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Sample records for acgih threshold limit

  1. Sampling and Analysis Issues Relating to the ACGIH Notice of Intended Change for the Beryllium Threshold Limit Value

    SciTech Connect

    Brisson, Michael J.; Ashley, Kevin

    2005-08-16

    Beryllium in various forms is widely used throughout the world in ceramics, aerospace and military applications, electronics, and sports equipment. Workplace exposure to beryllium is a growing industrial hygiene concern due to the potential for development of chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a lung condition with no known cure, in a small percentage of those exposed. There are workplace exposure limits for beryllium that have been in place for several decades. However, recent studies suggest that the current American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) may not be sufficiently protective for workers who are potentially exposed to airborne beryllium. Early in 2005, ACGIH issued a Notice of Intended Change (NIC) to the current TLV for beryllium which entails a 100-fold reduction (from 2 to 0.02 micrograms per cubic meter of sampled air). It is noted that ACGIH TLVs do not carry legal force in the manner that OSHA PELs or other federal regulations do. Nevertheless, OSHA plans a beryllium rulemaking in the near future, and a reduction in the PEL is anticipated. Also, if this change in the TLV for beryllium is adopted, it is reasonable to assume that at least some sampling and analysis activities will need to be modified to address airborne beryllium at the lower levels. There are implications to both the industrial hygiene and the laboratory communities, which are discussed.

  2. Threshold Graph Limits and Random Threshold Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Diaconis, Persi; Holmes, Susan; Janson, Svante

    2010-01-01

    We study the limit theory of large threshold graphs and apply this to a variety of models for random threshold graphs. The results give a nice set of examples for the emerging theory of graph limits. PMID:20811581

  3. Threshold limit values, permissible exposure limits, and feasibility: the bases for exposure limits in the United States.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, S M

    1993-05-01

    The development of exposure limits in the United States has always relied heavily upon the threshold limit values (TLVs) developed by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). In fact, the TLVs were adopted as official exposure limits by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 1972 and 1989. Given the continuing importance of the ACGIH limits, this paper compares the basis of the TLVs with that employed by OSHA de novo in its 12 new permissible exposure limits (PELs). Using benzene as an example, it is shown that OSHA's new PELs have been established following a rigorous assessment of the inherent risks and the feasibility of instituting the limit. The TLVs, on the other hand, have been developed by ad hoc procedures and appear to have traditionally reflected levels thought to be achievable at the time. However, this might be changing. Analysis of the historical reductions of TLVs, for 27 substances on the 1991-1992 list of intended changes, indicates smaller reductions in the past (median reduction of 2.0-2.5-fold between 1946 and 1988) compared to those currently being observed (median reduction of 7.5-fold between 1989 and 1991). Further analysis suggests a more aggressive policy of the ACGIH regarding TLVs for carcinogens but not for substances that produce effects other than cancer. Regardless of whether the basis of the TLVs has changed recently, it would take a relatively long time for the impact of any change to be felt, since the median age of the 1991-1992 TLVs is 16.5 years, and 75% of these limits are more than 10 years old. The implications of OSHA's continued reliance on the TLVs as a means of updating its PELs are discussed, and four alternatives are presented to the ACGIH regarding the future of its activities related to exposure limits. It is concluded that new mechanisms are needed for OSHA to update its PELs in a timely fashion so that the TLVs will not be adopted by default in the future.

  4. 30 CFR 57.5001 - Exposure limits for airborne contaminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Air Quality, Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Surface and... publication, entitled “TLV's Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances in Workroom Air Adopted by ACGIH... 1330 Kemper Meadow Drive, Attn: Customer Service, Cincinnati, OH 45240, http://www.acgih.org, or may...

  5. 30 CFR 57.5001 - Exposure limits for airborne contaminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Air Quality, Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Surface and... publication, entitled “TLV's Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances in Workroom Air Adopted by ACGIH... 1330 Kemper Meadow Drive, Attn: Customer Service, Cincinnati, OH 45240, http://www.acgih.org, or may...

  6. 30 CFR 57.5001 - Exposure limits for airborne contaminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Air Quality, Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Surface and... publication, entitled “TLV's Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances in Workroom Air Adopted by ACGIH... 1330 Kemper Meadow Drive, Attn: Customer Service, Cincinnati, OH 45240, http://www.acgih.org, or may...

  7. 30 CFR 57.5001 - Exposure limits for airborne contaminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Air Quality, Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Surface and... publication, entitled “TLV's Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances in Workroom Air Adopted by ACGIH... 1330 Kemper Meadow Drive, Attn: Customer Service, Cincinnati, OH 45240, http://www.acgih.org, or may...

  8. 45 CFR 149.115 - Cost threshold and cost limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cost threshold and cost limit. 149.115 Section 149... REQUIREMENTS FOR THE EARLY RETIREE REINSURANCE PROGRAM Reinsurance Amounts § 149.115 Cost threshold and cost limit. The following cost threshold and cost limits apply individually, to each early retiree as...

  9. 45 CFR 149.115 - Cost threshold and cost limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost threshold and cost limit. 149.115 Section 149.115 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS... percentage increase in the Medical Care Component of the Consumer Price Index for all urban...

  10. 45 CFR 149.115 - Cost threshold and cost limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cost threshold and cost limit. 149.115 Section 149.115 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS... percentage increase in the Medical Care Component of the Consumer Price Index for all urban...

  11. Measurement of Optical Limiting Threshold in Various Matenals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    high-performance carbon suspension named DREV CBS-100. Thresholds as low as 24 mJ/cm2 (nanosecond regime) and 100 mJ/cm2 (microsecond regime) have...Les recherches sur les materiaux susceptibles de proteger les yeux et les capteurs electro...optiques contre le rayonnement laser par limitation optique ont montre que de fines particules de carbone en suspension dans un liquide presentent des

  12. 75 FR 8353 - Price Index Adjustments for Expenditure Limitations and Lobbyist Bundling Disclosure Threshold

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... Price Index Adjustments for Expenditure Limitations and Lobbyist Bundling Disclosure Threshold AGENCY: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of adjustments to expenditure limitations and lobbyist... Commission'') is adjusting certain expenditure limitations and the lobbyist bundling disclosure threshold...

  13. A comparison of assessment methods of hand activity and force for use in calculating the ACGIH(R) hand activity level (HAL) TLV(R).

    PubMed

    Wurzelbacher, Steve; Burt, Susan; Crombie, Ken; Ramsey, Jessica; Luo, Lian; Allee, Steve; Jin, Yan

    2010-07-01

    This article compares several methods that were used for determining hand activity level and force in a large prospective ergonomics study. The first goal of this analysis was to determine the degree of correlation between hand activity/ force ratings using different assessment methods. The second goal was to determine if the hand activity/force methods were functionally equivalent for the purpose of calculating the ACGIH(R) hand activity level (HAL) threshold limit value (TLV(R)). A final goal was to investigate reasons for potential differences between methods. More than 700 task analyses were conducted on 484 workers at three study locations. Hand activity was assessed by two methods, including a trained observer on site using a 10-point visual analog scale for hand activity level and by offsite video analysis of the same task to calculate the frequency of exertions and the work/recovery ratio. Hand force was assessed by two on-site methods: ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) using a modified Borg CR-10 scale by a trained observer and RPE by the worker performing the task. The two methods for assessing hand activity level were correlated (Spearman rank = 0.49) and produced main TLV result categories (below Action Limit, Action Limit, TLV) with percent of exact agreement ranging from 71 to 91% and weighted Kappa ranging from 0.61 to 0.75. The two RPE methods for assessing hand force were correlated (Spearman rank ranging from 0.47 to 0.69) and produced TLVs with percent of exact agreement ranging from 64 to 83% and weighted Kappa ranging from 0.52 to 0.62. Differences between methods may be explained by a number of task and subject variables that were significantly associated with higher levels of hand activity and force. In summary, this study found substantial agreement between two methods for assessing hand activity level and moderate agreement between two methods for assessing hand force.

  14. Thresholds and noise limitations of colour vision in dim light.

    PubMed

    Kelber, Almut; Yovanovich, Carola; Olsson, Peter

    2017-04-05

    Colour discrimination is based on opponent photoreceptor interactions, and limited by receptor noise. In dim light, photon shot noise impairs colour vision, and in vertebrates, the absolute threshold of colour vision is set by dark noise in cones. Nocturnal insects (e.g. moths and nocturnal bees) and vertebrates lacking rods (geckos) have adaptations to reduce receptor noise and use chromatic vision even in very dim light. In contrast, vertebrates with duplex retinae use colour-blind rod vision when noisy cone signals become unreliable, and their transition from cone- to rod-based vision is marked by the Purkinje shift. Rod-cone interactions have not been shown to improve colour vision in dim light, but may contribute to colour vision in mesopic light intensities. Frogs and toads that have two types of rods use opponent signals from these rods to control phototaxis even at their visual threshold. However, for tasks such as prey or mate choice, their colour discrimination abilities fail at brighter light intensities, similar to other vertebrates, probably limited by the dark noise in cones.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in dim light'.

  15. Threshold-limited spreading in social networks with multiple initiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, P.; Sreenivasan, S.; Szymanski, B. K.; Korniss, G.

    2013-07-01

    A classical model for social-influence-driven opinion change is the threshold model. Here we study cascades of opinion change driven by threshold model dynamics in the case where multiple initiators trigger the cascade, and where all nodes possess the same adoption threshold ϕ. Specifically, using empirical and stylized models of social networks, we study cascade size as a function of the initiator fraction p. We find that even for arbitrarily high value of ϕ, there exists a critical initiator fraction pc(ϕ) beyond which the cascade becomes global. Network structure, in particular clustering, plays a significant role in this scenario. Similarly to the case of single-node or single-clique initiators studied previously, we observe that community structure within the network facilitates opinion spread to a larger extent than a homogeneous random network. Finally, we study the efficacy of different initiator selection strategies on the size of the cascade and the cascade window.

  16. Threshold-limited spreading in social networks with multiple initiators

    PubMed Central

    Singh, P.; Sreenivasan, S.; Szymanski, B. K.; Korniss, G.

    2013-01-01

    A classical model for social-influence-driven opinion change is the threshold model. Here we study cascades of opinion change driven by threshold model dynamics in the case where multiple initiators trigger the cascade, and where all nodes possess the same adoption threshold ϕ. Specifically, using empirical and stylized models of social networks, we study cascade size as a function of the initiator fraction p. We find that even for arbitrarily high value of ϕ, there exists a critical initiator fraction pc(ϕ) beyond which the cascade becomes global. Network structure, in particular clustering, plays a significant role in this scenario. Similarly to the case of single-node or single-clique initiators studied previously, we observe that community structure within the network facilitates opinion spread to a larger extent than a homogeneous random network. Finally, we study the efficacy of different initiator selection strategies on the size of the cascade and the cascade window. PMID:23900230

  17. Threshold effect under nonlinear limitation of the intensity of high-power light

    SciTech Connect

    Tereshchenko, S A; Podgaetskii, V M; Gerasimenko, A Yu; Savel'ev, M S

    2015-04-30

    A model is proposed to describe the properties of limiters of high-power laser radiation, which takes into account the threshold character of nonlinear interaction of radiation with the working medium of the limiter. The generally accepted non-threshold model is a particular case of the threshold model if the threshold radiation intensity is zero. Experimental z-scan data are used to determine the nonlinear optical characteristics of media with carbon nanotubes, polymethine and pyran dyes, zinc selenide, porphyrin-graphene and fullerene-graphene. A threshold effect of nonlinear interaction between laser radiation and some of investigated working media of limiters is revealed. It is shown that the threshold model more adequately describes experimental z-scan data. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  18. The effects of limited-precision weights on the threshold Adaline.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, M

    1997-01-01

    The effect of limited-precision weights on the functional capability of a threshold Adaline is examined. The number of logic functions which can be implemented by the threshold Adaline serves as the primary measure of functional capability. Closed-form expressions are provided for the number of logic functions which can be implemented by a threshold Adaline with four different levels of weight precision. In addition, realization tests and procedures (based on the characterizing numbers) are provided for each level of weight precision. The number of realizable logic functions is compared to the capacity of a threshold Adaline with limited precision weights and a relationship between the two measures is proposed.

  19. The limits of thresholds: silica and the politics of science, 1935 to 1990.

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, G; Rosner, D

    1995-01-01

    Since the 1930s threshold limit values have been presented as an objectively established measure of US industrial safety. However, there have been important questions raised regarding the adequacy of these thresholds for protecting workers from silicosis. This paper explores the historical debates over silica threshold limit values and the intense political negotiation that accompanied their establishment. In the 1930s and early 1940s, a coalition of business, public health, insurance, and political interests formed in response to a widely perceived "silicosis crisis." Part of the resulting program aimed at containing the crisis was the establishment of threshold limit values. Yet silicosis cases continued to be documented. By the 1960s these cases had become the basis for a number of revisions to the thresholds. In the 1970s, following a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommendation to lower the threshold limit value for silica and to eliminate sand as an abrasive in blasting, industry fought attempts to make the existing values more stringent. This paper traces the process by which threshold limit values became part of a compromise between the health of workers and the economic interests of industry. Images p254-a p256-a p257-a p259-a PMID:7856788

  20. 77 FR 9925 - Price Index Adjustments for Expenditure Limitations and Lobbyist Bundling Disclosure Threshold

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION...: Federal Election Commission. ACTION: Notice of adjustments to expenditure limitations and lobbyist bundling disclosure threshold. SUMMARY: As mandated by provisions of the Federal Election Campaign Act...

  1. The uncertainty threshold principle - Fundamental limitations of optimal decision making under dynamic uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.; Ku, R.; Gershwin, S. B.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental limitations of the optimal control of dynamic systems with random parameters are analyzed by studying a scalar linear-quadratic optimal control example. It is demonstrated that optimum long-range decision making is possible only if the dynamic uncertainty (quantified by the means and covariances of the random parameters) is below a certain threshold. If this threshold is exceeded, there do not exist optimum decision rules. This phenomenon is called the 'uncertainty threshold principle'. The implications of this phenomenon to the field of modelling, identification, and adaptive control are discussed.

  2. The Uncertainty Threshold Principle: Some Fundamental Limitations of Optimal Decision Making Under Dynamic Uncertainity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.; Ku, R.; Gershwin, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    This note shows that the optimal control of dynamic systems with uncertain parameters has certain limitations. In particular, by means of a simple scalar linear-quadratic optimal control example, it is shown that the infinite horizon solution does not exist if the parameter uncertainty exceeds a certain quantifiable threshold; we call this the uncertainty threshold principle. The philosophical and design implications of this result are discussed.

  3. The uncertainty threshold principle - Some fundamental limitations of optimal decision making under dynamic uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.; Ku, R.; Gershwin, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    This note shows that the optimal control of dynamic systems with uncertain parameters has certain limitations. In particular, by means of a simple scalar linear-quadratic optimal control example, it is shown that the infinite horizon solution does not exist if the parameter uncertainty exceeds a certain quantifiable threshold; we call this the uncertainty threshold principle. The philosophical and design implications of this result are discussed.

  4. Limitations in the spectral method for graph partitioning: Detectability threshold and localization of eigenvectors.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Investigating the performance of different methods is a fundamental problem in graph partitioning. In this paper, we estimate the so-called detectability threshold for the spectral method with both un-normalized and normalized Laplacians in sparse graphs. The detectability threshold is the critical point at which the result of the spectral method is completely uncorrelated to the planted partition. We also analyze whether the localization of eigenvectors affects the partitioning performance in the detectable region. We use the replica method, which is often used in the field of spin-glass theory, and focus on the case of bisection. We show that the gap between the estimated threshold for the spectral method and the threshold obtained from Bayesian inference is considerable in sparse graphs, even without eigenvector localization. This gap closes in a dense limit.

  5. Limitations in the spectral method for graph partitioning: Detectability threshold and localization of eigenvectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Investigating the performance of different methods is a fundamental problem in graph partitioning. In this paper, we estimate the so-called detectability threshold for the spectral method with both un-normalized and normalized Laplacians in sparse graphs. The detectability threshold is the critical point at which the result of the spectral method is completely uncorrelated to the planted partition. We also analyze whether the localization of eigenvectors affects the partitioning performance in the detectable region. We use the replica method, which is often used in the field of spin-glass theory, and focus on the case of bisection. We show that the gap between the estimated threshold for the spectral method and the threshold obtained from Bayesian inference is considerable in sparse graphs, even without eigenvector localization. This gap closes in a dense limit.

  6. Nonlinear threshold effect in the Z-scan method of characterizing limiters for high-intensity laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tereshchenko, S. A.; Savelyev, M. S.; Podgaetsky, V. M.; Gerasimenko, A. Yu.; Selishchev, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    A threshold model is described which permits one to determine the properties of limiters for high-powered laser light. It takes into account the threshold characteristics of the nonlinear optical interaction between the laser beam and the limiter working material. The traditional non-threshold model is a particular case of the threshold model when the limiting threshold is zero. The nonlinear characteristics of carbon nanotubes in liquid and solid media are obtained from experimental Z-scan data. Specifically, the nonlinear threshold effect was observed for aqueous dispersions of nanotubes, but not for nanotubes in solid polymethylmethacrylate. The threshold model fits the experimental Z-scan data better than the non-threshold model. Output characteristics were obtained that integrally describe the nonlinear properties of the optical limiters.

  7. Incorporation of trace elements in Portland cement clinker: Thresholds limits for Cu, Ni, Sn or Zn

    SciTech Connect

    Gineys, N.; Aouad, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Damidot, D.

    2011-11-15

    This paper aims at defining precisely, the threshold limits for several trace elements (Cu, Ni, Sn or Zn) which correspond to the maximum amount that could be incorporated into a standard clinker whilst reaching the limit of solid solution of its four major phases (C{sub 3}S, C{sub 2}S, C{sub 3}A and C{sub 4}AF). These threshold limits were investigated through laboratory synthesised clinkers that were mainly studied by X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The reference clinker was close to a typical Portland clinker (65% C{sub 3}S, 18% C{sub 2}S, 8% C{sub 3}A and 8% C{sub 4}AF). The threshold limits for Cu, Ni, Zn and Sn are quite high with respect to the current contents in clinker and were respectively equal to 0.35, 0.5, 0.7 and 1 wt.%. It appeared that beyond the defined threshold limits, trace elements had different behaviours. Ni was associated with Mg as a magnesium nickel oxide (MgNiO{sub 2}) and Sn reacted with lime to form a calcium stannate (Ca{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}). Cu changed the crystallisation process and affected therefore the formation of C{sub 3}S. Indeed a high content of Cu in clinker led to the decomposition of C{sub 3}S into C{sub 2}S and of free lime. Zn, in turn, affected the formation of C{sub 3}A. Ca{sub 6}Zn{sub 3}Al{sub 4}O{sub 15} was formed whilst a tremendous reduction of C{sub 3}A content was identified. The reactivity of cements made with the clinkers at the threshold limits was followed by calorimetry and compressive strength measurements on cement paste. The results revealed that the doped cements were at least as reactive as the reference cement.

  8. On the difference of H-mode power threshold in divertor and limiter tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalupin, D.; Tokar, M. Z.; Unterberg, B.; Loozen, X.; Pilipenko, D.; Zagorski, R.; Contributors, TEXTOR

    2006-05-01

    The difference in the H-mode power threshold in divertor and limiter configurations is numerically investigated by analysing the effect of boundary conditions imposed on the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS) and given by prescribed density and temperature e-folding lengths, δn and δT, respectively. It is demonstrated that the variation of δn and δT significantly affects the H-mode power threshold. This is explained by the change in the balance between conductive and convective heat losses at the edge. For the ratio δn/δT large enough, when the convective loss does not exceed 45% of the total power, the threshold agrees well with the experimental multi-machine scaling for divertor tokamaks. With reduction in δn/δT and increase in convective loss above this critical level, the power threshold significantly exceeds the scaling, in agreement with observations on different limiter tokamaks. By considering the power and particle balances in the scrape-off layer it is shown that the ratio δn/δT is controlled by the distance which recycling neutrals pass before entering the confined plasma and which is normally much larger in divertor machines than in the limiter ones. The calculations for the limiter tokamak TEXTOR have predicted the experimentally found conditions for the L H transition in advance.

  9. Evaluating intercepts from demographic models to understand resource limitation and resource thresholds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds-Hogland, M. J.; Hogland, J.S.; Mitchell, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding resource limitation is critical to effective management and conservation of wild populations, however resource limitation is difficult to quantify partly because resource limitation is a dynamic process. Specifically, a resource that is limiting at one time may become non-limiting at another time, depending upon changes in its availability and changes in the availability of other resources. Methods for understanding resource limitation, therefore, must consider the dynamic effects of resources on demography. We present approaches for interpreting results of demographic modeling beyond analyzing model rankings, model weights, slope estimates, and model averaging. We demonstrate how interpretation of y-intercepts, odds ratios, and rates of change can yield insights into resource limitation as a dynamic process, assuming logistic regression is used to link estimates of resources with estimates of demography. In addition, we show how x-intercepts can be evaluated with respect to odds ratios to understand resource thresholds. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Laser damage threshold of gelatin and a copper phthalocyanine doped gelatin optical limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Brant, M.C.; McLean, D.G.; Sutherland, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    The authors demonstrate optical limiting in a unique guest-host system which uses neither the typical liquid or solid host. Instead, they dope a gelatin gel host with a water soluble Copper (II) phthalocyaninetetrasulfonic acid, tetrasodium salt (CuPcTs). They report on the gelatin`s viscoelasticity, laser damage threshold, and self healing of this damage. The viscoelastic gelatin has mechanical properties quite different than a liquid or solid. The authors` laser measurements demonstrate that the single shot damage threshold of the undoped gelatin host increases with decreasing gelatin concentration. The gelatin also has a much higher laser damage threshold than a stiff acrylic. Unlike brittle solids, the soft gelatin self heals from laser induced damage. Optical limiting test also show the utility of a gelatin host doped with CuPcTs. The CuPcTs/gelatin matrix is not damaged at incident laser energies 5 times the single shot damage threshold of the gelatin host. However, at this high laser energy the CuPcTs is photo bleached at the beam waist. The authors repair photo bleached sites by annealing the CuPcTs/gelatin matrix.

  11. Using self-organizing maps to determine observation threshold limit predictions in highly variant data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paganoni, C.A.; Chang, K.C.; Robblee, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    A significant data quality challenge for highly variant systems surrounds the limited ability to quantify operationally reasonable limits on the data elements being collected and provide reasonable threshold predictions. In many instances, the number of influences that drive a resulting value or operational range is too large to enable physical sampling for each influencer, or is too complicated to accurately model in an explicit simulation. An alternative method to determine reasonable observation thresholds is to employ an automation algorithm that would emulate a human analyst visually inspecting data for limits. Using the visualization technique of self-organizing maps (SOM) on data having poorly understood relationships, a methodology for determining threshold limits was developed. To illustrate this approach, analysis of environmental influences that drive the abundance of a target indicator species (the pink shrimp, Farfantepenaeus duorarum) provided a real example of applicability. The relationship between salinity and temperature and abundance of F. duorarum is well documented, but the effect of changes in water quality upstream on pink shrimp abundance is not well understood. The highly variant nature surrounding catch of a specific number of organisms in the wild, and the data available from up-stream hydrology measures for salinity and temperature, made this an ideal candidate for the approach to provide a determination about the influence of changes in hydrology on populations of organisms.

  12. Limited English proficient Asian Americans: Threshold language policy and access to mental health treatment.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Lonnie R; Masland, Mary C; Peng, Carol J; Wei-Mien Lou, Christine; Wallace, Neal T

    2011-01-01

    The importance of providing timely, effective mental health services is increasingly recognized worldwide, and language barriers are a formidable obstacle to achieving this objective. Threshold language policy is one response implemented by California and other states within the U.S., in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, and national origin in programs receiving federal funding. This policy mandates language assistance services for Medicaid enrollees whose primary language is other than English once their population size reaches a designated level. Medicaid is the federal-state-funded health insurance program for specific classifications of low-income Americans. This study evaluated the impact of threshold language policy on Vietnamese, Cantonese, Hmong, and Cambodian limited English proficiency persons' use of public mental health services in California. Using random-effects regression on 247 observations, we regressed aggregate Vietnamese, Cantonese, Hmong, and Cambodian Medicaid mental health service penetration rates on an indicator of the threshold language policy's implementation, while controlling for a linear time trend and the effects of non-threshold language assistance programming. Immediately after implementation, threshold language policy requirements were associated with a penetration rate increase among this population. The penetration rate increase became greater after accounting for the impact of concurrent language assistance. However, this increase diminished over time. The findings indicate that, at least in the short run, language assistance measures requiring reasonable accommodations once populations of LEP persons reach a specified size have detectable effects on their mental health service use. These requirements increase the number of mental health consumers, but appear to provide declining benefit over time. California's threshold language policy provides

  13. The Impact of Different Permissible Exposure Limits on Hearing Threshold Levels Beyond 25 dBA

    PubMed Central

    Sayapathi, Balachandar S; Su, Anselm Ting; Koh, David

    2014-01-01

    Background: Development of noise-induced hearing loss is reliant on a few factors such as frequency, intensity, and duration of noise exposure. The occurrence of this occupational malady has doubled from 120 million to 250 million in a decade. Countries such as Malaysia, India, and the US have adopted 90 dBA as the permissible exposure limit. According to the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the exposure limit for noise is 90 dBA, while that of the US National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is 85 dBA for 8 hours of noise exposure. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the development of hearing threshold levels beyond 25 dBA on adoption of 85 dBA as the permissible exposure limit compared to 90 dBA. Patients and Methods: This is an intervention study done on two automobile factories. There were 203 employees exposed to noise levels beyond the action level. Hearing protection devices were distributed to reduce noise levels to a level between the permissible exposure limit and action level. The permissible exposure limits were 90 and 85 dBA in factories 1 and 2, respectively, while the action levels were 85 and 80 dBA, respectively. The hearing threshold levels of participants were measured at baseline and at first month of postshift exposure of noise. The outcome was measured by a manual audiometer. McNemar and chi-square tests were used in the statistical analysis. Results: We found that hearing threshold levels of more than 25 dBA has changed significantly from pre-intervention to post-intervention among participants from both factories (3000 Hz for the right ear and 2000 Hz for the left ear). There was a statistically significant association between participants at 3000 Hz on the right ear at ‘deteriorated’ level ( χ² (1) = 4.08, φ = - 0.142, P = 0.043), whereas there was worsening of hearing threshold beyond 25 dBA among those embraced 90 dBA. Conclusions: The adoption of 85 dBA as the permissible exposure

  14. Identifying congruence in stream assemblage thresholds in response to nutrient and sediment gradients for limit setting.

    PubMed

    Wagenhoff, Annika; Clapcott, Joanne E; Lau, Kelvin E M; Lewis, Gillian D; Young, Roger G

    2017-03-01

    The setting of numeric instream objectives (effects-based criteria) and catchment limits for major agricultural stressors, such as nutrients and fine sediment, is a promising policy instrument to prevent or reduce degradation of stream ecosystem health. We explored the suitability of assemblage thresholds, defined as a point at which a small increase in a stressor will result in a disproportionally large change in assemblage structure relative to other points across the stressor gradient, to inform instream nutrient and sediment objectives. Identification and comparison of thresholds for macroinvertebrate, periphyton, and bacterial assemblages aimed at making the setting of objectives more robust and may further provide a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of nutrient and fine sediment effects. Gradient forest, a novel approach to assemblage threshold identification based on regression-tree-based random forest models for individual taxa, allowed inclusion of multiple predictors to strengthen the evidence of cause and effect between stressors and multispecies responses. The most prominent macroinvertebrate and periphyton assemblage threshold across the nitrogen (N) gradient was located at very low levels and mainly attributed to declines of multiple taxa. This provided strong evidence for stream assemblages being significantly affected when N concentrations exceed reference conditions and for effects cascading through the ecosystem. The most prominent macroinvertebrate assemblage threshold across a gradient of suspended fine sediment was also located at very low levels and attributed to declines of multiple taxa. However, this threshold did not correspond with periphyton assemblage thresholds, suggesting that the sensitivity of macroinvertebrate assemblages is unrelated to sediment effects on periphyton assemblages. Overall, the spectrum of N concentrations and fine sediment levels within which these stream assemblages changed most dramatically were

  15. A frequency-duty cycle equation for the ACGIH hand activity level.

    PubMed

    Radwin, Robert G; Azari, David P; Lindstrom, Mary J; Ulin, Sheryl S; Armstrong, Thomas J; Rempel, David

    2015-01-01

    A new equation for predicting the hand activity level (HAL) used in the American Conference for Government Industrial Hygienists threshold limit value®(TLV®) was based on exertion frequency (F) and percentage duty cycle (D). The TLV® includes a table for estimating HAL from F and D originating from data in Latko et al. (Latko WA, Armstrong TJ, Foulke JA, Herrin GD, Rabourn RA, Ulin SS, Development and evaluation of an observational method for assessing repetition in hand tasks. American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, 58(4):278-285, 1997) and post hoc adjustments that include extrapolations outside of the data range. Multimedia video task analysis determined D for two additional jobs from Latko's study not in the original data-set, and a new nonlinear regression equation was developed to better fit the data and create a more accurate table. The equation, HAL = 6:56 ln D[F(1:31) /1+3:18 F(1:31), generally matches the TLV® HAL lookup table, and is a substantial improvement over the linear model, particularly for F>1.25 Hz and D>60% jobs. The equation more closely fits the data and applies the TLV® using a continuous function.

  16. Setting limits: Using air pollution thresholds to protect and restore US ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenn, Mark E.; Lambert, Kathleen F.; Blett, Tamara F.; Burns, Douglas A.; Pardo, Linda H.; Lovett, Gary M.; Haeuber, Richard A.; Evers, David C.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Jeffries, Dean S.

    2011-01-01

    More than four decades of research provide unequivocal evidence that sulfur, nitrogen, and mercury pollution have altered, and will continue to alter, our nation's lands and waters. The emission and deposition of air pollutants harm native plants and animals, degrade water quality, affect forest productivity, and are damaging to human health. Many air quality policies limit emissions at the source but these control measures do not always consider ecosystem impacts. Air pollution thresholds at which ecological effects are observed, such as critical loads, are effective tools for assessing the impacts of air pollution on essential ecosystem services and for informing public policy. U.S. ecosystems can be more effectively protected and restored by using a combination of emissions-based approaches and science-based thresholds of ecosystem damage.

  17. Setting limits: Using air pollution thresholds to protect and restore U.S. ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenn, M.E.; Lambert, K.F.; Blett, T.F.; Burns, Douglas A.; Pardo, L.H.; Lovett, Gary M.; Haeuber, R. A.; Evers, D.C.; Driscoll, C.T.; Jeffries, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    More than four decades of research provide unequivocal evidence that sulfur, nitrogen, and mercury pollution have altered, and will continue to alter, our nation's lands and waters. The emission and deposition of air pollutants harm native plants and animals, degrade water quality, affect forest productivity, and are damaging to human health. Many air quality policies limit emissions at the source but these control measures do not always consider ecosystem impacts. Air pollution thresholds at which ecological effects are observed, such as critical loads, are effective tools for assessing the impacts of air pollution on essential ecosystem services and for informing public policy. U.S. ecosystems can be more effectively protected and restored by using a combination of emissions-based approaches and science-based thresholds of ecosystem damage. Based on the results of a comprehensive review of air pollution thresholds, we conclude: ??? Ecosystem services such as air and water purification, decomposition and detoxification of waste materials, climate regulation, regeneration of soil fertility, production and biodiversity maintenance, as well as crop, timber and fish supplies are impacted by deposition of nitrogen, sulfur, mercury and other pollutants. The consequences of these changes may be difficult or impossible to reverse as impacts cascade throughout affected ecosystems. ??? The effects of too much nitrogen are common across the U.S. and include altered plant and lichen communities, enhanced growth of invasive species, eutrophication and acidification of lands and waters, and habitat deterioration for native species, including endangered species. ??? Lake, stream and soil acidification is widespread across the eastern United States. Up to 65% of lakes within sensitive areas receive acid deposition that exceeds critical loads. ??? Mercury contamination adversely affects fish in many inland and coastal waters. Fish consumption advisories for mercury exist in all 50

  18. Crossing the pedogenetic threshold: Apparent phosphorus limitation by soil microorganisms in unglaciated acidic eastern hardwood forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, J. L.; Smemo, K. A.; Burke, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    The availability of soil phosphorus (P) can significantly influence microbial community composition and the ecosystem-level processes they mediate. However, the threshold at which soil microorganisms become functionally P-limited is unclear because of soil acidity effect on P availability. We reason that acidic temperate hardwood forest ecosystems are, in fact, functionally P-limited, but compensation occur via soil microbial production of phosphatase enzymes. We tested this hypothesis in glaciated and unglaciated mature mixed-mesophytic forests in eastern Ohio where both soil pH and P availability had been experientially manipulated. We measured the activity of two P acquiring soil enzymes, phosphomonoesterase (PMono) and phosphodiesterase (PDi), to understand how soil acidity and available P influence microbial function. Our experimental treatments elevated ambient soil pH from below 4.5 to around 5.5 and increased readily available phosphate from 3 to ~25 mg P/kg on glaciated soils and from 0.5 to ~5 mg P/kg on unglaciated soils. The P treatment decreased the activity of PDi by 82% relative to the control on unglaciated soils, but we observed no P treatment effect on glaciated soils. A similar result was observed for PMono. Soil pH, alone, did not significantly influence enzyme activities. Results suggest that soil microorganisms are more likely to be P-limited in older unglaciated soils. However, dramatically higher phosphatase activity in response to very low P availability suggests that an underlying ecosystem P limitation can be ameliorated by soil microbial community dynamics. This mechanism may be more important for older, unglaciated soils that have already crossed a pedogenic threshold where P availability influences ecosystem and microbial function.

  19. Assessing the role of soil water limitation in determining the Phytotoxic Ozone Dose (PODY) thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, Alessandra; Sicard, Pierre; Fares, Silvano; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka; Anav, Alessandro; Paoletti, Elena

    2016-12-01

    Phytotoxic Ozone Dose (PODY), defined as the accumulated stomatal ozone flux over a threshold of Y, is considered an optimal metric to evaluate O3 effects on vegetation. PODY is often computed through the DO3SE model, which includes species-specific parameterizations for the environmental response of stomatal conductance. However, the effect of soil water content (SWC) on stomatal aperture is difficult to model on a regional scale and thus often ignored. In this study, we used environmental input data obtained from the WRF-CHIMERE model for 14,546 grid-based forest sites in Southern Europe. SWC was obtained for the upper 10 cm of soil, which resulted in a worst-case risk scenario. PODY was calculated either with or without water limitation for different Y thresholds. Exclusion of the SWC effect on stomatal fluxes caused a serious overestimation of PODY. The difference increased with increasing Y (78%, 128%, 237% and 565% with Y = 0, 1, 2 and 3 nmol O3 m-2 s-1, respectively). This behaviour was confirmed by applying the same approach to field data measured in a Mediterranean Quercus ilex forest. WRF-CHIMERE overestimated SWC at this field site, so under real-world conditions the SWC effect may be larger than modelled. The differences were lower for temperate species (Pinus cembra 50-340%, P. sylvestris 57-363%, Abies alba 57-371%) than for Mediterranean species (P. pinaster 87-356%, P. halepensis 96-429%, P. pinea 107-532%, Q. suber 104-1602%), although a high difference was recorded also for the temperate species Fagus sylvatica with POD3 (524%). We conclude that SWC should be considered in PODY simulations and a low Y threshold should be used for robustness.

  20. Physiological limitation at alpine treeline: relationships of threshold responses of conifers to their establishment patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germino, M. J.; Lazarus, B.; Castanha, C.; Moyes, A. B.; Kueppers, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    An understanding of physiological limitations to tree establishment at alpine treeline form the basis for predicting how this climate-driven boundary will respond to climate shifts. Most research on this topic has focused on limitations related to carbon balance and growth of trees. Carbon balance could limit survival and establishment primarily through slow-acting, chronic means. We asked whether tree survival and thus establishment patterns reflect control by chronic effects in comparison to acute, threshold responses, such as survival of frost events. Seedling survivorship patterns were compared to thresholds in freezing (temperature causing leaf freezing, or freezing point, FP; and physiological response to freezing) and water status (turgor loss point, TLP; and related physiological adjustments). Subject seedlings were from forest, treeline, and alpine sites in the Alpine Treeline Warming Experiment in Colorado, and included limber and lodgepole pine (a low-elevation species), and Engelmann Spruce. Preliminary results show survival increases with seedling age, but the only corresponding increase in stress acclimation was photosynthetic resistance to freezing and TLP, not FP. Differences in survivorship among the species were not consistent with variation in FP but they generally agreed with variation in photosynthetic resistance to deep freezing and to early-season drought avoidance. Mortality of limber pine increased 35% when minimum temperatures decreased below -9C, which compares with FPs of >-8.6C, and about 1/3 of its mortality occurred during cold/wet events, particularly in the alpine. The other major correlate of mortality is midsummer drying events, as previously reported. Also in limber pine, the TLP for year-old seedlings (-2.5 MPa) corresponded with seasonal-drought mortality. In summary, we show several examples of correspondence in physiological thresholds to mortality events within a species, although the relationships are not strong. Across

  1. ZnO-PVA nanocomposite films for low threshold optical limiting applications

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanath, Varsha; Beenakumari, C.; Muneera, C. I.

    2014-10-15

    Zinc oxide-PVA nanocomposite films were fabricated adopting a simple method based on solution-casting, incorporating small weight percentages (<1.2 wt%) of ZnO in PVA (∼0.625×10{sup −3}M to 7×10{sup −3}M), and their structure, morphology, linear and low threshold nonlinear optical properties were investigated. The films were characterized as nanostructured ZnO encapsulated between the molecules/chains of the semicrystalline host polymer PVA. The samples exhibited low threshold nonlinear absorption and negative nonlinear refraction, as studied using the Z-scan technique. A switchover from SA to RSA was observed as the concentration of ZnO was increased. The optical limiting of 632.8 nm CW laser light displayed by these nanocomposite films is also demonstrated. The estimated values of the effective coefficients of nonlinear absorption, nonlinear refraction and third-order nonlinear susceptibility, |χ{sup (3)}|, compared to those reported for continuous wave laser light excitation, measure up to the highest among them. The results show that the ZnO-PVA nanocomposite films have great potential applications in future optical and photonic devices.

  2. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  3. Threshold raw retrieved contrast in coronagraphs is limited by internal polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckinridge, James

    The objective of this work is to provide the exoplanet program with an accurate model of the coronagraph complex point spread function, methods to correct chromatic aberration in the presence of polarization aberrations, device requirements to minimize and compensate for these aberrations at levels needed for exoplanet coronagraphy, and exoplanet retrieval algorithms in the presence of polarizaiton aberrations. Currently, space based coronagraphs are designed and performance analyzed using scalar wave aberration theory. Breckinridge, Lam & Chipman (2015) PASP 127: 445-468 and Breckinridge & Oppenheimer (2004) ApJ 600: 1091-1098 showed that astronomical telescopes designed for exoplanet and precision astrometric science require polarization or vector-wave analysis. Internal instrument polarization limits both threshold raw contrast and measurements of the vector wave properties of the electromagnetic radiation from stars, exoplanets, gas and dust. The threshold raw contrast obtained using only scalar wave theory is much more optimistic than that obtained using the more hardware-realistic vector wave theory. Internal polarization reduces system contrast, increases scattered light, alters radiometric measurements, distorts diffraction-limited star images and reduces signal-to-noise ratio. For example, a vector-wave analysis shows that the WFIRST-CGI instrument will have a threshold raw contrast of 10-7 not the 10-8 forecasted using the scalar wave analysis given in the WFIRST-CGI 2015 report. The physical nature of the complex point spread function determines the exoplanet scientific yield of coronagraphs. We propose to use the Polaris-M polarization aberration ray-tracing software developed at the College of Optical Science of the University of Arizona to ray trace both a "typical" exoplanet coronagraph system as well as the WFIRST-CGI system. Threshold raw contrast and the field across the complex PSF will be calculated as a function of optical device vector E

  4. Odor as an aid to chemical safety: odor thresholds compared with threshold limit values and volatilities for 214 industrial chemicals in air and water dilution.

    PubMed

    Amoore, J E; Hautala, E

    1983-12-01

    The body of information in this paper is directed to specialists in industrial health and safety, and air and water pollution, who need quantitative data on the odor thresholds of potentially hazardous chemical vapors and gases. The literature, largely unorganized, has been reviewed for 214 compounds and condensed into tables based on consistent units. Data on the volatility, solubility, ionization and water-air distribution ratio at 25 degrees C are included. From the currently recommended threshold limit value (TLV), a safe dilution factor and an odor safety factor are calculated for each compound. The equivalent data are presented for both air and water dilutions of the chemicals. Available data are summarized on the variability of odor sensitivities in the population, and the increased odor concentrations that are required to elicit responses from persons whose attention is distracted, or who are sleeping. This information is reduced to calibration charts that may be used to estimate the relative detectability, warning potential and rousing capacity of the odorous vapors. Each compound has been assigned a letter classification, from A to E, to indicate the margin of safety, if any, that may be afforded by the odor of the compound as a warning that its threshold limit value is being exceeded.

  5. An analysis of the implications of a magnetic field threshold limit value on utility work practices.

    PubMed

    Dillon, R; von Winterfeldt, D

    2000-01-01

    This article examines the implications of a 10 gauss (G) occupational threshold limit value (TLV) on the work practices of a utility that must maintain and repair 500 and 230 kV transmission lines. Three work practices are compared: bare-handed work with live lines (the current practice at the example utility), use of hot sticks, and de-energizing lines prior to work. Bare-handed work with live lines leads to occasional exceedances of the 10 G TLV. Use of hot sticks and de-energizing lines eliminate these exceedances, but they do so at a price. Both practices increase the job duration and, as a result, may increase occupational injury risks. The annual costs for the current live-line, bare-handed practice is approximately $175,000. Use of hot sticks increases this annual cost of maintenance and repair by 30 to 55%. De-energizing lines can increase annual costs by $4 million to $14 million, due to the need for adding additional electricity generation during the planned outages. De-energizing lines also increases the risk to service reliability slightly.

  6. Threshold scaling limits of RO concentrates flowing in a long waste disposal pipeline.

    PubMed

    Semiat, R; Hasson, D; Zelmanov, G; Hemo, I

    2004-01-01

    Disposal of RO concentrates emanating from inland brackish water desalination plants presents a difficult environmental problem. The solution adopted by Mekorot--the National Water Company of Israel--is to construct a 30 km waste disposal pipeline for collecting concentrates emanating from several RO desalination plants and discharging them into the sea. The discharged concentrates are highly supersaturated with respect to CaCO3. Scale precipitation during concentrate flow through the RO module is inhibited by the presence of anti-scalants. The retention time of the concentrate solution in the discharge pipe will exceed 100 hours. This raises the issue of the risk of scale precipitation in the discharge pipe that could impair its proper functioning. The aim of the present study was to provide data for guiding the design and operation of the disposal pipeline. The extent of the induction period prior to the onset of precipitation was measured in a pilot plant simulating flow of concentrate solutions dosed with anti-scalants. The parameters investigated were the scaling potential, the anti-scalant concentration and the presence of a mixture of several anti-scalants. The results of this study provide threshold scaling limits under various conditions.

  7. Formate in serum and urine after controlled methanol exposure at the threshold limit value

    SciTech Connect

    d'Alessandro, A. ); Osterloh, J.D.; Chuwers, P.; Quinlan, P.J.; Kelly, T.J.; Becker, C.E. )

    1994-02-01

    Methanol will be present as a new air pollutant when methanol-powered vehicles are introduced in the United States. Little is known about the effect of low-dose methanol exposure. It is controversial whether or not formate, the main metabolite responsible for methanol's acute toxicity, is a sensitive biological marker of toxicity or exposure. We studied the effect of a 4-hr exposure at rest to 200 ppm of methanol vapors on endogenous serum formate and on urinary formic acid excretion. A randomized, double-blind study of human exposure to a constant concentration of methanol was performed in a whole-body exposure chamber. Twenty-six healthy volunteers, each serving as his or her own control, participated in sham and methanol exposures. Urine (at 0, 4, 8 hr) and serum specimens (15 time points over 8 hr) collected before, during, and after the exposure were measured for formate. We found no significant differences in serum formate concentration between exposure and control conditions either at any time point or for area under the curve. Mean concentrations at the end of the exposure were: exposed 14.28 [+-] 8.90 mg/l and control 12.68 [+-] 6.43 mg/l. A slight, but nonsignificant (p = 0.08), increase in urine formate excretion rate was found at 4 hr (exposed 2.17 [+-] 1.69 mg/4 hr and control 1.67 [+-] 1.02 mg/4 hr). Age, sex, folic acid level, and smoking were not significant covariates. At 200 ppm, methanol exposure does not contribute substantially to endogenous formate quantities. Serum and urine formate determinations are not sensitive biological markers of methanol exposure at the threshold limit value. 24 refs., 4 tabs.

  8. Overcoming non-local effects and Brillouin threshold limitations in Brillouin distributed sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urricelqui, Javier; Ruiz-Lombera, Rubén.; Sagues, Mikel; Mirapeix, Jesús; López-Higuera, José M.; Loayssa, Alayn

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, a Brillouin optical time domain analysis sensor that is able to operate with a probe power larger than the Brillouin threshold of the deployed sensing fiber and that is free from detrimental non-local effects. The technique is based on a dual-probe-sideband setup in which a frequency modulation of the probes waves along the fiber is introduced. This makes the frequency of maximum interaction between pump and probes to vary along the fiber, thus mitigating the pump pulse depletion and making it possible to use very large probe power, which brings an improved signal-to-noise ratio in detection.

  9. Blister Threshold Based Thermal Limits for the U-Mo Monolithic Fuel System

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Wachs; I. Glagolenko; F. J. Rice; A. B. Robinson; B. H. Rabin; M. K. Meyer

    2012-10-01

    Fuel failure is most commonly induced in research and test reactor fuel elements by exposure to an under-cooled or over-power condition that results in the fuel temperature exceeding a critical threshold above which blisters form on the plate. These conditions can be triggered by normal operational transients (i.e. temperature overshoots that may occur during reactor startup or power shifts) or mild upset events (e.g., pump coastdown, small blockages, mis-loading of fuel elements into higher-than-planned power positions, etc.). The rise in temperature has a number of general impacts on the state of a fuel plate that include, for example, stress relaxation in the cladding (due to differential thermal expansion), softening of the cladding, increased mobility of fission gases, and increased fission-gas pressure in pores, all of which can encourage the formation of blisters on the fuel-plate surface. These blisters consist of raised regions on the surface of fuel plates that occur when the cladding plastically deforms in response to fission-gas pressure in large pores in the fuel meat and/or mechanical buckling of the cladding over damaged regions in the fuel meat. The blister temperature threshold decreases with irradiation because the mechanical properties of the fuel plate degrade while under irradiation (due to irradiation damage and fission-product accumulation) and because the fission-gas inventory progressively increases (and, thus, so does the gas pressure in pores).

  10. The threshold temperature where type-I and type-II interchange in mesoscopic superconductors at the Bogomolnyi limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Isaías G.

    2017-04-01

    In this work we discuss the H - T phase diagram for mesoscopic squared superconducting samples at the Bogomolnyi limit, where the Ginzburg-Landau constant κ = 1 /√{ 2}. We calculate Hp (T), the vortex penetration field, and Hu (T) the upper critical field. Through the study of the temperature dependence on the Hp, it is possible to distinguish the region where the magnetic field penetrates into the sample, like a type-I or a type-II superconductor. It permits to determine the threshold temperature T⋆ (L , H) where the phase transition from type-I to type-II occurs for some different sizes L of the mesoscopic superconducting samples. The calculation of the upper critical field Hu (T), for these samples, shows that, these two curves, Hp (T) and Hu (T), overlap at the threshold temperature mentioned above. The magnetization of the system was calculated for all sizes studied in this work, and for temperatures above and below T⋆ (L , H). This study confirms the existence of the threshold temperature, T⋆ (L , H), where type-I and type-II interchange in mesoscopic superconductors at the Bogomolnyi limit.

  11. Niche overlap, threshold food densities, and limits to prey depletion for a diving duck assemblage in an estuarine bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovvorn, James R.; De La Cruz, Susan; Takekawa, John Y.; Shaskey, Laura E.; Richman, Samantha E.

    2013-01-01

    Planning for marine conservation often requires estimates of the amount of habitat needed to support assemblages of interacting species. During winter in subtidal San Pablo Bay, California, the 3 main diving duck species are lesser scaup Aythya affinis (LESC), greater scaup A. marila (GRSC), and surf scoter Melanitta perspicillata (SUSC), which all feed almost entirely on the bivalve Corbula amurensis. Decreased body mass and fat, increased foraging effort, and major departures of these birds appeared to result from food limitation. Broad overlap in prey size, water depth, and location suggested that the 3 species responded similarly to availability of the same prey. However, an energetics model that accounts for differing body size, locomotor mode, and dive behavior indicated that each species will become limited at different stages of prey depletion in the order SUSC, then GRSC, then LESC. Depending on year, 35 to 66% of the energy in Corbula standing stocks was below estimated threshold densities for profitable foraging. Ectothermic predators, especially flounders and sturgeons, could reduce excess carrying capacity for different duck species by 4 to 10%. A substantial quantity of prey above profitability thresholds was not exploited before most ducks left San Pablo Bay. Such pre-depletion departure has been attributed in other taxa to foraging aggression. However, in these diving ducks that showed no overt aggression, this pattern may result from high costs of locating all adequate prey patches, resulting reliance on existing flocks to find food, and propensity to stay near dense flocks to avoid avian predation. For interacting species assemblages, modeling profitability thresholds can indicate the species most vulnerable to food declines. However, estimates of total habitat needed require better understanding of factors affecting the amount of prey above thresholds that is not depleted before the predators move elsewhere.

  12. Late Miocene threshold response of marine algae to carbon dioxide limitation.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Clara T; Stoll, Heather M

    2013-08-29

    Coccolithophores are marine algae that use carbon for calcification and photosynthesis. The long-term adaptation of these and other marine algae to decreasing carbon dioxide levels during the Cenozoic era has resulted in modern algae capable of actively enhancing carbon dioxide at the site of photosynthesis. This enhancement occurs through the transport of dissolved bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) and with the help of enzymes whose expression can be modulated by variable aqueous carbon dioxide concentration, [CO2], in laboratory cultures. Coccolithophores preserve the geological history of this adaptation because the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of their calcite plates (coccoliths), which are preserved in the fossil record, are sensitive to active carbon uptake and transport by the cell. Here we use a model of cellular carbon fluxes and show that at low [CO2] the increased demand for HCO3(-) at the site of photosynthesis results in a diminished allocation of HCO3(-) to calcification, which is most pronounced in larger cells. This results in a large divergence between the carbon isotopic compositions of small versus large coccoliths only at low [CO2]. Our evaluation of the oxygen and carbon isotope record of size-separated fossil coccoliths reveals that this isotopic divergence first arose during the late Miocene to the earliest Pliocene epoch (about 7-5 million years ago). We interpret this to be a threshold response of the cells' carbon acquisition strategies to decreasing [CO2]. The documented coccolithophore response is synchronous with a global shift in terrestrial vegetation distribution between 8 and 5 Myr ago, which has been interpreted by some studies as a floral response to decreasing partial pressures of carbon dioxide () in the atmosphere. We infer a global decrease in carbon dioxide levels for this time interval that has not yet been identified in the sparse proxy record but is synchronous with global cooling and progressive glaciations.

  13. Application of thresholds of potential concern and limits of acceptable change in the condition assessment of a significant wetland.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kerrylee; Saintilan, Neil; Colloff, Matthew J; Wen, Li

    2013-10-01

    We propose a framework in which thresholds of potential concern (TPCs) and limits of acceptable change (LACs) are used in concert in the assessment of wetland condition and vulnerability and apply the framework in a case study. The lower Murrumbidgee River floodplain (the 'Lowbidgee') is one of the most ecologically important wetlands in Australia and the focus of intense management intervention by State and Federal government agencies. We used a targeted management stakeholder workshop to identify key values that contribute to the ecological significance of the Lowbidgee floodplain, and identified LACs that, if crossed, would signify the loss of significance. We then used conceptual models linking the condition of these values (wetland vegetation communities, waterbirds, fish species and the endangered southern bell frog) to measurable threat indicators, for which we defined a management goal and a TPC. We applied this framework to data collected across 70 wetland storages', or eco-hydrological units, at the peak of a prolonged drought (2008) and following extensive re-flooding (2010). At the suggestion of water and wetland mangers, we neither aggregated nor integrated indices but reported separately in a series of chloropleth maps. The resulting assessment clearly identified the effect of rewetting in restoring indicators within TPC in most cases, for most storages. The scale of assessment was useful in informing the targeted and timely management intervention and provided a context for retaining and utilising monitoring information in an adaptive management context.

  14. Investigation of stimulated raman scattering using short-pulse diffraction limited laser beam near the instability threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, John L; Montgomery, David S; Flippo, Kirk A; Rose, Harvey A; Yin, L; Albright, B J; Johnson, R P; Shimada, T; Bowers, K; Rousseaux, C; Tassin, V; Baton, S D; Amiranoff, F; Hardin, R A

    2008-01-01

    Short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments using diffraction limited beams provide an excellent platform to investigate the fundamental physics of Stimulated Raman Scattering. Detailed understanding of these laser plasma instabilities impacts the current inertial confinement fusion ignition designs and could potentially impact fast ignition when higher energy lasers are used with longer pulse durations ( > 1 kJ and> 1 ps). Using short laser pulses, experiments can be modeled over the entire interaction time of the laser using particle-in-cell codes to validate our understanding quantitatively. Experiments have been conducted at the Trident laser facility and the LULI (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses) to investigate stimulated Raman scattering near the threshold of the instability using 527 nm and 1059 nm laser light respectively with 1.5-3.0 ps pulses. In both experiments, the interaction beam was focused into a pre-ionized He gas-jet plasma. Measurements of the reflectivity as a function of intensity and k{lambda}{sub D} were completed at the Trident laser facility. At LULI, a 300 fs Thomson scattering probe is used to directly measure the density fluctuations of the driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves. Work is currently underway comparing the results of the experiments with simulations using the VPIC [K. J. Bowers, et at., Phys. Plasmas, 15 055703 (2008)] particle-in-cell code. Details of the experimental results are presented in this manuscript.

  15. 30 CFR 56.5001 - Exposure limits for airborne contaminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality and Physical Agents Air Quality § 56.5001 Exposure limits for airborne contaminants. Except as... Workroom Air Adopted by ACGIH for 1973,” pages 1 through 54, which are hereby incorporated by reference...

  16. 30 CFR 56.5001 - Exposure limits for airborne contaminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality and Physical Agents Air Quality § 56.5001 Exposure limits for airborne contaminants. Except as... Workroom Air Adopted by ACGIH for 1973,” pages 1 through 54, which are hereby incorporated by reference...

  17. 30 CFR 56.5001 - Exposure limits for airborne contaminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality and Physical Agents Air Quality § 56.5001 Exposure limits for airborne contaminants. Except as... Workroom Air Adopted by ACGIH for 1973,” pages 1 through 54, which are hereby incorporated by reference...

  18. 30 CFR 56.5001 - Exposure limits for airborne contaminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality and Physical Agents Air Quality § 56.5001 Exposure limits for airborne contaminants. Except as... Workroom Air Adopted by ACGIH for 1973,” pages 1 through 54, which are hereby incorporated by reference...

  19. 30 CFR 56.5001 - Exposure limits for airborne contaminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality and Physical Agents Air Quality § 56.5001 Exposure limits for airborne contaminants. Except as... Workroom Air Adopted by ACGIH for 1973,” pages 1 through 54, which are hereby incorporated by reference...

  20. An evaluation of compliance with occupational exposure limits for crystalline silica (quartz) in ten Georgia granite sheds.

    PubMed

    Wickman, Arthur R; Middendorf, Paul J

    2002-06-01

    Since the 1920s, industrial hygiene studies have documented granite shed workers' exposures to crystalline silica, and the data from these studies have contributed to a better understanding of the relationship between silica exposures and adverse health effects, such as silicosis. The majority of these studies were conducted in the Barre, Vermont, granite sheds. However, a second major granite processing region is located in Elberton, Georgia, where approximately 1800 workers are employed in 150 granite sheds and 45 quarries. The current study reports the exposures of 40 workers in 10 granite sheds in Elberton, Georgia. The arithmetic mean exposure to silica for all monitored employees was 0.052 mg/m3. Employees were classified into one of seven job task groups. The job task group with the greatest exposure was the top polish group, which had a mean exposure of 0.085 mg/m3. Among the top polish workers, the greatest percentage of exposures above the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's permissible exposure limit (OSHA PEL) occurred among the workers who used dry grinders. Wet methods were effective in reducing these exposures to below the OSHA PEL. The mean exposure of Elberton granite shed workers was less than the OSHA PEL, but was not below the threshold limit value of the American Conference of Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH TLV), which was lowered in the year 2000 to 0.05 mg/m3. The Elberton granite shed workers provide a valuable cohort for research on the effects of exposure to crystalline silica at levels between the ACGIH TLV and the OSHA PEL. They are a relatively permanent worker population, are concentrated geographically, and have a quantitatively documented exposure to crystalline silica over the past twenty years.

  1. PSYCHOPHYSICAL METHODOLOGY I. COMPARISON OF THRESHOLDS OF THE METHOD OF LIMITS AND OF THE METHOD OF CONSTANT STIMULI.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    On the basis of this assumption (a) the relationships between the method of limits and the method of constant stimuli are derived, (b) a procedure for...comparing data obtained by the two methods is recommended, (c) a procedure for comparing ascending and descending series within the method of limits is given. (Author)

  2. Dissociation limit and dissociation dynamic of CF4(+): application of threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence velocity imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Xiaoguo; Wu, Manman; Gao, Zhi; Liu, Shilin; Liu, Fuyi; Shan, Xiaobin; Sheng, Liusi

    2013-03-07

    Dissociation of internal energy selected CF4(+) ions in an excitation energy range of 15.40-19.60 eV has been investigated using threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) velocity imaging. Only CF3(+) fragment ions are observed in coincident mass spectra, indicating all the X(2)T1, A(2)T2, and B(2)E ionic states of CF4(+) are fully dissociative. Both kinetic energy released distribution (KERD) and angular distribution in dissociation of CF4(+) ions have been derived from three-dimensional TPEPICO time-sliced images. A parallel distribution of CF3(+) fragments along the polarization vector of photon is observed for dissociation of CF4(+) ions in all the low-lying electronic states. With the aid of F-loss potential energy curves, dissociation mechanisms of CF4(+) ions in these electronic states have been proposed. CF4(+) ions in both X(2)T1 and A(2)T2 states directly dissociate to CF3(+) and F fragments along the repulsive C-F coordinate, while a two-step dissociation mechanism is suggested for B(2)E state: CF4(+)(B(2)E) ion first converts to the lower A(2)T2 state via internal conversion, then dissociates to CF3(+) and F fragments along the steep A(2)T2 potential energy surface. In addition, an adiabatic appearance potential of AP0(CF3(+)∕CF4) has also been established to be 14.71 ± 0.02 eV, which is very consistent with the recent calculated values.

  3. Limitations of Spectral Electromyogramic Analysis to Determine the Onset of Neuromuscular Fatigue Threshold during Incremental Ergometer Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Latasa, Iban; Cordova, Alfredo; Malanda, Armando; Navallas, Javier; Lavilla-Oiz, Ana; Rodriguez-Falces, Javier

    2016-01-01

    relation between spectral indicators and workload and the other half showing the opposite behaviour. None of the spectral EMG indicators examined (Fmean nor Fmedian) decreased significantly between the ventilatory threshold and the highest power output. Examination of spectral indicators within individual exercise periods of the test showed that neither Fmean nor Fmedian decreased significantly during the last (most fatiguing) exercise periods. PMID:26957938

  4. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  5. Benefits and limitations of using the weather radar for the definition of rainfall thresholds for debris flows. Case study from Catalonia (Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abancó, C.; Hürlimann, M.; Sempere, D.; Berenguer, M.

    2012-04-01

    Torrential processes such as debris flows or hyperconcentrated flows are fast movements formed by a mix of water and different amounts of unsorted solid material. They occur in steep torrents and suppose a high risk for the human settlements. Rainfall is the most common triggering factor for debris flows. The rainfall threshold defines the rainfall conditions that, when reached or exceeded, are likely to provoke one or more events. Many different types of empirical rainfall thresholds for landslide triggering have been defined. Direct measurements of rainfall data are normally not available from a point next to or in the surroundings of the initiation area of the landslide. For this reason, most of the thresholds published for debris flows have been established by data measured at the nearest rain gauges (often located several km far from the landslide). Only in very few cases, the rainfall data to analyse the triggering conditions of the debris flows have been obtained by weather (Doppler) radar. Radar devices present certain limitations in mountainous regions due to undesired reboots, but their main advantage is that radar data can be obtained for any point of the territory. The objective of this work was to test the use of the weather radar data for the definition of rainfall thresholds for debris-flow triggering. Thus, rainfall data obtained from 3 to 5 rain gauges and from radar were compared for a dataset of events occurred in Catalonia (Spain). The goal was to determine in which cases the description of the rainfall episode (in particular the maximum intensity) had been more accurate. The analysed dataset consists of: 1) three events occurred in the Rebaixader debris-flow monitoring station (Axial Pyrenees) including two hyperconcentrated flows and one debris flow; 2) one debris-flow event occurred in the Port Ainé ski resort (Axial Pyrenees); 3) one debris-flow event in Montserrat (Mediterranean Coastal range). The comparison of the hyetographs from the

  6. Interactions between cold and water limitation along a climate gradient produce sharp thresholds in ecosystem type, carbon balance, and water cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, A. E.; Goulden, M.; Fellows, A. W.

    2013-12-01

    California's Mediterranean climate supports a broad diversity of ecosystem types, including Sequoia forests in the mid-montane Sierra Nevada. Understanding how winter cold and summer drought interact to produce the lush forest in the Sierra is critical to predicting the impacts of projected climate change on California's ecosystems, water supply, and carbon cycling. We investigated how smooth gradients of temperature and water availability produced sharp thresholds in biomass, productivity, growing season, water use, and ultimately ecosystem type and function. We used the climate gradient of the western slope of the Sierra Nevada as a study system. Four eddy covariance towers were situated in the major ecosystem types of the Sierra Nevada at approximately 800-m elevation intervals. Eddy flux data were combined with remote sensing and direct measurements of biomass, productivity, soil available water, and evapotranspiration to understand how weather and available water control ecosystem production and function. We found that production at the high elevation lodgepole site at 2700 m was strongly limited by winter cold. Production at the low elevation oak woodland site at 400 m was strongly limited by summer drought. The yellow pine site at 1200 m was only 4 °C cooler than the oak woodland site, yet had an order of magnitude more biomass and productivity with year-round growth. The mixed conifer site at 2000 m is 3.5 °C warmer than the lodgepole forest, yet also has higher biomass, ten times higher productivity, and year-round growth. We conclude that there is a broad climatological 'sweet spot' within the Sierra Nevada, in which the Mediterranean climate can support large-statured forest with high growth rates. The range of the mid-elevation forest was sharply bounded by water limitation at the lower edge and cold limitation at the upper edge despite small differences in precipitation and temperature across these boundaries. Our results suggest that small changes

  7. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  8. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  9. Redefining the Speed Limit of Phase Change Memory Revealed by Time-resolved Steep Threshold-Switching Dynamics of AgInSbTe Devices

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Krishna Dayal; Saxena, Nishant; Durai, Suresh; Manivannan, Anbarasu

    2016-01-01

    Although phase-change memory (PCM) offers promising features for a ‘universal memory’ owing to high-speed and non-volatility, achieving fast electrical switching remains a key challenge. In this work, a correlation between the rate of applied voltage and the dynamics of threshold-switching is investigated at picosecond-timescale. A distinct characteristic feature of enabling a rapid threshold-switching at a critical voltage known as the threshold voltage as validated by an instantaneous response of steep current rise from an amorphous off to on state is achieved within 250 picoseconds and this is followed by a slower current rise leading to crystallization. Also, we demonstrate that the extraordinary nature of threshold-switching dynamics in AgInSbTe cells is independent to the rate of applied voltage unlike other chalcogenide-based phase change materials exhibiting the voltage dependent transient switching characteristics. Furthermore, numerical solutions of time-dependent conduction process validate the experimental results, which reveal the electronic nature of threshold-switching. These findings of steep threshold-switching of ‘sub-50 ps delay time’, opens up a new way for achieving high-speed non-volatile memory for mainstream computing. PMID:27886266

  10. Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2006-03-24

    A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

  11. The limits of applicability of the sound exposure level (SEL) metric to temporal threshold shifts (TTS) in beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas.

    PubMed

    Popov, Vladimir V; Supin, Alexander Ya; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav V; Nechaev, Dmitry I; Sysueva, Evgenia V

    2014-05-15

    The influence of fatiguing sound level and duration on post-exposure temporary threshold shift (TTS) was investigated in two beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). The fatiguing sound was half-octave noise with a center frequency of 22.5 kHz. TTS was measured at a test frequency of 32 kHz. Thresholds were measured by recording rhythmic evoked potentials (the envelope following response) to a test series of short (eight cycles) tone pips with a pip rate of 1000 s(-1). TTS increased approximately proportionally to the dB measure of both sound pressure (sound pressure level, SPL) and duration of the fatiguing noise, as a product of these two variables. In particular, when the noise parameters varied in a manner that maintained the product of squared sound pressure and time (sound exposure level, SEL, which is equivalent to the overall noise energy) at a constant level, TTS was not constant. Keeping SEL constant, the highest TTS appeared at an intermediate ratio of SPL to sound duration and decreased at both higher and lower ratios. Multiplication (SPL multiplied by log duration) better described the experimental data than an equal-energy (equal SEL) model. The use of SEL as a sole universal metric may result in an implausible assessment of the impact of a fatiguing sound on hearing thresholds in odontocetes, including under-evaluation of potential risks.

  12. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  13. Threshold photodissociation of Cr+2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessen, D. E.; Asher, R. L.; Brucat, P. J.

    1991-08-01

    A one-photon photodissociation threshold for supersonically cooled Cr+2 is determined to be 2.13 eV. This threshold provides a strict upper limit to the adiabatic binding energy of the ground state of chromium dimer cation if the initial internal energy of the parent ion may be neglected. From the difference in the IPs of chromium atom and dimer, an upper limit to the dissociation of Cr2 is placed at 1.77 eV.

  14. Vision thresholds revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garstang, R. H.

    1999-05-01

    During and just after World War II there was intense interest in the threshold for seeing faint sources against illuminated backgrounds. Knoll, Tousey and Hulburt (1946, 1948) determined the threshold for (effectively) point sources seen against backgrounds ranging in brightness from darkness to subdued daylight. Blackwell (1946) gave contrast ratios for sources of various sizes ranging from point sources up to circular disks of 6 degrees diameter, all seen against the same range of brightnesses, and determined by a very large number of visual observations made by a team of observers. I have combined the two sets of results, and represented them by an improvement on the theoretical formula for threshold illuminance as a function of background brightness which was suggested by Hecht (1934). My formula agrees very well with the observations, and is very suitable for incorporation into computer programs. Applications have been made to problems where the background brightness is caused by light pollution, and the source size is determined by the seeing. These include the optimum magnification and limiting magnitude of telescopes, and the analysis of visual limiting magnitudes determined by Bowen (1947) to determine the night sky brightness at Mount Wilson in 1947.

  15. An isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for trace analysis of xylene and its metabolites in tissues following threshold limit value exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Pyon, K.H.; Kracko, D.A.; Strunk, M.R.

    1995-12-01

    The existence of a nose-brain barrier that functions to protect the central nervous system (CNS) from inhaled toxicants has been postulated. Just as a blood-brain barrier protects the CNS from systemic toxicants, the nose-brain barrier may have similar characteristic functions. One component of interest is nasal xenobiotic metabolism and its effect on the transport of pollutants into the CNS at environmentally plausible levels of exposure. Previous results have shown that inhaled xylene are dimethyl phenol (DMP) and methyl benzyl alcohol (MBA), and the nonvolatile metabolites are toluic acid (TA) and methyl hippuric acid (MHA). The nonvolatile metabolites of xylene, along with a small quantity of volatiles, representing either parent xylene or volatile metabolites, are transported via the olfactory epithelium to the glomeruli within the olfactory bulbs of the brain. Further work will be done to establish the linearity for each analyte at the actual highest detection limit of the GC/MS.

  16. CARA Risk Assessment Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Warning remediation threshold (Red threshold): Pc level at which warnings are issued, and active remediation considered and usually executed. Analysis threshold (Green to Yellow threshold): Pc level at which analysis of event is indicated, including seeking additional information if warranted. Post-remediation threshold: Pc level to which remediation maneuvers are sized in order to achieve event remediation and obviate any need for immediate follow-up maneuvers. Maneuver screening threshold: Pc compliance level for routine maneuver screenings (more demanding than regular Red threshold due to additional maneuver uncertainty).

  17. Laser threshold magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of sensor, which uses diamond containing the optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centres as a laser medium. The magnetometer can be operated at room-temperature and generates light that can be readily fibre coupled, thereby permitting use in industrial applications and remote sensing. By combining laser pumping with a radio-frequency Rabi-drive field, an external magnetic field changes the fluorescence of the NV- centres. We use this change in fluorescence level to push the laser above threshold, turning it on with an intensity controlled by the external magnetic field, which provides a coherent amplification of the readout signal with very high contrast. This mechanism is qualitatively different from conventional NV--based magnetometers which use fluorescence measurements, based on incoherent photon emission. We term our approach laser threshold magnetometer (LTM). We predict that an NV--based LTM with a volume of 1 mm3 can achieve shot-noise limited dc sensitivity of 1.86 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}} and ac sensitivity of 3.97 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}.

  18. Oscillatory Threshold Logic

    PubMed Central

    Borresen, Jon; Lynch, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In the 1940s, the first generation of modern computers used vacuum tube oscillators as their principle components, however, with the development of the transistor, such oscillator based computers quickly became obsolete. As the demand for faster and lower power computers continues, transistors are themselves approaching their theoretical limit and emerging technologies must eventually supersede them. With the development of optical oscillators and Josephson junction technology, we are again presented with the possibility of using oscillators as the basic components of computers, and it is possible that the next generation of computers will be composed almost entirely of oscillatory devices. Here, we demonstrate how coupled threshold oscillators may be used to perform binary logic in a manner entirely consistent with modern computer architectures. We describe a variety of computational circuitry and demonstrate working oscillator models of both computation and memory. PMID:23173034

  19. Low Threshold Quantum Dot Lasers.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Veena Hariharan; Mahadevu, Rekha; Pandey, Anshu

    2016-04-07

    Semiconductor quantum dots have replaced conventional inorganic phosphors in numerous applications. Despite their overall successes as emitters, their impact as laser materials has been severely limited. Eliciting stimulated emission from quantum dots requires excitation by intense short pulses of light typically generated using other lasers. In this Letter, we develop a new class of quantum dots that exhibit gain under conditions of extremely low levels of continuous wave illumination. We observe thresholds as low as 74 mW/cm(2) in lasers made from these materials. Due to their strong optical absorption as well as low lasing threshold, these materials could possibly convert light from diffuse, polychromatic sources into a laser beam.

  20. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been…

  1. HRS Threshold Adjustment Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skapik, Joe

    1991-07-01

    This test will determine the optimal, non-standard discriminator thresholds for the few anomalous channels on each HRS detector. A 15 second flat field observation followed by a 210 second dark count is performed at each of 10 discriminator threshold values for each detector. The result of the test will be the optimal threshold values to be entered into the PDB. Edited 4/30/91 to add comments to disable/re-enable cross-talk tables.

  2. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time…

  3. Scaling behavior of threshold epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2012-05-01

    We study the classic Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model for the spread of an infectious disease. In this stochastic process, there are two competing mechanism: infection and recovery. Susceptible individuals may contract the disease from infected individuals, while infected ones recover from the disease at a constant rate and are never infected again. Our focus is the behavior at the epidemic threshold where the rates of the infection and recovery processes balance. In the infinite population limit, we establish analytically scaling rules for the time-dependent distribution functions that characterize the sizes of the infected and the recovered sub-populations. Using heuristic arguments, we also obtain scaling laws for the size and duration of the epidemic outbreaks as a function of the total population. We perform numerical simulations to verify the scaling predictions and discuss the consequences of these scaling laws for near-threshold epidemic outbreaks.

  4. Double Photoionization Near Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehlitz, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    The threshold region of the double-photoionization cross section is of particular interest because both ejected electrons move slowly in the Coulomb field of the residual ion. Near threshold both electrons have time to interact with each other and with the residual ion. Also, different theoretical models compete to describe the double-photoionization cross section in the threshold region. We have investigated that cross section for lithium and beryllium and have analyzed our data with respect to the latest results in the Coulomb-dipole theory. We find that our data support the idea of a Coulomb-dipole interaction.

  5. Life below the threshold.

    PubMed

    Castro, C

    1991-01-01

    This article explains that malnutrition, poor health, and limited educational opportunities plague Philippine children -- especially female children -- from families living below the poverty threshold. Nearly 70% of households in the Philippines do not meet the required daily level of nutritional intake. Because it is often -- and incorrectly -- assumed that women's nutritional requirements are lower than men's, women suffer higher rates of malnutrition and poor health. A 1987 study revealed that 11.7% of all elementary students were underweight and 13.9% had stunted growths. Among elementary-school girls, 17% were malnourished and 40% suffered from anemia (among lactating mothers, more than 1/2 are anemic). A 1988 Program for Decentralized Educational Development study showed that grade VI students learn only about 1/2 of what they are supposed to learn. 30% of the children enrolled in grade school drop out before they reach their senior year. The Department of Education, Culture and Sports estimates that some 2.56 million students dropped out of school in l989. That same year, some 3.7 million children were counted as part of the labor force. In Manila alone, some 60,000 children work the streets, whether doing odd jobs or begging, or turning to crime or prostitution. the article tells the story of a 12 year-old girl named Ging, a 4th grader at a public school and the oldest child in a poor family of 6 children. The undernourished Ging dreams of a good future for her family and sees education as a way out of poverty; unfortunately, her time after school is spend working in the streets or looking after her family. She considers herself luckier than many of the other children working in the streets, since she at least has a family.

  6. Experimental realization of chaos control by thresholding.

    PubMed

    Murali, K; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2003-07-01

    We report the experimental verification of thresholding as a versatile tool for efficient and flexible chaos control. The strategy here simply involves monitoring a single state variable and resetting it when it exceeds a threshold. We demonstrate the success of the technique in rapidly controlling different chaotic electrical circuits, including a hyperchaotic circuit, onto stable fixed points and limit cycles of different periods, by thresholding just one variable. The simplicity of this controller entailing no run-time computation, and the ease and rapidity of switching between different targets it offers, suggests a potent tool for chaos based applications.

  7. [Threshold values for chemicals to prevent disease].

    PubMed

    Schweinsberg, F

    1990-05-01

    Proper interpretation of threshold limit values should always take into account that such limits are not absolute, but rather subject to change depending on advances in scientific knowledge. Threshold limit values derived from toxicologic study are best suited to evaluation of health risks of chemicals in the environment. Although more toxicologic information than is currently available would be desirable for the establishment of limit values, this should not prevent agreement on limits for more substances. "Better" threshold limit values would be forthcoming from epidemiologic studies, which are particularly rare in the FRG. Prospective studies measure current exposure; but appearance of detrimental health effects generally requires a lengthy latency period (e.g., decades in the case of cancer or cardiovascular disease). Threshold limit values permit monitoring and, if necessary, restriction of anthropogenic activity. Such restrictions are necessary, as shown by severe health damage which has occurred in the past (e.g., angiosarcoma due to vinyl chloride or neurogenic damage due to mercury in the workplace, tumors due to arsenic in drinking water, and methemoglobinemia in infants due to nitrite or renal damage due to cadmium in food). Evaluation of potential detrimental health effects for threshold limit values in environmental media is difficult because the effective dose cannot be determined. Monitoring of such limit values, which have already been incorporated into West German law, is relatively easy to implement, however (e.g. continuous outdoor air quality sampling and measurement, and periodic analysis of drinking water and foodstuffs). Since such monitoring may be performed close to the source, preventive measures should be easy to implement. Biological threshold limit values (biological monitoring) are essential to effective evaluation of the health effects of chemicals. Such limits should be established for more substances. When biological limit values

  8. Upper limit for the cross-section of the overlapping scalar resonances f0(980) and a0(980) produced in proton proton collisions in the range of the reaction threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskal, P.; Adam, H.-H.; Budzanowski, A.; Czyzykiewicz, R.; Grzonka, D.; Janusz, M.; Jarczyk, L.; Kamys, B.; Khoukaz, A.; Kilian, K.; Kolf, C.; Kowina, P.; Lister, T.; Oelert, W.; Piskor-Ignatowicz, C.; Przerwa, J.; Quentmeier, C.; Rozek, T.; Santo, R.; Schepers, G.; Sefzick, T.; Siemaszko, M.; Smyrski, J.; Strzalkowski, A.; Täschner, A.; Winter, P.; Wolke, M.; Wüstner, P.; Zipper, W.

    2003-09-01

    Utilizing a missing mass technique we investigate the pp rightarrow ppX reaction scanning beam energies in the range permitting to create a mass close to that of the f0(980) and a0(980) scalar resonances, but still below the K+K- threshold where they decay dominantly into pipi and pieta mesons, respectively. Prior to the data analysis we introduce a notion of the close to threshold total cross-section for broad resonances. We estimated for the overlapping mesons a0 and f0 the total cross-section to be smaller than 430 nb at excess energy of Q = 5 MeV. The experiment has been performed at the Cooler Synchrotron (COSY) using the COSY-11 facility.

  9. Mitochondrial threshold effects.

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Rodrigue; Faustin, Benjamin; Rocher, Christophe; Malgat, Monique; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Letellier, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial diseases has revealed dramatic variability in the phenotypic presentation of mitochondrial genetic defects. To attempt to understand this variability, different authors have studied energy metabolism in transmitochondrial cell lines carrying different proportions of various pathogenic mutations in their mitochondrial DNA. The same kinds of experiments have been performed on isolated mitochondria and on tissue biopsies taken from patients with mitochondrial diseases. The results have shown that, in most cases, phenotypic manifestation of the genetic defect occurs only when a threshold level is exceeded, and this phenomenon has been named the 'phenotypic threshold effect'. Subsequently, several authors showed that it was possible to inhibit considerably the activity of a respiratory chain complex, up to a critical value, without affecting the rate of mitochondrial respiration or ATP synthesis. This phenomenon was called the 'biochemical threshold effect'. More recently, quantitative analysis of the effects of various mutations in mitochondrial DNA on the rate of mitochondrial protein synthesis has revealed the existence of a 'translational threshold effect'. In this review these different mitochondrial threshold effects are discussed, along with their molecular bases and the roles that they play in the presentation of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:12467494

  10. Motion parallax thresholds for unambiguous depth perception.

    PubMed

    Holmin, Jessica; Nawrot, Mark

    2015-10-01

    The perception of unambiguous depth from motion parallax arises from the neural integration of retinal image motion and extra-retinal eye movement signals. It is only recently that these parameters have been articulated in the form of the motion/pursuit ratio. In the current study, we explored the lower limits of the parameter space in which observers could accurately perform near/far relative depth-sign discriminations for a translating random-dot stimulus. Stationary observers pursued a translating random dot stimulus containing relative image motion. Their task was to indicate the location of the peak in an approximate square-wave stimulus. We measured thresholds for depth from motion parallax, quantified as motion/pursuit ratios, as well as lower motion thresholds and pursuit accuracy. Depth thresholds were relatively stable at pursuit velocities 5-20 deg/s, and increased at lower and higher velocities. The pattern of results indicates that minimum motion/pursuit ratios are limited by motion and pursuit signals, both independently and in combination with each other. At low and high pursuit velocities, depth thresholds were limited by inaccurate pursuit signals. At moderate pursuit velocities, depth thresholds were limited by motion signals.

  11. Upper threshold of extracellular neural stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pangratz-Fuehrer, Susanne; Suh, Bongsoo; Mathieson, Keith; Naik, Natasha; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that spiking neurons can produce action potentials in response to extracellular stimulation above certain threshold. It is widely assumed that there is no upper limit to somatic stimulation, except for cellular or electrode damage. Here we demonstrate that there is an upper stimulation threshold, above which no action potential can be elicited, and it is below the threshold of cellular damage. Existence of this upper stimulation threshold was confirmed in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) at pulse durations ranging from 5 to 500 μs. The ratio of the upper to lower stimulation thresholds varied typically from 1.7 to 7.6, depending on pulse duration. Computational modeling of extracellular RGC stimulation explained the upper limit by sodium current reversal on the depolarized side of the cell membrane. This was further confirmed by experiments in the medium with a low concentration of sodium. The limited width of the stimulation window may have important implications in design of the electro-neural interfaces, including neural prosthetics. PMID:22993266

  12. Upper threshold of extracellular neural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Boinagrov, David; Pangratz-Fuehrer, Susanne; Suh, Bongsoo; Mathieson, Keith; Naik, Natasha; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that spiking neurons can produce action potentials in response to extracellular stimulation above certain threshold. It is widely assumed that there is no upper limit to somatic stimulation, except for cellular or electrode damage. Here we demonstrate that there is an upper stimulation threshold, above which no action potential can be elicited, and it is below the threshold of cellular damage. Existence of this upper stimulation threshold was confirmed in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) at pulse durations ranging from 5 to 500 μs. The ratio of the upper to lower stimulation thresholds varied typically from 1.7 to 7.6, depending on pulse duration. Computational modeling of extracellular RGC stimulation explained the upper limit by sodium current reversal on the depolarized side of the cell membrane. This was further confirmed by experiments in the medium with a low concentration of sodium. The limited width of the stimulation window may have important implications in design of the electro-neural interfaces, including neural prosthetics.

  13. Network problem threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gejji, Raghvendra, R.

    1992-01-01

    Network transmission errors such as collisions, CRC errors, misalignment, etc. are statistical in nature. Although errors can vary randomly, a high level of errors does indicate specific network problems, e.g. equipment failure. In this project, we have studied the random nature of collisions theoretically as well as by gathering statistics, and established a numerical threshold above which a network problem is indicated with high probability.

  14. Elaborating on threshold concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-09-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account for both the important and the problematic characteristics of TCs in terms of the Knowledge/Strategies/Mental Models Framework defined in previous work.

  15. Threshold Concepts in Research Education and Evidence of Threshold Crossing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiley, Margaret; Wisker, Gina

    2009-01-01

    Most work on threshold concepts has hitherto related to discipline-specific undergraduate education, however, the idea of generic doctoral-level threshold concepts appeared to us to provide a strong and useful framework to support research learning and teaching at the graduate level. The early work regarding research-level threshold concepts is…

  16. Methods for threshold determination in multiplexed assays

    DOEpatents

    Tammero, Lance F. Bentley; Dzenitis, John M; Hindson, Benjamin J

    2014-06-24

    Methods for determination of threshold values of signatures comprised in an assay are described. Each signature enables detection of a target. The methods determine a probability density function of negative samples and a corresponding false positive rate curve. A false positive criterion is established and a threshold for that signature is determined as a point at which the false positive rate curve intersects the false positive criterion. A method for quantitative analysis and interpretation of assay results together with a method for determination of a desired limit of detection of a signature in an assay are also described.

  17. Effects of pulse duration on magnetostimulation thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Saritas, Emine U.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Conolly, Steven M.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic particle imaging (MPI) utilize time-varying magnetic fields that are subject to magnetostimulation limits, which often limit the speed of the imaging process. Various human-subject experiments have studied the amplitude and frequency dependence of these thresholds for gradient or homogeneous magnetic fields. Another contributing factor was shown to be number of cycles in a magnetic pulse, where the thresholds decreased with longer pulses. The latter result was demonstrated on two subjects only, at a single frequency of 1.27 kHz. Hence, whether the observed effect was due to the number of cycles or due to the pulse duration was not specified. In addition, a gradient-type field was utilized; hence, whether the same phenomenon applies to homogeneous magnetic fields remained unknown. Here, the authors investigate the pulse duration dependence of magnetostimulation limits for a 20-fold range of frequencies using homogeneous magnetic fields, such as the ones used for the drive field in MPI. Methods: Magnetostimulation thresholds were measured in the arms of six healthy subjects (age: 27 ± 5 yr). Each experiment comprised testing the thresholds at eight different pulse durations between 2 and 125 ms at a single frequency, which took approximately 30–40 min/subject. A total of 34 experiments were performed at three different frequencies: 1.2, 5.7, and 25.5 kHz. A solenoid coil providing homogeneous magnetic field was used to induce stimulation, and the field amplitude was measured in real time. A pre-emphasis based pulse shaping method was employed to accurately control the pulse durations. Subjects reported stimulation via a mouse click whenever they felt a twitching/tingling sensation. A sigmoid function was fitted to the subject responses to find the threshold at a specific frequency and duration, and the whole procedure was repeated at all relevant frequencies and pulse durations

  18. Optical thresholding and Max Operation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Thresholding and Max operations are essential elements in the implementation of neural networks. Although there have been several optical...implementations of neural networks, the thresholding functions are performed electronically. Optical thresholding and Max operations have the advantages of...we propose and study the properties of self-oscillation in nonlinear optical (NLO) four-wave mixing (FWM) and NLO resonators for parallel optical thresholding and Max operation.

  19. The absolute threshold of cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Koeing, Darran; Hofer, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute threshold of cone vision, which has been previously underestimated due to sub-optimal conditions or overly strict subjective response criteria. We avoided these limitations by using optimized stimuli and experimental conditions while having subjects respond within a rating scale framework. Small (1′ fwhm), brief (34 msec), monochromatic (550 nm) stimuli were foveally presented at multiple intensities in dark-adapted retina for 5 subjects. For comparison, 4 subjects underwent similar testing with rod-optimized stimuli. Cone absolute threshold, that is, the minimum light energy for which subjects were just able to detect a visual stimulus with any response criterion, was 203 ± 38 photons at the cornea, ∼0.47 log units lower than previously reported. Two-alternative forced-choice measurements in a subset of subjects yielded consistent results. Cone thresholds were less responsive to criterion changes than rod thresholds, suggesting a limit to the stimulus information recoverable from the cone mosaic in addition to the limit imposed by Poisson noise. Results were consistent with expectations for detection in the face of stimulus uncertainty. We discuss implications of these findings for modeling the first stages of human cone vision and interpreting psychophysical data acquired with adaptive optics at the spatial scale of the receptor mosaic. PMID:21270115

  20. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  1. Thresholded Power law Size Distributions of Instabilities in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2015-11-01

    Power-law-like size distributions are ubiquitous in astrophysical instabilities. There are at least four natural effects that cause deviations from ideal power law size distributions, which we model here in a generalized way: (1) a physical threshold of an instability; (2) incomplete sampling of the smallest events below a threshold x0; (3) contamination by an event-unrelated background xb; and (4) truncation effects at the largest events due to a finite system size. These effects can be modeled in the simplest terms with a “thresholded power law” distribution function (also called generalized Pareto [type II] or Lomax distribution), N(x){dx}\\propto {(x+{x}0)}-a{dx}, where x0 > 0 is positive for a threshold effect, while x0 < 0 is negative for background contamination. We analytically derive the functional shape of this thresholded power law distribution function from an exponential growth evolution model, which produces avalanches only when a disturbance exceeds a critical threshold x0. We apply the thresholded power law distribution function to terrestrial, solar (HXRBS, BATSE, RHESSI), and stellar flare (Kepler) data sets. We find that the thresholded power law model provides an adequate fit to most of the observed data. Major advantages of this model are the automated choice of the power law fitting range, diagnostics of background contamination, physical instability thresholds, instrumental detection thresholds, and finite system size limits. When testing self-organized criticality models that predict ideal power laws, we suggest including these natural truncation effects.

  2. Optimising threshold levels for information transmission in binary threshold networks: Independent multiplicative noise on each threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bingchang; McDonnell, Mark D.

    2015-02-01

    The problem of optimising the threshold levels in multilevel threshold system subject to multiplicative Gaussian and uniform noise is considered. Similar to previous results for additive noise, we find a bifurcation phenomenon in the optimal threshold values, as the noise intensity changes. This occurs when the number of threshold units is greater than one. We also study the optimal thresholds for combined additive and multiplicative Gaussian noise, and find that all threshold levels need to be identical to optimise the system when the additive noise intensity is a constant. However, this identical value is not equal to the signal mean, unlike the case of additive noise. When the multiplicative noise intensity is instead held constant, the optimal threshold levels are not all identical for small additive noise intensity but are all equal to zero for large additive noise intensity. The model and our results are potentially relevant for sensor network design and understanding neurobiological sensory neurons such as in the peripheral auditory system.

  3. Preliminary recommendations on the design of the characterization program for the Hanford Site single-shell tanks: A system analysis. Volume 2, Closure-related analyte priorities, concentration thresholds, and detection limit goals based on public health concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, J.W.; Peffers, M.S.; Hwang, S.T.

    1991-11-01

    The work described in this volume was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide preliminary recommendations on data quality objectives (DQOs) to support the Waste Characterization Plan (WCP) and closure decisions for the Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs). The WCP describes the first of a two-phase characterization program that will obtain information to assess and implement disposal options for SSTs. This work was performed for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), the current operating contractor on the Hanford Site. The preliminary DQOs contained in this volume deal with the analysis of SST wastes in support of the WCP and final closure decisions. These DQOs include information on significant contributors and detection limit goals (DLGs) for SST analytes based on public health risk.

  4. The Limits to Adaptation; A Systems Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Limits to Adaptation: A Systems Approach. The ability to adapt to climate change is delineated by capacity thresholds, after which climate damages begin to overwhelm the adaptation response. Such thresholds depend upon physical properties (natural processes and engineering...

  5. Learning foraging thresholds for lizards

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.A.; Hart, W.E.; Wilson, D.B.

    1996-01-12

    This work gives a proof of convergence for a randomized learning algorithm that describes how anoles (lizards found in the Carribean) learn a foraging threshold distance. This model assumes that an anole will pursue a prey if and only if it is within this threshold of the anole`s perch. This learning algorithm was proposed by the biologist Roughgarden and his colleagues. They experimentally confirmed that this algorithm quickly converges to the foraging threshold that is predicted by optimal foraging theory our analysis provides an analytic confirmation that the learning algorithm converses to this optimal foraging threshold with high probability.

  6. Probabilistic Threshold Criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Gresshoff, M; Hrousis, C A

    2010-03-09

    The Probabilistic Shock Threshold Criterion (PSTC) Project at LLNL develops phenomenological criteria for estimating safety or performance margin on high explosive (HE) initiation in the shock initiation regime, creating tools for safety assessment and design of initiation systems and HE trains in general. Until recently, there has been little foundation for probabilistic assessment of HE initiation scenarios. This work attempts to use probabilistic information that is available from both historic and ongoing tests to develop a basis for such assessment. Current PSTC approaches start with the functional form of the James Initiation Criterion as a backbone, and generalize to include varying areas of initiation and provide a probabilistic response based on test data for 1.8 g/cc (Ultrafine) 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder). Application of the PSTC methodology is presented investigating the safety and performance of a flying plate detonator and the margin of an Ultrafine TATB booster initiating LX-17.

  7. Thresholds in Xeric Hydrology and Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, T.; Brooks, P. D.; Simpson, S. C.; Soto, C. D.; Yuan, F.; Turner, D.; Richter, H.

    2011-12-01

    Due to water limitation, thresholds in hydrologic and biogeochemical processes are common in arid and semi-arid systems. Some of these thresholds such as those focused on rainfall runoff relationships have been well studied. However to gain a full picture of the role that thresholds play in driving the hydrology and biogeochemistry of xeric systems a full view of the entire array of processes at work is needed. Here a walk through the landscape of xeric systems will be conducted illustrating the powerful role of hydrologic thresholds on xeric system biogeochemistry. To understand xeric hydro-biogeochemistry two key ideas need to be focused on. First, it is important to start from a framework of reaction and transport. Second an understanding of the temporal and spatial components of thresholds that have a large impact on hydrologic and biogeochemical fluxes needs to be offered. In the uplands themselves episodic rewetting and drying of soils permits accelerated biogeochemical processing but also more gradual drainage of water through the subsurface than expected in simple conceptions of biogeochemical processes. Hydrologic thresholds (water content above hygroscopic) results in a stop start nutrient spiral of material across the landscape since runoff connecting uplands to xeric perennial riparian is episodic and often only transports materials a short distance (100's of m). This episodic movement results in important and counter-intuitive nutrient inputs to riparian zones but also significant processing and uptake of nutrients. The floods that transport these biogeochemicals also result in significant input to riparian groundwater and may be key to sustaining these critical ecosystems. Importantly the flood driven recharge process itself is a threshold process dependent on flood characteristics (floods greater than 100 cubic meters per second) and antecedent conditions (losing to near neutral gradients). Floods also appear to influence where arid and semi

  8. Human eye color difference threshold measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Zhou, Taogeng

    2013-12-01

    The human eye has the ability to distinguish millions of colors, with this feature we can identify very subtle color differences, and the measurement of human eye color difference threshold can provide a visual function diagnosis for testee. In recent years, people begin to focus on studies on visual threshold diagnostic equipment. This paper proposes a human eye color difference threshold measurement system which is based on dual integrating sphere. The system includes two pairs of dual integrating sphere and color control module. Dual integrating sphere uses to mix and produce color, and palette unit which produces primary colors (red (R), green (G), blue (B)) is embedded in dual integrating sphere. At the same time, the embedded palette unit which produces cyan (C), magenta (M), and yellow (Y) expands color area that the system can generate. One optical path based on dual integrating sphere generates standard color, the other path produces the matching color which is similar to a standard color. In the high-precision closed-loop color control module, photoelectric switch records stepper motor's origin position and limits move displacement. Precision stepper motor pushes the light-blocking panel of the palette unit to a predetermined position, while real-time monitoring the position of the light-blocking panel and mixing the ideal controllable color. Two colors that the system generates are projected onto the same target area. Subjects make a judgment on color difference threshold by observing the target eventually.

  9. Threshold Hypothesis: Fact or Artifact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karwowski, Maciej; Gralewski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The threshold hypothesis (TH) assumes the existence of complex relations between creative abilities and intelligence: linear associations below 120 points of IQ and weaker or lack of associations above the threshold. However, diverse results have been obtained over the last six decades--some confirmed the hypothesis and some rejected it. In this…

  10. The Nature of Psychological Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Morey, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Following G. T. Fechner (1966), thresholds have been conceptualized as the amount of intensity needed to transition between mental states, such as between a states of unconsciousness and consciousness. With the advent of the theory of signal detection, however, discrete-state theory and the corresponding notion of threshold have been discounted.…

  11. Association between rheumatoid arthritis disease activity, progression of functional limitation and long-term risk of orthopaedic surgery: combined analysis of two prospective cohorts supports EULAR treat to target DAS thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Nikiphorou, Elena; Norton, Sam; Young, Adam; Carpenter, Lewis; Dixey, Josh; Walsh, David Andrew; Kiely, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between disease activity in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), functional limitation and long-term orthopaedic episodes. Methods Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) disability scores were collected from two longitudinal early RA inception cohorts in routine care; Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Study and Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Network from 1986 to 2012. The incidence of major and intermediate orthopaedic surgical episodes over 25 years was collected from national data sets. Disease activity was categorised by mean disease activity score (DAS28) annually between years 1 and 5; remission (RDAS≤2.6), low (LDAS>2.6–3.2), low-moderate (LMDAS≥3.2–4.19), high-moderate (HMDAS 4.2–5.1) and high (HDAS>5.1). Results Data from 2045 patients were analysed. Patients in RDAS showed no HAQ progression over 5 years, whereas there was a significant relationship between rising DAS28 category and HAQ at 1 year, and the rate of HAQ progression between years 1 and 5. During 27 986 person-years follow-up, 392 intermediate and 591 major surgeries were observed. Compared with the RDAS category, there was a significantly increased cumulative incidence of intermediate surgery in HDAS (OR 2.59 CI 1.49 to 4.52) and HMDAS (OR 1.8 CI 1.05 to 3.11) categories, and for major surgery in HDAS (OR 2.48 CI 1.5 to 4.11), HMDAS (OR 2.16 CI 1.32 to 3.52) and LMDAS (OR 2.07 CI 1.28 to 3.33) categories. There was no significant difference in HAQ progression or orthopaedic episodes between RDAS and LDAS categories. Conclusions There is an association between disease activity and both poor function and long-term orthopaedic episodes. This illustrates the far from benign consequences of persistent moderate disease activity, and supports European League Against Rheumatism treat to target recommendations to secure low disease activity or remission in all patients. PMID:26979104

  12. Evaluation of raw acceleration sedentary thresholds in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Maria; Hansen, Bjørge H; van Hees, Vincent T; Ekelund, Ulf

    2016-11-22

    The aim was to develop sedentary (sitting/lying) thresholds from hip and wrist worn raw tri-axial acceleration data from the ActiGraph and GENEActiv, and to examine the agreement between free-living time spent below these thresholds with sedentary time estimated by the activPAL. Sixty children and adults wore an ActiGraph and GENEActiv on the hip and wrist while performing six structured activities, before wearing the monitors, in addition to an activPAL, for 24 h. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine sedentary thresholds based on activities in the laboratory. Agreement between developed sedentary thresholds during free-living and activPAL were assessed by Bland-Altman plots and by calculating sensitivity and specificity. Using laboratory data and ROC-curves showed similar classification accuracy for wrist and hip thresholds (Area under the curve = 0.84-0.92). Greatest sensitivity (97-98%) and specificity (74-78%) were observed for the wrist thresholds, with no large differences between brands. During free-living, Bland-Altman plots showed large mean individual biases and 95% limits of agreement compared with activPAL, with smallest difference for the ActiGraph wrist threshold in children (+30 min, P = 0.3). Sensitivity and specificity for the developed thresholds during free-living were low for both age groups and for wrist (Sensitivity, 68-88%, Specificity, 46-59%) and hip placements (Sensitivity, 89-97%, Specificity, 26-34%). Laboratory derived sedentary thresholds generally overestimate free-living sedentary time compared with activPAL. Wrist thresholds appear to perform better than hip thresholds for estimating free-living sedentary time in children and adults relative to activPAL, however, specificity for all the developed thresholds are low.

  13. Ventricular fibrillation threshold of rapid short pulses.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Gregory P; Kroll, Mark W; Ideker, Raymond E

    2011-01-01

    The risk of VF (ventricular fibrillation) from continuous AC utility (50/60 Hz) power has been well quantified and is reflected in accepted standards. Similarly, the required charge for a single pulse delivered during the T-wave of the ECG is also quantified. However, there are no studies that deal with the VF risk of a train of multiple short pulses such as those used in electric fences and conducted electrical weapons (CEWs). We studied 5 swine with an electrode placed through the anterior chest such that the tip was 10 mm from the epicardium. A return electrode was attached remotely to the lower abdomen. Five-second trains of 100 μs pulses at rates of 10-70 PPS (pulses per second) were delivered with gradually increasing charges until VF was induced. The VF threshold was also determined for 60 Hz AC current. As expected, the VF charge threshold decreased with increasing rates. For pulse rates between 10-30 PPS, the aggregate current (= charge • pulse rate) was constant at the VF threshold. The VF threshold in terms of AC RMS current was 7.4 ± 1.9 times the aggregate current VF threshold for the rapid short pulses. These results may have utility for setting safety standards for electric fences and for CEWs such as TASER® CEWs. This also allows for the risk assessment of CEWs by comparison to international electrical safety standards. The output of these weapons appears to be well below the VF risk limits as set by these standards.

  14. The effect of static pressure on the inertial cavitation threshold.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Raymond, Jason L; Mobley, Joel; Church, Charles C; Felipe Gaitan, D

    2012-08-01

    The amplitude of the acoustic pressure required to nucleate a gas or vapor bubble in a fluid, and to have that bubble undergo an inertial collapse, is termed the inertial cavitation threshold. The magnitude of the inertial cavitation threshold is typically limited by mechanisms other than homogeneous nucleation such that the theoretical maximum is never achieved. However, the onset of inertial cavitation can be suppressed by increasing the static pressure of the fluid. The inertial cavitation threshold was measured in ultrapure water at static pressures up to 30 MPa (300 bars) by exciting a radially symmetric standing wave field in a spherical resonator driven at a resonant frequency of 25.5 kHz. The threshold was found to increase linearly with the static pressure; an exponentially decaying temperature dependence was also found. The nature and properties of the nucleating mechanisms were investigated by comparing the measured thresholds to an independent analysis of the particulate content and available models for nucleation.

  15. Bayesian estimation of dose thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groer, P. G.; Carnes, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    An example is described of Bayesian estimation of radiation absorbed dose thresholds (subsequently simply referred to as dose thresholds) using a specific parametric model applied to a data set on mice exposed to 60Co gamma rays and fission neutrons. A Weibull based relative risk model with a dose threshold parameter was used to analyse, as an example, lung cancer mortality and determine the posterior density for the threshold dose after single exposures to 60Co gamma rays or fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. The data consisted of survival, censoring times and cause of death information for male B6CF1 unexposed and exposed mice. The 60Co gamma whole-body doses for the two exposed groups were 0.86 and 1.37 Gy. The neutron whole-body doses were 0.19 and 0.38 Gy. Marginal posterior densities for the dose thresholds for neutron and gamma radiation were calculated with numerical integration and found to have quite different shapes. The density of the threshold for 60Co is unimodal with a mode at about 0.50 Gy. The threshold density for fission neutrons declines monotonically from a maximum value at zero with increasing doses. The posterior densities for all other parameters were similar for the two radiation types.

  16. Detection thresholds for small haptic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosher, Jesse A.; Hannaford, Blake

    2002-02-01

    We are interested in finding out whether or not haptic interfaces will be useful in portable and hand held devices. Such systems will have severe constraints on force output. Our first step is to investigate the lower limits at which haptic effects can be perceived. In this paper we report on experiments studying the effects of varying the amplitude, size, shape, and pulse-duration of a haptic feature. Using a specific haptic device we measure the smallest detectable haptics effects, with active exploration of saw-tooth shaped icons sized 3, 4 and 5 mm, a sine-shaped icon 5 mm wide, and static pulses 50, 100, and 150 ms in width. Smooth shaped icons resulted in a detection threshold of approximately 55 mN, almost twice that of saw-tooth shaped icons which had a threshold of 31 mN.

  17. An Analysis of Changes in Threshold Limit Values Over Time

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    i _ _ Caprolactam 105-60-2 1 _ Dust 1974 1974 _ Vapor ,1974 1974 _ _ _ Captafol 2 4 2 5 - 0 6 - 1 1977 1977 y_ Captan 133-06-2 1976 1976 y Carbaryl ...4 Caprolactam r Dust 0 0 _ _ + Vapor _ _ Captafol 0 0 _ _ Captan _ _ Carbaryl f 0 0 t _ Carbofuran T _ Carbon black 0 J0 0 _ _ Carbon dioxide i 0 0...1971 1 Propoxur 114-26-1 1969 ] 1969 _ _ _ _ n-Propyl acetate :109-60-4 1946 1946 , _ n-Propyl alcohol !71-23-8 1968 1968 r _ Propylene dichloride 178

  18. Threshold models in radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, D.G.; Li, P.

    1998-09-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality data from the atomic bomb survivors cohort has been analyzed to allow for the possibility of a threshold dose response. The same dose-response models as used in the original papers were fit to the data. The estimated cancer incidence from the fitted models over-predicted the observed cancer incidence in the lowest exposure group. This is consistent with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response at low-doses. Thresholds were added to the dose-response models and the range of possible thresholds is shown for both solid tumor cancers as well as the different leukemia types. This analysis suggests that the A-bomb cancer incidence data agree more with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response model than a purely linear model although the linear model is statistically equivalent. This observation is not found with the mortality data. For both the incidence data and the mortality data the addition of a threshold term significantly improves the fit to the linear or linear-quadratic dose response for both total leukemias and also for the leukemia subtypes of ALL, AML, and CML.

  19. Excitation threshold for subharmonic generation from contrast microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Amit; Sarkar, Kausik

    2011-01-01

    Six models of contrast microbubbles are investigated to determine the excitation threshold for subharmonic generation. The models are applied to a commercial contrast agent; its characteristic parameters according to each model are determined using experimentally measured ultrasound attenuation. In contrast to the classical perturbative result, the minimum threshold for subharmonic generation is not always predicted at excitation with twice the resonance frequency; instead it occurs over a range of frequencies from resonance to twice the resonance frequency. The quantitative variation of the threshold with frequency depends on the model and the bubble radius. All models are transformed into a common interfacial rheological form, where the encapsulation is represented by two radius dependent surface properties—effective surface tension and surface dilatational viscosity. Variation of the effective surface tension with radius, specifically having an upper limit (resulting from strain softening or rupture of the encapsulation during expansion), plays a critical role. Without the upper limit, the predicted threshold is extremely large, especially near the resonance frequency. Having a lower limit on surface tension (e.g., zero surface tension in the buckled state) increases the threshold value at twice the resonance frequency, in some cases shifting the minimum threshold toward resonance. PMID:22087942

  20. Novel Threshold Changeable Secret Sharing Schemes Based on Polynomial Interpolation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingchu; Guo, Cheng; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond; Ren, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    After any distribution of secret sharing shadows in a threshold changeable secret sharing scheme, the threshold may need to be adjusted to deal with changes in the security policy and adversary structure. For example, when employees leave the organization, it is not realistic to expect departing employees to ensure the security of their secret shadows. Therefore, in 2012, Zhang et al. proposed (t → t′, n) and ({t1, t2,⋯, tN}, n) threshold changeable secret sharing schemes. However, their schemes suffer from a number of limitations such as strict limit on the threshold values, large storage space requirement for secret shadows, and significant computation for constructing and recovering polynomials. To address these limitations, we propose two improved dealer-free threshold changeable secret sharing schemes. In our schemes, we construct polynomials to update secret shadows, and use two-variable one-way function to resist collusion attacks and secure the information stored by the combiner. We then demonstrate our schemes can adjust the threshold safely. PMID:27792784

  1. Novel Threshold Changeable Secret Sharing Schemes Based on Polynomial Interpolation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lifeng; Li, Mingchu; Guo, Cheng; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond; Ren, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    After any distribution of secret sharing shadows in a threshold changeable secret sharing scheme, the threshold may need to be adjusted to deal with changes in the security policy and adversary structure. For example, when employees leave the organization, it is not realistic to expect departing employees to ensure the security of their secret shadows. Therefore, in 2012, Zhang et al. proposed (t → t', n) and ({t1, t2,⋯, tN}, n) threshold changeable secret sharing schemes. However, their schemes suffer from a number of limitations such as strict limit on the threshold values, large storage space requirement for secret shadows, and significant computation for constructing and recovering polynomials. To address these limitations, we propose two improved dealer-free threshold changeable secret sharing schemes. In our schemes, we construct polynomials to update secret shadows, and use two-variable one-way function to resist collusion attacks and secure the information stored by the combiner. We then demonstrate our schemes can adjust the threshold safely.

  2. Bacteriopheophorbide esters: photosensitizers without "threshold dose"?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Joerg G.; Ostrowsky, Andreas; Guemuesdagli, Maria; Kleiber, Beate

    1994-03-01

    Uptake and phototoxicity of the methyl-, ethyl-, n-propyl, and 2-propyl esters of 132- hydroxy bacteriopheophorbide a were studied in OAT 75 SCLC cells and 3 different amelanotic melanoma cell lines. (A 375, Melur SP 18, SkAMel 25). Specific phototoxicity did not substantially differ for the different esters. Most surprisingly, these photosensitizers did not show any significant threshold behavior: even at 25 (mu) W/cm2 (775 nm, diode laser) cancer cell suspensions were killed in a time-dependent logarithmic fashion. Furthermore, phototoxicity is enhanced at low power densities if compared with the effects at 1 - 10 mW/cm2. This can be related only in part to a lack of oxygen at higher power densities. Complementary experiments confirmed that threshold is power but not dose dependent. Thus, threshold power density should be included into a prospective list of criteria characterizing photosensitizers suitable for photodynamic cancer therapy. The obvious lack of a limiting power density in bacteriopheophobide a esters make these sensitizers a prospective tool for tumor therapy in considerable tissue depth.

  3. Solution of an infection model near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, David A.; Shnerb, Nadav M.

    2007-07-01

    We study the susceptible-infected-recovered model of epidemics in the vicinity of the threshold infectivity. We derive the distribution of total outbreak size in the limit of large population size N . This is accomplished by mapping the problem to the first passage time of a random walker subject to a drift that increases linearly with time. We recover the scaling results of Ben-Naim and Krapivsky that the effective maximal size of the outbreak scales as N2/3 , with the average scaling as N1/3 , with an explicit form for the scaling function.

  4. Femtosecond damage threshold of multilayer metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Wael M. G.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Bonner, Carl E.

    2003-05-01

    With the availability of terawatt laser systems with subpicosecond pulses, laser damage to optical components has become the limiting factor for further increases in the output peak power. Evaluation of different material structures in accordance to their suitability for high-power laser systems is essential. Multi-shot damage experiments, using 110 fs laser pulses at 800 nm, on polycrystalline single layer gold films and multi-layer (gold-vanadium, and gold-titanium) films were conducted. The laser incident fluence was varied, in both cases, from 0.1 to 0.6 J/cm2. No evidence of surface damage was apparent in the gold sample up to a fluence of 0.3 J/cm2. The multilayer sample experienced the onset of surface damage at the lowest fluence value used of 0.1 J/cm2. Damage results are in contrast with the time resolved ultrafast thermoreflectivity measurements that revealed a reduction of the thermoreflectivity signal for the multilayer films. This decrease in the thermoreflectivity signal signifies a reduction in the surface electron temperature that should translate in a lower lattice temperature at the later stage. Hence, one should expect a higher damage threshold for the multilayer samples. Comparison of the experimental results with the predictions of the Two-Temperature Model (TTM) is presented. The damage threshold of the single layer gold film corresponds to the melting threshold predicted by the model. In contrast to the single layer gold film, the multi-layer sample damaged at almost one third the damage threshold predicted by the TTM model. Possible damage mechanisms leading to the early onset of damage for the multilayer films are discussed.

  5. Thresholds in chemical respiratory sensitisation.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Stella A; Arts, Josje H E; Ehnes, Colin; Hindle, Stuart; Hollnagel, Heli M; Poole, Alan; Suto, Hidenori; Kimber, Ian

    2015-07-03

    There is a continuing interest in determining whether it is possible to identify thresholds for chemical allergy. Here allergic sensitisation of the respiratory tract by chemicals is considered in this context. This is an important occupational health problem, being associated with rhinitis and asthma, and in addition provides toxicologists and risk assessors with a number of challenges. In common with all forms of allergic disease chemical respiratory allergy develops in two phases. In the first (induction) phase exposure to a chemical allergen (by an appropriate route of exposure) causes immunological priming and sensitisation of the respiratory tract. The second (elicitation) phase is triggered if a sensitised subject is exposed subsequently to the same chemical allergen via inhalation. A secondary immune response will be provoked in the respiratory tract resulting in inflammation and the signs and symptoms of a respiratory hypersensitivity reaction. In this article attention has focused on the identification of threshold values during the acquisition of sensitisation. Current mechanistic understanding of allergy is such that it can be assumed that the development of sensitisation (and also the elicitation of an allergic reaction) is a threshold phenomenon; there will be levels of exposure below which sensitisation will not be acquired. That is, all immune responses, including allergic sensitisation, have threshold requirement for the availability of antigen/allergen, below which a response will fail to develop. The issue addressed here is whether there are methods available or clinical/epidemiological data that permit the identification of such thresholds. This document reviews briefly relevant human studies of occupational asthma, and experimental models that have been developed (or are being developed) for the identification and characterisation of chemical respiratory allergens. The main conclusion drawn is that although there is evidence that the

  6. On computational Gestalt detection thresholds.

    PubMed

    Grompone von Gioi, Rafael; Jakubowicz, Jérémie

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show some recent developments of computational Gestalt theory, as pioneered by Desolneux, Moisan and Morel. The new results allow to predict much more accurately the detection thresholds. This step is unavoidable if one wants to analyze visual detection thresholds in the light of computational Gestalt theory. The paper first recalls the main elements of computational Gestalt theory. It points out a precision issue in this theory, essentially due to the use of discrete probability distributions. It then proposes to overcome this issue by using continuous probability distributions and illustrates it on the meaningful alignment detector of Desolneux et al.

  7. The HEL Upper Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billingsley, J. P.

    2002-07-01

    A threshold particle velocity, Vf, derived by Professor E.R. Fitzgerald for the onset of atomic lattice Disintegration Phenomena (LDP) is shown to exceed and/or compare rather well with the maximum experimental Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) particle (mass) velocities (UpHEL) for selected hard strong mineral/ceramic materials.

  8. Bandwidth and threshold calculations for angle-tuned parametric oscillators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, R.; Steier, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    The bandwidth of angle-tuned optical parametric oscillators, in some cases, is limited by the noncolinear interaction of the pump, signal, and idler beams, which results when the nonlinear material is rotated relative to the pump beam. To determine this bandwidth, a theoretical expression for the pump power threshold is derived in the near field limit taking into account double refraction for a noncolinear interaction. Angle tuning can be done by (1) rotating the crystal and mirrors as a unit, or by (2) rotating the crystal only. Expressions for determining the tuning rate and threshold increase for both tuning methods are derived.

  9. Colour thresholds in a coral reef fish

    PubMed Central

    Vorobyev, M.; Marshall, N. J.

    2016-01-01

    Coral reef fishes are among the most colourful animals in the world. Given the diversity of lifestyles and habitats on the reef, it is probable that in many instances coloration is a compromise between crypsis and communication. However, human observation of this coloration is biased by our primate visual system. Most animals have visual systems that are ‘tuned’ differently to humans; optimized for different parts of the visible spectrum. To understand reef fish colours, we need to reconstruct the appearance of colourful patterns and backgrounds as they are seen through the eyes of fish. Here, the coral reef associated triggerfish, Rhinecanthus aculeatus, was tested behaviourally to determine the limits of its colour vision. This is the first demonstration of behavioural colour discrimination thresholds in a coral reef species and is a critical step in our understanding of communication and speciation in this vibrant colourful habitat. Fish were trained to discriminate between a reward colour stimulus and series of non-reward colour stimuli and the discrimination thresholds were found to correspond well with predictions based on the receptor noise limited visual model and anatomy of the eye. Colour discrimination abilities of both reef fish and a variety of animals can therefore now be predicted using the parameters described here. PMID:27703704

  10. Colour thresholds in a coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Champ, C M; Vorobyev, M; Marshall, N J

    2016-09-01

    Coral reef fishes are among the most colourful animals in the world. Given the diversity of lifestyles and habitats on the reef, it is probable that in many instances coloration is a compromise between crypsis and communication. However, human observation of this coloration is biased by our primate visual system. Most animals have visual systems that are 'tuned' differently to humans; optimized for different parts of the visible spectrum. To understand reef fish colours, we need to reconstruct the appearance of colourful patterns and backgrounds as they are seen through the eyes of fish. Here, the coral reef associated triggerfish, Rhinecanthus aculeatus, was tested behaviourally to determine the limits of its colour vision. This is the first demonstration of behavioural colour discrimination thresholds in a coral reef species and is a critical step in our understanding of communication and speciation in this vibrant colourful habitat. Fish were trained to discriminate between a reward colour stimulus and series of non-reward colour stimuli and the discrimination thresholds were found to correspond well with predictions based on the receptor noise limited visual model and anatomy of the eye. Colour discrimination abilities of both reef fish and a variety of animals can therefore now be predicted using the parameters described here.

  11. Threshold Concepts and Pedagogic Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Jan H. F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a brief exposure to the development of the threshold concepts framework (TCF), the intention being to illuminate for interested readers a broader landscape of research activity than that perhaps conveyed by the individual contributions to this special edition. Design/Methodology/Approach: There is…

  12. A Grouped Threshold Approach for Scene Identification in AVHRR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, Bryan A.; Trepte, Qing

    1999-01-01

    The authors propose a grouped threshold method for scene identification in Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer imagery that may contain clouds, fire, smoke, or snow. The philosophy of the approach is to build modules that contain groups of spectral threshold tests that are applied concurrently, not sequentially, to each pixel in an image. The purpose of each group of tests is to identify uniquely a specific class in the image, such as smoke. A strength of this approach is that insight into the limits used in the threshold tests may be gained through the use of radiative transfer theory. Methodology and examples are provided for two different scenes, one containing clouds, forest fires, and smoke; and the other containing clouds over snow in the central United States. For both scenes, a limited amount of supporting information is provided by surface observers.

  13. Threshold kinetics of a solar-simulator-pumped iodine laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Lee, Y.; Weaver, W. R.; Humes, D. H.; Lee, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the chemical kinetics of the n-C3F7I solar-simulator-pumped iodine laser is utilized to study the major kinetic processes associated with the threshold behavior of this experimental system. Excited-state diffusion to the cell wall is the dominant limiting factor below 5 torr. Excited-state diffusion to the cell wall is the dominant limiting factor below 5 torr. Excited-state recombination with the alkyl radical and quenching by the parent gas control threshold at higher pressures. Treatment of the hyperfine splitting and uncertainty in the pressure broadening are important factors in fixing the threshold level. In spite of scatter in the experimental data caused by instabilities in the simulator high-pressure high-pressure arc, reasonable agreement is achieved between the model and experiment. Model parameters arrived at are within the uncertainty range of values found in the literature.

  14. Tissue damage thresholds during therapeutic electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Ludwig, Kip A.; Welle, Cristin G.; Takmakov, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Recent initiatives in bioelectronic modulation of the nervous system by the NIH (SPARC), DARPA (ElectRx, SUBNETS) and the GlaxoSmithKline Bioelectronic Medicines effort are ushering in a new era of therapeutic electrical stimulation. These novel therapies are prompting a re-evaluation of established electrical thresholds for stimulation-induced tissue damage. Approach. In this review, we explore what is known and unknown in published literature regarding tissue damage from electrical stimulation. Main results. For macroelectrodes, the potential for tissue damage is often assessed by comparing the intensity of stimulation, characterized by the charge density and charge per phase of a stimulus pulse, with a damage threshold identified through histological evidence from in vivo experiments as described by the Shannon equation. While the Shannon equation has proved useful in assessing the likely occurrence of tissue damage, the analysis is limited by the experimental parameters of the original studies. Tissue damage is influenced by factors not explicitly incorporated into the Shannon equation, including pulse frequency, duty cycle, current density, and electrode size. Microelectrodes in particular do not follow the charge per phase and charge density co-dependence reflected in the Shannon equation. The relevance of these factors to tissue damage is framed in the context of available reports from modeling and in vivo studies. Significance. It is apparent that emerging applications, especially with microelectrodes, will require clinical charge densities that exceed traditional damage thresholds. Experimental data show that stimulation at higher charge densities can be achieved without causing tissue damage, suggesting that safety parameters for microelectrodes might be distinct from those defined for macroelectrodes. However, these increased charge densities may need to be justified by bench, non-clinical or clinical testing to provide evidence of device

  15. Tissue damage thresholds during therapeutic electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cogan, Stuart F; Ludwig, Kip A; Welle, Cristin G; Takmakov, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Objective Recent initiatives in bioelectronic modulation of the nervous system by the NIH (SPARC), DARPA (ElectRx, SUBNETS) and the GlaxoSmithKline Bioelectronic Medicines effort are ushering in a new era of therapeutic electrical stimulation. These novel therapies are prompting a re-evaluation of established electrical thresholds for stimulation-induced tissue damage. Approach In this review, we explore what is known and unknown in published literature regarding tissue damage from electrical stimulation. Main results For macroelectrodes, the potential for tissue damage is often assessed by comparing the intensity of stimulation, characterized by the charge density and charge per phase of a stimulus pulse, with a damage threshold identified through histological evidence from in vivo experiments as described by the Shannon equation. While the Shannon equation has proved useful in assessing the likely occurrence of tissue damage, the analysis is limited by the experimental parameters of the original studies. Tissue damage is influenced by factors not explicitly incorporated into the Shannon equation, including pulse frequency, duty cycle, current density, and electrode size. Microelectrodes in particular do not follow the charge per phase and charge density co-dependence reflected in the Shannon equation. The relevance of these factors to tissue damage is framed in the context of available reports from modeling and in vivo studies. Significance It is apparent that emerging applications, especially with microelectrodes, will require clinical charge densities that exceed traditional damage thresholds. Experimental data show that stimulation at higher charge densities can be achieved without causing tissue damage, suggesting that safety parameters for microelectrodes might be distinct from those defined for macroelectrodes. However, these increased charge densities may need to be justified by bench, non-clinical or clinical testing to provide evidence of device safety

  16. Analysis of the interrelationship of the pulmonary irritation and elicitation thresholds in rats sensitized with 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI)

    PubMed Central

    Pauluhn, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This paper summarizes a range of experimental data central for developing a science-based approach for hazard identification of monomeric and polymeric aliphatic 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI). The dose–response curve of HDI-induced pulmonary responses in naïve or dermally sensitized rats after one or several inhalation priming exposures was examined in the Brown Norway (BN) rat asthma model. Emphasis was directed to demonstrate the need and the difficulty in selecting an appropriate pulmonary dose when much of the inhaled chemically reactive vapor may concentration dependently be retained in the upper airways of obligate nose-breathing rats. The course taken acknowledges the experimental challenges in identifying an elicitation threshold for HDI-monomer near or above the saturated vapor concentration or in the presence of a HDI-polymer aerosol. The inhalation threshold dose on elicitation was determined based on a fixed concentration (C) × variable exposure duration (t) protocol for improving inhalation dosimetry of the lower airways. Neutrophilic granulocytes (PMN) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in equally inhalation primed naïve and dermally sensitized rats were used to define the inhalation elicitation threshold C × t. Sensitized rats elaborated markedly increased PMN challenged sensitized rats relative to equally challenged naïve rats at 5625 mg HDI/m3 × min (75 mg/m3 for 75 min). PMN were essentially indistinguishable at 900 mg HDI/m3 × min. By applying adjustment factors accounting for both inter-species differences in inhalation dosimetry and intra-species susceptibility, the workplace human-equivalent threshold C × t was estimated to be in the range of the current ACGIH TLV® of HDI. Thus, this rat “asthma” model was suitable to demonstrate elicitation thresholds for HDI-vapor after one or several inhalation priming exposures and seems to be suitable to derive occupational exposure values

  17. ISODATA: Thresholds for splitting clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, E. P. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The parameter AD (average distance) as used in the ISODATA program was critically examined. Thresholds of AD to decide on the splitting of clusters were obtained. For the univariate case, 0.84 was established as a sound choice, after examining several simple, as well as composite, distributions and also after investigating the probability of misclassification when points have to be reassigned to the newly identified clusters. For the multivariate case, the empirical threshold (N-0.16)/square root of N was extrapolated. A final criticism on AD was that AD would lose its effectiveness as a discriminative measure for the present purpose when N was large.

  18. The Influence of Humidity on Assessing Irritation Threshold of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Sucker, Kirsten; Jettkant, Birger; Berresheim, Hans; Brüning, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large number of occupational exposure limit values (OELs) are based on avoiding of sensory irritation of the eyes and the upper respiratory tract. In order to investigate the chemosensory effect range of a chemical, odor and sensory irritation thresholds (lateralization thresholds, LTs) can be assessed. Humidity affects olfactory function and thus influences odor thresholds; however, a similar effect has not been shown for sensory irritation thresholds. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether LTs for ammonia vapor vary depending on the water vapor content of the inspired stimulus. Eight healthy nonsmoking volunteers were simultaneously exposed to ammonia vapor through one nostril and clean air through the other and were asked to determine which nostril received the chemical. Within experimental runs, ascending ammonia concentrations (60–350 ppm) that were either dry or humidified were administered at fixed time intervals. Geometric mean LTs obtained at wet (181 ppm) or dry (172 ppm) conditions did not differ significantly (P = 0.19) and were within the range of those reported by previous studies. These results suggest that humidity is not a critical factor in determining sensory irritation thresholds for ammonia, and future studies will examine if these findings are transferable to sensory irritation thresholds for other chemicals. PMID:27379250

  19. The Influence of Humidity on Assessing Irritation Threshold of Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Monsé, Christian; Sucker, Kirsten; Hoffmeyer, Frank; Jettkant, Birger; Berresheim, Hans; Bünger, Jürgen; Brüning, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large number of occupational exposure limit values (OELs) are based on avoiding of sensory irritation of the eyes and the upper respiratory tract. In order to investigate the chemosensory effect range of a chemical, odor and sensory irritation thresholds (lateralization thresholds, LTs) can be assessed. Humidity affects olfactory function and thus influences odor thresholds; however, a similar effect has not been shown for sensory irritation thresholds. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether LTs for ammonia vapor vary depending on the water vapor content of the inspired stimulus. Eight healthy nonsmoking volunteers were simultaneously exposed to ammonia vapor through one nostril and clean air through the other and were asked to determine which nostril received the chemical. Within experimental runs, ascending ammonia concentrations (60-350 ppm) that were either dry or humidified were administered at fixed time intervals. Geometric mean LTs obtained at wet (181 ppm) or dry (172 ppm) conditions did not differ significantly (P = 0.19) and were within the range of those reported by previous studies. These results suggest that humidity is not a critical factor in determining sensory irritation thresholds for ammonia, and future studies will examine if these findings are transferable to sensory irritation thresholds for other chemicals.

  20. Roots at the Percolation Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; Kaestner, A.; Vontobel, P.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Much of the carbon assimilated by plants during photosynthesis is lost to the soil via rhizodepositions. One component of rhizopdeposition is mucilage, a hydrogel that dramatically alters the soil physical properties. Mucilage was assumed to explain unexpectedly low rhizosphere rewetting rates during irrigation (Carminati et al. 2010) and temporarily water repellency in the rhizosphere after severe drying (Moradi et al. 2012).Here, we present an experimental and theoretical study for the rewetting behaviour of a soil mixed with mucilage, which was used as an analogue of the rhizosphere. Our samples were made of two layers of untreated soils separated by a thin layer (ca. 1 mm) of soil treated with mucilage. We prepared soil columns of varying particle size, mucilage concentration and height of the middle layer above the water table. The dry soil columns were re-wetted by capillary rise from the bottom.The rewetting of the middle layer showed a distinct dual behavior. For mucilage concentrations lower than a certain threshold, water could cross the thin layer almost immediately after rewetting of bulk soil. At slightly higher mucilage concentrations, the thin layer was almost impermeable. The mucilage concentration at the threshold strongly depended on particle size: the smaller the particle size the larger the soil specific surface and the more mucilage was needed to cover the entire particle surface and to induce water repellency.We applied a classic pore network model to simulate the experimental observations. In the model a certain fraction of nodes were randomly disconnected to reproduce the effect of mucilage in temporarily blocking the flow. The percolation model could qualitatively reproduce well the threshold characteristics of the experiments. Our experiments, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively

  1. New near-threshold mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Thomas D.; Gelman, Boris A.; Nussinov, Shmuel

    2004-01-01

    We show that under a number of rather plausible assumptions QCD spectrum may contain a number of mesons which have not been predicted or observed. Such states will have the quantum numbers of two existing mesons and masses very close to the dissociation threshold into the two mesons. Moreover, at least one of the two mesonic constituents itself must be very close to its dissociation threshold. In particular, one might expect the existence of loosely bound systems of D and D∗sJ(2317); similarly, K and f0(980), K¯ and f0(980), K and a0(980) and K¯ and a0(980) can be bound. The mechanism for binding in these cases is the S-wave kaon exchange. The nearness of one of the constituents to its decay threshold into a kaon plus a remainder, implies that the range of the kaon exchange force becomes abnormally long—significantly longer than 1/mK which greatly aids the binding.

  2. Silica Nanoconstruct Cellular Toleration Threshold In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Herd, Heather L.; Malugin, Alexander; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2011-01-01

    The influence of geometry of silica nanomaterials on cellular uptake and toxicity on epithelial and phagocytic cells was studied. Three types of amine-terminated silica nanomaterials were prepared and characterized via the modified Stober method, namely spheres (178±27 nm), worms (232±22 nm × 1348±314 nm) and cylinders (214±29 nm × 428±66 nm). The findings of the study suggest that in this size range and for the cell types studied, geometry does not play a dominant role in the modes of toxicity and uptake of these particles. Rather, a concentration threshold and cell type dependent toxicity of all particle types was observed. This correlated with confocal microscopy observations, as all nanomaterials were observed to be taken up in both cell types, with a greater extent in phagocytic cells. It must be noted that there appears to be a concentration threshold at ~100 µg/mL, below which there is limited to no impact of the nanoparticles on membrane integrity, mitochondrial function, phagocytosis or cell death. Analysis of cell morphology by transmission electron microscopy, colocalization experiments with intracellular markers and Western Blot results provide evidence of potential involvement of lysosomal escape, autophagic like activity, compartmental fusion and recycling in response to intracellular nanoparticle accumulation. These processes could be involved in cellular coping or defense mechanisms. The manipulation of physicochemical properties to enhance or reduce toxicity paves the way for the safe design of silica-based nanoparticles for use in nanomedicine. PMID:21342660

  3. Industry viewpoint on thresholds for genotoxic carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Morelli, M A

    2000-01-01

    Modern chemical control of pests has contributed to a dramatic improvement in public welfare since its introduction 50 years ago. Millions of lives have been saved through the control of disease vectors, and millions more have been improved by the use of chemicals to produce an inexpensive and abundant food supply. Hundreds of pesticidally active ingredients are in commercial use today, and among these are found genotoxic and nongenotoxic carcinogens. In the United States, the Environmental Protection Agency regulates carcinogens using threshold and nonthreshold approaches depending upon the outcome of a weight-of-evidence determination. More than one-half of all pesticides with some evidence of carcinogenic potential are regulated by the nonthreshold approach. The limitations on product use imposed by this approach have restricted the number of products available to growers and to the public. This restriction has had a direct impact on industry with respect to commercial success and financial returns on investment as well as an indirect impact on the industry's ability to fund the discovery and development of new compounds. This paper explores the question of how well regulation by the nonthreshold approach has achieved the goal of protecting public health, whether it does this better than the alternative use of the threshold approach, and whether the incremental protection it affords is a meaningful public benefit that justifies the aforementioned impacts on industry.

  4. Colour thresholding and objective quantification in bioimaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Gerber, M. A.; Torre-Bueno, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Computer imaging is rapidly becoming an indispensable tool for the quantification of variables in research and medicine. Whilst its use in medicine has largely been limited to qualitative observations, imaging in applied basic sciences, medical research and biotechnology demands objective quantification of the variables in question. In black and white densitometry (0-256 levels of intensity) the separation of subtle differences between closely related hues from stains is sometimes very difficult. True-colour and real-time video microscopy analysis offer choices not previously available with monochrome systems. In this paper we demonstrate the usefulness of colour thresholding, which has so far proven indispensable for proper objective quantification of the products of histochemical reactions and/or subtle differences in tissue and cells. In addition, we provide interested, but untrained readers with basic information that may assist decisions regarding the most suitable set-up for a project under consideration. Data from projects in progress at Tulane are shown to illustrate the advantage of colour thresholding over monochrome densitometry and for objective quantification of subtle colour differences between experimental and control samples.

  5. Bedding material affects mechanical thresholds, heat thresholds and texture preference

    PubMed Central

    Moehring, Francie; O’Hara, Crystal L.; Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that the bedding type animals are housed on can affect breeding behavior and cage environment. Yet little is known about its effects on evoked behavior responses or non-reflexive behaviors. C57BL/6 mice were housed for two weeks on one of five bedding types: Aspen Sani Chips® (standard bedding for our institute), ALPHA-Dri®, Cellu-Dri™, Pure-o’Cel™ or TEK-Fresh. Mice housed on Aspen exhibited the lowest (most sensitive) mechanical thresholds while those on TEK-Fresh exhibited 3-fold higher thresholds. While bedding type had no effect on responses to punctate or dynamic light touch stimuli, TEK-Fresh housed animals exhibited greater responsiveness in a noxious needle assay, than those housed on the other bedding types. Heat sensitivity was also affected by bedding as animals housed on Aspen exhibited the shortest (most sensitive) latencies to withdrawal whereas those housed on TEK-Fresh had the longest (least sensitive) latencies to response. Slight differences between bedding types were also seen in a moderate cold temperature preference assay. A modified tactile conditioned place preference chamber assay revealed that animals preferred TEK-Fresh to Aspen bedding. Bedding type had no effect in a non-reflexive wheel running assay. In both acute (two day) and chronic (5 week) inflammation induced by injection of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant in the hindpaw, mechanical thresholds were reduced in all groups regardless of bedding type, but TEK-Fresh and Pure-o’Cel™ groups exhibited a greater dynamic range between controls and inflamed cohorts than Aspen housed mice. PMID:26456764

  6. Effects of Temperature on the Histotripsy Intrinsic Threshold for Cavitation.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Xu, Zhen; Maxwell, Adam; Mancia, Lauren; Zhang, Xi; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Duryea, Alexander; Sukovich, Jonathan; Hall, Tim; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles

    2016-05-10

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that depends on the initiation of a dense cavitation bubble cloud to fractionate soft tissue. Previous work has demonstrated that a cavitation cloud can be formed by a single acoustic pulse with one high amplitude negative cycle, when the negative pressure amplitude exceeds a threshold intrinsic to the medium. The intrinsic thresholds in soft tissues and tissue phantoms that are water-based are similar to the intrinsic threshold of water over an experimentally verified frequency range of 0.3-3 MHz. Previous work studying the histotripsy intrinsic threshold has been limited to experiments performed at room temperature (~20°C). In this study, we investigate the effects of temperature on the histotripsy intrinsic threshold in water, which is essential to accurately predict the intrinsic thresholds expected over the full range of in vivo therapeutic temperatures. Based on previous work studying the histotripsy intrinsic threshold and classical nucleation theory, we hypothesize that the intrinsic threshold will decrease with increasing temperature. To test this hypothesis, the intrinsic threshold in water was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The probability of generating cavitation bubbles was measured by applying a single pulse with one high amplitude negative cycle at 1 MHz to distilled, degassed water at temperatures ranging from 10°C-90°C. Cavitation was detected and characterized by passive cavitation detection and high-speed photography, from which the probability of cavitation was measured vs. pressure amplitude. The results indicate that the intrinsic threshold (the negative pressure at which the cavitation probability=0.5) significantly decreases with increasing temperature, showing a nearly linear decreasing trend from 29.8±0.4 MPa at 10˚C to 14.9±1.4 MPa at 90˚C. Overall, the results of this study support our hypothesis that the intrinsic threshold is highly dependent upon the temperature

  7. Thresholds for Coral Bleaching: Are Synergistic Factors and Shifting Thresholds Changing the Landscape for Management? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, C.; Donner, S. D.; Logan, C. A.; Gledhill, D. K.; Liu, G.; Heron, S. F.; Christensen, T.; Rauenzahn, J.; Morgan, J.; Parker, B. A.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Skirving, W. J.; Strong, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    As carbon dioxide rises in the atmosphere, climate change and ocean acidification are modifying important physical and chemical parameters in the oceans with resulting impacts on coral reef ecosystems. Rising CO2 is warming the world’s oceans and causing corals to bleach, with both alarming frequency and severity. The frequent return of stressful temperatures has already resulted in major damage to many of the world’s coral reefs and is expected to continue in the foreseeable future. Warmer oceans also have contributed to a rise in coral infectious diseases. Both bleaching and infectious disease can result in coral mortality and threaten one of the most diverse ecosystems on Earth and the important ecosystem services they provide. Additionally, ocean acidification from rising CO2 is reducing the availability of carbonate ions needed by corals to build their skeletons and perhaps depressing the threshold for bleaching. While thresholds vary among species and locations, it is clear that corals around the world are already experiencing anomalous temperatures that are too high, too often, and that warming is exceeding the rate at which corals can adapt. This is despite a complex adaptive capacity that involves both the coral host and the zooxanthellae, including changes in the relative abundance of the latter in their coral hosts. The safe upper limit for atmospheric CO2 is probably somewhere below 350ppm, a level we passed decades ago, and for temperature is a sustained global temperature increase of less than 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. How much can corals acclimate and/or adapt to the unprecedented fast changing environmental conditions? Any change in the threshold for coral bleaching as the result of acclimation and/or adaption may help corals to survive in the future but adaptation to one stress may be maladaptive to another. There also is evidence that ocean acidification and nutrient enrichment modify this threshold. What do shifting thresholds mean

  8. Thresholds in shock response across the elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, F. L.; Bourne, N. K.

    2017-01-01

    Compendia of shock data have been assembled across national laboratories across the world. Previous work has shown a threshold in behaviour for materials; the weak shock limit. This corresponds to the stress state at which the shock is overdriven in a single front. Here the shock velocity-particle velocity data for elements and compounds has been systematically analysed to note discontinuities in the data. A range of materials show such features and the form of the discontinuity in each case is analysed. Some of these are found to correspond to martensitic phase transformations as expected whilst others are more difficult to classify. Particular groups within the elements show characteristic forms according to their groupings within the periodic table. Typical datasets are presented and trends in behaviour are noted for a range of elements.

  9. Threshold condition for nonlinear tearing modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Zabiego, M.F.; Callen, J.D.

    1996-03-01

    Low-mode-number tearing, mode nonlinear evolution is analyzed emphasizing the need for a threshold condition, to account for observations in tokamaks. The discussion is illustrated by two models recently introduced in the literature. The models can be compared with the available data and/or serve as a basis for planning some experiments in order to either test theory (by means of beta-limit scaling laws, as proposed in this paper) or attempt to control undesirable tearing modes. Introducing a threshold condition in the tearing mode stability analysis is found to reveal some bifurcation points and thus domains of intrinsic stability in the island dynamics operational space.

  10. Androstadienone odor thresholds in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Thomas; Krone, Franziska; Lundström, Johan N; Bartsch, Oliver

    2005-03-01

    A sex-related difference in olfactory sensitivity to androstenone has been reported to occur during adolescence. More males than females exhibited anosmia to androstenone, or an increase in androstenone threshold with age. The current study addressed the question whether similar, sexually dimorphic effects of aging over puberty can also be found for androstadienone. A total of 102 subjects participated (36 females, 66 males). Similar to previous investigations, subjects were divided into a group of 47 individuals with a mean age of 13.3 years, defined as pre/peri-pubertal, and a group of 55 subjects with a mean age of 17.1 years, defined as post-pubertal. All subjects underwent tests for verbal abilities, general olfactory function, and measurements of androstadienone thresholds. The study provided the following major results: (1) Male subjects exhibited higher androstadienone sensitivity in the pre/peri-pubertal group as compared to the post-pubertal group. This difference was not observed in female subjects. Correspondingly, a negative correlation between age and androstadienone sensitivity was found for male subjects, but not for female subjects. (2) In contrast to this sex-specific change of the androstadienone odor threshold, verbal skills and odor identification abilities increased with age in all subjects regardless of their sex. In conclusion, the present observations confirm previous research on sex-differentiated effects of aging during puberty on sensitivity towards odorous steroids. While the underlying causes are unknown, it may be hypothesized that the decreased sensitivity could result from the increased endogenous levels of androstadienone in male subjects. Future studies should include both steroid and non-steroid odorants to further explore these age-related changes.

  11. Thresholds for impaired species recovery

    PubMed Central

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on small and declining populations dominate research in conservation biology. This emphasis reflects two overarching frameworks: the small-population paradigm focuses on correlates of increased extinction probability; the declining-population paradigm directs attention to the causes and consequences of depletion. Neither, however, particularly informs research on the determinants, rate or uncertainty of population increase. By contrast, Allee effects (positive associations between population size and realized per capita population growth rate, rrealized, a metric of average individual fitness) offer a theoretical and empirical basis for identifying numerical and temporal thresholds at which recovery is unlikely or uncertain. Following a critique of studies on Allee effects, I quantify population-size minima and subsequent trajectories of marine fishes that have and have not recovered following threat mitigation. The data suggest that threat amelioration, albeit necessary, can be insufficient to effect recovery for populations depleted to less than 10% of maximum abundance (Nmax), especially when they remain depleted for lengthy periods of time. Comparing terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates, life-history analyses suggest that population-size thresholds for impaired recovery are likely to be comparatively low for marine fishes but high for marine mammals. Articulation of a ‘recovering population paradigm’ would seem warranted. It might stimulate concerted efforts to identify generic impaired recovery thresholds across species. It might also serve to reduce the confusion of terminology, and the conflation of causes and consequences with patterns currently evident in the literature on Allee effects, thus strengthening communication among researchers and enhancing the practical utility of recovery-oriented research to conservation practitioners and resource managers. PMID:26213739

  12. Ultra-low threshold polariton condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steger, Mark; Fluegel, Brian; Alberi, Kirstin; Snoke, David W.; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate condensation of microcavity polaritons with a very sharp threshold occuring at two orders of magnitude lower pump intensity than previous demonstrations of condensation. The long cavity-lifetime and trapping and pumping geometries are crucial to the realization of this low threshold. Polariton condensation, or "polariton lasing" has long been proposed as a promising source of coherent light at lower threshold than traditional lasing, and these results suggest methods to bring this threshold even lower.

  13. Ultra-low threshold polariton condensation.

    PubMed

    Steger, Mark; Fluegel, Brian; Alberi, Kirstin; Snoke, David W; Pfeiffer, Loren N; West, Ken; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2017-03-15

    We demonstrate the condensation of microcavity polaritons with a very sharp threshold occurring at a two orders of magnitude pump intensity lower than previous demonstrations of condensation. The long cavity lifetime and trapping and pumping geometries are crucial to the realization of this low threshold. Polariton condensation, or "polariton lasing" has long been proposed as a promising source of coherent light at a lower threshold than traditional lasing, and these results indicate some considerations for optimizing designs for lower thresholds.

  14. Do Optimal Prognostic Thresholds in Continuous Physiological Variables Really Exist? Analysis of Origin of Apparent Thresholds, with Systematic Review for Peak Oxygen Consumption, Ejection Fraction and BNP

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Tora; Rehman, Michaela B.; Pastormerlo, Luigi Emilio; Harrell, Frank E.; Coats, Andrew J. S.; Francis, Darrel P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinicians are sometimes advised to make decisions using thresholds in measured variables, derived from prognostic studies. Objectives We studied why there are conflicting apparently-optimal prognostic thresholds, for example in exercise peak oxygen uptake (pVO2), ejection fraction (EF), and Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) in heart failure (HF). Data Sources and Eligibility Criteria Studies testing pVO2, EF or BNP prognostic thresholds in heart failure, published between 1990 and 2010, listed on Pubmed. Methods First, we examined studies testing pVO2, EF or BNP prognostic thresholds. Second, we created repeated simulations of 1500 patients to identify whether an apparently-optimal prognostic threshold indicates step change in risk. Results 33 studies (8946 patients) tested a pVO2 threshold. 18 found it prognostically significant: the actual reported threshold ranged widely (10–18 ml/kg/min) but was overwhelmingly controlled by the individual study population's mean pVO2 (r = 0.86, p<0.00001). In contrast, the 15 negative publications were testing thresholds 199% further from their means (p = 0.0001). Likewise, of 35 EF studies (10220 patients), the thresholds in the 22 positive reports were strongly determined by study means (r = 0.90, p<0.0001). Similarly, in the 19 positives of 20 BNP studies (9725 patients): r = 0.86 (p<0.0001). Second, survival simulations always discovered a “most significant” threshold, even when there was definitely no step change in mortality. With linear increase in risk, the apparently-optimal threshold was always near the sample mean (r = 0.99, p<0.001). Limitations This study cannot report the best threshold for any of these variables; instead it explains how common clinical research procedures routinely produce false thresholds. Key Findings First, shifting (and/or disappearance) of an apparently-optimal prognostic threshold is strongly determined by studies' average pVO2, EF or BNP. Second

  15. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-04-24

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

  16. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Student Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-01-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by…

  17. Threshold temperature optical fibre sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasiewicz, K. A.; Musial, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a new approach to manufacture a threshold temperature sensor based on a biconical optical fibre taper. The presented sensor employs the influence of variable state of concentration of some isotropic materials like wax or paraffin. Application of the above- mentioned materials is an attempt to prove that there is a possibility to obtain a low-cost, repeatable and smart sensor working as an in-line element. Optical fibre taper was obtained from a standard single mode fibre (SMF28®) by using a low pressure gas burner technique. The diameter of the manufactured tapers was 6.0 ± 0.5 μm with the length of elongation equal to 30.50 ± 0.16 mm. The applied technology allowed to produce tapers with the losses of 0.183 ± 0.015 dB. Application of materials with different temperature transition points made it possible to obtain the threshold work at the temperatures connected directly with their conversion temperature. External materials at the temperatures above their melting points do not influence the propagation losses. For each of them two types of the protection area and position of the optical fibre taper were applied.

  18. Computational gestalts and perception thresholds.

    PubMed

    Desolneux, Agnès; Moisan, Lionel; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    In 1923, Max Wertheimer proposed a research programme and method in visual perception. He conjectured the existence of a small set of geometric grouping laws governing the perceptual synthesis of phenomenal objects, or "gestalt" from the atomic retina input. In this paper, we review this set of geometric grouping laws, using the works of Metzger, Kanizsa and their schools. In continuation, we explain why the Gestalt theory research programme can be translated into a Computer Vision programme. This translation is not straightforward, since Gestalt theory never addressed two fundamental matters: image sampling and image information measurements. Using these advances, we shall show that gestalt grouping laws can be translated into quantitative laws allowing the automatic computation of gestalts in digital images. From the psychophysical viewpoint, a main issue is raised: the computer vision gestalt detection methods deliver predictable perception thresholds. Thus, we are set in a position where we can build artificial images and check whether some kind of agreement can be found between the computationally predicted thresholds and the psychophysical ones. We describe and discuss two preliminary sets of experiments, where we compared the gestalt detection performance of several subjects with the predictable detection curve. In our opinion, the results of this experimental comparison support the idea of a much more systematic interaction between computational predictions in Computer Vision and psychophysical experiments.

  19. Threshold-avoiding proteomics pipeline.

    PubMed

    Suits, Frank; Hoekman, Berend; Rosenling, Therese; Bischoff, Rainer; Horvatovich, Peter

    2011-10-15

    We present a new proteomics analysis pipeline focused on maximizing the dynamic range of detected molecules in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data and accurately quantifying low-abundance peaks to identify those with biological relevance. Although there has been much work to improve the quality of data derived from LC-MS instruments, the goal of this study was to extend the dynamic range of analyzed compounds by making full use of the information available within each data set and across multiple related chromatograms in an experiment. Our aim was to distinguish low-abundance signal peaks from noise by noting their coherent behavior across multiple data sets, and central to this is the need to delay the culling of noise peaks until the final peak-matching stage of the pipeline, when peaks from a single sample appear in the context of all others. The application of thresholds that might discard signal peaks early is thereby avoided, hence the name TAPP: threshold-avoiding proteomics pipeline. TAPP focuses on quantitative low-level processing of raw LC-MS data and includes novel preprocessing, peak detection, time alignment, and cluster-based matching. We demonstrate the performance of TAPP on biologically relevant sample data consisting of porcine cerebrospinal fluid spiked over a wide range of concentrations with horse heart cytochrome c.

  20. Normalized pulsed energy thresholding in a nonlinear optical loop mirror.

    PubMed

    Nahmias, M A; Shastri, B J; Tait, A N; Eder, M; Rafidi, Nicole; Tian, Yue; Prucnal, P R

    2015-04-10

    We demonstrate for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that a Sagnac interferometer can threshold the energies of pulses. Pulses below a given threshold T are suppressed, while those above this threshold are normalized. The device contains an in-loop tunable isolator and 10.4 m of a highly doped silica fiber. We derive an analytical model of the nonlinear optical loop mirror's pulse energy transfer function and show that its energy transfer function approximates a step function for very high phase shifts (>π). We reveal some limitations of this approach, showing that a step-function transfer function necessarily results in pulse distortion in fast, nonresonant all-optical devices.

  1. Pressure Flammability Thresholds in Oxygen of Selected Aerospace Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David; Williams, Jim; Harper, Susana; Beeson, Harold; Ruff, Gary; Pedley, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The experimental approach consisted of concentrating the testing in the flammability transition zone following the Bruceton Up-and-Down Method. For attribute data, the method has been shown to be very repeatable and most efficient. Other methods for characterization of critical levels (Karberand Probit) were also considered. The data yielded the upward limiting pressure index (ULPI), the pressure level where approx.50% of materials self-extinguish in a given environment.Parametric flammability thresholds other than oxygen concentration can be determined with the methodology proposed for evaluating the MOC when extinguishment occurs. In this case, a pressure threshold in 99.8% oxygen was determined with the methodology and found to be 0.4 to 0.9 psia for typical spacecraft materials. Correlation of flammability thresholds obtained with chemical, hot wire, and other ignition sources will be conducted to provide recommendations for using alternate ignition sources to evaluate flammability of aerospace materials.

  2. Interevent Correlations from Avalanches Hiding Below the Detection Threshold.

    PubMed

    Janićević, Sanja; Laurson, Lasse; Måløy, Knut Jørgen; Santucci, Stéphane; Alava, Mikko J

    2016-12-02

    Numerous systems ranging from deformation of materials to earthquakes exhibit bursty dynamics, which consist of a sequence of events with a broad event size distribution. Very often these events are observed to be temporally correlated or clustered, evidenced by power-law-distributed waiting times separating two consecutive activity bursts. We show how such interevent correlations arise simply because of a finite detection threshold, created by the limited sensitivity of the measurement apparatus, or used to subtract background activity or noise from the activity signal. Data from crack-propagation experiments and numerical simulations of a nonequilibrium crack-line model demonstrate how thresholding leads to correlated bursts of activity by separating the avalanche events into subavalanches. The resulting temporal subavalanche correlations are well described by our general scaling description of thresholding-induced correlations in crackling noise.

  3. Interevent Correlations from Avalanches Hiding Below the Detection Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janićević, Sanja; Laurson, Lasse; Mâløy, Knut Jørgen; Santucci, Stéphane; Alava, Mikko J.

    2016-12-01

    Numerous systems ranging from deformation of materials to earthquakes exhibit bursty dynamics, which consist of a sequence of events with a broad event size distribution. Very often these events are observed to be temporally correlated or clustered, evidenced by power-law-distributed waiting times separating two consecutive activity bursts. We show how such interevent correlations arise simply because of a finite detection threshold, created by the limited sensitivity of the measurement apparatus, or used to subtract background activity or noise from the activity signal. Data from crack-propagation experiments and numerical simulations of a nonequilibrium crack-line model demonstrate how thresholding leads to correlated bursts of activity by separating the avalanche events into subavalanches. The resulting temporal subavalanche correlations are well described by our general scaling description of thresholding-induced correlations in crackling noise.

  4. Regime change and oscillation thresholds in recorder-like instruments.

    PubMed

    Auvray, Roman; Fabre, Benoît; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves

    2012-02-01

    Based on results from the literature, a description of sound generation in a recorder is developed. Linear and non-linear analysis are performed to study the dependence of the frequency on the jet velocity. The linear analysis predicts that the frequency is a function of the jet velocity. The non-linear resolution provides information about limit cycle oscillation and hysteretic regime change thresholds. A comparison of the frequency between linear theory and experiments on a modified recorder shows good agreement except at very low jet velocities. Although the predicted threshold for the onset of the first regime shows an important deviation from experiments, the hysteresis of threshold to higher regimes is accurately estimated. Furthermore, a qualitative analysis of the influence of different parameters in the model on the sound generation and regime changes is presented.

  5. Setting conservation management thresholds using a novel participatory modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Addison, P F E; de Bie, K; Rumpff, L

    2015-10-01

    We devised a participatory modeling approach for setting management thresholds that show when management intervention is required to address undesirable ecosystem changes. This approach was designed to be used when management thresholds: must be set for environmental indicators in the face of multiple competing objectives; need to incorporate scientific understanding and value judgments; and will be set by participants with limited modeling experience. We applied our approach to a case study where management thresholds were set for a mat-forming brown alga, Hormosira banksii, in a protected area management context. Participants, including management staff and scientists, were involved in a workshop to test the approach, and set management thresholds to address the threat of trampling by visitors to an intertidal rocky reef. The approach involved trading off the environmental objective, to maintain the condition of intertidal reef communities, with social and economic objectives to ensure management intervention was cost-effective. Ecological scenarios, developed using scenario planning, were a key feature that provided the foundation for where to set management thresholds. The scenarios developed represented declines in percent cover of H. banksii that may occur under increased threatening processes. Participants defined 4 discrete management alternatives to address the threat of trampling and estimated the effect of these alternatives on the objectives under each ecological scenario. A weighted additive model was used to aggregate participants' consequence estimates. Model outputs (decision scores) clearly expressed uncertainty, which can be considered by decision makers and used to inform where to set management thresholds. This approach encourages a proactive form of conservation, where management thresholds and associated actions are defined a priori for ecological indicators, rather than reacting to unexpected ecosystem changes in the future.

  6. Color difference threshold determination for acrylic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiabao; Lin, Hong; Huang, Qingmei; Liang, Qifan; Zheng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to set evaluation indicators, i.e., perceptibility and acceptability color difference thresholds, of color stability for acrylic denture base resins for a spectrophotometric assessing method, which offered an alternative to the visual method described in ISO 20795-1:2013. A total of 291 disk specimens 50±1 mm in diameter and 0.5±0.1 mm thick were prepared (ISO 20795-1:2013) and processed through radiation tests in an accelerated aging chamber (ISO 7491:2000) for increasing times of 0 to 42 hours. Color alterations were measured with a spectrophotometer and evaluated using the CIE L*a*b* colorimetric system. Color differences were calculated through the CIEDE2000 color difference formula. Thirty-two dental professionals without color vision deficiencies completed perceptibility and acceptability assessments under controlled conditions in vitro. An S-curve fitting procedure was used to analyze the 50:50% perceptibility and acceptability thresholds. Furthermore, perceptibility and acceptability against the differences of the three color attributes, lightness, chroma, and hue, were also investigated. According to the S-curve fitting procedure, the 50:50% perceptibility threshold was 1.71ΔE00 (r(2)=0.88) and the 50:50% acceptability threshold was 4.00 ΔE00 (r(2)=0.89). Within the limitations of this study, 1.71/4.00 ΔE00 could be used as perceptibility/acceptability thresholds for acrylic denture base resins.

  7. Threshold phenomena in soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhibin

    Although two different fields are covered, this thesis is mainly focused on some threshold behaviors in both liquid crystal field and fluid dynamic systems. A method of rubbed polyimide is used to obtain pretilt. Sufficiently strong rubbing of a polyimide (SE-1211) results in a large polar pretilt of liquid crystal director with respect to the homeotropic orientation. There exists a threshold rubbing strength required to induce nonzero pretilt. For the homologous liquid crystal series alkyl-cyanobyphenyl, we found that the threshold rubbing strength is a monotonic function of the number of methylene units. A dual easy axis model is then used to explain the results. Freedericksz transition measurements have been used to determine the quadratical and quartic coefficients associated with the molecules' tilt with respect to the layer normal in surface-induced smectic layers in the nematic phase above the smectic-A-nematic phase transition temperature. Both the quadratic and quartic coefficients are consistent with the scaling relationship as predicted in theory, and their ratio is approximately constant. A Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiment is performed by using a magnetic field gradient to draw down a low density but highly paramagnetic fluid below a more dense fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell. When turning off the magnetic field, the RT instability occurs in situ and the growth of the most unstable wavevector is measured as a function of time. The wavelength of the RT instability along with the growth rate was measured as a function of capillary number (which is related to the density difference and interfacial tension between two fluids). A theory for the instability that permits different viscosities for two immiscible fluids was developed, and good agreement was found with the experimental results. The technique of magnetic levitation promises to broaden significantly the accessible parameter space of gravitational interfacial instability experiments. A method is

  8. Recursive adaptive frame integration limited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailov, Michael K.

    2006-05-01

    Recursive Frame Integration Limited was proposed as a way to improve frame integration performance and mitigate issues related to high data rate needed for conventional frame integration. The technique applies two thresholds - one tuned for optimum probability of detection, the other to manage required false alarm rate - and allows a non-linear integration process that, along with Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) gain, provides system designers more capability where cost, weight, or power considerations limit system data rate, processing, or memory capability. However, Recursive Frame Integration Limited may have performance issues when single frame SNR is really low. Recursive Adaptive Frame Integration Limited is proposed as a means to improve limited integration performance with really low single frame SNR. It combines the benefits of nonlinear recursive limited frame integration and adaptive thresholds with a kind of conventional frame integration.

  9. Epidemic thresholds for bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, D. G.; Risau-Gusman, S.

    2013-11-01

    It is well known that sexually transmitted diseases (STD) spread across a network of human sexual contacts. This network is most often bipartite, as most STD are transmitted between men and women. Even though network models in epidemiology have quite a long history now, there are few general results about bipartite networks. One of them is the simple dependence, predicted using the mean field approximation, between the epidemic threshold and the average and variance of the degree distribution of the network. Here we show that going beyond this approximation can lead to qualitatively different results that are supported by numerical simulations. One of the new features, that can be relevant for applications, is the existence of a critical value for the infectivity of each population, below which no epidemics can arise, regardless of the value of the infectivity of the other population.

  10. Iterative wavelet thresholding for rapid MRI reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayvanrad, Mohammad H.; McKenzie, Charles A.; Peters, Terry M.

    2011-03-01

    According to the developments in the field of compressed sampling and and sparse recovery, one might take advantage of the sparsity of an object, as an additional a priori knowledge about the object, to reconstruct it from fewer samples than that needed by the traditional sampling strategies. Since most magnetic resonance (MR) images are sparse in some domain, in this work we consider the problem of MR reconstruction and how one could apply this idea to accelerate the process of MR image/map acquisition. In particular, based on the Paupolis-Gerchgerg algorithm, an iterative thresholding algorithm for reconstruction of MR images from limited k-space observations is proposed. The proposed method takes advantage of the sparsity of most MR images in the wavelet domain. Initializing with a minimum-energy reconstruction, the object of interest is reconstructed by going through a sequence of thresholding and recovery iterations. Furthermore, MR studies often involve acquisition of multiple images in time that are highly correlated. This correlation can be used as additional knowledge on the object beside the sparsity to further reduce the reconstruction time. The performance of the proposed algorithms is experimentally evaluated and compared to other state-of-the-art methods. In particular, we show that the quality of reconstruction is increased compared to total variation (TV) regularization, and the conventional Papoulis-Gerchberg algorithm both in the absence and in the presence of noise. Also, phantom experiments show good accuracy in the reconstruction of relaxation maps from a set of highly undersampled k-space observations.

  11. Regulatory criteria: Legal or ecological thresholds?

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.M.; Skorupa, J.P.; Schwarzbach, S.E.

    1994-12-31

    Selenium-laden irrigation drainwater has been identified as a significant threat to breeding waterfowl and shorebirds in terminal sink environments throughout the western United States. Due to historic wetland habitat losses, irrigation drainwater disposal ponds represent virtually all the available breeding habitat for waterbirds in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California. Egg selenium residues from birds breeding at these ponds have been monitored by the US Fish and Wildlife Service since 1987, and physiological risk thresholds for individual and population-level hatchability and teratogenesis have been determined from these studies. For Blacknecked stilt populations, egg selenium below 3 ppm may be considered a safe level, hatchability is significantly depressed at mean egg selenium concentrations above 8 ppm, and induction of teratogenesis is virtually certain at egg selenium levels above 18 ppm (p < 0.05). Egg samples collected in 1993 from these ponds showed concentrations as high as 160 ppm. Despite the high degree of statistical confidence in these effects thresholds, and the incidence of selenium-induced bird death and deformity at these ponds, regulation of evaporation ponds has been problematic. Existing civil statutes regarding water quality are dependent on risk-based criteria, but irrigation drainwater is exempted from these regulations. The only applicable law is the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, a criminal statute with no risk-based guidelines, and consequently no wildlife safety factors. The authors present data from the San Joaquin Valley in the context of these regulatory and legal limitations. Evaluation of acute and chronic models for ambient water quality indicate that this approach may not provide adequate protection for breeding birds. Based on the inadequacy of these models, the authors consider the development of regulatory criteria for egg selenium, a standard which is ecologically relevant.

  12. Introducing hydrological information in rainfall intensity-duration thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Roberto; Bogaard, Thom

    2016-04-01

    Regional landslide hazard assessment is mainly based on empirically derived precipitation-intensity-duration (PID) thresholds. Generally, two features of rainfall events are plotted to discriminate between observed occurrence and absence of occurrence of mass movements. Hereafter, a separation line is drawn in logarithmic space. Although successfully applied in many case studies, such PID thresholds suffer from many false positives as well as limited physical process insight. One of the main limitations is indeed that they do not include any information about the hydrological processes occurring along the slopes, so that the triggering is only related to rainfall characteristics. In order to introduce such an hydrological information in the definition of rainfall thresholds for shallow landslide triggering assessment, in this study the introduction of non-dimensional rainfall characteristics is proposed. In particular, rain storm depth, intensity and duration are divided by a characteristic infiltration depth, a characteristic infiltration rate and a characteristic duration, respectively. These latter variables depend on the hydraulic properties and on the moisture state of the soil cover at the beginning of the precipitation. The proposed variables are applied to the case of a slope covered with shallow pyroclastic deposits in Cervinara (southern Italy), for which experimental data of hourly rainfall and soil suction were available. Rainfall thresholds defined with the proposed non-dimensional variables perform significantly better than those defined with dimensional variables, either in the intensity-duration plane or in the depth-duration plane.

  13. Embracing thresholds for better environmental management

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ryan P.; Erickson, Ashley L.; Mease, Lindley A.; Battista, Willow; Kittinger, John N.; Fujita, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Three decades of study have revealed dozens of examples in which natural systems have crossed biophysical thresholds (‘tipping points’)—nonlinear changes in ecosystem structure and function—as a result of human-induced stressors, dramatically altering ecosystem function and services. Environmental management that avoids such thresholds could prevent severe social, economic and environmental impacts. Here, we review management measures implemented in ecological systems that have thresholds. Using Ostrom's social–ecological systems framework, we analysed key biophysical and institutional factors associated with 51 social–ecological systems and associated management regimes, and related these to management success defined by ecological outcomes. We categorized cases as instances of prospective or retrospective management, based upon whether management aimed to avoid a threshold or to restore systems that have crossed a threshold. We find that smaller systems are more amenable to threshold-based management, that routine monitoring is associated with successful avoidance of thresholds and recovery after thresholds have been crossed, and that success is associated with the explicit threshold-based management. These findings are powerful evidence for the policy relevance of information on ecological thresholds across a wide range of ecosystems.

  14. A common fluence threshold for first positive and second positive phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janoudi, A.; Poff, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the amount of light and the amount of response for any photobiological process can be based on the number of incident quanta per unit time (fluence rate-response) or on the number of incident quanta during a given period of irradiation (fluence-response). Fluence-response and fluence rate-response relationships have been measured for second positive phototropism by seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. The fluence-response relationships exhibit a single limiting threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter when measured at fluence rates from 2.4 x 10(-5) to 6.5 x 10(-3) micromoles per square meter per second. The threshold values in the fluence rate-response curves decrease with increasing time of irradiation, but show a common fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. These thresholds are the same as the threshold of about 0.01 micromole per square meter measured for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that second positive curvature has a threshold in time of about 10 minutes. Moreover, if the times of irradiation exceed the time threshold, there is a single limiting fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. Thus, the limiting fluence threshold for second positive phototropism is the same as the fluence threshold for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, we suggest that this common fluence threshold for first positive and second positive phototropism is set by a single photoreceptor pigment system.

  15. Sensory properties of selected terpenes. Thresholds for odor, nasal pungency, nasal localization, and eye irritation.

    PubMed

    Cometto-Muñiz, J E; Cain, W S; Abraham, M H; Kumarsingh, R

    1998-11-30

    We tested four normosmics and four anosmics in detection thresholds for six terpenes commonly found indoors: cumene, p-cymene, delta-3-carene, linalool, 1,8-cineole and geraniol. Normosmics provided odor thresholds and anosmics provided nasal pungency thresholds. All subjects provided nasal localization (i.e., right/left nostril) and eye irritation thresholds. Each type of threshold was measured eight times per subject-stimulus combination. Stimuli were presented from squeeze bottles in a two-alternative forced-choice procedure via an ascending method of limits. Odor thresholds ranged between 0.1 and 1.0 parts per million (ppm, by volume). Nasal pungency thresholds lay about three orders of magnitude above odor thresholds. Nasal localization and eye irritation thresholds did not differ between normosmics and anosmics, and fell close to nasal pungency thresholds. Olfactory thresholds could be obtained for all stimuli in all repetitions using the criterion of five correct choices in a row. Trigeminal thresholds (i.e., pungency, localization and eye irritation) could be obtained on all repetitions only for some terpenes using that same criterion. Carene and cineol produced nasal pungency and eye irritation on all repetitions. None of the terpenes could be localized on all repetitions, but cineol was localized a higher percentage of instances than were the other stimuli. At the other extreme, geraniol failed to evoke any of the three trigeminal responses in most instances. Overall, the results indicate that the three trigeminal thresholds produce a uniform view of the potency of these terpenes, with nasal pungency and eye irritation being slightly more sensitive than nasal localization. Furthermore, application of a previously derived linear solvation energy relationship to the results reinforced the view that physicochemical properties can predict the chemesthetic impact of volatile organic compounds.

  16. Thresholds for Cenozoic bipolar glaciation.

    PubMed

    Deconto, Robert M; Pollard, David; Wilson, Paul A; Pälike, Heiko; Lear, Caroline H; Pagani, Mark

    2008-10-02

    The long-standing view of Earth's Cenozoic glacial history calls for the first continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica in the earliest Oligocene epoch ( approximately 33.6 million years ago), followed by the onset of northern-hemispheric glacial cycles in the late Pliocene epoch, about 31 million years later. The pivotal early Oligocene event is characterized by a rapid shift of 1.5 parts per thousand in deep-sea benthic oxygen-isotope values (Oi-1) within a few hundred thousand years, reflecting a combination of terrestrial ice growth and deep-sea cooling. The apparent absence of contemporaneous cooling in deep-sea Mg/Ca records, however, has been argued to reflect the growth of more ice than can be accommodated on Antarctica; this, combined with new evidence of continental cooling and ice-rafted debris in the Northern Hemisphere during this period, raises the possibility that Oi-1 represents a precursory bipolar glaciation. Here we test this hypothesis using an isotope-capable global climate/ice-sheet model that accommodates both the long-term decline of Cenozoic atmospheric CO(2) levels and the effects of orbital forcing. We show that the CO(2) threshold below which glaciation occurs in the Northern Hemisphere ( approximately 280 p.p.m.v.) is much lower than that for Antarctica ( approximately 750 p.p.m.v.). Therefore, the growth of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere immediately following Antarctic glaciation would have required rapid CO(2) drawdown within the Oi-1 timeframe, to levels lower than those estimated by geochemical proxies and carbon-cycle models. Instead of bipolar glaciation, we find that Oi-1 is best explained by Antarctic glaciation alone, combined with deep-sea cooling of up to 4 degrees C and Antarctic ice that is less isotopically depleted (-30 to -35 per thousand) than previously suggested. Proxy CO(2) estimates remain above our model's northern-hemispheric glaciation threshold of approximately 280 p.p.m.v. until approximately 25 Myr

  17. Outcome-Driven Thresholds for Home Blood Pressure Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Niiranen, Teemu J.; Asayama, Kei; Thijs, Lutgarde; Johansson, Jouni K.; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Kikuya, Masahiro; Boggia, José; Hozawa, Atsushi; Sandoya, Edgardo; Stergiou, George S.; Tsuji, Ichiro; Jula, Antti M.; Imai, Yutaka; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The lack of outcome-driven operational thresholds limits the clinical application of home blood pressure (BP) measurement. Our objective was to determine an outcome-driven reference frame for home BP measurement. We measured home and clinic BP in 6470 participants (mean age, 59.3 years; 56.9% women; 22.4% on antihypertensive treatment) recruited in Ohasama, Japan (n=2520); Montevideo, Uruguay (n=399); Tsurugaya, Japan (n=811); Didima, Greece (n=665); and nationwide in Finland (n=2075). In multivariable-adjusted analyses of individual subject data, we determined home BP thresholds, which yielded 10-year cardiovascular risks similar to those associated with stages 1 (120/80 mm Hg) and 2 (130/85 mm Hg) prehypertension, and stages 1 (140/90 mm Hg) and 2 (160/100 mm Hg) hypertension on clinic measurement. During 8.3 years of follow-up (median), 716 cardiovascular end points, 294 cardiovascular deaths, 393 strokes, and 336 cardiac events occurred in the whole cohort; in untreated participants these numbers were 414, 158, 225, and 194, respectively. In the whole cohort, outcome-driven systolic/diastolic thresholds for the home BP corresponding with stages 1 and 2 prehypertension and stages 1 and 2 hypertension were 121.4/77.7, 127.4/79.9, 133.4/82.2, and 145.4/86.8 mm Hg; in 5018 untreated participants, these thresholds were 118.5/76.9, 125.2/79.7, 131.9/82.4, and 145.3/87.9 mm Hg, respectively. Rounded thresholds for stages 1 and 2 prehypertension and stages 1 and 2 hypertension amounted to 120/75, 125/80, 130/85, and 145/90 mm Hg, respectively. Population-based outcome-driven thresholds for home BP are slightly lower than those currently proposed in hypertension guidelines. Our current findings could inform guidelines and help clinicians in diagnosing and managing patients. PMID:23129700

  18. Optimizing Systems of Threshold Detection Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    mean of the "no event" distribution, we use mathematical nonlinear programming techniques to determine appropriate individual thresholds to maximize...decreases in all thresholds (less than five to ten percent) result in modest nonlinear percentage increases in detection performance (again, less than ten...level. In this thesis, we develop a model using nonlinear mathematical programming techniques to determine appropriate individual thresholds at

  19. Required thermal thresholds during transport of animals.

    PubMed

    Schrama, J W; van der Hel, W; Gorssen, J; Henken, A M; Verstegen, M W; Noordhuizen, J P

    1996-09-01

    Conditions (total complex of stressors) during the transport of animals vary strongly between and within transports. Adverse climatic conditions are stressors that animals have to face during transport. The thermoregulation of animals id discussed with respect to threshold values for optimal climatic conditions. These thermal thresholds depend on animal related factors and environmental conditions. The specific impact of transport conditions, such as food and water deprivation, high stocking density, high humidity and high air velocity, on thermal thresholds are described.

  20. GHRS Side 2 Threshold Adjustment - 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skapik, Joe

    1994-01-01

    This test will determine the optimal, non-standard discriminator thresholds for the few anomalous channels on HRS detector 2. A 15 second flat field observation followed by a 210 second dark count is performed at each of 10 discriminator threshold values for each detector. The result of the test will be the optimal threshold values to be entered into the PDB. Edited 4/30/91 to add comments to disable/re-enable cross-talk tables.

  1. GHRS Side 1 Threshold Adjustment - 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skapik, Joe

    1994-01-01

    This test will determine the optimal, non-standard discriminator thresholds for the few anomalous channels on HRS detector 1. A 15 second flat field observation followed by a 210 second dark count is performed at each of 10 discriminator threshold values for each detector. The result of the test will be the optimal threshold values to be entered into the PDB. Edited 4/30/91 to add comments to disable/re-enable cross-talk tables.

  2. Automatic threshold selection using histogram quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Adali, Tulay; Lo, Shih-Chung B.

    1997-04-01

    An automatic threshold selection method is proposed for biomedical image analysis based on a histogram coding scheme. The threshold values can be determined based on the well-known Lloyd-Max scalar quantization rule, which is optimal in the sense of achieving minimum mean-square-error distortion. An iterative self-organizing learning rule is derived to determine the threshold levels. The rule does not require any prior information about the histogram, hence is fully automatic. Experimental results show that this new approach is easy to implement yet is highly efficient, robust with respect to noise, and yields reliable estimates of the threshold levels.

  3. A study of FM threshold extension techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.; Loch, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of three postdetection threshold extension techniques are evaluated with respect to the ability of such techniques to improve the performance of a phase lock loop demodulator. These techniques include impulse-noise elimination, signal correlation for the detection of impulse noise, and delta modulation signal processing. Experimental results from signal to noise ratio data and bit error rate data indicate that a 2- to 3-decibel threshold extension is readily achievable by using the various techniques. This threshold improvement is in addition to the threshold extension that is usually achieved through the use of a phase lock loop demodulator.

  4. Percolation Threshold in Polycarbonate Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2014-03-01

    Nanocomposites have unique mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical and thermal properties. Many methods could be applied to prepare polymer-inorganic nanocomposites, such as sol-gel processing, in-situ polymerization, particle in-situ formation, blending, and radiation synthesis. The analytical composite models that have been put forth include Voigt and Reuss bounds, Polymer nanocomposites offer the possibility of substantial improvements in material properties such as shear and bulk modulus, yield strength, toughness, film scratch resistance, optical properties, electrical conductivity, gas and solvent transport, with only very small amounts of nanoparticles Experimental results are compared against composite models of Hashin and Shtrikman bounds, Halpin-Tsai model, Cox model, and various Mori and Tanaka models. Examples of numerical modeling are molecular dynamics modeling and finite element modeling of reduced modulus and hardness that takes into account the modulus of the components and the effect of the interface between the hard filler and relatively soft polymer, polycarbonate. Higher nanoparticle concentration results in poor dispersion and adhesion to polymer matrix which results in lower modulus and hardness and departure from the existing composite models. As the level of silica increases beyond a threshold level, aggregates form which results in weakening of the structure. Polymer silica interface is found to be weak as silica is non-interacting promoting interfacial slip at silica-matrix junctions. Our experimental results compare favorably with those of nanocomposites of polyesters where the effect of nanoclay on composite hardness and modulus depended on dispersion of nanoclay in polyester.

  5. Exhaustive Thresholds and Resistance Checkpoints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, Charles; Khuzadi, Mbuyi

    2008-01-01

    Once deployed, all intricate systems that operate for a long time (such as an airplane or chemical processing plant) experience degraded performance during operational lifetime. These can result from losses of integrity in subsystems and parts that generally do not materially impact the operation of the vehicle (e.g., the light behind the button that opens the sliding door of the minivan). Or it can result from loss of more critical parts or subsystems. Such losses need to be handled quickly in order to avoid loss of personnel, mission, or part of the system itself. In order to manage degraded systems, knowledge of its potential problem areas and the means by which these problems are detected should be developed during the initial development of the system. Once determined, a web of sensors is employed and their outputs are monitored with other system parameters while the system is in preparation or operation. Just gathering the data is only part of the story. The interpretation of the data itself and the response of the system must be carefully developed as well to avoid a mishap. Typically, systems use a test-threshold-response paradigm to process potential system faults. However, such processing sub-systems can suffer from errors and oversights of a consistent type, causing system aberrant behavior instead of expected system and recovery operations. In our study, we developed a complete checklist for determining the completeness of a fault system and its robustness to common processing and response difficulties.

  6. Roots at the percolation threshold.

    PubMed

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is the layer of soil around the roots where complex and dynamic interactions between plants and soil affect the capacity of plants to take up water. The physical properties of the rhizosphere are affected by mucilage, a gel exuded by roots. Mucilage can absorb large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. We use a percolation model to describe the rewetting of dry rhizosphere. We find that at a critical mucilage concentration the rhizosphere becomes impermeable. The critical mucilage concentration depends on the radius of the soil particle size. Capillary rise experiments with neutron radiography prove that for concentrations below the critical mucilage concentration water could easily cross the rhizosphere, while above the critical concentration water could no longer percolate through it. Our studies, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water?

  7. Roots at the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is the layer of soil around the roots where complex and dynamic interactions between plants and soil affect the capacity of plants to take up water. The physical properties of the rhizosphere are affected by mucilage, a gel exuded by roots. Mucilage can absorb large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. We use a percolation model to describe the rewetting of dry rhizosphere. We find that at a critical mucilage concentration the rhizosphere becomes impermeable. The critical mucilage concentration depends on the radius of the soil particle size. Capillary rise experiments with neutron radiography prove that for concentrations below the critical mucilage concentration water could easily cross the rhizosphere, while above the critical concentration water could no longer percolate through it. Our studies, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water?

  8. Excitation Spectra of Carbon Nuclei near η ' Emission Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itahashi, Kenta; Ayyad, Yassid; Benlliure, Jose; Brinkmann, Kai-Thomas; Friedrich, Stefan; Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Geissel, Hans; Gellanki, Jnaneswari; Guo, Chenlei; Gutz, Eric; Haettner, Emma; Harakeh, Muhsin N.; Hayano, Ryugo S.; Higashi, Yuko; Hirenzaki, Satoru; Hornung, Christine; Igarashi, Yoichi; Ikeno, Natsumi; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Jido, Daisuke; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, Nasser; Kanungo, Rituparna; Knoebel, Ronja; Kurz, Nikolaus; Metag, Volker; Mukha, Ivan; Nagae, Tomofumi; Nagahiro, Hideko; Nanova, Mariana; Nishi, Takahiro; Ong, Hooi Jin; Pietri, Stephane; Prochazka, Andrej; Rappold, Christophe; Reiter, Moritz P.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, José L.; Scheidenberger, Christoph; Simon, Haik; Sitar, Branislav; Strmen, Peter; Sun, Baohua; Suzuki, Ken; Szarka, Imrich; Takechi, Maya; Tanaka, Yoshiki K.; Tanihata, Isao; Terashima, Satoru; Watanabe, Yuni N.; Weick, Helmut; Widmann, Eberhard; Winfield, John S.; Xu, Xiaodong; Yamakami, Hiroki; Zhao, Jianwei

    We measured an excitation spectrum of 12C(p, d) reaction near the η' emission threshold using a 2.5 GeV proton beam. The measured spectrum shows no peak structures which are associated to formation of η'-mesic nuclei. Further analysis is ongoing to deduce upper limits of the formation cross section and to set constraints in the η'-nucleus interaction.

  9. Oil Mist Compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, Lloyd

    2009-02-02

    This report summarizes activities at the KCP related to evaluating and modifying machine tools in order to be in compliance with Section 23 of DOE 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program. Section 851.23 (a) states that “Contractors must comply with the following safety and health standards that are applicable to the hazards in their covered workplace”, and subsection 9 contains the following applicable standard: “American Congress of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), ‘Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices,’ (2005) (incorporated by reference, see §851.27) when the ACGIH Threshold Limit Values are lower (more protective) than permissible exposure limits in 29 CFR 1910.” In the 2005 ACGIHThreshold Limit Value book a Notice of Change was issued for exposure to mineral oil mist used in metalworking fluids (MWFs). The effects of planning for the new facility and which machine tools would be making the transition to the new facility affected which machine tools were modified.

  10. Mechanisms Controlling Virulence Thresholds of Mixed Viral Populations ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Karen Z.; Pfeiffer, Julie K.

    2011-01-01

    The propensity of RNA viruses to revert attenuating mutations contributes to disease and complicates vaccine development. Despite the presence of virulent revertant viruses in some live-attenuated vaccines, disease from vaccination is rare. This suggests that in mixed viral populations, attenuated viruses may limit the pathogenesis of virulent viruses, thus establishing a virulence threshold. Here we examined virulence thresholds using mixtures of virulent and attenuated viruses in a transgenic mouse model of poliovirus infection. We determined that a 1,000-fold excess of the attenuated Sabin strain of poliovirus was protective against disease induced by the virulent Mahoney strain. Protection was induced locally, and inactivated virus conferred protection. Treatment with a poliovirus receptor-blocking antibody phenocopied the protective effect of inactivated viruses in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that one mechanism controlling virulence thresholds may be competition for a viral receptor. Additionally, the type I interferon response reduces poliovirus pathogenesis; therefore, we examined virulence thresholds in mice lacking the alpha/beta interferon receptor. We found that the attenuated virus was virulent in immunodeficient mice due to the enhanced replication and reversion of attenuating mutations. Therefore, while the type I interferon response limits the virulence of the attenuated strain by reducing replication, protection from disease conferred by the attenuated strain in immunocompetent mice can occur independently of replication. Our results identified mechanisms controlling the virulence of mixed viral populations and indicate that live-attenuated vaccines containing virulent virus may be safe, as long as virulent viruses are present at levels below a critical threshold. PMID:21795346

  11. The Military Deployment Human Exposure Assessment Study (MDHEXAS): Blood and Urine Exposure Biomarkers as Environmental Surveillance Tools for Assessing Military Personnel Exposure to Chemicals During Deployment to Camp McGovern, Bosnia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    exposure-related health effects such as cancer (Ketchum, 1999), diabetes mellitus (Longnecker et al., 2000), and immunologic responses (Michalek et al...the following table indicate primarily acutely toxic effects. The cancer rating denotes the chronic toxic effects. It should be noted that...and Health (NIOSH) Pocket Guide of Hazardous Chemicals, 1996. The cancer rating and BEI® information is reported from the 1996 ACGIH Threshold Limit

  12. The hyperbolic strength-duration relationship of defibrillation threshold.

    PubMed

    Irnich, Werner

    2008-08-01

    Defibrillation with square-wave pulses has proved to possess hyperbolic strength-duration relationship. Does such a hyperbolic relation also exist for exponentially decaying pulses as they are commonly used today? This paper hypothesizes that exponentially decaying pulses obey hyperbolic strength-duration relationship, calculates the consequences, and advises of how such thresholds should be investigated. If the strength-duration relationship exists for current, the corresponding charge threshold must be a Weiss' straight threshold line. In analogy, for exponentially decaying pulses, the integral of the amplitude over pulse duration (PD) must be calculated as a function of PD. If this function is linearly correlated, the mean voltage possesses a hyperbolic strength-duration relationship, whereas the peak voltage does not. Peak amplitude curves possess minima shifting to the right with increasing time constant RC limiting the allowed range of useful PDs. To prove that exponentially decaying pulses have a hyperbolic relationship, testing must be done in six steps that are demonstrated with results published in literature. Mean voltages have, indeed, hyperbolic strength-duration relationship. Chronaxie is not calculated correctly as long as peak voltage thresholds are correlated and PDs are greater than allowed.

  13. Improving massive experiments with threshold blocking

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Michael J.; Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    2016-01-01

    Inferences from randomized experiments can be improved by blocking: assigning treatment in fixed proportions within groups of similar units. However, the use of the method is limited by the difficulty in deriving these groups. Current blocking methods are restricted to special cases or run in exponential time; are not sensitive to clustering of data points; and are often heuristic, providing an unsatisfactory solution in many common instances. We present an algorithm that implements a widely applicable class of blocking—threshold blocking—that solves these problems. Given a minimum required group size and a distance metric, we study the blocking problem of minimizing the maximum distance between any two units within the same group. We prove this is a nondeterministic polynomial-time hard problem and derive an approximation algorithm that yields a blocking where the maximum distance is guaranteed to be, at most, four times the optimal value. This algorithm runs in O(n log n) time with O(n) space complexity. This makes it, to our knowledge, the first blocking method with an ensured level of performance that works in massive experiments. Whereas many commonly used algorithms form pairs of units, our algorithm constructs the groups flexibly for any chosen minimum size. This facilitates complex experiments with several treatment arms and clustered data. A simulation study demonstrates the efficiency and efficacy of the algorithm; tens of millions of units can be blocked using a desktop computer in a few minutes. PMID:27382151

  14. Human contrast threshold and astronomical visibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crumey, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    The standard visibility model in light-pollution studies is the formula of Hecht, as used e.g. by Schaefer. However, it is applicable only to point sources and is shown to be of limited accuracy. A new visibility model is presented for uniform achromatic targets of any size against background luminances ranging from zero to full daylight, produced by a systematic procedure applicable to any appropriate data set (e.g. Blackwell's), and based on a simple but previously unrecognized empirical relation between contrast threshold and adaptation luminance. The scotopic luminance correction for variable spectral radiance (colour index) is calculated. For point sources, the model is more accurate than Hecht's formula and is verified using telescopic data collected at Mount Wilson in 1947, enabling the sky brightness at that time to be determined. The result is darker than the calculation by Garstang, implying that light pollution grew more rapidly in subsequent decades than has been supposed. The model is applied to the nebular observations of William Herschel, enabling his visual performance to be quantified. Proposals are made regarding sky quality indicators for public use.

  15. Shock Initiation Thresholds of Various Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, David; Welle, Eric; Yarrington, Cole

    2013-06-01

    Shock initiation threshold data for several energetic materials has been analyzed for both short-pulses and long, sustained shocks. In the limit of long duration shocks, the critical pressure for initiation is governed by the balance between chemical energy release in the vicinity of hotspots and thermal dissipation which cools the hotspot and can quench reactions. The observed trends in critical pressure from one material to the next are related to the thermophysical properties and chemical reaction kinetics of each material. Scaling analysis, combined with hydrocode simulations of collapsing pores has confirmed these trends; however large uncertainty in the reaction kinetics under shock loading prevents an accurate quantitative description of hotspot ignition. For a given pore diameter, scaling analysis allows a quick estimate of the temperature at which the reaction rate will exceed the rate of thermal dissipation. Using published thermophysical property data and reaction kinetics we found that the trend in critical hotspot temperatures for several common materials (e.g. PETN, HMX, HNS, and TATB) matches the observed trend in initiation sensitivity. The hydrocode simulations of pore collapse provide a link between the critical temperature and the initial shock pressure. For these simulations we have used recently published QMD-based equations of state for the fully-dense, crystalline phase and have included the effects of variable specific heat, viscous dissipation, and plastic work. These results will be presented and the need for physically-meaningful reaction rates will be emphasized.

  16. Objective definition of rainfall intensity-duration thresholds for the initiation of post-fire debris flows in southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staley, Dennis; Kean, Jason W.; Cannon, Susan H.; Schmidt, Kevin M.; Laber, Jayme L.

    2012-01-01

    Rainfall intensity–duration (ID) thresholds are commonly used to predict the temporal occurrence of debris flows and shallow landslides. Typically, thresholds are subjectively defined as the upper limit of peak rainstorm intensities that do not produce debris flows and landslides, or as the lower limit of peak rainstorm intensities that initiate debris flows and landslides. In addition, peak rainstorm intensities are often used to define thresholds, as data regarding the precise timing of debris flows and associated rainfall intensities are usually not available, and rainfall characteristics are often estimated from distant gauging locations. Here, we attempt to improve the performance of existing threshold-based predictions of post-fire debris-flow occurrence by utilizing data on the precise timing of debris flows relative to rainfall intensity, and develop an objective method to define the threshold intensities. We objectively defined the thresholds by maximizing the number of correct predictions of debris flow occurrence while minimizing the rate of both Type I (false positive) and Type II (false negative) errors. We identified that (1) there were statistically significant differences between peak storm and triggering intensities, (2) the objectively defined threshold model presents a better balance between predictive success, false alarms and failed alarms than previous subjectively defined thresholds, (3) thresholds based on measurements of rainfall intensity over shorter duration (≤60 min) are better predictors of post-fire debris-flow initiation than longer duration thresholds, and (4) the objectively defined thresholds were exceeded prior to the recorded time of debris flow at frequencies similar to or better than subjective thresholds. Our findings highlight the need to better constrain the timing and processes of initiation of landslides and debris flows for future threshold studies. In addition, the methods used to define rainfall thresholds in this

  17. Threshold Concepts, Systems and Learning for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandri, Orana Jade

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for understanding the role that systems theory might play in education for sustainability (EfS). It offers a sketch and critique of Land and Meyer's notion of a "threshold concept", to argue that seeing systems as a threshold concept for sustainability is useful for understanding the processes of…

  18. 24 CFR 954.104 - Performance thresholds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Performance thresholds. 954.104... DEVELOPMENT INDIAN HOME PROGRAM Applying for Assistance § 954.104 Performance thresholds. Applicants must have... HOME program must have performed adequately. In cases of previously documented deficient...

  19. 40 CFR 98.221 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.221 Section 98.221 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Nitric Acid Production § 98.221 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  20. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.251 Section 98.251 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  1. Applying Threshold Concepts to Finance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Susan; Wood, Leigh N.; Tickle, Leonie; Kyng, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate and identify threshold concepts that are the essential conceptual content of finance programmes. Design/Methodology/Approach: Conducted in three stages with finance academics and students, the study uses threshold concepts as both a theoretical framework and a research methodology. Findings: The…

  2. 40 CFR 98.421 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.421 Section 98.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.421 Reporting threshold. Any supplier...

  3. 40 CFR 98.421 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.421 Section 98.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.421 Reporting threshold. Any supplier...

  4. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.81 Section 98.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  5. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  6. 40 CFR 98.421 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.421 Section 98.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.421 Reporting threshold. Any supplier...

  7. Detectability thresholds of general modular graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the detectability thresholds of various modular structures in the stochastic block model. Our analysis reveals how the detectability threshold is related to the details of the modular pattern, including the hierarchy of the clusters. We show that certain planted structures are impossible to infer regardless of their fuzziness.

  8. Thresholds for odor and nasal pungency.

    PubMed

    Cometto-Muñiz, J E; Cain, W S

    1990-11-01

    Detection thresholds were measured repeatedly for 11 chemicals in normosmic and anosmic subjects. The stimuli comprised the first eight members of the series of n-aliphatic alcohols, phenyl ethyl alcohol, pyridine, and menthol. Results showed that anosmics could detect, via pungency, all but phenyl ethyl alcohol reliably. In the aliphatic series, both odor and pungency thresholds declined with chain length in a way that implied dependence of both in part on phase distribution in the mucosa. Odor thresholds, however, declined more rapidly than pungency thresholds: the ratio of anosmics threshold/normosmics threshold increased from 23 for methanol to 10,000 for 1-octanol. The outcome of a scaling experiment employing normosmic subjects indicated that, with the exception of methanol and ethanol, pungency arose when perceived intensity reached a narrowly tuned criterion level. When thresholds were expressed as percentages of saturated vapor, an index of thermodynamic activity, thereby accounting for differences in solubility and in phase distribution in the mucosa among the various stimuli, both odor and pungency thresholds depicted a striking constancy across stimuli.

  9. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.471 Section 98.471 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You...

  10. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.471 Section 98.471 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You...

  11. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.471 Section 98.471 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You...

  12. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.471 Section 98.471 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You...

  13. Network Motif Basis of Threshold Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been a long-running debate over the existence of thresholds for adverse effects. The difficulty stems from two fundamental challenges: (i) statistical analysis by itself cannot prove the existence of a threshold, i.e., a dose below which there is no effect; and (ii) the...

  14. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.341 Section 98.341 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You...

  15. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.341 Section 98.341 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You...

  16. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.341 Section 98.341 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You...

  17. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.341 Section 98.341 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You...

  18. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.341 Section 98.341 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You...

  19. Intelligence and Creativity: Over the Threshold Together?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welter, Marisete Maria; Jaarsveld, Saskia; van Leeuwen, Cees; Lachmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Threshold theory predicts a positive correlation between IQ and creativity scores up to an IQ level of 120 and no correlation above this threshold. Primary school children were tested at beginning (N = 98) and ending (N = 70) of the school year. Participants performed the standard progressive matrices (SPM) and the Test of Creative…

  20. Thresholds of cutaneous afferents related to perceptual threshold across the human foot sole

    PubMed Central

    Strzalkowski, Nicholas D. J.; Mildren, Robyn L.

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual thresholds are known to vary across the foot sole, despite a reported even distribution in cutaneous afferents. Skin mechanical properties have been proposed to account for these differences; however, a direct relationship between foot sole afferent firing, perceptual threshold, and skin mechanical properties has not been previously investigated. Using the technique of microneurography, we recorded the monofilament firing thresholds of cutaneous afferents and associated perceptual thresholds across the foot sole. In addition, receptive field hardness measurements were taken to investigate the influence of skin hardness on these threshold measures. Afferents were identified as fast adapting [FAI (n = 48) or FAII (n = 13)] or slowly adapting [SAI (n = 21) or SAII (n = 20)], and were grouped based on receptive field location (heel, arch, metatarsals, toes). Overall, perceptual thresholds were found to most closely align with firing thresholds of FA afferents. In contrast, SAI and SAII afferent firing thresholds were found to be significantly higher than perceptual thresholds and are not thought to mediate monofilament perceptual threshold across the foot sole. Perceptual thresholds and FAI afferent firing thresholds were significantly lower in the arch compared with other regions, and skin hardness was found to positively correlate with both FAI and FAII afferent firing and perceptual thresholds. These data support a perceptual influence of skin hardness, which is likely the result of elevated FA afferent firing threshold at harder foot sole sites. The close coupling between FA afferent firing and perceptual threshold across foot sole indicates that small changes in FA afferent firing can influence perceptual thresholds. PMID:26289466

  1. Methods for automatic trigger threshold adjustment

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Benjamin J; Partridge, Michael E

    2014-03-18

    Methods are presented for adjusting trigger threshold values to compensate for drift in the quiescent level of a signal monitored for initiating a data recording event, thereby avoiding false triggering conditions. Initial threshold values are periodically adjusted by re-measuring the quiescent signal level, and adjusting the threshold values by an offset computation based upon the measured quiescent signal level drift. Re-computation of the trigger threshold values can be implemented on time based or counter based criteria. Additionally, a qualification width counter can be utilized to implement a requirement that a trigger threshold criterion be met a given number of times prior to initiating a data recording event, further reducing the possibility of a false triggering situation.

  2. The HEL Upper Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billingsley, James

    2001-06-01

    A threshold particle velocity, Vf, derived by Professor E.R. Fitzgerald for the onset of atomic lattice disintegration phenomena (LDP) is shown to exceed or compare rather well with the maximum experimentally observed Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) particle or mass velocities (Uphel) for certain hard and strong mineral/ceramic materials. They are: diamond, quartz, sapphire, alumina, silicon carbide, titanium diboride, and partially stabilized zirconia. The LDP is caused by a conflict between the DeBroglie momentum-wavelength relation and the minimum wavelength allowed in a lattice row of atoms.

  3. Thermoregulatory response thresholds during spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kurz, A; Sessler, D I; Schroeder, M; Kurz, M

    1993-10-01

    Reportedly, during spinal anesthesia, the shivering threshold is reduced approximately 1 degree C but the vasoconstriction threshold remains normal. Such divergence between the shivering and vasoconstriction thresholds is an unusual pattern of thermoregulatory impairment and suggests that the mechanisms of impairment during regional anesthesia may be especially complex. Accordingly, we sought to define the pattern of thermoregulatory impairment during spinal anesthesia by measuring response thresholds. Seven healthy women volunteered to participate on two study days. On one day, we evaluated thermoregulatory responses to hypothermia and hyperthermia during spinal anesthesia; on the other day, responses were evaluated without anesthesia. Upper body skin temperature was kept constant throughout the study. The volunteers were warmed via the lower body and cooled by central venous infusion of cold fluid. The core temperatures triggering a sweating rate of 40 g.m-2 x h-1, a finger flow of 0.1 mL/min, and a marked and sustained increase in oxygen consumption were considered the thermoregulatory thresholds for sweating, vasoconstriction, and shivering, respectively. Spinal anesthesia significantly decreased the thresholds for vasoconstriction and shivering, and the decrease in each was approximately 0.5 degree C. The range of temperatures not triggering thermoregulatory responses (those between sweating and vasoconstriction) was 0.9 +/- 0.6 degree C during spinal anesthesia. The synchronous decrease in the shivering and vasoconstriction thresholds during spinal anesthesia is consistent with thermoregulatory impairment resulting from altered afferent thermal input.

  4. Diversity of threshold phenomena in geophysical media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The sample analysis of threshold phenomena in the lithosphere, atmosphere, and magnetosphere is conducted. The phenomena due to the flow of electric current and pore fluid in the rocks are considered, the scenario of wind-driven generation of atmospheric electricity is suggested, and the model of the geomagnetic storm time Dst variation is analyzed. An important general conclusion consists in the fact that in the geophysical media there is a wide class of threshold phenomena that are affine with phase transitions of the second kind. These phenomena are also related to the critical transitions in self-oscillatory systems with soft self-excitation. The integral representation of bifurcation diagrams for threshold phenomena is suggested. This provides a simple way to take into account the influence of the fluctuations on the transition of a system through the threshold. Fluctuations remove singularity at the threshold point and, generally, lead to a certain shifting of the threshold. The question concerning the hard transition through the threshold and several aspects of modeling the blow-up instability which is presumed to occasionally develop in the geophysical media are discussed.

  5. Hyper-arousal decreases human visual thresholds.

    PubMed

    Woods, Adam J; Philbeck, John W; Wirtz, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Arousal has long been known to influence behavior and serves as an underlying component of cognition and consciousness. However, the consequences of hyper-arousal for visual perception remain unclear. The present study evaluates the impact of hyper-arousal on two aspects of visual sensitivity: visual stereoacuity and contrast thresholds. Sixty-eight participants participated in two experiments. Thirty-four participants were randomly divided into two groups in each experiment: Arousal Stimulation or Sham Control. The Arousal Stimulation group underwent a 50-second cold pressor stimulation (immersing the foot in 0-2° C water), a technique known to increase arousal. In contrast, the Sham Control group immersed their foot in room temperature water. Stereoacuity thresholds (Experiment 1) and contrast thresholds (Experiment 2) were measured before and after stimulation. The Arousal Stimulation groups demonstrated significantly lower stereoacuity and contrast thresholds following cold pressor stimulation, whereas the Sham Control groups showed no difference in thresholds. These results provide the first evidence that hyper-arousal from sensory stimulation can lower visual thresholds. Hyper-arousal's ability to decrease visual thresholds has important implications for survival, sports, and everyday life.

  6. Sputtering Threshold Energies of Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, Maris A.

    1999-01-01

    Sputter erosion in ion thrusters has been measured in lifetests at discharge voltages as low as 25 V. Thruster operation at this discharge voltage results in component erosion rates sufficiently low to satisfy most mission requirements. It has been recognized that most of the internal sputtering in ion thrusters is done by doubly charged ions. Knowledge of the sputtering threshold voltage of a xenon molybdenum system would be beneficial in understanding the sputtering process as well as making more accurate calculations of the sputtering rates of ion thruster components. Sputtering threshold energies calculated from various formulations found in the literature results in values ranging from 28 to 200 eV. It is evident that some of these formulations cannot be relied upon to provide sputtering thresholds with any degree of accuracy. This paper re-examines the threshold energies measurements made in the early sixties by Askerov and Sena, and Stuart and Wehner. The threshold voltages as derived by Askerov and au have been reevaluated by using a different extrapolation method of sputter yields at low ion energies. The resulting threshold energies are in general similar to those measured by Stuart and Wehner. An empirical relationship is derived,for mercury and xenon ions for the ratio of the sputtering threshold energy to the sublimation energy as a function of the ratio of target to ion atomic mass.

  7. Threshold concepts as barriers to understanding climate science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, P.

    2013-12-01

    Whilst the scientific case for current climate change is compelling, the consequences of climate change have largely failed to permeate through to individuals. This lack of public awareness of the science and the potential impacts could be considered a key obstacle to action. The possible reasons for such limited success centre on the issue that climate change is a complex subject, and that a wide ranging academic, political and social research literature on the science and wider implications of climate change has failed to communicate the key issues in an accessible way. These failures to adequately communicate both the science and the social science of climate change at a number of levels results in ';communication gaps' that act as fundamental barriers to both understanding and engagement with the issue. Meyer and Land (2003) suggest that learners can find certain ideas and concepts within a discipline difficult to understand and these act as a barrier to deeper understanding of a subject. To move beyond these threshold concepts, they suggest that the expert needs to support the learner through a range of learning experiences that allows the development of learning strategies particular to the individual. Meyer and Land's research into these threshold concepts has been situated within Economics, but has been suggested to be more widely applicable though there has been no attempt to either define or evaluate threshold concepts to climate change science. By identifying whether common threshold concepts exist specifically in climate science for cohorts of either formal or informal learners, scientists will be better able to support the public in understanding these concepts by changing how the knowledge is communicated to help overcome these barriers to learning. This paper reports on the findings of a study that examined the role of threshold concepts as barriers to understanding climate science in a UK University and considers its implications for wider

  8. Improved Error Thresholds for Measurement-Free Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, Daniel; Joynt, Robert; Saffman, M.

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by limitations and capabilities of neutral atom qubits, we examine whether measurement-free error correction can produce practical error thresholds. We show that this can be achieved by extracting redundant syndrome information, giving our procedure extra fault tolerance and eliminating the need for ancilla verification. The procedure is particularly favorable when multiqubit gates are available for the correction step. Simulations of the bit-flip, Bacon-Shor, and Steane codes indicate that coherent error correction can produce threshold error rates that are on the order of 10-3 to 10-4—comparable with or better than measurement-based values, and much better than previous results for other coherent error correction schemes. This indicates that coherent error correction is worthy of serious consideration for achieving protected logical qubits.

  9. Modeling the Interactions Between Multiple Crack Closure Mechanisms at Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    A fatigue crack closure model is developed that includes interactions between the three closure mechanisms most likely to occur at threshold; plasticity, roughness, and oxide. This model, herein referred to as the CROP model (for Closure, Roughness, Oxide, and Plasticity), also includes the effects of out-of plane cracking and multi-axial loading. These features make the CROP closure model uniquely suited for, but not limited to, threshold applications. Rough cracks are idealized here as two-dimensional sawtooths, whose geometry induces mixed-mode crack- tip stresses. Continuum mechanics and crack-tip dislocation concepts are combined to relate crack face displacements to crack-tip loads. Geometric criteria are used to determine closure loads from crack-face displacements. Finite element results, used to verify model predictions, provide critical information about the locations where crack closure occurs.

  10. Thermal threshold determination in alcoholic polyneuropathy: an improvement of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hilz, M J; Zimmermann, P; Claus, D; Neundörfer, B

    1995-05-01

    Reports on the incidence of alcoholic polyneuropathies are variable depending on diagnostic tools. In this study, 50 chronic alcoholics with positive MALT (Munich Alcoholism Test) and greater than seven years history of excessive alcohol abuse were examined neurologically. Tibial and peroneal motor and sural nerve conduction velocities (NCV) were studied. Warm and cold perception was evaluated in the area behind the internal malleolus using a Somedic-Thermotest. Thresholds were determined by the method of limits. The effect of a slow, medium and fast temperature change rate on thermal perception was tested. Thirty-eight patients (76%) showed signs of neuropathy. Thermal perception was more often abnormal (62%) than NCV (42%) and clinical examination (56%). A medium temperature change rate of 2.0-2.5 degrees C/s was the most sensitive index of small fiber neuropathy. Thermal threshold measurement proved to be a reliable, sensitive and easy to perform method that should become standard in the examination of polyneuropathies.

  11. Measured skin damage thresholds for 1314-nm laser exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes de Oca, Cecilia I.; Cain, Clarence P.; Schuster, Kurt J.; Stockton, Kevin; Thomas, James J.; Eggleston, Thomas A.; Roach, William P.

    2003-06-01

    The use of lasers in the infrared region between 1200-1400 nm has steadily increased in various industrial and commercial applications. However, there are few studies documenting damage thresholds for the skin in this region, and current laser safety standards are based on limited data. This study has determined preliminary skin damage thresholds for the Effective Dose for 50% probability (ED50) of a Minimum Visible Lesion (MVL) with laser exposure at 1314nm and 0.35 ms pulse width. An in-vivo pigmented animal model, Yucatan mini-pig (Sus scrofa domestica), was used in this study. The type and extent of tissue damage in the porcine skin was determined through histopathologic examination, and the findings are discussed. Finally, the results of this study were compared to other literature as well as to the existing ANSI Z136.1 (2000) standard for safe use of lasers.

  12. Improved Error Thresholds for Measurement-Free Error Correction.

    PubMed

    Crow, Daniel; Joynt, Robert; Saffman, M

    2016-09-23

    Motivated by limitations and capabilities of neutral atom qubits, we examine whether measurement-free error correction can produce practical error thresholds. We show that this can be achieved by extracting redundant syndrome information, giving our procedure extra fault tolerance and eliminating the need for ancilla verification. The procedure is particularly favorable when multiqubit gates are available for the correction step. Simulations of the bit-flip, Bacon-Shor, and Steane codes indicate that coherent error correction can produce threshold error rates that are on the order of 10^{-3} to 10^{-4}-comparable with or better than measurement-based values, and much better than previous results for other coherent error correction schemes. This indicates that coherent error correction is worthy of serious consideration for achieving protected logical qubits.

  13. Intrashell Electron Interaction Mediated Photoformation of Hollow Atoms near Threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Houtari, S.; Kao, C.; Hamalainen, K.; Diamant, R.; Sharon, R.; Deutsch, M.

    2008-07-25

    Double photoionization (DPI) of an atom by a single photon is a direct consequence of electron-electron interactions within the atom. We have measured the evolution of the K-shell DPI from threshold up in transition metals by high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy of the K{sup h}a hypersatellites, photoexcited by monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The measured evolution of the single-to-double photoionization cross-section ratio with excitation energy was found to be universal. Theoretical fits suggest that near threshold DPI is predominantly a semiclassical knockout effect, rather than the purely quantum-mechanical shake-off observed at the infinite photon energy limit.

  14. Financial networks with static and dynamic thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tian; Zheng, Bo; Chen, Guang

    2010-04-01

    Based on the daily data of the American and Chinese stock markets, the dynamic behavior of a financial network with static and dynamic thresholds is investigated. Compared with the static threshold, the dynamic threshold suppresses the large fluctuation induced by the cross correlation of individual stock prices and leads to a stable topological structure in the dynamic evolution. Long-range time correlations are revealed for the average clustering coefficient, average degree and cross correlation of degrees. The dynamic network shows a two-peak behavior in the degree distribution.

  15. Threshold for chaos and thermalization in the one-dimensional mean-field bose-hubbard model.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Amy C; Mason, Douglas; Dunjko, Vanja; Olshanii, Maxim

    2009-01-16

    We study the threshold for chaos and its relation to thermalization in the 1D mean-field Bose-Hubbard model, which, in particular, describes atoms in optical lattices. We identify the threshold for chaos, which is finite in the thermodynamic limit, and show that it is indeed a precursor of thermalization. Far above the threshold, the state of the system after relaxation is governed by the usual laws of statistical mechanics.

  16. Infrared skin damage thresholds from 1940-nm continuous-wave laser exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Stolarski, David J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Hodnett, Harvey M.; Harbert, Corey A.; Schuster, Kurt J.; Foltz, Michael F.; Kumru, Semih S.; Cain, Clarence P.; Finkeldei, C. J.; Buffington, Gavin D.; Noojin, Isaac D.; Thomas, Robert J.

    2010-11-01

    A series of experiments are conducted in vivo using Yucatan mini-pigs (Sus scrofa domestica) to determine thermal damage thresholds to the skin from 1940-nm continuous-wave thulium fiber laser irradiation. Experiments employ exposure durations from 10 ms to 10 s and beam diameters of approximately 4.8 to 18 mm. Thermal imagery data provide a time-dependent surface temperature response from the laser. A damage endpoint of minimally visible effect is employed to determine threshold for damage at 1 and 24 h postexposure. Predicted thermal response and damage thresholds are compared with a numerical model of optical-thermal interaction. Results are compared with current exposure limits for laser safety. It is concluded that exposure limits should be based on data representative of large-beam exposures, where effects of radial diffusion are minimized for longer-duration damage thresholds.

  17. Threshold altitude resulting in decompression sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. V.; Waligora, James M.; Calkins, Dick S.

    1990-01-01

    A review of case reports, hypobaric chamber training data, and experimental evidence indicated that the threshold for incidence of altitude decompression sickness (DCS) was influenced by various factors such as prior denitrogenation, exercise or rest, and period of exposure, in addition to individual susceptibility. Fitting these data with appropriate statistical models makes it possible to examine the influence of various factors on the threshold for DCS. This approach was illustrated by logistic regression analysis on the incidence of DCS below 9144 m. Estimations using these regressions showed that, under a noprebreathe, 6-h exposure, simulated EVA profile, the threshold for symptoms occurred at approximately 3353 m; while under a noprebreathe, 2-h exposure profile with knee-bends exercise, the threshold occurred at 7925 m.

  18. Effective theories and thresholds in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1991-06-07

    The role of effective theories in probing a more fundamental underlying theory and in indicating new physics thresholds is discussed, with examples from the standard model and more speculative applications to superstring theory. 38 refs.

  19. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  20. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  1. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  2. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  3. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Waste Landfills § 98.461 Reporting threshold. You must report... generation corrected for oxidation as determined using Equation TT-6 of this subpart times the global...

  4. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  5. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  6. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  7. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  8. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  9. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  10. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  11. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  12. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  13. 40 CFR 98.181 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lead Production § 98.181 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a lead production process and the facility meets...

  14. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  15. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an adipic acid production process and the...

  16. 40 CFR 98.181 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lead Production § 98.181 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a lead production process and the facility meets...

  17. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  18. 40 CFR 98.171 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.171 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an iron and steel production process...

  19. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  20. 40 CFR 98.141 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Glass Production § 98.141 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a glass production process and the facility meets...

  1. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a cement production process and the facility...

  2. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an adipic acid production process and the...

  3. 40 CFR 98.111 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ferroalloy Production § 98.111 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a ferroalloy production process and the...

  4. 40 CFR 98.111 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ferroalloy Production § 98.111 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a ferroalloy production process and the...

  5. 40 CFR 98.281 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Silicon Carbide Production § 98.281 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a silicon carbide production process...

  6. 40 CFR 98.171 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.171 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an iron and steel production process...

  7. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a cement production process and the facility...

  8. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a cement production process and the facility...

  9. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  10. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  11. 40 CFR 98.331 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Zinc Production § 98.331 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a zinc production process and the facility meets...

  12. 40 CFR 98.171 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.171 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an iron and steel production process...

  13. 40 CFR 98.191 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lime Manufacturing § 98.191 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility is a lime manufacturing plant as defined in § 98.190 and...

  14. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  15. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  16. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  17. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  18. 40 CFR 98.291 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Soda Ash Manufacturing § 98.291 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a soda ash manufacturing process and the...

  19. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an adipic acid production process and the...

  20. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an adipic acid production process and the...

  1. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  2. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  3. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  4. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  5. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  6. 40 CFR 98.411 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Industrial Greenhouse Gases § 98.411 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of industrial greenhouse gases who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report...

  7. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  8. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  9. 40 CFR 98.161 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.161 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a hydrogen production process and the facility...

  10. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  11. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  12. 40 CFR 98.261 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Phosphoric Acid Production § 98.261 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a phosphoric acid production process...

  13. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  14. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  15. 40 CFR 98.311 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Titanium Dioxide Production § 98.311 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a titanium dioxide production process...

  16. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  17. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  18. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  19. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  20. 40 CFR 98.41 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.41 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains one or more electricity generating units and...

  1. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a cement production process and the facility...

  2. 40 CFR 98.171 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Iron and Steel Production § 98.171 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an iron and steel production process...

  3. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  4. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  5. 40 CFR 98.201 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Magnesium Production § 98.201 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a magnesium production process and the facility...

  6. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  7. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  8. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  9. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  10. 40 CFR 98.61 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Aluminum Production § 98.61 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an aluminum production process and the facility...

  11. 40 CFR 98.391 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Petroleum Products § 98.391 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of petroleum products who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report GHG emissions....

  12. 40 CFR 98.381 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Coal-based Liquid Fuels § 98.381 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of coal-to-liquid products who meets the requirements of § 98.2(a)(4) must report GHG emissions....

  13. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an ammonia manufacturing process and the...

  14. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an ammonia manufacturing process and the...

  15. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an ammonia manufacturing process and the...

  16. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an ammonia manufacturing process and the...

  17. 40 CFR 98.71 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ammonia Manufacturing § 98.71 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an ammonia manufacturing process and the...

  18. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  19. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  20. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  1. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  2. 40 CFR 98.401 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids § 98.401 Reporting threshold. Any supplier of natural gas and natural gas liquids that meets the requirements of §...

  3. 40 CFR 98.271 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Pulp and Paper Manufacturing § 98.271 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a pulp and paper manufacturing...

  4. 40 CFR 98.271 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Pulp and Paper Manufacturing § 98.271 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a pulp and paper manufacturing...

  5. 40 CFR 98.271 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Pulp and Paper Manufacturing § 98.271 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a pulp and paper manufacturing...

  6. 40 CFR 98.271 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Pulp and Paper Manufacturing § 98.271 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a pulp and paper manufacturing...

  7. 40 CFR 98.271 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Pulp and Paper Manufacturing § 98.271 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a pulp and paper manufacturing...

  8. Mass Analyzed Threshold Ionization of Lutetium Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lu; Roudjane, Mourad; Liu, Yang; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2013-06-01

    Lu_2 is produced in a pulsed laser-vaporization metal-cluster source and studied by mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy. The MATI spectrum displays several long progressions from the transitions between various vibrational levels of the neutral and ion electronic states. From the spectrum, the upper limit of the ionization energy of the dimer is determined to be 43996 cm^{-1}, and the vibrational frequencies are measured to be 121 cm^{-1} in the neutral state and 90 cm^{-1} in the ion state. By combining with ab initio calculations at CASPT2 level, the ground state of Lu_2 is identified as ^3Σ_g^-. The ^3Σ_g^- state has an electron configuration of 6sσ_g^25dπ_u^15dπ_u^16sσ_u^2, which is formed by the interactions of two Lu atoms in the ^2D(5d6s^2) ground state. Ionization of the neutral state removes a 5dπ_u bonding electron and yields a ion state with a considerably longer bond distance. Lu_2 has a very different bonding feature from La_2, for which a ^1Σ_g^+ ground state was previously identified with an electron configuration of 5dπ_u^46sσ_g^2 formed by the interactions of two La atoms in the ^4F(5d^26s) excited state. Yang Liu, Lu Wu, Chang-Hua Zhang, Serge A. Krasnokutski, and Dong-Sheng Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034309 (2011).

  9. High Performance Magazine Acceptor Threshold Criteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    detonation transition (DDT). To account for unknown mechanisms the term XDT is also used. Development of a design procedure to prevent SD requires...propagation walls are used to prevent sympathetic detonation between munitions stored in adjacent cells. Design of the walls, and their mitigation...effects, requires sympathetic detonation threshold criteria for acceptor munitions. This paper outlines the procedures being used to develop SD threshold

  10. Computer simulation of the threshold sensitivity determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayle, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    A computer simulation study was carried out to evaluate various methods for determining threshold stimulus levels for impact sensitivity tests. In addition, the influence of a number of variables (initial stimulus level, particular stimulus response curve, and increment size) on the apparent threshold values and on the corresponding population response levels was determined. Finally, a critical review of previous assumptions regarding the stimulus response curve for impact testing is presented in the light of the simulation results.

  11. The odderon versus a new threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, K. . Dept. of Physics); White, A.R. )

    1991-10-01

    We show that a new threshold model with a threshold close to but below the UA4 energy is compatible with all forward elastic scattering data at high energies including the widely known UA4 measurement of the forward real part of the elastic p{bar p} scattering amplitude and the recent Fermilab Tevatron Collider experiments of the p{bar p} total cross-section. 14 refs.

  12. Flicker fusion thresholds in Best macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Massof, R W; Fleischman, J A; Fine, S L; Yoder, F

    1977-06-01

    Flicker fusion threshold intensities were measured as a function of flicker frequency for patients with Best macular dystrophy having normal or near-normal Snellen visual acuity. These data were found to differ from normal in ways that may be interpreted to be an abnormal elevation of the foveal cone threshold, a loss of cone temporal resolution, or both. The results led to the conclusion that Best macular dystrophy affects the neurosensory retina even when Snellen visual acuity is normal.

  13. Optimizing Retransmission Threshold in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Ran; Li, Yingshu; Tan, Guozhen; Sun, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The retransmission threshold in wireless sensor networks is critical to the latency of data delivery in the networks. However, existing works on data transmission in sensor networks did not consider the optimization of the retransmission threshold, and they simply set the same retransmission threshold for all sensor nodes in advance. The method did not take link quality and delay requirement into account, which decreases the probability of a packet passing its delivery path within a given deadline. This paper investigates the problem of finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in a sensor network. The object of optimizing retransmission thresholds is to maximize the summation of the probability of the packet being successfully delivered to the next relay node or destination node in time. A dynamic programming-based distributed algorithm for finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in the sensor network is proposed. The time complexity is OnΔ·max1≤i≤n{ui}, where ui is the given upper bound of the retransmission threshold of sensor node i in a given delivery path, n is the length of the delivery path and Δ is the given upper bound of the transmission delay of the delivery path. If Δ is greater than the polynomial, to reduce the time complexity, a linear programming-based (1+pmin)-approximation algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, when the ranges of the upper and lower bounds of retransmission thresholds are big enough, a Lagrange multiplier-based distributed O(1)-approximation algorithm with time complexity O(1) is proposed. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms have better performance. PMID:27171092

  14. Optimizing Retransmission Threshold in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ran; Li, Yingshu; Tan, Guozhen; Sun, Liang

    2016-05-10

    The retransmission threshold in wireless sensor networks is critical to the latency of data delivery in the networks. However, existing works on data transmission in sensor networks did not consider the optimization of the retransmission threshold, and they simply set the same retransmission threshold for all sensor nodes in advance. The method did not take link quality and delay requirement into account, which decreases the probability of a packet passing its delivery path within a given deadline. This paper investigates the problem of finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in a sensor network. The object of optimizing retransmission thresholds is to maximize the summation of the probability of the packet being successfully delivered to the next relay node or destination node in time. A dynamic programming-based distributed algorithm for finding optimal retransmission thresholds for relay nodes along a delivery path in the sensor network is proposed. The time complexity is O n Δ · max 1 ≤ i ≤ n { u i } , where u i is the given upper bound of the retransmission threshold of sensor node i in a given delivery path, n is the length of the delivery path and Δ is the given upper bound of the transmission delay of the delivery path. If Δ is greater than the polynomial, to reduce the time complexity, a linear programming-based ( 1 + p m i n ) -approximation algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, when the ranges of the upper and lower bounds of retransmission thresholds are big enough, a Lagrange multiplier-based distributed O ( 1 ) -approximation algorithm with time complexity O ( 1 ) is proposed. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms have better performance.

  15. Fibonacci thresholding: signal representation and morphological filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, Artyom M.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2014-02-01

    A new weighted thresholding concept is presented, which is used for the set-theoretical representation of signals, the producing new signals containing a large number of key features that are in the original signals and the design new morphological filters. Such representation maps many operations of non binary signal and image processing to the union of the simple operations over the binary signals and images. The weighted thresholding is invariant under the morphological transformations, including the basic ones, erosion and dilation. The main idea of using the weighted thresholding is in the choice of the special level of thresholding on which we can concentrate all our attention for the future processing. Together with arithmetical thresholding the so-called Fibonacci levels are chosen because of many interesting properties; one of them is the effective decomposition of the median filter. Experimental results show that the Fibonacci thresholding is much promised and can be used for many applications, including the image enhancement, segmentation, and edge detection.

  16. Initiation Pressure Thresholds from Three Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2007-02-28

    Pressure thresholds are minimum pressures needed to start explosive initiation that ends in detonation. We obtain pressure thresholds from three sources. Run-to-detonation times are the poorest source but the fitting of a function gives rough results. Flyer-induced initiation gives the best results because the initial conditions are the best known. However, very thick flyers are needed to give the lowest, asymptotic pressure thresholds used in modern models and this kind of data is rarely available. Gap test data is in much larger supply but the various test sizes and materials are confusing. We find that explosive pressures are almost the same if the distance in the gap test spacers are in units of donor explosive radius. Calculated half-width time pulses in the spacers may be used to create a pressure-time curve similar to that of the flyers. The very-large Eglin gap tests give asymptotic thresholds comparable to extrapolated flyer results. The three sources are assembled into a much-expanded set of near-asymptotic pressure thresholds. These thresholds vary greatly with density: for TATB/LX-17/PBX 9502, we find values of 4.9 and 8.7 GPa at 1.80 and 1.90 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively.

  17. Thresholds for boreal biome transitions.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Marten; Hirota, Marina; Holmgren, Milena; Van Nes, Egbert H; Chapin, F Stuart

    2012-12-26

    Although the boreal region is warming twice as fast as the global average, the way in which the vast boreal forests and tundras may respond is poorly understood. Using satellite data, we reveal marked alternative modes in the frequency distributions of boreal tree cover. At the northern end and at the dry continental southern extremes, treeless tundra and steppe, respectively, are the only possible states. However, over a broad intermediate temperature range, these treeless states coexist with boreal forest (∼75% tree cover) and with two more open woodland states (∼20% and ∼45% tree cover). Intermediate tree covers (e.g., ∼10%, ∼30%, and ∼60% tree cover) between these distinct states are relatively rare, suggesting that they may represent unstable states where the system dwells only transiently. Mechanisms for such instabilities remain to be unraveled, but our results have important implications for the anticipated response of these ecosystems to climatic change. The data reveal that boreal forest shows no gradual decline in tree cover toward its limits. Instead, our analysis suggests that it becomes less resilient in the sense that it may more easily shift into a sparse woodland or treeless state. Similarly, the relative scarcity of the intermediate ∼10% tree cover suggests that tundra may shift relatively abruptly to a more abundant tree cover. If our inferences are correct, climate change may invoke massive nonlinear shifts in boreal biomes.

  18. Thresholds for boreal biome transitions

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Marten; Hirota, Marina; Holmgren, Milena; Van Nes, Egbert H.; Chapin, F. Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Although the boreal region is warming twice as fast as the global average, the way in which the vast boreal forests and tundras may respond is poorly understood. Using satellite data, we reveal marked alternative modes in the frequency distributions of boreal tree cover. At the northern end and at the dry continental southern extremes, treeless tundra and steppe, respectively, are the only possible states. However, over a broad intermediate temperature range, these treeless states coexist with boreal forest (∼75% tree cover) and with two more open woodland states (∼20% and ∼45% tree cover). Intermediate tree covers (e.g., ∼10%, ∼30%, and ∼60% tree cover) between these distinct states are relatively rare, suggesting that they may represent unstable states where the system dwells only transiently. Mechanisms for such instabilities remain to be unraveled, but our results have important implications for the anticipated response of these ecosystems to climatic change. The data reveal that boreal forest shows no gradual decline in tree cover toward its limits. Instead, our analysis suggests that it becomes less resilient in the sense that it may more easily shift into a sparse woodland or treeless state. Similarly, the relative scarcity of the intermediate ∼10% tree cover suggests that tundra may shift relatively abruptly to a more abundant tree cover. If our inferences are correct, climate change may invoke massive nonlinear shifts in boreal biomes. PMID:23236159

  19. 77 FR 19127 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Inflation Adjustment of Threshold for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... Regulation Supplement; Inflation Adjustment of Threshold for Acquisition of Right-Hand Drive Passenger Sedans... Year 2012 that requires that the statutory limitation on the acquisition of right-hand drive passenger... limitation established in 10 U.S.C. 2253(a)(2) for the acquisition of right-hand drive passenger sedans...

  20. Current limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Loescher, D.H.; Noren, K.

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  1. Orthodoxy, recalcitrance and in-between: describing variation in seed storage characteristics using threshold responses to water loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tolerance of desiccation is typically described by a threshold or low-water-content-limit to survival. This convention provides fairly good distinction between orthodox and recalcitrant seeds, which show thresholds of less than about 0.07 and greater than about 0.2 g H2O g dw-1, respectively. Thresh...

  2. Interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Murri, Gretchen B.; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1987-01-01

    Static and cyclic end notched flexure tests were conducted on a graphite epoxy, a glass epoxy, and graphite thermoplastic to determine their interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for delamination in terms of limiting values of the mode II strain energy release rate, G-II, for delamination growth. The influence of precracking and data reduction schemes are discussed. Finite element analysis indicated that the beam theory calculation for G-II with the transverse shear contribution included was reasonably accurate over the entire range of crack lengths. Cyclic loading significantly reduced the critical G-II for delamination. A threshold value of the maximum cyclic G-II below which no delamination occurred after one million cycles was identified for each material. Also, residual static toughness tests were conducted on glass epoxy specimens that had undergone one million cycles without delamination. A linear mixed-mode delamination criteria was used to characterize the static toughness of several composite materials; however, a total G threshold criterion appears to characterize the fatigue delamination durability of composite materials with a wide range of static toughness.

  3. Interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Murri, Gretchen B.; Salpekar, Satish A.

    1989-01-01

    Static and cyclic end notched flexure tests were conducted on a graphite epoxy, a glass epoxy, and graphite thermoplastic to determine their interlaminar shear fracture toughness and fatigue thresholds for delamination in terms of limiting values of the mode II strain energy release rate, G-II, for delamination growth. The influence of precracking and data reduction schemes are discussed. Finite element analysis indicated that the beam theory calculation for G-II with the transverse shear contribution included was reasonably accurate over the entire range of crack lengths. Cyclic loading significantly reduced the critical G-II for delamination. A threshold value of the maximum cyclic G-II below which no delamination occurred after one million cycles was identified for each material. Also, residual static toughness tests were conducted on glass epoxy specimens that had undergone one million cycles without delamination. A linear mixed-mode delamination criteria was used to characterize the static toughness of several composite materials; however, a total G threshold criterion appears to characterize the fatigue delamination durability of composite materials with a wide range of static toughness.

  4. Assessment of cortical excitability using threshold tracking techniques.

    PubMed

    Vucic, Steve; Howells, James; Trevillion, Louise; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2006-04-01

    Conventional paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) techniques of assessing cortical excitability are limited by fluctuations in the motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude. The aim of the present study was to determine the feasibility of threshold tracking TMS for assessing cortical excitability in a clinical setting and to establish normative data. Studies were undertaken in 26 healthy controls, tracking the MEP response from abductor pollicis brevis. Short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) occurred up to an interstimulus interval (ISI) of 7-10 ms, with two distinct peaks evident, at ISIs of < or =1 and 3 ms, followed by intracortical facilitation to an ISI of 30 ms. Long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI) occurred at ISIs of 50-300 ms, peaking at 150 ms. The present study has confirmed the effectiveness of the threshold tracking TMS technique in reliably and reproducibly measuring cortical excitability. Simultaneous assessment of upper and lower motor neuronal function with threshold tracking techniques may help to determine the site of disease onset and patterns of progression in neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Higher-than-predicted saltation threshold wind speeds on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burr, Devon M.; Bridges, Nathan T.; Marshall, John R.; Smith, James K.; White, Bruce R.; Emery, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, exhibits extensive aeolian, that is, wind-formed, dunes, features previously identified exclusively on Earth, Mars and Venus. Wind tunnel data collected under ambient and planetary-analogue conditions inform our models of aeolian processes on the terrestrial planets. However, the accuracy of these widely used formulations in predicting the threshold wind speeds required to move sand by saltation, or by short bounces, has not been tested under conditions relevant for non-terrestrial planets. Here we derive saltation threshold wind speeds under the thick-atmosphere, low-gravity and low-sediment-density conditions on Titan, using a high-pressure wind tunnel refurbished to simulate the appropriate kinematic viscosity for the near-surface atmosphere of Titan. The experimentally derived saltation threshold wind speeds are higher than those predicted by models based on terrestrial-analogue experiments, indicating the limitations of these models for such extreme conditions. The models can be reconciled with the experimental results by inclusion of the extremely low ratio of particle density to fluid density on Titan. Whereas the density ratio term enables accurate modelling of aeolian entrainment in thick atmospheres, such as those inferred for some extrasolar planets, our results also indicate that for environments with high density ratios, such as in jets on icy satellites or in tenuous atmospheres or exospheres, the correction for low-density-ratio conditions is not required.

  6. Ecotoxicological thresholds-practical application to an industrial inventory.

    PubMed

    Gutsell, Steve; Hodges, Geoff; Marshall, Stuart; Roberts, Jayne

    2015-04-01

    The concept of thresholds of toxicological concern as a potentially useful tool in environmental risk assessment has been applied to the inventory of a home and personal care products company to derive a series of chemical class-based ecotoxicological threshold of concern (ecoTTC) values. Cationic chemicals of various types show notably higher toxicity than other classes and should be treated separately. Despite this, the ecoTTC for the full data set in the present study is only slightly lower than that derived previously for chemicals causing toxicity via Verhaar modes of action (MoAs) 1 to 3. Exclusion of cationic chemicals resulted in an ecoTTC value slightly higher than the MoA 1 to 3 value. These observations indicate that such data sets contain few specifically acting chemicals. The applicability of threshold approaches in environmental risk assessment has been extended to include a limited number of inorganic/organometallic chemicals, polymers, and all classes of surfactants. The use of such ecoTTC values in conjunction with mode of action-based quantitative structure-activity relationships will allow the efficient screening and prioritization of large inventories of heterogeneous chemicals, focusing resources on those chemicals that require additional information to better understand any potential risk.

  7. Fluence thresholds for grazing incidence hard x-ray mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, A.; Ozkan, C.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Mancuso, A. P.; Gaudin, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Klepka, M. T.; Dłużewski, P.; Morawiec, K.; Störmer, M.; Bajt, S.; Ohashi, H.; Koyama, T.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y. [RIKEN and others

    2015-06-15

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) have the potential to contribute to many fields of science and to enable many new avenues of research, in large part due to their orders of magnitude higher peak brilliance than existing and future synchrotrons. To best exploit this peak brilliance, these XFEL beams need to be focused to appropriate spot sizes. However, the survivability of X-ray optical components in these intense, femtosecond radiation conditions is not guaranteed. As mirror optics are routinely used at XFEL facilities, a physical understanding of the interaction between intense X-ray pulses and grazing incidence X-ray optics is desirable. We conducted single shot damage threshold fluence measurements on grazing incidence X-ray optics, with coatings of ruthenium and boron carbide, at the SPring-8 Angstrom compact free electron laser facility using 7 and 12 keV photon energies. The damage threshold dose limits were found to be orders of magnitude higher than would naively be expected. The incorporation of energy transport and dissipation via keV level energetic photoelectrons accounts for the observed damage threshold.

  8. Higher-than-predicted saltation threshold wind speeds on Titan.

    PubMed

    Burr, Devon M; Bridges, Nathan T; Marshall, John R; Smith, James K; White, Bruce R; Emery, Joshua P

    2015-01-01

    Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, exhibits extensive aeolian, that is, wind-formed, dunes, features previously identified exclusively on Earth, Mars and Venus. Wind tunnel data collected under ambient and planetary-analogue conditions inform our models of aeolian processes on the terrestrial planets. However, the accuracy of these widely used formulations in predicting the threshold wind speeds required to move sand by saltation, or by short bounces, has not been tested under conditions relevant for non-terrestrial planets. Here we derive saltation threshold wind speeds under the thick-atmosphere, low-gravity and low-sediment-density conditions on Titan, using a high-pressure wind tunnel refurbished to simulate the appropriate kinematic viscosity for the near-surface atmosphere of Titan. The experimentally derived saltation threshold wind speeds are higher than those predicted by models based on terrestrial-analogue experiments, indicating the limitations of these models for such extreme conditions. The models can be reconciled with the experimental results by inclusion of the extremely low ratio of particle density to fluid density on Titan. Whereas the density ratio term enables accurate modelling of aeolian entrainment in thick atmospheres, such as those inferred for some extrasolar planets, our results also indicate that for environments with high density ratios, such as in jets on icy satellites or in tenuous atmospheres or exospheres, the correction for low-density-ratio conditions is not required.

  9. THRESHOLD FOR EXTENDED EMISSION IN SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels, Neil

    2010-07-01

    The initial pulse complex (IPC) in short gamma-ray bursts is sometimes accompanied by a softer, low-intensity extended emission (EE) component. In cases where such a component is not observed, it is not clear if it is present but below the detection threshold. Using Bayesian Block (BB) methods, we measure the EE component and show that it is present in one-quarter of a Swift/BAT sample of 51 short bursts, as was found for the Compton/BATSE sample. We simulate bursts with EE to calibrate the BAT threshold for EE detection and show that this component would have been detected in nearly half of BAT short bursts if it were present, to intensities {approx}10{sup -2} counts cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, a factor of 5 lower than actually observed in short bursts. In the BAT sample, the ratio of average EE intensity to IPC peak intensity, R{sub int}, ranges over a factor of 25, R{sub int} {approx} 3 x 10{sup -3} to 8 x 10{sup -2}. In comparison, for the average of the 39 bursts without an EE component, the 2{sigma} upper limit is R{sub int} < 8 x 10{sup -4}. These results suggest that a physical threshold effect operates near R{sub int} {approx} few x 10{sup -3} below which the EE component is not manifest.

  10. Increment Threshold Functions in Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Ronald M.; Moskowitz, Anne; Bush, Jennifer N.; Fulton, Anne B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess scotopic background adaptation in subjects with a history of preterm birth and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Retinopathy of prematurity is known to have long-term effects on rod photoreceptor and rod mediated postreceptor retinal function. Methods Rod-mediated thresholds for detection of 3° diameter, 50 ms stimuli presented 20° from fixation were measured using a spatial forced choice method in 36 subjects (aged 9–17 years) with a history of preterm birth and 11 age similar term-born subjects. Thresholds were measured first in the dark-adapted condition and then in the presence of 6 steady background lights (−2.8 to +2.0 log scot td). A model of the increment threshold function was fit to each subject's thresholds to estimate the dark-adapted threshold (TDA) and the Eigengrau (A0, the background that elevates threshold 0.3 log unit above TDA). Results In subjects with a history of severe ROP, both TDA and A0 were significantly elevated relative to those in former preterms who never had ROP and term-born control subjects. Subjects who had mild ROP had normal TDA but elevated A0. Neither TDA nor A0 differed significantly between former preterms who never had ROP and term-born controls. Conclusions The results suggest that in severe ROP, threshold is affected at a preadaptation site, possibly the rod outer segment. In mild ROP, changes in the Eigengrau may reflect increased intrinsic noise in the photoreceptor or postreceptor circuitry or both. PMID:27145476

  11. Evidence for an anaerobic syntrophic benzoate degradation threshold and isolation of the syntrophic benzoate degrader

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, B.T.; McInerney, M.J.; Warikoo, V.

    1995-02-01

    An anaerobic, motile, gram-negative, rod-shaped, syntrophic. benzoate-degrading bacterium, strain SB. was isolated in pure culture with crotonate as the energy source. Benzoate was degraded only in association with an H{sub 2}-using bacterium. The kinetics of benzoate degradation by cell suspensions of strain SB in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G-11 was studied by using progress curve analysis. The coculture degraded benzoate to a threshold concentration of 214 nM to 6.5 {mu}M, with no further benzoate degradation observed even after extended incubation times. The value of the threshold depended on the amount of benzoate added and, consequently, the amount of acetate produced. The addition of sodium acetate. but not that of sodium chloride, affected the threshold value; higher acetate concentrations resulted in higher threshold values for benzoate. When a cell suspension that had reached a threshold benzoate concentration was reamended with benzoate, benzoate was used without a lag. The hydrogen partial pressure was very low and formate was not detected in cell suspensions that had degraded benzoate to a threshold value. The Gibbs free energy change calculations showed that the degradation of benzoate was favorable when the threshold was reached. These studies showed that the threshold for benzoate degradation was not caused by nutritional limitations. the loss of metabolic activity, or inhibition by hydrogen or formate. The data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the existence of a threshold, but a kinetic explanation based on acetate inhibition may also account for the existence of a threshold.

  12. Overcoming the effects of false positives and threshold bias in graph theoretical analyses of neuroimaging data

    PubMed Central

    Drakesmith, M.; Caeyenberghs, K.; Dutt, A.; Lewis, G.; David, A.S.; Jones, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graph theory (GT) is a powerful framework for quantifying topological features of neuroimaging-derived functional and structural networks. However, false positive (FP) connections arise frequently and influence the inferred topology of networks. Thresholding is often used to overcome this problem, but an appropriate threshold often relies on a priori assumptions, which will alter inferred network topologies. Four common network metrics (global efficiency, mean clustering coefficient, mean betweenness and smallworldness) were tested using a model tractography dataset. It was found that all four network metrics were significantly affected even by just one FP. Results also show that thresholding effectively dampens the impact of FPs, but at the expense of adding significant bias to network metrics. In a larger number (n = 248) of tractography datasets, statistics were computed across random group permutations for a range of thresholds, revealing that statistics for network metrics varied significantly more than for non-network metrics (i.e., number of streamlines and number of edges). Varying degrees of network atrophy were introduced artificially to half the datasets, to test sensitivity to genuine group differences. For some network metrics, this atrophy was detected as significant (p < 0.05, determined using permutation testing) only across a limited range of thresholds. We propose a multi-threshold permutation correction (MTPC) method, based on the cluster-enhanced permutation correction approach, to identify sustained significant effects across clusters of thresholds. This approach minimises requirements to determine a single threshold a priori. We demonstrate improved sensitivity of MTPC-corrected metrics to genuine group effects compared to an existing approach and demonstrate the use of MTPC on a previously published network analysis of tractography data derived from a clinical population. In conclusion, we show that there are large biases and instability

  13. Rejection Thresholds in Chocolate Milk: Evidence for Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, Meriel L.; Ziegler, Gregory R.; Hayes, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Bitterness is generally considered a negative attribute in food, yet many individuals enjoy some bitterness in products like coffee or chocolate. In chocolate, bitterness arises from naturally occurring alkaloids and phenolics found in cacao. Fermentation and roasting help develop typical chocolate flavor and reduce the intense bitterness of raw cacao by modifying these bitter compounds. As it becomes increasingly common to fortify chocolate with `raw' cacao to increase the amount of healthful phytonutrients, it is important to identify the point at which the concentration of bitter compounds becomes objectionable, even to those who enjoy some bitterness. Classical threshold methods focus on the presence or absence of a sensation rather than acceptability or hedonics. A new alternative, the rejection threshold, was recently described in the literature. Here, we sought to quantify and compare differences in Rejection Thresholds (RjT) and Detection Thresholds (DT) in chocolate milk spiked with a food safe bitterant (sucrose octaacetate). In experiment 1, a series of paired preference tests was used to estimate the RjT for bitterness in chocolate milk. In a new group of participants (experiment 2), we determined the RjT and DT using the forced choice ascending method of limits. In both studies, participants were segmented on the basis of self-declared preference for milk or dark solid chocolate. Based on sigmoid fits of the indifference-preference function, the RjT was ~2.3 times higher for those preferring dark chocolate than the RjT for those preferring milk chocolate in both experiments. In contrast, the DT for both groups was functionally identical, suggesting that differential effects of bitterness on liking of chocolate products are not based on the ability to detect bitterness in these products. PMID:22754143

  14. Rejection Thresholds in Chocolate Milk: Evidence for Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Meriel L; Ziegler, Gregory R; Hayes, John E

    2012-10-01

    Bitterness is generally considered a negative attribute in food, yet many individuals enjoy some bitterness in products like coffee or chocolate. In chocolate, bitterness arises from naturally occurring alkaloids and phenolics found in cacao. Fermentation and roasting help develop typical chocolate flavor and reduce the intense bitterness of raw cacao by modifying these bitter compounds. As it becomes increasingly common to fortify chocolate with `raw' cacao to increase the amount of healthful phytonutrients, it is important to identify the point at which the concentration of bitter compounds becomes objectionable, even to those who enjoy some bitterness. Classical threshold methods focus on the presence or absence of a sensation rather than acceptability or hedonics. A new alternative, the rejection threshold, was recently described in the literature. Here, we sought to quantify and compare differences in Rejection Thresholds (RjT) and Detection Thresholds (DT) in chocolate milk spiked with a food safe bitterant (sucrose octaacetate). In experiment 1, a series of paired preference tests was used to estimate the RjT for bitterness in chocolate milk. In a new group of participants (experiment 2), we determined the RjT and DT using the forced choice ascending method of limits. In both studies, participants were segmented on the basis of self-declared preference for milk or dark solid chocolate. Based on sigmoid fits of the indifference-preference function, the RjT was ~2.3 times higher for those preferring dark chocolate than the RjT for those preferring milk chocolate in both experiments. In contrast, the DT for both groups was functionally identical, suggesting that differential effects of bitterness on liking of chocolate products are not based on the ability to detect bitterness in these products.

  15. Low-threshold support for families with dementia in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Low-threshold support services are a part of the German health care system and help relieving family caregivers. There is limited information available on how to construct and implement low-threshold support services for people with dementia and their families in Germany. Some studies describe separately different perspectives of experiences and expectations, but there is no study combining all the different perspectives of those involved and taking the arrangements and organisation as well as their opinions on supporting and inhibiting factors into consideration. Findings This protocol describes the design of the study on low-threshold support services for families with a person with dementia in two German regions. The aim is to develop recommendations on how to build up these services and how to implement them in a region. A quantitative as well as a qualitative approach will be used. The quantitative part will be a survey on characteristics of service users and providers, as well as health care structures of the two project regions and an evaluation of important aspects derived from a literature search. Group discussions and semi-structured interviews will be carried out to get a deeper insight into the facilitators and barriers for both using and providing these services. All people involved will be included, such as the people with dementia, their relatives, volunteers, coordinators and institution representatives. Discussion Results of this study will provide important aspects for policymakers who are interested in an effective and low-threshold support for people with dementia. Furthermore the emerging recommendations can help staff and institutions to improve quality of care and can contribute to developing health and social care structures in Germany. PMID:22721553

  16. Cost-effectiveness thresholds: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Melanie Y; Lauer, Jeremy A; De Joncheere, Kees; Edejer, Tessa; Hutubessy, Raymond; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Hill, Suzanne R

    2016-12-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis is used to compare the costs and outcomes of alternative policy options. Each resulting cost-effectiveness ratio represents the magnitude of additional health gained per additional unit of resources spent. Cost-effectiveness thresholds allow cost-effectiveness ratios that represent good or very good value for money to be identified. In 2001, the World Health Organization's Commission on Macroeconomics in Health suggested cost-effectiveness thresholds based on multiples of a country's per-capita gross domestic product (GDP). In some contexts, in choosing which health interventions to fund and which not to fund, these thresholds have been used as decision rules. However, experience with the use of such GDP-based thresholds in decision-making processes at country level shows them to lack country specificity and this - in addition to uncertainty in the modelled cost-effectiveness ratios - can lead to the wrong decision on how to spend health-care resources. Cost-effectiveness information should be used alongside other considerations - e.g. budget impact and feasibility considerations - in a transparent decision-making process, rather than in isolation based on a single threshold value. Although cost-effectiveness ratios are undoubtedly informative in assessing value for money, countries should be encouraged to develop a context-specific process for decision-making that is supported by legislation, has stakeholder buy-in, for example the involvement of civil society organizations and patient groups, and is transparent, consistent and fair.

  17. Threshold concepts in finance: student perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-10-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by finance academics. In addition, we investigate the potential of a framework of different types of knowledge to differentiate the delivery of the finance curriculum and the role of modelling in finance. Our purpose is to identify ways to improve curriculum design and delivery, leading to better student outcomes. Whilst we find that there is significant overlap between what students identify as important in finance and the threshold concepts identified by academics, much of this overlap is expressed by indirect reference to the concepts. Further, whilst different types of knowledge are apparent in the student data, there is evidence that students do not necessarily distinguish conceptual from other types of knowledge. As well as investigating the finance curriculum, the research demonstrates the use of threshold concepts to compare and contrast student and academic perceptions of a discipline and, as such, is of interest to researchers in education and other disciplines.

  18. Manganese toxicity thresholds for restoration grass species.

    PubMed

    Paschke, Mark W; Valdecantos, Alejandro; Redente, Edward F

    2005-05-01

    Manganese toxicity thresholds for restoration plants have not been established. As a result, ecological risk assessments rely on toxicity thresholds for agronomic species, which may differ from those of restoration species. Our objective was to provide Mn toxicity thresholds for grasses commonly used in restoration. We used a greenhouse screening study where seedlings of redtop, slender wheatgrass, tufted hairgrass, big bluegrass, basin wildrye, and common wheat were grown in sand culture and exposed to increasing concentrations of Mn. The LC50, EC50-plant, EC50-shoot, EC50-root, PT50-shoot, and the PT50-root were then determined. Phytotoxicity thresholds and effective concentrations for the restoration species were generally higher than values reported for agronomic species. Our estimates of PT50-shoot for the five restoration grasses range from 41,528 to 120,082 mg Mn kg(-1). Measures of EC50-plant for these restoration grasses ranged from 877 to >6,000 mg Mn l(-1). These thresholds might be more useful for risk assessors than those based on crop plants that are widely used.

  19. Threshold pion photoproduction and chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, A.M.; Guillian, E.

    1992-12-01

    Experiments on the {gamma}p{yields}{pi}{sup o}p threshold reaction (performed at Saclay and Mainz) have attracted considerable attention because they test low energy, QCD related, predictions. The latest analyses of these data have indicated that the threshold value for the (s wave) electric dipole amplitude (E{sub o+}) is in agreement with {open_quotes}low energy theorems{close_quotes} based on current algebra (PCAC). However there was a strong energy dependence for this amplitude which makes it problematical to compare theory and experiment at only one point, the x{sup o} threshold. All of the previous analyses made model dependent assumptions about the p wave multipoles. The authors have performed, for the first time, a model independent analysis of the total and differential cross section data. In agreement with their previous analysis, and with the PCAC prediction, they obtain a threshold value of E{sub o+}= (2.0 {plus_minus} 0.2) x 10{sup {minus}3}/m{sub {pi}}. However the slope of this amplitude does not vary rapidly with energy which makes the question of what energy to compare the threshold values with theory less of a problem. A comparison with theory and previous analyses will be presented.

  20. Detection of tactile stimuli. Thresholds of afferent units related to psychophysical thresholds in the human hand.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, R S; Vallbo, A B

    1979-01-01

    1. Psychophysical thresholds were determined at 162 points in the glabrous skin area of the human hand when slowly rising, triangular indentations of controlled amplitudes were delivered with a small probe. The method of constant stimuli was used with either the two alternative forced choice or the yes-no procedure. It was found that the distribution of the psychophysical thresholds varied with the skin region. Thresholds from the volar aspect of the fingers and the peripheral parts of the palm were low and their distribution was unimodal with a median of 11.2 micrometers. In contrast, there was an over-representation of high thresholds when observations from the centre of the palm, the lateral aspects of the fingers and the regions of the creases were pooled, and the distribution was slightly bimodal with a median of 36.0 micrometers. 2. Nerve impulses were recorded from single fibres in the median nerve of human subjects with percutaneously inserted tungsten needle electrodes. The thresholds of 128 mechanosensitive afferent units in the glabrous skin area of the hand were determined when stimuli were delivered to partly the same points as stimulated for the assessment of the psychophysical thresholds. Of the four types of units present in this area the Pacinian corpuscle (PC) and rapidly adapting (RA) units had the lowest thresholds with medians of 9.2 and 13.8 micrometers, followed by the slowly adapting type I and slowly adapting type II units with medians of 56.5 and 33.1 micrometers. There was no indication of a difference between thresholds of units located in different skin areas. 3. In the region of low psychophysical thresholds there was good agreement between the thresholds of the rapidly adapting and Pacinian corpuscle units and the psychophysical thresholds, particularly at the lower ends of the samples. In the skin regions of high thresholds, on the other hand, practically all psychophysical thresholds were higher than the thresholds of the most

  1. A hand speed-duty cycle equation for estimating the ACGIH hand activity level rating.

    PubMed

    Akkas, Oguz; Azari, David P; Chen, Chia-Hsiung Eric; Hu, Yu Hen; Ulin, Sheryl S; Armstrong, Thomas J; Rempel, David; Radwin, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    An equation was developed for estimating hand activity level (HAL) directly from tracked root mean square (RMS) hand speed (S) and duty cycle (D). Table lookup, equation or marker-less video tracking can estimate HAL from motion/exertion frequency (F) and D. Since automatically estimating F is sometimes complex, HAL may be more readily assessed using S. Hands from 33 videos originally used for the HAL rating were tracked to estimate S, scaled relative to hand breadth (HB), and single-frame analysis was used to measure D. Since HBs were unknown, a Monte Carlo method was employed for iteratively estimating the regression coefficients from US Army anthropometry survey data. The equation: HAL = 10[e(-15:87+0:02D+2:25 ln S)/(1+e(-15:87+0:02D+2:25 ln S)], R(2) = 0.97, had a residual range ± 0.5 HAL. The S equation superiorly fits the Latko et al. ( 1997 ) data and predicted independently observed HAL values (Harris 2011) better (MSE = 0.16) than the F equation (MSE = 1.28).

  2. Theory of Threshold Fluctuations in Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Lecar, Harold; Nossal, Ralph

    1971-01-01

    Threshold fluctuations in axon firing can arise as a result of electrical noise in the excitable membrane. A general theoretical expression for the fluctuations is applied to the analysis of three sources of membrane noise: Johnson noise, excess 1/f noise, and sodium conductance fluctuations. Analytical expressions for the width of the firing probability curve are derived for each of these noise sources. Specific calculations are performed for the node of Ranvier of the frog, and attention is given to the manner in which threshold fluctuations are affected by variations of temperature, ion concentrations, and the application of various drugs. Comparison with existing data suggests that threshold fluctuations can best be explained by sodium conductance fluctuations. Additional experiments directed at distinguishing among the various noise sources are proposed. PMID:5167401

  3. L-H Threshold Studies in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S M; Battaglia, D; Bell, R E; Chang, C S; Hosea, J; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B P; Meyer, H; Park, G Y

    2011-09-06

    Recent experiments in the low aspect ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have been run in support of the high priority ITER and ITPA issue of access to the H-mode. Specifically, a series of experiments showed reduced power threshold values for deuterium vs helium plasmas, and for plasmas with lower current, lower triangularity and with lithium conditioning. Application of n=3 fields at the plasma edge resulted in higher power thresholds. To within the constraints of temporal and spatial resolutions, no systematic difference in T{sub e}, n{sub e}, p{sub e}, T{sub i}, v or their derivatives was found in discharges that transitioned into the H-mode versus those at slightly lower power that did not. Finally, H{sub 98y,2} {approx} 1 confinement quality could be achieved for powers just above the threshold power in ELM-free conditions.

  4. Estimating vowel formant discrimination thresholds using a single-interval classification task.

    PubMed

    Oglesbee, Eric; Kewley-Port, Diane

    2009-04-01

    Previous research estimating vowel formant discrimination thresholds in words and sentences has often employed a modified two-alternative-forced-choice (2AFC) task with adaptive tracking. Although this approach has produced stable data, the length and number of experimental sessions, as well as the unnaturalness of the task, limit generalizations of results to ordinary speech communication. In this exploratory study, a typical identification task was used to estimate vowel formant discrimination thresholds. Specifically, a signal detection theory approach was used to develop a method to estimate vowel formant discrimination thresholds from a quicker, more natural single-interval classification task. In experiment 1 "classification thresholds" for words in isolation and embedded in sentences were compared to previously collected 2AFC data. Experiment 2 used a within-subjects design to compare thresholds estimated from both classification and 2AFC tasks. Due to instabilities observed in the experiment 1 sentence data, experiment 2 examined only isolated words. Results from these experiments show that for isolated words, thresholds estimated using the classification procedure are comparable to those estimated using the 2AFC task. These results, as well as an analysis of several aspects of the classification procedure, support the viability of this new approach for estimating discrimination thresholds for speech stimuli.

  5. The Impact of Heterogeneous Thresholds on Social Contagion with Multiple Initiators

    PubMed Central

    Karampourniotis, Panagiotis D.; Sreenivasan, Sameet; Szymanski, Boleslaw K.; Korniss, Gyorgy

    2015-01-01

    The threshold model is a simple but classic model of contagion spreading in complex social systems. To capture the complex nature of social influencing we investigate numerically and analytically the transition in the behavior of threshold-limited cascades in the presence of multiple initiators as the distribution of thresholds is varied between the two extreme cases of identical thresholds and a uniform distribution. We accomplish this by employing a truncated normal distribution of the nodes’ thresholds and observe a non-monotonic change in the cascade size as we vary the standard deviation. Further, for a sufficiently large spread in the threshold distribution, the tipping-point behavior of the social influencing process disappears and is replaced by a smooth crossover governed by the size of initiator set. We demonstrate that for a given size of the initiator set, there is a specific variance of the threshold distribution for which an opinion spreads optimally. Furthermore, in the case of synthetic graphs we show that the spread asymptotically becomes independent of the system size, and that global cascades can arise just by the addition of a single node to the initiator set. PMID:26571486

  6. Energy Switching Threshold for Climatic Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Cao, L.; Caldeira, K.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change is one of the great challenges facing humanity currently and in the future. Its most severe impacts may still be avoided if efforts are made to transform current energy systems (1). A transition from the global system of high Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission electricity generation to low GHG emission energy technologies is required to mitigate climate change (2). Natural gas is increasingly seen as a choice for transitions to renewable sources. However, recent researches in energy and climate puzzled about the climate implications of relying more energy on natural gas. On one hand, a shift to natural gas is promoted as climate mitigation because it has lower carbon per unit energy than coal (3). On the other hand, the effect of switching to natural gas on nuclear-power and other renewable energies development may offset benefits from fuel-switching (4). Cheap natural gas is causing both coal plants and nuclear plants to close in the US. The objective of this study is to measure and evaluate the threshold of energy switching for climatic benefits. We hypothesized that the threshold ratio of energy switching for climatic benefits is related to GHGs emission factors of energy technologies, but the relation is not linear. A model was developed to study the fuel switching threshold for greenhouse gas emission reduction, and transition from coal and nuclear electricity generation to natural gas electricity generation was analyzed as a case study. The results showed that: (i) the threshold ratio of multi-energy switching for climatic benefits changes with GHGs emission factors of energy technologies. (ii)The mathematical relation between the threshold ratio of energy switching and GHGs emission factors of energies is a curved surface function. (iii) The analysis of energy switching threshold for climatic benefits can be used for energy and climate policy decision support.

  7. Near-threshold production of heavy quarks with QQbar_threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneke, M.; Kiyo, Y.; Maier, A.; Piclum, J.

    2016-12-01

    We describe the QQbar_threshold library for computing the production cross section of heavy quark-antiquark pairs near threshold at electron-positron colliders. The prediction includes all presently known QCD, electroweak, Higgs, and nonresonant corrections in the combined nonrelativistic and weak-coupling expansion.

  8. A dual-threshold radar detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerle, K. J.

    It is known that the beam agility of a phased-array radar can be utilized to enhance target detection capability as compared to a radar which has the same power but which radiates its energy uniformly over the solid angle being surveilled. A dual-threshold approach for realizing this enhancement is examined. Quantitative results are presented parametrically for four signal fluctuation models. The study also identifies the optimum combination of dual-threshold design parameters for each target model under a wide range of imposed system constraints such as the allowed number of false alarms per beam position. It is shown that under certain imposed constraints, no enhancement is possible.

  9. Radar rainfall estimation for the identification of debris-flow precipitation thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Francesco; Nikolopoulos, Efthymios I.; Creutin, Jean-Dominique; Borga, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Identification of rainfall thresholds for the prediction of debris-flow occurrence is a common approach for warning procedures. Traditionally the debris-flow triggering rainfall is derived from the closest available raingauge. However, the spatial and temporal variability of intense rainfall on mountainous areas, where debris flows take place, may lead to large uncertainty in point-based estimates. Nikolopoulos et al. (2014) have shown that this uncertainty translates into a systematic underestimation of the rainfall thresholds, leading to a step degradation of the performances of the rainfall threshold for identification of debris flows occurrence under operational conditions. A potential solution to this limitation lies on use of rainfall estimates from weather radar. Thanks to their high spatial and temporal resolutions, these estimates offer the advantage of providing rainfall information over the actual debris flow location. The aim of this study is to analyze the value of radar precipitation estimations for the identification of debris flow precipitation thresholds. Seven rainfall events that triggered debris flows in the Adige river basin (Eastern Italian Alps) are analyzed using data from a dense raingauge network and a C-Band weather radar. Radar data are elaborated by using a set of correction algorithms specifically developed for weather radar rainfall application in mountainous areas. Rainfall thresholds for the triggering of debris flows are identified in the form of average intensity-duration power law curves using a frequentist approach by using both radar rainfall estimates and raingauge data. Sampling uncertainty associated to the derivation of the thresholds is assessed by using a bootstrap technique (Peruccacci et al. 2012). Results show that radar-based rainfall thresholds are largely exceeding those obtained by using raingauge data. Moreover, the differences between the two thresholds may be related to the spatial characteristics (i.e., spatial

  10. Bird colour vision: behavioural thresholds reveal receptor noise.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Peter; Lind, Olle; Kelber, Almut

    2015-01-15

    Birds have impressive physiological adaptations for colour vision, including tetrachromacy and coloured oil droplets, yet it is not clear exactly how well birds can discriminate the reflecting object colours that they encounter in nature. With behavioural experiments, we determined colour discrimination thresholds of chickens in bright and dim light. We performed the experiments with two colour series, orange and green, covering two parts of chicken colour space. These experiments allowed us to compare behavioural results with model expectations and determine how different noise types limit colour discrimination. At intensities ranging from bright light to those corresponding to early dusk (250-10 cd m(-2)), we describe thresholds accurately by assuming a constant signal-to-noise ratio, in agreement with an invariant Weber fraction of Weber's law. Below this intensity, signal-to-noise ratio decreases and Weber's law is violated because photon-shot noise limits colour discrimination. In very dim light (below 0.05 cd m(-2) for the orange series or 0.2 cd m(-2) for the green series) colour discrimination is possibly constrained by dark noise, and the lowest intensity at which chickens can discriminate colours is 0.025 and 0.08 cd m(-2) for the orange and green series, respectively. Our results suggest that chickens use spatial pooling of cone outputs to mitigate photon-shot noise. Surprisingly, we found no difference between colour discrimination of chickens and humans tested with the same test in bright light.

  11. Signal Detection Theory Applied to Helicopter Transmission Diagnostic Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Keller, Jonathan A.; Wade, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Helicopter Health Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) have potential for providing data to support increasing the service life of a dynamic mechanical component in the transmission of a helicopter. Data collected can demonstrate the HUMS condition indicator responds to a specific component fault with appropriate alert limits and minimal false alarms. Defining thresholds for specific faults requires a tradeoff between the sensitivity of the condition indicator (CI) limit to indicate damage and the number of false alarms. A method using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves to assess CI performance was demonstrated using CI data collected from accelerometers installed on several UH60 Black Hawk and AH64 Apache helicopters and an AH64 helicopter component test stand. Results of the analysis indicate ROC curves can be used to reliably assess the performance of commercial HUMS condition indicators to detect damaged gears and bearings in a helicopter transmission.

  12. Everlasting initial memory threshold for rare events in equilibration processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Kwon, Chulan; Park, Hyunggyu

    2013-02-01

    Conventional wisdom indicates that initial memory should decay away exponentially in time for general (noncritial) equilibration processes. In particular, time-integrated quantities such as heat are presumed to lose initial memory in a sufficiently long-time limit. However, we show that the large deviation function of time-integrated quantities may exhibit initial memory effect even in the infinite-time limit, if the system is initially prepared sufficiently far away from equilibrium. For a Brownian particle dynamics, as an example, we found a sharp finite threshold rigorously, beyond which the corresponding large deviation function contains everlasting initial memory. The physical origin for this phenomenon is explored with an intuitive argument and also from a toy model analysis. Our results can be applied to general nonequilibrium relaxation processes reaching (non)equilibrium steady states.

  13. When luminance increment thresholds depend on apparent lightness.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Marianne; Wichmann, Felix A

    2013-05-31

    A fundamental question in visual perception research is whether the sensitivity to stimulus differences is limited by the sensory representation of the external stimulus, that is, the proximal stimulus, or by its perceptual representation, i.e., stimulus appearance. In the domain of lightness perception, the question translates into whether discrimination thresholds depend on the local luminance in the retinal image or on the apparent lightness of the corresponding image region. The majority of findings seem to indicate that sensitivity is limited by the sensory stimulus representation, which would imply different mechanisms for stimulus discrimination and appearance. We think this conclusion needs to be qualified. We report data suggesting that the relationship between discrimination and appearance judgments depends on how exactly they are being measured. We propose a theoretical account that provides a common mechanism for appearance and sensitivity. An interesting corollary of this model is that it also accounts for the perceptual phenomenon of assimilation.

  14. Signal Detection Theory Applied to Helicopter Transmission Diagnostic Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Keller, Jonathan A.; Wade, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Helicopter Health Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) have potential for providing data to support increasing the service life of a dynamic mechanical component in the transmission of a helicopter. Data collected can demonstrate the HUMS condition indicator responds to a specific component fault with appropriate alert limits and minimal false alarms. Defining thresholds for specific faults requires a tradeoff between the sensitivity of the condition indicator (CI) limit to indicate damage and the number of false alarms. A method using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves to assess CI performance was demonstrated using CI data collected from accelerometers installed on several UH60 Black Hawk and AH64 Apache helicopters and an AH64 helicopter component test stand. Results of the analysis indicate ROC curves can be used to reliably assess the performance of commercial HUMS condition indicators to detect damaged gears and bearings in a helicopter transmission.

  15. Identifying Threshold Concepts in the Careers of Educational Developers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmermans, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this multiple case study was to identify threshold concepts in the careers of educational developers. Twenty-one common threshold concepts emerged, with one threshold concept common among all participants: Facilitating a change process. The remaining 20 threshold concepts were captured in the following three categories: (1) Ways of…

  16. Thermal pulse damage thresholds in cadmium telluride.

    PubMed

    Slattery, J E; Thompson, J S; Schroeder, J B

    1975-09-01

    A model is presented for predicting the temperature rise in an opaque material during the absorption of a moderately short pulse of energy. Experimental verification of the model employing a pulsed ruby laser and a cadmium telluride plate is described. Two distinct damage thresholds were noted: (1) at modest energy levels plastic deformation occurred, and (2) the higher energies resulted in surface melting.

  17. A Cognitive Approach to Threshold Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Guy

    2013-01-01

    This paper asks a fundamental question: what is happening inside the mind of the undergraduate during teaching and learning experiences, and how should curricula be designed to support it? A number of concepts lend themselves to providing an answer, principle among which is the relatively recent idea of Threshold Concepts. In this paper we attempt…

  18. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-Charged Equipment or Closed-Cell Foams § 98.431 Reporting threshold. Any importer or exporter of fluorinated GHGs contained in pre-charged equipment or closed-cell foams who meets the requirements of § 98.2... or closed-cell foams....

  19. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-Charged Equipment or Closed-Cell Foams § 98.431 Reporting threshold. Any importer or exporter of fluorinated GHGs contained in pre-charged equipment or closed-cell foams who meets the requirements of § 98.2... or closed-cell foams....

  20. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-Charged Equipment or Closed-Cell Foams § 98.431 Reporting threshold. Any importer or exporter of fluorinated GHGs contained in pre-charged equipment or closed-cell foams who meets the requirements of § 98.2... or closed-cell foams....

  1. 40 CFR 98.441 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... amount of CO2 for long-term containment in subsurface geologic formations. There is no threshold. (b... permitted as Class VI under the Underground Injection Control program, a copy of the applicable Underground Injection Control program Director's authorization of site closure. (ii) For all other wells, and as...

  2. 40 CFR 98.441 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... amount of CO2 for long-term containment in subsurface geologic formations. There is no threshold. (b... permitted as Class VI under the Underground Injection Control program, a copy of the applicable Underground Injection Control program Director's authorization of site closure. (ii) For all other wells, and as...

  3. 42 CFR 433.206 - Threshold methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Threshold methodology. 433.206 Section 433.206 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...; or, if the State had affirmatively set the cap at a lower level consistent with flexibility...

  4. 40 CFR 98.351 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment § 98.351 Reporting threshold. You must... (2). (3) The facility operates an anaerobic process to treat industrial wastewater and/or industrial wastewater treatment sludge. (b) Ethanol production and food processing facilities. (1) The facility...

  5. 40 CFR 98.351 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment § 98.351 Reporting threshold. You must... (2). (3) The facility operates an anaerobic process to treat industrial wastewater and/or industrial wastewater treatment sludge. (b) Ethanol production and food processing facilities. (1) The facility...

  6. 40 CFR 98.351 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment § 98.351 Reporting threshold. You must... (2). (3) The facility operates an anaerobic process to treat industrial wastewater and/or industrial wastewater treatment sludge. (b) Ethanol production and food processing facilities. (1) The facility...

  7. 40 CFR 98.351 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment § 98.351 Reporting threshold. You must... (2). (3) The facility operates an anaerobic process to treat industrial wastewater and/or industrial wastewater treatment sludge. (b) Ethanol production and food processing facilities. (1) The facility...

  8. 40 CFR 98.121 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Fluorinated Gas Production § 98.121 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a fluorinated gas production process that... in § 98.2(a)(2), calculate process emissions from fluorinated gas production using uncontrolled...

  9. Threshold π- production on the deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandberg, B.; Annand, J. R. M.; Briscoe, W.; Feldman, G.; Fissum, K.; Hansen, K.; Isaksson, L.; Myers, L.; O'Reilly, G. V.

    2016-11-01

    An experiment that aims to measure the π- photoproduction cross-section σ(E) on the deuteron γ + 2H → π- + 2p near threshold is discussed. The main concepts of the experimental technique are presented alongside some preliminary signals.

  10. Simulated Critical Differences for Speech Reception Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Ellen Raben; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Critical differences state by how much 2 test results have to differ in order to be significantly different. Critical differences for discrimination scores have been available for several decades, but they do not exist for speech reception thresholds (SRTs). This study presents and discusses how critical differences for SRTs can be…

  11. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.431 Section 98.431 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Importers and Exporters of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases Contained in...

  12. 40 CFR 98.121 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Fluorinated Gas Production § 98.121 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a fluorinated gas production process that... in § 98.2(a)(2), calculate process emissions from fluorinated gas production using uncontrolled...

  13. 40 CFR 98.121 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Fluorinated Gas Production § 98.121 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a fluorinated gas production process that... in § 98.2(a)(2), calculate process emissions from fluorinated gas production using uncontrolled...

  14. 40 CFR 98.121 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Fluorinated Gas Production § 98.121 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains a fluorinated gas production process that... in § 98.2(a)(2), calculate process emissions from fluorinated gas production using uncontrolled...

  15. Identification of Threshold Concepts for Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer; Green, David; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Lin, Sara; Minderhout, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    Threshold concepts (TCs) are concepts that, when mastered, represent a transformed understanding of a discipline without which the learner cannot progress. We have undertaken a process involving more than 75 faculty members and 50 undergraduate students to identify a working list of TCs for biochemistry. The process of identifying TCs for…

  16. The gradual nature of threshold switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, M.; Salinga, M.

    2014-11-01

    The recent commercialization of electronic memories based on phase change materials proved the usability of this peculiar family of materials for application purposes. More advanced data storage and computing concepts, however, demand a deeper understanding especially of the electrical properties of the amorphous phase and the switching behaviour. In this work, we investigate the temporal evolution of the current through the amorphous state of the prototypical phase change material, Ge2Sb2Te5, under constant voltage. A custom-made electrical tester allows the measurement of delay times over five orders of magnitude, as well as the transient states of electrical excitation prior to the actual threshold switching. We recognize a continuous current increase over time prior to the actual threshold-switching event to be a good measure for the electrical excitation. A clear correlation between a significant rise in pre-switching-current and the later occurrence of threshold switching can be observed. This way, we found experimental evidence for the existence of an absolute minimum for the threshold voltage (or electric field respectively) holding also for time scales far beyond the measurement range.

  17. Phi Delta Kappa at the Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2006-01-01

    Since its fraternal origins a century ago, Phi Delta Kappa (PDK) International has been foremost a society of individuals joined together in professional collegiality and dedicated to tenets of leadership, service, and research in education. As PDK crosses the threshold into its second century, that early spirit of association lit in 1906, like…

  18. Retinal injury thresholds for blue wavelength lasers.

    PubMed

    Lund, David J; Stuck, Bruce E; Edsall, Peter

    2006-05-01

    The interaction mechanism leading to laser-induced retinal alteration can be thermal or non-thermal, depending upon the wavelength of the laser radiation and the duration of the exposure. To investigate the effect of exposure duration on the interaction mechanism, retinal injury thresholds in the rhesus monkey were experimentally measured for exposure to laser radiation at wavelengths of 441.6, 457.9, 476.5, and 496.5 nm. Exposure durations were 0.1, 1, 5, 16, and 100 s; and 1/e retinal irradiance diameters were 50, 125, and 327 microm. Tissue response was observed via ophthalmoscope 1 h and 48 h post exposure. Thermal and non-thermal damage thresholds were obtained depending upon the exposure duration. These threshold data are in agreement with data previously reported in the literature for 100-s duration exposures, but differences were noted for shorter exposures. The current study yielded an estimated injury threshold for 1-s duration, 327-microm retinal irradiance diameter exposures at 441.6 nm, which is an order of magnitude higher than that previously reported. This study provides evidence that laser-induced retinal damage is primarily induced via thermal mechanisms for exposures shorter than 5 s in duration. Arguments are presented that support an amendment of the thermal hazard function, R(lambda).

  19. 40 CFR 98.441 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide § 98.441 Reporting threshold. (a... permitted as Class VI under the Underground Injection Control program, a copy of the applicable Underground Injection Control program Director's authorization of site closure. (ii) For all other wells, and as...

  20. 40 CFR 98.441 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide § 98.441 Reporting threshold. (a... permitted as Class VI under the Underground Injection Control program, a copy of the applicable Underground Injection Control program Director's authorization of site closure. (ii) For all other wells, and as...

  1. 40 CFR 98.301 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electrical Transmission and Distribution Equipment Use § 98.301 Reporting threshold. (a) You must report GHG emissions from an electric power system if the total nameplate capacity...). (b) A facility other than an electric power system that is subject to this part because of...

  2. Potency matters: thresholds govern endocrine activity.

    PubMed

    Borgert, Christopher J; Baker, Stephen P; Matthews, John C

    2013-10-01

    Whether thresholds exist for endocrine active substances and for endocrine disrupting effects of exogenous chemicals has been posed as a question for regulatory policy by the European Union. This question arises from a concern that the endocrine system is too complex to allow estimations of safe levels of exposure to any chemical with potential endocrine activity, and a belief that any such chemical can augment, retard, or disrupt the normal background activity of endogenous hormones. However, vital signaling functions of the endocrine system require it to continuously discriminate the biological information conveyed by potent endogenous hormones from a more concentrated background of structurally similar, endogenous molecules with low hormonal potential. This obligatory ability to discriminate important hormonal signals from background noise can be used to define thresholds for induction of hormonal effects, without which normal physiological functions would be impossible. From such thresholds, safe levels of exposure can be estimated. This brief review highlights how the fundamental principles governing hormonal effects - affinity, efficacy, potency, and mass action - dictate the existence of thresholds and why these principles also define the potential that exogenous chemicals might have to interfere with normal endocrine functioning.

  3. Efficient adaptive thresholding with image masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Young-Taek; Hwang, Youngkyoo; Kim, Jung-Bae; Bang, Won-Chul

    2014-03-01

    Adaptive thresholding is a useful technique for document analysis. In medical image processing, it is also helpful for segmenting structures, such as diaphragms or blood vessels. This technique sets a threshold using local information around a pixel, then binarizes the pixel according to the value. Although this technique is robust to changes in illumination, it takes a significant amount of time to compute thresholds because it requires adding all of the neighboring pixels. Integral images can alleviate this overhead; however, medical images, such as ultrasound, often come with image masks, and ordinary algorithms often cause artifacts. The main problem is that the shape of the summing area is not rectangular near the boundaries of the image mask. For example, the threshold at the boundary of the mask is incorrect because pixels on the mask image are also counted. Our key idea to cope with this problem is computing the integral image for the image mask to count the valid number of pixels. Our method is implemented on a GPU using CUDA, and experimental results show that our algorithm is 164 times faster than a naïve CPU algorithm for averaging.

  4. 40 CFR 98.91 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing § 98.91 Reporting threshold. (a) You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if electronics manufacturing production processes, as defined in.... Rather than using the calculation methodologies in § 98.93 to calculate emissions from...

  5. 40 CFR 98.91 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing § 98.91 Reporting threshold. (a) You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if electronics manufacturing production processes, as defined in.... Rather than using the calculation methodologies in § 98.93 to calculate emissions from...

  6. 40 CFR 98.91 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing § 98.91 Reporting threshold. (a) You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if electronics manufacturing production processes, as defined in.... Rather than using the calculation methodologies in § 98.93 to calculate emissions from...

  7. 40 CFR 98.91 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing § 98.91 Reporting threshold. (a) You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if electronics manufacturing production processes, as defined in.... Rather than using the calculation methodologies in § 98.93 to calculate emissions from...

  8. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Waste Landfills § 98.461 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an industrial waste landfill meeting the...)(2), the emissions from the industrial waste landfill are to be determined using the...

  9. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Waste Landfills § 98.461 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an industrial waste landfill meeting the...)(2), the emissions from the industrial waste landfill are to be determined using the...

  10. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Waste Landfills § 98.461 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if your facility contains an industrial waste landfill meeting the...)(2), the emissions from the industrial waste landfill are to be determined using the...

  11. 49 CFR 80.13 - Threshold criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), eligible project costs shall be reasonably anticipated to equal or... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Threshold criteria. 80.13 Section 80.13 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation CREDIT ASSISTANCE FOR SURFACE TRANSPORTATION...

  12. 49 CFR 80.13 - Threshold criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), eligible project costs shall be reasonably anticipated to equal or... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Threshold criteria. 80.13 Section 80.13 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation CREDIT ASSISTANCE FOR SURFACE TRANSPORTATION...

  13. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Conceptualizing the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Susan; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.; Kyng, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Graduates with well-developed capabilities in finance are invaluable to our society and in increasing demand. Universities face the challenge of designing finance programmes to develop these capabilities and the essential knowledge that underpins them. Our research responds to this challenge by identifying threshold concepts that are central to…

  14. LANSCE Beam Current Limiter (XL)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.; Hall, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is an engineered safety system that provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated proton beams. The Beam Current Limiter (XL), as an active component of the RSS, limits the maximum average current in a beamline, thus the current available for a beam spill accident. Exceeding the pre-set limit initiates action by the RSS to mitigate the hazard (insertion of beam stoppers in the low energy beam transport). The beam limiter is an electrically isolated, toroidal transformer and associated electronics. The device was designed to continuously monitor beamline currents independent of any external timing. Fail-safe operation was a prime consideration in its development. Fail-safe operation is defined as functioning as intended (due to redundant circuitry), functioning with a more sensitive fault threshold, or generating a fault condition. This report describes the design philosophy, hardware, implementation, operation, and limitations of the device.

  15. Identifying Thresholds for Ecosystem-Based Management

    PubMed Central

    Samhouri, Jameal F.; Levin, Phillip S.; Ainsworth, Cameron H.

    2010-01-01

    Background One of the greatest obstacles to moving ecosystem-based management (EBM) from concept to practice is the lack of a systematic approach to defining ecosystem-level decision criteria, or reference points that trigger management action. Methodology/Principal Findings To assist resource managers and policymakers in developing EBM decision criteria, we introduce a quantitative, transferable method for identifying utility thresholds. A utility threshold is the level of human-induced pressure (e.g., pollution) at which small changes produce substantial improvements toward the EBM goal of protecting an ecosystem's structural (e.g., diversity) and functional (e.g., resilience) attributes. The analytical approach is based on the detection of nonlinearities in relationships between ecosystem attributes and pressures. We illustrate the method with a hypothetical case study of (1) fishing and (2) nearshore habitat pressure using an empirically-validated marine ecosystem model for British Columbia, Canada, and derive numerical threshold values in terms of the density of two empirically-tractable indicator groups, sablefish and jellyfish. We also describe how to incorporate uncertainty into the estimation of utility thresholds and highlight their value in the context of understanding EBM trade-offs. Conclusions/Significance For any policy scenario, an understanding of utility thresholds provides insight into the amount and type of management intervention required to make significant progress toward improved ecosystem structure and function. The approach outlined in this paper can be applied in the context of single or multiple human-induced pressures, to any marine, freshwater, or terrestrial ecosystem, and should facilitate more effective management. PMID:20126647

  16. Cost–effectiveness thresholds: pros and cons

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Jeremy A; De Joncheere, Kees; Edejer, Tessa; Hutubessy, Raymond; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Hill, Suzanne R

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cost–effectiveness analysis is used to compare the costs and outcomes of alternative policy options. Each resulting cost–effectiveness ratio represents the magnitude of additional health gained per additional unit of resources spent. Cost–effectiveness thresholds allow cost–effectiveness ratios that represent good or very good value for money to be identified. In 2001, the World Health Organization’s Commission on Macroeconomics in Health suggested cost–effectiveness thresholds based on multiples of a country’s per-capita gross domestic product (GDP). In some contexts, in choosing which health interventions to fund and which not to fund, these thresholds have been used as decision rules. However, experience with the use of such GDP-based thresholds in decision-making processes at country level shows them to lack country specificity and this – in addition to uncertainty in the modelled cost–effectiveness ratios – can lead to the wrong decision on how to spend health-care resources. Cost–effectiveness information should be used alongside other considerations – e.g. budget impact and feasibility considerations – in a transparent decision-making process, rather than in isolation based on a single threshold value. Although cost–effectiveness ratios are undoubtedly informative in assessing value for money, countries should be encouraged to develop a context-specific process for decision-making that is supported by legislation, has stakeholder buy-in, for example the involvement of civil society organizations and patient groups, and is transparent, consistent and fair. PMID:27994285

  17. Measurement of ventilatory threshold by respiratory frequency.

    PubMed

    Nabetani, Teru; Ueda, Takeshi; Teramoto, Keisuke

    2002-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess whether respiratory frequency can be used as a valid parameter for estimating ventilatory threshold and for examining differences in exercise modes such as a cycle ergometer and a treadmill. 24 men and 12 women performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer and on a treadmill. Oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output, pulmonary ventilation, ventilatory frequency, and heart rate were measured continuously every 30 sec. during the test. Three different and independent reviewers detected the ventilatory threshold point and break point of respiratory rate, which were then compared. Analysis indicated that (1) ventilatory threshold was well correlated with break point of respiratory rate for both cycle (r=.88, p<.001) and treadmill exercise (r=.96, p<.001). However, on the average, ventilatory threshold was only 71% (cycle) or 88% (treadmill) of break point of respiratory rate. (2) The regression equation for treadmill exercise was more accurate than that for cycling, but the detected data samples were smaller. The break point of respiratory rate was more easily detected for the cycle ergometer test 33 of 36 subjects) than for the treadmill test (only 15 of 36). The cycle ergometer test identified the break point of respiratory rate more easily than did the treadmill test. (3) There was an association between physical fitness and whether the break point of respiratory rate was detectable, and the more fit the subject (above average), the more likely the break point was to be undetected. Our study demonstrates that the break point of respiratory rate is closely associated with ventilatory threshold and that the cycle ergometer test is more conducive than the treadmill test to the detectability of break point of respiratory rate.

  18. [The analysis of threshold effect using Empower Stats software].

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Chen, Chang-zhong; Yu, Xiao-dan

    2013-11-01

    In many studies about biomedical research factors influence on the outcome variable, it has no influence or has a positive effect within a certain range. Exceeding a certain threshold value, the size of the effect and/or orientation will change, which called threshold effect. Whether there are threshold effects in the analysis of factors (x) on the outcome variable (y), it can be observed through a smooth curve fitting to see whether there is a piecewise linear relationship. And then using segmented regression model, LRT test and Bootstrap resampling method to analyze the threshold effect. Empower Stats software developed by American X & Y Solutions Inc has a threshold effect analysis module. You can input the threshold value at a given threshold segmentation simulated data. You may not input the threshold, but determined the optimal threshold analog data by the software automatically, and calculated the threshold confidence intervals.

  19. On Limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzmann, Gerard J.

    2008-01-01

    In the last 3 decades or so, the size of systems we have been able to verify formally with automated tools has increased dramatically. At each point in this development, we encountered a different set of limits -- many of which we were eventually able to overcome. Today, we may have reached some limits that may be much harder to conquer. The problem I will discuss is the following: given a hypothetical machine with infinite memory that is seamlessly shared among infinitely many CPUs (or CPU cores), what is the largest problem size that we could solve?

  20. Determination of rainfall thresholds for shallow landslides by a probabilistic and empirical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Ju, N. P.; Liao, Y. J.; Liu, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides not only cause property loss, but also kill and injure large numbers of people every year in mountainous areas in China. These losses and casualties may be avoided to some extent with rainfall threshold values used in an early warning system at a regional scale for the occurrence of landslides. However, the limited availability of data always causes difficulties. In this paper we present a method to calculate rainfall threshold values with limited data sets for two rainfall parameters: hourly rainfall intensity and accumulated precipitation. The method has been applied to the Huangshan region, in the province of Anhui, China. Four early warning levels (zero, outlook, attention, and warning) have been adopted and the corresponding rainfall threshold values have been defined by probability lines. A validation procedure showed that this method can significantly enhance the effectiveness of a warning system, and finally reduce and mitigate the risk of shallow landslides in mountainous regions.

  1. Bifurcation threshold of the delayed van der Pol oscillator under stochastic modulation.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Mathieu; Drolet, François; Viñals, Jorge

    2012-05-01

    We obtain the location of the Hopf bifurcation threshold for a modified van der Pol oscillator, parametrically driven by a stochastic source and including delayed feedback in both position and velocity. We introduce a multiple scale expansion near threshold, and we solve the resulting Fokker-Planck equation associated with the evolution at the slowest time scale. The analytical results are compared with a direct numerical integration of the model equation. Delay modifies the Hopf frequency at threshold and leads to a stochastic bifurcation that is shifted relative to the deterministic limit by an amount that depends on the delay time, the amplitude of the feedback terms, and the intensity of the noise. Interestingly, stochasticity generally increases the region of stability of the limit cycle.

  2. Overwash threshold experiment for gravel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matias, Ana; Williams, Jon; Bradbury, Andrew; Masselink, Gerhard; Ferreira, Óscar

    2010-05-01

    Field measurements of overwash effects, associated physical forcing, and determination of threshold conditions, are much less common for gravel than for sandy barriers (e.g., field measurements by Lorang, 2002; Bradbury et al., 2005; and laboratory studies by Obhrai et al., 2008). In order to define overwash thresholds for gravel there is a need for measurements under a variety of forcing conditions that include waves, tides and surges. Flume experiments allow the manipulation of physical forcing and can make a valuable contribution to improve the understanding and prediction of overwash. To study gravel barrier overwash processes, BARDEX proto-type scale laboratory experiment was undertaken in the Delta flume (Williams et al., 2009). A 4 m high, 50 m wide gravel barrier composed of sediments with D50 = 10 mm was emplaced in the flume and subjected to a range of water levels, wave heights and wave periods. Barrier morphology was surveyed before and after each run. Two situations were simulated: overwashing and overtopping. Following Orford and Carter (1982) terminology, the distinction between overtopping and overwash was based on the type of morphological change over the barrier crest. Overtopping causes vertical accretion at the crest, whereas overwashing promotes the formation of washover deposits landwards from the crest. Ten overwash experiments were conducted (divided in 63 runs), and overtopping was recorded in 22 runs and overwash in 20 runs. In other runs, only the beach face was reworked by waves. In a systematic series of tests water levels were varied between 3.00 m and 3.75 m (in steps of 0.125 m); wave height was varied between 0.8 m and 1.3 m (in steps of 0.05 or 0.1 m); and wave periods of 4.5, 6, 7 and 8 seconds were used. These hydrodynamic conditions were used to compute wave run-up using several well-known formulae (cf., Powell, 1990; Stockdon et al., 2007). Comparison between run-up estimations and the barrier crest elevation prior to wave

  3. Extended High Frequency Thresholds in College Students: Effects of Recreational Noise

    PubMed Central

    Le Prell, C. G.; Spankovich, C.; Lobarinas, E.; Griffiths, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Human hearing is sensitive to sounds from as low as 20 Hz to as high as 20,000 Hz in normal ears. However, clinical tests of human hearing rarely include extended high frequency (EHF) threshold assessments, at frequencies extending beyond 8,000 Hz. EHF thresholds have been suggested for use monitoring the earliest effects of noise on the inner ear, although the clinical utility of EHF threshold testing is not well established for this purpose. Purpose The primary objective of this study was to determine if EHF thresholds in healthy, young adult college students vary as a function of recreational noise exposure. Research Design A retrospective analysis of a laboratory database was conducted; all participants with both EHF threshold testing and noise history data were included. The potential for “pre-clinical” EHF deficits was assessed based on the measured thresholds, with the noise surveys used to estimate recreational noise exposure. Study Sample EHF thresholds measured during participation in other ongoing studies were available from 87 subjects (34 male and 53 female); all participants had hearing within normal clinical limits (≤25 HL) at conventional frequencies (0.25 to 8 kHz). Results EHF thresholds closely matched standard reference thresholds [ANSI S3.6 (1996) Annex C]. There were statistically reliable threshold differences in subjects that used music players, with 3–6 dB worse thresholds at the highest test frequencies (10–16 kHz) in participants that reported long-term music player device use (longer than 5 years), or higher listening levels during music player use. Conclusions It should be possible to detect small changes in high frequency hearing for patients/participants that undergo repeat testing at periodic intervals. However, the increased population-level variability in thresholds at the highest frequencies will make it difficult to identify the presence of small but potentially important deficits in otherwise normal hearing

  4. Measuring Input Thresholds on an Existing Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuperman, Igor; Gutrich, Daniel G.; Berkun, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    A critical PECL (positive emitter-coupled logic) interface to Xilinx interface needed to be changed on an existing flight board. The new Xilinx input interface used a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) type of input, and the driver could meet its thresholds typically, but not in worst-case, according to the data sheet. The previous interface had been based on comparison with an external reference, but the CMOS input is based on comparison with an internal divider from the power supply. A way to measure what the exact input threshold was for this device for 64 inputs on a flight board was needed. The measurement technique allowed an accurate measurement of the voltage required to switch a Xilinx input from high to low for each of the 64 lines, while only probing two of them. Directly driving an external voltage was considered too risky, and tests done on any other unit could not be used to qualify the flight board. The two lines directly probed gave an absolute voltage threshold calibration, while data collected on the remaining 62 lines without probing gave relative measurements that could be used to identify any outliers. The PECL interface was forced to a long-period square wave by driving a saturated square wave into the ADC (analog to digital converter). The active pull-down circuit was turned off, causing each line to rise rapidly and fall slowly according to the input s weak pull-down circuitry. The fall time shows up as a change in the pulse width of the signal ready by the Xilinx. This change in pulse width is a function of capacitance, pulldown current, and input threshold. Capacitance was known from the different trace lengths, plus a gate input capacitance, which is the same for all inputs. The pull-down current is the same for all inputs including the two that are probed directly. The data was combined, and the Excel solver tool was used to find input thresholds for the 62 lines. This was repeated over different supply voltages and

  5. Setting evidence-based occupational exposure limits for manganese.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Ruth; Ashdown, Lini; McGough, Doreen; Huici-Montagud, Alicia; Levy, Leonard

    2017-01-01

    In 2004, a review by the Institute of Environment and Health (IEH) made recommendations on occupational exposure limits (OELs) for manganese and its inorganic compounds for inhalable and respirable fractions respectively. These OELs were based on a detailed comprehensive evaluation of all the scientific data available at that time. Since then, more published studies have become available and a number of occupational standard-setting committees (EU SCOEL, US ACGIH-TLV, and German MAK) have proposed OEL's for manganese and its inorganic compounds that are somewhat lower that those proposed in the 2004 review. Based on current understanding, the key toxicological and human health issues that are likely to influence a health-based recommendation relate to: neurotoxicology; reproductive and developmental toxicology; and mutagenicity/carcinogenicity. Of these, it is generally considered that neurotoxicity presents the most sensitive endpoint. As such, many of the studies that have been reported since the IEH review have sought to use those neurofunctional tests that appear to be particularly sensitive at identifying the subtle neurological changes thought to associate with manganese toxicity. These recent studies have, however, continued to be limited to a significant extent by reliance on cross-sectional designs and also by use of unreliable exposure estimation methods. Consequently the strength of the potential association between manganese exposure and these subtle subclinical cognitive or neuromotor changes is still poorly characterised and the relevance of these minor differences in terms of either their clinical or quality of life consequences remains unknown. Based upon the overall evidence, it is concluded that the 8-h time weighted averages (TWA) for respirable (0.05mg/m(3) as Mn) and inhalable (0.2mg/m(3) as Mn) fractions as recommended by the SCOEL in 2011 are the most methodologically-sound, as they are based on the best available studies, most suited to the

  6. Edith Wharton's threshold phobia and two worlds.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Deanna; Kulish, Nancy

    2014-08-01

    The American novelist Edith Wharton suffered an unusual childhood neurotic symptom, a fear of crossing thresholds, a condition that might be called a "threshold phobia." This symptom is identified and examined in autobiographical material, letters, diaries, and selected literary fiction and nonfiction left by Wharton to arrive at a formulation not previously drawn together. A fascinating theme-living or being trapped between "two worlds"-runs through much of the writer's life and work. The phobia is related to this theme, and both can be linked more broadly to certain sexual conflicts in women. This understanding of Wharton's phobia, it is argued, throws new light on the developmental issues and conflicts related to the female "oedipal" or triadic phase, characterized by the need to negotiate the two worlds of mother and of father.

  7. Differential equation models for sharp threshold dynamics.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Harrison C; Dimitrov, Nedialko B

    2014-01-01

    We develop an extension to differential equation models of dynamical systems to allow us to analyze probabilistic threshold dynamics that fundamentally and globally change system behavior. We apply our novel modeling approach to two cases of interest: a model of infectious disease modified for malware where a detection event drastically changes dynamics by introducing a new class in competition with the original infection; and the Lanchester model of armed conflict, where the loss of a key capability drastically changes the effectiveness of one of the sides. We derive and demonstrate a step-by-step, repeatable method for applying our novel modeling approach to an arbitrary system, and we compare the resulting differential equations to simulations of the system's random progression. Our work leads to a simple and easily implemented method for analyzing probabilistic threshold dynamics using differential equations.

  8. Thresholds of hypoxia for marine biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Vaquer-Sunyer, Raquel; Duarte, Carlos M

    2008-10-07

    Hypoxia is a mounting problem affecting the world's coastal waters, with severe consequences for marine life, including death and catastrophic changes. Hypoxia is forecast to increase owing to the combined effects of the continued spread of coastal eutrophication and global warming. A broad comparative analysis across a range of contrasting marine benthic organisms showed that hypoxia thresholds vary greatly across marine benthic organisms and that the conventional definition of 2 mg O(2)/liter to designate waters as hypoxic is below the empirical sublethal and lethal O(2) thresholds for half of the species tested. These results imply that the number and area of coastal ecosystems affected by hypoxia and the future extent of hypoxia impacts on marine life have been generally underestimated.

  9. Ku-band radar threshold analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, C. L.; Polydoros, A.

    1979-01-01

    The statistics of the CFAR threshold for the Ku-band radar was determined. Exact analytical results were developed for both the mean and standard deviations in the designated search mode. The mean value is compared to the results of a previously reported simulation. The analytical results are more optimistic than the simulation results, for which no explanation is offered. The normalized standard deviation is shown to be very sensitive to signal-to-noise ratio and very insensitive to the noise correlation present in the range gates of the designated search mode. The substantial variation in the CFAR threshold is dominant at large values of SNR where the normalized standard deviation is greater than 0.3. Whether or not this significantly affects the resulting probability of detection is a matter which deserves additional attention.

  10. Low-threshold bidirectional air lasing.

    PubMed

    Laurain, Alexandre; Scheller, Maik; Polynkin, Pavel

    2014-12-19

    Air lasing refers to the remote optical pumping of the constituents of ambient air that results in a directional laserlike emission from the pumped region. Intense current investigations of this concept are motivated by the potential applications in remote atmospheric sensing. Different approaches to air lasing are being investigated, but, so far, only the approach based on dissociation and resonant two-photon pumping of air molecules by deep-UV laser pulses has produced measurable lasing energies in real air and in the backward direction, which is of the most relevance for applications. However, the emission had a high pumping threshold, in hundreds of GW/cm^{2}. We demonstrate that the threshold can be virtually eliminated through predissociation of air molecules with an additional nanosecond laser. We use a single tunable pump laser system to generate backward-propagating lasing in both oxygen and nitrogen in air, with energies of up to 1  μJ per pulse.

  11. Reinforcement learning for adaptive threshold control of restorative brain-computer interfaces: a Bayesian simulation

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Restorative brain-computer interfaces (BCI) are increasingly used to provide feedback of neuronal states in a bid to normalize pathological brain activity and achieve behavioral gains. However, patients and healthy subjects alike often show a large variability, or even inability, of brain self-regulation for BCI control, known as BCI illiteracy. Although current co-adaptive algorithms are powerful for assistive BCIs, their inherent class switching clashes with the operant conditioning goal of restorative BCIs. Moreover, due to the treatment rationale, the classifier of restorative BCIs usually has a constrained feature space, thus limiting the possibility of classifier adaptation. In this context, we applied a Bayesian model of neurofeedback and reinforcement learning for different threshold selection strategies to study the impact of threshold adaptation of a linear classifier on optimizing restorative BCIs. For each feedback iteration, we first determined the thresholds that result in minimal action entropy and maximal instructional efficiency. We then used the resulting vector for the simulation of continuous threshold adaptation. We could thus show that threshold adaptation can improve reinforcement learning, particularly in cases of BCI illiteracy. Finally, on the basis of information-theory, we provided an explanation for the achieved benefits of adaptive threshold setting. PMID:25729347

  12. Reinforcement learning for adaptive threshold control of restorative brain-computer interfaces: a Bayesian simulation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Restorative brain-computer interfaces (BCI) are increasingly used to provide feedback of neuronal states in a bid to normalize pathological brain activity and achieve behavioral gains. However, patients and healthy subjects alike often show a large variability, or even inability, of brain self-regulation for BCI control, known as BCI illiteracy. Although current co-adaptive algorithms are powerful for assistive BCIs, their inherent class switching clashes with the operant conditioning goal of restorative BCIs. Moreover, due to the treatment rationale, the classifier of restorative BCIs usually has a constrained feature space, thus limiting the possibility of classifier adaptation. In this context, we applied a Bayesian model of neurofeedback and reinforcement learning for different threshold selection strategies to study the impact of threshold adaptation of a linear classifier on optimizing restorative BCIs. For each feedback iteration, we first determined the thresholds that result in minimal action entropy and maximal instructional efficiency. We then used the resulting vector for the simulation of continuous threshold adaptation. We could thus show that threshold adaptation can improve reinforcement learning, particularly in cases of BCI illiteracy. Finally, on the basis of information-theory, we provided an explanation for the achieved benefits of adaptive threshold setting.

  13. Fluid shear stress threshold regulates angiogenic sprouting.

    PubMed

    Galie, Peter A; Nguyen, Duc-Huy T; Choi, Colin K; Cohen, Daniel M; Janmey, Paul A; Chen, Christopher S

    2014-06-03

    The density and architecture of capillary beds that form within a tissue depend on many factors, including local metabolic demand and blood flow. Here, using microfluidic control of local fluid mechanics, we show the existence of a previously unappreciated flow-induced shear stress threshold that triggers angiogenic sprouting. Both intraluminal shear stress over the endothelium and transmural flow through the endothelium above 10 dyn/cm(2) triggered endothelial cells to sprout and invade into the underlying matrix, and this threshold is not impacted by the maturation of cell-cell junctions or pressure gradient across the monolayer. Antagonizing VE-cadherin widened cell-cell junctions and reduced the applied shear stress for a given transmural flow rate, but did not affect the shear threshold for sprouting. Furthermore, both transmural and luminal flow induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 1, and this up-regulation was required for the flow-induced sprouting. Once sprouting was initiated, continuous flow was needed to both sustain sprouting and prevent retraction. To explore the potential ramifications of a shear threshold on the spatial patterning of new sprouts, we used finite-element modeling to predict fluid shear in a variety of geometric settings and then experimentally demonstrated that transmural flow guided preferential sprouting toward paths of draining interstitial fluid flow as might occur to connect capillary beds to venules or lymphatics. In addition, we show that luminal shear increases in local narrowings of vessels to trigger sprouting, perhaps ultimately to normalize shear stress across the vasculature. Together, these studies highlight the role of shear stress in controlling angiogenic sprouting and offer a potential homeostatic mechanism for regulating vascular density.

  14. Kitaev's Zd-code threshold estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclos-Cianci, Guillaume; Poulin, David

    2013-06-01

    We study the quantum error correction threshold of Kitaev's toric code over the group Zd subject to a generalized bit-flip noise. This problem requires special decoding techniques, and for this purpose we generalize the renormalization-group method we introduced previously [G. Duclos-Cianci and D. Poulin, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.050504 104, 050504 (2010) and IEEE Information Theory Workshop, Dublin (2010), p. 1] for Z2 topological codes.

  15. Monolayer semiconductor nanocavity lasers with ultralow thresholds.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sanfeng; Buckley, Sonia; Schaibley, John R; Feng, Liefeng; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David G; Hatami, Fariba; Yao, Wang; Vučković, Jelena; Majumdar, Arka; Xu, Xiaodong

    2015-04-02

    Engineering the electromagnetic environment of a nanometre-scale light emitter by use of a photonic cavity can significantly enhance its spontaneous emission rate, through cavity quantum electrodynamics in the Purcell regime. This effect can greatly reduce the lasing threshold of the emitter, providing a low-threshold laser system with small footprint, low power consumption and ultrafast modulation. An ultralow-threshold nanoscale laser has been successfully developed by embedding quantum dots into a photonic crystal cavity (PCC). However, several challenges impede the practical application of this architecture, including the random positions and compositional fluctuations of the dots, extreme difficulty in current injection, and lack of compatibility with electronic circuits. Here we report a new lasing strategy: an atomically thin crystalline semiconductor--that is, a tungsten diselenide monolayer--is non-destructively and deterministically introduced as a gain medium at the surface of a pre-fabricated PCC. A continuous-wave nanolaser operating in the visible regime is thereby achieved with an optical pumping threshold as low as 27 nanowatts at 130 kelvin, similar to the value achieved in quantum-dot PCC lasers. The key to the lasing action lies in the monolayer nature of the gain medium, which confines direct-gap excitons to within one nanometre of the PCC surface. The surface-gain geometry gives unprecedented accessibility and hence the ability to tailor gain properties via external controls such as electrostatic gating and current injection, enabling electrically pumped operation. Our scheme is scalable and compatible with integrated photonics for on-chip optical communication technologies.

  16. Power threshold for neutral beam current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Politzer, P.A. ); Porter, G.D. )

    1989-10-02

    For fully noninductive current drive in tokamaks using neutral beams, there is a power and density threshold condition, setting a minimum value for P{sup 3/2}/n{sup 2}. If this condition is not met, stationary state cannot occur, and a tokamak discharge will collapse. This is a consequence of the coupling between current and electron temperature, or between current drive efficiency and energy confinement time. 4 figs.

  17. Dielectric nanostructures with high laser damage threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, C. Y.; Hong, L. Y.; Deng, J.; Khoo, E. H.; Liu, Z.; Wu, R. F.; Teng, J. H.

    2017-02-01

    Dielectric-based metamaterials are proposed to be the ideal candidates for low-loss, high-efficiency devices. However, to employ dielectric nanostructures for high-power applications, the dielectric material must have a high laser-induced damaged threshold (LIDT) value. In this work, we investigated the LIDT values of dielectric nanostructures for high-power fiber laser applications. Consequently, we found that the fabricated SiO2 nanostructured lens can withstand laser fluence exceeding 100 J/cm2.

  18. Factors affecting mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets

    PubMed Central

    Janczak, Andrew M; Ranheim, Birgit; Fosse, Torunn K; Hild, Sophie; Nordgreen, Janicke; Moe, Randi O; Zanella, Adroaldo J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the stability and repeatability of measures of mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets and to examine potentially confounding factors when using a hand held algometer. Study design Descriptive, prospective cohort. Animals Forty-four piglets from four litters, weighing 4.6 ± 1.0 kg (mean ± SD) at 2 weeks of age. Methods Mechanical thresholds were measured twice on each of 2 days during the first and second week of life. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures design to test the effects of behavior prior to testing, sex, week, day within week, and repetition within day. The effect of body weight and the interaction between piglet weight and behaviour were also tested. Piglet was entered into the model as a random effect as an additional test of repeatability. The effect of repeated testing was used to test the stability of measures. Pearson correlations between repeated measures were used to test the repeatability of measures. Variance component analysis was used to describe the variability in the data. Results Variance component analysis indicated that piglet explained only 17% of the variance in the data. All variables in the model (behaviour prior to testing, sex, week, day within week, repetition within day, body weight, the interaction between body weight and behaviour, piglet identity) except sex had a significant effect (p < 0.04 for all). Correlations between repeated measures increased from the first to the second week. Conclusions and Clinical relevance Repeatability was acceptable only during the second week of testing and measures changed with repeated testing and increased with increasing piglet weight, indicating that time (age) and animal body weight should be taken into account when measuring mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets. Mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds can be used both for testing the efficacy of anaesthetics and analgesics, and for assessing hyperalgesia in chronic pain states in research and

  19. Monolayer semiconductor nanocavity lasers with ultralow thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Sanfeng; Buckley, Sonia; Schaibley, John R.; Feng, Liefeng; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David G.; Hatami, Fariba; Yao, Wang; Vučković, Jelena; Majumdar, Arka; Xu, Xiaodong

    2015-03-16

    Engineering the electromagnetic environment of a nanoscale light emitter by a photonic cavity can significantly enhance its spontaneous emission rate through cavity quantum electrodynamics in the Purcell regime. This effect can greatly reduce the lasing threshold of the emitter1–5, providing the ultimate low-threshold laser system with small footprint, low power consumption and ultrafast modulation. A state-of-the-art ultra-low threshold nanolaser has been successfully developed though embedding quantum dots into photonic crystal cavity (PhCC)6–8. However, several core challenges impede the practical applications of this architecture, including the random positions and compositional fluctuations of the dots7, extreme difficulty in current injection8, and lack of compatibility with electronic circuits7,8. Here, we report a new strategy to lase, where atomically thin crystalline semiconductor, i.e., a tungsten-diselenide (WSe2) monolayer, is nondestructively and deterministically introduced as a gain medium at the surface of a pre-fabricated PhCC. A new type of continuous-wave nanolaser operating in the visible regime is achieved with an optical pumping threshold as low as 27 nW at 130 K, similar to the value achieved in quantum dot PhCC lasers7. The key to the lasing action lies in the monolayer nature of the gain medium, which confines direct-gap excitons to within 1 nm of the PhCC surface. The surface-gain geometry allows unprecedented accessibilities to multi-functionalize the gain, enabling electrically pumped operation. Our scheme is scalable and compatible with integrated photonics for on-chip optical communication technologies.

  20. Monolayer semiconductor nanocavity lasers with ultralow thresholds

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Sanfeng; Buckley, Sonia; Schaibley, John R.; ...

    2015-03-16

    Engineering the electromagnetic environment of a nanoscale light emitter by a photonic cavity can significantly enhance its spontaneous emission rate through cavity quantum electrodynamics in the Purcell regime. This effect can greatly reduce the lasing threshold of the emitter1–5, providing the ultimate low-threshold laser system with small footprint, low power consumption and ultrafast modulation. A state-of-the-art ultra-low threshold nanolaser has been successfully developed though embedding quantum dots into photonic crystal cavity (PhCC)6–8. However, several core challenges impede the practical applications of this architecture, including the random positions and compositional fluctuations of the dots7, extreme difficulty in current injection8, and lackmore » of compatibility with electronic circuits7,8. Here, we report a new strategy to lase, where atomically thin crystalline semiconductor, i.e., a tungsten-diselenide (WSe2) monolayer, is nondestructively and deterministically introduced as a gain medium at the surface of a pre-fabricated PhCC. A new type of continuous-wave nanolaser operating in the visible regime is achieved with an optical pumping threshold as low as 27 nW at 130 K, similar to the value achieved in quantum dot PhCC lasers7. The key to the lasing action lies in the monolayer nature of the gain medium, which confines direct-gap excitons to within 1 nm of the PhCC surface. The surface-gain geometry allows unprecedented accessibilities to multi-functionalize the gain, enabling electrically pumped operation. Our scheme is scalable and compatible with integrated photonics for on-chip optical communication technologies.« less

  1. Near threshold studies of photoelectron satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Heimann, P.A.

    1986-11-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation have been used to study correlation effects in the rare gases: He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. Two kinds of time-of-flight electron analyzers were employed to examine photoionization very close to threshold and at higher kinetic energies. Partial cross sections and angular distributions have been measured for a number of photoelectron satellites. The shake-off probability has been determined at some inner-shell resonances. 121 refs., 28 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. Threshold enhancement phenomena in Y(4260) decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Hai

    2014-04-01

    We investigate several strong and radiative decay modes of Y(4260), by assuming that Y(4260) either is a D1\\bar {D} molecular state, or has sizeable couplings with D0 \\bar {D}* and D1' \\bar {D}. In such ansatzes, obvious threshold enhancements or narrow cusp structures appear quite naturally without introducing a genuine resonance. And we emphasize that the radiative decay modes may be useful for studying D(*)\\bar {D}S-wave scattering.

  3. A threshold theory of the humor response.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Robert; Joker, Veronica R

    2007-01-01

    The humor response has long been considered mysterious, and it is given relatively little attention in modern experimental psychology, in spite of the fact that numerous studies suggest that it has substantial benefits for mood and health. Existing theories of humor fail to account for some of the most basic humor phenomena. On most occasions when a humor response occurs, certain verbal or visual stimuli (the "setup" stimuli, which function as an establishing operation) must precede a critical stimulus (such as a "punch line" or the final panel or critical feature of a cartoon), which then occasions a sudden "revelation" or "understanding"; this revelation is often accompanied by the humor response. We suggest that the setup stimuli increase the strength of the revelatory response to a point just below the threshold of awareness and that the critical stimulus, properly designed and timed, edges the revelatory response to a point just above threshold. We also suggest that it is this threshold phenomenon that produces most instances of the humor response. We discuss these issues in the context of some notable humor of Carl Rogers and B. F. Skinner.

  4. High-performance thresholding with adaptive equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Ka Po

    1998-09-01

    The ability to simplify an image whilst retaining such crucial information as shapes and geometric structures is of great importance for real-time image analysis applications. Here the technique of binary thresholding which reduces the image complexity has generally been regarded as one of the most valuable methods, primarily owing to its ease of design and analysis. This paper studies the state of developments in the field, and describes a radically different approach of adaptive thresholding. The latter employs the analytical technique of histogram normalization for facilitating an optimal `contrast level' of the image under consideration. A suitable criterion is also developed to determine the applicability of the adaptive processing procedure. In terms of performance and computational complexity, the proposed algorithm compares favorably to five established image thresholding methods selected for this study. Experimental results have shown that the new algorithm outperforms these methods in terms of a number of important errors measures, including a consistently low visual classification error performance. The simplicity of design of the algorithm also lends itself to efficient parallel implementations.

  5. Threshold control of chaotic neural network.

    PubMed

    He, Guoguang; Shrimali, Manish Dev; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    The chaotic neural network constructed with chaotic neurons exhibits rich dynamic behaviour with a nonperiodic associative memory. In the chaotic neural network, however, it is difficult to distinguish the stored patterns in the output patterns because of the chaotic state of the network. In order to apply the nonperiodic associative memory into information search, pattern recognition etc. it is necessary to control chaos in the chaotic neural network. We have studied the chaotic neural network with threshold activated coupling, which provides a controlled network with associative memory dynamics. The network converges to one of its stored patterns or/and reverse patterns which has the smallest Hamming distance from the initial state of the network. The range of the threshold applied to control the neurons in the network depends on the noise level in the initial pattern and decreases with the increase of noise. The chaos control in the chaotic neural network by threshold activated coupling at varying time interval provides controlled output patterns with different temporal periods which depend upon the control parameters.

  6. Threshold photodetachment spectroscopy of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kitsopoulos, T.N.

    1991-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with the development and application of high resolution threshold photodetachment spectroscopy of negative ions. Chapter I deals with the principles of our photodetachment technique, and in chapter II a detailed description of the apparatus is presented. The threshold photodetachment spectra of I{sup {minus}}, and SH{sup {minus}}, presented in the last sections of chapter II, indicated that a resolution of 3 cm{sup {minus}1} can be achieved using our technique. In chapter III the threshold photodetachment spectroscopy study of the transition state region of I + HI and I + Di reactions is discussed. Our technique probes the transition state region directly, and the results of our study are the first unambiguous observations of reactive resonances in a chemical reaction. Chapters IV, V and VI are concerned with the spectroscopy of small silicon and carbon clusters. From our spectra we were able to assign electronic state energies and vibrational frequencies for the low lying electronics states of Si{sub n} (n=2,3,4), C{sub 5} and their corresponding anions.

  7. Are there threshold numbers for protected forests?

    PubMed

    Bücking, Winfried

    2003-01-01

    Maintenance of forests biodiversity is intimately related on the one hand to the species and community-related ecological needs of flora and fauna living in the forest and on the other hand the disturbance regimes of the specific forest type. Populations of plants and animals need minimum biotopes for their ontogeny; for assuring their survival they depend on a minimum of connected suitable areas. Specific traits of forest types are based upon different disturbance regimes, ranging from small-scale internal processes (e.g. regeneration, growth, senescence, mortality, gap dynamics) generating normal forest cycles (i.e. regular sequences, e.g. regeneration, optimum, decay phases) to potentially chaotic and large-scale, frequently external, disturbances, e.g. fire, landslides, or beetle attacks. Forest protection may meet the needs of these very different demands by varied protected area networks going from small (>100 ha), medium (1000 ha) to large-scale reserves (National Parks, several thousands of ha). According to this triple protection concept not only graduated threshold numbers, but also threshold sizes and threshold areas for forest protection must be defined. To realize this concept the regional and local conditions (forest area, forest cover percentage, forest composition, socio-economic targets) must always be taken in consideration.

  8. Explaining the length threshold of polyglutamine aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Los Rios, Paolo; Hafner, Marc; Pastore, Annalisa

    2012-06-01

    The existence of a length threshold, of about 35 residues, above which polyglutamine repeats can give rise to aggregation and to pathologies, is one of the hallmarks of polyglutamine neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington’s disease. The reason why such a minimal length exists at all has remained one of the main open issues in research on the molecular origins of such classes of diseases. Following the seminal proposals of Perutz, most research has focused on the hunt for a special structure, attainable only above the minimal length, able to trigger aggregation. Such a structure has remained elusive and there is growing evidence that it might not exist at all. Here we review some basic polymer and statistical physics facts and show that the existence of a threshold is compatible with the modulation that the repeat length imposes on the association and dissociation rates of polyglutamine polypeptides to and from oligomers. In particular, their dramatically different functional dependence on the length rationalizes the very presence of a threshold and hints at the cellular processes that might be at play, in vivo, to prevent aggregation and the consequent onset of the disease.

  9. Anaerobic threshold measurements of elite oarsmen.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, T C; Hagerman, F C

    1982-01-01

    Anaerobic threshold (AT) and Vo2max were determined by automated analysis for 25 members of the 1980 U.S. Olympic Rowing Team during a progressive rowing ergometer exercise to exhaustion. Heart rates and power outputs were also measured to gauge severity of the exercise and to compare with metabolic data. Power increments of 27 W each min were achieved by progressively increasing the brake weight resistance on the ergometer while maintaining a stroke rate of 28-32 strokes/min and spinning the ergometer flywheel at 550 rpm. Anaerobic threshold measurements were determined by observing the onset of the non-linear relationship between Vo2 and VE-Vco2; plots of delta FEO2 and FECO2 were also utilized to confirm recorded AT's. A mean AT of 83% of Vo2max attests to the high aerobic capacity of oarsmen and supports previous research conducted with these subjects. Power output data indicated that 72% of total power is generated at AT; this substantiates previous energy cost data recorded during simulated rowing during which work was 70% aerobic and 30% anaerobic. High levels of anaerobic thresholds among oarsmen are attributed to the specific nature of training regimens that increase oxidative capacity of muscle fibers and significantly improve the cardiorespiratory transport system. Measurement of heart rate at AT has provided coaches and athletes an objective method of determining the intensity of training sessions.

  10. Density Threshold for Edge Poloidal Flow Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, N.; Ware, A. S.; Newman, D. E.; Hidalgo, C.

    2004-11-01

    A numerical transport model is used to examine a density threshold for the onset of an edge poloidal velocity shear layer in toroidal devices. This work is motivated by recent experimental results from the TJ-II stellarator which indicate a critical density threshold for the development of an edge poloidal velocity shear layer [1]. Edge shear-flow layers are commonly observed in toroidal confinement devices, even in L-mode discharges. The numerical transport model has been used to examine internal transport barriers and front propagation of internal transport barriers [2]. The transport model couples together density, ion temperature, electron temperature, poloidal flow, toroidal flow, radial electric field, and a fluctuation envelope equation which includes a shear-suppression factor. In this work, we present results from a series of cases using parameters that are typical of TJ-II discharges. The dependence of the critical density threshold on flow damping and Reynolds stress drive is investigated. [1] C. Hidalgo, M. A. Pedrosa, L. Garcia, and A. Ware, "Direct experimental evidence of coupling between sheared flows development and increasing in level of turbulence in the TJ-II stellarator", submitted to Phys. Rev. E. [2] D. E. Newman, B. A. Carreras, D. Lopez-Bruna, P. H. Diamond, and V. B. Lebedev, Phys. Plasmas 5, 938 (1998).

  11. A Threshold Theory of the Humor Response

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Robert; Joker, Veronica R

    2007-01-01

    The humor response has long been considered mysterious, and it is given relatively little attention in modern experimental psychology, in spite of the fact that numerous studies suggest that it has substantial benefits for mood and health. Existing theories of humor fail to account for some of the most basic humor phenomena. On most occasions when a humor response occurs, certain verbal or visual stimuli (the “setup” stimuli, which function as an establishing operation) must precede a critical stimulus (such as a “punch line” or the final panel or critical feature of a cartoon), which then occasions a sudden “revelation” or “understanding”; this revelation is often accompanied by the humor response. We suggest that the setup stimuli increase the strength of the revelatory response to a point just below the threshold of awareness and that the critical stimulus, properly designed and timed, edges the revelatory response to a point just above threshold. We also suggest that it is this threshold phenomenon that produces most instances of the humor response. We discuss these issues in the context of some notable humor of Carl Rogers and B. F. Skinner. PMID:22478488

  12. Threshold foraging behavior of baleen whales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatt, John F.; Methven, David A.

    1992-01-01

    We conducted hydroacoustic surveys for capelin Mallotus villosus in Witless Bay, Newfoundland, Canada, on 61 days during the summers of 1983 to 1985. On 32 of those days in whlch capelin surveys were conducted, we observed a total of 129 baleen whales - Including 93 humpback Megaptera novaeangliae, 31 minke Balaenoptera acutorostrata and 5 fin whales B. phvsalus. Although a few whales were observed when capelin schools were scarce, the majority (96%) of whales were observed when mean daily capelin densities exceeded 5 schools per linear km surveyed (range of means over 3 yr: 0.0 to 14.0 schools km-1). Plots of daily whale abundance (no. h-1 surveyed) vs daily capelin school density (mean no. schools km-1 surveyed) in each summer revealed that baleen whales have a threshold foraging response to capelin density. Thresholds were estimated using a simple itterative step-function model. Foraging thresholds of baleen whales (7.3, 5.0, and 5.8 schools km-1) varied between years in relation to the overall abundance of capelin schools in the study area during summer (means of 7.2, 3.3, and 5.3 schools km-1, respectively).

  13. Search for sub-threshold photoproduction of J/{psi} mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Bosted, P.; Chudakov, E.; Ent, R.; Gaskell, D.; Meekins, D. G.; Roche, J.; Wood, S. A.; Dunne, J.; Junnarkar, P.; Dutta, D.; Lee, C. A.; Dalton, M. M.; Strikman, M.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Navasardyan, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Christy, M. E.; Keppel, C. E.

    2009-01-15

    A search was made for sub-threshold J/{psi} production from a carbon target by using a mixed real and quasireal Bremsstrahlung photon beam with an endpoint energy of 5.76 GeV. No events were observed, which is consistent with predictions under the assumption of quasifree production. The results place limits on exotic mechanisms that strongly enhance quasifree production.

  14. Search for sub-threshold photoproduction of j/{Psi} mesons.

    SciTech Connect

    Bosted, P.; Dunne, J.; Lee, C. A.; Junnarkar, P.; Arrington, J.; Physics; Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Lab.; Mississippi State Univ.; Univ. of Witwatersrand

    2009-01-01

    A search was made for sub-threshold J/{psi} production from a carbon target by using a mixed real and quasireal Bremsstrahlung photon beam with an endpoint energy of 5.76 GeV. No events were observed, which is consistent with predictions under the assumption of quasifree production. The results place limits on exotic mechanisms that strongly enhance quasifree production.

  15. 77 FR 52252 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Inflation Adjustment of Threshold for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... Regulation Supplement: Inflation Adjustment of Threshold for Acquisition of Right-Hand Drive Passenger Sedans... acquisition of right-hand drive passenger sedans. DATES: Effective Date: August 29, 2012. FOR FURTHER... adjusted the dollar limitation on the acquisition of right-hand drive passenger sedans from $30,000...

  16. Designing and Teaching Business & Society Courses from a Threshold Concept Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidal, Natalia; Smith, Renae; Spetic, Wellington

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the redesign of an undergraduate course in Business & Society using a threshold concept approach. Business & Society courses may be troublesome for students because they depart from the premise that business is limited to creating value for shareholders. We argue that Business & Society courses contain a web of…

  17. Error channels and the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastin, Bryan

    The threshold for fault-tolerant quantum computation depends on the available resources, including knowledge about the error model. I investigate the utility of such knowledge by designing a fault-tolerant procedure tailored to a restricted stochastic Pauli channel and studying the corresponding threshold for quantum computation. Surprisingly, I find that tailoring yields, at best, modest gains in the threshold, while substantial losses occur for error models only marginally different from the assumed channel. This result is shown to derive from the fact that the ancillae used in threshold estimation are of exceedingly high quality and, thus, difficult to improve upon. Motivated by this discovery, I propose a tractable algebraic algorithm for predicting the outcome of threshold estimates, one which approximates ancillae as having independent and identically distributed errors on their constituent qubits. In the limit of an infinitely large code, the algorithm simplifies tremendously, yielding a rigorous threshold bound given the availability of ancillae with i.i.d. errors. I use this bound as a metric to judge the relative performance of various fault-tolerant procedures in combination with different error models. Modest gains in the threshold are observed for certain restricted error models, and, for the assumed ancillae, Knill's fault-tolerant method is found to be superior to that of Steane. My algorithm generally yields high threshold bounds, reflecting the computational value of large, low-error ancillae. In an effort to render these bounds achievable, I develop a novel procedure for directly constructing large ancillae. Numerically, the scaling and average error properties of this procedure are found to be encouraging, and, though it is not fault-tolerant, I prove that each error can spread to only one additional location. Promising means of improving the ancillae are proposed, and I discuss briefly the challenges associated with preparing the cat states

  18. Evaluation of different methods for determining growing degree-day thresholds in apricot cultivars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruml, Mirjana; Vuković, Ana; Milatović, Dragan

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine different methods for determining growing degree-day (GDD) threshold temperatures for two phenological stages (full bloom and harvest) and select the optimal thresholds for a greater number of apricot ( Prunus armeniaca L.) cultivars grown in the Belgrade region. A 10-year data series were used to conduct the study. Several commonly used methods to determine the threshold temperatures from field observation were evaluated: (1) the least standard deviation in GDD; (2) the least standard deviation in days; (3) the least coefficient of variation in GDD; (4) regression coefficient; (5) the least standard deviation in days with a mean temperature above the threshold; (6) the least coefficient of variation in days with a mean temperature above the threshold; and (7) the smallest root mean square error between the observed and predicted number of days. In addition, two methods for calculating daily GDD, and two methods for calculating daily mean air temperatures were tested to emphasize the differences that can arise by different interpretations of basic GDD equation. The best agreement with observations was attained by method (7). The lower threshold temperature obtained by this method differed among cultivars from -5.6 to -1.7°C for full bloom, and from -0.5 to 6.6°C for harvest. However, the “Null” method (lower threshold set to 0°C) and “Fixed Value” method (lower threshold set to -2°C for full bloom and to 3°C for harvest) gave very good results. The limitations of the widely used method (1) and methods (5) and (6), which generally performed worst, are discussed in the paper.

  19. Evaluation of different methods for determining growing degree-day thresholds in apricot cultivars.

    PubMed

    Ruml, Mirjana; Vuković, Ana; Milatović, Dragan

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine different methods for determining growing degree-day (GDD) threshold temperatures for two phenological stages (full bloom and harvest) and select the optimal thresholds for a greater number of apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) cultivars grown in the Belgrade region. A 10-year data series were used to conduct the study. Several commonly used methods to determine the threshold temperatures from field observation were evaluated: (1) the least standard deviation in GDD; (2) the least standard deviation in days; (3) the least coefficient of variation in GDD; (4) regression coefficient; (5) the least standard deviation in days with a mean temperature above the threshold; (6) the least coefficient of variation in days with a mean temperature above the threshold; and (7) the smallest root mean square error between the observed and predicted number of days. In addition, two methods for calculating daily GDD, and two methods for calculating daily mean air temperatures were tested to emphasize the differences that can arise by different interpretations of basic GDD equation. The best agreement with observations was attained by method (7). The lower threshold temperature obtained by this method differed among cultivars from -5.6 to -1.7 degrees C for full bloom, and from -0.5 to 6.6 degrees C for harvest. However, the "Null" method (lower threshold set to 0 degrees C) and "Fixed Value" method (lower threshold set to -2 degrees C for full bloom and to 3 degrees C for harvest) gave very good results. The limitations of the widely used method (1) and methods (5) and (6), which generally performed worst, are discussed in the paper.

  20. Oil-in-Water Emulsion Exhibits Bitterness-Suppressing Effects in a Sensory Threshold Study.

    PubMed

    Torrico, Damir Dennis; Sae-Eaw, Amporn; Sriwattana, Sujinda; Boeneke, Charles; Prinyawiwatkul, Witoon

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about how emulsion characteristics affect saltiness/bitterness perception. Sensory detection and recognition thresholds of NaCl, caffeine, and KCl in aqueous solution compared with oil-in-water emulsion systems were evaluated. For emulsions, NaCl, KCl, or caffeine were dissolved in water + emulsifier and mixed with canola oil (20% by weight). Two emulsions were prepared: emulsion 1 (viscosity = 257 cP) and emulsion 2 (viscosity = 59 cP). The forced-choice ascending concentration series method of limits (ASTM E-679-04) was used to determine detection and/or recognition thresholds at 25 °C. Group best estimate threshold (GBET) geometric means were expressed as g/100 mL. Comparing NaCl with KCl, there were no significant differences in detection GBET values for all systems (0.0197 - 0.0354). For saltiness recognition thresholds, KCl GBET values were higher compared with NaCl GBET (0.0822 - 0.1070 compared with 0.0471 - 0.0501). For NaCl and KCl, emulsion 1 and/or emulsion 2 did not significantly affect the saltiness recognition threshold compared with that of the aqueous solution. However, the bitterness recognition thresholds of caffeine and KCl in solution were significantly lower than in the emulsions (0.0242 - 0.0586 compared with 0.0754 - 0.1025). Gender generally had a marginal effect on threshold values. This study showed that, compared with the aqueous solutions, emulsions did not significantly affect the saltiness recognition threshold of NaCl and KCl, but exhibited bitterness-suppressing effects on KCl and/or caffeine.

  1. A simple and valid method to determine thermoregulatory sweating threshold and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Bearden, Shawn E; Kenefick, Robert W; Ely, Brett R; Degroot, David W; Sawka, Michael N; Montain, Scott J

    2009-07-01

    Sweating threshold temperature and sweating sensitivity responses are measured to evaluate thermoregulatory control. However, analytic approaches vary, and no standardized methodology has been validated. This study validated a simple and standardized method, segmented linear regression (SReg), for determination of sweating threshold temperature and sensitivity. Archived data were extracted for analysis from studies in which local arm sweat rate (m(sw); ventilated dew-point temperature sensor) and esophageal temperature (T(es)) were measured under a variety of conditions. The relationship m(sw)/T(es) from 16 experiments was analyzed by seven experienced raters (Rater), using a variety of empirical methods, and compared against SReg for the determination of sweating threshold temperature and sweating sensitivity values. Individual interrater differences (n = 324 comparisons) and differences between Rater and SReg (n = 110 comparisons) were evaluated within the context of biologically important limits of magnitude (LOM) via a modified Bland-Altman approach. The average Rater and SReg outputs for threshold temperature and sensitivity were compared (n = 16) using inferential statistics. Rater employed a very diverse set of criteria to determine the sweating threshold temperature and sweating sensitivity for the 16 data sets, but interrater differences were within the LOM for 95% (threshold) and 73% (sensitivity) of observations, respectively. Differences between mean Rater and SReg were within the LOM 90% (threshold) and 83% (sensitivity) of the time, respectively. Rater and SReg were not different by conventional t-test (P > 0.05). SReg provides a simple, valid, and standardized way to determine sweating threshold temperature and sweating sensitivity values for thermoregulatory studies.

  2. Threshold Sensitivity of the Mid-IR Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, S. E.; Gavrilov, G. A.; Kapralov, A. A.; Sotnikova, G. Yu.

    The report presents expected threshold characteristics of photosensors based on uncooled mid-infrared (2-5 μm) A3B5 photodiodes characterized by a fast response time (tens of ns) and high detectivity (10-10-10-11 W / cm2√Hz), but low (from few Ω to kΩ) shunt resistance. The calculations are based on the noise analysis of the sensors using various types of photodiodes and operational amplifiers. The proposed "vector" noise description method was used to optimize the A3B5 sensor design elements and to estimate the value of their threshold sensitivity at the required speed of operation. As an example of promising A3B5 sensor application in the measurement technologies, the metrological characteristics of these sensors estimated for infrared thermometry (pyrometric sensors) are presented. It is shown that they are superior to known analogues in the low temperature detection limit (from 0 °C) and high response time (a few microseconds), while maintaining the high accuracy (at 1%) at low temperatures.

  3. Multiple seeds sensitivity using a single seed with threshold.

    PubMed

    Egidi, Lavinia; Manzini, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    Spaced seeds are a fundamental tool for similarity search in biosequences. The best sensitivity/selectivity trade-offs are obtained using many seeds simultaneously: This is known as the multiple seed approach. Unfortunately, spaced seeds use a large amount of memory and the available RAM is a practical limit to the number of seeds one can use simultaneously. Inspired by some recent results on lossless seeds, we revisit the approach of using a single spaced seed and considering two regions homologous if the seed hits in at least t sufficiently close positions. We show that by choosing the locations of the don't care symbols in the seed using quadratic residues modulo a prime number, we derive single seeds that when used with a threshold t > 1 have competitive sensitivity/selectivity trade-offs, indeed close to the best multiple seeds known in the literature. In addition, the choice of the threshold t can be adjusted to modify sensitivity and selectivity a posteriori, thus enabling a more accurate search in the specific instance at issue. The seeds we propose also exhibit robustness and allow flexibility in usage.

  4. Thermal thresholds of the predatory mite Balaustium hernandezi

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, Megan R; Bale, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    The lower and upper thermal activity thresholds of adult and larval Balaustium hernandezi von Heyden (Acari: Erythraeidae) are compared with those of its prey Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae). Adult female B. hernandezi retain ambulatory function (CTmin) and movement of appendages (chill coma) at significantly lower temperatures (5.9 and −2.1 °C, respectively) than those of larval B. hernandezi (8.1 and −1.7 °C) and T. urticae (10.6 and 10.3 °C). There is no significant difference between the temperature at which adult and larval B. hernandezi and T. urticae cease walking as the temperature is raised (CTmax) (46.7, 46.3 and 47.3 °C, respectively). However, both life stages of B. hernandezi cease movement (heat coma) below the upper locomotory limits of T. urticae (46.8, 46.7 and 48.7 °C, respectively). Adult B. hernandezi have significantly faster walking speeds than larvae and T. urticae across a range of temperatures. The lower thermal activity threshold data indicate that B. hernandezi would make an effective biological control agent in temperate climates; however, the extent of the low temperature tolerances of the species suggests the potential to establish in a northern European climate. PMID:26279601

  5. Pressure Systems Stored-Energy Threshold Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, Samuel S.

    2009-08-25

    Federal Regulation 10 CFR 851, which became effective February 2007, brought to light potential weaknesses regarding the Pressure Safety Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The definition of a pressure system in 10 CFR 851 does not contain a limit based upon pressure or any other criteria. Therefore, the need for a method to determine an appropriate risk-based hazard level for pressure safety was identified. The Laboratory has historically used a stored energy of 1000 lbf-ft to define a pressure hazard; however, an analytical basis for this value had not been documented. This document establishes the technical basis by evaluating the use of stored energy as an appropriate criterion to establish a pressure hazard, exploring a suitable risk threshold for pressure hazards, and reviewing the methods used to determine stored energy. The literature review and technical analysis concludes the use of stored energy as a method for determining a potential risk, the 1000 lbf-ft threshold, and the methods used by PNNL to calculate stored energy are all appropriate. Recommendations for further program improvements are also discussed

  6. Collective Treatment of High Energy Thresholds in SUSY GUT's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsikatsou, A.

    Supersymmetric GUT's are the most natural extension of the Standard Model unifying electroweak and strong forces. Despite their indubitable virtues, among these the gauge coupling unification and the quantization of the electric charge, one of their shortcomings is the large number of parameters used to describe the high energy thresholds, which are hard to handle. We present a new method according to which the effects of the high energy thresholds, in any GUT model, can be described by fewer parameters that are randomly produced from the original set of the parameters of the model. In this way, regions favored by the experimental data are easier to locate, avoiding a detailed and time-consuming exploration of the parameter space, which is multidimensional even in the most economic unifying schemes. To check the efficiency of this method, we directly apply it to a SUSY SO(10) GUT model in which the doublet-triplet splitting is realized through the Dimopoulos-Wilczek mechanism. We show that the demand of gauge coupling unification, in conjunction with precision data, locates regions of the parameter space in which values of the strong coupling αstrong are within the experimental limits, along with a suppressed nucleon decay, mediated by a higgsino driven dimension five operators, yielding lifetimes that are comfortably above the current experimental bounds. These regions open up for values of the SUSY breaking parameters m0, M1/2 < 1 TeV being therefore accessible to LHC.

  7. Distortion of power law blinking with binning and thresholding

    SciTech Connect

    Amecke, Nicole; Heber, André; Cichos, Frank

    2014-03-21

    Fluorescence intermittency is a random switching between emitting (on) and non-emitting (off) periods found for many single chromophores such as semiconductor quantum dots and organic molecules. The statistics of the duration of on- and off-periods are commonly determined by thresholding the emission time trace of a single chromophore and appear to be power law distributed. Here we test with the help of simulations if the experimentally determined power law distributions can actually reflect the underlying statistics. We find that with the experimentally limited time resolution real power law statistics with exponents α{sub on/off} ≳ 1.6, especially if α{sub on} ≠ α{sub off} would not be observed as such in the experimental data after binning and thresholding. Instead, a power law appearance could simply be obtained from the continuous distribution of intermediate intensity levels. This challenges much of the obtained data and the models describing the so-called power law blinking.

  8. Critical dynamics of randomly assembled and diluted threshold networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürten, Karl E.; Clark, John W.

    2008-04-01

    The dynamical behavior of a class of randomly assembled networks of binary threshold units subject to random deletion of connections is studied based on the annealed approximation suitable in the thermodynamic limit. The dynamical phase diagram is constructed for several forms of the probability density distribution of nonvanishing connection strengths. The family of power-law distribution functions ρ0(x)=(1-α)/(2|x|α) is found to play a special role in expanding the domain of stable, ordered dynamics at the expense of the disordered, “chaotic” phase. Relationships with other recent studies of the dynamics of complex networks allowing for variable in-degree of the units are explored. The relevance of the pruning of network connections to neural modeling and developmental neurobiology is discussed.

  9. Percutaneously injectable fetal pacemaker: electronics, pacing thresholds, and power budget.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Adriana; Chmait, Ramen; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Zheng, Kaihui; Loeb, Gerald E

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a cardiac pacemaker that is designed to be implanted percutaneously into a fetus to treat complete heart block and consequent hydrops fetalis, which is otherwise fatal. One of the most significant considerations for this device is the technical challenges presented by the battery and charging system. The size of the device is limited to about 3 mm in diameter; batteries on this scale have very small charge capacities. The smaller capacity means that the device needs to be designed so that it uses as little current as possible and so that its battery can be recharged wirelessly. We determined the pacing thresholds for a simple relaxation oscillator that can be assembled from discrete, surface mount components and analyzed the power consumption of the device given different electrode configurations and stimulus parameters. An inductive recharging system will be required for some patients; it is feasible within the package constraints and under development.

  10. Commensal bacteria calibrate the activation threshold of innate antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael C; Osborne, Lisa C; Monticelli, Laurel A; Doering, Travis A; Alenghat, Theresa; Sonnenberg, Gregory F; Paley, Michael A; Antenus, Marcelo; Williams, Katie L; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E John; Artis, David

    2012-07-27

    Signals from commensal bacteria can influence immune cell development and susceptibility to infectious or inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms by which commensal bacteria regulate protective immunity after exposure to systemic pathogens remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that antibiotic-treated (ABX) mice exhibit impaired innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses and substantially delayed viral clearance after exposure to systemic LCMV or mucosal influenza virus. Furthermore, ABX mice exhibited severe bronchiole epithelial degeneration and increased host mortality after influenza virus infection. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of macrophages isolated from ABX mice revealed decreased expression of genes associated with antiviral immunity. Moreover, macrophages from ABX mice exhibited defective responses to type I and type II IFNs and impaired capacity to limit viral replication. Collectively, these data indicate that commensal-derived signals provide tonic immune stimulation that establishes the activation threshold of the innate immune system required for optimal antiviral immunity.

  11. Commensal Bacteria Calibrate the Activation Threshold of Innate Antiviral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Michael C.; Osborne, Lisa C.; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Doering, Travis A.; Alenghat, Theresa; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Paley, Michael A.; Antenus, Marcelo; Williams, Katie L.; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E. John; Artis, David

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Signals from commensal bacteria can influence immune cell development and susceptibility to infectious or inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms by which commensal bacteria regulate protective immunity after exposure to systemic pathogens remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that antibiotic-treated (ABX) mice exhibit impaired innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses and substantially delayed viral clearance after exposure to systemic LCMV or mucosal influenza virus. Furthermore, ABX mice exhibited severe bronchiole epithelial degeneration and increased host mortality after influenza virus infection. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of macrophages isolated from ABX mice revealed decreased expression of genes associated with antiviral immunity. Moreover, macrophages from ABX mice exhibited defective responses to type I and type II IFNs and impaired capacity to limit viral replication. Collectively, these data indicate that commensal-derived signals provide tonic immune stimulation that establishes the activation threshold of the innate immune system required for optimal antiviral immunity. PMID:22705104

  12. Existence of a light intensity threshold for photoconversion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg, B.A.; Nozik, A.J. )

    1993-12-23

    Two models of the mechanism of photoinduced electron transfer at semiconductor surfaces have long been differentiated by their prediction, or their denial, of the existence of a light intensity threshold for fuel-forming photoconversion processes. We attempt to clarify this problem by making a distinction between two possible types of thresholds: a threshold for incipient product formation and a threshold for product formation in a specified state, such as its standard state. A light intensity threshold for incipient product formation appears to be forbidden by molecular electron-transfer theory and has apparently never been observed. Conversely, a light intensity threshold for product formation in its standard state must always occur, simply because the product concentration must first build up from its equilibrium value to its standard-state value. Since the former threshold is forbidden, while the latter is unavoidable, the existence of a threshold cannot be used to distinguish between the models. 20 refs.

  13. Threshold concepts: implications for the management of natural resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Gross, John

    2014-01-01

    Threshold concepts can have broad relevance in natural resource management. However, the concept of ecological thresholds has not been widely incorporated or adopted in management goals. This largely stems from the uncertainty revolving around threshold levels and the post hoc analyses that have generally been used to identify them. Natural resource managers have a need for new tools and approaches that will help them assess the existence and detection of conditions that demand management actions. Recognition of additional threshold concepts include: utility thresholds (which are based on human values about ecological systems) and decision thresholds (which reflect management objectives and values and include ecological knowledge about a system) as well as ecological thresholds. All of these concepts provide a framework for considering the use of threshold concepts in natural resource decision making.

  14. Category 3 threshold quantities for hazard categorization of nonreactor facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mandigo, R.L.

    1996-02-13

    This document provides the information necessary to determine Hazard Category 3 threshold quantities for those isotopes of interest not listed in WHC-CM-4-46, Section 4, Table 1.''Threshold Quantities.''

  15. Thresholds of cat cochlear nucleus neurons to microwave pulses.

    PubMed

    Seaman, R L; Lebovitz, R M

    1989-01-01

    Action potentials of neurons in cat dorsal and posteroventral cochlear nuclei were recorded extracellularly with glass microelectrodes while the head of the cat was exposed to microwave pulses at 915 MHz using a diathermy applicator. Response thresholds to acoustic tones, acoustic clicks, and microwave pulses were determined for auditory units with characteristic frequencies (CFs) from 278 Hz to 39.2 kHz. Tests with pulsatile stimuli were performed for durations of 20-700 mus, principally 20, 70, and 200 mus. Brainstem midline specific absorption rate (SAR) threshold was as small as 11.1 mW/g per pulse, and specific absorption (SA) threshold was a small as 0.6 muJ/g per pulse. Microwave thresholds were generally lower for CF less than 9 kHz, as were most acoustic thresholds. However, microwave threshold was only weakly related to click threshold and CF-tone threshold of each unit.

  16. Intrashell Electron-Interaction-Mediated Photoformation of Hollow Atoms near Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huotari, S.; Hämäläinen, K.; Diamant, R.; Sharon, R.; Kao, C. C.; Deutsch, M.

    2008-07-01

    Double photoionization (DPI) of an atom by a single photon is a direct consequence of electron-electron interactions within the atom. We have measured the evolution of the K-shell DPI from threshold up in transition metals by high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy of the Khα hypersatellites, photoexcited by monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The measured evolution of the single-to-double photoionization cross-section ratio with excitation energy was found to be universal. Theoretical fits suggest that near threshold DPI is predominantly a semiclassical knockout effect, rather than the purely quantum-mechanical shake-off observed at the infinite photon energy limit.

  17. Wafer plane inspection with soft resist thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Carl; Shi, Rui-fang; Wihl, Mark; Xiong, Yalin; Pang, Song

    2008-10-01

    Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is an inspection mode on the KLA-Tencor TeraScaTM platform that uses the high signalto- noise ratio images from the high numerical aperture microscope, and then models the entire lithographic process to enable defect detection on the wafer plane[1]. This technology meets the needs of some advanced mask manufacturers to identify the lithographically-significant defects while ignoring the other non-lithographically-significant defects. WPI accomplishes this goal by performing defect detection based on a modeled image of how the mask features would actually print in the photoresist. There are several advantages to this approach: (1) the high fidelity of the images provide a sensitivity advantage over competing approaches; (2) the ability to perform defect detection on the wafer plane allows one to only see those defects that have a printing impact on the wafer; (3) the use of modeling on the lithographic portion of the flow enables unprecedented flexibility to support arbitrary illumination profiles, process-window inspection in unit time, and combination modes to find both printing and non-printing defects. WPI is proving to be a valuable addition to the KLA-Tencor detection algorithm suite. The modeling portion of WPI uses a single resist threshold as the final step in the processing. This has been shown to be adequate on several advanced customer layers, but is not ideal for all layers. Actual resist chemistry has complicated processes including acid and base-diffusion and quench that are not consistently well-modeled with a single resist threshold. We have considered the use of an advanced resist model for WPI, but rejected it because the burdensome requirements for the calibration of the model were not practical for reticle inspection. This paper describes an alternative approach that allows for a "soft" resist threshold to be applied that provides a more robust solution for the most challenging processes. This approach is just

  18. Threshold hypothesis revisited in the global perspective.

    PubMed

    Lin, W L

    1984-03-01

    International cross-sectional data for 1975 were used to examine the relationship between fertility and socioeconomic development in 116 developing countries. The choice of countries was based primarily on the availability of data on some major development indicators. These 116 countries account for about 98% of world population, with the exclusion of mainland China. The study included 34 economically more developed countries and 82 economically less developed countries. Countries more developed included 27 developed market countries, 6 centrally planned economies of Eastern Europe, and the USSR. The less developed countries included in this study have market economies with the exception of Viet Nam, which has a centrally planned economy. The 18 development indicators were classified into 3 categories: 8 demographic indicators; 8 social indicators; and 2 economic indicators. This study tests 1 aspect of the relationship between fertility decline and socioeconomic development, i.e., the threshold hypothesis. The central point of this hypothesis is that fertility levels resist forces tending towards a decline until a certain level of development is achieved. Beyond this point, fertility eventually will fall to a relatively low level. The evidence suggests that changes in levels of development variables may have little impact on the level of fertility in countries of the high fertility group, but fertility levels are related to development variables in the medium and low fertility group. The results conform with the threshold hypothesis. The regression results generally are consistent with the conclusion of past studies and support the recommendation that development policy should consider the effects of development variables such as education and health on fertility change rather than continuing to treat the fertility change as an exogenous variable in the development process. The study results are consistent with the hypothesis that specific socioeconomic

  19. An Activation Threshold Model for Response Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Hayley J.; McMorland, Angus J. C.; Stinear, Cathy M.; Coxon, James P.; Byblow, Winston D.

    2017-01-01

    Reactive response inhibition (RI) is the cancellation of a prepared response when it is no longer appropriate. Selectivity of RI can be examined by cueing the cancellation of one component of a prepared multi-component response. This substantially delays execution of other components. There is debate regarding whether this response delay is due to a selective neural mechanism. Here we propose a computational activation threshold model (ATM) and test it against a classical “horse-race” model using behavioural and neurophysiological data from partial RI experiments. The models comprise both facilitatory and inhibitory processes that compete upstream of motor output regions. Summary statistics (means and standard deviations) of predicted muscular and neurophysiological data were fit in both models to equivalent experimental measures by minimizing a Pearson Chi-square statistic. The ATM best captured behavioural and neurophysiological dynamics of partial RI. The ATM demonstrated that the observed modulation of corticomotor excitability during partial RI can be explained by nonselective inhibition of the prepared response. The inhibition raised the activation threshold to a level that could not be reached by the original response. This was necessarily followed by an additional phase of facilitation representing a secondary activation process in order to reach the new inhibition threshold and initiate the executed component of the response. The ATM offers a mechanistic description of the neural events underlying RI, in which partial movement cancellation results from a nonselective inhibitory event followed by subsequent initiation of a new response. The ATM provides a framework for considering and exploring the neuroanatomical constraints that underlie RI. PMID:28085907

  20. Threshold Barrier of Carbon Nanotube Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qinghong; Hu, Hong; Ding, Feng

    2011-10-01

    A previously overlooked step of carbon nanotube (CNT) growth, incorporating C atoms into the CNT wall through the CNT-catalyst interface, is studied by density functional theory calculations. A significant barrier for incorporating C atoms into the CNT wall (˜2eV for most used catalysts, Fe, Co, and Ni) is revealed and the incorporation can be the threshold step of CNT growth in most experiments. In addition, the temperature dependent CNT growth rate is calculated and our calculation demonstrates that growing 0.1-1 m long CNTs in 1 h is theoretically possible.

  1. Learning regulatory programs by threshold SVD regression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Xiao, Luo; Wong, Wing Hung

    2014-11-04

    We formulate a statistical model for the regulation of global gene expression by multiple regulatory programs and propose a thresholding singular value decomposition (T-SVD) regression method for learning such a model from data. Extensive simulations demonstrate that this method offers improved computational speed and higher sensitivity and specificity over competing approaches. The method is used to analyze microRNA (miRNA) and long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium. The analysis yields previously unidentified insights into the combinatorial regulation of gene expression by noncoding RNAs, as well as findings that are supported by evidence from the literature.

  2. Dynamic model of the threshold displacement energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupchishin, A. I.; Kupchishin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A dynamic (cascade-probability) model for calculating the threshold displacement energy of knocked-out atoms (Ed) was proposed taking into account the influence of the instability zone (spontaneous recombination). General expression was recorded for Ed depending on the formation energy of interstitial atoms Ef and vacancies Ei, on the energy transfer coefficient α and the number of interactions i needed to move the atom out of the instability zone. The parameters of primary particles were calculated. Comparison of calculations with experimental data gives a satisfactory agreement.

  3. Level reduction and the quantum threshold theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliferis, Panagiotis (Panos)

    Computers have led society to the information age revolutionizing central aspects of our lives from production and communication to education and entertainment. There exist, however, important problems which are intractable with the computers available today and, experience teaches us, will remain so even with the more advanced computers we can envision for tomorrow.Quantum computers promise speedups to some of these important but classically intractable problems. Simulating physical systems, a problem of interest in a diverse range of areas from testing physical theories to understanding chemical reactions, and solving number factoring, a problem at the basis of cryptographic protocols that are used widely today on the internet, are examples of applications for which quantum computers, when built, will offer a great advantage over what is possible with classical computer technology.The construction of a quantum computer of sufficient scale to solve interesting problems is, however, especially challenging. The reason for this is that, by its very nature, operating a quantum computer will require the coherent control of the quantum state of a very large number of particles. Fortunately, the theory of quantum error correction and fault-tolerant quantum computation gives us confidence that such quantum states can be created, can be stored in memory and can also be manipulated provided the quantum computer can be isolated to a sufficient degree from sources of noise.One of the central results in the theory of fault-tolerant quantum computation, the quantum threshold theorem shows that a noisy quantum computer can accurately and efficiently simulate any ideal quantum computation provided that noise is weakly correlated and its strength is below a critical value known as the quantum accuracy threshold. This thesis provides a simpler and more transparent non-inductive proof of this theorem based on the concept of level reduction. This concept is also used in proving the

  4. Technology Thresholds for Microgravity: Status and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    The technological and economic thresholds for microgravity space research are estimated in materials science and biotechnology. In the 1990s, the improvement of materials processing has been identified as a national scientific priority, particularly for stimulating entrepreneurship. The substantial US investment at stake in these critical technologies includes six broad categories: aerospace, transportation, health care, information, energy, and the environment. Microgravity space research addresses key technologies in each area. The viability of selected space-related industries is critically evaluated and a market share philosophy is developed, namely that incremental improvements in a large markets efficiency is a tangible reward from space-based research.

  5. Automatic DarkAdaptation Threshold Detection Algorithm.

    PubMed

    G de Azevedo, Dario; Helegda, Sergio; Glock, Flavio; Russomano, Thais

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an algorithm used to automatically determine the threshold sensitivity in a new dark adaptometer. The new instrument is controlled by a personal computer and can be used in the investigation of several retinal diseases. The stimulus field is delivered to the eye through the modified optics of a fundus camera. An automated light stimulus source was developed to operate together with this fundus camera. New control parameters were developed in this instrument to improve the traditional Goldmann-Weekers dark adaptometer.

  6. User Settings of Cue Thresholds for Binary Categorization Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botzer, Assaf; Meyer, Joachim; Bak, Peter; Parmet, Yisrael

    2010-01-01

    The output of binary cuing systems, such as alerts or alarms, depends on the threshold setting--a parameter that is often user-adjustable. However, it is unknown if users are able to adequately adjust thresholds and what information may help them to do so. Two experiments tested threshold settings for a binary classification task based on binary…

  7. Static and Transient Cavitation Threshold Measurements for Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Moraga, F.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    Transient and static cavitation thresholds for mercury as a function of the cover gas (helium or air), and pressure are reported. Both static and transient cavitation onset pressure thresholds increase linearly with cover gas pressure. Additionally, the cavitation thresholds as a function of dissolved gases were also measured and are reported.

  8. Threshold Capability Development in Intensive Mode Business Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crispin, Stuart; Hancock, Phil; Male, Sally Amanda; Baillie, Caroline; MacNish, Cara; Leggoe, Jeremy; Ranmuthugala, Dev; Alam, Firoz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore: student perceptions of threshold concepts and capabilities in postgraduate business education, and the potential impacts of intensive modes of teaching on student understanding of threshold concepts and development of threshold capabilities. Design/Methodology/Approach: The student experience of…

  9. Age Limits.

    PubMed

    Antfolk, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Whereas women of all ages prefer slightly older sexual partners, men-regardless of their age-have a preference for women in their 20s. Earlier research has suggested that this difference between the sexes' age preferences is resolved according to women's preferences. This research has not, however, sufficiently considered that the age range of considered partners might change over the life span. Here we investigated the age limits (youngest and oldest) of considered and actual sex partners in a population-based sample of 2,655 adults (aged 18-50 years). Over the investigated age span, women reported a narrower age range than men and women tended to prefer slightly older men. We also show that men's age range widens as they get older: While they continue to consider sex with young women, men also consider sex with women their own age or older. Contrary to earlier suggestions, men's sexual activity thus reflects also their own age range, although their potential interest in younger women is not likely converted into sexual activity. Compared to homosexual men, bisexual and heterosexual men were more unlikely to convert young preferences into actual behavior, supporting female-choice theory.

  10. Theoretical model for FCGR near the threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanteigne, Jacques; Baïlon, Jean-Paul

    1981-03-01

    A theoretical model for fatigue crack growth rate at low and near threshold stress intensity factor is developed. The crack tip is assumed to be a semicircular notch of radius ρ and incremental crack growth occurs along a distance 4ρ ahead of the crack tip. After analysis of the stress and strain distribution ahead of the crack tip, a relationship between the strain range and the stress intensity range is proposed. It is then assumed that Manson-Coffin cumulative rule can be applied to a region of length 4ρ from the crack tip, where strain reversal occurs. Finally, a theoretical equation giving the fatigue crack growth rate is obtained and applied to several materials (316L stainless steel, 300M alloy steel, 70-30 α brass, 2618A and 7025 aluminum alloys). It is found that the model can be used to correlate fatigue crack growth rates with the mechanical properties of the materials, and to determine the threshold stress intensity factor, once the crack tip radius α is obtained from the previous data.

  11. Granular motions near the threshold of entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Alexakis, athanasios-Theodosios

    2016-04-01

    Our society is continuously impacted by significant weather events many times resulting in catastrophes that interrupt our normal way of life. In the context of climate change and increasing urbanisation these "extreme" hydrologic events are intensified both in magnitude and frequency, inducing costs of the order of billions of pounds. The vast majority of such costs and impacts (even more to developed societies) are due to water related catastrophes such as the geomorphic action of flowing water (including scouring of critical infrastructure, bed and bank destabilisation) and flooding. New tools and radically novel concepts are in need, to enable our society becoming more resilient. This presentation, emphasises the utility of inertial sensors in gaining new insights on the interaction of flow hydrodynamics with the granular surface at the particle scale and for near threshold flow conditions. In particular, new designs of the "smart-sphere" device are discussed with focus on the purpose specific sets of flume experiments, designed to identify the exact response of the particle resting at the bed surface for various below, near and above threshold flow conditions. New sets of measurements are presented for particle entrainment from a Lagrangian viewpoint. Further to finding direct application in addressing real world challenges in the water sector, it is shown that such novel sensor systems can also help the research community (both experimentalists and computational modellers) gain a better insight on the underlying processes governing granular dynamics.

  12. An Adaptive Threshold in Mammalian Neocortical Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kalinka, Alex T.; Tomancak, Pavel; Huttner, Wieland B.

    2014-01-01

    Expansion of the neocortex is a hallmark of human evolution. However, determining which adaptive mechanisms facilitated its expansion remains an open question. Here we show, using the gyrencephaly index (GI) and other physiological and life-history data for 102 mammalian species, that gyrencephaly is an ancestral mammalian trait. We find that variation in GI does not evolve linearly across species, but that mammals constitute two principal groups above and below a GI threshold value of 1.5, approximately equal to 109 neurons, which may be characterized by distinct constellations of physiological and life-history traits. By integrating data on neurogenic period, neuroepithelial founder pool size, cell-cycle length, progenitor-type abundances, and cortical neuron number into discrete mathematical models, we identify symmetric proliferative divisions of basal progenitors in the subventricular zone of the developing neocortex as evolutionarily necessary for generating a 14-fold increase in daily prenatal neuron production, traversal of the GI threshold, and thus establishment of two principal groups. We conclude that, despite considerable neuroanatomical differences, changes in the length of the neurogenic period alone, rather than any novel neurogenic progenitor lineage, are sufficient to explain differences in neuron number and neocortical size between species within the same principal group. PMID:25405475

  13. $DK$ and $D^* K$ scattering near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel; Prelovsek, Sasa; Woloshyn, R. M.

    2015-05-20

    We study the three $D_s$ quantum channels $J^P = 0^+$, $1^+$ and $2^+$ where experiments have identified the charm-strange states $D^*_{s0} (2317)$, $D_{s1}(2460)$, $D_{s1}(2536)$ near the $DK$ and $D^*K$ thresholds, and $D^*_{s2}(2573)$. We consider correlation functions for sets of $\\overline q q$ operators and, for $J^P = 0^+$, $1^+$, also the $DK$ and $D^*K$ meson-meson interpolators and determine for these cases values of the elastic scattering amplitude. Constructing the full set of correlators requires propagators which connect any pair of lattice sites. For one ensemble of gauge configurations ($32^3\\times 64$, $m_\\pi\\approx 156$ MeV) a stochastic distillation variant is employed and for another ensemble ($16^3\\times 32$, $m_\\pi\\approx 266$ MeV) we use the full distillation method. Both, $D^*_{s0} (2317)$ and $D_{s1}(2460)$, are found as bound states below threshold, whereas $D_{s1}(2536)$, and $D^*_{s2}(2573)$ are identified as narrow resonances close to the experimental masses.

  14. Dose-response thresholds for progressive diseases.

    PubMed

    Cox, Louis Anthony Tony

    2012-01-01

    Many diseases, including cancers, heart diseases, and lung diseases, can usefully be viewed as arising from disruption of feedback control systems that normally maintain homeostasis of tissues and cell populations. Excessive exposure can destabilize feedback control loops, leading to sustained elevation of variables to saturated levels and clinical consequences such as chronic unresolved inflammation, destruction of tissue (as in emphysema), proliferation of cell populations (as in lung cancer), and increases in reactive oxygen species and protease levels (as in coronary heart diseases and chronic obstructive lung disease). We propose a framework for understanding how exposure can destabilize normally homeostatic feedback control systems and create sustained imbalances and elevated levels of disease-related variables, by creating a new, locally stable, alternative equilibrium for the dynamic system, in addition to its normal (homeostatic) equilibrium. The resulting model, which we call alternative-equilibria (AE) theory, implies the existence of an exposure threshold below which transition to the alternative equilibrium (potential disease) state will not occur. Once this threshold is exceeded, progression to the alternative equilibrium continues spontaneously, even without further exposure. These predictions may help to explain patterns observed in experimental and epidemiological data for diseases such as COPD, silicosis, and inflammation-mediated lung cancer.

  15. Superlinear threshold detectors in quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Lydersen, Lars; Maroey, Oystein; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim; Jain, Nitin; Wittmann, Christoffer; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2011-09-15

    We introduce the concept of a superlinear threshold detector, a detector that has a higher probability to detect multiple photons if it receives them simultaneously rather than at separate times. Highly superlinear threshold detectors in quantum key distribution systems allow eavesdropping the full secret key without being revealed. Here, we generalize the detector control attack, and analyze how it performs against quantum key distribution systems with moderately superlinear detectors. We quantify the superlinearity in superconducting single-photon detectors based on earlier published data, and gated avalanche photodiode detectors based on our own measurements. The analysis shows that quantum key distribution systems using detector(s) of either type can be vulnerable to eavesdropping. The avalanche photodiode detector becomes superlinear toward the end of the gate. For systems expecting substantial loss, or for systems not monitoring loss, this would allow eavesdropping using trigger pulses containing less than 120 photons per pulse. Such an attack would be virtually impossible to catch with an optical power meter at the receiver entrance.

  16. A threshold model of investor psychology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod; Grinfeld, Michael; Lamba, Harbir; Seaman, Tim

    2005-08-01

    We introduce a class of agent-based market models founded upon simple descriptions of investor psychology. Agents are subject to various psychological tensions induced by market conditions and endowed with a minimal ‘personality’. This personality consists of a threshold level for each of the tensions being modeled, and the agent reacts whenever a tension threshold is reached. This paper considers an elementary model including just two such tensions. The first is ‘cowardice’, which is the stress caused by remaining in a minority position with respect to overall market sentiment and leads to herding-type behavior. The second is ‘inaction’, which is the increasing desire to act or re-evaluate one's investment position. There is no inductive learning by agents and they are only coupled via the global market price and overall market sentiment. Even incorporating just these two psychological tensions, important stylized facts of real market data, including fat-tails, excess kurtosis, uncorrelated price returns and clustered volatility over the timescale of a few days are reproduced. By then introducing an additional parameter that amplifies the effect of externally generated market noise during times of extreme market sentiment, long-time volatility correlations can also be recovered.

  17. Depression Storage Thresholds in Prairie Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martz, L. W.

    2012-12-01

    An initial and essential step in hydrologic modeling is to decompose a watershed into its constituent channel and catchment segments and to measure the geometric andenvironmental properties of those segments. TOPAZ (Topographic Parameterization) is a widely used software system that processes digital elevation models todelineate channel and catchment segments and to measure their geometric properties. TOPAZ and similar software are now widely used in meso-scale hydrologic modeling. TOPAZ and similar software assume that surface depressions are errors in the digital elevation data and apply various techniques to fill those depressions and direct flow across the resulting surface. However, it is the case in many low-relief areas of the earth's surface that depressions are real features that function as significant storage reservoirs. These depressions are typically strung together by connecting channels and the filling of depressions represents major thresholds in changing the contributing area of streams. This paper examines some recent advances in digital terrain analysis for hydrologic model parameterization that address the role of depression storage thresholds in producing step-wise and major changes in watershed contributing areas.

  18. Phased arrays: A strategy to lower the energy threshold for neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissel, Stephanie; Avva, Jessica; Bechtol, Keith; Chesebro, Tyler; Cremonesi, Linda; Gupta, Anusha; Ludwig, Andrew; Messino, Wesley; Miki, Christian; Nichol, Ryan; Oberla, Eric; Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Saltzberg, David; Schlupf, Chandler; Shipp, Nora; Varner, Gary; Vieregg, Abigail

    2017-03-01

    In-ice radio arrays are optimized for detecting the highest energy, cosmogenic neutrinos expected to be produced though cosmic ray interactions with background photons. However, there are two expected populations of high energy neutrinos: the astrophysical flux observed by IceCube ( 1 PeV) and the cosmogenic flux ( 1017 eV or 100 PeV). Typical radio arrays employ a noise-riding trigger, which limits their minimum energy threshold based on the background noise temperature of the ice. Phased radio arrays could lower the energy threshold by combining the signals from several channels before triggering, thereby improving the signal-to-noise at the trigger level. Reducing the energy threshold would allow radio experiments to more efficiently overlap with optical Cherenkov neutrino telescopes as well as for more efficient searches for cosmogenic neutrinos. We discuss the proposed technique and prototypical phased arrays deployed in an anechoic chamber and at Greenland's Summit Station.

  19. The Dirac Equation in Two Dimensions: Dispersive Estimates and Classification of Threshold Obstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdoğan, M. Burak; Green, William R.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate dispersive estimates for the two dimensional Dirac equation with a potential. In particular, we show that the Dirac evolution satisfies a t -1 decay rate as an operator from the Hardy space H 1 to BMO, the space of functions of bounded mean oscillation. This estimate, along with the L 2 conservation law allows one to deduce a family of Strichartz estimates. We classify the structure of threshold obstructions as being composed of s-wave resonances, p-wave resonances and eigenfunctions. We show that, as in the case of the Schrödinger evolution, the presence of a threshold s-wave resonance does not destroy the t -1 decay rate. As a consequence of our analysis we obtain a limiting absorption principle in the neighborhood of the threshold, and show that there are only finitely many eigenvalues in the spectral gap.

  20. Effect of mobile phone radiation on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kouchaki, Ebrahim; Motaghedifard, Morteza; Banafshe, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Scientific interest in potential mobile phone impact on human brain and performance has significantly increased in recent years. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of mobile phone radiation on seizure threshold in mice. Materials and methods: BALB/c male mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, acute, and chronic mobile phone radiation for 30, 60, and 90 min with frequency 900 to 950 MHz and pulse of 217 Hz. The chronic group received 30 days of radiation, while the acute group received only once. The intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole (5 mg/ml) was used to induce seizure signs. Results: Although acute mobile radiation did not change seizure threshold, chronic radiation decreased the clonic and tonic seizure thresholds significantly. Conclusion: Our data suggests that the continued and prolonged contact with the mobile phone radiation might increase the risk of seizure attacks and should be limited. PMID:27635206