for ASA and 0.1-50 microg/mL for SA. The between-batch precision (%CV) ranged from 2.1 to 7.9% for ASA and from 0.2 to 5.2% for SA. The between-batch accuracy ranged from 95.4 to 96.7% for ASA and from 94.6 to 111.3% for SA. The validated method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of ASA after single oral administration of 650 mg test formulation versus two 325 mg reference formulations of ASA in human subjects. PMID:21755814

  6. Comparison between 3-Nitrooxyphenyl acetylsalicylate (NO-ASA) and O2-(acetylsalicyloxymethyl)-1-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (NONO-ASA) as Safe Anti-Inflammatory, Analgesic, Antipyretic, Antioxidant Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Velazquez, Carlos A.; Pruski, April; Nia, Kamran V.; Abdellatif, Khaled R.; Keefer, Larry K.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is an underlying etiological factor in carcinogenesis; nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and their chemically modified NO-releasing prodrugs (NO-NSAIDs) are promising chemopreventive agents. The aim of this study was to conduct a head-to-head comparison between two NO-ASAs possessing different NO donor groups, an organic nitrate [3-nitrooxyphenyl acetylsalicylate (NO-ASA; NCX-4016)] and an N-diazeniumdiolate [NONO-ASA, O2- (acetylsalicyloxymethyl)-1-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (NONO-ASA; CVM-01)], as antiulcerogenic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic agents. All drugs were administered orally at equimolar doses. For antiulcerogenic study, 6 h after administration, the number and size of hemorrhagic lesions in stomachs from euthanized animals were counted. Tissue samples were frozen for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde determination. For anti-inflammatory study, 1 h after drug administration, the volume of carrageenan-induced rat paw edemas was measured for 6 h. For antipyretic study, 1 h after dosing, fever was induced by intraperitoneal LPS, and body core temperatures measured for 5 h. For analgesic study, time-dependent analgesic effect of prodrugs was evaluated by carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia. Drugs were administered 30 min after carrageenan. NO-ASA and NONO-ASA were equipotent as analgesic and anti-inflammatory agents but were better than aspirin. Despite a drastic reduction of PGE2 in stomach tissue, both prodrugs were devoid of gastric side effects. Lipid peroxidation induced by aspirin was higher than that observed by prodrugs. SOD activity induced by both prodrugs was similar, but approximately 2-fold higher than that induced by aspirin. CVM-01 is as effective as NCX-4016 in anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic assays in vivo, and it showed an equivalent safety profile in the stomach. These results underscore the use of N-diazeniumdiolate moieties

  7. An examination of binding motifs associated with inter-particle interactions between facetted nano-crystals of acetylsalicylic acid and ascorbic acid through the application of molecular grid-based search methods.

    PubMed

    Hammond, R B; Jeck, S; Ma, C Y; Pencheva, K; Roberts, K J; Auffret, T

    2009-12-01

    Grid-based intermolecular search methods using atom-atom force fields are used to assess the structural nature of potential crystal-crystal interfacial binding associated with the examination of representative pharmaceutical formulation components, viz acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C). Molecular models of nano-sized molecular clusters for these two compounds, shaped in accordance with an attachment energy model of the respective particle morphologies, are constructed and used together with a grid-based search method to model the likely inter-particle interactions. The most-stable, mutual alignments of the respective nano-clusters based on their interaction energies are identified in the expectation that these are indicative of the most likely inter-particle binding configurations. The stable inter-particle binding configurations identified reveal that the number of interfacial hydrogen bonds formed between the binding particles is, potentially, an important factor in terms of the stability of inter-particle cohesion. All preferred inter-particle alignments are found to involve either the (1 0 0) or the (1 1 0) face of aspirin crystals interacting with a number of the growth forms of ascorbic acid. Four main types of interfacial hydrogen bonds are found to be associated with inter-particle binding and involve acceptor-donor interactions between hydroxyl, carbonyl, ester and lactone acceptor groups and hydroxyl donor groups. This hydrogen bonding network is found to be consistent with the surface chemistry of the interacting habit faces with, in general, the number of hydrogen bonds increasing for the more stable alignments. The likely usefulness of this approach for predicting solid-state formulation properties is reviewed. PMID:19544525

  8. Evaluation of Apoptosis in Immunotoxicity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Vakharia, Dilip; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.

    2014-01-01

    Immunotoxicity testing is important in determining the toxic effects of chemical substances, medicinal products, airborne pollutants, cosmetics, medical devices, and food additives. The immune system of the host is a direct target of these toxicants, and the adverse effects include serious health complications such as susceptibility to infections, cancer, allergic reactions, and autoimmune diseases. One way to investigate the harmful effects of different chemicals is to study apoptosis in immune cell populations. Apoptosis is defined as the programmed cell death, and in general, this process helps in development and maintains homeostasis. However, in the case of an insult by a toxicant, apoptosis of the immune cells can lead to immunosuppression resulting in the development of cancer and the inability to fight infections. Apoptosis is characterized by cell shrinkage, nuclear condensation, changes in cell membrane and mitochondria, DNA fragmentation into 200 base oligomers, and protein degradation by caspases. Various methods are employed in order to investigate apoptosis. These methods include direct measurement of apoptotic cells with flow cytometry and in situ labeling, as well as RNA, DNA, and protein assays that are indicative of apoptotic molecules. PMID:19967519

  9. Sodium nitroprusside induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by a slowly progressing degradation of the matrix and destruction of articular cartilage. Apoptosis of chondrocyte is accounted for the mechanism of OA. Nitric oxide (NO), as a stimulus, has been shown to induce chondrocyte apoptosis by activating the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), inhibiting the proteoglycan synthesis and type II collagen expression. In this study, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was administered to be the NO donor to explore the mechanism of NO-induced apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes obtained from six weeks old New Zealand rabbits. CCK-8 assay revealed the inhibitory effect of SNP on cell viability. We used flow cytometry (FCM) to assess the form of cell death by Annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining, and evaluate the change of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). We found that the SNP induced chondrocyte apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner and an observable reduction of ΔΨm. In conclusion, our findings indicate that SNP induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes via a mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  10. Targeting the Apoptosis Pathway in Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Shadia; Wang, Rui; Gandhi, Varsha

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is a cell death program that is well-orchestrated for normal tissue homeostasis and for removal of damaged, old, or infected cells. It is regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The intrinsic pathway responds to signals such as ultraviolet radiation or DNA damage and activates “executioner” caspases through a mitochondria-dependent pathway. The extrinsic pathway is activated by death signals induced, for example, by an infection that activates the immune system or receptor-mediated pathways. The extrinsic pathway signals also cascade down to executioner caspases that cleave target proteins and lead to cell death. Strict control of cellular apoptosis is important for the hematopoietic system as it has a high turnover rate. However, the apoptosis program is often deregulated in hematologic malignancies leading to the accumulation of malignant cells. Therefore, apoptosis pathways have been identified for development of anticancer therapeutics. We review here the proteins that have been targeted for anticancer drug development in hematologic malignancies. These include BCL-2 family proteins, death ligands and receptors, inhibitor of apoptosis family proteins, and caspases. Except for caspase activators, drugs that target each of these classes of proteins have advanced into clinical trials. PMID:24295132

  11. NMR exposure sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ghibelli, L; Cerella, C; Cordisco, S; Clavarino, G; Marazzi, S; De Nicola, M; Nuccitelli, S; D'Alessio, M; Magrini, A; Bergamaschi, A; Guerrisi, V; Porfiri, L M

    2006-03-01

    NMR technology has dramatically contributed to the revolution of image diagnostic. NMR apparatuses use combinations of microwaves over a homogeneous strong (1 Tesla) static magnetic field. We had previously shown that low intensity (0.3-66 mT) static magnetic fields deeply affect apoptosis in a Ca2+ dependent fashion (Fanelli et al., 1999 FASEBJ., 13;95-102). The rationale of the present study is to examine whether exposure to the static magnetic fields of NMR can affect apoptosis induced on reporter tumor cells of haematopoietic origin. The impressive result was the strong increase (1.8-2.5 fold) of damage-induced apoptosis by NMR. This potentiation is due to cytosolic Ca2+ overload consequent to NMR-promoted Ca2+ influx, since it is prevented by intracellular (BAPTA-AM) and extracellular (EGTA) Ca2+ chelation or by inhibition of plasma membrane L-type Ca2+ channels. Three-days follow up of treated cultures shows that NMR decrease long term cell survival, thus increasing the efficiency of cytocidal treatments. Importantly, mononuclear white blood cells are not sensitised to apoptosis by NMR, showing that NMR may increase the differential cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs on tumor vs normal cells. This strong, differential potentiating effect of NMR on tumor cell apoptosis may have important implications, being in fact a possible adjuvant for antitumor therapies. PMID:16528477

  12. Lysosomal destabilization in p53-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xi-Ming; Li, Wei; Dalen, Helge; Lotem, Joseph; Kama, Rachel; Sachs, Leo; Brunk, Ulf T.

    2002-01-01

    The tumor suppressor wild-type p53 can induce apoptosis. M1-t-p53 myeloid leukemic cells have a temperature-sensitive p53 protein that changes its conformation to wild-type p53 after transfer from 37°C to 32°C. We have now found that these cells showed an early lysosomal rupture after transfer to 32°C. Mitochondrial damage, including decreased membrane potential and release of cytochrome c, and the appearance of apoptotic cells occurred later. Lysosomal rupture, mitochondrial damage, and apoptosis were all inhibited by the cytokine IL-6. Some other compounds can also inhibit apoptosis induced by p53. The protease inhibitor N-tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone inhibited the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release, the Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin inhibited only cytochrome c release, and the antioxidant butylated hydroxyanisole inhibited only the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. In contrast to IL-6, these other compounds that inhibited some of the later occurring mitochondrial damage did not inhibit the earlier p53-induced lysosomal damage. The results indicate that apoptosis is induced by p53 through a lysosomal-mitochondrial pathway that is initiated by lysosomal destabilization, and that this pathway can be dissected by using different apoptosis inhibitors. These findings on the induction of p53-induced lysosomal destabilization can also help to formulate new therapies for diseases with apoptotic disorders. PMID:11959917

  13. Apoptosis in Drosophila: which role for mitochondria?

    PubMed

    Clavier, Amandine; Rincheval-Arnold, Aurore; Colin, Jessie; Mignotte, Bernard; Guénal, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    It is now well established that the mitochondrion is a central regulator of mammalian cell apoptosis. However, the importance of this organelle in non-mammalian apoptosis has long been regarded as minor, mainly because of the absence of a crucial role for cytochrome c in caspase activation. Recent results indicate that the control of caspase activation and cell death in Drosophila occurs at the mitochondrial level. Numerous proteins, including RHG proteins and proteins of the Bcl-2 family that are key regulators of Drosophila apoptosis, constitutively or transiently localize in mitochondria. These proteins participate in the cell death process at different levels such as degradation of Diap1, a Drosophila IAP, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or stimulation of the mitochondrial fission machinery. Here, we review these mitochondrial events that might have their counterpart in human. PMID:26679112

  14. Lipid metabolism, apoptosis and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunfa; Freter, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, and generates a variety of bioactive lipid molecules. These bioactive lipid molecules known as signaling molecules, such as fatty acid, eicosanoids, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, lysophophatidic acid, ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and cholesterol, are involved in the activation or regulation of different signaling pathways. Lipid metabolism participates in the regulation of many cellular processes such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, survival, apoptosis, inflammation, motility, membrane homeostasis, chemotherapy response, and drug resistance. Bioactive lipid molecules promote apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway by modulating mitochondrial membrane permeability and activating different enzymes including caspases. In this review, we discuss recent data in the fields of lipid metabolism, lipid-mediated apoptosis, and cancer therapy. In conclusion, understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of lipid metabolism and the function of different lipid molecules could provide the basis for cancer cell death rationale, discover novel and potential targets, and develop new anticancer drugs for cancer therapy. PMID:25561239

  15. Control of apoptosis by Drosophila DCAF12.

    PubMed

    Hwangbo, Dae-Sung; Biteau, Benoit; Rath, Sneha; Kim, Jihyun; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-05-01

    Regulated Apoptosis (Programmed Cell Death, PCD) maintains tissue homeostasis in adults, and ensures proper growth and morphogenesis of tissues during development of metazoans. Accordingly, defects in cellular processes triggering or executing apoptotic programs have been implicated in a variety of degenerative and neoplastic diseases. Here, we report the identification of DCAF12, an evolutionary conserved member of the WD40-motif repeat family of proteins, as a new regulator of apoptosis in Drosophila. We find that DCAF12 is required for Diap1 cleavage in response to pro-apoptotic signals, and is thus necessary and sufficient for RHG (Reaper, Hid, and Grim)-mediated apoptosis. Loss of DCAF12 perturbs the elimination of supernumerary or proliferation-impaired cells during development, and enhances tumor growth induced by loss of neoplastic tumor suppressors, highlighting the wide requirement for DCAF12 in PCD. PMID:26972874

  16. Downregulation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Chul-Ho; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by diverse anti-cancer drugs or phytochemicals has been closely related with the induction of apoptosis in cancers. Also, the downregulation of ROS by these chemicals has been found to block initiation of carcinogenesis. Therefore, modulation of ROS by phytochemicals emerges as a crucial mechanism to regulate apoptosis in cancer prevention or therapy. This review summarizes the current understanding of the selected chemical compounds and related cellular components that modulate ROS during apoptotic process. Metformin, quercetin, curcumin, vitamin C, and other compounds have been shown to downregulate ROS in the cellular apoptotic process, and some of them even induce apoptosis in cancer cells. The cellular components mediating the downregulation of ROS include nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 antioxidant signaling pathway, thioredoxin, catalase, glutathione, heme oxygenase-1, and uncoupling proteins. The present review provides information on the relationship between these compounds and the cellular components in modulating ROS in apoptotic cancer cells. PMID:27051644

  17. Apoptosis induced by dioscin in Hela cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Liu, Mingjie; Wang, Zhao; Ju, Yong

    2002-02-01

    Dioscin, a saponin extracted from the root of Polygonatum Zanlanscianense Pamp, markedly inhibited proliferation of Hela cells. The results indicated that Hela cells underwent apoptosis in dose- and time-dependent manners when treated with Dioscin. Caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities were also detected. The low enzymatic activity of caspase-8 and high activity of caspase-9 showed that the mitochondrial pathway was activated in apoptosis. The reduced expression of the survival protein Bcl-2 also confirmed this result. These studies may be significant in finding a new drug to treat human cervical cancer. PMID:11853164

  18. Apoptosis after reperfused myocardial infarction: Role of angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Jugdutt, Bodh I

    2004-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a significant role in apoptosis after myocardial infarction (MI) and reperfused MI. Cumulative evidence suggests that Ang II is a major contributor to cardiomyocyte (CM) apoptosis and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction after acute reperfused MI and that apoptosis mediates a major portion of early LV dysfunction. Importantly, blockade of the Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) limits CM apoptosis and LV dysfunction after acute reperfused MI. Ang II type 2 receptor activation during AT1R blockade contributes to these beneficial effects. The role of Ang II and apoptosis in chronic LV remodelling, healing and post-MI heart failure is more complex and involves effects on the CMs, fibroblasts and vascular cells. The long-term effects of agents targeting apoptosis after reperfused MI, including AT1R blockade, on apoptosis in different cell types, windows of enhanced apoptosis and the appropriate timing of therapy need to be considered. PMID:19641712

  19. Uric acid enhances PKC-dependent eNOS phosphorylation and mediates cellular ER stress: A mechanism for uric acid-induced endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    LI, PENG; ZHANG, LINA; ZHANG, MEI; ZHOU, CHANGYONG; LIN, NAN

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism by which hyperuricemia induced-endothelial dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) is not yet fully understood. In the present study, we used uric acid (UA) to trigger endothelial dysfunction in cultured endothelial cells, and investigated the effects of induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induction, and the protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signaling pathway. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated with 6, 9 or 12 mg/dl UA, ROS scavenger polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD), ER stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), and PKC inhibitor polymyxin B for 6–48 h. Nitric oxide (NO) production, eNOS activity, intracellular ROS, ER stress levels, and the interaction between eNOS and calmodulin (CaM) and cytosolic calcium levels were assessed using fluorescence microscopy and western blot analysis. Apoptosis was assessed by annexin V staining. UA increased HUVEC apoptosis and reduced eNOS activity and NO production in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Intracellular ROS was elevated after 3 h, while ER stress level increased after 6 h. UA did not alter intracellular Ca2+, CaM, or eNOS concentration, or eNOS Ser1177 phosphorylation. However, PKC-dependent eNOS phosphorylation at Thr495 was greatly enhanced, and consequently interaction between eNOS and CaM was reduced. Cellular ROS depletion, ER stress inhibition and PKC activity reduction inhibited the effect of UA on eNOS activity, NO release and apoptosis in HUVECs. Thus, we concluded that UA induced HUVEC apoptosis and endothelial dysfunction by triggering oxidative and ER stress through PKC/eNOS-mediated eNOS activity and NO production. PMID:26935704

  20. A novel method for detection of apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zagariya, Alexander M.

    2012-04-15

    There are two different Angiotensin II (ANG II) peptides in nature: Human type (ANG II) and Bovine type (ANG II*). These eight amino acid peptides differ only at position 5 where Valine is replaced by Isoleucine in the Bovine type. They are present in all species studied so far. These amino acids are different by only one atom of carbon. This difference is so small, that it will allow any of ANG II, Bovine or Human antibodies to interact with all species and create a universal method for apoptosis detection. ANG II concentrations are found at substantially higher levels in apoptotic, compared to non-apoptotic, tissues. ANG II accumulation can lead to DNA damage, mutations, carcinogenesis and cell death. We demonstrate that Bovine antiserum can be used for universal detection of apoptosis. In 2010, the worldwide market for apoptosis detection reached the $20 billion mark and significantly increases each year. Most commercially available methods are related to Annexin V and TUNNEL. Our new method based on ANG II is more widely known to physicians and scientists compared to previously used methods. Our approach offers a novel alternative for assessing apoptosis activity with enhanced sensitivity, at a lower cost and ease of use.

  1. Farnesol-induced apoptosis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Shirtliff, Mark E; Krom, Bastiaan P; Meijering, Roelien A M; Peters, Brian M; Zhu, Jingsong; Scheper, Mark A; Harris, Megan L; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann

    2009-06-01

    Farnesol, a precursor in the isoprenoid/sterol pathway, was recently identified as a quorum-sensing molecule produced by the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Farnesol is involved in the inhibition of germination and biofilm formation by C. albicans and can be cytotoxic at certain concentrations. In addition, we have shown that farnesol can trigger apoptosis in mammalian cells via the classical apoptotic pathways. In order to elucidate the mechanism behind farnesol cytotoxicity in C. albicans, the response to farnesol was investigated, using proteomic analysis. Global protein expression profiles demonstrated significant changes in protein expression resulting from farnesol exposure. Among the downregulated proteins were those involved in metabolism, glycolysis, protein synthesis, and mitochondrial electron transport and the respiratory chain, whereas proteins involved in folding, protection against environmental and oxidative stress, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, and apoptosis were upregulated. Cellular changes that accompany apoptosis (regulated cell death) were further analyzed using fluorescent microscopy and gene expression analysis. The results indicated reactive oxygen species accumulation, mitochondrial degradation, and positive terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) in the farnesol-exposed cells concurrent with increased expression of antioxidant-encoding and drug response genes. More importantly, the results demonstrated farnesol-induced upregulation of the caspase gene MCA1 and the intracellular presence of activated caspases. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that farnesol promotes apoptosis in C. albicans through caspase activation, implying an important physiological role for farnesol in the fungal cell life cycle with important implications for adaptation and survival. PMID:19364863

  2. THE ROLE OF APOPTOSIS IN NEUROTOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death, occurs in the nervous system throughout development, but with a preponderance of cell death occurring during the prenatal and perinatal periods. Aberrant periods of increased or decreased cell death, induced by toxicants in air, water,...

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy to assess apoptosis in myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranji, Mahsa; Matsubara, Muneaki; Grosso, Michael A.; Jaggard, Dwight L.; Chance, Britton; Gorman, Robert C.; Gorman, Joseph H., III

    2007-02-01

    Apoptosis induced mitochondrial destruction and dysfunction has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of both acute cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury and chronic myocardial infarction-induced ventricular remodeling. Unfortunately this understanding has not translated into effective therapeutic strategies for either condition-mostly due to an inability to assess mitochondrial dysfunction/apoptosis effectively in humans. All current measures of apoptosis are pseudo-quantitative and require invasive tissue biopsy. Our group has developed an optical, non-tissue destructive catheter based device that allows the quantitative regional assessment of this pathological process in vivo. This instrument has been designed to acquire fluorescence signals of intrinsic mitochondrial fluorophores, Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD) and Flavoprotein (FP). The normalized ratio of these fluorophores (FP/FP+NADH) called the redox ratio, is an indicator of the in vivo mitochondrial dysfunction. 1-3 We have demonstrated in a rabbit reperfusion model of apoptotic myocyte injury that this redox ratio is drastically increased which is consistent with profound apoptosis-induced "unhinging" of the mitochondrial respiratory function.

  4. Techniques to Distinguish Apoptosis from Necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Feoktistova, Maria; Wallberg, Fredrik; Tenev, Tencho; Geserick, Peter; Leverkus, Martin; Meier, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    The processes by which cells die are as tightly regulated as those that govern cell growth and proliferation. Recent studies of the molecular pathways that regulate and execute cell death have uncovered a plethora of signaling cascades that lead to distinct modes of cell death, including "apoptosis," "necrosis," "autophagic cell death," and "mitotic catastrophe." Cells can readily switch from one form of death to another; therefore, it is vital to have the ability to monitor the form of death that cells are undergoing. A number of techniques are available that allow the detection of cell death and when combined with either knockdown approaches or inhibitors of specific signaling pathways, such as caspase or RIP kinase pathways, they allow the rapid dissection of divergent cell death pathways. However, techniques that reveal the end point of cell death cannot reconstruct the sequence of events that have led to death; therefore, they need to be complemented with methods that can distinguish all forms of cell death. Apoptotic cells frequently undergo secondary necrosis under in vitro culture conditions; therefore, novel methods relying on high-throughput time-lapse fluorescence video microscopy are necessary to provide temporal resolution to cell death events. Further, visualizing the assembly of multiprotein signaling hubs that can execute apoptosis or necroptosis helps to explore the underlying processes. Here we introduce a suite of techniques that reliably distinguish necrosis from apoptosis and secondary necrosis, and that enable investigation of signaling platforms capable of instructing apoptosis or necroptosis. PMID:27037077

  5. Ceramide in apoptosis: a revisited role.

    PubMed

    Levade, Thierry; Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Gouazé, Valérie; Ségui, Bruno; Tardy, Claudine; Betito, Susan; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2002-08-01

    The sphingolipid ceramide has recently emerged as a new transducer or modulator of apoptotic cell death. This function, however, has recently been challenged. Here, in the light of recent observations, the role of ceramide in apoptosis signaling is discussed. PMID:12374195

  6. Effect of hyaluronic acid on chondrocyte apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Ronald Bispo; Sadigursky, David; de Rezende, Marcia Uchoa; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the percentage of apoptotic cells in a contusion model of osteoarthritis (OA) and to assess whether intra-articular injection of high doses of hyaluronic acid (HA) immediately after trauma reduces chondrocyte apoptosis. METHODS: Forty knees from adult rabbits were impacted thrice with a 1 kg block released through a 1 meter tall cylinder (29.4 Joules). Subsequently, 2 mL of HA was injected in one knee and 2 mL saline in the contra-lateral knee. Medication were administered twice a week for 30 days, when animals were sacrificed. Specimens were prepared for optical microscopy exam and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase end labeling assay (TUNEL). RESULTS: The apoptosis rate in the contusion model was 68.01% (± 19.73%), a higher rate than previously described. HA significantly reduced the rate of apoptosis to 53.52% (± 18.09) (p <0.001). CONCLUSION: Intra-articular HA administration started immediately after trauma reduces impact-induced chondrocyte apoptosis rates in rabbits. Level of Evidence I, Experimental Study. PMID:27069407

  7. Sodium orthovanadate inhibits p53-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Morita, Akinori; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Suzuki, Norio; Aoki, Shin; Ito, Azusa; Nanao, Tomohisa; Ohya, Soichiro; Yoshino, Minako; Zhu, Jin; Enomoto, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Funatsu, Osamu; Hosoi, Yoshio; Ikekita, Masahiko

    2010-01-01

    Sodium orthovanadate (vanadate) inhibits the DNA-binding activity of p53, but its precise effects on p53 function have not been examined. Here, we show that vanadate exerts a potent antiapoptotic activity through both transcription-dependent and transcription-independent mechanisms relative to other p53 inhibitors, including pifithrin (PFT) alpha. We compared the effects of vanadate to PFTalpha and PFTmicro, an inhibitor of transcription-independent apoptosis by p53. Vanadate suppressed p53-associated apoptotic events at the mitochondria, including the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the conformational change of Bax and Bak, the mitochondrial translocation of p53, and the interaction of p53 with Bcl-2. Similarly, vanadate suppressed the apoptosis-inducing activity of a mitochondrially targeted temperature-sensitive p53 in stable transfectants of SaOS-2 cells. In radioprotection assays, which rely on p53, vanadate completely protected mice from a sublethal dose of 8 Gy and partially from a lethal dose of 12 Gy. Together, our findings indicated that vanadate effectively suppresses p53-mediated apoptosis by both transcription-dependent and transcription-independent pathways, and suggested that both pathways must be inhibited to completely block p53-mediated apoptosis. PMID:20048077

  8. Antiviral activity of human oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) is mediated by enhancing retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yugen; Ghosh, Arundhati; Cuevas, Rolando A.; Forero, Adriana; Dhar, Jayeeta; Ibsen, Mikkel Søes; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan Leo; Schmidt, Tobias; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K.; Fujita, Takashi; Hartmann, Rune; Barik, Sailen; Hornung, Veit; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Virus infection is sensed in the cytoplasm by retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I, also known as DDX58), which requires RNA and polyubiquitin binding to induce type I interferon (IFN), and activate cellular innate immunity. We show that the human IFN-inducible oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) protein had antiviral activity and mediated RIG-I activation by mimicking polyubiquitin. Loss of OASL expression reduced RIG-I signaling and enhanced virus replication in human cells. Conversely, OASL expression suppressed replication of a number of viruses in a RIG-I-dependent manner and enhanced RIG-I-mediated IFN induction. OASL interacted and colocalized with RIG-I, and through its C-terminal ubiquitin-like domain specifically enhanced RIG-I signaling. Bone marrow derived macrophages from mice deficient for Oasl2 showed that among the two mouse orthologs of human OASL; Oasl2 is functionally similar to human OASL. Our findings show a mechanism by which human OASL contributes to host antiviral responses by enhancing RIG-I activation. PMID:24931123

  9. c-Myc-mediated expression of nucleophosmin/B23 decreases during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of human leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Yung, Benjamin Y M

    2004-12-17

    The retinoic acid-induced differentiation of human leukemia HL-60 cells towards mature granulocytic cells was accompanied by the decline in the protein levels of c-myc, nucleophosmin/B23 and its promoter activity. These RA-induced effects were further enhanced by the concurrent treatment of HL-60 cells with p38 map kinase inhibitor SB203580 (SB). It seems that there is a strong correlation of nucleophosmin/B23 and c-Myc expressions in cells under RA treatment. Furthermore, nucleophosmin/B23 promoter activity decreased upon c-Myc antisense-mediated reduction of intracellular amount of c-Myc. CHIP assays showed that binding of c-Myc to the nucleophosmin/B23 promoter decreased in RA-treated cells. Thus, nucleophosmin/B23 expression is targeted by c-Myc during RA-induced differentiation. These results provide evidence for a novel mechanism of transcriptional downregulation of nucleophosmin/B23 and the functional role of c-Myc in RA-induced differentiation. PMID:15589822

  10. Evidence for genetic regulation of mRNA expression of the dosage-sensitive gene retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1) in human brain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Tao, Yu; Song, Fan; Yuan, Xi; Wang, Jian; Saffen, David

    2016-01-01

    RAI1 (retinoic acid induced-1) is a dosage-sensitive gene that causes Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) when mutated or deleted and Potocki-Lupski Syndrome (PTLS) when duplicated, with psychiatric features commonly observed in both syndromes. How common genetic variants regulate this gene, however, is unknown. In this study, we found that RAI1 mRNA expression in Chinese prefrontal and temporal cortex correlate with genotypes of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the RAI1 5'-upstream region. Using genotype imputation, "R(2)-Δ(2)" analysis, and data from the RegulomeDB database, we identified SNPs rs4925102 and rs9907986 as possible regulatory variants, accounting for approximately 30-40% of the variance in RAI1 mRNA expression in both brain regions. Specifically, rs4925102 and rs9907986 are predicted to disrupt the binding of retinoic acid RXR-RAR receptors and the transcription factor DEAF1 (Deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1), respectively. Consistent with these predictions, we observed binding of RXRα and RARα to the predicted RAI1 target in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Retinoic acid is crucial for early development of the central neural system, and DEAF1 is associated with intellectual disability. The observation that a significant portion of RAI1 mRNA expression is genetically controlled raises the possibility that common RAI1 5'-region regulatory variants contribute more generally to psychiatric disorders. PMID:26743651

  11. MicroRNA-31 negatively regulates peripherally derived regulatory T-cell generation by repressing retinoic acid-inducible protein 3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingyun; Ke, Fang; Liu, Zhaoyuan; Bai, Jing; Liu, Jinlin; Yan, Sha; Xu, Zhenyao; Lou, Fangzhou; Wang, Hong; Zhu, Huiyuan; Sun, Yang; Cai, Wei; Gao, Yuanyuan; Li, Qun; Yu, Xue-Zhong; Qian, Youcun; Hua, Zichun; Deng, Jiong; Li, Qi-Jing; Wang, Honglin

    2015-01-01

    Peripherally derived regulatory T (pT(reg)) cell generation requires T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling and the cytokines TGF-β1 and IL-2. Here we show that TCR signalling induces the microRNA miR-31, which negatively regulates pT(reg)-cell generation. miR-31 conditional deletion results in enhanced induction of pT(reg) cells, and decreased severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Unexpectedly, we identify Gprc5a as a direct target of miR-31. Gprc5a is known as retinoic acid-inducible protein 3, and its deficiency leads to impaired pT(reg-)cell induction and increased EAE severity. By generating miR-31 and Gprc5a double knockout mice, we show that miR-31 promotes the development of EAE through inhibiting Gprc5a. Thus, our data identify miR-31 and its target Gprc5a as critical regulators for pT(reg)-cell generation, suggesting a previously unrecognized epigenetic mechanism for dysfunctional T(reg) cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26165721

  12. Retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptor (RLR)-mediated antiviral innate immune responses in the lower respiratory tract: Roles of TRAF3 and TRAF5.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yuki; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Satoh, Tsugumi; Hayakari, Ryo; Furudate, Ken; Xing, Fei; Yoshida, Hidemi; Tanji, Kunikazu; Mizukami, Hiroki; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Ito, Etsuro

    2015-11-13

    Upon viral infection, the cytoplasmic viral sensor retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) recognizes viral RNA to activate antiviral signaling to induce type I interferon (IFN). RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) activate antiviral signaling in a tissue-specific manner. The molecular mechanism underlying antiviral signaling in the respiratory system remains unclear. We studied antiviral signaling in the lower respiratory tract (LRT), which is the site of many harmful viral infections. Epithelial cells of the LRT can be roughly divided into two groups: bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) and pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). These two cell types exhibit different phenotypes; therefore, we hypothesized that these cells may play different roles in antiviral innate immunity. We found that BECs exhibited higher antiviral activity than AECs. TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) has been shown to be a crucial molecule in RLR signaling. The expression levels of TRAF3 and TRAF5, which have conserved domains that are nearly identical, in the LRT were examined. We found that the bronchus exhibited the highest expression levels of TRAF3 and TRAF5 in the LRT. These findings suggest the importance of the bronchus in antiviral innate immunity in the LRT and indicate that TRAF3 and TRAF5 may contribute to RLR signaling. PMID:26454171

  13. Protective effect of hesperidin and naringin against 3-nitropropionic acid induced Huntington's like symptoms in rats: possible role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2010-01-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP) is a well known experimental model to study Huntington's disease (HD) and associated neuropsychiatric problems. Present study has been designed to explore the protective effects of hesperidin, naringin, and their nitric oxide mechanism (if any) against 3-nitropropionic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats. Systemic 3-nitropropionic acid (10 mg/kg) treatment for 14 days in rats significantly induced HD like symptoms in rats as indicated by reduced locomotor activity, body weight, grip strength, oxidative defense and mitochondrial complex enzymes (complex-I, -II, and -IV) activities in striatum. Naringin and hesperidin pretreatment significantly attenuated behavioral alterations, oxidative stress and mitochondrial enzymes complex dysfunction in 3-NP treated group. L-Arginine (50 mg/kg) pretreatment with lower dose of hesperidin (50 mg/kg) and naringin (50 mg/kg) significantly attenuated the protective effect of hesperidin and naringin respectively. Whereas L-NAME (10 mg/kg), a non-selective NOS inhibitor pretreatment with hesperidin (50 mg/kg) and naringin (50 mg/kg) significantly potentiated their protective effect which was significant as compared to their effect per se. Study highlights the therapeutic potential of hesperidin and naringin against Huntington's like conditions and further indicates that these drugs might act through nitric oxide mechanism. PMID:19716383

  14. Alkali- or acid-induced changes in structure, moisture absorption ability and deacetylating reaction of β-chitin extracted from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) pens.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jooyeoun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2014-01-01

    Alkali- or acid-induced structural modifications in β-chitin from squid (Dosidicus gigas, d'Orbigny, 1835) pens and their moisture absorption ability (MAA) and deacetylating reaction were investigated and compared with α-chitin from shrimp shells. β-Chitin was converted into the α-form after 3h in 40% NaOH or 1-3 h in 40% HCl solution, and α-chitin obtained from NaOH treatment had higher MAA than had native α-chitin, due to polymorphic destructions. In contrast, induced α-chitin from acid treatment of β-chitin had few polymorphic modifications, showing no significant change (P>0.05) in MAA. β-Chitin was more susceptible to alkali deacetylation than was α-chitin, and required a lower concentration of NaOH and shorter reaction time. These results demonstrate that alkali- or acid-treated β-chitin retained high susceptibility toward solvents, which in turn resulted in good biological activity of β-chitosan for use as a natural antioxidant and antimicrobial substance or application as edible coatings and films for various food applications. PMID:24444948

  15. Evidence for genetic regulation of mRNA expression of the dosage-sensitive gene retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1) in human brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Tao, Yu; Song, Fan; Yuan, Xi; Wang, Jian; Saffen, David

    2016-01-01

    RAI1 (retinoic acid induced-1) is a dosage-sensitive gene that causes Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) when mutated or deleted and Potocki-Lupski Syndrome (PTLS) when duplicated, with psychiatric features commonly observed in both syndromes. How common genetic variants regulate this gene, however, is unknown. In this study, we found that RAI1 mRNA expression in Chinese prefrontal and temporal cortex correlate with genotypes of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the RAI1 5′-upstream region. Using genotype imputation, “R2-Δ2” analysis, and data from the RegulomeDB database, we identified SNPs rs4925102 and rs9907986 as possible regulatory variants, accounting for approximately 30–40% of the variance in RAI1 mRNA expression in both brain regions. Specifically, rs4925102 and rs9907986 are predicted to disrupt the binding of retinoic acid RXR-RAR receptors and the transcription factor DEAF1 (Deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1), respectively. Consistent with these predictions, we observed binding of RXRα and RARα to the predicted RAI1 target in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Retinoic acid is crucial for early development of the central neural system, and DEAF1 is associated with intellectual disability. The observation that a significant portion of RAI1 mRNA expression is genetically controlled raises the possibility that common RAI1 5′-region regulatory variants contribute more generally to psychiatric disorders. PMID:26743651

  16. Effect of dietary fibers on cholic acid induced cell proliferation in the colonic epithelium of C57BL/6J mice

    SciTech Connect

    Robblee, N.M.; Bruce, W.R.; Bird, R.P.

    1986-03-01

    It has been postulated that high fat diets promote tumorigenesis by increasing the level of secondary bile acids in the colonic lumen. Dietary fibers are thought to be protective perhaps through their interaction with bile acids. In the present study, animals were fed diets containing either 0%, 5%, or 10% cellulose (C), pectin (P), or wheat bran (WB). The diets were formulated to contain either 0% (control) or 0.2% cholic acid (test). After two weeks of dietary treatment the animals were injected with (/sup 3/H)-thymidine and their colons were processed for autoradiography. The number of labeled cells (LC) in the colonic crypts was determined. Among the control diets, 10%P induced a two-fold increase in the LC. All the test groups had significantly higher LC than in their controls. However, the C group excited a higher LC than the P or WB groups (5.2 +/- 0.8 vs 3.9 +/- 0.8 or 3.9 +/- 0.6). These results were substantiated by metaphase arrest technique. The authors results show that nonfermentable fiber does not alleviate bile acid induced cell proliferative activity in the colon whereas fermentable fibers will counteract the promotional effect of a high fat diet.

  17. Uric acid induces oxidative stress via an activation of the renin-angiotensin system in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-xia; Zhang, Yu-ping; Wu, Qi-nan; Chen, Bing

    2015-02-01

    Hyperuricemia is recently reported involving in various obesity-related cardiovascular disorders, especially hypertension. However, the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated whether uric acid upregulates renin-angiotensin system (RAS) expression in adipocytes. We also examined whether RAS activation plays a role in uric acid-induced oxidative stress in adipocytes. The adipocytes of different phenotypes were incubated with uric acid for 48 h, respectively. Losartan (10(-4) M) or captopril (10(-4) M) was used to block adipose tissue RAS activation. mRNA expressions of angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin-converting enzyme-1 (ACE-1), renin, angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R), and angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) were evaluated with real-time PCR. Angiotensin II concentrations in supernatant were measured by ELISA. Intracellular reactive species (ROS) levels were measured by fluorescent probe DCFH-DA, DHR, or NBT assay. The uric acid upregulated both RAS (AGT, ACE1, renin, AT1R, and AT2R) mRNA expressions and angiotensin II protein secretion and caused a significant increase in ROS production in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These effects could be prevented by RAS inhibitors, either losartan or captopril. RAS activation has been causally implicated in oxidative stress induced by uric acid in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, suggesting a plausible mechanism through which hyperuricemia contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24671741

  18. PECAM-1, apoptosis and CD34+ precursors.

    PubMed

    Zocchi, Maria R; Poggi, A

    2004-11-01

    Apoptosis is a physiological process that controls tissue homeostasis, in combination with survival signals delivered by distinct receptors that bind hormones, growth factors or extracellular matrix components. The extrinsic pathway of apoptosis is due to the triggering of death receptors and the activation of the caspase cascade; the intrinsic pathway is due to withdrawal of growth factors and mainly related to mitochondrial metabolism. The choice between survival or apoptosis, which is the result of such different integrated environmental signals, is crucial for the maintainance of bone marrow reservoir of hematopoietic precursors (HPC). CD34+ HPC can receive multiple survival signals during homing and maturation, due to different interactions with adhesion molecules expressed on endothelial and bone marrow stromal cells, proteins of the extracellular matrix and chemokines or growth factors. Among them, the signal delivered via platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) seems to contribute to the resistance of this cell population to starvation, and it is related to the maintainance of mitochondrial metabolism. Indeed, this molecule, originally described as an adhesion receptor belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily, capable of homophilic and heterophilic interactions, turned out to be a signalling molecule, containing an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIM) within its cytoplasmic domain. In particular, it has been shown that PECAM-1 binds to different kinases and phosphatases, including the phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase that phosphorylates Akt, which, in turn can upregulate transcription and function of antiapoptotic proteins, such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-x or A1, responsible for the rescue from mitochondrial apoptosis. The possible role of PECAM-1 engagement in the prevention of starvation-induced apoptosis of HPC precursors and in the maintainance of their survival is discussed. PMID:15512808

  19. Erythrocyte ion channels in regulation of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lang, Florian; Birka, Christina; Myssina, Svetlana; Lang, Karl S; Lang, Philipp A; Tanneur, Valerie; Duranton, Christophe; Wieder, Thomas; Huber, Stephan M

    2004-01-01

    Erythrocytes lack mitochondria and nuclei, key organelles in the regulation of apoptosis. Until recently, erythrocytes were thus not considered subject to this type of cell death. However, exposure of erythrocytes to the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin was shown to induce cell shrinkage, cell membrane blebbing and breakdown of phosphatidylserine asymmetry with subsequent phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface, all typical features of apoptosis. Further studies revealed the participation of ion channels in the regulation of erythrocyte "apoptosis." Osmotic shock, oxidative stress and energy depletion all activate a Ca2(+)-permeable non-selective cation channel in the erythrocyte cell membrane. The subsequent increase of Ca2+ concentration stimulates a scramblase leading to breakdown of cell membrane phosphatidylserine asymmetry and activates Ca2+ sensitive K+ (Gardos) channels leading to KCl loss and (further) cell shrinkage. Phosphatidylserine exposure and cell shrinkage are blunted in the nominal absence of extracellular Ca2+, in the presence of the cation channel inhibitors amiloride or ethylisopropylamiloride, at increased extracellular K+ or in the presence of the Gardos channel inhibitors clotrimazole or charybdotoxin. Thus, increase of cytosolic Ca2+ and cellular loss of K+ participate in the triggering of erythrocyte scramblase. Nevertheless, phosphatidylserine exposure is not completely abrogated in the nominal absence of Ca2+, pointing to additional Ca2(+)-independent pathways. One of those is activation of sphingomyelinase with subsequent formation of ceramide which in turn leads to stimulation of erythrocyte scramblase. The exposure of phosphatidylserine at the extracellular face of the cell membrane stimulates phagocytes to engulf the apoptotic erythrocytes. Thus, sustained activation of the cation channels eventually leads to clearance of affected erythrocytes from peripheral blood. Erythropoietin inhibits the non-selective cation channel and thus

  20. Randomised comparison of zofenopril and ramipril plus acetylsalicylic acid in postmyocardial infarction patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction: a post hoc analysis of the SMILE-4 Study in patients according to levels of left ventricular ejection fraction at entry

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Claudio; Omboni, Stefano; Cicero, Arrigo FG; Bacchelli, Stefano; Degli Esposti, Daniela; Novo, Salvatore; Vinereanu, Dragos; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Ambrosioni, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    Objective Conflicting evidence exists on the benefits of treating patients with coronary artery disease and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) with an ACE inhibitor. This retrospective analysis of the SMILE-4 Study sought to compare the efficacy of zofenopril 60 mg plus acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) versus ramipril 10 mg plus ASA 100 mg in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and heart failure, according to an impaired or preserved LVEF. Methods The primary study end point was 1-year combined occurrence of death or hospitalisation for cardiovascular causes. A preserved LVEF was defined by a baseline LVEF >40% and an impaired one by an LVEF ≤40%. Results 448 patients (63%) had preserved and 262 (37%) had impaired LVEF. The primary end point occurred in 125 patients with preserved (28%) and 106 patients with impaired LVEF (41%, p=0.001). In the first group, the rate of major cardiovascular events was significantly lower under zofenopril than under ramipril (23% vs 33%; OR and 95% CI 0.60, 0.39 to 0.91; p=0.016). This was also the case for patients with impaired LVEF, though between-group difference was not statistically significant (38% zofenopril vs 44% ramipril; OR 0.77, 0.47 to 1.26; p=0.297). LVEF values significantly (p<0.0001) increased during the follow-up in both subsets with no between-treatment differences. However, improvement rates in LVEF (increase ≥5%) were higher in patients with impaired LVEF (72% vs 61%, p=0.006). Conclusions In the SMILE-4 Study, the cardiovascular outcome of patients with post-AMI with preserved LVEF was more favourable in the zofenopril than in the ramipril treatment group. Trial registration number EudraCT Number: 2004-001150-88 (http://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu); Italian Ministry of Health Code: GUIDOTT_III_2004_001 (https://oss-sper-clin.agenziafarmaco.it). PMID:26288740

  1. Key regulators of apoptosis execution as biomarker candidates in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Emilie M; Rehm, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to apoptosis is frequently detected in malignant melanoma, a skin cancer with rapidly growing incidence rates. Apoptosis resistance may develop with disease progression and may be associated with the poor responsiveness of metastatic melanoma to apoptosis-inducing treatments, such as genotoxic chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Likewise, the efficacy of novel treatment options (targeted kinase inhibitors and immunotherapeutics) that indirectly lead to cell death may depend on the susceptibility of melanoma to apoptosis. At its core, apoptosis execution is regulated by the interplay between a comparatively small number of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, and consequently numerous studies have investigated the potential of these players as biomarker candidates. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of biomarker discovery studies focusing on key regulators of apoptosis execution, critically review the findings of these studies, and outline strategies that address current limitations and challenges in exploiting regulators of apoptosis execution as prognostic or predictive biomarkers in melanoma. PMID:27308353

  2. Biomarkers of Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Weinberg, Annelie Martina; Al-Wasiyah, Mohammad K.; Alqahtani, Mohammed H.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Cell death with morphological and molecular features of apoptosis has been detected in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage, which suggests a key role for chondrocyte death/survival in the pathogenesis of OA. Identification of biomarkers of chondrocyte apoptosis may facilitate the development of novel therapies that may eliminate the cause or, at least, slow down the degenerative processes in OA. The aim of this review was to explore the molecular markers and signals that induce chondrocyte apoptosis in OA. A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar using the keywords chondrocyte death, apoptosis, osteoarthritis, autophagy and biomarker. Several molecules considered to be markers of chondrocyte apoptosis will be discussed in this brief review. Molecular markers and signalling pathways associated with chondroycte apoptosis may turn out to be therapeutic targets in OA and approaches aimed at neutralizing apoptosis-inducing molecules may at least delay the progression of cartilage degeneration in OA. PMID:26334269

  3. Rabies virus matrix protein induces apoptosis by targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Zan, Jie; Liu, Juan; Zhou, Jian-Wei; Wang, Hai-Long; Mo, Kai-Kun; Yan, Yan; Xu, Yun-Bin; Liao, Min; Su, Shuo; Hu, Rong-Liang; Zhou, Ji-Yong

    2016-09-10

    Apoptosis, as an innate antiviral defense, not only functions to limit viral replication by eliminating infected cells, but also contribute to viral dissemination, particularly at the late stages of infection. A highly neurotropic CVS strain of rabies virus induces apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. However, the detailed mechanism of CVS-mediated neuronal apoptosis is not entirely clear. Here, we show that CVS induces apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway by dissipating mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c and AIF. CVS blocks Bax activation at the early stages of infection; while M protein partially targets mitochondria and induces mitochondrial apoptosis at the late stages of infection. The α-helix structure spanning 67-79 amino acids of M protein is essential for mitochondrial targeting and induction of apoptosis. These results suggest that CVS functions on mitochondria to regulate apoptosis at different stages of infection, so as to for viral replication and dissemination. PMID:27426727

  4. Neuronal Deletion of Caspase 8 Protects against Brain Injury in Mouse Models of Controlled Cortical Impact and Kainic Acid-Induced Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Krajewska, Maryla; You, Zerong; Rong, Juan; Kress, Christina; Huang, Xianshu; Yang, Jinsheng; Kyoda, Tiffany; Leyva, Ricardo; Banares, Steven; Hu, Yue; Sze, Chia-Hung; Whalen, Michael J.; Salmena, Leonardo; Hakem, Razqallah; Head, Brian P.; Reed, John C.; Krajewski, Stan

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute brain injury is an important health problem. Given the critical position of caspase 8 at the crossroads of cell death pathways, we generated a new viable mouse line (Ncasp8−/−), in which the gene encoding caspase 8 was selectively deleted in neurons by cre-lox system. Methodology/Principal Findings Caspase 8 deletion reduced rates of neuronal cell death in primary neuronal cultures and in whole brain organotypic coronal slice cultures prepared from 4 and 8 month old mice and cultivated up to 14 days in vitro. Treatments of cultures with recombinant murine TNFα (100 ng/ml) or TRAIL (250 ng/mL) plus cyclohexamide significantly protected neurons against cell death induced by these apoptosis-inducing ligands. A protective role of caspase 8 deletion in vivo was also demonstrated using a controlled cortical impact (CCI) model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and seizure-induced brain injury caused by kainic acid (KA). Morphometric analyses were performed using digital imaging in conjunction with image analysis algorithms. By employing virtual images of hundreds of brain sections, we were able to perform quantitative morphometry of histological and immunohistochemical staining data in an unbiased manner. In the TBI model, homozygous deletion of caspase 8 resulted in reduced lesion volumes, improved post-injury motor performance, superior learning and memory retention, decreased apoptosis, diminished proteolytic processing of caspases and caspase substrates, and less neuronal degeneration, compared to wild type, homozygous cre, and caspase 8-floxed control mice. In the KA model, Ncasp8−/− mice demonstrated superior survival, reduced seizure severity, less apoptosis, and reduced caspase 3 processing. Uninjured aged knockout mice showed improved learning and memory, implicating a possible role for caspase 8 in cognitive decline with aging. Conclusions Neuron-specific deletion of caspase 8 reduces brain damage and improves post-traumatic functional

  5. Calcium-dependent nitric oxide production is involved in the cytoprotective properties of n-acetylcysteine in glycochenodeoxycholic acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Rubio, Sandra; Linares, Clara I.; Bello, Rosario I.; Gonzalez, Raul; Ferrin, Gustavo; Hidalgo, Ana B.; Munoz-Gomariz, Elisa; Rodriguez, Blanca A.; Barrera, Pilar; Ranchal, Isidora; Duran-Prado, Mario; De la Mata, Manuel; Muntane, Jordi

    2010-01-15

    The intracellular oxidative stress has been involved in bile acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes. Nitric oxide (NO) exerts cytoprotective properties in glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)-treated hepatocytes. The study evaluated the involvement of Ca{sup 2+} on the regulation of NO synthase (NOS)-3 expression during N-acetylcysteine (NAC) cytoprotection against GCDCA-induced cell death in hepatocytes. The regulation of Ca{sup 2+} pools (EGTA or BAPTA-AM) and NO (L-NAME or NO donor) production was assessed during NAC cytoprotection in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} entrance was induced by A23187 in HepG2. Cell death, Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, NOS-1, -2 and -3 expression, AP-1 activation, and NO production were evaluated. GCDCA reduced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration and NOS-3 expression, and enhanced cell death in HepG2. NO donor prevented, and L-NAME enhanced, GCDCA-induced cell death. The reduction of Ca{sup 2+} entry by EGTA, but not its release from intracellular stores by BAPTA-AM, enhanced cell death in GCDCA-treated cells. The stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} entrance by A23187 reduced cell death and enhanced NOS-3 expression in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The cytoprotective properties of NAC were related to the recovery of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration, NOS-3 expression and NO production induced by GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The increase of NO production by Ca{sup 2+}-dependent NOS-3 expression during NAC administration reduces cell death in GCDCA-treated hepatocytes.

  6. Cluster of Differentiation 38 (CD38) Mediates Bile Acid-induced Acinar Cell Injury and Pancreatitis through Cyclic ADP-ribose and Intracellular Calcium Release*

    PubMed Central

    Orabi, Abrahim I.; Muili, Kamaldeen A.; Javed, Tanveer A.; Jin, Shunqian; Jayaraman, Thottala; Lund, Frances E.; Husain, Sohail Z.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant Ca2+ signals within pancreatic acinar cells are an early and critical feature in acute pancreatitis, yet it is unclear how these signals are generated. An important mediator of the aberrant Ca2+ signals due to bile acid exposure is the intracellular Ca2+ channel ryanodine receptor. One putative activator of the ryanodine receptor is the nucleotide second messenger cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), which is generated by an ectoenzyme ADP-ribosyl cyclase, CD38. In this study, we examined the role of CD38 and cADPR in acinar cell Ca2+ signals and acinar injury due to bile acids using pharmacologic inhibitors of CD38 and cADPR as well as mice deficient in Cd38 (Cd38−/−). Cytosolic Ca2+ signals were imaged using live time-lapse confocal microscopy in freshly isolated mouse acinar cells during perifusion with the bile acid taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate (TLCS; 500 μm). To focus on intracellular Ca2+ release and to specifically exclude Ca2+ influx, cells were perifused in Ca2+-free medium. Cell injury was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase leakage and propidium iodide uptake. Pretreatment with either nicotinamide (20 mm) or the cADPR antagonist 8-Br-cADPR (30 μm) abrogated TLCS-induced Ca2+ signals and cell injury. TLCS-induced Ca2+ release and cell injury were reduced by 30 and 95%, respectively, in Cd38-deficient acinar cells compared with wild-type cells (p < 0.05). Cd38-deficient mice were protected against a model of bile acid infusion pancreatitis. In summary, these data indicate that CD38-cADPR mediates bile acid-induced pancreatitis and acinar cell injury through aberrant intracellular Ca2+ signaling. PMID:23940051

  7. Gibberellic Acid-Induced Aleurone Layers Responding to Heat Shock or Tunicamycin Provide Insight into the N-Glycoproteome, Protein Secretion, and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress1[W

    PubMed Central

    Barba-Espín, Gregorio; Dedvisitsakul, Plaipol; Hägglund, Per; Svensson, Birte; Finnie, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The growing relevance of plants for the production of recombinant proteins makes understanding the secretory machinery, including the identification of glycosylation sites in secreted proteins, an important goal of plant proteomics. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone layers maintained in vitro respond to gibberellic acid by secreting an array of proteins and provide a unique system for the analysis of plant protein secretion. Perturbation of protein secretion in gibberellic acid-induced aleurone layers by two independent mechanisms, heat shock and tunicamycin treatment, demonstrated overlapping effects on both the intracellular and secreted proteomes. Proteins in a total of 22 and 178 two-dimensional gel spots changing in intensity in extracellular and intracellular fractions, respectively, were identified by mass spectrometry. Among these are proteins with key roles in protein processing and secretion, such as calreticulin, protein disulfide isomerase, proteasome subunits, and isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase. Sixteen heat shock proteins in 29 spots showed diverse responses to the treatments, with only a minority increasing in response to heat shock. The majority, all of which were small heat shock proteins, decreased in heat-shocked aleurone layers. Additionally, glycopeptide enrichment and N-glycosylation analysis identified 73 glycosylation sites in 65 aleurone layer proteins, with 53 of the glycoproteins found in extracellular fractions and 36 found in intracellular fractions. This represents major progress in characterization of the barley N-glycoproteome, since only four of these sites were previously described. Overall, these findings considerably advance knowledge of the plant protein secretion system in general and emphasize the versatility of the aleurone layer as a model system for studying plant protein secretion. PMID:24344171

  8. Music application alleviates short-term memory impairments through increasing cell proliferation in the hippocampus of valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Choi, Hyun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder and this disorder shows impairment in reciprocal social interactions, deficits in communication, and restrictive and repetitive patterns of behaviors and interests. The effect of music on short-term memory in the view of cell proliferation in the hippocampus was evaluated using valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups. Animal model of autism was made by subcutaneous injection of 400-mg/kg valproic acid into the rat pups on the postnatal day 14. The rat pups in the music-applied groups were exposed to the 65-dB comfortable classic music for 1 hr once a day, starting postnatal day 15 and continued until postnatal day 28. In the present results, short-term memory was deteriorated by autism induction. The numbers of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyridine (BrdU)-positive, Ki-67-positive, and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by autism induction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) expressions in the hippocampus were also suppressed in the autistic rat pups. Music application alleviated short-term memory deficits with enhancing the numbers of BrdU-positive, Ki-67-positive, and DCX-positive cells in the autistic rat pups. Music application also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the autistic rat pups. The present study show that application of music enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation and alleviated short-term memory impairment through stimulating BDNF-TrkB signaling in the autistic rat pups. Music can be suggested as the therapeutic strategy to overcome the autism-induced memory deficits. PMID:27419108

  9. Constitutive androstane receptor-mediated changes in bile acid composition contributes to hepatoprotection from lithocholic acid-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Beilke, Lisa D; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Holland, Ricky D; Besselsen, David G; Beger, Rick D; Klaassen, Curtis D; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2009-05-01

    Pharmacological activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) protects the liver during cholestasis. The current study evaluates how activation of CAR influences genes involved in bile acid biosynthesis as a mechanism of hepatoprotection during bile acid-induced liver injury. CAR activators phenobarbital (PB) and 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) or corn oil (CO) were administered to C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and CAR knockout (CAR-null) mice before and during induction of intrahepatic cholestasis using the secondary bile acid, lithocholic acid (LCA). In LCA-treated WT and all the CAR-null groups (excluding controls), histology revealed severe multifocal necrosis. This pathology was absent in WT mice pretreated with PB and TCPOBOP, indicating CAR-dependent hepatoprotection. Decreases in total hepatic bile acids and hepatic monohydroxy, dihydroxy, and trihydroxy bile acids in PB- and TCPOBOP-pretreated WT mice correlated with hepatoprotection. In comparison, concentrations of monohydroxylated and dihydroxylated bile acids were increased in all the treated CAR-null mice compared with CO controls. Along with several other enzymes (Cyp7b1, Cyp27a1, Cyp39a1), Cyp8b1 expression was increased in hepatoprotected mice, which could be suggestive of a shift in the bile acid biosynthesis pathway toward the formation of less toxic bile acids. In CAR-null mice, these changes in gene expression were not different among treatment groups. These results suggest CAR mediates a shift in bile acid biosynthesis toward the formation of less toxic bile acids, as well as a decrease in hepatic bile acid concentrations. We propose that these combined CAR-mediated effects may contribute to the hepatoprotection observed during LCA-induced liver injury. PMID:19196849

  10. Music application alleviates short-term memory impairments through increasing cell proliferation in the hippocampus of valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Choi, Hyun-Hee

    2016-06-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder and this disorder shows impairment in reciprocal social interactions, deficits in communication, and restrictive and repetitive patterns of behaviors and interests. The effect of music on short-term memory in the view of cell proliferation in the hippocampus was evaluated using valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups. Animal model of autism was made by subcutaneous injection of 400-mg/kg valproic acid into the rat pups on the postnatal day 14. The rat pups in the music-applied groups were exposed to the 65-dB comfortable classic music for 1 hr once a day, starting postnatal day 15 and continued until postnatal day 28. In the present results, short-term memory was deteriorated by autism induct