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Sample records for acgih threshold limit

  1. Sampling and Analysis Issues Relating to the ACGIH Notice of Intended Change for the Beryllium Threshold Limit Value

    SciTech Connect

    Brisson, Michael J.; Ashley, Kevin

    2005-08-16

    Beryllium in various forms is widely used throughout the world in ceramics, aerospace and military applications, electronics, and sports equipment. Workplace exposure to beryllium is a growing industrial hygiene concern due to the potential for development of chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a lung condition with no known cure, in a small percentage of those exposed. There are workplace exposure limits for beryllium that have been in place for several decades. However, recent studies suggest that the current American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) may not be sufficiently protective for workers who are potentially exposed to airborne beryllium. Early in 2005, ACGIH issued a Notice of Intended Change (NIC) to the current TLV for beryllium which entails a 100-fold reduction (from 2 to 0.02 micrograms per cubic meter of sampled air). It is noted that ACGIH TLVs do not carry legal force in the manner that OSHA PELs or other federal regulations do. Nevertheless, OSHA plans a beryllium rulemaking in the near future, and a reduction in the PEL is anticipated. Also, if this change in the TLV for beryllium is adopted, it is reasonable to assume that at least some sampling and analysis activities will need to be modified to address airborne beryllium at the lower levels. There are implications to both the industrial hygiene and the laboratory communities, which are discussed.

  2. Exposure–response relationships for the ACGIH threshold limit value for hand-activity level: results from a pooled data study of carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kapellusch, Jay M; Gerr, Frederic E; Malloy, Elizabeth J; Garg, Arun; Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Bao, Stephen S; Burt, Susan E; Dale, Ann Marie; Eisen, Ellen A; Evanoff, Bradley A; Hegmann, Kurt T; Silverstein, Barbara A; Theise, Matthew S; Rempel, David M

    2014-01-01

    Objective This paper aimed to quantify exposure–response relationships between the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists’ (ACGIH) threshold limit value (TLV) for hand-activity level (HAL) and incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods Manufacturing and service workers previously studied by six research institutions had their data combined and re-analyzed. CTS cases were defined by symptoms and abnormal nerve conduction. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using proportional hazards regression after adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, and CTS predisposing conditions. Results The longitudinal study comprised 2751 incident-eligible workers, followed prospectively for up to 6.4 years and contributing 6243 person-years of data. Associations were found between CTS and TLV for HAL both as a continuous variable [HR 1.32 per unit, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.11–1.57] and when categorized using the ACGIH action limit (AL) and TLV. Those between the AL and TLV and above the TLV had HR of 1.7 (95% CI 1.2–2.5) and 1.5 (95% CI 1.0–2.1), respectively. As independent variables (in the same adjusted model) the HR for peak force (PF) and HAL were 1.14 per unit (95% CI 1.05–1.25), and 1.04 per unit (95% CI 0.93–1.15), respectively. Conclusion Those with exposures above the AL were at increased risk of CTS, but there was no further increase in risk for workers above the TLV. This suggests that the current AL may not be sufficiently protective of workers. Combinations of PF and HAL are useful for predicting risk of CTS. PMID:25266844

  3. Quantitative level of protection offered to workers by ACGIH threshold limit values occupational exposure limits.

    PubMed

    Jayjock, M A; Lewis, P G; Lynch, J R

    2001-01-01

    The details of the example or modeling methodologies used herein are not critical to the general point of this article, which advises the estimation of residual risk at the OEL by using some quantitative modeling structure. Specifically, the authors believe that an explicit attempt to gauge the level of residual risk at the OEL based on conceptual stochastic models with transparent and testable assumptions could be seen as an important enhancement to the process. This is especially true in sharing the OEL deliberations and explaining OEL decisions to the stakeholders. Indeed, if this approach is used, it is critically important to understand and continually communicate that this "cloud of uncertainty" represents model estimates in which the true risk would most likely be less than worst case estimates and could possibly be zero. It is also possible but highly unlikely that it could be higher than the worst case upper-bound estimate. The above quantitative estimation scheme represents a possible improvement that could provide a reasoned attempt on the part of the risk assessors to use rational science (i.e., conceptual models with transparent and testable assumptions) to inform all of the OEL users and stakeholders of their meaning. PMID:11258867

  4. Job level risk assessment using task level ACGIH hand activity level TLV scores: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Drinkaus, Phillip; Sesek, Richard; Bloswick, Donald S; Mann, Clay; Bernard, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Existing upper extremity musculoskeletal disorder analytical tools are primarily intended for single or mono-task jobs. However, many jobs contain more than 1 task and some include job rotation. This case/control study investigates methods of modifying an existing tool, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Hand Activity Level (HAL) Threshold Limit Value (TLV), to assess the upper extremity risk of multi-task jobs. Various methods of combining the task differences and ratios into a job level assessment were explored. Two methods returned significant odds ratios, (p < .05) of 18.0 (95% CI 1.8-172) and 12.0 (95% CI 1.2-120). These results indicate that a modified ACGIH HAL TLV may provide insight into the work-related risk of multi-task jobs. Further research is needed to optimize this process. PMID:16219155

  5. 45 CFR 149.115 - Cost threshold and cost limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....115 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE EARLY RETIREE REINSURANCE PROGRAM Reinsurance Amounts § 149.115 Cost threshold and cost limit. The following cost threshold and cost limits apply individually, to each early retiree as...

  6. 45 CFR 149.115 - Cost threshold and cost limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....115 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE EARLY RETIREE REINSURANCE PROGRAM Reinsurance Amounts § 149.115 Cost threshold and cost limit. The following cost threshold and cost limits apply individually, to each early retiree as...

  7. 45 CFR 149.115 - Cost threshold and cost limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....115 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE EARLY RETIREE REINSURANCE PROGRAM Reinsurance Amounts § 149.115 Cost threshold and cost limit. The following cost threshold and cost limits apply individually, to each early retiree as...

  8. 45 CFR 149.115 - Cost threshold and cost limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....115 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE EARLY RETIREE REINSURANCE PROGRAM Reinsurance Amounts § 149.115 Cost threshold and cost limit. The following cost threshold and cost limits apply individually, to each early retiree as...

  9. 45 CFR 149.115 - Cost threshold and cost limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....115 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE EARLY RETIREE REINSURANCE PROGRAM Reinsurance Amounts § 149.115 Cost threshold and cost limit. The following cost threshold and cost limits apply individually, to each early retiree as...

  10. Comparative reproducibility of defibrillation threshold and upper limit of vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, C D; Davie, S; Ahern, T; Chen, P S

    1996-12-01

    The upper limit of vulnerability (ULV) is the strength at or above which VF is not induced when a stimulus is delivered during the vulnerable phase of the cardiac cycle. Previous studies have demonstrated a statistically significant correlation between the ULV and the defibrillation threshold (DFT) in groups of patients. However, the correlation between ULV and DFT may not be close in individual patients. This imperfect correlation may be due to physiological factors or to limitations of the measurement methods. The reproducibility of either DFT or ULV has not been studied critically. The purpose of this study was to compare the reproducibility of clinically applicable methods for determination of DFT and ULV. We prospectively studied 25 patients with a transvenous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (Medtronic 7219D) at postoperative electrophysiological study. DFT was defined as the lowest energy that defibrillated after 10 seconds of VF. The ULV was defined as the lowest energy that did not induce VF with three shocks at 0, 20, and 40 ms before the peak of the T wave in ventricular paced rhythm at a cycle length of 500 ms. Both the DFT and the ULV were determined twice for biphasic pulses using a three-step, midpoint protocol. There was no significant difference between the two determinations of DFT (10.1 +/- 5.9 J vs 10.4 +/- 5.8 J), the two determinations of ULV (13.4 +/- 6.8 J vs 13.8 +/- 6.6) or the DFT-ULV Pearson correlation coefficients for each determination (0.84, P < 0.001 vs 0.75, P < 0.001). To analyze reproducibility, Lin concordance coefficients for second determination versus first determination were constructed for both ULV and DFT. This coefficient is similar to the Pearson correlation coefficient, but measures closeness to the line of identity rather than the line of regression. The Lin concordance coefficient for ULV was higher than that for DFT (0.93, 95% CI 0.85-0.97 vs 0.64, 95% CI 0.33-0.82; P < 0.01). For paired comparison of

  11. The limits of thresholds: silica and the politics of science, 1935 to 1990.

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, G; Rosner, D

    1995-01-01

    Since the 1930s threshold limit values have been presented as an objectively established measure of US industrial safety. However, there have been important questions raised regarding the adequacy of these thresholds for protecting workers from silicosis. This paper explores the historical debates over silica threshold limit values and the intense political negotiation that accompanied their establishment. In the 1930s and early 1940s, a coalition of business, public health, insurance, and political interests formed in response to a widely perceived "silicosis crisis." Part of the resulting program aimed at containing the crisis was the establishment of threshold limit values. Yet silicosis cases continued to be documented. By the 1960s these cases had become the basis for a number of revisions to the thresholds. In the 1970s, following a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommendation to lower the threshold limit value for silica and to eliminate sand as an abrasive in blasting, industry fought attempts to make the existing values more stringent. This paper traces the process by which threshold limit values became part of a compromise between the health of workers and the economic interests of industry. Images p254-a p256-a p257-a p259-a PMID:7856788

  12. The uncertainty threshold principle - Fundamental limitations of optimal decision making under dynamic uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.; Ku, R.; Gershwin, S. B.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental limitations of the optimal control of dynamic systems with random parameters are analyzed by studying a scalar linear-quadratic optimal control example. It is demonstrated that optimum long-range decision making is possible only if the dynamic uncertainty (quantified by the means and covariances of the random parameters) is below a certain threshold. If this threshold is exceeded, there do not exist optimum decision rules. This phenomenon is called the 'uncertainty threshold principle'. The implications of this phenomenon to the field of modelling, identification, and adaptive control are discussed.

  13. The Uncertainty Threshold Principle: Some Fundamental Limitations of Optimal Decision Making Under Dynamic Uncertainity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.; Ku, R.; Gershwin, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    This note shows that the optimal control of dynamic systems with uncertain parameters has certain limitations. In particular, by means of a simple scalar linear-quadratic optimal control example, it is shown that the infinite horizon solution does not exist if the parameter uncertainty exceeds a certain quantifiable threshold; we call this the uncertainty threshold principle. The philosophical and design implications of this result are discussed.

  14. The uncertainty threshold principle - Some fundamental limitations of optimal decision making under dynamic uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.; Ku, R.; Gershwin, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    This note shows that the optimal control of dynamic systems with uncertain parameters has certain limitations. In particular, by means of a simple scalar linear-quadratic optimal control example, it is shown that the infinite horizon solution does not exist if the parameter uncertainty exceeds a certain quantifiable threshold; we call this the uncertainty threshold principle. The philosophical and design implications of this result are discussed.

  15. Incorporation of trace elements in Portland cement clinker: Thresholds limits for Cu, Ni, Sn or Zn

    SciTech Connect

    Gineys, N.; Aouad, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Damidot, D.

    2011-11-15

    This paper aims at defining precisely, the threshold limits for several trace elements (Cu, Ni, Sn or Zn) which correspond to the maximum amount that could be incorporated into a standard clinker whilst reaching the limit of solid solution of its four major phases (C{sub 3}S, C{sub 2}S, C{sub 3}A and C{sub 4}AF). These threshold limits were investigated through laboratory synthesised clinkers that were mainly studied by X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The reference clinker was close to a typical Portland clinker (65% C{sub 3}S, 18% C{sub 2}S, 8% C{sub 3}A and 8% C{sub 4}AF). The threshold limits for Cu, Ni, Zn and Sn are quite high with respect to the current contents in clinker and were respectively equal to 0.35, 0.5, 0.7 and 1 wt.%. It appeared that beyond the defined threshold limits, trace elements had different behaviours. Ni was associated with Mg as a magnesium nickel oxide (MgNiO{sub 2}) and Sn reacted with lime to form a calcium stannate (Ca{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}). Cu changed the crystallisation process and affected therefore the formation of C{sub 3}S. Indeed a high content of Cu in clinker led to the decomposition of C{sub 3}S into C{sub 2}S and of free lime. Zn, in turn, affected the formation of C{sub 3}A. Ca{sub 6}Zn{sub 3}Al{sub 4}O{sub 15} was formed whilst a tremendous reduction of C{sub 3}A content was identified. The reactivity of cements made with the clinkers at the threshold limits was followed by calorimetry and compressive strength measurements on cement paste. The results revealed that the doped cements were at least as reactive as the reference cement.

  16. On the difference of H-mode power threshold in divertor and limiter tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalupin, D.; Tokar, M. Z.; Unterberg, B.; Loozen, X.; Pilipenko, D.; Zagorski, R.; Contributors, TEXTOR

    2006-05-01

    The difference in the H-mode power threshold in divertor and limiter configurations is numerically investigated by analysing the effect of boundary conditions imposed on the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS) and given by prescribed density and temperature e-folding lengths, δn and δT, respectively. It is demonstrated that the variation of δn and δT significantly affects the H-mode power threshold. This is explained by the change in the balance between conductive and convective heat losses at the edge. For the ratio δn/δT large enough, when the convective loss does not exceed 45% of the total power, the threshold agrees well with the experimental multi-machine scaling for divertor tokamaks. With reduction in δn/δT and increase in convective loss above this critical level, the power threshold significantly exceeds the scaling, in agreement with observations on different limiter tokamaks. By considering the power and particle balances in the scrape-off layer it is shown that the ratio δn/δT is controlled by the distance which recycling neutrals pass before entering the confined plasma and which is normally much larger in divertor machines than in the limiter ones. The calculations for the limiter tokamak TEXTOR have predicted the experimentally found conditions for the L H transition in advance.

  17. 77 FR 9925 - Price Index Adjustments for Expenditure Limitations and Lobbyist Bundling Disclosure Threshold

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... Price Index Adjustments for Expenditure Limitations and Lobbyist Bundling Disclosure Threshold AGENCY... forth in the Act, to index the amounts for inflation. Additional details appear in the supplemental... reflect changes in the consumer price index. See 2 U.S.C. 434(i)(3)(B) and 441a(c)(1), 11 CFR...

  18. 75 FR 8353 - Price Index Adjustments for Expenditure Limitations and Lobbyist Bundling Disclosure Threshold

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... Price Index Adjustments for Expenditure Limitations and Lobbyist Bundling Disclosure Threshold AGENCY... forth in the Act, to index the amounts for inflation. Additional details appear in the supplemental...)(A)) are adjusted periodically to reflect changes in the consumer price index. See 2 U.S.C....

  19. Analyzing threshold pressure limitations in microfluidic transistors for self-regulated microfluidic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Takayama, Shuichi

    2012-12-01

    This paper reveals a critical limitation in the electro-hydraulic analogy between a microfluidic membrane-valve (μMV) and an electronic transistor. Unlike typical transistors that have similar on and off threshold voltages, in hydraulic μMVs, the threshold pressures for opening and closing are significantly different and can change, even for the same μMVs depending on overall circuit design and operation conditions. We explain, in particular, how the negative values of the closing threshold pressures significantly constrain operation of even simple hydraulic μMV circuits such as autonomously switching two-valve microfluidic oscillators. These understandings have significant implications in designing self-regulated microfluidic devices.

  20. Analyzing threshold pressure limitations in microfluidic transistors for self-regulated microfluidic circuits

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Takayama, Shuichi

    2012-01-01

    This paper reveals a critical limitation in the electro-hydraulic analogy between a microfluidic membrane-valve (μMV) and an electronic transistor. Unlike typical transistors that have similar on and off threshold voltages, in hydraulic μMVs, the threshold pressures for opening and closing are significantly different and can change, even for the same μMVs depending on overall circuit design and operation conditions. We explain, in particular, how the negative values of the closing threshold pressures significantly constrain operation of even simple hydraulic μMV circuits such as autonomously switching two-valve microfluidic oscillators. These understandings have significant implications in designing self-regulated microfluidic devices. PMID:23284181

  1. Critical Thresholds and the Limit Distribution in the Bak-Sneppen Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meester, Ronald; Znamenski, Dmitri

    One of the key problems related to the Bak-Sneppen evolution model is to compute the limit distribution of the fitnesses in the stationary regime, as the size of the system tends to infinity. Simulations in [3, 1, 4] suggest that the one-dimensional limit marginal distribution is uniform on (pc, 1), for some pc 0.667. In this paper we define three critical thresholds related to avalanche characteristics. We prove that if these critical thresholds are the same and equal to some pc (we can only prove that two of them are the same) then the limit distribution is the product of uniform distributions on (pc, 1), and moreover pc<0.75. Our proofs are based on a self-similar graphical representation of the avalanches.

  2. Laser damage threshold of gelatin and a copper phthalocyanine doped gelatin optical limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Brant, M.C.; McLean, D.G.; Sutherland, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    The authors demonstrate optical limiting in a unique guest-host system which uses neither the typical liquid or solid host. Instead, they dope a gelatin gel host with a water soluble Copper (II) phthalocyaninetetrasulfonic acid, tetrasodium salt (CuPcTs). They report on the gelatin`s viscoelasticity, laser damage threshold, and self healing of this damage. The viscoelastic gelatin has mechanical properties quite different than a liquid or solid. The authors` laser measurements demonstrate that the single shot damage threshold of the undoped gelatin host increases with decreasing gelatin concentration. The gelatin also has a much higher laser damage threshold than a stiff acrylic. Unlike brittle solids, the soft gelatin self heals from laser induced damage. Optical limiting test also show the utility of a gelatin host doped with CuPcTs. The CuPcTs/gelatin matrix is not damaged at incident laser energies 5 times the single shot damage threshold of the gelatin host. However, at this high laser energy the CuPcTs is photo bleached at the beam waist. The authors repair photo bleached sites by annealing the CuPcTs/gelatin matrix.

  3. Using self-organizing maps to determine observation threshold limit predictions in highly variant data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paganoni, C.A.; Chang, K.C.; Robblee, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    A significant data quality challenge for highly variant systems surrounds the limited ability to quantify operationally reasonable limits on the data elements being collected and provide reasonable threshold predictions. In many instances, the number of influences that drive a resulting value or operational range is too large to enable physical sampling for each influencer, or is too complicated to accurately model in an explicit simulation. An alternative method to determine reasonable observation thresholds is to employ an automation algorithm that would emulate a human analyst visually inspecting data for limits. Using the visualization technique of self-organizing maps (SOM) on data having poorly understood relationships, a methodology for determining threshold limits was developed. To illustrate this approach, analysis of environmental influences that drive the abundance of a target indicator species (the pink shrimp, Farfantepenaeus duorarum) provided a real example of applicability. The relationship between salinity and temperature and abundance of F. duorarum is well documented, but the effect of changes in water quality upstream on pink shrimp abundance is not well understood. The highly variant nature surrounding catch of a specific number of organisms in the wild, and the data available from up-stream hydrology measures for salinity and temperature, made this an ideal candidate for the approach to provide a determination about the influence of changes in hydrology on populations of organisms.

  4. A frequency-duty cycle equation for the ACGIH hand activity level.

    PubMed

    Radwin, Robert G; Azari, David P; Lindstrom, Mary J; Ulin, Sheryl S; Armstrong, Thomas J; Rempel, David

    2015-01-01

    A new equation for predicting the hand activity level (HAL) used in the American Conference for Government Industrial Hygienists threshold limit value®(TLV®) was based on exertion frequency (F) and percentage duty cycle (D). The TLV® includes a table for estimating HAL from F and D originating from data in Latko et al. (Latko WA, Armstrong TJ, Foulke JA, Herrin GD, Rabourn RA, Ulin SS, Development and evaluation of an observational method for assessing repetition in hand tasks. American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, 58(4):278-285, 1997) and post hoc adjustments that include extrapolations outside of the data range. Multimedia video task analysis determined D for two additional jobs from Latko's study not in the original data-set, and a new nonlinear regression equation was developed to better fit the data and create a more accurate table. The equation, HAL = 6:56 ln D[F(1:31) /1+3:18 F(1:31), generally matches the TLV® HAL lookup table, and is a substantial improvement over the linear model, particularly for F>1.25 Hz and D>60% jobs. The equation more closely fits the data and applies the TLV® using a continuous function. PMID:25343340

  5. The Impact of Different Permissible Exposure Limits on Hearing Threshold Levels Beyond 25 dBA

    PubMed Central

    Sayapathi, Balachandar S; Su, Anselm Ting; Koh, David

    2014-01-01

    Background: Development of noise-induced hearing loss is reliant on a few factors such as frequency, intensity, and duration of noise exposure. The occurrence of this occupational malady has doubled from 120 million to 250 million in a decade. Countries such as Malaysia, India, and the US have adopted 90 dBA as the permissible exposure limit. According to the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the exposure limit for noise is 90 dBA, while that of the US National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is 85 dBA for 8 hours of noise exposure. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the development of hearing threshold levels beyond 25 dBA on adoption of 85 dBA as the permissible exposure limit compared to 90 dBA. Patients and Methods: This is an intervention study done on two automobile factories. There were 203 employees exposed to noise levels beyond the action level. Hearing protection devices were distributed to reduce noise levels to a level between the permissible exposure limit and action level. The permissible exposure limits were 90 and 85 dBA in factories 1 and 2, respectively, while the action levels were 85 and 80 dBA, respectively. The hearing threshold levels of participants were measured at baseline and at first month of postshift exposure of noise. The outcome was measured by a manual audiometer. McNemar and chi-square tests were used in the statistical analysis. Results: We found that hearing threshold levels of more than 25 dBA has changed significantly from pre-intervention to post-intervention among participants from both factories (3000 Hz for the right ear and 2000 Hz for the left ear). There was a statistically significant association between participants at 3000 Hz on the right ear at ‘deteriorated’ level ( χ² (1) = 4.08, φ = - 0.142, P = 0.043), whereas there was worsening of hearing threshold beyond 25 dBA among those embraced 90 dBA. Conclusions: The adoption of 85 dBA as the permissible exposure

  6. The origin and development of the asbestos Threshold Limit Value: scientific indifference and corporate influence.

    PubMed

    Egilman, D S; Reinert, A A

    1995-01-01

    Several recent articles have critiqued the process employed by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists in determining Threshold Limit Values. Criticisms have included inadequate data collection, inadequate research, excessive corporate influence, and slow response to informational changes. In this article, the authors address the historical development of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' asbestos exposure guideline. They demonstrate that the proposed guideline was known to be inadequate when it was first proposed, was severely criticized between 1946 and 1968, but nonetheless was promulgated annually and remained unchanged 1971. PMID:8575867

  7. Thermally stable J-type phthalocyanine dimers as new non-linear absorbers for low-threshold optical limiters.

    PubMed

    Tolbin, Alexander Yu; Savelyev, Mikhail S; Gerasimenko, Alexander Yu; Tomilova, Larisa G; Zefirov, Nikolay S

    2016-06-21

    The possibility of developing new advanced optical limiters of laser radiation at 532 nm with low limiting thresholds has been demonstrated on thermally stable phthalocyanine J-type dimeric complexes of Mg, Zn, Cu, Ni, and Co. A new "threshold" model based on radiative transfer phenomena in nonlinear optical media was suggested for the exact definition of nonlinear absorption coefficient β and optical limiting threshold Ic. This model allows the determination of the optical characteristics of the limiter in the same active material with layers of different thicknesses, as well as the use of different parameters of laser radiation, such as cross-sectional spatial profiles of the laser beam and shapes of the laser pulse over time. The maximum value of the nonlinear absorption coefficient (β = 360 cm GW(-1)) and the lowest limiting threshold (Ic = 0.03 J cm(-2)) were estimated for a J-type zinc phthalocyanine dimer. PMID:27241278

  8. Bus mathematical model of acceleration threshold limit estimation in lateral rollover test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauchía, A.; Olmeda, E.; Aparicio, F.; Díaz, V.

    2011-10-01

    Vehicle safety is a major concerns for researchers, governments and vehicle manufacturers, and therefore a special attention is paid to it. Particularly, rollover is one of the types of accidents where researchers have focused due to the gravity of injuries and the social impact it generates. One of the parameters that define bus lateral behaviour is the acceleration threshold limit, which is defined as the lateral acceleration from which the rollover process begins to take place. This parameter can be obtained by means of a lateral rollover platform test or estimated by means of mathematical models. In this paper, the differences between these methods are deeply analysed, and a new mathematical model is proposed to estimate the acceleration threshold limit in the lateral rollover test. The proposed model simulates the lateral rollover test, and, for the first time, it includes the effect of a variable position of the centre of gravity. Finally, the maximum speed at which the bus can travel in a bend without rolling over is computed.

  9. Crossing the pedogenetic threshold: Apparent phosphorus limitation by soil microorganisms in unglaciated acidic eastern hardwood forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, J. L.; Smemo, K. A.; Burke, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    The availability of soil phosphorus (P) can significantly influence microbial community composition and the ecosystem-level processes they mediate. However, the threshold at which soil microorganisms become functionally P-limited is unclear because of soil acidity effect on P availability. We reason that acidic temperate hardwood forest ecosystems are, in fact, functionally P-limited, but compensation occur via soil microbial production of phosphatase enzymes. We tested this hypothesis in glaciated and unglaciated mature mixed-mesophytic forests in eastern Ohio where both soil pH and P availability had been experientially manipulated. We measured the activity of two P acquiring soil enzymes, phosphomonoesterase (PMono) and phosphodiesterase (PDi), to understand how soil acidity and available P influence microbial function. Our experimental treatments elevated ambient soil pH from below 4.5 to around 5.5 and increased readily available phosphate from 3 to ~25 mg P/kg on glaciated soils and from 0.5 to ~5 mg P/kg on unglaciated soils. The P treatment decreased the activity of PDi by 82% relative to the control on unglaciated soils, but we observed no P treatment effect on glaciated soils. A similar result was observed for PMono. Soil pH, alone, did not significantly influence enzyme activities. Results suggest that soil microorganisms are more likely to be P-limited in older unglaciated soils. However, dramatically higher phosphatase activity in response to very low P availability suggests that an underlying ecosystem P limitation can be ameliorated by soil microbial community dynamics. This mechanism may be more important for older, unglaciated soils that have already crossed a pedogenic threshold where P availability influences ecosystem and microbial function.

  10. Physiological limitation at alpine treeline: relationships of threshold responses of conifers to their establishment patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germino, M. J.; Lazarus, B.; Castanha, C.; Moyes, A. B.; Kueppers, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    An understanding of physiological limitations to tree establishment at alpine treeline form the basis for predicting how this climate-driven boundary will respond to climate shifts. Most research on this topic has focused on limitations related to carbon balance and growth of trees. Carbon balance could limit survival and establishment primarily through slow-acting, chronic means. We asked whether tree survival and thus establishment patterns reflect control by chronic effects in comparison to acute, threshold responses, such as survival of frost events. Seedling survivorship patterns were compared to thresholds in freezing (temperature causing leaf freezing, or freezing point, FP; and physiological response to freezing) and water status (turgor loss point, TLP; and related physiological adjustments). Subject seedlings were from forest, treeline, and alpine sites in the Alpine Treeline Warming Experiment in Colorado, and included limber and lodgepole pine (a low-elevation species), and Engelmann Spruce. Preliminary results show survival increases with seedling age, but the only corresponding increase in stress acclimation was photosynthetic resistance to freezing and TLP, not FP. Differences in survivorship among the species were not consistent with variation in FP but they generally agreed with variation in photosynthetic resistance to deep freezing and to early-season drought avoidance. Mortality of limber pine increased 35% when minimum temperatures decreased below -9C, which compares with FPs of >-8.6C, and about 1/3 of its mortality occurred during cold/wet events, particularly in the alpine. The other major correlate of mortality is midsummer drying events, as previously reported. Also in limber pine, the TLP for year-old seedlings (-2.5 MPa) corresponded with seasonal-drought mortality. In summary, we show several examples of correspondence in physiological thresholds to mortality events within a species, although the relationships are not strong. Across

  11. ZnO-PVA nanocomposite films for low threshold optical limiting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanath, Varsha; Beenakumari, C.; Muneera, C. I.

    2014-10-01

    Zinc oxide-PVA nanocomposite films were fabricated adopting a simple method based on solution-casting, incorporating small weight percentages (<1.2 wt%) of ZnO in PVA (˜0.625×10-3M to 7×10-3M), and their structure, morphology, linear and low threshold nonlinear optical properties were investigated. The films were characterized as nanostructured ZnO encapsulated between the molecules/chains of the semicrystalline host polymer PVA. The samples exhibited low threshold nonlinear absorption and negative nonlinear refraction, as studied using the Z-scan technique. A switchover from SA to RSA was observed as the concentration of ZnO was increased. The optical limiting of 632.8 nm CW laser light displayed by these nanocomposite films is also demonstrated. The estimated values of the effective coefficients of nonlinear absorption, nonlinear refraction and third-order nonlinear susceptibility, |χ(3)|, compared to those reported for continuous wave laser light excitation, measure up to the highest among them. The results show that the ZnO-PVA nanocomposite films have great potential applications in future optical and photonic devices.

  12. ZnO-PVA nanocomposite films for low threshold optical limiting applications

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanath, Varsha; Beenakumari, C.; Muneera, C. I.

    2014-10-15

    Zinc oxide-PVA nanocomposite films were fabricated adopting a simple method based on solution-casting, incorporating small weight percentages (<1.2 wt%) of ZnO in PVA (∼0.625×10{sup −3}M to 7×10{sup −3}M), and their structure, morphology, linear and low threshold nonlinear optical properties were investigated. The films were characterized as nanostructured ZnO encapsulated between the molecules/chains of the semicrystalline host polymer PVA. The samples exhibited low threshold nonlinear absorption and negative nonlinear refraction, as studied using the Z-scan technique. A switchover from SA to RSA was observed as the concentration of ZnO was increased. The optical limiting of 632.8 nm CW laser light displayed by these nanocomposite films is also demonstrated. The estimated values of the effective coefficients of nonlinear absorption, nonlinear refraction and third-order nonlinear susceptibility, |χ{sup (3)}|, compared to those reported for continuous wave laser light excitation, measure up to the highest among them. The results show that the ZnO-PVA nanocomposite films have great potential applications in future optical and photonic devices.

  13. Thresholds of optical limiting in solutions of nanoscale compounds of zinc phthalocyanine with galactopyranosyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheev, G. M.; Angelov, I. P.; Mantareva, V. N.; Mogileva, T. N.; Mikheev, K. G.

    2013-07-01

    The optical limiting (OL) of nanosecond laser pulses in solutions of newly synthesized dyes in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been investigated. These dyes are compounds of zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) with D-galactopyranosyl radicals (Gal) located in the peripheral ( p-GalZnPc) and nonperipheral ( n-GalZnPc) positions with respect to the ZnPc macrocycle. Experiments have been performed using laser radiation with a wavelength of 532 nm, at which the optical absorbance of solutions of ZnPc, p-GalZnPc and n-GalZnPc dyes is four orders of magnitude lower than the absorbance in the peaks at wavelengths of 671, 680, and 701 nm, respectively. It is established that solutions of p-GalZnPc and n-GalZnPc in DMSO have a much lower OL threshold in comparison with ZnPc solution; the nonlinearity of p-GalZnPc solutions exceeds that of n-GalZnPc solutions. OL thresholds for the dyes under study in a wide concentration range are determined.

  14. Human interaural time difference thresholds for sine tones: The high-frequency limit

    PubMed Central

    Brughera, Andrew; Dunai, Larisa; Hartmann, William M.

    2013-01-01

    The smallest detectable interaural time difference (ITD) for sine tones was measured for four human listeners to determine the dependence on tone frequency. At low frequencies, 250–700 Hz, threshold ITDs were approximately inversely proportional to tone frequency. At mid-frequencies, 700–1000 Hz, threshold ITDs were smallest. At high frequencies, above 1000 Hz, thresholds increased faster than exponentially with increasing frequency becoming unmeasurably high just above 1400 Hz. A model for ITD detection began with a biophysically based computational model for a medial superior olive (MSO) neuron that produced robust ITD responses up to 1000 Hz, and demonstrated a dramatic reduction in ITD-dependence from 1000 to 1500 Hz. Rate-ITD functions from the MSO model became inputs to binaural display models—both place based and rate-difference based. A place-based, centroid model with a rigid internal threshold reproduced almost all features of the human data. A signal-detection version of this model reproduced the high-frequency divergence but badly underestimated low-frequency thresholds. A rate-difference model incorporating fast contralateral inhibition reproduced the major features of the human threshold data except for the divergence. A combined, hybrid model could reproduce all the threshold data. PMID:23654390

  15. Infection propagator approach to compute epidemic thresholds on temporal networks: impact of immunity and of limited temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdano, Eugenio; Poletto, Chiara; Colizza, Vittoria

    2015-12-01

    The epidemic threshold of a spreading process indicates the condition for the occurrence of the wide spreading regime, thus representing a predictor of the network vulnerability to the epidemic. Such threshold depends on the natural history of the disease and on the pattern of contacts of the network with its time variation. Based on the theoretical framework introduced in [E. Valdano, L. Ferreri, C. Poletto, V. Colizza, Phys. Rev. X 5, 21005 (2015)] for a susceptible-infectious-susceptible model, we formulate here an infection propagator approach to compute the epidemic threshold accounting for more realistic effects regarding a varying force of infection per contact, the presence of immunity, and a limited time resolution of the temporal network. We apply the approach to two temporal network models and an empirical dataset of school contacts. We find that permanent or temporary immunity do not affect the estimation of the epidemic threshold through the infection propagator approach. Comparisons with numerical results show the good agreement of the analytical predictions. Aggregating the temporal network rapidly deteriorates the predictions, except for slow diseases once the heterogeneity of the links is preserved. Weight-topology correlations are found to be the critical factor to be preserved to improve accuracy in the prediction.

  16. Blister Threshold Based Thermal Limits for the U-Mo Monolithic Fuel System

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Wachs; I. Glagolenko; F. J. Rice; A. B. Robinson; B. H. Rabin; M. K. Meyer

    2012-10-01

    Fuel failure is most commonly induced in research and test reactor fuel elements by exposure to an under-cooled or over-power condition that results in the fuel temperature exceeding a critical threshold above which blisters form on the plate. These conditions can be triggered by normal operational transients (i.e. temperature overshoots that may occur during reactor startup or power shifts) or mild upset events (e.g., pump coastdown, small blockages, mis-loading of fuel elements into higher-than-planned power positions, etc.). The rise in temperature has a number of general impacts on the state of a fuel plate that include, for example, stress relaxation in the cladding (due to differential thermal expansion), softening of the cladding, increased mobility of fission gases, and increased fission-gas pressure in pores, all of which can encourage the formation of blisters on the fuel-plate surface. These blisters consist of raised regions on the surface of fuel plates that occur when the cladding plastically deforms in response to fission-gas pressure in large pores in the fuel meat and/or mechanical buckling of the cladding over damaged regions in the fuel meat. The blister temperature threshold decreases with irradiation because the mechanical properties of the fuel plate degrade while under irradiation (due to irradiation damage and fission-product accumulation) and because the fission-gas inventory progressively increases (and, thus, so does the gas pressure in pores).

  17. Niche overlap, threshold food densities, and limits to prey depletion for a diving duck assemblage in an estuarine bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovvorn, James R.; De La Cruz, Susan; Takekawa, John Y.; Shaskey, Laura E.; Richman, Samantha E.

    2013-01-01

    Planning for marine conservation often requires estimates of the amount of habitat needed to support assemblages of interacting species. During winter in subtidal San Pablo Bay, California, the 3 main diving duck species are lesser scaup Aythya affinis (LESC), greater scaup A. marila (GRSC), and surf scoter Melanitta perspicillata (SUSC), which all feed almost entirely on the bivalve Corbula amurensis. Decreased body mass and fat, increased foraging effort, and major departures of these birds appeared to result from food limitation. Broad overlap in prey size, water depth, and location suggested that the 3 species responded similarly to availability of the same prey. However, an energetics model that accounts for differing body size, locomotor mode, and dive behavior indicated that each species will become limited at different stages of prey depletion in the order SUSC, then GRSC, then LESC. Depending on year, 35 to 66% of the energy in Corbula standing stocks was below estimated threshold densities for profitable foraging. Ectothermic predators, especially flounders and sturgeons, could reduce excess carrying capacity for different duck species by 4 to 10%. A substantial quantity of prey above profitability thresholds was not exploited before most ducks left San Pablo Bay. Such pre-depletion departure has been attributed in other taxa to foraging aggression. However, in these diving ducks that showed no overt aggression, this pattern may result from high costs of locating all adequate prey patches, resulting reliance on existing flocks to find food, and propensity to stay near dense flocks to avoid avian predation. For interacting species assemblages, modeling profitability thresholds can indicate the species most vulnerable to food declines. However, estimates of total habitat needed require better understanding of factors affecting the amount of prey above thresholds that is not depleted before the predators move elsewhere.

  18. Inspiratory muscle training in chronic airflow limitation: comparison of two different training loads with a threshold device.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, C; Muñoz, V; Beroiza, T; Leiva, A; Cruz, E

    1994-07-01

    The usefulness of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in chronic airflow limitation (CAL) patients is a controversial issue, mainly due to differences in the training load. To further evaluate this aspect, we studied the effect of the magnitude of the load using a threshold pressure trainer. Ten CAL patients (5 males, 5 females) 67 +/- 2 yrs (mean +/- SEM) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 36 +/- 2% pred, were trained for 30 min a day using a load of 30% of their maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (PImax) (Group 1). Another 10 CAL patients (5 males, 5 females), 73 +/- 2 yrs and FEV1 37 +/- 2% pred), were trained using only 12% of their PImax (Group 2). Training was assessed by PImax, inspiratory muscle power output (IMPO), sustainable inspiratory pressure (SIP), maximal inspiratory flow rate (VImax), pattern of breathing during loaded breathing, Mahler's dyspnoea score, and the 6 min walking distance (6MWD). After 5 weeks of training, Group 1 exhibited significant increments in: PImax (34 +/- 11%); IMPO (92 +/- 16%); SIP (36 +/- 9%); and VImax (34 +/- 13%). Dyspnoea was also reduced, and the 6MWD increased by 48 +/- 22 m. We observed no significant changes in Group 2. During loaded breathing, Group 1 showed a significant increment in tidal volume (VT) and mean inspiratory flow (VT/TI), and a reduction in inspiratory time (TI). In Group 2, VT and VT/TI also increased significantly, but the breathing frequency increased with a reduction of expiratory time.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7925905

  19. Investigation of Stimulated Raman Scattering Using Short-Pulse Diffraction Limited Laser Beam near the Instability Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Yin, L.; Flippo, K. A.; Albright, B. J.; Johnson, R. P.; Shimada, T.; Rose, H. A.; Rousseaux, C.; Tassin, V.; Baton, S. D.; Amiranoff, F.; Hardin, R. A.

    2008-11-01

    Short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments using diffraction limited beams provide an excellent platform to investigate the fundamental physics of Stimulated Raman (SRS) and Stimulated Brillouin (SBS) Scattering. Detailed understanding of these laser plasma instabilities impacts the current inertial confinement fusion ignition designs and could potentially impact fast ignition when higher energy lasers are used with longer pulse durations ( > 1 kJ and > 1 ps). Using short laser pulses, experiments can be modeled over the entire interaction time of the laser using PIC codes to validate our understanding. Experiments have been conducted at the Trident laser and the LULI to investigate SRS near the threshold of the instability using 527 and 1064 nm laser light respectively with 1.5 -- 3 ps pulses. In the case of both experiments, the interaction beam was focused into a pre-ionized He gasjet plasma. Measurements of the reflectivity as a function of intensity and k?D were completed at the Trident laser. At LULI, a 300 fs Thomson scattering probe is used to directly measure the density fluctuations of the driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves. Details of the experimental results will be presented.

  20. Limitations of threshold voltage engineering of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures by dielectric interface charge density and manipulation by oxygen plasma surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lükens, G.; Yacoub, H.; Kalisch, H.; Vescan, A.

    2016-05-01

    The interface charge density between the gate dielectric and an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure has a significant impact on the absolute value and stability of the threshold voltage Vth of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) heterostructure field effect transistor. It is shown that a dry-etching step (as typically necessary for normally off devices engineered by gate-recessing) before the Al2O3 gate dielectric deposition introduces a high positive interface charge density. Its origin is most likely donor-type trap states shifting Vth to large negative values, which is detrimental for normally off devices. We investigate the influence of oxygen plasma annealing techniques of the dry-etched AlGaN/GaN surface by capacitance-voltage measurements and demonstrate that the positive interface charge density can be effectively compensated. Furthermore, only a low Vth hysteresis is observable making this approach suitable for threshold voltage engineering. Analysis of the electrostatics in the investigated MIS structures reveals that the maximum Vth shift to positive voltages achievable is fundamentally limited by the onset of accumulation of holes at the dielectric/barrier interface. In the case of the Al2O3/Al0.26Ga0.74N/GaN material system, this maximum threshold voltage shift is limited to 2.3 V.

  1. Theoretical limits on the threshold for the response of long cells to weak extremely low frequency electric fields due to ionic and molecular flux rectification.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, J C; Vaughan, T E; Adair, R K; Astumian, R D

    1998-01-01

    Understanding exposure thresholds for the response of biological systems to extremely low frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields is a fundamental problem of long-standing interest. We consider a two-state model for voltage-gated channels in the membrane of an isolated elongated cell (Lcell = 1 mm; rcell = 25 micron) and use a previously described process of ionic and molecular flux rectification to set lower bounds for a threshold exposure. A key assumption is that it is the ability of weak physical fields to alter biochemistry that is limiting, not the ability of a small number of molecules to alter biological systems. Moreover, molecular shot noise, not thermal voltage noise, is the basis of threshold estimates. Models with and without stochastic resonance are used, with a long exposure time, texp = 10(4) s. We also determined the dependence of the threshold on the basal transport rate. By considering both spherical and elongated cells, we find that the lowest bound for the threshold is Emin approximately 9 x 10(-3) V m-1 (9 x 10(-5) V cm-1). Using a conservative value for the loop radius rloop = 0.3 m for induced current, the corresponding lower bound in the human body for a magnetic field exposure is Bmin approximately 6 x 10(-4) T (6 G). Unless large, organized, and electrically amplifying multicellular systems such as the ampullae of Lorenzini of elasmobranch fish are involved, these results strongly suggest that the biophysical mechanism of voltage-gated macromolecules in the membranes of cells can be ruled out as a basis of possible effects of weak ELF electric and magnetic fields in humans. PMID:9788920

  2. Limitations of Spectral Electromyogramic Analysis to Determine the Onset of Neuromuscular Fatigue Threshold during Incremental Ergometer Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Latasa, Iban; Cordova, Alfredo; Malanda, Armando; Navallas, Javier; Lavilla-Oiz, Ana; Rodriguez-Falces, Javier

    2016-01-01

    relation between spectral indicators and workload and the other half showing the opposite behaviour. None of the spectral EMG indicators examined (Fmean nor Fmedian) decreased significantly between the ventilatory threshold and the highest power output. Examination of spectral indicators within individual exercise periods of the test showed that neither Fmean nor Fmedian decreased significantly during the last (most fatiguing) exercise periods. PMID:26957938

  3. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  4. Comparing the inhibitory thresholds of dairy manure co-digesters after prolonged acclimation periods: Part 1--Performance and operating limits.

    PubMed

    Usack, J G; Angenent, L T

    2015-12-15

    Co-digestion has been used to improve biogas yields and the long-term stability of anaerobic digesters compared to mono-digestion; however, less is known about the ultimate inhibition from co-substrates at their maximum loading rates and mixing ratios because these limits cannot be practically tested by existing facilities. Here, we performed a controlled experiment with long operating periods to ensure sufficient acclimation with the goal to observe ultimate inhibition and the full benefit that can be gained from co-digestion. The three substrates: 1) food waste (FW); 2) alkaline hydrolysate (AH); and 3) crude glycerol (GY) were individually co-digested with dairy manure (MN) for more than 900 days using continuously stirred anaerobic reactors at mesophilic temperatures. Food waste caused no reduction in performance or stability when co-digested with manure up to a total organic loading rate (OLR) of 3.9 g volatile solids (VS)·L(-1)·Day(-1) (MN:FW = 51:49; VS basis), resulting in a specific methane yield (SMY) of 297 ± 3 mL CH4·g VS(-1) for the combined wastes. Alkaline hydrolysate was co-digested with manure up to a total OLR of 2.7 g VS·L(-1)·Day(-1) (MN:AH = 75:25) with a corresponding SMY of 299 ± 6 mL CH4·g VS(-1). However, the free ammonia concentration reached levels previously reported as inhibitory, and may have led to the observed accumulation of volatile fatty acids at higher loading rates. Crude glycerol co-digestion resulted in an optimum SMY of 549 ± 25 mL CH4·g VS(-1) at a total OLR of 3.2 g VS·L(-1)·Day(-1) (MN:GY = 62:38). Stable digestion beyond this level was prohibited by an accumulation of long-chain fatty acids and foaming. These results can be used to implement effective co-digestion strategies. Co-substrates that possess similar inhibiting characteristics should be monitored to prevent severe instability at high loading rates and mixing ratios. PMID:26054695

  5. Interactions between cold and water limitation along a climate gradient produce sharp thresholds in ecosystem type, carbon balance, and water cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, A. E.; Goulden, M.; Fellows, A. W.

    2013-12-01

    California's Mediterranean climate supports a broad diversity of ecosystem types, including Sequoia forests in the mid-montane Sierra Nevada. Understanding how winter cold and summer drought interact to produce the lush forest in the Sierra is critical to predicting the impacts of projected climate change on California's ecosystems, water supply, and carbon cycling. We investigated how smooth gradients of temperature and water availability produced sharp thresholds in biomass, productivity, growing season, water use, and ultimately ecosystem type and function. We used the climate gradient of the western slope of the Sierra Nevada as a study system. Four eddy covariance towers were situated in the major ecosystem types of the Sierra Nevada at approximately 800-m elevation intervals. Eddy flux data were combined with remote sensing and direct measurements of biomass, productivity, soil available water, and evapotranspiration to understand how weather and available water control ecosystem production and function. We found that production at the high elevation lodgepole site at 2700 m was strongly limited by winter cold. Production at the low elevation oak woodland site at 400 m was strongly limited by summer drought. The yellow pine site at 1200 m was only 4 °C cooler than the oak woodland site, yet had an order of magnitude more biomass and productivity with year-round growth. The mixed conifer site at 2000 m is 3.5 °C warmer than the lodgepole forest, yet also has higher biomass, ten times higher productivity, and year-round growth. We conclude that there is a broad climatological 'sweet spot' within the Sierra Nevada, in which the Mediterranean climate can support large-statured forest with high growth rates. The range of the mid-elevation forest was sharply bounded by water limitation at the lower edge and cold limitation at the upper edge despite small differences in precipitation and temperature across these boundaries. Our results suggest that small changes

  6. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  7. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  8. Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2006-03-24

    A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

  9. The limits of applicability of the sound exposure level (SEL) metric to temporal threshold shifts (TTS) in beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas.

    PubMed

    Popov, Vladimir V; Supin, Alexander Ya; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav V; Nechaev, Dmitry I; Sysueva, Evgenia V

    2014-05-15

    The influence of fatiguing sound level and duration on post-exposure temporary threshold shift (TTS) was investigated in two beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). The fatiguing sound was half-octave noise with a center frequency of 22.5 kHz. TTS was measured at a test frequency of 32 kHz. Thresholds were measured by recording rhythmic evoked potentials (the envelope following response) to a test series of short (eight cycles) tone pips with a pip rate of 1000 s(-1). TTS increased approximately proportionally to the dB measure of both sound pressure (sound pressure level, SPL) and duration of the fatiguing noise, as a product of these two variables. In particular, when the noise parameters varied in a manner that maintained the product of squared sound pressure and time (sound exposure level, SEL, which is equivalent to the overall noise energy) at a constant level, TTS was not constant. Keeping SEL constant, the highest TTS appeared at an intermediate ratio of SPL to sound duration and decreased at both higher and lower ratios. Multiplication (SPL multiplied by log duration) better described the experimental data than an equal-energy (equal SEL) model. The use of SEL as a sole universal metric may result in an implausible assessment of the impact of a fatiguing sound on hearing thresholds in odontocetes, including under-evaluation of potential risks. PMID:24829327

  10. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  11. An isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for trace analysis of xylene and its metabolites in tissues following threshold limit value exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Pyon, K.H.; Kracko, D.A.; Strunk, M.R.

    1995-12-01

    The existence of a nose-brain barrier that functions to protect the central nervous system (CNS) from inhaled toxicants has been postulated. Just as a blood-brain barrier protects the CNS from systemic toxicants, the nose-brain barrier may have similar characteristic functions. One component of interest is nasal xenobiotic metabolism and its effect on the transport of pollutants into the CNS at environmentally plausible levels of exposure. Previous results have shown that inhaled xylene are dimethyl phenol (DMP) and methyl benzyl alcohol (MBA), and the nonvolatile metabolites are toluic acid (TA) and methyl hippuric acid (MHA). The nonvolatile metabolites of xylene, along with a small quantity of volatiles, representing either parent xylene or volatile metabolites, are transported via the olfactory epithelium to the glomeruli within the olfactory bulbs of the brain. Further work will be done to establish the linearity for each analyte at the actual highest detection limit of the GC/MS.

  12. CARA Risk Assessment Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Warning remediation threshold (Red threshold): Pc level at which warnings are issued, and active remediation considered and usually executed. Analysis threshold (Green to Yellow threshold): Pc level at which analysis of event is indicated, including seeking additional information if warranted. Post-remediation threshold: Pc level to which remediation maneuvers are sized in order to achieve event remediation and obviate any need for immediate follow-up maneuvers. Maneuver screening threshold: Pc compliance level for routine maneuver screenings (more demanding than regular Red threshold due to additional maneuver uncertainty).

  13. New limits on spin-independent and spin-dependent couplings of low-mass WIMP dark matter with a germanium detector at a threshold of 220 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S. T.; Li, H. B.; Lin, S. K.; Wong, H. T.; Lin, C. W.; Lin, F. K.; Wang, J. J.; Wang, Y. R.; Wu, S. C.; Li, X.; Fang, B. B.; He, D.; Yue, Q.; Deniz, M.; Li, J.; Ruan, X. C.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Singh, V.; Soma, A. K.

    2009-03-15

    An energy threshold of (220{+-}10) eV was achieved at an efficiency of 50% with a four-channel ultralow-energy germanium detector, each with an active mass of 5 g. This provides a unique probe to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP) dark matter with mass below 10 GeV. With a data acquisition live time of 0.338 kg-day at the Kuo-Sheng Laboratory, constraints on WIMPs in the galactic halo were derived. The limits improve over previous results on both spin-independent WIMP-nucleon and spin-dependent WIMP-neutron cross-sections for WIMP mass between 3 and 6 GeV. Sensitivities for full-scale experiments are projected. This detector technique makes the unexplored sub-keV energy window accessible for new neutrino and dark matter experiments.

  14. Laser threshold magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of sensor, which uses diamond containing the optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centres as a laser medium. The magnetometer can be operated at room-temperature and generates light that can be readily fibre coupled, thereby permitting use in industrial applications and remote sensing. By combining laser pumping with a radio-frequency Rabi-drive field, an external magnetic field changes the fluorescence of the NV- centres. We use this change in fluorescence level to push the laser above threshold, turning it on with an intensity controlled by the external magnetic field, which provides a coherent amplification of the readout signal with very high contrast. This mechanism is qualitatively different from conventional NV--based magnetometers which use fluorescence measurements, based on incoherent photon emission. We term our approach laser threshold magnetometer (LTM). We predict that an NV--based LTM with a volume of 1 mm3 can achieve shot-noise limited dc sensitivity of 1.86 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}} and ac sensitivity of 3.97 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}.

  15. Threshold quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding.

  16. Oscillatory Threshold Logic

    PubMed Central

    Borresen, Jon; Lynch, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In the 1940s, the first generation of modern computers used vacuum tube oscillators as their principle components, however, with the development of the transistor, such oscillator based computers quickly became obsolete. As the demand for faster and lower power computers continues, transistors are themselves approaching their theoretical limit and emerging technologies must eventually supersede them. With the development of optical oscillators and Josephson junction technology, we are again presented with the possibility of using oscillators as the basic components of computers, and it is possible that the next generation of computers will be composed almost entirely of oscillatory devices. Here, we demonstrate how coupled threshold oscillators may be used to perform binary logic in a manner entirely consistent with modern computer architectures. We describe a variety of computational circuitry and demonstrate working oscillator models of both computation and memory. PMID:23173034

  17. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been…

  18. Pausing at the Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Patrick K.

    2015-01-01

    Since about 2003, the notion of threshold concepts--the central ideas in any field that change how learners think about other ideas--have become difficult to escape at library conferences and in general information literacy discourse. Their visibility will likely only increase because threshold concepts figure prominently in the Framework for…

  19. Threshold Concepts in Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine threshold concepts in the context of teaching and learning first-year university economics. It outlines some of the arguments for using threshold concepts and provides examples using opportunity cost as an exemplar in economics. Design/ Methodology/Approach: The paper provides an overview of the…

  20. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time…

  1. Low Threshold Quantum Dot Lasers.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Veena Hariharan; Mahadevu, Rekha; Pandey, Anshu

    2016-04-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have replaced conventional inorganic phosphors in numerous applications. Despite their overall successes as emitters, their impact as laser materials has been severely limited. Eliciting stimulated emission from quantum dots requires excitation by intense short pulses of light typically generated using other lasers. In this Letter, we develop a new class of quantum dots that exhibit gain under conditions of extremely low levels of continuous wave illumination. We observe thresholds as low as 74 mW/cm(2) in lasers made from these materials. Due to their strong optical absorption as well as low lasing threshold, these materials could possibly convert light from diffuse, polychromatic sources into a laser beam. PMID:26978011

  2. Life below the threshold.

    PubMed

    Castro, C

    1991-01-01

    This article explains that malnutrition, poor health, and limited educational opportunities plague Philippine children -- especially female children -- from families living below the poverty threshold. Nearly 70% of households in the Philippines do not meet the required daily level of nutritional intake. Because it is often -- and incorrectly -- assumed that women's nutritional requirements are lower than men's, women suffer higher rates of malnutrition and poor health. A 1987 study revealed that 11.7% of all elementary students were underweight and 13.9% had stunted growths. Among elementary-school girls, 17% were malnourished and 40% suffered from anemia (among lactating mothers, more than 1/2 are anemic). A 1988 Program for Decentralized Educational Development study showed that grade VI students learn only about 1/2 of what they are supposed to learn. 30% of the children enrolled in grade school drop out before they reach their senior year. The Department of Education, Culture and Sports estimates that some 2.56 million students dropped out of school in l989. That same year, some 3.7 million children were counted as part of the labor force. In Manila alone, some 60,000 children work the streets, whether doing odd jobs or begging, or turning to crime or prostitution. the article tells the story of a 12 year-old girl named Ging, a 4th grader at a public school and the oldest child in a poor family of 6 children. The undernourished Ging dreams of a good future for her family and sees education as a way out of poverty; unfortunately, her time after school is spend working in the streets or looking after her family. She considers herself luckier than many of the other children working in the streets, since she at least has a family. PMID:12285009

  3. Experimental realization of chaos control by thresholding.

    PubMed

    Murali, K; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2003-07-01

    We report the experimental verification of thresholding as a versatile tool for efficient and flexible chaos control. The strategy here simply involves monitoring a single state variable and resetting it when it exceeds a threshold. We demonstrate the success of the technique in rapidly controlling different chaotic electrical circuits, including a hyperchaotic circuit, onto stable fixed points and limit cycles of different periods, by thresholding just one variable. The simplicity of this controller entailing no run-time computation, and the ease and rapidity of switching between different targets it offers, suggests a potent tool for chaos based applications. PMID:12935228

  4. Mitochondrial threshold effects.

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Rodrigue; Faustin, Benjamin; Rocher, Christophe; Malgat, Monique; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Letellier, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial diseases has revealed dramatic variability in the phenotypic presentation of mitochondrial genetic defects. To attempt to understand this variability, different authors have studied energy metabolism in transmitochondrial cell lines carrying different proportions of various pathogenic mutations in their mitochondrial DNA. The same kinds of experiments have been performed on isolated mitochondria and on tissue biopsies taken from patients with mitochondrial diseases. The results have shown that, in most cases, phenotypic manifestation of the genetic defect occurs only when a threshold level is exceeded, and this phenomenon has been named the 'phenotypic threshold effect'. Subsequently, several authors showed that it was possible to inhibit considerably the activity of a respiratory chain complex, up to a critical value, without affecting the rate of mitochondrial respiration or ATP synthesis. This phenomenon was called the 'biochemical threshold effect'. More recently, quantitative analysis of the effects of various mutations in mitochondrial DNA on the rate of mitochondrial protein synthesis has revealed the existence of a 'translational threshold effect'. In this review these different mitochondrial threshold effects are discussed, along with their molecular bases and the roles that they play in the presentation of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:12467494

  5. Motion parallax thresholds for unambiguous depth perception.

    PubMed

    Holmin, Jessica; Nawrot, Mark

    2015-10-01

    The perception of unambiguous depth from motion parallax arises from the neural integration of retinal image motion and extra-retinal eye movement signals. It is only recently that these parameters have been articulated in the form of the motion/pursuit ratio. In the current study, we explored the lower limits of the parameter space in which observers could accurately perform near/far relative depth-sign discriminations for a translating random-dot stimulus. Stationary observers pursued a translating random dot stimulus containing relative image motion. Their task was to indicate the location of the peak in an approximate square-wave stimulus. We measured thresholds for depth from motion parallax, quantified as motion/pursuit ratios, as well as lower motion thresholds and pursuit accuracy. Depth thresholds were relatively stable at pursuit velocities 5-20 deg/s, and increased at lower and higher velocities. The pattern of results indicates that minimum motion/pursuit ratios are limited by motion and pursuit signals, both independently and in combination with each other. At low and high pursuit velocities, depth thresholds were limited by inaccurate pursuit signals. At moderate pursuit velocities, depth thresholds were limited by motion signals. PMID:26232612

  6. Yield threshold decision framework

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, B.R.; Younker, L.W.; Hannon, W.J.

    1989-08-17

    The USA is developing a decision analysis framework for evaluating the relative value of lower yield thresholds and related verification policies. The framework facilitates systematic analysis of the major issues in the yield threshold decision. The framework can be used to evaluate options proposed either in the inter-agency process or in the negotiations. In addition, the framework can measure the importance of uncertainties and alternative judgments, and thereby determine the advantages of additional research. Since the model is explicit and quantitative, it provides a rational, defensible approach for reaching important treaty and verification decisions. 9 figs.

  7. Elaborating on Threshold Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account…

  8. Network problem threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gejji, Raghvendra, R.

    1992-01-01

    Network transmission errors such as collisions, CRC errors, misalignment, etc. are statistical in nature. Although errors can vary randomly, a high level of errors does indicate specific network problems, e.g. equipment failure. In this project, we have studied the random nature of collisions theoretically as well as by gathering statistics, and established a numerical threshold above which a network problem is indicated with high probability.

  9. Elaborating on threshold concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-09-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account for both the important and the problematic characteristics of TCs in terms of the Knowledge/Strategies/Mental Models Framework defined in previous work.

  10. Threshold improvement and acoustic gain with hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Walden, B E; Kasten, R N

    1976-01-01

    Aided speech reception thresholds were obtained from 20 hearing-impaired listeners with three hearing aids adjusted to confort settings, and with the aids adjusted to deliver 40 dB of acoustic gain. The aided speech reception threshold under each condition was substracted from the unaided speech reception threshold to yield a measure of threshold improvement. Threshold improvement and acoustic gain comparisons revealed that, at comfort setting, these two measures were quite similar. However, at the 40-dB gain setting, acoustic gain exceeded threshold improvement by an average of 5.6 dB. For the high-gain condition, it appeared that the threshold improvement obtained by subjects with relatively good unaided sensitivity was limited by the ambient noise in the test chamber. PMID:938347

  11. Effects of pulse duration on magnetostimulation thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Saritas, Emine U.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Conolly, Steven M.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic particle imaging (MPI) utilize time-varying magnetic fields that are subject to magnetostimulation limits, which often limit the speed of the imaging process. Various human-subject experiments have studied the amplitude and frequency dependence of these thresholds for gradient or homogeneous magnetic fields. Another contributing factor was shown to be number of cycles in a magnetic pulse, where the thresholds decreased with longer pulses. The latter result was demonstrated on two subjects only, at a single frequency of 1.27 kHz. Hence, whether the observed effect was due to the number of cycles or due to the pulse duration was not specified. In addition, a gradient-type field was utilized; hence, whether the same phenomenon applies to homogeneous magnetic fields remained unknown. Here, the authors investigate the pulse duration dependence of magnetostimulation limits for a 20-fold range of frequencies using homogeneous magnetic fields, such as the ones used for the drive field in MPI. Methods: Magnetostimulation thresholds were measured in the arms of six healthy subjects (age: 27 ± 5 yr). Each experiment comprised testing the thresholds at eight different pulse durations between 2 and 125 ms at a single frequency, which took approximately 30–40 min/subject. A total of 34 experiments were performed at three different frequencies: 1.2, 5.7, and 25.5 kHz. A solenoid coil providing homogeneous magnetic field was used to induce stimulation, and the field amplitude was measured in real time. A pre-emphasis based pulse shaping method was employed to accurately control the pulse durations. Subjects reported stimulation via a mouse click whenever they felt a twitching/tingling sensation. A sigmoid function was fitted to the subject responses to find the threshold at a specific frequency and duration, and the whole procedure was repeated at all relevant frequencies and pulse durations

  12. Methods for threshold determination in multiplexed assays

    DOEpatents

    Tammero, Lance F. Bentley; Dzenitis, John M; Hindson, Benjamin J

    2014-06-24

    Methods for determination of threshold values of signatures comprised in an assay are described. Each signature enables detection of a target. The methods determine a probability density function of negative samples and a corresponding false positive rate curve. A false positive criterion is established and a threshold for that signature is determined as a point at which the false positive rate curve intersects the false positive criterion. A method for quantitative analysis and interpretation of assay results together with a method for determination of a desired limit of detection of a signature in an assay are also described.

  13. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  14. Thresholds for Epidemic Spreading in Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Claudio; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2010-11-01

    We study the threshold of epidemic models in quenched networks with degree distribution given by a power-law. For the susceptible-infected-susceptible model the activity threshold λc vanishes in the large size limit on any network whose maximum degree kmax⁡ diverges with the system size, at odds with heterogeneous mean-field (HMF) theory. The vanishing of the threshold has nothing to do with the scale-free nature of the network but stems instead from the largest hub in the system being active for any spreading rate λ>1/kmax⁡ and playing the role of a self-sustained source that spreads the infection to the rest of the system. The susceptible-infected-removed model displays instead agreement with HMF theory and a finite threshold for scale-rich networks. We conjecture that on quenched scale-rich networks the threshold of generic epidemic models is vanishing or finite depending on the presence or absence of a steady state.

  15. Thresholded Power law Size Distributions of Instabilities in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2015-11-01

    Power-law-like size distributions are ubiquitous in astrophysical instabilities. There are at least four natural effects that cause deviations from ideal power law size distributions, which we model here in a generalized way: (1) a physical threshold of an instability; (2) incomplete sampling of the smallest events below a threshold x0; (3) contamination by an event-unrelated background xb; and (4) truncation effects at the largest events due to a finite system size. These effects can be modeled in the simplest terms with a “thresholded power law” distribution function (also called generalized Pareto [type II] or Lomax distribution), N(x){dx}\\propto {(x+{x}0)}-a{dx}, where x0 > 0 is positive for a threshold effect, while x0 < 0 is negative for background contamination. We analytically derive the functional shape of this thresholded power law distribution function from an exponential growth evolution model, which produces avalanches only when a disturbance exceeds a critical threshold x0. We apply the thresholded power law distribution function to terrestrial, solar (HXRBS, BATSE, RHESSI), and stellar flare (Kepler) data sets. We find that the thresholded power law model provides an adequate fit to most of the observed data. Major advantages of this model are the automated choice of the power law fitting range, diagnostics of background contamination, physical instability thresholds, instrumental detection thresholds, and finite system size limits. When testing self-organized criticality models that predict ideal power laws, we suggest including these natural truncation effects.

  16. Empirical rainfall thresholds for landslide occurrence in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zêzere, José Luis; Vaz, Teresa; Pereira, Susana; Oliveira, Sérgio C.; Marques, Rui; Garcia, Ricardo A. C.

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall is the most important physical process responsible for the landslide triggering in Portugal. Following the work of Zêzere et al. (2014), we present the state of the art concerning the proposition of empirical rainfall thresholds in Portugal for different types of landslides observed in different zones of the country: the Lisbon region, the Douro Valley and the NW Mountains, and the Povoação Municipality in São Miguel Island (Azores). The empirical thresholds applied in Portugal are based on the identification of 120 landslide events and include (i) the computation of antecedent rainfall threshold defined by linear regression, (ii) the normalization of rainfall by the mean annual precipitation, (iii) the definition of combined rainfall thresholds, which integrates the rainfall event and the antecedent rainfall for different time periods, and (iv) the definition of lower limit and upper limit rainfall thresholds. The intensity-duration (ID) threshold is the empirical rainfall threshold more used worldwide. In mainland Portugal, the highest ID rainfall threshold is registered in the NW Mountains, which is the rainiest zone of the country. The Lisbon Region typically receives less rain per year and the corresponding ID threshold is lower than that obtained in the north part of the country. The Povoação study area evidence a contrasting situation, which is associated to the highest value of the negative exponential of the threshold (-0.66). As a consequence, for short duration (< 10 h) this threshold is only exceeded in the NW Mountains, while for long durations (>1,000 h) it is below the remaining thresholds. The normalization of the ID threshold by the mean annual precipitation (MAP) has showed that, in relative terms: (i) the ID threshold is highest in Lisbon Region for duration less than 50 h; (ii) in the north of the country, the ID threshold is more exigent in the Douro Valley than in the NW Mountains and (iii) the ID threshold in Povoa

  17. Scaling the mode instability threshold with multicore fibers.

    PubMed

    Otto, Hans-Jürgen; Klenke, Arno; Jauregui, Cesar; Stutzki, Fabian; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Mode instabilities (MIs) have quickly become the most limiting effect for the average power scaling of nearly diffraction-limited beams from state-of-the-art fiber laser systems. In this work it is shown that, by using an advanced multicore photonic crystal fiber design, the threshold power of MIs can be increased linearly with the number of cores. An average output power of 536 W, corresponding to 4 times the threshold power of a single core, is demonstrated. PMID:24784076

  18. Learning foraging thresholds for lizards

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.A.; Hart, W.E.; Wilson, D.B.

    1996-01-12

    This work gives a proof of convergence for a randomized learning algorithm that describes how anoles (lizards found in the Carribean) learn a foraging threshold distance. This model assumes that an anole will pursue a prey if and only if it is within this threshold of the anole`s perch. This learning algorithm was proposed by the biologist Roughgarden and his colleagues. They experimentally confirmed that this algorithm quickly converges to the foraging threshold that is predicted by optimal foraging theory our analysis provides an analytic confirmation that the learning algorithm converses to this optimal foraging threshold with high probability.

  19. Hairpin Vortex Regeneration Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatino, Daniel; Maharjan, Rijan

    2015-11-01

    A free surface water channel is used to study hairpin vortex formation created by fluid injection through a narrow slot into a laminar boundary layer. Particle image velocimetry is used to calculate the circulation of the primary hairpin vortex head which is found to monotonically decrease in strength with downstream distance. When a secondary hairpin vortex is formed upstream of the primary vortex, the circulation strength of the head is comparable to the strength of the primary head at the time of regeneration. However, the legs of the primary vortex strengthen up to the moment the secondary hairpin is generated. Although the peak circulation in the legs is not directly correlated to the strength of the original elongated ring vortex, when the circulation is scaled with the injection momentum ratio it is linearly related to scaled injection time. It is proposed that the injection momentum ratio and nondimensionalized injection time based on the wall normal penetration time can be used to identify threshold conditions which produce a secondary vortex. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant CBET- 1040236.

  20. Probabilistic Threshold Criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Gresshoff, M; Hrousis, C A

    2010-03-09

    The Probabilistic Shock Threshold Criterion (PSTC) Project at LLNL develops phenomenological criteria for estimating safety or performance margin on high explosive (HE) initiation in the shock initiation regime, creating tools for safety assessment and design of initiation systems and HE trains in general. Until recently, there has been little foundation for probabilistic assessment of HE initiation scenarios. This work attempts to use probabilistic information that is available from both historic and ongoing tests to develop a basis for such assessment. Current PSTC approaches start with the functional form of the James Initiation Criterion as a backbone, and generalize to include varying areas of initiation and provide a probabilistic response based on test data for 1.8 g/cc (Ultrafine) 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder). Application of the PSTC methodology is presented investigating the safety and performance of a flying plate detonator and the margin of an Ultrafine TATB booster initiating LX-17.

  1. The Limits to Adaptation; A Systems Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Limits to Adaptation: A Systems Approach. The ability to adapt to climate change is delineated by capacity thresholds, after which climate damages begin to overwhelm the adaptation response. Such thresholds depend upon physical properties (natural processes and engineering...

  2. Human eye color difference threshold measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Zhou, Taogeng

    2013-12-01

    The human eye has the ability to distinguish millions of colors, with this feature we can identify very subtle color differences, and the measurement of human eye color difference threshold can provide a visual function diagnosis for testee. In recent years, people begin to focus on studies on visual threshold diagnostic equipment. This paper proposes a human eye color difference threshold measurement system which is based on dual integrating sphere. The system includes two pairs of dual integrating sphere and color control module. Dual integrating sphere uses to mix and produce color, and palette unit which produces primary colors (red (R), green (G), blue (B)) is embedded in dual integrating sphere. At the same time, the embedded palette unit which produces cyan (C), magenta (M), and yellow (Y) expands color area that the system can generate. One optical path based on dual integrating sphere generates standard color, the other path produces the matching color which is similar to a standard color. In the high-precision closed-loop color control module, photoelectric switch records stepper motor's origin position and limits move displacement. Precision stepper motor pushes the light-blocking panel of the palette unit to a predetermined position, while real-time monitoring the position of the light-blocking panel and mixing the ideal controllable color. Two colors that the system generates are projected onto the same target area. Subjects make a judgment on color difference threshold by observing the target eventually.

  3. Threshold Hypothesis: Fact or Artifact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karwowski, Maciej; Gralewski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The threshold hypothesis (TH) assumes the existence of complex relations between creative abilities and intelligence: linear associations below 120 points of IQ and weaker or lack of associations above the threshold. However, diverse results have been obtained over the last six decades--some confirmed the hypothesis and some rejected it. In this…

  4. The Nature of Psychological Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Morey, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Following G. T. Fechner (1966), thresholds have been conceptualized as the amount of intensity needed to transition between mental states, such as between a states of unconsciousness and consciousness. With the advent of the theory of signal detection, however, discrete-state theory and the corresponding notion of threshold have been discounted.…

  5. Threshold Concepts and Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Lori; Brunetti, Korey; Hofer, Amy R.

    2011-01-01

    What do we teach when we teach information literacy in higher education? This paper describes a pedagogical approach to information literacy that helps instructors focus content around transformative learning thresholds. The threshold concept framework holds promise for librarians because it grounds the instructor in the big ideas and underlying…

  6. Threshold selection for regional peaks-over-threshold data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Martin; Jongbloed, Geurt; Adri Buishand, T.

    2016-04-01

    A hurdle in the peaks-over-threshold approach for analyzing extreme values is the selection of the threshold. A method is developed to reduce this obstacle in the presence of multiple, similar data samples. This is for instance the case in many environmental applications. The idea is to combine threshold selection methods into a regional method. Regionalized versions of the threshold stability and the mean excess plot are presented as graphical tools for threshold selection. Moreover, quantitative approaches based on the bootstrap distribution of the spatially averaged Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling test statistics are introduced. It is demonstrated that the proposed regional method leads to an increased sensitivity for too low thresholds, compared to methods that do not take into account the regional information. The approach can be used for a wide range of univariate threshold selection methods. We test the methods using simulated data and present an application to rainfall data from the Dutch water board Vallei en Veluwe.

  7. Bayesian estimation of dose thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groer, P. G.; Carnes, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    An example is described of Bayesian estimation of radiation absorbed dose thresholds (subsequently simply referred to as dose thresholds) using a specific parametric model applied to a data set on mice exposed to 60Co gamma rays and fission neutrons. A Weibull based relative risk model with a dose threshold parameter was used to analyse, as an example, lung cancer mortality and determine the posterior density for the threshold dose after single exposures to 60Co gamma rays or fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. The data consisted of survival, censoring times and cause of death information for male B6CF1 unexposed and exposed mice. The 60Co gamma whole-body doses for the two exposed groups were 0.86 and 1.37 Gy. The neutron whole-body doses were 0.19 and 0.38 Gy. Marginal posterior densities for the dose thresholds for neutron and gamma radiation were calculated with numerical integration and found to have quite different shapes. The density of the threshold for 60Co is unimodal with a mode at about 0.50 Gy. The threshold density for fission neutrons declines monotonically from a maximum value at zero with increasing doses. The posterior densities for all other parameters were similar for the two radiation types.

  8. Temporal discrimination threshold with healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie Llaneza; Esquenazi, Alina; Villegas, Monica Anne Faye; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The temporal discrimination threshold (TDT) is the shortest interstimulus interval at which a subject can perceive successive stimuli as separate. To investigate the effects of aging on TDT, we studied tactile TDT using the method of limits with 120% of sensory threshold in each hand for each of 100 healthy volunteers, equally divided among men and women, across 10 age groups, from 18 to 79 years. Linear regression analysis showed that age was significantly related to left-hand mean, right-hand mean, and mean of 2 hands with R-square equal to 0.08, 0.164, and 0.132, respectively. Reliability analysis indicated that the 3 measures had fair-to-good reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.4-0.8). We conclude that TDT is affected by age and has fair-to-good reproducibility using our technique. PMID:27255827

  9. Detection thresholds for small haptic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosher, Jesse A.; Hannaford, Blake

    2002-02-01

    We are interested in finding out whether or not haptic interfaces will be useful in portable and hand held devices. Such systems will have severe constraints on force output. Our first step is to investigate the lower limits at which haptic effects can be perceived. In this paper we report on experiments studying the effects of varying the amplitude, size, shape, and pulse-duration of a haptic feature. Using a specific haptic device we measure the smallest detectable haptics effects, with active exploration of saw-tooth shaped icons sized 3, 4 and 5 mm, a sine-shaped icon 5 mm wide, and static pulses 50, 100, and 150 ms in width. Smooth shaped icons resulted in a detection threshold of approximately 55 mN, almost twice that of saw-tooth shaped icons which had a threshold of 31 mN.

  10. Threshold switching uniformity in In2Se3 nanowire-based phase change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Du, Gang; Liu, Xiao-Yan

    2015-05-01

    The uniformity of threshold voltage and threshold current in the In2Se3 nanowire-based phase change memory (PCM) devices is investigated. Based on the trap-limited transport model, amorphous layer thickness, trap density, and trap depth are considered to clarify their influences upon the threshold voltage and threshold current through simulations. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CBA00604).

  11. Threshold models in radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, D.G.; Li, P.

    1998-09-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality data from the atomic bomb survivors cohort has been analyzed to allow for the possibility of a threshold dose response. The same dose-response models as used in the original papers were fit to the data. The estimated cancer incidence from the fitted models over-predicted the observed cancer incidence in the lowest exposure group. This is consistent with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response at low-doses. Thresholds were added to the dose-response models and the range of possible thresholds is shown for both solid tumor cancers as well as the different leukemia types. This analysis suggests that the A-bomb cancer incidence data agree more with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response model than a purely linear model although the linear model is statistically equivalent. This observation is not found with the mortality data. For both the incidence data and the mortality data the addition of a threshold term significantly improves the fit to the linear or linear-quadratic dose response for both total leukemias and also for the leukemia subtypes of ALL, AML, and CML.

  12. Guidelines for Auditory Threshold Measurement for Significant Threshold Shift.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kathleen; Hammill, Tanisha; Hoffer, Michael; Kil, Jonathan; Le Prell, Colleen

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide guidelines for determining a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift in clinical trials involving human populations. The article reviews recommendations for the standards to be referenced for human subjects, equipment, test environment, and personnel. Additional guidelines for military populations are provided. Guidelines for the calibration of audiometers, sound booth noise levels, and immitance equipment are provided. In addition the guidance provides specific suggestions for the subjects history before study onset, and otoscopy.Test frequencies for threshold determination and methods of threshold determination are reviewed for both air conduction and bone conduction for both baseline testing and later determination of either a temporary (TTS) or permanent threshold shift (PTS). Once a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift has been determined, subjects should be retested, conductive component should be ruled out or addressed, and the subject should be counseled or referred for additional medical evaluation. Guidance for reporting procedures and the computerized study database are described. Finally, experimental designs suggested for noise-induced otoprotection clinical trials are described. PMID:27518134

  13. Bacteriopheophorbide esters: photosensitizers without "threshold dose"?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Joerg G.; Ostrowsky, Andreas; Guemuesdagli, Maria; Kleiber, Beate

    1994-03-01

    Uptake and phototoxicity of the methyl-, ethyl-, n-propyl, and 2-propyl esters of 132- hydroxy bacteriopheophorbide a were studied in OAT 75 SCLC cells and 3 different amelanotic melanoma cell lines. (A 375, Melur SP 18, SkAMel 25). Specific phototoxicity did not substantially differ for the different esters. Most surprisingly, these photosensitizers did not show any significant threshold behavior: even at 25 (mu) W/cm2 (775 nm, diode laser) cancer cell suspensions were killed in a time-dependent logarithmic fashion. Furthermore, phototoxicity is enhanced at low power densities if compared with the effects at 1 - 10 mW/cm2. This can be related only in part to a lack of oxygen at higher power densities. Complementary experiments confirmed that threshold is power but not dose dependent. Thus, threshold power density should be included into a prospective list of criteria characterizing photosensitizers suitable for photodynamic cancer therapy. The obvious lack of a limiting power density in bacteriopheophobide a esters make these sensitizers a prospective tool for tumor therapy in considerable tissue depth.

  14. Damage thresholds for terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, Danielle R.; McQuade, Jill; Vincelette, Rebecca; Ibey, Bennet; Payne, Jason; Thomas, Robert; Roach, W. P.; Roth, Caleb L.; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2010-02-01

    Several international organizations establish minimum safety standards to ensure that workers and the general population are protected against adverse health effects associated with electromagnetic radiation. Suitable standards are typically defined using published experimental data. To date, few experimental studies have been conducted at Terahertz (THz) frequencies, and as a result, current THz standards have been defined using extrapolated estimates from neighboring spectral regions. In this study, we used computational modeling and experimental approaches to determine tissue-damage thresholds at THz frequencies. For the computational modeling efforts, we used the Arrhenius damage integral to predict damage-thresholds. We determined thresholds experimentally for both long (minutes) and short (seconds) THz exposures. For the long exposure studies, we used an in-house molecular gas THz laser (υ= 1.89 THz, 189.92 mW/cm2, 10 minutes) and excised porcine skin. For the short exposure studies, we used the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at Jefferson Laboratory (υ= 0.1-1.0 THz, 2.0-14.0 mW/cm2, 2 seconds) and wet chamois cloths. Thresholds were determined using conventional damage score determination and probit analysis techniques, and tissue temperatures were measured using infrared thermographic techniques. We found that the FEL was ideal for tissue damage studies, while our in-house THz source was not suitable to determine tissue damage thresholds. Using experimental data, the tissue damage threshold (ED50) was determined to be 7.16 W/cm2. This value was in well agreement with that predicted using our computational models. We hope that knowledge of tissue-damage thresholds at THz frequencies helps to ensure the safe use of THz radiation.

  15. Computational analysis of thresholds for magnetophosphenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2012-10-01

    In international guidelines, basic restriction limits on the exposure of humans to low-frequency magnetic and electric fields are set with the objective of preventing the generation of phosphenes, visual sensations of flashing light not caused by light. Measured data on magnetophosphenes, i.e. phosphenes caused by a magnetically induced electric field on the retina, are available from volunteer studies. However, there is no simple way for determining the retinal threshold electric field or current density from the measured threshold magnetic flux density. In this study, the experimental field configuration of a previous study, in which phosphenes were generated in volunteers by exposing their heads to a magnetic field between the poles of an electromagnet, is computationally reproduced. The finite-element method is used for determining the induced electric field and current in five different MRI-based anatomical models of the head. The direction of the induced current density on the retina is dominantly radial to the eyeball, and the maximum induced current density is observed at the superior and inferior sides of the retina, which agrees with literature data on the location of magnetophosphenes at the periphery of the visual field. On the basis of computed data, the macroscopic retinal threshold current density for phosphenes at 20 Hz can be estimated as 10 mA m-2 (-20% to  + 30%, depending on the anatomical model); this current density corresponds to an induced eddy current of 14 μA (-20% to  + 10%), and about 20% of this eddy current flows through each eye. The ICNIRP basic restriction limit for the induced electric field in the case of occupational exposure is not exceeded until the magnetic flux density is about two to three times the measured threshold for magnetophosphenes, so the basic restriction limit does not seem to be conservative. However, the reasons for the non-conservativeness are purely technical: removal of the highest 1% of electric

  16. Neutrino floor at ultralow threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strigari, Louis E.

    2016-05-01

    By lowering their energy threshold, direct dark matter searches can reach the neutrino floor with experimental technology that is now in development. The 7Be flux can be detected with ˜10 eV nuclear recoil energy threshold and 50 kg/yr exposure. The p e p flux can be detected with ˜3 ton/yr exposure, and the first detection of the CNO flux is possible with similar exposure. The p p flux can be detected with threshold of ˜eV and only ˜ kg /yr exposure. These can be the first pure neutral current measurements of the low-energy solar neutrino flux. Measuring this flux is important for low mass dark matter searches and for understanding the solar interior.

  17. Explosive percolation in thresholded networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaka, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    Explosive percolation in a network is a phase transition where a large portion of nodes becomes connected with an addition of a small number of edges. Although extensively studied in random network models and reconstructed real networks, explosive percolation has not been observed in a more realistic scenario where a network is generated by thresholding a similarity matrix describing between-node associations. In this report, I examine construction schemes of such thresholded networks, and demonstrate that explosive percolation can be observed by introducing edges in a particular order.

  18. Surface characterizations of color threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirson, Allen B.; Wandell, Brian A.; Varner, Denise C.; Brainard, David H.

    1990-01-01

    The paper evaluates how well three different parametric shapes, ellipsoids, rectangles, and parallelograms, serve as models of three-dimentional detection contours. The constraints of the procedures for deriving the best-fitting shapes on inferences about the theoretical visual detection mechanisms are described. Results of two statistical tests show that only the parallelogram fits the data with more precision than the variance in repeated threshold measurements, and thus provides a slightly better fit than the other two shapes. Nevertheless it does not serve as a better guide than the ellipsoidal model for interpolating from the measurements to thresholds in novel color directions.

  19. Thresholds in chemical respiratory sensitisation.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Stella A; Arts, Josje H E; Ehnes, Colin; Hindle, Stuart; Hollnagel, Heli M; Poole, Alan; Suto, Hidenori; Kimber, Ian

    2015-07-01

    There is a continuing interest in determining whether it is possible to identify thresholds for chemical allergy. Here allergic sensitisation of the respiratory tract by chemicals is considered in this context. This is an important occupational health problem, being associated with rhinitis and asthma, and in addition provides toxicologists and risk assessors with a number of challenges. In common with all forms of allergic disease chemical respiratory allergy develops in two phases. In the first (induction) phase exposure to a chemical allergen (by an appropriate route of exposure) causes immunological priming and sensitisation of the respiratory tract. The second (elicitation) phase is triggered if a sensitised subject is exposed subsequently to the same chemical allergen via inhalation. A secondary immune response will be provoked in the respiratory tract resulting in inflammation and the signs and symptoms of a respiratory hypersensitivity reaction. In this article attention has focused on the identification of threshold values during the acquisition of sensitisation. Current mechanistic understanding of allergy is such that it can be assumed that the development of sensitisation (and also the elicitation of an allergic reaction) is a threshold phenomenon; there will be levels of exposure below which sensitisation will not be acquired. That is, all immune responses, including allergic sensitisation, have threshold requirement for the availability of antigen/allergen, below which a response will fail to develop. The issue addressed here is whether there are methods available or clinical/epidemiological data that permit the identification of such thresholds. This document reviews briefly relevant human studies of occupational asthma, and experimental models that have been developed (or are being developed) for the identification and characterisation of chemical respiratory allergens. The main conclusion drawn is that although there is evidence that the

  20. New states above charm threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Eichten, Estia J.; Lane, Kenneth; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    We revise and extend expectations for the properties of charmonium states that lie above charm threshold, in light of new experimental information. We refine the Cornell coupled-channel model for the coupling of c{bar c} levels to two-meson states, defining resonance masses and widths by pole positions in the complex energy plane, and suggest new targets for experiment.

  1. Estimating Conservation Thresholds on Rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) is a multi-agency effort designed to quantify the environmental and economic impacts of land conservation practices. One of USDA’s goals is to identify Conservation Thresholds, the point at which accelerated erosion occurs, and to examine the usefu...

  2. Threshold Concepts and Pedagogic Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Jan H. F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a brief exposure to the development of the threshold concepts framework (TCF), the intention being to illuminate for interested readers a broader landscape of research activity than that perhaps conveyed by the individual contributions to this special edition. Design/Methodology/Approach: There is…

  3. Crossing Thresholds in Academic Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at the conceptual thresholds in relation to academic reading which might be crossed by undergraduate English Literature students. It is part of a wider study following 16 students through three years of undergraduate study. It uses theoretical ideas from Bakhtin and Foucault to analyse interviews with English lecturers. It…

  4. Threshold kinetics of a solar-simulator-pumped iodine laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Lee, Y.; Weaver, W. R.; Humes, D. H.; Lee, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the chemical kinetics of the n-C3F7I solar-simulator-pumped iodine laser is utilized to study the major kinetic processes associated with the threshold behavior of this experimental system. Excited-state diffusion to the cell wall is the dominant limiting factor below 5 torr. Excited-state diffusion to the cell wall is the dominant limiting factor below 5 torr. Excited-state recombination with the alkyl radical and quenching by the parent gas control threshold at higher pressures. Treatment of the hyperfine splitting and uncertainty in the pressure broadening are important factors in fixing the threshold level. In spite of scatter in the experimental data caused by instabilities in the simulator high-pressure high-pressure arc, reasonable agreement is achieved between the model and experiment. Model parameters arrived at are within the uncertainty range of values found in the literature.

  5. Tissue damage thresholds during therapeutic electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Ludwig, Kip A.; Welle, Cristin G.; Takmakov, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Recent initiatives in bioelectronic modulation of the nervous system by the NIH (SPARC), DARPA (ElectRx, SUBNETS) and the GlaxoSmithKline Bioelectronic Medicines effort are ushering in a new era of therapeutic electrical stimulation. These novel therapies are prompting a re-evaluation of established electrical thresholds for stimulation-induced tissue damage. Approach. In this review, we explore what is known and unknown in published literature regarding tissue damage from electrical stimulation. Main results. For macroelectrodes, the potential for tissue damage is often assessed by comparing the intensity of stimulation, characterized by the charge density and charge per phase of a stimulus pulse, with a damage threshold identified through histological evidence from in vivo experiments as described by the Shannon equation. While the Shannon equation has proved useful in assessing the likely occurrence of tissue damage, the analysis is limited by the experimental parameters of the original studies. Tissue damage is influenced by factors not explicitly incorporated into the Shannon equation, including pulse frequency, duty cycle, current density, and electrode size. Microelectrodes in particular do not follow the charge per phase and charge density co-dependence reflected in the Shannon equation. The relevance of these factors to tissue damage is framed in the context of available reports from modeling and in vivo studies. Significance. It is apparent that emerging applications, especially with microelectrodes, will require clinical charge densities that exceed traditional damage thresholds. Experimental data show that stimulation at higher charge densities can be achieved without causing tissue damage, suggesting that safety parameters for microelectrodes might be distinct from those defined for macroelectrodes. However, these increased charge densities may need to be justified by bench, non-clinical or clinical testing to provide evidence of device

  6. A threshold for dissipative fission

    SciTech Connect

    Thoennessen, M.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1993-09-21

    The empirical domain of validity of statistical theory is examined as applied to fission data on pre-fission data on pre-fission neutron, charged particle, and {gamma}-ray multiplicities. Systematics are found of the threshold excitation energy for the appearance of nonstatistical fission. From the data on systems with not too high fissility, the relevant phenomenological parameter is the ratio of the threshold temperature T{sub thresh} to the (temperature-dependent) fission barrier height E{sub Bar}(T). The statistical model reproduces the data for T{sub thresh}/E{sub Bar}(T) < 0.26 {plus_minus} 0.05, but underpredicts the multiplicities at higher T{sub thresh}/E{sub Bar}(T) independent of mass and fissility of the systems.

  7. Hadronic resonances enhanced by thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramés, T. F.; Valcarce, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a neat example of a meson-baryon system where the vicinity of two different thresholds enhances the binding of a hadronic resonance, a pentaquark. As a consequence the pattern of states may change when moving among different flavor sectors, what poses a warning on naive extrapolations to heavy flavor sectors based on systematic expansions. For this purpose we simultaneously analyze the N D bar and NB two-hadron systems looking for possible bound states or resonances. When a resonance is controlled by a coupled-channel effect, going to a different flavor sector may enhance or diminish the binding. This effect may, for example, generate significant differences between the charmonium and bottomonium spectra above open-flavor thresholds or pentaquark states in the open-charm and open-bottom sectors.

  8. The Influence of Humidity on Assessing Irritation Threshold of Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Monsé, Christian; Sucker, Kirsten; Hoffmeyer, Frank; Jettkant, Birger; Berresheim, Hans; Bünger, Jürgen; Brüning, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large number of occupational exposure limit values (OELs) are based on avoiding of sensory irritation of the eyes and the upper respiratory tract. In order to investigate the chemosensory effect range of a chemical, odor and sensory irritation thresholds (lateralization thresholds, LTs) can be assessed. Humidity affects olfactory function and thus influences odor thresholds; however, a similar effect has not been shown for sensory irritation thresholds. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether LTs for ammonia vapor vary depending on the water vapor content of the inspired stimulus. Eight healthy nonsmoking volunteers were simultaneously exposed to ammonia vapor through one nostril and clean air through the other and were asked to determine which nostril received the chemical. Within experimental runs, ascending ammonia concentrations (60-350 ppm) that were either dry or humidified were administered at fixed time intervals. Geometric mean LTs obtained at wet (181 ppm) or dry (172 ppm) conditions did not differ significantly (P = 0.19) and were within the range of those reported by previous studies. These results suggest that humidity is not a critical factor in determining sensory irritation thresholds for ammonia, and future studies will examine if these findings are transferable to sensory irritation thresholds for other chemicals. PMID:27379250

  9. The Influence of Humidity on Assessing Irritation Threshold of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Sucker, Kirsten; Jettkant, Birger; Berresheim, Hans; Brüning, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large number of occupational exposure limit values (OELs) are based on avoiding of sensory irritation of the eyes and the upper respiratory tract. In order to investigate the chemosensory effect range of a chemical, odor and sensory irritation thresholds (lateralization thresholds, LTs) can be assessed. Humidity affects olfactory function and thus influences odor thresholds; however, a similar effect has not been shown for sensory irritation thresholds. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether LTs for ammonia vapor vary depending on the water vapor content of the inspired stimulus. Eight healthy nonsmoking volunteers were simultaneously exposed to ammonia vapor through one nostril and clean air through the other and were asked to determine which nostril received the chemical. Within experimental runs, ascending ammonia concentrations (60–350 ppm) that were either dry or humidified were administered at fixed time intervals. Geometric mean LTs obtained at wet (181 ppm) or dry (172 ppm) conditions did not differ significantly (P = 0.19) and were within the range of those reported by previous studies. These results suggest that humidity is not a critical factor in determining sensory irritation thresholds for ammonia, and future studies will examine if these findings are transferable to sensory irritation thresholds for other chemicals. PMID:27379250

  10. Roots at the Percolation Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; Kaestner, A.; Vontobel, P.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Much of the carbon assimilated by plants during photosynthesis is lost to the soil via rhizodepositions. One component of rhizopdeposition is mucilage, a hydrogel that dramatically alters the soil physical properties. Mucilage was assumed to explain unexpectedly low rhizosphere rewetting rates during irrigation (Carminati et al. 2010) and temporarily water repellency in the rhizosphere after severe drying (Moradi et al. 2012).Here, we present an experimental and theoretical study for the rewetting behaviour of a soil mixed with mucilage, which was used as an analogue of the rhizosphere. Our samples were made of two layers of untreated soils separated by a thin layer (ca. 1 mm) of soil treated with mucilage. We prepared soil columns of varying particle size, mucilage concentration and height of the middle layer above the water table. The dry soil columns were re-wetted by capillary rise from the bottom.The rewetting of the middle layer showed a distinct dual behavior. For mucilage concentrations lower than a certain threshold, water could cross the thin layer almost immediately after rewetting of bulk soil. At slightly higher mucilage concentrations, the thin layer was almost impermeable. The mucilage concentration at the threshold strongly depended on particle size: the smaller the particle size the larger the soil specific surface and the more mucilage was needed to cover the entire particle surface and to induce water repellency.We applied a classic pore network model to simulate the experimental observations. In the model a certain fraction of nodes were randomly disconnected to reproduce the effect of mucilage in temporarily blocking the flow. The percolation model could qualitatively reproduce well the threshold characteristics of the experiments. Our experiments, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively

  11. Analysis of the interrelationship of the pulmonary irritation and elicitation thresholds in rats sensitized with 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI)

    PubMed Central

    Pauluhn, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This paper summarizes a range of experimental data central for developing a science-based approach for hazard identification of monomeric and polymeric aliphatic 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI). The dose–response curve of HDI-induced pulmonary responses in naïve or dermally sensitized rats after one or several inhalation priming exposures was examined in the Brown Norway (BN) rat asthma model. Emphasis was directed to demonstrate the need and the difficulty in selecting an appropriate pulmonary dose when much of the inhaled chemically reactive vapor may concentration dependently be retained in the upper airways of obligate nose-breathing rats. The course taken acknowledges the experimental challenges in identifying an elicitation threshold for HDI-monomer near or above the saturated vapor concentration or in the presence of a HDI-polymer aerosol. The inhalation threshold dose on elicitation was determined based on a fixed concentration (C) × variable exposure duration (t) protocol for improving inhalation dosimetry of the lower airways. Neutrophilic granulocytes (PMN) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in equally inhalation primed naïve and dermally sensitized rats were used to define the inhalation elicitation threshold C × t. Sensitized rats elaborated markedly increased PMN challenged sensitized rats relative to equally challenged naïve rats at 5625 mg HDI/m3 × min (75 mg/m3 for 75 min). PMN were essentially indistinguishable at 900 mg HDI/m3 × min. By applying adjustment factors accounting for both inter-species differences in inhalation dosimetry and intra-species susceptibility, the workplace human-equivalent threshold C × t was estimated to be in the range of the current ACGIH TLV® of HDI. Thus, this rat “asthma” model was suitable to demonstrate elicitation thresholds for HDI-vapor after one or several inhalation priming exposures and seems to be suitable to derive occupational exposure values

  12. Analysis of the interrelationship of the pulmonary irritation and elicitation thresholds in rats sensitized with 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI).

    PubMed

    Pauluhn, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    This paper summarizes a range of experimental data central for developing a science-based approach for hazard identification of monomeric and polymeric aliphatic 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI). The dose-response curve of HDI-induced pulmonary responses in naïve or dermally sensitized rats after one or several inhalation priming exposures was examined in the Brown Norway (BN) rat asthma model. Emphasis was directed to demonstrate the need and the difficulty in selecting an appropriate pulmonary dose when much of the inhaled chemically reactive vapor may concentration dependently be retained in the upper airways of obligate nose-breathing rats. The course taken acknowledges the experimental challenges in identifying an elicitation threshold for HDI-monomer near or above the saturated vapor concentration or in the presence of a HDI-polymer aerosol. The inhalation threshold dose on elicitation was determined based on a fixed concentration (C) × variable exposure duration (t) protocol for improving inhalation dosimetry of the lower airways. Neutrophilic granulocytes (PMN) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in equally inhalation primed naïve and dermally sensitized rats were used to define the inhalation elicitation threshold C × t. Sensitized rats elaborated markedly increased PMN challenged sensitized rats relative to equally challenged naïve rats at 5625 mg HDI/m(3) × min (75 mg/m(3) for 75 min). PMN were essentially indistinguishable at 900 mg HDI/m(3) × min. By applying adjustment factors accounting for both inter-species differences in inhalation dosimetry and intra-species susceptibility, the workplace human-equivalent threshold C × t was estimated to be in the range of the current ACGIH TLV® of HDI. Thus, this rat "asthma" model was suitable to demonstrate elicitation thresholds for HDI-vapor after one or several inhalation priming exposures and seems to be suitable to derive occupational exposure values (OELs) for

  13. Analysis of intensity instability threshold at transition in RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer,W.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Cameron, P.; Montag, C.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2008-06-23

    The beam intensity of ion beams in RHIC is limited by a fast transverse instability at transition, driven by the machine impedance and electron clouds. For gold and deuteron beams we analyze the dependence of the instability threshold on beam and machine parameters from recent operational data and dedicated experiments. We fit the machine impedance to the experimental data.

  14. Subsurface characterization with localized ensemble Kalman filter employing adaptive thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delijani, Ebrahim Biniaz; Pishvaie, Mahmoud Reza; Boozarjomehry, Ramin Bozorgmehry

    2014-07-01

    Ensemble Kalman filter, EnKF, as a Monte Carlo sequential data assimilation method has emerged promisingly for subsurface media characterization during past decade. Due to high computational cost of large ensemble size, EnKF is limited to small ensemble set in practice. This results in appearance of spurious correlation in covariance structure leading to incorrect or probable divergence of updated realizations. In this paper, a universal/adaptive thresholding method is presented to remove and/or mitigate spurious correlation problem in the forecast covariance matrix. This method is, then, extended to regularize Kalman gain directly. Four different thresholding functions have been considered to threshold forecast covariance and gain matrices. These include hard, soft, lasso and Smoothly Clipped Absolute Deviation (SCAD) functions. Three benchmarks are used to evaluate the performances of these methods. These benchmarks include a small 1D linear model and two 2D water flooding (in petroleum reservoirs) cases whose levels of heterogeneity/nonlinearity are different. It should be noted that beside the adaptive thresholding, the standard distance dependant localization and bootstrap Kalman gain are also implemented for comparison purposes. We assessed each setup with different ensemble sets to investigate the sensitivity of each method on ensemble size. The results indicate that thresholding of forecast covariance yields more reliable performance than Kalman gain. Among thresholding function, SCAD is more robust for both covariance and gain estimation. Our analyses emphasize that not all assimilation cycles do require thresholding and it should be performed wisely during the early assimilation cycles. The proposed scheme of adaptive thresholding outperforms other methods for subsurface characterization of underlying benchmarks.

  15. Thresholds for Universal Concatenated Quantum Codes.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, Christopher; Jochym-O'Connor, Tomas; Laflamme, Raymond

    2016-07-01

    Quantum error correction and fault tolerance make it possible to perform quantum computations in the presence of imprecision and imperfections of realistic devices. An important question is to find the noise rate at which errors can be arbitrarily suppressed. By concatenating the 7-qubit Steane and 15-qubit Reed-Muller codes, the 105-qubit code enables a universal set of fault-tolerant gates despite not all of them being transversal. Importantly, the cnot gate remains transversal in both codes, and as such has increased error protection relative to the other single qubit logical gates. We show that while the level-1 pseudothreshold for the concatenated scheme is limited by the logical Hadamard gate, the error suppression of the logical cnot gates allows for the asymptotic threshold to increase by orders of magnitude at higher levels. We establish a lower bound of 1.28×10^{-3} for the asymptotic threshold of this code, which is competitive with known concatenated models and does not rely on ancillary magic state preparation for universal computation. PMID:27419549

  16. Thresholds for Universal Concatenated Quantum Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberland, Christopher; Jochym-O'Connor, Tomas; Laflamme, Raymond

    2016-07-01

    Quantum error correction and fault tolerance make it possible to perform quantum computations in the presence of imprecision and imperfections of realistic devices. An important question is to find the noise rate at which errors can be arbitrarily suppressed. By concatenating the 7-qubit Steane and 15-qubit Reed-Muller codes, the 105-qubit code enables a universal set of fault-tolerant gates despite not all of them being transversal. Importantly, the cnot gate remains transversal in both codes, and as such has increased error protection relative to the other single qubit logical gates. We show that while the level-1 pseudothreshold for the concatenated scheme is limited by the logical Hadamard gate, the error suppression of the logical cnot gates allows for the asymptotic threshold to increase by orders of magnitude at higher levels. We establish a lower bound of 1.28 ×10-3 for the asymptotic threshold of this code, which is competitive with known concatenated models and does not rely on ancillary magic state preparation for universal computation.

  17. Colour thresholding and objective quantification in bioimaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Gerber, M. A.; Torre-Bueno, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Computer imaging is rapidly becoming an indispensable tool for the quantification of variables in research and medicine. Whilst its use in medicine has largely been limited to qualitative observations, imaging in applied basic sciences, medical research and biotechnology demands objective quantification of the variables in question. In black and white densitometry (0-256 levels of intensity) the separation of subtle differences between closely related hues from stains is sometimes very difficult. True-colour and real-time video microscopy analysis offer choices not previously available with monochrome systems. In this paper we demonstrate the usefulness of colour thresholding, which has so far proven indispensable for proper objective quantification of the products of histochemical reactions and/or subtle differences in tissue and cells. In addition, we provide interested, but untrained readers with basic information that may assist decisions regarding the most suitable set-up for a project under consideration. Data from projects in progress at Tulane are shown to illustrate the advantage of colour thresholding over monochrome densitometry and for objective quantification of subtle colour differences between experimental and control samples.

  18. Thresholds for Coral Bleaching: Are Synergistic Factors and Shifting Thresholds Changing the Landscape for Management? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, C.; Donner, S. D.; Logan, C. A.; Gledhill, D. K.; Liu, G.; Heron, S. F.; Christensen, T.; Rauenzahn, J.; Morgan, J.; Parker, B. A.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Skirving, W. J.; Strong, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    As carbon dioxide rises in the atmosphere, climate change and ocean acidification are modifying important physical and chemical parameters in the oceans with resulting impacts on coral reef ecosystems. Rising CO2 is warming the world’s oceans and causing corals to bleach, with both alarming frequency and severity. The frequent return of stressful temperatures has already resulted in major damage to many of the world’s coral reefs and is expected to continue in the foreseeable future. Warmer oceans also have contributed to a rise in coral infectious diseases. Both bleaching and infectious disease can result in coral mortality and threaten one of the most diverse ecosystems on Earth and the important ecosystem services they provide. Additionally, ocean acidification from rising CO2 is reducing the availability of carbonate ions needed by corals to build their skeletons and perhaps depressing the threshold for bleaching. While thresholds vary among species and locations, it is clear that corals around the world are already experiencing anomalous temperatures that are too high, too often, and that warming is exceeding the rate at which corals can adapt. This is despite a complex adaptive capacity that involves both the coral host and the zooxanthellae, including changes in the relative abundance of the latter in their coral hosts. The safe upper limit for atmospheric CO2 is probably somewhere below 350ppm, a level we passed decades ago, and for temperature is a sustained global temperature increase of less than 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. How much can corals acclimate and/or adapt to the unprecedented fast changing environmental conditions? Any change in the threshold for coral bleaching as the result of acclimation and/or adaption may help corals to survive in the future but adaptation to one stress may be maladaptive to another. There also is evidence that ocean acidification and nutrient enrichment modify this threshold. What do shifting thresholds mean

  19. Thresholds in shock response across the elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, F. L.; Bourne, N. K.; CMEC Team

    2015-06-01

    Compendia of shock data have been assembled across national laboratories across the world. Previous work has shown a threshold in behaviour for materials; the weak shock limit. This corresponds the stress state at which the shock is overdriven in a single front. The shock velocity-particle velocity data for elements and compounds has been systematically analysed to note discontinuities in the data. A range of materials show these features and the form of the discontinuity in each case is analysed. Some correspond to martensitic phase transformations as expected whilst others are more difficult to track down. Particular groups within the elements show characteristic forms according to groupings in the periodic table. The datasets are presented and trends are noted.

  20. Jamming threshold of dry fine powders.

    PubMed

    Valverde, J M; Quintanilla, M A S; Castellanos, A

    2004-06-25

    We report a novel experimental study on the jamming transition of dry fine powders with controlled attractive energy and particle size. Like in attractive colloids dry fine particles experience diffusion-limited clustering in the fluidlike regime. At the jamming threshold fractal clusters crowd in a metastable state at volume fractions depending on attractive energy and close to the volume fraction of hard nonattractive spheres at jamming. Near the phase transition the stress-(volume fraction) relationship can be fitted to a critical-like functional form for a small range of applied stresses sigma approximately (phi-phi(J))(beta) as measured on foams, emulsions, and colloidal systems and predicted by numerical simulations on hard spheres. PMID:15245067

  1. Laser damage threshold measurements of optical materials for direct laser accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Ken; Byer, R. L.; Colby, E. R.; England, R. J.; Peralta, E. A.

    2012-12-21

    The laser-damage threshold is a fundamental limit for any dielectric laser-driven accelerator and is set by the material of the structure. In this paper, we present a theoretical model of the laser damage mechanism, in comparison with experimental data on the damage threshold of silicon. Additionally, we present damage threshold measurement data of various optical materials, most of which have not been previously characterized in the picosecond-regime.

  2. Program For Thresholding In Digital Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolf, Scott R.; Avis, Elizabeth L.; Matthews, Christine G.; Stacy, Kathryn

    1994-01-01

    THRTOOL program applies thresholding techniques to Sun rasterfiles. Provides for choice among four methods of thresholding. Written in C language and implemented on Sun series and Silicon Graphics IRIS machines.

  3. USE OF THRESHOLDS IN LANDSCAPE ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification and use of thresholds are potentially important additions to interpretations of ecological monitoring data. However, there are a number of issues related to defining and using thresholds in interpreting ecological data. Most of these issues center around the pauc...

  4. Analytic formulas for above threshold ionization or detachment plateau spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, M. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2009-11-01

    Closed form analytic formulas are derived in the tunneling limit for both above threshold detachment (ATD) of negative ions and above threshold ionization (ATI) of neutral atoms. These formulas provide a fully quantum justification of the well-known classical three-step scenario for strong field ionization and detachment spectra in the high energy region of the ATI or ATD plateau and also provide analytical insight into how the ATI/ATD rates may be controlled by varying the laser field parameters or by varying the atomic species.

  5. Thresholds for impaired species recovery.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-22

    Studies on small and declining populations dominate research in conservation biology. This emphasis reflects two overarching frameworks: the small-population paradigm focuses on correlates of increased extinction probability; the declining-population paradigm directs attention to the causes and consequences of depletion. Neither, however, particularly informs research on the determinants, rate or uncertainty of population increase. By contrast, Allee effects (positive associations between population size and realized per capita population growth rate, r(realized), a metric of average individual fitness) offer a theoretical and empirical basis for identifying numerical and temporal thresholds at which recovery is unlikely or uncertain. Following a critique of studies on Allee effects, I quantify population-size minima and subsequent trajectories of marine fishes that have and have not recovered following threat mitigation. The data suggest that threat amelioration, albeit necessary, can be insufficient to effect recovery for populations depleted to less than 10% of maximum abundance (N(max)), especially when they remain depleted for lengthy periods of time. Comparing terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates, life-history analyses suggest that population-size thresholds for impaired recovery are likely to be comparatively low for marine fishes but high for marine mammals.Articulation of a 'recovering population paradigm' would seem warranted. It might stimulate concerted efforts to identify generic impaired recovery thresholds across species. It might also serve to reduce the confusion of terminology, and the conflation of causes and consequences with patterns currently evident in the literature on Allee effects, thus strengthening communication among researchers and enhancing the practical utility of recovery-oriented research to conservation practitioners and resource managers. PMID:26213739

  6. Thresholds for impaired species recovery

    PubMed Central

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on small and declining populations dominate research in conservation biology. This emphasis reflects two overarching frameworks: the small-population paradigm focuses on correlates of increased extinction probability; the declining-population paradigm directs attention to the causes and consequences of depletion. Neither, however, particularly informs research on the determinants, rate or uncertainty of population increase. By contrast, Allee effects (positive associations between population size and realized per capita population growth rate, rrealized, a metric of average individual fitness) offer a theoretical and empirical basis for identifying numerical and temporal thresholds at which recovery is unlikely or uncertain. Following a critique of studies on Allee effects, I quantify population-size minima and subsequent trajectories of marine fishes that have and have not recovered following threat mitigation. The data suggest that threat amelioration, albeit necessary, can be insufficient to effect recovery for populations depleted to less than 10% of maximum abundance (Nmax), especially when they remain depleted for lengthy periods of time. Comparing terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates, life-history analyses suggest that population-size thresholds for impaired recovery are likely to be comparatively low for marine fishes but high for marine mammals. Articulation of a ‘recovering population paradigm’ would seem warranted. It might stimulate concerted efforts to identify generic impaired recovery thresholds across species. It might also serve to reduce the confusion of terminology, and the conflation of causes and consequences with patterns currently evident in the literature on Allee effects, thus strengthening communication among researchers and enhancing the practical utility of recovery-oriented research to conservation practitioners and resource managers. PMID:26213739

  7. Do Optimal Prognostic Thresholds in Continuous Physiological Variables Really Exist? Analysis of Origin of Apparent Thresholds, with Systematic Review for Peak Oxygen Consumption, Ejection Fraction and BNP

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Tora; Rehman, Michaela B.; Pastormerlo, Luigi Emilio; Harrell, Frank E.; Coats, Andrew J. S.; Francis, Darrel P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinicians are sometimes advised to make decisions using thresholds in measured variables, derived from prognostic studies. Objectives We studied why there are conflicting apparently-optimal prognostic thresholds, for example in exercise peak oxygen uptake (pVO2), ejection fraction (EF), and Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) in heart failure (HF). Data Sources and Eligibility Criteria Studies testing pVO2, EF or BNP prognostic thresholds in heart failure, published between 1990 and 2010, listed on Pubmed. Methods First, we examined studies testing pVO2, EF or BNP prognostic thresholds. Second, we created repeated simulations of 1500 patients to identify whether an apparently-optimal prognostic threshold indicates step change in risk. Results 33 studies (8946 patients) tested a pVO2 threshold. 18 found it prognostically significant: the actual reported threshold ranged widely (10–18 ml/kg/min) but was overwhelmingly controlled by the individual study population's mean pVO2 (r = 0.86, p<0.00001). In contrast, the 15 negative publications were testing thresholds 199% further from their means (p = 0.0001). Likewise, of 35 EF studies (10220 patients), the thresholds in the 22 positive reports were strongly determined by study means (r = 0.90, p<0.0001). Similarly, in the 19 positives of 20 BNP studies (9725 patients): r = 0.86 (p<0.0001). Second, survival simulations always discovered a “most significant” threshold, even when there was definitely no step change in mortality. With linear increase in risk, the apparently-optimal threshold was always near the sample mean (r = 0.99, p<0.001). Limitations This study cannot report the best threshold for any of these variables; instead it explains how common clinical research procedures routinely produce false thresholds. Key Findings First, shifting (and/or disappearance) of an apparently-optimal prognostic threshold is strongly determined by studies' average pVO2, EF or BNP. Second

  8. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Student Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-01-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by…

  9. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-04-24

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

  10. Epidemic threshold in directed networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Wang, Huijuan; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2013-12-01

    Epidemics have so far been mostly studied in undirected networks. However, many real-world networks, such as the online social network Twitter and the world wide web, on which information, emotion, or malware spreads, are directed networks, composed of both unidirectional links and bidirectional links. We define the directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links. The epidemic threshold τ(c) for the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic is lower bounded by 1/λ(1) in directed networks, where λ(1), also called the spectral radius, is the largest eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix. In this work, we propose two algorithms to generate directed networks with a given directionality ξ. The effect of ξ on the spectral radius λ(1), principal eigenvector x(1), spectral gap (λ(1)-|λ(2)|), and algebraic connectivity μ(N-1) is studied. Important findings are that the spectral radius λ(1) decreases with the directionality ξ, whereas the spectral gap and the algebraic connectivity increase with the directionality ξ. The extent of the decrease of the spectral radius depends on both the degree distribution and the degree-degree correlation ρ(D). Hence, in directed networks, the epidemic threshold is larger and a random walk converges to its steady state faster than that in undirected networks with the same degree distribution. PMID:24483506

  11. Epidemic threshold in directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cong; Wang, Huijuan; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2013-12-01

    Epidemics have so far been mostly studied in undirected networks. However, many real-world networks, such as the online social network Twitter and the world wide web, on which information, emotion, or malware spreads, are directed networks, composed of both unidirectional links and bidirectional links. We define the directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links. The epidemic threshold τc for the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic is lower bounded by 1/λ1 in directed networks, where λ1, also called the spectral radius, is the largest eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix. In this work, we propose two algorithms to generate directed networks with a given directionality ξ. The effect of ξ on the spectral radius λ1, principal eigenvector x1, spectral gap (λ1-λ2), and algebraic connectivity μN-1 is studied. Important findings are that the spectral radius λ1 decreases with the directionality ξ, whereas the spectral gap and the algebraic connectivity increase with the directionality ξ. The extent of the decrease of the spectral radius depends on both the degree distribution and the degree-degree correlation ρD. Hence, in directed networks, the epidemic threshold is larger and a random walk converges to its steady state faster than that in undirected networks with the same degree distribution.

  12. Computational gestalts and perception thresholds.

    PubMed

    Desolneux, Agnès; Moisan, Lionel; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    In 1923, Max Wertheimer proposed a research programme and method in visual perception. He conjectured the existence of a small set of geometric grouping laws governing the perceptual synthesis of phenomenal objects, or "gestalt" from the atomic retina input. In this paper, we review this set of geometric grouping laws, using the works of Metzger, Kanizsa and their schools. In continuation, we explain why the Gestalt theory research programme can be translated into a Computer Vision programme. This translation is not straightforward, since Gestalt theory never addressed two fundamental matters: image sampling and image information measurements. Using these advances, we shall show that gestalt grouping laws can be translated into quantitative laws allowing the automatic computation of gestalts in digital images. From the psychophysical viewpoint, a main issue is raised: the computer vision gestalt detection methods deliver predictable perception thresholds. Thus, we are set in a position where we can build artificial images and check whether some kind of agreement can be found between the computationally predicted thresholds and the psychophysical ones. We describe and discuss two preliminary sets of experiments, where we compared the gestalt detection performance of several subjects with the predictable detection curve. In our opinion, the results of this experimental comparison support the idea of a much more systematic interaction between computational predictions in Computer Vision and psychophysical experiments. PMID:14766147

  13. Setting conservation management thresholds using a novel participatory modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Addison, P F E; de Bie, K; Rumpff, L

    2015-10-01

    We devised a participatory modeling approach for setting management thresholds that show when management intervention is required to address undesirable ecosystem changes. This approach was designed to be used when management thresholds: must be set for environmental indicators in the face of multiple competing objectives; need to incorporate scientific understanding and value judgments; and will be set by participants with limited modeling experience. We applied our approach to a case study where management thresholds were set for a mat-forming brown alga, Hormosira banksii, in a protected area management context. Participants, including management staff and scientists, were involved in a workshop to test the approach, and set management thresholds to address the threat of trampling by visitors to an intertidal rocky reef. The approach involved trading off the environmental objective, to maintain the condition of intertidal reef communities, with social and economic objectives to ensure management intervention was cost-effective. Ecological scenarios, developed using scenario planning, were a key feature that provided the foundation for where to set management thresholds. The scenarios developed represented declines in percent cover of H. banksii that may occur under increased threatening processes. Participants defined 4 discrete management alternatives to address the threat of trampling and estimated the effect of these alternatives on the objectives under each ecological scenario. A weighted additive model was used to aggregate participants' consequence estimates. Model outputs (decision scores) clearly expressed uncertainty, which can be considered by decision makers and used to inform where to set management thresholds. This approach encourages a proactive form of conservation, where management thresholds and associated actions are defined a priori for ecological indicators, rather than reacting to unexpected ecosystem changes in the future. PMID:26040608

  14. Transformation and Contextualisation: Conceptualising Students' Conceptual Understandings of Threshold Concepts in Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheja, Max; Pettersson, Kerstin

    2010-01-01

    Research on student learning in higher education suggests that threshold concepts within various disciplines have the capacity to transform students' understanding. The present study explores students' understanding in relation to particular threshold concepts in mathematics--integral and limit--and tries to clarify in what sense developing an…

  15. Thermal perception thresholds: influence of determination paradigm and reference temperature.

    PubMed

    Hilz, M J; Glorius, S; Berić, A

    1995-04-01

    The use of different paradigms and initial skin and thermode reference temperatures in quantitative thermal testing does not allow strict comparison of results generated from different laboratories. We tested (a) whether the reproducibility of the method of limits is higher for measurement of isolated warm and cold thresholds (WT, CT) as compared to difference limen (DL) thresholds, i.e. values derived from alternating warm and cold stimulation, and (b) whether WT-, CT- and DL-thresholds depend on the value of baseline skin and thermode temperatures. In 20 healthy volunteers WT-, CT-, and DL-thresholds were determined at the volar wrist using a Somedic-Thermotest. In condition A the baseline thermode temperature was set at 30 degrees C, and in conditions B and C at 35 degrees C; in condition C the tested skin area was also warmed to 35 degrees C prior to the test. The randomized tests were repeated within 1-8 days. WT-, CT-, and DL-values were reproducible, but DL-values were more widely spread than WT and CT. CT variability was lowest in condition A, and WT variability in condition C. We conclude that DL determination should be abandoned, since CT and WT better differentiate normal from abnormal thresholds than the coarse DL-values. We recommend the use of the lower baseline thermode temperature (30 degrees C) and elimination of warming of the tested skin area prior to the test. PMID:7608727

  16. Retronasal smell and detection thresholds of iron and copper salts.

    PubMed

    Epke, Effie M; Lawless, Harry T

    2007-10-22

    Iron and copper salts, when placed in the mouth, may give rise to odorous compounds which complicate their functioning as chemical stimuli. The contribution of retronasal smell to perception of these metal salts at threshold has not been determined. Detection thresholds of the sulfate and chloride salts of ferrous iron and copper, and sodium chloride (as a control) were determined using a modified forced-choice ascending method of limits, with and without nasal occlusion. Threshold values were calculated from geometric means of individual estimates, and from interpolation on logistic regression and percent correct plots. Nasal occlusion raised thresholds for iron salts and copper but not sodium. The geometric mean detection thresholds with the nose open were 30, 64, 7.8, and 8.2 microM for FeSO(4), FeCl(2), CuSO(4), CuCl(2), respectively but rose to 160, 227, 24.6 and 15.6 with the nose closed. Metal salts of both iron and copper create a retronasally perceived olfactory stimulus at low concentration levels, probably arising from lipid oxidation products generated in the mouth. PMID:17532013

  17. Retronasal Smell and Detection Thresholds of Iron and Copper Salts

    PubMed Central

    Epke, Effie M.; Lawless, Harry T.

    2016-01-01

    Iron and copper salts, when placed in the mouth, may give rise to odorous compounds which complicate their functioning as chemical stimuli. The contribution of retronasal smell to perception of these metal salts at threshold has not been determined. Detection thresholds of the sulfate and chloride salts of ferrous iron and copper, and sodium chloride (as a control) were determined using a modified forced-choice ascending method of limits, with and without nasal occlusion. Threshold values were calculated from geometric means of individual estimates, and from interpolation on logistic regression and percent correct plots. Nasal occlusion raised thresholds for iron salts and copper but not sodium. The geometric mean detection thresholds with the nose open were 30, 64, 7.8, and 8.2 μM for FeSO4, FeCl2, CuSO4, CuCl2, respectively but rose to 160, 227, 24.6 and 15.6 with the nose closed. Metal salts of both iron and copper create a retronasally perceived olfactory stimulus at low concentration levels, probably arising from lipid oxidation products generated in the mouth. PMID:17532013

  18. Critical thresholds in species` responses to landscape structure

    SciTech Connect

    With, K.A.; Crist, T.O.

    1995-12-01

    Critical thresholds are transition ranges across which small changes in spatial pattern produce abrupt shifts in ecological responses. Habitat fragmentation provides a familiar example of a critical threshold. As the landscape becomes dissected into smaller parcels of habitat. landscape connectivity-the functional linkage among habitat patches - may suddenly become disrupted, which may have important consequences for the distribution and persistence of populations. Landscape connectivity depends not only on the abundance and spatial patterning of habitat. but also on the habitat specificity and dispersal abilities of species. Habitat specialists with limited dispersal capabilities presumably have a much lower threshold to habitat fragmentation than highly vagile species, which may perceive the landscape as functionally connected across a greater range of fragmentation severity. To determine where threshold effects in species, responses to landscape structure are likely to occur, a simulation model modified from percolation theory was developed. Our simulations predicted the distributional patterns of populations in different landscape mosaics, which we tested empirically using two grasshopper species (Orthoptera: Acrididae) that occur in the shortgrass prairie of north-central Colorado. The distribution of these two species in this grassland mosaic matched the predictions from our simulations. By providing quantitative predictions of threshold effects, this modelling approach may prove useful in the formulation of conservation strategies and assessment of land-use changes on species` distributional patterns and persistence.

  19. Near-threshold Ps(n=2)-p scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrikant, Ilya; Bray, Igor

    2016-05-01

    We study the threshold behavior of elastic and inelastic collisions of the excited positronium (Ps) atom with the proton using the theory developed by Gailitis. We show that partial cross sections for elastic and quasielastic processes exhibit pronounced oscillations above the threshold and diverge as 1 / E where E is the collision energy. This behavior is limited from below by the energy equal to the relativistic splitting between degenerate Ps states. Ab initio close coupling calculations are in excellent agreement with the results of the threshold theory. The oscillations almost completely disappear in the total (summed over partial waves) cross sections. However, dipole-supported resonances appear in inelastic processes, in particular in the important process Ps(nl) + p --> H(n'l') +e+ below higher-energy thresholds. Above thresholds these cross sections don't exhibit oscillations but have the 1 / E divergence in an exothermic case. These results are important for current attempts to produce antihydrogen in a similar charge-conjugated reaction Ps(nl) + p --> H (n'l') +e- . Supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  20. Quantum threshold for optomechanical self-structuring in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Robb, G R M; Tesio, E; Oppo, G-L; Firth, W J; Ackemann, T; Bonifacio, R

    2015-05-01

    Theoretical analysis of the optomechanics of degenerate bosonic atoms with a single feedback mirror shows that self-structuring occurs only above an input threshold that is quantum mechanical in origin. This threshold also implies a lower limit to the size (period) of patterns that can be produced in a condensate for a given pump intensity. These thresholds are interpreted as due to the quantum rigidity of Bose-Einstein condensates, which has no classical counterpart. Above the threshold, the condensate self-organizes into an ordered supersolid state with a spatial period self-selected by optical diffraction. PMID:25978236

  1. Epidemic thresholds for bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, D. G.; Risau-Gusman, S.

    2013-11-01

    It is well known that sexually transmitted diseases (STD) spread across a network of human sexual contacts. This network is most often bipartite, as most STD are transmitted between men and women. Even though network models in epidemiology have quite a long history now, there are few general results about bipartite networks. One of them is the simple dependence, predicted using the mean field approximation, between the epidemic threshold and the average and variance of the degree distribution of the network. Here we show that going beyond this approximation can lead to qualitatively different results that are supported by numerical simulations. One of the new features, that can be relevant for applications, is the existence of a critical value for the infectivity of each population, below which no epidemics can arise, regardless of the value of the infectivity of the other population.

  2. Should viral load thresholds be lowered?

    PubMed Central

    Labhardt, Niklaus D.; Bader, Joëlle; Lejone, Thabo Ishmael; Ringera, Isaac; Hobbins, Michael A.; Fritz, Christiane; Ehmer, Jochen; Cerutti, Bernard; Puga, Daniel; Klimkait, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on antiretroviral therapy (ART) define treatment failure as 2 consecutive viral loads (VLs) ≥1000 copies/mL. There is, however, little evidence supporting 1000 copies as an optimal threshold to define treatment failure. Objective of this study was to assess the correlation of the WHO definition with the presence of drug-resistance mutations in patients who present with 2 consecutive unsuppressed VL in a resource-limited setting. In 10 nurse-led clinics in rural Lesotho children and adults on first-line ART for ≥6 months received a first routine VL. Those with plasma VL ≥80 copies/mL were enrolled in a prospective study, receiving enhanced adherence counseling (EAC) and a follow-up VL after 3 months. After a second unsuppressed VL genotypic resistance testing was performed. Viruses with major mutations against ≥2 drugs of the current regimen were classified as “resistant”. A total of 1563 adults and 191 children received a first routine VL. Of the 138 adults and 53 children with unsuppressed VL (≥80 copies/mL), 165 (116 adults; 49 children) had a follow-up VL after EAC; 108 (74 adults; 34 children) remained unsuppressed and resistance testing was successful. Ninety of them fulfilled the WHO definition of treatment failure (both VL ≥1000 copies/mL); for another 18 both VL were unsuppressed but with <1000 copies/mL. The positive predictive value (PPV) for the WHO failure definition was 81.1% (73/90) for the presence of resistant virus. Among the 18 with VL levels between 80 and 1000 copies/mL, thereby classified as “non-failures”, 17 (94.4%) harbored resistant viruses. Lowering the VL threshold from 1000 copies/mL to 80 copies/mL at both determinations had no negative influence on the PPV (83.3%; 90/108). The current WHO-definition misclassifies patients who harbor resistant virus at VL below 1000 c/mL as “nonfailing.” Lowering the threshold to VL ≥80

  3. Regulatory criteria: Legal or ecological thresholds?

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.M.; Skorupa, J.P.; Schwarzbach, S.E.

    1994-12-31

    Selenium-laden irrigation drainwater has been identified as a significant threat to breeding waterfowl and shorebirds in terminal sink environments throughout the western United States. Due to historic wetland habitat losses, irrigation drainwater disposal ponds represent virtually all the available breeding habitat for waterbirds in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California. Egg selenium residues from birds breeding at these ponds have been monitored by the US Fish and Wildlife Service since 1987, and physiological risk thresholds for individual and population-level hatchability and teratogenesis have been determined from these studies. For Blacknecked stilt populations, egg selenium below 3 ppm may be considered a safe level, hatchability is significantly depressed at mean egg selenium concentrations above 8 ppm, and induction of teratogenesis is virtually certain at egg selenium levels above 18 ppm (p < 0.05). Egg samples collected in 1993 from these ponds showed concentrations as high as 160 ppm. Despite the high degree of statistical confidence in these effects thresholds, and the incidence of selenium-induced bird death and deformity at these ponds, regulation of evaporation ponds has been problematic. Existing civil statutes regarding water quality are dependent on risk-based criteria, but irrigation drainwater is exempted from these regulations. The only applicable law is the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, a criminal statute with no risk-based guidelines, and consequently no wildlife safety factors. The authors present data from the San Joaquin Valley in the context of these regulatory and legal limitations. Evaluation of acute and chronic models for ambient water quality indicate that this approach may not provide adequate protection for breeding birds. Based on the inadequacy of these models, the authors consider the development of regulatory criteria for egg selenium, a standard which is ecologically relevant.

  4. Theory of Mesoscopic Threshold Detectors of non-Gaussian Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Recently, measurements of current fluctuations arising from the charge discreteness (shot noise) have become an invaluable tool in mesoscopic physics, the most noticeable achievement being the measurement of quasi-particle charge in the fractional quantum Hall state. Typically, shot noise experiments report measurements of the zero-frequency noise power, which is a characteristic of the Gaussian component of current fluctuations. A natural generalization of the noise power, the counting statistics of charge transmitted through a system, is interesting in itself, because it contains complete information about the electron transport on a long time scale. However, the measurement of non-Gaussian noise effects presents an experimental challenge because of the limitations imposed by the central limit theorem. This difficulty can be partly overcome by placing an auxiliary mesoscopic system (detector) very close to the noise source and arranging strong coupling to the noise. This leads to the idea of a threshold detector, which is able to measure rare current fluctuations. Its basic principle is analogous to a pole vault: A detection event occurs when the measured system variable exceeds a given threshold value. A natural candidate for such a threshold detector is a metastable system operating on an activation principle. By measuring the rate of switching out of the metastable state, information about the statistical properties of the noise driving the system may be extracted. This requires solving the Kramers' problem of noise-activated escape from a metastable state beyond the Gaussian noise approximation and investigating how the measurement circuit affects threshold detection.

  5. Introducing hydrological information in rainfall intensity-duration thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Roberto; Bogaard, Thom

    2016-04-01

    Regional landslide hazard assessment is mainly based on empirically derived precipitation-intensity-duration (PID) thresholds. Generally, two features of rainfall events are plotted to discriminate between observed occurrence and absence of occurrence of mass movements. Hereafter, a separation line is drawn in logarithmic space. Although successfully applied in many case studies, such PID thresholds suffer from many false positives as well as limited physical process insight. One of the main limitations is indeed that they do not include any information about the hydrological processes occurring along the slopes, so that the triggering is only related to rainfall characteristics. In order to introduce such an hydrological information in the definition of rainfall thresholds for shallow landslide triggering assessment, in this study the introduction of non-dimensional rainfall characteristics is proposed. In particular, rain storm depth, intensity and duration are divided by a characteristic infiltration depth, a characteristic infiltration rate and a characteristic duration, respectively. These latter variables depend on the hydraulic properties and on the moisture state of the soil cover at the beginning of the precipitation. The proposed variables are applied to the case of a slope covered with shallow pyroclastic deposits in Cervinara (southern Italy), for which experimental data of hourly rainfall and soil suction were available. Rainfall thresholds defined with the proposed non-dimensional variables perform significantly better than those defined with dimensional variables, either in the intensity-duration plane or in the depth-duration plane.

  6. Embracing thresholds for better environmental management

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ryan P.; Erickson, Ashley L.; Mease, Lindley A.; Battista, Willow; Kittinger, John N.; Fujita, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Three decades of study have revealed dozens of examples in which natural systems have crossed biophysical thresholds (‘tipping points’)—nonlinear changes in ecosystem structure and function—as a result of human-induced stressors, dramatically altering ecosystem function and services. Environmental management that avoids such thresholds could prevent severe social, economic and environmental impacts. Here, we review management measures implemented in ecological systems that have thresholds. Using Ostrom's social–ecological systems framework, we analysed key biophysical and institutional factors associated with 51 social–ecological systems and associated management regimes, and related these to management success defined by ecological outcomes. We categorized cases as instances of prospective or retrospective management, based upon whether management aimed to avoid a threshold or to restore systems that have crossed a threshold. We find that smaller systems are more amenable to threshold-based management, that routine monitoring is associated with successful avoidance of thresholds and recovery after thresholds have been crossed, and that success is associated with the explicit threshold-based management. These findings are powerful evidence for the policy relevance of information on ecological thresholds across a wide range of ecosystems.

  7. Whole-body vibration perception thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, K. C.; Griffin, M. J.

    1988-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of laboratory experiments concerned with perception thresholds for whole-body vibration. The nature of absolute perception thresholds is discussed and a method of determining vibration thresholds, based upon signal detection theory, is proposed. Thresholds of subjects exposed to x-, y- and z-axis sinusoidal vibration were determined for sitting and standing subjects (from 2 to 100 Hz). Perception thresholds have also been determined for supine subjects exposed to vertical ( x-axis) sinusoidal vibration (10-63 Hz). In additional experiments the effects of complex (e.g., random) vibration and the effects of duration on the perception thresholds were investigated. The relation between perception thresholds and vibration levels, said by subjects to be unacceptable if they occurred in their own homes, was investigated as well as the effects of subjects' personality and the visual and acoustic conditions in the laboratory. For the vertical vibration of seated subjects no significant differences were found between the responses of male and female subjects. Significant differences were found between perception thresholds for sitting and standing postures. The median threshold was approximately 0·01 m/s 2 r.m.s. between 2 and 100 Hz. Perception thresholds for x-axis and y-axis vibration were not significantly different in either sitting or standing subjects but significant differences in thresholds were found between sitting and standing positions for both x-axis and y-axis vibration. Subjects tended to be more sensitive to vibration when lying than when sitting or standing. The results suggested that the perception of random vibrations can be predicted from a knowledge of the perception of its component vibrations. The number of cycles of vibration did not affect perception thresholds for vibration durations of more than about 0·25 s. Some assessments suggested that vibration at more than twice the perception threshold may not

  8. A comparison of two methods for measuring thermal thresholds in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, D; Abraham, R; Reid, G

    1989-01-01

    Thermal thresholds can be measured psychophysically using either the method of limits or a forced-choice method. We have compared the two methods in 367 diabetic patients, 128 with symptomatic neuropathy. The Sensortek method was chosen for the forced-choice device, the Somedic modification of the Marstock method for a method of limits. Cooling and heat pain thresholds were also measured using the Marstock method. Somedic thermal thresholds increase with age in normal subjects, but not to a clinically significant degree. In diabetics Marstock warm threshold increased by 0.8 degrees C/decade, Sensortek by 0.1 degrees C/decade. Both methods had a high coefficient of variation in normal subjects (Sensortek 29%, Marstock warm 14%, cool 42%). The prevalence of abnormal thresholds was similar for both methods (28-32%), though Marstock heat pain thresholds were less frequently abnormal (18%). Only 15-18% of patients had abnormal results in both tests. Sensortek thresholds were significantly lower on repeat testing, and all thresholds were higher in symptomatic patients. Both methods are suitable for clinical thermal testing, though the method of limits is quicker. In screening studies the choice of a suitable apparatus need not be determined by the psychophysical basis of the test. PMID:2795077

  9. A common fluence threshold for first positive and second positive phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janoudi, A.; Poff, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the amount of light and the amount of response for any photobiological process can be based on the number of incident quanta per unit time (fluence rate-response) or on the number of incident quanta during a given period of irradiation (fluence-response). Fluence-response and fluence rate-response relationships have been measured for second positive phototropism by seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. The fluence-response relationships exhibit a single limiting threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter when measured at fluence rates from 2.4 x 10(-5) to 6.5 x 10(-3) micromoles per square meter per second. The threshold values in the fluence rate-response curves decrease with increasing time of irradiation, but show a common fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. These thresholds are the same as the threshold of about 0.01 micromole per square meter measured for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that second positive curvature has a threshold in time of about 10 minutes. Moreover, if the times of irradiation exceed the time threshold, there is a single limiting fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. Thus, the limiting fluence threshold for second positive phototropism is the same as the fluence threshold for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, we suggest that this common fluence threshold for first positive and second positive phototropism is set by a single photoreceptor pigment system.

  10. A Common Fluence Threshold for First Positive and Second Positive Phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Janoudi, Abdul; Poff, Kenneth L.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the amount of light and the amount of response for any photobiological process can be based on the number of incident quanta per unit time (fluence rate-response) or on the number of incident quanta during a given period of irradiation (fluence-response). Fluence-response and fluence rate-response relationships have been measured for second positive phototropism by seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. The fluence-response relationships exhibit a single limiting threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter when measured at fluence rates from 2.4 × 10−5 to 6.5 × 10−3 micromoles per square meter per second. The threshold values in the fluence rateresponse curves decrease with increasing time of irradiation, but show a common fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. These thresholds are the same as the threshold of about 0.01 micromole per square meter measured for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that second positive curvature has a threshold in time of about 10 minutes. Moreover, if the times of irradiation exceed the time threshold, there is a single limiting fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. Thus, the limiting fluence threshold for second positive phototropism is the same as the fluence threshold for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, we suggest that this common fluence threshold for first positive and second positive phototropism is set by a single photoreceptor pigment system. PMID:11537470

  11. Recursive adaptive frame integration limited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailov, Michael K.

    2006-05-01

    Recursive Frame Integration Limited was proposed as a way to improve frame integration performance and mitigate issues related to high data rate needed for conventional frame integration. The technique applies two thresholds - one tuned for optimum probability of detection, the other to manage required false alarm rate - and allows a non-linear integration process that, along with Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) gain, provides system designers more capability where cost, weight, or power considerations limit system data rate, processing, or memory capability. However, Recursive Frame Integration Limited may have performance issues when single frame SNR is really low. Recursive Adaptive Frame Integration Limited is proposed as a means to improve limited integration performance with really low single frame SNR. It combines the benefits of nonlinear recursive limited frame integration and adaptive thresholds with a kind of conventional frame integration.

  12. Thresholds for Cenozoic bipolar glaciation.

    PubMed

    Deconto, Robert M; Pollard, David; Wilson, Paul A; Pälike, Heiko; Lear, Caroline H; Pagani, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The long-standing view of Earth's Cenozoic glacial history calls for the first continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica in the earliest Oligocene epoch ( approximately 33.6 million years ago), followed by the onset of northern-hemispheric glacial cycles in the late Pliocene epoch, about 31 million years later. The pivotal early Oligocene event is characterized by a rapid shift of 1.5 parts per thousand in deep-sea benthic oxygen-isotope values (Oi-1) within a few hundred thousand years, reflecting a combination of terrestrial ice growth and deep-sea cooling. The apparent absence of contemporaneous cooling in deep-sea Mg/Ca records, however, has been argued to reflect the growth of more ice than can be accommodated on Antarctica; this, combined with new evidence of continental cooling and ice-rafted debris in the Northern Hemisphere during this period, raises the possibility that Oi-1 represents a precursory bipolar glaciation. Here we test this hypothesis using an isotope-capable global climate/ice-sheet model that accommodates both the long-term decline of Cenozoic atmospheric CO(2) levels and the effects of orbital forcing. We show that the CO(2) threshold below which glaciation occurs in the Northern Hemisphere ( approximately 280 p.p.m.v.) is much lower than that for Antarctica ( approximately 750 p.p.m.v.). Therefore, the growth of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere immediately following Antarctic glaciation would have required rapid CO(2) drawdown within the Oi-1 timeframe, to levels lower than those estimated by geochemical proxies and carbon-cycle models. Instead of bipolar glaciation, we find that Oi-1 is best explained by Antarctic glaciation alone, combined with deep-sea cooling of up to 4 degrees C and Antarctic ice that is less isotopically depleted (-30 to -35 per thousand) than previously suggested. Proxy CO(2) estimates remain above our model's northern-hemispheric glaciation threshold of approximately 280 p.p.m.v. until approximately 25 Myr

  13. Outcome-Driven Thresholds for Home Blood Pressure Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Niiranen, Teemu J.; Asayama, Kei; Thijs, Lutgarde; Johansson, Jouni K.; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Kikuya, Masahiro; Boggia, José; Hozawa, Atsushi; Sandoya, Edgardo; Stergiou, George S.; Tsuji, Ichiro; Jula, Antti M.; Imai, Yutaka; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The lack of outcome-driven operational thresholds limits the clinical application of home blood pressure (BP) measurement. Our objective was to determine an outcome-driven reference frame for home BP measurement. We measured home and clinic BP in 6470 participants (mean age, 59.3 years; 56.9% women; 22.4% on antihypertensive treatment) recruited in Ohasama, Japan (n=2520); Montevideo, Uruguay (n=399); Tsurugaya, Japan (n=811); Didima, Greece (n=665); and nationwide in Finland (n=2075). In multivariable-adjusted analyses of individual subject data, we determined home BP thresholds, which yielded 10-year cardiovascular risks similar to those associated with stages 1 (120/80 mm Hg) and 2 (130/85 mm Hg) prehypertension, and stages 1 (140/90 mm Hg) and 2 (160/100 mm Hg) hypertension on clinic measurement. During 8.3 years of follow-up (median), 716 cardiovascular end points, 294 cardiovascular deaths, 393 strokes, and 336 cardiac events occurred in the whole cohort; in untreated participants these numbers were 414, 158, 225, and 194, respectively. In the whole cohort, outcome-driven systolic/diastolic thresholds for the home BP corresponding with stages 1 and 2 prehypertension and stages 1 and 2 hypertension were 121.4/77.7, 127.4/79.9, 133.4/82.2, and 145.4/86.8 mm Hg; in 5018 untreated participants, these thresholds were 118.5/76.9, 125.2/79.7, 131.9/82.4, and 145.3/87.9 mm Hg, respectively. Rounded thresholds for stages 1 and 2 prehypertension and stages 1 and 2 hypertension amounted to 120/75, 125/80, 130/85, and 145/90 mm Hg, respectively. Population-based outcome-driven thresholds for home BP are slightly lower than those currently proposed in hypertension guidelines. Our current findings could inform guidelines and help clinicians in diagnosing and managing patients. PMID:23129700

  14. Pooling optimal combinations of energy thresholds in spectroscopic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Thomas; Zuber, Marcus; Hamann, Elias; Runz, Armin; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2014-03-01

    Photon counting detectors used in spectroscopic CT are often based on small pixels and therefore offer only limited space to include energy discriminators and their associated counters in each pixel cell. For this reason, it is important to make efficient use of the available energy discriminators in order to achieve an optimized material contrast at a radiation dose as low as possible. Unfortunately, the complexity of evaluating every possible combination of energy thresholds, given a fixed number of counters, rapidly increases with the resolution at which this search is performed, and makes brute-force approaches to this problem infeasible. In this work, we introduce methods from machine learning, in particular sparse regression, to perform a feature selection to determine optimal combinations of energy thresholds. We will demonstrate how methods enforcing row-sparsity on a linear regression's coefficient matrix can be applied to the multiple response problem in spectroscopic CT, i.e. the case in which a single set of energy thresholds is sought to simultaneously retrieve concentrations pertaining to a multitude of materials in an optimal way. These methods are applied to CT images experimentally obtained with a Medipix3RX detector operated in charge summing mode and with a CdTe sensor at a pixel pitch of 110μm. We show that the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso), generalized to the multiple response case, chooses four out of 20 possible threshold positions that allow discriminating PMMA, iodine and gadolinium in a contrast agent phantom at a higher accuracy than with equally spaced thresholds. Finally, we illustrate why it might be unwise to use a higher number of energy thresholds than absolutely necessary.

  15. The three thresholds for fatigue crack propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.J.

    1997-12-01

    The three governing threshold conditions in metal fatigue are considered, one relating to crack growth in single crystals, one concerned with crack growth in polycrystalline materials, and one based on linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). All three conditions are examined in relation to the two physical processes of cracking, i.e., Stage I (shear) and Stage II (tensile) crack growth. The LEFM threshold is seen as a lower bound condition for fatigue crack growth rate, and the single crystal threshold is viewed in relation to the fundamental threshold pertaining to the fatigue resistance of polycrystalline metals.

  16. A study of FM threshold extension techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.; Loch, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of three postdetection threshold extension techniques are evaluated with respect to the ability of such techniques to improve the performance of a phase lock loop demodulator. These techniques include impulse-noise elimination, signal correlation for the detection of impulse noise, and delta modulation signal processing. Experimental results from signal to noise ratio data and bit error rate data indicate that a 2- to 3-decibel threshold extension is readily achievable by using the various techniques. This threshold improvement is in addition to the threshold extension that is usually achieved through the use of a phase lock loop demodulator.

  17. Roots at the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is the layer of soil around the roots where complex and dynamic interactions between plants and soil affect the capacity of plants to take up water. The physical properties of the rhizosphere are affected by mucilage, a gel exuded by roots. Mucilage can absorb large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. We use a percolation model to describe the rewetting of dry rhizosphere. We find that at a critical mucilage concentration the rhizosphere becomes impermeable. The critical mucilage concentration depends on the radius of the soil particle size. Capillary rise experiments with neutron radiography prove that for concentrations below the critical mucilage concentration water could easily cross the rhizosphere, while above the critical concentration water could no longer percolate through it. Our studies, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water?

  18. Percolation Threshold in Polycarbonate Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2014-03-01

    Nanocomposites have unique mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical and thermal properties. Many methods could be applied to prepare polymer-inorganic nanocomposites, such as sol-gel processing, in-situ polymerization, particle in-situ formation, blending, and radiation synthesis. The analytical composite models that have been put forth include Voigt and Reuss bounds, Polymer nanocomposites offer the possibility of substantial improvements in material properties such as shear and bulk modulus, yield strength, toughness, film scratch resistance, optical properties, electrical conductivity, gas and solvent transport, with only very small amounts of nanoparticles Experimental results are compared against composite models of Hashin and Shtrikman bounds, Halpin-Tsai model, Cox model, and various Mori and Tanaka models. Examples of numerical modeling are molecular dynamics modeling and finite element modeling of reduced modulus and hardness that takes into account the modulus of the components and the effect of the interface between the hard filler and relatively soft polymer, polycarbonate. Higher nanoparticle concentration results in poor dispersion and adhesion to polymer matrix which results in lower modulus and hardness and departure from the existing composite models. As the level of silica increases beyond a threshold level, aggregates form which results in weakening of the structure. Polymer silica interface is found to be weak as silica is non-interacting promoting interfacial slip at silica-matrix junctions. Our experimental results compare favorably with those of nanocomposites of polyesters where the effect of nanoclay on composite hardness and modulus depended on dispersion of nanoclay in polyester.

  19. Efficient threshold for volumetric segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdescu, Dumitru D.; Brezovan, Marius; Stanescu, Liana; Stoica Spahiu, Cosmin; Ebanca, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Image segmentation plays a crucial role in effective understanding of digital images. However, the research on the existence of general purpose segmentation algorithm that suits for variety of applications is still very much active. Among the many approaches in performing image segmentation, graph based approach is gaining popularity primarily due to its ability in reflecting global image properties. Volumetric image segmentation can simply result an image partition composed by relevant regions, but the most fundamental challenge in segmentation algorithm is to precisely define the volumetric extent of some object, which may be represented by the union of multiple regions. The aim in this paper is to present a new method to detect visual objects from color volumetric images and efficient threshold. We present a unified framework for volumetric image segmentation and contour extraction that uses a virtual tree-hexagonal structure defined on the set of the image voxels. The advantage of using a virtual tree-hexagonal network superposed over the initial image voxels is that it reduces the execution time and the memory space used, without losing the initial resolution of the image.

  20. Roots at the percolation threshold.

    PubMed

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is the layer of soil around the roots where complex and dynamic interactions between plants and soil affect the capacity of plants to take up water. The physical properties of the rhizosphere are affected by mucilage, a gel exuded by roots. Mucilage can absorb large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. We use a percolation model to describe the rewetting of dry rhizosphere. We find that at a critical mucilage concentration the rhizosphere becomes impermeable. The critical mucilage concentration depends on the radius of the soil particle size. Capillary rise experiments with neutron radiography prove that for concentrations below the critical mucilage concentration water could easily cross the rhizosphere, while above the critical concentration water could no longer percolate through it. Our studies, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water? PMID:25974526

  1. Oil Mist Compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, Lloyd

    2009-02-02

    This report summarizes activities at the KCP related to evaluating and modifying machine tools in order to be in compliance with Section 23 of DOE 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program. Section 851.23 (a) states that “Contractors must comply with the following safety and health standards that are applicable to the hazards in their covered workplace”, and subsection 9 contains the following applicable standard: “American Congress of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), ‘Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices,’ (2005) (incorporated by reference, see §851.27) when the ACGIH Threshold Limit Values are lower (more protective) than permissible exposure limits in 29 CFR 1910.” In the 2005 ACGIHThreshold Limit Value book a Notice of Change was issued for exposure to mineral oil mist used in metalworking fluids (MWFs). The effects of planning for the new facility and which machine tools would be making the transition to the new facility affected which machine tools were modified.

  2. Occupational Exposure to Benzene from Painting with Epoxy and Other High Performance Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    JAHN, STEVEN

    2005-04-20

    Following the discovery of trace benzene in paint products, an assessment was needed to determine potential for benzene exposures to exceed the established ACGIH Threshold Limit Value (TLV) during painting operations. Sample data was collected by area industrial hygienists for benzene during routine maintenance and construction activities at Savannah River Site. A set of available data from the IH database, Sentry, was analyzed to provide guidance to the industrial hygiene staff and draw conclusions on the exposure potential during typical painting operations.

  3. Thresholds of carcinogenicity of flavors.

    PubMed

    Waddell, William J

    2002-08-01

    Fifteen compounds approved by the FEMA (Flavor and Extract Manufacturers Association) expert panel as GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) and structurally related compounds have been reported to be carcinogenic in rodent studies. The dose response of the 15 compounds in these studies was scrutinized by attempting to plot the percentage of animals with tumors against the dose of the compound on a logarithmic scale in molecules of compound per kg per day (the Rozman scale). Four compounds had either no or an inverse dose response: benzaldehyde, furfural, 3,4-dihydroxycoumarin, and gamma-buterolactone. Three had a response at one dose only: anethole, estragole (2 studies), and isophorone. Obviously, a dose-response curve could not be generated for these 7 compounds. Four compounds had an increasing response at two doses (benzyl acetate, cinnamyl anthranilate, ethyl acrylate, and estragole); three compounds had increasing responses at three doses (citral, 2,4-hexadienal, and pyridine); one compound had increasing responses at four doses (methyl eugenol). The three compounds with three doses fit a linear plot with a correlation coefficient of at least 0.9; the four doses in male rats of methyl eugenol fit a linear plot with a correlation coefficient of 0.999983. The intercept at zero percentage tumors of these linear fits was at least several orders of magnitude greater than the estimated daily dose of these flavoring agents to individuals in the United States. This is interpreted to indicate that these flavoring agents have a clear threshold for carcinogenicity in animals that is well above the levels currently approved for use in foods; consequently, these animal studies should not be a cause for concern for carcinogenicity of these compounds in humans. Rather, the animal studies should be viewed as providing evidence for the safety of these compounds at current levels of human exposure. PMID:12151622

  4. Intervention thresholds: a conceptual frame for advance care planning choices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Advance care planning (ACP) provides for decisions in the event of decisional incapacity. Determining ahead of time what a person may want is challenging and limits the utility of ACP. We present empirical evidence for a new approach to ACP: the individual’s “intervention threshold.” The intervention threshold is intuitively understood by clinicians and lay people, but has not been thoroughly described, measured, or analyzed. Methods Using a mixed-methods approach to address the concept of the intervention thresholds, we recruited 52 subjects from a population of chronically ill outpatients for structured telephone interviews assessing knowledge, attitudes, and prior ACP activities. Respondents were presented with 11 interventions for each of four medical scenarios. For each scenario, they were asked whether they would accept each intervention. Data was evaluated by descriptive statistics and chi-squared statistics. Results Complete data were obtained from 52 patients, mean age of 64.5, 34.6% of whom were male. Only 17.3% reported prior ACP discussion with a physician. Rates of accepting and refusing interventions varied by scenario (p < 0.0001) and intervention intensity (p < 0.0001). Conclusions These data provide evidence that people display transitions between wanting or not wanting interventions based on scenarios. Further research is needed to determine effective ways to identify, measure, and represent the components of an individual’s intervention threshold in order to facilitate informed decision making during future incapacity. PMID:24721698

  5. Thresholds of ecosystem response to nutrient enrichment from fish aggregations.

    PubMed

    Layman, Craig A; Allgeier, Jacob E; Yeager, Lauren A; Stoner, Elizabeth W

    2013-02-01

    Biogeochemical hotspots can be driven by aggregations of animals, via excretion, that provide a concentrated source of limiting nutrients for primary producers. In a subtropical seagrass ecosystem, we characterized thresholds of ecological change associated with such hotspots surrounding artificial reef habitats. We deployed reefs of three sizes to aggregate fishes at different densities (and thus different levels of nutrient supply via excretion) and examined seagrass characteristics that reflect ecosystem processes. Responses varied as a function of reef size, with higher fish densities (on larger reefs) associated with more distinct ecological thresholds. For example, adjacent to larger reefs, the percentage of P content (%P) of seagrass (Thalassia testudinum) blades was significantly higher than background concentrations; fish densities on smaller reefs were insufficient to support sharp transitions in %P. Blade height was the only variable characterized by thresholds adjacent to smaller reefs, but lower fish densities (and hence, nutrient input) on smaller reefs were not sufficient for luxury nutrient storage by seagrass. Identifying such complexities in ecological thresholds is crucial for characterizing the extent to which biogeochemical hotspots may influence ecosystem function at a landscape scale. PMID:23691671

  6. Improving massive experiments with threshold blocking.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Michael J; Sävje, Fredrik; Sekhon, Jasjeet S

    2016-07-01

    Inferences from randomized experiments can be improved by blocking: assigning treatment in fixed proportions within groups of similar units. However, the use of the method is limited by the difficulty in deriving these groups. Current blocking methods are restricted to special cases or run in exponential time; are not sensitive to clustering of data points; and are often heuristic, providing an unsatisfactory solution in many common instances. We present an algorithm that implements a widely applicable class of blocking-threshold blocking-that solves these problems. Given a minimum required group size and a distance metric, we study the blocking problem of minimizing the maximum distance between any two units within the same group. We prove this is a nondeterministic polynomial-time hard problem and derive an approximation algorithm that yields a blocking where the maximum distance is guaranteed to be, at most, four times the optimal value. This algorithm runs in O(n log n) time with O(n) space complexity. This makes it, to our knowledge, the first blocking method with an ensured level of performance that works in massive experiments. Whereas many commonly used algorithms form pairs of units, our algorithm constructs the groups flexibly for any chosen minimum size. This facilitates complex experiments with several treatment arms and clustered data. A simulation study demonstrates the efficiency and efficacy of the algorithm; tens of millions of units can be blocked using a desktop computer in a few minutes. PMID:27382151

  7. Human contrast threshold and astronomical visibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crumey, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    The standard visibility model in light-pollution studies is the formula of Hecht, as used e.g. by Schaefer. However, it is applicable only to point sources and is shown to be of limited accuracy. A new visibility model is presented for uniform achromatic targets of any size against background luminances ranging from zero to full daylight, produced by a systematic procedure applicable to any appropriate data set (e.g. Blackwell's), and based on a simple but previously unrecognized empirical relation between contrast threshold and adaptation luminance. The scotopic luminance correction for variable spectral radiance (colour index) is calculated. For point sources, the model is more accurate than Hecht's formula and is verified using telescopic data collected at Mount Wilson in 1947, enabling the sky brightness at that time to be determined. The result is darker than the calculation by Garstang, implying that light pollution grew more rapidly in subsequent decades than has been supposed. The model is applied to the nebular observations of William Herschel, enabling his visual performance to be quantified. Proposals are made regarding sky quality indicators for public use.

  8. Improving massive experiments with threshold blocking

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Michael J.; Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    2016-01-01

    Inferences from randomized experiments can be improved by blocking: assigning treatment in fixed proportions within groups of similar units. However, the use of the method is limited by the difficulty in deriving these groups. Current blocking methods are restricted to special cases or run in exponential time; are not sensitive to clustering of data points; and are often heuristic, providing an unsatisfactory solution in many common instances. We present an algorithm that implements a widely applicable class of blocking—threshold blocking—that solves these problems. Given a minimum required group size and a distance metric, we study the blocking problem of minimizing the maximum distance between any two units within the same group. We prove this is a nondeterministic polynomial-time hard problem and derive an approximation algorithm that yields a blocking where the maximum distance is guaranteed to be, at most, four times the optimal value. This algorithm runs in O(n log n) time with O(n) space complexity. This makes it, to our knowledge, the first blocking method with an ensured level of performance that works in massive experiments. Whereas many commonly used algorithms form pairs of units, our algorithm constructs the groups flexibly for any chosen minimum size. This facilitates complex experiments with several treatment arms and clustered data. A simulation study demonstrates the efficiency and efficacy of the algorithm; tens of millions of units can be blocked using a desktop computer in a few minutes. PMID:27382151

  9. Optimal thresholds for the estimation of area rain-rate moments by the threshold method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A.; Shimizu, Kunio; Kedem, Benjamin

    1993-01-01

    Optimization of the threshold method, achieved by determination of the threshold that maximizes the correlation between an area-average rain-rate moment and the area coverage of rain rates exceeding the threshold, is demonstrated empirically and theoretically. Empirical results for a sequence of GATE radar snapshots show optimal thresholds of 5 and 27 mm/h for the first and second moments, respectively. Theoretical optimization of the threshold method by the maximum-likelihood approach of Kedem and Pavlopoulos (1991) predicts optimal thresholds near 5 and 26 mm/h for lognormally distributed rain rates with GATE-like parameters. The agreement between theory and observations suggests that the optimal threshold can be understood as arising due to sampling variations, from snapshot to snapshot, of a parent rain-rate distribution. Optimal thresholds for gamma and inverse Gaussian distributions are also derived and compared.

  10. Objective definition of rainfall intensity-duration thresholds for the initiation of post-fire debris flows in southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staley, Dennis; Kean, Jason W.; Cannon, Susan H.; Schmidt, Kevin M.; Laber, Jayme L.

    2012-01-01

    Rainfall intensity–duration (ID) thresholds are commonly used to predict the temporal occurrence of debris flows and shallow landslides. Typically, thresholds are subjectively defined as the upper limit of peak rainstorm intensities that do not produce debris flows and landslides, or as the lower limit of peak rainstorm intensities that initiate debris flows and landslides. In addition, peak rainstorm intensities are often used to define thresholds, as data regarding the precise timing of debris flows and associated rainfall intensities are usually not available, and rainfall characteristics are often estimated from distant gauging locations. Here, we attempt to improve the performance of existing threshold-based predictions of post-fire debris-flow occurrence by utilizing data on the precise timing of debris flows relative to rainfall intensity, and develop an objective method to define the threshold intensities. We objectively defined the thresholds by maximizing the number of correct predictions of debris flow occurrence while minimizing the rate of both Type I (false positive) and Type II (false negative) errors. We identified that (1) there were statistically significant differences between peak storm and triggering intensities, (2) the objectively defined threshold model presents a better balance between predictive success, false alarms and failed alarms than previous subjectively defined thresholds, (3) thresholds based on measurements of rainfall intensity over shorter duration (≤60 min) are better predictors of post-fire debris-flow initiation than longer duration thresholds, and (4) the objectively defined thresholds were exceeded prior to the recorded time of debris flow at frequencies similar to or better than subjective thresholds. Our findings highlight the need to better constrain the timing and processes of initiation of landslides and debris flows for future threshold studies. In addition, the methods used to define rainfall thresholds in this

  11. The Threshold Level--For Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauerbach, Gerda

    1979-01-01

    Comments on the document "Threshold Level for Modern Language Learning Schools" (J. A. Van Ek, Strasbourg, 1976) and its appropriateness as a description of learning goals for the first years of foreign language teaching. Criticizes particularly the "reduced learning" concept, on which the threshold projects are based. (IFS/WGA)

  12. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.81 Section 98.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  13. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  14. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.81 Section 98.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  15. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  16. 40 CFR 98.111 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.111 Section 98.111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ferroalloy Production § 98.111 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  17. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.81 Section 98.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  18. 40 CFR 98.361 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.361 Section 98.361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management § 98.361 Reporting threshold. Livestock facilities must report GHG emissions under this...

  19. 40 CFR 98.361 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.361 Section 98.361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management § 98.361 Reporting threshold. Livestock facilities...

  20. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.461 Section 98.461 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Waste Landfills § 98.461 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if...

  1. 24 CFR 954.104 - Performance thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Performance thresholds. 954.104... DEVELOPMENT INDIAN HOME PROGRAM Applying for Assistance § 954.104 Performance thresholds. Applicants must have the administrative capacity to undertake the project proposed, including systems of internal...

  2. 40 CFR 98.111 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.111 Section 98.111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ferroalloy Production § 98.111 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  3. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  4. 40 CFR 98.181 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.181 Section 98.181 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lead Production § 98.181 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  5. STIMULUS AND TRANSDUCER EFFECTS ON THRESHOLD

    PubMed Central

    Flamme, Gregory A.; Geda, Kyle; McGregor, Kara; Wyllys, Krista; Deiters, Kristy K.; Murphy, William J.; Stephenson, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examined differences in thresholds obtained under Sennheiser HDA200 circumaural earphones using pure tone, equivalent rectangular noise bands, and 1/3 octave noise bands relative to thresholds obtained using Telephonics TDH-39P supra-aural earphones. Design Thresholds were obtained via each transducer and stimulus condition six times within a 10-day period. Study Sample Forty-nine adults were selected from a prior study to represent low, moderate, and high threshold reliability. Results The results suggested that (1) only small adjustments were needed to reach equivalent TDH-39P thresholds, (2) pure-tone thresholds obtained with HDA200 circumaural earphones had reliability equal to or better than those obtained using TDH-39P earphones, (3) the reliability of noise-band thresholds improved with broader stimulus bandwidth and was either equal to or better than pure-tone thresholds, and (4) frequency-specificity declined with stimulus bandwidths greater than one Equivalent Rectangular Band, which could complicate early detection of hearing changes that occur within a narrow frequency range. Conclusions These data suggest that circumaural earphones such as the HDA200 headphones provide better reliability for audiometric testing as compared to the TDH-39P earphones. These data support the use of noise bands, preferably ERB noises, as stimuli for audiometric monitoring. PMID:25549164

  6. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.461 Section 98.461 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Waste Landfills § 98.461 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if...

  7. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.341 Section 98.341 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You...

  8. Applying Threshold Concepts to Finance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Susan; Wood, Leigh N.; Tickle, Leonie; Kyng, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate and identify threshold concepts that are the essential conceptual content of finance programmes. Design/Methodology/Approach: Conducted in three stages with finance academics and students, the study uses threshold concepts as both a theoretical framework and a research methodology. Findings: The…

  9. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  10. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  11. Intelligence and Creativity: Over the Threshold Together?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welter, Marisete Maria; Jaarsveld, Saskia; van Leeuwen, Cees; Lachmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Threshold theory predicts a positive correlation between IQ and creativity scores up to an IQ level of 120 and no correlation above this threshold. Primary school children were tested at beginning (N = 98) and ending (N = 70) of the school year. Participants performed the standard progressive matrices (SPM) and the Test of Creative…

  12. Network Motif Basis of Threshold Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been a long-running debate over the existence of thresholds for adverse effects. The difficulty stems from two fundamental challenges: (i) statistical analysis by itself cannot prove the existence of a threshold, i.e., a dose below which there is no effect; and (ii) the...

  13. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.471 Section 98.471 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You...

  14. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.471 Section 98.471 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You...

  15. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.471 Section 98.471 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You...

  16. Threshold Concepts, Systems and Learning for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandri, Orana Jade

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for understanding the role that systems theory might play in education for sustainability (EfS). It offers a sketch and critique of Land and Meyer's notion of a "threshold concept", to argue that seeing systems as a threshold concept for sustainability is useful for understanding the processes of…

  17. 40 CFR 98.111 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.111 Section 98.111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ferroalloy Production § 98.111 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  18. 40 CFR 98.111 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.111 Section 98.111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ferroalloy Production § 98.111 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  19. 40 CFR 98.421 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.421 Section 98.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.421 Reporting threshold. Any supplier...

  20. 40 CFR 98.421 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.421 Section 98.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.421 Reporting threshold. Any supplier...

  1. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.461 Section 98.461 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Waste Landfills § 98.461 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if...

  2. 40 CFR 98.231 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.231 Section 98.231 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum and Natural Gas Systems § 98.231 Reporting threshold. (a)...

  3. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.461 Section 98.461 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Waste Landfills § 98.461 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if...

  4. Methods for automatic trigger threshold adjustment

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Benjamin J; Partridge, Michael E

    2014-03-18

    Methods are presented for adjusting trigger threshold values to compensate for drift in the quiescent level of a signal monitored for initiating a data recording event, thereby avoiding false triggering conditions. Initial threshold values are periodically adjusted by re-measuring the quiescent signal level, and adjusting the threshold values by an offset computation based upon the measured quiescent signal level drift. Re-computation of the trigger threshold values can be implemented on time based or counter based criteria. Additionally, a qualification width counter can be utilized to implement a requirement that a trigger threshold criterion be met a given number of times prior to initiating a data recording event, further reducing the possibility of a false triggering situation.

  5. A Threshold Continuum for Aeolian Sand Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, C.; Ewing, R. C.; Sherman, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport marks the initial entrainment of sand particles by the force of the wind. This is typically defined and modeled as a singular wind speed for a given grain size and is based on field and laboratory experimental data. However, the definition of threshold varies significantly between these empirical models, largely because the definition is based on visual-observations of initial grain movement. For example, in his seminal experiments, Bagnold defined threshold of motion when he observed that 100% of the bed was in motion. Others have used 50% and lesser values. Differences in threshold models, in turn, result is large errors in predicting the fluxes associated with sand and dust transport. Here we use a wind tunnel and novel sediment trap to capture the fractions of sand in creep, reptation and saltation at Earth and Mars pressures and show that the threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport is best defined as a continuum in which grains progress through stages defined by the proportion of grains in creep and saltation. We propose the use of scale dependent thresholds modeled by distinct probability distribution functions that differentiate the threshold based on micro to macro scale applications. For example, a geologic timescale application corresponds to a threshold when 100% of the bed in motion whereas a sub-second application corresponds to a threshold when a single particle is set in motion. We provide quantitative measurements (number and mode of particle movement) corresponding to visual observations, percent of bed in motion and degrees of transport intermittency for Earth and Mars. Understanding transport as a continuum provides a basis for revaluating sand transport thresholds on Earth, Mars and Titan.

  6. A unified statistical model for hydrological variables including the selection of threshold for the peak over threshold method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solari, S.; Losada, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    This paper explores the use of a mixture model for determining the marginal distribution of hydrological variables, consisting of a truncated central distribution that is representative of the central or main-mass regime, which for the cases studied is a lognormal distribution, and of two generalized Pareto distributions for the maximum and minimum regimes, representing the upper and lower tails, respectively. The thresholds defining the limits between these regimes and the central regime are parameters of the model and are calculated together with the remaining parameters by maximum likelihood. After testing the model with a simulation study we concluded that the upper threshold of the model can be used when applying the peak over threshold method. This will yield an automatic and objective identification of the threshold presenting an alternative to existing methods. The model was also applied to four hydrological data series: two mean daily flow series, the Thames at Kingston (United Kingdom), and the Guadalfeo River at Orgiva (Spain); and two daily precipitation series, Fort Collins (CO, USA), and Orgiva (Spain). It was observed that the model improved the fit of the data series with respect to the fit obtained with the lognormal (LN) and, in particular, provided a good fit for the upper tail. Moreover, we concluded that the proposed model is able to accommodate the entire range of values of some significant hydrological variables.

  7. Evaluation of Maryland abutment scour equation through selected threshold velocity methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, S.T.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Maryland State Highway Administration, used field measurements of scour to evaluate the sensitivity of the Maryland abutment scour equation to the critical (or threshold) velocity variable. Four selected methods for estimating threshold velocity were applied to the Maryland abutment scour equation, and the predicted scour to the field measurements were compared. Results indicated that performance of the Maryland abutment scour equation was sensitive to the threshold velocity with some threshold velocity methods producing better estimates of predicted scour than did others. In addition, results indicated that regional stream characteristics can affect the performance of the Maryland abutment scour equation with moderate-gradient streams performing differently from low-gradient streams. On the basis of the findings of the investigation, guidance for selecting threshold velocity methods for application to the Maryland abutment scour equation are provided, and limitations are noted.

  8. Sputtering Threshold Energies of Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, Maris A.

    1999-01-01

    Sputter erosion in ion thrusters has been measured in lifetests at discharge voltages as low as 25 V. Thruster operation at this discharge voltage results in component erosion rates sufficiently low to satisfy most mission requirements. It has been recognized that most of the internal sputtering in ion thrusters is done by doubly charged ions. Knowledge of the sputtering threshold voltage of a xenon molybdenum system would be beneficial in understanding the sputtering process as well as making more accurate calculations of the sputtering rates of ion thruster components. Sputtering threshold energies calculated from various formulations found in the literature results in values ranging from 28 to 200 eV. It is evident that some of these formulations cannot be relied upon to provide sputtering thresholds with any degree of accuracy. This paper re-examines the threshold energies measurements made in the early sixties by Askerov and Sena, and Stuart and Wehner. The threshold voltages as derived by Askerov and au have been reevaluated by using a different extrapolation method of sputter yields at low ion energies. The resulting threshold energies are in general similar to those measured by Stuart and Wehner. An empirical relationship is derived,for mercury and xenon ions for the ratio of the sputtering threshold energy to the sublimation energy as a function of the ratio of target to ion atomic mass.

  9. Threshold concepts as barriers to understanding climate science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, P.

    2013-12-01

    Whilst the scientific case for current climate change is compelling, the consequences of climate change have largely failed to permeate through to individuals. This lack of public awareness of the science and the potential impacts could be considered a key obstacle to action. The possible reasons for such limited success centre on the issue that climate change is a complex subject, and that a wide ranging academic, political and social research literature on the science and wider implications of climate change has failed to communicate the key issues in an accessible way. These failures to adequately communicate both the science and the social science of climate change at a number of levels results in ';communication gaps' that act as fundamental barriers to both understanding and engagement with the issue. Meyer and Land (2003) suggest that learners can find certain ideas and concepts within a discipline difficult to understand and these act as a barrier to deeper understanding of a subject. To move beyond these threshold concepts, they suggest that the expert needs to support the learner through a range of learning experiences that allows the development of learning strategies particular to the individual. Meyer and Land's research into these threshold concepts has been situated within Economics, but has been suggested to be more widely applicable though there has been no attempt to either define or evaluate threshold concepts to climate change science. By identifying whether common threshold concepts exist specifically in climate science for cohorts of either formal or informal learners, scientists will be better able to support the public in understanding these concepts by changing how the knowledge is communicated to help overcome these barriers to learning. This paper reports on the findings of a study that examined the role of threshold concepts as barriers to understanding climate science in a UK University and considers its implications for wider

  10. Threshold wind velocity dynamics as a driver of aeolian sediment mass flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Galloza, Magda S.; Zobeck, Ted M.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.

    2016-03-01

    Horizontal (saltation) mass flux is a key driver of aeolian dust emission. Estimates of the horizontal mass flux underpin assessments of the global dust budget and influence our understanding of the dust cycle and its interactions. Current equations for predicting horizontal mass flux are based on limited field data and are constrained to representing transport-limited equilibrium saltation, driven by the wind momentum flux in excess of an entrainment threshold. This can result in large overestimation of the sediment mass flux. Here we compare measurements of the soil entrainment threshold, horizontal mass flux, and their temporal variability for five undisturbed dryland soils to explore the role of threshold in controlling the magnitude of mass flux. Average and median entrainment threshold showed relatively small variability among sites and relatively small variability between seasons, despite significant differences in soil surface conditions. Physical and biological soil crusts had little effect on the threshold value, and threshold appeared to play a minor role in determining the magnitude of sediment transport. Our results suggest that horizontal mass flux was controlled more by the supply limitation and abrasion efficiency of saltators present as loose erodible material or originating from neighboring soil sources. The omission of sediment supply and explicit representation of saltation bombardment from horizontal flux equations is inconsistent with the process representation in dust emission schemes and contributes to uncertainty in model predictions. This uncertainty can be reduced by developing greater process fidelity in models to predict horizontal mass flux under both supply- and transport-limited conditions.

  11. Modeling the Interactions Between Multiple Crack Closure Mechanisms at Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    A fatigue crack closure model is developed that includes interactions between the three closure mechanisms most likely to occur at threshold; plasticity, roughness, and oxide. This model, herein referred to as the CROP model (for Closure, Roughness, Oxide, and Plasticity), also includes the effects of out-of plane cracking and multi-axial loading. These features make the CROP closure model uniquely suited for, but not limited to, threshold applications. Rough cracks are idealized here as two-dimensional sawtooths, whose geometry induces mixed-mode crack- tip stresses. Continuum mechanics and crack-tip dislocation concepts are combined to relate crack face displacements to crack-tip loads. Geometric criteria are used to determine closure loads from crack-face displacements. Finite element results, used to verify model predictions, provide critical information about the locations where crack closure occurs.

  12. Photoproduction of the phi (1020) near threshold in CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Tedeschi, D J

    2002-06-01

    The differential cross section for the photoproduction of the phi(1020) near threshold (E_{gamma} - 1.57GeV ) is predicted to be sensitive to production mechanisms other than diffraction. However, the existing low energy data is of limited statistics and kinematical coverage. Complete measurements of phi meson production on the proton have been performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility using a liquid hydrogen target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The phi was identified by missing mass using a proton and positive kaon detected by CLAS in coincidence with an electron in the photon tagger. The energy of the tagged, bremsstrahlung photons ranged from phi-threshold to 2.4 GeV. A description of the data set and the differential cross section far (E_{gamma} = 2.0 GeV ) will be presented and compared with present theoretical calculations.

  13. On threshold resummation beyond leading 1 - x order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunberg, G.; Ravindran, V.

    2009-10-01

    We check against exact finite order three-loop results for the non-singlet F2 and F3 structure functions the validity of a class of momentum space ansaetze for threshold resummation at the next-to-leading order in 1 - x, which generalize results previously obtained in the large-β0 limit. We find that the ansaetze do not work exactly, pointing towards an obstruction to threshold resummation at this order, but still yield correct results at the leading logarithmic level for each color structures, as well as at the next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic level for the specific CF3 color factor. A universality of the leading logarithm contributions to the physical evolution kernels of F2 and F3 at the next-to-leading order in 1 - x is observed.

  14. A detailed analysis of threshold behavior for the Efimov effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côté, R.; Simbotin, I.; Shu, D.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the energy dependence of the three-body recombination rate K3 for systems which possess Efimov states, and we identify a new regime of energies, characterized by a simple behavior of K3(E) . Using a model which captures the key features of the Efimov problem, we confirm the oscillatory behavior at high energy found by Esry et al. However, we find that in the ultracold limit, the oscillatory behavior does not transition directly into the Wigner type behavior. We uncovered a domain of intermediate energies between the Wigner and the oscillatory regimes. The extent of the new energy regime is determined by the Efimov state nearest to the threshold, or by an Efimov resonance just above the threshold. Partial support from the US Army Research Office (Grant No. W911NF-13-1-0213).

  15. Intrashell Electron Interaction Mediated Photoformation of Hollow Atoms near Threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Houtari, S.; Kao, C.; Hamalainen, K.; Diamant, R.; Sharon, R.; Deutsch, M.

    2008-07-25

    Double photoionization (DPI) of an atom by a single photon is a direct consequence of electron-electron interactions within the atom. We have measured the evolution of the K-shell DPI from threshold up in transition metals by high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy of the K{sup h}a hypersatellites, photoexcited by monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The measured evolution of the single-to-double photoionization cross-section ratio with excitation energy was found to be universal. Theoretical fits suggest that near threshold DPI is predominantly a semiclassical knockout effect, rather than the purely quantum-mechanical shake-off observed at the infinite photon energy limit.

  16. Initial analyses of the relationship between 'Thresholds' of toxicity for individual chemicals and 'Interaction Thresholds' for chemical mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Raymond S.H. Dennison, James E.

    2007-09-01

    and its component single chemicals. Our analyses revealed that the mixture 'Interaction Thresholds' appear to stay within the bounds of the 'Thresholds' of its respective component single chemicals. Although such a trend appears to be emerging, nevertheless, it should be emphasized that our analyses are based on limited data sets and further analyses on data sets, preferably the more comprehensive experimental data sets, are needed before a definitive conclusion can be drawn.

  17. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  18. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  19. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  20. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  1. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  2. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  3. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  4. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  5. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  6. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  7. Error Threshold of Fully Random Eigen Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duo-Fang; Cao, Tian-Guang; Geng, Jin-Peng; Qiao, Li-Hua; Gu, Jian-Zhong; Zhan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Species evolution is essentially a random process of interaction between biological populations and their environments. As a result, some physical parameters in evolution models are subject to statistical fluctuations. In this work, two important parameters in the Eigen model, the fitness and mutation rate, are treated as Gaussian distributed random variables simultaneously to examine the property of the error threshold. Numerical simulation results show that the error threshold in the fully random model appears as a crossover region instead of a phase transition point, and as the fluctuation strength increases the crossover region becomes smoother and smoother. Furthermore, it is shown that the randomization of the mutation rate plays a dominant role in changing the error threshold in the fully random model, which is consistent with the existing experimental data. The implication of the threshold change due to the randomization for antiviral strategies is discussed.

  8. Threshold altitude resulting in decompression sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. V.; Waligora, James M.; Calkins, Dick S.

    1990-01-01

    A review of case reports, hypobaric chamber training data, and experimental evidence indicated that the threshold for incidence of altitude decompression sickness (DCS) was influenced by various factors such as prior denitrogenation, exercise or rest, and period of exposure, in addition to individual susceptibility. Fitting these data with appropriate statistical models makes it possible to examine the influence of various factors on the threshold for DCS. This approach was illustrated by logistic regression analysis on the incidence of DCS below 9144 m. Estimations using these regressions showed that, under a noprebreathe, 6-h exposure, simulated EVA profile, the threshold for symptoms occurred at approximately 3353 m; while under a noprebreathe, 2-h exposure profile with knee-bends exercise, the threshold occurred at 7925 m.

  9. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  10. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  11. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  12. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  13. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  14. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  15. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  16. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  17. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  18. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  19. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  20. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  1. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a MSW landfill and the facility...

  2. Nonlinear theory of kinetic instabilities near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Pekker, M.S.; Breizman, B.N. |

    1997-05-01

    A new nonlinear equation has been derived and solved for the evolution of an unstable collective mode in a kinetic system close to the threshold of linear instability. The resonant particle response produces the dominant nonlinearity, which can be calculated iteratively in the near-threshold regime as long as the mode doe snot trap resonant particles. With sources and classical relaxation processes included, the theory describes both soft nonlinear regimes, where the mode saturation level is proportional to an increment above threshold, and explosive nonlinear regimes, where the mode grows to a level that is independent of the closeness to threshold. The explosive solutions exhibit mode frequency shifting. For modes that exist in the absence of energetic particles, the frequency shift is both upward and downward. For modes that require energetic particles for their existence, there is a preferred direction of the frequency shift. The frequency shift continues even after the mode traps resonant particles.

  3. Laser damage threshold of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Cropper, Andre D.; Watkins, Linwood C.; Byvik, Charles E.; Buoncristiani, A. Martin

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that diamond films may inhibit laser-induced damage to optical components in laser systems films was investigated by measuring laser damage thresholds of free-standing diamond film windows, diamond films deposited on silicon substrates, and bare silicon substrate. Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a dc plasma-enhanced CVD process. It was found that free-standing diamond films had the highest laser damage threshold at 1064 nm. For a diamond film of 630 nm, the damage threshold was found to be 7 J/sq cm, as compared to a damage threshold of 4.5 J/sq cm for bare silicon, and a low value of 1.5 J/sq cm for the film/substrate combination. The damage mechanism is considered to involve melting or dielectric breakdown induced by laser radiation. The low value of the film/substrate combination is attributed to film stress and conditions of film deposition.

  4. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  5. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  6. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  7. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  8. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  9. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  10. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a cement production process and the facility...

  11. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a cement production process and the facility...

  12. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  13. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  14. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  15. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  16. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  17. Laser damage threshold of diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Cropper, Andre D.; Watkins, Linwood C.; Byvik, Charles E.; Buoncristiani, A. Martin

    1989-03-01

    The possibility that diamond films may inhibit laser-induced damage to optical components in laser systems films was investigated by measuring laser damage thresholds of free-standing diamond film windows, diamond films deposited on silicon substrates, and bare silicon substrate. Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a dc plasma-enhanced CVD process. It was found that free-standing diamond films had the highest laser damage threshold at 1064 nm. For a diamond film of 630 nm, the damage threshold was found to be 7 J/sq cm, as compared to a damage threshold of 4.5 J/sq cm for bare silicon, and a low value of 1.5 J/sq cm for the film/substrate combination. The damage mechanism is considered to involve melting or dielectric breakdown induced by laser radiation. The low value of the film/substrate combination is attributed to film stress and conditions of film deposition.

  18. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  19. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  20. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  1. 40 CFR 98.31 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING General Stationary Fuel Combustion Sources § 98.31 Reporting threshold... combustion sources and the facility meets the applicability requirements of either § 98.2(a)(1), §...

  2. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  3. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  4. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  5. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  6. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  7. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics]. [Threshold unstable MHD activity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical predictions were compared with available data from JET on the threshold unstable MHD activity in toroidal confinement devices. In particular, questions arising as to Hartmans number and the selection of a kinematic viscosity are discussed.

  8. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an ammonia manufacturing process and the...

  9. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an ammonia manufacturing process and the...

  10. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an ammonia manufacturing process and the...

  11. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an ammonia manufacturing process and the...

  12. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an ammonia manufacturing process and the...

  13. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  14. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  15. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  16. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  17. 40 CFR 98.321 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Underground Coal Mines § 98.321 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an active underground coal mine and the...

  18. 40 CFR 98.381 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Coal-based Liquid Fuels § 98.381 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of coal-to-liquid products who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report GHG emissions....

  19. 40 CFR 98.321 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Underground Coal Mines § 98.321 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an active underground coal mine and the...

  20. 40 CFR 98.381 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Coal-based Liquid Fuels § 98.381 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of coal-to-liquid products who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report GHG emissions....

  1. 40 CFR 98.381 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Coal-based Liquid Fuels § 98.381 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of coal-to-liquid products who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report GHG emissions....

  2. 40 CFR 98.381 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Coal-based Liquid Fuels § 98.381 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of coal-to-liquid products who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report GHG emissions....

  3. 40 CFR 98.381 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Coal-based Liquid Fuels § 98.381 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of coal-to-liquid products who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report GHG emissions....

  4. 40 CFR 98.321 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Underground Coal Mines § 98.321 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an active underground coal mine and the...

  5. 40 CFR 98.321 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Underground Coal Mines § 98.321 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an active underground coal mine and the...

  6. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  7. 40 CFR 98.171 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.171 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an iron and steel production process...

  8. 40 CFR 98.171 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.171 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an iron and steel production process...

  9. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  10. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  11. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  12. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  13. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  14. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  15. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  16. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  17. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  18. 40 CFR 98.221 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Nitric Acid Production § 98.221 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a nitric acid train and the facility meets...

  19. Interword and intraword pause threshold in writing.

    PubMed

    Chenu, Florence; Pellegrino, François; Jisa, Harriet; Fayol, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Writing words in real life involves setting objectives, imagining a recipient, translating ideas into linguistic forms, managing grapho-motor gestures, etc. Understanding writing requires observation of the processes as they occur in real time. Analysis of pauses is one of the preferred methods for accessing the dynamics of writing and is based on the idea that pauses are behavioral correlates of cognitive processes. However, there is a need to clarify what we are observing when studying pause phenomena, as we will argue in the first section. This taken into account, the study of pause phenomena can be considered following two approaches. A first approach, driven by temporality, would define a threshold and observe where pauses, e.g., scriptural inactivity occurs. A second approach, linguistically driven, would define structural units and look for scriptural inactivity at the boundaries of these units or within these units. Taking a temporally driven approach, we present two methods which aim at the automatic identification of scriptural inactivity which is most likely not attributable to grapho-motor management in texts written by children and adolescents using digitizing tablets in association with Eye and Pen (©) (Chesnet and Alamargot, 2005). The first method is purely statistical and is based on the idea that the distribution of pauses exhibits different Gaussian components each of them corresponding to a different type of pause. After having reviewed the limits of this statistical method, we present a second method based on writing dynamics which attempts to identify breaking points in the writing dynamics rather than relying only on pause duration. This second method needs to be refined to overcome the fact that calculation is impossible when there is insufficient data which is often the case when working with young scriptors. PMID:24723896

  20. Interword and intraword pause threshold in writing

    PubMed Central

    Chenu, Florence; Pellegrino, François; Jisa, Harriet; Fayol, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Writing words in real life involves setting objectives, imagining a recipient, translating ideas into linguistic forms, managing grapho-motor gestures, etc. Understanding writing requires observation of the processes as they occur in real time. Analysis of pauses is one of the preferred methods for accessing the dynamics of writing and is based on the idea that pauses are behavioral correlates of cognitive processes. However, there is a need to clarify what we are observing when studying pause phenomena, as we will argue in the first section. This taken into account, the study of pause phenomena can be considered following two approaches. A first approach, driven by temporality, would define a threshold and observe where pauses, e.g., scriptural inactivity occurs. A second approach, linguistically driven, would define structural units and look for scriptural inactivity at the boundaries of these units or within these units. Taking a temporally driven approach, we present two methods which aim at the automatic identification of scriptural inactivity which is most likely not attributable to grapho-motor management in texts written by children and adolescents using digitizing tablets in association with Eye and Pen© (Chesnet and Alamargot, 2005). The first method is purely statistical and is based on the idea that the distribution of pauses exhibits different Gaussian components each of them corresponding to a different type of pause. After having reviewed the limits of this statistical method, we present a second method based on writing dynamics which attempts to identify breaking points in the writing dynamics rather than relying only on pause duration. This second method needs to be refined to overcome the fact that calculation is impossible when there is insufficient data which is often the case when working with young scriptors. PMID:24723896

  1. Vanishing of {1}/{m} corrections at threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, C. Glenn; Brahm, David E.

    1991-03-01

    Heavy-quark predictions for hadronic weak-decay transition amplitudes have O( {1}/{m}) corrections, but we show these always vanish at threshold. This follows from the nonrenormalization of the threshold effective currents at O( {1}/{m}) , and an application of the Ademollo-Gatto theorem. The result, which we call Luke's theorem, holds for initial and final particles consisting of a heavy quark or scalar and light degrees of freedom in an arbitrary spin state.

  2. Optimizing Retransmission Threshold in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ran; Li, Yingshu; Tan, Guozhen; Sun, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The retransmission threshold in wireless sensor networks is critical to the latency of data delivery in the networks. However, existing works on data transmission in sensor networks did not consider the optimization of the retransmission threshold, and they simply set the same retransmission threshold for all sensor nodes in advance. The method did not take link quality and delay requirement into account, which decreases the probability of a packet passing its delivery path within a given deadline. This paper investigates the problem of finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in a sensor network. The object of optimizing retransmission thresholds is to maximize the summation of the probability of the packet being successfully delivered to the next relay node or destination node in time. A dynamic programming-based distributed algorithm for finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in the sensor network is proposed. The time complexity is O n Δ · max 1 ≤ i ≤ n { u i } , where u i is the given upper bound of the retransmission threshold of sensor node i in a given delivery path, n is the length of the delivery path and Δ is the given upper bound of the transmission delay of the delivery path. If Δ is greater than the polynomial, to reduce the time complexity, a linear programming-based ( 1 + p m i n ) -approximation algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, when the ranges of the upper and lower bounds of retransmission thresholds are big enough, a Lagrange multiplier-based distributed O ( 1 ) -approximation algorithm with time complexity O ( 1 ) is proposed. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms have better performance. PMID:27171092

  3. Flicker fusion thresholds in Best macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Massof, R W; Fleischman, J A; Fine, S L; Yoder, F

    1977-06-01

    Flicker fusion threshold intensities were measured as a function of flicker frequency for patients with Best macular dystrophy having normal or near-normal Snellen visual acuity. These data were found to differ from normal in ways that may be interpreted to be an abnormal elevation of the foveal cone threshold, a loss of cone temporal resolution, or both. The results led to the conclusion that Best macular dystrophy affects the neurosensory retina even when Snellen visual acuity is normal. PMID:869758

  4. Optimizing Retransmission Threshold in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Ran; Li, Yingshu; Tan, Guozhen; Sun, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The retransmission threshold in wireless sensor networks is critical to the latency of data delivery in the networks. However, existing works on data transmission in sensor networks did not consider the optimization of the retransmission threshold, and they simply set the same retransmission threshold for all sensor nodes in advance. The method did not take link quality and delay requirement into account, which decreases the probability of a packet passing its delivery path within a given deadline. This paper investigates the problem of finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in a sensor network. The object of optimizing retransmission thresholds is to maximize the summation of the probability of the packet being successfully delivered to the next relay node or destination node in time. A dynamic programming-based distributed algorithm for finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in the sensor network is proposed. The time complexity is OnΔ·max1≤i≤n{ui}, where ui is the given upper bound of the retransmission threshold of sensor node i in a given delivery path, n is the length of the delivery path and Δ is the given upper bound of the transmission delay of the delivery path. If Δ is greater than the polynomial, to reduce the time complexity, a linear programming-based (1+pmin)-approximation algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, when the ranges of the upper and lower bounds of retransmission thresholds are big enough, a Lagrange multiplier-based distributed O(1)-approximation algorithm with time complexity O(1) is proposed. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms have better performance. PMID:27171092

  5. Optical spectral singularities as threshold resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Mostafazadeh, Ali

    2011-04-15

    Spectral singularities are among generic mathematical features of complex scattering potentials. Physically they correspond to scattering states that behave like zero-width resonances. For a simple optical system, we show that a spectral singularity appears whenever the gain coefficient coincides with its threshold value and other parameters of the system are selected properly. We explore a concrete realization of spectral singularities for a typical semiconductor gain medium and propose a method of constructing a tunable laser that operates at threshold gain.

  6. Derivation of an occupational exposure limit for inorganic borates using a weight of evidence approach.

    PubMed

    Maier, A; Vincent, M; Hack, E; Nance, P; Ball, W

    2014-04-01

    Inorganic borates are encountered in many settings worldwide, spurring international efforts to develop exposure guidance (US EPA, 2004; WHO, 2009; ATSDR, 2010) and occupational exposure limits (OEL) (ACGIH, 2005; MAK, 2011). We derived an updated OEL to reflect new data and current international risk assessment frameworks. We assessed toxicity and epidemiology data on inorganic borates to identify relevant adverse effects. International risk assessment frameworks (IPCS, 2005, 2007) were used to evaluate endpoint candidates: reproductive toxicity, developmental toxicity, and sensory irritation. For each endpoint, a preliminary OEL was derived and adjusted based on consideration of toxicokinetics, toxicodynamics, and other uncertainties. Selection of the endpoint point of departures (PODs) is supported by dose-response modeling. Developmental toxicity was the most sensitive systemic effect. An OEL of 1.6mgB/m(3) was estimated for this effect based on a POD of 63mgB/m(3) with an uncertainty factor (UF) of 40. Sensory irritation was considered to be the most sensitive effect for the portal of entry. An OEL of 1.4mgB/m(3) was estimated for this effect based on the identified POD and an UF of 1. An OEL of 1.4mgB/m(3) as an 8-h time-weighted average (TWA) is recommended. PMID:24525063

  7. Determining empirical thresholds for "definitely large" amounts of food for defining binge-eating episodes.

    PubMed

    Forney, K Jean; Holland, Lauren A; Joiner, Thomas E; Keel, Pamela K

    2015-01-01

    Binge episodes involve "definitely large" amounts of food, yet limited data exist regarding the upper limits of food consumption in non-binge eating episodes. Study 1 examined the concurrent validity of a self-report measure developed to measure "usual" food consumption. Results support good concurrent validity for most items across response versions. Study 2 identified the upper limits of normal food consumption (i.e., 85(th) percentile of participants' largest reported usual servings). Thresholds differed across types of foods, and men reported higher thresholds than women for several foods. Type of food and gender should be considered when assessing for "definitely large" amounts of food. PMID:24983483

  8. Initiation Pressure Thresholds from Three Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2007-02-28

    Pressure thresholds are minimum pressures needed to start explosive initiation that ends in detonation. We obtain pressure thresholds from three sources. Run-to-detonation times are the poorest source but the fitting of a function gives rough results. Flyer-induced initiation gives the best results because the initial conditions are the best known. However, very thick flyers are needed to give the lowest, asymptotic pressure thresholds used in modern models and this kind of data is rarely available. Gap test data is in much larger supply but the various test sizes and materials are confusing. We find that explosive pressures are almost the same if the distance in the gap test spacers are in units of donor explosive radius. Calculated half-width time pulses in the spacers may be used to create a pressure-time curve similar to that of the flyers. The very-large Eglin gap tests give asymptotic thresholds comparable to extrapolated flyer results. The three sources are assembled into a much-expanded set of near-asymptotic pressure thresholds. These thresholds vary greatly with density: for TATB/LX-17/PBX 9502, we find values of 4.9 and 8.7 GPa at 1.80 and 1.90 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively.

  9. Quantitative mammography contrast threshold test tool.

    PubMed

    Wagner, A J; Frey, G D

    1995-02-01

    Mammographic contrast is commonly evaluated by visualizing small objects of varying size or mass divided by projected area. These qualitative contrast determinations are commonly performed by imaging a phantom like the American College of Radiology accreditation phantom at clinical mammographic settings. However, this contrast assessment does not take into account the kVp of the machine. This work describes a quantitative mammography contrast threshold test tool which examines light object contrast on a uniform background for a contrast range of 0.32% to 1.38% at 25 kVp. For this mammography contrast threshold test tool, contrast is defined by delta I/I = loge (psi O/ psi b), where psi O is the target energy flux, and psi b is the background energy flux. Contrast threshold is defined as the lowest contrast value for which the objects are visible. Unlike traditional assessments of mammographic contrast, this measurement of contrast threshold is kVp corrected. The mammography contrast threshold test tool is constructed out of common plastics and provides a quantitative means of assessing contrast threshold for individual mammographic units and total mammographic systems. PMID:7565343

  10. Thresholds for boreal biome transitions.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Marten; Hirota, Marina; Holmgren, Milena; Van Nes, Egbert H; Chapin, F Stuart

    2012-12-26

    Although the boreal region is warming twice as fast as the global average, the way in which the vast boreal forests and tundras may respond is poorly understood. Using satellite data, we reveal marked alternative modes in the frequency distributions of boreal tree cover. At the northern end and at the dry continental southern extremes, treeless tundra and steppe, respectively, are the only possible states. However, over a broad intermediate temperature range, these treeless states coexist with boreal forest (∼75% tree cover) and with two more open woodland states (∼20% and ∼45% tree cover). Intermediate tree covers (e.g., ∼10%, ∼30%, and ∼60% tree cover) between these distinct states are relatively rare, suggesting that they may represent unstable states where the system dwells only transiently. Mechanisms for such instabilities remain to be unraveled, but our results have important implications for the anticipated response of these ecosystems to climatic change. The data reveal that boreal forest shows no gradual decline in tree cover toward its limits. Instead, our analysis suggests that it becomes less resilient in the sense that it may more easily shift into a sparse woodland or treeless state. Similarly, the relative scarcity of the intermediate ∼10% tree cover suggests that tundra may shift relatively abruptly to a more abundant tree cover. If our inferences are correct, climate change may invoke massive nonlinear shifts in boreal biomes. PMID:23236159

  11. Thresholds for boreal biome transitions

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Marten; Hirota, Marina; Holmgren, Milena; Van Nes, Egbert H.; Chapin, F. Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Although the boreal region is warming twice as fast as the global average, the way in which the vast boreal forests and tundras may respond is poorly understood. Using satellite data, we reveal marked alternative modes in the frequency distributions of boreal tree cover. At the northern end and at the dry continental southern extremes, treeless tundra and steppe, respectively, are the only possible states. However, over a broad intermediate temperature range, these treeless states coexist with boreal forest (∼75% tree cover) and with two more open woodland states (∼20% and ∼45% tree cover). Intermediate tree covers (e.g., ∼10%, ∼30%, and ∼60% tree cover) between these distinct states are relatively rare, suggesting that they may represent unstable states where the system dwells only transiently. Mechanisms for such instabilities remain to be unraveled, but our results have important implications for the anticipated response of these ecosystems to climatic change. The data reveal that boreal forest shows no gradual decline in tree cover toward its limits. Instead, our analysis suggests that it becomes less resilient in the sense that it may more easily shift into a sparse woodland or treeless state. Similarly, the relative scarcity of the intermediate ∼10% tree cover suggests that tundra may shift relatively abruptly to a more abundant tree cover. If our inferences are correct, climate change may invoke massive nonlinear shifts in boreal biomes. PMID:23236159

  12. 77 FR 19127 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Inflation Adjustment of Threshold for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... Regulation Supplement; Inflation Adjustment of Threshold for Acquisition of Right-Hand Drive Passenger Sedans... Year 2012 that requires that the statutory limitation on the acquisition of right-hand drive passenger... limitation established in 10 U.S.C. 2253(a)(2) for the acquisition of right-hand drive passenger sedans...

  13. Cluster-span threshold: An unbiased threshold for binarising weighted complete networks in functional connectivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Keith; Azami, Hamed; Parra, Mario A; Starr, John M; Escudero, Javier

    2015-08-01

    We propose a new unbiased threshold for network analysis named the Cluster-Span Threshold (CST). This is based on the clustering coefficient, C, following logic that a balance of `clustering' to `spanning' triples results in a useful topology for network analysis and that the product of complementing properties has a unique value only when perfectly balanced. We threshold networks by fixing C at this balanced value, rather than fixing connection density at an arbitrary value, as has been the trend. We compare results from an electroencephalogram data set of volunteers performing visual short term memory tasks of the CST alongside other thresholds, including maximum spanning trees. We find that the CST holds as a sensitive threshold for distinguishing differences in the functional connectivity between tasks. This provides a sensitive and objective method for setting a threshold on weighted complete networks which may prove influential on the future of functional connectivity research. PMID:26736883

  14. Orthodoxy, recalcitrance and in-between: describing variation in seed storage characteristics using threshold responses to water loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tolerance of desiccation is typically described by a threshold or low-water-content-limit to survival. This convention provides fairly good distinction between orthodox and recalcitrant seeds, which show thresholds of less than about 0.07 and greater than about 0.2 g H2O g dw-1, respectively. Thresh...

  15. Analytical Computation of the Epidemic Threshold on Temporal Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdano, Eugenio; Ferreri, Luca; Poletto, Chiara; Colizza, Vittoria

    2015-04-01

    The time variation of contacts in a networked system may fundamentally alter the properties of spreading processes and affect the condition for large-scale propagation, as encoded in the epidemic threshold. Despite the great interest in the problem for the physics, applied mathematics, computer science, and epidemiology communities, a full theoretical understanding is still missing and currently limited to the cases where the time-scale separation holds between spreading and network dynamics or to specific temporal network models. We consider a Markov chain description of the susceptible-infectious-susceptible process on an arbitrary temporal network. By adopting a multilayer perspective, we develop a general analytical derivation of the epidemic threshold in terms of the spectral radius of a matrix that encodes both network structure and disease dynamics. The accuracy of the approach is confirmed on a set of temporal models and empirical networks and against numerical results. In addition, we explore how the threshold changes when varying the overall time of observation of the temporal network, so as to provide insights on the optimal time window for data collection of empirical temporal networked systems. Our framework is of both fundamental and practical interest, as it offers novel understanding of the interplay between temporal networks and spreading dynamics.

  16. Minimal spaser threshold within electrodynamic framework: Shape, size and modes

    PubMed Central

    Hrelescu, Calin; Klar, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    It is known (yet often ignored) from quantum mechanical or energetic considerations, that the threshold gain of the quasi‐static spaser depends only on the dielectric functions of the metal and the gain material. Here, we derive this result from the purely classical electromagnetic scattering framework. This is of great importance, because electrodynamic modelling is far simpler than quantum mechanical one. The influence of the material dispersion and spaser geometry are clearly separated; the latter influences the threshold gain only indirectly, defining the resonant wavelength. We show that the threshold gain has a minimum as a function of wavelength. A variation of nanoparticle shape, composition, or spasing mode may shift the plasmonic resonance to this optimal wavelength, but it cannot overcome the material‐imposed minimal gain. Furthermore, retardation is included straightforwardly into our framework; and the global spectral gain minimum persists beyond the quasi‐static limit. We illustrate this with two examples of widely used geometries: Silver spheroids and spherical shells embedded in and filled with gain materials. PMID:27158151

  17. Higher-than-predicted saltation threshold wind speeds on Titan.

    PubMed

    Burr, Devon M; Bridges, Nathan T; Marshall, John R; Smith, James K; White, Bruce R; Emery, Joshua P

    2015-01-01

    Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, exhibits extensive aeolian, that is, wind-formed, dunes, features previously identified exclusively on Earth, Mars and Venus. Wind tunnel data collected under ambient and planetary-analogue conditions inform our models of aeolian processes on the terrestrial planets. However, the accuracy of these widely used formulations in predicting the threshold wind speeds required to move sand by saltation, or by short bounces, has not been tested under conditions relevant for non-terrestrial planets. Here we derive saltation threshold wind speeds under the thick-atmosphere, low-gravity and low-sediment-density conditions on Titan, using a high-pressure wind tunnel refurbished to simulate the appropriate kinematic viscosity for the near-surface atmosphere of Titan. The experimentally derived saltation threshold wind speeds are higher than those predicted by models based on terrestrial-analogue experiments, indicating the limitations of these models for such extreme conditions. The models can be reconciled with the experimental results by inclusion of the extremely low ratio of particle density to fluid density on Titan. Whereas the density ratio term enables accurate modelling of aeolian entrainment in thick atmospheres, such as those inferred for some extrasolar planets, our results also indicate that for environments with high density ratios, such as in jets on icy satellites or in tenuous atmospheres or exospheres, the correction for low-density-ratio conditions is not required. PMID:25487154

  18. Fluence thresholds for grazing incidence hard x-ray mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, A.; Ozkan, C.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Mancuso, A. P.; Gaudin, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Klepka, M. T.; Dłużewski, P.; Morawiec, K.; Störmer, M.; Bajt, S.; Ohashi, H.; Koyama, T.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y. [RIKEN and others

    2015-06-15

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) have the potential to contribute to many fields of science and to enable many new avenues of research, in large part due to their orders of magnitude higher peak brilliance than existing and future synchrotrons. To best exploit this peak brilliance, these XFEL beams need to be focused to appropriate spot sizes. However, the survivability of X-ray optical components in these intense, femtosecond radiation conditions is not guaranteed. As mirror optics are routinely used at XFEL facilities, a physical understanding of the interaction between intense X-ray pulses and grazing incidence X-ray optics is desirable. We conducted single shot damage threshold fluence measurements on grazing incidence X-ray optics, with coatings of ruthenium and boron carbide, at the SPring-8 Angstrom compact free electron laser facility using 7 and 12 keV photon energies. The damage threshold dose limits were found to be orders of magnitude higher than would naively be expected. The incorporation of energy transport and dissipation via keV level energetic photoelectrons accounts for the observed damage threshold.

  19. Higher-than-predicted saltation threshold wind speeds on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burr, Devon M.; Bridges, Nathan T.; Marshall, John R.; Smith, James K.; White, Bruce R.; Emery, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, exhibits extensive aeolian, that is, wind-formed, dunes, features previously identified exclusively on Earth, Mars and Venus. Wind tunnel data collected under ambient and planetary-analogue conditions inform our models of aeolian processes on the terrestrial planets. However, the accuracy of these widely used formulations in predicting the threshold wind speeds required to move sand by saltation, or by short bounces, has not been tested under conditions relevant for non-terrestrial planets. Here we derive saltation threshold wind speeds under the thick-atmosphere, low-gravity and low-sediment-density conditions on Titan, using a high-pressure wind tunnel refurbished to simulate the appropriate kinematic viscosity for the near-surface atmosphere of Titan. The experimentally derived saltation threshold wind speeds are higher than those predicted by models based on terrestrial-analogue experiments, indicating the limitations of these models for such extreme conditions. The models can be reconciled with the experimental results by inclusion of the extremely low ratio of particle density to fluid density on Titan. Whereas the density ratio term enables accurate modelling of aeolian entrainment in thick atmospheres, such as those inferred for some extrasolar planets, our results also indicate that for environments with high density ratios, such as in jets on icy satellites or in tenuous atmospheres or exospheres, the correction for low-density-ratio conditions is not required.

  20. Interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Murri, Gretchen B.; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1989-01-01

    Static and cyclic end notched flexure tests were conducted on a graphite epoxy, a glass epoxy, and graphite thermoplastic to determine their interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for delamination in terms of limiting values of the mode II strain energy release rate, G-II, for delamination growth. The influence of precracking and data reduction schemes are discussed. Finite element analysis indicated that the beam theory calculation for G-II with the transverse shear contribution included was reasonably accurate over the entire range of crack lengths. Cyclic loading significantly reduced the critical G-II for delamination. A threshold value of the maximum cyclic G-II below which no delamination occurred after one million cycles was identified for each material. Also, residual static toughness tests were conducted on glass epoxy specimens that had undergone one million cycles without delamination. A linear mixed-mode delamination criteria was used to characterize the static toughness of several composite materials; however, a total G threshold criterion appears to characterize the fatigue delamination durability of composite materials with a wide range of static toughness.

  1. Interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Murri, Gretchen B.; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1987-01-01

    Static and cyclic end notched flexure tests were conducted on a graphite epoxy, a glass epoxy, and graphite thermoplastic to determine their interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for delamination in terms of limiting values of the mode II strain energy release rate, G-II, for delamination growth. The influence of precracking and data reduction schemes are discussed. Finite element analysis indicated that the beam theory calculation for G-II with the transverse shear contribution included was reasonably accurate over the entire range of crack lengths. Cyclic loading significantly reduced the critical G-II for delamination. A threshold value of the maximum cyclic G-II below which no delamination occurred after one million cycles was identified for each material. Also, residual static toughness tests were conducted on glass epoxy specimens that had undergone one million cycles without delamination. A linear mixed-mode delamination criteria was used to characterize the static toughness of several composite materials; however, a total G threshold criterion appears to characterize the fatigue delamination durability of composite materials with a wide range of static toughness.

  2. Overcoming the effects of false positives and threshold bias in graph theoretical analyses of neuroimaging data

    PubMed Central

    Drakesmith, M.; Caeyenberghs, K.; Dutt, A.; Lewis, G.; David, A.S.; Jones, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graph theory (GT) is a powerful framework for quantifying topological features of neuroimaging-derived functional and structural networks. However, false positive (FP) connections arise frequently and influence the inferred topology of networks. Thresholding is often used to overcome this problem, but an appropriate threshold often relies on a priori assumptions, which will alter inferred network topologies. Four common network metrics (global efficiency, mean clustering coefficient, mean betweenness and smallworldness) were tested using a model tractography dataset. It was found that all four network metrics were significantly affected even by just one FP. Results also show that thresholding effectively dampens the impact of FPs, but at the expense of adding significant bias to network metrics. In a larger number (n = 248) of tractography datasets, statistics were computed across random group permutations for a range of thresholds, revealing that statistics for network metrics varied significantly more than for non-network metrics (i.e., number of streamlines and number of edges). Varying degrees of network atrophy were introduced artificially to half the datasets, to test sensitivity to genuine group differences. For some network metrics, this atrophy was detected as significant (p < 0.05, determined using permutation testing) only across a limited range of thresholds. We propose a multi-threshold permutation correction (MTPC) method, based on the cluster-enhanced permutation correction approach, to identify sustained significant effects across clusters of thresholds. This approach minimises requirements to determine a single threshold a priori. We demonstrate improved sensitivity of MTPC-corrected metrics to genuine group effects compared to an existing approach and demonstrate the use of MTPC on a previously published network analysis of tractography data derived from a clinical population. In conclusion, we show that there are large biases and instability

  3. Impact of uncertainty in rainfall estimation on the identification of rainfall thresholds for debris flow occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolopoulos, Efthymios I.; Crema, Stefano; Marchi, Lorenzo; Marra, Francesco; Guzzetti, Fausto; Borga, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Estimation of rainfall intensity-duration thresholds, used for the identification of debris flow/landslide triggering rainfall events, has been traditionally based on raingauge observations. The main drawback of using information from gauges is that the measurement stations are usually located far away from the debris flow initiation areas. In complex terrain where debris flows take place, the spatial variability of rainfall can be very high and this translates in large uncertainty of raingauge-based estimates of debris flow triggering rainfall. This work focuses on the assessment of the impact of rainfall estimation uncertainty on identification and use of rainfall thresholds for debris flow occurrence. The Upper Adige River basin, Northern Italy, is the area of study. A detailed database of more than 400 identified debris flow initiation points during the period 2000-2010 and a raingauge network of 100 stations comprise the database used for this work. The methodology examines the intensity-duration thresholds derived from a set of raingauges that are assumed to be located at debris flow initiation points (DFRs) and an equivalent set of raingauges assumed to have the role of the closest (to debris flow) available measurement (MRs). A set of reference rainfall thresholds is used to identify the rainfall events at DFRs that “triggered” debris flows (i.e. exceed the threshold). For these same events, the corresponding rainfall thresholds are derived from MR observations. Comparison between the rainfall thresholds derived from DFRs and MRs revealed that uncertainty in rainfall estimation has a major impact on estimated intensity-duration thresholds. Specifically, the results showed that thresholds estimated from MR observations are consistently underestimated. Evaluation of the estimated thresholds for warning procedures showed that while detection is high, the main issue is the high false alarm ratio, which limits the overall accuracy of the procedure. Overall

  4. Rejection Thresholds in Chocolate Milk: Evidence for Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, Meriel L.; Ziegler, Gregory R.; Hayes, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Bitterness is generally considered a negative attribute in food, yet many individuals enjoy some bitterness in products like coffee or chocolate. In chocolate, bitterness arises from naturally occurring alkaloids and phenolics found in cacao. Fermentation and roasting help develop typical chocolate flavor and reduce the intense bitterness of raw cacao by modifying these bitter compounds. As it becomes increasingly common to fortify chocolate with `raw' cacao to increase the amount of healthful phytonutrients, it is important to identify the point at which the concentration of bitter compounds becomes objectionable, even to those who enjoy some bitterness. Classical threshold methods focus on the presence or absence of a sensation rather than acceptability or hedonics. A new alternative, the rejection threshold, was recently described in the literature. Here, we sought to quantify and compare differences in Rejection Thresholds (RjT) and Detection Thresholds (DT) in chocolate milk spiked with a food safe bitterant (sucrose octaacetate). In experiment 1, a series of paired preference tests was used to estimate the RjT for bitterness in chocolate milk. In a new group of participants (experiment 2), we determined the RjT and DT using the forced choice ascending method of limits. In both studies, participants were segmented on the basis of self-declared preference for milk or dark solid chocolate. Based on sigmoid fits of the indifference-preference function, the RjT was ~2.3 times higher for those preferring dark chocolate than the RjT for those preferring milk chocolate in both experiments. In contrast, the DT for both groups was functionally identical, suggesting that differential effects of bitterness on liking of chocolate products are not based on the ability to detect bitterness in these products. PMID:22754143

  5. Retinal threshold studies for nanosecond and picosecond visible laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, William P.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Smith, Audrey B.; Rogers, Mark E.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1995-05-01

    Threshold measurements for Minimum Visible Lesions (MVL) at the retina are reported for 60 picoseconds (ps) and 4 nanoseconds (ns), single laser pulses in rhesus monkey eyes using a visible wavelength of 532 nanometers (nm) from a doubled Nd:YAG laser. The 50% probability for damage (ED50) dosages are calculated for 1 hour and 24 hour post exposures using 95% fiducial limits. For both pulsewidths, the threshold values calculated by probit analysis decrease between the 1 hour and 24 hour ophthalmoscopic evaluations. The ED50 value determined for the 60 ps pulsewidth was less than half the value at 4 ns (0.43 (mu) J/60 ps vs. 0.90 (mu) J/4 ns at 24 hours) for both readings. Of the 136 exposures for pulse energies ranging from 0.03 to 5.0 (mu) J no hemorrhagic lesions were produced for either pulsewidth studied. However, at 6.6 (mu) J one intraretinal hemorrhagic lesion was observed for 60 ps. The slope of the probit curve was higher for 60 ps when compared with the 4 ns value (3.03 at 60 ps vs. 2.68 at 4 ns). MVL threshold doses calculated are comparable with those reported in the literature. However, the 4 ns MVL values is less than one order of magnitude (a factor 4.7) above the Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) level as defined by the 'American National Standard For The Safe Use Of Lasers', ANSI Z136.1-19932. We present the current MVL data as it compares with previous data obtained for picosecond and femtosecond laser pulse thresholds and provide a preliminary assessment of how the ANSI MPE standard might be amended.

  6. Low-threshold support for families with dementia in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Low-threshold support services are a part of the German health care system and help relieving family caregivers. There is limited information available on how to construct and implement low-threshold support services for people with dementia and their families in Germany. Some studies describe separately different perspectives of experiences and expectations, but there is no study combining all the different perspectives of those involved and taking the arrangements and organisation as well as their opinions on supporting and inhibiting factors into consideration. Findings This protocol describes the design of the study on low-threshold support services for families with a person with dementia in two German regions. The aim is to develop recommendations on how to build up these services and how to implement them in a region. A quantitative as well as a qualitative approach will be used. The quantitative part will be a survey on characteristics of service users and providers, as well as health care structures of the two project regions and an evaluation of important aspects derived from a literature search. Group discussions and semi-structured interviews will be carried out to get a deeper insight into the facilitators and barriers for both using and providing these services. All people involved will be included, such as the people with dementia, their relatives, volunteers, coordinators and institution representatives. Discussion Results of this study will provide important aspects for policymakers who are interested in an effective and low-threshold support for people with dementia. Furthermore the emerging recommendations can help staff and institutions to improve quality of care and can contribute to developing health and social care structures in Germany. PMID:22721553

  7. Threshold concepts in finance: conceptualizing the curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoadley, Susan; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.; Kyng, Tim

    2015-08-01

    Graduates with well-developed capabilities in finance are invaluable to our society and in increasing demand. Universities face the challenge of designing finance programmes to develop these capabilities and the essential knowledge that underpins them. Our research responds to this challenge by identifying threshold concepts that are central to the mastery of finance and by exploring their potential for informing curriculum design and pedagogical practices to improve student outcomes. In this paper, we report the results of an online survey of finance academics at multiple institutions in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom. The outcomes of our research are recommendations for threshold concepts in finance endorsed by quantitative evidence, as well as a model of the finance curriculum incorporating finance, modelling and statistics threshold concepts. In addition, we draw conclusions about the application of threshold concept theory supported by both quantitative and qualitative evidence. Our methodology and findings have general relevance to the application of threshold concept theory as a means to investigate and inform curriculum design and delivery in higher education.

  8. Ignition threshold for impact-generated fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durda, Daniel D.; Kring, David A.

    2004-08-01

    Widespread fires can be generated after large impact events by atmospheric heating caused by the reaccretion of high-energy, vapor-rich plume material. We examine the threshold irradiance levels necessary for spontaneous and pilot ignition of various types of vegetation and define three specific cases for investigation: (1) 51 kW/m2 for a period of at least 2 min to spontaneously ignite wood; (2) 20 kW/m2 for a period of at least 20 min to ignite wood in the presence of an ignition source; and (3) 28 kW/m2 for a period of at least 1 min to ignite foliage, rotten wood, and forest litter. The threshold ejected plume mass for continent-wide spontaneous ignition of wood is ~2 to 6 × 1015 kg, independent of impact location but dependent on the details of the ejecta speed distribution. The threshold ejected plume mass for global spontaneous ignition of wood is in the range ~1 to 2 × 1016 kg. The threshold plume masses for continent-wide and global fires are very nearly the same for piloted ignition of wood, while the threshold plume masses for continent-wide and global ignition of leaves and forest litter are significantly lower, by a factor of ~2 to 3. Impact craters of at least 85 km diameter are needed to produce continental-scale fires, and craters of ~135 km diameter are needed for global-scale fires.

  9. Threshold of the precedence effect in noise

    PubMed Central

    Freyman, Richard L.; Griffin, Amanda M.; Zurek, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Three effects that show a temporal asymmetry in the influence of interaural cues were studied through the addition of masking noise: (1) The transient precedence effect—the perceptual dominance of a leading transient over a similar lagging transient; (2) the ongoing precedence effect—lead dominance with lead and lag components that extend in time; and (3) the onset capture effect—determination by an onset transient of the lateral position of an otherwise ambiguous extended trailing sound. These three effects were evoked with noise-burst stimuli and were compared in the presence of masking noise. Using a diotic noise masker, detection thresholds for stimuli with lead/lag interaural delays of 0/500 μs were compared to those with 500/0 μs delays. None of the three effects showed a masking difference between those conditions, suggesting that none of the effects is operative at masked threshold. A task requiring the discrimination between stimuli with 500/0 and 0/500 μs interaural delays was used to determine the threshold for each effect in noise. The results showed similar thresholds in noise (10–13 dB SL) for the transient and ongoing precedence effects, but a much higher threshold (33 dB SL) for onset capture of an ambiguous trailing sound. PMID:24815272

  10. A hand speed-duty cycle equation for estimating the ACGIH hand activity level rating.

    PubMed

    Akkas, Oguz; Azari, David P; Chen, Chia-Hsiung Eric; Hu, Yu Hen; Ulin, Sheryl S; Armstrong, Thomas J; Rempel, David; Radwin, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    An equation was developed for estimating hand activity level (HAL) directly from tracked root mean square (RMS) hand speed (S) and duty cycle (D). Table lookup, equation or marker-less video tracking can estimate HAL from motion/exertion frequency (F) and D. Since automatically estimating F is sometimes complex, HAL may be more readily assessed using S. Hands from 33 videos originally used for the HAL rating were tracked to estimate S, scaled relative to hand breadth (HB), and single-frame analysis was used to measure D. Since HBs were unknown, a Monte Carlo method was employed for iteratively estimating the regression coefficients from US Army anthropometry survey data. The equation: HAL = 10[e(-15:87+0:02D+2:25 ln S)/(1+e(-15:87+0:02D+2:25 ln S)], R(2) = 0.97, had a residual range ± 0.5 HAL. The S equation superiorly fits the Latko et al. ( 1997 ) data and predicted independently observed HAL values (Harris 2011) better (MSE = 0.16) than the F equation (MSE = 1.28). PMID:25343278

  11. Current limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Loescher, D.H.; Noren, K.

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  12. L-H Threshold Studies in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S. M.; Maingi, Rajesh; Battaglia, D. J.; Bell, R. E.; Chang, C. S.; Hosea, J.; Kugel, H. W.; LaBlanc, B. P.; Meyer, H.; Wilson, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experiments in the low aspect ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have been run in support of the high priority ITER and ITPA issue of access to the H-mode. Specifically, a series of experiments showed reduced power threshold values for deuterium versus helium plasmas, and for plasmas with lower current, lower triangularity and with lithium conditioning. Application of n = 3 fields at the plasma edge resulted in higher power thresholds. To within the constraints of temporal and spatial resolutions, no systematic difference in T(e), n(e), p(e), T(i), v or their derivatives was found in discharges that transitioned into the H-mode versus those at slightly lower power that did not. Finally, H(98y,2) similar to 1 confinement quality could be achieved for powers just above the threshold power in ELM-free conditions.

  13. L-H Threshold Studies in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S M; Battaglia, D; Bell, R E; Chang, C S; Hosea, J; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B P; Meyer, H; Park, G Y

    2011-09-06

    Recent experiments in the low aspect ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have been run in support of the high priority ITER and ITPA issue of access to the H-mode. Specifically, a series of experiments showed reduced power threshold values for deuterium vs helium plasmas, and for plasmas with lower current, lower triangularity and with lithium conditioning. Application of n=3 fields at the plasma edge resulted in higher power thresholds. To within the constraints of temporal and spatial resolutions, no systematic difference in T{sub e}, n{sub e}, p{sub e}, T{sub i}, v or their derivatives was found in discharges that transitioned into the H-mode versus those at slightly lower power that did not. Finally, H{sub 98y,2} {approx} 1 confinement quality could be achieved for powers just above the threshold power in ELM-free conditions.

  14. On limit and limit setting.

    PubMed

    Gorney, J E

    1994-01-01

    This article investigates the role of limit and limit setting within the psychoanalytic situation. Limit is understood to be a boundary between self and others, established as an interactional dimension of experience. Disorders of limit are here understood within the context of Winnicott's conception of the "anti-social tendency." Limit setting is proposed as a necessary and authentic response to the patient's acting out via holding and empathic responsiveness, viewed here as a form of boundary delineation. It is proposed that the patient attempts to repair his or her boundary problem through a seeking of secure limits within the analyst. The setting of secure and appropriate limits must arise from a working through of the analyst's own countertransference response to the patient. It is critical that this response be evoked by, and arise from, the immediate therapeutic interaction so that the patient can experience limit setting as simultaneously personal and authentic. PMID:7972580

  15. The Impact of Heterogeneous Thresholds on Social Contagion with Multiple Initiators

    PubMed Central

    Karampourniotis, Panagiotis D.; Sreenivasan, Sameet; Szymanski, Boleslaw K.; Korniss, Gyorgy

    2015-01-01

    The threshold model is a simple but classic model of contagion spreading in complex social systems. To capture the complex nature of social influencing we investigate numerically and analytically the transition in the behavior of threshold-limited cascades in the presence of multiple initiators as the distribution of thresholds is varied between the two extreme cases of identical thresholds and a uniform distribution. We accomplish this by employing a truncated normal distribution of the nodes’ thresholds and observe a non-monotonic change in the cascade size as we vary the standard deviation. Further, for a sufficiently large spread in the threshold distribution, the tipping-point behavior of the social influencing process disappears and is replaced by a smooth crossover governed by the size of initiator set. We demonstrate that for a given size of the initiator set, there is a specific variance of the threshold distribution for which an opinion spreads optimally. Furthermore, in the case of synthetic graphs we show that the spread asymptotically becomes independent of the system size, and that global cascades can arise just by the addition of a single node to the initiator set. PMID:26571486

  16. The Impact of Heterogeneous Thresholds on Social Contagion with Multiple Initiators.

    PubMed

    Karampourniotis, Panagiotis D; Sreenivasan, Sameet; Szymanski, Boleslaw K; Korniss, Gyorgy

    2015-01-01

    The threshold model is a simple but classic model of contagion spreading in complex social systems. To capture the complex nature of social influencing we investigate numerically and analytically the transition in the behavior of threshold-limited cascades in the presence of multiple initiators as the distribution of thresholds is varied between the two extreme cases of identical thresholds and a uniform distribution. We accomplish this by employing a truncated normal distribution of the nodes' thresholds and observe a non-monotonic change in the cascade size as we vary the standard deviation. Further, for a sufficiently large spread in the threshold distribution, the tipping-point behavior of the social influencing process disappears and is replaced by a smooth crossover governed by the size of initiator set. We demonstrate that for a given size of the initiator set, there is a specific variance of the threshold distribution for which an opinion spreads optimally. Furthermore, in the case of synthetic graphs we show that the spread asymptotically becomes independent of the system size, and that global cascades can arise just by the addition of a single node to the initiator set. PMID:26571486

  17. Effects of cost threshold and noise in spatial snowdrift games with fixed multi-person interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Long

    2010-05-01

    Most previous studies assume that each individual who chooses to cooperate can always afford the cost in multi-person snowdrift games, no matter how much the cost is. However, in real situations each cooperative individual can only afford a limited cost. In other words, there is generally a bearable cost threshold for cooperators. Here we propose a spatial multi-person snowdrift game model with the cost threshold, and study the effects of cost threshold and noise on the evolution of cooperation. Interestingly, simulation results show that the cooperation level varying with the cost threshold exhibits discontinuous phase transitions and step structures, and an intermediate region of cost threshold can lead to the optimal cooperation level. We provide theoretical analysis by pair approximation for the simulation results, and show some typical snapshots of the system. Furthermore, we find that the cooperation level changing with the noise displays several different behaviors for moderate values of cost threshold. We also show how cooperation evolves in a modified way of payoff calculation. Our work reflects the nontrivial roles of cost threshold and noise in the evolution of cooperation in spatial multi-person snowdrift games.

  18. Predictability of threshold exceedances in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bódai, Tamás

    2015-12-01

    In a low-order model of the general circulation of the atmosphere we examine the predictability of threshold exceedance events of certain observables. The likelihood of such binary events-the cornerstone also for the categoric (as opposed to probabilistic) prediction of threshold exceedances-is established from long time series of one or more observables of the same system. The prediction skill is measured by a summary index of the ROC curve that relates the hit- and false alarm rates. Our results for the examined systems suggest that exceedances of higher thresholds are more predictable; or in other words: rare large magnitude, i.e., extreme, events are more predictable than frequent typical events. We find this to hold provided that the bin size for binning time series data is optimized, but not necessarily otherwise. This can be viewed as a confirmation of a counterintuitive (and seemingly contrafactual) statement that was previously formulated for more simple autoregressive stochastic processes. However, we argue that for dynamical systems in general it may be typical only, but not universally true. We argue that when there is a sufficient amount of data depending on the precision of observation, the skill of a class of data-driven categoric predictions of threshold exceedances approximates the skill of the analogous model-driven prediction, assuming strictly no model errors. Therefore, stronger extremes in terms of higher threshold levels are more predictable both in case of data- and model-driven prediction. Furthermore, we show that a quantity commonly regarded as a measure of predictability, the finite-time maximal Lyapunov exponent, does not correspond directly to the ROC-based measure of prediction skill when they are viewed as functions of the prediction lead time and the threshold level. This points to the fact that even if the Lyapunov exponent as an intrinsic property of the system, measuring the instability of trajectories, determines predictability

  19. Energy Switching Threshold for Climatic Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Cao, L.; Caldeira, K.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change is one of the great challenges facing humanity currently and in the future. Its most severe impacts may still be avoided if efforts are made to transform current energy systems (1). A transition from the global system of high Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission electricity generation to low GHG emission energy technologies is required to mitigate climate change (2). Natural gas is increasingly seen as a choice for transitions to renewable sources. However, recent researches in energy and climate puzzled about the climate implications of relying more energy on natural gas. On one hand, a shift to natural gas is promoted as climate mitigation because it has lower carbon per unit energy than coal (3). On the other hand, the effect of switching to natural gas on nuclear-power and other renewable energies development may offset benefits from fuel-switching (4). Cheap natural gas is causing both coal plants and nuclear plants to close in the US. The objective of this study is to measure and evaluate the threshold of energy switching for climatic benefits. We hypothesized that the threshold ratio of energy switching for climatic benefits is related to GHGs emission factors of energy technologies, but the relation is not linear. A model was developed to study the fuel switching threshold for greenhouse gas emission reduction, and transition from coal and nuclear electricity generation to natural gas electricity generation was analyzed as a case study. The results showed that: (i) the threshold ratio of multi-energy switching for climatic benefits changes with GHGs emission factors of energy technologies. (ii)The mathematical relation between the threshold ratio of energy switching and GHGs emission factors of energies is a curved surface function. (iii) The analysis of energy switching threshold for climatic benefits can be used for energy and climate policy decision support.

  20. Linear pattern dynamics in nonlinear threshold systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rundle, John B.; Klein, W.; Tiampo, Kristy; Gross, Susanna

    2000-03-01

    Complex nonlinear threshold systems frequently show space-time behavior that is difficult to interpret. We describe a technique based upon a Karhunen-Loeve expansion that allows dynamical patterns to be understood as eigenstates of suitably constructed correlation operators. The evolution of space-time patterns can then be viewed in terms of a ''pattern dynamics'' that can be obtained directly from observable data. As an example, we apply our methods to a particular threshold system to forecast the evolution of patterns of observed activity. Finally, we perform statistical tests to measure the quality of the forecasts. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  1. Investigation of the threshold for allergic reactivity to chromium.

    PubMed

    Basketter, D; Horev, L; Slodovnik, D; Merimes, S; Trattner, A; Ingber, A

    2001-02-01

    Allergy to chromium is relatively common, often in association with exposure to cement or in leather manufacture. However, in certain locations, there appears to be a relatively large cohort of chromium-sensitive individuals whose allergy cannot be explained by these common sources. In particular, this group include Israeli housewives with persistent hand eczema and concomitant patch test positivity to chromium. The causation of their allergy has been linked with relatively high levels of chromium contamination in household products. To provide further information in respect of the definition of safe levels for such products, we examined 17 chromium-allergic individuals to determine their threshold for reaction under closed patch test and repeated open application test (ROAT) conditions. The data derived indicated that, on normal skin, the patch test threshold was 10 ppm chromium; in the presence of an irritant (sodium lauryl sulfate) the threshold was closer to 1 ppm, 2/17 subjects giving 1+ reactions at this concentration. In the more realistic exposure conditions of the ROAT, 8/14 individuals failed to react to 50 ppm, whilst 3/15 reacted to 5 ppm. Interestingly, there was very poor correlation between patch test sensitivity and ROAT sensitivity. To ensure the large majority of chromium-allergic individuals do not suffer elicitation of their allergy, as well as to limit the development of new chromium-sensitive subjects, it is recommended that household products adhere to a previously published standard of a maximum limit of 5 ppm, with an ultimate target of 1 ppm contamination by chromium. PMID:11205406

  2. Thresholds, Mode-Switching, and Emergent Pseudo-Equilibrium in Geomorphic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. D.

    2012-04-01

    Many geomorphic systems exhibit mode shifts as they evolve, or react to disturbances, from an initial mode of dynamically unstable, divergent evolution, to a mode of convergent evolution. These trends are often interpreted as progression toward a normative equilibrium. However, these mode shifts are shown to arise from two basic principles: gradient (or resistance) selection, and threshold-mediated modulation. In early stages of system development positive feedbacks associated with gradient selection are dominant, and dynamical instability, chaos, and divergence result. Eventually, however, as the system approaches limiting thresholds, negative feedback associated with the thresholds becomes stronger than the positive feedbacks, and the system becomes stable, with convergent evolution. The unstable-to-stable mode switches are an emergent outcome of the gradient selection and threshold modulation principles, not a goal function of Earth surface systems. These principles are illustrated with two examples—fluvial dissection of the Cumberland Plateau, Kentucky, and channel development in deltas of the Texas coastal plain.

  3. Search for threshold enhancement in the. gamma. p. -->. charmed baryon+charmed meson cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Bacon, T.C.; Bingham, H.H.; Brau, J.E.; Braune, K.; Brick, D.; Bugg, W.M.; Butler, J.M.; Cameron, W.; Cohen, H.O.; Colley, D.C.; Dado, S.; Dingus, P.; Erickson, R.; Field, R.C.; Franek, B.; Gearhart, R.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, I.M.; Hall, G.; Hancock, E.R.; Hargis, H.J.; Hart, E.L.; Harwin, M.J.; Hasegawa, K.; Hulsizer, R.I.; Jobes, M.; Kafka, T.; Kalmus, G.E.; Kelsey, D.P.; Kitagaki, T.; Levy, A.; Merenyi, R.; Murray, J.J.; O'Dell, V.; Pless, I.A.; Rankin, P.; Ronat, E.; Sagawa, H.; Sewell, S.J.; Shank, J.; Shimony, J.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, S.; Waide, D.A.; Widgoff, M.; Wolbers, S.; Woods, C.A.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamamoto, R.K.; Yost, G.P.; Yuta, H.

    1984-08-01

    Results of a search for a predicted enhancement of several microbarns in the charm-photoproduction cross section just above threshold are reported. No charm decays were detected, from which an upper limit to the charm cross section of 94 nb (90% C.L.) at E/sub ..gamma../approx. =10 GeV was obtained. Upper limits in the range 270 to 450 nb were also obtained for the peak cross sections for threshold enhancements in ..gamma..p..-->..D/sup -/..sigma../sub c//sup + +/ and similar channels.

  4. Bird colour vision: behavioural thresholds reveal receptor noise.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Peter; Lind, Olle; Kelber, Almut

    2015-01-15

    Birds have impressive physiological adaptations for colour vision, including tetrachromacy and coloured oil droplets, yet it is not clear exactly how well birds can discriminate the reflecting object colours that they encounter in nature. With behavioural experiments, we determined colour discrimination thresholds of chickens in bright and dim light. We performed the experiments with two colour series, orange and green, covering two parts of chicken colour space. These experiments allowed us to compare behavioural results with model expectations and determine how different noise types limit colour discrimination. At intensities ranging from bright light to those corresponding to early dusk (250-10 cd m(-2)), we describe thresholds accurately by assuming a constant signal-to-noise ratio, in agreement with an invariant Weber fraction of Weber's law. Below this intensity, signal-to-noise ratio decreases and Weber's law is violated because photon-shot noise limits colour discrimination. In very dim light (below 0.05 cd m(-2) for the orange series or 0.2 cd m(-2) for the green series) colour discrimination is possibly constrained by dark noise, and the lowest intensity at which chickens can discriminate colours is 0.025 and 0.08 cd m(-2) for the orange and green series, respectively. Our results suggest that chickens use spatial pooling of cone outputs to mitigate photon-shot noise. Surprisingly, we found no difference between colour discrimination of chickens and humans tested with the same test in bright light. PMID:25609782

  5. On the two steps threshold selection for over-threshold modelling of extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardara, Pietro; Mazas, Franck; Weiss, Jerome; Andreewsky, Marc; Kergadallan, Xavier; Benoit, Michel; Hamm, Luc

    2013-04-01

    The estimation of the probability of occurrence of extreme events is traditionally achieved by fitting a probability distribution on a sample of extreme observations. In particular, the extreme value theory (EVT) states that values exceeding a given threshold converge through a Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) if the original sample is composed of independent and identically distributed values. However, the temporal series of sea and ocean variables usually show strong temporal autocorrelation. Traditionally, in order to select independent events for the following statistical analysis, the concept of a physical threshold is introduced: events that excess that threshold are defined as "extreme events". This is the so-called "Peak Over a Threshold (POT)" sampling, widely spread in the literature and currently used for engineering applications among many others. In the past, the threshold for the statistical sampling of extreme values asymptotically convergent toward GPD and the threshold for the physical selection of independent extreme events were confused, as the same threshold was used for both sampling data and to meet the hypothesis of extreme value convergence, leading to some incoherencies. In particular, if the two steps are performed simultaneously, the number of peaks over the threshold can increase but also decrease when the threshold decreases. This is logic in a physical point of view, since the definition of the sample of "extreme events" changes, but is not coherent with the statistical theory. We introduce a two-steps threshold selection for over-threshold modelling, aiming to discriminate (i) a physical threshold for the selection of extreme and independent events, and (ii) a statistical threshold for the optimization of the coherence with the hypothesis of the EVT. The former is a physical events identification procedure (also called "declustering") aiming at selecting independent extreme events. The latter is a purely statistical optimization

  6. Signal Detection Theory Applied to Helicopter Transmission Diagnostic Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Keller, Jonathan A.; Wade, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Helicopter Health Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) have potential for providing data to support increasing the service life of a dynamic mechanical component in the transmission of a helicopter. Data collected can demonstrate the HUMS condition indicator responds to a specific component fault with appropriate alert limits and minimal false alarms. Defining thresholds for specific faults requires a tradeoff between the sensitivity of the condition indicator (CI) limit to indicate damage and the number of false alarms. A method using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves to assess CI performance was demonstrated using CI data collected from accelerometers installed on several UH60 Black Hawk and AH64 Apache helicopters and an AH64 helicopter component test stand. Results of the analysis indicate ROC curves can be used to reliably assess the performance of commercial HUMS condition indicators to detect damaged gears and bearings in a helicopter transmission.

  7. Signal Detection Theory Applied to Helicopter Transmission Diagnostic Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Keller, Jonathan A.; Wade, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Helicopter Health Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) have potential for providing data to support increasing the service life of a dynamic mechanical component in the transmission of a helicopter. Data collected can demonstrate the HUMS condition indicator responds to a specific component fault with appropriate alert limits and minimal false alarms. Defining thresholds for specific faults requires a tradeoff between the sensitivity of the condition indicator (CI) limit to indicate damage and the number of false alarms. A method using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves to assess CI performance was demonstrated using CI data collected from accelerometers installed on several UH60 Black Hawk and AH64 Apache helicopters and an AH64 helicopter component test stand. Results of the analysis indicate ROC curves can be used to reliably assess the performance of commercial HUMS condition indicators to detect damaged gears and bearings in a helicopter transmission.

  8. Temperature thresholds to freeze damage in cranberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sprinkler irrigation is required for frost protection of cranberry and is arguably the most important cultural practice used in production of the crop. A study was initiated in a commercial bed of ‘Stevens’ cranberry located in Langlois, OR. The objectives are to identify temperature thresholds to...

  9. Mandated Reporting Thresholds for Community Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowell, Kathryn; Levi, Benjamin H.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how community-based mandated reporters understand and interpret "reasonable suspicion", the standard threshold for mandated reporting of suspected child abuse. Respondents were asked to identify the probability necessary for "suspicion of child abuse" to constitute "reasonable suspicion". Data were analyzed for internal…

  10. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....151 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold... HFC-23 destruction process and the facility meets the requirements of either § 98.2(a)(1) or (a)(2)....

  11. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.431 Section 98.431 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Importers and Exporters of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases Contained in...

  12. Speech reception thresholds in various interference conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Suzanne P.; Colburn, H. Steven

    2001-05-01

    Speech intelligibility is integral to human verbal communication; however, our understanding of the effects of competing noise, room reverberation, and frequency range restriction is incomplete. Using virtual stimuli, the dependence of intelligibility threshold levels on the extent of room reverberation, the relative locations of speech target and masking noise, and the available frequency content of the speech and the masking noise is explored. Speech-shaped masking noise and target sentences have three spectral conditions: wideband, high pass above 2-kHz, and low pass below 2-kHz. The 2-kHz cutoff was chosen to approximately bisect the range of frequencies most important in speech, and the high pass noise condition simulates high-frequency hearing loss. Reverberation conditions include a pseudo-anechoic case, a moderately reverberant ``classroom'' case, and a very reverberant ``bathroom'' case. Both binaural and monaural intelligibility are measured. Preliminary results show that source separation decreases thresholds, reverberation increases thresholds, and low frequency noise reverberates more in the rooms, contributing to increasing thresholds along with the effects of the upward spread of masking. The energetic effects of reverberation are explored. [Work supported by NIH DC00100.

  13. Auricular electrical stimulation and dental pain threshold.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, M. S.; Oleson, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    A modified double-blind evaluation of naloxone reversibility of dental analgesia produced by auricular electrical stimulation (AES) was examined in 40 subjects assigned randomly to one of four groups: AES followed by saline (AS), AES followed by naloxone (AN), placebo AES followed by saline (PS), and placebo AES followed by naloxone (PN). Dental pain threshold was tested using a hand-held dental pulp tester. A second investigator administered the true or placebo AES using an electrical stimulator. A third investigator injected intravenously saline or naloxone. The subjects and investigators 1 and 3 were blind to all treatment conditions. A repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference among the four groups. The AES groups exhibited a statistically significant 18% elevation of pain threshold, whereas the two placebo stimulation groups (PS and PN) remained essentially unchanged. The mean pain threshold increased to more than 23% for group AS, but fell to less than 12% for the subjects in group AN, who were given naloxone. These findings indicate a small but significant elevation of pain threshold by AES, an effect partially blocked by naloxone, suggesting an endogenous opioid system as one mechanism for AES analgesia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8185085

  14. Gastric Residual Volume: Rethinking the Threshold.

    PubMed

    Emami Zeydi, Amir; Sharafkhani, Mohammad; Armat, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    There are many challenges related to enteral feedings of the mechanically ventilated patient. Among the most often debated issues is the threshold for gastric residual volume before further feeding. This brief article considers the factors to be considered and reviews current thinking on the topic. PMID:27575801

  15. 40 CFR 98.121 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Fluorinated Gas Production § 98.121 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a fluorinated gas production process that... in § 98.2(a)(2), calculate process emissions from fluorinated gas production using uncontrolled...

  16. 40 CFR 98.121 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Fluorinated Gas Production § 98.121 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a fluorinated gas production process that... in § 98.2(a)(2), calculate process emissions from fluorinated gas production using uncontrolled...

  17. 40 CFR 98.121 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Fluorinated Gas Production § 98.121 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a fluorinated gas production process that... in § 98.2(a)(2), calculate process emissions from fluorinated gas production using uncontrolled...

  18. 40 CFR 98.121 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Fluorinated Gas Production § 98.121 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a fluorinated gas production process that... in § 98.2(a)(2), calculate process emissions from fluorinated gas production using uncontrolled...

  19. The gradual nature of threshold switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, M.; Salinga, M.

    2014-11-01

    The recent commercialization of electronic memories based on phase change materials proved the usability of this peculiar family of materials for application purposes. More advanced data storage and computing concepts, however, demand a deeper understanding especially of the electrical properties of the amorphous phase and the switching behaviour. In this work, we investigate the temporal evolution of the current through the amorphous state of the prototypical phase change material, Ge2Sb2Te5, under constant voltage. A custom-made electrical tester allows the measurement of delay times over five orders of magnitude, as well as the transient states of electrical excitation prior to the actual threshold switching. We recognize a continuous current increase over time prior to the actual threshold-switching event to be a good measure for the electrical excitation. A clear correlation between a significant rise in pre-switching-current and the later occurrence of threshold switching can be observed. This way, we found experimental evidence for the existence of an absolute minimum for the threshold voltage (or electric field respectively) holding also for time scales far beyond the measurement range.

  20. Environment as a Threshold Variable: An Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marjoribanks, Kevin

    1974-01-01

    It is often assumed that, for intellectual performance, the environment acts as a threshold variable. This assumption was investigated by examining the nature of the relationship between the learning environment of the home and verbal, number, spatial, and reasoning ability test scores. (Author/JA)

  1. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Conceptualizing the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Susan; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.; Kyng, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Graduates with well-developed capabilities in finance are invaluable to our society and in increasing demand. Universities face the challenge of designing finance programmes to develop these capabilities and the essential knowledge that underpins them. Our research responds to this challenge by identifying threshold concepts that are central to…

  2. Identification of Threshold Concepts for Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer; Green, David; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Lin, Sara; Minderhout, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    Threshold concepts (TCs) are concepts that, when mastered, represent a transformed understanding of a discipline without which the learner cannot progress. We have undertaken a process involving more than 75 faculty members and 50 undergraduate students to identify a working list of TCs for biochemistry. The process of identifying TCs for…

  3. Verification of the heart rate threshold.

    PubMed

    Bunc, V; Hofmann, P; Leitner, H; Gaisl, G

    1995-01-01

    Among the methods for determining anaerobic threshold (AT), the heart rate (HR) method seems to be the simplest. On the other hand, many conflicting results from comparing this method with others have been presented over the last 10 years. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the heart rate threshold (HRT) with the lactate turn point (LTP)-"second" break point of dependence of lactate (LA) to power output, ventilatory threshold (VT) and threshold determined by electromyography (EMGAT), all determined by the same exercise test and evaluated by the same computer algorithm. A group of 24 female students [mean age 20.5 (SD 1.6) years, maximal oxygen consumption 48.8 (SD 4.7) ml.kg-1.min-1] performed an incremental exercise test on a cycle ergometer (modified Conconi test) starting with an initial power output (PO) of 40 W with intensity increments of 10 W.min-1 until the subjects were exhausted. The HRT, LTP and EMGAT determination was done by computer-aided break-point regression analysis from dependence of functional measures on PO. The same computer algorithm was used for VT determination from the relationship between ventilation (V) and oxygen uptake (VO2) or carbon dioxide output (VCO2).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7607203

  4. 40 CFR 98.301 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.301 Section 98.301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electrical Transmission and Distribution Equipment Use § 98.301...

  5. A Cognitive Approach to Threshold Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Guy

    2013-01-01

    This paper asks a fundamental question: what is happening inside the mind of the undergraduate during teaching and learning experiences, and how should curricula be designed to support it? A number of concepts lend themselves to providing an answer, principle among which is the relatively recent idea of Threshold Concepts. In this paper we attempt…

  6. 42 CFR 433.206 - Threshold methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Threshold methodology. 433.206 Section 433.206 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... implements appropriate tracking for purpose of claiming Federal Medicaid funding for the associated...

  7. 42 CFR 433.206 - Threshold methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Threshold methodology. 433.206 Section 433.206 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... implements appropriate tracking for purpose of claiming Federal Medicaid funding for the associated...

  8. Speech Recognition Thresholds for Multilingual Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramkissoon, Ishara

    2001-01-01

    This article traces the development of speech audiometry in the United States and reports on the current status, focusing on the needs of a multilingual population in terms of measuring speech recognition threshold (SRT). It also discusses sociolinguistic considerations, alternative SRT stimuli for second language learners, and research on using…

  9. Handwriting Automaticity: The Search for Performance Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medwell, Jane; Wray, David

    2014-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that handwriting has an important role in written composition. In particular, handwriting automaticity appears to relate to success in composition. This relationship has been little explored in British contexts and we currently have little idea of what threshold performance levels might be. In this paper, we report on two…

  10. Excitable neurons, firing threshold manifolds and canards.

    PubMed

    Mitry, John; McCarthy, Michelle; Kopell, Nancy; Wechselberger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We investigate firing threshold manifolds in a mathematical model of an excitable neuron. The model analyzed investigates the phenomenon of post-inhibitory rebound spiking due to propofol anesthesia and is adapted from McCarthy et al. (SIAM J. Appl. Dyn. Syst. 11(4):1674-1697, 2012). Propofol modulates the decay time-scale of an inhibitory GABAa synaptic current. Interestingly, this system gives rise to rebound spiking within a specific range of propofol doses. Using techniques from geometric singular perturbation theory, we identify geometric structures, known as canards of folded saddle-type, which form the firing threshold manifolds. We find that the position and orientation of the canard separatrix is propofol dependent. Thus, the speeds of relevant slow synaptic processes are encoded within this geometric structure. We show that this behavior cannot be understood using a static, inhibitory current step protocol, which can provide a single threshold for rebound spiking but cannot explain the observed cessation of spiking for higher propofol doses. We then compare the analyses of dynamic and static synaptic inhibition, showing how the firing threshold manifolds of each relate, and why a current step approach is unable to fully capture the behavior of this model. PMID:23945278

  11. Erosion thresholds and land surface morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, William E.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Montgomery, David R.; McKean, James; Bauer, Romy

    1992-08-01

    We propose a graphical technique to analyze the entirety of landforms in a catchment to define quantitatively the spatial variation in the dominance of different erosion processes. High-resolution digital elevation data of a 1.2 km2 hilly area where the channel network had been mapped in the field were used in the digital terrain model, TOPOG, to test threshold theories for erosion. The land surface was divided into ˜20 m2 elements whose shapes were then classified as convergent, planar, or divergent. The entire landscape plotted on a graph of area per unit contour length against surface gradient shows each planform plotting as a separate field. A simple steady-state hydrologic model was used to predict zones of saturation and areas of high pore pressure to mimic the extreme hydrologic events responsible for erosive instability of the land surface. The field observation that saturation overland flow is rare outside convergent zones provided a significant constraint on the hydrologic parameter in the model. This model was used in threshold theories to predict areas of slope instability and areas subject to erosion by saturation overland flow, both of which can contribute to channel initiation. The proportion of convergent elements predicted to exceed the threshold varies greatly with relatively small changes in surface resistance, demonstrating a high sensitivity to land use such as cattle grazing. Overall, the landscape can be divided, using erosion threshold lines, into areas prone to channel instability due to runoff and stable areas where diffusive transport predominates.

  12. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-Charged Equipment or Closed-Cell Foams § 98.431 Reporting threshold. Any importer or exporter of fluorinated GHGs contained in pre-charged equipment or closed-cell foams who meets the requirements of § 98.2... or closed-cell foams....

  13. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-Charged Equipment or Closed-Cell Foams § 98.431 Reporting threshold. Any importer or exporter of fluorinated GHGs contained in pre-charged equipment or closed-cell foams who meets the requirements of § 98.2... or closed-cell foams....

  14. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-Charged Equipment or Closed-Cell Foams § 98.431 Reporting threshold. Any importer or exporter of fluorinated GHGs contained in pre-charged equipment or closed-cell foams who meets the requirements of § 98.2... or closed-cell foams....

  15. 49 CFR 80.13 - Threshold criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation CREDIT ASSISTANCE FOR SURFACE TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS... project shall meet the following five threshold criteria: (1) The project shall be consistent with the... before the DOT and the project sponsor execute a term sheet or credit agreement that results in...

  16. 49 CFR 80.13 - Threshold criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation CREDIT ASSISTANCE FOR SURFACE TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS... project shall meet the following five threshold criteria: (1) The project shall be consistent with the... before the DOT and the project sponsor execute a term sheet or credit agreement that results in...

  17. Phi Delta Kappa at the Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2006-01-01

    Since its fraternal origins a century ago, Phi Delta Kappa (PDK) International has been foremost a society of individuals joined together in professional collegiality and dedicated to tenets of leadership, service, and research in education. As PDK crosses the threshold into its second century, that early spirit of association lit in 1906, like…

  18. Robust stochastic resonance for simple threshold neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosko, Bart; Mitaim, Sanya

    2004-09-01

    Simulation and theoretical results show that memoryless threshold neurons benefit from small amounts of almost all types of additive noise and so produce the stochastic-resonance or SR effect. Input-output mutual information measures the performance of such threshold systems that use subthreshold signals. The SR result holds for all possible noise probability density functions with finite variance. The only constraint is that the noise mean must fall outside a “forbidden” threshold-related interval that the user can control—a new theorem shows that this condition is also necessary. A corollary and simulations show that the SR effect occurs for right-sided beta and Weibull noise as well. These SR results further hold for the entire uncountably infinite class of alpha-stable probability density functions. Alpha-stable noise densities have infinite variance and infinite higher-order moments and often model impulsive noise environments. The stable noise densities include the special case of symmetric bell-curve densities with thick tails such as the Cauchy probability density. The SR result for alpha-stable noise densities shows that the SR effect in threshold and thresholdlike systems is robust against occasional or even frequent violent fluctuations in noise. Regression analysis reveals both an exponential relationship for the optimal noise dispersion as a function of the alpha bell-curve tail thickness and an approximate linear relationship for the SR-maximal mutual information as a function of the alpha bell-curve tail thickness.

  19. Occupational exposures to radiofrequency fields: results of an Israeli national survey.

    PubMed

    Hareuveny, R; Kavet, R; Shachar, A; Margaliot, M; Kheifets, L

    2015-06-01

    Relatively high exposures to radiofrequency (RF) fields can occur in the broadcast, medical, and communications industries, as well in occupations that use RF emitting equipment (e.g. law enforcement). Information on exposure to workers employed in these industries and occupations is limited. We present results of an Israeli National Survey of occupational RF field levels at frequencies between ~100 kHz and 40 GHz, representing Industrial Heating, Communications, Radar, Research, and Medicine. Almost 4300 measurements from 900 sources across 25 occupations were recorded and categorised as 'routine', 'incidental', or 'unintended'. The occupation-specific geometric means (GMs) of the percentage of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit values (TLVs) for each of the three exposure scenarios are presented together with the geometric standard deviation (GSD). Additionally, we present estimates of occupation-specific annual personal exposures and collective exposures. The vast majority of the GM of routine exposures ranged from a fraction to less than 1% of ACGIH TLVs, except for Walkie-Talkie (GM 94% of ACGIH), Induction Heating (17%), Plastic Welding (11%), Industrial Heating (6%) and Diathermy (6%). The GM of incidental and unintended exposures exceeded the TLV for one and 14 occupations, respectively. In many cases, the within-occupation GSD was very large, and though the medians remained below TLV, variable fractions of these occupations were projected to exceed the TLV. In rank order, Walkie-Talkie, Plastic Welding, and Induction Heating workers had the highest annual cumulative personal exposure. For cumulative collective exposures within an occupation, Walkie-Talkie dominated with 96.3% of the total, reflecting both large population and high personal exposure. A brief exceedance of the TLV does not automatically translate to hazard as RF exposure limits (issued by various bodies, including ACGIH) include a 10

  20. Overwash threshold experiment for gravel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matias, Ana; Williams, Jon; Bradbury, Andrew; Masselink, Gerhard; Ferreira, Óscar

    2010-05-01

    Field measurements of overwash effects, associated physical forcing, and determination of threshold conditions, are much less common for gravel than for sandy barriers (e.g., field measurements by Lorang, 2002; Bradbury et al., 2005; and laboratory studies by Obhrai et al., 2008). In order to define overwash thresholds for gravel there is a need for measurements under a variety of forcing conditions that include waves, tides and surges. Flume experiments allow the manipulation of physical forcing and can make a valuable contribution to improve the understanding and prediction of overwash. To study gravel barrier overwash processes, BARDEX proto-type scale laboratory experiment was undertaken in the Delta flume (Williams et al., 2009). A 4 m high, 50 m wide gravel barrier composed of sediments with D50 = 10 mm was emplaced in the flume and subjected to a range of water levels, wave heights and wave periods. Barrier morphology was surveyed before and after each run. Two situations were simulated: overwashing and overtopping. Following Orford and Carter (1982) terminology, the distinction between overtopping and overwash was based on the type of morphological change over the barrier crest. Overtopping causes vertical accretion at the crest, whereas overwashing promotes the formation of washover deposits landwards from the crest. Ten overwash experiments were conducted (divided in 63 runs), and overtopping was recorded in 22 runs and overwash in 20 runs. In other runs, only the beach face was reworked by waves. In a systematic series of tests water levels were varied between 3.00 m and 3.75 m (in steps of 0.125 m); wave height was varied between 0.8 m and 1.3 m (in steps of 0.05 or 0.1 m); and wave periods of 4.5, 6, 7 and 8 seconds were used. These hydrodynamic conditions were used to compute wave run-up using several well-known formulae (cf., Powell, 1990; Stockdon et al., 2007). Comparison between run-up estimations and the barrier crest elevation prior to wave

  1. Measuring Input Thresholds on an Existing Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuperman, Igor; Gutrich, Daniel G.; Berkun, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    A critical PECL (positive emitter-coupled logic) interface to Xilinx interface needed to be changed on an existing flight board. The new Xilinx input interface used a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) type of input, and the driver could meet its thresholds typically, but not in worst-case, according to the data sheet. The previous interface had been based on comparison with an external reference, but the CMOS input is based on comparison with an internal divider from the power supply. A way to measure what the exact input threshold was for this device for 64 inputs on a flight board was needed. The measurement technique allowed an accurate measurement of the voltage required to switch a Xilinx input from high to low for each of the 64 lines, while only probing two of them. Directly driving an external voltage was considered too risky, and tests done on any other unit could not be used to qualify the flight board. The two lines directly probed gave an absolute voltage threshold calibration, while data collected on the remaining 62 lines without probing gave relative measurements that could be used to identify any outliers. The PECL interface was forced to a long-period square wave by driving a saturated square wave into the ADC (analog to digital converter). The active pull-down circuit was turned off, causing each line to rise rapidly and fall slowly according to the input s weak pull-down circuitry. The fall time shows up as a change in the pulse width of the signal ready by the Xilinx. This change in pulse width is a function of capacitance, pulldown current, and input threshold. Capacitance was known from the different trace lengths, plus a gate input capacitance, which is the same for all inputs. The pull-down current is the same for all inputs including the two that are probed directly. The data was combined, and the Excel solver tool was used to find input thresholds for the 62 lines. This was repeated over different supply voltages and

  2. Impact of uncertainty in rainfall estimation on the identification of rainfall thresholds for debris flow occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolopoulos, Efthymios I.; Borga, Marco; Crema, Stefano; Marchi, Lorenzo; Marra, Francesco; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2014-05-01

    Estimation of rainfall intensity-duration thresholds, used for the identification of debris flows/landslides triggering rainfall events, has been traditionally based on raingauge observations. The main drawback of using information from gauges is that rainfall estimates are available only over gauge locations, which are usually located far away from the debris flow/landslide initiation areas. Thus, successful implementation of gauge-based rainfall thresholds involves the intrinsic assumption that rainfall over gauge and actual initiation point is highly correlated. However, in complex terrain where this natural hazard takes place, spatial variability of rainfall can be very high even at very small scales due to orographic enhancement of precipitation and the development of highly localized convective systems. This work is focused on the assessment of the impact of rainfall estimation uncertainty on identification and use of rainfall thresholds for debris flow occurrence. The Upper Adige river basin, northern Italy, is the area of study. A detailed database of more than 400 identified debris flows during period 2000-2010 and a raingauge network of 95 stations, is used for this work. The methodology examines the intensity-duration thresholds derived from a set of raingauge locations that is assumed to be collocated with debris flow/landslide points (DFR) and an equivalent set of raingauges assumed to have the role of closest available measurement (MR). Comparison between the rainfall thresholds derived from DFR and MR, revealed that uncertainty in rainfall estimation has a major impact on estimated intensity-duration thresholds. Specifically, results showed that thresholds estimated from MR observations are consistently underestimated. Evaluation of the estimated thresholds for warning procedures showed that while detection is high, the main issue is the high false alarm ratio, which limits the overall accuracy of the procedure. Overall performance on debris flow

  3. Extended High Frequency Thresholds in College Students: Effects of Recreational Noise

    PubMed Central

    Le Prell, C. G.; Spankovich, C.; Lobarinas, E.; Griffiths, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Human hearing is sensitive to sounds from as low as 20 Hz to as high as 20,000 Hz in normal ears. However, clinical tests of human hearing rarely include extended high frequency (EHF) threshold assessments, at frequencies extending beyond 8,000 Hz. EHF thresholds have been suggested for use monitoring the earliest effects of noise on the inner ear, although the clinical utility of EHF threshold testing is not well established for this purpose. Purpose The primary objective of this study was to determine if EHF thresholds in healthy, young adult college students vary as a function of recreational noise exposure. Research Design A retrospective analysis of a laboratory database was conducted; all participants with both EHF threshold testing and noise history data were included. The potential for “pre-clinical” EHF deficits was assessed based on the measured thresholds, with the noise surveys used to estimate recreational noise exposure. Study Sample EHF thresholds measured during participation in other ongoing studies were available from 87 subjects (34 male and 53 female); all participants had hearing within normal clinical limits (≤25 HL) at conventional frequencies (0.25 to 8 kHz). Results EHF thresholds closely matched standard reference thresholds [ANSI S3.6 (1996) Annex C]. There were statistically reliable threshold differences in subjects that used music players, with 3–6 dB worse thresholds at the highest test frequencies (10–16 kHz) in participants that reported long-term music player device use (longer than 5 years), or higher listening levels during music player use. Conclusions It should be possible to detect small changes in high frequency hearing for patients/participants that undergo repeat testing at periodic intervals. However, the increased population-level variability in thresholds at the highest frequencies will make it difficult to identify the presence of small but potentially important deficits in otherwise normal hearing

  4. LANSCE Beam Current Limiter (XL)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.; Hall, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is an engineered safety system that provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated proton beams. The Beam Current Limiter (XL), as an active component of the RSS, limits the maximum average current in a beamline, thus the current available for a beam spill accident. Exceeding the pre-set limit initiates action by the RSS to mitigate the hazard (insertion of beam stoppers in the low energy beam transport). The beam limiter is an electrically isolated, toroidal transformer and associated electronics. The device was designed to continuously monitor beamline currents independent of any external timing. Fail-safe operation was a prime consideration in its development. Fail-safe operation is defined as functioning as intended (due to redundant circuitry), functioning with a more sensitive fault threshold, or generating a fault condition. This report describes the design philosophy, hardware, implementation, operation, and limitations of the device.

  5. Effects of Accelerated Aging on Fiber Damage Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Setchell, R.E.

    1999-02-15

    Laser-induced damage mechanisms that can occur during high-intensity fiber transmission have been under study for a number of years. Our particular interest in laser initiation of explosives has led us to examine damage processes associated with the transmission of Q-switched, Nd:YAG pulses at 1.06 {micro}m through step-index, multimode, fused silica fiber. Laser breakdown at the fiber entrance face is often the first process to limit fiber transmission but catastrophic damage can also occur at either fiber end face, within the initial entry segment of the fiber, and at other internal sites along the fiber path. Past studies have examined how these various damage mechanisms depend upon fiber end-face preparation, fiber fixturing and routing, laser characteristics, and laser-to-fiber injection optics. In some applications of interest, however, a fiber transmission system may spend years in storage before it is used. Consequently, an important additional issue for these applications is whether or not there are aging processes that can result in lower damage thresholds over time. Fiber end-face contamination would certainly lower breakdown and damage thresholds at these surfaces, but careful design of hermetic seals in connectors and other end-face fixtures can minimize this possibility. A more subtle possibility would be a process for the slow growth of internal defects that could lead to lower thresholds for internal damage. In the current study, two approaches to stimulating the growth of internal defects were used in an attempt to produce observable changes in internal damage thresholds. In the first approach test fibers were subjected to a very high tensile stress for a time sufficient for some fraction to fail from static fatigue. In the second approach, test fibers were subjected to a combination of high tensile stress and large, cyclic temperature variations. Both of these approaches were rather arbitrary due to the lack of an established growth mechanism for

  6. Nature limits filarial transmission

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Goutam

    2008-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, caused by Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and B. timori is a public health problem of considerable magnitude of the tropics and subtropics. Presently 1.3 billion people are at risk of lymphatic filariasis (LF) infection and about 120 million people are affected in 83 countries. In this context it is worth mentioning that 'nature' itself limits filarial transmission to a great extent in a number of ways such as by reducing vector populations, parasitic load and many other bearings. Possibilities to utilize these bearings of natural control of filariasis should be searched and if manipulations on nature, like indiscriminate urbanization and deforestation, creating sites favourable for the breeding of filarial vectors and unsanitary conditions, water pollution with organic matters etc., are reduced below the threshold level, we will be highly benefited. Understandings of the factors related to natural phenomena of control of filariasis narrated in this article may help to adopt effective control strategies. PMID:18500974

  7. Anomalous threshold laws in quantum sticking.

    PubMed

    Clougherty, Dennis P

    2003-11-28

    It has been stated that for a short-ranged surface interaction, the probability of a low-energy particle sticking to a surface always vanishes as s approximately k with k-->0 where k=sqrt[E]. Deviations from this so-called universal threshold law are derived using a linear model of particle-surface scattering. The Fredholm theory of integral equations is used to find the global conditions necessary for a convergent solution. The exceptional case of a zero-energy resonance is considered in detail. Anomalous threshold laws, where s approximately k(1+alpha),alpha>0 as k-->0, are shown to arise from a soft gap in the weighted density of states of excitations; alpha is determined by the behavior of the weighted density of states near the binding energy. PMID:14683254

  8. Anomalous Threshold Laws in Quantum Sticking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clougherty, Dennis P.

    2003-11-01

    It has been stated that for a short-ranged surface interaction, the probability of a low-energy particle sticking to a surface always vanishes as s˜k with k→0 where k=√(E). Deviations from this so-called universal threshold law are derived using a linear model of particle-surface scattering. The Fredholm theory of integral equations is used to find the global conditions necessary for a convergent solution. The exceptional case of a zero-energy resonance is considered in detail. Anomalous threshold laws, where s˜k1+α,α>0 as k→0, are shown to arise from a soft gap in the weighted density of states of excitations; α is determined by the behavior of the weighted density of states near the binding energy.

  9. Anomalous Threshold Laws in Quantum Sticking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clougherty, Dennis

    2004-03-01

    It has been stated that for a short-ranged surface interaction, the probability of a low-energy particle sticking to a surface always vanishes as s ˜ k with k→ 0 where k=√E. Deviations from this so-called universal threshold law are derived using a linear model of particle-surface scattering. The Fredholm theory of integral equations is used to find the global conditions necessary for a convergent solution. The exceptional case of a zero-energy resonance is considered in detail. Anomalous threshold laws, where s ˜ k^1+α, α > 0 as k→ 0, are shown to arise from a soft gap in the weighted density of states of excitations; α is determined by the behavior of the weighted density of states near the binding energy.

  10. Semiclassical approaches to below-threshold harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Hostetter, James A.; Tate, Jennifer L.; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Gaarde, Mette B.

    2010-08-15

    We study the generation of below-threshold harmonics in a model atom by extending the three-step semiclassical model of harmonic generation to include effects of the atomic potential. We explore the generalization of semiclassical trajectories of the electron in the presence of the combined laser-atom potential and calculate the intensity-dependent dipole phase associated with these trajectories. Our results are in good agreement with fully quantum mechanical calculations, as well as with recent experimental observations. We show that the so-called long trajectory readily generalizes to below-threshold harmonic generation and is relatively insensitive to the choice of initial conditions. We also find that the short trajectory can only lead to low-energy harmonics for electrons that have been released close to the ion core in a process that is closer to multiphoton than to tunnel ionization.

  11. Semiclassical approaches to below-threshold harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetter, James A.; Tate, Jennifer L.; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Gaarde, Mette B.

    2010-08-01

    We study the generation of below-threshold harmonics in a model atom by extending the three-step semiclassical model of harmonic generation to include effects of the atomic potential. We explore the generalization of semiclassical trajectories of the electron in the presence of the combined laser-atom potential and calculate the intensity-dependent dipole phase associated with these trajectories. Our results are in good agreement with fully quantum mechanical calculations, as well as with recent experimental observations. We show that the so-called long trajectory readily generalizes to below-threshold harmonic generation and is relatively insensitive to the choice of initial conditions. We also find that the short trajectory can only lead to low-energy harmonics for electrons that have been released close to the ion core in a process that is closer to multiphoton than to tunnel ionization.

  12. Mars Dust Threshold Under Heated Surface Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coquilla, R. V.; White, B. R.

    2002-12-01

    A wind tunnel was used to study the effects of a heated surface, thereby creating an unstable near-surface atmosphere, on the threshold of aeolian-blown (windblown) dust-size particles (1-2 mm) under Mars-simulated pressure. Unstable conditions on Mars typically arise during the mid to late afternoon hours due to the accumulation of daytime solar-radiation. When the surface is warmer than the atmosphere just above it, vertical turbulence is increased. Thus, loose dust particles can be more easily lofted and mixed at a threshold wind speed lower than that known under neutral atmospheric conditions. For this wind-tunnel study, unstable (heated) surface conditions were simulated based on the negative temperature gradients and surface bulk Richardson numbers estimated from the Mars Pathfinder Lander (MPL) mission data during the mid-afternoon to early evening Mars period. According to other missions, evidence of highly active dust suspension during this part of the Mars daytime hours was recorded, including the presence of "dust devils". Experiments were performed in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel (MARSWIT) located at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. Based on data acquired from the MPL site, the mean surface pressure was found to be 6.75 mb. Thus, simulations in MARSWIT were conducted at 10-mb atmospheric pressure using air, which agrees with a dynamically similar environment of 6.5 mb on Mars. In order to attain the necessary vertical temperature gradients that would develop an unstable layer, a test bed was heated by sub-surface heaters. Three surface roughness conditions were simulated, over which not only dust threshold was measured but also velocity and temperature profiles were acquired under various heating levels. Boundary layer measurements and analysis conducted under neutral conditions were used to estimate roughness height, zo, and the friction speed, u*, for all stability conditions. Dust threshold tests were conducted using a

  13. Differential equation models for sharp threshold dynamics.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Harrison C; Dimitrov, Nedialko B

    2014-01-01

    We develop an extension to differential equation models of dynamical systems to allow us to analyze probabilistic threshold dynamics that fundamentally and globally change system behavior. We apply our novel modeling approach to two cases of interest: a model of infectious disease modified for malware where a detection event drastically changes dynamics by introducing a new class in competition with the original infection; and the Lanchester model of armed conflict, where the loss of a key capability drastically changes the effectiveness of one of the sides. We derive and demonstrate a step-by-step, repeatable method for applying our novel modeling approach to an arbitrary system, and we compare the resulting differential equations to simulations of the system's random progression. Our work leads to a simple and easily implemented method for analyzing probabilistic threshold dynamics using differential equations. PMID:24184349

  14. Autoionization of OCS by threshold photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delwiche, Jacques; Hubin-Franskin, Marie-Jeanne; Guyon, Paul-Marie; Nenner, Irène

    1981-04-01

    Autoionization of carbonyl sulfide between 12 and 16 eV has been investigated by photoionization using the pulsed synchrotron radiation from ACO Orsay's storage ring. The threshold photoelectron spectrum and the total photoionization spectrum of carbonyl sulfide have been recorded at high resolution in the wavelength range between 112.0 and 65.0 nm (11-19 eV). Threshold energy electrons are observed in specific wavelength regions: (i) at excitation energies where the X˜, Ã, B˜, and C˜ ionic states are formed by a direct process; (ii) in the à state region where resonant autoionization to à can be understood classically within the Franck-Condon approximation; (iii) in the ÖX˜ Franck-Condon gap between 90 and 110 nm, where resonant autoionization leads to very sharp electron energy distribution strongly peaked at zero energy. Here the mechanism must be more complex.

  15. Thresholds of hypoxia for marine biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Vaquer-Sunyer, Raquel; Duarte, Carlos M

    2008-10-01

    Hypoxia is a mounting problem affecting the world's coastal waters, with severe consequences for marine life, including death and catastrophic changes. Hypoxia is forecast to increase owing to the combined effects of the continued spread of coastal eutrophication and global warming. A broad comparative analysis across a range of contrasting marine benthic organisms showed that hypoxia thresholds vary greatly across marine benthic organisms and that the conventional definition of 2 mg O(2)/liter to designate waters as hypoxic is below the empirical sublethal and lethal O(2) thresholds for half of the species tested. These results imply that the number and area of coastal ecosystems affected by hypoxia and the future extent of hypoxia impacts on marine life have been generally underestimated. PMID:18824689

  16. Photodetachment Spectroscopy of La-: Resonances and Thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, C. W.; Gibson, N. D.; Crocker, C.; Dungan, K. A.; Matola, B. R.

    2015-05-01

    The negative ion of lanthanum, La-, has the richest bound state spectrum ever observed for an atomic negative ion, and it has been proposed as perhaps the best candidate for laser cooling of a negative ion. In the present experiments, photodetachment thresholds and transitions between bound states of La- are investigated using tunable infrared spectroscopy. The relative signal for neutral atom production was measured with a crossed ion-beam-laser-beam apparatus over the photon energy range 290-900 meV. The spectrum reveals at least 14 sharp resonance peaks due to transitions to either bound states of the negative ion or quasibound states in the continuum. Multiple photodetachment thresholds are also observed, providing information on the binding energies for some states of La-. This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1068308 and 1404109.

  17. Ku-band radar threshold analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, C. L.; Polydoros, A.

    1979-01-01

    The statistics of the CFAR threshold for the Ku-band radar was determined. Exact analytical results were developed for both the mean and standard deviations in the designated search mode. The mean value is compared to the results of a previously reported simulation. The analytical results are more optimistic than the simulation results, for which no explanation is offered. The normalized standard deviation is shown to be very sensitive to signal-to-noise ratio and very insensitive to the noise correlation present in the range gates of the designated search mode. The substantial variation in the CFAR threshold is dominant at large values of SNR where the normalized standard deviation is greater than 0.3. Whether or not this significantly affects the resulting probability of detection is a matter which deserves additional attention.

  18. A threshold effect for spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The borderline case between no charging and large (kV) negative potentials for eclipse charging events on geosynchronous satellites is investigated, and the dependence of this transition on a threshold energy in the ambient plasma is examined. Data from the Applied Technology Satellite 6 and P78-2 (SCATHA) show that plasma sheet fluxes must extend above 10 keV for these satellites to charge in eclipse. The threshold effect is a result of the shape of the normal secondary yield curve, in particular the high energy crossover, where the secondary yield drops below 1. It is found that a large portion of the ambient electron flux must exceed this energy for a negative current to exist.

  19. Edith Wharton's threshold phobia and two worlds.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Deanna; Kulish, Nancy

    2014-08-01

    The American novelist Edith Wharton suffered an unusual childhood neurotic symptom, a fear of crossing thresholds, a condition that might be called a "threshold phobia." This symptom is identified and examined in autobiographical material, letters, diaries, and selected literary fiction and nonfiction left by Wharton to arrive at a formulation not previously drawn together. A fascinating theme-living or being trapped between "two worlds"-runs through much of the writer's life and work. The phobia is related to this theme, and both can be linked more broadly to certain sexual conflicts in women. This understanding of Wharton's phobia, it is argued, throws new light on the developmental issues and conflicts related to the female "oedipal" or triadic phase, characterized by the need to negotiate the two worlds of mother and of father. PMID:25059543

  20. Detection thresholds for 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine in Concord and Niagara grape juice.

    PubMed

    Pickering, G J; Karthik, A; Inglis, D; Sears, M; Ker, K

    2008-08-01

    2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IPMP) is the compound responsible for the off-flavor known as ladybug taint, which occurs when Harmnonia axyridis beetles become incorporated with the grapes during juice processing. It is also an important grape-derived component of juice flavor in some varieties. The main objective of this study was to determine the orthonasal (ON) and retronasal (RN) detection thresholds for IPMP in juice. The ASTM E679 ascending forced choice method of limits was used to determine detection thresholds for 26 individuals in Concord and Niagara juices. Group best estimate thresholds (BETs) averaged 0.93 ng/L and were 50% and 21% higher in Concord than in Niagara juices for ON and RN evaluation, respectively. Group BETs for IPMP (ng/L) for Concord were ON: 1.11; RN: 1.02 and for Niagara were ON: 0.74; RN: 0.84. Variation in individual detection thresholds was observed, although familiarity with ladybug taint was not associated with individual threshold values. We conclude that humans are very sensitive to IPMP in juice, and that detection thresholds are more strongly influenced by grape variety than evaluation mode. These results may assist juice producers in establishing tolerance levels for IPMP in juice affected by ladybug taint or derived from grapes of suboptimal ripeness. PMID:19241569

  1. Reinforcement learning for adaptive threshold control of restorative brain-computer interfaces: a Bayesian simulation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Restorative brain-computer interfaces (BCI) are increasingly used to provide feedback of neuronal states in a bid to normalize pathological brain activity and achieve behavioral gains. However, patients and healthy subjects alike often show a large variability, or even inability, of brain self-regulation for BCI control, known as BCI illiteracy. Although current co-adaptive algorithms are powerful for assistive BCIs, their inherent class switching clashes with the operant conditioning goal of restorative BCIs. Moreover, due to the treatment rationale, the classifier of restorative BCIs usually has a constrained feature space, thus limiting the possibility of classifier adaptation. In this context, we applied a Bayesian model of neurofeedback and reinforcement learning for different threshold selection strategies to study the impact of threshold adaptation of a linear classifier on optimizing restorative BCIs. For each feedback iteration, we first determined the thresholds that result in minimal action entropy and maximal instructional efficiency. We then used the resulting vector for the simulation of continuous threshold adaptation. We could thus show that threshold adaptation can improve reinforcement learning, particularly in cases of BCI illiteracy. Finally, on the basis of information-theory, we provided an explanation for the achieved benefits of adaptive threshold setting. PMID:25729347

  2. Ex-plant retinal laser induced threshold studies in the millisecond time regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulmeister, Karl; Husinsky, Johannes; Seiser, Bernhard; Edthofer, Florian; Tuschl, Helga; Lund, David J.

    2006-02-01

    Excised bovine retinas were used as model for threshold determination of laser induced thermal damage in the pulse regime of 1 ms to 655 ms for a range of laser spot size diameters. The thresholds as determined by fluorescence viability staining compare very well with the prediction of thermal damage models. Both models compare well with published and new Rhesus monkey threshold data. A distinctive dependence of the threshold on laser spot size diameter for different pulse duration was found which indicates that current (ICNIRP, ANSI and IEC) laser exposure limits for large spots can be increased in this pulse duration regime. A time dependent α max is proposed which only for the case of long exposure durations has the current value of 100 mrad, but decreases to smaller angles for short exposure durations, effectively increasing the permissible exposure level. An explanation based on intra-retinal scattering is offered for the unexpected spot size dependence for spot diameters less than about 80 µm. The time dependence and nature of damage is discussed for pulse durations shorter than 1 ms where bubble induced damage seems to lead to a threshold a factor of 10 lower than the thermally induced threshold, resulting in the need to lower the MPE values for this condition. Possible changes of the MPE values are offered and discussed.

  3. Reinforcement learning for adaptive threshold control of restorative brain-computer interfaces: a Bayesian simulation

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Restorative brain-computer interfaces (BCI) are increasingly used to provide feedback of neuronal states in a bid to normalize pathological brain activity and achieve behavioral gains. However, patients and healthy subjects alike often show a large variability, or even inability, of brain self-regulation for BCI control, known as BCI illiteracy. Although current co-adaptive algorithms are powerful for assistive BCIs, their inherent class switching clashes with the operant conditioning goal of restorative BCIs. Moreover, due to the treatment rationale, the classifier of restorative BCIs usually has a constrained feature space, thus limiting the possibility of classifier adaptation. In this context, we applied a Bayesian model of neurofeedback and reinforcement learning for different threshold selection strategies to study the impact of threshold adaptation of a linear classifier on optimizing restorative BCIs. For each feedback iteration, we first determined the thresholds that result in minimal action entropy and maximal instructional efficiency. We then used the resulting vector for the simulation of continuous threshold adaptation. We could thus show that threshold adaptation can improve reinforcement learning, particularly in cases of BCI illiteracy. Finally, on the basis of information-theory, we provided an explanation for the achieved benefits of adaptive threshold setting. PMID:25729347

  4. Long-term deficits in motion detection thresholds and spike count variability after unilateral vestibular lesion

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiong-Jie; Thomassen, Jakob S.; Dickman, J. David; Newlands, Shawn D.

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system operates in a push-pull fashion using signals from both labyrinths and an intricate bilateral organization. Unilateral vestibular lesions cause well-characterized motor deficits that are partially compensated over time and whose neural correlates have been traced in the mean response modulation of vestibular nuclei cells. Here we compare both response gains and neural detection thresholds of vestibular nuclei and semicircular canal afferent neurons in intact vs. unilateral-lesioned macaques using three-dimensional rotation and translation stimuli. We found increased stimulus-driven spike count variability and detection thresholds in semicircular canal afferents, although mean responses were unchanged, after contralateral labyrinth lesion. Analysis of trial-by-trial spike count correlations of a limited number of simultaneously recorded pairs of canal afferents suggests increased noise correlations after lesion. In addition, we also found persistent, chronic deficits in rotation detection thresholds of vestibular nuclei neurons, which were larger in the ipsilesional than the contralesional brain stem. These deficits, which persisted several months after lesion, were due to lower rotational response gains, whereas spike count variability was similar in intact and lesioned animals. In contrast to persistent deficits in rotation threshold, translation detection thresholds were not different from those in intact animals. These findings suggest that, after compensation, a single labyrinth is sufficient to recover motion sensitivity and normal thresholds for the otolith, but not the semicircular canal, system. PMID:24848470

  5. Monolayer semiconductor nanocavity lasers with ultralow thresholds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Sanfeng; Buckley, Sonia; Schaibley, John R.; Feng, Liefeng; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David G.; Hatami, Fariba; Yao, Wang; Vučković, Jelena; Majumdar, Arka; et al

    2015-03-16

    Engineering the electromagnetic environment of a nanoscale light emitter by a photonic cavity can significantly enhance its spontaneous emission rate through cavity quantum electrodynamics in the Purcell regime. This effect can greatly reduce the lasing threshold of the emitter1–5, providing the ultimate low-threshold laser system with small footprint, low power consumption and ultrafast modulation. A state-of-the-art ultra-low threshold nanolaser has been successfully developed though embedding quantum dots into photonic crystal cavity (PhCC)6–8. However, several core challenges impede the practical applications of this architecture, including the random positions and compositional fluctuations of the dots7, extreme difficulty in current injection8, and lackmore » of compatibility with electronic circuits7,8. Here, we report a new strategy to lase, where atomically thin crystalline semiconductor, i.e., a tungsten-diselenide (WSe2) monolayer, is nondestructively and deterministically introduced as a gain medium at the surface of a pre-fabricated PhCC. A new type of continuous-wave nanolaser operating in the visible regime is achieved with an optical pumping threshold as low as 27 nW at 130 K, similar to the value achieved in quantum dot PhCC lasers7. The key to the lasing action lies in the monolayer nature of the gain medium, which confines direct-gap excitons to within 1 nm of the PhCC surface. The surface-gain geometry allows unprecedented accessibilities to multi-functionalize the gain, enabling electrically pumped operation. Our scheme is scalable and compatible with integrated photonics for on-chip optical communication technologies.« less

  6. Near threshold studies of photoelectron satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Heimann, P.A.

    1986-11-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation have been used to study correlation effects in the rare gases: He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. Two kinds of time-of-flight electron analyzers were employed to examine photoionization very close to threshold and at higher kinetic energies. Partial cross sections and angular distributions have been measured for a number of photoelectron satellites. The shake-off probability has been determined at some inner-shell resonances. 121 refs., 28 figs., 13 tabs.

  7. Factors affecting mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets

    PubMed Central

    Janczak, Andrew M; Ranheim, Birgit; Fosse, Torunn K; Hild, Sophie; Nordgreen, Janicke; Moe, Randi O; Zanella, Adroaldo J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the stability and repeatability of measures of mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets and to examine potentially confounding factors when using a hand held algometer. Study design Descriptive, prospective cohort. Animals Forty-four piglets from four litters, weighing 4.6 ± 1.0 kg (mean ± SD) at 2 weeks of age. Methods Mechanical thresholds were measured twice on each of 2 days during the first and second week of life. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures design to test the effects of behavior prior to testing, sex, week, day within week, and repetition within day. The effect of body weight and the interaction between piglet weight and behaviour were also tested. Piglet was entered into the model as a random effect as an additional test of repeatability. The effect of repeated testing was used to test the stability of measures. Pearson correlations between repeated measures were used to test the repeatability of measures. Variance component analysis was used to describe the variability in the data. Results Variance component analysis indicated that piglet explained only 17% of the variance in the data. All variables in the model (behaviour prior to testing, sex, week, day within week, repetition within day, body weight, the interaction between body weight and behaviour, piglet identity) except sex had a significant effect (p < 0.04 for all). Correlations between repeated measures increased from the first to the second week. Conclusions and Clinical relevance Repeatability was acceptable only during the second week of testing and measures changed with repeated testing and increased with increasing piglet weight, indicating that time (age) and animal body weight should be taken into account when measuring mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets. Mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds can be used both for testing the efficacy of anaesthetics and analgesics, and for assessing hyperalgesia in chronic pain states in research and

  8. Threshold photoelectron spectroscopy of vibrationally excited nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, Fabrizio; Eypper, Marie; Stranges, Stefano; West, John B.; King, George C.; Dyke, John M.

    2013-02-01

    Threshold photoelectron spectroscopy (TPES) has been used to study flowing nitrogen subjected to a microwave discharge. The first three photoelectron (PE) bands of nitrogen corresponding to the ionizations N2+ (X2Σ+g) v+ ← N2 (X1Σ+g) v″, N2+ (A2Πu) v+ ← N2 (X1Σ+g) v″ and N2 + (B2Σ+u) v+ ← N2 (X1Σ+g) v″ were investigated. An analysis of the vibrationally resolved threshold photoelectron (TPE) spectra shows evidence of population of the vibrational levels v″ = 0-5 in the N2 X1Σ+g neutral state. By a comparison with the PE spectrum recorded under the same conditions, use of computed Franck-Condon factors for each ionization and evidence from vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, the relative intensities of vibrational components in a TPE band can be qualitatively explained using the Franck-Condon factors for each ionization as well as the gain in intensity from autoionization from Rydberg states that are degenerate with an ionization threshold or lie just above a threshold. The enhancement in intensity obtained in the TPE spectra, relative to the intensity in a PE spectrum recorded under the same conditions, was estimated as at least one order of magnitude. The first band of atomic nitrogen was also observed in the discharge-on TPE spectra. The experimental resolution was sufficiently good to allow the three ionizations N+(3P0,1,2) ← N(4S3/2) to be resolved and their relative component intensities were measured as 1: 0.95 ± 0.10: 0.70 ± 0.10. The complementary nature of the TPES and PES techniques has been outlined and the extra information obtained from studying a vibrationally excited small molecule such as N2 with these methods has been demonstrated.

  9. Monolayer semiconductor nanocavity lasers with ultralow thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Sanfeng; Buckley, Sonia; Schaibley, John R.; Feng, Liefeng; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David G.; Hatami, Fariba; Yao, Wang; Vučković, Jelena; Majumdar, Arka; Xu, Xiaodong

    2015-03-16

    Engineering the electromagnetic environment of a nanoscale light emitter by a photonic cavity can significantly enhance its spontaneous emission rate through cavity quantum electrodynamics in the Purcell regime. This effect can greatly reduce the lasing threshold of the emitter1–5, providing the ultimate low-threshold laser system with small footprint, low power consumption and ultrafast modulation. A state-of-the-art ultra-low threshold nanolaser has been successfully developed though embedding quantum dots into photonic crystal cavity (PhCC)6–8. However, several core challenges impede the practical applications of this architecture, including the random positions and compositional fluctuations of the dots7, extreme difficulty in current injection8, and lack of compatibility with electronic circuits7,8. Here, we report a new strategy to lase, where atomically thin crystalline semiconductor, i.e., a tungsten-diselenide (WSe2) monolayer, is nondestructively and deterministically introduced as a gain medium at the surface of a pre-fabricated PhCC. A new type of continuous-wave nanolaser operating in the visible regime is achieved with an optical pumping threshold as low as 27 nW at 130 K, similar to the value achieved in quantum dot PhCC lasers7. The key to the lasing action lies in the monolayer nature of the gain medium, which confines direct-gap excitons to within 1 nm of the PhCC surface. The surface-gain geometry allows unprecedented accessibilities to multi-functionalize the gain, enabling electrically pumped operation. Our scheme is scalable and compatible with integrated photonics for on-chip optical communication technologies.

  10. Monolayer semiconductor nanocavity lasers with ultralow thresholds.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sanfeng; Buckley, Sonia; Schaibley, John R; Feng, Liefeng; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David G; Hatami, Fariba; Yao, Wang; Vučković, Jelena; Majumdar, Arka; Xu, Xiaodong

    2015-04-01

    Engineering the electromagnetic environment of a nanometre-scale light emitter by use of a photonic cavity can significantly enhance its spontaneous emission rate, through cavity quantum electrodynamics in the Purcell regime. This effect can greatly reduce the lasing threshold of the emitter, providing a low-threshold laser system with small footprint, low power consumption and ultrafast modulation. An ultralow-threshold nanoscale laser has been successfully developed by embedding quantum dots into a photonic crystal cavity (PCC). However, several challenges impede the practical application of this architecture, including the random positions and compositional fluctuations of the dots, extreme difficulty in current injection, and lack of compatibility with electronic circuits. Here we report a new lasing strategy: an atomically thin crystalline semiconductor--that is, a tungsten diselenide monolayer--is non-destructively and deterministically introduced as a gain medium at the surface of a pre-fabricated PCC. A continuous-wave nanolaser operating in the visible regime is thereby achieved with an optical pumping threshold as low as 27 nanowatts at 130 kelvin, similar to the value achieved in quantum-dot PCC lasers. The key to the lasing action lies in the monolayer nature of the gain medium, which confines direct-gap excitons to within one nanometre of the PCC surface. The surface-gain geometry gives unprecedented accessibility and hence the ability to tailor gain properties via external controls such as electrostatic gating and current injection, enabling electrically pumped operation. Our scheme is scalable and compatible with integrated photonics for on-chip optical communication technologies. PMID:25778703

  11. Anaerobic Threshold and Salivary α-amylase during Incremental Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Akizuki, Kazunori; Yazaki, Syouichirou; Echizenya, Yuki; Ohashi, Yukari

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the validity of salivary α-amylase as a method of quickly estimating anaerobic threshold and to establish the relationship between salivary α-amylase and double-product breakpoint in order to create a way to adjust exercise intensity to a safe and effective range. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven healthy young adults performed an incremental exercise test using a cycle ergometer. During the incremental exercise test, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and ventilatory equivalent were measured using a breath-by-breath gas analyzer. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate were measured to calculate the double product, from which double-product breakpoint was determined. Salivary α-amylase was measured to calculate the salivary threshold. [Results] One-way ANOVA revealed no significant differences among workloads at the anaerobic threshold, double-product breakpoint, and salivary threshold. Significant correlations were found between anaerobic threshold and salivary threshold and between anaerobic threshold and double-product breakpoint. [Conclusion] As a method for estimating anaerobic threshold, salivary threshold was as good as or better than determination of double-product breakpoint because the correlation between anaerobic threshold and salivary threshold was higher than the correlation between anaerobic threshold and double-product breakpoint. Therefore, salivary threshold is a useful index of anaerobic threshold during an incremental workload. PMID:25140097

  12. Acoustic emission sensor radiation damage threshold experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, K.M.; Pepper, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Determination of the threshold for damage to acoustic emission sensors exposed to radiation is important in their application to leak detection in radioactive waste transport and storage. Proper response to system leaks is necessary to ensure the safe operation of these systems. A radiation impaired sensor could provide ``false negative or false positive`` indication of acoustic signals from leaks within the system. Research was carried out in the Radiochemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the beta/gamma radiation damage threshold for acoustic emission sensor systems. The individual system consisted of an acoustic sensor mounted with a two part epoxy onto a stainless steel waveguide. The systems were placed in an irradiation fixture and exposed to a Cobalt-60 source. After each irradiation, the sensors were recalibrated by Physical Acoustics Corporation. The results were compared to the initial calibrations performed prior to irradiation and a control group, not exposed to radiation, was used to validate the results. This experiment determines the radiation damage threshold of each acoustic sensor system and verifies its life expectancy, usefulness and reliability for many applications in radioactive environments.

  13. A threshold theory of the humor response.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Robert; Joker, Veronica R

    2007-01-01

    The humor response has long been considered mysterious, and it is given relatively little attention in modern experimental psychology, in spite of the fact that numerous studies suggest that it has substantial benefits for mood and health. Existing theories of humor fail to account for some of the most basic humor phenomena. On most occasions when a humor response occurs, certain verbal or visual stimuli (the "setup" stimuli, which function as an establishing operation) must precede a critical stimulus (such as a "punch line" or the final panel or critical feature of a cartoon), which then occasions a sudden "revelation" or "understanding"; this revelation is often accompanied by the humor response. We suggest that the setup stimuli increase the strength of the revelatory response to a point just below the threshold of awareness and that the critical stimulus, properly designed and timed, edges the revelatory response to a point just above threshold. We also suggest that it is this threshold phenomenon that produces most instances of the humor response. We discuss these issues in the context of some notable humor of Carl Rogers and B. F. Skinner. PMID:22478488

  14. Auricular Acupressure Can Modulate Pain Threshold.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Antonietta; Nori, Stefania Lucia; Lorusso, Letizia; Secondulfo, Carmine; Monda, Marcellino; Viggiano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate if auriculotherapy (AT) can modulate pain threshold. In our experiments, AT consisted of placing Vaccaria seeds over the "fingers point" of one ear. Two groups of healthy volunteers were enrolled for the study. Each subject was asked to perform an autoalgometric test developed by our group on three occasions: before, 1 hour after, AT and 24 hours after AT. Participants of the first group received a 2-minute long session of AT, while participants of the second group received a 2-minute long session of sham treatment, consisting of a puncture/massage above the skin of the neck. The autoalgometric test consisted of applying an increasing pressure with the finger-tips and finger-backs of four fingers by the subjects themselves (i.e., eight sites were evaluated) against a round-shaped needle for two times: until a minimum pain sensation (first time, minimal test) or a maximally tolerable pain sensation (second time, maximal test). Our results showed a significant higher pain threshold in the maximal test at 24 hours after AT compared to sham treatment. This result indicates for the first time that AT can increase pain tolerability, rather than affecting the minimal pain threshold. PMID:26236378

  15. Auricular Acupressure Can Modulate Pain Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Antonietta; Nori, Stefania Lucia; Lorusso, Letizia; Secondulfo, Carmine; Monda, Marcellino; Viggiano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate if auriculotherapy (AT) can modulate pain threshold. In our experiments, AT consisted of placing Vaccaria seeds over the “fingers point” of one ear. Two groups of healthy volunteers were enrolled for the study. Each subject was asked to perform an autoalgometric test developed by our group on three occasions: before, 1 hour after, AT and 24 hours after AT. Participants of the first group received a 2-minute long session of AT, while participants of the second group received a 2-minute long session of sham treatment, consisting of a puncture/massage above the skin of the neck. The autoalgometric test consisted of applying an increasing pressure with the finger-tips and finger-backs of four fingers by the subjects themselves (i.e., eight sites were evaluated) against a round-shaped needle for two times: until a minimum pain sensation (first time, minimal test) or a maximally tolerable pain sensation (second time, maximal test). Our results showed a significant higher pain threshold in the maximal test at 24 hours after AT compared to sham treatment. This result indicates for the first time that AT can increase pain tolerability, rather than affecting the minimal pain threshold. PMID:26236378

  16. Automatic Classification of Kepler Threshold Crossing Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauliff, Sean; Catanzarite, Joseph; Jenkins, Jon Michael

    2014-06-01

    Over the course of its 4-year primary mission the Kepler mission has discovered numerous planets. Part of the process of planet discovery has involved generating threshold crossing events (TCEs); a light curve with a repeating exoplanet transit-like feature. The large number of diagnostics 100) makes it difficult to examine all the information available for each TCE. The effort required for vetting all threshold-crossing events (TCEs) takes several months by many individuals associated with the Kepler Threshold Crossing Event Review Team (TCERT). The total number of objects with transit-like features identified in the light curves has increased to as many as 18,000, just examining the first three years of data. In order to accelerate the process by which new planet candidates are classified, we propose a machine learning approach to establish a preliminary list of planetary candidates ranked from most credible to least credible. The classifier must distinguish between three classes of detections: non-transiting phenomena, astrophysical false positives, and planet candidates. We use random forests, a supervised classification algorithm to this end. We report on the performance of the classifier and identify diagnostics that are important for discriminating between these classes of TCEs.Funding for this mission is provided by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate.

  17. Are there threshold numbers for protected forests?

    PubMed

    Bücking, Winfried

    2003-01-01

    Maintenance of forests biodiversity is intimately related on the one hand to the species and community-related ecological needs of flora and fauna living in the forest and on the other hand the disturbance regimes of the specific forest type. Populations of plants and animals need minimum biotopes for their ontogeny; for assuring their survival they depend on a minimum of connected suitable areas. Specific traits of forest types are based upon different disturbance regimes, ranging from small-scale internal processes (e.g. regeneration, growth, senescence, mortality, gap dynamics) generating normal forest cycles (i.e. regular sequences, e.g. regeneration, optimum, decay phases) to potentially chaotic and large-scale, frequently external, disturbances, e.g. fire, landslides, or beetle attacks. Forest protection may meet the needs of these very different demands by varied protected area networks going from small (>100 ha), medium (1000 ha) to large-scale reserves (National Parks, several thousands of ha). According to this triple protection concept not only graduated threshold numbers, but also threshold sizes and threshold areas for forest protection must be defined. To realize this concept the regional and local conditions (forest area, forest cover percentage, forest composition, socio-economic targets) must always be taken in consideration. PMID:12659802

  18. A Threshold Theory of the Humor Response

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Robert; Joker, Veronica R

    2007-01-01

    The humor response has long been considered mysterious, and it is given relatively little attention in modern experimental psychology, in spite of the fact that numerous studies suggest that it has substantial benefits for mood and health. Existing theories of humor fail to account for some of the most basic humor phenomena. On most occasions when a humor response occurs, certain verbal or visual stimuli (the “setup” stimuli, which function as an establishing operation) must precede a critical stimulus (such as a “punch line” or the final panel or critical feature of a cartoon), which then occasions a sudden “revelation” or “understanding”; this revelation is often accompanied by the humor response. We suggest that the setup stimuli increase the strength of the revelatory response to a point just below the threshold of awareness and that the critical stimulus, properly designed and timed, edges the revelatory response to a point just above threshold. We also suggest that it is this threshold phenomenon that produces most instances of the humor response. We discuss these issues in the context of some notable humor of Carl Rogers and B. F. Skinner. PMID:22478488

  19. INFLUENCE OF MASS ON DISPLACEMENT THRESHOLD

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, A.; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-12-30

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the effect of mass on displacement threshold energy in Cr, Mo, Fe and W. For each interatomic potential, the mass of the atoms is varied among those metals for a total of 16 combinations. The average threshold energy over all crystal directions is calculated within the irreducible crystal directions using appropriate weighting factors. The weighting factors account for the different number of equivalent directions among the grid points and the different solid angle coverage of each grid point. The grid points are constructed with a Miller index increment of 1/24 for a total of 325 points. For each direction, 10 simulations each with a different primary-knock-on atom are performed. The results show that for each interatomic potential, the average threshold energy is insensitive to the mass; i.e., the values are the same within the standard error. In the future, the effect of mass on high-energy cascades for a given interatomic potential will be investigated.

  20. Threshold photodetachment spectroscopy of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kitsopoulos, T.N.

    1991-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with the development and application of high resolution threshold photodetachment spectroscopy of negative ions. Chapter I deals with the principles of our photodetachment technique, and in chapter II a detailed description of the apparatus is presented. The threshold photodetachment spectra of I{sup {minus}}, and SH{sup {minus}}, presented in the last sections of chapter II, indicated that a resolution of 3 cm{sup {minus}1} can be achieved using our technique. In chapter III the threshold photodetachment spectroscopy study of the transition state region of I + HI and I + Di reactions is discussed. Our technique probes the transition state region directly, and the results of our study are the first unambiguous observations of reactive resonances in a chemical reaction. Chapters IV, V and VI are concerned with the spectroscopy of small silicon and carbon clusters. From our spectra we were able to assign electronic state energies and vibrational frequencies for the low lying electronics states of Si{sub n} (n=2,3,4), C{sub 5} and their corresponding anions.

  1. Designing and Teaching Business & Society Courses from a Threshold Concept Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidal, Natalia; Smith, Renae; Spetic, Wellington

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the redesign of an undergraduate course in Business & Society using a threshold concept approach. Business & Society courses may be troublesome for students because they depart from the premise that business is limited to creating value for shareholders. We argue that Business & Society courses contain a web of…

  2. Search for sub-threshold photoproduction of J/{psi} mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Bosted, P.; Chudakov, E.; Ent, R.; Gaskell, D.; Meekins, D. G.; Roche, J.; Wood, S. A.; Dunne, J.; Junnarkar, P.; Dutta, D.; Lee, C. A.; Dalton, M. M.; Strikman, M.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Navasardyan, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Christy, M. E.; Keppel, C. E.

    2009-01-15

    A search was made for sub-threshold J/{psi} production from a carbon target by using a mixed real and quasireal Bremsstrahlung photon beam with an endpoint energy of 5.76 GeV. No events were observed, which is consistent with predictions under the assumption of quasifree production. The results place limits on exotic mechanisms that strongly enhance quasifree production.

  3. Search for sub-threshold photoproduction of j/{Psi} mesons.

    SciTech Connect

    Bosted, P.; Dunne, J.; Lee, C. A.; Junnarkar, P.; Arrington, J.; Physics; Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Lab.; Mississippi State Univ.; Univ. of Witwatersrand

    2009-01-01

    A search was made for sub-threshold J/{psi} production from a carbon target by using a mixed real and quasireal Bremsstrahlung photon beam with an endpoint energy of 5.76 GeV. No events were observed, which is consistent with predictions under the assumption of quasifree production. The results place limits on exotic mechanisms that strongly enhance quasifree production.

  4. Evaluation of different methods for determining growing degree-day thresholds in apricot cultivars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruml, Mirjana; Vuković, Ana; Milatović, Dragan

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine different methods for determining growing degree-day (GDD) threshold temperatures for two phenological stages (full bloom and harvest) and select the optimal thresholds for a greater number of apricot ( Prunus armeniaca L.) cultivars grown in the Belgrade region. A 10-year data series were used to conduct the study. Several commonly used methods to determine the threshold temperatures from field observation were evaluated: (1) the least standard deviation in GDD; (2) the least standard deviation in days; (3) the least coefficient of variation in GDD; (4) regression coefficient; (5) the least standard deviation in days with a mean temperature above the threshold; (6) the least coefficient of variation in days with a mean temperature above the threshold; and (7) the smallest root mean square error between the observed and predicted number of days. In addition, two methods for calculating daily GDD, and two methods for calculating daily mean air temperatures were tested to emphasize the differences that can arise by different interpretations of basic GDD equation. The best agreement with observations was attained by method (7). The lower threshold temperature obtained by this method differed among cultivars from -5.6 to -1.7°C for full bloom, and from -0.5 to 6.6°C for harvest. However, the “Null” method (lower threshold set to 0°C) and “Fixed Value” method (lower threshold set to -2°C for full bloom and to 3°C for harvest) gave very good results. The limitations of the widely used method (1) and methods (5) and (6), which generally performed worst, are discussed in the paper.

  5. On Limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzmann, Gerard J.

    2008-01-01

    In the last 3 decades or so, the size of systems we have been able to verify formally with automated tools has increased dramatically. At each point in this development, we encountered a different set of limits -- many of which we were eventually able to overcome. Today, we may have reached some limits that may be much harder to conquer. The problem I will discuss is the following: given a hypothetical machine with infinite memory that is seamlessly shared among infinitely many CPUs (or CPU cores), what is the largest problem size that we could solve?

  6. Threshold effects in assembling a cell on a young planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    2011-10-01

    Molecules in the young Earth's oceans underwent a finite number C of collisions during the time interval which elapsed between Earth's formation and the emergence of life. The finiteness of C sets an upper limit G on the number of constituent molecules which could have been randomly assembled into a genetic molecule from a reservoir of the relevant constituent molecules for use in the first cell. A viable cell requires a certain minimum number of genes in order to be functional: this means that the genetic material must include a minimum number M of the constituent molecules which encode for information. The question we address here is: is it mathematically possible for G to take on values which are at least as large as M? The answer is Yes, provided that we allow for the fact that there is a large amount of flexibility ("non-specificity") in the operation of biological molecules. When this flexibility is allowed for, we find that G can be comparable to M provided that the mass of constituent molecules which were available in the pre-biotic Earth exceeded a certain threshold. Our estimates indicate that a mass on the order of a few tons would satisfy the threshold.

  7. Impedance and instability threshold estimates in the main injector I

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, M.A.; Ng, K.Y.

    1994-03-01

    One of the important considerations in the design of the Main Injector is the beam coupling impedances in the vacuum chamber and the stability of the beam. Along with the higher intensities comes the possibility of instabilities which lead to growth in beam emittances and/or the loss of beam. This paper makes estimations of the various impedances and instability thresholds based on impedance estimations and measurements. Notably missing from this paper is any analysis of transition crossing and its potential limitations on beam intensity and beam emittance. Future work should consider this issue. The body of the work contains detailed analysis of the various impedance estimations and instability threshold calculations. The calculations are based on the Main Injector beam intensity of 6 x 10{sup 10} protons per bunch, 95% normalized transverse emittances of 20{pi} mm-mrad, and 95% normalized longitudinal emittance of 0.1 eV-s at 8.9 GeV injection energy and 0.25 eV-s at 150 GeV flattop energy. The conclusions section summarizes the results in the paper and is meant to be readable by itself without referring to the rest of the paper. Also in the conclusion section are recommendations for future investigations.

  8. Adaptive threshold harvesting and the suppression of transients.

    PubMed

    Segura, Juan; Hilker, Frank M; Franco, Daniel

    2016-04-21

    Fluctuations in population size are in many cases undesirable, as they can induce outbreaks and extinctions or impede the optimal management of populations. We propose the strategy of adaptive threshold harvesting (ATH) to control fluctuations in population size. In this strategy, the population is harvested whenever population size has grown beyond a certain proportion in comparison to the previous generation. Taking such population increases into account, ATH intervenes also at smaller population sizes than the strategy of threshold harvesting. Moreover, ATH is the harvesting version of adaptive limiter control (ALC) that has recently been shown to stabilize population oscillations in both experiments and theoretical studies. We find that ATH has similar stabilization properties as ALC and thus offers itself as a harvesting alternative for the control of pests, exploitation of biological resources, or when restocking interventions required from ALC are unfeasible. We present numerical simulations of ATH to illustrate its performance in the presence of noise, lattice effect, and Allee effect. In addition, we propose an adjustment to both ATH and ALC that restricts interventions when control seems unnecessary, i.e. when population size is too small or too large, respectively. This adjustment cancels prolonged transients. PMID:26854876

  9. Fault-tolerant adaptive FIR filters using variable detection threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L. K.; Redinbo, G. R.

    1994-10-01

    Adaptive filters are widely used in many digital signal processing applications, where tap weight of the filters are adjusted by stochastic gradient search methods. Block adaptive filtering techniques, such as block least mean square and block conjugate gradient algorithm, were developed to speed up the convergence as well as improve the tracking capability which are two important factors in designing real-time adaptive filter systems. Even though algorithm-based fault tolerance can be used as a low-cost high level fault-tolerant technique to protect the aforementioned systems from hardware failures with minimal hardware overhead, the issue of choosing a good detection threshold remains a challenging problem. First of all, the systems usually only have limited computational resources, i.e., concurrent error detection and correction is not feasible. Secondly, any prior knowledge of input data is very difficult to get in practical settings. We propose a checksum-based fault detection scheme using two-level variable detection thresholds that is dynamically dependent on the past syndromes. Simulations show that the proposed scheme reduces the possibility of false alarms and has a high degree of fault coverage in adaptive filter systems.

  10. Thermal thresholds of the predatory mite Balaustium hernandezi

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, Megan R; Bale, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    The lower and upper thermal activity thresholds of adult and larval Balaustium hernandezi von Heyden (Acari: Erythraeidae) are compared with those of its prey Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae). Adult female B. hernandezi retain ambulatory function (CTmin) and movement of appendages (chill coma) at significantly lower temperatures (5.9 and −2.1 °C, respectively) than those of larval B. hernandezi (8.1 and −1.7 °C) and T. urticae (10.6 and 10.3 °C). There is no significant difference between the temperature at which adult and larval B. hernandezi and T. urticae cease walking as the temperature is raised (CTmax) (46.7, 46.3 and 47.3 °C, respectively). However, both life stages of B. hernandezi cease movement (heat coma) below the upper locomotory limits of T. urticae (46.8, 46.7 and 48.7 °C, respectively). Adult B. hernandezi have significantly faster walking speeds than larvae and T. urticae across a range of temperatures. The lower thermal activity threshold data indicate that B. hernandezi would make an effective biological control agent in temperate climates; however, the extent of the low temperature tolerances of the species suggests the potential to establish in a northern European climate. PMID:26279601

  11. Distortion of power law blinking with binning and thresholding

    SciTech Connect

    Amecke, Nicole; Heber, André; Cichos, Frank

    2014-03-21

    Fluorescence intermittency is a random switching between emitting (on) and non-emitting (off) periods found for many single chromophores such as semiconductor quantum dots and organic molecules. The statistics of the duration of on- and off-periods are commonly determined by thresholding the emission time trace of a single chromophore and appear to be power law distributed. Here we test with the help of simulations if the experimentally determined power law distributions can actually reflect the underlying statistics. We find that with the experimentally limited time resolution real power law statistics with exponents α{sub on/off} ≳ 1.6, especially if α{sub on} ≠ α{sub off} would not be observed as such in the experimental data after binning and thresholding. Instead, a power law appearance could simply be obtained from the continuous distribution of intermediate intensity levels. This challenges much of the obtained data and the models describing the so-called power law blinking.

  12. Multiple seeds sensitivity using a single seed with threshold.

    PubMed

    Egidi, Lavinia; Manzini, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    Spaced seeds are a fundamental tool for similarity search in biosequences. The best sensitivity/selectivity trade-offs are obtained using many seeds simultaneously: This is known as the multiple seed approach. Unfortunately, spaced seeds use a large amount of memory and the available RAM is a practical limit to the number of seeds one can use simultaneously. Inspired by some recent results on lossless seeds, we revisit the approach of using a single spaced seed and considering two regions homologous if the seed hits in at least t sufficiently close positions. We show that by choosing the locations of the don't care symbols in the seed using quadratic residues modulo a prime number, we derive single seeds that when used with a threshold t > 1 have competitive sensitivity/selectivity trade-offs, indeed close to the best multiple seeds known in the literature. In addition, the choice of the threshold t can be adjusted to modify sensitivity and selectivity a posteriori, thus enabling a more accurate search in the specific instance at issue. The seeds we propose also exhibit robustness and allow flexibility in usage. PMID:25747382

  13. Pressure Systems Stored-Energy Threshold Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, Samuel S.

    2009-08-25

    Federal Regulation 10 CFR 851, which became effective February 2007, brought to light potential weaknesses regarding the Pressure Safety Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The definition of a pressure system in 10 CFR 851 does not contain a limit based upon pressure or any other criteria. Therefore, the need for a method to determine an appropriate risk-based hazard level for pressure safety was identified. The Laboratory has historically used a stored energy of 1000 lbf-ft to define a pressure hazard; however, an analytical basis for this value had not been documented. This document establishes the technical basis by evaluating the use of stored energy as an appropriate criterion to establish a pressure hazard, exploring a suitable risk threshold for pressure hazards, and reviewing the methods used to determine stored energy. The literature review and technical analysis concludes the use of stored energy as a method for determining a potential risk, the 1000 lbf-ft threshold, and the methods used by PNNL to calculate stored energy are all appropriate. Recommendations for further program improvements are also discussed

  14. Distribution Characteristics of Normal Pure-Tone Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Robert H.; Wilson, Richard H.; Popelka, Gerald R.; Eikelboom, Robert H.; Swanepoel, De Wet; Saly, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined the statistical properties of normal air-conduction thresholds obtained with automated and manual audiometry to test the hypothesis that thresholds are normally distributed and to examine the distributions for evidence of bias in manual testing. Design Four databases were mined for normal thresholds. One contained audiograms obtained with an automated method. The other three were obtained with manual audiometry. Frequency distributions were examined for four test frequencies (250, 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz). Study Sample The analysis is based on 317,569 threshold determinations of 80,547 subjects from four clinical databases. Results Frequency distributions of thresholds obtained with automated audiometry are normal in form. Corrected for age, the mean thresholds are within 1.5 dB of Reference Equivalent Threshold Sound Pressure Levels. Frequency distributions of thresholds obtained by manual audiometry are shifted toward higher thresholds. Two of the three datasets obtained by manual audiometry are positively skewed. Conclusions The positive shift and skew of the manual audiometry data may result from tester bias. The striking scarcity of thresholds below 0 dB HL suggests that audiologists place less importance on identifying low thresholds than they do for higher-level thresholds. We refer to this as the Good Enough Bias and suggest that it may be responsible for differences in distributions of thresholds obtained by automated and manual audiometry. PMID:25938502

  15. Critical dynamics of randomly assembled and diluted threshold networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürten, Karl E.; Clark, John W.

    2008-04-01

    The dynamical behavior of a class of randomly assembled networks of binary threshold units subject to random deletion of connections is studied based on the annealed approximation suitable in the thermodynamic limit. The dynamical phase diagram is constructed for several forms of the probability density distribution of nonvanishing connection strengths. The family of power-law distribution functions ρ0(x)=(1-α)/(2|x|α) is found to play a special role in expanding the domain of stable, ordered dynamics at the expense of the disordered, “chaotic” phase. Relationships with other recent studies of the dynamics of complex networks allowing for variable in-degree of the units are explored. The relevance of the pruning of network connections to neural modeling and developmental neurobiology is discussed.

  16. Replacing effective spectral radiance by temperature in occupational exposure limits to protect against retinal thermal injury from light and near IR radiation.

    PubMed

    Madjidi, Faramarz; Behroozy, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to visible light and near infrared (NIR) radiation in the wavelength region of 380 to 1400 nm may cause thermal retinal injury. In this analysis, the effective spectral radiance of a hot source is replaced by its temperature in the exposure limit values in the region of 380-1400 nm. This article describes the development and implementation of a computer code to predict those temperatures, corresponding to the exposure limits proposed by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). Viewing duration and apparent diameter of the source were inputs for the computer code. At the first stage, an infinite series was created for calculation of spectral radiance by integration with Planck's law. At the second stage for calculation of effective spectral radiance, the initial terms of this infinite series were selected and integration was performed by multiplying these terms by a weighting factor R(λ) in the wavelength region 380-1400 nm. At the third stage, using a computer code, the source temperature that can emit the same effective spectral radiance was found. As a result, based only on measuring the source temperature and accounting for the exposure time and the apparent diameter of the source, it is possible to decide whether the exposure to visible and NIR in any 8-hr workday is permissible. The substitution of source temperature for effective spectral radiance provides a convenient way to evaluate exposure to visible light and NIR. PMID:25175283

  17. Category 3 threshold quantities for hazard categorization of nonreactor facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mandigo, R.L.

    1996-02-13

    This document provides the information necessary to determine Hazard Category 3 threshold quantities for those isotopes of interest not listed in WHC-CM-4-46, Section 4, Table 1.''Threshold Quantities.''

  18. Threshold concepts: implications for the management of natural resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Gross, John

    2014-01-01

    Threshold concepts can have broad relevance in natural resource management. However, the concept of ecological thresholds has not been widely incorporated or adopted in management goals. This largely stems from the uncertainty revolving around threshold levels and the post hoc analyses that have generally been used to identify them. Natural resource managers have a need for new tools and approaches that will help them assess the existence and detection of conditions that demand management actions. Recognition of additional threshold concepts include: utility thresholds (which are based on human values about ecological systems) and decision thresholds (which reflect management objectives and values and include ecological knowledge about a system) as well as ecological thresholds. All of these concepts provide a framework for considering the use of threshold concepts in natural resource decision making.

  19. Family Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert

    1966-01-01

    Dr Robert Smith surveys the history of birth control and sounds a warning for the future of mankind, if the population explosion is allowed to continue unchecked. He stresses the importance of the role of the general practitioner in the limitation of births. Sir Theodore Fox describes the work of the Family Planning Association and stresses that, increasingly, this is a specialist service covering all aspects of fertility. He also feels that the general practitioner has a role in family planning. PMID:5954261

  20. Experimental Determination of Damage Threshold Characteristics of IR Compatible Optical Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Ken

    2011-05-20

    The accelerating gradient in a laser-driven dielectric accelerating structure is often limited by the laser damage threshold of the structure. For a given laser-driven dielectric accelerator design, we can maximize the accelerating gradient by choosing the best combination of the accelerator's constituent material and operating wavelength. We present here a model of the damage mechanism from ultrafast infrared pulses and compare that model with experimental measurements of the damage threshold of bulk silicon. Additionally, we present experimental measurements of a variety of candidate materials, thin films, and nanofabricated accelerating structures.

  1. Factors Affecting Perceptual Thresholds in Epiretinal Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    de Balthasar, Chloé; Patel, Sweta; Roy, Arup; Freda, Ricardo; Greenwald, Scott; Horsager, Alan; Mahadevappa, Manjunatha; Yanai, Douglas; McMahon, Matthew J.; Humayun, Mark S.; Greenberg, Robert J.; Weiland, James D.; Fine, Ione

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The goal was to evaluate how perceptual thresholds are related to electrode impedance, electrode size, the distance of electrodes from the retinal surface, and retinal thickness in six subjects blind as a result of retinitis pigmentosa, who received epiretinal prostheses implanted monocularly as part of a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved clinical trial. Methods The implant consisted of an extraocular unit containing electronics for wireless data, power recovery, and generation of stimulus current, and an intraocular unit containing 16 platinum stimulating electrodes (260- or 520-μm diameter) arranged in a 4 × 4 pattern. The electrode array was held onto the retina by a small tack. Stimulation was controlled by a computer-based external system that allowed independent control over each electrode. Perceptual thresholds (the current necessary to see a percept on 79% of trials) and impedance were measured for each electrode on a biweekly basis. The distance of electrodes from the retinal surface and retinal thickness were measured by optical coherence tomography on a less regular basis. Results Stimulation thresholds for detecting phosphenes correlated with the distance of the electrodes from the retinal surface, but not with electrode size, electrode impedance, or retinal thickness. Conclusions Maintaining close proximity between the electrode array and the retinal surface is critical in developing a successful retinal implant. With the development of chronic electrode arrays that are stable and flush on the retinal surface, it is likely that the influence of other factors such as electrode size, retinal degeneration, and subject age will become more apparent. PMID:18515576

  2. Wafer plane inspection with soft resist thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Carl; Shi, Rui-fang; Wihl, Mark; Xiong, Yalin; Pang, Song

    2008-10-01

    Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is an inspection mode on the KLA-Tencor TeraScaTM platform that uses the high signalto- noise ratio images from the high numerical aperture microscope, and then models the entire lithographic process to enable defect detection on the wafer plane[1]. This technology meets the needs of some advanced mask manufacturers to identify the lithographically-significant defects while ignoring the other non-lithographically-significant defects. WPI accomplishes this goal by performing defect detection based on a modeled image of how the mask features would actually print in the photoresist. There are several advantages to this approach: (1) the high fidelity of the images provide a sensitivity advantage over competing approaches; (2) the ability to perform defect detection on the wafer plane allows one to only see those defects that have a printing impact on the wafer; (3) the use of modeling on the lithographic portion of the flow enables unprecedented flexibility to support arbitrary illumination profiles, process-window inspection in unit time, and combination modes to find both printing and non-printing defects. WPI is proving to be a valuable addition to the KLA-Tencor detection algorithm suite. The modeling portion of WPI uses a single resist threshold as the final step in the processing. This has been shown to be adequate on several advanced customer layers, but is not ideal for all layers. Actual resist chemistry has complicated processes including acid and base-diffusion and quench that are not consistently well-modeled with a single resist threshold. We have considered the use of an advanced resist model for WPI, but rejected it because the burdensome requirements for the calibration of the model were not practical for reticle inspection. This paper describes an alternative approach that allows for a "soft" resist threshold to be applied that provides a more robust solution for the most challenging processes. This approach is just

  3. Nuclear Threshold States: Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    Ogloblin, A. A.; Danilov, A. N.; Demyanova, A. S.; Belyaeva, T. L.; Goncharov, S. A.

    2010-04-30

    50 years ago exotic nuclear states with abnormally large radii located close to the thresholds of emission of nucleons or clusters were predicted. Recently a hypothesis of possible existence of alpha-particle Bose condensation was proposed. The 0{sup +}{sub 2}(7.65 MeV) state of {sup 12}C(so-called Hoyle state) is considered to be the prototype of such condensed state and have a dilute structure. We propose two methods for searching the alpha-condensate signatures in the Hoyle state and some other ones near the alpha-thresholds by using inelastic diffractive and rainbow scattering. Inelastic scattering of {sup 2}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, {sup 6}Li, and {sup 12}C on {sup 12}C was studied and the enhancement of the {sup 12}C radius in the Hoyle state relatively the ground state radius by a factor of 1.2 was demonstrated. Another signature of the condensate structure, 70% probability of all three alpha-particles to be in the s-state, was observed for the Hoyle state by studying the {sup 8}Be transfer reaction. The analogs of the Hoyle state with enhanced radii were identified in {sup 11}B and {sup 13}C. The proposed methods of measuring the nuclear radii allowed observation of neutron halos in the excited states of {sup 9}Be and {sup 13}C. The conception of abnormal dimensions of the threshold states finds its confirmation in many nuclear phenomena both well-known and new ones. One of the perspective domains of its manifestation are the nuclei heavier than {sup 100}Sn with N = Z, which are able to emit several alpha particles.

  4. Navigating the Nucleotide Excision Repair Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liren; Lee, Jennifer; Zhou, Pengbo

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the primary DNA repair pathway that removes helix-distorting DNA strand damage induced by ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation or chemical carcinogens to ensure genome integrity. While the core NER proteins that carry out damage recognition, excision and repair reactions have been identified and extensively characterized, and the NER pathway has been reconstituted in vitro, the regulatory pathways that govern the threshold levels of NER have not been fully elucidated. This mini-review focuses on recently discovered transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms that specify the capacity of NER, and suggests the potential implications of modulating NER activity in cancer prevention and therapeutic intervention. PMID:20458729

  5. Percolation threshold on planar Euclidean Gabriel graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrenbrock, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In the present article, numerical simulations have been performed to find the bond and site percolation thresholds on two-dimensional Gabriel graphs (GG) for Poisson point processes. GGs belong to the family of "proximity graphs" and are discussed, e.g., in context of the construction of backbones for wireless ad-hoc networks. Finite-size scaling analyses have been performed to find the critical points and critical exponents ν, β and γ. The critical exponents obtained this way verify that the associated universality class is that of standard 2D percolation.

  6. Above-threshold ionization of negative hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolopoulos, L. A. A.; Lambropoulos, P.

    1997-10-01

    We present detailed calculations for two-and three-photon above-threshold ionization of the negative hydrogen ion. In addition to calculated values for partial wave amplitudes and phase shifts pertaining to recent experimental results [Xin Miao Zhao et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 1656 (1997)], we also address the question of the asymmetry of photoelectron angular distributions in ionization under elliptically polarized radiation, which has been studied experimentally in other negative ions [C. Blondel and C. Delsart, Laser Phys. 3, 3 (1993); Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 79, 156 (1993); F. Dulieu, C. Blondel, and C. Delsart, J. Phys. B 28, 3861 (1995)].

  7. Percolation threshold on planar Euclidean Gabriel graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrenbrock, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    In the present article, numerical simulations have been performed to find the bond and site percolation thresholds on two-dimensional Gabriel graphs (GG) for Poisson point processes. GGs belong to the family of "proximity graphs" and are discussed, e.g., in context of the construction of backbones for wireless ad-hoc networks. Finite-size scaling analyses have been performed to find the critical points and critical exponents ν, β and γ. The critical exponents obtained this way verify that the associated universality class is that of standard 2D percolation.

  8. From migraine to epilepsy: a threshold mechanism?

    PubMed

    Dainese, Filippo; Mainardi, Federico; Zanchin, Giorgio; Paladin, Francesco

    2012-08-01

    A 67-year-old man complained of a transient blurring of vision in his right visual field lasting 30 min followed by headache. Two weeks later, the visual disturbance changed its pattern; it was described as the occurrence of brown round-shaped images in the right visual field spinning and turning for few seconds. This evolution from visual aura to visual seizures, with video-EEG correlation, supports the hypothesis of modification in threshold of cortical hyperexcitability from migraine to epilepsy. PMID:22080383

  9. Technology Thresholds for Microgravity: Status and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    The technological and economic thresholds for microgravity space research are estimated in materials science and biotechnology. In the 1990s, the improvement of materials processing has been identified as a national scientific priority, particularly for stimulating entrepreneurship. The substantial US investment at stake in these critical technologies includes six broad categories: aerospace, transportation, health care, information, energy, and the environment. Microgravity space research addresses key technologies in each area. The viability of selected space-related industries is critically evaluated and a market share philosophy is developed, namely that incremental improvements in a large markets efficiency is a tangible reward from space-based research.

  10. Local thresholding de-noise speech signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haitao

    2013-07-01

    De-noise speech signal if it is noisy. Construct a wavelet according to Daubechies' method, and derive a wavelet packet from the constructed scaling and wavelet functions. Decompose the noisy speech signal by wavelet packet. Develop algorithms to detect beginning and ending point of speech. Construct polynomial function for local thresholding. Apply different strategies to de-noise and compress the decomposed terminal nodes coefficients. Reconstruct the wavelet packet tree. Re-build audio file using reconstructed data and compare the effectiveness of different strategies.

  11. Learning regulatory programs by threshold SVD regression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Xiao, Luo; Wong, Wing Hung

    2014-01-01

    We formulate a statistical model for the regulation of global gene expression by multiple regulatory programs and propose a thresholding singular value decomposition (T-SVD) regression method for learning such a model from data. Extensive simulations demonstrate that this method offers improved computational speed and higher sensitivity and specificity over competing approaches. The method is used to analyze microRNA (miRNA) and long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium. The analysis yields previously unidentified insights into the combinatorial regulation of gene expression by noncoding RNAs, as well as findings that are supported by evidence from the literature. PMID:25331876

  12. Jost function description of near threshold resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simbotin, I.; Shu, D.; Côté, R.

    2015-05-01

    The low energy behavior of cross sections for any scattering problem can be drastically affected by the presence of a resonance near the threshold. In this work, we show that any such strong dependence on energy can be accounted for in terms of the much simpler behavior of the Jost function. Although this is an old idea, see, and despite its advantages, it has not been employed widely. However, this method provides not only a theoretical tool for scattering problems in general, but also a convenient numerical approach in practice. Partially supported by AFOSR (IS), NSF (DS), and ARO (RC).

  13. Threshold Capability Development in Intensive Mode Business Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crispin, Stuart; Hancock, Phil; Male, Sally Amanda; Baillie, Caroline; MacNish, Cara; Leggoe, Jeremy; Ranmuthugala, Dev; Alam, Firoz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore: student perceptions of threshold concepts and capabilities in postgraduate business education, and the potential impacts of intensive modes of teaching on student understanding of threshold concepts and development of threshold capabilities. Design/Methodology/Approach: The student experience of…

  14. THE THRESHOLD OF GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY TO MAREK'S DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The threshold of genetic susceptibility to Marek’s disease (MD) varies between lines of chickens due to genomic differences between the lines. For instance, one inbred line, 63, has a high threshold of susceptibility to MD, whereas another inbred line, 72, has a low threshold; both of the lines were...

  15. User Settings of Cue Thresholds for Binary Categorization Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botzer, Assaf; Meyer, Joachim; Bak, Peter; Parmet, Yisrael

    2010-01-01

    The output of binary cuing systems, such as alerts or alarms, depends on the threshold setting--a parameter that is often user-adjustable. However, it is unknown if users are able to adequately adjust thresholds and what information may help them to do so. Two experiments tested threshold settings for a binary classification task based on binary…

  16. Static and Transient Cavitation Threshold Measurements for Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Moraga, F.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    Transient and static cavitation thresholds for mercury as a function of the cover gas (helium or air), and pressure are reported. Both static and transient cavitation onset pressure thresholds increase linearly with cover gas pressure. Additionally, the cavitation thresholds as a function of dissolved gases were also measured and are reported.

  17. Threshold analysis of pulsed lasers with application to a room-temperature Co:MgF2 laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, James; Welford, David; Moulton, Peter F.

    1989-01-01

    Rate-equation calculations are used to model accurately the near-threshold behavior of a Co:MgF2 laser operating at room temperature. The results demonstrate the limitations of the conventional threshold analysis in cases of practical interest. This conclusion is applicable to pulsed solid-state lasers in general. The calculations, together with experimental data, are used to determine emission cross sections for the Co:MgF2 laser.

  18. Flash Expansion Threshold in Whirligig Swarms

    PubMed Central

    Romey, William L.; Lamb, Alicia R.

    2015-01-01

    In the selfish herd hypothesis, prey animals move toward each other to avoid the likelihood of being selected by a predator. However, many grouped animals move away from each other the moment before a predator attacks. Very little is known about this phenomenon, called flash expansion, such as whether it is triggered by one individual or a threshold and how information is transferred between group members. We performed a controlled experiment with whirligig beetles in which the ratio of sighted to unsighted individuals was systematically varied and emergent flash expansion was measured. Specifically, we examined: the percentage of individuals in a group that startled, the resulting group area, and the longevity of the flash expansion. We found that one or two sighted beetles in a group of 24 was not enough to cause a flash expansion after a predator stimulus, but four sighted beetles usually initiated a flash expansion. Also, the more beetles that were sighted the larger the resulting group area and the longer duration of the flash expansion. We conclude that flash expansion is best described as a threshold event whose adaptive value is to prevent energetically costly false alarms while quickly mobilizing an emergent predator avoidance response. This is one of the first controlled experiments of flash expansion, an important emergent property that has applications to understanding collective motion in swarms, schools, flocks, and human crowds. Also, our study is a convincing demonstration of social contagion, how the actions of one individual can pass through a group. PMID:26301958

  19. Disgust and fear lower olfactory threshold.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kai Qin; Holland, Rob W; van Loon, Ruud; Arts, Roy; van Knippenberg, Ad

    2016-08-01

    Odors provide information regarding the chemical properties of potential environment hazards. Some of this information may be disgust-related (e.g., organic decay), whereas other information may be fear-related (e.g., smoke). Many studies have focused on how disgust and fear, as prototypical avoidant emotions, facilitate the detection of possible threats, but these studies have typically confined to the visual modality. Here, we examine how disgust and fear influence olfactory detection at a particular level-the level at which a subliminal olfactory stimulus crosses into conscious perception, also known as a detection threshold. Here, using psychophysical methods that allow us to test perceptual capabilities directly, we show that one way that disgust (Experiments 1-3) and fear (Experiment 3) facilitate detection is by lowering the amount of physical input that is needed to trigger a conscious experience of that input. This effect is particularly strong among individuals with high disgust sensitivity (Experiments 2-3). Our research suggests that a fundamental way in which avoidant emotions foster threat detection is through lowering perceptual thresholds. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27064291

  20. Updated LPI Thresholds for the Nike Laser*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J. L.; Oh, J.; Afeyan, B.; Phillips, L.; Seely, J.; Kehne, D.; Brown, C.; Obenschain, S. P.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Feldman, U.; Holland, G.; Manka, C.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E.

    2009-11-01

    Advanced implosion designs for direct drive inertial confinement fusion use high laser intensities (10^15-10^16 W/cm^2) to achieve gain (g>100) with a reduction in total laser energy (E<1 MJ). Krypton-fluoride lasers such as the Nike laser at NRL are an attractive choice due to their combination of short wavelength (248 nm), large bandwidth (1-2 THz), and beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence but the potential threat from laser-plasma instabilities (LPI) needs to be assessed. The 2008 LPI campaign at Nike yielded threshold intensities above 10^15 W/cm^2 for the two-plasmon instability, a value higher than reported for 351 nm glass lasers. The experiments used a planar geometry, solid polystyrene targets, and a subset of beams (E<200 J) with a reduced focal spot (d<125 μm). The 2009 campaign extended the shot parameters to higher laser energies (E<1 kJ) and larger spot sizes (d<300 μm). Spectrally-resolved and time-resolved measurements of x-rays and emission near ^1/2φo and ^3/2φo harmonics of the laser wavelength show threshold intensities consistent with the 2008 results. *Work supported by DoE/NNSA

  1. Superlinear threshold detectors in quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Lydersen, Lars; Maroey, Oystein; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim; Jain, Nitin; Wittmann, Christoffer; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2011-09-15

    We introduce the concept of a superlinear threshold detector, a detector that has a higher probability to detect multiple photons if it receives them simultaneously rather than at separate times. Highly superlinear threshold detectors in quantum key distribution systems allow eavesdropping the full secret key without being revealed. Here, we generalize the detector control attack, and analyze how it performs against quantum key distribution systems with moderately superlinear detectors. We quantify the superlinearity in superconducting single-photon detectors based on earlier published data, and gated avalanche photodiode detectors based on our own measurements. The analysis shows that quantum key distribution systems using detector(s) of either type can be vulnerable to eavesdropping. The avalanche photodiode detector becomes superlinear toward the end of the gate. For systems expecting substantial loss, or for systems not monitoring loss, this would allow eavesdropping using trigger pulses containing less than 120 photons per pulse. Such an attack would be virtually impossible to catch with an optical power meter at the receiver entrance.

  2. Mirror instability near the threshold: Hybrid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, P.; Trávníček, P.; Passot, T.; Sulem, P.; Kuznetsov, E. A.; Califano, F.

    2007-12-01

    Nonlinear behavior of the mirror instability near the threshold is investigated using 1-D hybrid simulations. The simulations demonstrate the presence of an early phase where quasi-linear effects dominate [ Shapiro and Shevchenko, 1964]. The quasi-linear diffusion is however not the main saturation mechanism. A second phase is observed where the mirror mode is linearly stable (the stability is evaluated using the instantaneous ion distribution function) but where the instability nevertheless continues to develop, leading to nonlinear coherent structures in the form of magnetic humps. This regime is well modeled by a nonlinear equation for the magnetic field evolution, derived from a reductive perturbative expansion of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations [ Kuznetsov et al., 2007] with a phenomenological term which represents local variations of the ion Larmor radius. In contrast with previous models where saturation is due to the cooling of a population of trapped particles, the resulting equation correctly reproduces the development of magnetic humps from an initial noise. References Kuznetsov, E., T. Passot and P. L. Sulem (2007), Dynamical model for nonlinear mirror modes near threshold, Phys. Rev. Lett., 98, 235003. Shapiro, V. D., and V. I. Shevchenko (1964), Sov. JETP, 18, 1109.

  3. Threshold modeling of extreme spatial rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibaud, E.; Davison, A.

    2013-12-01

    Complex events such as sustained extreme precipitation have major effects on human populations and environmental sustainability, and there is a growing interest in modeling them realistically. For risk assessment based on spatial quantities such as the total amount of rainfall falling over a region, it is necessary to properly model the dependence among extremes over that region, based on data from perhaps only a few sites within it. We propose an approach to spatial modeling of extreme rainfall, based on max-stable processes fitted using partial duration series and a censored threshold likelihood function. The resulting models are coherent with classical extreme-value theory and allow the consistent treatment of spatial dependence of rainfall using ideas related to those of classical geostatistics. The method can be used to produce simulations needed for hydrological models, and in particular for the generation of spatially heterogeneous extreme rainfall fields over catchments. We illustrate the ideas through data from the Val Ferret watershed in the Swiss Alps, based on daily cumulative rainfall totals recorded at 24 stations for four summers, augmented by a longer series from nearby. References: Davison, A. C., Huser, R., Thibaud, E. (2013). Geostatistics of Dependent and Asymptotically Independent Extremes, Mathematical Geosciences, vol. 45, num. 5, p. 511-529, 2013, doi:10.1007/s11004-013-9469-y Thibaud, E., Mutzner, R., Davison A. C. (2013, to appear). Threshold modeling of extreme spatial rainfall, Water Resources Research, doi:10.1002/wrcr.20329

  4. An Adaptive Threshold in Mammalian Neocortical Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kalinka, Alex T.; Tomancak, Pavel; Huttner, Wieland B.

    2014-01-01

    Expansion of the neocortex is a hallmark of human evolution. However, determining which adaptive mechanisms facilitated its expansion remains an open question. Here we show, using the gyrencephaly index (GI) and other physiological and life-history data for 102 mammalian species, that gyrencephaly is an ancestral mammalian trait. We find that variation in GI does not evolve linearly across species, but that mammals constitute two principal groups above and below a GI threshold value of 1.5, approximately equal to 109 neurons, which may be characterized by distinct constellations of physiological and life-history traits. By integrating data on neurogenic period, neuroepithelial founder pool size, cell-cycle length, progenitor-type abundances, and cortical neuron number into discrete mathematical models, we identify symmetric proliferative divisions of basal progenitors in the subventricular zone of the developing neocortex as evolutionarily necessary for generating a 14-fold increase in daily prenatal neuron production, traversal of the GI threshold, and thus establishment of two principal groups. We conclude that, despite considerable neuroanatomical differences, changes in the length of the neurogenic period alone, rather than any novel neurogenic progenitor lineage, are sufficient to explain differences in neuron number and neocortical size between species within the same principal group. PMID:25405475

  5. Granular motions near the threshold of entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Alexakis, athanasios-Theodosios

    2016-04-01

    Our society is continuously impacted by significant weather events many times resulting in catastrophes that interrupt our normal way of life. In the context of climate change and increasing urbanisation these "extreme" hydrologic events are intensified both in magnitude and frequency, inducing costs of the order of billions of pounds. The vast majority of such costs and impacts (even more to developed societies) are due to water related catastrophes such as the geomorphic action of flowing water (including scouring of critical infrastructure, bed and bank destabilisation) and flooding. New tools and radically novel concepts are in need, to enable our society becoming more resilient. This presentation, emphasises the utility of inertial sensors in gaining new insights on the interaction of flow hydrodynamics with the granular surface at the particle scale and for near threshold flow conditions. In particular, new designs of the "smart-sphere" device are discussed with focus on the purpose specific sets of flume experiments, designed to identify the exact response of the particle resting at the bed surface for various below, near and above threshold flow conditions. New sets of measurements are presented for particle entrainment from a Lagrangian viewpoint. Further to finding direct application in addressing real world challenges in the water sector, it is shown that such novel sensor systems can also help the research community (both experimentalists and computational modellers) gain a better insight on the underlying processes governing granular dynamics.

  6. Depression Storage Thresholds in Prairie Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martz, L. W.

    2012-12-01

    An initial and essential step in hydrologic modeling is to decompose a watershed into its constituent channel and catchment segments and to measure the geometric andenvironmental properties of those segments. TOPAZ (Topographic Parameterization) is a widely used software system that processes digital elevation models todelineate channel and catchment segments and to measure their geometric properties. TOPAZ and similar software are now widely used in meso-scale hydrologic modeling. TOPAZ and similar software assume that surface depressions are errors in the digital elevation data and apply various techniques to fill those depressions and direct flow across the resulting surface. However, it is the case in many low-relief areas of the earth's surface that depressions are real features that function as significant storage reservoirs. These depressions are typically strung together by connecting channels and the filling of depressions represents major thresholds in changing the contributing area of streams. This paper examines some recent advances in digital terrain analysis for hydrologic model parameterization that address the role of depression storage thresholds in producing step-wise and major changes in watershed contributing areas.

  7. On Generating Fatigue Crack Growth Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Newman, James, Jr.; Forman, Royce G.

    2003-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth threshold, defining crack growth as either very slow or nonexistent, has been traditionally determined with standardized load reduction methodologies. These experimental procedures can induce load history effects that result in crack closure. This history can affect the crack driving force, i.e. during the unloading process the crack will close first at some point along the wake or blunt at the crack tip, reducing the effective load at the crack tip. One way to reduce the effects of load history is to propagate a crack under constant amplitude loading. As a crack propagates under constant amplitude loading, the stress intensity factor range, Delta K, will increase, as will the crack growth rate. da/dN. A fatigue crack growth threshold test procedure is experimentally validated that does not produce load history effects and can be conducted at a specified stress ratio, R. The authors have chosen to study a ductile aluminum alloy where the plastic deformations generated during testing may be of the magnitude to impact the crack opening.

  8. A threshold model of investor psychology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod; Grinfeld, Michael; Lamba, Harbir; Seaman, Tim

    2005-08-01

    We introduce a class of agent-based market models founded upon simple descriptions of investor psychology. Agents are subject to various psychological tensions induced by market conditions and endowed with a minimal ‘personality’. This personality consists of a threshold level for each of the tensions being modeled, and the agent reacts whenever a tension threshold is reached. This paper considers an elementary model including just two such tensions. The first is ‘cowardice’, which is the stress caused by remaining in a minority position with respect to overall market sentiment and leads to herding-type behavior. The second is ‘inaction’, which is the increasing desire to act or re-evaluate one's investment position. There is no inductive learning by agents and they are only coupled via the global market price and overall market sentiment. Even incorporating just these two psychological tensions, important stylized facts of real market data, including fat-tails, excess kurtosis, uncorrelated price returns and clustered volatility over the timescale of a few days are reproduced. By then introducing an additional parameter that amplifies the effect of externally generated market noise during times of extreme market sentiment, long-time volatility correlations can also be recovered.

  9. Neural Field Models with Threshold Noise.

    PubMed

    Thul, Rüdiger; Coombes, Stephen; Laing, Carlo R

    2016-12-01

    The original neural field model of Wilson and Cowan is often interpreted as the averaged behaviour of a network of switch like neural elements with a distribution of switch thresholds, giving rise to the classic sigmoidal population firing-rate function so prevalent in large scale neuronal modelling. In this paper we explore the effects of such threshold noise without recourse to averaging and show that spatial correlations can have a strong effect on the behaviour of waves and patterns in continuum models. Moreover, for a prescribed spatial covariance function we explore the differences in behaviour that can emerge when the underlying stationary distribution is changed from Gaussian to non-Gaussian. For travelling front solutions, in a system with exponentially decaying spatial interactions, we make use of an interface approach to calculate the instantaneous wave speed analytically as a series expansion in the noise strength. From this we find that, for weak noise, the spatially averaged speed depends only on the choice of covariance function and not on the shape of the stationary distribution. For a system with a Mexican-hat spatial connectivity we further find that noise can induce localised bump solutions, and using an interface stability argument show that there can be multiple stable solution branches. PMID:26936267

  10. Effect of mobile phone radiation on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kouchaki, Ebrahim; Motaghedifard, Morteza; Banafshe, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Scientific interest in potential mobile phone impact on human brain and performance has significantly increased in recent years. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of mobile phone radiation on seizure threshold in mice. Materials and methods: BALB/c male mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, acute, and chronic mobile phone radiation for 30, 60, and 90 min with frequency 900 to 950 MHz and pulse of 217 Hz. The chronic group received 30 days of radiation, while the acute group received only once. The intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole (5 mg/ml) was used to induce seizure signs. Results: Although acute mobile radiation did not change seizure threshold, chronic radiation decreased the clonic and tonic seizure thresholds significantly. Conclusion: Our data suggests that the continued and prolonged contact with the mobile phone radiation might increase the risk of seizure attacks and should be limited.

  11. Decision-relevant early-warning thresholds for ensemble flood forecasting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Liz; Pappenberger, Florian; Cloke, Hannah; Alfieri, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    Over and under warning of potential future floods is problematic for decision-making, and could ultimately lead to trust being lost in the forecasts. The use of ensemble flood forecasting systems for early warning therefore requires a consideration of how to determine and implement decision-relevant thresholds for flood magnitude and probability. This study uses a year's worth of hindcasts from the Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS) to explore the sensitivity of the warning system to the choice of threshold. We use a number of different methods for choosing these thresholds, building on current approaches that use model climatologies to determine the critical flow magnitudes, to those that can provide 'first guesses' of potential impacts (through integration with global-scale inundation mapping), as well as methods that could incorporate resource limitations.

  12. Future temperature in southwest Asia projected to exceed a threshold for human adaptability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Jeremy S.; Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.

    2016-02-01

    A human body may be able to adapt to extremes of dry-bulb temperature (commonly referred to as simply temperature) through perspiration and associated evaporative cooling provided that the wet-bulb temperature (a combined measure of temperature and humidity or degree of `mugginess’) remains below a threshold of 35 °C. (ref. ). This threshold defines a limit of survivability for a fit human under well-ventilated outdoor conditions and is lower for most people. We project using an ensemble of high-resolution regional climate model simulations that extremes of wet-bulb temperature in the region around the Arabian Gulf are likely to approach and exceed this critical threshold under the business-as-usual scenario of future greenhouse gas concentrations. Our results expose a specific regional hotspot where climate change, in the absence of significant mitigation, is likely to severely impact human habitability in the future.

  13. The Development of Audiologic Criteria to Differentiate Between Auditory Thresholds and Cutile Thresholds of Deaf Children. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nober, E. Harris

    Researchers investigated a variety of audiologic procedures to determine whether they could differentiate between auditory thresholds and cutile (cutaneous-tactile) thresholds of 32 deaf adolescents. Ss were classified into one of the following three groups: a cutile group with no pure tone thresholds beyond 750 Hertz (Hz); a group of questionable…

  14. Two-photon ionization thresholds of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization matrix clusters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Q; Knochenmuss, R

    2001-01-01

    Direct two-photon ionization of the matrix has been considered a likely primary ionization mechanism in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. This mechanism requires that the vertical ionization threshold of matrix materials be below twice the laser photon energy. Because dimers and larger aggregates may be numerous in the early stages of the MALDI plume expansion, their ionization thresholds are important as well. We have used two-color two-photon ionization to determine the ionization thresholds of jet cooled clusters of an important matrix, 2,5-dihydroxy benzoic acid (DHB), and mixed clusters with the thermal decomposition product of DHB, hydroquinone. The thresholds of the clusters were reduced by only a few tenths of an eV compared to the monomers, to an apparent limit of 7.82 eV for pure DHB clusters. None of the investigated clusters can be directly ionized by two nitrogen laser photons (7.36 eV), and the ionization efficiency at the thresholds is low. PMID:11507754

  15. Determination of absolute threshold and just noticeable difference in the sensory perception of pungency.

    PubMed

    Orellana-Escobedo, L; Ornelas-Paz, J J; Olivas, G I; Guerrero-Beltran, J A; Jimenez-Castro, J; Sepulveda, D R

    2012-03-01

    Absolute threshold and just noticeable difference (JND) were determined for the perception of pungency using chili pepper in aqueous solutions. Absolute threshold and JND were determined using 2 alternative forced-choice sensory tests tests. High-performance liquid chromatography technique was used to determine capsaicinoids concentration in samples used for sensory analysis. Sensory absolute threshold was 0.050 mg capsaicinoids/kg sample. Five JND values were determined using 5 reference solutions with different capsaicinoids concentration. JND values changed proportionally as capsaicinoids concentration of the reference sample solutions changed. Weber fraction remained stable for the first 4 reference capsaicinoid solutions (0.05, 0.11, 0.13, and 0.17 mg/kg) but changed when the most concentrated reference capsaicinoids solution was used (0.23 mg/kg). Quantification limit for instrumental analysis was 1.512 mg/kg capsaicinoids. Sensory methods employed in this study proved to be more sensitive than instrumental methods. Practical Application: A better understanding of the process involved in the sensory perception of pungency is currently required because "hot" foods are becoming more popular in western cuisine. Absolute thresholds and differential thresholds are useful tools in the formulation and development of new food products. These parameters may help in defining how much chili pepper is required in a formulated product to ensure a perceptible level of pungency, as well as in deciding how much more chili pepper is required in a product to produce a perceptible increase in its pungency. PMID:22384966

  16. Determination of ortho- and retronasal detection thresholds for 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine in wine.

    PubMed

    Pickering, G J; Karthik, A; Inglis, D; Sears, M; Ker, K

    2007-09-01

    2-Isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IPMP) is a grape-derived component of wine flavor in some wine varieties as well as the causal compound of the off-flavor known as ladybug taint (LBT), which occurs when Harmonia axyridis beetles are incorporated with the grapes during juice and wine processing. The main objective of this study was to obtain robust estimates of the orthonasal (ON) and retronasal (RN) detection thresholds (DTs) for IPMP in wines of differing styles. The ASTM E679 ascending forced choice method of limits was used to determine DTs for 47 individuals in 3 different wines--Chardonnay, Gewürztraminer, and a red wine blend of Baco Noir and Marechel Foch. The group best estimate thresholds (BETs) obtained for IPMP (ng/L) were Chardonnay, ON: 0.32; Gewürztraminer, ON: 1.56, RN: 1.15, and red wine blend, ON: 1.03, RN: 2.29. A large variation in individual DTs was observed. Familiarity with LBT was inversely correlated with DTs for Gewürztraminer, and no difference in thresholds was observed between winemakers and nonwinemakers. We conclude that the human DT for IPMP is extremely low and influenced significantly by wine style and evaluation mode. We recommend against the reporting of single-threshold values for wine flavor compounds, and encourage the determination of consumer rejection thresholds for IPMP in wine. PMID:17995659

  17. Optimization of rainfall thresholds for a flood warning system to Taiwan urban areas during storm events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hao-Yu; Pan, Tsung-Yi; Su, Ming-Daw; Hsieh, Ming-Chang; Tan, Yih-Chi

    2016-04-01

    Flood is one of the most damage disaster that always happen around the world. Because of the extreme weather change, the flood disaster damage becomes higher than before. In recent years, Taiwan suffered from flood damage frequently by excessive rainfall induced by extreme weather, like typhoons. Therefore, it is necessary to build an effective flood warning system to reduce the flood damage. The operational flood warning system in Taiwan is based on the rainfall thresholds. When cumulative rainfall over the rainfall thresholds, the flood warning system would alert the local government where region would happen flood disaster. According to the flood warning system alert, the governments have more time to prepare how to face the flood disaster before happens. Although Taiwanese government has a preliminary flood warning system, the system has still lack of theoretical background. For this reason, the alert accuracy of the system is limited. Thus it is important to develop the effective rainfall thresholds that could predict flood disaster successfully. The research aims to improve the accuracy of the system through statistical methods. When the accumulated rainfall reaches the alert value, the warning message would be announced early to government for dealing with flooding damage which would happen. According to extreme events, the data driven and statistical methods are adopted to calculate the optimum rainfall thresholds. The results of this study could be applied to enhance rainfall thresholds forecasting accuracy, and could reduce the risk of floods.

  18. Threshold Capabilities: Threshold Concepts and Knowledge Capability Linked through Variation Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baillie, Caroline; Bowden, John A.; Meyer, Jan H. F.

    2013-01-01

    The Threshold Capability Integrated Theoretical Framework (TCITF) is presented as a framework for the design of university curricula, aimed at developing graduates' capability to deal with previously unseen situations in their professional, social, and personal lives. The TCITF is a new theoretical framework derived from, and heavily dependent…

  19. Complex mixtures in industrial workspaces: lessons for indoor air quality evaluations.

    PubMed Central

    Lippy, B E; Turner, R W

    1991-01-01

    Acceptable occupational exposure levels for hundreds of airborne concentrations of dusts, vapors, fumes, and gases have been set by consensus organizations and regulatory bodies for decades. These levels have established tremendous precedent and are tempting reference values in the relatively new field of indoor air quality evaluations where validated criteria are greatly needed. The American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) has been the most visible and productive group setting these guidelines for industrial exposure. The ACGIH Chemical Substances Committee has published an annual list of threshold limit values (TLVs) for more than 40 years. Currently the list covers more than 400 substances. In 1989, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published updated permissible exposure limits (PELs) for approximately 600 substances. Most PELs before this update were adopted from the 1968 ACGIH list of TLVs and consensus standards of the American Standards Association. This OSHA update has resulted in reductions of 212 PELs and the addition of 164 new levels. The magnitude of the problem of protecting workers can be seen by the small fraction that the OSHA PELs represent of the more than 60,000 entries in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances. None of these levels, whether guidelines or regulatory requirements, are established based on any possible synergistic effect with other chemicals. The only guidance given by the ACGIH for synergistic effects is that such cases must be determined individually. Clearly, there are major drawbacks in using occupational standards and guidelines for evaluating the health effects of chemical agents that can be found in office settings, often in concentrations orders of magnitude less than what is routinely measured in the workplace. These guidelines are even less valuable when the concern is the complex mixing of chemicals in

  20. Instrumenting Beliefs in Threshold Public Goods.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Angela C M; Spraggon, John M; Denny, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the causal impact of beliefs on contributions in Threshold Public Goods (TPGs) is particularly important since the social optimum can be supported as a Nash Equilibrium and best-response contributions are a function of beliefs. Unfortunately, investigations of the impact of beliefs on behavior are plagued with endogeneity concerns. We create a set of instruments by cleanly and exogenously manipulating beliefs without deception. Tests indicate that the instruments are valid and relevant. Perhaps surprisingly, we fail to find evidence that beliefs are endogenous in either the one-shot or repeated-decision settings. TPG allocations are determined by a base contribution and beliefs in a one shot-setting. In the repeated-decision environment, once we instrument for first-round allocations, we find that second-round allocations are driven equally by beliefs and history. Moreover, we find that failing to instrument prior decisions overstates their importance. PMID:26859492

  1. Simulations of threshold displacement in beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Matthew L.; Fossati, Paul C. M.; Grimes, Robin W.

    2016-07-01

    Atomic scale molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage have been performed on beryllium. Direct threshold displacement simulations along a geodesic projection of directions were used to investigate the directional dependence with a high spatial resolution. It was found that the directionally averaged probability of displacement increases from 0 at 35 eV, with the energy at which there is a 50% chance of a displacement occurring is 70 eV and asymptotically approaching 1 for higher energies. This is, however, strongly directionally dependent with a 50% probability of displacement varying from 35 to 120 eV, with low energy directions corresponding to the nearest neighbour directions. A new kinetic energy dependent expression for the average maximum displacement of an atom as a function of energy is derived which closely matches the simulated data.

  2. Thresholds of allergenic proteins in foods

    SciTech Connect

    Hourihane, Jonathan O'B. . E-mail: J.Hourihane@soton.ac.uk; Knulst, Andre C.

    2005-09-01

    Threshold doses or Estimated Eliciting Doses (EEDs) represent an important new field of research in food allergy. Clinicians and regulators have embraced some toxicological concepts such as LOAEL and NOAEL and applied them to an area of significant clinical uncertainty and interest. The impact of intrinsic human factors (e.g., asthma and exercise) and extrinsic event factors (e.g., season, location and especially dose of allergen) on a future allergic reaction in the community needs to be considered carefully when interpreting results of clinical and research low-dose food challenges. The ongoing cooperation of food allergy research groups in medicine, food science and government will surely deliver results of the highest importance to the wider communities of allergology, food science and technology and the increasing number of allergic consumers.

  3. Instrumenting Beliefs in Threshold Public Goods

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the causal impact of beliefs on contributions in Threshold Public Goods (TPGs) is particularly important since the social optimum can be supported as a Nash Equilibrium and best-response contributions are a function of beliefs. Unfortunately, investigations of the impact of beliefs on behavior are plagued with endogeneity concerns. We create a set of instruments by cleanly and exogenously manipulating beliefs without deception. Tests indicate that the instruments are valid and relevant. Perhaps surprisingly, we fail to find evidence that beliefs are endogenous in either the one-shot or repeated-decision settings. TPG allocations are determined by a base contribution and beliefs in a one shot-setting. In the repeated-decision environment, once we instrument for first-round allocations, we find that second-round allocations are driven equally by beliefs and history. Moreover, we find that failing to instrument prior decisions overstates their importance. PMID:26859492

  4. Threshold photodetachment of HOCO-: a theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyabe, S.; Haxton, D. J.; Lawler, K. V.; Lawler, A. E.; McCurdy, C. W.; Rescigno, T. N.

    2011-05-01

    The HOCO radical is an important intermediate in combustion. Information about its electronic structure has been obtained from studies of the photodetachment of HOCO-. We present the results of a theoretical study of HOCO- photodetachment, with a view toward understanding the origin of two peaks observed in the photoelectron kinetic energy spectrum very close to threshold. Fixed-nuclei variational electron-HOCO scattering calculations are used to compute photodetachment cross sections and laboratory-frame photoelectron angular distributions. We show that the observed peaks cannot, as previously assumed, be narrow shape resonances and argue that they can be attributed to vibrational Feshbach resonances of dipole-bound trans-HOCO-. LBNL, UC Davis. Work performed under auspices of US DOE and supported by OBES, Division of Chemical Sciences.

  5. Kaon photoproduction and electroproduction near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Mart, T.

    2011-10-21

    We analyze the electromagnetic production of K{sup +}{Lambda} and K{sup 0}{Lambda} near their production thresholds by using isobar models. In the K{sup +}{Lambda} channel we show that the model can nicely describe the available experimental data. In the K{sup 0}{Lambda} channel we demonstrate that the K{sup 0} charge form factor has sizable effects on the longitudinal cross section. By extending the model up to W = 1730 MeV, we are able to observe the existence of the narrow P{sub 11}(J{sup p} = 1/2{sup +}) resonance in the kaon photoproduction process. It is found that the most convincing mass (width) of this resonance is 1650 MeV(5 MeV).

  6. Aerospect operations criteria for Mercury thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, S.

    1979-01-01

    The hazards anticipated from a large scale mercury spill during a possible failure in the preflight and early flight stages of the Space Shuttle were studied. Toxicity thresholds were investigated as well as other consequences of mercury interacting with the environment. Three sites of mercury spill were investigated: land, water, and atmosphere. A laboratory study of interactions between mercury vapor and ozone in a low pressure, high ultraviolet radiation environment approximated the conditions of a mercury vapor release in the ozone layer region of the stratosphere. Clear evidence of an interaction leading to the destruction of ozone by conversion to oxygen was obtained. The impact of a spill on the Earth's environment and methods of early detection of a developing hazard wave of primary concern in the study.

  7. Caries-selective ablation: the second threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Thomas; Rechmann, Peter; Jeitner, Peter; Kaufmann, Raimund

    1993-07-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the appropriate fluence necessary for the effective removal of dental decay by ablation processes without or with at least minimal removal of healthy dentin. The experiments were conducted at two wavelengths [355 nm (frequency tripled, Q-switched Nd:YAG-laser) and 377 nm (frequency doubled, gain-switched Alexandrite-laser)] found to be close to the maximum of preferential absorption of carious dentin over healthy dentin. Optoacoustic techniques were applied to determine the ablation thresholds of healthy and carious dentin. The ablation efficiencies at characteristic fluences were determined using non-tactile microtopography. During all experiments a fiber optic delivery system was engaged.

  8. Dynamical Threshold of Diluteness of Soft Colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Ren; Do, Changwoo; Egami, T; Falus, Peter; Li, Xin; Liu, Dazhi; Porcar, L.; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis E; Smith, Gregory Scott; Wu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of soft colloids in solutions is characterized by internal collective motion as well as center-of-mass diffusion. Using neutron scattering we demonstrate that the competition between the relaxation processes associated with these two degrees of freedom results in strong dependence of dynamics and structure on colloid concentration, c, well below the overlap concentration c*. Triggered by the increasing inter-particle collisions, substantial structural dehydration and slowing-down of internal dynamics occurs before geometrically defined colloidal overlap develops. This observation is surprising since it is generally believed that the internal dynamics and conformation of soft colloidal particles essentially remain invariant below c*. The competition between these two relaxation processes gives rise to a new dynamically-defined dilute threshold concentration well below c*.

  9. Threshold Phenomena in Atomic Inner Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honghong

    1995-01-01

    Two types of atomic inner-shell threshold phenomena are studied: (1) atomic inner-shell radiationless resonant Raman scattering (RRRS) as a function of excitation energy, and (2) the onset of Cu Coster-Kronig (CK) transitions due to extraatomic relaxation, as a function of cluster size. (1). The K-L_{2,3}L _{2,3} and L_{2,3 }-VV Auger spectra of P in InP were measured in the vicinity of the P K-shell ionization threshold as well as at high excess energies. The evolution of the P K-L_{2,3 }L_{2,3} ^1D Auger spectrum from the radiationless resonant Raman scattering regime into the normal Auger transition regime in InP is found to be in accordance with time-independent resonant scattering theory of inner-shell threshold phenomena. The measured RRRS intensity reveals a quasi-bound state in the bulk-sensitive P K absorption spectrum. The origins of deviations of the RRRS energy from linear dispersion are examined in terms of the finite incident-photon-energy distribution and multiple resonances. Both our measurements and semiclassical calculations show that the post-collision interaction effect is relatively small. The measured P K-L_{2,3}L_{2,3} intensities and P 1s lifetime width are found to be in good agreement with atomic calculations, revealing the predominantly atomic character of P inner-shell transitions in InP. The evolution of P L_{2,3 }-VV Auger transitions in InP is found to be sensitive to the excitation energy at the P 1s threshold; the P K-L_{2,3}L_{2,3 } Raman resonance causes changes in the L _{2,3}-VV diagram-transition line shape as well as intensity enhancement of all L _{2,3}-VV features. Applying the Cini-Sawatzky model to the line shape reveals a 0.3-eV change in the local effective Coulomb interaction U _{eff} near the resonance. The difference in the line shapes between the satellite and diagram transitions indicates a change of the local density of states in the valence band in the presence of a spectator 2p hole. The single- and double-2p

  10. Higher-order corrections in threshold resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moch, S.; Vermaseren, J. A. M.; Vogt, A.

    2005-10-01

    We extend the threshold resummation exponents G in Mellin- N space to the fourth logarithmic (N 3LL) order collecting the terms αs2( to all orders in the strong coupling constant α. Comparing the results to our previous three-loop calculations for deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), we derive the universal coefficients B and B governing the final-state jet functions to order αs3, extending the previous quark and gluon results by one and two orders. A curious relation is found at second order between these quantities, the splitting functions and the large-angle soft emissions in Drell-Yan type processes. We study the numerical effect of the N 3LL corrections using both the fully exponentiated form and the expansion of the coefficient function in towers of logarithms.

  11. Nucleation pressure threshold in acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Christopher J.; Doering, Charles R.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.

    2016-07-01

    We combine classical nucleation theory with superharmonic focusing to predict necessary pressures to induce nucleation in acoustic droplet vaporization. We show that linear acoustics is a valid approximation to leading order when particle displacements in the sound field are small relative to the radius of the droplet. This is done by perturbation analysis of an axisymmetric compressible inviscid flow about a droplet with small surface perturbations relative to the mean radius subjected to an incoming ultrasonic wave. The necessary nucleation pressure threshold inside the droplet is calculated to be -9.33 ± 0.30 MPa for typical experimental parameters by employing results from classical homogeneous nucleation theory. As a result, we are able to predict if a given incident pressure waveform will induce nucleation.

  12. Threshold Phenomena in a Throbbing Complex Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mikikian, Maxime; Coueedel, Lenaiec; Cavarroc, Marjorie; Tessier, Yves; Boufendi, Laiefa

    2010-08-13

    In complex plasmas, the trapped dust particle cloud is often characterized by a central dust-free region ('void'). The void induces a spatial inhomogeneity of the dust particle distribution and is at the origin of many intricate unstable phenomena. One type of this kind of behavior is the so-called heartbeat instability consisting of successive contractions and expansions of the void. This instability is characterized by a strong nonlinear dynamics which can reveal the occurrence of incomplete sequences corresponding to failed contractions. Experimental results based on high-speed imaging are presented for the first time and underline this threshold effect in both the dust cloud motion and the evolution of the plasma light emission.

  13. Stability threshold approach for complex dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinshov, Vladimir V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A new measure to characterize the stability of complex dynamical systems against large perturbations is suggested, the stability threshold (ST). It quantifies the magnitude of the weakest perturbation capable of disrupting the system and switch it to an undesired dynamical regime. In the phase space, the ST corresponds to the 'thinnest site' of the attraction basin and therefore indicates the most 'dangerous' direction of perturbations. We introduce a computational algorithm for quantification of the ST and demonstrate that the suggested approach is effective and provides important insights. The generality of the obtained results defines their vast potential for application in such fields as engineering, neuroscience, power grids, Earth science and many others where the robustness of complex systems is studied.

  14. Stability threshold approach for complex dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinshov, Vladimir V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A new measure to characterize the stability of complex dynamical systems against large perturbations is suggested, the stability threshold (ST). It quantifies the magnitude of the weakest perturbation capable of disrupting the system and switch it to an undesired dynamical regime. In the phase space, the ST corresponds to the ‘thinnest site’ of the attraction basin and therefore indicates the most ‘dangerous’ direction of perturbations. We introduce a computational algorithm for quantification of the ST and demonstrate that the suggested approach is effective and provides important insights. The generality of the obtained results defines their vast potential for application in such fields as engineering, neuroscience, power grids, Earth science and many others where the robustness of complex systems is studied.

  15. Identification of Threshold Concepts for Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Green, David; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Lin, Sara; Minderhout, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    Threshold concepts (TCs) are concepts that, when mastered, represent a transformed understanding of a discipline without which the learner cannot progress. We have undertaken a process involving more than 75 faculty members and 50 undergraduate students to identify a working list of TCs for biochemistry. The process of identifying TCs for biochemistry was modeled on extensive work related to TCs across a range of disciplines and included faculty workshops and student interviews. Using an iterative process, we prioritized five concepts on which to focus future development of instructional materials. Broadly defined, the concepts are steady state, biochemical pathway dynamics and regulation, the physical basis of interactions, thermodynamics of macromolecular structure formation, and free energy. The working list presented here is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather is meant to identify a subset of TCs for biochemistry for which instructional and assessment tools for undergraduate biochemistry will be developed. PMID:25185234

  16. Intergroup networks as random threshold graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sudipta; Ganguly, Niloy; Mukherjee, Animesh; Krueger, Tyll

    2014-04-01

    Similar-minded people tend to form social groups. Due to pluralistic homophily as well as a sort of heterophily, people also participate in a wide variety of groups. Thus, these groups generally overlap with each other; an overlap between two groups can be characterized by the number of common members. These common members can play a crucial role in the transmission of information between the groups. As a step towards understanding the information dissemination, we perceive the system as a pruned intergroup network and show that it maps to a very basic graph theoretic concept known as a threshold graph. We analyze several structural properties of this network such as degree distribution, largest component size, edge density, and local clustering coefficient. We compare the theoretical predictions with the results obtained from several online social networks (LiveJournal, Flickr, YouTube) and find a good match.

  17. Threshold Games and Cooperation on Multiplayer Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Kaare B.; Bach, Lars A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study investigates the effect on cooperation in multiplayer games, when the population from which all individuals are drawn is structured—i.e. when a given individual is only competing with a small subset of the entire population. Method To optimize the focus on multiplayer effects, a class of games were chosen for which the payoff depends nonlinearly on the number of cooperators—this ensures that the game cannot be represented as a sum of pair-wise interactions, and increases the likelihood of observing behaviour different from that seen in two-player games. The chosen class of games are named “threshold games”, and are defined by a threshold, M > 0, which describes the minimal number of cooperators in a given match required for all the participants to receive a benefit. The model was studied primarily through numerical simulations of large populations of individuals, each with interaction neighbourhoods described by various classes of networks. Results When comparing the level of cooperation in a structured population to the mean-field model, we find that most types of structure lead to a decrease in cooperation. This is both interesting and novel, simply due to the generality and breadth of relevance of the model—it is likely that any model with similar payoff structure exhibits related behaviour. More importantly, we find that the details of the behaviour depends to a large extent on the size of the immediate neighbourhoods of the individuals, as dictated by the network structure. In effect, the players behave as if they are part of a much smaller, fully mixed, population, which we suggest an expression for. PMID:26844547

  18. Crossing thresholds: Analysis of hazardous tipping points in alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutzmann, Silke; Sass, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Steep mountain channels or torrents in small alpine catchments are characterized by high geomorphic activity with sediment dynamics being inherently nonlinear and threshold-mediated. Localized, high intensity rainstorms can drive torrential systems past a tipping point resulting in a sudden onset of hazardous events like (flash-) flooding, heavy bedload transport or debris flows. Such responses exhibit an abrupt switch in the fluvial system's mode (e.g. transport / supply limited). Changes in functional connectivity may persist beyond the tipping point. Torrential hazards cause costly damage in the densely populated Alpine Region. Thus, there is a rising interest in potential effects of climate change on torrential sediment dynamics. Understanding critical conditions close to tipping points is important to reduce uncertainty in predicting sediment fluxes. In this study we aim at (i) establishing threshold precipitation characteristics for the Eastern Alps of Austria. Precipitation is hypothesized to be the main forcing factor of torrential events. (ii) How do thresholds vary in space and time? (iii) The effect of external triggers is strongly mediated by the internal disposition of catchments to respond. Which internal conditions are critical for susceptibility? (iv) Is there a change in magnitude or frequency in the recent past and what can be expected for the future? The 71 km2 catchment of the river Schöttlbach in the East Alpine Region of Styria (Austria) is monitored since a heavy precipitation event resulted in a catastrophic flood in July 2011. Sediment mobilization from slopes as well as within-channel storage and bedload transport are regularly measured using photogrammetric methods and sediment impact sensors. Thus, detailed knowledge exists on magnitude and spatial propagation of sediment waves through the catchment. The associated hydro-meteorological (pre-) conditions can be inferred from a dense station network. Changing bedload transport rates and

  19. Aided auditory thresholds in children with postmeningitic deafness.

    PubMed

    Brookhouser, P E; Auslander, M C

    1989-08-01

    Postmeningitic hearing loss is often bilateral, profound, and rapid in onset. Children with postmeningitic hearing loss may be identified as potential candidates for cochlear implantation. The length of time required for a definitive trial with conventional amplification, which must precede a final decision regarding cochlear implant surgery, has been the subject of debate. Twenty-five children with bilateral severe-to-profound postmeningitic sensorineural hearing loss were fitted with appropriate amplification and results of serial-aided tests were analyzed to determine the degree of benefit and changes in aided thresholds over time. Twelve children gave aided responses that clearly indicated the presence of residual hearing and good aided benefit. Ten youngsters have responded consistently in the vibrotactile range when aided, thus receiving limited benefit from conventional amplification. Of particular interest are three children who initially exhibited limited or no auditory responses but who, after a period of 16 to 25 months, showed excellent benefit with binaural hearing aids. These children are all in total communication programs and have received good auditory training. Caution should be exercised when concluding that such a child does not benefit from amplification. PMID:2755288

  20. Image boundaries detection: from thresholding to implicit curve evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balla-Arabé, Souleymane; Brost, Vincent; Yang, Fan

    2015-02-01

    The development of high dimensional large-scale imaging devices increases the need of fast, robust and accurate image segmentation methods. Due to its intrinsic advantages such as the ability to extract complex boundaries, while handling topological changes automatically, the level set method (LSM) has been widely used in boundaries detection. Nevertheless, their computational complexity limits their use for real time systems. Furthermore, most of the LSMs share the limit of leading very often to a local minimum, while the effectiveness of many computer vision applications depends on the whole image boundaries. In this paper, using the image thresholding and the implicit curve evolution frameworks, we design a novel boundaries detection model which handles the above related drawbacks of the LSMs. In order to accelerate the method using the graphics processing units, we use the explicit and highly parallelizable lattice Boltzmann method to solve the level set equation. The introduced algorithm is fast and achieves global image segmentation in a spectacular manner. Experimental results on various kinds of images demonstrate the effectiveness and the efficiency of the proposed method.