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Sample records for acetyltransferase cat activity

  1. Application of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) diffusion assay to transgenic plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Peach, C; Velten, J

    1992-02-01

    Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity was quantified in crude extracts from tobacco callus tissues using a modification of a previously reported diffusion assay. We describe here the alterations necessary in applying this rapid and simple assay procedure to plant materials. Due to the high concentration of nonspecific oxidases present in most plant tissues, some type of protective agent is required to maintain enzyme activity. We have tested beta-mercaptoethanol, cysteine, dithiothreitol, ascorbic acid and polyvinyl pyrrolidone as protective agents within the initial extraction buffer. We also investigated the effect of heat (60 degrees C, 10 min) and 5 mM EDTA on CAT activity. The highest CAT activity was obtained using 5 mM cysteine plus 5 mM EDTA in 40 mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.8) as the initial extraction buffer followed by a heat treatment. Using this buffer, CAT activity was stable on ice for more than two hours. In our hands, total acetyl-coenzyme A concentration within the assay mixture was found to be saturating at 250 microM and the Km determined to be 100 microM. Assays performed using the same crude plant extract indicate that 1) duplicate assays show less than 1.5% variation in activities and 2) CAT activity increases linearly with respect to volume of extract used.

  2. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  3. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  4. Obesity and lipid stress inhibit carnitine acetyltransferase activity[S

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Sarah E.; Martin, Ola J.; Noland, Robert C.; Slentz, Dorothy H.; DeBalsi, Karen L.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; An, Jie; Newgard, Christopher B.; Koves, Timothy R.; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of acetyl-CoA and acetylcarnitine. Emerging evidence suggests that this enzyme functions as a positive regulator of total body glucose tolerance and muscle activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a mitochondrial enzyme complex that promotes glucose oxidation and is feedback inhibited by acetyl-CoA. Here, we used tandem mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling to identify a negative relationship between CrAT activity and muscle content of lipid intermediates. CrAT specific activity was diminished in muscles from obese and diabetic rodents despite increased protein abundance. This reduction in enzyme activity was accompanied by muscle accumulation of long-chain acylcarnitines (LCACs) and acyl-CoAs and a decline in the acetylcarnitine/acetyl-CoA ratio. In vitro assays demonstrated that palmitoyl-CoA acts as a direct mixed-model inhibitor of CrAT. Similarly, in primary human myocytes grown in culture, nutritional and genetic manipulations that promoted mitochondrial influx of fatty acids resulted in accumulation of LCACs but a pronounced decrease of CrAT-derived short-chain acylcarnitines. These results suggest that lipid-induced antagonism of CrAT might contribute to decreased PDH activity and glucose disposal in the context of obesity and diabetes. PMID:24395925

  5. Histone acetyltransferase activity of MOF is required for adult but not early fetal hematopoiesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Daria G; Xu, Haiming; Eisold, Meghan E; Woolthuis, Carolien M; Pandita, Tej K; Armstrong, Scott A

    2017-01-05

    K(lysine) acetyltransferase 8 (KAT8, also known as MOF) mediates the acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16ac) and is crucial for murine embryogenesis. Lysine acetyltransferases have been shown to regulate various stages of normal hematopoiesis. However, the function of MOF in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development has not yet been elucidated. We set out to study the role of MOF in general hematopoiesis by using a Vav1-cre-induced conditional murine Mof knockout system and found that MOF is critical for hematopoietic cell maintenance and HSC engraftment capacity in adult hematopoiesis. Rescue experiments with a MOF histone acetyltransferase domain mutant illustrated the requirement for MOF acetyltransferase activity in the clonogenic capacity of HSCs and progenitors. In stark contrast, fetal steady-state hematopoiesis at embryonic day (E) 14.5 was not affected by homozygous Mof deletion despite dramatic loss of global H4K16ac. Hematopoietic defects start manifesting in late gestation at E17.5. The discovery that MOF and its H4K16ac activity are required for adult but not early and midgestational hematopoiesis supports the notion that multiple chromatin regulators may be crucial for hematopoiesis at varying stages of development. MOF is therefore a developmental-stage-specific chromatin regulator found to be essential for adult but not early fetal hematopoiesis.

  6. Expression, purification and characterization of recombinant human choline acetyltransferase: phosphorylation of the enzyme regulates catalytic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Dobransky, T; Davis, W L; Xiao, G H; Rylett, R J

    2000-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase synthesizes acetylcholine in cholinergic neurons and, in humans, may be produced in 82- and 69-kDa forms. In this study, recombinant choline acetyltransferase from baculovirus and bacterial expression systems was used to identify protein isoforms by two-dimensional SDS/PAGE and as substrate for protein kinases. Whereas hexa-histidine-tagged 82- and 69-kDa enzymes did not resolve as individual isoforms on two-dimensional gels, separation of wild-type choline acetyltransferase expressed in insect cells revealed at least nine isoforms for the 69-kDa enzyme and at least six isoforms for the 82-kDa enzyme. Non-phosphorylated wild-type choline acetyltransferase expressed in Escherichia coli yielded six (69 kDa) and four isoforms (82 kDa) respectively. Immunofluorescent labelling of insect cells expressing enzyme showed differential subcellular localization with the 69-kDa enzyme localized adjacent to plasma membrane and the 82-kDa enzyme being cytoplasmic at 24 h. By 64 h, the 69-kDa form was in cytoplasm and the 82-kDa form was only present in nucleus. Studies in vitro showed that recombinant 69-kDa enzyme was a substrate for protein kinase C (PKC), casein kinase II (CK2) and alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (alpha-CaM kinase), but not for cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA); phosphorylation by PKC and CK2 enhanced enzyme activity. The 82-kDa enzyme was a substrate for PKC and CK2 but not for PKA or alpha-CaM kinase, with only PKC yielding increased enzyme activity. Dephosphorylation of both forms of enzyme by alkaline phosphatase decreased enzymic activity. These studies are of functional significance as they report for the first time that phosphorylation enhances choline acetyltransferase catalytic activity. PMID:10861222

  7. Age-associated mitochondrial oxidative decay: Improvement of carnitine acetyltransferase substrate-binding affinity and activity in brain by feeding old rats acetyl-l- carnitine and/or R-α-lipoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiankang; Killilea, David W.; Ames, Bruce N.

    2002-01-01

    We test whether the dysfunction with age of carnitine acetyltransferase (CAT), a key mitochondrial enzyme for fuel utilization, is due to decreased binding affinity for substrate and whether this substrate, fed to old rats, restores CAT activity. The kinetics of CAT were analyzed by using the brains of young and old rats and of old rats supplemented for 7 weeks with the CAT substrate acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR) and/or the mitochondrial antioxidant precursor R-α-lipoic acid (LA). Old rats, compared with young rats, showed a decrease in CAT activity and in CAT-binding affinity for both substrates, ALCAR and CoA. Feeding ALCAR or ALCAR plus LA to old rats significantly restored CAT-binding affinity for ALCAR and CoA, and CAT activity. To explore the underlying mechanism, lipid peroxidation and total iron and copper levels were assayed; all increased in old rats. Feeding old rats LA or LA plus ALCAR inhibited lipid peroxidation but did not decrease iron and copper levels. Ex vivo oxidation of young-rat brain with Fe(II) caused loss of CAT activity and binding affinity. In vitro oxidation of purified CAT with Fe(II) inactivated the enzyme but did not alter binding affinity. However, in vitro treatment of CAT with the lipid peroxidation products malondialdehyde or 4-hydroxy-nonenal caused a decrease in CAT-binding affinity and activity, thus mimicking age-related change. Preincubation of CAT with ALCAR or CoA prevented malondialdehyde-induced dysfunction. Thus, feeding old rats high levels of key mitochondrial metabolites can ameliorate oxidative damage, enzyme activity, substrate-binding affinity, and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:11854488

  8. Activation Domain-Specific and General Transcription Stimulation by Native Histone Acetyltransferase Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Keiko; Steger, David J.; Eberharter, Anton; Workman, Jerry L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent progress in identifying the catalytic subunits of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes has implicated histone acetylation in the regulation of transcription. Here, we have analyzed the function of two native yeast HAT complexes, SAGA (Spt-Ada-Gcn5 Acetyltransferase) and NuA4 (nucleosome acetyltransferase of H4), in activating transcription from preassembled nucleosomal array templates in vitro. Each complex was tested for the ability to enhance transcription driven by GAL4 derivatives containing either acidic, glutamine-rich, or proline-rich activation domains. On nucleosomal array templates, the SAGA complex selectively stimulates transcription driven by the VP16 acidic activation domain in an acetyl coenzyme A-dependent manner. In contrast, the NuA4 complex facilitates transcription mediated by any of the activation domains tested if allowed to preacetylate the nucleosomal template, indicating a general stimulatory effect of histone H4 acetylation. However, when the extent of acetylation by NuA4 is limited, the complex also preferentially stimulates VP16-driven transcription. SAGA and NuA4 interact directly with the VP16 activation domain but not with a glutamine-rich or proline-rich activation domain. These data suggest that recruitment of the SAGA and NuA4 HAT complexes by the VP16 activation domain contributes to HAT-dependent activation. In addition, extensive H4/H2B acetylation by NuA4 leads to a general activation of transcription, which is independent of activator-NuA4 interactions. PMID:9858608

  9. Effect of increased yeast alcohol acetyltransferase activity on flavor profiles of wine and distillates.

    PubMed

    Lilly, M; Lambrechts, M G; Pretorius, I S

    2000-02-01

    The distinctive flavor of wine, brandy, and other grape-derived alcoholic beverages is affected by many compounds, including esters produced during alcoholic fermentation. The characteristic fruity odors of the fermentation bouquet are primarily due to a mixture of hexyl acetate, ethyl caproate (apple-like aroma), iso-amyl acetate (banana-like aroma), ethyl caprylate (apple-like aroma), and 2-phenylethyl acetate (fruity, flowery flavor with a honey note). The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of improving the aroma of wine and distillates by overexpressing one of the endogenous yeast genes that controls acetate ester production during fermentation. The synthesis of acetate esters by the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation is ascribed to at least three acetyltransferase activities, namely, alcohol acetyltransferase (AAT), ethanol acetyltransferase, and iso-amyl AAT. To investigate the effect of increased AAT activity on the sensory quality of Chenin blanc wines and distillates from Colombar base wines, we have overexpressed the alcohol acetyltransferase gene (ATF1) of S. cerevisiae. The ATF1 gene, located on chromosome XV, was cloned from a widely used commercial wine yeast strain of S. cerevisiae, VIN13, and placed under the control of the constitutive yeast phosphoglycerate kinase gene (PGK1) promoter and terminator. Chromoblot analysis confirmed the integration of the modified copy of ATF1 into the genome of three commercial wine yeast strains (VIN7, VIN13, and WE228). Northern blot analysis indicated constitutive expression of ATF1 at high levels in these yeast transformants. The levels of ethyl acetate, iso-amyl acetate, and 2-phenylethyl acetate increased 3- to 10-fold, 3.8- to 12-fold, and 2- to 10-fold, respectively, depending on the fermentation temperature, cultivar, and yeast strain used. The concentrations of ethyl caprate, ethyl caprylate, and hexyl acetate only showed minor changes, whereas the acetic acid

  10. Histone Acetyltransferase Complexes Can Mediate Transcriptional Activation by the Major Glucocorticoid Receptor Activation Domain

    PubMed Central

    Wallberg, Annika E.; Neely, Kristen E.; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Workman, Jerry L.; Wright, Anthony P. H.; Grant, Patrick A.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the Ada adapter proteins are important for glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated gene activation in yeast. The N-terminal transactivation domain of GR, τ1, is dependent upon Ada2, Ada3, and Gcn5 for transactivation in vitro and in vivo. Using in vitro techniques, we demonstrate that the GR-τ1 interacts directly with the native Ada containing histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex SAGA but not the related Ada complex. Mutations in τ1 that reduce τ1 transactivation activity in vivo lead to a reduced binding of τ1 to the SAGA complex and conversely, mutations increasing the transactivation activity of τ1 lead to an increased binding of τ1 to SAGA. In addition, the Ada-independent NuA4 HAT complex also interacts with τ1. GAL4-τ1-driven transcription from chromatin templates is stimulated by SAGA and NuA4 in an acetyl coenzyme A-dependent manner. Low-activity τ1 mutants reduce SAGA- and NuA4-stimulated transcription while high-activity τ1 mutants increase transcriptional activation, specifically from chromatin templates. Our results demonstrate that the targeting of native HAT complexes by the GR-τ1 activation domain mediates transcriptional stimulation from chromatin templates. PMID:10454542

  11. Choline Acetyltransferase Activity in Striatum of Neonatal Rats Increased by Nerve Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, William C.; Rutkowski, J. Lynn; Tennekoon, Gihan I.; Buchanan, Karen; Johnston, Michael V.

    1985-07-01

    Some neurodegenerative disorders may be caused by abnormal synthesis or utilization of trophic molecules required to support neuronal survival. A test of this hypothesis requires that trophic agents specific for the affected neurons be identified. Cholinergic neurons in the corpus striatum of neonatal rats were found to respond to intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor with prominent, dose-dependent, selective increases in choline acetyltransferase activity. Cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain also respond to nerve growth factor in this way. These actions of nerve growth factor may indicate its involvement in the normal function of forebrain cholinergic neurons as well as in neurodegenerative disorders involving such cells.

  12. Circadian clock controlling arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase-like activity in the cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus) egg.

    PubMed

    Itoh, M T; Sumi, Y

    1998-07-13

    When cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus) eggs were incubated under a 12-h light/12-h dark (LD) cycle for 6 days after oviposition at 24-26 degrees C and thereafter transferred to constant darkness (DD), arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT)-like activity fluctuated in a circadian manner, peaking during the subjective dark period, and the rhythmic activity persisted during the 3rd day of incubation in DD. When the eggs were transferred from LD to a lighting regime in which the light and dark periods were reversed, the rhythm of NAT-like activity continued to oscillate in phase with the light/dark cycle. These data demonstrate that the cricket egg (probably the embryo) contains a circadian clock controlling NAT-like activity, and that the circadian clock entrains to environmental light/dark cycles.

  13. Effects of acute ethanol administration on nocturnal pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Creighton, J.A.; Rudeen, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acute ethanol administration on pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity, norepinephrine and indoleamine content was examined in male rats. When ethanol was administered in two equal doses (2 g/kg body weight) over a 4 hour period during the light phase, the nocturnal rise in NAT activity was delayed by seven hours. The nocturnal pineal norepinephrine content was not altered by ethanol except for a delay in the reduction of NE with the onset of the following light phase. Although ethanol treatment led to a significant reduction in nocturnal levels of pineal serotonin content, there was no significant effect upon pineal content of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). The data indicate that ethanol delays the onset of the rise of nocturnal pineal NAT activity.

  14. Recombinant genomes which express chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, C.M.; Moffat, L.F.; Howard, B.H.

    1982-09-01

    The authors constructed a series of recombinant genomes which directed expression of the enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in mammalian cells. The prototype recombinant in this series, pSV2-cat, consisted of the beta-lactamase gene and origin of replication from pBR322 coupled to a simian virus 40 (SV40) early transcription region into which CAT coding sequences were inserted. Readily measured levels of CAT accumulated within 48 h after the introduction of pSV2-cat DNA into African green monkey kidney CV-1 cells. Because endogenous CAT activity is not present in CV-1 or other mammalian cells, and because rapid, sensitive assays for CAT activity are available, these recombinants provided a uniquely convenient system for monitoring the expression of foreign DNAs in tissue culture cells. To demonstrate the usefulness of this system, we constructed derivatives of pSV2-cat from which part or all of the SV 40 promoter region was removed. Deletion of one copy of the 72-base-pair repeat sequence in the SV40 promoter caused no significant decrease in CAT synthesis in monkey kidney CV-1 cells; however, an additional deletion of 50 base pairs from the second copy of the repeats reduced CAT synthesis to 11% of its level in the wild type. They also constructed a recombinant, pSVO-cat, in which the entire SV40 promoter region was removed and a unique HindIII site was substituted for the insertion of other promoter sequences.

  15. The histone acetyltransferase MOF activates hypothalamic polysialylation to prevent diet-induced obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brenachot, Xavier; Rigault, Caroline; Nédélec, Emmanuelle; Laderrière, Amélie; Khanam, Tasneem; Gouazé, Alexandra; Chaudy, Sylvie; Lemoine, Aleth; Datiche, Frédérique; Gascuel, Jean; Pénicaud, Luc; Benani, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Overfeeding causes rapid synaptic remodeling in hypothalamus feeding circuits. Polysialylation of cell surface molecules is a key step in this neuronal rewiring and allows normalization of food intake. Here we examined the role of hypothalamic polysialylation in the long-term maintenance of body weight, and deciphered the molecular sequence underlying its nutritional regulation. We found that upon high fat diet (HFD), reduced hypothalamic polysialylation exacerbated the diet-induced obese phenotype in mice. Upon HFD, the histone acetyltransferase MOF was rapidly recruited on the St8sia4 polysialyltransferase-encoding gene. Mof silencing in the mediobasal hypothalamus of adult mice prevented activation of the St8sia4 gene transcription, reduced polysialylation, altered the acute homeostatic feeding response to HFD and increased the body weight gain. These findings indicate that impaired hypothalamic polysialylation contribute to the development of obesity, and establish a role for MOF in the brain control of energy balance. PMID:25161885

  16. The place of choline acetyltransferase activity measurement in the "cholinergic hypothesis" of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Contestabile, Antonio; Ciani, Elisabetta; Contestabile, Andrea

    2008-02-01

    The so-called "cholinergic hypothesis" assumes that degenerative dysfunction of the cholinergic system originating in the basal forebrain and innervating several cortical regions and the hippocampus, is related to memory impairment and neurodegeneration found in several forms of dementia and in brain aging. Biochemical methods measuring the activity of the key enzyme for acetylcholine synthesis, choline acetyltransferase, have been used for many years as a reliable marker of the integrity or the damage of the cholinergic pathways. Stereologic counting of the basal forebrain cholinergic cell bodies, has been additionally used to assess neurodegenerative changes of the forebrain cholinergic system. While initially believed to mark relatively early stages of disease, cholinergic dysfunction is at present considered to occur in advanced dementia of Alzheimer's type, while its involvement in mild and prodromal stages of the disease has been questioned. The issue is relevant to better understand the neuropathological basis of the diseases, but it is also of primary importance for therapy. During the last few years, indeed, cholinergic replacement therapies, mainly based on the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors to increase synaptic availability of acetylcholine, have been exploited on the assumption that they could ameliorate the progression of the dementia from its initial stages. In the present paper, we review data from human studies, as well as from animal models of Alzheimer's and Down's diseases, focusing on different ways to evaluate cholinergic dysfunction, also in relation to the time point at which these dysfunctions can be demonstrated, and on some discrepancy arising from the use of different methodological approaches. The reviewed literature, as well as some recent data from our laboratories on a mouse model of Down's syndrome, stress the importance of performing biochemical evaluation of choline acetyltransferase activity to assess cholinergic

  17. Polyamine regulation of heat-shock-induced spermidine N1-acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, D J; Carper, S W; Clay, L; Chen, J R; Gerner, E W

    1990-01-01

    The enzyme spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (N1-SAT) is rapidly induced by heat shock in CHO and A549 cells, with activity declining by 24 h. Depletion of intracellular polyamines by alpha-difluoromethylornithine, an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, blocks this induction. Re-addition of putrescine to these cultures restores the response to heat shock, with a concomitant increase in intracellular N1-acetylspermidine. Diaminopropane is more than twice as effective as the naturally occurring diamine putrescine, suggesting that the propylamine moiety of spermidine is involved in the regulation of N1-SAT induction. Inhibitor studies indicate transcriptional activation and that the enzyme has an apparent half-life of 30-60 min. A second heat shock rapidly inhibits induced N1-SAT activity, which decays with a half-life of 2-3 min. Despite its induction by heat, N1-SAT is not a stable enzyme, suggesting that the activity observed is not due to a modification of an existing peptide, but is due to a transcriptional event, which may justify the inclusion of this enzyme in the family of heat-shock proteins. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2111132

  18. DNA damage induces N-acetyltransferase NAT10 gene expression through transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haijing; Ling, Yun; Gong, Yilei; Sun, Ying; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Bo

    2007-06-01

    NAT10 (N-acetyltransferase 10) is a protein with histone acetylation activity and primarily identified to be involved in regulation of telomerase activity. The presented research shows its transcriptional activation by genotoxic agents and possible role in DNA damage. NAT10 mRNA could be markedly increased by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or cisplatin in a dose- and time-dependent way, and the immunofluorescent staining revealed that the treatment of H2O2 or cisplatin induced focal accumulation of NAT10 protein in cellular nuclei. Both H2O2 and cisplatin could stimulate the transcriptional activity of the NAT10 promoter through the upstream sequences from -615 bp to +110 bp, with which some nuclear proteins interacted. Ectopic expression of NAT10 could enhance the number of survival cells in the presence of H2O2 or cisplatin. The above results suggested that NAT10 could be involved in DNA damage response and increased cellular resistance to genotoxicity.

  19. Effects of humic acid-metal complexes on hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase, carnitine acetyltransferase and catalase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fungjou Lu; Youngshin Chen . Dept. of Biochemistry); Tienshang Huang . Dept. of Medicine)

    1994-03-01

    A significant increase in activities of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase and carnitine acetyltransferase was observed in male Balb/c mice intraperitoneally injected for 40 d with 0.125 mg/0.1 ml/d humic acid-metal complexes. Among these complexes, the humic acid-As complex was relatively effective, whereas humic acid-25 metal complex was more effective, and humic acid-26 metal complex was most effective. However, humic acid or metal mixtures, or metal such as As alone, was not effective. Humic acid-metal complexes also significantly decreased hepatic catalase activity. A marked decrease of 60-kDa polypeptide in liver cytoplasm was also observed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after the mice had been injected with the complexes. Morphological analysis of a histopathological biopsy of such treated mice revealed several changes in hepatocytes, including focal necrosis and cell infiltration, mild fatty changes, reactive nuclei, and hypertrophy. Humic acid-metal complexes affect activities of metabolic enzymes of fatty acids, and this results in accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and increase of the lipid peroxidation. The products of lipid peroxidation may be responsible for liver damage and possible carcinogenesis. Previous studies in this laboratory had shown that humic acid-metal complex altered the coagulation system and that humic acid, per se, caused vasculopathy. Therefore, humic acid-metal complexes may be main causal factors of not only so-called blackfoot disease, but also the liver cancer prevailing on the southwestern coast of Taiwan.

  20. Cats

    MedlinePlus

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  1. Garcinol Inhibits GCN5-Mediated Lysine Acetyltransferase Activity and Prevents Replication of the Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Jeffers, Victoria; Gao, Hongyu; Checkley, Lisa A.; Liu, Yunlong; Ferdig, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a critical posttranslational modification that influences protein activity, stability, and binding properties. The acetylation of histone proteins in particular is a well-characterized feature of gene expression regulation. In the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, a number of lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) contribute to gene expression and are essential for parasite viability. The natural product garcinol was recently reported to inhibit enzymatic activities of GCN5 and p300 family KATs in other species. Here we show that garcinol inhibits TgGCN5b, the only nuclear GCN5 family KAT known to be required for Toxoplasma tachyzoite replication. Treatment of tachyzoites with garcinol led to a reduction of global lysine acetylation, particularly on histone H3 and TgGCN5b itself. We also performed transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), which revealed increasing aberrant gene expression coincident with increasing concentrations of garcinol. The majority of the genes that were most significantly affected by garcinol were also associated with TgGCN5b in a previously reported chromatin immunoprecipitation assay with microarray technology (ChIP-chip) analysis. The dysregulated gene expression induced by garcinol significantly inhibits Toxoplasma tachyzoite replication, and the concentrations used exhibit no overt toxicity on human host cells. Garcinol also inhibits Plasmodium falciparum asexual replication with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) similar to that for Toxoplasma. Together, these data support that pharmacological inhibition of TgGCN5b leads to a catastrophic failure in gene expression control that prevents parasite replication. PMID:26810649

  2. Arylamine N-acetyltransferase activity in bronchial epithelial cells and its inhibition by cellular oxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Dairou, Julien; Petit, Emile; Ragunathan, Nilusha; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Marano, Francelyne; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2009-05-01

    Bronchial epithelial cells express xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) that are involved in the biotransformation of inhaled toxic compounds. The activities of these XMEs in the lung may modulate respiratory toxicity and have been linked to several diseases of the airways. Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NAT) are conjugating XMEs that play a key role in the biotransformation of aromatic amine pollutants such as the tobacco-smoke carcinogens 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) and {beta}-naphthylamine ({beta}-NA). We show here that functional human NAT1 or its murine counterpart Nat2 are present in different lung epithelial cells i.e. Clara cells, type II alveolar cells and bronchial epithelial cells, thus indicating that inhaled aromatic amines may undergo NAT-dependent biotransformation in lung epithelium. Exposure of these cells to pathophysiologically relevant amounts of oxidants known to contribute to lung dysfunction, such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or peroxynitrite, was found to impair the NAT1/Nat2-dependent cellular biotransformation of aromatic amines. Genetic and non genetic impairment of intracellular NAT enzyme activities has been suggested to compromise the important detoxification pathway of aromatic amine N-acetylation and subsequently to contribute to an exacerbation of untoward effects of these pollutants on health. Our study suggests that oxidative/nitroxidative stress in lung epithelial cells, due to air pollution and/or inflammation, could contribute to local and/or systemic dysfunctions through the alteration of the functions of pulmonary NAT enzymes.

  3. Rapid intranasal delivery of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in the active form to different brain regions as a model for enzyme therapy in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Appu, Abhilash P; Arun, Peethambaran; Krishnan, Jishnu K. S.; Moffett, John R.; Namboodiri, Aryan M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The blood brain barrier (BBB) is critical for maintaining central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis by restricting entry of potentially toxic substances. However, the BBB is a major obstacle in the treatment of neurotoxicity and neurological disorders due to the restrictive nature of the barrier to many medications. Intranasal delivery of active enzymes to the brain has therapeutic potential for the treatment of numerous CNS enzyme deficiency disorders and CNS toxicity caused by chemical threat agents. New method The aim of this work is to provide a sensitive model system for analyzing the rapid delivery of active enzymes into various regions of the brain with therapeutic bioavailability. Results We tested intranasal delivery of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), a relatively large (75 kD) enzyme, in its active form into different regions of the brain. CAT was delivered intranasally to anaesthetized rats and enzyme activity was measured in different regions using a highly specific High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HP-TLC)-radiometry coupled assay. Active enzyme reached all examined areas of the brain within 15 min (the earliest time point tested). In addition, the yield of enzyme activity in the brain was almost doubled in the brains of rats pre-treated with matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Comparison with existing method (s) Intranasal administration of active enzymes in conjunction with MMP-9 to the CNS is both rapid and effective. Conclusion The present results suggest that intranasal enzyme therapy is a promising method for counteracting CNS chemical threat poisoning, as well as for treating CNS enzyme deficiency disorders. PMID:26688469

  4. Influence of photoperiod on N-acetyltransferase activity and melatonin in the fiddler crab Uca pugilator.

    PubMed

    Tilden, A R; Alt, J; Brummer, K; Groth, R; Herwig, K; Wilson, A; Wilson, S

    2001-06-01

    Melatonin and N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were measured in the eyestalks of fiddler crabs acclimated to various photoperiods: constant light, a L:D 12:12 h photoperiod, or constant dark. Following acclimation, eyestalks were collected every 3 h over a 24-h period; they were assayed for melatonin with a radioimmunoassay and for NAT activity with a radioenzymatic assay. In constant light, melatonin levels increased at 1300 h, from 142 to 431 pg x mg(-1) eyestalk; NAT activity increased concurrently, from 97 to 203 pmol x h(-1) x mg(-1) eyestalk, and both remained elevated until 0400 h. In the L:D 12:12 h photoperiod, melatonin levels increased at 1300 h from 28 to 230 pg x mg(-1) eyestalk, and though NAT activity increased significantly, from 80 to 122 pmol x h(-1) x mg(-1) eyestalk, an even greater increase occurred at 0400 h, when melatonin levels were low. In constant dark, melatonin levels increased at 1600 h, from 22 to 196 pg x mg(-1) eyestalk, with a concurrent increase in NAT activity from 93 to 140 pmol x mg(-1) x h(-1) eyestalk. However, the second peak in melatonin (111 pg x mg(-1)), occurring at 0400 h, was out of phase with the second peak of NAT activity (113 pmol x mg(-1) x h(-1) eyestalk) which occurred at 0700 h. NAT may be a rate-limiting step in melatonin synthesis in fiddler crabs under some conditions (constant light and the 1300 h peak in constant dark); however, NAT activity correlates poorly with melatonin levels in a L:D 12:12 h photoperiod and in constant dark relative to the 0400 h melatonin peak.

  5. Melatonin and serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity in developing eggs of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Itoh, M T; Sumi, Y

    1998-01-19

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) and serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT), a key regulatory enzyme in melatonin synthesis, are present in the adults and larvae of several insect species, as well as in vertebrates. To determine when melatonin and NAT first appear in insects ontogenetically, melatonin levels and NAT-like activity were measured in developing eggs of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. When the eggs were incubated under a 12-h light/12-h dark (LD) cycle at 24-26 degrees C, melatonin was detected in the egg extracts at all of the developmental stages examined. NAT-like activity was first found in the eggs 3 days after oviposition. From 5 to 11 days after oviposition, both NAT-like activity and melatonin levels showed significant day/night changes with the high levels occurring during the dark period of the LD cycle. By contrast, significant day/night changes were not detected in eggs just before hatching. To determine more detailed temporal changes, NAT-like activity was assayed in eggs 6 to 7 days after oviposition at 2- or 4-h intervals over a 48-h period. The activity in the eggs clearly exhibited a diurnal rhythm, peaking in the dark period of the LD cycle, and the rhythm persisted in constant darkness. These results suggest that the cricket egg (probably the embryo) synthesizes melatonin, and that its melatonin synthesis may fluctuate with a circadian rhythm. In addition, the results of the present study strongly suggest that a circadian clock controlling NAT activity functions in the cricket at the embryonic stage.

  6. The Lysine Acetyltransferase Activator Brpf1 Governs Dentate Gyrus Development through Neural Stem Cells and Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    You, Linya; Yan, Kezhi; Zhou, Jinfeng; Zhao, Hong; Bertos, Nicholas R.; Park, Morag; Wang, Edwin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine acetylation has recently emerged as an important post-translational modification in diverse organisms, but relatively little is known about its roles in mammalian development and stem cells. Bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1) is a multidomain histone binder and a master activator of three lysine acetyltransferases, MOZ, MORF and HBO1, which are also known as KAT6A, KAT6B and KAT7, respectively. While the MOZ and MORF genes are rearranged in leukemia, the MORF gene is also mutated in prostate and other cancers and in four genetic disorders with intellectual disability. Here we show that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene causes hypoplasia in the dentate gyrus, including underdevelopment of the suprapyramidal blade and complete loss of the infrapyramidal blade. We trace the developmental origin to compromised Sox2+ neural stem cells and Tbr2+ intermediate neuronal progenitors. We further demonstrate that Brpf1 loss deregulates neuronal migration, cell cycle progression and transcriptional control, thereby causing abnormal morphogenesis of the hippocampus. These results link histone binding and acetylation control to hippocampus development and identify an important epigenetic regulator for patterning the dentate gyrus, a brain structure critical for learning, memory and adult neurogenesis. PMID:25757017

  7. Structure of the E. Coli Bifunctional GlmU Acetyltransferase Active Site with Substrates and Products

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen,L.; Vetting, M.; Roderick, S.

    2007-01-01

    The biosynthesis of UDP-GlcNAc in bacteria is carried out by GlmU, an essential bifunctional uridyltransferase that catalyzes the CoA-dependent acetylation of GlcN-1-PO{sub 4} to form GlcNAc-1-PO{sub 4} and its subsequent condensation with UTP to form pyrophosphate and UDP-GlcNAc. As a metabolite, UDP-GlcNAc is situated at a branch point leading to the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan. Consequently, GlmU is regarded as an important target for potential antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of the Escherichia coli GlmU acetyltransferase active site has been determined in complexes with acetyl-CoA, CoA/GlcN-1-PO{sub 4}, and desulpho-CoA/GlcNAc-1-PO{sub 4}. These structures reveal the enzyme groups responsible for binding the substrates. A superposition of these complex structures suggests that the 2-amino group of GlcN-1-PO{sub 4} is positioned in proximity to the acetyl-CoA to facilitate direct attack on its thioester by a ternary complex mechanism.

  8. Benzodiazepines: rat pinealocyte binding sites and augmentation of norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew, E.; Parfitt, A.G.; Sugden, D.; Engelhardt, D.L.; Zimmerman, E.A.; Klein, D.C.

    1984-02-01

    Studies of (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding to intact rat pineal cells were carried out in tissue culture preparations. The binding was saturable, reversible and proportional to the number of cells used. Scatchard analysis resulted in a linear plot (Kd . 23 nM, maximum binding sites (Bmax) . 1.56 pmol/mg of protein for cells in monolayer culture; Kd . 7 nM, Bmax . 1.3 pmol/mg of protein for cells in suspension culture). Inhibition constants (Ki) for clonazepam (500 nM), flunitrazepam (38 nM) and Ro-5-4864 (5 nM) indicated that the binding sites were probably of the ''peripheral'' type. In addition, the effects of diazepam on norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were studied in organ culture and dissociated cell culture. Diazepam (10-50 microM) both prolonged and increased the magnitude of the norepinephrine-induced increase in NAT activity but did not affect the initial rate of rise of enzyme activity. The effect was dose-dependent and was also seen with clonazepam, flunitrazepam and Ro-5-4864, but not with Ro-15-1788. Diazepam, by itself, at these concentrations, had no effect on NAT, but enzyme activity was increased by higher concentrations (0.1-1 mM). Although a relationship between the (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding sites described here and the effect of benzodiazepines on NAT cannot be established from these studies, the data suggest that the benzodiazepines may alter melatonin levels through their action on NAT.

  9. Histone Acetyltransferase Activity of MOF Is Required for MLL-AF9 Leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Daria G; Xu, Haiming; Chen, Chun-Wei; Hoshii, Takayuki; Eisold, Meghan E; Delaney, Christopher; Cusan, Monica; Deshpande, Aniruddha J; Huang, Chun-Hao; Lujambio, Amaia; Zheng, YuJun George; Zuber, Johannes; Pandita, Tej K; Lowe, Scott W; Armstrong, Scott A

    2017-02-15

    Chromatin-based mechanisms offer therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that are of great current interest. In this study, we conducted an RNAi-based screen to identify druggable chromatin regulator-based targets in leukemias marked by oncogenic rearrangements of the MLL gene. In this manner, we discovered the H4K16 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) MOF to be important for leukemia cell growth. Conditional deletion of Mof in a mouse model of MLL-AF9-driven leukemogenesis reduced tumor burden and prolonged host survival. RNA sequencing showed an expected downregulation of genes within DNA damage repair pathways that are controlled by MOF, as correlated with a significant increase in yH2AX nuclear foci in Mof-deficient MLL-AF9 tumor cells. In parallel, Mof loss also impaired global H4K16 acetylation in the tumor cell genome. Rescue experiments with catalytically inactive mutants of MOF showed that its enzymatic activity was required to maintain cancer pathogenicity. In support of the role of MOF in sustaining H4K16 acetylation, a small-molecule inhibitor of the HAT component MYST blocked the growth of both murine and human MLL-AF9 leukemia cell lines. Furthermore, Mof inactivation suppressed leukemia development in an NUP98-HOXA9-driven AML model. Taken together, our results establish that the HAT activity of MOF is required to sustain MLL-AF9 leukemia and may be important for multiple AML subtypes. Blocking this activity is sufficient to stimulate DNA damage, offering a rationale to pursue MOF inhibitors as a targeted approach to treat MLL-rearranged leukemias. Cancer Res; 77(7); 1-10. ©2017 AACR.

  10. Isothiazolones as inhibitors of PCAF and p300 histone acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Stimson, Lindsay; Rowlands, Martin G; Newbatt, Yvette M; Smith, Nicola F; Raynaud, Florence I; Rogers, Paul; Bavetsias, Vassilios; Gorsuch, Stephen; Jarman, Michael; Bannister, Andrew; Kouzarides, Tony; McDonald, Edward; Workman, Paul; Aherne, G Wynne

    2005-10-01

    Histone acetylation plays an important role in regulating the chromatin structure and is tightly regulated by two classes of enzyme, histone acetyltransferases (HAT) and histone deacetylases (HDAC). Deregulated HAT and HDAC activity plays a role in the development of a range of cancers. Consequently, inhibitors of these enzymes have potential as anticancer agents. Several HDAC inhibitors have been described; however, few inhibitors of HATs have been disclosed. Following a FlashPlate high-throughput screen, we identified a series of isothiazolone-based HAT inhibitors. Thirty-five N-substituted analogues inhibited both p300/cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein-binding protein-associated factor (PCAF) and p300 (1 to >50 micromol/L, respectively) and the growth of a panel of human tumor cell lines (50% growth inhibition, 0.8 to >50 micromol/L). CCT077791 and CCT077792 decreased cellular acetylation in a time-dependent manner (2-48 hours of exposure) and a concentration-dependent manner (one to five times, 72 hours, 50% growth inhibition) in HCT116 and HT29 human colon tumor cell lines. CCT077791 reduced total acetylation of histones H3 and H4, levels of specific acetylated lysine marks, and acetylation of alpha-tubulin. Four and 24 hours of exposure to the compounds produced the same extent of growth inhibition as 72 hours of continuous exposure, suggesting that growth arrest was an early event. Chemical reactivity of these compounds, as measured by covalent protein binding and loss of HAT inhibition in the presence of DTT, indicated that reaction with thiol groups might be important in their mechanism of action. As one of the first series of small-molecule inhibitors of HAT activity, further analogue synthesis is being pursued to examine the potential scope for reducing chemical reactivity while maintaining HAT inhibition.

  11. NolL of Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234 Is Required for O-Acetyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Berck, S.; Perret, X.; Quesada-Vincens, D.; Promé, J.-C.; Broughton, W. J.; Jabbouri, S.

    1999-01-01

    Following (iso)flavonoid induction, nodulation genes of the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 elaborate a large family of lipooligosaccharidic Nod factors (NodNGR factors). When secreted into the rhizosphere of compatible legumes, these signal molecules initiate root hair deformation and nodule development. The nonreducing glucosamine residue of NodNGR factors are N acylated, N methylated, and mono- or biscarbamoylated, while position C-6 of the reducing extremity is fucosylated. This fucose residue is normally 2-O methylated and either sulfated or acetylated. Here we present an analysis of all acetylated NodNGR factors, which clearly shows that the acetate group may occupy position C-3 or C-4 of the fucose moiety. Disruption of the flavonoid-inducible nolL gene, which is preceded by a nod box, results in the synthesis of NodNGR factors that lack the 3-O- or 4-O-acetate groups. Interestingly, the nodulation capacity of the mutant NGRΩnolL is not impaired, whereas introduction of the nod box::nolL construct into the related strain Rhizobium fredii USDA257 extends the host range of this bacterium to Calopogonium caeruleum, Leucaena leucocephala, and Lotus halophilus. Nod factors produced by a USDA257(pnolL) transconjugant were also acetylated. The nod box::nolL construct was also introduced into ANU265 (NGR234 cured of its symbiotic plasmid), along with extra copies of the nodD1 gene. When permeabilized, these cells possessed acetyltransferase activity, although crude extracts did not. PMID:9922261

  12. Plasma matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity in cats with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tamamoto, T; Ohno, K; Takahashi, M; Fukushima, K; Kanemoto, H; Fujino, Y; Tsujimoto, H

    2017-03-01

    In this study, plasma MMP-9 activity was evaluated in cats with lymphoma. Plasma samples were obtained from 26 cats with lymphoma before treatment. From 13 of the included 26 cats, plasma samples were obtained 4 weeks after the initiation of treatment. Plasma samples were also obtained from 10 healthy cats as a control. Plasma MMP-9 activity was examined by gelatin zymography and semi-quantitative value (arbitrary unit; a.u.) for each sample was calculated. Relatively high levels of MMP-9 were observed in cats with lymphoma compared with those in healthy control cats. MMP-9 quantification through zymography showed significantly higher activity in cats with lymphoma (median, 0.63 a.u.; range, 0.23-3.24 a.u.) than in healthy controls (0.22 a.u.; 0.12-0.46 a.u.; P < 0.01). MMP-9 activities were significantly different before (0.73 a.u.; 0.30-3.24 a.u.) and after treatment (0.50 a.u.; 0.14-1.32 a.u.; P = 0.017). Measuring plasma MMP-9 activity in cats with lymphoma may become an appropriate monitoring tool for feline lymphoma.

  13. Arginine vasotocin activates phosphoinositide signal transduction system and potentiates N-acetyltransferase activity in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Novotná, R; Jác, M; Hájek, I; Novotný, I

    1999-03-05

    The pineal gland is innervated by pinealopetal peptidergic fibers originating in the hypothalamic nuclei which release arginine vasopressin (AVP) and arginine vasotocin (AVT) from their endings. Since the mechanism of AVT action on the pineal signal transduction and melatonin synthesis has not been determined so far, we examined the effect of AVT on the phosphoinositide signalling system and the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity in the rat pineal gland. The effect of AVP 4-9 fragment and AVP analogue desmopressin was also tested. The phosphoinositide signalling system was studied by measuring 32P labelling of phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) which reflects PI cycle activation. AVT (10(-5) and 10(-4) M) induced a significant increase in 32P labelling of PI, PIP and PIP2. The AVT mediated activation of the PI signal cascade was supressed by the vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist. The desmopressin and AVP 4-9 fragment were without the effect on PI signalling. To assess the AVT role in the melatonin synthesis we studied the daily pattern of the pineal NAT activity in rats treated by AVT (10 microg/100 g b.w). AVT application in the dark period of the day significantly increased nocturnal NAT activity. It can be summarized that AVT activates PI signalling system and potentiates NAT activity in the rat pineal gland.

  14. A distinct DGAT with sn-3 acetyltransferase activity that synthesizes unusual, reduced-viscosity oils in Euonymus and transgenic seeds

    PubMed Central

    Durrett, Timothy P.; McClosky, Daniel D.; Tumaney, Ajay W.; Elzinga, Dezi A.; Ohlrogge, John; Pollard, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Endosperm and embryo tissues from the seeds of Euonymus alatus (Burning Bush) accumulate high levels of 3-acetyl-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerols (acTAGs) as their major storage lipids. In contrast, the aril tissue surrounding the seed produces long-chain triacylglycerols (lcTAGs) typical of most other organisms. The presence of the sn-3 acetyl group imparts acTAGs with different physical and chemical properties, such as a 30% reduction in viscosity, compared to lcTAGs. Comparative transcriptome analysis of developing endosperm and aril tissues using pyrosequencing technology was performed to isolate the enzyme necessary for the synthesis of acTAGs. An uncharacterized membrane-bound O-acyltransferase (MBOAT) family member was the most abundant acyltransferase in the endosperm but was absent from the aril. Expression of this MBOAT in yeast resulted in the accumulation of acTAGs but not lcTAG; hence, the enzyme was named EaDAcT (Euonymus alatus diacylglycerol acetyltransferase). Yeast microsomes expressing EaDAcT possessed acetyl-CoA diacylglycerol acetyltransferase activity but lacked long-chain acyl-CoA diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity. Expression of EaDAcT under the control of a strong, seed-specific promoter in Arabidopsis resulted in the accumulation of acTAGs, up to 40 mol % of total TAG in the seed oil. These results demonstrate the utility of deep transcriptional profiling with multiple tissues as a gene discovery strategy for low-abundance proteins. They also show that EaDAcT is the acetyltransferase necessary and sufficient for the production of acTAGs in Euonymus seeds, and that this activity can be introduced into the seeds of other plants, allowing the evaluation of these unusual TAGs for biofuel and other applications. PMID:20439724

  15. The acetyltransferase activity of San stabilizes the mitotic cohesin at the centromeres in a shugoshin-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Fajian; Chu, Chih-Wen; Kong, Xiangduo; Yokomori, Kyoko; Zou, Hui

    2007-01-01

    Proper sister chromatid cohesion is critical for maintaining genetic stability. San is a putative acetyltransferase that is important for sister chromatid cohesion in Drosophila melanogaster, but not in budding yeast. We showed that San is critical for sister chromatid cohesion in HeLa cells, suggesting that this mechanism may be conserved in metazoans. Furthermore, although a small fraction of San interacts with the NatA complex, San appears to mediate cohesion independently. San exhibits acetyltransferase activity in vitro, and its activity is required for sister chromatid cohesion in vivo. In the absence of San, Sgo1 localizes correctly throughout the cell cycle. However, cohesin is no longer detected at the mitotic centromeres. Furthermore, San localizes to the cytoplasm in interphase cells; thus, it may not gain access to chromosomes until mitosis. Moreover, in San-depleted cells, further depletion of Plk1 rescues the cohesion along the chromosome arms, but not at the centromeres. Collectively, San may be specifically required for the maintenance of the centromeric cohesion in mitosis. PMID:17502424

  16. Nitrergic ventro-medial medullary neurons activated during cholinergically induced active (REM) sleep in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Pose, Inés; Sampogna, Sharon; Chase, Michael H.; Morales, Francisco R.

    2010-01-01

    The rostral ventro-medial medullary reticular formation is a complex structure that is involved with a variety of motor functions. It contains glycinergic neurons that are activated during active (REM) sleep (AS); these neurons appear to be responsible for the postsynaptic inhibition of motoneurons that occurs during this state. We have reported that neurons in this same region contain nitric oxide (NO) synthase and that they innervate brainstem motor pools. In the present study we examined the c-fos expression of these neurons after carbachol-induced active sleep (C-AS). Three control and four experimental cats were employed to identify c-fos expressing nitrergic neurons using immunocytochemical techniques to detect the Fos protein together with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) or NADPH-diaphorase activity. The classical neurotransmitter content of the nitrergic cells in this region was examined through the combination of immunocytochemical techniques for the detection of glutamate, glycine, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), tyrosine hydroxilase (TH) or GABA together with nNOS. During C-AS, there was a 1074% increase in the number of nitrergic neurons that expressed c-fos. These neurons did not contain glycine, ChAT, TH or GABA, but a subpopulation (15%) of them displayed glutamate-like immunoreactivity. Therefore, some of these neurons contain both an excitatory neurotransmitter (glutamate) and an excitatory neuromodulator (NO); the neurotransmitter content of the rest of them remains to be determined. Because some of the nitrergic neurons innervate brainstem motoneurons it is possible that they participate in the generation of tonic and excitatory phasic motor events that occur during AS. We also suggest that these nitrergic neurons may be involved in autonomic regulation during this state. In addition, because NO has trophic effects on target neurons, the present findings represent the first, albeit indirect, evidence for a possible trophic function of

  17. von Hippel-Lindau partner Jade-1 is a transcriptional co-activator associated with histone acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, Maria V; Zhou, Mina I; Cohen, Herbert T

    2004-12-31

    Jade-1 was identified as a protein partner of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor pVHL. The interaction of Jade-1 and pVHL correlates with renal cancer risk. We have investigated the molecular function of Jade-1. Jade-1 has two zinc finger motifs called plant homeodomains (PHD). A line of evidence suggests that the PHD finger functions in chromatin remodeling and protein-protein interactions. We determined the cellular localization of Jade-1 and examined whether Jade-1 might have transcriptional and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) functions. Biochemical cell fractionation studies as well as confocal images of cells immunostained with a specific Jade-1 antibody revealed that endogenous Jade-1 is localized predominantly in the cell nucleus. Tethering of Gal4-Jade-1 fusion protein to Gal4-responsive promoters in co-transfection experiments activated transcription 5-6-fold, indicating that Jade-1 is a possible transcriptional activator. It was remarkable that overexpression of Jade-1 in cultured cells specifically increased levels of endogenous acetylated histone H4, but not histone H3, strongly suggesting that Jade-1 associates with HAT activity specific for histone H4. Deletion of the two PHD fingers completely abolished Jade-1 transcriptional and HAT activities, indicating that these domains are indispensable for Jade-1 nuclear functions. In addition, we demonstrated that TIP60, a known HAT with histone H4/H2A specificity, physically associates with Jade-1 and is able to augment Jade-1 HAT function in live cells, strongly suggesting that TIP60 might mediate Jade-1 HAT activity. Thus, Jade-1 is a novel candidate transcriptional co-activator associated with HAT activity and may play a key role in the pathogenesis of renal cancer and von Hippel-Lindau disease.

  18. Inhibition of cytosolic human forebrain choline acetyltransferase activity by phospho-L-serine: a phosphomonoester that accumulates during early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Andriamampandry, C; Kanfer, J N

    1993-01-01

    There is no satisfactory explanation for the cholinergic deficit characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. We have performed a series of experiments which demonstrate that (a) an inhibitor of cytosolic human brain choline acetyltransferase is present in the cytosol of Alzheimer brain tissue, (b) human brain cytosolic choline acetyltransferase activity is inhibited by phospho-L-serine in a competitive manner. Cytosol was prepared from human forebrain or amygdala and the Km for choline and acetyl CoA of the choline acetyltransferase were 750 microM and 12.5 microM, respectively. Phospho-L-serine was found to be a competitive inhibitor of this enzyme with respect to choline but not with respect to acetyl CoA with a Ki of 750 microM for the human forebrain and 3 mM for human amygdala. These concentrations of phospho-L-serine are present in brain tissue at early stages of Alzheimer's disease. Several other phosphomonoesters and phosphodiesters that are increased in Alzheimer's disease were either less inhibitory or without effect. The addition of heat denatured and non-heat denatured cytosol from Alzheimers forebrain inhibited the choline acetyltransferase activity present in control human brain cytosol. The inhibitory activity of the Alzheimers cytosol was retained in TCA deproteinized samples and removed by dialysis or by alkaline phosphatase treatment. Dialysis of the cytosol increased the choline acetyltransferase activity of 5 of 8 Alzheimer's disease samples from 21 to 118% with p values of < 0.025 or < 0.001, respectively. These observations provide evidence that an endogenous non-proteinaceous, dialyzable, phosphomonoester, present in Alzheimers brain inhibits the choline acetyltransferase of both control and Alzheimers brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Balance of activities of alcohol acetyltransferase and esterase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for production of isoamyl acetate.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, K; Yamamoto, N; Kiyokawa, Y; Yanagiuchi, T; Wakai, Y; Kitamoto, K; Inoue, Y; Kimura, A

    1998-10-01

    Isoamyl acetate is synthesized from isoamyl alcohol and acetyl coenzyme A by alcohol acetyltransferase (AATFase) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is hydrolyzed by esterases at the same time. We hypothesized that the balance of both enzyme activities was important for optimum production of isoamyl acetate in sake brewing. To test this hypothesis, we constructed yeast strains with different numbers of copies of the AATFase gene (ATF1) and the isoamyl acetate-hydrolyzing esterase gene (IAH1) and used these strains in small-scale sake brewing. Fermentation profiles as well as components of the resulting sake were largely alike; however, the amount of isoamyl acetate in the sake increased with an increasing ratio of AATFase/Iah1p esterase activity. Therefore, we conclude that the balance of these two enzyme activities is important for isoamyl acetate accumulation in sake mash.

  20. Balance of Activities of Alcohol Acetyltransferase and Esterase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Important for Production of Isoamyl Acetate

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Nagi; Kiyokawa, Yoshifumi; Yanagiuchi, Toshiyasu; Wakai, Yoshinori; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Inoue, Yoshiharu; Kimura, Akira

    1998-01-01

    Isoamyl acetate is synthesized from isoamyl alcohol and acetyl coenzyme A by alcohol acetyltransferase (AATFase) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is hydrolyzed by esterases at the same time. We hypothesized that the balance of both enzyme activities was important for optimum production of isoamyl acetate in sake brewing. To test this hypothesis, we constructed yeast strains with different numbers of copies of the AATFase gene (ATF1) and the isoamyl acetate-hydrolyzing esterase gene (IAH1) and used these strains in small-scale sake brewing. Fermentation profiles as well as components of the resulting sake were largely alike; however, the amount of isoamyl acetate in the sake increased with an increasing ratio of AATFase/Iah1p esterase activity. Therefore, we conclude that the balance of these two enzyme activities is important for isoamyl acetate accumulation in sake mash. PMID:9758847

  1. Generating controlled reducing environments in aerobic recombinant Escherichia coli fermentations: effects on cell growth, oxygen uptake, heat shock protein expression, and in vivo CAT activity.

    PubMed

    Gill, R T; Cha, H J; Jain, A; Rao, G; Bentley, W E

    1998-07-20

    The independent control of culture redox potential (CRP) by the regulated addition of a reducing agent, dithiothreitol (DTT) was demonstrated in aerated recombinant Escherichia coli fermentations. Moderate levels of DTT addition resulted in minimal changes to specific oxygen uptake, growth rate, and dissolved oxygen. Excessive levels of DTT addition were toxic to the cells resulting in cessation of growth. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity (nmoles/microgram total protein min.) decreased in batch fermentation experiments with respect to increasing levels of DTT addition. To further investigate the mechanisms affecting CAT activity, experiments were performed to assay heat shock protein expression and specific CAT activity (nmoles/microgram CAT min.). Expression of such molecular chaperones as GroEL and DnaK were found to increase after addition of DTT. Additionally, sigma factor 32 (sigma32) and several proteases were seen to increase dramatically during addition of DTT. Specific CAT activity (nmoles/microgram CAT min. ) varied greatly as DTT was added, however, a minimum in activity was found at the highest level of DTT addition in E. coli strains RR1 [pBR329] and JM105 [pROEX-CAT]. In conjunction, cellular stress was found to reach a maximum at the same levels of DTT. Although DTT addition has the potential for directly affecting intracellular protein folding, the effects felt from the increased stress within the cell are likely the dominant effector. That the effects of DTT were measured within the cytoplasm of the cell suggests that the periplasmic redox potential was also altered. The changes in specific CAT activity, molecular chaperones, and other heat shock proteins, in the presence of minimal growth rate and oxygen uptake alterations, suggest that the ex vivo control of redox potential provides a new process for affecting the yield and conformation of heterologous proteins in aerated E. coli fermentations.

  2. [Transformation of neuronal activity in the cat lateral geniculate body].

    PubMed

    Silakov, V L

    1976-05-01

    The neuronal activity transformations were studied in the cat LGB under the action of nembutal, light stimulation, and micropolarization of geniculate cells. The transformation of single spike activity into bursts was found to reflect the inhibitory state of the neurons. Their excitation entailed a reverse transformation. Short feed-back connections functioning within the microsystems of LGB neurons are supposed to underlie the transformations.

  3. Moco biosynthesis and the ATAC acetyltransferase engage translation initiation by inhibiting latent PKR activity.

    PubMed

    Suganuma, Tamaki; Swanson, Selene K; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Workman, Jerry L

    2016-02-01

    Molybdenum cofactor (Moco) biosynthesis is linked to c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling in Drosophila through MoaE, a molybdopterin (MPT) synthase subunit that is also a component of the Ada Two A containing (ATAC) acetyltransferase complex. Here, we show that human MPT synthase and ATAC inhibited PKR, a double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase, to facilitate translation initiation of iron-responsive mRNA. MPT synthase and ATAC directly interacted with PKR and suppressed latent autophosphorylation of PKR and its downstream phosphorylation of JNK and eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α). The suppression of eIF2α phosphorylation via MPT synthase and ATAC prevented sequestration of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor eIF2B, which recycles eIF2-GDP to eIF2-GTP, resulting in the promotion of translation initiation. Indeed, translation of the iron storage protein, ferritin, was reduced in the absence of MPT synthase or ATAC subunits. Thus, MPT synthase and ATAC regulate latent PKR signaling and link transcription and translation initiation.

  4. Chromatographic separation of reaction products from the choline acetyltransferase and carnitine acetyltransferase assay: differential ChAT and CrAT activity in brain extracts from Alzheimer's disease versus controls.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jason A; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2012-08-01

    Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) catalyzes the reaction between choline and acetylcoenzyme A (AcCoA) to form acetylcholine (ACh) in nerve terminals. ACh metabolism has implications in numerous aspects of physiology and varied disease states, such as Alzheimer's disease. Therefore a specific, sensitive, and reliable method for detecting ChAT enzyme activity is of great utility in a number of situations. Using an existing radionuclide-based enzyme activity assay, we have observed detectable ChAT signals from non-cholinergic cells, suggesting a contaminant in the assay producing an artifactual signal. Previous reports have suggested that L-acetylcarnitine (LAC) contaminates many assays of ChAT activity, because of difficulties in separating LAC from ACh by organic extraction. To determine the source of this hypothesized artifact and to rectify the problem, we have developed a paper chromatography-based assay for the detection of acetylcholine and other contaminating reaction products of this assay, including LAC. Our first goal was to develop a simple and economical method for resolving and verifying the identities of various reaction products or contaminants that could be performed in most laboratories without specialized equipment. Our second goal was to apply this separation method in postmortem human brain tissue samples. Our assay successfully detected several contaminants, especially in assays using brain tissue, and allowed the separation of the intended ACh product from these contaminants. We further demonstrate that this assay can be used to measure carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) activity in the same samples, and assays comparing ChAT and CrAT show that CrAT is highly active in neuronal tissues and in neuronal cell cultures relative to ChAT. Thus, the simple chromatography-based assay we describe allows the measurement of specific reaction products separated from contaminants using commonly available and inexpensive materials. Further, we show that Ch

  5. Serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity as a target for temperature in the regulation of melatonin production by frog retina.

    PubMed

    Valenciano, A I; Alonso-Gómez, A L; De Pedro, N; Alonso-Bedate, M; Delgado, M J

    1994-12-01

    The adaptive mechanisms of serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity in the regulation of melatonin synthesis in frog retina in the face of chronic and acute temperature changes have been investigated. We performed thermal acclimation experiments to test different environmental temperatures at two seasons of the year (summer and winter), followed by the set-up of an eyecup culture system to investigate the acute effects of temperature on NAT activity and melatonin production daily rhythms. Low temperature induced a significant increase in NAT activity, independent of both the time of the photocycle (midday or midnight) and the season of the year (winter or summer). Acute cold-induced stimulation of NAT activity may be associated with lower decreases in the enzyme synthesis rate, rather than decreases in the degradation rate. In contrast, acclimation to warm temperature (25 degrees C) stimulated ocular melatonin production. Nocturnal melatonin production in eyecups cultured at 25 degrees C was significantly higher than in eyecups cultured at 5 degrees C. We suggest that this discrepancy in thermal regulation of melatonin synthesis can be justified by a seasonal variation in serotonin content within the photoreceptor cells, which determines the thermal response of melatonin production through changes in NAT kinetics.

  6. CBP and p300 histone acetyltransferases contribute to homologous recombination by transcriptionally activating the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Hideaki; Kohno, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Histone acetylation at DNA double-strand break (DSB) sites by CBP and p300 histone acetyltransferases (HATs) is critical for the recruitment of DSB repair proteins to chromatin. Here, we show that CBP and p300 HATs also function in DSB repair by transcriptionally activating the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes, which are involved in homologous recombination (HR), a major DSB repair system. siRNA-mediated depletion of CBP and p300 impaired HR activity and downregulated BRCA1 and RAD51 at the protein and mRNA levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that CBP and p300 bind to the promoter regions of the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes, and that depletion of CBP and/or p300 reduces H3 and H4 acetylation and inhibits binding of the transcription factor E2F1 to these promoters. Depletion of CBP and p300 impaired DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and chromatin binding of the single-strand DNA-binding protein RPA following BRCA1-mediated DNA end resection. Consistent with this, subsequent phosphorylation of CHK1 and activation of the G2/M damage checkpoint were also impaired. These results indicate that the HATs CBP and p300 play multiple roles in the activation of the cellular response to DSBs.

  7. Activation of the 2'-N-acetyltransferase gene [aac(2')-Ia] in Providencia stuartii by an interaction of AarP with the promoter region.

    PubMed

    Macinga, D R; Paradise, M R; Parojcic, M M; Rather, P N

    1999-07-01

    The aac(2')-Ia gene in Providencia stuartii encodes a 2'-N-acetyltransferase capable of acetylating both peptidoglycan and certain aminoglycoside antibiotics. Regulation of the aac(2')-Ia gene is influenced in a positive manner by the product of the aarP gene, which encodes a small transcriptional activator of the AraC (XylS) family. In this study, we demonstrate the sequence requirements at the aac(2')-Ia promoter for AarP binding and activation.

  8. Anti-histone acetyltransferase activity from allspice extracts inhibits androgen receptor-dependent prostate cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo-Hyun; Hong, Soon Won; Jun, Woojin; Cho, Hong Yon; Kim, Han-Cheon; Jung, Myung Gu; Wong, Jiemin; Kim, Ha-Il; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Yoon, Ho-Geun

    2007-11-01

    Histone acetylation depends on the activity of two enzyme families, histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and deacetylase (HDAC). In this study, we screened various plant extracts to find potent HAT inhibitors. Hot water extracts of allspice inhibited HAT activity, especially p300 and CBP (40% at 100 microg/ml). The mRNA levels of two androgen receptor (AR) regulated genes, PSA and TSC22, decreased with allspice treatment (100 microg/ml). Importantly, in IP western analysis, AR acetylation was dramatically decreased by allspice treatment.Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated that the acetylation of histone H3 in the PSA and B2M promoter regions was also repressed. Finally, allspice treatment reduced the growth of human prostate cancer cells, LNCaP (50% growth inhibition at 200 microg/ml). Taken together, our data indicate that the potent HAT inhibitory activity of allspice reduced AR and histone acetylation and led to decreased transcription of AR target genes, resulting in inhibition of prostate cancer cell growth.

  9. Treatment of Rats with Apocynin Has Considerable Inhibitory Effects on Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase Activity in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Sheena; Laurieri, Nicola; Nwokocha, Chukwuemeka; Delgoda, Rupika

    2016-01-01

    The effect of apocynin on the activity of arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) in excised liver samples was examined using eighteen Sprague-Dawley rats. Three groups of six animals each were fed a normal diet alone or a treatment of 50 or 100 mg/kg/day of apocynin via gavages for eight (8) weeks. Chronic in vivo administration of apocynin led to significant (p < 0.001) reduction of in vitro liver NAT activity up to 93% as compared with untreated rats (18.80 ± 2.10 μmols p-anisidine/min/μg liver protein). In vitro exposure of untreated liver homogenates to apocynin led to a dose-dependent inhibition of NAT activity with IC50 = 0.69 ± 0.02 mM. In silico modelling of apocynin tautomers and radical species into human NAT crystal structures supported the hypothesis that thiol functionalities in NAT enzymes may be crucial in apocynin binding. The involvement of human NAT enzymes in different pathological conditions, such as cancer, has encouraged the research for selective NAT inhibitors in both humans and animal models with possible chemopreventive properties. PMID:27242013

  10. Regulation of platelet activating factor synthesis: modulation of 1-alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in rat spleen microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lenihan, D.J.; Lee, T.C.

    1984-05-16

    1-Alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase plays an important regulatory role in the biosynthesis of platelet activating factor, a potent bioactive mediator. The authors tested the hypothesis that the activity of acetyltransferase may be modulated by enzymatic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The results showed that acetyltransferase activity in rat spleens was 2- to 3-fold higher in microsomes isolated in the presence of F/sup -/ than in those isolated in the presence of Cl/sup -/. The microsomal acetyltransferase could be activated by preincubation of microsomes, isolated in the presence of Cl/sup -/, with ATP, Mg/sup 2 +/, and the soluble fraction from rat spleen. Addition of phosphatidylserine, diacylglycerols, plus Ca/sup 2 +/ further enhanced the activity. The increase in the activity of acetyltranferase was abolished by treatment of the activated microsomes with alkaline phosphatase. Conversely, the activity of acetyltransferase can be reactivated in the alkaline phosphatase-treated microsomes with incubation conditions that favor phosphorylation. Therefore, the findings suggest that acetyltransferase activity is regulated by reversible activation/inactivation through phosphorylation/dephosphorylation.

  11. Diencephalic Size Is Restricted by a Novel Interplay Between GCN5 Acetyltransferase Activity and Retinoic Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Jonathan J; Siegenthaler, Julie A; Dent, Sharon Y R; Niswander, Lee A

    2017-03-08

    Diencephalic defects underlie an array of neurological diseases. Previous studies have suggested that retinoic acid (RA) signaling is involved in diencephalic development at late stages of embryonic development, but its roles and mechanisms of action during early neural development are still unclear. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking enzymatic activity of the acetyltransferase GCN5 ((Gcn5(hat/hat) )), which were previously characterized with respect to their exencephalic phenotype, exhibit significant diencephalic expansion, decreased diencephalic RA signaling, and increased diencephalic WNT and SHH signaling. Using a variety of molecular biology techniques in both cultured neuroepithelial cells treated with a GCN5 inhibitor and forebrain tissue from (Gcn5(hat/hat) ) embryos, we demonstrate that GCN5, RARα/γ, and the poorly characterized protein TACC1 form a complex in the nucleus that binds specific retinoic acid response elements in the absence of RA. Furthermore, RA triggers GCN5-mediated acetylation of TACC1, which results in dissociation of TACC1 from retinoic acid response elements and leads to transcriptional activation of RA target genes. Intriguingly, RA signaling defects caused by in vitro inhibition of GCN5 can be rescued through RA-dependent mechanisms that require RARβ. Last, we demonstrate that the diencephalic expansion and transcriptional defects seen in (Gcn5(hat/hat) ) mutants can be rescued with gestational RA supplementation, supporting a direct link between GCN5, TACC1, and RA signaling in the developing diencephalon. Together, our studies identify a novel, nonhistone substrate for GCN5 whose modification regulates a previously undescribed, tissue-specific mechanism of RA signaling that is required to restrict diencephalic size during early forebrain development.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Changes in diencephalic size and shape, as well as SNPs associated with retinoic acid (RA) signaling-associated genes, have been linked to neuropsychiatric

  12. Arachidonic acid increases choline acetyltransferase activity in spinal cord neurons through a protein kinase C-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chalimoniuk, Malgorzata; King-Pospisil, Kelley; Pedersen, Ward A; Malecki, Andrzej; Wylegala, Edward; Mattson, Mark P; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2004-08-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) plays an important role as a signaling factor in the CNS. Therefore, exposure to AA may affect cholinergic neurons in the spinal cord. To test this hypothesis, mRNA expression and activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) was measured in cultured spinal cord neurons treated with increasing concentrations (0.1-10 microm) of AA. Exposure to AA increased mRNA levels and activity of ChAT in dose- and time-dependent manners. The most marked effect of AA on ChAT expression was observed in spinal cord neurons treated with 10 microm AA for 1 h. To study the mechanisms associated with these effects, ChAT mRNA levels and activity were measured in cultured spinal cord neurons exposed to AA and inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC), such as 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine dichloride (H-7) and chelerythrine. Inhibition of PKC completely prevented an AA-induced increase in ChAT expression. In addition, exposure of spinal cord neurons to phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), an activator of PKC, mimicked AA-induced stimulation of ChAT activity. The AA-mediated increase in ChAT mRNA levels and activity was also prevented by treatments with EGTA, indicating the role of calcium metabolism in induction of this enzyme. In contrast, treatments with 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, a specific inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase), sodium vanadate (NaV, a non-specific inhibitor of phosphatases), and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant) had no effect on AA-induced changes in ChAT activity. The protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide completely blocked AA-mediated increase in ChAT activity. These results indicate that the AA-evoked increase in ChAT activity in spinal cord neurons is mediated by PKC, presumably at the transcriptional level.

  13. Thermoadaptation-directed evolution of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in an error-prone thermophile using improved procedures.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Jyumpei; Furukawa, Megumi; Ohshiro, Takashi; Suzuki, Hirokazu

    2015-07-01

    Enhancing the thermostability of thermolabile enzymes extends their practical utility. We previously demonstrated that an error-prone thermophile derived from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 can generate mutant genes encoding enzyme variants that are more thermostable than the parent enzyme. Here, we used this approach, termed as thermoadaptation-directed enzyme evolution, to increase the thermostability of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) of Staphylococcus aureus and successfully generated a CAT variant with an A138T replacement (CAT(A138T)). This variant was heterologously produced, and its enzymatic properties were compared with those of the wild type. We found that CAT(A138T) had substantially higher thermostability than CAT but had comparable activities, showing that the A138T replacement enhanced protein thermostability without affecting the catalytic activity. Because variants CAT(A138S) and CAT(A138V), which were generated via in vitro site-directed mutagenesis, were more thermostable than CAT, the thermostability enhancement resulting from the A138T replacement can be attributed to both the presence of a hydroxyl group and the bulk of the threonine side chain. CAT(A138T) conferred chloramphenicol resistance to G. kaustophilus cells at high temperature more efficiently than CAT. Therefore, the gene encoding CAT(A138T) may be useful as a genetic marker in Geobacillus spp. Notably, CAT(A138T) generation was achieved only by implementing improved procedures (plasmid-based mutations on solid media); previous procedures (chromosome-based mutations in liquid media) were unsuccessful. This result suggests that this improved procedure is crucial for successful thermoadaptation-directed evolution in certain cases and increases the opportunities for generating thermostable enzymes.

  14. GT-CATS: Tracking Operator Activities in Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd J.; Mitchell, Christine M.; Palmer, Everett A.

    1999-01-01

    Human operators of complex dynamic systems can experience difficulties supervising advanced control automation. One remedy is to develop intelligent aiding systems that can provide operators with context-sensitive advice and reminders. The research reported herein proposes, implements, and evaluates a methodology for activity tracking, a form of intent inferencing that can supply the knowledge required for an intelligent aid by constructing and maintaining a representation of operator activities in real time. The methodology was implemented in the Georgia Tech Crew Activity Tracking System (GT-CATS), which predicts and interprets the actions performed by Boeing 757/767 pilots navigating using autopilot flight modes. This report first describes research on intent inferencing and complex modes of automation. It then provides a detailed description of the GT-CATS methodology, knowledge structures, and processing scheme. The results of an experimental evaluation using airline pilots are given. The results show that GT-CATS was effective in predicting and interpreting pilot actions in real time.

  15. Regulation of NuA4 histone acetyltransferase activity in transcription and DNA repair by phosphorylation of histone H4.

    PubMed

    Utley, Rhea T; Lacoste, Nicolas; Jobin-Robitaille, Olivier; Allard, Stéphane; Côté, Jacques

    2005-09-01

    The NuA4 complex is a histone H4/H2A acetyltransferase involved in transcription and DNA repair. While histone acetylation is important in many processes, it has become increasingly clear that additional histone modifications also play a crucial interrelated role. To understand how NuA4 action is regulated, we tested various H4 tail peptides harboring known modifications in HAT assays. While dimethylation at arginine 3 (R3M) had little effect on NuA4 activity, phosphorylation of serine 1 (S1P) strongly decreased the ability of the complex to acetylate H4 peptides. However, R3M in combination with S1P alleviates the repression of NuA4 activity. Chromatin from cells treated with DNA damage-inducing agents shows an increase in phosphorylation of serine 1 and a concomitant decrease in H4 acetylation. We found that casein kinase 2 phosphorylates histone H4 and associates with the Rpd3 deacetylase complex, demonstrating a physical connection between phosphorylation of serine 1 and unacetylated H4 tails. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments also link local phosphorylation of H4 with its deacetylation, during both transcription and DNA repair. Time course chromatin immunoprecipitation data support a model in which histone H4 phosphorylation occurs after NuA4 action during double-strand break repair at the step of chromatin restoration and deacetylation. These findings demonstrate that H4 phospho-serine 1 regulates chromatin acetylation by the NuA4 complex and that this process is important for normal gene expression and DNA repair.

  16. N-hydroxyarylamine O-acetyltransferase of Salmonella typhimurium: proposal for a common catalytic mechanism of arylamine acetyltransferase enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, M; Igarashi, T; Kaminuma, T; Sofuni, T; Nohmi, T

    1994-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA:N-hydroxyarylamine O-acetyltransferase is an enzyme involved in the metabolic activation of N-hydroxyarylamines derived from mutagenic and carcinogenic aromatic amines and nitroarenes. The O-acetyltransferase gene of Salmonella typhimurium has been cloned, and new Ames tester substrains highly sensitive to mutagenic aromatic amines and nitroarenes have been established in our laboratory. The nucleotide sequence of the O-acetyltransferase gene was determined. There was an open reading frame of 843 nucleotides coding for a protein with a calculated molecular weight of 32,177, which was close to the molecular weight of the O-acetyltransferase protein determined by using the maxicell technique. Only the residue of Cys69 in O-acetyltransferase of S. typhimurium and its corresponding residue (Cys68) in N-acetyltransferase of higher organisms were conserved in all acetyltransferase enzymes sequenced so far. The amino acid sequence Arg-Gly-Gly-X-Cys, including the Cys69, was highly conserved. A mutant O-acetyltransferase of S. typhimurium, which contained Ala69 instead of Cys69, no longer showed the activities of O- and N-acetyltransferase. These results suggest that the Cys69 of S. typhimurium and the corresponding cysteine residues of the higher organisms are essential for the enzyme activities as an acetyl-CoA binding site. We propose a new catalytic model of acetyltransferase for S. typhimurium and the higher organisms. PMID:7889864

  17. The Chromatin Regulator BRPF3 Preferentially Activates the HBO1 Acetyltransferase but Is Dispensable for Mouse Development and Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Kezhi; You, Linya; Degerny, Cindy; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Liu, Xin; Chen, Lulu; Li, Lin; Miao, Dengshun; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2016-01-01

    To interpret epigenetic information, chromatin readers utilize various protein domains for recognition of DNA and histone modifications. Some readers possess multidomains for modification recognition and are thus multivalent. Bromodomain- and plant homeodomain-linked finger-containing protein 3 (BRPF3) is such a chromatin reader, containing two plant homeodomain-linked fingers, one bromodomain and a PWWP domain. However, its molecular and biological functions remain to be investigated. Here, we report that endogenous BRPF3 preferentially forms a tetrameric complex with HBO1 (also known as KAT7) and two other subunits but not with related acetyltransferases such as MOZ, MORF, TIP60, and MOF (also known as KAT6A, KAT6B, KAT5, and KAT8, respectively). We have also characterized a mutant mouse strain with a lacZ reporter inserted at the Brpf3 locus. Systematic analysis of β-galactosidase activity revealed dynamic spatiotemporal expression of Brpf3 during mouse embryogenesis and high expression in the adult brain and testis. Brpf3 disruption, however, resulted in no obvious gross phenotypes. This is in stark contrast to Brpf1 and Brpf2, whose loss causes lethality at E9.5 and E15.5, respectively. In Brpf3-null mice and embryonic fibroblasts, RT-quantitative PCR uncovered no changes in levels of Brpf1 and Brpf2 transcripts, confirming no compensation from them. These results indicate that BRPF3 forms a functional tetrameric complex with HBO1 but is not required for mouse development and survival, thereby distinguishing BRPF3 from its paralogs, BRPF1 and BRPF2. PMID:26677226

  18. Arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT2) mutations and their allelic linkage in unrelated caucasian individuals: Correlation with phenotypic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Cascorbi, I.; Drakoulis, N.; Brockmoeller, J.

    1995-09-01

    The polymorphic arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT2; EC2.3.1.5) is supposed to be a susceptibility factor for several drug side effects and certain malignancies. A group of 844 unrelated German subjects was genotyped for their acetylation type, and 563 of them were also phenotyped. Seven mutations of the NAT2 gene were evaluated by allele-specific PCR (mutation 341C to T) and PCR-RFLP for mutations at nt positions 191, 282, 481, 590, 803, and 857. From the mutation pattern eight different alleles, including the wild type coding for rapid acetylation and seven alleles coding for slow phenotype, were determined. Four hundred ninety-seven subjects had a genotype of slow acetylation (58.9%; 95% confidence limits 55.5%-62.2%). Phenotypic acetylation capacity was expressed as the ratio of 5-acetylamino-6-formylamino-3-methyluracil and 1-methylxanthine in urine after caffeine intake. Some 6.7% of the cases deviated in genotype and phenotype, but sequencing DNA of these probands revealed no new mutations. Furthermore, linkage pattern of the mutations was always confirmed, as tested in 533 subjects. In vivo acetylation capacity of homozygous wild-type subjects (NAT2{sup *}4/{sup *}4) was significantly higher than in heterozygous genotypes (P = .001). All mutant alleles showed low in vivo acetylation capacities, including the previously not-yet-defined alleles {sup *}5A, {sup *}5C, and {sup *}13. Moreover, distinct slow genotypes differed significantly among each other, as reflected in lower acetylation capacity of {sup *}6A, {sup *}7B, and {sup *}13 alleles than the group of {sup *}5 alleles. The study demonstrated differential phenotypic activity of various NAT2 genes and gives a solid basis for clinical and molecular-epidemiological investigations. 34 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Identification and analysis of aarP, a transcriptional activator of the 2'-N-acetyltransferase in Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed

    Macinga, D R; Parojcic, M M; Rather, P N

    1995-06-01

    The aarP gene has been identified in a search for activators of the 2-N-acetyltransferase [encoded by aac(2')-Ia] in Providencia stuartii. Introduction of aarP into P. stuartii on a multicopy plasmid resulted in a 9.9-fold increase in the accumulation of beta-galactosidase from an aac(2')-lacZ fusion. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrated that this increased aac(2')-Ia expression occurred at the level of mRNA accumulation. The deduced AarP protein was 15,898 Da in size and exhibited significant homology to a number of transcriptional activators in the AraC/XyIS family, including TetD,Rob, MarA, and SoxS. The similarity of AarP to the MarA and SoxS proteins prompted an investigation to determine whether AarP is involved in activation of genes in either the multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) phenotype or redox stress (SoxRS) system. Introduction of aarP on a multicopy plasmid into either P. stuartii or Escherichia coli conferred a Mar phenotype with higher levels of resistance to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and ciprofloxacin. Multiple copies of aarP in E. coli also resulted in activation of the endonuclease IV gene (nfo), a gene in the SoxRS regulon of E. coli. The function of aarP in its single-copy state was addressed by using allelic replacement to construct an aarP::Cm disruption, which resulted in a fivefold reduction in the accumulation of aac(2')-Ia mRNA. Analysis of aarP regulation showed that aarP mRNA accumulation was slightly increased by exposure to tetracycline and dramatically increased in cells containing the aarB3 (aar3) mutation, which was previously shown to increase transcription of the aac(2')-Ia gene. (P.N. Rather, E. Oroz, K.J. Shaw, R. Hare, and G. Miller, J. Bacteriol. 175:6492-6498).

  20. Activity changes of the cat paraventricular hypothalamus during stressor exposure.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Morten P; Rector, David M; Poe, Gina R; Harper, Ronald M

    2004-01-19

    Dorso-medial paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) activity was assessed by light scattering procedures in freely behaving cats during auditory stressor exposure. Acoustic noise (> 95dB) raised plasma ACTH concentrations, somatic muscle tonus, respiratory frequency and cardiac rates; PVH activity peaked 0.8s following stimulation, and then markedly declined below baseline to a trough at 9.7s. Hypothalamic responses were not uniformly distributed across the recorded PVH field. Activity changes emerged from subregions within the visualized area, and were widespread at the overall activity zenith and nadir. Isolated pixels appeared opposite in activity pattern to overall changes. We suggest that transient activity increases represent initial PVH neural stress responses, and that subsequent profound declines result from neural inhibitory feedback.

  1. A series of shuttle vectors using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase as a reporter enzyme in yeast.

    PubMed

    Mannhaupt, G; Pilz, U; Feldmann, H

    1988-07-30

    Reports from numerous laboratories have shown that the gene coding for the bacterial enzyme chloramphenicol-3-O-acetyltransferase can be used as a reporter gene (cat) in mammalian and plant systems to analyze gene activity at the transcriptional level when combined with endogenous regulatory signals; the enzyme activity can be quantified by a chromatographic or a photometric assay. To adapt this simple and highly sensitive test for the yeast system, we constructed a series of yeast vectors containing the cat gene together with selectable markers for Escherichia coli and yeast; integrating, autonomously replicating and centromere-carrying plasmids were used. We show that the cat gene lacking the endogenous promoter is expressed at low levels in yeast transformants. To demonstrate functional expression of the cat gene placed under the control of a yeast promoter, we chose the PHO5 regulatory region. We found that cat expression was induced via the PHO5 promoter in a manner as observed for the endogenous PHO5 gene, whereas in the repressed state cat expression remained low. Using these vectors, it should be feasible to analyze other sequences conferring promoter activity or other control functions in yeast.

  2. A pair of transposon-derived proteins function in a histone acetyltransferase complex for active DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Cheng-Guo; Wang, Xingang; Xie, Shaojun; Pan, Li; Miki, Daisuke; Tang, Kai; Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Lei, Mingguang; Zhong, Yingli; Hou, Yueh-Ju; Wang, Zhijuan; Zhang, Zhengjing; Mangrauthia, Satendra K; Xu, Huawei; Zhang, Heng; Dilkes, Brian; Tao, W Andy; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Transposons are generally kept silent by epigenetic mechanisms including DNA methylation. Here, we identified a pair of Harbinger transposon-derived proteins (HDPs), HDP1 and HDP2, as anti-silencing factors in Arabidopsis. hdp1 and hdp2 mutants displayed an enhanced silencing of transgenes and some transposons. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that HDP1 and HDP2 were co-domesticated from the Harbinger transposon-encoded transposase and DNA-binding protein, respectively. HDP1 interacts with HDP2 in the nucleus, analogous to their transposon counterparts. Moreover, HDP1 and HDP2 are associated with IDM1, IDM2, IDM3 and MBD7 that constitute a histone acetyltransferase complex functioning in DNA demethylation. HDP2 and the methyl-DNA-binding protein MBD7 share a large set of common genomic binding sites, indicating that they jointly determine the target specificity of the histone acetyltransferase complex. Thus, our data revealed that HDP1 and HDP2 constitute a functional module that has been recruited to a histone acetyltransferase complex to prevent DNA hypermethylation and epigenetic silencing. PMID:27934869

  3. Expression and Activity of a Novel Cathelicidin from Domestic Cats

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Brian C.; Chu, Hiutung; Johns, Jennifer L.; Gallo, Richard L.; Moore, Peter F.; Marks, Stanley L.; Bevins, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Cathelicidins are small cationic antimicrobial peptides found in many species including primates, mammals, marsupials, birds and even more primitive vertebrates, such as the hagfish. Some animals encode multiple cathelicidins in their genome, whereas others have only one. This report identifies and characterizes feline cathelicidin (feCath) as the sole cathelicidin in domestic cats (Felis catus). Expression of feCath is predominantly found in the bone marrow, with lower levels of expression in the gastrointestinal tract and skin. By immunocytochemistry, feCath localizes to the cytoplasm of neutrophils in feline peripheral blood. Structurally, the mature feCath sequence is most similar to a subgroup of cathelicidins that form linear α-helices. feCath possesses antimicrobial activity against E. coli D31, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (IR715), Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (clinical isolate) similar to that of the human ortholog, LL-37. In contrast, feCath lacks the DNA binding activity seen with LL-37. Given its similarity in sequence, structure, tissue expression, and antimicrobial activity, the cathelicidin encoded by cats, feCath, belongs to the subgroup of linear cathelicidins found not only in humans, but also non-human primates, dogs, mice, and rats. PMID:21533281

  4. (+)-N-allylnormetazocine enhances N-acetyltransferase activity and melatonin synthesis: preliminary evidence for a functional role of sigma receptors in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Steardo, L; Monteleone, P; d'Istria, M; Serino, I; Maj, M; Cuomo, V

    1995-11-01

    In the present study, to evaluate the role that sigma receptors play in the physiology of the pineal gland, we assessed the effects of the sigma receptor ligand (+)-N-allylnormetazocine on the gland activity during either the day or the night. As compared to saline, (+)-N-allylnormetazocine enhanced the physiological increases in both pineal N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity and melatonin content at night, but it did not affect the biosynthetic activity of the gland during the day. Moreover, (+)-N-allylnormetazocine potentiated the enhancement of NAT activity and pineal melatonin content induced by isoproterenol administration during the day. The nocturnal stimulation of pineal NAT activity and melatonin levels by (+)-N-allylnormetazocine was prevented by pretreatment with rimcazole, a specific sigma receptor antagonist. These results demonstrate that sigma receptor activation by (+)-N-allylnormetazocine is not able, by itself, to stimulate pineal melatonin production, whereas it potentiates the biosynthetic activity of the pineal gland when this is stimulated noradrenergically.

  5. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of an Active Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase Possessing a Non-canonical Cys-His-Glu Catalytic Triad*

    PubMed Central

    Kubiak, Xavier; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès; Chaffotte, Alain F.; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Weber, Patrick; Haouz, Ahmed; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs), a class of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, catalyze the acetylation of aromatic amine compounds through a strictly conserved Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad. Each residue is essential for catalysis in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic NATs. Indeed, in (HUMAN)NAT2 variants, mutation of the Asp residue to Asn, Gln, or Glu dramatically impairs enzyme activity. However, a putative atypical NAT harboring a catalytic triad Glu residue was recently identified in Bacillus cereus ((BACCR)NAT3) but has not yet been characterized. We report here the crystal structure and functional characterization of this atypical NAT. The overall fold of (BACCR)NAT3 and the geometry of its Cys-His-Glu catalytic triad are similar to those present in functional NATs. Importantly, the enzyme was found to be active and to acetylate prototypic arylamine NAT substrates. In contrast to (HUMAN) NAT2, the presence of a Glu or Asp in the triad of (BACCR)NAT3 did not significantly affect enzyme structure or function. Computational analysis identified differences in residue packing and steric constraints in the active site of (BACCR)NAT3 that allow it to accommodate a Cys-His-Glu triad. These findings overturn the conventional view, demonstrating that the catalytic triad of this family of acetyltransferases is plastic. Moreover, they highlight the need for further study of the evolutionary history of NATs and the functional significance of the predominant Cys-His-Asp triad in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic forms. PMID:23770703

  6. [The dynamics of forming an active defensive reflex in cats].

    PubMed

    Fokin, V F

    1975-01-01

    Active defensive reflexes were elaborated in cats with pain stimulations of the forepaw by means of an electrical pricking device with a target attached to it. The elaboration was carried out during action of a flickering light used for the convenience of the EEG analysis. Repeated pain stimulation led to elaboration of an aggressive attacking reaction, chiefly manifested in the paw striking the target. At the beginning of the elaboration, passive-defensive reactions were manifest, which did not completely disappear even after formation of a stable attacking reflex. Two types of active defensive reflexes were elaborated: A-type reflex which helped the animal to get rid of the pain stimulation at the very beginning; B-type reflex which prevented the pain stimulation. The difference beteween these two types is discussed.

  7. A human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus, as a eucaryotic vector: Transient expression and encapsidation of the procaryotic gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Tratschin, J.D.; West, M.H.P.; Sandbank, T.; Carter, B.J.

    1984-10-01

    The authors have used the defective human parvovirus adeno-associated virus (AAV) as a novel eurocaryotic vector (parvector) for the expression of a foreign gene in human cells. The recombinant, pAV2, contains the AAV genome in a pBR322-derived bacterial plasmid. When pAV2 is transfected into human cells together with helper adenovirus particles, the AAV genome is rescued from the recombinant plasmid and replicated to produce infectious AAV particles at high efficiency. To create a vector, we inserted a procaryotic sequence coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) into derivatives of pAV2 following either of the AAV promoters p/sub 40/ (pAVHiCAT) and p/sub 19/ (pAVBcCAT). When transfected into human 293 cells or HeLa cells, pAVHiCAT expressed CAT activity in the absence of adenovirus. In the presence of adenovirus, this vector produced increased amounts of CAT activity and the recombinant AAV-CAT genome was replicated. In 293 cells, pAVBcCAT expressed a similar amount of CAT activity in the absence or presence of adenovirus and the recombinant AAV-CAT genome was not replicated. In HeLa cells, pAVBcCAT expressed low levels of CAT activity, but this level was elevated by coinfection with adenovirus particles or by cotransfection with a plasmid which expressed the adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) product. The E1A product is a transcriptional activator and is expressed in 293 cells. Thus, expression from two AAV promoters is differentially regulated: expression from p/sub 19/ is increased by E1A, whereas p/sub 40/ yields high levels of constitutive expression in the absence of E1A. Both AAV vectors were packaged into AAV particles by complementation with wild-type AAV and yielded CAT activity when subsequently infected into cells in the presence of adenovirus.

  8. The Feline Mystique: Dispelling the Myth of the Independent Cat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Describes learning activities about cats for primary and intermediate grades. Primary grade activity subjects include cat behavior, needs, breeds, storybook cats, and celestial cats. Intermediate grade activity subjects include cat history, care, language, literary cats, and cats in art. (BC)

  9. Parathyroid hormone activation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 transcription requires the histone acetyltransferase activity of p300 and PCAF and p300-dependent acetylation of PCAF.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minnkyong; Partridge, Nicola C

    2010-12-03

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) regulates the transcription of many genes involved in bone remodeling in osteoblasts. One of these genes is matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13), which is involved in bone remodeling and early stages of endochondral bone formation. We have previously shown that Mmp-13 gene expression is highly induced by PTH treatment in osteoblastic UMR 106-01 cells, as well as primary osteoblasts. Here, we show that p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF), in addition to p300 and Runx2, is required for PTH activation of Mmp-13 transcription. PCAF was increasingly recruited to the MMP-13 proximal promoter region after PTH treatment, and this was associated with an increase in RNA polymerase II recruitment and histone acetylation. In addition, PTH treatment increased the acetylation of PCAF, a process that required p300. Knockdown of PCAF, p300, or Runx2 by siRNA decreased Mmp-13 mRNA expression after PTH treatment in both UMR 106-01 cells and primary osteoblasts. We found that there is a mutual dependence between p300 and PCAF to be recruited to the Mmp-13 promoter after PTH treatment. In promoter-reporter assays, p300 and PCAF had an additive effect on PTH stimulation of MMP-13 promoter activity, and this required their histone acetyltransferase activity. Our findings demonstrate that PCAF acts downstream of PTH signaling as a transcriptional coactivator that is required for PTH stimulation of MMP-13 transcription. PCAF cooperates with p300 and Runx2 to mediate PTH activation of MMP-13 transcription.

  10. The Fungal Sexual Pheromone Sirenin Activates the Human CatSper Channel Complex.

    PubMed

    Syeda, Shameem Sultana; Carlson, Erick J; Miller, Melissa R; Francis, Rawle; Clapham, David E; Lishko, Polina V; Hawkinson, Jon E; Hook, Derek; Georg, Gunda I

    2016-02-19

    The basal fungus Allomyces macrogynus (A. macrogynus) produces motile male gametes displaying well-studied chemotaxis toward their female counterparts. This chemotaxis is driven by sirenin, a sexual pheromone released by the female gametes. The pheromone evokes a large calcium influx in the motile gametes, which could proceed through the cation channel of sperm (CatSper) complex. Herein, we report the total synthesis of sirenin in 10 steps and 8% overall yield and show that the synthetic pheromone activates the CatSper channel complex, indicated by a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular calcium in human sperm. Sirenin activation of the CatSper channel was confirmed using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology with human sperm. Based on this proficient synthetic route and confirmed activation of CatSper, analogues of sirenin can be designed as blockers of the CatSper channel that could provide male contraceptive agents.

  11. Nucleotide sequence and phylogeny of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase encoded by the plasmid pSCS7 from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, S; Cardoso, M

    1991-08-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (cat) and its regulatory region, encoded by the plasmid pSCS7 from Staphylococcus aureus, was determined. The structural cat gene encoded a protein of 209 amino acids, which represented one monomer of the enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Comparisons between the amino acid sequences of the pSCS7-encoded CAT from S. aureus and the previously sequenced CAT variants from S. aureus, Staphylococcus intermedius, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Bacillus pumilis, Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Proteus mirabilis were performed. An alignment of CAT amino acid sequences demonstrated the presence of 34 conserved amino acids among all CAT variants. These conserved residues were considered for their possible roles in the structure and function of CAT. On the basis of the alignment, a phylogenetic tree was constructed. It demonstrated relatively large evolutionary distances between the CAT variants of enteric bacteria, Clostridium, Bacillus, and Staphylococcus species.

  12. Cat hindlimb motoneurons during locomotion. II. Normal activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, J A; Sugano, N; Loeb, G E; Marks, W B; O'Donovan, M J; Pratt, C A

    1987-02-01

    Activity patterns were recorded from 51 motoneurons in the fifth lumbar ventral root of cats walking on a motorized treadmill at a range of speeds between 0.1 and 1.3 m/s. The muscle of destination of recorded motoneurons was identified by spike-triggered averaging of EMG recordings from each of the anterior thigh muscles. Forty-three motoneurons projected to one of the quadriceps (vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, vastus intermedius, or rectus femoris) or sartorius (anterior or medial) muscles of the anterior thigh. Anterior thigh motoneurons always discharged a single burst of action potentials per step cycle, even in multifunctional muscles (e.g., sartorius anterior) that exhibited more than one burst of EMG activity per step cycle. The instantaneous firing rates of most motoneurons were lowest upon recruitment and increased progressively during a burst, as long as the EMG was still increasing. Firing rates peaked midway through each burst and tended to decline toward the end of the burst. The initial, mean, and peak firing rates of single motoneurons typically increased for faster walking speeds. At any given walking speed, early recruited motoneurons typically reached higher firing rates than late recruited motoneurons. In contrast to decerebrated cats, initial doublets at the beginning of bursts were seen only rarely. In the 4/51 motoneurons that showed initial doublets, both the instantaneous frequency of the doublet and the probability of starting a burst with a doublet decreased for faster walking speeds. The modulations in firing rate of every motoneuron were found to be closely correlated to the smoothed electromyogram of its target muscle. For 32 identified motoneurons, the unit's instantaneous frequencygram was scaled linearly by computer to the rectified smoothed EMG recorded from each of the anterior thigh muscles. The covariance between unitary frequencygram and muscle EMG was computed for each muscle. Typically, the EMG profile of the target

  13. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity of p300 modulates human T lymphotropic virus type 1 p30{sup II}-mediated repression of LTR transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Bindhu; Nair, Amrithraj M.; Datta, Antara; Hiraragi, Hajime; Ratner, Lee; Lairmore, Michael D. . E-mail: lairmore.1@osu.edu

    2006-10-25

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma, and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory disorders. HTLV-1 provirus has regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. HTLV-1 pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13{sup II} and p30{sup II}, which are incompletely defined in virus replication or pathogenesis. We have demonstrated that pX ORF-II mutations block virus replication in vivo and that ORF-II encoded p30{sup II}, a nuclear-localizing protein that binds with CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300, represses CREB and Tax responsive element (TRE)-mediated transcription. Herein, we have identified p30{sup II} motifs important for p300 binding and in regulating TRE-mediated transcription in the absence and presence of HTLV-1 provirus. Within amino acids 100-179 of p30{sup II}, a region important for repression of LTR-mediated transcription, we identified a single lysine residue at amino acid 106 (K3) that significantly modulates the ability of p30{sup II} to repress TRE-mediated transcription. Exogenous p300, in a dose-responsive manner, reverses p30{sup II}-dependent repression of TRE-mediated transcription, in the absence or presence of the provirus, In contrast to wild type p300, p300 HAT mutants (defective in histone acetyltransferase activity) only partially rescued p30{sup II}-mediated LTR repression. Deacetylation by histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC-1) enhanced p30{sup II}-mediated LTR repression, while inhibition of deacetylation by trichostatin A decreases p30{sup II}-mediated LTR repression. Collectively, our data indicate that HTLV-1 p30{sup II} modulates viral gene expression in a cooperative manner with p300-mediated acetylation.

  14. Subunits of ADA-two-A-containing (ATAC) or Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltrasferase (SAGA) Coactivator Complexes Enhance the Acetyltransferase Activity of GCN5.

    PubMed

    Riss, Anne; Scheer, Elisabeth; Joint, Mathilde; Trowitzsch, Simon; Berger, Imre; Tora, László

    2015-11-27

    Histone acetyl transferases (HATs) play a crucial role in eukaryotes by regulating chromatin architecture and locus specific transcription. GCN5 (KAT2A) is a member of the GNAT (Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase) family of HATs. In metazoans this enzyme is found in two functionally distinct coactivator complexes, SAGA (Spt Ada Gcn5 acetyltransferase) and ATAC (Ada Two A-containing). These two multiprotein complexes comprise complex-specific and shared subunits, which are organized in functional modules. The HAT module of ATAC is composed of GCN5, ADA2a, ADA3, and SGF29, whereas in the SAGA HAT module ADA2b is present instead of ADA2a. To better understand how the activity of human (h) hGCN5 is regulated in the two related, but different, HAT complexes we carried out in vitro HAT assays. We compared the activity of hGCN5 alone with its activity when it was part of purified recombinant hATAC or hSAGA HAT modules or endogenous hATAC or hSAGA complexes using histone tail peptides and full-length histones as substrates. We demonstrated that the subunit environment of the HAT complexes into which GCN5 incorporates determines the enhancement of GCN5 activity. On histone peptides we show that all the tested GCN5-containing complexes acetylate mainly histone H3K14. Our results suggest a stronger influence of ADA2b as compared with ADA2a on the activity of GCN5. However, the lysine acetylation specificity of GCN5 on histone tails or full-length histones was not changed when incorporated in the HAT modules of ATAC or SAGA complexes. Our results thus demonstrate that the catalytic activity of GCN5 is stimulated by subunits of the ADA2a- or ADA2b-containing HAT modules and is further increased by incorporation of the distinct HAT modules in the ATAC or SAGA holo-complexes.

  15. Application of Salmonella strains with altered nitroreductase and O-acetyltransferase activities to the evaluation of the mutagenicity of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Adamiak, W; Jadczyk, P; Kucharczyk, J

    1999-01-01

    The Ames test was applied to evaluation of the mutagenicity of month's samples of airborne particles from the center of Wrocław (SW Poland) collected in August and December 1997. The strains used for the study were TA 98, TA 100 and their derivatives: TA 98 NR, YG 1021, YG 1024, YG 1026, YG 1029, YG 1041, YG 1042. Both studied samples were mutagenic for almost all tested strains, with the exception of the August sample which did not influence the strain TA 100 without the metabolic activation with the S9 fraction. The December sample exhibited higher genotoxic activity than the August sample. Mutagenicity ratios of the strains with reduced nitroreductase and O-acetyltransferase activities were higher, and of the strain without the nitroreductase--lower than those of the parent strains. This indicates that nitro and amino derivatives of PAHs are responsible for the significant proportion of total mutagenicity of the studied samples of particulates. Metabolic activation with the S9 fraction caused the increase of the mutagenic activity of the samples, which indicates the presence of promutagens. The GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of known indirect mutagens from the PAHs group.

  16. Adaptation of cat motoneurons to sustained and intermittent extracellular activation.

    PubMed Central

    Spielmann, J M; Laouris, Y; Nordstrom, M A; Robinson, G A; Reinking, R M; Stuart, D G

    1993-01-01

    1. The main purpose of this study was to quantify the adaptation of spinal motoneurons to sustained and intermittent activation, using an extracellular route of stimulating current application to single test cells, in contrast to an intracellular route, as has been used previously. In addition, associations were tested between firing rate properties of the tested cells and other type (size)-related properties of these cells and their motor units. 2. Motoneurons supplying the medial gastrocnemius muscle of the deeply anaesthetized cat were stimulated for 240 s with microelectrodes which passed sustained extracellular current at 1.25 times the threshold for repetitive firing. Many cells were also tested following a rest period with intermittent 1 s current pulses (duration 600 ms) at the same relative stimulus strength. Cell discharge was assessed from the EMG of the motor unit innervated by the test neuron. The motoneurons and their motor units were assigned to four categories (i.e. types FF, FR, S and F; where F = FF + FR) based on conventional criteria. In all, twenty F (16 FF, 4 FR) and fourteen S cells were studied with sustained stimulation. Thirty of these cells (17 F, 13 S) and an additional two cells (1 F, 1 S) were studied with intermittent stimulation. 3. The mean threshold current required for sustained firing for a period of > or = 2 s was not significantly different for F and S cells. However, most of the other measured parameters of motoneuron firing differed significantly for these two cell groups. For example, at 1.25 times the threshold current for repetitive firing, the mean firing duration in response to 240 s of sustained activation was 123 +/- 88 s (+/- S.D.) for F cells vs. 233 +/- 19 s for S cells. These values were significantly longer than those from a comparable, previously reported study that employed intracellular stimulation. With intermittent stimulation, the firing durations of F and S cells were not significantly different from each

  17. Cannabinoids attenuate norepinephrine-induced melatonin biosynthesis in the rat pineal gland by reducing arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase activity without involvement of cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Koch, Marco; Dehghani, Faramarz; Habazettl, Iris; Schomerus, Christof; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2006-07-01

    Cannabinoids modulate neuronal and neuroendocrine circuits by binding to cannabinoid receptors acting upon cAMP/Ca(2+)-mediated intracellular signaling cascades. The rat pineal represents an established model to investigate intracellular signaling processes because a well defined input, the neurotransmitter norepinephrine, is transformed via cAMP/Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms into an easily detectable output signal, the biosynthesis of melatonin. Here we investigated the impact of cannabinoids on norepinephrine-regulated melatonin biosynthesis in the rat pineal. We demonstrated that treatment of cultured rat pineals with 9-carboxy-11-nor-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol or cannabinol significantly reduced norepinephrine-induced arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) activity and melatonin biosynthesis. These effects were not mimicked by the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 and were not blocked by cannabinoid 1 and 2 receptor antagonists. The cannabinoids used did not affect norepinephrine-induced increases in cAMP/Ca(2+) levels. Notably, cannabinoids were found to directly inhibit AANAT activity in lysates of the pineal gland. This effect was specific in so far as cannabinoids did not influence the activity of hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (HIOMT), the last enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that cannabinoids inhibit AANAT activity and attenuate melatonin biosynthesis through intracellular actions without involvement of classical cannabinoid receptor-dependent signaling cascades.

  18. Effect of inhibition of aloe-emodin on N-acetyltransferase activity and gene expression in human malignant melanoma cells (A375.S2).

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuw-Yuan; Yang, Jen-Hung; Hsia, Te-Chun; Lee, Jau-Hong; Chiu, Tsan-Hung; Wei, Yau-Huei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2005-12-01

    Arylamine carcinogens and drugs are N-acetylated by cytosolic N-acetyltransferase (NAT), which uses acetyl-coenzyme A as a cofactor. NAT plays an initial role in the metabolism of these arylamine compounds. 2-Aminofluorene is one of the arylamine carcinogens which have been demonstrated to undergo N-acetylation in laboratory animals and humans. Our previous study showed that human cancer cell lines (colon cancer, colo 205; liver cancer, Hep G2; bladder cancer, T24; leukemia, HL-60; prostate cancer, LNCaP; osteogenic sarcoma, U-2 OS; malignant melanoma, A375.S2) displayed NAT activity, which was affected by aloe-emodin in human leukemia cells. The purpose of this study was to determine whether aloe-emodin could affect the enzyme activity and gene expression of NAT at the mRNA and protein levels in malignant human melanoma A375.S2 cells. The results showed that aloe-emodin inhibited NAT1 activity (decreased N-acetylation of 2-aminofluorene) in intact cells in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of aloe-emodin on NAT1 at the protein level was determined by Western blotting and the mRNA levels were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cDNA microarray. These results clearly indicate that aloe-emodin inhibits the mRNA expression and enzyme activity of NAT1 in A375.S2 cells.

  19. Repression of GCN5 Histone Acetyltransferase Activity via Bromodomain-Mediated Binding and Phosphorylation by the Ku–DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Barlev, Nickolai A.; Poltoratsky, Vladimir; Owen-Hughes, Tom; Ying, Carol; Liu, Lin; Workman, Jerry L.; Berger, Shelley L.

    1998-01-01

    GCN5, a putative transcriptional adapter in humans and yeast, possesses histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity which has been linked to GCN5’s role in transcriptional activation in yeast. In this report, we demonstrate a functional interaction between human GCN5 (hGCN5) and the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) holoenzyme. Yeast two-hybrid screening detected an interaction between the bromodomain of hGCN5 and the p70 subunit of the human Ku heterodimer (p70-p80), which is the DNA-binding component of DNA-PK. Interaction between intact hGCN5 and Ku70 was shown biochemically using recombinant proteins and by coimmunoprecipitation of endogenous proteins following chromatography of HeLa nuclear extracts. We demonstrate that the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK phosphorylates hGCN5 both in vivo and in vitro and, moreover, that the phosphorylation inhibits the HAT activity of hGCN5. These findings suggest a possible regulatory mechanism of HAT activity. PMID:9488450

  20. Differences in Enzymatic Properties of the Saccharomyces kudriavzevii and Saccharomyces uvarum Alcohol Acetyltransferases and Their Impact on Aroma-Active Compounds Production

    PubMed Central

    Stribny, Jiri; Querol, Amparo; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Higher alcohols and acetate esters belong to the most important yeast secondary metabolites that significantly contribute to the overall flavor and aroma profile of fermented products. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, esterification of higher alcohols is catalyzed mainly by the alcohol acetyltransferases encoded by genes ATF1 and ATF2. Previous investigation has shown other Saccharomyces species, e.g., S. kudriavzevii and S. uvarum, to vary in aroma-active higher alcohols and acetate esters formation when compared to S. cerevisiae. Here, we aimed to analyze the enzymes encoded by the ATF1 and ATF2 genes from S. kudriavzevii (SkATF1, SkATF2) and S. uvarum (SuATF1, SuATF2). The heterologous expression of the individual ATF1 and ATF2 genes in a host S. cerevisiae resulted in the enhanced production of several higher alcohols and acetate esters. Particularly, an increase of 2-phenylethyl acetate production by the strains that harbored ATF1 and ATF2 genes from S. kudriavzevii and S. uvarum was observed. When grown with individual amino acids as the nitrogen source, the strain that harbored SkATF1 showed particularly high 2-phenylethyl acetate production and the strains with introduced SkATF2 or SuATF2 revealed increased production of isobutyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, and 2-phenylethyl acetate compared to the reference strains with endogenous ATF genes. The alcohol acetyltransferase activities of the individual Atf1 and Atf2 enzymes measured in the cell extracts of the S. cerevisiae atf1 atf2 iah1 triple-null strain were detected for all the measured substrates. This indicated that S. kudriavzevii and S. uvarum Atf enzymes had broad range substrate specificity as S. cerevisiae Atf enzymes. Individual Atf1 enzymes exhibited markedly different kinetic properties since SkAtf1p showed c. twofold higher and SuAtf1p c. threefold higher Km for isoamyl alcohol than ScAtf1p. Together these results indicated that the differences found among the three Saccharomyces species during the

  1. High-affinity choline uptake (HACU) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity in neuronal cultures for mechanistic and drug discovery studies.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Bailey, Jason A; Simon, Jay R; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2012-07-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is the neurotransmitter used by cholinergic neurons at the neuromuscular junction, in parasympathetic peripheral nerve terminals, and in important memory-related circuits in the brain, and takes part in other critical functions. ACh is synthesized from choline and acetyl coenzyme A by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). The formation of ACh in cholinergic nerve terminals requires the transport of choline into cells from the extracellular space and the activity of ChAT. High-affinity choline uptake (HACU) represents the majority of choline uptake into the nerve terminal and is the acutely regulated, rate-limiting step in ACh synthesis. HACU can be differentiated from nonspecific choline uptake by inhibition of the choline transporter with hemicholinium. Several methods have been described previously to measure HACU and ChAT activity simultaneously in synaptosomes, but a well-documented protocol for cultured cells is lacking. We describe a procedure for simultaneous measurement of HACU and ChAT in cultured cells by simple radionuclide-based techniques. Using this procedure, we have quantitatively determined HACU and ChAT activity in cholinergically differentiated human neuroblastoma (SK-N-SH) cells. These simple methods can be used for neurochemical and drug discovery studies relevant to several disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, myasthenia gravis, and cardiovascular disease.

  2. Activities of cytochrome P450 1A2, N-acetyltransferase 2, xanthine oxidase, and cytochrome P450 2D6 are unaltered in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Mary Jayne; Scripture, Charity D; Kashuba, Angela D M; Scott, Christy S; Gaedigk, Andrea; Kearns, Gregory L

    2004-03-01

    The activities of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT-2), xanthine oxidase (XO), and CYP2D6 were evaluated in 12 young children (aged 3-8 years) with mild cystic fibrosis (CF) and 12 age-matched healthy control subjects by use of standard caffeine and dextromethorphan phenotyping methods. Subjects were given 4 oz of Coca-Cola (approximately 35 mg caffeine) (The Coca-Cola Company, Atlanta, Ga) and a single 0.5-mg/kg dose of dextromethorphan. Urine was collected for 8 hours after biomarker administration, and enzyme activity was assessed by use of previously validated caffeine and dextromethorphan molar ratios. CYP2D6 genotyping was also performed in 10 of 12 subjects with CF and 11 of 12 control subjects. There were no significant differences in the urinary molar ratios for any of the enzyme systems evaluated. These data suggest that CF does not alter the activities of CYP1A2, NAT-2, XO, and CYP2D6. Altered biotransformation of drugs in this patient population is likely enzyme- and isoform-specific and thus is apparent for only selected compounds that are substrates for enzymes other than CYP1A2, NAT-2, XO, and CYP2D6.

  3. Modeling the Interaction between β-Amyloid Aggregates and Choline Acetyltransferase Activity and Its Relation with Cholinergic Dysfunction through Two-Enzyme/Two-Compartment Model

    PubMed Central

    Fgaier, Hedia; Mustafa, Ibrahim H. I.; Awad, Asmaa A. R.; Elkamel, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The effect of β-amyloid aggregates on activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) which is responsible for synthesizing acetylcholine (ACh) in human brain is investigated through the two-enzyme/two-compartment (2E2C) model where the presynaptic neuron is considered as compartment 1 while both the synaptic cleft and the postsynaptic neuron are considered as compartment 2 through suggesting three different kinetic mechanisms for the inhibition effect. It is found that the incorporation of ChAT inhibition by β-amyloid aggregates into the 2E2C model is able to yield dynamic solutions for concentrations of generated β-amyloid, ACh, choline, acetate, and pH in addition to the rates of ACh synthesis and ACh hydrolysis in compartments 1 and 2. It is observed that ChAT activity needs a high concentration of β-amyloid aggregates production rate. It is found that ChAT activity is reduced significantly when neurons are exposed to high levels of β-amyloid aggregates leading to reduction in levels of ACh which is one of the most significant physiological symptoms of AD. Furthermore, the system of ACh neurocycle is dominated by the oscillatory behavior when ChAT enzyme is completely inhibited by β-amyloid. It is observed that the direct inactivation of ChAT by β-amyloid aggregates may be a probable mechanism contributing to the development of AD. PMID:26413144

  4. A Metazoan ATAC Acetyltransferase Subunit That Regulates Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Is Related to an Ancient Molybdopterin Synthase Component*

    PubMed Central

    Suganuma, Tamaki; Mushegian, Arcady; Swanson, Selene K.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2012-01-01

    Molybdopterin (MPT) synthase is an essential enzyme involved in the synthesis of the molybdenum cofactor precursor molybdopterin. The molybdenum cofactor biosynthetic pathway is conserved from prokaryotes to Metazoa. CG10238 is the Drosophila homolog of the MoaE protein, a subunit of MPT synthase, and is found in a fusion with the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-upstream protein kinase-binding inhibitory protein (MBIP). This fused protein inhibits the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). dMoaE (CG10238) carries out this function as a subunit of the ATAC histone acetyltransferase complex. In this study, we demonstrate that Drosophila MoaE (CG10238) also interacts with Drosophila MoaD and with itself to form a complex with stoichiometry identical to the MPT synthase holoenzyme in addition to its function in ATAC. We also show that sequence determinants that regulate MAPK signaling are located within the MoaE region of dMoaE (CG10238). Analysis of other metazoan MBIPs reveals that MBIP protein sequences have an N-terminal region that appears to have been derived from the MoaE protein, although it has lost residues responsible for catalytic activity. Thus, intact and modified copies of the MoaE protein may have been conscripted to play a new, noncatalytic role in MAPK signaling in Metazoa as part of the ATAC complex. PMID:22345504

  5. Mechanical regulation of the proangiogenic factor CCN1/CYR61 gene requires the combined activities of MRTF-A and CREB-binding protein histone acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Mary; Liu, Haibo; Amir, Jawaria; Sun, Yi; Morris, Stephan W; Siddiqui, M A Q; Lau, Lester F; Chaqour, Brahim

    2009-08-21

    Smooth muscle-rich tissues respond to mechanical overload by an adaptive hypertrophic growth combined with activation of angiogenesis, which potentiates their mechanical overload-bearing capabilities. Neovascularization is associated with mechanical strain-dependent induction of angiogenic factors such as CCN1, an immediate-early gene-encoded matricellular molecule critical for vascular development and repair. Here we have demonstrated that mechanical strain-dependent induction of the CCN1 gene involves signaling cascades through RhoA-mediated actin remodeling and the p38 stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK). Actin signaling controls serum response factor (SRF) activity via SRF interaction with the myocardin-related transcriptional activator (MRTF)-A and tethering to a single CArG box sequence within the CCN1 promoter. Such activity was abolished in mechanically stimulated mouse MRTF-A(-/-) cells or upon inhibition of CREB-binding protein (CBP) histone acetyltransferase (HAT) either pharmacologically or by siRNAs. Mechanical strain induced CBP-mediated acetylation of histones 3 and 4 at the SRF-binding site and within the CCN1 gene coding region. Inhibition of p38 SAPK reduced CBP HAT activity and its recruitment to the SRF.MRTF-A complex, whereas enforced induction of p38 by upstream activators (e.g. MKK3 and MKK6) enhanced both CBP HAT and CCN1 promoter activities. Similarly, mechanical overload-induced CCN1 gene expression in vivo was associated with nuclear localization of MRTF-A and enrichment of the CCN1 promoter with both MRTF-A and acetylated histone H3. Taken together, these data suggest that signal-controlled activation of SRF, MRTF-A, and CBP provides a novel connection between mechanical stimuli and angiogenic gene expression.

  6. Chloroplastic and cytoplasmic overexpression of sheep serotonin N-acetyltransferase in transgenic rice plants is associated with low melatonin production despite high enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2015-05-01

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT), the penultimate enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis, catalyzes the conversion of serotonin into N-acetylserotonin. Plant SNAT is localized in chloroplasts. To test SNAT localization effects on melatonin synthesis, we generated transgenic rice plants overexpressing a sheep (Ovis aries) SNAT (OaSNAT) in their chloroplasts and compared melatonin biosynthesis with that of transgenic rice plants overexpressing OaSNAT in their cytoplasm. To localize the OaSNAT in chloroplasts, we used a chloroplast targeting sequence (CTS) from tobacco protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase (PPO), which expresses in chloroplasts. The purified recombinant CTS:OaSNAT fusion protein was enzymatically functional and localized in chloroplasts as confirmed by confocal microscopic analysis. The chloroplast-targeted CTS:OaSNAT lines and cytoplasm-expressed OaSNAT lines had similarly high SNAT enzyme activities. However, after cadmium and butafenacil treatments, melatonin production in rice leaves was severalfold lower in the CTS:OaSNAT lines than in the OaSNAT lines. Notably, enhanced SNAT enzyme activity was not directly proportional to the production of N-acetylserotonin, melatonin, or 2-hydroxymelatonin, suggesting that plant SNAT has a role in the homeostatic regulation of melatonin rather than in accelerating melatonin synthesis.

  7. Yng1p Modulates the Activity of Sas3p as a Component of the Yeast NuA3 Histone Acetyltransferase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Howe, LeAnn; Kusch, Thomas; Muster, Nemone; Chaterji, Ranjana; Yates III, John R.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2002-01-01

    The mammalian ING1 gene encodes a tumor suppressor required for the function of p53. In this study we report a novel function for YNG1, a yeast homolog of ING1. Yng1p is a stable component of the NuA3 histone acetyltransferase complex, which contains Sas3p, the yeast homolog of the mammalian MOZ proto-oncogene product, as its catalytic subunit. Yng1p is required for NuA3 function in vivo but surprisingly is not required for the integrity of the complex. Instead, we find that Yng1p mediates the interaction of Sas3p with nucleosomes and is thus required for the ability of NuA3 to modify histone tails. These data, and the observations that other ING1 homologs are found in additional yeast complexes that posttranslationally modify histones, suggest that members of the ING1 class of proteins may have broad roles in enhancing or modifying the activities of chromatin-modifying complexes, thereby regulating their activities in transcription control. PMID:12077334

  8. Evidence for arylamine N-acetyltransferase in Hymenolepis nana.

    PubMed

    Chung, J G; Kuo, H M; Wu, L T; Lai, J M; Lee, J H; Hung, C F

    1997-02-01

    N-acetyltransferase activities with p-aminobenzoic acid and 2-aminofluorene were determined in Hymenolepis nana, a cestode found in the intestine of the Sprague-Dawley rats. The N-acetyltransferase activity was determined using an acetyl CoA recycling assay and high pressure liquid chromatography. The N-acetyltransferase activities from a number of Hymenolepis nana whole tissue homogenizations were found to be 2.83 +/- 0.31 nmole/min/mg for 2-aminofluorene and 2.07 +/- 0.24 nmole/min/mg for p-aminobenzoic acid. The apparent Km and Vmax were 1.06 +/- 0.38 mM and 8.92 +/- 1.46 nmol/min/mg for 2-aminofluorene, and 2.16 +/- 0.19 mM and 12.68 +/- 2.26 nmol/min/mg for p-aminobenzoic acid. The optimal pH value for the enzyme activity was pH 8.0 for both substrates tested. The optimal temperature for enzyme activity was 37 degrees C for both substrates. The N-acetyltransferase activity was inhibited by iodacetamide. At 0.25 mM iodacetamide the activity was reduced 50% and 1.0 mM iodacetamide inhibited activity more than 90%. Among a series of divalent cations and salts, Fe2+, Ca2+ and Zn2+ were demonstrated to be the most potent inhibi-tors. Among the protease inhibitors, only ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid significantly protected N-acetyltransferase. Iodoacetate, in contrast to other agents, markedly inhibited N-acetyltransferase activity. This is the first demonstration of acetyl CoA:arylamine N-acetyltransferase activity in a cestode and extends the number of phyla in which this activity has been found.

  9. Overexpression and characterization of the chromosomal aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase of Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed

    Franklin, K; Clarke, A J

    2001-08-01

    The gene coding for aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase Ia [AAC(2')-Ia] from Providencia stuartii was amplified by PCR and cloned. The resulting construct, pACKF2, was transferred into Escherichia coli for overexpression of AAC(2')-Ia as a fusion protein with an N-terminal hexa-His tag. The fusion protein was isolated and purified by affinity chromatography on Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetic acid agarose and gel permeation chromatography on Superdex 75. Comparison of the specific activity of this enzyme with that of its enterokinase-digested derivative lacking the His tag indicated that the presence of the extra N-terminal peptide does not affect activity. The temperature and pH optima for activity of both forms of the 2'-N-acetyltransferase were 20 degrees C and pH 6.0, respectively, while the enzymes were most stable at 15 degrees C and pH 8.1. The Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters for AAC(2')-Ia at 20 degrees C and pH 6.0 were determined using a series of aminoglycoside antibiotics possessing a 2'-amino group and a concentration of acetyl coenzyme A fixed at 10 times its K(m) value of 8.75 microM. Under these conditions, gentamicin was determined to be the best substrate for the enzyme in terms of both K(m) and k(cat)/K(m) values, whereas neomycin was the poorest. Comparison of the kinetic parameters obtained with the different aminoglycosides indicated that their hexopyranosyl residues provided the most important binding sites for AAC(2')-Ia activity, while the enzyme exhibits greater tolerance further from these sites. No correlation was found between these kinetic parameters and MICs determined for P. stuartii PR50 expressing the 2'-N-acetyltransferase, suggesting that its true in vivo function is not as a resistance factor.

  10. Heparanase-mediated Loss of Nuclear Syndecan-1 Enhances Histone Acetyltransferase (HAT) Activity to Promote Expression of Genes That Drive an Aggressive Tumor Phenotype*

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Hurst, Douglas R.; Pisano, Claudio; Mizumoto, Shuji; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2011-01-01

    Heparanase acts as a master regulator of the aggressive tumor phenotype in part by enhancing expression of proteins known to drive tumor progression (e.g. VEGF, MMP-9, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and RANKL). However, the mechanism whereby this enzyme regulates gene expression remains unknown. We previously reported that elevation of heparanase levels in myeloma cells causes a dramatic reduction in the amount of syndecan-1 in the nucleus. Because syndecan-1 has heparan sulfate chains and because exogenous heparan sulfate has been shown to inhibit the activity of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) enzymes in vitro, we hypothesized that the reduction in nuclear syndecan-1 in cells expressing high levels of heparanase would result in increased HAT activity leading to stimulation of protein transcription. We found that myeloma cells or tumors expressing high levels of heparanase and low levels of nuclear syndecan-1 had significantly higher levels of HAT activity when compared with cells or tumors expressing low levels of heparanase. High levels of HAT activity in heparanase-high cells were blocked by SST0001, an inhibitor of heparanase. Restoration of high syndecan-1 levels in heparanase-high cells diminished nuclear HAT activity, establishing syndecan-1 as a potent inhibitor of HAT. Exposure of heparanase-high cells to anacardic acid, an inhibitor of HAT activity, significantly suppressed their expression of VEGF and MMP-9, two genes known to be up-regulated following elevation of heparanase. These results reveal a novel mechanistic pathway driven by heparanase expression, which leads to decreased nuclear syndecan-1, increased HAT activity, and up-regulation of transcription of multiple genes that drive an aggressive tumor phenotype. PMID:21757697

  11. Cat Batiks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buban, Marcia H.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses an art activity where fourth-grade students created backgrounds using melted paraffin and a variety of paints for their cat batik/collage. Explains that after the students created their backgrounds, they assembled their paper cats for the collage using smaller shapes glued together and wax to add texture for fur. (CMK)

  12. Spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) activity in human small-cell lung carcinoma cells following transfection with a genomic SSAT construct.

    PubMed

    Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Applegren, Nancy B; Devereux, Wendy; Hacker, Amy; Smith, Renee; Wang, Yanlin; Casero, Robert A

    2003-07-15

    Spermidine/spermine N (1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT) activity is typically highly inducible in non-small-cell lung carcinomas in response to treatment with anti-tumour polyamine analogues, and this induction is associated with subsequent cell death. In contrast, cells of the small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) phenotype generally do not respond to these compounds with an increase in SSAT activity, and usually are only moderately affected with respect to growth. The goal of the present study was to produce an SSAT-overexpressing SCLC cell line to further investigate the role of SSAT in response to these anti-tumour analogues. To accomplish this, NCI-H82 SCLC cells were stably transfected with plasmids containing either the SSAT genomic sequence or the corresponding cDNA sequence. Individual clones were selected based on their ability to show induced SSAT activity in response to exposure to a polyamine analogue, and an increase in the steady-state SSAT mRNA level. Cells transfected with the genomic sequence exhibited a significant increase in basal SSAT mRNA expression, as well as enhanced SSAT activity, intracellular polyamine pool depletion and growth inhibition following treatment with the analogue N (1), N (11)-bis(ethyl)norspermine. Cells containing the transfected cDNA also exhibited an increase in the basal SSAT mRNA level, but remained phenotypically similar to vector control cells with respect to their response to analogue exposure. These studies indicate that both the genomic SSAT sequence and polyamine analogue exposure play a role in the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation and subsequent induction of SSAT activity in these cells. Furthermore, this is the first production of a cell line capable of SSAT protein induction from a generally unresponsive parent line.

  13. Characterization of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) activities and action spectrum for suppression in the band-legged cricket, Dianemobius nigrofasciatus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Izawa, Norimitsu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Takeda, Makio

    2009-04-01

    Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT), constituting a large family of enzymes, catalyzes the transacetylation from acetyl-CoA to monoamine substrates, although homology among species is not very high. AANAT in vertebrates is photosensitive and mediates circadian regulation. Here, we analyzed AANAT of the cricket, Dianemobius nigrofasciatus. The central nervous system contained AANAT activity. The optimum pHs were 6.0 (a minor peak) and 10.5 (a major peak) with crude enzyme solution. We analyzed the kinetics at pH 10.5 using the sample containing collective AANAT activities, which we term AANAT. Lineweaver-Burk plot and secondary plot yielded a K(m) for tryptamine as substrate of 0.42 microM, and a V(max) of 9.39 nmol/mg protein/min. The apparent K(m) for acetyl-CoA was 59.9 microM and the V(max) was 8.14 nmol/mg protein/min. AANAT of D. nigrofasciatus was light-sensitive. The activity was higher at night-time than at day-time as in vertebrates. To investigate most effective wavelengths on AANAT activity, a series of monochromatic lights was applied (350, 400, 450, 500, 550, 600 and 650 nm). AANAT showed the highest sensitivity to around 450 nm and 550 nm. 450 nm light was more effective than 550 nm light. Therefore, the most effective light affecting AANAT activity is blue light, which corresponds to the absorption spectrum of blue wave (BW)-opsin.

  14. Piperidinols that show anti-tubercular activity as inhibitors of arylamine N-acetyltransferase: an essential enzyme for mycobacterial survival inside macrophages.

    PubMed

    Abuhammad, Areej; Fullam, Elizabeth; Lowe, Edward D; Staunton, David; Kawamura, Akane; Westwood, Isaac M; Bhakta, Sanjib; Garner, Alun Christopher; Wilson, David L; Seden, Peter T; Davies, Stephen G; Russell, Angela J; Garman, Elspeth F; Sim, Edith

    2012-01-01

    Latent M. tuberculosis infection presents one of the major obstacles in the global eradication of tuberculosis (TB). Cholesterol plays a critical role in the persistence of M. tuberculosis within the macrophage during latent infection. Catabolism of cholesterol contributes to the pool of propionyl-CoA, a precursor that is incorporated into cell-wall lipids. Arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) is encoded within a gene cluster that is involved in the cholesterol sterol-ring degradation and is essential for intracellular survival. The ability of the NAT from M. tuberculosis (TBNAT) to utilise propionyl-CoA links it to the cholesterol-catabolism pathway. Deleting the nat gene or inhibiting the NAT enzyme prevents intracellular survival and results in depletion of cell-wall lipids. TBNAT has been investigated as a potential target for TB therapies. From a previous high-throughput screen, 3-benzoyl-4-phenyl-1-methylpiperidinol was identified as a selective inhibitor of prokaryotic NAT that exhibited antimycobacterial activity. The compound resulted in time-dependent irreversible inhibition of the NAT activity when tested against NAT from M. marinum (MMNAT). To further evaluate the antimycobacterial activity and the NAT inhibition of this compound, four piperidinol analogues were tested. All five compounds exert potent antimycobacterial activity against M. tuberculosis with MIC values of 2.3-16.9 µM. Treatment of the MMNAT enzyme with this set of inhibitors resulted in an irreversible time-dependent inhibition of NAT activity. Here we investigate the mechanism of NAT inhibition by studying protein-ligand interactions using mass spectrometry in combination with enzyme analysis and structure determination. We propose a covalent mechanism of NAT inhibition that involves the formation of a reactive intermediate and selective cysteine residue modification. These piperidinols present a unique class of antimycobacterial compounds that have a novel mode of action different from

  15. Piperidinols That Show Anti-Tubercular Activity as Inhibitors of Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase: An Essential Enzyme for Mycobacterial Survival Inside Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Abuhammad, Areej; Fullam, Elizabeth; Lowe, Edward D.; Staunton, David; Kawamura, Akane; Westwood, Isaac M.; Bhakta, Sanjib; Garner, Alun Christopher; Wilson, David L.; Seden, Peter T.; Davies, Stephen G.; Russell, Angela J.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Sim, Edith

    2012-01-01

    Latent M. tuberculosis infection presents one of the major obstacles in the global eradication of tuberculosis (TB). Cholesterol plays a critical role in the persistence of M. tuberculosis within the macrophage during latent infection. Catabolism of cholesterol contributes to the pool of propionyl-CoA, a precursor that is incorporated into cell-wall lipids. Arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) is encoded within a gene cluster that is involved in the cholesterol sterol-ring degradation and is essential for intracellular survival. The ability of the NAT from M. tuberculosis (TBNAT) to utilise propionyl-CoA links it to the cholesterol-catabolism pathway. Deleting the nat gene or inhibiting the NAT enzyme prevents intracellular survival and results in depletion of cell-wall lipids. TBNAT has been investigated as a potential target for TB therapies. From a previous high-throughput screen, 3-benzoyl-4-phenyl-1-methylpiperidinol was identified as a selective inhibitor of prokaryotic NAT that exhibited antimycobacterial activity. The compound resulted in time-dependent irreversible inhibition of the NAT activity when tested against NAT from M. marinum (MMNAT). To further evaluate the antimycobacterial activity and the NAT inhibition of this compound, four piperidinol analogues were tested. All five compounds exert potent antimycobacterial activity against M. tuberculosis with MIC values of 2.3–16.9 µM. Treatment of the MMNAT enzyme with this set of inhibitors resulted in an irreversible time-dependent inhibition of NAT activity. Here we investigate the mechanism of NAT inhibition by studying protein-ligand interactions using mass spectrometry in combination with enzyme analysis and structure determination. We propose a covalent mechanism of NAT inhibition that involves the formation of a reactive intermediate and selective cysteine residue modification. These piperidinols present a unique class of antimycobacterial compounds that have a novel mode of action different

  16. Stimulation of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase mRNA translation by reovirus capsid polypeptide sigma 3 in cotransfected COS cells.

    PubMed Central

    Giantini, M; Shatkin, A J

    1989-01-01

    The mammalian reovirus S4 gene has been implicated in the serotype-dependent inhibition of host cell protein synthesis during viral replication in mouse L cells. To examine the effect(s) of this gene on transcription or translation or both, a DNA copy of the serotype 3 S4 gene was inserted into a eucaryotic expression vector. Cotransfection of COS cells with plasmids containing S4 and the reporter gene, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), resulted in a marked stimulation of CAT expression, predominantly at the level of translation. The significance of these findings is discussed in relation to the double-stranded-RNA-binding activity of the S4 gene product, polypeptide sigma 3. Images PMID:2724407

  17. Highly sensitive umu test system for the detection of mutagenic nitroarenes in Salmonella typhimurium NM3009 having high O-acetyltransferase and nitroreductase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Yoshimitsu; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Nohmi, Takehiko; Shimada, Tsutomu )

    1993-01-01

    A highly sensitive umu test system for the detection of genotoxic activities of a variety of mutagenic nitroarenes has been developed using a new tester strain, Salmonella typhimurium NM3009 having high O-acetyltransferase (O-AT) and nitroreductase (NR) activities. The NM3009 was constructed by subcloning both the O-AT and NR genes into plasmid vector pACYC184, and the resulting plasmid was introduced into the parent tester strain S. typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 harboring an umuC[prime]-[prime]lacZ fusion gene. The induction of umuC gene expression could be monitored by measuring the cellular [beta]-galactosidase activity produced by fusion gene. The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether the newly developed strain NM3009 is highly sensitive toward nitroarene compounds. The sensitivity of the strain NM3009 was compared with those of the parent TA1535/pSK1002 strain, the NR-overexpressing strain NM1011, the NR-deficient strain NM1000, the O-AT-overexpressing strain NM2009, and the O-AT-defective strain NM2000. The newly developed NM3009 strain had about 13-fold and 3-fold higher activities for N-AT and NR, respectively, than the original S. typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 strain. Among six strains tested, NM3009 showed the highest sensitivity toward such chemicals as 1-nitronaphthalene, 2-nitrofluorene, 3,7-dinitro-fluoranthene, 3-nitrofluoranthene, 5-nitroacenaphthene, 2-nitronaphthalene, 1-nitropyrene, 1,6-dinitropyrene, 3,9-dinitrofluoranthene, 4,4[prime]-dinitrobiphenyl, 1,8-dinitropyrene, m-dinitrobenzene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, and 1,3-dinitropyrene. The authors have also found that the order of sensitivities to induce umuC gene expression toward a variety of nitroarenes was NM3009 > NM2009 > NM1011 > TA1535/pSK1002 > NM2000 > NM1000. 40 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Effects of photoperiod on food intake, activity and metabolic rate in adult neutered male cats.

    PubMed

    Kappen, K L; Garner, L M; Kerr, K R; Swanson, K S

    2014-10-01

    With the continued rise in feline obesity, novel weight management strategies are needed. To date, strategies aimed at altering physical activity, an important factor in weight maintenance, have been lacking. Photoperiod is known to cause physiological changes in seasonal mammals, including changes in body weight (BW) and reproductive status. Thus, our objective was to determine the effect of increased photoperiod (longer days) on voluntary physical activity levels, resting metabolic rate (RMR), food intake required to maintain BW, and fasting serum leptin and ghrelin concentrations in adult cats. Eleven healthy, adult, neutered, male domestic shorthair cats were used in a randomized crossover design study. During two 12-week periods, cats were exposed to either a short-day (SD) photoperiod of 8 h light: 16 h dark or a long-day (LD) photoperiod of 16 h light: 8 h dark. Cats were fed a commercial diet to maintain baseline BW. In addition to daily food intake and twice-weekly BW, RMR (via indirect calorimetry), body composition [via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA)] and physical activity (via Actical activity monitors) were measured at week 0 and 12 of each period. Fasting serum leptin and ghrelin concentrations were measured at week 0, 6 and 12 of each period. Average hourly physical activity was greater (p = 0.008) in LD vs. SD cats (3770 vs. 3129 activity counts/h), which was primarily due to increased (p < 0.001) dark period activity (1188 vs. 710 activity counts/h). This corresponded to higher (p < 0.0001) daily metabolizable energy intake (mean over 12-week period: 196 vs. 187 kcal/day), and increased (p = 0.048) RMR in LD cats (9.02 vs. 8.37 kcal/h). Body composition, serum leptin and serum ghrelin were not altered by photoperiod. More research is needed to determine potential mechanisms by which these physiological changes occurred and how they may apply to weight management strategies.

  19. Leptin-induced Growth Stimulation of Breast Cancer Cells Involves Recruitment of Histone Acetyltransferases and Mediator Complex to CYCLIN D1 Promoter via Activation of Stat3*

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Neeraj K.; Vertino, Paula M.; Anania, Frank A.; Sharma, Dipali

    2010-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies documented that obesity is a risk factor for breast cancer development in postmenopausal women. Leptin, the key player in the regulation of energy balance and body weight control also acts as a growth factor on certain organs in both normal and disease state. In this study, we analyzed the role of leptin and the molecular mechanism(s) underlying its action in breast cancer cells that express both short and long isoforms of leptin receptor. Leptin increased MCF7 cell population in the S-phase of the cell cycle along with a robust increase in CYCLIN D1 expression. Also, leptin induced Stat3-phosphorylation-dependent proliferation of MCF7 cells as blocking Stat3 phosphorylation with a specific inhibitor, AG490, abolished leptin-induced proliferation. Using deletion constructs of CYCLIN D1 promoter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we show that leptin induced increase in CYCLIN D1 promoter activity is mediated through binding of activated Stat3 at the Stat binding sites and changes in histone acetylation and methylation. We also show specific involvement of coactivator molecules, histone acetyltransferase SRC1, and mediator complex in leptin-mediated regulation of CYCLIN D1 promoter. Importantly, silencing of SRC1 and Med1 abolished the leptin induced increase in CYCLIN D1 expression and MCF7 cell proliferation. Intriguingly, recruitment of both SRC1 and Med1 was dependent on phosphorylated Stat3 as AG490 treatment inhibited leptin-induced recruitment of these coactivators to CYCLIN D1 promoter. Our data suggest that CYCLIN D1 may be a target gene for leptin mediated growth stimulation of breast cancer cells and molecular mechanisms involve activated Stat3-mediated recruitment of distinct coactivator complexes. PMID:17344214

  20. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the gene specifying the bifunctional 6'-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase 2"-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase enzyme in Streptococcus faecalis and identification and cloning of gene regions specifying the two activities.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, J J; Gilmore, K S; Courvalin, P

    1986-08-01

    The gene specifying the bifunctional 6'-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase [AAC(6')] 2"-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase [APH(2")] enzyme from the Streptococcus faecalis plasmid pIP800 was cloned in Escherichia coli. A single protein with an apparent molecular weight of 56,000 was specified by this cloned determinant as detected in minicell experiments. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed the presence of an open reading frame capable of specifying a protein of 479 amino acids and with a molecular weight of 56,850. The deduced amino acid sequence of the bifunctional AAC(6')-APH(2") gene product possessed two regions of homology with other sequenced resistance proteins. The N-terminal region contained a sequence that was homologous to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase of Bacillus pumilus, and the C-terminal region contained a sequence homologous to the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase of Streptomyces fradiae. Subcloning experiments were performed with the AAC(6')-APH(2") resistance determinant, and it was possible to obtain gene segments independently specifying the acetyltransferase and phosphotransferase activities. These data suggest that the gene specifying the AAC(6')-APH(2") resistance enzyme arose as a result of a gene fusion.

  1. The narrow active-site cleft of O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase from Leishmania donovani allows complex formation with serine acetyltransferases with a range of C-terminal sequences.

    PubMed

    Raj, Isha; Kumar, Sudhir; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2012-08-01

    Cysteine is a crucial substrate for the synthesis of glutathione and trypanothione, which in turn maintain intracellular redox homeostasis and defend against oxidative stress in the pathogen Leishmania donovani. Here, the identification, sequencing, characterization and crystal structure at 1.79 Å resolution of O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS), a cysteine-biosynthetic pathway enzyme from L. donovani (LdOASS), are reported. It shows binding to the serine acetyltransferase (SAT) C-terminal peptide, indicating that OASS and SAT interact with each other to form a cysteine synthase complex, further confirmed by the structure of LdOASS in complex with SAT C-terminal octapeptide at 1.68 Å resolution. Docking and fluorescence binding studies show that almost all SAT C-terminus mimicking tetrapeptides can bind to LdOASS. Some peptides had a higher binding affinity than the native peptide, indicating that SAT-OASS interactions are not sequence-specific. The structure of LdOASS with a designed peptide (DWSI) revealed that LdOASS makes more interactions with the designed peptide than with the native peptide. In almost all known SAT-OASS interactions the SAT C-terminal sequence was shown to contain amino acids with large side chains. Structural comparison with other OASSs revealed that LdOASS has a relatively less open active-site cleft, which may be responsible for its interaction with the smaller-amino-acid-containing C-terminal LdSAT peptide. Biochemical studies confirmed that LdOASS interacts with SATs from Entamoeba histolytica and Brucella abortus, further displaying its sequence-independent and versatile mode of interaction with SATs. This implicates a critical role of the size of the active-site cleft opening in OASS for SAT-OASS interaction and thus cysteine synthase complex formation.

  2. Resistance to glufosinate is proportional to phosphinothricin acetyltransferase expression and activity in LibertyLink® and WideStrike® Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    LibertyLink® cotton cultivars are engineered for glufosinate resistance by overexpressing the bar gene that encodes phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT), whereas the insect-resistant WideStrike® cultivars were obtained by using the similar pat gene as a selectable marker. The latter cultivars ca...

  3. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase gene expressions are significantly correlated in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Linsalata, Michele; Giannini, Romina; Notarnicola, Maria; Cavallini, Aldo

    2006-01-01

    Background The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a transcription factor that regulates adipogenic differentiation and glucose homeostasis. Spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) are key enzymes involved in the metabolism of polyamines, compounds that play an important role in cell proliferation. While the PPARγ role in tumour growth has not been clearly defined, the involvement of the altered polyamine metabolism in colorectal carcinogenesis has been established. In this direction, we have evaluated the PPARγ expression and its relationship with polyamine metabolism in tissue samples from 40 patients operated because of colorectal carcinoma. Since it is known that the functional role of K-ras mutation in colorectal tumorigenesis is associated with cell growth and differentiation, polyamine metabolism and the PPARγ expression were also investigated in terms of K-ras mutation. Methods PPARγ, ODC and SSAT mRNA levels were evaluated by reverse transcriptase and real-time PCR. Polyamines were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). ODC and SSAT activity were measured by a radiometric technique. Results PPARγ expression, as well as SSAT and ODC mRNA levels were significantly higher in cancer as compared to normal mucosa. Tumour samples also showed significantly higher polyamine levels and ODC and SSAT activities in comparison to normal samples. A significant and positive correlation between PPARγ and the SSAT gene expression was observed in both normal and neoplastic tissue (r = 0.73, p < 0.0001; r = 0.65, p < 0.0001, respectively). Moreover, gene expression, polyamine levels and enzymatic activities were increased in colorectal carcinoma samples expressing K-ras mutation as compared to non mutated K-ras samples. Conclusion In conclusion, our data demonstrated a close relationship between PPARγ and SSAT in human colorectal cancer and this could represent an attempt to decrease

  4. The facC Gene of Aspergillus nidulans Encodes an Acetate-Inducible Carnitine Acetyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Stemple, Christopher J.; Davis, Meryl A.; Hynes, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Mutations in the facC gene of Aspergillus nidulans result in an inability to use acetate as a sole carbon source. This gene has been cloned by complementation. The proposed translation product of the facC gene has significant similarity to carnitine acetyltransferases (CAT) from other organisms. Total CAT activity was found to be inducible by acetate and fatty acids and repressed by glucose. Acetate-inducible activity was found to be absent in facC mutants, while fatty acid-inducible activity was absent in an acuJ mutant. Acetate induction of facC expression was dependent on the facB regulatory gene, and an expressed FacB fusion protein was demonstrated to bind to 5′ facC sequences. Carbon catabolite repression of facC expression was affected by mutations in the creA gene and a CreA fusion protein bound to 5′ facC sequences. Mutations in the acuJ gene led to increased acetate induction of facC expression and also of an amdS-lacZ reporter gene, and it is proposed that this results from accumulation of acetate, as well as increased expression of facB. A model is presented in which facC encodes a cytosolic CAT enzyme, while a different CAT enzyme, which is acuJ dependent, is present in peroxisomes and mitochondria, and these activities are required for the movement of acetyl groups between intracellular compartments. PMID:9829933

  5. Human Protein C produces anticoagulation and increased fibrinolytic activity in the cat

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, M.D.; Schaub, R.G.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of activated human Protein C (PCa) infusion on the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems of the Nembutal anesthetized cat was assessed. Human Protein C was activated by incubation with thrombin or by passage over a column of thrombin immobilized on CNBr Sepharose 4B. Cats were given bolus i.v. injections of either vehicle or PCa in a dose range of 3-16 ..mu..g/mL of calculated whole body volume. Citrated blood samples (9:1) were taken from a femoral vein prior to and at 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 120, and 180 min. after PCa. Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT) euglobulin clot lysis (ECLT) and I-125 fibrin release (FR) was measured. Vehicle treated cats had no change in any parameter. PCa produced a dose and time dependent prolongation of APTT while TT was unchanged. Anticoagulation was evident immediately after PCa infusion and began to normalize within 20 min. Fibrinolytic activity measured by ECLT and FR was also stimulated by PCa but was not evident until 40-60 minutes after PCa injection. The results show that human PCa induces anticoagulation effects in the cat similar to other species. However, stimulation of fibrinolysis requires a longer period of time before expression. This delay of fibrinolytic stimulation should be considered when assessing the effects of human Protein C in other species.

  6. Regulation of cAMP-induced arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase, Period1, and MKP-1 gene expression by mitogen-activated protein kinases in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Chansard, Mathieu; Iwahana, Eiko; Liang, Jian; Fukuhara, Chiaki

    2005-10-03

    In rodent pineal glands, sympathetic innervation, which leads to norepinephrine release, is a key process in the circadian regulation of physiology and certain gene expressions. It has been shown that gene expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in the melatonin synthesis arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aa-Nat), circadian clock gene Period1, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphtase-1 (MKP-1), is controlled mainly by a norepinephrine-beta-adrenergic receptor-cAMP signaling cascade in the rat pineal gland. To further dissect the signaling cascades that regulate those gene expressions, we examined whether MAPKs are involved in cAMP-induced gene expression. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses showed that one of the three MAPKs, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), was expressed in the pineal, and was phosphorylated by cAMP analogue stimulation with a peak 20 min after start of the stimulation, in vitro. A specific JNK inhibitor SP600125 (Anthra[1,9-cd]pyrazol-6(2H)-one1,9-pyrazoloanthrone), but not its negative control (N1-Methyl-1,9-pyrazoloanthrone), significantly reduced cAMP-stimulated Aa-Nat, Period1, and MKP-1 mRNA levels. Although another MAPK, p38(MAPK), has also been shown to be activated by cAMP stimulation, a p38(MAPK) inhibitor, SB203580 (4-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole, HCl), showed no effect on cAMP-induced Aa-Nat and Period1 mRNA levels; whereas SB203580, but not its negative analogue SB202474 (4-Ethyl-2(p-methoxyphenyl)-5-(4'-pyridyl)-IH-imidazole, DiHCl), significantly reduced cAMP-induced MKP-1 mRNA levels. Taken together, our data suggest that cAMP-induced Aa-Nat and Period1 are likely to be mediated by activation of JNK, whereas MKP-1 may be mediated by both p38(MAPK) and JNK activations.

  7. Opposite effects of EGTA and neutral surfactants on the loss of chicken pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Cabello, J C; Arpa, F; Agapito, M T; Recio, J M

    1990-01-01

    The effects of some general purpose drugs on the deactivation and activity measurement of the chicken pineal gland enzyme serotonin N-acetyl transferase (EC 2.3.1.5.) were studied. The drugs used were EGTA and two neutral surfactants, Nonidet P40 and Triton X-100. Enzyme activity showed significant variations ranging from 2.8 +/- 1.3 nmol/gland/h when Nonidet P40 was added to the homogenate buffer, to 31.8 +/- 1.7 nmol/gland/h when EGTA was present. This striking variation seemed to be caused by the ability of these compounds to modify the rate of NAT deactivation acting either as accelerating agents, as in the case of the detergents or as braking agent, as in the case of EGTA.

  8. The Purification of Choline Acetyltransferase of Squid-Head Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Husain, S. S.; Mautner, Henry G.

    1973-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.6) isolated from the head ganglia of squid could be purified by use of mercurial-Sepharose columns as well as Sepharose columns to which the enzyme inhibitor p-(m-bromophenyl)vinyl pyridinium had been attached. These columns, in conjunction with 30-55% ammonium sulfate precipitation, 40-30% ammonium sulfate extraction, chromatography on sulfopropyl-Sephadex and on cellulose phosphate and hydroxylapatite columns, led to the isolation of three factions of choline acetyltransferase ranging in activity from 1000 to 4000 μmole/mg of protein/per hr. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis suggests that two of these fractions are homogeneous. The squid choline acetyltransferase is different from the mammalian-brain enzymes in having a larger molecular weight under the conditions used and in being relatively poorly inhibited by styryl pyridinium compounds. Images PMID:4521199

  9. Accurate stepping on a narrow path: mechanics, EMG, and motor cortex activity in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Brad J.; Bulgakova, Margarita A.; Sirota, Mikhail G.; Prilutsky, Boris I.

    2015-01-01

    How do cats manage to walk so graciously on top of narrow fences or windowsills high above the ground while apparently exerting little effort? In this study we investigated cat full-body mechanics and the activity of limb muscles and motor cortex during walking along a narrow 5-cm path on the ground. We tested the hypotheses that during narrow walking 1) lateral stability would be lower because of the decreased base-of-support area and 2) the motor cortex activity would increase stride-related modulation because of imposed demands on lateral stability and paw placement accuracy. We measured medio-lateral and rostro-caudal dynamic stability derived from the extrapolated center of mass position with respect to the boundaries of the support area. We found that cats were statically stable in the frontal plane during both unconstrained and narrow-path walking. During narrow-path walking, cats walked slightly slower with more adducted limbs, produced smaller lateral forces by hindlimbs, and had elevated muscle activities. Of 174 neurons recorded in cortical layer V, 87% of forelimb-related neurons (from 114) and 90% of hindlimb-related neurons (from 60) had activities during narrow-path walking distinct from unconstrained walking: more often they had a higher mean discharge rate, lower depth of stride-related modulation, and/or longer period of activation during the stride. These activity changes appeared to contribute to control of accurate paw placement in the medio-lateral direction, the width of the stride, rather than to lateral stability control, as the stability demands on narrow-path and unconstrained walking were similar. PMID:26354314

  10. The lac operon galactoside acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Roderick, Steven L

    2005-06-01

    Of the proteins encoded by the three structural genes of the lac operon, the galactoside acetyltransferase (thiogalactoside transacetylase, LacA, GAT) encoded by lacA is the only protein whose biological role remains in doubt. Here, we briefly note the classical literature that led to the identification and initial characterization of GAT, and focus on more recent results which have revealed its chemical mechanism of action and its membership in a large superfamily of structurally similar acyltransferases. The structural and sequence similarities of several members of this superfamily confirm the original claim for GAT as a CoA-dependent acetyltransferase specific for the 6-hydroxyl group of certain pyranosides, but do not yet point to the identity of the natural substrate(s) of the enzyme.

  11. [The role of beta-endorphin in regulating the conditioned reflex activity of cats].

    PubMed

    Karamian, A I; Pankov, Iu A; Protsenko, A L; Sollertinskaia, T N; Kofman, I L

    1990-08-01

    The role of beta-endorphin in regulation of instrumental food conditioning and in more complicated forms of nervous activity in cats was found to involve a facilitating unspecific effect both on positive and negative food conditioning, the latter having a general adaptive character. The influence of the same small doses of beta-endorphin (10 mkg/kg - 15 x 10(-6) mkg/kg) on the choice responses was more complicated and depended on the basic level of conditioning and the typology of animals. Possible mechanism of the beta-endorphin effect on higher nervous activity, is discussed.

  12. Cat odor causes long-lasting contextual fear conditioning and increased pituitary-adrenal activation, without modifying anxiety.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Abellán, Cristina; Daviu, Nuria; Rabasa, Cristina; Nadal, Roser; Armario, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    A single exposure to a cat or cat odors has been reported by some groups to induce contextual and auditory fear conditioning and long-lasting changes in anxiety-like behaviour, but there is no evidence for parallel changes in biological stress markers. In the present study we demonstrated in male rats that exposure to a novel environment containing a cloth impregnated with cat fur odor resulted in avoidance of the odor, lower levels of activity and higher pituitary-adrenal (PA) response as compared to those exposed to the novel environment containing a clean cloth, suggesting increased levels of stress in the former animals. When re-exposed 9 days later to the same environment with a clean cloth, previously cat fur exposed rats again showed avoidance of the cloth area and lower levels of activity, suggesting development of contextual fear conditioning, which again was associated with a higher PA activation. In contrast, unaltered both anxiety-like behaviour and PA responsiveness to an elevated plus-maze were found 7 days after cat odor exposure. It is concluded that: (i) PA activation is able to reflect both the stressful properties of cat fur odor and odor-induced contextual fear conditioning; (ii) development of cat odor-induced contextual fear conditioning is independent of the induction of long-lasting changes in anxiety-like behaviour; and (iii) greater PA activation during exposure to the odor context is not explained by non-specific sensitization of the PA axis caused by previous exposure to cat fur odor.

  13. Inhibition of midbrain-evoked tonic and rhythmic motor activity by cutaneous stimulation in decerebrate cats.

    PubMed

    Beyaert, C A; Haouzi, P; Marchal, F

    2003-03-01

    The effect of mechanical and electrical stimulation of cervical cutaneous afferents was analysed on both the centrally induced tonic and rhythmic activities in hindlimb antagonist muscle nerves of 16 decerebrate paralysed cats. Electrical stimulation of dorsal midbrain evoked in the nerve to the tibialis anterior muscle (TAn) either rhythmic discharges (n=14), associated with tonic discharges in ten cats, or only tonic discharges (n=4). Centrally induced activity in the ipsilateral nerve to gastrocnemius medialis (GMn) occurred in fewer cats (n=12) and displayed similar patterns as in TAn. Manual traction of the scruff of the neck reduced the TAn tonic and rhythmic discharges (n=6) by 73% (P<0.05) and 71% (P<0.05), respectively, and reduced only the tonic component of GMn discharges (by 41%, n=3). Electrical stimulation (impulses 0.1-0.5 ms, 50 Hz) of cervical nerves belonging to C5 or C6 dermatomes, the intensity (0.4-4 mA) of which induced minimal inhibition of both TAn and GMn discharges, reduced significantly the tonic component of TAn discharges (by 39%, n=4). At higher intensities of electrical cervical nerve stimulation (2-6 mA) inducing maximal inhibitory effect, both tonic and rhythmic activities in TAn and GMn were both significantly reduced by, respectively, 81% and 94% in TAn (n=7), and by 49% and 43% in GMn (n=7). Electrical cervical nerve stimulation consistently reduced the isolated tonic discharge in TAn by 66% (n=4, P<0.05) and in GMn by 23% (n=3) when present. Thus the tonic component was more sensitive to inhibition than the rhythmic component of hindlimb muscle nerve activity.

  14. Structure and Biochemical Characterization of Protein Acetyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    SciTech Connect

    Brent, Michael M.; Iwata, Ayaka; Carten, Juliana; Zhao, Kehao; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2009-09-02

    The Sulfolobus solfataricus protein acetyltransferase (PAT) acetylates ALBA, an abundant nonspecific DNA-binding protein, on Lys{sup 16} to reduce its DNA affinity, and the Sir2 deacetylase reverses the modification to cause transcriptional repression. This represents a 'primitive' model for chromatin regulation analogous to histone modification in eukaryotes. We report the 1.84-{angstrom} crystal structure of PAT in complex with coenzyme A. The structure reveals homology to both prokaryotic GNAT acetyltransferases and eukaryotic histone acetyltransferases (HATs), with an additional 'bent helix' proximal to the substrate binding site that might play an autoregulatory function. Investigation of active site mutants suggests that PAT does not use a single general base or acid residue for substrate deprotonation and product reprotonation, respectively, and that a diffusional step, such as substrate binding, may be rate-limiting. The catalytic efficiency of PAT toward ALBA is low relative to other acetyltransferases, suggesting that there may be better, unidentified substrates for PAT. The structural similarity of PAT to eukaryotic HATs combined with its conserved role in chromatin regulation suggests that PAT is evolutionarily related to the eukaryotic HATs.

  15. The Use of Functional Data Analysis to Evaluate Activity in a Spontaneous Model of Degenerative Joint Disease Associated Pain in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Gruen, Margaret E.; Alfaro-Córdoba, Marcela; Thomson, Andrea E.; Worth, Alicia C.; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Lascelles, B. Duncan X.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction and objectives Accelerometry is used as an objective measure of physical activity in humans and veterinary species. In cats, one important use of accelerometry is in the study of therapeutics designed to treat degenerative joint disease (DJD) associated pain, where it serves as the most widely applied objective outcome measure. These analyses have commonly used summary measures, calculating the mean activity per-minute over days and comparing between treatment periods. While this technique has been effective, information about the pattern of activity in cats is lost. In this study, functional data analysis was applied to activity data from client-owned cats with (n = 83) and without (n = 15) DJD. Functional data analysis retains information about the pattern of activity over the 24-hour day, providing insight into activity over time. We hypothesized that 1) cats without DJD would have higher activity counts and intensity of activity than cats with DJD; 2) that activity counts and intensity of activity in cats with DJD would be inversely correlated with total radiographic DJD burden and total orthopedic pain score; and 3) that activity counts and intensity would have a different pattern on weekends versus weekdays. Results and conclusions Results showed marked inter-cat variability in activity. Cats exhibited a bimodal pattern of activity with a sharp peak in the morning and broader peak in the evening. Results further showed that this pattern was different on weekends than weekdays, with the morning peak being shifted to the right (later). Cats with DJD showed different patterns of activity from cats without DJD, though activity and intensity were not always lower; instead both the peaks and troughs of activity were less extreme than those of the cats without DJD. Functional data analysis provides insight into the pattern of activity in cats, and an alternative method for analyzing accelerometry data that incorporates fluctuations in activity across

  16. Atomic resolution structure of human α-tubulin acetyltransferase bound to acetyl-CoA

    PubMed Central

    Taschner, Michael; Vetter, Melanie; Lorentzen, Esben

    2012-01-01

    Acetylation of lysine residues is an important posttranslational modification found in all domains of life. α-tubulin is specifically acetylated on lysine 40, a modification that serves to stabilize microtubules of axons and cilia. Whereas histone acetyltransferases have been extensively studied, there is no structural and mechanistic information available on α-tubulin acetyltransferases. Here, we present the structure of the human α-tubulin acetyltransferase catalytic domain bound to its cosubstrate acetyl-CoA at 1.05 Å resolution. Compared with other lysine acetyltransferases of known structure, α-tubulin acetyltransferase displays a relatively well-conserved cosubstrate binding pocket but is unique in its active site and putative α-tubulin binding site. Using acetylation assays with structure-guided mutants, we map residues important for acetyl-CoA binding, substrate binding, and catalysis. This analysis reveals a basic patch implicated in substrate binding and a conserved glutamine residue required for catalysis, demonstrating that the family of α-tubulin acetyltransferases uses a reaction mechanism different from other lysine acetyltransferases characterized to date. PMID:23071318

  17. Cat vestibular neurons that exhibit different responses to active and passive yaw head rotations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, F. R.; Tomko, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    Neurons in the vestibular nuclei were recorded in alert cats during voluntary yaw rotations of the head and during the same rotations delivered with a turntable driven from a record of previous voluntary movements. During both voluntary and passive rotations, 35 percent (6/17) of neurons tested responded at higher rates or for a larger part of the movement during voluntary movements than during the same rotations delivered with the turntable. Neck sensory input was evaluated separately in many of these cells and can account qualitatively for the extra firing present during active movement.

  18. Feeding frequency, but not dietary water content, affects voluntary physical activity in young lean adult female cats.

    PubMed

    de Godoy, M R C; Ochi, K; de Oliveira Mateus, L F; de Justino, A C C; Swanson, K S

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether increased dietary water content and feeding frequency increased voluntary physical activity of young, lean adult female cats. A replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with a 2 × 2 factorial treatment arrangement (feeding frequency and water content) was used. The 4 treatments consisted of 1 meal daily dry pet food without added water (1D; 12% moisture as is), 1 meal daily dry pet food with added water (1W; 70% total water content), 4 meals daily dry pet food without added water (4D; 12% moisture as is), and 4 meals daily dry pet food with added water (4W; 70% total water content). Eight healthy adult, lean, intact, young, female domestic shorthair cats were used in this experiment. Voluntary physical activity was evaluated using Actical activity monitors placed on collars and worn around the cats' necks for the last 7 d of each experimental period of 14 d. Food anticipatory activity (FAA) was calculated based on 2 h prior to feeding periods and expressed as a percentage of total daily voluntary physical activity. Increased feeding frequency (4 vs. 1 meal daily) resulted in greater average daily activity (P = 0.0147), activity during the light period (P = 0.0023), and light:dark activity ratio (P = 0.0002). In contrast, physical activity during the dark period was not altered by feeding frequency (P > 0.05). Cats fed 4 meals daily had increased afternoon FAA (P= 0.0029) compared with cats fed once daily. Dietary water content did not affect any measure of voluntary physical activity. Increased feeding frequency is an effective strategy to increase the voluntary physical activity of cats. Thus, it may assist in the prevention and management of obesity.

  19. Alteration of ventilatory activity by intralaryngeal CO2 in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, D; Knuth, S L; Leiter, J C

    1992-01-01

    1. We investigated the responses of phrenic and hypoglossal nerve activities to the addition of 3, 5 and 10% CO2 to a constant flow of warm, humidified air through the isolated upper airway in decerebrate, paralysed, artificially ventilated cats. 2. In bilaterally vagotomized animals, intralaryngeal CO2 caused a dose-related decrease in peak integrated phrenic activity. This response became attenuated with time, but was still discernible after 3 min of continuous intralaryngeal CO2. In the same experiments, intralaryngeal CO2 caused a gradual increase in peak integrated hypoglossal nerve activity. 3. Intermittent pulsing of intralaryngeal CO2 during neural inspiration or expiration resulted in similar, but smaller decreases in the phrenic activity of some animals. Hypoglossal activity was not influenced appreciably by this procedure. 4. Systemic hypercapnia attenuated the phrenic responses to intralaryngeal CO2. The hypoglossal responses were greatly reduced or abolished. 5. In vagally intact cats, ventilated by a servo-respirator in accordance with phrenic nerve activity, intralaryngeal CO2 resulted in only a trace of reduction in phrenic discharge. After bilateral vagotomy, the same animals showed typical responses, as described above. 6. All responses to intralaryngeal CO2 were abolished after bilateral section of the superior laryngeal nerves (SLNs). 7. We conclude that intralaryngeal CO2 acts by way of receptors with afferents in the SLNs to decrease phrenic and increase hypoglossal nerve activities. The responses are not importantly gated during neural inspiration or expiration. The responses to intralaryngeal CO2 are most clearly demonstrable after bilateral vagotomy, suggesting that vagal mechanisms serve to stabilize respiratory motor neural activity in intact animals. PMID:1297832

  20. Imbalance in SOD/CAT activities in rat skeletal muscles submitted to treadmill training exercise.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Ricardo A; Andrades, Michael E; Oliveira, Marcos R; Pirola, Aline C; Zago, Morgana S; Silveira, Paulo C L; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Moreira, José Cláudio F

    2006-10-01

    The association between physical exercise and oxidative damage in the skeletal musculature has been the focus of many studies in literature, but the balance between superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and its relation to oxidative damage is not well established. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association between regular treadmill physical exercise, oxidative damage and antioxidant defenses in skeletal muscle of rats. Fifteen male Wistar rats (8-12 months) were randomly separated into two groups (trained n=9 and untrained n=6). Trained rats were treadmill-trained for 12 weeks in progressive exercise (velocity, time, and inclination). Training program consisted in a progressive exercise (10 m/min without inclination for 10 min/day). After 1 week the speed, time and inclination were gradually increased until 17 m/min at 10% for 50 min/day. After the training period animals were killed, and gastrocnemius and quadriceps were surgically removed to the determination of biochemical parameters. Lipid peroxidation, protein oxidative damage, catalase, superoxide dismutase and citrate synthase activities, and muscular glycogen content were measured in the isolated muscles. We demonstrated that there is a different modulation of CAT and SOD in skeletal muscle in trained rats when compared to untrained rats (increased SOD/CAT ratio). TBARS levels were significantly decreased and, in contrast, a significant increase in protein carbonylation was observed. These results suggest a non-described adaptation of skeletal muscle against exercise-induced oxidative stress.

  1. New perspectives for the regulation of acetyltransferase MOF.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangzhi; Dou, Yali

    2010-04-01

    In higher eukaryotes, histone acetyltransferase MOF (male absent on the first) is the major enzyme that acetylates histone H4 lysine 16, a prevalent mark associated with chromatin decondensation. Recent studies show that MOF resides in two different but evolutionarily conserved complexes, MSL and MOF-MSL1v1. Although these two MOF complexes have indistinguishable activity on histone H4 K16, they differ dramatically in acetylating non-histone substrate p53. The regulation of MOF activity in these complexes remains elusive. Given the evolution conservation of MOF and the importance of H4 K16 acetylation in maintaining higher order chromatin structures, understanding the function and regulation of MOF bears great significance. Here, we discussed the key differences in two MOF complexes that may shed light on the regulation of their distinct acetyltransferase activities. We also discussed coordinated functions of two MOF complexes with different histone methyltransferase complexes in transcription regulation.

  2. Inhibition of p300 lysine acetyltransferase activity by luteolin reduces tumor growth in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Selvi, Ruthrotha B.; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Shanmugam, Muthu K.; Li, Feng; Ramakrishnan, Gowsica B.; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M. Emam; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Basha, Jeelan; Bhat, Akshay; Vasudevan, Madavan; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam; Sethi, Gautam; Kundu, Tapas K.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin acetylation is attributed with distinct functional relevance with respect to gene expression in normal and diseased conditions thereby leading to a topical interest in the concept of epigenetic modulators and therapy. We report here the identification and characterization of the acetylation inhibitory potential of an important dietary flavonoid, luteolin. Luteolin was found to inhibit p300 acetyltransferase with competitive binding to the acetyl CoA binding site. Luteolin treatment in a xenografted tumor model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), led to a dramatic reduction in tumor growth within 4 weeks corresponding to a decrease in histone acetylation. Cells treated with luteolin exhibit cell cycle arrest and decreased cell migration. Luteolin treatment led to an alteration in gene expression and miRNA profile including up-regulation of p53 induced miR-195/215, let7C; potentially translating into a tumor suppressor function. It also led to down-regulation of oncomiRNAs such as miR-135a, thereby reflecting global changes in the microRNA network. Furthermore, a direct correlation between the inhibition of histone acetylation and gene expression was established using chromatin immunoprecipitation on promoters of differentially expressed genes. A network of dysregulated genes and miRNAs was mapped along with the gene ontology categories, and the effects of luteolin were observed to be potentially at multiple levels: at the level of gene expression, miRNA expression and miRNA processing. PMID:26517526

  3. Characterization of two metagenome-derived esterases that reactivate chloramphenicol by counteracting chloramphenicol acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weixin; Lee, Myung Hwan; Yoon, Mi-Young; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Malhotra, Shweta; Wu, Jing; Hwang, Eul Chul; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2011-12-01

    Function-driven metagenomic analysis is a powerful approach to screening for novel biocatalysts. In this study, we investigated lipolytic enzymes selected from an alluvial soil metagenomic library, and identified two novel esterases, EstDL26 and EstDL136. EstDL26 and EstDL136 reactivated chloramphenicol from its acetyl derivates by counteracting the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity in Escherichia coli. These two enzymes showed only 27% identity in amino acid sequence to each other; however both preferentially hydrolyzed short-chain p-nitrophenyl esters (< or =C5) and showed mesophilic properties. In vitro, EstDL136 catalyzed the deacetylation of 1- and 3- acetyl and 1,3-diacetyl derivates; in contrast, EstDL26 was not capable of the deacetylation at C1, indicating a potential regioselectivity. EstDL26 and EstDL136 were similar to microbial hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), and since chloramphenicol acetate esterase (CAE) activity was detected from two other soil esterases in the HSL family, this suggests a distribution of CAE among the soil microorganisms. The isolation and characterization of EstDL26 and EstDL136 in this study may be helpful in understanding the diversity of CAE enzymes and their potential role in releasing active chloramphenicol in the producing bacteria.

  4. Differential neural activation of vascular alpha-adrenoceptors in oral tissues of cats.

    PubMed

    Koss, Michael C

    2002-04-05

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative contribution of alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-adrenoceptors involved in sympathetic-evoked vasoconstrictor responses in tissues perfused by the lingual arterial circulation in pentobarbital anesthetized cats. Blood flow in the lingual artery was measured by ultrasonic flowmetry. Laser-Doppler flowmetry was utilized to measure oral tissue vasoconstrictor responses in the maxillary gingiva and from the surface of the tongue. Electrical stimulation of the preganglionic superior cervical sympathetic nerve resulted in frequency-dependent blood flow decreases at all three sites. These responses were stable over time and were uniformly antagonized by administration of phentolamine (0.3 - 3.0 mg kg(-1)). The selective alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin (10 - 300 microg kg(-1)), attenuated vasoconstriction in the lingual artery and gingiva, but was ineffective in blocking vasoconstriction in the tongue. Subsequent administration of rauwolscine (300 microg kg(-1)) antagonized remaining vasoconstrictor responses. In contrast, rauwolscine (10 - 300 microg kg(-1)), given alone, blocked evoked vasoconstriction in the tongue, and was without effect on gingival or lingual artery vasoconstrictor responses. Subsequent administration of prazosin (300 microg kg(-1)) largely antagonized remaining neurally elicited responses. These results suggest that neural vasoconstrictor responses in some regional vascular beds in the cat oral cavity are mediated by both alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-adrenoceptors. In contrast, tongue surface vasoconstrictor responses to sympathetic nerve activation appear to be mediated primarily by alpha(2)-adrenoceptors.

  5. Force regulation of ankle extensor muscle activity in freely walking cats.

    PubMed

    Donelan, J M; McVea, D A; Pearson, K G

    2009-01-01

    To gain insight into the relative importance of force feedback to ongoing ankle extensor activity during walking in the conscious cat, we isolated the medial gastrocnemius muscle (MG) by denervating the other ankle extensors and measured the magnitude of its activity at different muscle lengths, velocities, and forces accomplished by having the animals walk up and down a sloped pegway. Mathematical models of proprioceptor dynamics predicted afferent activity and revealed that the changes in muscle activity under our experimental conditions were strongly correlated with Ib activity and not consistently associated with changes in Ia or group II activity. This allowed us to determine the gains within the force feedback pathway using a simple model of the neuromuscular system and the measured relationship between MG activity and force. Loop gain increased with muscle length due to the intrinsic force-length property of muscle. The gain of the pathway that converts muscle force to motoneuron depolarization was independent of length. To better test for a causal relationship between modulation of force feedback and changes in muscle activity, a second set of experiments was performed in which the MG muscle was perturbed during ground contact of the hind foot by dropping or lifting the peg underfoot. Collectively, these investigations support a causal role for force feedback and indicate that about 30% of the total muscle activity is due to force feedback during level walking. Force feedback's role increases during upslope walking and decreases during downslope walking, providing a simple mechanism for compensating for changes in terrain.

  6. Medullary respiratory neural activity during hypoxia in NREM and REM sleep in the cat.

    PubMed

    Lovering, Andrew T; Fraigne, Jimmy J; Dunin-Barkowski, Witali L; Vidruk, Edward H; Orem, John M

    2006-02-01

    Intact unanesthetized cats hyperventilate in response to hypocapnic hypoxia in both wakefulness and sleep. This hyperventilation is caused by increases in diaphragmatic activity during inspiration and expiration. In this study, we recorded 120 medullary respiratory neurons during sleep in hypoxia. Our goal was to understand how these neurons change their activity to increase breathing efforts and frequency in response to hypoxia. We found that the response of medullary respiratory neurons to hypoxia was variable. While the activity of a small majority of inspiratory (58%) and expiratory (56%) neurons was increased in response to hypoxia, the activity of a small majority of preinspiratory (57%) neurons was decreased. Cells that were more active in hypoxia had discharge rates that averaged 183% (inspiratory decrementing), 154% (inspiratory augmenting), 155% (inspiratory), 230% (expiratory decrementing), 191% (expiratory augmenting), and 136% (expiratory) of the rates in normoxia. The response to hypoxia was similar in non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) and REM sleep. Additionally, changes in the profile of activity were observed in all cell types examined. These changes included advanced, prolonged, and abbreviated patterns of activity in response to hypoxia; for example, some inspiratory neurons prolonged their discharge into expiration during the postinspiratory period in hypoxia but not in normoxia. Although changes in activity of the inspiratory neurons could account for the increased breathing efforts and activity of the diaphragm observed during hypoxia, the mechanisms responsible for the change in respiratory rate were not revealed by our data.

  7. Rapid anterograde spread of premitotic activity along degenerating cat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Oaklander, A L; Miller, M S; Spencer, P S

    1987-01-01

    Peripheral nerve transection triggers a series of phenotypic alterations in Schwann cells distal to the site of injury. Mitosis is one of the earliest and best characterized of these responses, although the mechanism by which axonal damage triggers this critical event is unknown. This study examines the appearance and spatio-temporal spread of premitotic activity in distal stumps of transected cat tibial nerves. Premitotic activity was determined by measuring incorporation of [3H]thymidine (a marker of DNA synthesis during the S-phase of the cell cycle) into consecutive segments of desheathed tibial nerve. Incorporation of [3H]thymidine spread proximo-distally within distal nerve stumps between 3 and 4 days posttransection with an apparent velocity of at least 199 +/- 67 mm/day. This suggests that anterograde fast axonal transport may directly or indirectly be associated with the Schwann cell mitotic response to axon transection.

  8. Central command does not decrease cardiac parasympathetic efferent nerve activity during spontaneous fictive motor activity in decerebrate cats.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Akito; Matsukawa, Kanji; Wakasugi, Rie; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Liang, Nan

    2011-04-01

    To examine whether withdrawal of cardiac vagal efferent nerve activity (CVNA) predominantly controls the tachycardia at the start of exercise, the responses of CVNA and cardiac sympathetic efferent nerve activity (CSNA) were directly assessed during fictive motor activity that occurred spontaneously in unanesthetized, decerebrate cats. CSNA abruptly increased by 71 ± 12% at the onset of the motor activity, preceding the tachycardia response. The increase in CSNA lasted for 4-5 s and returned to the baseline, even though the motor activity was not ended. The increase of 6 ± 1 beats/min in heart rate appeared with the same time course of the increase in CSNA. In contrast, CVNA never decreased but increased throughout the motor activity, in parallel with a rise in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). The peak increase in CVNA was 37 ± 9% at 5 s after the motor onset. The rise in MAP gradually developed to 21 ± 2 mmHg and was sustained throughout the spontaneous motor activity. Partial sinoaortic denervation (SAD) blunted the baroreflex sensitivity of the MAP-CSNA and MAP-CVNA relationship to 22-33% of the control. Although partial SAD blunted the initial increase in CSNA to 53% of the control, the increase in CSNA was sustained throughout the motor activity. In contrast, partial SAD almost abolished the increase in CVNA during the motor activity, despite the augmented elevation of 31 ± 1 mmHg in MAP. Because afferent inputs from both muscle receptors and arterial baroreceptors were absent or greatly attenuated in the partial SAD condition, only central command was operating during spontaneous fictive motor activity in decerebrate cats. Therefore, it is likely that central command causes activation of cardiac sympathetic outflow but does not produce withdrawal of cardiac parasympathetic outflow during spontaneous motor activity.

  9. Expression of a streptomycete leaderless mRNA encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C J; Janssen, G R

    1997-01-01

    The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene from Streptomyces acrimycini encodes a leaderless mRNA. Expression of the cat coding sequence as a leaderless mRNA from a modified lac promoter resulted in chloramphenicol resistance in Escherichia coli. Transcript mapping with nuclease S1 confirmed that the 5' end of the cat message initiated at the A of the AUG translational start codon. Site-directed mutagenesis of the lac promoter or the cat start codon abolished chloramphenicol resistance, indicating that E. coli initiated translation at the 5' terminal AUG of the cat leaderless mRNA. Addition of 5'-AUGC-3' to the 5' end of the cat mRNA resulted in translation occurring also from the reading frame defined by the added AUG triplet, suggesting that a 5'-terminal start codon is an important recognition feature for initiation and establishing reading frame during translation of leaderless mRNA. Addition of an untranslated leader and Shine-Dalgarno sequence to the cat coding sequence increased cat expression in a cat:lacZ fusion; however, the level of expression was significantly lower than when a fragment of the bacteriophage lambda cI gene, also encoding a leaderless mRNA, was fused to lacZ. These results indicate that in the absence of an untranslated leader and Shine-Dalgarno sequence, the streptomycete cat mRNA is translated by E. coli; however, the cat translation signals, or other features of the cat mRNA, provide for only a low level of expression in E. coli. PMID:9352935

  10. Comparison of membrane electrical activity of cat gastric submucosal arterioles and venules.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, K G

    1983-01-01

    Intracellular electrical recordings were made from arterioles and venules of the cat gastric submucosa. Spontaneous rhythmic fluctuations of the membrane potential were recorded in 54% of the venular preparations. Arteriolar cells showed no spontaneous activity. Excitatory junction potentials were recorded in arterioles but not venules after single shocks to the perivascular nerves. The amplitude of the excitatory junction potential was decreased in the presence of alpha-blockers. Repetitive stimulation of the perivascular nerve caused a biphasic electrical response of venular smooth muscle cells. The depolarizing component was decreased by alpha-adrenergic blockade and the hyperpolarizing component by beta-blockade. Venules contracted in response to smaller depolarizations than did arterioles. The voltage threshold for contraction of venular cells was similar to that for arteriolar cells but the venular cells were significantly more depolarized at rest than were the arteriolar cells. The difference in resting potential provides an explanation for the difference in sensitivity to electrical input. PMID:6663496

  11. Conditioning of cortical neurons in cats with antidromic activation as the unconditioned stimulus.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, J H; Wilder, M B; Stevens, C D

    1977-08-01

    Single-cell activity was recorded from the postcruciate cortex of acutely prepared cats during a differential classical conditioning procedure. The conditioned stimuli (CS) were hind paw stimuli, and the unconditioned stimulus (US) was pyramidal tract stimulation that produced an antidromic response in the recorded cortical neuron. A control group was also examined in which the pyramidal stimulus was set below the threshold to produce an antidromic response. Clear differential conditioning was found for the experimental group, with antidromic activation of the neuron as the US. There was no evidence of differential conditioning in the control group without antidromic activation. Any activation of orthodromic pathways should have been the same in the control and experimental groups. The absence of conditioning in the control group demonstrated that orthodromic pathways were not contributing to the differential conditioning observed in the experimental group. This indicates that it was activation of the neuron produced by antidromic firing which was important for conditioning. All the evidence suggests that the site of learning was in the cortex. It is concluded that the the role of the US in conditioning may be simply to activate the neuron at an appropriate interval following the CS.

  12. Time budget and activity patterns of oncilla cats (Leopardus tigrinus) in captivity.

    PubMed

    Resende, Letícia de Souza; Neto, Glauce Lima e; Carvalho, Patrícia Gonçalves Duarte; Landau-Remy, Gabriella; Ramos-Júnior, Valdir de Almeida; Andriolo, Artur; Genaro, Gelson

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have reported on the diet of Leopardus tigrinus and ecological aspects, but studies of behavior are scarce. The aims of this study were to describe the time budget and activity patterns of 10 captive Leopardus tigrinus individuals. The group had an activity budget of 66% resting, 20.66% moving, 6.08% vigilant, 3.12% feeding, and 4.14% other activities during 720 hr of observations. The activity budgets of the males and females did not differ significantly; however, males ate more than did females. The nonhuman animals spent more time resting during the day than during the night. Moving, socializing, maintenance, and vigilance showed statistically higher mean values at night. Group analysis of the temporal pattern of behavior showed bimodal peaks. Activity levels were high from 5 a.m. to 6 a.m. and decreased through the day only to peak again at 7 p.m. Stereotypic pacing peaked at dawn and at dusk. Patterns of vigilance, feeding, and maintenance were also determined for the group during a 24-hr period. These results may be useful for the development of management plans and effective conservation strategies for captive cats.

  13. Long-term effects of axotomy on neural activity during cat locomotion.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, T; Hoffer, J A; Jhamandas, J; Stein, R B

    1980-01-01

    1. Neural activity was recorded from cats during locomotion on a treadmill using electrodes in Silastic cuffs placed around the sciatic nerve and the lateral gastrocnemius-soleus, medial gastrocnemius, common peroneal and tibial nerve branches. Each branch gave characteristic patterns of activity which were studied before and after it was cut distal to the recording cuffs. Sensory and motor components were separated and measured using cross-correlation techniques. The amplitude of the cross-correlation peaks was compared with the amplitude of compound action potentials evoked by electrical stimulation and recorded from the same sites in the anaesthetized animal. 2. Sensory activity declined rapidly following axotomy and did not recover unless reinnervation occurred. Sensory activity even 5 months after nerve section and resuture had recovered to only a fraction of the control values. This reduction is attributed to a decline in the evoked compound potentials and to many fibres being unsuccessful in regenerating to appropriate sensory organs. 3. Motor activity declined more than could be accounted for by a decline in evoked potentials over the first month after axotomy. The extra reduction represents a decline in the number of impulses generated by alpha-motoneurones after axotomy. If regeneration was permitted, motor activity recovered to higher levels than did the evoked potentials for the whole nerve. Even if regeneration was prevented by nerve ligation, motoneurones continued to generate activity at a stable level over a period of months during which whole nerve compound potentials continued to decline. 4. The modulation of motor activity in ligated nerves during the step cycle was still appropriate to the required movement. Thus, activity recorded from severed nerves in human amputees may be useful in controlling powered artificial limbs. The persistence of motor activity may be responsible for the lesser degree of atrophy found in motor fibres than in sensory

  14. [Cyclic processes in neuronal populations of the cat somatosensory cortex during extero- and interoceptive activation and in extinction].

    PubMed

    Lavrov, V V

    1991-11-01

    Comparative analysis of the EEG activation responses and multiunit responses in the cortical somatosensory (I) areas revealed a cyclic character of the multiunit discharges in response to light, sound, mechanical and chemical stimuli in alert cats. The fluctuations were reducing to initial values in the course of the stimulation.

  15. Substantia nigra dopaminergic unit activity in behaving cats: effect of arousal on spontaneous discharge and sensory evoked activity.

    PubMed

    Strecker, R E; Jacobs, B L

    1985-12-30

    Single-unit activity of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra was recorded in freely moving cats during a variety of conditions designed to shed light on the hypotheses that these neurons are involved in the regulation of arousal-stress and/or selective attention. Both aversive and non-aversive arousing experimental conditions were used, including tail pinch, immersion of feet in ice-water, white noise, inaccessible food, feeding, grooming, inaccessible rats, and somatosensory stimulation. None of these conditions had an effect on tonic neuronal discharge rate. However, these neurons did exhibit brief excitatory and inhibitory responses to phasic auditory or visual stimuli presented when the cat was sitting quietly. These responses were dramatically attenuated if these stimuli were presented during the aforementioned conditions of behavioral arousal. This sharply contrasts with the inability of these same conditions to influence spontaneous discharge rate. The sensitivity of this neuronal sensory response to the concurrent behavioral condition supports the hypothesis that these neurons are involved in attentional processes or selective responding. The lack of responsiveness of these neurons to a variety of arousal/stress manipulations supports the hypothesis that dopaminergic neurons play a permissive, rather than an active, role in these processes.

  16. [Extinction of brain activation responses to direct electrical stimulation of its structures in normal awake cats].

    PubMed

    Kratin, Iu G; Andreeva, V N; Iragashev, M S

    1975-03-01

    In unrestrained cats, repeated electric stimulation of the mesencephalic reticular formation (MRF), center median (CM) of the thalamus, and different cortical areas: both the low--and the high--threshold points (in regard to the brain activation), with the threshold strength current evoked similar EEG reactions of activation which diminished and disappeared after 3--5 repetitions of the stimuli. The moderate strength current evoked, apart from the EEG activation, pseudoviolent movements (turning of the head, etc.) and changes in the breathing rate. All these reactions could be extinguidhed by sufficient number of repetitions of stimuli, the effector reactions disappearing first, the EEG changes--last. The essential difference of the stimulation effects emerged when the strong current stimulation was used. In this case, when stimulating the high-threshold cortical points, the EEG and effector reactions could be abolished during long enough repetition of the stimuli, but it was impossible when stimulating the low-threshold cortical points, the MRF or CM: all the reactions stayed intense and stable, the animals became highly irritated. The data obtained are discussed from the point of view of the authors' concept of the interaction between the activating and integrative analysing mechanisms of the brain.

  17. Occurrence of neutral endopeptidase activity in the cat carotid body and its significance in chemoreception.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G K; Runold, M; Ghai, R D; Cherniack, N S; Prabhakar, N R

    1990-05-28

    The carotid body contains both tachykinins and enkephalins. Neutral endopeptidase (NEP, E.C. 3.4.24.11), has been suggested to involve in the metabolism of these neuropeptides in several organs. In the present study we determined neutral endopeptidase activity of the cat carotid body and assessed its significance in chemoreception. The cytosolic and membrane fractions of the carotid body contained NEP-like activity whereas it occurred only in the membrane fractions of the superior cervical and the nodose ganglia. Phosphoramidon, thiorphan and metal ion chelators inhibited NEP-like activity of all the 3 tissues studied; other protease inhibitors, however, were ineffective. Close carotid body administration of phosphoramidon significantly potentiated the carotid body response to low PO2 but not to hypercapnia. The enhanced response to hypoxia following phosphoramidon was further augmented by naloxone, an enkephalin antagonist. These results demonstrate that the glomus tissue contains detectable amounts of NEP-like activity and its inhibition selectively affects the hypoxic response of the carotid body.

  18. Research on acupuncture points and cortical functional activation position in cats by infrared imaging detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuwang; Sha, Zhanyou; Wang, Shuhai; Wen, Huanming

    2007-12-01

    The research of the brain cognition is mainly to find out the activation position in brain according to the stimulation at present in the world. The research regards the animals as the experimental objects and explores the stimulation response on the cerebral cortex of acupuncture. It provides a new method, which can detect the activation position on the creatural cerebral cortex directly by middle-far infrared imaging. According to the theory of local temperature situation, the difference of cortical temperature maybe associate with the excitement of cortical nerve cells, the metabolism of local tissue and the local hemal circulation. Direct naked detection of temperature variety on cerebral cortex is applied by middle and far infrared imaging technology. So the activation position is ascertained. The effect of stimulation response is superior to other indirect methods. After removing the skulls on the head, full of cerebral cortex of a cat are exposed. By observing the infrared images and measuring the temperatures of the visual cerebral cortex during the process of acupuncturing, the points are used to judge the activation position. The variety in the cortical functional sections is corresponding to the result of the acupuncture points in terms of infrared images and temperatures. According to experimental results, we know that the variety of a cortical functional section is corresponding to a special acupuncture point exactly.

  19. Molecular cloning of cDNAs encoding human carnitine acetyltransferase and mapping of the corresponding gene to chromosome 9q34.1

    SciTech Connect

    Corti, O.; Finocchiaro, G.; DiDonato, S.

    1994-09-01

    Using a combination of PCR screening of cDNA libraries and reverse transcription PCR, we have cloned three overlapping DNA fragments that encode human carnitine acetyltransferase (CAT), a key enzyme for metabolic pathways involved with the control of the acyl-Co/CoA ratio in mitochondria, peroxisomes, and endoplasmic reticulum. The resulting cDNA (2436 bp) hybridizes to a mRNA species of {approximately}2.9 kb that is particularly abundant in skeletal muscle and encodes a 68-kDa protein containing a peroxisomal targeting signal. The sequence matches those of several tryptic peptides obtained from purified human liver CAT and shows striking similarities with other members of the carnitine/choline acetyltransferase family very distant throughout evolution. CAT cDNA has also been used for fluorescence in situ hybridization on metaphase spreads of human chromosomes, and the corresponding gene, CAT1, has been mapped to chromosome 9q34.1. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  20. A chromosomal chloramphenicol acetyltransferase determinant from a probiotic strain of Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Galopin, Sébastien; Cattoir, Vincent; Leclercq, Roland

    2009-06-01

    The mechanism of resistance to chloramphenicol was studied in four strains of Bacillus clausii included in a probiotic mixture, which is administered to humans for prevention of gastrointestinal side effects due to oral antibiotic therapy. By cloning experiments, a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene, cat(Bcl), coding for a putative 228-amino acid CAT protein was identified in B. clausii SIN. The deduced amino acid sequence displayed from 31% to 85% identity with 56 CAT proteins from other Gram-positive bacterial strains. The cat(Bcl) gene was also detected by PCR in the three other B. clausii strains resistant to chloramphenicol, whereas it was absent in the three control strains susceptible to chloramphenicol. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis of total DNA digested by I-CeuI followed by hybridization with a cat-specific probe as well as unsuccessful repeated attempts of in vitro transfer of chloramphenicol resistance to various recipient cells indicated that cat(Bcl) was chromosomally located in all four resistant B. clausii strains.

  1. That Fat Cat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Phyllis Gilchrist

    2012-01-01

    This activity began with a picture book, Nurit Karlin's "Fat Cat On a Mat" (HarperCollins; 1998). The author and her students started their project with a 5-inch circular template for the head of their cats. They reviewed shapes as they drew the head and then added the ears and nose, which were triangles. Details to the face were added when…

  2. Activity of Caudate Nucleus Neurons in a Visual Fixation Paradigm in Behaving Cats

    PubMed Central

    Nagypál, Tamás; Gombkötő, Péter; Barkóczi, Balázs; Benedek, György; Nagy, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Beside its motor functions, the caudate nucleus (CN), the main input structure of the basal ganglia, is also sensitive to various sensory modalities. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of visual stimulation on the CN by using a behaving, head-restrained, eye movement-controlled feline model developed recently for this purpose. Extracellular multielectrode recordings were made from the CN of two cats in a visual fixation paradigm applying static and dynamic stimuli. The recorded neurons were classified in three groups according to their electrophysiological properties: phasically active (PAN), tonically active (TAN) and high-firing (HFN) neurons. The response characteristics were investigated according to this classification. The PAN and TAN neurons were sensitive primarily to static stimuli, while the HFN neurons responded primarily to changes in the visual environment i.e. to optic flow and the offset of the stimuli. The HFNs were the most sensitive to visual stimulation; their responses were stronger than those of the PANs and TANs. The majority of the recorded units were insensitive to the direction of the optic flow, regardless of group, but a small number of direction-sensitive neurons were also found. Our results demonstrate that both the static and the dynamic components of the visual information are represented in the CN. Furthermore, these results provide the first piece of evidence on optic flow processing in the CN, which, in more general terms, indicates the possible role of this structure in dynamic visual information processing. PMID:26544604

  3. Dynamics of single unit activity in the association cortex of waking cats during defensive conditioning.

    PubMed

    Shevko, G N; Bakanova, N F

    1981-01-01

    Responses of neurons in association area 5 during defensive conditioning to acoustic stimulation were studied in chronic experiments on cats. As a rule the neurons responded by excitation to presentation of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli. During the conditioned reflex unit responses usually appeared in the first 50 msec after the beginning of acoustic stimulation, i.e., they were connected with the action of the conditioned stimulus and not with manifestations of conditioned-reflex motion. The most significant changes in responses of cortical association units were observed in the initial period of conditioning. During stabilization of the conditioned reflex, responses of some neurons became stabilized, whereas in other neurons the spontaneous activity and intensity of responses increased, and in a third group the response to one of the stimuli disappeared. This last result indicated a switch during conditioning from polysensory unit responses to monosensory specialized responses. Extinctive inhibition was found to consist of a gradual decrease in the level of the spike discharge and its approximation to spontaneous activity, i.e., to be passive in character.

  4. Selective activation of carotid nerve fibers by acetylcholine applied to the cat petrosal ganglion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alcayaga, J; Iturriaga, R; Varas, R; Arroyo, J; Zapata, P

    1998-03-09

    The petrosal ganglion innervates carotid body chemoreceptors through the carotid (sinus) nerve. These primary sensory neurons are activated by transmitters released from receptor (glomus) cells, acetylcholine (ACh) having been proposed as one of the transmitters involved in this process. Since the perikarya of primary sensory neurons share several properties with peripheral sensory endings, we studied the electrical responses of the carotid nerve and glossopharyngeal branch to ACh locally applied to the cat petrosal ganglion superfused in vitro. Ganglionar applications of AChCl (1 microg-1 mg) generated bursts of action potentials conducted along the carotid nerve, while only a few spikes were exceptionally recorded from the glossopharyngeal branch in response to the largest doses. Carotid nerve responses to ACh were dose-dependent, the higher doses inducing transient desensitization. Application of nicotine to the petrosal ganglion also evoked dose-dependent excitatory responses in the carotid nerve. Responses to ACh were reversibly antagonized by adding hexamethonium to the superfusate, more intense and prolonged block of ACh responses being produced by mecamylamine. Ganglionar applications of gamma-amino butyric acid and serotonin, in doses of up to 5 mg, did not induce firing of action potentials in any of the branches of the glossopharyngeal nerve. Our results indicate that petrosal ganglion neurons projecting through the carotid nerve are selectively activated by ACh acting on nicotinic ACh receptors located in the somata of these neurons. Thus, cholinosensitivity would be shared by the membranes of peripheral endings and perikarya of primary sensory neurons involved in arterial chemoreception.

  5. Prejunctional inhibition of sympathetically evoked pupillary dilation in cats by activation of histamine H3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Koss, M C; Hey, J A

    1993-08-01

    Frequency-dependent pupillary dilations were evoked by electrical stimulation of the pre- or post-ganglionic cervical sympathetic nerve (sympatho-excitation) or the hypothalamus (parasympatho-inhibition) in sympathectomized anesthetized cats. Systemic administration of the selective histamine H3 receptor agonist (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (R alpha MeHA) produced a dose-dependent depression of mydriasis due to direct neural sympathetic activation but had no effect on responses elicited by parasympathetic withdrawal. The histamine H2 receptor agonist, dimaprit, was inactive. R alpha MeHA was much more effective in depressing sympathetic responses obtained at lower frequencies when compared to higher frequencies of stimulation. Responses evoked both pre- and postganglionically were inhibited by R alpha MeHA. This peripheral sympatho-inhibitory action of R alpha MeHA was antagonized by the histamine H3 receptor blocker thioperamide but not by intravenous pretreatment with the histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine. Histamine H2 receptor blockers cimetidine and ranitidine were also without effect. R alpha MeHA did not depress pupillary responses elicited by i.v. (-)-adrenaline. The results demonstrate that histamine H3 receptors modulate sympathetic activation of the iris at a site proximal to the iris dilator muscle. The predominant mechanism of action appears to the prejunctional inhibition of noradrenaline release from postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings. However, a concomitant ganglionic inhibitory action cannot be excluded.

  6. Activity of pyramidal tract neurons in the cat during standing and walking on an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Karayannidou, A; Beloozerova, I N; Zelenin, P V; Stout, E E; Sirota, M G; Orlovsky, G N; Deliagina, T G

    2009-08-01

    To keep balance when standing or walking on a surface inclined in the roll plane, the cat modifies its body configuration so that the functional length of its right and left limbs becomes different. The aim of the present study was to assess the motor cortex participation in the generation of this left/right asymmetry. We recorded the activity of fore- and hindlimb-related pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) during standing and walking on a treadmill. A difference in PTN activity at two tilted positions of the treadmill (+/- 15 deg) was considered a positional response to surface inclination. During standing, 47% of PTNs exhibited a positional response, increasing their activity with either the contra-tilt (20%) or the ipsi-tilt (27%). During walking, PTNs were modulated in the rhythm of stepping, and tilts of the supporting surface evoked positional responses in the form of changes to the magnitude of modulation in 58% of PTNs. The contra-tilt increased activity in 28% of PTNs, and ipsi-tilt increased activity in 30% of PTNs. We suggest that PTNs with positional responses contribute to the modifications of limb configuration that are necessary for adaptation to the inclined surface. By comparing the responses to tilts in individual PTNs during standing and walking, four groups of PTNs were revealed: responding in both tasks (30%); responding only during standing (16%); responding only during walking (30%); responding in none of the tasks (24%). This diversity suggests that common and separate cortical mechanisms are used for postural adaptation to tilts during standing and walking.

  7. Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A capsular polysaccharide acetyltransferase, methods and compositions

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, David S [Stone Mountain, GA; Gudlavalleti, Seshu K [Kensington, MD; Tzeng, Yih-Ling [Atlanta, GA; Datta, Anup K [San Diego, CA; Carlson, Russell W [Athens, GA

    2011-02-08

    Provided are methods for recombinant production of an O-acetyltransferase and methods for acetylating capsular polysaccharides, especially those of a Serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis using the recombinant O-acetyltransferase, and immunogenic compositions comprising the acetylated capsular polysaccharide.

  8. The mechanical actions of muscles predict the direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations in the cat hindlimb

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, T. Richard

    2013-01-01

    Humans and cats respond to balance challenges, delivered via horizontal support surface perturbations, with directionally selective muscle recruitment and constrained ground reaction forces. It has been suggested that this postural strategy arises from an interaction of limb biomechanics and proprioceptive networks in the spinal cord. A critical experimental validation of this hypothesis is to test the prediction that the principal directions of muscular activation oppose the directions responding muscles exert their forces on the environment. Therefore, our objective was to quantify the endpoint forces of a diverse set of cat hindlimb muscles and compare them with the directionally sensitive muscle activation patterns generated in the intact and decerebrate cat. We hypothesized that muscles are activated based on their mechanical advantage. Our primary expectation was that the principal direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations will be directed oppositely (180°) from the muscle endpoint ground reaction force. We found that muscle activation during postural perturbations was indeed directed oppositely to the endpoint reaction forces of that muscle. These observations indicate that muscle recruitment during balance challenges is driven, at least in part, by limb architecture. This suggests that sensory sources that provide feedback about the mechanical environment of the limb are likely important to appropriate and effective responses during balance challenges. Finally, we extended the analysis to three dimensions and different stance widths, laying the groundwork for a more comprehensive study of postural regulation than was possible with measurements confined to the horizontal plane and a single stance configuration. PMID:24304861

  9. The mechanical actions of muscles predict the direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations in the cat hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Honeycutt, Claire F; Nichols, T Richard

    2014-03-01

    Humans and cats respond to balance challenges, delivered via horizontal support surface perturbations, with directionally selective muscle recruitment and constrained ground reaction forces. It has been suggested that this postural strategy arises from an interaction of limb biomechanics and proprioceptive networks in the spinal cord. A critical experimental validation of this hypothesis is to test the prediction that the principal directions of muscular activation oppose the directions responding muscles exert their forces on the environment. Therefore, our objective was to quantify the endpoint forces of a diverse set of cat hindlimb muscles and compare them with the directionally sensitive muscle activation patterns generated in the intact and decerebrate cat. We hypothesized that muscles are activated based on their mechanical advantage. Our primary expectation was that the principal direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations will be directed oppositely (180°) from the muscle endpoint ground reaction force. We found that muscle activation during postural perturbations was indeed directed oppositely to the endpoint reaction forces of that muscle. These observations indicate that muscle recruitment during balance challenges is driven, at least in part, by limb architecture. This suggests that sensory sources that provide feedback about the mechanical environment of the limb are likely important to appropriate and effective responses during balance challenges. Finally, we extended the analysis to three dimensions and different stance widths, laying the groundwork for a more comprehensive study of postural regulation than was possible with measurements confined to the horizontal plane and a single stance configuration.

  10. Effects of hippocampal stimulation on retention and extinction of one way active avoidance response in cats.

    PubMed

    Gralewicz, K; Gralewicz, S

    1984-01-01

    We found previously that hippocampal stimulation (HiSt) at 20 cps, 100 mikroA, applied jointly with a tone (500 Hz) CS in the course of retention test, improved the performance and retarded the extinction of one way active avoidance response (AAR) in cats. During this test failures to perform the AAR were not punished in all but two trials it the beginning of each session. The first experiment of the present studies demonstrated that - (i) the AAR facilitating the effect of HiSt might be prevented by m all electrolytic lesions made around the tips of the stimulating electrodes, (ii) large lesions of the hippocampus exerted little effect on the AAR acquisition, but the response was extinguished faster during the retention test. In the second experiment two response prevention trials (non-reinforced presentations of the CS with no possibility to make the AAR) were run at the beginning of each session after the end of training. In these conditions the HiSt resulted in a faster extinction of the AAR as compared with implanted unstimulated animals. Large lesions of the hippocampus had no effect on the extinction rate. We conclude that the facilitation of retrieval from memory may be responsible for the effects of HiSt on conditioned behavior.

  11. Activity of thoracic and lumbar epaxial extensors during postural responses in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macpherson, J. M.; Fung, J.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the role of trunk extensor muscles in the thoracic and lumbar regions during postural adjustments in the freely standing cat. The epaxial extensor muscles participate in the rapid postural responses evoked by horizontal translation of the support surface. The muscles segregate into two regional groups separated by a short transition zone, according to the spatial pattern of the electromyographic (EMG) responses. The upper thoracic muscles (T5-9) respond best to posteriorly directed translations, whereas the lumbar muscles (T13 to L7) respond best to anterior translations. The transition group muscles (T10-12) respond to almost all translations. Muscles group according to vertebral level rather than muscle species. The upper thoracic muscles change little in their response with changes in stance distance (fore-hindpaw separation) and may act to stabilize the intervertebral angles of the thoracic curvature. Activity in the lumbar muscles increases along with upward rotation of the pelvis (iliac crest) as stance distance decreases. Lumbar muscles appear to stabilize the pelvis with respect to the lumbar vertebrae (L7-sacral joint). The transition zone muscles display a change in spatial tuning with stance distance, responding to many directions of translation at short distances and focusing to respond best to contralateral translations at the long stance distance.

  12. Electrical activity from smooth muscle of the anal sphincteric area of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, M; Gonella, J

    1981-01-01

    1. The electrical activities of longitudinal and circular smooth muscle of the anal sphincteric area have been studied in the cat. 2. Electromyographic recordings were achieved with extracellular electrodes, in vivo on acute and chronic animals, and in vitro on the isolated organ. In addition, electrical and mechanical activities were recorded from muscle strips with the sucrose gap technique. 3. Circular muscle coat electrical activity consisted exclusively of slow variations of the membrane potential of the smooth muscle cells. Each slow potential variation was followed by a contraction. 4. The electrical activity and the concomitant contractions were tetrodotoxin resistant (10(-6) g/ml.). Both disappeared in Ca-free solution or in the presence of Mn ions (10(-3) M). 5. On circular muscle, noradrenaline (10(-8)-10(-7) g/ml. in vitro, or 0.1-0.15 mg/kg in vivo) had an excitatory effect consisting in an increase of slow potential frequency. The action of noradrenaline was antagonized by phentolamine (10(-6)-10(-5) g/ml. in vitro, or 0.2 mg/kg in vivo). 6. On circular muscle, acetylcholine (10(-8)-10(-6) g/ml.), used exclusively on muscle strips, did never produce any clear cut effect. 7. Longitudinal muscle coat electrical activity consisted of spike potentials superimposed on slow time course depolarizations which were never observed alone. Each spike was followed by a contraction. This electrical activity was tetrodotoxin resistant (10(-6) g/ml.). 8. Longitudinal muscle activity was abolished by noradrenaline (10(-6) g/ml.) and enhanced by acetylcholine (10(-8)-10(-6) g/ml.). The action of noradrenaline was antagonized by propranolol (0.2 mg/kg I.V.; 10(-6) g/ml.) and that of acetylcholine by atropine (10(-7) g/ml.). 9. Electrophysiological and pharmacological data indicate that electromechanical coupling is achieved (1) in circular muscle, through Ca dependent slow variations in membrane potential of the muscle cells and (2) in longitudinal muscle, through spike

  13. Day/night fluctuations in melatonin content, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase activity and NAT mRNA expression in the CNS, peripheral tissues and hemolymph of the cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Bembenek, Jadwiga; Sehadova, Hana; Ichihara, Naoyuki; Takeda, Makio

    2005-01-01

    Melatonin content measured by a radioenzymatic assay in the brain of the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) showed a day/night fluctuation with higher levels at night under LD 12:12. The activity of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) in brain was also higher at night and this pattern continued in constant darkness. The results suggest that the rhythmicity in melatonin content can be caused by NAT. Melatonin content in hemolymph showed an even greater day/night difference, more than 12 times that in brain under LD 12:12. Melatonin levels in retina were also higher at night while NAT activity was not significantly higher at night than at daytime. Using a probe designed from NAT cloned from testes we performed Northern blot analysis of total RNA, which revealed that the level of NAT mRNA was higher in midgut, ovary and female accessory glands than in fat body and brain. The level of transcript in midgut was higher at night, but the levels in ovary and female accessory reproductive gland showed the opposite pattern. We also used the antibody to whole Drosophila melanogaster aaNAT1 protein, seeking a homologous antigen in the cephalic ganglia. NAT-like antigen was detected in several restricted populations of cells in the brain that were partially co-localized with PER-like antigen. The results suggest that NAT exists in multiple forms in various tissues of the cockroach and that its functions and regulations can vary among tissues. The results in the brain led to the conclusion that NAT could be a clock-controlled gene functioning as an output regulator of the circadian clock.

  14. Sensory experiences in humans and single-unit activity in cats evoked by polymodal stimulation of the cornea

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, M Carmen; Belmonte, Carlos; Gallar, Juana

    2001-01-01

    The cornea of human subjects and of anaesthetised cats was stimulated with a jet of air of controlled flow, temperature and CO2 concentration delivered by a gas aesthesiometer. In humans, the intensity and magnitude of various components of the sensory experience (intensity of the sensation, degree of irritation, magnitude of burning and stinging pain, magnitude of the cold and warm components of the sensation) were measured using separate visual analog scales. In anaesthetised cats, the impulse response to the same stimuli was recorded from single mechanosensory, polymodal and cold-sensitive corneal fibres in the ciliary nerves. Intensity-response curves for mechanical stimulation showed that all parameters of the sensation experienced by humans increased with the intensity of the stimulus. Mechanical stimuli recruited mainly phasic mechanosensory and polymodal afferents in the cat. Acidic stimulation with gas mixtures of increasing CO2 concentration evoked irritation, burning and to a lesser extent stinging pain of a magnitude roughly proportional to the intensity of the stimulus in humans. CO2 primarily recruited polymodal afferents and weakly excited cold-sensitive fibres in the cat's cornea. Heat stimuli evoked in humans a sensation profile similar to CO2 but accompanied by a warmth component. In the cat's cornea, heat excited only polymodal fibres and silenced cold-sensitive corneal units. Cold stimuli applied to the human cornea elicited a sensation of cooling that became irritant at the lowest temperatures. Corneal cold-sensitive fibres of the cat were activated in a manner proportional to the temperature drop, while polymodal nociceptor fibres were recruited only by the lowest temperatures. Topical menthol (0.2 mm) applied to humans evoked and later eliminated cold sensations produced by cold stimuli while the irritation sensation caused by low temperature stimuli still persisted. Human subjects were able to identify masked mechanical, thermal and chemical

  15. Propranolol, but not naloxone, enhances spinal reflex bladder activity and reduces pudendal inhibition in cats.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Marc J; Xiao, Zhiying; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of β-adrenergic and opioid receptors in spinal reflex bladder activity and in the inhibition induced by pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) or tibial nerve stimulation (TNS). Spinal reflex bladder contractions were induced by intravesical infusion of 0.25% acetic acid in α-chloralose-anesthetized cats after an acute spinal cord transection (SCT) at the thoracic T9/T10 level. PNS or TNS at 5 Hz was applied to inhibit these spinal reflex contractions at 2 and 4 times the threshold intensity (T) for inducing anal or toe twitch, respectively. During a cystrometrogram (CMG), PNS at 2T and 4T significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity from 58.0 ± 4.7% to 85.8 ± 10.3% and 96.5 ± 10.7%, respectively, of saline control capacity, while TNS failed to inhibit spinal reflex bladder contractions. After administering propranolol (3 mg/kg iv, a β₁/β₂-adrenergic receptor antagonist), the effects of 2T and 4T PNS on bladder capacity were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced to 64.5 ± 9.5% and 64.7 ± 7.3%, respectively, of the saline control capacity. However, the residual PNS inhibition (about 10% increase in capacity) was still statistically significant (P < 0.05). Propranolol treatment also significantly (P = 0.0019) increased the amplitude of bladder contractions but did not change the control bladder capacity. Naloxone (1 mg/kg iv, an opioid receptor antagonist) had no effect on either spinal reflex bladder contractions or PNS inhibition. At the end of experiments, hexamethonium (10 mg/kg iv, a ganglionic blocker) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions. This study indicates an important role of β₁/β₂-adrenergic receptors in pudendal inhibition and spinal reflex bladder activity.

  16. Arylamine N-Acetyltransferases in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Edith; Sandy, James; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios; Fullam, Elizabeth; Bhakta, Sanjib; Westwood, Isaac; Krylova, Anna; Lack, Nathan; Noble, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Polymorphic Human arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT2) inactivates the anti-tubercular drug isoniazid by acetyltransfer from acetylCoA. There are active NAT proteins encoded by homologous genes in mycobacteria including M. tuberculosis, M. bovis BCG, M. smegmatis and M. marinum. Crystallographic structures of NATs from M. smegmatis and M. marinum, as native enzymes and with isoniazid bound share a similar fold with the first NAT structure, Salmonella typhimurium NAT. There are three approximately equal domains and an active site essential catalytic triad of cysteine, histidine and aspartate in the first two domains. An acetyl group from acetylCoA is transferred to cysteine and then to the acetyl acceptor e.g. isoniazid. M. marinum NAT binds CoA in a more open mode compared with CoA binding to human NAT2. The structure of mycobacterial NAT may promote its role in synthesis of cell wall lipids, identified through gene deletion studies. NAT protein is essential for survival of M. bovis BCG in macrophage as are the proteins encoded by other genes in the same gene cluster (hsaA-D). HsaA-D degrade cholesterol, essential for mycobacterial survival inside macrophage. Nat expression remains to be fully understood but is co-ordinated with hsaA-D and other stress response genes in mycobacteria. Amide synthase genes in the streptomyces are also nat homologues. The amide synthases are predicted to catalyse intramolecular amide bond formation and creation of cyclic molecules, e.g. geldanamycin. Lack of conservation of the CoA binding cleft residues of M. marinum NAT suggests the amide synthase reaction mechanism does not involve a soluble CoA intermediate during amide formation and ring closure. PMID:18680471

  17. Chemical biology of histone acetyltransferase natural compounds modulators.

    PubMed

    Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Vassallo, Antonio; Rubio, Osmany Cuesta; Castellano, Sabrina; Sbardella, Gianluca; De Tommasi, Nunziatina

    2011-05-01

    Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are a class of epigenetic enzymes crucial for chromatin restructuring and transcriptional regulation in eukaryotic cells, thus being a promising target for therapeutic development. Nonetheless, differently from histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibitors, there is still paucity of small-molecule modulators of HAT activity. After a decline during past decade, natural products and their derivatives could be once again a valuable tool in the lead discovery process and meet such need of Novel Chemical Entities (NCEs). In this review, we will provide a comprehensive summary on the discovery of small-molecule HAT modulators from naturally occurring molecular scaffolds.

  18. Overexpression of Shati/Nat8l, an N-acetyltransferase, in the nucleus accumbens attenuates the response to methamphetamine via activation of group II mGluRs in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Ishikawa, Yudai; Iegaki, Noriyuki; Sumi, Kazuyuki; Fu, Kequan; Sato, Keiji; Furukawa-Hibi, Yoko; Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Uno, Kyosuke; Nitta, Atsumi

    2014-08-01

    A novel N-acetyltransferase, Shati/Nat8l, was identified in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of mice with methamphetamine (METH) treatment. Previously we reported that suppression of Shati/Nat8l enhanced METH-induced behavioral alterations via dopaminergic neuronal regulation. However, the physiological mechanisms of Shati/Nat8l on the dopaminergic system in the brain are unclear. In this study, we injected adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector containing Shati/Nat8l into the NAc or dorsal striatum (dS) of mice, to increase Shati/Nat8l expression. Overexpression of Shati/Nat8l in the NAc, but not in the dS, attenuated METH-induced hyperlocomotion, locomotor sensitization, and conditioned place preference in mice. Moreover, the Shati/Nat8l overexpression in the NAc attenuated the elevation of extracellular dopamine levels induced by METH in in vivo microdialysis experiments. These behavioral and neurochemical alterations due to Shati/Nat8l overexpression in the NAc were inhibited by treatment with selective group II metabotropic glutamate receptor type 2 and 3 (mGluR2/3) antagonist LY341495. In the AAV vector-injected NAc, the tissue contents of both N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), endogenous mGluR3 agonist, were elevated. The injection of peptidase inhibitor of NAAG or the perfusion of NAAG itself reduced the basal levels of extracellular dopamine in the NAc of naive mice. These results indicate that Shati/Nat8l in the NAc, but not in the dS, plays an important suppressive role in the behavioral responses to METH by controlling the dopaminergic system via activation of group II mGluRs.

  19. System-wide Studies of N-Lysine Acetylation in Rhodopseudomonas palustris Reveals Substrate Specificity of Protein Acetyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Crosby, Heidi A; Pelletier, Dale A; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2012-01-01

    Background: Protein acetylation is widespread in prokaryotes. Results: Six new acyl-CoA synthetases whose activities are controlled by acetylation were identified, and their substrate preference established. A new protein acetyltransferase was also identified and its substrate specificity determined. Conclusion: Protein acetyltransferases acetylate a conserved lysine residue in protein substrates. Significance: The R. palustris Pat enzyme specifically acetylates AMP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases and regulates fatty acid metabolism.

  20. Role of biomechanics and muscle activation strategy in the production of endpoint force patterns in the cat hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Michel A; Bhowmik-Stoker, Manoshi; McConnell, George C; Grill, Warren M

    2007-01-01

    We used a musculoskeletal model of the cat hindlimb to compare the patterns of endpoint forces generated by all possible combination of 12 hindlimb muscles under three different muscle activation rules: homogeneous activation of muscles based on uniform activation levels, homogeneous activation of muscles based on uniform (normalized) force production, and activation based on the topography of spinal motoneuron pools. Force patterns were compared with the patterns obtained experimentally by microstimulation of the lumbar spinal cord in spinal intact cats. Magnitude and orientation of the force patterns were compared, as well as the proportion of the types found, and the proportions of patterns exhibiting points of zero force (equilibrium points). The force patterns obtained with the homogenous activation and motoneuron topography models were quite similar to those measured experimentally, with the differences being larger for the patterns from the normalized endpoint forces model. Differences in the proportions of types of force patterns between the three models and the experimental results were significant for each model. Both homogeneous activation and normalized endpoint force models produced similar proportions of equilibrium points as found experimentally. The results suggest that muscle biomechanics play an important role in limiting the number of endpoint force pattern types, and that muscle combinations activated at similar levels reproduced best the experimental results obtained with intraspinal microstimulation.

  1. Multichannel Detrended Fluctuation Analysis Reveals Synchronized Patterns of Spontaneous Spinal Activity in Anesthetized Cats

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Erika E.; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Itzá-Ortiz, Benjamín A.; Jiménez, Ismael; Rudomín, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of the interaction and synchronization of relatively large ensembles of neurons is fundamental for the understanding of complex functions of the nervous system. It is known that the temporal synchronization of neural ensembles is involved in the generation of specific motor, sensory or cognitive processes. Also, the intersegmental coherence of spinal spontaneous activity may indicate the existence of synaptic neural pathways between different pairs of lumbar segments. In this study we present a multichannel version of the detrended fluctuation analysis method (mDFA) to analyze the correlation dynamics of spontaneous spinal activity (SSA) from time series analysis. This method together with the classical detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) were used to find out whether the SSA recorded in one or several segments in the spinal cord of the anesthetized cat occurs either in a random or in an organized manner. Our results are consistent with a non-random organization of the sets of neurons involved in the generation of spontaneous cord dorsum potentials (CDPs) recorded either from one lumbar segment (DFA- mean = 1.040.09) or simultaneously from several lumbar segments (mDFA- mean = 1.010.06), where  = 0.5 indicates randomness while 0.5 indicates long-term correlations. To test the sensitivity of the mDFA method we also examined the effects of small spinal lesions aimed to partially interrupt connectivity between neighboring lumbosacral segments. We found that the synchronization and correlation between the CDPs recorded from the L5 and L6 segments in both sides of the spinal cord were reduced when a lesion comprising the left dorsal quadrant was performed between the segments L5 and L6 (mDFA- = 0.992 as compared to initial conditions mDFA- = 1.186). The synchronization and correlation were reduced even further after a similar additional right spinal lesion (mDFA- = 0.924). In contrast to the classical methods, such as correlation

  2. Intersegmental synchronization of spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurons in the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Manjarrez, E; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    2003-02-01

    Extracellular recordings of neuronal activity made in the lumbosacral spinal segments of the anesthetized cat have disclosed the existence of a set of neurons in Rexed's laminae III-VI that discharged in a highly synchronized manner during the occurrence of spontaneous negative cord dorsum potentials (nCDPs) and responded to stimulation of low-threshold cutaneous fibers (<1.5x T) with mono- and polysynaptic latencies. The cross-correlation between the spontaneous discharges of pairs of synchronic neurons was highest when they were close to each other, and decreased with increasing longitudinal separation. Simultaneous recordings of nCDPs from several segments in preparations with the peripheral nerves intact have disclosed the existence of synchronized spontaneous nCDPs in segments S1-L4. These potentials lasted between 25 and 70 ms and were usually larger in segments L7-L5, where they attained amplitudes between 50 and 150 micro V. The transection of the intact ipsilateral hindlimb cutaneous and muscle nerves, or the section of the dorsal columns between the L5 and L6, or between the L6 and L7 segments in preparations with already transected nerves, had very small effects on the intersegmental synchronization of the spontaneous nCDPs and on the power spectra of the cord dorsum potentials recorded in the lumbosacral enlargement. In contrast, sectioning the ipsilateral dorsal horn and the dorsolateral funiculus at these segmental levels strongly decoupled the spontaneous nCDPs generated rostrally from those generated caudally to the lesion and reduced the magnitude of the power spectra throughout the whole frequency range. These results indicate that the lumbosacral intersegmental synchronization between the spontaneous nCDPs does not require sensory inputs and is most likely mediated by intra- and intersegmental connections. It is suggested that the occurrence of spontaneous synchronized nCDPs is due to the activation of tightly coupled arrays of neurons, each

  3. Multichannel detrended fluctuation analysis reveals synchronized patterns of spontaneous spinal activity in anesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Erika E; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Itzá-Ortiz, Benjamín A; Jiménez, Ismael; Rudomín, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of the interaction and synchronization of relatively large ensembles of neurons is fundamental for the understanding of complex functions of the nervous system. It is known that the temporal synchronization of neural ensembles is involved in the generation of specific motor, sensory or cognitive processes. Also, the intersegmental coherence of spinal spontaneous activity may indicate the existence of synaptic neural pathways between different pairs of lumbar segments. In this study we present a multichannel version of the detrended fluctuation analysis method (mDFA) to analyze the correlation dynamics of spontaneous spinal activity (SSA) from time series analysis. This method together with the classical detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) were used to find out whether the SSA recorded in one or several segments in the spinal cord of the anesthetized cat occurs either in a random or in an organized manner. Our results are consistent with a non-random organization of the sets of neurons involved in the generation of spontaneous cord dorsum potentials (CDPs) recorded either from one lumbar segment (DFA-α mean = 1.04[Formula: see text]0.09) or simultaneously from several lumbar segments (mDFA-α mean = 1.01[Formula: see text]0.06), where α = 0.5 indicates randomness while α = 0.5 indicates long-term correlations. To test the sensitivity of the mDFA method we also examined the effects of small spinal lesions aimed to partially interrupt connectivity between neighboring lumbosacral segments. We found that the synchronization and correlation between the CDPs recorded from the L5 and L6 segments in both sides of the spinal cord were reduced when a lesion comprising the left dorsal quadrant was performed between the segments L5 and L6 (mDFA-[Formula: see text] = 0.992 as compared to initial conditions mDFA-α = 1.186). The synchronization and correlation were reduced even further after a similar additional right spinal lesion (mDFA-α = 0.924). In contrast

  4. Activation of silent mechanoreceptive cat C and Adelta sensory neurons and their substance P expression following peripheral inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xu, G Y; Huang, L Y; Zhao, Z Q

    2000-10-15

    The effect of inflammation on the excitability and the level of substance P (SP) in cat mechanoreceptive C and Adelta dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were studied in vivo using intracellular recording and immunocytochemical techniques. Following injections of carrageenan (Carg) into the cat hindpaw, the percentage of C neurons exhibiting spontaneous activity increased from 7.2 to 20.7% and the percentage of Adelta neurons increased from 6.9 to 18.6%. In contrast to most cells from normal cats, which fired regularly below 10 Hz, many cells from Carg-treated cats fired at higher frequencies or in bursts. Inflammation (Carg treatment) also depolarized membrane potentials, increased membrane input resistance, caused the disappearance of inward rectifying currents and lowered the mean current thresholds of tibial nerve-evoked responses in DRG neurons. With inflammation, the percentage of C or Adelta neurons responding to low threshold mechanoreceptive stimuli increased (C neurons: normal, 13%; inflamed, 41%; Adelta neurons: normal, 13 %; inflamed, 39 %), while the percentage of C or Adelta neurons responding to high threshold mechanoreceptive stimuli remained unchanged. Some receptive field (RF)-responsive cells were injected with Lucifer Yellow and their SP immunoreactivity was determined. Following Carg treatment, substantially higher percentages of RF-responsive cells were SP positive (C neurons: normal, 35.7%; inflamed, 60%; Adelta neurons: normal, 18.2%; inflamed, 66.7%). These combined increases in the excitability of DRG neurons and SP-containing RF-responsive neurons could lead to sensitization of sensory neurons, thus contributing to the development of hyperalgesia.

  5. The relationship between soleus and gastrocnemius muscle activity in conscious cats--a model for motor unit recruitment?

    PubMed

    Hodgson, J A

    1983-04-01

    Force and electromyogram (e.m.g.) data were recorded from medial gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of conscious cats using chronically implanted devices. A digital computer was used to take simultaneous samples of the data from both muscles and construct two-dimensional frequency distributions relating the activities in the two muscles. The results show that posture is the only activity where soleus may be active without corresponding activity in the medial gastrocnemius muscle. In locomotion the ratio between soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscle activities changed with treadmill speed, although peak soleus force remained constant at approximately 80% of the isometric tetanic tension measured in terminal experiments. A hypothesis is put forward, associating these findings with the activities of slow and fast motor units and emphasizing the influence of neural activity in the determination of motor unit recruitment.

  6. Differential response of maize catalases to abscisic acid: Vp1 transcriptional activator is not required for abscisic acid-regulated Cat1 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, J D; Scandalios, J G

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we describe the distinctive responses of the maize catalases to the plant growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA). We analyzed RNA and enzyme accumulation in excised maize embryos and found that each catalase responded differently to exogenously applied ABA. Levels of Cat1 transcript and enzyme activity rapidly increased. In contrast, levels of Cat2 transcript and protein decreased, while Cat3 transcript levels were not affected. In developing kernels of the ABA-deficient/biosynthetic viviparous mutant vp5, lower levels of Cat1 RNA correlated with lower endogenous ABA levels when compared to measured levels in comparably aged wild-type siblings from the same ear. The maize vp1 mutant line is morphologically insensitive to normal endogenous levels of ABA. Analysis of the response of Cat1 to exogenously applied ABA in mutant and wild-type vp1 sibling embryos suggests that, unlike other ABA-responsive genes analyzed to date, the Vp1 gene product is not essential for the ABA-mediated regulation of Cat1. The significance of these responses to ABA in defining the roles of the various CATs in maize is discussed. Images PMID:1388272

  7. Structure and Active Stie Residues of Pg1D, an N-Acetyltransferase from the Bacillosamine Synthetic Pathway Required for N-Glycan Synthesis in Campylobacter jejuni

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan,E.; Ruane, K.; Sulea, T.; Watson, D.; Proteau, A.; Leclerc, S.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.; Young, N.

    2008-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is highly unusual among bacteria in forming N-linked glycoproteins. The heptasaccharide produced by its pgl system is attached to protein Asn through its terminal 2, 4-diacetamido-2, 4,6-trideoxy-d-Glc (QuiNAc4NAc or N, N'-diacetylbacillosamine) moiety. The crucial, last part of this sugar's synthesis is the acetylation of UDP-2-acetamido-4-amino-2, 4,6-trideoxy-d-Glc by the enzyme PglD, with acetyl-CoA as a cosubstrate. We have determined the crystal structures of PglD in CoA-bound and unbound forms, refined to 1.8 and 1.75 Angstroms resolution, respectively. PglD is a trimer of subunits each comprised of two domains, an N-terminal {alpha}/{beta}-domain and a C-terminal left-handed {beta}-helix. Few structural differences accompany CoA binding, except in the C-terminal region following the {beta}-helix (residues 189-195), which adopts an extended structure in the unbound form and folds to extend the {beta}-helix upon binding CoA. Computational molecular docking suggests a different mode of nucleotide-sugar binding with respect to the acetyl-CoA donor, with the molecules arranged in an 'L-shape', compared with the 'in-line' orientation in related enzymes. Modeling indicates that the oxyanion intermediate would be stabilized by the NH group of Gly143', with His125' the most likely residue to function as a general base, removing H+ from the amino group prior to nucleophilic attack at the carbonyl carbon of acetyl-CoA. Site-specific mutations of active site residues confirmed the importance of His125', Glu124', and Asn118. We conclude that Asn118 exerts its function by stabilizing the intricate hydrogen bonding network within the active site and that Glu124' may function to increase the pKa of the putative general base, His125'.

  8. Active cigarette smoking and the risk of breast cancer at the level of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Kasajova, Petra; Holubekova, Veronika; Mendelova, Andrea; Lasabova, Zora; Zubor, Pavol; Kudela, Erik; Biskupska-Bodova, Kristina; Danko, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the correlation between the tobacco exposure and NAT2 gene (rs1041983 C/T, rs1801280 T/C, rs1799930 G/A) polymorphisms in association with breast cancer development. We wanted to determine the prognostic clinical importance of these polymorphisms in association with smoking and breast cancer. For the detection of possible association between smoking, NAT2 gene polymorphisms, and the risk of breast cancer, we designed a case-controlled study with 198 patients enrolled, 98 breast cancer patients and 100 healthy controls. Ten milliliters of peripheral blood from the cubital vein was withdrawn from every patient. The HRM (high resolution melting) analysis was used for the detection of three abovementioned NAT2 gene polymorphisms. When comparing a group of women smoking more than 5 cigarettes a day with the patients smoking fewer than 5 cigarettes a day, we found out that if women were the carriers of aberrant AA genotype for rs1799930, the first group of women had higher risk of breast carcinoma than the second group. If patients were the carriers of aberrant TT genotype for rs1041983, for rs1801280CC genotype, and rs1799930AA genotype and they smoked more than 5 cigarettes a day, they had higher risk of malignant breast disease than never-smoking women. Our results confirm the hypothesis that NAT2 gene polymorphisms (rs1041983 C/T, rs1801280 T/C, and rs1799930 G/A) in association with long-period active smoking could be the possible individual risk-predicting factors for breast cancer development in the population of Slovak women.

  9. Ocular and neural distribution of feline herpesvirus-1 during active and latent experimental infection in cats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) cause extensive intra-ocular and neural infections in humans and are closely related to Felid herpes virus 1 (FeHV-1). We report the extent of intra-ocular replication and the extent and morphological aspects of neural replication during the acute and latent phases of FeHV-1 infection. Juvenile, SPF cats were inoculated with FeHV-1. Additional cats were used as negative controls. Cats were euthanized on days 6, 10, and 30 post-inoculation. Results FeHV-1 was isolated from the conjunctiva, cornea, uveal tract, retina, optic nerve, ciliary ganglion (CG), pterygopalatine ganglion (PTPG), trigeminal ganglion (TG), brainstem, visual cortex, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb of infected cats during the acute phase, but not the cranial cervical ganglion (CCG) and optic chiasm. Viral DNA was detected in all tissues during acute infection by a real-time quantitative PCR assay. On day 30, viral DNA was detected in all TG, all CCG, and 2 PTPG. Histologically mild inflammation and ganglion cell loss were noted within the TG during acute, but not latent infection. Using linear regression, a strong correlation existed between clinical score and day 30 viral DNA copy number within the TG. Conclusions The correlation between clinical score and day 30 viral DNA copy number suggests the severity of the acute clinical infection is related to the quantity of latent viral DNA. The histologic response was similar to that seen during HSV-1 or VZV infection. To the author’s knowledge this is the first report of FeHV-1 infection involving intraocular structures and autonomic ganglia. PMID:24053192

  10. Enzyme kinetics and inhibition of histone acetyltransferase KAT8.

    PubMed

    Wapenaar, Hannah; van der Wouden, Petra E; Groves, Matthew R; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Dekker, Frank J

    2015-11-13

    Lysine acetyltransferase 8 (KAT8) is a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) responsible for acetylating lysine 16 on histone H4 (H4K16) and plays a role in cell cycle progression as well as acetylation of the tumor suppressor protein p53. Further studies on its biological function and drug discovery initiatives will benefit from the development of small molecule inhibitors for this enzyme. As a first step towards this aim we investigated the enzyme kinetics of this bi-substrate enzyme. The kinetic experiments indicate a ping-pong mechanism in which the enzyme binds Ac-CoA first, followed by binding of the histone substrate. This mechanism is supported by affinity measurements of both substrates using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Using this information, the KAT8 inhibition of a focused compound collection around the non-selective HAT inhibitor anacardic acid has been investigated. Kinetic studies with anacardic acid were performed, based on which a model for the catalytic activity of KAT8 and the inhibitory action of anacardic acid (AA) was proposed. This enabled the calculation of the inhibition constant Ki of anacardic acid derivatives using an adaptation of the Cheng-Prusoff equation. The results described in this study give insight into the catalytic mechanism of KAT8 and present the first well-characterized small-molecule inhibitors for this HAT.

  11. Enzyme kinetics and inhibition of histone acetyltransferase KAT8

    PubMed Central

    Wapenaar, Hannah; van der Wouden, Petra E.; Groves, Matthew R.; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Dekker, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetyltransferase 8 (KAT8) is a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) responsible for acetylating lysine 16 on histone H4 (H4K16) and plays a role in cell cycle progression as well as acetylation of the tumor suppressor protein p53. Further studies on its biological function and drug discovery initiatives will benefit from the development of small molecule inhibitors for this enzyme. As a first step towards this aim we investigated the enzyme kinetics of this bi-substrate enzyme. The kinetic experiments indicate a ping-pong mechanism in which the enzyme binds Ac-CoA first, followed by binding of the histone substrate. This mechanism is supported by affinity measurements of both substrates using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Using this information, the KAT8 inhibition of a focused compound collection around the non-selective HAT inhibitor anacardic acid has been investigated. Kinetic studies with anacardic acid were performed, based on which a model for the catalytic activity of KAT8 and the inhibitory action of AA was proposed. This enabled the calculation of the inhibition constant Ki of anacardic acid derivatives using an adaptation of the Cheng-Prusoff equation. The results described in this study give insight into the catalytic mechanism of KAT8 and present the first well-characterized small-molecule inhibitors for this HAT. PMID:26505788

  12. Structure and mechanism of non-histone protein acetyltransferase enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Post translational modification (PTM) of proteins is ubiquitous and mediates many cellular processes including intracellular localization, protein-protein interactions, enzyme activity, transcriptional regulation and protein stability. While the role of phosphorylation as a key PTM has been well studied, the more evolutionarily conserved acetylation PTM has only recently attracted attention as a key regulator of cellular events. Protein acetylation has been largely studied in the context of its role in histone modification and gene regulation, where histones are modified by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) to promote transcription. However, more recent acetylomic and biochemical studies have revealed that acetylation is mediated by a broader family of protein acetyltransferases (PATs). The recent structure determination of several PATs has provided a wealth of molecular information regarding structural features of PATs, their enzymatic mechanisms, their mode of substrate-specific recognition and their regulatory elements. In this minireview, we will briefly describe what is known about non-histone protein substrates, but mainly focus on a few recent structures of PATs to compare and contrast them with HATs to better understand the molecular basis for protein recognition and modification by this burgeoning family of protein modification enzymes. PMID:23742047

  13. The effect of activation of central adrenergic receptors by clonidine on the excitability of the solitary tract neurons in cats.

    PubMed

    Lipski, J; Solnicka, E

    1976-01-01

    The effect of i.v. administered clonidine (10-15 mug/kg) on the evoked potential recorded in the dosal part of medulla oblongata, during carotid sinus nerve stimulation, was studied in chloralose-urethane anaesthetized cats. Clonidine influenced the amplitude and configuration of the evoked potential and the changes were parallel to the blood pressure depressor response. However, the blood pressure drops, evoked by i.v. infusion of papaverine, did not influence the potential. It is concluded that the synaptic transmission from the carotid sinus nerve to the second order neurons in the solatary tract area can be modulated by the clonidine-induced activation of central adrenergic receptors.

  14. Crosstalk between NSL histone acetyltransferase and MLL/SET complexes: NSL complex functions in promoting histone H3K4 di-methylation activity by MLL/SET complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoming; Su, Jiaming; Wang, Fei; Liu, Da; Ding, Jian; Yang, Yang; Conaway, Joan W; Conaway, Ronald C; Cao, Lingling; Wu, Donglu; Wu, Min; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji

    2013-11-01

    hMOF (MYST1), a histone acetyltransferase (HAT), forms at least two distinct multiprotein complexes in human cells. The male specific lethal (MSL) HAT complex plays a key role in dosage compensation in Drosophila and is responsible for histone H4K16ac in vivo. We and others previously described a second hMOF-containing HAT complex, the non-specific lethal (NSL) HAT complex. The NSL complex has a broader substrate specificity, can acetylate H4 on K16, K5, and K8. The WD (tryptophan-aspartate) repeat domain 5 (WDR5) and host cell factor 1 (HCF1) are shared among members of the MLL/SET (mixed-lineage leukemia/set-domain containing) family of histone H3K4 methyltransferase complexes. The presence of these shared subunits raises the possibility that there are functional links between these complexes and the histone modifications they catalyze; however, the degree to which NSL and MLL/SET influence one another's activities remains unclear. Here, we present evidence from biochemical assays and knockdown/overexpression approaches arguing that the NSL HAT promotes histone H3K4me2 by MLL/SET complexes by an acetylation-dependent mechanism. In genomic experiments, we identified a set of genes including ANKRD2, that are affected by knockdown of both NSL and MLL/SET subunits, suggested they are co-regulated by NSL and MLL/SET complexes. In ChIP assays, we observe that depletion of the NSL subunits hMOF or NSL1 resulted in a significant reduction of both H4K16ac and H3K4me2 in the vicinity of the ANKRD2 transcriptional start site proximal region. However, depletion of RbBP5 (a core component of MLL/SET complexes) only reduced H3K4me2 marks, but not H4K16ac in the same region of ANKRD2, consistent with the idea that NSL acts upstream of MLL/SET to regulate H3K4me2 at certain promoters, suggesting coordination between NSL and MLL/SET complexes is involved in transcriptional regulation of certain genes. Taken together, our results suggest a crosstalk between the NSL and MLL

  15. Melatonin production: proteasomal proteolysis in serotonin N-acetyltransferase regulation.

    PubMed

    Gastel, J A; Roseboom, P H; Rinaldi, P A; Weller, J L; Klein, D C

    1998-02-27

    The nocturnal increase in circulating melatonin in vertebrates is regulated by 10- to 100-fold increases in pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) activity. Changes in the amount of AA-NAT protein were shown to parallel changes in AA-NAT activity. When neural stimulation was switched off by either light exposure or L-propranolol-induced beta-adrenergic blockade, both AA-NAT activity and protein decreased rapidly. Effects of L-propranolol were blocked in vitro by dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) or inhibitors of proteasomal proteolysis. This result indicates that adrenergic-cAMP regulation of AA-NAT is mediated by rapid reversible control of selective proteasomal proteolysis. Similar proteasome-based mechanisms may function widely as selective molecular switches in vertebrate neural systems.

  16. Astronomy CATS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissenden, Gina; Prather, Edward E.; Impey, Chris

    2012-08-01

    The Center for Astronomy Education's (CAE's) NSF-funded Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) Program is a grassroots multi-institutional effort to increase the capacity for astronomy education research and improve science literacy in the United States.Our primary target population is the 500,000 college students who each year enroll in an introductory general education (a breadth requirement for non-science majors) Earth, Astronomy, and Space Science (EASS) course (Fraknoi 2001, AGI 2006).An equally important population for our efforts is the individuals who are, or will be, teaching these students. In this chapter, we will briefly discuss the goals of CAE and CATS, the varied personnel that make up the CATS collective, the diverse projects we've undertaken, and the many challenges we have had to work through to make CATS a success.

  17. Progesterone Accelerates the Completion of Sperm Capacitation and Activates CatSper Channel in Spermatozoa from the Rhesus Macaque1

    PubMed Central

    Sumigama, Shiho; Mansell, Steven; Miller, Melissa; Lishko, Polina V.; Cherr, Gary N.; Meyers, Stuart A.; Tollner, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    During transit through the female reproductive tract, mammalian spermatozoa are exposed to increasing concentrations of progesterone (P4) released by the cumulus oophorus. P4 triggers massive calcium influx into human sperm through activation of the sperm-specific calcium channel CatSper. These properties of human spermatozoa are thought to be unique since CatSper is not progesterone sensitive in rodent sperm. Here, by performing patch clamp recording from spermatozoa from rhesus macaque for the first time, we report that they express P4-sensitive CatSper channel identically to human sperm and react to P4 by inducing responsiveness to zona pellucida, unlike human sperm, which respond directly to P4. We have also determined the physiologic levels of P4 capable of inducing capacitation-associated changes in macaque sperm. Progesterone (1 μM) induced up to a 3-fold increase in the percentage of sperm undergoing the zona pellucida-induced acrosome reaction with the lowest threshold as low as 10 nM of P4. Submicromolar levels of P4 induced a dose-dependent increase in curvilinear velocity and lateral head displacement, while sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation was not altered. Macaque spermatozoa exposed to 10 μM of P4 developed fully hyperactivated motility. Similar to human sperm, on approaching cumulus mass and binding to zona pellucida, macaque spermatozoa display hyperactivation and undergo an acrosome reaction that coincides with the rise in the sperm intracellular calcium. Taken together, these data indicate that P4 accelerates the completion of capacitation and provides evidence of spermatozoa “priming” as they move into a gradient of progesterone in search for the oocyte. PMID:26490839

  18. Progesterone Accelerates the Completion of Sperm Capacitation and Activates CatSper Channel in Spermatozoa from the Rhesus Macaque.

    PubMed

    Sumigama, Shiho; Mansell, Steven; Miller, Melissa; Lishko, Polina V; Cherr, Gary N; Meyers, Stuart A; Tollner, Theodore

    2015-12-01

    During transit through the female reproductive tract, mammalian spermatozoa are exposed to increasing concentrations of progesterone (P4) released by the cumulus oophorus. P4 triggers massive calcium influx into human sperm through activation of the sperm-specific calcium channel CatSper. These properties of human spermatozoa are thought to be unique since CatSper is not progesterone sensitive in rodent sperm. Here, by performing patch clamp recording from spermatozoa from rhesus macaque for the first time, we report that they express P4-sensitive CatSper channel identically to human sperm and react to P4 by inducing responsiveness to zona pellucida, unlike human sperm, which respond directly to P4. We have also determined the physiologic levels of P4 capable of inducing capacitation-associated changes in macaque sperm. Progesterone (1 μM) induced up to a 3-fold increase in the percentage of sperm undergoing the zona pellucida-induced acrosome reaction with the lowest threshold as low as 10 nM of P4. Submicromolar levels of P4 induced a dose-dependent increase in curvilinear velocity and lateral head displacement, while sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation was not altered. Macaque spermatozoa exposed to 10 μM of P4 developed fully hyperactivated motility. Similar to human sperm, on approaching cumulus mass and binding to zona pellucida, macaque spermatozoa display hyperactivation and undergo an acrosome reaction that coincides with the rise in the sperm intracellular calcium. Taken together, these data indicate that P4 accelerates the completion of capacitation and provides evidence of spermatozoa "priming" as they move into a gradient of progesterone in search for the oocyte.

  19. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhances neutrophil adhesiveness: induction of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 via activation of Akt and CaM kinase II and modifications of histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase 4 in human tracheal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiang-Wen; Lin, Chih-Chung; Luo, Shue-Fen; Lee, Hui-Chun; Lee, I-Ta; Aird, William C; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2008-05-01

    Up-regulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) involves adhesions between both circulating and resident leukocytes and the human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs) during airway inflammatory reaction. We have demonstrated previously that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced VCAM-1 expression is regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinases, nuclear factor-kappaB, and p300 activation in HTSMCs. In addition to this pathway, phosphorylation of Akt and CaM kinase II has been implicated in histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) activation. Here, we investigated whether these different mechanisms participated in TNF-alpha-induced VCAM-1 expression and enhanced neutrophil adhesion. TNF-alpha significantly increased HTSMC-neutrophil adhesions, and this effect was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1 on the HTSMCs and was blocked by the selective inhibitors of Src [4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine (PP1)], epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR; 4-(3'-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxy-quinazoline, (AG1478)], phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) [2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-1(4H)-benzopyran-4-one hydrochloride(LY294002) and wortmannin],calcium[1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester; BAPTA-AM], phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PLC) [1-[6-[[17beta-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U73122)], protein kinase C (PKC) [12-(2-cyanoethyl)-6,7,12, 13-tetrahydro-13-methyl-5-oxo-5H-indolo(2,3-a)pyrrolo(3,4-c)-carbazole (Gö6976), rottlerin, and 3-1-[3-(amidinothio)propyl-1H-indol-3-yl]-3-(1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl) maleimide (bisindolylmaleimide IX) (Ro 31-8220)], CaM (calmidazolium chloride), CaM kinase II [(8R(*),9S(*),11S(*))-(-)-9-hydroxy-9-methoxycarbonyl-8-methyl-14-n-propoxy-2,3,9, 10-tetrahydro-8,11-epoxy, 1H,8H, 11H-2,7b,11a-triazadibenzo[a,g]cycloocta[cde]trinden-1-one (KT5926) and 1-[N,O-bis(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl

  20. Conditions for the self-catalysed inactivation of carnitine acetyltransferase. A novel form of enzyme inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chase, J. F. A.; Tubbs, P. K.

    1969-01-01

    1. Carnitine acetyltransferase is very rapidly inhibited in the presence of bromoacetyl-(−)-carnitine plus CoA or of bromoacetyl-CoA plus (−)-carnitine. 2. Under appropriate conditions, the enzyme may be titrated with either bromoacetyl substrate analogue; in each case about 1mole of inhibitor is required to inactivate completely 1mole of enzyme of molecular weight 58000±3000. 3. Inhibition by bromoacetyl-CoA plus (−)-carnitine results in the formation of an inactive enzyme species, containing stoicheiometric amounts of bound adenine nucleotide and (−)-carnitine in a form that is not removed by gel filtration. This is shown to be S-carboxymethyl-CoA (−)-carnitine ester. 4. The inhibited enzyme recovers activity slowly on prolonged standing at 4°. 5. Incubation with S-carboxymethyl-CoA (−)-carnitine ester causes a slow inhibition of carnitine acetyltransferase. 6. The formation of bound S-carboxymethyl-CoA (−)-carnitine ester by the enzyme is discussed. Presumably the resulting inhibition reflects binding of the ester to both the CoA- and carnitine-binding sites on the enzyme and its consequent very slow dissociation. These observations confirm that carnitine acetyltransferase can form ternary enzyme–substrate complexes; this also appears to be the case with carnitine palmitoyltransferase and choline acetyltransferase. PMID:5763788

  1. Regulation and function of histone acetyltransferase MOF.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Han, Xiaofei; Guan, Jingyun; Li, Xiangzhi

    2014-03-01

    The mammalian MOF (male absent on the first), a member of the MYST (MOZ, YBF2, SAS2, and Tip60) family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs), is the major enzyme that catalyzes the acetylation of histone H4 on lysine 16. Acetylation of K16 is a prevalent mark associated with chromatin decondensation. MOF has recently been shown to play an essential role in maintaining normal cell functions. In this study, we discuss the important roles of MOF in DNA damage repair, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. We also analyze the role of MOF as a key regulator of the core transcriptional network of embryonic stem cells.

  2. Effects of changes in chemoreceptor activity on extracellular K+ and Ca2+ activities in the cat carotid body.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, R G; Acker, H

    1988-04-05

    In anaesthetized, paralysed and artificially ventilated cats triple-barrelled ion-selective microelectrodes (ISMs) were inserted into the right carotid body in order to measure extracellular activities of K+ ([K+]o) and Ca2+ ([Ca2+]o) simultaneously. In 3 experiments a method involving iron deposition located the tips of the ISMs in the cellular islands of the organ. A thin cannula inserted into the right carotid artery (i.c.) via the lingual artery was used to infuse Ringer-Locke solutions (0.1-0.5 ml/min) containing either sodium cyanide (NaCN), acetylcholine (ACh) or dopamine (DA). Analysis of the effects of administration of NaCN (20-100 micrograms/min i.c.) showed that during this procedure [K+]o increased and [Ca2+]o decreased by mean values (+/- S.D.) of 0.99 +/- 0.82 and 0.22 +/- 0.06 mM respectively. During administration of ACh (20-50 micrograms/min i.c.) [K+]o increased and [Ca2+]o decreased respectively by mean values (+/- S.D.) of 3.18 +/- 3.0 and 0.31 +/- 0.14 mM. Decreases in [K+]o and [Ca2+]o by mean values (+/- S.D.) of 1.53 +/- 1.64 and 0.34 +/- 0.33 mM respectively were associated with administration of DA (20-50 micrograms/min i.c.). The predominant influences exerted by NaCN and ACh on chemoreceptor activity were excitatory whereas administration of DA caused either inhibition, excitation or a combination of these two effects. Stimulation of the sympathetic supply to the carotid body was associated with either increases, decreases or no reaction of chemosensory activity, [K+]o and [Ca2+]o. The changes in [K+]o associated with the various procedures may reflect the state of polarization within the chemoreceptor complex. Decreases in [Ca2+]o usually accompanied the performance of all procedures and may have resulted from an increased influx of this ion from the interstitial fluids into the cells for the purpose of provoking neurotransmitter release. However, the time course of the changes in [K+]o and [Ca2+]o were considerably slower in onset and

  3. Hydrogen sulfide activates the carotid body chemoreceptors in cat, rabbit and rat ex vivo preparations.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yingfu; Li, Qian; Sun, Biying; Zhang, Guohua; Rong, Weifang

    2015-03-01

    We and others previously reported experimental evidence suggesting an important role for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in oxygen sensing in murine carotid body chemoreceptors. More recent data implicated abnormal H2S-mediated chemoreceptor signaling in pathological conditions such as chronic heart failure and hypertension. However, the idea of H2S as a mediator of oxygen-sensing in chemoreceptors has been challenged. In particular, it was shown that exogenous H2S inhibited the release of neurotransmitters (ACh and ATP) from the cat carotid body, raising the possibility that there exists significant species difference in H2S-mediated signaling in chemoreceptors. This study was designed specifically to determine the effect of H2S on chemoreceptors in different species. We conducted multiunit extracellular recordings of the sinus nerve in the ex vivo carotid body preparation taken from the rat, the cat and the rabbit. As observed in the mouse carotid body, H2S donors (NaHS or Na2S) evoked qualitatively similar excitatory responses of the afferent sinus nerves of the species studied here. The excitatory effects of the H2S donors were concentration-dependent and reversible. The sinus nerve responses to H2S donors were prevented by blockade of the transmission between type I cells and the afferent terminals, as was the response to hypoxia. These results demonstrate that exogenous H2S exerts qualitatively similar excitatory effects on chemoreceptor afferents of different species. The role of endogenous H2S-mediated signaling in carotid body function in different species awaits further investigation.

  4. Assays for mechanistic investigations of protein/histone acetyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Berndsen, Christopher E; Denu, John M

    2005-08-01

    Protein/histone acetyltransferases (PATs/HATs) have been implicated in a number of cellular functions including gene regulation, DNA synthesis, and repair. This paper reviews methods that can be used to quantitatively determine the activity and ultimately the catalytic/kinetic mechanism of PAT/HATs in vitro. Two methods will be described in detail. The first method is a filter-binding assay that measures the transfer of radiolabeled acetate from acetyl-CoA to protein. The second method is a continuous, spectroscopic, enzyme-coupled assay that links the PAT/HAT reaction to the reduction of NAD+ by pyruvate or alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. Both methods are highly applicable in determining steady-state reaction rates, and obtaining the kinetic constants Vmax, Km, and V/K from substrate saturation curves. We describe a new application of the filter-binding assay to determine the kinetic parameters for HATs using low concentrations of nucleosomal substrates.

  5. The MOZ histone acetyltransferase in epigenetic signaling and disease.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Samuel; Glass, Karen C

    2014-11-01

    The monocytic leukemic zinc finger (MOZ) histone acetyltransferase (HAT) plays a role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). It functions as a quaternary complex with the bromodomain PHD finger protein 1 (BRPF1), the human Esa1-associated factor 6 homolog (hEAF6), and the inhibitor of growth 5 (ING5). Each of these subunits contain chromatin reader domains that recognize specific post-translational modifications (PTMs) on histone tails, and this recognition directs the MOZ HAT complex to specific chromatin substrates. The structure and function of these epigenetic reader modules has now been elucidated, and a model describing how the cooperative action of these domains regulates HAT activity in response to the epigenetic landscape is proposed. The emerging role of epigenetic reader domains in disease, and their therapeutic potential for many types of cancer is also highlighted.

  6. B-cell activation in cats with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) by FIP-virus-induced B-cell differentiation/survival factors.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Azuma, Natsuko; Hashida, Yoshikiyo; Satoh, Ryoichi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that antibody overproduction plays a role in the pathogenesis of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). However, only a few studies on the B-cell activation mechanism after FIP virus (FIPV) infection have been reported. The present study shows that: (1) the ratio of peripheral blood sIg(+) CD21(-) B-cells was higher in cats with FIP than in SPF cats, (2) the albumin-to-globulin ratio has negative correlation with the ratio of peripheral blood sIg(+) CD21(-) B-cell, (3) cells strongly expressing mRNA of the plasma cell master gene, B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1), were increased in peripheral blood in cats with FIP, (4) mRNA expression of B-cell differentiation/survival factors, IL-6, CD40 ligand, and B-cell-activating factor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF), was enhanced in macrophages in cats with FIP, and (5) mRNAs of these B-cell differentiation/survival factors were overexpressed in antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE)-induced macrophages. These data suggest that virus-infected macrophages overproduce B-cell differentiation/survival factors, and these factors act on B-cells and promote B-cell differentiation into plasma cells in FIPV-infected cats.

  7. Cat scratch disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cat scratch disease is an infectious illness associated with cat scratches, bites, or exposure to cat saliva, causing chronic swelling of the lymph nodes. Cat scratch disease is possibly the most common cause of chronic ...

  8. Cat and Dog Bites

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Pets and Animals Cat and Dog Bites Cat and Dog Bites Pets and AnimalsPrevention and WellnessStaying Healthy Share Cat and Dog Bites Cat and dog bites are ...

  9. Cutaneous inputs from the back abolish locomotor-like activity and reduce spastic-like activity in the adult cat following complete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Frigon, Alain; Thibaudier, Yann; Johnson, Michael D; Heckman, C J; Hurteau, Marie-France

    2012-06-01

    Spasticity is a condition that can include increased muscle tone, clonus, spasms, and hyperreflexia. In this study, we report the effect of manually stimulating the dorsal lumbosacral skin on spontaneous locomotor-like activity and on a variety of reflex responses in 5 decerebrate chronic spinal cats treated with clonidine. Cats were spinalized 1 month before the terminal experiment. Stretch reflexes were evoked by stretching the left triceps surae muscles. Crossed reflexes were elicited by electrically stimulating the right tibial or superficial peroneal nerves. Wind-up of reflex responses was evoked by electrically stimulating the left tibial or superficial peroneal nerves. We found that pinching the skin of the back abolished spontaneous locomotor-like activity. We also found that back pinch abolished the rhythmic activity observed during reflex testing without eliminating the reflex responses. Some of the rhythmic episodes of activity observed during reflex testing were consistent with clonus with an oscillation frequency greater than 3 Hz. Pinching the skin of the back effectively abolished rhythmic activity occurring spontaneously or evoked during reflex testing, irrespective of oscillation frequency. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that locomotion and clonus are produced by common central pattern-generators. Stimulating the skin of the back could prove helpful in managing undesired rhythmic activity in spinal cord-injured humans.

  10. Rhythmic activity of neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of conscious cats: effect of removal of vestibular inputs

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Susan M.; Sugiyama, Yoichiro; Suzuki, Takeshi; Cotter, Lucy A.; DeStefino, Vincent J.; Reighard, Derek A.; Cass, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    Although it is well established that bulbospinal neurons located in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a pivotal role in regulating sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure, virtually all neurophysiological studies of this region have been conducted in anesthetized or decerebrate animals. In the present study, we used time- and frequency-domain analyses to characterize the naturally occurring discharges of RVLM neurons in conscious cats. Specifically, we compared their activity to fluctuations in carotid artery blood flow to identify neurons with cardiac-related (CR) activity; we then considered whether neurons with CR activity also had a higher-frequency rhythmic firing pattern. In addition, we ascertained whether the surgical removal of vestibular inputs altered the rhythmic discharge properties of RVLM neurons. Less than 10% of RVLM neurons expressed CR activity, although the likelihood of observing a neuron with CR activity in the RVLM varied between recording sessions, even when tracking occurred in a very limited area and was higher after vestibular inputs were surgically removed. Either a 10-Hz or a 20- to 30-Hz rhythmic discharge pattern coexisted with the CR discharges in some of the RVLM neurons. Additionally, the firing rate of RVLM neurons, including those with CR activity, decreased after vestibular lesions. These findings raise the prospect that RVLM neurons may or may not express rhythmic firing patterns at a particular time due to a variety of influences, including descending projections from higher brain centers and sensory inputs, such as those from the vestibular system. PMID:21734018

  11. Patterns of spatio-temporal correlations in the neural activity of the cat motor cortex during trained forelimb movements.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumya; Putrino, David; Burro, Bianca; Ring, Alexander

    2009-06-01

    In order to study how neurons in the primary motor cortex (MI) are dynamically linked together during skilled movement, we recorded simultaneously from many cortical neurons in cats trained to perform a reaching and retrieval task using their forelimbs. Analysis of task-related spike activity in the MI of the hemisphere contralateral to the reaching forelimb (in identified forelimb or hindlimb representations) recorded through chronically implanted microwires, was followed by pairwise evaluation of temporally correlated activity in these neurons during task performance using shuffle corrected cross-correlograms. Over many months of recording, a variety of task-related modulations of neural activities were observed in individual efferent zones. Positively correlated activity (mainly narrow peaks at zero or short latencies) was seen during task performance frequently between neurons recorded within the forelimb representation of MI, rarely within the hindlimb area of MI, and never between forelimb and hindlimb areas. Correlated activity was frequently observed between neurons with different patterns of task-related activity or preferential activity during different task elements (reaching, feeding, etc.), and located in efferent zones with dissimilar representation as defined by intracortical microstimulation. The observed synchronization of action potentials among selected but functionally varied groups of MI neurons possibly reflects dynamic recruitment of network connections between efferent zones during skilled movement.

  12. New N-Acetyltransferase Fold in the Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphonate Biosynthetic Enzyme FrbF

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Brian; Cobb, Ryan E.; DeSieno, Matthew A.; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K.

    2015-10-15

    The enzyme FrbF from Streptomyces rubellomurinus has attracted significant attention due to its role in the biosynthesis of the antimalarial phosphonate FR-900098. The enzyme catalyzes acetyl transfer onto the hydroxamate of the FR-900098 precursors cytidine 5'-monophosphate-3-aminopropylphosphonate and cytidine 5'-monophosphate-N-hydroxy-3-aminopropylphosphonate. Despite the established function as a bona fide N-acetyltransferase, FrbF shows no sequence similarity to any member of the GCN5-like N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily. Here, we present the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of FrbF in complex with acetyl-CoA, which demonstrates a unique architecture that is distinct from those of canonical GNAT-like acetyltransferases. We also utilized the co-crystal structure to guide structure-function studies that identified the roles of putative active site residues in the acetyltransferase mechanism. The combined biochemical and structural analyses of FrbF provide insights into this previously uncharacterized family of N-acetyltransferases and also provide a molecular framework toward the production of novel N-acyl derivatives of FR-900098.

  13. Autoacetylation of the MYST lysine acetyltransferase MOF protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Wu, Jiang; Sinha, Sarmistha H; Neveu, John M; Zheng, Yujun George

    2012-10-12

    The MYST family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) plays critical roles in diverse cellular processes, such as the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Lysine autoacetylation of the MYST HATs has recently received considerable attention. Nonetheless, the mechanism and function of the autoacetylation process are not well defined. To better understand the biochemical mechanism of MYST autoacetylation and the impact of autoacetylation on the cognate histone acetylation, we carried out detailed analyses of males-absent-on-the-first (MOF), a key member of the MYST family. A number of mutant MOF proteins were produced with point mutations at several key residues near the active site of the enzyme. Autoradiography and immunoblotting data showed that mutation of these residues affects the autoacetylation activity and HAT activity of MOF by various degrees demonstrating that MOF activity is highly sensitive to the chemical changes in those residues. We produced MOF protein in the deacetylated form by using a nonspecific lysine deacetylase. Interestingly, both the autoacetylation activity and the histone acetylation activity of the deacetylated MOF were found to be very close to that of wild-type MOF, suggesting that autoacetylation of MOF only marginally modulates the enzymatic activity. Also, we found that the autoacetylation rates of MOF and deacetylated MOF were much slower than the cognate substrate acetylation. Thus, autoacetylation does not seem to contribute to the intrinsic enzymatic activity in a significant manner. These data provide new insights into the mechanism and function of MYST HAT autoacetylation.

  14. Histone H3 specific acetyltransferases are essential for cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Howe, LeAnn; Auston, Darryl; Grant, Patrick; John, Sam; Cook, Richard G.; Workman, Jerry L.; Pillus, Lorraine

    2001-01-01

    Longstanding observations suggest that acetylation and/or amino-terminal tail structure of histones H3 and H4 are critical for eukaryotic cells. For Saccharomyces cerevisiae, loss of a single H4-specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT), Esa1p, results in cell cycle defects and death. In contrast, although several yeast HAT complexes preferentially acetylate histone H3, the catalytic subunits of these complexes are not essential for viability. To resolve the apparent paradox between the significance of H3 versus H4 acetylation, we tested the hypothesis that H3 modification is essential, but is accomplished through combined activities of two enzymes. We observed that Sas3p and Gcn5p HAT complexes have overlapping patterns of acetylation. Simultaneous disruption of SAS3, the homolog of the MOZ leukemia gene, and GCN5, the hGCN5/PCAF homolog, is synthetically lethal due to loss of acetyltransferase activity. This key combination of activities is specific for these two HATs because neither is synthetically lethal with mutations of other MYST family or H3-specific acetyltransferases. Further, the combined loss of GCN5 and SAS3 functions results in an extensive, global loss of H3 acetylation and arrest in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. The strikingly similar effect of loss of combined essential H3 HAT activities and the loss of a single essential H4 HAT underscores the fundamental biological significance of each of these chromatin-modifying activities. PMID:11731478

  15. Effects of thalidomide and pentobarbital on neuronal activity in the preoptic area during sleep and wakefulness in the cat.

    PubMed

    Kaitin, K I

    1985-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that sleep produced by thalidomide, unlike that of pentobarbital, is associated with increased neuronal activity in the preoptic area (POA), the spontaneous activity of 96 POA neurons was recorded in chronically prepared cats during alert wakefulness (W), deep slow-wave sleep (SWS), and REM sleep in a drug-free preparation and after administration of thalidomide (4 mg/kg) and pentobarbital (4 or 8 mg/kg). Thalidomide, unlike pentobarbital, at a dose that significantly increased the amount of SWS, failed to depress neuronal activity in the POA compared to drug-free controls. Mean discharge rates during thalidomide treatment were similar to drug-free rates. In contrast, rates during low-dose pentobarbital treatment were significantly less than those of drug-free and thalidomide-treated animals. Rates during high-dose pentobarbital treatment were significantly less than those in all other groups. Thalidomide, compared with the other groups, in addition to increasing the amount of SWS, significantly increased the total amount of REM sleep as well as REM sleep as a percent of total sleep, but did not produce ataxia or behavioral excitement. These results do not confirm the initial hypothesis, but suggest that hypnotic drugs that do not depress neuronal activity in the POA may be devoid of some of the unwanted side effects often associated with the more commonly prescribed hypnotic medications.

  16. Resistance to apramycin in two enterobacterial clinical isolates: detection of a 3-N-acetyltransferase IV.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Lus, R; Rivera, M J; Gómez-Lus, M L; Gil, J; Gómez-Lus, S; Castillo, J; Goñi, P; Madero, P; Rubio, M C

    1990-08-01

    Considering the possible role of farm animals in the contamination of human consumers by plasmid-mediated apramycin-resistant enterobacteria strains, this type of resistance should be tested more systematically in human isolates. Very recently we isolated in Zaragoza one apramycin-resistant Escheria coli strain obtained from the blood of a hospitalized patient; this clinical isolate produced a plasmid-mediated 3-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase IV. We describe also the isolation in Madrid of one multiresistant Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strain. This isolate harbored a single plasmid and carried determinants for apramycin, gentamicin, tobramycin, hygromycin B, streptomycin, and ampicillin, which could be transferred en bloc to E. coli K-12 J62. Extracts from donor and transconjugant strains carrying pUZ6776 plasmid produce acetyltransferase activity AAC(3)-IV and double phosphotransferase activity (HPH and APH(3'')).

  17. Effects of training on neuronal activity and interactions in primary and higher visual cortices in the alert cat.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Rodrigo F; Kayser, Christoph; König, Peter

    2004-02-18

    The effects of behavioral training on early visual representations have been elusive when assessed with firing rates. Learning-induced changes in performance, however, suggest that representations should encompass early cortical stages. Here, we address the question of whether training-induced effects are pertinent to neuronal activity outside the task proper, which is a requirement if subsequent perceptional processes should profit from training. To search for a neuronal signature of training effects beyond firing rates, we measured local field potentials, multiunit and isolated spike activity during passive viewing of previously learned stimulus response associations (S+ and S-) in areas 17/18 and 21a of two alert cats. Evoked potential responses as well as gamma oscillations even during the first 200 msec were found to be stronger for S+ in both areas. Most importantly, the later parts of the response (>200 msec) not only exhibit a highly significant difference in coherent gamma oscillations for S+ and S- both within and across areas, but are also characterized by a pronounced preference in firing rate for S+ in area 21a, whereas primary cortex shows a nonsignificant trend for weaker spike responses. From these results, we conclude that training-induced plasticity occurs in adult visual cortex for behaviorally relevant stimuli by changing primarily the temporal structure of neuronal activity at early stages of cortical processing, whereas later stages of cortical processing express the increased coherence of their input in elevated firing rates.

  18. Catecholamine secretion and adrenal nerve activity in response to movements of normal and inflamed knee joints in cats.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, A; Sato, Y; Schmidt, R F

    1986-01-01

    The effects of articular stimulation on adrenal catecholamine secretion and adrenal sympathetic nerve activity were studied using halothane anaesthetized cats. Various natural passive movements were applied to the normal and inflamed knee joints. Rhythmic flexions and extensions as well as rhythmic inward and outward rotation of normal knee joints within their physiological range of motion did not change nerve activity or the secretion of adrenal catecholamines. Static outward rotation in the normal working range was also ineffective. However, as soon as this static rotation was extended into the noxious range, significant increases in both of these variables were elicited. In the acutely inflamed knee joint, various passive movements produced increases in both adrenal sympathetic and catecholamine secretion. Especially noteworthy was the finding that movements of the inflamed knee joint that were within the normal range of motion produced increases in all variables. Articularly induced increases in adrenal sympathetic nerve activity were diminished by severing various hind-limb somatic afferent nerves and abolished by complete denervation of the knee joint. Additionally, section of the adrenal sympathetic nerves eliminated the catecholamine secretion response. From these data it was concluded that the responses observed in these experiments were reflexes having an afferent limb in hind-limb nerves and an efferent limb in the adrenal sympathetic nerves. A contribution of supraspinal structures was suggested for the reflex responses of sympatho-adrenal medullary function evoked by knee joint stimulations, since spinal transection at the C2 level completely abolished the responses. PMID:3795070

  19. Region-specific network plasticity in simulated and living cortical networks: comparison of the center of activity trajectory (CAT) with other statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Zenas C.; Bakkum, Douglas J.; Potter, Steve M.

    2007-09-01

    Electrically interfaced cortical networks cultured in vitro can be used as a model for studying the network mechanisms of learning and memory. Lasting changes in functional connectivity have been difficult to detect with extracellular multi-electrode arrays using standard firing rate statistics. We used both simulated and living networks to compare the ability of various statistics to quantify functional plasticity at the network level. Using a simulated integrate-and-fire neural network, we compared five established statistical methods to one of our own design, called center of activity trajectory (CAT). CAT, which depicts dynamics of the location-weighted average of spatiotemporal patterns of action potentials across the physical space of the neuronal circuitry, was the most sensitive statistic for detecting tetanus-induced plasticity in both simulated and living networks. By reducing the dimensionality of multi-unit data while still including spatial information, CAT allows efficient real-time computation of spatiotemporal activity patterns. Thus, CAT will be useful for studies in vivo or in vitro in which the locations of recording sites on multi-electrode probes are important.

  20. N-Acetyltransferase 1 Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    analysis of the N-acetyltransferase 1 gene (NAT1*) using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment- single strand conformation polymorphism assay...risk of smoking-induced lung cancer (Bouchardy et al., 1998). NAT1*14B is characterized by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) G560A (rs4986782...Structure-function analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms in human N-acetyltransferase 1. Drug Metab Rev 40, 169-184. Zheng, W., Deitz, A.C., Campbell

  1. The Novel SLIK Histone Acetyltransferase Complex Functions in the Yeast Retrograde Response Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pray-Grant, Marilyn G.; Schieltz, David; McMahon, Stacey J.; Wood, Jennifer M.; Kennedy, Erin L.; Cook, Richard G.; Workman, Jerry L.; Yates III, John R.; Grant, Patrick A.

    2002-01-01

    The SAGA complex is a conserved histone acetyltransferase-coactivator that regulates gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. SAGA contains a number of subunits known to function in transcription including Spt and Ada proteins, the Gcn5 acetyltransferase, a subset of TATA-binding-protein-associated factors (TAFIIs), and Tra1. Here we report the identification of SLIK (SAGA-like), a complex related in composition to SAGA. Notably SLIK uniquely contains the protein Rtg2, linking the function of SLIK to the retrograde response pathway. Yeast harboring mutations in both SAGA and SLIK complexes displays synthetic phenotypes more severe than those of yeast with mutation of either complex alone. We present data indicating that distinct forms of the SAGA complex may regulate specific subsets of genes and that SAGA and SLIK have multiple partly overlapping activities, which play a critical role in transcription by RNA polymerase II. PMID:12446794

  2. Spermidine/spermine-N(1)-acetyltransferase: a key metabolic regulator.

    PubMed

    Pegg, Anthony E

    2008-06-01

    Spermidine/spermine-N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT) regulates cellular polyamine content. Its acetylated products are either excreted from the cell or oxidized by acetylpolyamine oxidase. Since polyamines play critical roles in normal and neoplastic growth and in ion channel regulation, SSAT is a key enzyme in these processes. SSAT is very highly regulated. Its content is adjusted in response to alterations in polyamine content to maintain polyamine homeostasis. Certain polyamine analogs can mimic the induction of SSAT and cause a loss of normal polyamines. This may have utility in cancer chemotherapy. SSAT activity is also induced via a variety of other stimuli, including toxins, hormones, cytokines, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, natural products, and stress pathways, and by ischemia-reperfusion injury. These increases are initiated by alterations in Sat1 gene transcription reinforced by alterations at the other regulatory steps, including protein turnover, mRNA processing, and translation. Transgenic manipulation of SSAT activity has revealed that SSAT activity links polyamine metabolism to lipid and carbohydrate metabolism by means of alterations in the content of acetyl-CoA and ATP. A high level of SSAT stimulates flux through the polyamine biosynthetic pathway, since biosynthetic enzymes are induced in response to the fall in polyamines. This sets up a futile cycle in which ATP is used to generate S-adenosylmethionine for polyamine biosynthesis and acetyl-CoA is consumed in the acetylation reaction. A variety of other effects of increased SSAT activity include death of pancreatic cells, blockage of regenerative tissue growth, behavioral changes, keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans, and hair loss. These are very likely due to changes in polyamine and putrescine levels, although increased oxidative stress via the oxidation of acetylated polyamines may also contribute. Recently, it was found that the SSAT protein and/or a related protein, thialysine

  3. Activation of spinal locomotor circuits in the decerebrated cat by spinal epidural and/or intraspinal electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, Igor; Musienko, Pavel E; Selionov, Victor A; Zdunowski, Sharon; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury

    2015-03-10

    The present study was designed to further compare the stepping-like movements generated via epidural (ES) and/or intraspinal (IS) stimulation. We examined the ability to generate stepping-like movements in response to ES and/or IS of spinal lumbar segments L1-L7 in decerebrate cats. ES (5-10 Hz) of the dorsal surface of the spinal cord at L3-L7 induced hindlimb stepping-like movements on a moving treadmill belt, but with no rhythmic activity in the forelimbs. IS (60 Hz) of the dorsolateral funiculus at L1-L3 (depth of 0.5-1.0mm from the dorsal surface of the spinal cord) induced quadrupedal stepping-like movements. Forelimb movements appeared first, followed by stepping-like movements in the hindlimbs. ES and IS simultaneously enhanced the rhythmic performance of the hindlimbs more robustly than ES or IS alone. The differences in the stimulation parameters, site of stimulation, and motor outputs observed during ES vs. IS suggest that different neural mechanisms were activated to induce stepping-like movements. The effects of ES may be mediated more via dorsal structures in the lumbosacral region of the spinal cord, whereas the effects of IS may be mediated via more ventral propriospinal networks and/or brainstem locomotor areas. Furthermore, the more effective facilitation of the motor output during simultaneous ES and IS may reflect some convergence of pathways on the same interneuronal populations involved in the regulation of locomotion.

  4. Epigenetic Modulation using Small Molecules - Targeting Histone Acetyltransferases in Disease.

    PubMed

    Richters, André; Koehler, Angela N

    2017-02-23

    Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are epigenetic drivers that catalyze the acetyl transfer from acetyl-CoA to lysines of both histone and non-histone substrates and thereby induce transcription either by chromatin remodeling or direct transcription factor activation. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) conduct the reverse reaction to counter HAT activity. Physiological processes such as cell cycle progression or apoptosis require a thoroughly balanced equilibrium of the interplay between acetylation and deacetylation processes to maintain or, if required, alter the global acetylome status. Aberrant HAT activity has recently been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the progression of various diseases such as prostate, lung, and colon cancers as well as glioblastomas and neurodegenerative diseases. Recent investigations have aimed for the identification of HAT modulators to further decipher the complexity of acetyl transferase related signaling cascades and discover potential leads for drug design approaches. HDACs have been extensively characterized and targeted by small molecules, including four FDA-approved HDAC inhibitors; in contrast, HATs have not been active targets for therapeutic development. This review will summarize the status of HAT associated diseases and the arsenal of currently known and available HAT inhibitors with respect to their discovery, further improvements, and current applications.

  5. Conformational flexibility and subunit arrangement of the modular yeast Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase complex.

    PubMed

    Setiaputra, Dheva; Ross, James D; Lu, Shan; Cheng, Derrick T; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yip, Calvin K

    2015-04-17

    The Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex is a highly conserved, 19-subunit histone acetyltransferase complex that activates transcription through acetylation and deubiquitination of nucleosomal histones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because SAGA has been shown to display conformational variability, we applied gradient fixation to stabilize purified SAGA and systematically analyzed this flexibility using single-particle EM. Our two- and three-dimensional studies show that SAGA adopts three major conformations, and mutations of specific subunits affect the distribution among these. We also located the four functional modules of SAGA using electron microscopy-based labeling and transcriptional activator binding analyses and show that the acetyltransferase module is localized in the most mobile region of the complex. We further comprehensively mapped the subunit interconnectivity of SAGA using cross-linking mass spectrometry, revealing that the Spt and Taf subunits form the structural core of the complex. These results provide the necessary restraints for us to generate a model of the spatial arrangement of all SAGA subunits. According to this model, the chromatin-binding domains of SAGA are all clustered in one face of the complex that is highly flexible. Our results relate information of overall SAGA structure with detailed subunit level interactions, improving our understanding of its architecture and flexibility.

  6. Mechanism of the lysosomal membrane enzyme acetyl coenzyme A: alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Bame, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA:..cap alpha..-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase is a lysosomal membrane enzyme, deficient in the genetic disease Sanfilippo C syndrome. The enzyme catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA to terminal ..cap alpha..-glucosamine residues of heparan sulfate within the organelle. The reaction mechanism was examined using high purified lysosomal membranes from rat liver and human fibroblasts. The N-acetyltransferase reaction is optimal above pH 5.5 and a 2-3 fold stimulation of activity is observed in the presence of 0.1% taurodeoxycholate. Double reciprocal analysis and product inhibition studies indicate that the enzyme works by a Di-Iso Ping Pong Bi Bi mechanism. The binding of acetyl-CoA to the enzyme is measured by exchange label from (/sup 3/H)CoA to acetyl-CoA, and is optimal at pH's above 7.0. The acetyl-enzyme intermediate is formed by incubating membranes with (/sup 3/H)acetyl-CoA. The acetyl group can be transferred to glucosamine, forming (/sup 3/H)N-acetylglucosamine; the transfer is optimal between pH 4 and 5. Lysosomal membranes from Sanfilippo C fibroblasts confirm that these half reactions carried out by the N-acetyltransferase. The enzyme is inactivated by N-bromosuccinimide and diethylpyrocarbonate, indicating that a histidine is involved in the reaction. These results suggest that the histidine residue is at the active site of the enzyme. The properties of the N-acetyltransferase in the membrane, the characterization of the enzyme kinetics, the chemistry of a histidine mediated acetylation and the pH difference across the lysosomal membrane all support a transmembrane acetylation mechanism.

  7. Molecular cloning of the feline thymus and activation-regulated chemokine cDNA and its expression in lesional skin of cats with eosinophilic plaque.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Sadatoshi; Okayama, Taro; Ohmori, Keitaro; Masuda, Kenichi; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2003-02-01

    Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) is a member of CC chemokine and plays an essential role in recruitment of CC chemokine receptor 4 positive Th2 cells to allergic lesion. To investigate the association of TARC in allergic inflammation of cats, a TARC cDNA was cloned from feline thymus by RT-PCR with 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The feline TARC clone contained a full length open reading frame encoding 99 amino acids which shared 80.8%, 72.5%, 65.6% and 67.8% homology with dog, human, mouse and rat homologues, respectively. Expression of TARC mRNA was detected not only in thymus but also in spleen, lung, lymph node, kidney, small intestine, colon and skin of the normal cat tissues examined. Furthermore, it was found that TARC mRNA was strongly expressed in lesional skin of cats with eosinophilic plaque. The present results demonstrated that TARC might be involved in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic plaque in cats.

  8. Glycolytic enzyme activity is essential for domestic cat (Felis catus) and cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) sperm motility and viability in a sugar-free medium.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Kimberly A; Wildt, David E; Anthony, Nicola M; Bavister, Barry D; Leibo, S P; Penfold, Linda M; Marker, Laurie L; Crosier, Adrienne E

    2011-06-01

    We have previously reported a lack of glucose uptake in domestic cat and cheetah spermatozoa, despite observing that these cells produce lactate at rates that correlate positively with sperm function. To elucidate the role of glycolysis in felid sperm energy production, we conducted a comparative study in the domestic cat and cheetah, with the hypothesis that sperm motility and viability are maintained in both species in the absence of glycolytic metabolism and are fueled by endogenous substrates. Washed ejaculates were incubated in chemically defined medium in the presence/absence of glucose and pyruvate. A second set of ejaculates was exposed to a chemical inhibitor of either lactate dehydrogenase (sodium oxamate) or glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (alpha-chlorohydrin). Sperm function (motility and acrosomal integrity) and lactate production were assessed, and a subset of spermatozoa was assayed for intracellular glycogen. In both the cat and cheetah, sperm function was maintained without exogenous substrates and following lactate dehydrogenase inhibition. Lactate production occurred in the absence of exogenous hexoses, but only if pyruvate was present. Intracellular glycogen was not detected in spermatozoa from either species. Unexpectedly, glycolytic inhibition by alpha-chlorohydrin resulted in an immediate decline in sperm motility, particularly in the domestic cat. Collectively, our findings reveal an essential role of the glycolytic pathway in felid spermatozoa that is unrelated to hexose metabolism or lactate formation. Instead, glycolytic enzyme activity could be required for the metabolism of endogenous lipid-derived glycerol, with fatty acid oxidation providing the primary energy source in felid spermatozoa.

  9. Marked dissociation between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation and long-term behavioral effects in rats exposed to immobilization or cat odor.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Abellán, C; Andero, R; Nadal, R; Armario, A

    2008-09-01

    Exposure of rodents to cats or certain cat odors results in long-term behavioral effects reminiscent of enhanced anxiety that have been considered to model post-traumatic stress disorder. However, other severe stressors such as tail-shock or immobilization in wooden boards (IMO) appear to induce shorter lasting changes in anxiety. In addition, there are controversial results regarding the effects of urine/feces odors. In the present work, we studied in two experiments the relationship between the degree of stress experienced by the animals during exposure to IMO, urine odors or fur odors (as assessed by hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation and plasma glucose) and the short- and long-term behavioral consequences. In the first experiment, rats were individually exposed for 15 min to a novel environment (white large cages) containing either clean cat litter (controls) or litter soiled by cats (urine odors). Half of the rats in each condition were left to freely explore the environment whereas the others were subjected to immobilization (IMO) within the cages. Although ACTH, corticosterone and glucose responses to IMO were much stronger than those to the white cages with clean litter or urine odors (which did not differ from each other), no effect of treatments on anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) were found one week later. However, previous IMO exposure did cause sensitization of the ACTH response to the EPM. In the second experiment, the response to white large cages containing either no odor (controls), litter soiled by cats (urine odor) or a cloth impregnated with cat odor (fur odor) was compared. Urine and fur odors elicited similar ACTH and corticosterone responses that were higher than those of controls, but plasma glucose levels were slightly higher in rats exposed to fur odor. When compared to controls, activity was only diminished in the novel cages containing fur odor. Similarly, fur odor-exposed rats, but not those exposed to urine

  10. Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early gene product trans-activates gene expression from the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, S.; Kamine, J.; Markovitz, D.; Fenrick, R.; Pagano, J.

    1988-03-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients are frequently coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this report, the authors demonstrate that an EBV immediate-early gene product, BamHI MLF1, stimulates expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene linked to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter. The HIV promoter sequences necessary for trans-activation by EBV do not include the tat-responsive sequences. In addition, in contrast to the other herpesvirus trans-activators previously studied, the EBV BamHI MLF1 gene product appears to function in part by a posttranscriptional mechanism, since it increases pHIV-CAT protein activity more than it increases HIV-CAT mRNA. This ability of an EBV gene product to activate HIV gene expression may have biologic consequences in persons coinfected with both viruses.

  11. Cat scratch disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... t scratch and bite. Don't allow a cat to lick your skin, eyes, mouth, or open wounds or scratches. Use flea control measures to lower the risk your cat develops the disease. Don't touch feral cats. ...

  12. Vestibulospinal and reticulospinal neuronal activity during locomotion in the intact cat. II. Walking on an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, K; Drew, T

    2000-11-01

    The experiments described in this report were designed to determine the contribution of vestibulospinal neurons (VSNs) in Deiters' nucleus and of reticulospinal neurons (RSNs) in the medullary reticular formation to the modifications of the walking pattern that are associated with locomotion on an inclined plane. Neuronal discharge patterns were recorded from 44 VSNs and 63 RSNs in cats trained to walk on a treadmill whose orientation was varied from +20 degrees (uphill) to -10 degrees (downhill), referred to as pitch tilt, and from 20 degrees roll tilt left to 20 degrees roll tilt right. During uphill locomotion, a majority of VSNs (25/44) and rhythmically active RSNs (24/39) showed an increase in peak discharge frequency, above that observed during locomotion on a level surface. VSNs, unlike some of the RSNs, exhibited no major deviations from the overall pattern of the activity recorded during level walking. The relative increase in discharge frequency of the RSNs (on average, 31.8%) was slightly more than twice that observed in the VSNs (on average, 14.4%), although the average absolute change in discharge frequency was similar (18.2 Hz in VSNs and 21.6 Hz in RSNs). Changes in discharge frequency during roll tilt were generally more modest and were more variable, than those observed during uphill locomotion as were the relative changes in the different limb muscle electromyograms that we recorded. In general, discharge frequency in VSNs was more frequently increased when the treadmill was rolled to the right (ear down contralateral to the recording site) than when it was rolled to the left. Most VSNs that showed significant linear relationships with treadmill orientation in the roll plane increased their activity during right roll and decreased activity during left roll. Discharge activity in phasically modulated RSNs was also modified by roll tilt of the treadmill. Modulation of activity in RSNs that discharged twice in each step cycle was frequently

  13. Evoked activity in the hypothalamus and amygdala of the cat in conditions of food-related motivation and emotional tension.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, I V; Vanetsian, G L

    2006-02-01

    The amplitude-time characteristics of potentials evoked by clicks were analyzed in bilateral leads from the lateral hypothalamus and amygdala in cats in conditions of food-related motivation, emotional tension (presentation of dogs), and orientational reactions. In conditions of food-related motivation, as compared with the satiated state, there were decreases in the latent periods and changes in the amplitudes of the P1 and N2 components in the hypothalamus and P1, N2, and N3 in the amygdala. The most marked changes occurred on the left side in both structures. Presentation of dogs induced decreases in the latent periods of all components (including N1) of evoked potentials in the hypothalamus and amygdala, the most marked changes in the hypothalamus occurring on the right side and the most marked changes in the amygdala occurring on the left side. Conversely, orientational reactions to emotionally neutral stimuli induced increases in the latent periods of evoked potentials. It is concluded that there is an increase in sensory reactivity in the hypothalamus and amygdala in motivational-emotional states. It is suggested that the side of dominance in these structures may be associated both with the factor of the activity/passivity of the behavior in conditions of fear and the genesis of the emotion (motivational or informational).

  14. Structure of the lac operon galactoside acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-Guo; Olsen, Laurence R; Roderick, Steven L

    2002-04-01

    The galactoside acetyltransferase (thiogalactoside transacetylase) of Escherichia coli (GAT, LacA, EC 2.3.1.18) is a gene product of the classical lac operon. GAT may assist cellular detoxification by acetylating nonmetabolizable pyranosides, thereby preventing their reentry into the cell. The structure of GAT has been solved in binary complexes with acetyl-CoA or CoA and in ternary complexes with CoA and the nonphysiological acceptor substrates isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) or p-nitrophenyl beta-D-galactopyranoside (PNPbetaGal). A hydrophobic cleft that binds the thioisopropyl and p-nitrophenyl aglycones of IPTG and PNPbetaGal may discriminate against substrates with hydrophilic substituents at this position, such as lactose, or inducers of the lac operon. An extended loop projecting from the left-handed parallel beta helix domain contributes His115, which is in position to facilitate attack of the C6-hydroxyl group of the substrate on the thioester.

  15. Effects of CO2 and H+ on laryngeal receptor activity in the perfused larynx in anaesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z H; Bradford, A; O'Regan, R G

    1999-09-01

    1. Intralaryngeal CO2 reflexly decreases ventilation and increases upper airway muscle activity. Topical anaesthesia of the laryngeal mucosa or cutting the superior laryngeal nerves (SLNs) abolishes these reflexes, indicating that the receptors responsible are superficially located and that their afferent fibres are in the SLN. Intralaryngeal CO2 affects the activity of receptors recorded from the SLN. 2. An isolated, luminally perfused laryngeal preparation was developed in anaesthetized, paralysed cats in order to compare the effects of solutions with varying levels of pH and PCO2 on pressure-sensitive laryngeal receptor activity. Since the pH of tracheal surface fluid is reported to be approximately 7.0, two neutral (pH 7.4 and 7.0) and two acidic (pH 6.8 and 6.3) solutions were used. 3. Compared with neutral acapnic control solutions, neutral hypercapnic (PCO2 64 mmHg) solutions either excited or inhibited the discharge of 113 out of 211 pressure-sensitive SLN afferents. In 24 receptors, the effects of hypercapnic solutions with either neutral or acidic pH were similar in both direction and magnitude. In 50 receptors affected by neutral hypercapnic solutions, acidic acapnic solutions had no effect on 66 % of units and significantly smaller effects in the remaining units. In 17 receptors, the effects of neutral solutions with a PCO2 of 35 mmHg were significantly less than for neutral solution with a PCO2 of 64 mmHg. 4. These results show that the effects of CO2 on laryngeal pressure-sensitive receptors are independent of the pH of the perfusing media, and suggest that acidification of the receptor cell or its microenvironment is the main mechanism of CO2 chemoreception.

  16. Modulation of synaptic transmission from segmental afferents by spontaneous activity of dorsal horn spinal neurones in the cat.

    PubMed

    Manjarrez, E; Rojas-Piloni, J G; Jimenez, I; Rudomin, P

    2000-12-01

    We examined, in the anaesthetised cat, the influence of the neuronal ensembles producing spontaneous negative cord dorsum potentials (nCDPs) on segmental pathways mediating primary afferent depolarisation (PAD) of cutaneous and group I muscle afferents and on Ia monosynaptic activation of spinal motoneurones. The intraspinal distribution of the field potentials associated with the spontaneous nCDPs indicated that the neuronal ensembles involved in the generation of these potentials were located in the dorsal horn of lumbar segments, in the same region of termination of low-threshold cutaneous afferents. During the occurrence of spontaneous nCDPs, transmission from low-threshold cutaneous afferents to second order neurones in laminae III-VI, as well as transmission along pathways mediating PAD of cutaneous and Ib afferents, was facilitated. PAD of Ia afferents was instead inhibited. Monosynaptic reflexes of flexors and extensors were facilitated during the spontaneous nCDPs. The magnitude of the facilitation was proportional to the amplitude of the 'conditioning' spontaneous nCDPs. This led to a high positive correlation between amplitude fluctuations of spontaneous nCDPs and fluctuations of monosynaptic reflexes. Stimulation of low-threshold cutaneous afferents transiently reduced the probability of occurrence of spontaneous nCDPs as well as the fluctuations of monosynaptic reflexes. It is concluded that the spontaneous nCDPs were produced by the activation of a population of dorsal horn neurones that shared the same functional pathways and involved the same set of neurones as those responding monosynaptically to stimulation of large cutaneous afferents. The spontaneous activity of these neurones was probably the main cause of the fluctuations of the monosynaptic reflexes observed under anaesthesia and could provide a dynamic linkage between segmental sensory and motor pathways.

  17. Modulation of synaptic transmission from segmental afferents by spontaneous activity of dorsal horn spinal neurones in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Manjarrez, E; Rojas-Piloni, J G; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    2000-01-01

    We examined, in the anaesthetised cat, the influence of the neuronal ensembles producing spontaneous negative cord dorsum potentials (nCDPs) on segmental pathways mediating primary afferent depolarisation (PAD) of cutaneous and group I muscle afferents and on Ia monosynaptic activation of spinal motoneurones. The intraspinal distribution of the field potentials associated with the spontaneous nCDPs indicated that the neuronal ensembles involved in the generation of these potentials were located in the dorsal horn of lumbar segments, in the same region of termination of low-threshold cutaneous afferents. During the occurrence of spontaneous nCDPs, transmission from low-threshold cutaneous afferents to second order neurones in laminae III-VI, as well as transmission along pathways mediating PAD of cutaneous and Ib afferents, was facilitated. PAD of Ia afferents was instead inhibited. Monosynaptic reflexes of flexors and extensors were facilitated during the spontaneous nCDPs. The magnitude of the facilitation was proportional to the amplitude of the ‘conditioning’ spontaneous nCDPs. This led to a high positive correlation between amplitude fluctuations of spontaneous nCDPs and fluctuations of monosynaptic reflexes. Stimulation of low-threshold cutaneous afferents transiently reduced the probability of occurrence of spontaneous nCDPs as well as the fluctuations of monosynaptic reflexes. It is concluded that the spontaneous nCDPs were produced by the activation of a population of dorsal horn neurones that shared the same functional pathways and involved the same set of neurones as those responding monosynaptically to stimulation of large cutaneous afferents. The spontaneous activity of these neurones was probably the main cause of the fluctuations of the monosynaptic reflexes observed under anaesthesia and could provide a dynamic linkage between segmental sensory and motor pathways. PMID:11101653

  18. Carnitine Acetyltransferase Mitigates Metabolic Inertia and Muscle Fatigue during Exercise.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Sarah E; Koves, Timothy R; Gooding, Jessica R; Wong, Kari E; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Wittmann, April H; DeBalsi, Karen L; Davies, Michael N; Lindeboom, Lucas; Schrauwen, Patrick; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B; Muoio, Deborah M

    2015-07-07

    Acylcarnitine metabolites have gained attention as biomarkers of nutrient stress, but their physiological relevance and metabolic purpose remain poorly understood. Short-chain carnitine conjugates, including acetylcarnitine, derive from their corresponding acyl-CoA precursors via the action of carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT), a bidirectional mitochondrial matrix enzyme. We show here that contractile activity reverses acetylcarnitine flux in muscle, from net production and efflux at rest to net uptake and consumption during exercise. Disruption of this switch in mice with muscle-specific CrAT deficiency resulted in acetyl-CoA deficit, perturbed energy charge, and diminished exercise tolerance, whereas acetylcarnitine supplementation produced opposite outcomes in a CrAT-dependent manner. Likewise, in exercise-trained compared to untrained humans, post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rates were positively associated with CrAT activity and coincided with dramatic shifts in muscle acetylcarnitine dynamics. These findings show acetylcarnitine serves as a critical acetyl buffer for working muscles and provide insight into potential therapeutic strategies for combatting exercise intolerance.

  19. Structural and Functional Evidence for Bacillus subtilis PaiA as a Novel N1-spermidine/spermine acetyltransferase (SSAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Forouhar,F.; Lee, I.; Vujcic, J.; Vujcic, S.; Shen, J.; Vorobiev, S.; Xiao, R.; Acton, T.; Montelione, G.; et al.

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis PaiA has been implicated in the negative control of sporulation as well as production of degradative enzymes. PaiA shares recognizable sequence homology with N-acetyltransferases, including those that can acetylate spermidine/spermine substrates (SSATs). We have determined the crystal structure of PaiA in complex with CoA at 1.9 Angstrom resolution and found that PaiA is a member of the N-acetyltransferase superfamily of enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observed the binding of an oxidized CoA dimer in the active site of PaiA, and the structural information suggests the substrates of the enzyme could be linear, positively charged compounds. Our biochemical characterization is also consistent with this possibility since purified PaiA possesses N1-acetyltransferase activity towards polyamine substrates including spermidine and spermine. Further, conditional over-expression of PaiA in bacteria results in increased acetylation of endogenous spermidine pools. Thus, our structural and biochemical analyses indicate that PaiA is a novel N-acetyltransferase capable of acetylating both spermidine and spermine. In this way, the pai operon may function in regulating intracellular polyamine concentrations and/or binding capabilities. In addition to preventing toxicity due to polyamine excess, this function may also serve to regulate expression of certain bacterial gene products such as those involved in sporulation.

  20. A technique for recording the activity of brain-stem neurones in awake, unrestrained cats using microwires and an implantable micromanipulator.

    PubMed

    Banks, D; Kuriakose, M; Matthews, B

    1993-01-01

    A new technique is described which is suitable for long-term recording of the activity of neurones in the brain of an awake, unrestrained cat. By using telescopic electrodes, neurones up to 39 mm from the cranial surface can be reached with a miniature micromanipulator which is small enough to be left in place between recording sessions. The most stable recordings have been obtained with electrodes made from microwire, with which units have been held for up to 8 h.

  1. Human Neural Stem Cells Overexpressing Choline Acetyltransferase Restore Unconditioned Fear in Rats with Amygdala Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kyungha; Cha, Yeseul; Kim, Kwang Sei; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Choi, Youngjin; Guo, Haiyu; Ban, Young-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Choon; Park, Dongsun; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Amygdala is involved in the fear memory that recognizes certain environmental cues predicting threatening events. Manipulation of neurotransmission within the amygdala affects the expression of conditioned and unconditioned emotional memories such as fear freezing behaviour. We previously demonstrated that F3.ChAT human neural stem cells (NSCs) overexpressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) improve cognitive function of Alzheimer's disease model rats with hippocampal or cholinergic nerve injuries by increasing acetylcholine (ACh) level. In the present study, we examined the effect of F3.ChAT cells on the deficit of unconditioned fear freezing. Rats given N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) in their amygdala 2 weeks prior to cat odor exposure displayed very short resting (freezing) time compared to normal animals. NMDA induced neuronal degeneration in the amygdala, leading to a decreased ACh concentration in cerebrospinal fluid. However, intracerebroventricular transplantation of F3.ChAT cells attenuated amygdala lesions 4 weeks after transplantation. The transplanted cells were found in the NMDA-injury sites and produced ChAT protein. In addition, F3.ChAT-receiving rats recuperated freezing time staying remote from the cat odor source, according to the recovery of brain ACh concentration. The results indicate that human NSCs overexpressing ChAT may facilitate retrieval of unconditioned fear memory by increasing ACh level. PMID:27087745

  2. The transcription factors ADR1 or CAT8 are required for RTG pathway activation and evasion from yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death in raffinose

    PubMed Central

    Laera, Luna; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Ždralević, Maša; Marzulli, Domenico; Liu, Zhengchang; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on glucose undergoes programmed cell death (PCD) induced by acetic acid (AA-PCD), but evades PCD when grown in raffinose. This is due to concomitant relief of carbon catabolite repression (CCR) and activation of mitochondrial retrograde signaling, a mitochondria-to-nucleus communication pathway causing up-regulation of various nuclear target genes, such as CIT2, encoding peroxisomal citrate synthase, dependent on the positive regulator RTG2 in response to mitochondrial dysfunction. CCR down-regulates genes mainly involved in mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. In this work, we investigated the relationships between the RTG and CCR pathways in the modulation of AA-PCD sensitivity under glucose repression or de-repression conditions. Yeast single and double mutants lacking RTG2 and/or certain factors regulating carbon source utilization, including MIG1, HXK2, ADR1, CAT8, and HAP4, have been analyzed for their survival and CIT2 expression after acetic acid treatment. ADR1 and CAT8 were identified as positive regulators of RTG-dependent gene transcription. ADR1 and CAT8 interact with RTG2 and with each other in inducing cell resistance to AA-PCD in raffinose and controlling the nature of cell death. In the absence of ADR1 and CAT8, AA-PCD evasion is acquired through activation of an alternative factor/pathway repressed by RTG2, suggesting that RTG2 may play a function in promoting necrotic cell death in repressing conditions when RTG pathway is inactive. Moreover, our data show that simultaneous mitochondrial retrograde pathway activation and SNF1-dependent relief of CCR have a key role in central carbon metabolism reprogramming which modulates the yeast acetic acid-stress response. PMID:28357334

  3. [Changes in the phasic activity of neuron microsystems of the somatosensory cortex of the cat during extinction of activation reactions to unreinforced stimuli].

    PubMed

    Kratin, Iu G; Panteleev, S S; Kalinina, N M; Chukova, S V

    1986-01-01

    In chronic experiments on cats, three-phasic responses of neuronal microsystems in the cortical somatic area I were studied during habituation of the EEG activation reactions. Repeated stimuli of different modalities were used: electrical pulses to the forepaw, sounds, direct stimulation of the mesencephalic RF. Simultaneously with the extinction of EEG activation reactions, the three-phasic responses of the multiunit activity (MUA) also became progressively extinct: the 1st phase of primary excitation--only a little, the 2nd phase (inhibitory)--greatly, as well as the 3rd phase--the phase of secondary excitation (if it existed at the beginning). The MUA responses to all stimuli show that these neuronal microsystems are polysensory. Relatively to the nonspecific activating RF macrosystem, the investigated neuronal microsystems are autonomous because their two functionally opposed response phases--the 1st excitatory and the 2nd inhibitory--occur against the monotonous excitatory background of the EEG activation. But in some way the neuronal microsystems are connected with the RF-system because of the parallel development of the extinction process.

  4. [Evoked activity of the cat hypothalamus and amygdala under food motivation and in emotional stress].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, I V; Vanetsian, G L

    2004-12-01

    Amplitude-latency characteristics of auditory evoked potentials (EPs) recorded in bilateral points of the lateral hypothalamus and amygdala were studied under food motivation, in emotional stress (presentation of dogs) and tentative reactions. In the state of hunger, as compared with safety, the latencies of P1, N2 components of EP in hypothalamus, and P1, N2, N3 in amygdala were decreased and their amplitudes were changed. Changes in the left side of both structures were more pronounced. During presentation of dogs, decreases of latencies of all EP components including N1 occurred in hypothalamus and amygdala, changes in hypothalamic potentials were more pronounced on the right side, whereas in the amygdala--on the left side. During tentative responses to emotional-neutral stimuli, the latency of EP increased. It was concluded that sensory reactivity of hypothalamus and amygdala increased in motivational-emotional states. It was supposed that the side of dominance of structure may be related both to the factors of active or passive behavior during fear and the genesis of emotion (motivational or informational).

  5. Detection of emetic activity in the cat by monitoring venous pressure and audio signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagahara, A.; Fox, Robert A.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Elfar, S.

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the use of audio signals as a simple, noninvasive measure of emetic activity, the relationship between the somatic events and sounds associated with retching and vomiting was studied. Thoracic venous pressure obtained from an implanted external jugular catheter was shown to provide a precise measure of the somatic events associated with retching and vomiting. Changes in thoracic venous pressure monitored through an indwelling external jugular catheter with audio signals, obtained from a microphone located above the animal in a test chamber, were compared. In addition, two independent observers visually monitored emetic episodes. Retching and vomiting were induced by injection of xylazine (0.66mg/kg s.c.), or by motion. A unique audio signal at a frequency of approximately 250 Hz is produced at the time of the negative thoracic venous pressure change associated with retching. Sounds with higher frequencies (around 2500 Hz) occur in conjunction with the positive pressure changes associated with vomiting. These specific signals could be discriminated reliably by individuals reviewing the audio recordings of the sessions. Retching and those emetic episodes associated with positive venous pressure changes were detected accurately by audio monitoring, with 90 percent of retches and 100 percent of emetic episodes correctly identified. Retching was detected more accurately (p is less than .05) by audio monitoring than by direct visual observation. However, with visual observation a few incidents in which stomach contents were expelled in the absence of positive pressure changes or detectable sounds were identified. These data suggest that in emetic situations, the expulsion of stomach contents may be accomplished by more than one neuromuscular system and that audio signals can be used to detect emetic episodes associated with thoracic venous pressure changes.

  6. Power spectral analysis of EEG activity obtained from cortical and subcortical sites during the vigilance states of the cat.

    PubMed

    Bronzino, J D; Stern, W C; Leahy, J P; Morgane, P J

    1976-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the raphé system and the region of the nucleus tractus solitarious (NTS), including the area postrema, play significant roles in slow-wave sleep mechanisms and in EEG synchronization. Studies of the interactions between these systems and the neocortex are much needed. If neuronal activity in these lower brainstem regions regulates the degree of cortical synchrony then a high degree of correspondence between the EEG of the area postrema or raphé complex with that of the cortex might be expected. In order to quantitate the reequency characteristics of the EEG obtained from these subcortical sites (nucleus raphé dorsalis, area postrema, as well as anatomical controls adjacent to these regions) during the different vigilance states (waking, slow-wave sleep, REM sleep) in the cat, power spectral analyses techniques were employed. Comparison of these subcortical spectral characteristic with those obtained from cortical (frontal and occipital) sites during the same vigilance state, show that the spectral measures elicited from the region of the area postrema closely correspond to that of the cortex, particularly during slow-wave sleep. On the other hand, the EEG of the anterior portion of the raphé region, although exhibiting a substantial low frequency component during slow-wave sleep in comparison to wakefulness does not show a statistically significant shift to low frequencies such as occurs in the area postrema or the cortex. These results suggest that the increases in the low frequency content of the cortical EEG sites during slow-wave sleep results from synchronizing inputs from the area postrema to a greater extent than from the raphé complex.

  7. [Neuronal activity of the head of the caudate nucleus during formation of positive and inhibitory motor alimentary conditioned reflexes in cats].

    PubMed

    Driagin, Iu M

    1977-01-01

    Cellular activity of the caudate nucleus head was studied on 15 cats during motor alimentary conditioning, extinction and elaboration of differentiation response. Analysis of the dynamics of the appearance and stabilization of neuronal conditioned responses attests that the caudate nuclei are a part of the morpho-functional structure of the given conditioned reflex. A functional heterogeneity within the nuclels head has been shown on the basis of responses of the cells during conditioned and unconditioned behaviour. It has been assumed that cellular populations of the ventral segment of the caudate nucleus head are predominantly involved in providing for a normal course of the processes of extinction and detection of significant signals in this form of conditioned alimentary behaviour in cats.

  8. Synaptic origin and stimulus dependency of neuronal oscillatory activity in the primary visual cortex of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Bringuier, V; Frégnac, Y; Baranyi, A; Debanne, D; Shulz, D E

    1997-01-01

    1. We have studied the oscillatory activity of single neurons (91 recorded extracellularly and 76 intracellularly) in the primary visual cortex of cats and kittens to characterize its origins and its stimulus dependency. A new method for the detection of oscillations was developed in order to maximize the range of detectable frequencies in both types of recordings. Three types of activity were examined: spontaneous background activity, responses to intracellular current steps and visual responses. 2. During spontaneous activity, persistent oscillatory activity was very rare in both types of recordings. However, when intracellular records were made using KCl-filled micropipettes, spontaneous activity appeared rhythmic and contained repeated depolarizing events at a variety of frequencies, suggestive of tonic periodic inhibitory input normally masked at resting potential. 3. Patterns of firing activity in response to intracellular current steps allowed us to classify neurons as regular spiking, intrinsically bursting, and fast-spiking types, as described in vitro. In the case of rhythmically firing cells, the spike frequency increased with the amount of injected current. Subthreshold current-induced oscillations were rarely observed (2 out of 76 cells). 4. Visual stimulation elicited oscillations in one-third of the neurons (55 out of 167), predominantly in the 7-20 Hz frequency range in 93% of the cases. Rhythmicity was observed in both simple and complex cells, and appeared to be more prominent at 5 and 6 weeks of age. 5. Intracellular recordings in bridge mode and voltage clamp revealed that visually evoked oscillations were driven by synaptic activity and did not depend primarily on the intrinsic properties of recorded neurons. Hyperpolarizing the membrane led to an increase in the size of the rhythmic depolarizing events without a change in frequency. In voltage-clamped cells, current responses showed large oscillations at the same frequency as in bridge mode

  9. Radioactive iodine therapy in cats with hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Turrel, J.M.; Feldman, E.C.; Hays, M.; Hornof, W.J.

    1984-03-01

    Eleven cats with hyperthyroidism were treated with radioactive iodine (/sup 131/I). Previous unsuccessful treatments for hyperthyroidism included hemithyroidectomy (2 cats) and an antithyroid drug (7 cats). Two cats had no prior treatment. Thyroid scans, using technetium 99m, showed enlargement and increased radionuclide accumulation in 1 thyroid lobe in 5 cats and in both lobes in 6 cats. Serum thyroxine concentrations were high and ranged from 4.7 to 18 micrograms/dl. Radioactive iodine tracer studies were used to determine peak radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU) and effective and biological half-lives. Activity of /sup 131/I administered was calculated from peak RAIU, effective half-life, and estimated thyroid gland weight. Activity of /sup 131/I administered ranged from 1.0 to 5.9 mCi. The treatment goal was to deliver 20,000 rad to hyperactive thyroid tissue. However, retrospective calculations based on peak RAIU and effective half-life obtained during the treatment period showed that radiation doses actually ranged from 7,100 to 64,900 rad. Complete ablation of the hyperfunctioning thyroid tissue and a return to euthyroidism were seen in 7 cats. Partial responses were seen in 2 cats, and 2 cats became hypothyroid. It was concluded that /sup 131/I ablation of thyroid tumors was a reasonable alternative in the treatment of hyperthyroidism in cats. The optimal method of dosimetry remains to be determined.

  10. The Yeast ATF1 Acetyltransferase Efficiently Acetylates Insect Pheromone Alcohols: Implications for the Biological Production of Moth Pheromones.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bao-Jian; Lager, Ida; Bansal, Sunil; Durrett, Timothy P; Stymne, Sten; Löfstedt, Christer

    2016-04-01

    Many moth pheromones are composed of mixtures of acetates of long-chain (≥10 carbon) fatty alcohols. Moth pheromone precursors such as fatty acids and fatty alcohols can be produced in yeast by the heterologous expression of genes involved in insect pheromone production. Acetyltransferases that subsequently catalyze the formation of acetates by transfer of the acetate unit from acetyl-CoA to a fatty alcohol have been postulated in pheromone biosynthesis. However, so far no fatty alcohol acetyltransferases responsible for the production of straight chain alkyl acetate pheromone components in insects have been identified. In search for a non-insect acetyltransferase alternative, we expressed a plant-derived diacylglycerol acetyltransferase (EaDAcT) (EC 2.3.1.20) cloned from the seed of the burning bush (Euonymus alatus) in a yeast system. EaDAcT transformed various fatty alcohol insect pheromone precursors into acetates but we also found high background acetylation activities. Only one enzyme in yeast was shown to be responsible for the majority of that background activity, the acetyltransferase ATF1 (EC 2.3.1.84). We further investigated the usefulness of ATF1 for the conversion of moth pheromone alcohols into acetates in comparison with Ea DAcT. Overexpression of ATF1 revealed that it was capable of acetylating these fatty alcohols with chain lengths from 10 to 18 carbons with up to 27- and 10-fold higher in vivo and in vitro efficiency, respectively, compared to Ea DAcT. The ATF1 enzyme thus has the potential to serve as the missing enzyme in the reconstruction of the biosynthetic pathway of insect acetate pheromones from precursor fatty acids in yeast.

  11. Force-sharing between cat soleus and gastrocnemius muscles during walking: explanations based on electrical activity, properties, and kinematics.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, B I; Herzog, W; Allinger, T L

    1994-10-01

    Studying force sharing between synergistic muscles can be useful for understanding the functional significance of musculoskeletal redundancy and the mechanisms underlying the control of synergistic muscles. The purpose of this study was to quantify and explain force sharing between cat soleus (SO) and gastrocnemius (GA) muscles, and changes in force sharing, as a function of integrated electrical activity (IEMG), contractile and mechanical properties, and kinematics of the muscles for a variety of locomotor conditions. Forces in SO and GA were measured using standard tendon force transducers of the 'buckle' type, and EMGs were recorded using bipolar, indwelling fine wire electrodes. Muscle tendon and fiber lengths, as well as the corresponding velocities, were derived from the hindlimb kinematics, anthropometric measurements, and a muscle model. In order to describe force- and IEMG-sharing between SO and GA, SO force vs GA force and SO IEMG vs GA IEMG plots were constructed. Force- and IEMG-sharing curves had a loop-like shape. Direction of formation of the loop was typically counterclockwise for forces and clockwise for IEMG; that is, forces of GA reached the maximum and then decreased faster relative to forces of SO, and IEMG of SO reached the maximum and then decreased faster relative to IEMG of GA. With increasing speeds of locomotion, the width of the force-sharing loops tended to decrease, and the width of the IEMG-sharing loops increased. Peak forces in GA muscle and peak IEMGs in SO and GA muscles tended to increase with increasing speeds of locomotion, whereas peak SO forces remained nearly constant for all activities. Because of these changes in the peak forces and IEMGs of SO and GA, the slope of the force-sharing loop decreased, and the slope of the IEMG-sharing loop did not change significantly with increasing speeds of locomotion. Length changes and velocities of SO and GA increased with the speed of locomotion and were similar in absolute magnitude

  12. A 252 bp upstream region of the rat spermatocyte-specific hst70 gene is sufficient to promote expression of the hst70-CAT hybrid gene in testis and brain of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Widłak, W; Markkula, M; Krawczyk, Z; Kananen, K; Huhtaniemi, I

    1995-11-07

    The rat hst70 gene belongs to a heat shock hsp70 multigene family and its expression has been detected so far solely in spermatocytes. To investigate the cis-elements responsible for testis-specific expression of the hst70 gene we produced several lines of transgenic mice carrying fragments of the 5'-flanking regions of the hst70 gene fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene. Hybrid genes of series B were constructed such that, besides the 780 bp, 343 bp and 163 bp 5'-flanking region these plasmids contained no other sequences of the hst70 gene. In hybrid genes of series D the CAT gene was ligated to 343 bp and 252 bp 5'-flanking regions together with the 57 bp of the 5'-end nontranslated (leader) sequences of the hst70 gene. We found that in 780/B, 343/B, 343/D and 252/D adult mice the transgene was specifically and highly expressed in testes. In developing testes the high CAT activity appeared in transgenic mice aged 3 weeks and older. None of the three 163/B transgenic lines exhibited CAT activity in any tissue analyzed. In all CAT expressing lines a weak but significant CAT activity (up to 5% of that in testis) was detected also in the brain. RNase protection assay confirmed that the endogenous hst70 gene transcripts are present in testis as well as in brain of nontransgenic rats and mice. Our data show that the cis-regulatory sequences responsible for testis-specific and developmentally regulated expression of the hst70 gene are localized within the 252 bp region 5' to the gene and neither the 5'-end nor 3'-end nontranslated sequences of the gene are important for this specificity.

  13. APPLICATION OF COMPUTER-AIDED TOMOGRAPHY (CAT) AS A POTENTIAL INDICATOR OF MARINE MARCO BENTHIC ACTIVITY ALONG POLLUTION GRADIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment cores were imaged using a local hospital CAT scanner. These image data were transferred to a personal computer at our laboratory using specially developed software. Previously, we reported an inverse correlation (r2 = 0.98, P<0.01) between the average sediment x-ray atte...

  14. Histone acetyltransferases: challenges in targeting bi-substrate enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wapenaar, Hannah; Dekker, Frank J

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are epigenetic enzymes that install acetyl groups onto lysine residues of cellular proteins such as histones, transcription factors, nuclear receptors, and enzymes. HATs have been shown to play a role in diseases ranging from cancer and inflammatory diseases to neurological disorders, both through acetylations of histone proteins and non-histone proteins. Several HAT inhibitors, like bi-substrate inhibitors, natural product derivatives, small molecules, and protein-protein interaction inhibitors, have been developed. Despite their potential, a large gap remains between the biological activity of inhibitors in in vitro studies and their potential use as therapeutic agents. To bridge this gap, new potent HAT inhibitors with improved properties need to be developed. However, several challenges have been encountered in the investigation of HATs and HAT inhibitors that hinder the development of new HAT inhibitors. HATs have been shown to function in complexes consisting of many proteins. These complexes play a role in the activity and target specificity of HATs, which limits the translation of in vitro to in vivo experiments. The current HAT inhibitors suffer from undesired properties like anti-oxidant activity, reactivity, instability, low potency, or lack of selectivity between HAT subtypes and other enzymes. A characteristic feature of HATs is that they are bi-substrate enzymes that catalyze reactions between two substrates: the cofactor acetyl coenzyme A (Ac-CoA) and a lysine-containing substrate. This has important-but frequently overlooked-consequences for the determination of the inhibitory potency of small molecule HAT inhibitors and the reproducibility of enzyme inhibition experiments. We envision that a careful characterization of molecular aspects of HATs and HAT inhibitors, such as the HAT catalytic mechanism and the enzyme kinetics of small molecule HAT inhibitors, will greatly improve the development of potent and

  15. Constitutive expression of catABC genes in the aniline-assimilating bacterium Rhodococcus species AN-22: production, purification, characterization and gene analysis of CatA, CatB and CatC.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Eitaro; Sakai, Masashi; Hayashi, Katsuaki; Murakami, Shuichiro; Takenaka, Shinji; Aoki, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    The aniline-assimilating bacterium Rhodococcus sp. AN-22 was found to constitutively synthesize CatB (cis,cis-muconate cycloisomerase) and CatC (muconolactone isomerase) in its cells growing on non-aromatic substrates, in addition to the previously reported CatA (catechol 1,2-dioxygenase). The bacterium maintained the specific activity of the three enzymes at an almost equal level during cultivation on succinate. CatB and CatC were purified to homogeneity and characterized. CatB was a monomer with a molecular mass of 44 kDa. The enzyme was activated by Mn2+, Co2+ and Mg2+. Native CatC was a homo-octamer with a molecular mass of 100 kDa. The enzyme was stable between pH 7.0 and 10.5 and was resistant to heating up to 90 degrees C. Genes coding for CatA, CatB and CatC were cloned and named catA, catB and catC respectively. The catABC genes were transcribed as one operon. The deduced amino acid sequences of CatA, CatB and CatC showed high identities with those from other Gram-positive micro-organisms. A regulator gene such as catR encoding a regulatory protein was not observed around the cat gene cluster of Rhodococcus sp. AN-22, but a possible relic of catR was found in the upstream region of catA. Reverse transcriptase-PCR and primer extension analyses showed that the transcriptional start site of the cat gene cluster was located 891 bp upstream of the catA initiation codon in the AN-22 strain growing on both aniline and succinate. Based on these data, we concluded that the bacterium constitutively transcribed the catABC genes and translated its mRNA into CatA, CatB and CatC.

  16. CatB is Critical for Total Catalase Activity and Reduces Bactericidal Effects of Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid on Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiayan; Wu, Jian; Xu, Shu; Duan, Yabing; Zhou, Mingguo

    2017-02-01

    Rice bacterial leaf blight, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, and rice bacterial leaf streak, caused by X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, are major diseases of rice. Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) is a natural product that is isolated from Pseudomonas spp. and is used to control many important rice diseases in China. We previously reported that PCA disturbs the redox balance, which results in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in X. oryzae pv. oryzae. In this study, we found that PCA significantly upregulated the transcript levels of catB and katE, which encode catalases, and that PCA sensitivity was reduced when X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola were cultured with exogenous catalase. Furthermore, catB deletion mutants of X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola showed dramatically decreased total catalase activity, increased sensitivity to PCA, and reduced virulence in rice. In contrast, deletion mutants of srpA and katG, which also encode catalases, exhibited little change in PCA sensitivity. The results indicate that catB in both X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola encodes a catalase that helps protect the bacteria against PCA-induced stress.

  17. Efferents and afferents in an intact muscle nerve: background activity and effects of sural nerve stimulation in the cat.

    PubMed

    Bessou, P; Joffroy, M; Pagès, B

    1981-11-01

    1. The background activity was observed in gamma and alpha efferent fibres and in group I and II fibres innervating the muscle gastrocnemius lateralis or medialis. The reflex effects of ipsilateral and contralateral sural nerve stimulations on the muscle efferents were analysed together with their consequences upon the afferents of the same muscle. The observations were made in the decerebrated cat without opening the neural loops between the muscle and the spinal cord.2. The multi-unit discharges of each category of fibres were obtained, on line, by an original electronic device (Joffroy, 1975, 1980) that sorted the action potentials from the whole electrical activity of a small branch of gastrocnemius lateralis or medialis nerve according to the direction and velocity of propagation of the potentials.3. The small nerve may be regarded as a representative sample of different functional groups of fibres conducting faster than 12 m.sec(-1) and supplying gastrocnemius muscles.4. Some gamma efferents were always tonically firing except when a transient flaccid state developed. Usually the alpha efferents were silent, probably because the muscle was fixed close to the minimal physiological length.5. Separate and selective stimulations of Abeta, Adelta and C fibres of ipsilateral and contralateral sural nerve showed that each group could induce the excitation of gamma neurones. The reciprocal inhibition period of alpha efferents during a flexor reflex was only once accompanied by a small decrease in gamma-firing.6. The reflex increase of over-all frequency of gamma efferents resulted from an increased firing rate of tonic gamma neurones and from the recruitment of gamma neurones previously silent. When the gamma efferents in the small nerve naturally occurred in two subgroups, the slower-conducting subgroup (mainly composed of tonic gamma axons) was activated before the faster-conducting subgroup (mostly composed by gamma axons with no background discharge). Some rare

  18. Hypophosphatemia associated with enteral alimentation in cats.

    PubMed

    Justin, R B; Hohenhaus, A E

    1995-01-01

    Hypophosphatemia is uncommon in cats, but it has been reported in association with diabetes mellitus and hepatic lipidosis, where it can cause hemolysis, rhabdomyopathy, depression, seizures, and coma. The purpose of this article is to describe 9 cats that developed low serum phosphorus concentrations (< 2.5 mg/dL) subsequent to enteral alimentation. Serum biochemical analyses from more than 6,000 cats were reviewed. The medical records of all cats with hypophosphatemia were examined for history of enteral alimentation; diabetic cats were excluded from the study. Nine cats, ranging in age from 3 to 17 years, were identified. All cats had normal serum phosphorus concentrations before tube feeding began. Onset of hypophosphatemia occurred 12 to 72 hours after initiation of enteral alimentation, and the nadir for phosphorus concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 2.4 mg/dL. Hemolysis occurred in 6 of the 9 cats. Hypophosphatemia secondary to enteral alimentation is an uncommon clinical finding in cats. Cats with high alanine aminotransferase activity, hyperbilirubinemia, and weight loss should be closely monitored for hypophosphatemia during the first 72 hours of enteral alimentation.

  19. Central command does not suppress baroreflex control of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity at the onset of spontaneous motor activity in the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Kanji; Ishii, Kei; Asahara, Ryota; Idesako, Mitsuhiro

    2016-10-01

    Our laboratory has reported that central command blunts the sensitivity of the aortic baroreceptor-heart rate (HR) reflex at the onset of voluntary static exercise in animals. We have examined whether baroreflex control of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) and/or cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity are altered at the onset of spontaneously occurring motor behavior, which was monitored with tibial nerve activity in paralyzed, decerebrate cats. CSNA exhibited a peak increase (126 ± 17%) immediately after exercise onset, followed by increases in HR and mean arterial pressure (MAP). With development of the pressor response, CSNA and HR decreased near baseline, although spontaneous motor activity was not terminated. Atropine methyl nitrate (0.1-0.2 mg/kg iv) with little central influence delayed the initial increase in HR but did not alter the response magnitudes of HR and CSNA, while atropine augmented the pressor response. The baroreflex-induced decreases in CSNA and HR elicited by brief occlusion of the abdominal aorta were challenged at the onset of spontaneous motor activity. Spontaneous motor activity blunted the baroreflex reduction in HR by aortic occlusion but did not alter the baroreflex inhibition of CSNA. Similarly, atropine abolished the baroreflex reduction in HR but did not influence the baroreflex inhibition of CSNA. Thus it is likely that central command increases CSNA and decreases cardiac vagal outflow at the onset of spontaneous motor activity while preserving baroreflex control of CSNA. Accordingly, central command must attenuate cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity against an excess rise in MAP as estimated from the effect of muscarinic blockade.

  20. [Readjustment of the efferent activity of the scratching generator in response to stimulation of muscle afferents of the hindlimb of the decerebrate immobilized cat].

    PubMed

    Shimanskiĭ, Iu P; Baev, K V

    1987-01-01

    Rebuildings of the scratching generator activity caused by phasic electrical stimulation of ipsilateral hindlimb muscle nerves during different hindlimb positions were studied in decerebrated immobilized cats. Strong dependence of these rebuildings on the stimulation phase was observed. The character of the "scratch" cycle duration rebuilding was formed by the scratching generator tendency to bring efferent activity into such correlation with the stimulus that the stimulation moment coincided with the moment of efferent activity phase triggering. Phasic altering of the efferent activity intensity rebuilding was observed against a background of "aiming" and "scratching" activity correlation shift in the direction of strengthening activation of muscles innervated by the stimulated nerve. This rebuilding was intensified when the hindlimb deflects from the aimed position in the direction of corresponding muscles stretching. Physiological sense of "rebuilding absence phases" is discussed. It is postulated that absence of the duration and intensity changes can be achieved simultaneously only with definite correlation between phase and intensity of the afferent impulsation burst.

  1. Neural plasticity maintained high by activation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase: an age-independent, general mechanism in cat striate cortex.

    PubMed

    Imamura, K; Kasamatsu, T; Tanaka, S

    2007-06-29

    Adult cats lack ocular dominance plasticity, showing little change in the ocular dominance distribution following monocular deprivation. Ocular dominance plasticity is also lost in kitten visual cortex that has been continuously infused with either catecholaminergic neurotoxin, beta-adrenoreceptor blocker, or inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A). Complementarily, in adult cats we showed earlier that pharmacological activation of protein kinase A, albeit partially, restored ocular dominance plasticity. In the present study, we first asked whether, mediated by protein kinase A activation, the same molecular mechanisms could restore ocular dominance plasticity to kitten cortex that once lost the expression of plasticity due to prior pharmacological treatments. Concurrently with monocular deprivation, two kinds of cyclic AMP-related drugs (cholera toxin A-subunit or dibutyryl cyclic AMP) were directly infused in two types of aplastic kitten cortex pretreated with either 6-hydroxydopamine or propranolol. The combined treatment resulted in clear ocular dominance shift to the non-deprived eye, indicating that cortical plasticity was fully restored to aplastic kitten cortex. Next, to directly prove the sensitivity difference in protein kinase A activation between the immature and mature cortex, we compared the thus-obtained data in kittens with the published data derived from adult cats under the comparable experimental paradigm. The extent of ocular dominance changes following monocular deprivation was compared at different drug concentrations in the two preparations: the shifted ocular dominance distribution in aplastic kitten cortex infused with dibutyryl cyclic AMP at the lowest concentration tested and the W-shaped distribution in similarly treated adult cortex at a thousandfold-higher drug concentration that induced nearly maximal changes. We conclude that, irrespective of the animal's age, activation of protein kinase A cascades is a

  2. Cross-linked polyvinyl polymers versus polyureas as designed supports for catalytically active M(0) nanoclusters. Part III. Nanometer scale structure of the cross-linked polyurea support EnCat 30 and of the Pd(II)/EnCat 30 and Pd(0)/EnCat 30NP catalysts.

    PubMed

    Centomo, P; Zecca, M; Zoleo, A; Maniero, A L; Canton, P; Jerábek, K; Corain, B

    2009-05-28

    The cross-linked polyurea support EnCat 30, its related macromolecular complex Pd(II)/EnCat 30 and its related Pd(0)/EnCat 30NP nanocomposite are thoroughly investigated with SEM, TEM, ISEC and ESR in the solid state (SEM and TEM) and swollen state in THF (ISEC and ESR). Pd(II)/EnCat 30 and its related Pd(0)/EnCat 30NP are obtained by microencapsulation of palladium acetate in a polyurea framework, which is formed upon hydrolysis/condensation of mixtures of multi-functional oligo-arylisocyanates in dichloroethane. Most remarkably, both Pd(II)/EnCat and Pd(0)/EnCat 30NP turn out to be far more (nano)porous and swellable materials than the blank polyurea matrix (EnCat 30). It is proposed that there is a strong nanostructural effect exerted by Pd(II) species due to its interaction with functional groups (amines stemming from the hydrolysis of the isocyanato groups or ureido groups belonging to the polymer chains) during the growth of the cross-linked polymer framework. As a consequence, the catalytic species in both Pd(II)/EnCat 30 and Pd(0)/EnCat 30NP are much more accessible to molecules diffusing from liquid phases in contact with the materials and, hence, are better catalysts than expected from the morphology of blank polyurea EnCat 30.

  3. Use of different derivatives of D-Val-Leu-Arg for studying kallikrein activities in cat submandibular glands and saliva.

    PubMed

    Garrett, J R; Kidd, A; Kyriacou, K; Smith, R E

    1985-07-01

    Glandular kallikrein shows a special selectivity for D-Val-Leu-Arg-4-methoxy-2-naphthylamide in comparison with other potential oligopeptide substrates and it provides a useful histochemical substrate, although the reaction may not always be specific. However, in cat submandibular saliva, a biochemical assay using the closely related D-Val-Leu-Arg-7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin (AFC) as substrate, which affords more sensitive detection, showed that soya bean trypsin inhibitor causes no inhibition. This indicates that there are unlikely to be contaminating enzymes competing for the substrate in this body fluid. Support for this observation has been gained by the useful new enzyme overlay membrane technique for fluorescent assessment of reactive bands of enzymes after isoelectric focusing, using membranes of cellulose acetate impregnated with D-Val-Leu-Arg-AFC. Comparison of results after isoelectric focusing of purified cat submandibular kallikrein with samples of cat submandibular saliva confirmed that the substrate is monospecific for kallikrein in saliva of the cat. This knowledge has enabled us to start assessing the dynamics of the secretion of kallikrein by the gland. Testing individual drops of saliva has shown that an amazingly rapid mobilization of kallikrein occurs in high concentrations on sympathetic nerve stimulation. The corresponding oligopeptide-based inhibitor D-Val-Leu-Arg-chloromethyl ketone was found to be strongly inhibitory of the amidase reaction by kallikrein but showed a low specificity for kallikrein. Nevertheless, its effects have been tested in vivo by the intravascular route and it caused an increase in the resting salivary vascular resistance whether administered close-arterially or intravenously. Thus, it would seem that a kallikrein-like protease does influence the background tone in the vessels and the source of this enzyme is thought to be mast cells.

  4. Contractile properties of extraocular muscle in Siamese cat.

    PubMed

    Lennerstrand, G

    1979-01-01

    Siamese cats are albinos with poor visual resolution and severely impaired binocular vision. Eey muscle phyiology was studied in Siamese cats as a part of a more extensive project on eye muscle properties in cats with deficient binocular vision. Isometric contractions of the inferior oblique muscle were recorded in response to single and repetitive muscle nerve stimulation. Speed of contraction, measured as twitch contraction time, fusion frequency and rate of tetanic tension rise, was lower in Siamese than in normal cats. Eye muscles of Siamese cats fatiqued more easily to continuous activation than normal cat eye mucle. These functional changes have also been found in cats with binocular defects from monocular lid suture, but were much more marked in Siamese cats. It is suggested that the eye muscle changes represent muscular adaptations to genetically caused impairments of binocular vision and visual resolution in Siamese cats.

  5. [Readjustment of the efferent activity of the scratching generator in response to stimulation of cutaneous afferents of the hindlimb of the decerebrate immobilized cat].

    PubMed

    Shimanskiĭ, Iu P; Baev, K V

    1987-01-01

    Rebuildings of the scratching generator efferent activity caused by the phasic electrical stimulation of ipsilateral hindlimb skin nerves during different hindlimb positions were studied in decerebrated immobilized cats. Stimulation was followed by short latency inhibition of the efferent activity. Stimulation did not cause correlation shifts in the common "aiming" and "scratching" activity. Changes in the efferent activity cycle duration and intensity depended on the stimulation phase. Inversion of intensity changes occurred with transition from the middle-force to strong stimulation. A functional role of the dependence of the efferent activity rebuilding on the stimulation phase is considered. The scratching generator is supposed to contain a model of the afferent inflow which enters the spinal cord during real scratching.

  6. Biochemical characteristics of a novel vegetative tissue geraniol acetyltransferase from a monoterpene oil grass (Palmarosa, Cymbopogon martinii var. Motia) leaf.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj K; Sangwan, Neelam S; Bose, Subir K; Sangwan, Rajender S

    2013-04-01

    Plants synthesize volatile alcohol esters on environmental insult or as metabolic induction during flower/fruit development. However, essential oil plants constitutively produce them as the oil constituents. Their synthesis is catalyzed by BAHD family enzymes called alcohol acyltransferases (AATs). However, no AAT has been characterized from plant foliage synthesizing acyclic monoterpenoids containing essential oils. Therefore, we have purified and biochemically characterized a geraniol: acetyl coenzyme A acetyltransferase (GAAT) from Palmarosa aroma grass (Cymbopogon martinii) leaf. MALDI-assisted proteomic study of the 43kDa monomeric enzyme revealed its sequence motif novelties e.g. relaxed conservation at Phe and Trp in DFGWG'. This suggests permissiveness of variations in the conserved motif without loss of catalytic ability. Also, some new conserved/semi-conserved motifs of AATs were recognized. The GAAT k(cat)/K(m) values (300-700M(-1)s(-1)) were low (a generic characteristic for secondary metabolism enzyme) but higher than those of some floral AATs. Wide substrate acceptability for catalyzing acetylation of diverse primary alcohols (chain of ≥C(6)) implied its catalytic description as a 'primary aliphatic alcohol acetyltransferase'. It signifies metabolic ability to deliver diverse aroma esters, should the acceptor alcohols be available in planta. To our knowledge, this is the first report of detailed kinetics of a vegetal monoterpenol acyltransferase.

  7. Cat Scratch Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an illness caused by the bacterium Bartonella henselae. Almost half of all cats carry the infection ... symptoms of CSD, call your doctor. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  8. Cat-Scratch Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients Infants and Young Children Publications & Materials Announcements Cat-Scratch Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ( ... play and learn how to attack prey. How cats and people become infected Kitten playing with a ...

  9. Tuna fish diet influences cat behavior. [Elevated levels of selenium and mercury in commercial tuna fish cat food

    SciTech Connect

    Houpt, K.A.; Essick, L.A.; Shaw, E.B.; Alo, D.K.; Gilmartin, J.E.; Gutenmann, W.H.; Littman, C.B.; Lisk, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    When observed in their home cages, cats fed commercial tuna fish cat food were less active, vocalized less, and spent more time on the floor and more time eating than cats fed commercial beef cat food. There were no differences in response to human handling between the two groups. There were no differences in learning ability on a two-choice point maze or in reversal learning in the same maze between beef- and tuna-fed cats. The behavior of the groups differed in a 15-min open field test only in the number of toys contacted. Cats fed the tuna had elevated tissue levels of mercury and selenium.

  10. Pulmonary transcription of CAT-2 and CAT-2B but not CAT-1 and CAT-2A were upregulated in hemorrhagic shock rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Jen; Tsai, Pei-Shan; Yang, Chen-Hsien; Su, Tsung-Hsien; Stevens, Bruce R; Skimming, Jeffrey W; Pan, Wynn H T

    2004-11-01

    Hemorrhagic shock stimulates nitric oxide (NO) biosynthesis through upregulation of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression. Trans-membrane l-arginine transportation mediated by the isozymes of cationic amino acid transporters (e.g. CAT-1, CAT-2, CAT-2A, and CAT-2B) is one crucial regulatory mechanism that regulates iNOS activity. We sought to assess the effects of hemorrhage and resuscitation on the expression of these regulatory enzymes in hemorrhage-stimulated rat lungs. Twenty-four rats were randomized to a sham-instrumented group, a sustained shock group, a shock with blood resuscitation group, or a shock with normal saline resuscitation group. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by withdrawing blood to maintain MAP between 40 and 45mmHg for 60min. Resuscitation by infusing blood/saline mixtures (blood resuscitation group) or saline alone (saline resuscitation group) was then performed. At the end of the experiment (300min after hemorrhage began), rats were sacrificed and enzymes expression as well as pulmonary NO biosynthesis and lung injuries were assayed. Our data revealed that hemorrhage-induced pulmonary iNOS, CAT-2, and CAT-2B transcription which was associated with pulmonary NO overproduction and subsequent lung injury. Resuscitation significantly attenuated the hemorrhage-induced enzyme upregulation, pulmonary NO overproduction, and lung injury. Blood/saline mixtures were superior to saline as a resuscitation solution in treating hemorrhage-induced pulmonary NO overproduction and lung injury. Hemorrhage and/or resuscitation, however, did not affect the expression of pulmonary CAT-1 and CAT-2A. It is, therefore, concluded that the expression of pulmonary iNOS, CAT-2, and CAT-2B is inducible and that of CAT-1 and CAT-2A is constitutive in hemorrhagic shock rat lungs.

  11. Cat-Scratch Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... have diabetes or those who have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Cat-scratch disease is also called cat-scratch fever. ... You can also get the bacteria in your eyes if you pet a cat that has the bacteria on its fur and ...

  12. CATS Featured Articles

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-01-31

      CATS Featured Articles       A Slice of Cirrus: Image of ... just hours before by the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) onboard the International Space Station. Nighttime View of Raung Volcanic Plume : Natural Hazards  - The CATS instrument slices through darkness to reveal the vertical structure of a ...

  13. Dual reporter transgene driven by 2.3Col1a1 promoter is active in differentiated osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marijanovic, Inga; Jiang, Xi; Kronenberg, Mark S.; Stover, Mary Louise; Erceg, Ivana; Lichtler, Alexander C.; Rowe, David W.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: As quantitative and spatial analyses of promoter reporter constructs are not easily performed in intact bone, we designed a reporter gene specific to bone, which could be analyzed both visually and quantitatively by using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and a cyan version of green fluorescent protein (GFPcyan), driven by a 2.3-kb fragment of the rat collagen promoter (Col2.3). METHODS: The construct Col2.3CATiresGFPcyan was used for generating transgenic mice. Quantitative measurement of promoter activity was performed by CAT analysis of different tissues derived from transgenic animals; localization was performed by visualized GFP in frozen bone sections. To assess transgene expression during in vitro differentiation, marrow stromal cell and neonatal calvarial osteoblast cultures were analyzed for CAT and GFP activity. RESULTS: In mice, CAT activity was detected in the calvaria, long bone, teeth, and tendon, whereas histology showed that GFP expression was limited to osteoblasts and osteocytes. In cell culture, increased activity of CAT correlated with increased differentiation, and GFP activity was restricted to mineralized nodules. CONCLUSION: The concept of a dual reporter allows a simultaneous visual and quantitative analysis of transgene activity in bone.

  14. Signal transduction of aortic and carotid sinus baroreceptors is not modified by central command during spontaneous motor activity in decerebrate cats.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Kanji; Ishii, Kei; Kadowaki, Akito; Ishida, Tomoko; Idesako, Mitsuhiro; Liang, Nan

    2014-05-15

    Our laboratory has suggested that central command provides selective inhibition of the cardiomotor component of aortic baroreflex at the start of exercise, preserving carotid sinus baroreflex. It is postulated that central command may modify the signal transduction of aortic baroreceptors, so as to decrease aortic baroreceptor input to the cardiovascular centers, and, thereby, can cause the selective inhibition of aortic baroreflex. To test the hypothesis, we directly analyzed the responses in multifiber aortic nerve activity (AoNA) and carotid sinus nerve activity (CsNA) during spontaneous motor activity in decerebrate, paralyzed cats. The increases of 62-104% in mean AoNA and CsNA were found during spontaneous motor activity, in proportion to a rise of 35 ± 3 mmHg (means ± SE) in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and had an attenuating tendency by restraining heart rate (HR) at the lower intrinsic frequency of 154 ± 6 beats/min. Brief occlusion of the abdominal aorta was conducted before and during spontaneous motor activity to produce a mechanically evoked increase in MAP and, thereby, to examine the stimulus-response relationship of arterial baroreceptors. Although the sensitivity of the MAP-HR baroreflex curve was markedly blunted during spontaneous motor activity, the stimulus-response relationships of AoNA and CsNA were not influenced by spontaneous motor activity, irrespective of the absence or presence of the HR restraint. Thus, it is concluded that aortic and carotid sinus baroreceptors can code beat-by-beat blood pressure during spontaneous motor activity in decerebrate cats and that central command is unlikely to modulate the signal transduction of arterial baroreceptors.

  15. Specific alkylation of a histidine residue in carnitine acetyltransferase by bromoacetyl-l-carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Chase, J. F. A.; Tubbs, P. K.

    1970-01-01

    Incubation of carnitine acetyltransferase with low concentrations of bromoacetyl-l-carnitine causes a rapid and irreversible loss of enzyme activity; one mol of inhibitor can inactivate one mol of enzyme. Bromoacetyl-d-carnitine, iodoacetate or iodoacetamide are ineffective. l-Carnitine protects the transferase from bromoacetyl-l-carnitine. Investigation shows that the enzyme first reversibly binds bromoacetyl-l-carnitine with an affinity similar to that shown for the normal substrate acetyl-l-carnitine; this binding is followed by an alkylation reaction, forming the carnitine ester of a monocarboxymethyl-protein, which is catalytically inactive. The carnitine is released at an appreciable rate by spontaneous hydrolysis, and the resulting carboxymethyl-enzyme is also inactive. Total acid hydrolysis of enzyme after treatment with 2-[14C]bromoacetyl-l-carnitine yields N-3-carboxy[14C]methylhistidine as the only labelled amino acid. These findings, taken in conjunction with previous work, suggest that the single active centre of carnitine acetyltransferase contains a histidine residue. PMID:5461620

  16. An extracellular factor regulating expression of the chromosomal aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase of Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed

    Rather, P N; Parojcic, M M; Paradise, M R

    1997-08-01

    The chromosomal aac(2')-Ia gene in Providencia stuartii encodes a housekeeping 2'-N-acetyltransferase [AAC(2')-Ia] involved in the acetylation of peptidoglycan. In addition, the AAC(2')-Ia enzyme also acetylates and confers resistance to the clinically important aminoglycoside antibiotics gentamicin, tobramycin, and netilmicin. Expression of the aac(2')-Ia gene was found to be strongly influenced by cell density, with a sharp decrease in aac(2')-Ia mRNA accumulation as cells approached stationary phase. This decrease was mediated by the accumulation of an extracellular factor, designated AR (for acetyltransferase repressing)-factor. AR-factor was produced in both minimal and rich media and acted in a manner that was strongly dose dependent. The activity of AR-factor was also pH dependent, with optimal activity at pH 8.0 and above. Biochemical characterization of conditioned media from P. stuartii has shown that AR-factor is between 500 and 1,000 Da in molecular size and is heat stable. In addition, AR-factor was inactivated by a variety of proteases, suggesting that it may be a small peptide.

  17. An acetyltransferase-independent function of Eso1 regulates centromere cohesion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Su-Jiun; Tapia-Alveal, Claudia; Jabado, Omar J.; Germain, Doris; O’Connell, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotes contain three essential Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC) complexes: cohesin, condensin, and Smc5/6. Cohesin forms a ring-shaped structure that embraces sister chromatids to promote their cohesion. The cohesiveness of cohesin is promoted by acetylation of N-terminal lysines of the Smc3 subunit by the acetyltransferases Eco1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the homologue, Eso1, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In both yeasts, these acetyltransferases are essential for cell viability. However, whereas nonacetylatable Smc3 mutants are lethal in S. cerevisiae, they are not in S. pombe. We show that the lethality of a temperature-sensitive allele of eso1 (eso1-H17) is due to activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and is associated with premature centromere separation. The lack of cohesion at the centromeres does not correlate with Psm3 acetylation or cohesin levels at the centromeres, but is associated ith significantly reduced recruitment of the cohesin regulator Pds5. The SAC activation in this context is dependent on Smc5/6 function, which is required to remove cohesin from chromosome arms but not centromeres. The mitotic defects caused by Smc5/6 and Eso1 dysfunction are cosuppressed in double mutants. This identifies a novel function (or functions) for Eso1 and Smc5/6 at centromeres and extends the functional relationships between these SMC complexes. PMID:27798241

  18. Reduction of feral cat (Felis catus Linnaeus 1758) colony size following hysterectomy of adult female cats.

    PubMed

    Mendes-de-Almeida, Flavya; Remy, Gabriella L; Gershony, Liza C; Rodrigues, Daniela P; Chame, Marcia; Labarthe, Norma V

    2011-06-01

    The size of urban cat colonies is limited only by the availability of food and shelter; therefore, their population growth challenges all known population control programs. To test a new population control method, a free-roaming feral cat colony at the Zoological Park in the city of Rio de Janeiro was studied, beginning in 2001. The novel method consisted of performing a hysterectomy on all captured female cats over 6 months of age. To estimate the size of the colony and compare population from year to year, a method of capture-mark-release-recapture was used. The aim was to capture as many individuals as possible, including cats of all ages and gender to estimate numbers of cats in all population categories. Results indicated that the feral cat population remained constant from 2001 to 2004. From 2004 to 2008, the hysterectomy program and population estimates were performed every other year (2006 and 2008). The population was estimated to be 40 cats in 2004, 26 in 2006, and 17 cats in 2008. Although pathogens tend to infect more individuals as the population grows older and maintains natural behavior, these results show that free-roaming feral cat colonies could have their population controlled by a biannual program that focuses on hysterectomy of sexually active female cats.

  19. Regulation of KAT6 Acetyltransferases and Their Roles in Cell Cycle Progression, Stem Cell Maintenance, and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fu

    2016-01-01

    The lysine acetyltransferase 6 (KAT6) histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes are highly conserved from yeast to higher organisms. They acetylate histone H3 and other nonhistone substrates and are involved in cell cycle regulation and stem cell maintenance. In addition, the human KAT6 HATs are recurrently mutated in leukemia and solid tumors. Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms underlying the regulation of KAT6 HATs and their roles in cell cycle progression. In this minireview, we summarize the identification and analysis of the KAT6 complexes and discuss the regulatory mechanisms governing their enzymatic activities and substrate specificities. We further focus on the roles of KAT6 HATs in regulating cell proliferation and stem cell maintenance and review recent insights that aid in understanding their involvement in human diseases. PMID:27185879

  20. Three-dimensional structure of a Streptomyces sviceus GNAT acetyltransferase with similarity to the C-terminal domain of the human GH84 O-GlcNAcase

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yuan; Roth, Christian; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Davies, Gideon J.

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of a bacterial acetyltransferase with 27% sequence identity to the C-terminal domain of human O-GlcNAcase has been solved at 1.5 Å resolution. This S. sviceus protein is compared with known GCN5-related acetyltransferases, adding to the diversity observed in this superfamily. The mammalian O-GlcNAc hydrolysing enzyme O-GlcNAcase (OGA) is a multi-domain protein with glycoside hydrolase activity in the N-terminus and with a C-terminal domain that has low sequence similarity to known acetyltransferases, prompting speculation, albeit controversial, that the C-terminal domain may function as a histone acetyltransferase (HAT). There are currently scarce data available regarding the structure and function of this C-terminal region. Here, a bacterial homologue of the human OGA C-terminal domain, an acetyltransferase protein (accession No. ZP-05014886) from Streptomyces sviceus (SsAT), was cloned and its crystal structure was solved to high resolution. The structure reveals a conserved protein core that has considerable structural homology to the acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) binding site of GCN5-related acetyltransferases (GNATs). Calorimetric data further confirm that SsAT is indeed able to bind AcCoA in solution with micromolar affinity. Detailed structural analysis provided insight into the binding of AcCoA. An acceptor-binding cavity was identified, indicating that the physiological substrate of SsAT may be a small molecule. Consistent with recently published work, the SsAT structure further questions a HAT function for the human OGA domain.

  1. Radioenzymatic assays for aminoglycosides with kanamycin 6'- acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, A.; Smith, A.L.; Opheim, K.E.

    1985-03-01

    To facilitate the rapid and accurate quantitation of parenterally administered aminoglycosides, the optimum conditions (pH, duration of incubation, and cofactor concentrations) were defined to permit radioenzymatic assays with kanamycin acetyltransferase. The accuracy in quantitating tobramycin, netilmicin, kanamycin, and amikacin at concentrations in the therapeutic range was greater than 90%, with a mean recovery of 102.8%. The mean of the interassay coefficient of variation was 7.8%. Typical standard curves at six different concentrations resulted in a correlation coefficient (r value) of greater than 0.99 for each aminoglycoside. The radioenzymatic assay correlates well with the bioassay (tobramycin and netilmicin) and radioimmunoassay (amikacin and kanamycin); the correlation coefficient is greater than 0.90 for all. The authors conclude that the radioenzymatic assay utilizing kanamycin 6'-acetyltransferase is feasible for all commercially available parenterally administered aminoglycosides.

  2. Lateral bias and temperament in the domestic cat (Felis silvestris).

    PubMed

    McDowell, Louise J; Wells, Deborah L; Hepper, Peter G; Dempster, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Research points to a relationship between lateralization and emotional functioning in humans and many species of animal. The present study explored the association between paw preferences and emotional functioning, specifically temperament, in a species thus far overlooked in this area, the domestic cat. Thirty left-pawed, 30 right-pawed, and 30 ambilateral pet cats were recruited following an assessment of their paw preferences using a food-reaching challenge. The animals' temperament was subsequently assessed using the Feline Temperament Profile (FTP). Cats' owners also completed a purpose-designed cat temperament (CAT) scale. Analysis revealed a significant relationship between lateral bias and FTP and CAT scale scores. Ambilateral cats had lower positive (FTP+) scores, and were perceived as less affectionate, obedient, friendly, and more aggressive, than left or right-pawed animals. Left and right pawed cats differed significantly on 1 trait on the CAT scale, namely playfulness. The strength of the cats' paw preferences was related to the animals' FTP and CAT scores. Cats with a greater strength of paw preference had higher FTP+ scores than those with a weaker strength of paw preference. Animals with stronger paw preferences were perceived as more confident, affectionate, active, and friendly than those with weaker paw preferences. Results suggest that motor laterality in the cat is strongly related to temperament and that the presence or absence of lateralization has greater implications for the expression of emotion in this species than the direction of the lateralized bias. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. The innate antiviral immune system of the cat: molecular tools for the measurement of its state of activation.

    PubMed

    Robert-Tissot, Céline; Rüegger, Vera L; Cattori, Valentino; Meli, Marina L; Riond, Barbara; Gomes-Keller, Maria Alice; Vögtlin, Andrea; Wittig, Burghardt; Juhls, Christiane; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Lutz, Hans

    2011-10-15

    The innate immune system plays a central role in host defence against viruses. While many studies portray mechanisms in early antiviral immune responses of humans and mice, much remains to be discovered about these mechanisms in the cat. With the objective of shedding light on early host-virus interactions in felids, we have developed 12 real-time TaqMan(®) qPCR systems for feline genes relevant to innate responses to viral infection, including those encoding for various IFNα and IFNω subtypes, IFNβ, intracellular antiviral factor Mx, NK cell stimulator IL-15 and effectors perforin and granzyme B, as well as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 3 and 8. Using these newly developed assays and others previously described, we measured the relative expression of selected markers at early time points after viral infection in vitro and in vivo. Feline embryonic fibroblasts (FEA) inoculated with feline leukemia virus (FeLV) indicated peak levels of IFNα, IFNβ and Mx expression already 6h after infection. In contrast, Crandell-Rees feline kidney (CrFK) cells inoculated with feline herpes virus (FHV) responded to infection with high levels of IFNα and IFNβ only after 24h, and no induction of Mx could be detected. In feline PBMCs challenged in vitro with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), maximal expression levels of IFNα, β and ω subtype genes as well as IL-15 and TLRs 3, 7 and 8 were measured between 12 and 24h after infection, whereas expression levels of proinflammatory cytokine gene IL-6 were consistently downregulated until 48h post inoculation. A marginal upregulation of granzyme B was also observed within 3h after infection. In an in vivo experiment, cats challenged with FIV exhibited a 2.4-fold increase in IFNα expression in blood 1 week post infection. We furthermore demonstrate the possibility of stimulating feline immune cells in vitro with various immune response modifiers (IRMs) already known for their immunostimulatory properties in mice and humans, namely

  4. The Protein Acetyltransferase PatZ from Escherichia coli Is Regulated by Autoacetylation-induced Oligomerization*

    PubMed Central

    de Diego Puente, Teresa; Gallego-Jara, Julia; Castaño-Cerezo, Sara; Bernal Sánchez, Vicente; Fernández Espín, Vanesa; García de la Torre, José; Manjón Rubio, Arturo; Cánovas Díaz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in the metabolic regulation of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In Escherichia coli, PatZ (formerly YfiQ) is the only known acetyltransferase protein and is responsible for acetyl-CoA synthetase acetylation. In this study, we demonstrated PatZ-positive cooperativity in response to acetyl-CoA and the regulation of acetyl-CoA synthetase activity by the acetylation level. Furthermore, functional analysis of an E809A mutant showed that the conserved glutamate residue is not relevant for the PatZ catalytic mechanism. Biophysical studies demonstrated that PatZ is a stable tetramer in solution and is transformed to its octameric form by autoacetylation. Moreover, this modification is reversed by the sirtuin CobB. Finally, an in silico PatZ tetramerization model based on hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions is proposed and validated by three-dimensional hydrodynamic analysis. These data reveal, for the first time, the structural regulation of an acetyltransferase by autoacetylation in a prokaryotic organism. PMID:26251518

  5. The Protein Acetyltransferase PatZ from Escherichia coli Is Regulated by Autoacetylation-induced Oligomerization.

    PubMed

    de Diego Puente, Teresa; Gallego-Jara, Julia; Castaño-Cerezo, Sara; Bernal Sánchez, Vicente; Fernández Espín, Vanesa; García de la Torre, José; Manjón Rubio, Arturo; Cánovas Díaz, Manuel

    2015-09-18

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in the metabolic regulation of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In Escherichia coli, PatZ (formerly YfiQ) is the only known acetyltransferase protein and is responsible for acetyl-CoA synthetase acetylation. In this study, we demonstrated PatZ-positive cooperativity in response to acetyl-CoA and the regulation of acetyl-CoA synthetase activity by the acetylation level. Furthermore, functional analysis of an E809A mutant showed that the conserved glutamate residue is not relevant for the PatZ catalytic mechanism. Biophysical studies demonstrated that PatZ is a stable tetramer in solution and is transformed to its octameric form by autoacetylation. Moreover, this modification is reversed by the sirtuin CobB. Finally, an in silico PatZ tetramerization model based on hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions is proposed and validated by three-dimensional hydrodynamic analysis. These data reveal, for the first time, the structural regulation of an acetyltransferase by autoacetylation in a prokaryotic organism.

  6. The N-terminal acetyltransferase Naa10 is essential for zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Ree, Rasmus; Myklebust, Line M.; Thiel, Puja; Foyn, Håvard; Fladmark, Kari E.; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    N-terminal acetylation, catalysed by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs), is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes and involves the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to the α-amino group of the first amino acid. Functions of N-terminal acetylation include protein degradation and sub-cellular targeting. Recent findings in humans indicate that a dysfunctional Nα-acetyltransferase (Naa) 10, the catalytic subunit of NatA, the major NAT, is associated with lethality during infancy. In the present study, we identified the Danio rerio orthologue zebrafish Naa 10 (zNaa10). In vitro N-terminal acetylation assays revealed that zNaa10 has NAT activity with substrate specificity highly similar to that of human Naa10. Spatiotemporal expression pattern was determined by in situ hybridization, showing ubiquitous expression with especially strong staining in brain and eye. By morpholino-mediated knockdown, we demonstrated that naa10 morphants displayed increased lethality, growth retardation and developmental abnormalities like bent axis, abnormal eyes and bent tails. In conclusion, we identified the zebrafish Naa10 orthologue and revealed that it is essential for normal development and viability of zebrafish. PMID:26251455

  7. Activation of histamine H3 receptors produces presynaptic inhibition of neurally evoked cat nictitating membrane responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Koss, M C; Hey, J A

    1992-08-01

    This study was undertaken in order to determine the potential role of prejunctional histamine H3 receptors in an in vivo adrenergic model system. Frequency-dependent nictitating membrane responses were elicited by sympathetic nerve stimulation in anesthetized cats. Systemic administration of the selective histamine H3 receptor agonist, (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (R alpha MeHA) produced a dose-related depression of amplitude of the evoked nictitating membrane responses with a threshold of about 10 micrograms/kg and maximal effect (50% depression at the lowest frequency; 0.5 Hz) seen at 100-300 micrograms/kg. Responses obtained with low frequency stimulation were more sensitive to depression by R alpha MeHA than were responses evoked with higher frequencies of stimulation. Larger doses of R alpha MeHA given to the same animals, failed to produce additional inhibition. R alpha MeHA depressed the amplitude of nictitating membrane responses evoked by either pre- or postganglionic nerve stimulation to an equivalent degree. This depressant action of R alpha MeHA was antagonized by pretreatment with the specific histamine H3 antagonist, thioperamide (3 mg/kg), but not by combined pretreatment with histamine H1 and H2 blockers chlorpheniramine (300 micrograms/kg) and cimetidine (5 mg/kg). Intravenous administration of adrenaline (1-30 micrograms/kg) also produced graded nictitating membrane responses that were not altered by subsequent administration of R alpha MeHA. These results suggest that histamine H3 receptors are involved in the modulation of neurally evoked noradrenaline release in the cat nictitating membrane by an inhibitory presynaptic action.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Cat scratch encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Silver, B E; Bean, C S

    1991-06-01

    Cat scratch disease is usually benign, self-limited and without sequelae. Margileth has established four clinical criteria, three of which must be satisfied to make the diagnosis: 1) a history of animal exposure, usually kitten, with primary skin or ocular lesions; 2) regional chronic adenopathy without other apparent cause; 3) a positive cat scratch disease antigen skin test; and 4) lymph node biopsy demonstrating noncaseating granulomas and germinal center hyperplasia. Central nervous system involvement in cat scratch disease has been previously reported, although it is extremely uncommon. In a several-month period, we encountered two cases of cat scratch disease complicated by encephalopathy. The intents of this paper are twofold: 1) to briefly review the current literature on cat scratch disease, 2) to demonstrate that cat scratch disease complicated by encephalopathy presents acutely with seizures, posturing and coma and resolves rapidly with supportive care.

  9. Analysis of p300/CBP histone acetyltransferase regulation using circular permutation and semisynthesis.

    PubMed

    Karukurichi, Kannan R; Wang, Ling; Uzasci, Lerna; Manlandro, Cara Marie; Wang, Qing; Cole, Philip A

    2010-02-03

    The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300/CBP has been shown to undergo autoacetylation on lysines in an apparent regulatory loop that stimulates HAT activity. Here we have developed a strategy to introduce acetyl-Lys at up to six known modification sites in p300/CBP HAT using a combination of circular permutation and expressed protein ligation. We show that these semisynthetic, circularly permuted acetylated proteins retain high affinity for an acetyl-CoA substrate analogue and that HAT activity correlates positively with degree of acetylation. This study provides novel evidence for control of p300/CBP HAT activity by site-specific autoacetylation and outlines a potentially general strategy for using expressed protein ligation and circular permutation to chemically interrogate internal regions of proteins.

  10. Cyclical processes in neuronal populations of the cat somatosensory cortex during extero- and interoceptive activation and in the course of its extinction.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, V V

    1993-01-01

    The EEG reactions were recorded in chronic experiments in awake cats and the slow periodic changes in the frequency of the multicellular impulse activity were observed at points (standard localization) of the somatosensory (1) zone of the cortex. Results of the analysis of both processes were combined in graphs in a single time scale. The correlation of the expressivity of the activation reaction and degree of modulation of the cyclical fluctuations of the frequency of the impulse activity were followed both during the action of exteroceptive (conditional, light; unconditional, sound) and the interoceptive (mechanical and chemical) stimuli. A particular characteristic of the interoceptive stimulation as compared with the exteroceptive consisted in the inertia of the respondent reaction and the lesser contrast in relation to the background. During the extinction of the responses the decrease in the activation reaction correlated with a decrease in the initial (after the switching on of the stimulus) fluctuation of the frequency of the multicellular impulse activity. The data obtained serves as proof of the unity of the two processes: the regulation of the activation of the brain and the regulation of the periodicity of the neuronal impulse activity.

  11. Computerised Axial Tomography (CAT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    OF COMPUTERISED AXIAL TOMOGRAPHY Paragraph 1.1 ORIGIN, DEVELOPMENT AND MARKET OF CAT Paragraph 1.2 EQUIPMENT Chapter 2 OPERATIONAL PRINCIPLE OF A CT...DEVELOPMENT OF THE COMPUTERISED AXIAL TOMOGRAPHY 1.1 Origin, development and marketing of the CAT The origin of the CAT goes back to 1961 when...count on wide commercial possibilities, in the international market . In particular, EMI entered, very forcefully, the American market , always

  12. Cat-scratch Disease.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Stephen A; Ianas, Voichita; Elliott, Sean P

    2011-01-15

    Cat-scratch disease is a common infection that usually presents as tender lymphadenopathy. It should be included in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin and any lymphadenopathy syndrome. Asymptomatic, bacteremic cats with Bartonella henselae in their saliva serve as vectors by biting and clawing the skin. Cat fleas are responsible for horizontal transmission of the disease from cat to cat, and on occasion, arthropod vectors (fleas or ticks) may transmit the disease to humans. Cat-scratch disease is commonly diagnosed in children, but adults can present with it as well. The causative microorganism, B. henselae, is difficult to culture. Diagnosis is most often arrived at by obtaining a history of exposure to cats and a serologic test with high titers (greater than 1:256) of immunoglobulin G antibody to B. henselae. Most cases of cat-scratch disease are self-limited and do not require antibiotic treatment. If an antibiotic is chosen, azithromycin has been shown in one small study to speed recovery. Infrequently, cat-scratch disease may present in a more disseminated form with hepatosplenomegaly or meningoencephalitis, or with bacillary angiomatosis in patients with AIDS.

  13. Involvement of OS-2 MAP kinase in regulation of the large-subunit catalases CAT-1 and CAT-3 in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kazuhiro; Shiozawa, Azusa; Banno, Shinpei; Fukumori, Fumiyasu; Ichiishi, Akihiko; Kimura, Makoto; Fujimura, Makoto

    2007-08-01

    Neurospora crassa has four catalase genes--cat-1, cat-2, cat-3, and ctt-1/cat-4. cat-1 and cat-3 encode two fungal-specific large-subunit catalases CAT-1 and CAT-3 normally produced in conidia and growing hyphae, respectively. cat-2 encodes CAT-2 catalase-peroxidase normally produced in conidia. ctt-1 (or cat-4), of which expression was controlled by OS-2 MAP kinase (Noguchi et al., Fungal Genet. Biol. 44, 208-218), encodes a small-subunit catalase with unknown function. To clarify the contribution of OS-2 on the regulation of CAT-1, CAT-2, and CAT-3, we performed quantitative RT-PCR and in-gel catalase activity analyses. When the hyphae were treated with a fungicide (1 mug/ml fludioxonil) or subjected to an osmotic stress (1 M sorbitol), cat-1 was strongly upregulated and CAT-1 was reasonably induced in the wild-type strain. Interestingly, fludioxonil caused not only the CAT-1 induction but also a remarkable CAT-3 decrease in the wild-type hyphae, implying of an abnormal stimulation of asexual differentiation. These responses were not observed in an os-2 mutant hyphae, indicating an involvement of OS-2 in the cat-1 expression; however, os-2 was dispensable for the production of CAT-1 in conidia. In contrast, the expression of cat-2 was significantly induced by heat shock (45 degrees C) and that of cat-3 was moderately stimulated by an oxidative stress (50 microg/ml methyl viologen) in both the wild-type strain and the os-2 mutant, and corresponding enzyme activities were detected after the treatments. Although basal levels of transcription of cat-1 and cat-3 in an os-2 mutant hyphae were a few-fold lower than in the wild-type hyphae, the os-2 mutant exhibited a considerably lower levels of CAT-3 activity than the wild-type strain. These findings suggest that OS-2 MAP kinase regulated the expression of cat-1 and cat-3 transcriptionally, and probably that of cat-3 posttranscriptionally, even though the presence of another regulatory system for each of these two

  14. Effects of spinal and peripheral nerve lesions on the intersegmental synchronization of the spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurons in the cat lumbosacral spinal cord.

    PubMed

    García, C A; Chávez, D; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    2004-05-06

    In the anesthetized and paralyzed cat, spontaneous negative cord dorsum potentials (nCDPs) appeared synchronously in the L3 to S1 segments, both ipsi- and contralaterally. The acute section of both the intact sural and the superficial peroneal nerve increased the variability of the spontaneous nCDPs without affecting their intersegmental coupling. On the other hand, the synchronization between the spontaneous nCDPs recorded in segments L5-L6 was strongly reduced following an interposed lesion of the left (ipsilateral) dorsolateral spinal quadrant and it was almost completely abolished by an additional lesion of the contralateral dorsolateral quadrant at the same level. Our observations support the existence of a system of spontaneously active dorsal horn neurons that is bilaterally distributed along the lumbosacral segments and affects, in a synchronized and organized manner, impulse transmission along many reflex pathways, including those mediating presynaptic inhibition.

  15. Hepatozoon species infection in domestic cats: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Baneth, G; Aroch, I; Tal, N; Harrus, S

    1998-10-01

    Hepatozoon sp. is a protozoan parasite of peripheral blood neutrophils in cats. Feline hepatozoonosis has been reported infrequently and little is known about the pathogenesis of this infection. In order to further clarify clinicopathological characteristics of hepatozoonosis in domestic cats, a retrospecitve study of hepatozoonosis in cats admitted during 1989-1995 to the Hebrew University School of Veterinary Medicine was conducted. The study population comprised all the cats whose medical records included a complete blood count with a microscopical examination of a blood smear during this 7-year period (n=1229). Hepatozoon gametocytes were identified in seven cats (0.57%) ranging from 1 to 6 years of age. Infected cats were mostly males (6/7) of mixed breed (5/7) with a variety of complaints and clinical signs. The clinicopathological findings included increased activities of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (5/6) and creatine kinase (CK) (5/6). The elevated enzymes detected in cats with hepatozoonosis are suggestive of muscular damage. Sixty-seven percent (4/6) of the cats with hepatozoonosis which were tested for a retroviral disease were found infected either in FIV or FELV. In addition, 2/7 cats were co-infected with Hemobartonella felis. In conclusion, parasitemia with Hepatozoon sp. is a rare finding in cats from Israel. The over-representation of cats with a retroviral disease among the cats with hepatozoonosis indicates a possible association between immunosupression and the development of Hepatozoon infection.

  16. In vitro antimicrobial activity of nitrofurantoin against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Maaland, Marit; Guardabassi, Luca

    2011-08-05

    Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of nitrofurantoin were determined by agar dilution in 269 canine and feline isolates of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, two of the most common bacterial species associated with urinary tract infection (UTI) in small animals. The MIC90 for E. coli and S. pseudintermedius were 32 and 16 μg/ml, respectively. All isolates, including multidrug-resistant strains of known genetic background, displayed MICs below the drug concentrations reported in canine urine following oral administration of nitrofurantoin. Preliminary data on mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and many years of nitrofurantoin usage in human medicine suggest that emergence of resistant mutants during treatment is not a critical issue for this drug. The study provides species-specific data on nitrofurantoin MIC distribution that can be used for setting dog- and cat-specific breakpoints. Although nitrofurantoin is not an appropriate first-line agent for empirical treatment of canine UTI due to toxicity and poor pharmacokinetic properties, it may be indicated for treatment of UTI caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria, which are otherwise difficult to treat using conventional veterinary antimicrobial agents.

  17. Pitfalls of the CAT reporter gene for analyzing translational regulation in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Folgueira, Cristina; Requena, Jose M

    2007-10-01

    Heterologous reporter genes are widely used for the characterization of gene expression in many organisms. Particularly, constructs bearing reporter genes have greatly contributed to our understanding of gene regulation in kinetoplastids. In some specific circumstances, however, such heterologous reporter has a risk of resulting in irrelevant observations and conclusions, which are primarily due to the introduction of foreign sequence elements. This communication describes our recent experience using the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene as a reporter for analysis of the translational regulation of HSP70 genes in Leishmania infantum. We show that chimeric mRNAs consisting of the CAT open reading frame (ORF) and the untranslated regions (UTRs) from HSP70-II genes behave differently as endogenous HSP70-II mRNAs and that this difference is due to the presence of CAT sequences. Thus, the main purpose of this communication is to alert researchers working in gene regulation to be cautious when interpreting results based on heterologous reporter genes.

  18. Three-dimensional structure of a Streptomyces sviceus GNAT acetyltransferase with similarity to the C-terminal domain of the human GH84 O-GlcNAcase.

    PubMed

    He, Yuan; Roth, Christian; Turkenburg, Johan P; Davies, Gideon J

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian O-GlcNAc hydrolysing enzyme O-GlcNAcase (OGA) is a multi-domain protein with glycoside hydrolase activity in the N-terminus and with a C-terminal domain that has low sequence similarity to known acetyltransferases, prompting speculation, albeit controversial, that the C-terminal domain may function as a histone acetyltransferase (HAT). There are currently scarce data available regarding the structure and function of this C-terminal region. Here, a bacterial homologue of the human OGA C-terminal domain, an acetyltransferase protein (accession No. ZP_05014886) from Streptomyces sviceus (SsAT), was cloned and its crystal structure was solved to high resolution. The structure reveals a conserved protein core that has considerable structural homology to the acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) binding site of GCN5-related acetyltransferases (GNATs). Calorimetric data further confirm that SsAT is indeed able to bind AcCoA in solution with micromolar affinity. Detailed structural analysis provided insight into the binding of AcCoA. An acceptor-binding cavity was identified, indicating that the physiological substrate of SsAT may be a small molecule. Consistent with recently published work, the SsAT structure further questions a HAT function for the human OGA domain.

  19. State of cat genomics.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren; Driscoll, Carlos; Pontius, Joan; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn

    2008-06-01

    Our knowledge of cat family biology was recently expanded to include a genomics perspective with the completion of a draft whole genome sequence of an Abyssinian cat. The utility of the new genome information has been demonstrated by applications ranging from disease gene discovery and comparative genomics to species conservation. Patterns of genomic organization among cats and inbred domestic cat breeds have illuminated our view of domestication, revealing linkage disequilibrium tracks consequent of breed formation, defining chromosome exchanges that punctuated major lineages of mammals and suggesting ancestral continental migration events that led to 37 modern species of Felidae. We review these recent advances here. As the genome resources develop, the cat is poised to make a major contribution to many areas in genetics and biology.

  20. [Platelet count in the cat].

    PubMed

    Moritz, A; Hoffmann, C

    1997-11-01

    The technique of collecting blood samples is primarily responsible for the appearance of platelet-agglomeration in cats. Blood obtained by the conventional way ("one syringe technology", drips of blood) caused in 52% of the cases an activation of the large and therefore active thrombocytes however. Rejection of the first 2-5 ml blood for the platelet count ("two syringe technology") reduced the rate of platelet-agglomeration significantly. No big differences in platelet-agglomeration were found with regard to the place used for collecting blood (V. cephalica antebrachii/V. jugularis). Platelet-agglutination was observed with Li-Heparin, K-EDTA, Na-Citrat or ACD anticoagulated blood samples. Citrat (Na-Citrat, ACD) seemed to have a stabilizing effect on feline thrombocytes as has been described for human thrombocytes. The platelet count in cats should be performed within 30 minutes.

  1. Eosinophilic leukaemia in a cat.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Hassan; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Esmaelli, Hossein; Khoshnegah, Javad

    2007-12-01

    A 14-year-old female domestic shorthair cat was presented to Tehran University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for a persistent fever, anorexia, intermittent vomiting, weight loss and weakness. The main clinical signs were pale mucous membranes, dehydration and splenomegaly. The complete blood count and serum biochemistry tests revealed non-regenerative anaemia, thrombocytopenia and increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test for feline leukaemia virus was negative. Blood film and bone marrow examination revealed a large number of immature eosinophils with variable sizes and numbers of faintly azurophilic granules. Cytochemical staining of blood film demonstrated 70% positive cells for ALP activity. Four percent CD34 positive cells were detected by flow cytometry. As eosinophilic leukaemia is difficult to identify by light microscopy, well-defined diagnostic criteria and the use of flow cytometry and cytochemical staining can improve the ability to correctly diagnose this type of leukaemia in cats.

  2. Actions of vanadate on vascular tension and sodium pump activity in cat isolated cerebral and femoral arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ferrer, C. F.; Marín, J.; Lluch, M.; Valverde, A.; Salaices, M.

    1988-01-01

    1. The mechanisms involved in the responses induced by sodium vanadate (Va3 VO4) on cat cerebral and femoral arteries were studied. The possibility that these responses were due to Na+, K+-ATPase inhibition was investigated by measuring the effect of vanadate on [3H]-ouabain binding to arterial membrane fractions, K+-induced vasodilatation and ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake. 2. The vanadium compounds (Na3VO4, VOSO4, VCl3 and O5V3) induced similar, concentration-dependent contractions in each kind of artery, the cerebral vessels being the most sensitive to these compounds. 3. Exposure of the arteries to a low-Na+ (25 mM) solution suppressed the contraction caused by vanadate in femoral but not in cerebral arteries. 4. Vanadate-induced contractions were reduced in Ca2+-free medium but remained unaffected by 3 x 10(-6) M phentolamine, reserpine pretreatment or 3 x 10(-6) M verapamil in both kinds of artery. 5. The addition of 7.5 mM K+ to the arteries immersed in a K+-free solution induced vasodilatation, which was not modified by 10(-3) M vanadate. 6. The consecutive administration of ouabain (10(-4) M) and vanadate (10(-3) M) (or vice versa), or the simultaneous administration of both agents (10(-8) to 10(-3) M) appeared to produce an additive contraction in both types of artery. 7. Vanadate (10(-7) to 10(-3) M) did not displace the [3H]-ouabain binding to arterial membrane fractions of these arteries, whereas 10(-4) M ouabain did. 8. In both kinds of artery, total 86Rb+ uptake was reduced by ouabain (10(-8) to 10(-3) M), in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas it was not modified by vanadate (10(-8)-10(-3) M).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3349233

  3. Voltage-sensitive-dye imaging of microstimulation-evoked neural activity through intracortical horizontal and callosal connections in cat visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzurikawa, Jun; Tani, Toshiki; Nakao, Masayuki; Tanaka, Shigeru; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2009-12-01

    Recently, intrinsic signal optical imaging has been widely used as a routine procedure for visualizing cortical functional maps. We do not, however, have a well-established imaging method for visualizing cortical functional connectivity indicating spatio-temporal patterns of activity propagation in the cerebral cortex. In the present study, we developed a novel experimental setup for investigating the propagation of neural activities combining the intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) technique with voltage sensitive dye (VSD) imaging, and demonstrated the feasibility of this setup applying to the measurement of time-dependent intra- and inter-hemispheric spread of ICMS-evoked excitation in the cat visual cortices, areas 17 and 18. A microelectrode array for the ICMS was inserted with a specially designed easy-to-detach electrode holder around the 17/18 transition zones (TZs), where the left and right hemispheres were interconnected via the corpus callosum. The microelectrode array was stably anchored in agarose without any holder, which enabled us to visualize evoked activities even in the vicinity of penetration sites as well as in a wide recording region that covered a part of both hemispheres. The VSD imaging could successfully visualize ICMS-evoked excitation and subsequent propagation in the visual cortices contralateral as well as ipsilateral to the ICMS. Using the orientation maps as positional references, we showed that the activity propagation patterns were consistent with previously reported anatomical patterns of intracortical and interhemispheric connections. This finding indicates that our experimental system can serve for the investigation of cortical functional connectivity.

  4. Comparative study of aural microflora in healthy cats, allergic cats and cats with systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Pressanti, Charline; Drouet, Clémence; Cadiergues, Marie-Christine

    2014-12-01

    Twenty healthy cats (group 1) with clinically normal ears, 15 cats with systemic disease (group 2) and 15 allergic cats (group 3) were included in a prospective study. The experimental unit was the ear. A clinical score was established for each ear canal after otoscopic examination. Microbial population was assessed on cytological examination of smears performed with the cotton-tipped applicator smear technique. Fungal population was significantly more prominent in allergic cats (P <0.001) and in diseased cats compared with healthy cats (P <0.02). Bacterial population was significantly higher in allergic cats than in healthy cats (P <0.001) and cats suffering from systemic disease (P <0.001). Bacterial overgrowth was also higher in cats with systemic disease than healthy cats. In cats from group 2, only fungal overgrowth was associated with otitis severity. In group 3, only bacterial overgrowth was associated with otitis severity.

  5. Choline acetyltransferase expression does not identify early pathogenic events in fetal SMA spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Soler-Botija, Carolina; Cuscó, Ivón; López, Eva; Clua, Agustín; Gich, Ignasi; Baiget, Montserrat; Ferrer, Isidre; Tizzano, Eduardo F

    2005-03-01

    We investigated the expression of choline acetyltransferase, a specific marker for cholinergic neurons, in control and spinal muscular atrophy fetuses and newborns. By immunoblot we observed at 12 and 15 weeks a similar pattern of choline acetyltransferase expression in spinal muscular atrophy with respect to controls, although at 22 weeks this expression was reduced, probably due to a smaller number of motor neurons in the spinal muscular atrophy spinal cord. By immunohistochemistry, the counting of positive and negative motor neurons for choline acetyltransferase immunostaining in control and spinal muscular atrophy fetuses showed a similar proportion at all stages analyzed. The choline acetyltransferase-negative motor neurons were of similar appearance in both groups. After birth, chromatolytic motor neurons were detected in spinal muscular atrophy, all of which were choline acetyltransferase-negative. Our results in spinal muscular atrophy fetuses indicate that choline acetyltransferase immunostaining does not identify early events in neuronal pathogenesis and suggest that the spinal muscular atrophy surviving motor neurons may not be dysfunctional during this period. Furthermore, spinal muscular atrophy choline acetyltransferase-negative motor neurons showed detectable pathological changes only after birth, indicating that choline acetyltransferase is a late marker for motor neuron degeneration and not a primary contributing factor in this process.

  6. Metabolic Regulation of Histone Acetyltransferases by Endogenous Acyl-CoA Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Guasch, Laura; Nicklaus, Marc C.; Meier, Jordan L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The finding that chromatin modifications are sensitive to changes in cellular cofactor levels potentially links altered tumor cell metabolism and gene expression. However, the specific enzymes and metabolites that connect these two processes remain obscure. Characterizing these metabolic-epigenetic axes is critical to understanding how metabolism supports signaling in cancer, and developing therapeutic strategies to disrupt this process. Here, we describe a chemical approach to define the metabolic regulation of lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) enzymes. Using a novel chemoproteomic probe, we identify a previously unreported interaction between fatty acyl-CoAs and KAT enzymes. Further analysis reveals that palmitoyl-CoA is a potent inhibitor of KAT activity and that fatty acyl-CoA precursors reduce cellular acetylation levels. These studies implicate fatty acyl-CoAs as endogenous regulators of histone acetylation, and suggest novel strategies for the investigation and metabolic modulation of epigenetic signaling. PMID:26190825

  7. Primary structure of the human M2 mitochondrial autoantigen of primary biliary cirrhosis: Dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Coppel, R.L.; McNeilage, L.J.; Surh, C.D.; Van De Water, J.; Spithill, T.W.; Whittingham, S.; Gershwin, M.E. )

    1988-10-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic, destructive autoimmune liver disease of humans. Patient sera are characterized by a high frequency of autoantibodies to a M{sub r} 70,000 mitochondrial antigen a component of the M2 antigen complex. The authors have identified a human cDNA clone encoding the complete amino acid sequence of this autoantigen. The predicted structure has significant similarity with the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex. The human sequence preserves the Glu-Thr-Asp-Lys-Ala motif of the lipoyl-binding site and has two potential binding sites. Expressed fragments of the cDNA react strongly with sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis but not with sera from patients with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis or sera from healthy subjects.

  8. Structural Basis of Substrate-Binding Specificity of Human Arylamine N-acetyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,H.; Dombrovsky, L.; Tempel, W.; Martin, F.; Loppnau, P.; Goodfellow, G.; Grant, D.; Plotnikov, A.

    2007-01-01

    The human arylamine N-acetyltransferases NAT1 and NAT2 play an important role in the biotransformation of a plethora of aromatic amine and hydrazine drugs. They are also able to participate in the bioactivation of several known carcinogens. Each of these enzymes is genetically variable in human populations, and polymorphisms in NAT genes have been associated with various cancers. Here we have solved the high resolution crystal structures of human NAT1 and NAT2, including NAT1 in complex with the irreversible inhibitor 2-bromoacetanilide, a NAT1 active site mutant, and NAT2 in complex with CoA, and have refined them to 1.7-, 1.8-, and 1.9- Angstroms resolution, respectively. The crystal structures reveal novel structural features unique to human NATs and provide insights into the structural basis of the substrate specificity and genetic polymorphism of these enzymes.

  9. Potent Inhibitors of Acetyltransferase Eis Overcome Kanamycin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Willby, Melisa J; Green, Keith D; Gajadeera, Chathurada S; Hou, Caixia; Tsodikov, Oleg V; Posey, James E; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2016-06-17

    A major cause of tuberculosis (TB) resistance to the aminoglycoside kanamycin (KAN) is the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) acetyltransferase Eis. Upregulation of this enzyme is responsible for inactivation of KAN through acetylation of its amino groups. A 123 000-compound high-throughput screen (HTS) yielded several small-molecule Eis inhibitors that share an isothiazole S,S-dioxide heterocyclic core. These were investigated for their structure-activity relationships. Crystal structures of Eis in complex with two potent inhibitors show that these molecules are bound in the conformationally adaptable aminoglycoside binding site of the enzyme, thereby obstructing binding of KAN for acetylation. Importantly, we demonstrate that several Eis inhibitors, when used in combination with KAN against resistant Mtb, efficiently overcome KAN resistance. This approach paves the way toward development of novel combination therapies against aminoglycoside-resistant TB.

  10. A new arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase in silkworm (Bombyx mori) affects integument pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Long, Yaohang; Li, Jiaorong; Zhao, Tianfu; Li, Guannan; Zhu, Yong

    2015-04-01

    Dopamine is a precursor for melanin synthesis. Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) is involved in the melatonin formation in insects because it could catalyze the transformation from dopamine to dopamine-N-acetyldopamine. In this study, we identified a new AANAT gene in the silkworm (Bombyx mori) and assessed its role in the silkworm. The cDNA of this gene encodes 233 amino acids that shares 57 % amino acid identity with the Bm-iAANAT protein. We thus refer to this gene as Bm-iAANAT2. To investigate the role of Bm-iAANAT2, we constructed a transgenic interference system using a 3xp3 promoter to suppress the expression of Bm-iAANAT2 in the silkworm. We observed that melanin deposition occurs in the head and integument in transgenic lines. To verify the melanism pattern, dopamine content and the enzyme activity of AANAT were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We found that an increase in dopamine levels affects melanism patterns on the heads of transgenic B. mori. A reduction in the enzyme activity of AANAT leads to changes in dopamine levels. We analyzed the expression of the Bm-iAANAT2 genes by qPCR and found that the expression of Bm-iAANAT2 gene is significantly lower in transgenic lines. Our results lead us to conclude that Bm-iAANAT2 is a new arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase gene in the silkworm and is involved in the metabolism of the dopamine to avoid the generation of melanin.

  11. Structural and functional characterization of TRI3 trichothecene 15-O-acetyltransferase from Fusarium sporotrichioides

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Graeme S.; McCormick, Susan P.; Alexander, Nancy J.; Rayment, Ivan

    2009-08-14

    Fusarium head blight is a devastating disease of cereal crops whose worldwide incidence is increasing and at present there is no satisfactory way of combating this pathogen or its associated toxins. There is a wide variety of trichothecene mycotoxins and they all contain a 12,13-epoxytrichothecene skeleton but differ in their substitutions. Indeed, there is considerable variation in the toxin profile across the numerous Fusarium species that has been ascribed to differences in the presence or absence of biosynthetic enzymes and their relative activity. This article addresses the source of differences in acetylation at the C15 position of the trichothecene molecule. Here, we present the in vitro structural and biochemical characterization of TRI3, a 15-O-trichothecene acetyltransferase isolated from F. sporotrichioides and the 'in vivo' characterization of Deltatri3 mutants of deoxynivalenol (DON) producing F. graminearum strains. A kinetic analysis shows that TRI3 is an efficient enzyme with the native substrate, 15-decalonectrin, but is inactive with either DON or nivalenol. The structure of TRI3 complexed with 15-decalonectrin provides an explanation for this specificity and shows that Tri3 and Tri101 (3-O-trichothecene acetyltransferase) are evolutionarily related. The active site residues are conserved across all sequences for TRI3 orthologs, suggesting that differences in acetylation at C15 are not due to differences in Tri3. The tri3 deletion mutant shows that acetylation at C15 is required for DON biosynthesis even though DON lacks a C15 acetyl group. The enzyme(s) responsible for deacetylation at the 15 position of the trichothecene mycotoxins have not been identified.

  12. Structural and Functional Role of Acetyltransferase hMOF K274 Autoacetylation

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, Cheryl E.; Song, Shufei; Shin, Michael H.; Johnson, F. Brad; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2016-07-05

    Many histone acetyltransferases undergo autoacetylation, either through chemical or enzymatic means, to potentiate enzymatic cognate substrate lysine acetylation, although the mode and molecular role of such autoacetylation is poorly understood. The MYST family of histone acetyltransferases is autoacetylated at an active site lysine residue to facilitate cognate substrate lysine binding and acetylation. Here, we report on a detailed molecular investigation of Lys-274 autoacetylation of the human MYST protein Males Absent on the First (hMOF). A mutational scan of hMOF Lys-274 reveals that all amino acid substitutions of this residue are able to bind cofactor but are significantly destabilized, both in vitro and in cells, and are catalytically inactive for cognate histone H4 peptide lysine acetylation. The x-ray crystal structure of a hMOF K274P mutant suggests that the reduced stability and catalytic activity stems from a disordering of the residue 274-harboring a α2-β7 loop. We also provide structural evidence that a C316S/E350Q mutant, which is defective for cognate substrate lysine acetylation; and biochemical evidence that a K268M mutant, which is defective for Lys-274 chemical acetylation in the context of a K274-peptide, can still undergo quantitative K274 autoacetylation. Together, these studies point to the critical and specific role of hMOF Lys-274 autoacetylation in hMOF stability and cognate substrate acetylation and argues that binding of Ac-CoA to hMOF likely drives Lys-274 autoacetylation for subsequent cognate substrate acetylation.

  13. Giardia infection in cats.

    PubMed

    Janeczko, Stephanie; Griffin, Brenda

    2010-08-01

    The protozoon Giardia duodenalis is a common gastrointestinal parasite of cats. While most Giardia-infected cats are asymptomatic, acute small bowel diarrhea, occasionally with concomitant weight loss, may occur. Giardia poses a diagnostic challenge, but newer tests, including a commercially available ELISA kit, have improved clinicians' ability to obtain an accurate diagnosis. Several treatment options have been reported, and although none has been shown to be universally effective, most cases can be successfully managed with drug therapy, supportive measures, and environmental control. Current recommendations suggest that combination therapy with fenbendazole and metronidazole may be the safest, most effective treatment option for symptomatic cats.

  14. Changes in correlation between spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurones lead to differential recruitment of inhibitory pathways in the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Chávez, D; Rodríguez, E; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    2012-04-01

    Simultaneous recordings of cord dorsum potentials along the lumbo-sacral spinal cord of the anaesthetized cat revealed the occurrence of spontaneous synchronous negative (n) and negative-positive (np) cord dorsum potentials (CDPs). The npCDPs, unlike the nCDPs, appeared preferentially associated with spontaneous negative dorsal root potentials (DRPs) resulting from primary afferent depolarization. Spontaneous npCDPs recorded in preparations with intact neuroaxis or after spinalization often showed a higher correlation than the nCDPs recorded from the same pair of segments. The acute section of the sural and superficial peroneal nerves further increased the correlation between paired sets of npCDPs and reduced the correlation between the nCDPs recorded from the same pair of segments. It is concluded that the spontaneous nCDPs and npCDPs are produced by the activation of interconnected sets of dorsal horn neurones located in Rexed's laminae III–IV and bilaterally distributed along the lumbo-sacral spinal cord. Under conditions of low synchronization in the activity of this network of neurones there would be a preferential activation of the intermediate nucleus interneurones mediating Ib non-reciprocal postsynaptic inhibition. Increased synchronization in the spontaneous activity of this ensemble of dorsal horn neurones would recruit the interneurones mediating primary afferent depolarization and presynaptic inhibition and, at the same time, reduce the activation of pathways mediating Ib postsynaptic inhibition. Central control of the synchronization in the spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurones and its modulation by cutaneous inputs is envisaged as an effective mechanism for the selection of alternative inhibitory pathways during the execution of specific motor or sensory tasks.

  15. Changes in correlation between spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurones lead to differential recruitment of inhibitory pathways in the cat spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Chávez, D; Rodríguez, E; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous recordings of cord dorsum potentials along the lumbo-sacral spinal cord of the anaesthetized cat revealed the occurrence of spontaneous synchronous negative (n) and negative–positive (np) cord dorsum potentials (CDPs). The npCDPs, unlike the nCDPs, appeared preferentially associated with spontaneous negative dorsal root potentials (DRPs) resulting from primary afferent depolarization. Spontaneous npCDPs recorded in preparations with intact neuroaxis or after spinalization often showed a higher correlation than the nCDPs recorded from the same pair of segments. The acute section of the sural and superficial peroneal nerves further increased the correlation between paired sets of npCDPs and reduced the correlation between the nCDPs recorded from the same pair of segments. It is concluded that the spontaneous nCDPs and npCDPs are produced by the activation of interconnected sets of dorsal horn neurones located in Rexed's laminae III–IV and bilaterally distributed along the lumbo-sacral spinal cord. Under conditions of low synchronization in the activity of this network of neurones there would be a preferential activation of the intermediate nucleus interneurones mediating Ib non-reciprocal postsynaptic inhibition. Increased synchronization in the spontaneous activity of this ensemble of dorsal horn neurones would recruit the interneurones mediating primary afferent depolarization and presynaptic inhibition and, at the same time, reduce the activation of pathways mediating Ib postsynaptic inhibition. Central control of the synchronization in the spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurones and its modulation by cutaneous inputs is envisaged as an effective mechanism for the selection of alternative inhibitory pathways during the execution of specific motor or sensory tasks. PMID:22271870

  16. Bovine immunodeficiency-like virus encodes factors which trans activate the long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Pallansch, L A; Lackman-Smith, C S; Gonda, M A

    1992-01-01

    Lentiviruses are known to encode factors which trans activate expression from the viral long terminal repeat (LTR); the primary trans activator is the tat gene product. One of the putative accessory genes (tat) of the bovine immunodeficiency-like virus (BIV) bears sequence similarity to other lentivirus tat genes. This finding suggests that BIV may encode a trans-activating protein capable of stimulating LTR-directed gene expression. To test this hypothesis in vitro, BIV LTR-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene plasmids were constructed and transfected into three cell lines established from canine, bovine, or lapine tissues that are susceptible to BIV infection. The level of BIV LTR-directed CAT gene expression was significantly elevated in BIV-infected cells compared with uninfected cells. The relatively high basal-level expression of BIV LTR-CAT in uninfected canine and bovine cell lines suggests that cellular factors play a role in regulating BIV LTR-directed gene expression. Additionally, by using a clonal canine cell line in which the BIV LTR-CAT plasmid is stably expressed, BIV LTR-directed CAT expression is elevated 15- to 80-fold by cocultivation with BIV-infected cells, supporting the notion that BIV encodes a trans activator. The relative specificity of this viral activation was assessed by coculturing the clonal BIV LTR-CAT cell line with bovine leukemia virus- or bovine syncytial virus-infected cells; these bovine retroviruses increased expression from the BIV LTR only two- to threefold. Thus, BIV LTR regulatory elements in infected cells, like those of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and other lentiviruses, are trans activated, presumably through the action of a Tat-like protein and cellular factors. PMID:1313891

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis enhances human immunodeficiency virus-1 replication by transcriptional activation at the long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Nakata, K; Weiden, M; Rom, W N

    1995-01-01

    Tuberculosis has emerged as an epidemic fueled by the large number of individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, especially those who are injecting drug users. We found a striking increase from 4- to 208-fold in p24 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from involved sites of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection vs uninvolved sites in three HIV+ patients. We used an in vitro cell culture model to determine if tuberculosis could activate replication of HIV-1. Mononuclear phagocyte cell lines U937 and THP-1 infected with HIV-1JR-CSF, in vitro and stimulated with live M. tuberculosis H37Ra, had a threefold increase in p24 in culture supernatants. Using the HIV-1 long terminal repeat with a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter construct, live M. tuberculosis increased transcription 20-fold in THP-1 cells, and cell wall components stimulated CAT expression to a lesser extent. The nuclear factor-kappa B enhancer element was responsible for the majority of the increased CAT activity although two upstream nuclear factor-IL6 sites may also contribute to enhanced transcription. Antibodies to TNF-alpha and IL-1 inhibited the increase in CAT activity of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat by M. tuberculosis from 21-fold to 8-fold. Stimulation of HIV-1 replication by M. tuberculosis may exacerbate dysfunction of the host immune response in dually infected individuals. Images PMID:7738195

  18. Cat tongue Velcro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, Alexis; Martinez, Andrea; Jung, Hyewon; Tsai, Ting-Wen; Hu, David

    2016-11-01

    A cat's tongue is covered in an array of spines called papillae. These spines are thought to be used in grooming and rasping meat from bones of prey, although no mechanism has been given. We use high-speed video to film a cat removing cat food deeply wedged into a 3-D printed fur mat. We show that the spines on the tongue act as Velcro for particles. The tongue itself is highly elastic. As the cat presses it against a substrate, the tongue flattens and the spines separate. When the tongue is removed from the substrate the spines come together, wedging particles between them. This elasticity-driven entrapment permits the surface of the tongue to act as a carrier for hard to reach particles, and to increase the efficacy of grooming and feeding.

  19. Ligand promiscuity through the eyes of the aminoglycoside N3 acetyltransferase IIa

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Adrianne L; Serpersu, Engin H

    2013-01-01

    Aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AGMEs) are expressed in many pathogenic bacteria and cause resistance to aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotics. Remarkably, the substrate promiscuity of AGMEs is quite variable. The molecular basis for such ligand promiscuity is largely unknown as there is not an obvious link between amino acid sequence or structure and the antibiotic profiles of AGMEs. To address this issue, this article presents the first kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of one of the least promiscuous AGMEs, the AG N3 acetyltransferase-IIa (AAC-IIa) and its comparison to two highly promiscuous AGMEs, the AG N3-acetyltransferase-IIIb (AAC-IIIb) and the AG phosphotransferase(3′)-IIIa (APH). Despite having similar antibiotic selectivities, AAC-IIIb and APH catalyze different reactions and share no homology to one another. AAC-IIa and AAC-IIIb catalyze the same reaction and are very similar in both amino acid sequence and structure. However, they demonstrate strong differences in their substrate profiles and kinetic and thermodynamic properties. AAC-IIa and APH are also polar opposites in terms of ligand promiscuity but share no sequence or apparent structural homology. However, they both are highly dynamic and may even contain disordered segments and both adopt well-defined conformations when AGs are bound. Contrary to this AAC-IIIb maintains a well-defined structure even in apo form. Data presented herein suggest that the antibiotic promiscuity of AGMEs may be determined neither by the flexibility of the protein nor the size of the active site cavity alone but strongly modulated or controlled by the effects of the cosubstrate on the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of the enzyme. PMID:23640799

  20. Function and subcellular localization of Gcn5, a histone acetyltransferase in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng; Fan, Xueyi; Chen, Jiangye

    2015-08-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen commonly found in humans. It has the ability to switch reversibly between three growth forms: budding yeast, pseudohypha, and hypha. The transition between yeast and hyphal growth forms is critical for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. During the yeast-to-hypha morphologic transition, gene expression is regulated by transcriptional regulators including histone modifying complexes and chromatin remodeling complexes. We previously reported that Esa1, a catalytic subunit in the histone acetyltransferase complex NuA4, is essential for the hyphal development of C. albicans. In this study, we analyzed the functional roles of Gcn5, a catalytic subunit in the histone acetyltransferase complex SAGA, in C. albicans. Gcn5 is required for the invasive and filamentous growth of C. albicans. Deletion of GCN5 impaired hyphal elongation in sensing serum and attenuated the virulence of C. albicans in a mouse systemic infection model. The C. albicans gcn5/gcn5 mutant cells also exhibited sensitivity to cell wall stress. Functional analysis showed that the HAT domain and Bromodomain in Gcn5 play distinct roles in morphogenesis and cell wall stress response of C. albicans. Our results show that the conserved residue Glu188 is crucial for the Gcn5 HAT activity and for Gcn5 function during filamentous growth. In addition, the subcellular distribution of ectopically expressed GFP-Gcn5 correlates with the different growth states of C. albicans. In stationary phase, Gcn5 accumulated in the nucleus, while during vegetative growth it localized in the cytoplasm in a morpha-independent manner. Our results suggest that the nuclear localization of Gcn5 depends on the existence of its N-terminal NLS and HAT domains.

  1. Fatal big cat attacks.

    PubMed

    Cohle, S D; Harlan, C W; Harlan, G

    1990-09-01

    Two cases of fatal attacks by large cats are presented. In the first case, a 30-year-old female zoo worker was attacked by a jaguar that had escaped its cage. In the second case, a 2-year-old girl was fatally injured by her father's pet leopard. The pattern of injuries in these cases is nearly identical to those of these cats' prey in the wild.

  2. Regulatory regions that control expression of two chloramphenicol-inducible cat genes cloned in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Duvall, E J; Williams, D M; Mongkolsuk, S; Lovett, P S

    1984-06-01

    Plasmid pPL603 is a promoter cloning vector for Bacillus subtilis and consists of a 1.1-kilobase fragment of Bacillus pumilus DNA inserted between the EcoRI and BamHI sites of pUB110. The gene cat-86, specifying chloramphenicol-inducible chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, is located on the 1.1-kilobase cloned DNA. When pPL603 is present in B. subtilis, cat-86 is unexpressed during vegetative growth but expressed during sporulation. The regulation of cat-86 in pPL603 is due to sequences within two restriction fragments, designated P1 and R1, that precede the main coding portion of the gene. The P1 fragment promotes transcription of cat-86 only during sporulation, whereas the adjacent R1 fragment lacks promoter function but contains sequences essential to chloramphenicol inducibility. A second B. pumilus gene, cat-66, was cloned in B. subtilis and is expressed throughout the vegetative growth and sporulation cycle. The cat-66 coding region is preceded by two adjacent restriction fragments designated as P2 and R2. P1 and P2 are identical in size and share 95% conservation of base sequence. R1 and R2 are also identical in size and share 91% conservation of base sequence. Fragment substitution experiments demonstrate that R2 can functionally replace R1. The substitution of P2 for P1 promotes cat-86 expression throughout vegetative growth and sporulation. Analysis of a derivative of pPL603 in which P2 has replaced P1 demonstrates that P2 promotes transcription of cat-86 during vegetative growth and that P2 contains the start site for transcription of cat-86. Thus, P1 and P2 differ strikingly in vegetative promoter function, yet they differ by single-base substitutions at only 11 positions of 203.

  3. Evaluation of a feline-specific multiplex, bead-based assay for detection of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and other immunologically active proteins in serum and plasma samples from cats.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Rachel E; Saunders, Rebecca S; Thompson, Beverly J; Rohde Newgent, Allison S; Amorim, Juliana; Melillo, Gabrielle N; DeClue, Amy E

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate a feline-specific multiplex, bead-based assay system for detection of recombinant and native proteins in serum samples and in EDTA-treated and heparinized plasma samples. SAMPLE Serum samples and EDTA-treated and heparinized plasma samples from 30 sick cats and 9 healthy client-owned cats and heparinized whole blood samples from 5 healthy purpose-bred cats. PROCEDURES Ability of the assay system to detect 19 recombinant and native immunologically active proteins in plasma and serum samples from healthy and purpose-bred cats was evaluated via spike-and-recovery tests, assessments of inter- and intra-assay variation, linearity results, and leukocyte stimulation. Effects of various concentrations of heparin and serum matrix solution on percentages of analytes recovered were also evaluated. Analyte concentrations in samples from healthy and sick cats were measured and compared between groups. RESULTS Percentages of analytes recovered were unsatisfactory for most assays. Serum and heparinized plasma samples yielded better recovery results than did EDTA-treated plasma samples. Use of serum matrix solution did not improve results. Use of heparin concentrations greater than the recommended range affected the results. Linearity of results was difficult to assess because of the poor recovery. For the analytes that were recovered sufficiently for assessment, linearity appeared to be reasonable despite the limited detection. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Poor percentages of analytes recovered and adverse effects of sample protein matrix limited the usefulness of the multiplex, bead-based assay system for measurement of immunologically active proteins in solutions with high protein content; however, recovery results were fairly linear, potentially allowing evaluation of feline plasma or serum samples with high analyte concentrations.

  4. Nucleotide sequencing and characterization of Pseudomonas putida catR: a positive regulator of the catBC operon is a member of the LysR family.

    PubMed Central

    Rothmel, R K; Aldrich, T L; Houghton, J E; Coco, W M; Ornston, L N; Chakrabarty, A M

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida utilizes the catBC operon for growth on benzoate as a sole carbon source. This operon is positively regulated by the CatR protein, which is encoded from a gene divergently oriented from the catBC operon. The catR gene encodes a 32.2-kilodalton polypeptide that binds to the catBC promoter region in the presence or absence of the inducer cis-cis-muconate, as shown by gel retardation studies. However, the inducer is required for transcriptional activation of the catBC operon. The catR promoter has been localized to a 385-base-pair fragment by using the broad-host-range promoter-probe vector pKT240. This fragment also contains the catBC promoter whose -35 site is separated by only 36 nucleotides from the predicted CatR translational start. Dot blot analysis suggests that CatR binding to this dual promoter-control region, in addition to inducing the catBC operon, may also regulate its own expression. Data from a computer homology search using the predicted amino acid sequence of CatR, deduced from the DNA sequence, showed CatR to be a member of a large class of procaryotic regulatory proteins designated the LysR family. Striking homology was seen between CatR and a putative regulatory protein, TfdS. Images FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:1688844

  5. Discharge patterns of hindlimb motoneurons during normal cat locomotion.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, J A; O'Donovan, M J; Pratt, C A; Loeb, G E

    1981-07-24

    Long-term recording from single lumbar motoneurons of intact cats revealed activation patterns fundamentally different from those seen in decerebrate preparations. In intact cats, motoneuron bursts showed marked rate modulation without initial doublets. Each unit's frequencygram generally resembled the envelope of the gross electromyogram simultaneously recorded from the corresponding muscle. Average and peak discharge rates increased for faster gaits. These findings suggest that, in cat locomotion, rate modulation is a more important contributor to force regulation than was previously thought.

  6. Role of sensory-motor cortex activity in postnatal development of corticospinal axon terminals in the cat.

    PubMed

    Friel, Kathleen M; Martin, John H

    2005-04-25

    The initial pattern of corticospinal (CS) terminations, as axons grow into the spinal gray matter, bears little resemblance to the pattern later in development and in maturity. This is because of extensive axon pruning and local axon terminal growth during early postnatal development. Pruning is driven by activity-dependent competition between the CS systems on each side during postnatal weeks (PW) 3-7. It is not known whether CS axon terminal growth and final topography are activity dependent. We examined the activity dependence of CS axon terminal growth and topography at different postnatal times. We inactivated sensory-motor cortex by infusion of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) agonist muscimol and traced CS axons from the inactivated side. Inactivation between PW5 and PW7 produced permanent changes in projection topography, reduced local axon branching, and prevented development of dense clusters of presynaptic sites, which are normally characteristic of CS terminals. Inactivation at younger (PW3-5) and older (PW8-12) ages did not affect projection topography but impeded development of local axon branching and presynaptic site clusters. These effects were not due to increased cortical cell death during inactivation. Neural activity plays an important role in determining the morphology of CS terminals during the entire period of development, but, for the projection topography, the role of activity is exercised during a very brief period. This points to a complex, and possibly independent, regulation of termination topography and terminal morphology. Surprisingly, when a CS neuron's activity is blocked during early development, it does not recover lost connections later in development once activity resumes.

  7. Homology modeling and identification of amino acids involved in the catalytic process of Mycobacterium tuberculosis serine acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Juanjuan; Zang, Shizhu; Ma, Yufang; Owusu, Lawrence; Zhou, Lei; Jiang, Tao; Xin, Yi

    2017-03-01

    Serine acetyltransferase (CysE) belongs to the hexapeptide acetyltransferase family and is involved in the biosynthesis of L‑cysteine in microorganisms. Mycobacterium tuberculosis CysE is regarded as a potential target for anti‑tuberculosis (TB) drugs; however, the structure and active sites of M. tuberculosis CysE remain unknown. The present study aimed to predict the secondary structure and to construct a 3D model for M. tuberculosis CysE using bioinformatics analysis. To determine the essential amino acids that are associated with CysE enzymatic activity, amino acid sequences from several microorganisms were compared, and a consensus sequence was identified. Subsequently, site‑directed mutagenesis was used to generate mutant M. tuberculosis CysE proteins. Enzyme assays demonstrated that D67A, H82A and H117A mutants abolished ~75% activity of M. tuberculosis CysE. Prediction of the protein structure and identification of the active amino acids for M. tuberculosis CysE is essential for designing inhibitors, which may aid the discovery of effective anti‑TB drugs.

  8. Effects of standardized extracts of St. John's wort on the single-unit activity of serotonergic dorsal Raphe neurons in awake cats: comparisons with fluoxetine and sertraline.

    PubMed

    Fornal, C A; Metzler, C W; Mirescu, C; Stein, S K; Jacobs, B L

    2001-12-01

    St. John's wort is widely used as an herbal remedy for depression. Although its mechanism of action remains unknown, some evidence suggests that St. John's wort might act via brain serotonin (e.g., as a serotonin reuptake inhibitor). To determine whether St. John's wort affects the central serotonergic system, we monitored the discharge rate of serotonin-containing neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus of awake cats following systemic administration of two clinical preparations of St. John's wort, Jarsin 300 (15-600 mg/kg, p.o.) and Hyperforat (0.5-4.0 ml, i.v.). Both preparations were found to have no effect on neuronal activity. This contrasts sharply with the action of fluoxetine and sertraline (2 mg/kg, p.o.), two selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which markedly depressed neuronal activity by increasing the synaptic availability of serotonin at inhibitory somatodendritic 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors. The failure of St. John's wort to depress neuronal activity cannot be attributed to an impairment of the 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor mechanism, since pretreatment with Jarsin 300 (300 mg/kg, p.o.) did not alter the responsiveness of serotonergic neurons to the 5-HT(1A) agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) (10 microg/kg, i.v.). Overall, these findings indicate that the mode of action of St. John's wort is different from that of conventional antidepressant drugs, which elevate brain serotonin and evoke negative feedback control of serotonergic neurons.

  9. An acetyltransferase assay for CREB-binding protein based on reverse phase-ultra-fast liquid chromatography of fluorescent histone H3 peptides.

    PubMed

    Duval, Romain; Fritsch, Lauriane; Bui, Linh-Chi; Berthelet, Jérémy; Guidez, Fabien; Mathieu, Cécile; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Chomienne, Christine; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    CREB-binding protein (CBP) is a lysine acetyltransferase that regulates transcription by acetylating histone and non-histone substrates. Defects in CBP activity are associated with hematologic malignancies, neurodisorders, and congenital malformations. Sensitive and quantitative enzymatic assays are essential to better characterize the pathophysiological features of CBP. We describe a sensitive nonradioactive method to measure purified and immunopurified cellular CBP enzymatic activity through rapid reverse phase-ultra-fast liquid chromatography (RP-UFLC) analysis of fluorescent histone H3 peptide substrates. The applicability and biological relevance of the assay are supported by kinetic, inhibition, and immunoprecipitation studies. More broadly, this approach could be easily adapted to assay other lysine acetyltransferases or methyltransferases.

  10. Biochemical effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content on teleostean fishes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Palas; Pal, Sandipan; Mukherjee, Aloke Kumar; Ghosh, Apurba Ratan

    2014-09-01

    Effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 at a dose of 17.20mg/l on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content were measured in different tissues of two Indian air-breathing teleosts, Anabas testudineus (Bloch) and Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) during an exposure period of 30 days under laboratory condition. AChE activity was significantly increased in all the investigated tissues of both fish species and maximum elevation was observed in brain of H. fossilis, while spinal cord of A. testudineus showed minimum increment. Fishes showed significant increase LPO levels in all the tissues; highest was observed in gill of A. testudineus but lowest LPO level was observed in muscle of H. fossilis. CAT was also enhanced in both the fishes, while GST activity in liver diminished substantially and minimum was observed in liver of A. testudineus. Total protein content showed decreased value in all the tissues, maximum reduction was observed in liver and minimum in brain of A. testudineus and H. fossilis respectively. The results indicated that Excel Mera 71 caused serious alterations in the enzyme activities resulting into severe deterioration of fish health; so, AChE, LPO, CAT and GST can be used as suitable indicators of herbicidal toxicity.

  11. Changes in the activity of units of the cat motor cortex with rapid conditioning and extinction of a compound eye blink movement.

    PubMed

    Aou, S; Woody, C D; Birt, D

    1992-02-01

    Patterns of spike activity were measured in the pericruciate cortex of conscious cats before and after development of a Pavlovian conditioned eye blink response. Unit activity was tested with presentations of a click conditioned stimulus (CS) and a hiss discriminative stimulus (DS) of similar intensity to the click. Unit discharge in response to the CS increased after conditioning, but not after backward conditioning when conditioned reflexes (CRs) were not performed. Rates of spontaneous, baseline discharge were not increased after conditioning with respect to rates of discharge measured in the naive state. It appeared that an increase in the ratio of CS-elicited discharge to background activity, together with an increase in the number of units responding to the CS after conditioning, supported discrimination of the CS from the DS and performance of the conditioned blink response. This is the first detailed characterization of patterns of a rapidly conditioned Pavlovian response. Activation of units by the CS preceded the onset of the CR, supporting the hypothesis that the activity played a role in initiating the conditioned eye blink movement. Extinction with retention of performance of the CR was associated with perseverance of the increased unit discharge in response to the CS. Extinction with substantially reduced performance of the CR was associated with diminution of the unit response to the CS below levels found with conditioning. Averages of patterns of spike activity elicited by the CS after conditioning showed components of discharge with onsets of 8-40 msec (alpha 1), 40-72 msec (alpha 2), 72-112 msec (beta), and greater than 112 msec (gamma), corresponding to each of four separate excitatory EMG components of the compound blink CR. Each component increased in magnitude after conditioning, relative to levels found in the naive state. The finding that long- as well as short-latency components of unit activation increased after conditioning supported the

  12. Molecular and Biochemical Analysis of a Madagascar Periwinkle Root-Specific Minovincinine-19-Hydroxy-O-Acetyltransferase1

    PubMed Central

    Laflamme, Pierre; St-Pierre, Benoit; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2001-01-01

    The terminal steps in the biosynthesis of the monoterpenoid indole alkaloids vindoline and minovincinine are catalyzed by separate acetyl coenzyme A-dependent O-acetyltransferases in Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus G. Don). Two genes were isolated that had 63% nucleic acid identity and whose deduced amino acid sequences were 78% identical. Active enzymes that were expressed as recombinant His-tagged proteins in Escherichia coli were named minovincinine-19-O-acetyltransferase (MAT) and deacetylvindoline-4-O-acetyltransferase (DAT) because they catalyzed the 19-O-acetylation of indole alkaloids such as minovincinine and hörhammericine and the 4-O-acetylation of deacetylvindoline, respectively. Kinetic studies showed that the catalytic efficiency of recombinant MAT (rMAT) was very poor compared with that of recombinant DAT (rDAT), whose turnover rates for Acetyl-coenzyme A and deacetylvindoline were approximately 240- and 10,000-fold greater than those of rMAT. Northern-blot analyses showed that MAT is expressed in cortical cells of the root tip, whereas DAT is only expressed in specialized idioblast and laticifer cells within light exposed tissues like leaves and stems. The coincident expression of trytophan decarboxylase, strictosidine synthase, and MAT within root cortical cells suggests that the entire pathway for the biosynthesis of tabersonine and its substituted analogs occurs within these cells. The ability of MAT to catalyze the 4-O-acetylation of deacetylvindoline with low efficiency suggests that this enzyme, rather than DAT, is involved in vindoline biosynthesis within transformed cell and root cultures, which accumulate low levels of this alkaloid under certain circumstances. PMID:11154328

  13. Cats protecting birds revisited.

    PubMed

    Fan, Meng; Kuang, Yang; Feng, Zhilan

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, we revisit the dynamical interaction among prey (bird), mesopredator (rat), and superpredator (cat) discussed in [Courchamp, F., Langlais, M., Sugihara, G., 1999. Cats protecting birds: modelling the mesopredator release effect. Journal of Animal Ecology 68, 282-292]. First, we develop a prey-mesopredator-superpredator (i.e., bird-rat-cat, briefly, BRC) model, where the predator's functional responses are derived based on the classical Holling's time budget arguments. Our BRC model overcomes several model construction problems in Courchamp et al. (1999), and admits richer, reasonable and realistic dynamics. We explore the possible control strategies to save or restore the bird by controlling or eliminating the rat or the cat when the bird is endangered. We establish the existence of two types of mesopredator release phenomena: severe mesopredator release, where once superpredators are suppressed, a burst of mesopredators follows which leads their shared prey to extinction; and mild mesopredator release, where the mesopredator release could assert more negative impact on the endemic prey but does not lead the endemic prey to extinction. A sharp sufficient criterion is established for the occurrence of severe mesopredator release. We also show that, in a prey-mesopredator-superpredator trophic food web, eradication of introduced superpredators such as feral domestic cats in the BRC model, is not always the best solution to protect endemic insular prey. The presence of a superpredator may have a beneficial effect in such systems.

  14. Hearing disorders in cats.

    PubMed

    Strain, George M

    2017-03-01

    Practical relevance: Auditory function is a sense that is central to life for cats - being important in situational awareness of potential predators, pursuit of prey, and for communication with conspecifics, humans and other species. Deafness in cats is most frequently the result of a genetic disorder, strongly associated with white fur and blue eyes, but may also result from acquired causes such as advancing age, ototoxic drugs, infection, environmental noise and physical trauma. Deafness can be sensorineural, where there is loss of cochlear hair cells, or conductive, where sound is muffled on its way to the inner ear. Clinical challenges: Establishing whether a cat is deaf can be difficult as behavioral testing of hearing is subjective and does not reliably detect unilateral deafness. Brainstem auditory evoked response testing is an objective measure but is limited in its availability. Currently, sensorineural deafness is irreversible because no treatments are available to restore lost hair cells. Conductive hearing loss can usually be treated, although full hearing recovery following otitis media may take weeks as the body clears the middle ear of debris. Evidence base: The author draws on the published literature and his extensive research on clinical aspects and molecular genetics of deafness, principally in companion animals, to review types and forms of deafness in cats. He also discusses current diagnostic approaches and provides brief advice for managing cats with hearing loss.

  15. A Statistical Analysis of the Continual Activity of Single Cortical Neurones in the Cat Unanaesthetized Isolated Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D. R.; Smith, G. K.

    1965-01-01

    Statistical analyses are applied to records obtained under conditions of spontaneous activity. These demonstrate that all the cells examined are similar in the respect that their signals are composed of an approximately Poissonian shower gated on and off at random instants. A mathematical model is developed on this basis which characterises the signal of any one neurone with a number of simple parameters. The manner in which these parameters change under various types of stimulation is studied. It is found that the average frequency inside the sections of Poisson shower remains unchanged in all cases examined. Implications as to the types of network involved are discussed. PMID:14284329

  16. Effect of undernutrition on the regional development of transmitter enzymes: glutamate decarboxylase and choline acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Patel, A J; del Vecchio, M; Atkinson, D J

    1978-01-01

    The effect of undernutrition on the activity of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAc) (markers for the GABA-ergic and the cholinergic transmitter system, respectively) was studied in various parts of the rat brain at the age of 10, 15 and 21 days, and at day 54 following 33 days of rehabilitation. The brain regions investigated were the olfactory bulbs, cerebellum, pons-medulla, hypothalamus, colliculi, cerebral cortex hippocampus and the residual brain. Undernutrition resulted in a marked retardation of the developmental rise of the activities of both enzymes, expressed in terms of either total brain part or unit weight or protein. The effect diminished with age even during the period of nutritional deprivation. In most brain regions the enzyme activities were restored to normal after rehabilitation. In the cerebral cortex the total activity of both enzymes was persistently reduced, although the concentration of GAD exceeded the control levels. A negative correlation was manifested between the activities of GAD and ChAc in the different brain parts (except the cerebellum) during development. The correlation became significant by day 21 in the controls, but only after postweaning rehabilitation of the undernourished rats. The results showed therefore that undernutrition caused a reversible retardation in the development of these two transmitter enzymes, and they suggested that even the balance of the GABA-ergic and cholinergic systems throughout the brain can be restored to normal by rehabilitation.

  17. The yeast SAS (something about silencing) protein complex contains a MYST-type putative acetyltransferase and functions with chromatin assembly factor ASF1

    PubMed Central

    Osada, Shigehiro; Sutton, Ann; Muster, Nemone; Brown, Christine E.; Yates, John R.; Sternglanz, Rolf; Workman, Jerry L.

    2001-01-01

    It is well established that acetylation of histone and nonhistone proteins is intimately linked to transcriptional activation. However, loss of acetyltransferase activity has also been shown to cause silencing defects, implicating acetylation in gene silencing. The something about silencing (Sas) 2 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a member of the MYST (MOZ, Ybf2/Sas3, Sas2, and TIP60) acetyltransferase family, promotes silencing at HML and telomeres. Here we identify a ∼450-kD SAS complex containing Sas2p, Sas4p, and the tf2f-related Sas5 protein. Mutations in the conserved acetyl-CoA binding motif of Sas2p are shown to disrupt the ability of Sas2p to mediate the silencing at HML and telomeres, providing evidence for an important role for the acetyltransferase activity of the SAS complex in silencing. Furthermore, the SAS complex is found to interact with chromatin assembly factor Asf1p, and asf1 mutants show silencing defects similar to mutants in the SAS complex. Thus, ASF1-dependent chromatin assembly may mediate the role of the SAS complex in silencing. PMID:11731479

  18. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes characterized in several bacteria and eukaryotic organisms. We report a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis employing an exhaustive dataset of NAT-homologous sequences recovered through inspection of 2445 genomes. We describe ...

  19. CAT8, a new zinc cluster-encoding gene necessary for derepression of gluconeogenic enzymes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Hedges, D; Proft, M; Entian, K D

    1995-01-01

    The expression of gluconeogenic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (encoded by the FBP1 gene) depends on the carbon source. Analysis of the FBP1 promoter revealed two upstream activating elements, UAS1FBP1 and UAS2FBP1, which confer carbon source-dependent regulation on a heterologous reporter gene. On glucose media neither element was activated, whereas after transfer to ethanol a 100-fold derepression was observed. This gene activation depended on the previously identified derepression genes CAT1 (SNF1) (encoding a protein kinase) and CAT3 (SNF4) (probably encoding a subunit of Cat1p [Snf1p]). Screening for mutations specifically involved in UAS1FBP1 derepression revealed the new recessive derepression mutation cat8. The cat8 mutants also failed to derepress UAS2FBP1, and these mutants were unable to grow on nonfermentable carbon sources. The CAT8 gene encodes a zinc cluster protein related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gal4p. Deletion of CAT8 caused a defect in glucose derepression which affected all key gluconeogenic enzymes. Derepression of glucose-repressible invertase and maltase was still normally regulated. A CAT8-lacZ promoter fusion revealed that the CAT8 gene itself is repressed by Cat4p (Mig1p). These results suggest that gluconeogenic genes are derepressed upon binding of Cat8p, whose synthesis depends on the release of Cat4p (Mig1p) from the CAT8 promoter. However, gluconeogenic promoters are still glucose repressed in cat4 mutants, which indicates that in addition to its transcription, the Cat8p protein needs further activation. The observation that multicopy expression of CAT8 reverses the inability of cat1 and cat3 mutants to grow on ethanol indicates that Cat8p might be the substrate of the Cat1p/Cat3p protein kinase. PMID:7891685

  20. Structure and function of human Naa60 (NatF), a Golgi-localized bi-functional acetyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji-Yun; Liu, Liang; Cao, Chun-Ling; Li, Mei-Jun; Tan, Kemin; Yang, Xiaohan; Yun, Cai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    N-terminal acetylation (Nt-acetylation), carried out by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs), is a conserved and primary modification of nascent peptide chains. Naa60 (also named NatF) is a recently identified NAT found only in multicellular eukaryotes. This protein was shown to locate on the Golgi apparatus and mainly catalyze the Nt-acetylation of transmembrane proteins, and it also harbors lysine Nε-acetyltransferase (KAT) activity to catalyze the acetylation of lysine ε-amine. Here, we report the crystal structures of human Naa60 (hNaa60) in complex with Acetyl-Coenzyme A (Ac-CoA) or Coenzyme A (CoA). The hNaa60 protein contains an amphipathic helix following its GNAT domain that may contribute to Golgi localization of hNaa60, and the β7-β8 hairpin adopted different conformations in the hNaa60(1-242) and hNaa60(1-199) crystal structures. Remarkably, we found that the side-chain of Phe 34 can influence the position of the coenzyme, indicating a new regulatory mechanism involving enzyme, co-factor and substrates interactions. Moreover, structural comparison and biochemical studies indicated that Tyr 97 and His 138 are key residues for catalytic reaction and that a non-conserved β3-β4 long loop participates in the regulation of hNaa60 activity. PMID:27550639

  1. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Acinetobacter spp. Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferases Highlights Functional and Evolutionary Variation among Antibiotic Resistance Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Stogios, Peter J; Kuhn, Misty L; Evdokimova, Elena; Law, Melissa; Courvalin, Patrice; Savchenko, Alexei

    2017-02-10

    Modification of aminoglycosides by N-acetyltransferases (AACs) is one of the major mechanisms of resistance to these antibiotics in human bacterial pathogens. More than 50 enzymes belonging to the AAC(6') subfamily have been identified in Gram-negative and Gram-positive clinical isolates. Our understanding of the molecular function and evolutionary origin of these resistance enzymes remains incomplete. Here we report the structural and enzymatic characterization of AAC(6')-Ig and AAC(6')-Ih from Acinetobacter spp. The crystal structure of AAC(6')-Ig in complex with tobramycin revealed a large substrate-binding cleft remaining partially unoccupied by the substrate, which is in stark contrast with the previously characterized AAC(6')-Ib enzyme. Enzymatic analysis indicated that AAC(6')-Ig and -Ih possess a broad specificity against aminoglycosides but with significantly lower turnover rates as compared to other AAC(6') enzymes. Structure- and function-informed phylogenetic analysis of AAC(6') enzymes led to identification of at least three distinct subfamilies varying in oligomeric state, active site composition, and drug recognition mode. Our data support the concept of AAC(6') functionality originating through convergent evolution from diverse Gcn5-related-N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) ancestral enzymes, with AAC(6')-Ig and -Ih representing enzymes that may still retain ancestral nonresistance functions in the cell as provided by their particular active site properties.

  2. Structure and function of human Naa60 (NatF), a Golgi-localized bi-functional acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ji-Yun; Liu, Liang; Cao, Chun-Ling; Li, Mei-Jun; Tan, Kemin; Yang, Xiaohan; Yun, Caihong

    2016-08-23

    N-terminal acetylation (Nt-acetylation), carried out by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs), is a conserved and primary modification of nascent peptide chains. Naa60 (also named NatF) is a recently identified NAT found only in multicellular eukaryotes. This protein was shown to locate on the Golgi apparatus and mainly catalyze the Nt-acetylation of transmembrane proteins, and it also harbors lysine Nε -acetyltransferase (KAT) activity to catalyze the acetylation of lysine ε-amine. Here, we report the crystal structures of human Naa60 (hNaa60) in complex with Acetyl-Coenzyme A (Ac-CoA) or Coenzyme A (CoA). The hNaa60 protein contains an amphipathic helix following its GNAT domain that may contribute to Golgi localization of hNaa60, and the β7-β8 hairpin adopted different conformations in the hNaa60(1-242) and hNaa60(1-199) crystal structures. Remarkably, we found that the side-chain of Phe 34 can influence the position of the coenzyme, indicating a new regulatory mechanism involving enzyme, co-factor and substrates interactions. Moreover, structural comparison and biochemical studies indicated that Tyr 97 and His 138 are key residues for catalytic reaction and that a non-conserved β3-β4 long loop participates in the regulation of hNaa60 activity.

  3. Structure and function of human Naa60 (NatF), a Golgi-localized bi-functional acetyltransferase

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Ji-Yun; Liu, Liang; Cao, Chun-Ling; ...

    2016-08-23

    N-terminal acetylation (Nt-acetylation), carried out by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs), is a conserved and primary modification of nascent peptide chains. Naa60 (also named NatF) is a recently identified NAT found only in multicellular eukaryotes. This protein was shown to locate on the Golgi apparatus and mainly catalyze the Nt-acetylation of transmembrane proteins, and it also harbors lysine Nε -acetyltransferase (KAT) activity to catalyze the acetylation of lysine ε-amine. Here, we report the crystal structures of human Naa60 (hNaa60) in complex with Acetyl-Coenzyme A (Ac-CoA) or Coenzyme A (CoA). The hNaa60 protein contains an amphipathic helix following its GNAT domain that maymore » contribute to Golgi localization of hNaa60, and the β7-β8 hairpin adopted different conformations in the hNaa60(1-242) and hNaa60(1-199) crystal structures. Remarkably, we found that the side-chain of Phe 34 can influence the position of the coenzyme, indicating a new regulatory mechanism involving enzyme, co-factor and substrates interactions. Moreover, structural comparison and biochemical studies indicated that Tyr 97 and His 138 are key residues for catalytic reaction and that a non-conserved β3-β4 long loop participates in the regulation of hNaa60 activity.« less

  4. N-acetylglucosamine sensing by a GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase induces transcription via chromatin histone acetylation in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chang; Lu, Yang; Liu, Haoping

    2016-01-01

    N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) exists ubiquitously as a component of the surface on a wide range of cells, from bacteria to humans. Many fungi are able to utilize environmental GlcNAc to support growth and induce cellular development, a property important for their survival in various host niches. However, how the GlcNAc signal is sensed and subsequently transduced is largely unknown. Here, we identify a gene that is essential for GlcNAc signalling (NGS1) in Candida albicans, a commensal and pathogenic yeast of humans. Ngs1 can bind GlcNAc through the N-terminal β-N-acetylglucosaminidase homology domain. This binding activates N-acetyltransferase activity in the C-terminal GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase domain, which is required for GlcNAc-induced promoter histone acetylation and transcription. Ngs1 is targeted to the promoters of GlcNAc-inducible genes constitutively by the transcription factor Rep1. Ngs1 is conserved in diverse fungi that have GlcNAc catabolic genes. Thus, fungi use Ngs1 as a GlcNAc-sensor and transducer for GlcNAc-induced transcription. PMID:27694804

  5. "catR": An R Package for Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; Raiche, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) is an active current research field in psychometrics and educational measurement. However, there is very little software available to handle such adaptive tasks. The R package "catR" was developed to perform adaptive testing with as much flexibility as possible, in an attempt to provide a developmental and…

  6. Presumptive sialadenosis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Boydell, P; Pike, R; Crossley, D

    2000-12-01

    A cat was presented with signs associated with enlargement of the mandibular salivary glands. Histological findings were normal, consistent with a diagnosis of sialadenosis, and the cat responded to symptomatic treatment with oral phenobarbitone.

  7. Oridonin, a novel lysine acetyltransferases inhibitor, inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in gastric cancer cells through p53- and caspase-3-mediated mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Diao, Hua; Li, Guangming; Xu, Ling; Wang, Ting; Wei, Jue; Meng, Wenying; Ma, Jia-Li; Yu, Heguo; Wang, Yu-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation has been reported to involve in the pathogenesis of multiple diseases including cancer. In our screening study to identify natural compounds with lysine acetyltransferase inhibitor (KATi) activity, oridonin was found to possess acetyltransferase-inhibitory effects on multiple acetyltransferases including P300, GCN5, Tip60, and pCAF. In gastric cancer cells, oridonin treatment inhibited cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner and down-regulated the expression of p53 downstream genes, whereas p53 inhibition by PFT-α reversed the antiproliferative effects of oridonin. Moreover, oridonin treatment induced cell apoptosis, increased the levels of activated caspase-3 and caspase-9, and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in gastric cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Caspase-3 inhibition by Ac-DEVD-CHO reversed the proapoptosis effect of oridonin. In conclusion, our study identified oridonin as a novel KATi and demonstrated its tumor suppressive effects in gastric cancer cells at least partially through p53-and caspase-3-mediated mechanisms. PMID:26980707

  8. Cat Scratch Disease (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cat Scratch Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Cat Scratch Disease Print A A A What's in ... Doctor en español Enfermedad por arañazo de gato Cat scratch disease is a bacterial infection that a ...

  9. Novel ligands of Choline Acetyltransferase designed by in silico molecular docking, hologram QSAR and lead optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajnish; Långström, Bengt; Darreh-Shori, Taher

    2016-08-01

    Recent reports have brought back the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase in the mainstream research in dementia and the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Here we report, a specific strategy for the design of novel ChAT ligands based on molecular docking, Hologram Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (HQSAR) and lead optimization. Molecular docking was performed on a series of ChAT inhibitors to decipher the molecular fingerprint of their interaction with the active site of ChAT. Then robust statistical fragment HQSAR models were developed. A library of novel ligands was generated based on the pharmacophoric and shape similarity scoring function, and evaluated in silico for their molecular interactions with ChAT. Ten of the top scoring invented compounds are reported here. We confirmed the activity of α-NETA, the only commercially available ChAT inhibitor, and one of the seed compounds in our model, using a new simple colorimetric ChAT assay (IC50 ~ 88 nM). In contrast, α-NETA exhibited an IC50 of ~30 μM for the ACh-degrading cholinesterases. In conclusion, the overall results may provide useful insight for discovering novel ChAT ligands and potential positron emission tomography tracers as in vivo functional biomarkers of the health of central cholinergic system in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

  10. Novel ligands of Choline Acetyltransferase designed by in silico molecular docking, hologram QSAR and lead optimization

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajnish; Långström, Bengt; Darreh-Shori, Taher

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have brought back the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase in the mainstream research in dementia and the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Here we report, a specific strategy for the design of novel ChAT ligands based on molecular docking, Hologram Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (HQSAR) and lead optimization. Molecular docking was performed on a series of ChAT inhibitors to decipher the molecular fingerprint of their interaction with the active site of ChAT. Then robust statistical fragment HQSAR models were developed. A library of novel ligands was generated based on the pharmacophoric and shape similarity scoring function, and evaluated in silico for their molecular interactions with ChAT. Ten of the top scoring invented compounds are reported here. We confirmed the activity of α-NETA, the only commercially available ChAT inhibitor, and one of the seed compounds in our model, using a new simple colorimetric ChAT assay (IC50 ~ 88 nM). In contrast, α-NETA exhibited an IC50 of ~30 μM for the ACh-degrading cholinesterases. In conclusion, the overall results may provide useful insight for discovering novel ChAT ligands and potential positron emission tomography tracers as in vivo functional biomarkers of the health of central cholinergic system in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:27507101

  11. Identification of arylamine N-acetyltransferase inhibitors as an approach towards novel anti-tuberculars.

    PubMed

    Westwood, Isaac M; Bhakta, Sanjib; Russell, Angela J; Fullam, Elizabeth; Anderton, Matthew C; Kawamura, Akane; Mulvaney, Andrew W; Vickers, Richard J; Bhowruth, Veemal; Besra, Gurdyal S; Lalvani, Ajit; Davies, Stephen G; Sim, Edith

    2010-01-01

    New anti-tubercular drugs and drug targets are urgently needed to reduce the time for treatment and also to identify agents that will be effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis persisting intracellularly. Mycobacteria have a unique cell wall. Deletion of the gene for arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) decreases mycobacterial cell wall lipids, particularly the distinctive mycolates, and also increases antibiotic susceptibility and killing within macrophage of Mycobacterium bovis BCG. The nat gene and its associated gene cluster are almost identical in sequence in M. bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis. The gene cluster is essential for intracellular survival of mycobacteria. We have therefore used pure NAT protein for high-throughput screening to identify several classes of small molecules that inhibit NAT activity. Here, we characterize one class of such molecules-triazoles-in relation to its effects on the target enzyme and on both M. bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis. The most potent triazole mimics the effects of deletion of the nat gene on growth, lipid disruption and intracellular survival. We also present the structure-activity relationship between NAT inhibition and effects on mycobacterial growth, and use ligand-protein analysis to give further insight into the structure-activity relationships. We conclude that screening a chemical library with NAT protein yields compounds that have high potential as anti-tubercular agents and that the inhibitors will allow further exploration of the biochemical pathway in which NAT is involved.

  12. Structural model of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I based on the carnitine acetyltransferase crystal.

    PubMed Central

    Morillas, Montserrat; López-VViñas, Eduardo; Valencia, Alfonso; Serra, Dolors; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Hegardt, Fausto G; Asins, Guillermina

    2004-01-01

    CPT I (carnitine palmitoyltransferase I) catalyses the conversion of palmitoyl-CoA into palmitoylcarnitine in the presence of L-carnitine, facilitating the entry of fatty acids into mitochondria. We propose a 3-D (three-dimensional) structural model for L-CPT I (liver CPT I), based on the similarity of this enzyme to the recently crystallized mouse carnitine acetyltransferase. The model includes 607 of the 773 amino acids of L-CPT I, and the positions of carnitine, CoA and the palmitoyl group were assigned by superposition and docking analysis. Functional analysis of this 3-D model included the mutagenesis of several amino acids in order to identify putative catalytic residues. Mutants D477A, D567A and E590D showed reduced L-CPT I activity. In addition, individual mutation of amino acids forming the conserved Ser685-Thr686-Ser687 motif abolished enzyme activity in mutants T686A and S687A and altered K(m) and the catalytic efficiency for carnitine in mutant S685A. We conclude that the catalytic residues are His473 and Asp477, while Ser687 probably stabilizes the transition state. Several conserved lysines, i.e. Lys455, Lys505, Lys560 and Lys561, were also mutated. Only mutants K455A and K560A showed decreases in activity of 50%. The model rationalizes the finding of nine natural mutations in patients with hereditary L-CPT I deficiencies. PMID:14711372

  13. Vibrational Schroedinger Cats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kis, Z.; Janszky, J.; Vinogradov, An. V.; Kobayashi, T.

    1996-01-01

    The optical Schroedinger cat states are simple realizations of quantum states having nonclassical features. It is shown that vibrational analogues of such states can be realized in an experiment of double pulse excitation of vibrionic transitions. To track the evolution of the vibrational wave packet we derive a non-unitary time evolution operator so that calculations are made in a quasi Heisenberg picture.

  14. CAT altitude avoidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, B. L. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for indicating the altitude of the tropopause or of an inversion layer wherein clear air turbulence (CAT) may occur, and the likely severity of any such CAT, includes directing a passive microwave radiometer on the aircraft at different angles with respect to the horizon. The microwave radiation measured at a frequency of about 55 GHz represents the temperature of the air at an ""average'' range of about 3 kilometers, so that the sine of the angle of the radiometer times 3 kilometers equals the approximate altitude of the air whose temperature is measured. A plot of altitude (with respect to the aircraft) versus temperature of the air at that altitude, can indicate when an inversion layer is present and can indicate the altitude of the tropopause or of such an inversion layer. The plot can also indicate the severity of any CAT in an inversion layer. If CAT has been detected in the general area, then the aircraft can be flown at an altitude to avoid the tropopause or inversion layer.

  15. The Chemistry of Cat Litter: Activities for High School Students to Evaluate a Commercial Product's Properties and Claims Using the Tools of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celestino, Teresa; Marchetti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Educating future scientists and citizens is more effective if students are guided to correctly apply what they learned in school to their daily lives. This experience-based work is focused on the study of a well-known commercial product: cat litter. This material offers different starting points for a critical examination. Questions related to…

  16. Polymorphisms in the Human Cytochrome P450 and Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase: Susceptibility to Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Khlifi, Rim; Messaoud, Olfa; Rebai, Ahmed; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of head and neck cancer (HNC) is associated with smoking and alcohol drinking. Tobacco smoking exposes smokers to a series of carcinogenic chemicals. Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP450s), such as CYP1A1, CYP1B1, and CYP2D6, usually metabolize carcinogens to their inactive derivatives, but they occasionally convert the chemicals to more potent carcinogens. In addition, via CYP450 (CYP2E1) oxidase, alcohol is metabolized to acetaldehyde, a highly toxic compound, which plays an important role in carcinogenesis. Furthermore, two N-acetyltransferase isozymes (NATs), NAT1 and NAT2, are polymorphic and catalyze both N-acetylation and O-acetylation of aromatic and heterocyclic amine carcinogens. Genetic polymorphisms are associated with a number of enzymes involved in the metabolism of carcinogens important in the induction of HNC. It has been suggested that such polymorphisms may be linked to cancer susceptibility. In this paper, we select four cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP1BA1, CYP2D6, and CYP2E1), and two N-acetyltransferase isozymes (NAT1 and NAT2) in order to summarize and analyze findings from the literature related to HNC risk by focusing on (i) the interaction between these genes and the environment, (ii) the impact of genetic defect on protein activity and/or expression, and (iii) the eventual involvement of race in such associations. PMID:24151610

  17. The Polyamine N-Acetyltransferase-Like Enzyme PmvE Plays a Role in the Virulence of Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Cecilia; Michaux, Charlotte; Bugli, Francesca; Arcovito, Alessandro; Iavarone, Federica; Cacaci, Margherita; Sterbini, Francesco Paroni; Hartke, Axel; Sauvageot, Nicolas; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that the mutant strain of Enterococcus faecalis lacking the transcriptional regulator SlyA is more virulent than the parental strain. We hypothesized that this phenotype was due to overexpression of the second gene of the slyA operon, ef_3001, renamed pmvE (for polyamine metabolism and virulence of E. faecalis). PmvE shares strong homologies with N1-spermidine/spermine acetyltransferase enzymes involved in the metabolism of polyamines. In this study, we used an E. faecalis strain carrying the recombinant plasmid pMSP3535-pmvE (V19/p3535-pmvE), which allows the induction of pmvE by addition of nisin. Thereby, we showed that the overexpression of PmvE increased the virulence of E. faecalis in the Galleria mellonella infection model, as well as the persistence within peritoneal macrophages. We were also able to show a direct interaction between the His-tagged recombinant PmvE (rPmvE) protein and putrescine by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique on a Biacore instrument. Moreover, biochemical assays showed that PmvE possesses an N-acetyltransferase activity toward polyamine substrates. Our results suggest that PmvE contributes to the virulence of E. faecalis, likely through its involvement in the polyamine metabolism. PMID:25385793

  18. A Novel H2A/H4 Nucleosomal Histone Acetyltransferase in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Reiko; Steger, David J.; Brownell, James E.; Mizzen, Craig A.; Cook, Richard G.; Côté, Jacques; Workman, Jerry L.; Allis, C. David

    1999-01-01

    Recently, we reported the identification of a 55-kDa polypeptide (p55) from Tetrahymena macronuclei as a catalytic subunit of a transcription-associated histone acetyltransferase (HAT A). Extensive homology between p55 and Gcn5p, a component of the SAGA and ADA transcriptional coactivator complexes in budding yeast, suggests an immediate link between the regulation of chromatin structure and transcriptional output. Here we report the characterization of a second transcription-associated HAT activity from Tetrahymena macronuclei. This novel activity is distinct from complexes containing p55 and putative ciliate SAGA and ADA components and shares several characteristics with NuA4 (for nucleosomal H2A/H4), a 1.8-MDa, Gcn5p-independent HAT complex recently described in yeast. A key feature of both the NuA4 and Tetrahymena activities is their acetylation site specificity for lysines 5, 8, 12, and 16 of H4 and lysines 5 and 9 of H2A in nucleosomal substrates, patterns that are distinct from those of known Gcn5p family members. Moreover, like NuA4, the Tetrahymena activity is capable of activating transcription from nucleosomal templates in vitro in an acetyl coenzyme A-dependent fashion. Unlike NuA4, however, sucrose gradient analyses of the ciliate enzyme, following sequential denaturation and renaturation, estimate the molecular size of the catalytically active subunit to be ∼80 kDa, consistent with the notion that a single polypeptide or a stable subcomplex is sufficient for this H2A/H4 nucleosomal HAT activity. Together, these data document the importance of this novel HAT activity for transcriptional activation from chromatin templates and suggest that a second catalytic HAT subunit, in addition to p55/Gcn5p, is conserved between yeast and Tetrahymena. PMID:10022893

  19. Inhibition of Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase Resistance Enzymes by Metal Salts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijia; Green, Keith D.; Johnson, Brooke R.

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycosides (AGs) are clinically relevant antibiotics used to treat infections caused by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as Mycobacteria. As with all current antibacterial agents, resistance to AGs is an increasing problem. The most common mechanism of resistance to AGs is the presence of AG-modifying enzymes (AMEs) in bacterial cells, with AG acetyltransferases (AACs) being the most prevalent. Recently, it was discovered that Zn2+ metal ions displayed an inhibitory effect on the resistance enzyme AAC(6′)-Ib in Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli. In this study, we explore a wide array of metal salts (Mg2+, Cr3+, Cr6+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, and Au3+ with different counter ions) and their inhibitory effect on a large repertoire of AACs [AAC(2′)-Ic, AAC(3)-Ia, AAC(3)-Ib, AAC(3)-IV, AAC(6′)-Ib′, AAC(6′)-Ie, AAC(6′)-IId, and Eis]. In addition, we determine the MIC values for amikacin and tobramycin in combination with a zinc pyrithione complex in clinical isolates of various bacterial strains (two strains of A. baumannii, three of Enterobacter cloacae, and four of Klebsiella pneumoniae) and one representative of each species purchased from the American Type Culture Collection. PMID:25941215

  20. The Functional Analysis of Histone Acetyltransferase MOF in Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiaming; Wang, Fei; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji

    2016-01-14

    Changes in chromatin structure and heritably regulating the gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone post-translational modification, are involved in most cellular biological processes. Thus, abnormal regulation of epigenetics is implicated in the occurrence of various diseases, including cancer. Human MOF (males absent on the first) is a member of the MYST (Moz-Ybf2/Sas3-Sas2-Tip60) family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs). As a catalytic subunit, MOF can form at least two distinct multiprotein complexes (MSL and NSL) in human cells. Both complexes can acetylate histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16); however, the NSL complex possesses broader substrate specificity and can also acetylate histone H4 at lysines 5 and 8 (H4K5 and H4K8), suggesting the complexity of the intracellular functions of MOF. Silencing of MOF in cells leads to genomic instability, inactivation of gene transcription, defective DNA damage repair and early embryonic lethality. Unbalanced MOF expression and its corresponding acetylation of H4K16 have been found in certain primary cancer tissues, including breast cancer, medulloblastoma, ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma, gastric cancer, as well as non-small cell lung cancer. In this review, we provide a brief overview of MOF and its corresponding histone acetylation, introduce recent research findings that link MOF functions to tumorigenesis and speculate on the potential role that may be relevant to tumorigenic pathways.

  1. Reconstruction of N-acetyltransferase 2 haplotypes using PHASE.

    PubMed

    Golka, Klaus; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Samimi, Mirabutaleb; Bolt, Hermann M; Selinski, Silvia

    2008-04-01

    The genotyping of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) by PCR/RFLP methods yields in a considerable percentage ambiguous results. To resolve this methodical problem a statistical approach was applied. PHASE v2.1.1, a statistical program for haplotype reconstruction was used to estimate haplotype pairs from NAT2 genotyping data, obtained by the analysis of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms relevant for Caucasians. In 1,011 out of 2,921 (35%) subjects the haplotype pairs were clearcut by the PCR/RFLP data only. For the majority of the data the applied method resulted in a multiplicity (2-4) of possible haplotype pairs. Haplotype reconstruction using PHASE v2.1.1 cleared this ambiguity in all cases but one, where an alternative haplotype pair was considered with a probability of 0.029. The estimation of the NAT2 haplotype is important because the assignment of the NAT2 alleles *12A, *12B, *12C or *13 to the rapid or slow NAT2 genotype has been discussed controversially. A clear assignment is indispensable in surveys of human bladder cancer caused by aromatic amine exposures. In conclusion, PHASE v2.1.1 software allowed an unambiguous haplotype reconstruction in 2,920 of 2,921 cases (>99.9%).

  2. The histone acetyltransferase p300 promotes intrinsic axonal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gaub, Perrine; Joshi, Yashashree; Wuttke, Anja; Naumann, Ulrike; Schnichels, Sven; Heiduschka, Peter; Di Giovanni, Simone

    2011-07-01

    Axonal regeneration and related functional recovery following axonal injury in the adult central nervous system are extremely limited, due to a lack of neuronal intrinsic competence and the presence of extrinsic inhibitory signals. As opposed to what occurs during nervous system development, a weak proregenerative gene expression programme contributes to the limited intrinsic capacity of adult injured central nervous system axons to regenerate. Here we show, in an optic nerve crush model of axonal injury, that adenoviral (cytomegalovirus promoter) overexpression of the acetyltransferase p300, which is regulated during retinal ganglion cell maturation and repressed in the adult, can promote axonal regeneration of the optic nerve beyond 0.5 mm. p300 acetylates histone H3 and the proregenerative transcription factors p53 and CCAAT-enhancer binding proteins in retinal ganglia cells. In addition, it directly occupies and acetylates the promoters of the growth-associated protein-43, coronin 1 b and Sprr1a and drives the gene expression programme of several regeneration-associated genes. On the contrary, overall increase in cellular acetylation using the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, enhances retinal ganglion cell survival but not axonal regeneration after optic nerve crush. Therefore, p300 targets both the epigenome and transcription to unlock a post-injury silent gene expression programme that would support axonal regeneration.

  3. X monosomy in a virilized female cat.

    PubMed

    Szczerbal, I; Nizanski, W; Dzimira, S; Nowacka-Woszuk, J; Ochota, M; Switonski, M

    2015-04-01

    An infertile Siamese female cat was subjected for clinical, histological, cytogenetic and molecular studies due to ambiguous external genitalia (vulva, vagina, rudimentary penis and scrotum-like structure) and masculine behaviour. An elevated oestrogen activity and a detectable level of testosterone were found. The cat underwent laparotomy. The gonads and the uterus were removed and subjected for histological studies, which showed ovaries with corpora lutea and a some primordial follicles. Chromosome studies of lymphocyte and fibroblast cultures, with the use of Giemsa staining, G-banding and whole X chromosome painting by fluorescence in situ hybridization, revealed pure X monosomy. Molecular analysis showed the absence of the SRY gene. Our study revealed for the first time that X monosomy in cats may be associated with virilization, in spite of the lack of the SRY gene.

  4. Diversity among the gram-positive acetyltransferases inactivating streptogramin A and structurally related compounds and characterization of a new staphylococcal determinant, vatB.

    PubMed

    Allignet, J; el Solh, N

    1995-09-01

    A gene encoding an acetyltransferase inactivating streptogramin A (SgA) and structurally similar compounds was isolated from a staphylococcal plasmid and sequenced. This gene, designated vatB, potentially encodes a 212-amino-acid protein, VatB, of 23,320 Da with 47.4 and 58.4% amino acid identities with two other enzymes with the same activity, Vat and SatA, respectively, which are encoded by a staphylococcal plasmid and an enterococcal plasmid, respectively. The C-terminal parts of these three enzymes share significant homology with the C-terminal parts of 10 other acetyltransferases modifying various substrates. A pair of degenerate primers representing the conserved motifs shared by VatB, Vat, and SatA was designed to detect the three genes encoding these SgA acetyltransferases. Five of 12 clinical SgAr Staphylococcus aureus isolates tested carried neither these genes nor the gene vga, which confers resistance to SgA by a different mechanism, suggesting that another gene(s) and possibly another mechanism of resistance to SgA in staphylococci remains to be characterized.

  5. Diversity among the gram-positive acetyltransferases inactivating streptogramin A and structurally related compounds and characterization of a new staphylococcal determinant, vatB.

    PubMed Central

    Allignet, J; el Solh, N

    1995-01-01

    A gene encoding an acetyltransferase inactivating streptogramin A (SgA) and structurally similar compounds was isolated from a staphylococcal plasmid and sequenced. This gene, designated vatB, potentially encodes a 212-amino-acid protein, VatB, of 23,320 Da with 47.4 and 58.4% amino acid identities with two other enzymes with the same activity, Vat and SatA, respectively, which are encoded by a staphylococcal plasmid and an enterococcal plasmid, respectively. The C-terminal parts of these three enzymes share significant homology with the C-terminal parts of 10 other acetyltransferases modifying various substrates. A pair of degenerate primers representing the conserved motifs shared by VatB, Vat, and SatA was designed to detect the three genes encoding these SgA acetyltransferases. Five of 12 clinical SgAr Staphylococcus aureus isolates tested carried neither these genes nor the gene vga, which confers resistance to SgA by a different mechanism, suggesting that another gene(s) and possibly another mechanism of resistance to SgA in staphylococci remains to be characterized. PMID:8540711

  6. Prostatic carcinoma in two cats.

    PubMed

    Caney, S M; Holt, P E; Day, M J; Rudorf, H; Gruffydd-Jones, T J

    1998-03-01

    Clinical, radiological and pathological features of two cats with prostatic carcinoma are reported. In both cats the presenting history included signs of lower urinary tract disease with haematuria and dysuria. Prostatomegaly was visible radiographically in one cat; an irregular intraprostatic urethra was seen on retrograde contrast urethrography in both cats. In one of the cats, neoplasia was suspected on the basis of a transurethral catheter biopsy. Following a poor response to palliative treatment in both cases, euthanasia was performed with histological confirmation of the diagnosis.

  7. Making a Cat's Eye in a Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovsek, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Three plain mirrors, perpendicular to each other, reflect a beam of light back into the direction it came from. An activity is suggested where pupils can employ this feature of perpendicular mirrors and make their own corner cube retroreflector--a kind of cat's eye. (Contains 7 figures and 1 footnote.)

  8. Mechanistic and Structural Analysis of Drosophila melanogaster Arylalkylamine N-Acetyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of melatonin and other N-acetylarylalkylamides from the corresponding arylalkylamine and acetyl-CoA. The N-acetylation of arylalkylamines is a critical step in Drosophila melanogaster for the inactivation of the bioactive amines and the sclerotization of the cuticle. Two AANAT variants (AANATA and AANATB) have been identified in D. melanogaster, in which AANATA differs from AANATB by the truncation of 35 amino acids from the N-terminus. We have expressed and purified both D. melanogaster AANAT variants (AANATA and AANATB) in Escherichia coli and used the purified enzymes to demonstrate that this N-terminal truncation does not affect the activity of the enzyme. Subsequent characterization of the kinetic and chemical mechanism of AANATA identified an ordered sequential mechanism, with acetyl-CoA binding first, followed by tyramine. We used a combination of pH–activity profiling and site-directed mutagenesis to study prospective residues believed to function in AANATA catalysis. These data led to an assignment of Glu-47 as the general base in catalysis with an apparent pKa of 7.0. Using the data generated for the kinetic mechanism, structure–function relationships, pH–rate profiles, and site-directed mutagenesis, we propose a chemical mechanism for AANATA. PMID:25406072

  9. Molecular Basis of Substrate Specific Acetylation by N-Terminal Acetyltransferase NatB.

    PubMed

    Hong, Haiyan; Cai, Yongfei; Zhang, Shijun; Ding, Hongyan; Wang, Haitao; Han, Aidong

    2017-04-04

    The NatB N-terminal acetyltransferase specifically acetylates the N-terminal group of substrate protein peptides starting with Met-Asp/Glu/Asn/Gln. How NatB recognizes and acetylates these substrates remains unknown. Here, we report crystal structures of a NatB holoenzyme from Candida albicans in the presence of its co-factor CoA and substrate peptides. The auxiliary subunit Naa25 of NatB forms a horseshoe-like deck to hold specifically its catalytic subunit Naa20. The first two amino acids Met and Asp of a substrate peptide mediate the major interactions with the active site in the Naa20 subunit. The hydrogen bonds between the substrate Asp and pocket residues of Naa20 are essential to determine the NatB substrate specificity. Moreover, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the substrate Met and a carbonyl group in the Naa20 active site directly anchors the substrate toward acetyl-CoA. Together, these structures define a unique molecular mechanism of specific N-terminal acetylation acted by NatB.

  10. Characterizing the Covalent Targets of a Small Molecule Inhibitor of the Lysine Acetyltransferase P300

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    C646 inhibits the lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) p300 and CBP and represents the most potent and selective small molecule KAT inhibitor identified to date. To gain insights into the cellular activity of this epigenetic probe, we applied chemoproteomics to identify covalent targets of the C646 chemotype. Modeling and synthetic derivatization was used to develop a clickable analogue (C646-yne) that inhibits p300 similarly to the parent compound and enables enrichment of bound proteins. LC–MS/MS identified the major covalent targets of C646-yne as highly abundant cysteine-containing proteins, and follow-up studies found that C646 can inhibit tubulin polymerization in vitro. Finally, we provide evidence that thiol reactivity of C646 may limit its ability to antagonize acetylation in cells. These findings should enable a more precise interpretation of studies utilizing C646 as a chemical probe of KAT activity and suggest that an underappreciated liability of electrophile-containing inhibitors is a reduction in their cellular potency due to consumption by abundant protein and metabolite thiol sinks. PMID:26985290

  11. Role of Saccharomyces cerevisiae serine O-acetyltransferase in cysteine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Kenji; Awano, Naoki; Nakamori, Shigeru; Ono, Bun ichiro

    2003-01-28

    Some strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have detectable activities of L-serine O-acetyltransferase (SATase) and O-acetyl-L-serine/O-acetyl-L-homoserine sulfhydrylase (OAS/OAH-SHLase), but synthesize L-cysteine exclusively via cystathionine by cystathionine beta-synthase and cystathionine gamma-lyase. To untangle this peculiar feature in sulfur metabolism, we introduced Escherichia coli genes encoding SATase and OAS-SHLase into S. cerevisiae L-cysteine auxotrophs. While the cells expressing SATase grew on medium lacking L-cysteine, those expressing OAS-SHLase did not grow at all. The cells expressing both enzymes grew very well without L-cysteine. These results indicate that S. cerevisiae SATase cannot support L-cysteine biosynthesis and that S. cerevisiae OAS/OAH-SHLase produces L-cysteine if enough OAS is provided by E. coli SATase. It appears as if S. cerevisiae SATase does not possess a metabolic role in vivo either because of very low activity or localization. For example, S. cerevisiae SATase may be localized in the nucleus, thus controlling the level of OAS required for regulation of sulfate assimilation, but playing no role in the direct synthesis of L-cysteine.

  12. Early adipogenesis is regulated through USP7-mediated deubiquitination of the histone acetyltransferase TIP60.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Koppen, Arjen; Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Tasdelen, Ismayil; van de Graaf, Stan F; van Loosdregt, Jorg; van Beekum, Olivier; Hamers, Nicole; van Leenen, Dik; Berkers, Celia R; Berger, Ruud; Holstege, Frank C P; Coffer, Paul J; Brenkman, Arjan B; Ovaa, Huib; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional coregulators, including the acetyltransferase Tip60, have a key role in complex cellular processes such as differentiation. Whereas post-translational modifications have emerged as an important mechanism to regulate transcriptional coregulator activity, the identification of the corresponding demodifying enzymes has remained elusive. Here we show that the expression of the Tip60 protein, which is essential for adipocyte differentiation, is regulated through polyubiquitination on multiple residues. USP7, a dominant deubiquitinating enzyme in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and mouse adipose tissue, deubiquitinates Tip60 both in intact cells and in vitro and increases Tip60 protein levels. Furthermore, inhibition of USP7 expression and activity decreases adipogenesis. Transcriptome analysis reveals several cell cycle genes to be co-regulated by both Tip60 and USP7. Knockdown of either factor results in impaired mitotic clonal expansion, an early step in adipogenesis. These results reveal deubiquitination of a transcriptional coregulator to be a key mechanism in the regulation of early adipogenesis.

  13. Genetic testing in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Leslie A

    2012-12-01

    Varieties of genetic tests are currently available for the domestic cat that support veterinary health care, breed management, species identification, and forensic investigations. Approximately thirty-five genes contain over fifty mutations that cause feline health problems or alterations in the cat's appearance. Specific genes, such as sweet and drug receptors, have been knocked-out of Felidae during evolution and can be used along with mtDNA markers for species identification. Both STR and SNP panels differentiate cat race, breed, and individual identity, as well as gender-specific markers to determine sex of an individual. Cat genetic tests are common offerings for commercial laboratories, allowing both the veterinary clinician and the private owner to obtain DNA test results. This article will review the genetic tests for the domestic cat, and their various applications in different fields of science. Highlighted are genetic tests specific to the individual cat, which are a part of the cat's genome.

  14. Big cat genomics.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E

    2005-01-01

    Advances in population and quantitative genomics, aided by the computational algorithms that employ genetic theory and practice, are now being applied to biological questions that surround free-ranging species not traditionally suitable for genetic enquiry. Here we review how applications of molecular genetic tools have been used to describe the natural history, present status, and future disposition of wild cat species. Insight into phylogenetic hierarchy, demographic contractions, geographic population substructure, behavioral ecology, and infectious diseases have revealed strategies for survival and adaptation of these fascinating predators. Conservation, stabilization, and management of the big cats are important areas that derive benefit from the genome resources expanded and applied to highly successful species, imperiled by an expanding human population.

  15. Cat scratch disease.

    PubMed

    Bozhkov, V; Madjov, R; Plachkov, I; Arnaudov, P; Chernopolsky, P; Krasnaliev, I

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 24,000 people are infected with cat scratch disease (CSD) every year. CSD is caused by the bacteria Bartonella henselae, a gram-negative bacteria most often transmitted to humans through a bite or scratch from an infected cat or kitten. Although CSD is often a benign and self-limiting condition, it can affect any major organ system in the body, manifesting in different ways and sometimes leading to lifelong sequelae. It is a disease that is often overlooked in primary care because of the wide range of symptom presentation and relative rarity of serious complications. It is important for health care providers to recognize patients at risk for CSD, know what laboratory testing and treatments are available, and be aware of complications that may arise from this disease in the future.

  16. Pancreatic rupture in four cats with high-rise syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liehmann, Lea M; Dörner, Judith; Hittmair, Katharina M; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Reifinger, Martin; Dupré, Gilles

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic trauma and rupture are rare after feline high-rise syndrome; however, should it happen, pancreatic enzymes will leak into the abdominal cavity and may cause pancreatic autodigestion and fatty tissue saponification. If not diagnosed and treated, it can ultimately lead to multiorgan failure and death. In this case series, 700 records of high-rise syndrome cats that presented between April 2001 and May 2006 were analysed, and four cats with pancreatic rupture were identified. Clinical signs, diagnosis using ultrasonography and lipase activity in blood and abdominal effusion, and treatment modalities are reported. Three cats underwent surgical abdominal exploration, one cat was euthanased. Rupture of the left pancreatic limb was confirmed in all cases. Two of the operated cats survived to date. High-rise syndrome can lead to abdominal trauma, including pancreatic rupture. A prompt diagnosis and surgical treatment should be considered.

  17. Fungal Rtt109 Histone Acetyltransferase is an Unexpected Structural Homolog of Metazoan p300/CBP

    SciTech Connect

    Tang,Y.; Holbert, M.; Wurtele, H.; Meeth, K.; Rocha, W.; Gharib, M.; Jiang, E.; Thibault, P.; Verreault, A.; et al

    2008-01-01

    Rtt109, also known as KAT11, is a recently characterized fungal-specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) that modifies histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56) to promote genome stability. Rtt109 does not show sequence conservation with other known HATs and depends on association with either of two histone chaperones, Asf1 or Vps75, for HAT activity. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of an Rtt109-acetyl coenzyme A complex and carry out structure-based mutagenesis, combined with in vitro biochemical studies of the Rtt109-Vps75 complex and studies of Rtt109 function in vivo. The Rtt109 structure reveals noteworthy homology to the metazoan p300/CBP HAT domain but exhibits functional divergence, including atypical catalytic properties and mode of cofactor regulation. The structure reveals a buried autoacetylated lysine residue that we show is also acetylated in the Rtt109 protein purified from yeast cells. Implications for understanding histone substrate and chaperone binding by Rtt109 are discussed.

  18. Synthesis of isothiazol-3-one derivatives as inhibitors of histone acetyltransferases (HATs).

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, Stephen; Bavetsias, Vassilios; Rowlands, Martin G; Aherne, G Wynne; Workman, Paul; Jarman, Michael; McDonald, Edward

    2009-01-15

    High-throughput screening led to the identification of isothiazolones 1 and 2 as inhibitors of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) with IC50s of 3 microM and 5 microM, respectively. Analogues of these hit compounds with variations of the N-phenyl group, and with variety of substituents at C-4, C-5 of the thiazolone ring, were prepared and assayed for inhibition of the HAT enzyme PCAF. Potency is modestly favoured when the N-aryl group is electron deficient (4-pyridyl derivative 10 has IC(50)=1.5 microM); alkyl substitution at C-4 has little effect, whilst similar substitution at C-5 causes a significant drop in potency. The ring-fused compound 38 has activity (IC(50)=6.1 microM) to encourage further exploration of this bicyclic structure. The foregoing SAR is consistent with an inhibitory mechanism involving cleavage of the S-N bond of the isothiazolone ring by a catalytically important thiol residue.

  19. The acetyltransferase Tip60 contributes to mammary tumorigenesis by modulating DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, C; Li, Y-T; Khu, K; Mateo, F; Baniasadi, P S; Elia, A; Mason, J; Stambolic, V; Pujana, M A; Mak, T W; Gorrini, C

    2016-01-01

    The acetyltransferase Tip60/Kat5 acetylates both histone and non-histone proteins, and is involved in a variety of biological processes. By acetylating p53, Tip60 controls p53-dependent transcriptional activity and so is implicated as a tumor suppressor. However, many breast cancers with low Tip60 also show p53 mutation, implying that Tip60 has a tumor suppressor function independent of its acetylation of p53. Here, we show in a p53-null mouse model of sporadic invasive breast adenocarcinoma that heterozygosity for Tip60 deletion promotes mammary tumorigenesis. Low Tip60 reduces DNA repair in normal and tumor mammary epithelial cells, both under resting conditions and following genotoxic stress. We demonstrate that Tip60 controls homologous recombination (HR)-directed DNA repair, and that Tip60 levels correlate inversely with a gene expression signature associated with defective HR-directed DNA repair. In human breast cancer data sets, Tip60 mRNA is downregulated, with low Tip60 levels correlating with p53 mutations in basal-like breast cancers. Our findings indicate that Tip60 is a novel breast tumor suppressor gene whose loss results in genomic instability leading to cancer formation. PMID:26915295

  20. Contribution of gentamicin 2'-N-acetyltransferase to the O acetylation of peptidoglycan in Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed

    Payie, K G; Rather, P N; Clarke, A J

    1995-08-01

    A collection of Providencia stuartii mutants which either underexpress or overexpress aac(2')-Ia, the chromosomal gene coding for gentamicin 2'-N-acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.59), have been characterized phenotypically as possessing either lower or higher levels of peptidoglycan O acetylation, respectively, than the wild type. These mutants were subjected to both negative-staining and thin-section electron microscopy. P. stuartii PR100, with 42% O acetylation of peptidoglycan compared with 52% O acetylation in the wild type, appeared as irregular rods. In direct contrast, P. stuartii strains PR50.LM3 and PR51, with increased levels of peptidoglycan O acetylation (65 and 63%, respectively), appeared as coccobacilli and chain formers, respectively. Membrane blebbing was also observed with the chain-forming strain PR51. Thin sectioning of this mutant indicated that it was capable of proper constriction and separation. P. stuartii PM1, when grown to mid-exponential phase, did not have altered peptidoglycan O-acetylation levels, and cellular morphology remained similar to that of wild-type strains. However, continued growth into stationary phase resulted in a 15% increase in peptidoglycan O acetylation concomitant with a change of some cells from a rod-shaped to a coccobacillus-shaped morphology. The fact that these apparent morphological changes were directly related to levels of O acetylation support the view that this modification plays a role in the maintenance of peptidoglycan structure, presumably through the control of autolytic activity.

  1. Molecular functions of the histone acetyltransferase chaperone complex Rtt109-Vps75

    SciTech Connect

    Berndsen, Christopher E; Tsubota, Toshiaki; Lindner, Scott E; Lee, Susan; Holton, James M; Kaufman, Paul D; Keck, James L; Denu, John M

    2010-01-12

    Histone acetylation and nucleosome remodeling regulate DNA damage repair, replication and transcription. Rtt109, a recently discovered histone acetyltransferase (HAT) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, functions with the histone chaperone Asf1 to acetylate lysine K56 on histone H3 (H3K56), a modification associated with newly synthesized histones. In vitro analysis of Rtt109 revealed that Vps75, a Nap1 family histone chaperone, could also stimulate Rtt109-dependent acetylation of H3K56. However, the molecular function of the Rtt109-Vps75 complex remains elusive. Here we have probed the molecular functions of Vps75 and the Rtt109-Vps75 complex through biochemical, structural and genetic means. We find that Vps75 stimulates the kcat of histone acetylation by {approx}100-fold relative to Rtt109 alone and enhances acetylation of K9 in the H3 histone tail. Consistent with the in vitro evidence, cells lacking Vps75 showed a substantial reduction (60%) in H3K9 acetylation during S phase. X-ray structural, biochemical and genetic analyses of Vps75 indicate a unique, structurally dynamic Nap1-like fold that suggests a potential mechanism of Vps75-dependent activation of Rtt109. Together, these data provide evidence for a multifunctional HAT-chaperone complex that acetylates histone H3 and deposits H3-H4 onto DNA, linking histone modification and nucleosome assembly.

  2. Choline acetyltransferase in the hippocampus is associated with learning strategy preference in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Wayne R; Witty, Christine F; Daniel, Jill M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2015-08-01

    One principle of the multiple memory systems hypothesis posits that the hippocampus-based and striatum-based memory systems compete for control over learning. Consistent with this notion, previous research indicates that the cholinergic system of the hippocampus plays a role in modulating the preference for a hippocampus-based place learning strategy over a striatum-based stimulus--response learning strategy. Interestingly, in the hippocampus, greater activity and higher protein levels of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), the enzyme that synthesizes acetylcholine, are associated with better performance on hippocampus-based learning and memory tasks. With this in mind, the primary aim of the current study was to determine if higher levels of ChAT and the high-affinity choline uptake transporter (CHT) in the hippocampus were associated with a preference for a hippocampus-based place learning strategy on a task that also could be solved by relying on a striatum-based stimulus--response learning strategy. Results confirmed that levels of ChAT in the dorsal region of the hippocampus were associated with a preference for a place learning strategy on a water maze task that could also be solved by adopting a stimulus-response learning strategy. Consistent with previous studies, the current results support the hypothesis that the cholinergic system of the hippocampus plays a role in balancing competition between memory systems that modulate learning strategy preference.

  3. Molecular Evolution of Aralkylamine N-Acetyltransferase in Fish: A Genomic Survey

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; You, Xinxin; Bian, Chao; Yu, Hui; Coon, Steven L.; Shi, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    All living organisms synchronize biological functions with environmental changes; melatonin plays a vital role in regulating daily and seasonal variations. Due to rhythmic activity of the timezyme aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT), the blood level of melatonin increases at night and decreases during daytime. Whereas other vertebrates have a single form of AANAT, bony fishes possess various isoforms of aanat genes, though the reasons are still unclear. Here, we have taken advantage of multiple unpublished teleost aanat sequences to explore and expand our understanding of the molecular evolution of aanat in fish. Our results confirm that two rounds of whole-genome duplication (WGD) led to the existence of three fish isoforms of aanat, i.e., aanat1a, aanat1b, and aanat2; in addition, gene loss led to the absence of some forms from certain special fish species. Furthermore, we suggest the different roles of two aanat1s in amphibious mudskippers, and speculate that the loss of aanat1a, may be related to terrestrial vision change. Several important sites of AANAT proteins and regulatory elements of aanat genes were analyzed for structural comparison and functional forecasting, respectively, which provides insights into the molecular evolution of the differences between AANAT1 and AANAT2. PMID:26729109

  4. Cloning and characterization of a serotonin N-acetyltransferase from a gymnosperm, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda).

    PubMed

    Park, Sangkyu; Byeon, Yeong; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Kim, Young-Soon; Ahn, Taeho; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-10-01

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) is the penultimate enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis in both animals and plants. SNAT catalyzes serotonin into N-acetylserotonin, an immediate precursor for melatonin biosynthesis by N-acetylserotonin methyltransferase (ASMT). We cloned the SNAT gene from a gymnosperm loblolly pine (Pinus teada). The loblolly pine SNAT (PtSNAT) gene encodes 255 amino acids harboring a transit sequence with 67 amino acids and shows 67% amino acid identity with rice SNAT when comparing the mature polypeptide regions. Purified recombinant PtSNAT showed peak activity at 55°C with the K(m) (428 μM) and Vmax (3.9 nmol/min/mg protein) values. As predicted, PtSNAT localized to chloroplasts. The SNAT mRNA was constitutively expressed in all tissues, including leaf, bud, flower, and pinecone, whereas the corresponding protein was detected only in leaf. In accordance with the exclusive SNAT protein expression in leaf, melatonin was detected only in leaf at 0.45 ng per gram fresh weight. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis indicated that the gymnosperm PtSNAT had high homology with SNATs from all plant phyla (even with cyanobacteria), and formed a clade separated from the angiosperm SNATs, suggestive of direct gene transfer from cyanobacteria via endosymbiosis.

  5. Schizosaccharomyces pombe mst2+ Encodes a MYST Family Histone Acetyltransferase That Negatively Regulates Telomere Silencing†

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Eliana B.; Espinosa, Joaquín M.; Forsburg, Susan L.

    2005-01-01

    Histone acetylation and deacetylation are associated with transcriptional activity and the formation of constitutively silent heterochromatin. Increasingly, histone acetylation is also implicated in other chromosome transactions, including replication and segregation. We have cloned the only Schizosaccharomyces pombe MYST family histone acetyltransferase genes, mst1+ and mst2+. Mst1p, but not Mst2p, is essential for viability. Both proteins are localized to the nucleus and bound to chromatin throughout the cell cycle. Δmst2 genetically interacts with mutants that affect heterochromatin, cohesion, and telomere structure. Mst2p is a negative regulator of silencing at the telomere but does not affect silencing in the centromere or mating type region. We generated a census of proteins and histone modifications at wild-type telomeres. A histone acetylation gradient at the telomeres is lost in Δmst2 cells without affecting the distribution of Taz1p, Swi6p, Rad21p, or Sir2p. We propose that the increased telomeric silencing is caused by histone hypoacetylation and/or an increase in the ratio of methylated to acetylated histones. Although telomere length is normal, meiosis is aberrant in Δmst2 diploid homozygote mutants, suggesting that telomeric histone acetylation contributes to normal meiotic progression. PMID:16199868

  6. Environmental History Modulates Arabidopsis Pattern-Triggered Immunity in a HISTONE ACETYLTRANSFERASE1-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant; Yekondi, Shweta; Chen, Po-Wen; Tsai, Chia-Hong; Yu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Keqiang; Zimmerli, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    In nature, plants are exposed to a fluctuating environment, and individuals exposed to contrasting environmental factors develop different environmental histories. Whether different environmental histories alter plant responses to a current stress remains elusive. Here, we show that environmental history modulates the plant response to microbial pathogens. Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to repetitive heat, cold, or salt stress were more resistant to virulent bacteria than Arabidopsis grown in a more stable environment. By contrast, long-term exposure to heat, cold, or exposure to high concentrations of NaCl did not provide enhanced protection against bacteria. Enhanced resistance occurred with priming of Arabidopsis pattern-triggered immunity (PTI)-responsive genes and the potentiation of PTI-mediated callose deposition. In repetitively stress-challenged Arabidopsis, PTI-responsive genes showed enrichment for epigenetic marks associated with transcriptional activation. Upon bacterial infection, enrichment of RNA polymerase II at primed PTI marker genes was observed in environmentally challenged Arabidopsis. Finally, repetitively stress-challenged histone acetyltransferase1-1 (hac1-1) mutants failed to demonstrate enhanced resistance to bacteria, priming of PTI, and increased open chromatin states. These findings reveal that environmental history shapes the plant response to bacteria through the development of a HAC1-dependent epigenetic mark characteristic of a primed PTI response, demonstrating a mechanistic link between the primed state in plants and epigenetics.

  7. Structural Basis for Microcin C7 Inactivation by the MccE Acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Metlitskaya, Anastasiya; Severinov, Konstantin; Nair, Satish K.

    2015-10-15

    The antibiotic microcin C7 (McC) acts as a bacteriocide by inhibiting aspartyl-tRNA synthetase and stalling the protein translation machinery. McC is synthesized as a heptapeptide-nucleotide conjugate, which is processed by cellular peptidases within target strains to yield the biologically active compound. As unwanted processing of intact McC can result in self-toxicity, producing strains utilize multiple mechanisms for autoimmunity against processed McC. We have shown previously that the mccE gene within the biosynthetic cluster can inactivate processed McC by acetylating the antibiotic. Here, we present the characterization of this acetylation mechanism through biochemical and structural biological studies of the MccE acetyltransferase domain (MccE{sup AcTase}). We have also determined five crystal structures of the MccE-acetyl-CoA complex with bound substrates, inhibitor, and reaction product. The structural data reveal an unexpected mode of substrate recognition through p-stacking interactions similar to those found in cap-binding proteins and nucleotidyltransferases. These studies provide a rationale for the observation that MccE{sup AcTase} can detoxify a range of aminoacylnucleotides, including those that are structurally distinct from microcin C7.

  8. Molecular Evolution of Aralkylamine N-Acetyltransferase in Fish: A Genomic Survey.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; You, Xinxin; Bian, Chao; Yu, Hui; Coon, Steven L; Shi, Qiong

    2015-12-31

    All living organisms synchronize biological functions with environmental changes; melatonin plays a vital role in regulating daily and seasonal variations. Due to rhythmic activity of the timezyme aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT), the blood level of melatonin increases at night and decreases during daytime. Whereas other vertebrates have a single form of AANAT, bony fishes possess various isoforms of aanat genes, though the reasons are still unclear. Here, we have taken advantage of multiple unpublished teleost aanat sequences to explore and expand our understanding of the molecular evolution of aanat in fish. Our results confirm that two rounds of whole-genome duplication (WGD) led to the existence of three fish isoforms of aanat, i.e., aanat1a, aanat1b, and aanat2; in addition, gene loss led to the absence of some forms from certain special fish species. Furthermore, we suggest the different roles of two aanat1s in amphibious mudskippers, and speculate that the loss of aanat1a, may be related to terrestrial vision change. Several important sites of AANAT proteins and regulatory elements of aanat genes were analyzed for structural comparison and functional forecasting, respectively, which provides insights into the molecular evolution of the differences between AANAT1 and AANAT2.

  9. In vitro inhibition of choline acetyltransferase by a series of 2-benzylidene-3-quinuclidinones

    SciTech Connect

    Capacio, B.R.

    1988-01-01

    Ten substituted 2-benzylidene-3-quinuclidinones were synthesized and evaluated for their relative potency as in vitro inhibitors of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis was followed radiometrically by the incorporation of labeled acetate originating from {sup 14}C-acetyl-CoA. Woolf-Augustinsson-Hofstee data analysis was used to calculate Vmax, Km, and Ki values. The inhibition was found to be noncompetitive or uncompetitive with respect to choline. Quantitative structure activity relationship correlations demonstrated a primary dependence on {kappa}-{sigma}, as well as steric properties of the substituted benzene ring. Additional radiometric and spectrophotometric were performed with 2-(3{prime}-methyl)-benzylidene-3-quinuclidinone, one of the more potent analogs, to further elucidate the inhibitory mechanism. ChAT-mediated cleavage of ACh was measured spectrophotometrically by following the appearance of NADH at 340 nanometers in an enzyme coupled assay. Lineweaver-Burk analysis indicated mixed or uncompetitive inhibition with respect to both substrates of the forward reaction, suggesting interference with a rate limiting step.

  10. N-Alpha-Acetyltransferases and Regulation of CFTR Expression.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Ali J; Karamyshev, Andrey L; Patrick, Anna E; Hudson, Henry; Thomas, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF)-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) lead to the misfolding, mistrafficking, and degradation of the mutant protein. Inhibition of degradation does not effectively increase the amount of trafficking competent CFTR, but typically leads to increased ER retention of misfolded forms. Thus, the initial off pathway steps occur early in the processing of the protein. To identify proteins that interact with these early forms of CFTR, in vitro crosslink experiments identified cotranslational partners of the nascent chain of the severe misfolded mutant, G85E CFTR. The mutant preferentially interacts with a subunit of an N-alpha-acetyltransferase A. Based on recent reports that acetylation of the N-termini of some N-end rule substrates control their ubiquitination and subsequent degradation, a potential role for this modification in regulation of CFTR expression was assessed. Knockdown experiments identified two complexes, which affect G85E CFTR proteins levels, NatA and NatB. Effects of the knockdowns on mRNA levels, translation rates, and degradation rates established that the two complexes regulate G85E CFTR through two separate mechanisms. NatA acts indirectly by regulating transcription levels and NatB acts through a previously identified, but incompletely understood posttranslational mechanism. This regulation did not effect trafficking of G85E CFTR, which remains retained in the ER, nor did it alter the degradation rate of CFTR. A mutation predicted to inhibit N-terminal acetylation of CFTR, Q2P, was without effect, suggesting neither system acts directly on CFTR. These results contradict the prediction that N-terminal acetylation of CFTR determines its fitness as a proteasome substrate, but rather NatB plays a role in the conformational maturation of CFTR in the ER through actions on an unidentified protein.

  11. Multiple invasions of an infectious retrovirus in cat genomes.

    PubMed

    Shimode, Sayumi; Nakagawa, So; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2015-02-02

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancient retroviral infections of host germ-line cells. While most ERVs are defective, some are active and express viral proteins. The RD-114 virus is a replication-competent feline ERV, and several feline cell lines produce infectious RD-114 viral particles. All domestic cats are considered to have an ERV locus encoding a replication-competent RD-114 virus in their genomes; however, the locus has not been identified. In this study, we investigated RD-114 virus-related proviral loci in genomes of domestic cats, and found that none were capable of producing infectious viruses. We also found that all domestic cats have an RD-114 virus-related sequence on chromosome C2, termed RDRS C2a, but populations of the other RDRSs are different depending on the regions where cats live or breed. Our results indicate that RDRS C2a, the oldest RD-114-related provirus, entered the host genome before an ancestor of domestic cats started diverging and the other new RDRSs might have integrated into migrating cats in Europe. We also show that infectious RD-114 virus can be resurrected by the recombination between two non-infectious RDRSs. From these data, we conclude that cats do not harbor infectious RD-114 viral loci in their genomes and RD-114-related viruses invaded cat genomes multiple times.

  12. Structures of Wild-Type and Mutant Human Spermidine/Spermine N1-acetyltransferase, a Potential Therapeutic Drug Target

    SciTech Connect

    Bewley,M.; Graziano, V.; Jiang, J.; Matz, E.; Studier, F.; Pegg, A.; Coleman, C.; Flanagan, J.

    2006-01-01

    Spermidine/spermine N{sup 1}-acetyltransferase (SSAT) is a key enzyme in the control of polyamine levels in human cells, as acetylation of spermidine and spermine triggers export or degradation. Increased intracellular polyamine levels accompany several types of cancers as well as other human diseases, and compounds that affect the expression, activity, or stability of SSAT are being explored as potential therapeutic drugs. We have expressed human SSAT from the cloned cDNA in Escherichia coli and have determined high-resolution structures of wild-type and mutant SSAT, as the free dimer and in binary and ternary complexes with CoA, acetyl-CoA (AcCoA), spermine, and the inhibitor N{sup 1},N{sup 11}-bis-(ethyl)-norspermine (BE-3-3-3). These structures show details of binding sites for cofactor, substrates, and inhibitor and provide a framework to understand enzymatic activity, mutations, and the action of potential drugs. Two dimer conformations were observed: a symmetric form with two open surface channels capable of binding substrate or cofactor, and an asymmetric form in which only one of the surface channels appears capable of binding and acetylating polyamines. SSAT was found to self-acetylate lysine-26 in the presence of AcCoA and absence of substrate, a reaction apparently catalyzed by AcCoA bound in the second channel of the asymmetric dimer. These unexpected and intriguing complexities seem likely to have some as yet undefined role in regulating SSAT activity or stability as a part of polyamine homeostasis. Sequence signatures group SSAT with proteins that appear to have thialysine N{sup {var_epsilon}}-acetyltransferase activity.

  13. Dissecting the Molecular Roles of Histone Chaperones in Histone Acetylation by Type B Histone Acetyltransferases (HAT-B).

    PubMed

    Haigney, Allison; Ricketts, M Daniel; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2015-12-18

    The HAT-B enzyme complex is responsible for acetylating newly synthesized histone H4 on lysines K5 and K12. HAT-B is a multisubunit complex composed of the histone acetyltransferase 1 (Hat1) catalytic subunit and the Hat2 (rbap46) histone chaperone. Hat1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus as a member of a trimeric NuB4 complex containing Hat1, Hat2, and a histone H3-H4 specific histone chaperone called Hif1 (NASP). In addition to Hif1 and Hat2, Hat1 interacts with Asf1 (anti-silencing function 1), a histone chaperone that has been reported to be involved in both replication-dependent and -independent chromatin assembly. To elucidate the molecular roles of the Hif1 and Asf1 histone chaperones in HAT-B histone binding and acetyltransferase activity, we have characterized the stoichiometry and binding mode of Hif1 and Asf1 to HAT-B and the effect of this binding on the enzymatic activity of HAT-B. We find that Hif1 and Asf1 bind through different modes and independently to HAT-B, whereby Hif1 binds directly to Hat2, and Asf1 is only capable of interactions with HAT-B through contacts with histones H3-H4. We also demonstrate that HAT-B is significantly more active against an intact H3-H4 heterodimer over a histone H4 peptide, independent of either Hif1 or Asf1 binding. Mutational studies further demonstrate that HAT-B binding to the histone tail regions is not sufficient for this enhanced activity. Based on these data, we propose a model for HAT-B/histone chaperone assembly and acetylation of H3-H4 complexes.

  14. Efferent inhibition of carotid body chemoreception in chronically hypoxic cats.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, S; Smatresk, N; Pokorski, M; Barnard, P; Mokashi, A

    1983-11-01

    The effects of chronic hypoxia on carotid chemoreceptor afferent activity before and after sectioning the carotid sinus nerves (CSN) were studied in cats exposed to 10% O2 for 21-49 days in a chamber at sea level. For comparison, chronically normoxic cats at sea level were also studied. The cats were anesthetized, paucifiber preparation for the measurement of carotid chemosensory activity from a small slip of CSN was made, and their steady-state responses to 4-5 levels of arterial pressure of O2 (PaO2) at a constant PaCO2 and to 3-4 levels of PaCO2 in hyperoxia were measured before and after sectioning the CSN. The chemosensory response to hypoxia in the cats with intact CSN after chronic exposure to hypoxia was not reduced relative to the cats that breathed room air at sea level. Sectioning the CSN significantly augmented the chemosensory responses to hypoxia in all the chronically hypoxic but not significantly in the normoxic cats. The responses to moderate hypercapnia during hyperoxia were not significantly changed by cutting the CSN in either group. We conclude that there is a significant CSN efferent inhibition of chemosensory activity due to chronic hypoxia in the cat. This implies that without the efferent inhibition the hypoxic chemosensitivity is increased by chronic hypoxia.

  15. Adrenergic mechanisms in oxygen chemoreception in the cat aortic body.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, E; Lahiri, S; Mokashi, A; Matsumoto, S; McGregor, K H

    1986-03-01

    Sixteen cats were studied to test the hypothesis that oxygen chemoreception in the cat aortic body is dependent on the beta-adrenergic mechanism. The chemoreceptor activity was measured from a few aortic chemoreceptor afferents in each cat, anesthetized with alpha-chloralose (60 mg X kg-1). Three types of experiments were conducted. Aortic chemoreceptor responses to steady-state hypoxia (PaO2 range, 100-30 Torr) were measured (a) before and during intravenous infusion of the beta-receptor agonist, isoproterenol (0.5 micrograms X kg-1) in nine spontaneously breathing cats, and (b) before and after intravenous injection of the beta-receptor antagonist, propranolol (1 mg X kg-1) in seven cats which were paralyzed and artificially ventilated. In the third category (c) the stimulatory effect of hypotension on aortic chemoreceptor activity was measured in six of the seven cats in group (b) before and after propranolol injection. Isoproterenol infusion only moderately stimulated aortic chemoreceptor activity. This stimulation was blocked by propranolol. However, propranolol did not attenuate aortic chemoreceptor responses to hypoxia or to hypotension. We conclude that the beta-receptor adrenergic mechanism does not mediate oxygen chemoreception in the cat aortic body.

  16. HnRNPA2 is a novel histone acetyltransferase that mediates mitochondrial stress-induced nuclear gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Guja, Kip; Mejia, Edison; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; Johnson, F Brad; Ruthel, Gordon; Kaufman, Brett A; Rappaport, Eric F; Glineburg, M Rebecca; Fang, Ji-Kang; Szanto, Andres Klein; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Basha, Jeelan; Kundu, Tapas; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2016-01-01

    Reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA mutations or disruption of electron transfer chain complexes induce mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling, which induces global change in nuclear gene expression ultimately contributing to various human pathologies including cancer. Recent studies suggest that these mitochondrial changes cause transcriptional reprogramming of nuclear genes although the mechanism of this cross talk remains unclear. Here, we provide evidence that mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling regulates chromatin acetylation and alters nuclear gene expression through the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNAP2). These processes are reversed when mitochondrial DNA content is restored to near normal cell levels. We show that the mitochondrial stress-induced transcription coactivator hnRNAP2 acetylates Lys 8 of H4 through an intrinsic histone lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) activity with Arg 48 and Arg 50 of hnRNAP2 being essential for acetyl-CoA binding and acetyltransferase activity. H4K8 acetylation at the mitochondrial stress-responsive promoters by hnRNAP2 is essential for transcriptional activation. We found that the previously described mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling-mediated transformation of C2C12 cells caused an increased expression of genes involved in various oncogenic processes, which is retarded in hnRNAP2 silenced or hnRNAP2 KAT mutant cells. Taken together, these data show that altered gene expression by mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling involves a novel hnRNAP2-dependent epigenetic mechanism that may have a role in cancer and other pathologies. PMID:27990297

  17. A review of over three decades of research on cat-human and human-cat interactions and relationships.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dennis C

    2017-01-22

    This review article covers research conducted over the last three decades on cat-human and human-cat interactions and relationships, especially from an ethological point of view. It includes findings on cat-cat and cat-human communication, cat personalities and cat-owner personalities, the effects of cats on humans, and problems caused by cats.

  18. CAT — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The CAT gene product, catalase, occurs in the peroxisome of almost all respiring organismÃÆ'¢â‚¬â„¢s cells. Catalase is a heme enzyme that converts the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen, diminishing the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide on the cell. Catalase promotes growth of cells including T-cells, B-cells, myeloid leukemia cells, melanoma cells, mastocytoma cells and normal and transformed fibroblast cells. Polymorphisms in this gene have been associated with decreases in catalase activity but, to date, acatalasemia is the only disease known to be caused by this gene.

  19. Raccoonpox in a Canadian cat.

    PubMed

    Yager, Julie A; Hutchison, Lisa; Barrett, John W

    2006-12-01

    Poxvirus infections affecting the skin of cats are extremely rare in North America, in contrast to Europe where cowpox virus is well recognized as an accidental pathogen in cats that hunt small rodents. The virus or viruses responsible for the anecdotal cases in North America have never been characterized. This paper reports a case of raccoonpox infection in a Canadian cat. Biopsy of the initial ulcerative lesion on the forepaw revealed ballooning degeneration of surface and follicular keratinoctyes. Infected cells contained large eosinophilic type A inclusions. Electron microscopic examination revealed virions of an orthopoxvirus, subsequently identified as raccoonpox by polymerase chain reaction and gene sequencing. The cat made a full recovery.

  20. External hydrocephalus in two cats.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Curtis W; Coates, Joan R; Ducoté, Julie M; Stefanacci, Joseph D; Walker, Michael A; Marino, Dominic J

    2003-01-01

    External hydrocephalus describes an accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) between the cerebral hemispheres and the overlying arachnoid membrane, rather than within the lateral ventricles. Two young cats with encephalopathic signs were diagnosed with external hydrocephalus, one via magnetic resonance imaging and one via computed tomography. Both cats had abnormally large, broad heads, with no evidence of open fontanelles. A surgical shunt was placed in each cat to divert the accumulated CSF within the cranial cavity to the peritoneal space. Both cats improved dramatically soon after surgical shunting was performed, and they continue to do well clinically, approximately 42 months and 8 months postoperatively, respectively.

  1. Contraceptive vaccines for the humane control of community cat populations.

    PubMed

    Levy, Julie K

    2011-07-01

    Free-roaming unowned stray and feral cats exist throughout the world, creating concerns regarding their welfare as well as their impact on the environment and on public health. Millions of healthy cats are culled each year in an attempt to control their numbers. Surgical sterilization followed by return to the environment is an effective non-lethal population control method but is limited in scope because of expense and logistical impediments. Immunocontraception has the potential to be a more practical and cost-effective method of control. This is a review of current research in immunocontraception in domestic cats. Functional characteristics of an ideal immunocontraceptive for community cats would include a wide margin of safety for target animals and the environment, rapid onset and long duration of activity following a single treatment in males and females of all ages, and sex hormone inhibition. In addition, product characteristics should include stability and ease of use under field conditions, efficient manufacturing process, and low cost to the user. Two reproductive antigens, zona pellucida and GnRH, have been identified as possible targets for fertility control in cats. Zona pellucida, which is used successfully in multiple wildlife species, has achieved little success in cats. In contrast, immunization against GnRH has resulted in long-term contraception in both male and female cats following a single dose. GnRH is an ideal contraceptive target because it regulates pituitary and gonadal hormone responses in both males and females, thus suppressing nuisance behaviors associated with sex hormones in addition to preventing pregnancy. The responsiveness of cats to fertility control via GnRH suppression should encourage researchers and cat control stakeholders to continue efforts to optimize vaccines that induce multiyear contraception following a single dose in a high proportion of treated cats.

  2. Serum thyroxine concentrations after radioactive iodine therapy in cats with hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Meric, S.M.; Hawkins, E.C.; Washabau, R.J.; Turrel, J.M.; Feldman, E.C.

    1986-05-01

    Thirty-one cats with hyperthyroidism were given one dose of radioactive iodine (131I) IV. Serum thyroxine (T4) concentrations were measured before treatment in all cats, at 12-hour intervals after treatment in 10 cats, and at 48-hour intervals after treatment in 21 cats. Serum T4 concentrations also were measured one month after /sup 131/I therapy in 29 cats. Activity of 131I administered was 1.5 to 6.13 mCi, resulting in a dose of 20,000 rads to the thyroid. Serum T4 concentrations before /sup 131/I administration were 5.3 to 51.0 micrograms/dl, with a median T4 concentration of 11.0 micrograms/dl. Serum T4 decreased most rapidly during the first 3 to 6 days after treatment. Sixteen cats (55%) had normal serum thyroxine concentrations by day 4 after 131I administration, and 23 cats (74%) were euthyroxinemic by day 8 after treatment. One month after administration of 131I, the 29 cats evaluated were clinically improved, and 24 (83%) of the 29 cats evaluated had normal serum T4 concentrations, 3 cats (10%) remained hyperthyroxinemic, and 2 cats (7%) were hypothyroxinemic. Therefore, administration of 131I was a safe and effective method to quickly decrease serum T4 concentrations in hyperthyroid cats.

  3. Ex Vivo Expansion of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells by Garcinol, a Potent Inhibitor of Histone Acetyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Taito; Wang, Changshan; Mochizuki-Kashio, Makiko; Osawa, Mitsujiro; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Iwama, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Background Human cord blood (hCB) is the main source of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSCs/PCs) for transplantation. Efforts to overcome relative shortages of HSCs/PCs have led to technologies to expand HSCs/PCs ex vivo. However, methods suitable for clinical practice have yet to be fully established. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we screened biologically active natural products for activity to promote expansion of hCB HSCs/PCs ex vivo, and identified Garcinol, a plant-derived histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitor, as a novel stimulator of hCB HSC/PC expansion. During a 7-day culture of CD34+CD38– HSCs supplemented with stem cell factor and thrombopoietin, Garcinol increased numbers of CD34+CD38– HSCs/PCs more than 4.5-fold and Isogarcinol, a derivative of Garcinol, 7.4-fold. Furthermore, during a 7-day culture of CD34+ HSCs/PCs, Garcinol expanded the number of SCID-repopulating cells (SRCs) 2.5-fold. We also demonstrated that the capacity of Garcinol and its derivatives to expand HSCs/PCs was closely correlated with their inhibitory effect on HAT. The Garcinol derivatives which expanded HSCs/PCs inhibited the HAT activity and acetylation of histones, while inactive derivatives did not. Conclusions/Significance Our findings identify Garcinol as the first natural product acting on HSCs/PCs and suggest the inhibition of HAT to be an alternative approach for manipulating HSCs/PCs. PMID:21931675

  4. Effects of stressors on the behavior and physiology of domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Stella, Judi; Croney, Candace; Buffington, Tony

    2013-01-31

    Feline interstitial cystitis (FIC) is a chronic pain syndrome of domestic cats. Cats with FIC have chronic, recurrent lower urinary tract signs (LUTS) and other comorbid disorders that are exacerbated by stressors. The aim of this study was to evaluate behavioral and physiological responses of healthy cats and cats diagnosed with FIC after exposure to a five day stressor. Ten healthy cats and 18 cats with FIC were housed at The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center (OSUVMC) vivarium. All cats were housed in enriched cages for at least one year prior to the experiment. Cats had daily play time and socialization outside of the cage, food treats and auditory enrichment. The daily husbandry schedule was maintained at a consistent time of day and cats were cared for by two familiar caretakers. During the test days, cats were exposed to multiple unpredictable stressors which included exposure to multiple unfamiliar caretakers, an inconsistent husbandry schedule, and discontinuation of play time, socialization, food treats, and auditory enrichment. Sickness behaviors (SB), including vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia or decreased food and water intake, fever, lethargy, somnolence, enhanced pain-like behaviors, decreased general activity, body care activities (grooming), and social interactions, were recorded daily. Blood samples were collected in the morning, before and after the stress period, for measurement of serum cortisol concentration, leukocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils, neutrophil: lymphocyte (N:L) ratio and mRNA for the cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Overall, the short term stressors led to a significant increase in SB in both healthy cats and cats with FIC, whereas lymphopenia and N:L changes occurred only in FIC cats. Daily monitoring of cats for SB may be a noninvasive and reliable way to assess stress responses and overall welfare of cats housed in cages.

  5. Systemic cat scratch disease.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hui-Min; Huang, Fu-Yuan; Chi, Hsin; Wang, Nieu-Lu; Chen, Be-Fong

    2006-08-01

    Systemic cat scratch disease (CSD) is often associated with prolonged fever and microabscesses in the liver and/or spleen. We report a case of systemic CSD with hepatic, splenic and renal involvement in an aboriginal child in Taiwan. A previously healthy 9-year-old girl had an intermittent fever for about 17 days, and complained of abdominal pain, headache and weight loss. Abdominal computed tomography showed multiple tiny hypodense nodular lesions in the spleen and both kidneys. Laparotomy revealed multiple soft, whitish-tan lesions on the surface of the liver and spleen. Histopathologic examination of a biopsy specimen of the spleen showed necrotizing granulomatous inflammation with central necrosis surrounded by epithelioid cells and occasional Langhans' giant cells, strongly suggestive of Bartonella henselae infection. History revealed close contact with a cat. B. henselae DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in the tissue specimen, and the single antibody titer against B. henselae was greater than 1:2048. These results confirmed the diagnosis of visceral CSD caused by B. henselae. The patient's symptoms resolved after treatment with rifampin and tetracycline. This case illustrates the need for inclusion of systemic CSD in patients with fever of unknown origin and abdominal pain.

  6. Isolation and expression of the catA gene encoding the major vegetative catalase in Streptomyces coelicolor Müller.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Y H; Roe, J H

    1997-01-01

    We isolated the catA gene for the major vegetative catalase from Streptomyces coelicolor Müller. It encodes a polypeptide of 488 residues (55,440 Da) that is highly homologous to typical monofunctional catalases. We investigated catA expression by analyzing both catA mRNA and catalase activity. catA expression was increased by H2O2 treatment but did not increase during stationary phase. A putative catalase (CatB) cross-reactive with anti-CatA antibody appeared during stationary phase and in the aerial mycelium. PMID:9190825

  7. Hypertensive retinopathy in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Van Boxtel, Sherry A.

    2003-01-01

    A 12-year-old cat presented for sudden blindness was diagnosed with hypertensive retinopathy on the basis of ophthalmologic and ultrasonic examination. Renal failure due to a large intranephric cyst obstructing the right ureter and renal artery was the suggested cause of the systemic hypertension. The cat died 8 hours after unilateral nephrectomy. PMID:12650046

  8. Oral masses in two cats.

    PubMed

    Bock, P; Hach, V; Baumgärtner, W

    2011-07-01

    Incisional biopsies from the oral cavity of 2 adult cats were submitted for histological investigation. Cat No. 1 showed a solitary well-circumscribed neoplasm in the left mandible. Cat No. 2 demonstrated a diffusely infiltrating neoplasm in the left maxilla. Both tumors consisted of medium-size epithelial cells embedded in a fibrovascular stroma. The mitotic index was 0 to 1 mitosis per high-power field. The epithelial cells showed an irregular arrangement forming nests or streams in cat No. 1, whereas a palisading growth was noted in cat No. 2. Both tumors, especially that of cat No. 1, showed multifocal accumulations of amyloid as confirmed by Congo red staining and a distinct green birefringence under polarized light, which lacked cytokeratin immunoreactivity as well as and AL and AA amyloid immunoreactivity. In addition, the amyloid in cat No. 2 was positive for the odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein, formerly termed APin. In sum, both cats suffered from an amyloid-producing odontogenic tumor, but their tumors varied with respect to morphology and type of amyloid produced.

  9. College Students and Their Cats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Alexander, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-two Siamese and 32 mixed breed cats' personalities were rated by their respective college student owners and compared. Further, the owners' self rated personality traits were correlated with the pets'; significant Siamese and Mixed differences and correlations were obtained. These are the first data to examine breed of cat on a personality…

  10. CONTRACT ADMINISTRATIVE TRACKING SYSTEM (CATS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Contract Administrative Tracking System (CATS) was developed in response to an ORD NHEERL, Mid-Continent Ecology Division (MED)-recognized need for an automated tracking and retrieval system for Cost Reimbursable Level of Effort (CR/LOE) Contracts. CATS is an Oracle-based app...

  11. Molecular Cloning and Expression Analysis of a Catalase Gene (NnCAT) from Nelumbo nucifera.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chen; Zheng, Xingfei; Diao, Ying; Wang, Youwei; Zhou, Mingquan; Hu, Zhongli

    2015-11-01

    Rapid amplification cDNA end (RACE) assay was established to achieve the complete cDNA sequence of a catalase gene (NnCAT) from Nelumbo nucifera. The obtained full-length cDNA was 1666 bp in size and contained a 1476-bp open reading frame. The 3D structural model of NnCAT was constructed by homology modeling. The putative NnCAT possessed all the main characteristic amino acid residues and motifs of catalase (CAT) protein family, and the phylogenetic analysis revealed that NnCAT grouped together with high plants. Moreover, recombinant NnCAT showed the CAT activity (758 U/mg) at room temperature, holding high activity during temperature range of 20-50 °C, then the optimal pH of recombinant protein was assessed from pH 4 to pH 11. Additionally, real-time PCR assay demonstrated that NnCAT mRNA was expressed in various tissues of N. nucifera, with the highest expression in young leaf and lowest level in the root, and mRNA level of NnCAT was significantly augmented in response to short-time mechanical wounding. Different expression pattern of NnCAT gene suggested that NnCAT probably played a defensive role in the initial stages of oxidative stress, regulating the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by extracellular stimuli such as short-time mechanical wounding.

  12. Garcinol, a Histone Acetyltransferase Inhibitor, Radiosensitizes Cancer Cells by Inhibiting Non-Homologous End Joining

    SciTech Connect

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Torikai, Kohta; Nakano, Takashi; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), a major pathway used to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated by ionizing radiation (IR), requires chromatin remodeling at DSB sites through the acetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs). However, the effect of compounds with HAT inhibitory activities on the DNA damage response (DDR), including the NHEJ and cell cycle checkpoint, as well as on the radiosensitivity of cancer cells, remains largely unclear. Here, we investigated whether garcinol, a HAT inhibitor found in the rinds of Garcinia indica fruit (called mangosteens), has effects on DDR, and whether it can be used for radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: The following assays were used to examine the effect of garcinol on the inhibition of DSB repair, including the following: a conventional neutral comet assay; a cell-based assay recently developed by us, in which NHEJ repair of DSBs on chromosomal DNA was evaluated; the micrococcal nuclease sensitivity assay; and immunoblotting for autophosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). We assessed the effect of garcinol on the cell cycle checkpoint after IR treatment by analyzing the phosphorylation levels of checkpoint kinases CHK1 and CHK2 and histone H3, and by cell cycle profile analysis using flow cytometry. The radiosensitizing effect of garcinol was assessed by a clonogenic survival assay, whereas its effects on apoptosis and senescence were examined by annexin V and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-Gal) staining, respectively. Results: We found that garcinol inhibits DSB repair, including NHEJ, without affecting cell cycle checkpoint. Garcinol radiosensitized A549 lung and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells with dose enhancement ratios (at 10% surviving fraction) of 1.6 and 1.5, respectively. Cellular senescence induced by IR was enhanced by garcinol. Conclusion: These results suggest that garcinol is a radiosensitizer that

  13. CBP/p300 acetyltransferases regulate the expression of NKG2D ligands on tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, M; Schuldner, M; Hoffmann, N; Cetintas, A; Reiners, K S; Shatnyeva, O; Hallek, M; Hansen, H P; Gasser, S; von Strandmann, E P

    2017-01-01

    Tumor surveillance of natural killer (NK) cells is mediated by the cytotoxicity receptor natural-killer group 2 member D (NKG2D). Ligands for NKG2D are generally not expressed on healthy cells, but induced on the surface of malignant cells. To date, NKG2D ligand (NKG2D-L) induction was mainly described to depend on the activation of the DNA damage response, although the molecular mechanisms that regulate NKG2D-L expression remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the acetyltransferases CBP (CREB-binding protein) and p300 play a crucial role in the regulation of NKG2D-L on tumor cells. Loss of CBP/p300 decreased the basal cell surface expression of human ligands and reduced the upregulation of MICA/B and ULBP2 in response to histone deacetylase inhibitors or DNA damage. Furthermore, CBP/P300 deficiency abrogated the sensitivity of stressed cells to NK cell-mediated killing. CBP/p300 were also identified as major regulators of mouse NKG2D ligand RAE-1 in vitro and in vivo using the Eμ-Myc lymphoma model. Mechanistically, we observed an enhanced activation of the CBP/p300 binding transcription factor CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) correlating to the NKG2D-L upregulation. Moreover, increased binding of CREB and CBP/p300 to NKG2D-L promoters and elevated histone acetylation were detectable. This study provides strong evidence for a major role of CBP and p300 in orchestrating NKG2D-L induction and consequently immunosurveillance of tumors in mice and humans. These findings might help to develop novel immunotherapeutic approaches against cancer. PMID:27477692

  14. Ocimum sanctum Linn. stimulate the expression of choline acetyltransferase on the human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kusindarta, Dwi Liliek; Wihadmadyatami, Hevi; Haryanto, Aris

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This research was conducted to identify the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs) and to clarify the capability of Ocimum sanctum Linn. ethanolic extract to stimulate the presence of ChAT in the aging HCMECs. Materials and Methods: In this study, we perform an in vitro analysis some in the presence of an ethanolic extract of O. sanctum Linn. as a stimulator for the ChAT expression. HCMECs are divided become two groups, the first is in low passage cells as a model of young aged and the second is in a high passage as a model of aging. Furthermore to analysis the expression of ChAT without and with extract treatments, immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis were performed. In addition, ChAT sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is developed to detect the increasing activity of the ChAT under normal, and aging HCMECs on the condition treated and untreated cells. Results: In our in vitro models using HCMECs, we found that ChAT is expressed throughout intracytoplasmic areas. On the status of aging, the ethanolic extract from O. sanctum Linn. is capable to stimulate and restore the expression of ChAT. The increasing of ChAT expression is in line with the increasing activity of this enzyme on the aging treated HCMECs. Conclusions: Our observation indicates that HCMECs is one of the noncholinergic cells which is produced ChAT. The administrated of O. sanctum Linn. ethanolic extract may stimulate and restore the expression of ChAT on the deteriorating cells of HCMECs, thus its may give nerve protection and help the production of acetylcholine. PMID:28096604

  15. Arylamine N-acetyltransferases: from drug metabolism and pharmacogenetics to drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Sim, E; Abuhammad, A; Ryan, A

    2014-01-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are polymorphic drug-metabolizing enzymes, acetylating arylamine carcinogens and drugs including hydralazine and sulphonamides. The slow NAT phenotype increases susceptibility to hydralazine and isoniazid toxicity and to occupational bladder cancer. The two polymorphic human NAT loci show linkage disequilibrium. All mammalian Nat genes have an intronless open reading frame and non-coding exons. The human gene products NAT1 and NAT2 have distinct substrate specificities: NAT2 acetylates hydralazine and human NAT1 acetylates p-aminosalicylate (p-AS) and the folate catabolite para-aminobenzoylglutamate (p-abaglu). Human NAT2 is mainly in liver and gut. Human NAT1 and its murine homologue are in many adult tissues and in early embryos. Human NAT1 is strongly expressed in oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer and may contribute to folate and acetyl CoA homeostasis. NAT enzymes act through a catalytic triad of Cys, His and Asp with the architecture of the active site-modulating specificity. Polymorphisms may cause unfolded protein. The C-terminus helps bind acetyl CoA and differs among NATs including prokaryotic homologues. NAT in Salmonella typhimurium supports carcinogen activation and NAT in mycobacteria metabolizes isoniazid with polymorphism a minor factor in isoniazid resistance. Importantly, nat is in a gene cluster essential for Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival inside macrophages. NAT inhibitors are a starting point for novel anti-tuberculosis drugs. Human NAT1-specific inhibitors may act in biomarker detection in breast cancer and in cancer therapy. NAT inhibitors for co-administration with 5-aminosalicylate (5-AS) in inflammatory bowel disease has prompted ongoing investigations of azoreductases in gut bacteria which release 5-AS from prodrugs including balsalazide. PMID:24467436

  16. Spatiotemporal expression of histone acetyltransferases, p300 and CBP, in developing embryonic hearts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guozhen; Zhu, Jing; Lv, Tiewei; Wu, Gang; Sun, Huichao; Huang, Xupei; Tian, Jie

    2009-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferases (HATs), p300 and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) are two structurally related transcriptional co-activators that activate expression of many eukaryotic genes involved in cellular growth and signaling, muscle differentiation and embryogenesis. However, whether these proteins play important and different roles in mouse cardiogenesis is not clear. Here, we investigate the protein distributions and mRNA expression of the two HATs in embryonic and adult mouse heart during normal heart development by using immunohistochemical and RT-PCR techniques. The data from immunohistochemical experiments revealed that p300 was extensively present in nearly every region of the hearts from embryonic stages to the adulthood. However, no CBP expression was detected in embryonic hearts at day E7.5. CBP expression appeared at the later stages, and the distribution of CBP was less than that of p300. In the developmental hearts after E10.5, both for p300 and CBP, the mRNA expression levels reached a peak on day E10.5, and then were gradually decreased afterwards. These results reveal that both p300 and CBP are related to embryonic heart development. The dynamic expression patterns of these two enzymes during mouse heart development indicate that they may play an important role on heart development. However, there is a difference in spatiotemporal expression patterns between these two enzymes during heart development. The expression of p300 is earlier and more predominate, suggesting that p300 may play a more important role in embryonic heart development especially during cardiac precursor cell induction and interventricular septum formation. PMID:19272189

  17. Choline Acetyltransferase Mutations Causing Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome: Molecular Findings and Genotype-Phenotype Correlations.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, Juan; Lara, Marian; Gospe, Sídney M; Mazia, Claudio G; Vaccarezza, Maria; Garcia-Erro, Marcela; Bowe, Constance M; Chang, Celia H; Mezei, Michelle M; Maselli, Ricardo A

    2015-09-01

    Choline acetyltransferase catalyzes the synthesis of acetylcholine at cholinergic nerves. Mutations in human CHAT cause a congenital myasthenic syndrome due to impaired synthesis of ACh; this severe variant of the disease is frequently associated with unexpected episodes of potentially fatal apnea. The severity of this condition varies remarkably, and the molecular factors determining this variability are poorly understood. Furthermore, genotype-phenotype correlations have been difficult to establish in patients with biallelic mutations. We analyzed the protein expression of phosphorylated ChAT of seven CHAT mutations, p.Val136Met, p.Arg207His, p.Arg186Trp, p.Val194Leu, p.Pro211Ala, p.Arg566Cys, and p.Ser694Cys, in HEK-293 cells to phosphorylated ChAT, determined their enzyme kinetics and thermal stability, and examined their structural changes. Three mutations, p.Arg207His, p.Arg186Trp, and p.Arg566Cys, are novel, and p.Val136Met and p.Arg207His are homozygous in three families and associated with severe disease. The characterization of mutants showed a decrease in the overall catalytic efficiency of ChAT; in particular, those located near the active-site tunnel produced the most seriously disruptive phenotypic effects. On the other hand, p.Val136Met, which is located far from both active and substrate-binding sites, produced the most drastic reduction of ChAT expression. Overall, CHAT mutations producing low enzyme expression and severe kinetic effects are associated with the most severe phenotypes.

  18. Choline acetyltransferase mutations causing congenital myasthenic syndrome: molecular findings and genotype-phenotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo, Juan; Lara, Marian; Gospe, Sídney M.; Mazia, Claudio G.; Vaccarezza, Maria; Garcia-Erro, Marcela; Bowe, Constance; Chang, Celia; Mezei, Michelle; Maselli, Ricardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase catalyzes the synthesis of acetylcholine at cholinergic nerves. Mutations in human CHAT cause a congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) due to impaired synthesis of ACh; this severe variant of the disease is frequently associated with unexpected episodes of potentially fatal apnea. The severity of this condition varies remarkably, and the molecular factors determining this variability are poorly understood. Furthermore, genotype–phenotype correlations have been difficult to establish in patients with biallelic mutations. We analyzed the protein expression of seven ChAT mutations, p.Val136Met, p.Arg207His, p.Arg186Trp, p.Val194Leu, p.Pro211Ala, p.Arg566Cys and p.Ser694Cys, in HEK-293 cells to phosphorylated ChAT, determined their enzyme kinetics and thermal instability, and examined their structural changes. Three mutations, p.Arg207His, p.Arg186Trp and p.Arg566Cys, are novel, and p.Val136Met and p.Arg207His are homozygous in three families and associated with severe disease. The characterization of mutants showed a decrease in the overall catalytic efficiency of ChAT; in particular, those located near the active-site tunnel produced the most seriously disruptive phenotypic effects. On the other hand, p.Val136Met is located far from both active and substrate-binding sites produced the most drastic reduction of ChAT expression. Overall, CHAT mutations producing low enzyme expression and severe kinetic effects are associated with the most severe phenotypes. PMID:26080897

  19. Head movement during walking in the cat.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Humza N; Beloozerova, Irina N; Sun, Hai; Marlinski, Vladimir

    2016-09-22

    Knowledge of how the head moves during locomotion is essential for understanding how locomotion is controlled by sensory systems of the head. We have analyzed head movements of the cat walking along a straight flat pathway in the darkness and light. We found that cats' head left-right translations, and roll and yaw rotations oscillated once per stride, while fore-aft and vertical translations, and pitch rotations oscillated twice. The head reached its highest vertical positions during second half of each forelimb swing, following maxima of the shoulder/trunk by 20-90°. Nose-up rotation followed head upward translation by another 40-90° delay. The peak-to-peak amplitude of vertical translation was ∼1.5cm and amplitude of pitch rotation was ∼3°. Amplitudes of lateral translation and roll rotation were ∼1cm and 1.5-3°, respectively. Overall, cats' heads were neutral in roll and 10-30° nose-down, maintaining horizontal semicircular canals and utriculi within 10° of the earth horizontal. The head longitudinal velocity was 0.5-1m/s, maximal upward and downward linear velocities were ∼0.05 and ∼0.1m/s, respectively, and maximal lateral velocity was ∼0.05m/s. Maximal velocities of head pitch rotation were 20-50°/s. During walking in light, cats stood 0.3-0.5cm taller and held their head 0.5-2cm higher than in darkness. Forward acceleration was 25-100% higher and peak-to-peak amplitude of head pitch oscillations was ∼20°/s larger. We concluded that, during walking, the head of the cat is held actively. Reflexes appear to play only a partial role in determining head movement, and vision might further diminish their role.

  20. Auditory lateralization of conspecific and heterospecific vocalizations in cats.

    PubMed

    Siniscalchi, Marcello; Laddago, Serena; Quaranta, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Auditory lateralization in response to both conspecific and heterospecific vocalizations (dog vocalizations) was observed in 16 tabby cats (Felis catus). Six different vocalizations were used: cat "purring," "meowing" and "growling" and dog typical vocalizations of "disturbance," "isolation" and "play." The head-orienting paradigm showed that cats turned their head with the right ear leading (left hemisphere activation) in response to their typical-species vocalization ("meow" and "purring"); on the other hand, a clear bias in the use of the left ear (right hemisphere activation) was observed in response to vocalizations eliciting intense emotion (dogs' vocalizations of "disturbance" and "isolation"). Overall these findings suggest that auditory sensory domain seems to be lateralized also in cat species, stressing the role of the left hemisphere for intraspecific communication and of the right hemisphere in processing threatening and alarming stimuli.

  1. The use of choline acetyltransferase for measuring the synthesis of acetyl-coenzyme A and its release from brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tucek, S

    1967-09-01

    1. A method for measuring small amounts of acetyl-CoA synthesized in subcellular fractions of the brain from pyruvate and released from particles into the incubation medium has been developed by using placental choline acetyltransferase and choline in the incubation medium to transform acetyl-CoA into acetylcholine. Acetylcholine is measured by biological assay. Optimum conditions of incubation are described. 2. With fresh mitochondria, a decrease of acetyl-CoA output into the medium is observed in the presence of ATP or ADP, and an increase in the presence of calcium chloride or 2,4-dinitrophenol. Fluorocitrate and malonate have little or no effect. 3. After the mitochondria had been treated with ether, the release of acetyl-CoA into the medium is much larger; presumably, nearly all acetyl-CoA synthesized is then released and transformed into acetylcholine under the conditions used. The release of acetyl-CoA is diminished in the presence of Krebs-cycle intermediates and ADP. 4. Of all subcellular fractions, the highest acetyl-CoA production from pyruvate is found in the crude mitochondria; rates up to 51 mumoles of acetyl-CoA/g. of original tissue/hr. are observed in ether-treated samples. 5. The activities of acetyl-CoA synthetase and ATP citrate lyase found in homogenates and nerve-ending fractions of brain tissue are considerably lower than those of pyruvate oxidase complex and choline acetyltransferase. 6. The bearing of some of the findings on the question of the source of acetyl radicals for the synthesis of acetylcholine in vivo is discussed.

  2. Structure of soybean serine acetyltransferase and formation of the cysteine regulatory complex as a molecular chaperone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) catalyzes the limiting reaction in plant and microbial biosynthesis of cysteine. In addition to its enzymatic function, SAT forms a macromolecular complex with O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). Formation of the cysteine regulatory complex (CRC) is a critical biochem...

  3. Genetic Variation at the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) Genes in Global Populations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Functional variability at the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) genes is associated with adverse drug reactions and cancer susceptibility in humans. Previous studies of small sets of ethnic groups have indicated that the NAT genes have high levels of amino acid variation that differ in f...

  4. Phylogenetic and biological investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family among fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes well-characterized in several bacteria and eukaryotic organisms. The role of NATs in fungal biology has only recently been investigated. The NAT1 (FDB2) gene of Fusarium verticillioides was the first NAT cloned and character...

  5. AAC(3)-XI, a New Aminoglycoside 3-N-Acetyltransferase from Corynebacterium striatum

    PubMed Central

    Galimand, Marc; Fishovitz, Jennifer; Lambert, Thierry; Barbe, Valérie; Zajicek, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium striatum BM4687 was resistant to gentamicin and tobramycin but susceptible to kanamycin A and amikacin, a phenotype distinct among Gram-positive bacteria. Analysis of the entire genome of this strain did not detect any genes for known aminoglycoside resistance enzymes. Yet, annotation of the coding sequences identified 12 putative acetyltransferases or GCN5-related N-acetyltransferases. A total of 11 of these coding sequences were also present in the genomes of other Corynebacterium spp. The 12th coding sequence had 55 to 60% amino acid identity with acetyltransferases in Actinomycetales. The gene was cloned in Escherichia coli, where it conferred resistance to aminoglycosides by acetylation. The protein was purified to homogeneity, and its steady-state kinetic parameters were determined for dibekacin and kanamycin B. The product of the turnover of dibekacin was purified, and its structure was elucidated by high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), indicating transfer of the acetyl group to the amine at the C-3 position. Due to the unique profile of the reaction, it was designated aminoglycoside 3-N-acetyltransferase type XI. PMID:26149994

  6. Comparative investigation of the xenobiotic metabolizing arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzyme family among fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes well-characterized in several bacteria and higher eukaryotes. The role of NATs in fungal biology has only recently been investigated. The NAT1 gene of Gibberella moniliformis was the first NAT cloned and characterized from fun...

  7. Inhibition of aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib-mediated amikacin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae by zinc and copper pyrithione.

    PubMed

    Chiem, Kevin; Fuentes, Brooke A; Lin, David L; Tran, Tung; Jackson, Alexis; Ramirez, Maria S; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2015-09-01

    The in vitro activity of the aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib [AAC(6')-Ib] was inhibited by CuCl2 with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.8 μM. The growth of an amikacin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain isolated from a neonate with meningitis was inhibited when amikacin was supplemented by the addition of Zn(2+) or Cu(2+) in complex with the ionophore pyrithione. Coordination complexes between cations and ionophores could be developed for their use, in combination with aminoglycosides, to treat resistant infections.

  8. Inhibition of Aminoglycoside 6′-N-Acetyltransferase Type Ib-Mediated Amikacin Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae by Zinc and Copper Pyrithione

    PubMed Central

    Chiem, Kevin; Fuentes, Brooke A.; Lin, David L.; Tran, Tung; Jackson, Alexis; Ramirez, Maria S.

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro activity of the aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase type Ib [AAC(6′)-Ib] was inhibited by CuCl2 with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.8 μM. The growth of an amikacin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain isolated from a neonate with meningitis was inhibited when amikacin was supplemented by the addition of Zn2+ or Cu2+ in complex with the ionophore pyrithione. Coordination complexes between cations and ionophores could be developed for their use, in combination with aminoglycosides, to treat resistant infections. PMID:26169410

  9. How cats lap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Roman; Reis, Pedro; Jung, Sunghwan; Aristoff, Jeffrey

    2010-11-01

    We studied the lapping of the domestic cat (Felis catus) by combining high-speed photography with a laboratory model of lapping. We found that Felis catus laps by a subtle mechanism based on water adhesion to the dorsal side of the tongue and the creation of a liquid column, exploiting inertia to defeat gravity and pull liquid into the mouth. The competition between inertia and gravity controls the pinch-off time of the column, determining the optimal lapping frequency, f. Felis catus was found to operate near the optimum and theoretical analysis yielded a scaling, f ˜M-1/6, of lapping frequency with animal mass, M. This prediction was verified by measuring lapping frequency across felids, from ocelots to lions, suggesting that the lapping mechanism is conserved among felines.

  10. The Use of Refuges by Communally Housed Cats

    PubMed Central

    Sicuto de Oliveira, Adriana; Terçariol, César Augusto Sangaletti; Genaro, Gelson

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Captive domestic cats frequently suffer from the lack of physical space and opportunities to perform species-typical behaviors, such as climbing or hiding. Environmental enrichment is a technique that helps transform the space available to animals into a more appropriate habitat. In this study, we tested horizontal and vertical refuge boxes as environmental enrichment for cats living communally in a cat rescue shelter. The provision of boxes in the environment increases the use of available space by the cats. We suggest this improves the cats’ welfare while in communally-housed rescue shelters. Abstract The increase of domestic animals kept in shelters highlights the need to ensure animal welfare. Environmental enrichment can improve animal welfare in many ways, such as encouraging captive animals to use all the space available to them. The effects of physical environmental enrichment on the spatial distribution and behavioral repertoire of 35 neutered domestic cats housed communally were analyzed. The provision of boxes in the environment increases the use of available space by the cats. We suggest this improves the cats’ welfare while in communally-housed rescue shelters. The frequencies of active and especially inactive behaviors also increased in the enriched condition. In a test with vertical environmental enrichment, the animals showed an increased length of stay in refuges located at a height of 0.5 m compared to those on the ground (0.0 m). However, the entry frequency was higher in refuges at 0.0 m. Both horizontal and vertical environmental enrichment increased the use of available space, demonstrating that box refuges as enrichment are effective in providing a refuge when at a height, or a place to explore at ground level. We suggest it enhances the welfare of cats in communally housed shelters. This information adds to the body of evidence relating to cat enrichment and can be useful in designing cat housing in veterinary clinics

  11. Phosphorylation of partially purified 1-O-alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase from rat spleen.

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Cambronero, J; Mato, J M; Vivanco, F; Sanchez-Crespo, M

    1987-01-01

    A new improved method for purification of the enzyme 1-O-alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.67) from rat spleen is described. The catalytic subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase in the presence of MgATP stimulated about 3-fold the activity of this partially purified enzyme activity. When [gamma-32P]ATP was included in the assay mixture, the analysis of phosphoprotein products by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and autoradiography showed the incorporation of [32P]phosphate into a single protein band of about 30 kDa. Analysis of the phosphorylated amino acids indicated that the phosphate was incorporated into a serine residue. Activation of the acetylation reaction by the protein kinase was reversible. The reversal of the activation was coincident with the loss of the [32P]phosphate incorporated into the 30 kDa protein band, which suggests that the acetyltransferase is regulated by a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mechanism dependent on cyclic AMP. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3663199

  12. Delphinidin, a specific inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase, suppresses inflammatory signaling via prevention of NF-{kappa}B acetylation in fibroblast-like synoviocyte MH7A cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, Ah-Reum; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, KyungChul; Lee, Mee-Hee; Lee, Yoo-Hyun; Lee, Jeongmin; Jun, Woojin; Kim, Sunoh; Yoon, Ho-Geun

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Delphinidin is a novel inhibitor of p300/CBP histone acetyltransferase. {yields} Delphinidin prevents the hyperacetylation of p65 by inhibiting the HAT activity of p300/CBP. {yields} Delphinidin efficiently suppresses the expression of inflammatory cytokines in MH7A cells via hypoacetylation of NF-{kappa}B. {yields} Delphinidin inhibits cytokine release in the Jurkat T lymphocyte cell line. -- Abstract: Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors (HATi) isolated from dietary compounds have been shown to suppress inflammatory signaling, which contributes to rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we identified a novel HATi in Punica granatum L. known as delphinidin (DP). DP did not affect the activity of other epigenetic enzymes (histone deacetylase, histone methyltransferase, or sirtuin1). DP specifically inhibited the HAT activities of p300/CBP. It also inhibited p65 acetylation in MH7A cells, a human rheumatoid arthritis synovial cell line. DP-induced hypoacetylation was accompanied by cytosolic accumulation of p65 and nuclear localization of IKB{alpha}. Accordingly, DP treatment inhibited TNF{alpha}-stimulated increases in NF-{kappa}B function and expression of NF-{kappa}B target genes in these cells. Importantly, DP suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in Jurkat T lymphocytes, demonstrating that HATi efficiently suppresses cytokine-mediated immune responses. Together, these results show that the HATi activity of DP counters anti-inflammatory signaling by blocking p65 acetylation and that this compound may be useful in preventing inflammatory arthritis.

  13. Pemphigus foliaceus in a cat.

    PubMed

    Kofod, H

    1993-01-16

    The author's cat started to develop the signs of pemphigus foliaceus one month after he returned home after six months absence. The initial signs included dry coughing and difficulty with purring and swallowing, followed by typical changes of the skin. The cat was treated by a combination of chrysotherapy and systemic glucocorticoid injections, and remained free of clinical signs for one and a half years. The cat then relapsed and showed the initial signs except that coughing was not observed. It was treated as before but after a second relapse and the same treatment it slowly developed a general weakness and was euthanased.

  14. Stress induction of the spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase by a post-transcriptional mechanism in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gerner, E W; Kurtts, T A; Fuller, D J; Casero, R A

    1993-01-01

    Heat shock and diethyldithiocarbamate stimulate polyamine catabolism in animal cells by a mechanism involving the induction of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (N1-SSAT) activity. Steady-state levels of RNA encoding this enzyme remain essentially unchanged during periods after these stresses when N1-SSAT activity is increased by 3.5-10-fold or more in three different cell lines of hamster and human origin. Depletion of intracellular spermidine pools by alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) inhibits stress induction of N1-SSAT activity. Exogenous spermidine can restore stress inducibility of N1-SSAT to DFMO-treated cells, and induce this enzyme activity in non-heat-shocked but polyamine-depleted cells. Acetylation at N1 suppresses the ability of spermidine to induce N1-SSAT activity, relative to this same modification at N8. Fluorinated spermidine analogues, which decrease the pKa values of the amine groups at positions 4 and 8, neither induce nor inhibit N1-SSAT activity in DFMO-treated cells. These data demonstrate that certain stresses induce N1-SSAT by a spermidine-dependent post-transcriptional mechanism. The mode of induction is affected by both the propyl and butyl moieties of spermidine. Images Figure 2 PMID:8396915

  15. The effect of a low molecular weight heparin on coagulation parameters in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Vargo, Cheryl L; Taylor, Susan M; Carr, Anthony; Jackson, Marion L

    2009-04-01

    The low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), dalteparin sodium, was administered subcutaneously (100 IU/kg) to 8 healthy cats twice daily for 13 doses. Anti-activated factor X (anti-Xa) activity was measured prior to administration (time 0), and 4, 6, 8, and 12 h after the 1st dose, 4 h after administration of the 3rd dose, and at 4, 6, 8, and 12 h after the last dose. Four cats developed measurable anti-Xa activity 4 h following a single dose, returning to baseline by 6 h. Anti-Xa activity was not detected at any time point in 4 cats. Prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and antithrombin (AT) concentrations were unaffected by LMWH administration. Dalteparin, at 100 IU/kg SC, did not achieve anti-Xa activity in 4 out of 8 cats and failed to maintain anti-Xa activity beyond 4 h in the other 4 healthy cats.

  16. Sex-biased transcription enhancement by a 5' tethered Gal4-MOF histone acetyltransferase fusion protein in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In male Drosophila melanogaster, the male specific lethal (MSL) complex is somehow responsible for a two-fold increase in transcription of most X-linked genes, which are enriched for histone H4 acetylated at lysine 16 (H4K16ac). This acetylation requires MOF, a histone acetyltransferase that is a component of the MSL complex. MOF also associates with the non-specific lethal or NSL complex. The MSL complex is bound within active genes on the male X chromosome with a 3' bias. In contrast, the NSL complex is enriched at promoter regions of many autosomal and X-linked genes in both sexes. In this study we have investigated the role of MOF as a transcriptional activator. Results MOF was fused to the DNA binding domain of Gal4 and targeted to the promoter region of UAS-reporter genes in Drosophila. We found that expression of a UAS-red fluorescent protein (DsRed) reporter gene was strongly induced by Gal4-MOF. However, DsRed RNA levels were about seven times higher in female than male larvae. Immunostaining of polytene chromosomes showed that Gal4-MOF co-localized with MSL1 to many sites on the X chromosome in male but not female nuclei. However, in female nuclei that express MSL2, Gal4-MOF co-localized with MSL1 to many sites on polytene chromosomes but DsRed expression was reduced. Mutation of conserved active site residues in MOF (Glu714 and Cys680) reduced HAT activity in vitro and UAS-DsRed activation in Drosophila. In the presence of Gal4-MOF, H4K16ac levels were enriched over UAS-lacZ and UAS-arm-lacZ reporter genes. The latter utilizes the constitutive promoter from the arm gene to drive lacZ expression. In contrast to the strong induction of UAS-DsRed expression, UAS-arm-lacZ expression increased by about 2-fold in both sexes. Conclusions Targeting MOF to reporter genes led to transcription enhancement and acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16. Histone acetyltransferase activity was required for the full transcriptional response. Incorporation of Gal

  17. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis in 17 Maine Coon cats.

    PubMed

    Borak, Danilo; Wunderlin, Nadja; Brückner, Michael; Schwarz, Günter; Klang, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Objectives From May 2009 to January 2015, 208 Maine Coon cats presented to the Tierklinik Hollabrunn - a small animal referral and first-opinion centre - and 17 (8.17%) cats were diagnosed with a slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Over the same time period, 29 (0.67%) of 4348 cats (all breeds) were diagnosed with SCFE. Methods Clinical and orthopaedic examinations and diagnostic imaging were performed on all affected Maine Coons. Age at first presentation, sex, body weight, body condition score (BCS), unilateral or bilateral manifestation of the disease, activity level and duration of lameness, age at neutering and known family history of disease were recorded. Sixteen of 17 Maine Coons were surgically treated. Surgically removed femoral tissue samples were histologically examined in 13 cases. Results The mean age at first presentation was 21.47 months; male to female ratio was 16:1; mean body weight was 7.5 kg (range 5.3-9.3 kg); and mean BCS was 5.06/9.0. Seven cats were bilaterally affected; the median duration of decreased activity level and lameness was 2 weeks; mean age at neutering was 7.7 months (range 3.0-12.0 months); and four cats were littermates. Fourteen femoral head and neck ostectomies, eight total hip replacements and one primary fixation were performed. All 13 histologically available samples confirmed the diagnosis of SCFE. Conclusions and relevance To date, SCFE has been reported only occasionally in Maine Coon cats. However, the results of this study showed that Maine Coons were approximately 12-fold more likely to develop SCFE than the overall population of cats presenting to the Tierklinik Hollabrunn over the same time period. Male sex, neutering, delayed physeal closure and breed-specific high body weight may play an important role in the pathogenesis of SCFE in Maine Coon cats.

  18. [Prevalence of Tritrichomonas foetus among Dutch cats].

    PubMed

    van Doorn, D C K; de Bruin, M J; Jorritsma, R A; Ploeger, H W; Schoormans, A

    2009-09-01

    Prevalence of Tritrichomonas foetus among Dutch cats The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for, Tritrichomonas foetus among cats in the Netherlands. A total of 154 faecal samples were collected from three groups of cats: cats with diarrhoea (n=53), cattery cats (n=47), and healthy pet cats (n=54). Faecal samples were examined with a T. foetus specific real-time PCR. All PCR-positive samples were run on gel electrophoresis for definitive diagnosis. The prevalence of T. foetus was 2% among cats with diarrhoea and 4% among cattery cats; T. foetus was not prevalent among pet cats (none of the samples tested positive). Questionnaires had been distributed to cat and cattery owners to determine risk factors for T. foetus, but the low prevalence precluded statistical analysis of the questionnaire results.

  19. Decreased glucocorticoid receptor activity following glucocorticoid receptor antisense RNA gene fragment transfection.

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, M C; Barden, N

    1991-01-01

    Depression is often characterized by increased cortisol secretion caused by hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and by nonsuppression of cortisol secretion following dexamethasone administration. This hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis could result from a reduced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activity in neurons involved in its control. To investigate the effect of reduced neuronal GR levels, we have blocked cellular GR mRNA processing and/or translation by introduction of a complementary GR antisense RNA strand. Two cell lines were transfected with a reporter plasmid carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under control of the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter). This gene construction permitted assay of the sensitivity of the cells to glucocorticoid hormones. Cells were also cotransfected with a plasmid containing 1,815 bp of GR cDNA inserted in the reverse orientation downstream from either a neurofilament gene promoter element or the Rous sarcoma virus promoter element. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrated formation of GR antisense RNA strands. Measurement of the sensitivity of CAT activity to exogeneous dexamethasone showed that although dexamethasone increased CAT activity by as much as 13-fold in control incubations, expression of GR antisense RNA caused a 2- to 4-fold decrease in the CAT response to dexamethasone. Stable transfectants bearing the GR antisense gene fragment construction demonstrated a 50 to 70% decrease of functional GR levels compared with normal cells, as evidenced by a ligand-binding assay with the type II glucocorticoid receptor-specific ligand [3H]RU 28362. These results validate the use of antisense RNA to GR to decrease cellular response to glucocorticoids. Images PMID:1996114

  20. Dog and cat bites.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Robert; Ellis, Carrie

    2014-08-15

    Animal bites account for 1% of all emergency department visits in the United States and more than $50 million in health care costs per year. Most animal bites are from a dog, usually one known to the victim. Most dog bite victims are children. Bite wounds should be cleaned, copiously irrigated with normal saline using a 20-mL or larger syringe or a 20-gauge catheter attached to the syringe. The wound should be explored for tendon or bone involvement and possible foreign bodies. Wounds may be closed if cosmetically favorable, such as wounds on the face or gaping wounds. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be considered, especially if there is a high risk of infection, such as with cat bites, with puncture wounds, with wounds to the hand, and in persons who are immunosuppressed. Amoxicillin/clavulanate is the first-line prophylactic antibiotic. The need for rabies prophylaxis should be addressed with any animal bite because even domestic animals are often unvaccinated. Postexposure rabies prophylaxis consists of immune globulin at presentation and vaccination on days 0, 3, 7, and 14. Counseling patients and families about animal safety may help decrease animal bites. In most states, physicians are required by law to report animal bites.

  1. Cat eye syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepak; Murki, Srinivas; Pratap, Tejo; Vasikarla, Madhavi

    2014-01-01

    A full-term female baby, a product of non-consanguineous marriage, was born at 37 weeks of gestation with a birth weight of 2.08 kg. Antenatal scan at 31 weeks revealed complex congenital heart disease with a hypoplastic right ventricle, pulmonary atresia and an intact septum. Immediately after birth, the infant was shifted to the nursery and was started on intravenous fluids and infusion prostaglandin E1 (Alprostidil). On examination, she had microcephaly, periorbital puffiness, a long philtrum, a broad nasal bridge and retrognathia, up slanting palpebral fissures, widely spaced nipples, a sacral dimple and right upper limb postaxial polydactyly. Postnatal echocardiography confirmed a large ostium secundum atrial septal defect with left to right shunt, right ventricle hypoplasia, pulmonary atresia with an intact septum and a large vertical patent ductus arteriosus. Ophthalmological examination showed a bilateral chorioretinal coloboma sparing disc and fovea. Karyotyping showed an extra small marker chromosome suggestive of the Cat eye syndrome. PMID:24842361

  2. Cat eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Murki, Srinivas; Pratap, Tejo; Vasikarla, Madhavi

    2014-05-19

    A full-term female baby, a product of non-consanguineous marriage, was born at 37 weeks of gestation with a birth weight of 2.08 kg. Antenatal scan at 31 weeks revealed complex congenital heart disease with a hypoplastic right ventricle, pulmonary atresia and an intact septum. Immediately after birth, the infant was shifted to the nursery and was started on intravenous fluids and infusion prostaglandin E1 (Alprostidil). On examination, she had microcephaly, periorbital puffiness, a long philtrum, a broad nasal bridge and retrognathia, up slanting palpebral fissures, widely spaced nipples, a sacral dimple and right upper limb postaxial polydactyly. Postnatal echocardiography confirmed a large ostium secundum atrial septal defect with left to right shunt, right ventricle hypoplasia, pulmonary atresia with an intact septum and a large vertical patent ductus arteriosus. Ophthalmological examination showed a bilateral chorioretinal coloboma sparing disc and fovea. Karyotyping showed an extra small marker chromosome suggestive of the Cat eye syndrome.

  3. Cloning of an arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (aaNAT1) from Drosophila melanogaster expressed in the nervous system and the gut.

    PubMed Central

    Hintermann, E; Grieder, N C; Amherd, R; Brodbeck, D; Meyer, U A

    1996-01-01

    In insects, neurotransmitter catabolism, melatonin precursor formation, and sclerotization involve arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (aaNAT, EC 2.3.1.87) activity. It is not known if one or multiple aaNAT enzymes are responsible for these activities. We recently have purified an aaNAT from Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we report the cloning of the corresponding aaNAT cDNA (aaNAT1) that upon COS cell expression acetylates dopamine, tryptamine, and the immediate melatonin precursor serotonin. aaNAT1 represents a novel gene family unrelated to known acetyl-transferases, except in two weakly conserved amino acid motifs. In situ hybridization studies of aaNAT1 mRNA in embryos reveal hybridization signals in the brain, the ventral cord, the gut, and probably in oenocytes, indicating a broad tissue distribution of aaNAT1 transcripts. Moreover, in day/ night studies we demonstrate a diurnal rhythm of melatonin concentration without a clear-cut change in aaNAT1 mRNA levels. The data suggest that tissue-specific regulation of aaNAT1 may be associated with different enzymatic functions and do not exclude the possibility of additional aaNAT genes. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8901578

  4. Different functions of the histone acetyltransferase HAC1 gene traced in the model species Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Boycheva, Irina; Vassileva, Valya; Revalska, Miglena; Zehirov, Grigor; Iantcheva, Anelia

    2017-03-01

    In eukaryotes, histone acetyltransferases regulate the acetylation of histones and transcription factors, affecting chromatin structural organization, transcriptional regulation, and gene activation. To assess the role of HAC1, a gene encoding for a histone acetyltransferase in Medicago truncatula, stable transgenic lines with modified HAC1 expression in the model plants M. truncatula, Lotus japonicus, and Arabidopsis thaliana were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and used for functional analyses. Histochemical, transcriptional, flow cytometric, and morphological analyses demonstrated the involvement of HAC1 in plant growth and development, responses to internal stimuli, and cell cycle progression. Expression patterns of a reporter gene encoding beta-glucuronidase (GUS) fused to the HAC1 promoter sequence were associated with young tissues comprised of actively dividing cells in different plant organs. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) signal, driven by the HAC1 promoter, was detected in the nuclei and cytoplasm of root cells. Transgenic lines with HAC1 overexpression and knockdown showed a wide range of phenotypic deviations and developmental abnormalities, which provided lines of evidence for the role of HAC1 in plant development. Synchronization of A. thaliana root tips in a line with HAC1 knockdown showed the involvement of this gene in the acetylation of two core histones during S phase of the plant cell cycle.

  5. Depletion of histone N-terminal-acetyltransferase Naa40 induces p53-independent apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Pavlou, Demetria; Kirmizis, Antonis

    2016-03-01

    Protein N-terminal acetylation is an abundant post-translational modification in eukaryotes implicated in various fundamental cellular and biochemical processes. This modification is catalysed by evolutionarily conserved N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs) whose deregulation has been linked to cancer development and thus, are emerging as useful diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Naa40 is a highly selective NAT that acetylates the amino-termini of histones H4 and H2A and acts as a sensor of cell growth in yeast. In the present study, we examine the role of Naa40 in cancer cell survival. We demonstrate that depletion of Naa40 in HCT116 and HT-29 colorectal cancer cells decreases cell survival by enhancing apoptosis, whereas Naa40 reduction in non-cancerous mouse embryonic fibroblasts has no effect on cell viability. Specifically, Naa40 knockdown in colon cancer cells activates the mitochondrial caspase-9-mediated apoptotic cascade. Consistent with this, we show that caspase-9 activation is required for the induced apoptosis because treatment of cells with an irreversible caspase-9 inhibitor impedes apoptosis when Naa40 is depleted. Furthermore, the effect of Naa40-depletion on cell-death is mediated through a p53-independent mechanism since p53-null HCT116 cells still undergo apoptosis upon reduction of the acetyltransferase. Altogether, these findings reveal an anti-apoptotic role for Naa40 and exhibit its potential as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancers.

  6. Structural and functional characterization of an arylamine N-acetyltransferase from the pathogen Mycobacterium abscessus: differences from other mycobacterial isoforms and implications for selective inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cocaign, Angélique; Kubiak, Xavier; Xu, Ximing; Garnier, Guillaume; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès; Chi-Bui, Linh; Dairou, Julien; Busi, Florent; Abuhammad, Areej; Haouz, Ahmed; Dupret, Jean Marie; Herrmann, Jean Louis; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is the most pathogenic rapid-growing mycobacterium and is one of the most resistant organisms to chemotherapeutic agents. However, structural and functional studies of M. abscessus proteins that could modify/inactivate antibiotics remain nonexistent. Here, the structural and functional characterization of an arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) from M. abscessus [(MYCAB)NAT1] are reported. This novel prokaryotic NAT displays significant N-acetyltransferase activity towards aromatic substrates, including antibiotics such as isoniazid and p-aminosalicylate. The enzyme is endogenously expressed and functional in both the rough and smooth M. abscessus morphotypes. The crystal structure of (MYCAB)NAT1 at 1.8 Å resolution reveals that it is more closely related to Nocardia farcinica NAT than to mycobacterial isoforms. In particular, structural and physicochemical differences from other mycobacterial NATs were found in the active site. Peculiarities of (MYCAB)NAT1 were further supported by kinetic and docking studies showing that the enzyme was poorly inhibited by the piperidinol inhibitor of mycobacterial NATs. This study describes the first structure of an antibiotic-modifying enzyme from M. abscessus and provides bases to better understand the substrate/inhibitor-binding specificities among mycobacterial NATs and to identify/optimize specific inhibitors. These data should also contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms that are responsible for the pathogenicity and extensive chemotherapeutic resistance of M. abscessus.

  7. Role of Jade-1 in the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) HBO1 complex.

    PubMed

    Foy, Rebecca L; Song, Ihn Young; Chitalia, Vipul C; Cohen, Herbert T; Saksouk, Nehme; Cayrou, Christelle; Vaziri, Cyrus; Côté, Jacques; Panchenko, Maria V

    2008-10-24

    Regulation of global chromatin acetylation is important for chromatin remodeling. A small family of Jade proteins includes Jade-1L, Jade-2, and Jade-3, each bearing two mid-molecule tandem plant homology domain (PHD) zinc fingers. We previously demonstrated that the short isoform of Jade-1L protein, Jade-1, is associated with endogenous histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity. It has been found that Jade-1L/2/3 proteins co-purify with a novel HAT complex, consisting of HBO1, ING4/5, and Eaf6. We investigated a role for Jade-1/1L in the HBO1 complex. When overexpressed individually, neither Jade-1/1L nor HBO1 affected histone acetylation. However, co-expression of Jade-1/1L and HBO1 increased acetylation of the bulk of endogenous histone H4 in epithelial cells in a synergistic manner, suggesting that Jade1/1L positively regulates HBO1 HAT activity. Conversely, small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of endogenous Jade resulted in reduced levels of H4 acetylation. Moreover, HBO1-mediated H4 acetylation activity was enhanced severalfold by the presence of Jade-1/1L in vitro. The removal of PHD fingers affected neither binding nor mutual Jade-1-HBO1 stabilization but completely abrogated the synergistic Jade-1/1L- and HBO1-mediated histone H4 acetylation in live cells and in vitro with reconstituted oligonucleosome substrates. Therefore, PHDs are necessary for Jade-1/1L-induced acetylation of nucleosomal histones by HBO1. In contrast to Jade-1/1L, the PHD zinc finger protein ING4/5 failed to synergize with HBO1 to promote histone acetylation. The physical interaction of ING4/5 with HBO1 occurred in the presence of Jade-1L or Jade-3 but not with the Jade-1 short isoform. In summary, this study demonstrates that Jade-1/1L are crucial co-factors for HBO1-mediated histone H4 acetylation.

  8. Error Generation in CATS-Based Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd

    2003-01-01

    This research presents a methodology for generating errors from a model of nominally preferred correct operator activities, given a particular operational context, and maintaining an explicit link to the erroneous contextual information to support analyses. It uses the Crew Activity Tracking System (CATS) model as the basis for error generation. This report describes how the process works, and how it may be useful for supporting agent-based system safety analyses. The report presents results obtained by applying the error-generation process and discusses implementation issues. The research is supported by the System-Wide Accident Prevention Element of the NASA Aviation Safety Program.

  9. Up-regulation of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) expression is a part of proliferative but not anabolic response of mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Dudkowska, Magdalena; Stachurska, Agnieszka; Grzelakowska-Sztabert, Barbara; Manteuffel-Cymborowska, Małgorzata

    2002-01-01

    A differential expression pattern of spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT), the enzyme critical to proper homeostasis of cellular polyamines, is reported in mouse kidney undergoing hyperplasia and hypertrophy. We have shown that SSAT activity and SSAT mRNA are significantly induced by antifolate CB 3717 and folate that evoke a drug-injury-dependent hyperplasia. In contrast, SSAT activity is down-regulated in the testosterone-induced hypertrophic kidney, while SSAT mRNA is positively controlled by this androgen. Catecholamine depletion evoked by reserpine drastically decreases the folate-induced activity of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC), which limits polyamine biosynthesis, but has no effect on SSAT activity augmented by CB 3717. Our results document that the increased SSAT expression solely accompanies the proliferative response of mouse kidney, and suggest the importance of post-transcriptional regulation to the control of SSAT activity in both hyperplastic and hypertrophic experimental models.

  10. Loss of Catalase-1 (Cat-1) results in decreased conidial viability enhanced by exposure to light in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Niyan; Yoshida, Yusuke; Hasunuma, Kohji

    2007-01-01

    Light is one of the most important factors inducing morphogenesis in Neurospora crassa. The reception of light triggers the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Catalase-1 (Cat-1) is one of three catalases known to detoxify H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen. We reported that the photomorphogenetic characteristics of mutants in nucleoside diphosphate kinase-1 (NDK-1), a light signal transducer, are severely affected, and NDK-1 interacted with Cat-1 in a yeast two-hybrid assay. To disclose the function of Cat-1, we created a Cat-1 loss-of-function mutant (cat-1 ( RIP )) by the repeat induced point-mutation (RIPing) method. No Cat-1 activity was detected in the mutant strain. Forty guanines were replaced with adenines in the cat-1 gene of cat-1 ( RIP ), which caused 30 amino acid substitutions. The mutant strain grew normally, but its conidia and mycelia were more sensitive to H(2)O(2) than those of the wild type. The lack of Cat-1 activity also caused a significant reduction in the conidial germination rate. Furthermore, light enhanced this reduction in cat-1 ( RIP ) more than that in the wild type. Introduction of cat-1 into the mutant reversed all of these defective phenotypes. These results indicate that Cat-1 plays an important role in supporting the survival of conidia under oxidative and light-induced stress.

  11. Induction of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) by aspirin in Caco-2 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Babbar, Naveen; Gerner, Eugene W; Casero, Robert A

    2006-02-15

    Epidemiological, experimental and clinical results suggest that aspirin and other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) inhibit the development of colon cancer. It has been shown that the NSAID sulindac induces apoptosis and suppresses carcinogenesis, in part, by a mechanism leading to the transcriptional activation of the gene encoding SSAT (spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase), a rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine catabolism. In the present study, we show that a variety of NSAIDs, including aspirin, sulindac, ibuprofen and indomethacin, can induce SSAT gene expression in Caco-2 cells. Aspirin, at physiological concentrations, can induce SSAT mRNA via transcriptional initiation mechanisms. This induction leads to increased SSAT protein levels and enzyme activity. Promoter deletion analysis of the 5' SSAT promoter-flanking region led to the identification of two NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) response elements. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays showed binding of NF-kappaB complexes at these sequences after aspirin treatment. Aspirin treatment led to the activation of NF-kappaB signalling and increased binding at these NF-kappaB sites in the SSAT promoter, hence providing a potential mechanism for the induction of SSAT by aspirin in these cells. Aspirin-induced SSAT ultimately leads to a decrease in cellular polyamine content, which has been associated with decreased carcinogenesis. These results suggest that activation of SSAT by aspirin and different NSAIDs may be a common property of NSAIDs that plays an important role in their chemopreventive actions in colorectal cancer.

  12. The Use of Refuges by Communally Housed Cats.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Adriana Sicuto; Terçariol, César Augusto Sangaletti; Genaro, Gelson

    2015-04-24

    The increase of domestic animals kept in shelters highlights the need to ensure animal welfare. Environmental enrichment can improve animal welfare in many ways, such as encouraging captive animals to use all the space available to them. The effects of physical environmental enrichment on the spatial distribution and behavioral repertoire of 35 neutered domestic cats housed communally were analyzed. The provision of boxes in the environment increases the use of available space by the cats. We suggest this improves the cats' welfare while in communally-housed rescue shelters. The frequencies of active and especially inactive behaviors also increased in the enriched condition. In a test with vertical environmental enrichment, the animals showed an increased length of stay in refuges located at a height of 0.5 m compared to those on the ground (0.0 m). However, the entry frequency was higher in refuges at 0.0 m. Both horizontal and vertical environmental enrichment increased the use of available space, demonstrating that box refuges as enrichment are effective in providing a refuge when at a height, or a place to explore at ground level. We suggest it enhances the welfare of cats in communally housed shelters. This information adds to the body of evidence relating to cat enrichment and can be useful in designing cat housing in veterinary clinics, research laboratories, shelters and domestic homes.

  13. Survival of a feline isolate of Tritrichomonas foetus in water, cat urine, cat food and cat litter.

    PubMed

    Rosypal, Alexa C; Ripley, Allyson; Stockdale Walden, Heather D; Blagburn, Byron L; Grant, David C; Lindsay, David S

    2012-04-30

    Feline intestinal trichomoniasis caused by Tritrichomonas foetus is associated with large bowel diarrhea in cats from many parts of the world. It has long been recognized as an economically important sexually transmitted disease that causes early abortion in cattle. Isolates of T. foetus from cattle are infectious for the large intestine of cats and isolates of T. foetus from cats are infectious for the reproductive system of cattle. The parasite is maintained by fecal-oral transmission in cats. The present study was conducted to examine the survival of a feline isolate of T. foetus, AUTf-12, under various conditions that are relevant to fecal-oral transmission in cats. Trophozoites were grown in TYM medium and then exposed to water, cat urine, dry cat food, canned cat food, clumping cat litter, or filter paper for various lengths of time and then re-cultured in TYM medium. Trophozoites survived exposure to distilled or tap water for 30 but not 60 min, while they survived for at least 180 min in urine. Trophozoites survived for 30 min on dry cat food but survived for 120-180 min in canned cat food. No survival of trophozoites was observed on cat litter but trophozoites survived for 15 min when placed on filter paper. Our results indicate that T. foetus can survive and be potentially infectious in water, urine, dry cat food and canned cat food.

  14. The chromosomal 2'-N-acetyltransferase of Providencia stuartii: physiological functions and genetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Macinga, D R; Rather, P N

    1999-02-01

    Intrinsic chromosomal acetyltransferases involved in aminoglycoside resistance have been identified in a number of bacteria. In Providencia stuartii, a chromosomal acetyltransferase (AAC(2')-Ia) has been characterized in detail. In addition to the ability to acetylate aminoglycosides, the AAC(2')-Ia enzyme has at least one physiological function, which is the acetylation of peptidoglycan. This modification is likely to influence the autolytic system in P. stuartii. The regulation of aac(2')-Ia expression is extremely complex involving at least seven regulatory genes acting in at least two pathways. This complexity in regulation indicates that aac(2')-Ia expression must be tightly controlled in response to different environmental conditions. This presumably reflects the importance of maintaining correct levels of peptidoglycan acetylation. In this review, a summary of data will be presented involving both the physiological and genetic aspects of aac(2')-Ia in P. stuartii.

  15. Expression profiling of S. pombe acetyltransferase mutants identifies redundant pathways of gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Histone acetyltransferase enzymes (HATs) are implicated in regulation of transcription. HATs from different families may overlap in target and substrate specificity. Results We isolated the elp3+ gene encoding the histone acetyltransferase subunit of the Elongator complex in fission yeast and characterized the phenotype of an Δelp3 mutant. We examined genetic interactions between Δelp3 and two other HAT mutants, Δmst2 and Δgcn5 and used whole genome microarray analysis to analyze their effects on gene expression. Conclusions Comparison of phenotypes and expression profiles in single, double and triple mutants indicate that these HAT enzymes have overlapping functions. Consistent with this, overlapping specificity in histone H3 acetylation is observed. However, there is no evidence for overlap with another HAT enzyme, encoded by the essential mst1+ gene. PMID:20096118

  16. Crystallization of ornithine acetyltransferase from yeast by counter-diffusion and preliminary X-ray study

    SciTech Connect

    Maes, Dominique Crabeel, Marjolaine; Van de Weerdt, Cécile; Martial, Joseph; Peeters, Eveline; Charlier, Daniël; Decanniere, Klaas; Vanhee, Celine; Wyns, Lode; Zegers, Ingrid

    2006-12-01

    A study on the crystallization of ornithine acetyltransferase from yeast, catalysing the fifth step in microbial arginine synthesis, is presented. The use of the counter-diffusion technique removes the disorder present in one dimension in crystals grown by either batch or hanging-drop techniques. A study is presented on the crystallization of ornithine acetyltransferase from yeast, which catalyzes the fifth step in microbial arginine synthesis. The use of the counter-diffusion technique removes the disorder present in one dimension in crystals grown by either the batch or hanging-drop techniques. This makes the difference between useless crystals and crystals that allow successful determination of the structure of the protein. The crystals belong to space group P4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.98, c = 427.09 Å, and a data set was collected to 2.76 Å.

  17. The Cat's Eye Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image shows one of the most complex planetary nebulae ever seen, NGC 6543, nicknamed the 'Cat's Eye Nebula.' Hubble reveals surprisingly intricate structures including concentric gas shells, jets of high-speed gas and unusual shock-induced knots of gas. Estimated to be 1,000 years old, the nebula is a visual 'fossil record' of the dynamics and late evolution of a dying star. A preliminary interpretation suggests that the star might be a double-star system. The suspected companion star also might be responsible for a pair of high-speed jets of gas that lie at right angles to this equatorial ring. If the companion were pulling in material from a neighboring star, jets escaping along the companion's rotation axis could be produced. These jets would explain several puzzling features along the periphery of the gas lobes. Like a stream of water hitting a sand pile, the jets compress gas ahead of them, creating the 'curlicue' features and bright arcs near the outer edge of the lobes. The twin jets are now pointing in different directions than these features. This suggests the jets are wobbling, or precessing, and turning on and off episodically. This color picture, taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2, is a composite of three images taken at different wavelengths. (red, hydrogen-alpha; blue, neutral oxygen, 6300 angstroms; green, ionized nitrogen, 6584 angstroms). The image was taken on September 18, 1994. NGC 6543 is 3,000 light- years away in the northern constellation Draco. The term planetary nebula is a misnomer; dying stars create these cocoons when they lose outer layers of gas. The process has nothing to do with planet formation, which is predicted to happen early in a star's life.

  18. Cat Ownership Perception and Caretaking Explored in an Internet Survey of People Associated with Cats.

    PubMed

    Zito, Sarah; Vankan, Dianne; Bennett, Pauleen; Paterson, Mandy; Phillips, Clive J C

    2015-01-01

    People who feed cats that they do not perceive they own (sometimes called semi-owners) are thought to make a considerable contribution to unwanted cat numbers because the cats they support are generally not sterilized. Understanding people's perception of cat ownership and the psychology underlying cat semi-ownership could inform approaches to mitigate the negative effects of cat semi-ownership. The primary aims of this study were to investigate cat ownership perception and to examine its association with human-cat interactions and caretaking behaviours. A secondary aim was to evaluate a definition of cat semi-ownership (including an association time of ≥1 month and frequent feeding), revised from a previous definition proposed in the literature to distinguish cat semi-ownership from casual interactions with unowned cats. Cat owners and semi-owners displayed similar types of interactions and caretaking behaviours. Nevertheless, caretaking behaviours were more commonly displayed towards owned cats than semi-owned cats, and semi-owned cats were more likely to have produced kittens (p<0.01). All interactions and caretaking behaviours were more likely to be displayed towards cats in semi-ownership relationships compared to casual interaction relationships. Determinants of cat ownership perception were identified (p<0.05) and included association time, attachment, perceived cat friendliness and health, and feelings about unowned cats, including the acceptability of feeding unowned cats. Encouraging semi-owners to have the cats they care for sterilized may assist in reducing the number of unwanted kittens and could be a valuable alternative to trying to prevent semi-ownership entirely. Highly accessible semi-owner "gatekeepers" could help to deliver education messages and facilitate the provision of cat sterilization services to semi-owners. This research enabled semi-ownership to be distinguished from casual interaction relationships and can assist welfare and

  19. The histone acetyltransferase MOF overexpression blunts cardiac hypertrophy by targeting ROS in mice.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Weiwei; Zhang, Weili; Gai, Yusheng; Zhao, Lan; Fan, Juexin

    2014-06-13

    Imbalance between histone acetylation/deacetylation critically participates in the expression of hypertrophic fetal genes and development of cardiac hypertrophy. While histone deacetylases play dual roles in hypertrophy, current evidence reveals that histone acetyltransferase such as p300 and PCAF act as pro-hypertrophic factors. However, it remains elusive whether some histone acetyltransferases can prevent the development of hypertrophy. Males absent on the first (MOF) is a histone acetyltransferase belonging to the MYST (MOZ, Ybf2/Sas3, Sas2 and TIP60) family. Here in this study, we reported that MOF expression was down-regulated in failing human hearts and hypertrophic murine hearts at protein and mRNA levels. To evaluate the roles of MOF in cardiac hypertrophy, we generated cardiac-specific MOF transgenic mice. MOF transgenic mice did not show any differences from their wide-type littermates at baseline. However, cardiac-specific MOF overexpression protected mice from transverse aortic constriction (TAC)-induced cardiac hypertrophy, with reduced radios of heart weight (HW)/body weight (BW), lung weight/BW and HW/tibia length, decreased left ventricular wall thickness and increased fractional shortening. We also observed lower expression of hypertrophic fetal genes in TAC-challenged MOF transgenic mice compared with that of wide-type mice. Mechanically, MOF overexpression increased the expression of Catalase and MnSOD, which blocked TAC-induced ROS and ROS downstream c-Raf-MEK-ERK pathway that promotes hypertrophy. Taken together, our findings identify a novel anti-hypertrophic role of MOF, and MOF is the first reported anti-hypertrophic histone acetyltransferase.

  20. MOZ and MORF acetyltransferases: Molecular interaction, animal development and human disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-08-01

    Lysine residues are subject to many forms of covalent modification and one such modification is acetylation of the ε-amino group. Initially identified on histone proteins in the 1960s, lysine acetylation is now considered as an important form of post-translational modification that rivals phosphorylation. However, only about a dozen of human lysine acetyltransferases have been identified. Among them are MOZ (monocytic leukemia zinc finger protein; a.k.a. MYST3 and KAT6A) and its paralog MORF (a.k.a. MYST4 and KAT6B). Although there is a distantly related protein in Drosophila and sea urchin, these two enzymes are vertebrate-specific. They form tetrameric complexes with BRPF1 (bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1) and two small non-catalytic subunits. These two acetyltransferases and BRPF1 play key roles in various developmental processes; for example, they are important for development of hematopoietic and neural stem cells. The human KAT6A and KAT6B genes are recurrently mutated in leukemia, non-hematologic malignancies, and multiple developmental disorders displaying intellectual disability and various other abnormalities. In addition, the BRPF1 gene is mutated in childhood leukemia and adult medulloblastoma. Therefore, these two acetyltransferases and their partner BRPF1 are important in animal development and human disease.

  1. Insights into the O-Acetylation Reaction of Hydroxylated Heterocyclic Amines by Human Arylamine N-Acetyltransferases: A Computational Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Felton, J S; Lightstone, F C

    2006-06-06

    A computational study was performed to better understand the differences between human arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) 1 and 2. Homology models were constructed from available crystal structures and comparisons of the active site residues 125, 127, and 129 for these two enzymes provide insight into observed substrate differences. The NAT2 model provided a basis for understanding how some of the common mutations may affect the structure of the protein. Molecular dynamics simulations of the human NAT models and the template structure (NAT from Mycobacterium smegmatis) were performed and showed the models to be stable and reasonable. Docking studies of hydroxylated heterocyclic amines in the models of NAT1 and NAT2 probed the differences exhibited by these two proteins with mutagenic agents. The hydroxylated heterocyclic amines were only able to fit into the NAT2 active site, and an alternative binding site by the P-loop was found using our models and will be discussed. Additionally, quantum mechanical calculations were performed to study the O-acetylation reaction of the hydroxylated heterocyclic amines N-OH MeIQx and N-OH PhIP. This study has given us insight into why there are substrate differences among isoenzymes and explains some of the polymorphic activity differences.

  2. Acetyl-CoA:benzylalcohol acetyltransferase--an enzyme involved in floral scent production in Clarkia breweri.

    PubMed

    Dudareva, N; D'Auria, J C; Nam, K H; Raguso, R A; Pichersky, E

    1998-05-01

    Volatile esters impart distinct characteristics to the floral scent of many plants, and are important in attracting insect pollinators. They are also important flavor compounds in fruits. The ester benzylacetate is a major constituent of the floral scent of Clarkia breweri, an annual plant native to California. The enzyme acetyl-CoA:benzylalcohol acetyltransferase (BEAT), which catalyzes the formation of benzylacetate, has been purified from C. breweri petals, and a cDNA encoding this enzyme has been isolated and characterized. The sequence of the 433-residue BEAT protein does not show high similarity to any previously characterized protein, but a 35-residue region from position 135-163 has significant similarity (42-56% identity) to several proteins known or suspected to use an acyl-CoA substrate. E. coli cells expressing C. breweri BEAT produced enzymatically active protein, and also synthesized benzylacetate and secreted it into the medium. Of the different parts of the C. breweri flower, petals contained the majority of BEAT transcripts, and no BEAT mRNA was detected in leaves. The levels of BEAT mRNA in the petals increased as the bud matured, and peaked at anthesis, paralleling changes in BEAT activity. However, three days after anthesis, mRNA levels began a steep decline, whereas BEAT activity remained high for the next two days, suggesting that the BEAT protein is relatively stable.

  3. Type B Chloramphenicol Acetyltransferases Are Responsible for Chloramphenicol Resistance in Riemerella anatipestifer, China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li; Yuan, Hui; Liu, Ma-Feng; Zhao, Xin-Xin; Wang, Ming-Shu; Jia, Ren-Yong; Chen, Shun; Sun, Kun-Feng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiao-Yue; Cheng, An-Chun; Zhu, De-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Riemerella anatipestifer causes serositis and septicaemia in domestic ducks, geese, and turkeys. Traditionally, the antibiotics were used to treat this disease. Currently, our understanding of R. anatipestifer susceptibility to chloramphenicol and the underlying resistance mechanism is limited. In this study, the cat gene was identified in 69/192 (36%) R. anatipestifer isolated from different regions in China, including R. anatipestifer CH-2 that has been sequenced in previous study. Sequence analysis suggested that there are two copies of cat gene in this strain. Only both two copies of the cat mutant strain showed a significant decrease in resistance to chloramphenicol, exhibiting 4 μg/ml in the minimum inhibitory concentration for this antibiotic, but not for the single cat gene deletion strains. Functional analysis of the cat gene via expression in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and in vitro site-directed mutagenesis indicated that His79 is the main catalytic residue of CAT in R. anatipestifer. These results suggested that chloramphenicol resistance of R. anatipestifer CH-2 is mediated by the cat genes. Finally, homology analysis of types A and B CATs indicate that R. anatipestifer comprises type B3 CATs. PMID:28298905

  4. Type B Chloramphenicol Acetyltransferases Are Responsible for Chloramphenicol Resistance in Riemerella anatipestifer, China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Yuan, Hui; Liu, Ma-Feng; Zhao, Xin-Xin; Wang, Ming-Shu; Jia, Ren-Yong; Chen, Shun; Sun, Kun-Feng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiao-Yue; Cheng, An-Chun; Zhu, De-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Riemerella anatipestifer causes serositis and septicaemia in domestic ducks, geese, and turkeys. Traditionally, the antibiotics were used to treat this disease. Currently, our understanding of R. anatipestifer susceptibility to chloramphenicol and the underlying resistance mechanism is limited. In this study, the cat gene was identified in 69/192 (36%) R. anatipestifer isolated from different regions in China, including R. anatipestifer CH-2 that has been sequenced in previous study. Sequence analysis suggested that there are two copies of cat gene in this strain. Only both two copies of the cat mutant strain showed a significant decrease in resistance to chloramphenicol, exhibiting 4 μg/ml in the minimum inhibitory concentration for this antibiotic, but not for the single cat gene deletion strains. Functional analysis of the cat gene via expression in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and in vitro site-directed mutagenesis indicated that His79 is the main catalytic residue of CAT in R. anatipestifer. These results suggested that chloramphenicol resistance of R. anatipestifer CH-2 is mediated by the cat genes. Finally, homology analysis of types A and B CATs indicate that R. anatipestifer comprises type B3 CATs.

  5. Unc-5 homolog B (UNC5B) is one of the key downstream targets of N-α-Acetyltransferase 10 (Naa10)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huiyu; Han, Yong; Liu, Bing; Li, Rong

    2016-01-01

    N-α-acetyltransferase 10 (Naa10) displays alpha (N-terminal) acetyltransferase activity. It functions as a major modulator of cell growth and differentiation. Until now, a few downstream targets were found, but no studies have concerned about which gene is the early event of Naa10 downstream target. As we know, the earlier events may play more significant role in Naa10 pathway. Through construction of Naa10 stably knocked down H1299 cell line, we discovered cell morphological changes induced by Naa10. Moreover, potential function of Naa10 in cell morphogenesis was also indicated using cDNA microarray analysis of the Naa10 stably knock-down cell line. We further discovered that netrin-1 (NTN1) and its receptor UNC-5 Homology B (UNC5B) were the early event among the genes involved in Naa10 stably knocked down induced genes expression changes in cell morphogenesis. This was further validated in caudal half region of E10 mouse embryos. Negative regulation of Naa10 towards NTN1 and its receptor UNC5B were also detected upon treatment of all-trans retinoid acid, which was often used to induce morphological differentiation. PMID:27910960

  6. Crystal Structure of the Golgi-Associated Human Nα-Acetyltransferase 60 Reveals the Molecular Determinants for Substrate-Specific Acetylation.

    PubMed

    Støve, Svein Isungset; Magin, Robert S; Foyn, Håvard; Haug, Bengt Erik; Marmorstein, Ronen; Arnesen, Thomas

    2016-07-06

    N-Terminal acetylation is a common and important protein modification catalyzed by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs). Six human NATs (NatA-NatF) contain one catalytic subunit each, Naa10 to Naa60, respectively. In contrast to the ribosome-associated NatA to NatE, NatF/Naa60 specifically associates with Golgi membranes and acetylates transmembrane proteins. To gain insight into the molecular basis for the function of Naa60, we developed an Naa60 bisubstrate CoA-peptide conjugate inhibitor, determined its X-ray structure when bound to CoA and inhibitor, and carried out biochemical experiments. We show that Naa60 adapts an overall fold similar to that of the catalytic subunits of ribosome-associated NATs, but with the addition of two novel elongated loops that play important roles in substrate-specific binding. One of these loops mediates a dimer to monomer transition upon substrate-specific binding. Naa60 employs a catalytic mechanism most similar to Naa50. Collectively, these data reveal the molecular basis for Naa60-specific acetyltransferase activity with implications for its Golgi-specific functions.

  7. An Intrinsically Disordered Region of the Acetyltransferase p300 with Similarity to Prion-Like Domains Plays a Role in Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kirilyuk, Alexander; Shimoji, Mika; Catania, Jason; Sahu, Geetaram; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Giordano, Antonio; Albanese, Christopher; Mocchetti, Italo; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Avantaggiati, Maria Laura

    2012-01-01

    Several human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders and cancer are associated with abnormal accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins. Proteins with high tendency to aggregate include the p53 gene product, TAU and alpha synuclein. The potential toxicity of aberrantly folded proteins is limited via their transport into intracellular sub-compartments, the aggresomes, where misfolded proteins are stored or cleared via autophagy. We have identified a region of the acetyltransferase p300 that is highly disordered and displays similarities with prion-like domains. We show that this region is encoded as an alternative spliced variant independently of the acetyltransferase domain, and provides an interaction interface for various misfolded proteins, promoting their aggregation. p300 enhances aggregation of TAU and of p53 and is a component of cellular aggregates in both tissue culture cells and in alpha-synuclein positive Lewy bodies of patients affected by Parkinson disease. Down-regulation of p300 impairs aggresome formation and enhances cytotoxicity induced by misfolded protein stress. These data unravel a novel activity of p300, offer new insights into the function of disordered domains and implicate p300 in pathological aggregation that occurs in neurodegeneration and cancer. PMID:23133622

  8. Priming affects the activity of a specific region of the promoter of the human beta interferon gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dron, M; Lacasa, M; Tovey, M G

    1990-01-01

    Treatment of Daudi or HeLa cells with human interferon (IFN) alpha 8 before induction with either poly(I)-poly(C) or Sendai virus resulted in an 8- to 100-fold increase in IFN production. The extent of priming in Daudi cells paralleled the increase in the intracellular content of IFN-beta mRNA. IFN-alpha mRNA remained undetectable in poly(I)-poly(C)-treated Daudi cells either before or after priming. An IFN-resistant clone of Daudi cells was found to produce 4- to 20-fold more IFN after priming, indicating that priming was unrelated to the phenotype of IFN sensitivity. IFN treatment of either Daudi or HeLa cells transfected with the human IFN-beta promoter (-282 to -37) linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene resulted in an increase in CAT activity after induction with poly(I)-poly(C) or Sendai virus. A synthetic double-stranded oligonucleotide corresponding to an authentic 30-base-pair (bp) region of the human IFN-beta promoter between positions -91 and -62 was found to confer virus inducibility upon the reporter CAT gene in HeLa cells. IFN treatment of HeLa cells transfected with this 30-bp region of the IFN-beta promoter in either the correct or reversed orientation also increased CAT activity upon subsequent induction. IFN treatment alone had no detectable effect on the activity of either the 30-bp region or the complete human IFN promoter. Images PMID:2153928

  9. Synergistic transcriptional activation of the mouse urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) gene and of its enhancer activator protein 1 (AP1) site by cAMP and retinoic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Mira-Y-Lopez, R; Jaramillo, S; Jing, Y

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism whereby all-trans retinoic acid (tRA) potentiates the 8-bromo-cAMP (8-BrcAMP)-dependent transcription of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) gene in SC115 mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Photoaffinity labelling experiments showed that tRA did not alter the cellular content of cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunits I and II. In agreement with this, nuclear run-on analysis in the presence of the translational inhibitor puromycin demonstrated that the effect of 8-BrcAMP and its potentiation by tRA were independent of protein synthesis. A transiently transfected 6.6 kb uPA 5'-flanking region-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) fusion gene mimicked the response of the endogenous uPA gene. Thus 1 mM 8-BrcAMP induced a 100-200% increase in CAT content, 100 nM tRA had no effect and 100 nM tRA+1 mM 8-BrcAMP induced a 300-500% increase in cells co-transfected with tRA receptor and/or 9-cis-RA receptor. Analysis of 5'-deleted constructs showed that the tRA effect required at least two cis regions: -2657 to -2186, encompassing the 100 bp uPA enhancer, and -709 to -324, which exhibited silencing activity. Neither region contained a tRA-response element-like motif. Because tRA receptor and 9-cis-RA receptor interact with activator protein 1 (AP1), we tested whether tRA regulated the uPA enhancer AP1 site in the presence of 8-BrcAMP. We found that a dimer of this site fused to a minimal uPA-CAT fusion gene was responsive to 1 mM 8-BrcAMP (100% CAT increase), not responsive to 100 nM tRA, and synergistically responsive to 100 nM tRA+1 mM 8-BrcAMP (240% CAT increase) in cells co-transfected with Fos and Jun. Synergistic activation of the same construct and of the 6.6 kb uPA-CAT fusion gene was also obtained using tRA and 100 nM PMA. We conclude that multiple cis elements, probably including the uPA enhancer AP1 site, mediate the tRA potentiation of uPA transcription. PMID:9560322

  10. A cat with acute myeloblastic leukemia without maturation (M1) treated with combination chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mashita, Tadahisa; Shimoda, Tetsuya; Yoshioka, Hisao; Takahashi, Yasushi; Mitsuda, Masashi

    2006-01-01

    A 2-year-old domestic shorthair cat was presented to us with decreased activity and anorexia. Hematologic findings revealed a mild non-regenerative anemia, thrombocytopenia, and leukocytosis with an increase in blast cells. Bone marrow aspirates also revealed a marked increase of blasts. The blastic cells were shown to be positive for peroxidase. Acute myeloblastic leukemia without maturation (M1) was diagnosed according to the FAB classification. Chemotherapy was initiated with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisolone, and cytosine arabinoside. The cat responded partially. In total, the cats were given 7 blood transfusions. The cat died 14 weeks after first being presented to us.

  11. Association between polymorphisms at N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) & risk of oral leukoplakia & cancer

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Mousumi; Ghosh, Saurabh; Roy, Bidyut

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: N-acetyltransferases 1 and 2 (NAT1 and NAT2) are important enzymes for metabolism of tobacco carcinogens. Due to polymorphisms, improper activities of these enzymes might lead to the formation of DNA adducts that may modulate risk of tobacco related oral precancer and cancer. Previously, it was shown that NAT2 polymorphisms did not modulate the risk of oral precancer and cancer. We undertook this study to check whether polymorphisms at NAT1 can modulate the risk of oral leukoplakia and cancer either alone or in combination with NAT2. Methods: Genotypes at four SNPs on NAT1 were determined by TaqMan method in 389 controls, 224 leukoplakia and 310 cancer patients. Genotype data were analyzed to know haplotypes and acetylation status of individuals and, then to estimate the risk of diseases. Using our previously published NAT2 data, combination of NAT1 and NAT2 acetylation genotypes of patients and controls were also analyzed to estimate the risk of diseases. Results: Analysis of NAT1 genotype data revealed that 1088T and 1095C alleles exist in strong linkage disequilibrium (r2=0.97, P<0.0001) and SNPs are in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (P=0.1). Wild type or normal acetylating and variant or rapid acetylating alleles were two major alleles (frequencies 0.62 and 0.36, respectively) present in the control population. NAT1 rapid acetylation could not modulate the risk of leukoplakia and cancer (OR=0.9, 95% CI: 0.6-1.3; OR=1.0, 95% CI: 0.7-1.4, respectively). Analysis of combined NAT1 and NAT2 acetylating data also showed no significant enhancement of the risk of diseases. Interpretation & conclusions: NAT1 rapid acetylation alone as well as combination of NAT1 rapid-NAT2 slow acetylation did not modulate the risk of oral precancer and cancer in our patient population. So, NAT1/NAT2 metabolized carcinogen products may not be involved in tobacco related oral precancer and cancer. It may be interpreted that large sample size as well as combination of

  12. Diuretic renal scintigraphy in normal cats.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Silke; Lane, India F; Daniel, Gregory B; Morandi, Federica; Sharp, Dorothy E

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a protocol for diuretic renal scintigraphy (renography) in cats and describe normal findings. 99mTc-DTPA renal scintigraphy was performed twice in 10 healthy cats. Furosemide or saline were injected 4.5 min after radiopharmaceutical administration for the diuretic or control scan, respectively. A dynamic acquisition was performed for 8 min. The following parameters were evaluated: (1) global and individual glomerular filtration rate (GFR); (2) shape of the time-activity curve (TAC); (3) time of peak (TOP); (4) individual kidney excretion half-time (T1/2) of the radiopharmaceutical; (5) percentage of maximum activity measured at the end of the study. Global GFR in the control studies (2.79 +/- 0.83 ml/min/kg, mean +/- SD) did not differ significantly from the diuretic scans (2.34 +/- 0.51 ml/min/kg). The shape of most (16/ 20) TAC of diuretic renograms was similar to those of control renograms. The TOP of the diuretic renogram curves was 3.06 +/- 0.58 min, and did not differ from that of the control scans (3.01 +/- 0.61 min). T1/2 of the diuretic renograms was significantly shorter (5.15 +/- 0.83 min) than that of the control renograms (6.31 +/- 1.50 min). A significantly lower percentage of maximum activity was present at the end of the study in diuretic renograms (median: 47.25%; range: 33.60-59.60%) compared with control renograms (63.40%; 30.00-69.40%). Diuretic renal scintigraphy is a noninvasive and fast procedure to perform in cats. The applicability of this technique needs to be investigated in patients with significantly impaired renal function and obstructive uropathies.

  13. Four cats with fungal rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Beth L; Broussard, John; Stefanacci, Joseph D

    2005-02-01

    Fungal rhinitis is uncommon in the cat and cases of nasal aspergillosis-penicilliosis have been rarely reported. Signs of fungal rhinitis include epistaxis, sneezing, mucopurulent nasal discharge and exophthalmos. Brachycephalic feline breeds seem to be at increased risk for development of nasal aspergillosis-penicilliosis. Computed tomography (CT) imaging and rhinoscopy are useful in assessing the extent of the disease and in obtaining diagnostic samples. Fungal culture may lead to false negative or positive results and must be used in conjunction with other diagnostic tests. Serological testing was not useful in two cats tested. The cats in this study were treated with oral itraconazole therapy. When itraconazole therapy was discontinued prematurely, clinical signs recurred. Hepatotoxicosis is a possible sequel to itraconazole therapy.

  14. Devil declines and catastrophic cascades: is mesopredator release of feral cats inhibiting recovery of the eastern quoll?

    PubMed

    Fancourt, Bronwyn A; Hawkins, Clare E; Cameron, Elissa Z; Jones, Menna E; Nicol, Stewart C

    2015-01-01

    The eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus) is a medium-sized Australian marsupial carnivore that has recently undergone a rapid and severe population decline over the 10 years to 2009, with no sign of recovery. This decline has been linked to a period of unfavourable weather, but subsequent improved weather conditions have not been matched by quoll recovery. A recent study suggested another mechanism: that declines in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) populations, due to the spread of the fatal Devil Facial Tumour Disease, have released feral cats (Felis catus) from competitive suppression, with eastern quoll declines linked to a subsequent increase in cat sightings. Yet current evidence of intraguild suppression among devils, cats and quolls is scant and equivocal. We therefore assessed the influences of top-down effects on abundance and activity patterns among devils, feral cats and eastern quolls. Between 2011 and 2013, we monitored four carnivore populations using longitudinal trapping and camera surveys, and performed camera surveys at 12 additional sites throughout the eastern quoll's range. We did not find evidence of a negative relationship between devil and cat abundance, nor of higher cat abundance in areas where devil populations had declined the longest. Cats did not appear to avoid devils spatially; however, there was evidence of temporal separation of cat and devil activity, with reduced separation and increasing nocturnal activity observed in areas where devils had declined the longest. Cats and quolls used the same areas, and there was no evidence that cat and quoll abundances were negatively related. Temporal overlap in observed cat and quoll activity was higher in summer than in winter, but this seasonal difference was unrelated to devil declines. We suggest that cats did not cause the recent quoll decline, but that predation of juvenile quolls by cats could be inhibiting low density quoll populations from recovering their former abundance

  15. G9a-mediated methylation of ERα links the PHF20/MOF histone acetyltransferase complex to hormonal gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Peng, Danni; Xi, Yuanxin; Yuan, Chao; Sagum, Cari A.; Klein, Brianna J.; Tanaka, Kaori; Wen, Hong; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.; Li, Wei; Bedford, Mark T.; Shi, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    The euchromatin histone methyltransferase 2 (also known as G9a) methylates histone H3K9 to repress gene expression, but it also acts as a coactivator for some nuclear receptors. The molecular mechanisms underlying this activation remain elusive. Here we show that G9a functions as a coactivator of the endogenous oestrogen receptor α (ERα) in breast cancer cells in a histone methylation-independent manner. G9a dimethylates ERα at K235 both in vitro and in cells. Dimethylation of ERαK235 is recognized by the Tudor domain of PHF20, which recruits the MOF histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex to ERα target gene promoters to deposit histone H4K16 acetylation promoting active transcription. Together, our data suggest the molecular mechanism by which G9a functions as an ERα coactivator. Along with the PHF20/MOF complex, G9a links the crosstalk between ERα methylation and histone acetylation that governs the epigenetic regulation of hormonal gene expression. PMID:26960573

  16. Melatonin production in Escherichia coli by dual expression of serotonin N-acetyltransferase and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin is a well-known bioactive molecule produced in animals and plants and a well-studied natural compound. Two enzymatic steps are required for the biosynthesis of melatonin from serotonin. First, serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) catalyzes serotonin to N-acetylserotonin (NAS) followed by the action of N-acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT), resulting in the synthesis of O-methylated NAS, also known as melatonin. Attempts to document melatonin production in Escherichia coli have been unsuccessful to date due to either low enzyme activity or inactive ASMT expression. Here, we employed caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) instead of ASMT, as COMT is a multifunctional enzyme that has ASMT activity as well. Among several combinations of dual expression cassettes, recombinant E. coli that expressed sheep SNAT with rice COMT produced a high quantity of melatonin, which was measured in a culture medium (1.46 mg/L in response to 1 mM serotonin). This level was several orders of magnitude higher than that produced in transgenic rice and tomato overexpressing sheep SNAT and ASMT, respectively. This heterologous expression system can be widely employed to screen various putative SNAT or ASMT genes from animals and plants as well as to overproduce melatonin in various useful microorganisms.

  17. Nuclear Arc Interacts with the Histone Acetyltransferase Tip60 to Modify H4K12 Acetylation1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Caroline L.; Teo, Shaun; Oey, Nicodemus E.; Wright, Graham D.; VanDongen, Hendrika M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Arc is an immediate-early gene whose genetic ablation selectively abrogates long-term memory, indicating a critical role in memory consolidation. Although Arc protein is found at synapses, it also localizes to the neuronal nucleus, where its function is less understood. Nuclear Arc forms a complex with the β-spectrin isoform βSpIVΣ5 and associates with PML bodies, sites of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. We report here a novel interaction between Arc and Tip60, a histone-acetyltransferase and subunit of a chromatin-remodelling complex, using biochemistry and super-resolution microscopy in primary rat hippocampal neurons. Arc and βSpIVΣ5 are recruited to nuclear Tip60 speckles, and the three proteins form a tight complex that localizes to nuclear perichromatin regions, sites of transcriptional activity. Neuronal activity-induced expression of Arc (1) increases endogenous nuclear Tip60 puncta, (2) recruits Tip60 to PML bodies, and (3) increases histone acetylation of Tip60 substrate H4K12, a learning-induced chromatin modification. These mechanisms point to an epigenetic role for Arc in regulating memory consolidation. PMID:26464963

  18. Camello, a novel family of Histone Acetyltransferases that acetylate histone H4 and is essential for zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Karmodiya, Krishanpal; Anamika, Krishanpal; Muley, Vijaykumar; Pradhan, Saurabh J.; Bhide, Yoshita; Galande, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated genome-wide occurrence of Histone Acetyltransferases (HATs) in genomes of Mus musculus and Danio rerio on the basis of presence of HAT domain. Our study identified a group of proteins that lacks characteristic features of known HAT families, relatively smaller in size and has no other associated domains. Most of the proteins in this unclassified group are Camello proteins, which are not yet known and classified as functional HATs. Our in vitro and in vivo analysis revealed that Camello family proteins are active HATs and exhibit specificity towards histone H4. Interestingly, Camello proteins are among the first identified HATs showing perinuclear localization. Moreover, Camello proteins are evolutionarily conserved in all chordates and are observed for the first time in cnidarians in phylogeny. Furthermore, knockdown of Camello protein (CMLO3) in zebrafish embryos exhibited defects in axis elongation and head formation. Thus, our study identified a novel family of active HATs that is specific for histone H4 acetylation, exhibits perinuclear localization and is essential for zebrafish development. PMID:25123547

  19. Homologues of xenobiotic metabolizing N-acetyltransferases in plant-associated fungi: Novel functions for an old enzyme family

    PubMed Central

    Karagianni, Eleni P.; Kontomina, Evanthia; Davis, Britton; Kotseli, Barbara; Tsirka, Theodora; Garefalaki, Vasiliki; Sim, Edith; Glenn, Anthony E.; Boukouvala, Sotiria

    2015-01-01

    Plant-pathogenic fungi and their hosts engage in chemical warfare, attacking each other with toxic products of secondary metabolism and defending themselves via an arsenal of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. One such enzyme is homologous to arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) and has been identified in Fusarium infecting cereal plants as responsible for detoxification of host defence compound 2-benzoxazolinone. Here we investigate functional diversification of NAT enzymes in crop-compromising species of Fusarium and Aspergillus, identifying three groups of homologues: Isoenzymes of the first group are found in all species and catalyse reactions with acetyl-CoA or propionyl-CoA. The second group is restricted to the plant pathogens and is active with malonyl-CoA in Fusarium species infecting cereals. The third group generates minimal activity with acyl-CoA compounds that bind non-selectively to the proteins. We propose that fungal NAT isoenzymes may have evolved to perform diverse functions, potentially relevant to pathogen fitness, acetyl-CoA/propionyl-CoA intracellular balance and secondary metabolism. PMID:26245863

  20. The histone acetyltransferases CBP and Chameau integrate developmental and DNA replication programs in Drosophila ovarian follicle cells.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Kristopher H; Dixon, Michael; Calvi, Brian R

    2012-10-01

    DNA replication origin activity changes during development. Chromatin modifications are known to influence the genomic location of origins and the time during S phase that they initiate replication in different cells. However, how chromatin regulates origins in concert with cell differentiation remains poorly understood. Here, we use developmental gene amplification in Drosophila ovarian follicle cells as a model to investigate how chromatin modifiers regulate origins in a developmental context. We find that the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) Chameau (Chm) binds to amplicon origins and is partially required for their function. Depletion of Chm had relatively mild effects on origins during gene amplification and genomic replication compared with previous knockdown of its ortholog HBO1 in human cells, which has severe effects on origin function. We show that another HAT, CBP (Nejire), also binds amplicon origins and is partially required for amplification. Knockdown of Chm and CBP together had a more severe effect on nucleosome acetylation and amplicon origin activity than knockdown of either HAT alone, suggesting that these HATs collaborate in origin regulation. In addition to their local function at the origin, we show that Chm and CBP also globally regulate the developmental transition of follicle cells into the amplification stages of oogenesis. Our results reveal a complexity of origin epigenetic regulation by multiple HATs during development and suggest that chromatin modifiers are a nexus that integrates differentiation and DNA replication programs.