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Sample records for acgme general competencies

  1. Assessing the ACGME Competencies in Psychiatry Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Susan; Hall, Sarah; Beresin, Eugene

    2006-01-01

    In 2000, the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) laid out a definition of competence that included six specific areas of focus: patient care (including clinical reasoning), medical knowledge, practice-based learning and improvement, interpersonal and communication skills, professionalism, and systems-based practice. The…

  2. Digital slides and ACGME resident competencies in anatomic pathology: An altered paradigm for acquisition and assessment.

    PubMed

    Hassell, Lewis A; Fung, Kar-Ming; Chaser, Brad

    2011-01-01

    Whole slide digital imaging technology has matured considerably over the past decade. Applications in pathology education are widespread and are rapidly transforming the manner in which medical students learn pathology and histology, and they have a novel and significant impact on postgraduate continuing medical education. Whole slide digital images for use in pathology graduate education have been slower in adoption and remain much less widespread. Emphasis on professional competency by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and credentialing organizations, however, appear poised to significantly increase. The convergence of these two forces is propitious for pathology training. This article examines the opportunities for the use of whole slide images (WSI) in pathology residency training along with the developing potential uses in each of the areas of competency, as categorized by the ACGME. Barriers to WSI adoption in the pathology community are identified along with potentially significant promoters for adoption in training and practice. Current literature and recent presentations are reviewed. Digital pathology coupled with emphasis on competency is a shift of tremendous magnitude that can dramatically improve our abilities to help trainees acquire, demonstrate, and maintain the skills to practice pathology in the generation ahead.

  3. Clinical instructors' perception of a faculty development programme promoting postgraduate year-1 (PGY1) residents' ACGME six core competencies: a 2-year study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Fa-Yauh; Yang, Ying-Ying; Hsu, Hui-Chi; Chuang, Chiao-Lin; Lee, Wei-Shin; Chang, Ching-Chih; Huang, Chia-Chang; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Cheng, Hao-Min; Jap, Tjin-Shing

    2011-01-01

    Objective The six core competencies designated by Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) are essential for establishing a patient centre holistic medical system. The authors developed a faculty programme to promote the postgraduate year 1 (PGY(1)) resident, ACGME six core competencies. The study aims to assess the clinical instructors' perception, attitudes and subjective impression towards the various sessions of the 'faculty development programme for teaching ACGME competencies.' Methods During 2009 and 2010, 134 clinical instructors participated in the programme to establish their ability to teach and assess PGY(1) residents about ACGME competencies. Results The participants in the faculty development programme reported that the skills most often used while teaching were learnt during circuit and itinerant bedside, physical examination teaching, mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) evaluation demonstration, training workshop and videotapes of 'how to teach ACGME competencies.' Participants reported that circuit bedside teaching and mini-CEX evaluation demonstrations helped them in the interpersonal and communication skills domain, and that the itinerant teaching demonstrations helped them in the professionalism domain, while physical examination teaching and mini-CEX evaluation demonstrations helped them in the patients' care domain. Both the training workshop and videotape session increase familiarity with teaching and assessing skills. Participants who applied the skills learnt from the faculty development programme the most in their teaching and assessment came from internal medicine departments, were young attending physician and had experience as PGY(1) clinical instructors. Conclusions According to the clinical instructors' response, our faculty development programme effectively increased their familiarity with various teaching and assessment skills needed to teach PGY(1) residents and ACGME competencies, and these clinical

  4. A Longitudinal, Experiential Quality Improvement Curriculum Meeting ACGME Competencies for Geriatrics Fellows: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Kathryn E.; Rogers, Matthew T.; Lovato, James F.; Fernandez, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) initiatives are critical in the care of older adults who are more vulnerable to substandard care. QI education meets aspects of core Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education competencies and prepares learners for the rising focus on performance measurement in health care. The authors developed, implemented, and…

  5. Using the Affective Domain to Enhance Teaching of the ACGME Competencies in Anesthesiology Training.

    PubMed

    Yanofsky, Samuel D; Nyquist, Julie G

    2010-01-01

    Teaching and assessing the advanced competencies will continue to be a challenge. Incorporating new and nontraditional skills into an already complex and challenging clinical curriculum and practice is not easy. This makes development of methods for curricular design, teaching and assessment of anesthesiology resident and fellow performance essential. The Domains of learning, particularly the Affective Domain can serve as an organizing structure for developing objectives and selecting teaching and assessment techniques. Using the Affective Domain to select targeted teaching techniques might help foster development of key beliefs and values that underlie the advanced competencies (and sub-competencies). Targeted teaching, outside of the patient care arena, when combined with traditional clinical teaching practices, may help to ensure continued performance of desired behaviors. These include acting in a consultative role for other health professionals (ICS), providing culturally responsive care (Professionalism), using evidence to enhance the care of patients (PBLI), and advocating for quality of care and working to enhance patient safety (SBP). As educators, our aim is not only to impact knowledge, attitudes and skills, but to impact the daily behavior of our graduates.

  6. A longitudinal, experiential quality improvement curriculum meeting ACGME competencies for geriatrics fellows: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Kathryn E; Rogers, Matthew T; Lovato, James F; Fernandez, Helen M

    2013-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) initiatives are critical in the care of older adults who are more vulnerable to substandard care. QI education meets aspects of core Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education competencies and prepares learners for the rising focus on performance measurement in health care. The authors developed, implemented, and evaluated a QI curriculum for geriatrics fellows. The evidence-based curriculum included didactics and a fellow-led QI intervention based on audit and feedback through the Practice Improvement Module in Care of the Vulnerable Elderly. QI knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors were assessed before and after the improvement project. Fellows' knowledge of QI improved (p = .0156), but behavior did not change significantly across a short-term improvement project. A structured focus group with fellows revealed themes of accountability and the importance of interprofessional teamwork in QI. QI education for geriatrics fellows can be feasible, well received, and prepare future physician leaders for patient-centered care, performance measurement, and effecting systems change.

  7. Is the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Resident/Fellow survey, a valid tool to assess general surgery residency programs compliance with work hours regulations?

    PubMed

    Sticca, Robert P; Macgregor, Jay M; Szlabick, Randolph E

    2010-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) uses the resident/fellow survey to assess residency programs compliance with ACGME work hours regulations. Survey results can have significant consequences for residency programs including ACGME letters of warning, shortened program accreditation cycle, immediate full program and institutional site visits, or administrative withdrawal of a program's accreditation. Survey validity was assessed by direct query of general surgery residents who answer the survey each year. A multiple-choice survey was created to assess all US general surgery residents' interpretation and understanding of the ACGME survey. The survey was distributed to all surgery residency program directors in the US in 2009. Responses were compiled via an online survey program. Statistical analysis was performed in aggregate and between junior and senior residents. Nine hundred sixty-five (13.2%) general surgical residents responded with 961 (99.6%) completing all questions. All responding residents had taken the ACGME survey at least once with 634 (66%) having taken it more than once. Nineteen percent of residents had difficulty understanding the questions with senior residents (23%) reporting difficulty more than junior residents (14%), p < 0.001. Thirty-five percent of residents had discussed the survey with their faculty or program director prior to taking it, while 17% were instructed on how to answer the survey. One hundred thirty-three residents (14%) admitted to not answering the questions truthfully while 352 (37%) of residents felt that the survey did not provide an accurate evaluation of their work hours in residency training. An evaluation tool in which 1 in 7 residents admit to answering the questions falsely and 1 in 5 residents had difficulty interpreting the questions may not be a valid method to evaluate compliance with work hours regulations. Evaluation of work hours regulations compliance should be based on actual work

  8. Competency-Based General Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Walter E.

    1979-01-01

    Presents arguments in favor of competency-based general education within the context of a program developed at Central Technical Community College (Nebraska) which utilizes an open entry, open exit approach for all programs. Outlines suggested competencies in the areas of communications and oral communications. (MB)

  9. General Marketing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for general marketing occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency…

  10. General Marketing. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This General Marketing Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) is one of a series of competency lists, verified by expert workers, that have evolved from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) job analysis process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from throughout Ohio. This OCAP identifies the…

  11. AOA Approval of ACGME Internship and Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Thomas; Martinez, Bulmaro

    2011-04-01

    Since the 1970s, the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) has provided a means for osteopathic physicians to apply for approval of their postdoctoral training in programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Osteopathic physicians who trained in ACGME programs need this approval to meet AOA licensure and board certification requirements. The AOA approves ACGME residency training with several different approval processes. Approval of the first year of postdoctoral training occurs through Resolution 42, specialty approval (for specialties in which the first year of training is part of the residency), or federal or military training approval. For residency training, the AOA verifies successful completion of an ACGME training program before approving the training. The AOA is using customer surveys and online applications to improve the review process for applicants.

  12. Smartphone app use among medical providers in ACGME training programs.

    PubMed

    Franko, Orrin I; Tirrell, Timothy F

    2012-10-01

    The past decade has witnessed the advent of the smartphone, a device armed with computing power, mobility and downloadable "apps," that has become commonplace within the medical field as both a personal and professional tool. The popularity of medically-related apps suggests that physicians use mobile technology to assist with clinical decision making, yet usage patterns have never been quantified. A digital survey examining smartphone and associated app usage was administered via email to all ACGME training programs. Data regarding respondent specialty, level of training, use of smartphones, use of smartphone apps, desired apps, and commonly used apps were collected and analyzed. Greater than 85% of respondents used a smartphone, of which the iPhone was the most popular (56%). Over half of the respondents reported using apps in their clinical practice; the most commonly used app types were drug guides (79%), medical calculators (18%), coding and billing apps (4%) and pregnancy wheels (4%). The most frequently requested app types were textbook/reference materials (average response: 55%), classification/treatment algorithms (46%) and general medical knowledge (43%). The clinical use of smartphones and apps will likely continue to increase, and we have demonstrated an absence of high-quality and popular apps despite a strong desire among physicians and trainees. This information should be used to guide the development of future healthcare delivery systems; expanded app functionality is almost certain but reliability and ease of use will likely remain major factors in determining the successful integration of apps into clinical practice.

  13. Medicine in 2035: Selected Insights From ACGME's Scenario Planning.

    PubMed

    Nasca, Thomas J; Thomas, Charles W

    2015-03-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has the responsibility for overseeing the preparation of future physician specialists and subspecialists to serve the American public. To ensure ACGME's ability to adapt and sustain its accreditation activities in a future marked by significant uncertainty, its administration and board of directors embarked on a planning process that would frame its strategic actions in support of this responsibility. We describe the scenario planning process, and report key insights that resulted from it. We also discuss in greater depth a subset of those insights, which challenge certain conventional truths, call for new collaborative directions for the ACGME, and reaffirm the importance of professionalism in service of the public across all future scenarios evaluated.

  14. New ACGME Work-Hour Guidelines and Their Impact on Current Residency Training Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattar, S. Pirzada; Basith, Fatima; Madison, James; Bhatia, Subhash C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has introduced new work-hour guidelines for residents in ACGME accredited programs that were implemented in July 2003. The new ACGME policies impact several practices in various psychiatry residency programs across the U.S., even though psychiatry has not been at the forefront…

  15. Toward a common taxonomy of competency domains for the health professions and competencies for physicians.

    PubMed

    Englander, Robert; Cameron, Terri; Ballard, Adrian J; Dodge, Jessica; Bull, Janet; Aschenbrener, Carol A

    2013-08-01

    Although health professions worldwide are shifting to competency-based education, no common taxonomy for domains of competence and specific competencies currently exists. In this article, the authors describe their work to (1) identify domains of competence that could accommodate any health care profession and (2) extract a common set of competencies for physicians from existing health professions' competency frameworks that would be robust enough to provide a single, relevant infrastructure for curricular resources in the Association of American Medical Colleges' (AAMC's) MedEdPORTAL and Curriculum Inventory and Reports (CIR) sites. The authors used the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)/American Board of Medical Specialties six domains of competence and 36 competencies delineated by the ACGME as their foundational reference list. They added two domains described by other groups after the original six domains were introduced: Interprofessional Collaboration (4 competencies) and Personal and Professional Development (8 competencies). They compared the expanded reference list (48 competencies within eight domains) with 153 competency lists from across the medical education continuum, physician specialties and subspecialties, countries, and health care professions. Comparison analysis led them to add 13 "new" competencies and to conflate 6 competencies into 3 to eliminate redundancy. The AAMC will use the resulting "Reference List of General Physician Competencies" (58 competencies in eight domains) to categorize resources for MedEdPORTAL and CIR. The authors hope that researchers and educators within medicine and other health professions will consider using this reference list when applicable to move toward a common taxonomy of competencies.

  16. E-portfolio competency metadata: pilot study for a call to action.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sishir; Swartz, Andrew; Obeid, Leila; Rao, Sevith; Joyce, Barbara; Whitehouse, Sarah; Horst, Mathilda; Butler, Jack; Kinnen, Ryan; Shepard, Alexander; Rubinfeld, Ilan

    2012-04-01

    The six competency domains required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) have led to a proliferation of measurement tools, assessment methods, and all forms of data from paper to electronic. The need exists to develop a standardized electronic (e)-portfolio to provide the aggregate data to improve education and patient care. This process requires a sound methodology using XML metadata to allow portability of e-portfolio data. We surveyed publicly available metadata and developed an e-portfolio system for the Henry Ford Hospital General Surgery Residency Program. Based on our implementation of e-portfolios for 70 physicians, we call upon the ACGME, the Residency Review Committees, and the American Board of Medical Specialties to establish a method to formalize and develop a standard for residency competency metadata. Using an approach similar to that of our study can streamline data and lead to improved medical education and ultimately better patient care.

  17. Specialty hospitals: can general hospitals compete?

    PubMed

    Dummit, Laura A

    2005-07-13

    The rapid increase in specialty cardiac, surgical, and orthopedic hospitals has captured the attention of general hospitals and policymakers. Although the number of specialty hospitals remains small in absolute terms, their entry into certain health care markets has fueled arguments about the rules of "fair" competition among health care providers. To allow the smoke to clear, Congress effectively stalled the growth in new specialty hospitals by temporarily prohibiting physicians from referring Medicare or Medicaid patients to specialty hospitals in which they had an ownership interest. During this 18-month moratorium, which expired June 8, 2005, two mandated studies of specialty hospitals provided information to help assess their potential effect on health care delivery. This issue brief discusses the research on specialty hospitals, including their payments under Medicare's hospital inpatient payment system, the quality and cost of care they deliver, their effect on general hospitals and on overall health care delivery, and the regulatory and legal environment in which they have proliferated. It concludes with open issues concerning physician self-referral and the role of general hospitals in providing a range of health care services.

  18. Clinical Competence: General Ability or Case-Specific?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimmers, Paul F.; Splinter, Ted A. W.; Hancock, Gregory R.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Before the 1970s, research into the development of clinical competence was mainly focused on general problem-solving abilities. The scope of research changed when Elstein and colleagues discovered that individual ability to solve clinical problems varies considerably across cases. It was concluded that problem solving abilities are…

  19. Community College General Academic Course Guide Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin. Div. of Community and Technical Colleges.

    The Community College General Academic Course Guide Manual (ACGM) is the official list of approved numbers for general academic transfer courses that may be offered by public community and technical colleges in Texas for state funding. This edition of the ACGM, effective September 1996, contains the latest information available for academic…

  20. HIPAA Compliance with Mobile Devices Among ACGME Programs.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Randall; Franko, Orrin

    2016-05-01

    To analyze self-reported HIPAA compliance with mobile technologies among residents, fellows, and attendings at ACGME training programs. A digital survey was sent to 678 academic institutions over a 1-month period. 2427 responses were analyzed using Chi-squared tests for independence. Post-hoc Bonferroni correction was applied for all comparisons between training levels, clinical setting, and specialty. 58 % of all residents self-report violating HIPAA by sharing protected health information (PHI) via text messaging with 27 % reporting they do it "often" or "routinely" compared to 15-19 % of attendings. For all specialties, 35 % of residents use text messaging photo or video sharing with PHI. Overall, 5 % of respondents "often" or "routinely" used HIPAA compliant (HCApps) with no significant differences related to training level. 20 % of residents admitted to using non-encrypted email at some point. 53 % of attendings and 41 % of residents utilized encrypted email routinely. Physicians from surgical specialties compared to non-surgical specialties demonstrated higher rates of HIPAA violations with SMS use (35 % vs. 17.7 %), standard photo/video messages (16.3 % vs. 4.7 %), HCApps (10.9 % vs. 4.9 %), and non-HCApps (5.6 % vs 1.5 %). The most significant barriers to complying with HIPAA were inconvenience (58 %), lack of knowledge (37 %), unfamiliarity (34 %), inaccessible (29 %) and habit (24 %). Medical professionals must acknowledge that despite laws to protect patient confidentiality in the era of mobile technology, over 50 % of current medical trainees knowingly violate these rules regularly despite the threat of severe consequences. The medical community must further examine the reason for these inconsistencies and work towards possible solutions.

  1. The Impact of 2011 ACGME Duty Hour Restrictions on Internal Medicine Resident Workload and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vucicevic, Darko; Mookadam, Farouk; Webb, Brandon J.; Labonte, Helene R.; Cha, Stephen S.; Blair, Janis E.

    2015-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) implemented work hour restrictions for physicians in training in 2003 that were revised July 1, 2011. Current published data are insufficient to assess whether such work hour restrictions will have long-term impact on residents' education. We searched computer-generated reports…

  2. What indicates competency in systems based practice? An analysis of perspective consistency among healthcare team members.

    PubMed

    Graham, Mark J; Naqvi, Zoon; Encandela, John A; Bylund, Carma L; Dean, Randa; Calero-Breckheimer, Ayxa; Schmidt, Hilary J

    2009-05-01

    In many parts of the world the practice of medicine and medical education increasingly focus on providing patient care within context of the larger healthcare system. Our purpose is to solicit perceptions of all professional stakeholders (e.g. nurses) of the system regarding the U.S. ACGME competency Systems Based Practice to uncover the extent to which there is agreement or discrepancy among key system stakeholders. Eighty-eight multidisciplinary personnel (n = 88) from two academic medical centers were invited to participate in one of 14 nominal group process sessions. Participants generated and prioritized resident characteristics that they believed were important for effective System Based Practices. Through content analysis the prioritized attribute statements were coded to identify embedded themes of resident roles and behavior. From the themes, three major resident roles emerged: resident as Self-Manager, Team Collaborator, and Patient Advocate. No one professional group (e.g., nurses, attending physicians, social workers) emphasized all of these roles. Some concepts that are emphasized in the ACGME definition like using cost-benefit analysis were conspicuously absent from the healthcare team generated list. We showed that there are gaps between the key stakeholders prioritizations about the ACGME definition of SBP and, more generally, the behaviors and roles identified by healthcare team stakeholders beyond the U.S. This suggests that within the process of developing a comprehensive working understanding of the Systems Based Practice competency (or other similar competencies, such as in CanMEDS), it is necessary to use multiple stakeholders in the system (perhaps including patients) to more accurately identify key resident roles and observable behaviors.

  3. Multicultural Competency Instrumentation: A Review and Analysis of Reliability Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Todd W.; Smith, Timothy B.; Montoya, Jared A.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the internal consistency reliability of multicultural competency instrumentation. Additional psychometric properties are qualitatively reviewed for commonly used instruments and 5 other measures of multicultural competency that have not previously been reviewed in the literature. Results indicate that the most widely used…

  4. Building a Competency-Based Curriculum: The Agony and the Ecstasy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albanese, Mark A.; Mejicano, George; Anderson, W. Marshall; Gruppen, Larry

    2010-01-01

    Physician competencies have increasingly been a focus of medical education at all levels. Although competencies are not a new concept, when the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) jointly agreed on six competencies for certification and maintenance of certification of…

  5. General Mechanical Repair. Minor Automotive Maintenance, Small Engine [Repair, and] Welding: Competency Test Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlin, Larry

    This document contains the competency test package for three sections of a general mechanical repair course: minor automotive maintenance, small engine mechanics, and welding. Following a list of the common essential elements for trade and industrial education, competency tests for the three sections are provided. Each test includes unit name,…

  6. Student Experiences with Competency Domains during a Psychiatry Clerkship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Donald A.; Nierenberg, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The authors reviewed medical student encounters during 3 years of a required psychiatry clerkship that were recorded on a web-based system of six broad competency domains (similar to ACGME-recommended domains). These were used to determine diagnoses of patients seen, clinical skills practiced, and experiences in interpersonal and…

  7. Portfolios: possibilities for addressing emergency medicine resident competencies.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Patricia; Greene, Constance

    2002-11-01

    Portfolios are an innovative approach to evaluate the competency of emergency medicine residents. Three key characteristics add to their attractiveness. First, portfolios draw from the resident's actual work. Second, they require self-reflection on the part of the resident. Third, they are inherently practice-based learning since residents must review and consider their practice in order to begin the portfolio. This paper illustrates five different applications of portfolios. First, portfolios are applied to evaluating specific competencies as part of the training of emergency physicians. While evaluating specific competencies, the portfolio captures aspects of the general competencies. Second, the article illustrates using portfolios as a way to address a specific residency review committee (RRC) requirement such as follow-ups. Third is a description of how portfolios can be used to evaluate resident conferences capturing the competency of practice-based learning and possibly other competencies such as medical knowledge and patient care. Fourth, the authors of the article designed a portfolio as a way to demonstrate clinical competence. Fifth, they elaborate as to how a continuous quality improvement project could be cast within the portfolio framework. They provide some guidance concerning issues to address when designing the portfolios. Portfolios are carefully structured and not haphazard collections of materials. Following criteria is important in maintaining the validity of the portfolio as well as contributing to reliability. The portfolios can enhance the relationship between faculty and residents since faculty will suggest cases, discuss anomalies, and interact with the residents around the portfolio. The authors believe that in general portfolios can cover many of the general competencies specified by the ACGME while still focusing on issues important to emergency medicine. The authors believe that portfolios provide an approach to evaluation commensurate

  8. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Core Competencies at a Community Teaching Hospital: Is There a Gap in Awareness?

    PubMed Central

    Al-Temimi, Mohammed; Kidon, Michael; Johna, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Context Reports evaluating faculty knowledge of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies in community hospitals without a dedicated residency program are uncommon. Objective Faculty evaluation regarding knowledge of ACGME core competencies before a residency program is started. Design Physicians at the Kaiser Permanente Fontana Medical Center (N = 480) were surveyed for their knowledge of ACGME core competencies before starting new residency programs. Main Outcome Measures Knowledge of ACGME core competencies. Results Fifty percent of physicians responded to the survey, and 172 (71%) of respondents were involved in teaching residents. Of physicians who taught residents and had complete responses (N = 164), 65 (39.7%) were unsure of their knowledge of the core competencies. However, most stated that they provided direct teaching to residents related to the knowledge, skills, and attitudes stated in each of the 6 competencies as follows: medical knowledge (96.3%), patient care (95.7%), professionalism (90.7%), interpersonal and communication skills (86.3%), practice-based learning (85.9%), and system-based practice (79.6%). Physician specialty, years in practice (1–10 vs > 10), and number of rotations taught per year (1–6 vs 7–12) were not associated with knowledge of the competencies (p > 0.05); however, full-time faculty (teaching 10–12 rotations per year) were more likely to provide competency-based teaching. Conclusion Objective assessment of faculty awareness of ACGME core competencies is essential when starting a residency program. Discrepancy between knowledge of the competencies and acclaimed provision of competency-based teaching emphasizes the need for standardized teaching methods that incorporate the values of these competencies. PMID:27768565

  9. Does operative experience during residency correlate with reported competency of recent general surgery graduates?

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Arash; Lai, Sarah; Butterworth, Sonia; Hameed, Morad; Schiller, Dan; Skarsgard, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Identification of attributes of residency training that predict competency would improve surgical education. We hypothesized that case experience during residency would correlate with self-reported competency of recent graduates. Methods Aggregate case log data of residents enrolled in 2 general surgery programs were collected over a 12-month period and stratified into Surgical Council on Resident Education (SCORE) categories. We surveyed recent (< 5 yr) residency graduates on procedural competency. Resident case volumes were correlated with survey responses by SCORE category. Results In all, 75 residents performed 11 715 operations, which were distributed by SCORE category as follows: essential-common (EC) 9935 (84.8%), essential-uncommon (EU) 889 (7.6%) and complex 891 (7.6%). Alimentary tract procedures were the most commonly performed EC (2386, 24%) and EU (504, 56.7%) procedures. The least common EC procedure was plastic surgery (4, 0.04%), and the least common EU procedure was abdomen–spleen (1, 0.1%). The questionnaire response rate was 45%. For EC procedures, self-reported competency was highest in skin and soft tissue, thoracic and head and neck (each 100%) and lowest in vascular–venous (54%), whereas for EU procedures it was highest in abdomen–general (100%) and lowest in vascular–arterial (62%). The correlation between case volume and self-reported competency was poor (R = 0.2 for EC procedures). Conclusion Self-reported competency correlates poorly with operative case experience during residency. Other curriculum factors, including specific rotations and timing, balance between inpatient and outpatient surgical experience and competition for cases, may contribute to procedural competency acquisition during residency. PMID:22854144

  10. General Shop Competencies in Vocational Agriculture for 9th and 10th Grade Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novotny, Ronald; And Others

    The document presents unit plans which offer list of experiences and competencies to be learned for general shop occupations in vocational agriculture. The units include: (1) arc welding, (2) oxy-acetylene welding, (3) flat concrete, (4) concrete block, (5) lumber patterns and wood building materials, (6) metal fasteners, (7) wood adhesives, (8)…

  11. How competent do graduates feel to undertake the skills required by the General Medical Council?

    PubMed

    Watmough, Simon; Kennedy, Tom

    2014-08-01

    The General Medical Council outlines the skills medical students are meant to learn as undergraduates. This article summarizes how competent some foundation year one doctors from one deanery felt to undertake these skills, what had prepared them and what they would like more training on.

  12. Comparing Multicultural with General Counseling Knowledge and Skill Competency for Students Who Completed Counselor Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cates, Jennifer T.; Schaefle, Scott E.; Smaby, Marlowe H.; Maddux, Cleborne D.; LeBeauf, Ireon

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of a counselor education program in teaching multicultural counseling knowledge and skills. Standardized examination scores and rater evaluations compare multicultural with general counseling knowledge and skill competency for students who completed a counseling master's program. The relationship between…

  13. Integrating the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education general competencies into forensic pathology fellowship training.

    PubMed

    Nine, Jeffrey S; Zumwalt, Ross E

    2005-12-01

    Since July 2004, forensic pathology fellowships have been required to provide training in 6 general competencies: patient care, medical knowledge, practice-based learning and improvement, interpersonal and communication skills, professionalism, and systems-based practice. In anticipation of this movement, beginning in 2002 the Office of the Medical Investigator (OMI) of the state of New Mexico began incorporating specific training in the general competencies into the fellowship program. Our experience has shown that the additional instruction and evaluation have proven to be valuable in preparing fellows for a successful forensic pathology career, did not detract from the more traditional aspects of forensic pathology training, and in many instances improved our training and assessment procedures.

  14. What Indicates Competency in Systems Based Practice? An Analysis of Perspective Consistency among Healthcare Team Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Mark J.; Naqvi, Zoon; Encandela, John A.; Bylund, Carma L.; Dean, Randa; Calero-Breckheimer, Ayxa; Schmidt, Hilary J.

    2009-01-01

    In many parts of the world the practice of medicine and medical education increasingly focus on providing patient care within context of the larger healthcare system. Our purpose is to solicit perceptions of all professional stakeholders (e.g. nurses) of the system regarding the U.S. ACGME competency Systems Based Practice to uncover the extent to…

  15. Psychotherapy Training for Residents: Reconciling Requirements with Evidence-Based, Competency-Focused Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weerasekera, Priyanthy; Manring, John; Lynn, David John

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) changed the training requirements in psychotherapy, moving toward evidence-based therapies and emphasizing competence and proficiency as outcomes of training. This article examines whether the therapies…

  16. What are the pathology education requirements for all nonpathology ACGME-accredited programs in an academic center?

    PubMed

    Bean, Sarah M; Nagler, Alisa; Buckley, Patrick J

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to determine institution-wide graduate medical education (GME) requirements in pathology (exclusive of pathology residency and fellowships) at an academic center. All documents related to residency review committee (RRC) program requirements were searched for the key words "pathology," "laboratory," "autopsy," and "morbidity." For each occurrence, it was determined whether a pathology education requirement had been identified. Requirements were categorized and tabulated. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) lists 135 nonpathology programs; 66 programs exist at Duke University Medical Center, of which 54 (82%) had pathology education requirement(s). Twelve education categories were identified. Teaching/conferences were the most common (52%). Thirty-nine percent required consultation/support. Sixteen programs were required to perform gross/microscopic examination. Trainees in medical genetics are required to have a pathology rotation. Elective rotations should be available for trainees in 6 programs. Pathology departments at academic centers face significant institution-wide pathology education requirements for clinical ACGME programs. Didactic teaching/conferences and consultation/support are common requirements. Opportunities exist for innovative teaching strategies.

  17. A general joint model for longitudinal measurements and competing risks survival data with heterogeneous random effects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Elashoff, Robert M.; Pan, Jianxin

    2011-01-01

    This article studies a general joint model for longitudinal measurements and competing risks survival data. The model consists of a linear mixed effects sub-model for the longitudinal outcome, a proportional cause-specific hazards frailty sub-model for the competing risks survival data, and a regression sub-model for the variance–covariance matrix of the multivariate latent random effects based on a modified Cholesky decomposition. The model provides a useful approach to adjust for non-ignorable missing data due to dropout for the longitudinal outcome, enables analysis of the survival outcome with informative censoring and intermittently measured time-dependent covariates, as well as joint analysis of the longitudinal and survival outcomes. Unlike previously studied joint models, our model allows for heterogeneous random covariance matrices. It also offers a framework to assess the homogeneous covariance assumption of existing joint models. A Bayesian MCMC procedure is developed for parameter estimation and inference. Its performances and frequentist properties are investigated using simulations. A real data example is used to illustrate the usefulness of the approach. PMID:20549344

  18. Teaching Forensic Psychiatry to General Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that general psychiatry residency training programs provide trainees with exposure to forensic psychiatry. Limited information is available on how to develop a core curriculum in forensic psychiatry for general psychiatry residents and few articles have been…

  19. General Practitioners’ Attitudes towards Essential Competencies in End-of-Life Care: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Giezendanner, Stéphanie; Jung, Corinna; Banderet, Hans-Ruedi; Otte, Ina Carola; Gudat, Heike; Haller, Dagmar M.; Elger, Bernice S.; Zemp, Elisabeth; Bally, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Background Identifying essential competencies in end-of-life care, as well as general practitioners’ (GPs) confidence in these competencies, is essential to guide training and quality improvement efforts in this domain. Aim To determine which competencies in end-of-life care are considered important by GPs, to assess GPs’ confidence in these competencies in a European context and their reasons to refer terminally ill patients to a specialist. Design and Setting Cross-sectional postal survey involving a stratified random sample of 2000 GPs in Switzerland in 2014. Method Survey development was informed by a previous qualitative exploration of relevant end-of-life GP competencies. Main outcome measures were GPs’ assessment of the importance of and confidence in 18 attributes of end-of-life care competencies, and reasons for transferring care of terminally-ill patients to a specialist. GP characteristics associated with main outcome measures were tested using multivariate regression models. Results The response rate was 31%. Ninety-nine percent of GPs considered the recognition and treatment of pain as important, 86% felt confident about it. Few GPs felt confident in cultural (16%), spiritual (38%) and legal end-of-life competencies such as responding to patients seeking assisted suicide (35%) although more than half of the respondents regarded these competencies as important. Most frequent reasons to refer terminally ill patients to a specialist were lack of time (30%), better training of specialists (23%) and end-of-life care being incompatible with other duties (19%). In multiple regression analyses, confidence in end-of-life care was positively associated with GPs’ age, practice size, home visits and palliative training. Conclusions GPs considered non-somatic competencies (such as spiritual, cultural, ethical and legal aspects) nearly as important as pain and symptom control. Yet, few GPs felt confident in these non-somatic competencies. These findings

  20. Identifying competencies required for medication prescribing for general practice residents: a nominal group technique study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Teaching of medication prescribing is a specific challenge in general practice curriculum. The aim of this study was to identify and rank the competencies required for prescribing medication for general practice residents in France. Methods Qualitative consensus study using the nominal group technique. We invited different stakeholders of the general practice curriculum and medication use in primary care to a series of meetings. The nominal group technique allowed for the quick development of a list of consensual and ranked answers to the following question: “At the end of their general practice curriculum, in terms of medication prescribing, what should residents be able to do?”. Results Four meetings were held that involved a total of 31 participants, enabling the creation of a final list of 29 ranked items, grouped in 4 domains. The four domains identified were ‘pharmacology’, ‘regulatory standards’, ‘therapeutics’, and ‘communication (both with patients and healthcare professionals)’. Overall, the five items the most highly valued across the four meetings were: ‘write a legible and understandable prescription’, ‘identify specific populations’, ‘prescribe the doses and durations following the indication’, ‘explain a lack of medication prescription to the patient’, ‘decline inappropriate medication request’. The ‘communication skills’ domain was the domain with the highest number of items (10 items), and with the most highly-valued items. Conclusion The study results suggest a need for developing general practice residents’ communication skills regarding medication prescribing. PMID:25084813

  1. Are Generalized Anxiety and Depression Symptoms Associated with Social Competence in Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder?

    PubMed

    Johnston, Krista Haley Smith; Iarocci, Grace

    2017-02-20

    Generalized anxiety and depression symptoms may be associated with poorer social outcomes among children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) without intellectual disability. The goal of this study was to examine whether generalized anxiety and depression symptoms were associated with social competence after accounting for IQ, age, and gender in typically developing children and in children with ASD. Results indicated that for the TD group, generalized anxiety and depression accounted for 38% of the variance in social competence and for children with ASD, they accounted for 29% of the variance in social competence. However, only depression accounted for a significant amount of the variance. The findings underscore the importance of assessing the social impact of internalizing symptoms in children with ASD.

  2. A computer program for the generalized chi-square analysis of competing risks grouped survival data (CRISCAT).

    PubMed

    Stanish, W M; Chi, G Y; Johnson, W D; Koch, G G; Landis, J R; Liu-Chi, S

    1978-09-01

    CRISCAT is a computer program for the analysis of grouped survival data with competing risks via weighted least squares methods. Competing risks adjustments are obtained from general matrix operations using many of the strategies employed in a previously developed program (GENCAT) for multivariate categorical data. CRISCAT computes survival rates at several time points for multiple causes of failure, where each rate is adjusted for other causes in the sense that failure due to thes other causes has been eliminated as a risk. The program can generate functions of the adjusted survival rates, to which asymptotic regression models may be fit. CRISCAT yields test statistics for hypotheses involving either these functions or estimated model parameters. Thus, this computational algorithm links competing risks theory to linear models methods for contingency table analysis and provides a unified approach to estimation and hypothesis testing of functions involving competing risks adjusted rates.

  3. Psychiatry Resident Training in Cultural Competence: An Educator's Toolkit.

    PubMed

    Corral, Irma; Johnson, Toni L; Shelton, Pheston G; Glass, Oliver

    2016-11-05

    Resident physicians training in psychiatry in the U.S. are required to master a body of knowledge related to cultural psychiatry; are expected to adopt attitudes that endorse the principles of cultural competence; and finally are expected to acquire specific cultural competence skills that facilitate working effectively with diverse patients. This article first provides an overview of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies related to cultural competence, as well as the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry's (AACAP) recommendations for the cultural competence training of child/adolescent fellows. Next, numerous print and electronic resources that can be used in cultural competence education in psychiatry are reviewed and discussed. Finally, we conclude by providing recommendations for psychiatry residency programs that we culled from model cultural competence curricula.

  4. Development of Structural Components of Future Technicians' Professional Competencies during Their Studies of General Disciplines in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopilov, Sergey N.; Dorozhkin, Evgenij M.; Tarasyuk, Olga V.; Osipova, Irina V.; Lazareva, Natalia V.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the problem stems from the necessity to develop and implement the formation model for structural components of future technicians' professional competencies during their studies of general professional disciplines. The purpose of the article is to carry out a theoretical study, to develop and approbate a model that forms the…

  5. Summary of ACOP (American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians) Program Directors' Annual Reports for First-Year Residents and Relationships between Resident Competency Performance Ratings and COMLEX-USA Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langenau, Erik E.; Pugliano, Gina; Roberts, William L.; Hostoffer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Context: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American Osteopathic Association (AOA) endorsed the use of competency-based assessment, with the intention to improve health care administration [1, 2]. High-stakes licensing exams, such as the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination -- USA (COMLEX-USA),…

  6. Mediation Effects of Latent Numerical Abilities on the Associations between Domain General Competencies and Fraction Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ye, Ai; Hansen, Nicole; Resnick, Ilyse; Carrique, Jessica; Jordan, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to reveal the developmental pathway from third grade cognitive competencies to sixth grade conceptual and procedural fraction knowledge through the intervening whole numerical skills at fifth grade. The study used empirical data that come from 536 students in nine schools across two Delaware public school…

  7. Clinical competence in myocardial perfusion scintigraphic stress testing: general training guidelines and assessment.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ian; Latus, Kate; Bartle, Luan; Gardner, Maureen; Parkin, Vicki

    2007-07-01

    The suggestion by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) to more than triple the number of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) procedures carried out by the NHS each year is a challenge both in terms of numbers of gamma cameras available to carry out the scans and qualified staff to supervise stress tests. In the past, exercise and pharmacological stress testing have been supervised only by doctors but, increasingly, this is taken on by suitably trained non-medical professionals such as nurses, radiographers and clinical technologists. The expansion of the numbers of non-medical professionals qualified to supervise stress testing will be key to meeting NICE's recommendations. This paper sets out how potential new stressors should be identified, what their training should cover and discusses the standards of competence they should meet. It provides guidelines for training non-medical stressors to perform a safe and efficient stress test during MPS and advice for maintaining competency.

  8. Point-of-care ultrasound as a competency for general internists: a survey of internal medicine training programs in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Ailon, Jonathan; Mourad, Ophyr; Nadjafi, Maral; Cavalcanti, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Background Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is increasingly used on General Internal Medicine (GIM) inpatient services, creating a need for defined competencies and formalized training. We evaluated the extent of training in POCUS and the clinical use of POCUS among Canadian GIM residency programs. Method Internal Medicine trainees and GIM Faculty at the University of Toronto were surveyed on their clinical use of POCUS and the extent of their training. We separately surveyed Canadian IM Program Directors and Division Directors on the extent of POCUS training in their programs, barriers in the implementation of POCUS curricula, and recommendations for POCUS competencies in IM. Results A majority of IM trainees (90/118, 76%) and GIM Faculty (15/29, 52%) used POCUS clinically. However, the vast majority of resident (111/117, 95%) and GIM Faculty (18/28, 64%) had received limited training. Of the Program Leaders surveyed, half (9/17, 53%) reported POCUS clinical use by their trainees; however only one quarter (4/16, 25%) reported offering formal curricula. Most respondents agreed that POCUS training should be incorporated into IM residency curricula, specifically for procedural guidance. Conclusions A considerable discrepancy exists between the clinical use of POCUS and the extent of formal training among Canadian IM residents and GIM Faculty. We propose that formalized POCUS training should be incorporated into IM residency programs, GIM fellowships, and Faculty development sessions, and identify POCUS skills that could be incorporated into future IM curricula. PMID:28344693

  9. Inquiry-Oriented Learning Material to Increased General Physics Competence Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinuraya, Jurubahasa

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to produce inquiry-oriented general physics learning material to improve student learning outcome. Development steps of learning materials were adapted from the design model of Dick and Carey. Stages of development consists of three phases: planning, development, and formative evaluation and revision. Implementation of formative…

  10. Implementing ePortfolios for the Assessment of General Education Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ring, Gail; Ramirez, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the Clemson ePortfolio Program initiated in 2006, where all undergraduate students are required to create an ePortfolio. Specifically, the program was designed as a mechanism through which to evaluate our recently revised general education program. In this program all undergraduates create and submit a digital portfolio as…

  11. Resident and Faculty Perceptions of Program Strengths and Opportunities for Improvement: Comparison of Site Visit Reports and ACGME Resident Survey Data in 5 Surgical Specialties.

    PubMed

    Caniano, Donna A; Yamazaki, Kenji; Yaghmour, Nicholas; Philibert, Ingrid; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2016-05-01

    Background Resident and faculty views of program strengths and opportunities for improvement (OFIs) offer insight into how stakeholders assess key elements of the learning environment. Objective This study sought (1) to assess the degree to which residents and faculty in 359 programs in 5 surgical specialties (obstetrics and gynecology, orthopaedic surgery, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, and surgery) were aligned or divergent in their respective views of program strengths and OFIs; and (2) to evaluate whether responses to selected questions on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Resident Survey correlated with strengths or OFIs identified by the residents during the site visit. Methods Faculty and resident lists of program strengths and OFIs in site visit reports for 2012 and 2013 were aggregated, analyzed, and compared to responses on the Resident Survey. Results While there was considerable alignment in resident and faculty perceptions of program strengths and OFIs, some attributes were more important to one or the other group. Collegiality was valued highly by both stakeholder groups. Responses to 2 questions on the ACGME Resident Survey were associated with resident-identified OFIs in site visit reports pertaining to aspects of the didactic program and responsiveness to resident suggestions for improvement. Conclusions The findings offer program leadership additional insight into how 2 key stakeholder groups view elements of the learning environment as program strengths or OFIs and may serve as useful focal areas for ongoing improvement activities.

  12. Operative experience in the era of duty hour restrictions: is broad-based general surgery training coming to an end?

    PubMed

    Fairfax, Lindsay M; Christmas, A Britton; Green, John M; Miles, William S; Sing, Ronald F

    2010-06-01

    Since the institution of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) resident work hour restrictions, conflicting evidence exists regarding the impact on resident case volume with most data from single-institution studies. We examined the effect of restrictions on national resident operative experience. After permission from the ACGME, we reviewed the publicly available national resident case log data (1999 through 2008) maintained on the ACGME web site (www.acgme.org), including total major cases with subanalysis of the ACGME-specified categories. The mean cases per resident were compared before (1999 to 2003) and after (2003 to 2008) restrictions. After the implementation of duty hour restrictions, the mean number of total cases per resident significantly decreased (949 +/- 18 vs 911 +/- 14, P = 0.004). Subanalysis showed a significant increase in alimentary tract (217 +/- 7 vs 229 +/- 3, P = 0.004), skin/soft tissue (31 +/- 3 vs 36 +/- 1, P = 0.01), and endocrine (26 +/- 2 vs 31 +/- 2, P = 0.006) cases. However, we observed a significant decrease in head and neck (21 +/- 0.3 vs 20 +/- 0.3, P = 0.01), vascular (164 +/- 29 vs 126 +/- 5, P = 0.01), pediatric (41 +/- 1 vs 37 +/- 2, P = 0.006), genitourinary (10 +/- 2 vs 7 +/- 1, P = 0.004), gynecologic surgery (5 +/- 1 vs 3 +/- 0.6, P = 0.002), plastics (16 +/- 0.3 vs 15 +/- 0.7, P = 0.03), and endoscopy (91 +/- 3 vs 82 +/- 2, P < 0.001) procedures. Analysis of the ACGME-compiled national data confirms that duty hour restrictions have significantly impacted resident operative experience. Importantly, experience in specialty areas, including vascular and endoscopy, appears to have been sacrificed for consolidation of resources into general surgery services as indicated by the increase in alimentary tract and endocrine cases. These findings raise the following question: Is the era of truly broad-based general surgery training coming to an end?

  13. Predicting first-grade mathematics achievement: the contributions of domain-general cognitive abilities, nonverbal number sense, and early number competence.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Caroline; Schiltz, Christine; Brunner, Martin; Martin, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Early number competence, grounded in number-specific and domain-general cognitive abilities, is theorized to lay the foundation for later math achievement. Few longitudinal studies have tested a comprehensive model for early math development. Using structural equation modeling and mediation analyses, the present work examined the influence of kindergarteners' nonverbal number sense and domain-general abilities (i.e., working memory, fluid intelligence, and receptive vocabulary) and their early number competence (i.e., symbolic number skills) on first grade math achievement (i.e., arithmetic, shape and space skills, and number line estimation) assessed 1 year later. Latent regression models revealed that nonverbal number sense and working memory are central building blocks for developing early number competence in kindergarten and that early number competence is key for first grade math achievement. After controlling for early number competence, fluid intelligence significantly predicted arithmetic and number line estimation while receptive vocabulary significantly predicted shape and space skills. In sum we suggest that early math achievement draws on different constellations of number-specific and domain-general mechanisms.

  14. Predicting first-grade mathematics achievement: the contributions of domain-general cognitive abilities, nonverbal number sense, and early number competence

    PubMed Central

    Hornung, Caroline; Schiltz, Christine; Brunner, Martin; Martin, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Early number competence, grounded in number-specific and domain-general cognitive abilities, is theorized to lay the foundation for later math achievement. Few longitudinal studies have tested a comprehensive model for early math development. Using structural equation modeling and mediation analyses, the present work examined the influence of kindergarteners' nonverbal number sense and domain-general abilities (i.e., working memory, fluid intelligence, and receptive vocabulary) and their early number competence (i.e., symbolic number skills) on first grade math achievement (i.e., arithmetic, shape and space skills, and number line estimation) assessed 1 year later. Latent regression models revealed that nonverbal number sense and working memory are central building blocks for developing early number competence in kindergarten and that early number competence is key for first grade math achievement. After controlling for early number competence, fluid intelligence significantly predicted arithmetic and number line estimation while receptive vocabulary significantly predicted shape and space skills. In sum we suggest that early math achievement draws on different constellations of number-specific and domain-general mechanisms. PMID:24772098

  15. The transition to competency-based pediatric training in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Halah; Al Tatari, Hossam; Holmboe, Eric S

    2015-04-01

    Although competency-based medical education has become the standard for physician training in the West, many developing countries have not yet adopted competency-based training. In 2009 in the United Arab Emirates, the government regulatory and operational authorities for healthcare in Abu Dhabi mandated a wide-scale reform of the emirate's postgraduate residency programs to the competency-based framework of the newly formed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-International (ACGME-I). This article briefly describes the rationale for competency-based medical education and provides an overview of the transition from traditional, time-based residency training to competency-based postgraduate medical education for the Pediatrics residency programs in Abu Dhabi. We will provide data on the initial impact of this transition on resident performance and patient outcomes in a Pediatrics residency program in an academic medical center in the United Arab Emirates.

  16. Restructuring a basic science course for core competencies: an example from anatomy teaching.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Jeremy K; Lachman, Nirusha; Camp, Christopher L; Chen, Laura P; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2009-09-01

    Medical schools revise their curricula in order to develop physicians best skilled to serve the public's needs. To ensure a smooth transition to residency programs, undergraduate medical education is often driven by the six core competencies endorsed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME): patient care, medical knowledge, practice-based learning, interpersonal skills, professionalism, and systems-based practice. Recent curricular redesign at Mayo Medical School provided an opportunity to restructure anatomy education and integrate radiology with first-year gross and developmental anatomy. The resulting 6-week (120-contact-hour) human structure block provides students with opportunities to learn gross anatomy through dissection, radiologic imaging, and embryologic correlation. We report more than 20 educational interventions from the human structure block that may serve as a model for incorporating the ACGME core competencies into basic science and early medical education. The block emphasizes clinically-oriented anatomy, invites self- and peer-evaluation, provides daily formative feedback through an audience response system, and employs team-based learning. The course includes didactic briefing sessions and roles for students as teachers, leaders, and collaborators. Third-year medical students serve as teaching assistants. With its clinical focus and competency-based design, the human structure block connects basic science with best-practice clinical medicine.

  17. Educational interventions to improve the effectiveness in clinical competence of general practitioners: problem-based versus critical reading-based learning

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that continuing medical education improves the clinical competence of general practitioners and the quality of health care services. Thus, we evaluated the relative impact of two educational strategies, critical reading (CR) and problem based learning (PBL), on the clinical competence of general practitioners in a healthcare system characterized by excessive workload and fragmentation into small primary healthcare centers. Methods Clinical competence was evaluated in general practitioners assigned to three groups based on the educational interventions used: 1) critical reading intervention; 2) problem based learning intervention; and 3) no intervention (control group, which continued clinical practice as normal). The effect on the clinical competence of general practitioners was evaluated in three dimensions: the cognitive dimension, via a self-administered questionnaire; the habitual behavioral dimension, via information from patient’s medical records; and the affective dimension, through interviews with patients. A paired Student´s t-test was used to evaluate the changes in the mean clinical competence scores before and after the intervention, and a 3 x 2 ANOVA was used to analyze groups, times and their interaction. Results Nine general practitioners participated in the critical reading workshop, nine in the problem-based learning workshop, and ten were assigned to the control group. The participants exhibited no significant differences in clinical competence measures at baseline, or in socio-demographic or job characteristics (p > 0.05). Significant improvements in all three dimensions (cognitive, 45.67 vs 54.89; habitual behavioral, 53.78 vs 82.33; affective, 4.16 vs 4.76) were only observed in the problem-based learning group after the intervention (p > 0.017). Conclusions While no differences in post-intervention scores were observed between groups, we conclude that problem-based learning can be effective, particularly in a

  18. Advances in the Assessment of Social Competence: Findings from a Preliminary Investigation of a General Outcome Measure for Social Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Kelli D.; Kaminski, Ruth A.; Merrell, Kenneth W.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the initial validation of an innovative social-behavioral observational assessment tool that is designed to be used on a repeated basis to assess growth and development of social competence over time to: (a) identify the social functioning of all students, (b) assist in planning support for students at risk, and (c) evaluate…

  19. Does Rhetorical Competence Moderate the Effect of Rhetorical Devices on the Comprehension of Expository Texts beyond General Comprehension Skills?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez, Emilio; García, J. Ricardo; Bustos, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the facilitating role of rhetorical devices in text comprehension, but there are also studies where rhetorical devices have not shown such effect. The present study sets out to explore whether readers' knowledge of rhetorical devices (that is, rhetorical competence) moderates their effectiveness beyond general…

  20. Narrative medicine as a means of training medical students toward residency competencies

    PubMed Central

    Arntfield, Shannon L.; Slesar, Kristen; Dickson, Jennifer; Charon, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study sought to explore the perceived influence of narrative medicine training on clinical skill development of fourth-year medical students, focusing on competencies mandated by ACGME and the RCPSC in areas of communication, collaboration, and professionalism. Methods Using grounded-theory, three methods of data collection were used to query twelve medical students participating in a one-month narrative medicine elective regarding the process of training and the influence on clinical skills. Iterative thematic analysis and data triangulation occurred. Results Response rate was 91% (survey), 50% (focus group) and 25% (follow-up). Five major findings emerged. Students perceive that they: develop and improve specific communication skills; enhance their capacity to collaborate, empathize, and be patient-centered; develop personally and professionally through reflection. They report that the pedagogical approach used in narrative training is critical to its dividends but misunderstood and perceived as counter-culture. Conclusion/Practice implications Participating medical students reported that they perceived narrative medicine to be an important, effective, but counter-culture means of enhancing communication, collaboration, and professional development. The authors contend that these skills are integral to medical practice, consistent with core competencies mandated by the ACGME/RCPSC, and difficult to teach. Future research must explore sequelae of training on actual clinical performance. PMID:23462070

  1. A qualitative assessment of internal medicine resident perceptions of graduate medical education following implementation of the 2011 ACGME duty hour standards

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2011, the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education implemented updated guidelines for medical resident duty hours, further limiting continuous work hours for first-year residents. We sought to investigate the impact of these restrictions on graduate medical education among internal medicine residents. Methods We conducted eight focus groups with internal medicine residents at the University of Alabama at Birmingham in 06/2012-07/2012. Discussion questions included, “How do you feel the 2011 ACGME work hour restrictions have impacted your graduate medical education?” Transcripts of the focus groups were reviewed and themes identified using a deductive/inductive approach. Participants completed a survey to collect demographic information and future practice plans. Results Thirty-four residents participated in our focus groups. Five themes emerged: decreased teaching, decreased experiential learning, shift-work mentality, tension between residency classes, and benefits and opportunities. Residents reported that since implementation of the guidelines, teaching was often deferred to complete patient-care tasks. Residents voiced concern that PGY-1 s were not receiving adequate clinical experience and that procedural and clinical reasoning skills are being negatively impacted. PGY-1 s reported being well-rested and having increased time for independent study. Conclusions Residents noted a decline in teaching and are concerned with the decrease in “hands-on” clinical education that is inevitably impacted by fewer hours in the hospital, though some benefits were also reported. Future studies are needed to further elucidate the impact of decreased resident work hours on graduate medical education. PMID:24755276

  2. AAOHN Competencies.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    The AAOHN Competency document is one of the core documents that define occupational health nursing practice. This article provides a description of the process used to update the competencies, as well as a description of the new competencies.

  3. Resident dashboards: helping your clinical competency committee visualize trainees’ key performance indicators

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Karen A.; Raimo, John; Spielmann, Kelly; Chaudhry, Saima

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Under the Next Accreditation System, programs need to find ways to collect and assess meaningful reportable information on its residents to assist the program director regarding resident milestone progression. This paper discusses the process that one large Internal Medicine Residency Program used to provide both quantitative and qualitative data to its clinical competency committee (CCC) through the creation of a resident dashboard. Methods Program leadership at a large university-based program developed four new end of rotation evaluations based on the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) and Accreditation Council of Graduated Medical Education's (ACGME) 22 reportable milestones. A resident dashboard was then created to pull together both milestone- and non-milestone-based quantitative data and qualitative data compiled from faculty, nurses, peers, staff, and patients. Results Dashboards were distributed to the members of the CCC in preparation for the semiannual CCC meeting. CCC members adjudicated quantitative and qualitative data to present their cohort of residents at the CCC meeting. Based on the committee's response, evaluation scores remained the same or were adjusted. Final milestone scores were then entered into the accreditation data system (ADS) on the ACGME website. Conclusions The process of resident assessment is complex and should comprise both quantitative and qualitative data. The dashboard is a valuable tool for program leadership to use both when evaluating house staff on a semiannual basis at the CCC and to the resident in person. PMID:27037226

  4. Adult Functional Competency: A Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Div. of Extension.

    The Adult Performance Level (APL) project summary specifies the competencies which are functional to economic and educational success in society and describes devices developed for assessing those competencies. The APL theory of functional competency identifies adult needs in general knowledge areas (consumer economics, occupational knowledge,…

  5. Milestones: a rapid assessment method for the Clinical Competency Committee

    PubMed Central

    Nabors, Christopher; Forman, Leanne; Peterson, Stephen J.; Gennarelli, Melissa; Aronow, Wilbert S.; DeLorenzo, Lawrence; Chandy, Dipak; Ahn, Chul; Sule, Sachin; Stallings, Gary W.; Khera, Sahil; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Frishman, William H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Educational milestones are now used to assess the developmental progress of all U.S. graduate medical residents during training. Twice annually, each program’s Clinical Competency Committee (CCC) makes these determinations and reports its findings to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). The ideal way to conduct the CCC is not known. After finding that deliberations reliant upon the new milestones were time intensive, our internal medicine residency program tested an approach designed to produce rapid but accurate assessments. Material and methods For this study, we modified our usual CCC process to include pre-meeting faculty ratings of resident milestones progress with in-meeting reconciliation of their ratings. Data were considered largely via standard report and presented in a pre-arranged pattern. Participants were surveyed regarding their perceptions of data management strategies and use of milestones. Reliability of competence assessments was estimated by comparing pre-/post-intervention class rank lists produced by individual committee members with a master class rank list produced by the collective CCC after full deliberation. Results Use of the study CCC approach reduced committee deliberation time from 25 min to 9 min per resident (p < 0.001). Committee members believed milestones improved their ability to identify and assess expected elements of competency development (p = 0.026). Individual committee member assessments of trainee progress agreed well with collective CCC assessments. Conclusions Modification of the clinical competency process to include pre-meeting competence ratings with in-meeting reconciliation of these ratings led to shorter deliberation times, improved evaluator satisfaction and resulted in reliable milestone assessments. PMID:28144272

  6. Informatics competencies for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Curran, Christine R

    2003-08-01

    Informatics knowledge and skills are essential if clinicians are to master the large volume of information generated in healthcare today. Thus, it is vital that informatics competencies be defined for nursing and incorporated into both curricula and practice. Staggers, Gassert, and Curran have defined informatics competencies for four general levels of nursing practice. However, informatics competencies by role (eg, those specific for advanced practice nursing) have not been defined and validated. This article presents an initial proposed list of informatics competencies essential for nurse practitioner education and practice. To this list, derived from the work of Staggers et al., 1 has been added informatics competencies related to evidence-based practice. Two nurse informaticists and six nurse practitioners, who are program directors, were involved in the development of the proposed competencies. The next step will be to validate these competencies via research.

  7. The ethics of cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Paasche-Orlow, Michael

    2004-04-01

    Cultural competence curricula have proliferated throughout medical education. Awareness of the moral underpinnings of this movement can clarify the purpose of such curricula for educators and trainees and serve as a way to evaluate the relationship between the ethics of cultural competence and normative Western medical ethics. Though rarely stated explicitly, the essential principles of cultural competence are (1) acknowledgement of the importance of culture in people's lives, (2) respect for cultural differences, and (3) minimization of any negative consequences of cultural differences. Culturally competent clinicians promote these principles by learning about culture, embracing pluralism, and proactive accommodation. Generally, culturally competent care will advance patient autonomy and justice. In this sense, cultural competence and Western medical ethics are mutually supportive movements. However, Western bioethics and the personal ethical commitments of many medical trainees will place limits on the extent to which they will endorse pluralism and accommodation. Specifically, if the values of cultural competence are thought to embrace ethical relativity, inexorable conflicts will be created. The author presents his view of the ethics of cultural competence and places the concepts of cultural competence in the context of Western moral theory. Clarity about the ethics of cultural competence can help educators promote and evaluate trainees' integration of their own moral intuitions, Western medical ethics, and the ethics of cultural competence.

  8. The Use of Peer-Mediated Interventions to Promote the Generalization of Social Competence for Adolescents with High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Carla; Stichter, Janine P.

    2012-01-01

    Impairments in social competence are core deficits for individuals with high-functioning autism and Asperger's Syndrome (HFA/AS). As the incidence rate for these disorders continues to increase so does the urgency to identify evidence-based interventions that can remediate core deficits in order to provide these individuals with independence as…

  9. Theme: Coping with Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Daniel; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Consists of five articles on the topic of competencies in vocational agriculture. Topics covered include (1) competency-based instruction, (2) competencies for agricultural recordkeeping, (3) competencies in hydroponics, and (4) competencies in agribusiness. (CH)

  10. Juvenile Competency to Stand Trial.

    PubMed

    Stepanyan, Sofia T; Sidhu, Shawn S; Bath, Eraka

    2016-01-01

    Competency to stand trial is interpreted as a protected due process right for all defendants and is defined as a defendant's fundamental knowledge and understanding of the criminal charges being filed, roles and procedures within the courtroom, and a general ability to work with the defense counsel. Questions of competency are most often raised by the judge, defense, or the prosecution, and competency evaluations are most often completed by psychiatrists or psychologists with forensic training or work experience. Mental illness, intellectual disability, developmental disorders, and developmental immaturity are the 4 main factors considered in most juvenile competency evaluations.

  11. Competencies as the basis for reformed premedical education. The case for an unrestricted liberal arts collegiate education.

    PubMed

    Kase, Nathan; Muller, David

    2012-01-01

    As the HHMI-AAMC declared, their report should be taken as a "first step in a continuing conversation about the appropriate skills and knowledge," and, echoing the ACGME and GPEP, "values and attitudes that future physicians should possess." (9pExecSum) As a new formulation evolves, the premedical curriculum must foster "scholastic vigor, analytic thinking, quantitative assessment and analysis of complex systems." (9pExecSum) Based on the Mount Sinai experience, these qualities are not engendered solely nor confined to engagement in natural sciences. Students involved in a variety of baccalaureate liberal arts endeavors appear to acquire similar intellectual competencies. Furthermore, when performed successfully in challenging collegiate environments, a thorough liberal arts education may yield precisely the same values, attitudes, and behavioral characteristics all agree are essential to the medical profession and preparing physicians for the twenty-first century.

  12. Communication Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boileau, Don M.

    Aware of the societal problems stemming from a lack of communication skills, the American public is pressing for instruction in speaking and listening in the schools. This response is reflected in the speaking and listening competency recommendations in many national reform reports. Such reports include "A Nation at Risk" by the National…

  13. Clients' ratings of counselor multicultural competency.

    PubMed

    Fuertes, Jairo N; Brobst, Karen

    2002-08-01

    Differences in perceptions between Euro American and ethnic minority respondents were examined to compare the role of counselor multicultural competency in multicultural versus traditional counseling. Results showed a strong positive correlation between clients' ratings of counselors' multicultural competencies and clients' ratings of counselors' general competency and empathy. However, when comparisons were made between Euro American and ethnic minority clients' on satisfaction, counselor multicultural competency explained a large and significant amount of variance for the ethnic minority sample only, above and beyond counselor general competency and empathy. Results are discussed in the context of relevant literature and suggestions for future research.

  14. Religious competence as cultural competence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Definitions of cultural competence often refer to the need to be aware and attentive to the religious and spiritual needs and orientations of patients. However, the institution of psychiatry maintains an ambivalent attitude to the incorporation of religion and spirituality into psychiatric practice. This is despite the fact that many patients, especially those from underserved and underprivileged minority backgrounds, are devotedly religious and find much solace and support in their religiosity. I use the case of mental health of African Americans as an extended example to support the argument that psychiatric services must become more closely attuned to religious matters. I suggest ways in which this can be achieved. Attention to religion can aid in the development of culturally competent and accessible services, which in turn, may increase engagement and service satisfaction among religious populations. PMID:22421686

  15. Competent psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Gardner, David M

    2014-08-01

    There is little doubt that undergraduate and post-graduate training of physicians, pharmacists, and nurses is insufficient to prepare them to use psychotropics safely and effectively, especially in the context of their expanded off-label uses. Therefore, the development of competencies in psychotropic prescribing needs to be approached as a long-term, practice-based learning commitment. Proposed are the abilities and knowledge components necessary for safe and effective use of psychotropics. Typical challenges in prescribing for chronic and recurrent illnesses include highly variable responses and tolerability, drug interactions, and adverse effects that can be serious, irreversible, and even fatal. Prescribing psychotropics is further complicated by negative public and professional reports and growing patient concerns about the quality of care, and questions about the efficacy, safety, and addictive risks of psychotropics. Increased efforts are needed to enhance clinical training and knowledge in psychopharmacology among trainees and practising clinicians, with more comprehensive and sustained attention to the assessment of individual patients, and greater reliance on patient education and collaboration. Improved competence in psychotropic prescribing should lead to more informed, thoughtful, and better-targeted applications as one component of more comprehensive clinical care.

  16. 13 CFR 125.5 - Certificate of Competency Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Certificate of Competency Program... CONTRACTING PROGRAMS § 125.5 Certificate of Competency Program. (a) General. (1) The Certificate of Competency... lacks any element of responsibility (including competency, capability, capacity, credit, integrity...

  17. Social Communication Competence and Functional Adaptation in a General Population of Children: Preliminary Evidence for Sex-by-Verbal IQ Differential Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skuse, David H.; Mandy, William D.; Steer, Colin; Miller, Laura L.; Lawrence, Kate; Amond, Alan; Golding, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Results from a Social and Communication Disorders Checklist finds that the scores were continuously distributed in the general population and that boys had mean scores 30 percent higher than girls. Above-average verbal IQ appears to protect female subjects from social communication impairments but not in male subjects. Participants to the study…

  18. Effects of General-Case Training, Instructions, Rehearsal, and Feedback on the Reduction of Sight-Reading Errors by Competent Musicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dib, Nancy Ellen; Sturmey, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We used general-case training, instructions, rehearsal, and feedback to teach 3 advanced flute students to improve their sight-reading skills. Training resulted in systematic decreases in note errors, rhythm errors, repetitions, and hesitations for each participant. The procedures and outcomes were socially validated through subjective evaluation…

  19. Effects of general-case training, instructions, rehearsal, and feedback on the reduction of sight-reading errors by competent musicians.

    PubMed

    Dib, Nancy Ellen; Sturmey, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We used general-case training, instructions, rehearsal, and feedback to teach 3 advanced flute students to improve their sight-reading skills. Training resulted in systematic decreases in note errors, rhythm errors, repetitions, and hesitations for each participant. The procedures and outcomes were socially validated through subjective evaluation by the participants and music teachers not involved with the study.

  20. A Call to Restructure Psychiatry General and Subspecialty Training.

    PubMed

    Kirwin, Paul; Conroy, Michelle; Lyketsos, Constantine; Greenwald, Blaine; Forester, Brent; deVries, Christine; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike; Wiechers, Ilse; Zdanys, Kristina; Steffens, David; Reynolds, Charles F

    2016-02-01

    Dire shortages of psychiatrists with special expertise in geriatrics, substance abuse, forensics, and psychosomatics create barriers to care for populations with complex mental disorders and pose a significant public health concern. To address these disparities in access to care, we propose streamlining graduate medical education to increase efficiency and enhance cost-effectiveness while simultaneously increasing the number of psychiatric subspecialists in these key areas. We propose that trainees interested in subspecialties complete their general training in 3 years, while meeting ACGME required milestones, and then utilize their 4th year to complete subspecialty fellowship training. Eligible trainees would then qualify for psychiatry subspecialty certification and general psychiatry ABPN certification at the end of 4 years.

  1. Competence-Based Management Training. Report 302.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strebler, M. T.; Bevan, S.

    A research study examined what competence-based management training (CBMT) is, how organizations are using it and why, and what impact it has had. It drew on evidence from a survey and case studies conducted among large employers in Britain (United Kingdom). General findings from 377 respondents indicated that the use of competencies was…

  2. The Action Competence Approach in Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Bjarne Bruun; Schnack, Karsten

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the concept of action competence is presented and an attempt is made to locate it within the concept of general educational theory. The concept of action competence, it is argued, should occupy a central position in the theory of environmental education as many of the crucial educational problems concerning a political liberal…

  3. Linguistic Competence in English and Exposure Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mota, Marisol

    2008-01-01

    This study examines Linguistic Competence in English Language (LCE) as a general indicator of Communicative Competence. A test and a questionnaire were administered to 1838 undergraduate freshmen from five major institutes of higher education in Aguascalientes, Mexico. The results of the test are analysed in their association with main features of…

  4. Improving General and Vocational Education in the High Schools. SREB-State Vocational Education Consortium Approaches for Achieving Gains in the Mathematics, Science, and Communications Competencies of Students in General and Vocational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottoms, Gene; Presson, Alice

    Recommendations for improving general and vocational education in the high schools are as follows: (1) providing clearly stated state and local school board policies establishing the purpose of vocational education; (2) upgrading the content of vocational courses; (3) providing students with access to higher level academic content taught through…

  5. Local and national trends in general surgery residents' operative experience: do work hour limitations negatively affect case volume in small community-based programs?

    PubMed

    Markelov, Alexey; Sakharpe, Aniket; Kohli, Harjeet; Livert, David

    2011-12-01

    The goals of this study were to analyze the impact of work hour restrictions on the operative case volume at a small community-based general surgery residency training program and compare changes with the national level. Annual national resident case log data from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) website and case logs of graduating Easton Hospital residents (years 2002-2009) were used for analysis. Weighted average change in total number of cases in our institution was -1.20 (P = 0.52) vs 1.78 (P = 0.07) for the national program average with statistically significant difference on comparison (P = 0.027). We also found significant difference in case volume changes at the national level compared with our institution for the following ACGME defined subcategories: alimentary tract [8.19 (P < 0.01) vs -1.08 (P = 0.54)], abdomen [8.48 (P < 0.01) vs -6.29 (P < 0.01)], breast [1.91 (P = 0.89) vs -3.6 (P = 0.02)], and vascular [4.03 (P = 0.02) vs -3.98 (P = 0.01)]. Comparing the national trend to the community hospital we see that there is total increase in cases at the national level whereas there is a decrease in case volume at the community hospital. These trends can also be followed in ACGME defined subcategories which form the major case load for a general surgical training such as alimentary tract, abdominal, breast, and vascular procedures. We hypothesize that work hour restrictions have been favorable for the larger programs, as these programs were able to better integrate the night float system, restructure their call schedule, and implement institutional modifications which are too resource demanding for smaller training programs.

  6. [From management competencies to nurse managerial competencies].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Patrícia de Oliveira; Cunha, Isabel Cristina Kowal Olm

    2010-01-01

    This article is a literature review that aimed to collect more information about the competencies management, understand the concepts of profile and competencies in the managing people; understand the issue of professional competence and its relationship with the organization's competencies; and finally identify the managerial competencies necessary to work of the nurse on the aspect of the labor market. The literature showed that the concept of competence shows great results when applied in the people management arena. It also can provide in the context of health services, benefits for the organizations and for the professionals and patients. For that, it's required that health services to take the ownership of this knowledge as possibility to achieve better results, as well as educational institutions and nurses that seek for information and training to achieve the challenges of the profession and the labor market.

  7. Competing Synchronization of Nonlinear Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Epaminondas

    2006-03-01

    Coupled nonlinear oscillators abound in nature and in man-made devices. Think for example of two neurons in the brain competing to get the attention of a third neuron, and eventually developing some sort of synchronization process. This is a common feature involving oscillators in general, and can be studied using numerical simulations and/or experimental setups. In this talk, results involving electronic circuits and plasma discharges will be presented showing interesting features related to the types of oscillators and to the types of couplings. In particular, for the case of two oscillators competing for synchronization with a third one, the target oscillator synchronizes alternately to one or the other of the competing oscillators. The time intervals of synchronous states vary in a random-like manner. Numerical and experimental results will be presented and the consistency between them will be discussed.

  8. Allgemeine Sprachfaehigkeit und Fremdsprachenerwerb. Zur Struktur von Leistungsdimensionen und linguistischer Kompetenz des Fremdsprachenlerners (General Language Ability and Foreign Language Acquisition. On the Structure of Performance Dimensions and the Linguistic Competence of the Foreign Language Learner). Diskussions beitraege aus dem Institute fuer Bildungsforschung, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sang, Fritz; Vollmer, Helmut J.

    This study investigates the theoretical plausibility and empirical validity of the assumption that all performance in a foreign language can be traced back to a single factor, the general language ability factor. The theoretical background of this hypothesis is reviewed in detail. The concept of a unitary linguistic competence, interpreted as an…

  9. Epistemic Evaluation of the Training and Managerial Competence Development Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Evelio F.; Zambrano, Marcos T.; Montes de Oca, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the problem of defining the concept of "competence", due to it being an integral and complex term that has been applied in many domains as well as in a more general sense for everyday life. However, no doubt, a competence can only be tested and valuated in the practice, and it is a person who becomes competent in a…

  10. 12 CFR 323.6 - Professional association membership; competency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Professional association membership; competency... OF GENERAL POLICY APPRAISALS § 323.6 Professional association membership; competency. (a) Membership... membership or lack of membership in any particular appraisal organization. (b) Competency. All staff and...

  11. 12 CFR 323.6 - Professional association membership; competency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Professional association membership; competency... OF GENERAL POLICY APPRAISALS § 323.6 Professional association membership; competency. (a) Membership... membership or lack of membership in any particular appraisal organization. (b) Competency. All staff and...

  12. 12 CFR 323.6 - Professional association membership; competency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Professional association membership; competency... OF GENERAL POLICY APPRAISALS § 323.6 Professional association membership; competency. (a) Membership... membership or lack of membership in any particular appraisal organization. (b) Competency. All staff and...

  13. What is Gillick competence?

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This article considers the requirements for Gillick competence, it highlights the factors that must be considered when determining whether a child is competent to give consent to treatment. PMID:26619366

  14. Competencies: A New Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brophy, Monica; Kiely, Tony

    2002-01-01

    Job analysis of managers in 42 Irish three-star hotels identified the following key management competencies and associated behavioral indicators. The results were used to develop a competency framework for management development. (Contains 29 references.) (SK)

  15. Competencies in Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathelitsch, Leopold

    2013-01-01

    The role of competencies is discussed with respect to science teaching. In particular, competence models from Germany, Switzerland and Austria are presented and compared. A special topical program, "Competencies in Mathematics and Science Teaching", was started in Austria three years ago. Initial experiences with this program are…

  16. Are Quantity Surveyors Competent to Value for Civil Engineering Works? Evaluating QSs' Competencies and Militating Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olawumi, Timothy Oluwatosin; Ayegun, Olaleke Amos

    2016-01-01

    The role of the quantity surveyor is one that is often unclear amongst the general public. This study discussed the competencies of the quantity surveyor in measuring and managing civil engineering works and also carrying out the financial management for civil engineering construction projects; also outlined the various competencies and skills…

  17. The Construct of Social Competence--How Preschool Teachers Define Social Competence in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillvist, Anne; Sandberg, Anette; Bjorck-Akesson, Eva; Granlund, Mats

    2009-01-01

    Preschool teachers share their environment with young children on a daily basis and interventions promoting social competence are generally carried out in the preschool setting. The aim was to find out if and how preschool teachers' definitions of social competence are related to factors in the preschool environment like: a) the number of children…

  18. Further considerations of evaluation competencies in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Fang; Altschuld, James W; Lee, Lung-Sheng Steven

    2013-12-01

    A list of evaluator competencies (Stevahn, King, Ghere, & Minnema, 2005) was adapted to fit the Taiwanese context by Lee, Altschuld, & Lee (2012). It was studied as to how it generalized to a large sample in Taiwan. Likert and Fuzzy surveys with needs assessment formats (importance and competence) were mailed via random assignment to two groups of participants. The questions for the study were: do the modified competencies relate country-wide to Taiwan, did the investigation uncover training needs for evaluators, and were there convergent rating patterns across the two forms of the instrument? The results supported a fit of the modified competencies to the context and convergent validity was observed but strong competency needs were not apparent. Reasons for the findings and implications for future research are discussed.

  19. Measuring nursing informatics competencies of practicing nurses in Korea: Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seon Yoon; Staggers, Nancy

    2014-12-01

    Informatics competencies are a necessity for contemporary nurses. However, few researchers have investigated informatics competencies for practicing nurses. A full set of Informatics competencies, an instrument to measure these competencies, and potential influencing factors have yet to be identified for practicing nurses. The Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire was designed, tested for psychometrics, and used to measure beginning and experienced levels of practice. A pilot study using 54 nurses ensured item comprehension and clarity. Internal consistency and face and content validity were established. A cross-sectional survey was then conducted on 230 nurses in Seoul, Korea, to determine construct validity, describe a complete set of informatics competencies, and explore possible influencing factors on existing informatics competencies. Principal components analysis, descriptive statistics, and multiple regression were used for data analysis. Principal components analysis gives support for the Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire construct validity. Survey results indicate that involvement in a managerial position and self-directed informatics-related education may be more influential for improving informatics competencies, whereas general clinical experience and workplace settings are not. This study provides a foundation for understanding how informatics competencies might be integrated throughout nurses' work lives and how to develop appropriate strategies to support nurses in their informatics practice in clinical settings.

  20. Competing on analytics.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Thomas H

    2006-01-01

    We all know the power of the killer app. It's not just a support tool; it's a strategic weapon. Companies questing for killer apps generally focus all their firepower on the one area that promises to create the greatest competitive advantage. But a new breed of organization has upped the stakes: Amazon, Harrah's, Capital One, and the Boston Red Sox have all dominated their fields by deploying industrial-strength analytics across a wide variety of activities. At a time when firms in many industries offer similar products and use comparable technologies, business processes are among the few remaining points of differentiation--and analytics competitors wring every last drop of value from those processes. Employees hired for their expertise with numbers or trained to recognize their importance are armed with the best evidence and the best quantitative tools. As a result, they make the best decisions. In companies that compete on analytics, senior executives make it clear--from the top down--that analytics is central to strategy. Such organizations launch multiple initiatives involving complex data and statistical analysis, and quantitative activity is managed atthe enterprise (not departmental) level. In this article, professor Thomas H. Davenport lays out the characteristics and practices of these statistical masters and describes some of the very substantial changes other companies must undergo in order to compete on quantitative turf. As one would expect, the transformation requires a significant investment in technology, the accumulation of massive stores of data, and the formulation of company-wide strategies for managing the data. But, at least as important, it also requires executives' vocal, unswerving commitment and willingness to change the way employees think, work, and are treated.

  1. Natural Resources. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile. Forest Industry Worker. Resource Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This competency analysis profile lists 155 competencies that have been identified by employers as core competencies for inclusion in programs to train forest industry and resource conservation workers. The core competencies are organized into 10 units dealing the following: general safety precautions, natural resource industry operations, soil…

  2. Scientific Competencies in the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Heike; Zhang, Ying; Klopp, Eric; Brünken, Roland; Krause, Ulrike-Marie; Spinath, Frank M.; Stark, Robin; Spinath, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to introduce a general theoretical model of scientific competencies in higher education and to adapt it to three social sciences, namely psychology, sociology, and political science, by providing evidence from expert interviews and program regulations. Within our general model, we distinguished and specified four…

  3. Electrodiagnostic medicine skills competency in physical medicine and rehabilitation residents: a method for development and assessment.

    PubMed

    Brown, David; Cuccurullo, Sara; Lee, Joseph; Petagna, Ann; Strax, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    This project sought to create an educational module including evaluation methodology to instruct physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) residents in electrodiagnostic evaluation of patients with neuromuscular problems, and to verify acquired competencies in those electrodiagnostic skills through objective evaluation methodology. Sixteen residents were trained by board-certified neuromuscular and electrodiagnostic medicine physicians through technical training, lectures, and review of self-assessment examination (SAE) concepts from the American Academy of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation syllabus provided in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. After delivery of the educational module, knowledge acquisition and skill attainment were measured in (1) clinical skill in diagnostic procedures via a procedure checklist, (2) diagnosis and ability to design a patient-care management plan via chart simulated recall (CSR) exams, (3) physician/patient interaction via patient surveys, (4) physician/staff interaction via 360-degree global ratings, and (5) ability to write a comprehensive patient-care report and to document a patient-care management plan in accordance with Medicare guidelines via written patient reports. Assessment tools developed for this program address the basic competencies outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). To test the success of the standardized educational module, data were collected on an ongoing basis. Objective measures compared resident SAE scores in electrodiagnostics (EDX) before and after institution of the comprehensive EDX competency module in a PM&R residency program. Fifteen of 16 residents (94%) successfully demonstrated proficiency in every segment of the evaluation element of the educational module by the end of their PGY-4 electrodiagnostic rotation. The resident who did not initially pass underwent remedial coursework and passed on the second attempt. Furthermore, the

  4. Sufficient Competence to Enter the Unsupervised Practice of Orthopaedics: What Is It, When Does It Occur, and Do We Know It When We See It? AOA Critical Issues.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Vincent D; Ferguson, Peter C; Cruess, Richard; Cruess, Sylvia; Briggs, Timothy W R

    2015-09-02

    The goal of residency programs is to provide an educational venue with graduated responsibility and increasing levels of independence as preparation for entering the unsupervised practice of medicine. Surgical programs are required to both cultivate and convey skills pursuant to three fundamental domains: a sufficient fund of knowledge, technical competence in surgical procedures, and a degree of professionalism to enable ethical independent practice. Never before has the expectation that residency programs provide graduated responsibility in preparation for entering the unsupervised practice of medicine been so clearly articulated as it has by Nasca in the recent Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) work-hour guideline revisions. The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons has provided similar guidance in Canada. Yet, as we progress further into the second decade of work-hour restrictions, it is unclear that we have adequately defined or can recognize the critical end points essential to trainee competency. What is clear is that we must achieve these end points in a manner different from that prior to the introduction of work-hour restrictions. We present the current state of thinking from North America and contrast this with the evolving medical educational process in the United Kingdom.

  5. Profiles of Algebraic Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humberstone, J.; Reeve, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The algebraic competence of 72 12-year-old female students was examined to identify profiles of understanding reflecting different algebraic knowledge states. Beginning algebraic competence (mapping abilities: word-to-symbol and vice versa, classifying, and solving equations) was assessed. One week later, the nature of assistance required to map…

  6. Assessing and Teaching Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Terri

    2004-01-01

    The Professional Communication Unit (PCU) at the University of Cape Town (UCT) recently conducted a business communication needs analysis to determine student perceptions of their communicative competence and the teaching strategies being used to develop such competence. Students felt that the specialist, stand-alone communication program was more…

  7. The Spiritual Competency Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Linda A.

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the development of the Spiritual Competency Scale, which was based on the Association for Spiritual, Ethical and Religious Values in Counseling's original Spiritual Competencies. Participants were 662 counseling students from religiously based and secular universities nationwide. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a 22-item,…

  8. Communicative Competence Reconsidered.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doushaq, Mufeeq

    A discussion of points raised by Dell Hymes in his article "On Communicative Competence" leads to a proposal for a clearer and more comprehensive theory of communicative competence based on two models, a matrix of discourse analysis and a model of communication interaction. Pedagogical implications of the theory are considered, including the…

  9. Curriculum Competencies, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Technical and Community Coll., Dover. Terry Campus.

    This manual specifies the skills and abilities possessed by the graduates of programs offered by the Terry Campus of Delaware Technical and Community College. First, introductory material discusses the college's competency-based philosophy and the efforts by faculty and administrators to criterion reference the competencies perceived by faculty to…

  10. Developing Competence at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bound, Helen; Lin, Magdalene

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the relationship between differing conceptualisations of competence, and the implications of these differences for the enacted workplace curriculum and its pedagogical epistemologies. We argue that when competence is understood as a set of stand-alone attributes that reside within an individual, it limits and over…

  11. Competencies and Their Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drisko, James W.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores competencies and methods for their assessment in higher education and in social work's accreditation standards. Many contemporary policy and educational accreditation efforts employ the model of competency assessment. The current emphasis on accountability in higher education, including the Council on Social Work…

  12. Curricular Design: Competency Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grussing, Paul G.

    1987-01-01

    A discussion of pharmaceutical curriculum design to meet the competency needs of professional pharmacists looks at the nature of competency, anticipates some of the demands of such a curriculum, describes some methods of organizing curriculum elements, and provides a brief bibliography. (MSE)

  13. Analyzing ADN competencies.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P R

    1989-01-01

    El Paso Community College District, using the DACUM Process, identified 19 major competency areas with 313 specific competencies for AD Nursing. This article provides an overview of the DACUM Process, a discussion of the application to the ADN program, a summary of the results, and future activities.

  14. Competencies in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on competencies in human resource development (HRD). "The Development of a Competency Model and Assessment Instrument for Public Sector Leadership and Management Development" (Sharon S. Naquin, Elwood F. Holton III) reports on a streamlined methodology and process used to develop a competency…

  15. Therapist Multicultural Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Jennifer O.

    2010-01-01

    The results of this qualitative investigation provide a framework for conceptualizing the practice of multiculturally competent therapy, and identify the characteristics of multiculturally competent therapists. Clinic managers employed in clinics or social service agencies in two Midwestern cities each nominated a white clinician on staff whom…

  16. Adult Educators' Core Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned…

  17. How should paediatricians assess Gillick competence?

    PubMed

    Larcher, Vic; Hutchinson, Anna

    2010-04-01

    Competence is an essential legal requirement for valid consent to medical treatment. Children under 16 may be considered 'Gillick competent' to make treatment decisions, but may need to demonstrate this. Applied tests for competence are wide-ranging and context dependent. Competence is related to cognitive ability and experience and may be enhanced by education, encouragement etc.; there is a general duty for professionals to enhance the competence of children in their care. The need to assess a child's competence may occur when s/he wishes to make a controversial decision whose wisdom others dispute. Potential assessors should have the necessary practical skills and an understanding of the child in their social and medical context. Assessments should be developmentally appropriate, explore systemic influences, and consider the child's emotional state, cognitive development and ability to balance risks and benefits. The involvement of a psychologist or other independent third party should be considered in cases that raise serious concerns about competency, or that involve complex decisions or conflict between the various parties. In rare cases courts may be involved.

  18. Relationship between language competence and emotional competence in middle childhood.

    PubMed

    Beck, Luna; Kumschick, Irina R; Eid, Michael; Klann-Delius, Gisela

    2012-06-01

    Research on children's emotional competence has received considerable attention in the last decade, including the role of language. Language competence (LC) and emotional competence (EC) comprise multiple components. These components and their specific interrelations have not been studied sufficiently. In our study, we examined relations between multiple components of LC and EC in a sample of 210 school-age children. Five measures represented LC: receptive vocabulary, verbal fluency, literacy, narrative structure, and the narrative use of evaluative devices. Four measures represented EC: expressive emotion vocabulary, declarative emotion knowledge, awareness of mixed emotions, and facial emotion recognition. Results showed strong positive correlations between LC and EC ranging between r = .12 and r = .45. In particular, receptive vocabulary and literacy were closely related to emotion knowledge and awareness of mixed emotions. A confirmatory factor analysis revealed that there is a common general ability factor for LC and EC. We discuss why receptive vocabulary and literacy might be so strongly related to emotion knowledge in school-age children. Our findings have implications for developmental psychologists, educational research, and speech-language pathologists.

  19. Competent poverty training.

    PubMed

    Stabb, Sally D; Reimers, Faye A

    2013-02-01

    Despite numerous calls to the discipline, attention to poverty and social class remains minimal in psychology even though most human experience is significantly affected by social ranking. As a result, educators lack models for training in the context of poverty. Recent and concerted efforts to define and implement competency-based models for the practice of professional psychology have resulted in the creation of Competency Benchmarks (American Psychological Association, 2011). Here, these Competency Benchmarks frame the integration of best practices in working with poor and working-class clients with what we know about what constitutes good training. The result is a competency-based approach for those who are training psychologists-to-be to work effectively with economically challenged clients.

  20. Military nursing competencies.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mary Candice

    2010-06-01

    Competencies for military nurses are much broader in scope than their civilian counterparts. Not only must they be proficient at basic nursing skills, but they must also quickly master such military skills as protecting themselves and others during attack or threat of attack, caring for major trauma victims under austere conditions, and preparing such patients for transport through the military system of evacuation. This requires consistent and specialized training. This article describes the competencies necessary for practice by military nurses.

  1. Dental Assisting Competencies. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Beverly; And Others

    This document contains dental assisting competencies and competency-based performance objectives, learning activities, resources, and evaluation procedures for each competency that was adapted and developed by instructors of dental assisting to suit the needs and legal parameters of Pennsylvania. The competencies and associated elements are…

  2. Medical Assisting Competencies. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Beverly; And Others

    This document contains medical assisting competencies and competency-based performance objectives, learning activities, resources, and levels of achievement for each competency that were adapted and developed by instructors of medical assisting to suit the needs and legal parameters of Pennsylvania. The competencies and associated elements are…

  3. Humor Competence: The Fifth Component.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Gladys M.

    The production and understanding of humor calls for a specific competence. It appears that second language learners fail to develop this competence even when they reach native-like proficiency levels. A review of the literature suggests that the notion of humor competence in second language learning has not been examined. Humor competence can be…

  4. Carpentry. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This comprehensive and verified employer competency list was developed from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This competency list contains 14 units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational,…

  5. Welding. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a comprehensive and verified employer competency list for a welding program. It contains units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability skills needed…

  6. Caring, Competence and Professional Identities in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeod, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the multiple discourses that influence medical education with a focus on the discourses of competence and caring. Discourses of competence are largely constituted through, and related to, biomedical and clinical issues whereas discourses of caring generally focus on social concerns. These discourses are not necessarily equal…

  7. Investigating the Multicultural Competency of a Sample of Wyoming Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Stacey L.

    2016-01-01

    The literature on disproportionality indicates a generally held belief that disproportionality endures, in part, because of the lack of multicultural competency in today's educators. Yet, there is a dearth of empirical evidence to support this belief. This study examined the multicultural competency of a sample of Wyoming educators in order to…

  8. Video Narratives to Assess Student Teachers' Competence as New Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Admiraal, Wilfried; Berry, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    In teacher education programmes, written portfolios or text-based self-evaluations are generally used to document the development of student teachers' competence. However, such approaches do no justice to the complex nature of teaching as they tend to lead to evidence in which teacher competencies are disconnected and removed from the actual…

  9. Schooled Language Competence: Linguistic Abilities in Reading and Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perfetti, Charles A.; McCutchen, Deborah

    The notion that a set of restricted-generalized abilities underlies both reading and writing is explored in this essay. Following a definition of schooled language competence (SLC), the first section asserts that knowledge and problem solving are insufficient and nonlinguistic approaches to language competence. The second section focuses on…

  10. Laboratory Skills and Competencies for Secondary Science Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Gerald; Dawson, Carolyn; Tripp, Brad; Pentecost, Tom; Chaloupka, Meg; Saunders, John

    The emphasis on laboratory activities for science students has increased. This paper describes research that sought to determine which laboratory skills and competencies are viewed by current teachers as necessary for the preservice teacher to develop. The skills and competencies survey included 145 items in three categories (general, biological…

  11. Minimum Competency Testing in the Great City Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Maureen, Comp.; Casserly, Michael, Comp.

    This report represents the first attempt by the Council of the Great City Schools to assess the states of minimal competency testing in its twenty-eight member cities. This report does not focus on the results of the tests, but on the general characteristics of each competency testing program. Few cities use the same tests or collaborate in…

  12. Gender Competence of the Modern Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auhadeeva, Ludmila A.; Yarmakeev, Iskander E.; Aukhadeev, Aver E.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses improvements in education and modern teacher's gender training in terms of a competence-based approach as a basic strategy of general and vocational education development in Russia. The article substantiates the relevance of teachers' gender training and the necessity to use the gender approach in their professional…

  13. Learning Analytics for 21st Century Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham Shum, Simon; Crick, Ruth Deakin

    2016-01-01

    Many educational institutions are shifting their teaching and learning towards equipping students with knowledge, skills, and dispositions that prepare them for lifelong learning, in a complex and uncertain world. These have been termed "21st century competencies." Learning analytics (LA) approaches in general offer different kinds of…

  14. Competencies in the Heartland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cejda, Brent

    2012-01-01

    Although many of the issues facing community colleges are similar, rural community colleges face additional leadership challenges due to limited resources, geographic isolation, and static economies. This chapter focuses on the impact of location on the interpretation and development of the leadership competencies. The chapter concludes with…

  15. Calibrating Communication Competencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surges Tatum, Donna

    2016-11-01

    The Many-faceted Rasch measurement model is used in the creation of a diagnostic instrument by which communication competencies can be calibrated, the severity of observers/raters can be determined, the ability of speakers measured, and comparisons made between various groups.

  16. Adult educators' core competences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  17. Pragmatics and Communicative Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Grace Hui Chin; Su, Simon Chun Feng; Ho, Max Ming Hsuang

    2009-01-01

    Pragmatics is included in one of four communicative competences (Canale, 1980). It is necessary and important to teach pragmatics at school in our globalized world in order to avoid as much as misunderstanding, which is likely to stem from cultural difference. As a result, greater importance should be attached to diverse customs and pragmatics.…

  18. Teachers' Assessment Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arce-Ferrer, Alvaro J.; Cab, Victor Pech; Cisneros-Cohernour, Edith J.

    This paper summarizes main findings from an investigation of the familiarity and importance of assessment practices from the perspectives of Mexican teachers, counselors, and administrators. A survey that listed 74 practices, sampling 7 areas of competencies, was assembled from the Code of Fair Testing Practices in Education, the Standards for…

  19. Competence without Credentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacey, Nevzer G., Ed.

    These workshop papers address the challenges of alternative credentials, new modes of instruction, and multiple sources of instruction. Following an introduction by Nevzer G. Stacey, "Competence without Credentials: Promise and Potential Problems of Computer-Based Distance Education" (Stephen R. Barley) provides a conceptual framework for the…

  20. Competent for What?

    PubMed Central

    Baker, F. M.

    1987-01-01

    As the United States population ages, psychiatrists will have increasing requests for consultations to address legal issues involving older persons. Following an overview of competency as a distinct legal issue, specific legal issues are addressed that include hospitalization, consent or refusal of treatment, living will legislation, and guardianship and conservatorship. Relevant cases are cited. PMID:3625793

  1. Ohio Biotechnology Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lavonna; Bowermeister, Bob; Boudreau, Joyce

    This document, which lists the biotechnology competencies identified by representatives from biotechnology businesses and industries as well as secondary and post-secondary educators throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing college tech prep programs that will prepare students from secondary through…

  2. Natural competence for transformation.

    PubMed

    Blokesch, Melanie

    2016-11-07

    While most molecular biologists are familiar with the artificial transformation of bacteria in the context of laboratory cloning experiments, natural competence for transformation refers to a specific physiological state in which prokaryotes are able to take up genetic material from their surroundings. Occasionally, such absorbed DNA is recombined into the organism's own genome, resulting in natural transformation (Figure 1). As a consequence, natural competence for transformation is considered a primary mode of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in prokaryotes, together with conjugation (direct cell to cell transfer of DNA via a specialized conjugal pilus) and phage transduction (DNA transfer mediated by viruses). HGT plays a major role in bacterial evolution, and past research has demonstrated that HGT, including natural competence for transformation, contributes to the emergence of pathogens and the spread of virulence factors. Indeed, Frederick Griffith discovered natural competence for transformation in 1928 while he was investigating the exchange of pathogenic traits in pneumococci. Due to the increase in the abundance and spread of multidrug-resistant microbes, research on HGT is even more important today than ever before.

  3. Carpentry. Competencies for Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeast Community Coll., Lincoln, NE.

    Materials contained in this guide present competencies describing carpentry skills necessary for success in initial employment or applicable to advanced educational placement, and may be used by administrators, students, and secondary and postsecondary vocational teachers. The student outcomes section provides guidelines for planning of and…

  4. Adult Competency Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education.

    A compilation of abstracts of 120 current Adult Performance Level (APL) and Adult Competency Education (ACE) federally supported projects being conducted in 34 States and the District of Columbia, this project profile was developed for adult and secondary education administrators, teachers, and program developers who are beginning or are currently…

  5. Adult Competency Education Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education.

    A compilation of brief descriptions of 20 current resources for Adult Performance Level (APL) and Adult Competency Education (ACE) programs, this guide was developed for adult and secondary education administrators, teachers, and program developers who are beginning or are already involved with APL/ACE programs. Each citation contains information…

  6. Assessing Culturally Competent Scholarship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendias, Elnora P.; Guevara, Edilma B.

    2001-01-01

    Eight criteria for culturally competent scholarship (contextuality, relevance, communication styles, awareness of identity and power differences, disclosure, reciprocation, empowerment, time) were applied to an international education/research nursing program. Appropriate measures for each were developed and ways to improve the program were…

  7. Plastics Technical Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is intended to assist individuals responsible for developing tech prep programs, lists the occupational, academic, and employability competencies that representatives from education, business/industry, and labor throughout Ohio have identified as being necessary for employment in technician-level positions involving the…

  8. Welding. Competencies for Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeast Community Coll., Lincoln, NE.

    Materials contained in this guide present competencies describing welding skills necessary for success in initial employment or applicable to advanced educational placement, and may be used by administrators, students, and secondary and postsecondary vocational teachers. The student outcomes section provides guidelines for planning of and…

  9. Teach to Compete

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, David Light; Funk, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    After years of working with athletes and coaches of all ages, the authors have come to the conclusion that young people need to be taught how to compete. Rather than assume students understand competition, it is vital that they are educated about it. Coaches and physical educators have both a unique opportunity and profound responsibility to teach…

  10. Intellectual Competence and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huesmann, L. Rowell; Yarmel, Patty Warnick

    Using data from a broader longitudinal study, this investigation explores within-subject and cross-generational stability of intellectual competence and the relationship of such stability to aggressive behavior. Data were gathered three times (when subjects' modal age was 8, 19, and 30 years). Initially, subjects included the entire population…

  11. Assessment Mathematics Teacher's Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnoor, A. G.; Yuanxiang, Guo; Abudhuim, F. S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper aimed to identifying the professional efficiencies for the intermediate schools mathematics teachers and tries to know at what level the math teachers experience those competencies. The researcher used a descriptive research approach, the study data collected from specialist educators and teacher's experts and previous studies to…

  12. Individual Growth in Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierschenk, Bernhard; Bierschenk, Inger

    This paper presents the second study in a series that has been designed to manifest the emergence of consciousness and to measure developed competence. Its major aim has been to demonstrate that an invariant formulation of the Agent-action-Objective model and an analysis of it's a-O kinematics have the capacity to reproduce contour similarity over…

  13. Diesel Vehicle Maintenance Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braswell, Robert; And Others

    Designed to provide a model set of competencies, this manual presents tasks which were identified by employers, employees, and teachers as important in a postsecondary diesel vehicle maintenance curriculum. The tasks are divided into seven major component areas of instruction: chassis and suspension, diesel engines, diesel fuel, electrical,…

  14. Aptitude, Achievement and Competence in Medicine: A Latent Variable Path Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin, V. Terri; Violato, Claudio; Hecker, Kent

    2009-01-01

    To develop and test a latent variable path model of general achievement, aptitude for medicine and competence in medicine employing data from the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), pre-medical undergraduate grade point average (UGPA) and demographic characteristics for competence in pre-clinical and measures of competence (United States…

  15. Impact of Placement Type on the Development of Clinical Competency in Speech-Language Pathology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheepway, Lyndal; Lincoln, Michelle; McAllister, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Background: Speech-language pathology students gain experience and clinical competency through clinical education placements. However, currently little empirical information exists regarding how competency develops. Existing research about the effectiveness of placement types and models in developing competency is generally descriptive and based…

  16. Residents' Perception of Effectiveness of Twelve Evaluation Methods for Measuring Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogbill, Kay K.; O'Sullivan, Patricia S.; Clardy, James

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors assessed residents' perceptions of techniques used to evaluate competency. METHODS: Psychiatry residents from a single program rated 12 evaluation techniques for their effectiveness to measure resident competency. They rated each method for 25 selected skills reflecting the six general competencies. RESULTS: Sixteen…

  17. Competency assessment of nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Changes in the healthcare industry have created great challenges for leaders of acute-care organizations. One of the greatest challenges is ensuring a competent nursing staff to care for patients within this changing environment (Boylan & Westra, 1998). Patients are more acutely ill and have shorter lengths of stay, placing greater demands on nurses who must demonstrate competency in caring for increasingly complex patients in a continually changing healthcare environment. Competency is defined as "the knowledge, skills, ability and behaviors that a person possesses in order to perform tasks correctly and skillfully" (O'Shea, 2002, p. 175). Competency assessment involves more than a checklist and a test. Hospitals are required to assess, maintain, demonstrate, track, and improve the competence of the staff. Competency assessment is an ongoing process of initial development, maintenance of knowledge and skills, educational consultation, remediation, and redevelopment. Methods to assess competencies include competency fairs, Performance Based Development System and online programs. Certain key people should be involved in the development of competencies. The department managers can give input related to department-specific competencies. Experienced staff members can provide valuable insight into the competencies that need to be assessed. Educators should be involved for providing the input for the methods used to validate competencies. Competencies are an important part of the work world. They are a part of a continual process to help ensure that the organization provides a high-quality care to its customers and patients.

  18. How do early career health sciences information professionals gain competencies?

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Bethany A.; Rodriguez, Bredny

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to describe early career health sciences information professionals' self-reported attainment of the Medical Library Association (MLA) Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success and to investigate the various methods by which participants developed these competencies. Methods A SurveyMonkey survey was designed to ascertain participants' demographic information and their competency attainment. “Early career” health information professionals were defined as those with less than five years of professional experience. Participants were asked to rate each of the seven competencies on a five-point Likert scale regarding their level of agreement with the statement, “I have demonstrated this competency.” Participants who responded positively were then asked to indicate how they acquired the competency on a multiple-choice, multiple-answer list. Free-text fields were provided for general comments and for participants to elaborate on their answers. The survey was distributed through the MLA email discussion list and other related email discussion lists. Participation was anonymous. Results One hundred eighty-seven responses were received. Out of those 187 respondents, 95 completed the entire survey. The majority of early career health sciences information professionals agreed that they had attained all 7 competencies. Of the various methods used to develop competencies, the most selected method was formal library and information studies education. Participants were least likely to report attaining competencies via mentoring, volunteering, or internships. Participants reported the highest level of confidence in having attained the “Health Sciences Information Services” competency, and the lowest level of confidence in having attained the “Research, Analysis, and Interpretation” competency. Conclusions These results contribute to the ongoing discussions regarding proposed changes to the MLA competencies

  19. Electronics. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability skills (competencies)…

  20. Engineering Technologies. State Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 397 competencies, grouped into 58 units, for tech prep programs in the engineering technologies cluster. The competencies were developed through collaboration of Ohio business, industry, and labor representatives and secondary and associate degree educators. The competencies are rated either "essential" (necessary…

  1. Competency Based Education: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Helen, Ed.

    This bibliography is a sampling of the types of publications which have appeared recently on the subject of competency based education. Emphasis is given to current (1970-76) materials and to adult career-related competencies. Titles specifically naming some phase of competency-based education are preferred above titles that emphasize performance,…

  2. Competency Index. [Health Technology Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This competency index lists the competencies included in the 62 units of the Tech Prep Competency Profiles within the Health Technologies Cluster. The unit topics are as follows: employability skills; professionalism; teamwork; computer literacy; documentation; infection control and risk management; medical terminology; anatomy, physiology, and…

  3. Spiritual Competency Scale: Further Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey, Stephanie F.; Robertson, Linda A.; Gill, Carman S.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a follow-up analysis of the Spiritual Competency Scale, which initially validated ASERVIC's (Association for Spiritual, Ethical and Religious Values in Counseling) spiritual competencies. The study examined whether the factor structure of the Spiritual Competency Scale would be supported by participants (i.e., ASERVIC…

  4. Entrepreneurship. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for entrepreneurship. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  5. Identification of Brigade Command Competencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    level needed for each competency, (b) the extent to which each competency differentiated among superior and less effective Brigade Commanders, and (c...categorized in four competency training clusters: leadership skills , operational skills , personal capabilities, and knowledge base. The survey also

  6. Guide to Marketing Course Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center.

    This curriculum guide was developed as a model for schools in Virginia to prepare local programs of studies for the marketing program. In addition to marketing competencies for developing occupational expertise, this curriculum includes foundational competencies important for successful performance in marketing. These baseline competencies address…

  7. Competency-Based Horticulture: Floriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL.

    This competency-based horticulture curriculum guide is designed to provide secondary and postsecondary horticulture teachers with a task-oriented program in floriculture. It contains a master resource list, a listing of floriculture resources available from various states, and 89 competency task sheets organized into nine competency areas. These…

  8. Masonry. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for masonry occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  9. Strategic Competence and Language Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rababah, Ghaleb Ahmed

    This paper discusses the notion of communicative competence, particularly strategic competence in English language teaching. Strategic competence refers to the individual's ability to use communication strategies such as paraphrase, circumlocution, literal translation, lexical approximation, and mime to get their message across and to compensate…

  10. Competencies in Teacher Education: Preservice Teachers' Perceptions about Competencies and Their Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koksal, Necla

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to identify the general teaching competency levels and professional attitudes of preservice teachers who are to graduate from four-year education faculties. It was conducted with a total of 379 senior-year students who were attending Pamukkale University Education Faculty during the spring term of the 2008 to 2009 academic year.…

  11. FIRST robots compete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    FIRST teams and their robots work to go through the right motions at the FIRST competition. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  12. Competing Orders and Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-01-01

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation “laws” could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the ’t Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed. PMID:27499184

  13. Competing Orders and Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-08-01

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation “laws” could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the ’t Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed.

  14. Competing Orders and Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-08-08

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation "laws" could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the 't Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed.

  15. [Assessing the clinical competence of dental students].

    PubMed

    Schoonheim-Klein, M E; van Selms, M K A; Volgenant, C M C; Wiegman, H P; Vervoorn, J M

    2012-06-01

    Nowadays, the competences of dental students are tested more on the basis of quality of their achievements than the quantity. 'Objective Structured Clinical Examinations' (OSCEs) can be used in a pre-clinical phase to test these clinical competences. For the clinical phase, the general examination and the digital portfolio have been developed. Tests are used to stimulate the learning process and to determine whether students are ready for the next step; in addition, the quality of the programme is protected by the set of examinations. The results of the last 5 general examinations reveal the pattern that the number of correct answers increases as the study progresses. The Amsterdam Academic Centre for Dentistry (ACTA) introduced a digital portfolio which was evaluated 1 year later with the help ofan anonymous questionnaire. Students judged the use of the digital portfolio in the clinic to be useful but also costly in time.

  16. Dementia and legal competency.

    PubMed

    Filaković, Pavo; Erić, Anamarija Petek; Mihanović, Mate; Glavina, Trpimir; Molnar, Sven

    2011-06-01

    The legal competency or capability to exercise rights is level of judgment and decision-making ability needed to manage one's own affairs and to sign official documents. With some exceptions, the person entitles this right in age of majority. It is acquired without legal procedures, however the annulment of legal capacity requires a juristic process. This resolution may not be final and could be revoked thorough the procedure of reverting legal capacity - fully or partially. Given the increasing number of persons with dementia, they are often subjects of legal expertise concerning their legal capacity. On the other part, emphasis on the civil rights of mentally ill also demands their maximal protection. Therefore such distinctive issue is approached with particular attention. The approach in determination of legal competency is more focused on gradation of it's particular aspects instead of existing dual concept: legally capable - legally incapable. The main assumption represents how person with dementia is legally capable and should enjoy all the rights, privileges and obligations as other citizens do. The aspects of legal competency for which person with dementia is going to be deprived, due to protection of one's rights and interests, are determined in legal procedure and then passed over to the guardian decided by court. Partial annulment of legal competency is measure applied when there is even one existing aspect of preserved legal capability (pension disposition, salary or pension disposition, ability of concluding contract, making testament, concluding marriage, divorce, choosing whereabouts, independent living, right to vote, right to decide course of treatment ect.). This measure is most often in favour of the patient and rarely for protection of other persons and their interests. Physicians are expected to precisely describe early dementia symptoms which may influence assessment of specific aspects involved in legal capacity (memory loss, impaired task

  17. Evaluation of competing software reliability predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Ghaly, A. A.; Chan, P. Y.; Littlewood, B.

    1986-01-01

    Different software reliability models can produce very different answers when called upon to predict future reliability in a reliability growth context. Users need to know which, if any, of the competing predictions are trustworthy. Some techniques are presented which form the basis of a partial solution to this problem. Rather than attempting to decide which model is generally best, the approach adopted here allows a user to decide upon the most appropriate model for each application.

  18. [The Competence Network Parkinson (CNP)].

    PubMed

    Oertel, Wolfgang H; Deuschl, Guenther; Eggert, Karla

    2016-04-01

    The Competence Network Parkinson (CNP) is a research infrastructure for disease-oriented translational and clinical research in the field of Parkinson syndromes (PS). It was initiated in 1999 and funded until 2008 by the German Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF). The CNP created a highly frequented website with information on PS for the general public and for experts. The CNP designed and established one of the first electronic internet-based data entry systems (secuTrial®) - fulfilling the legal standards of data safety and security - a material bank for genetic research on Parkinson's disease (PD), implemented and investigated new methods for early diagnosis of PD and related atypical PS including in vivo dopamine transporter imaging (DAT SPECT), established the German Parkinson Study Group (GPS-Pharma) with 40 certified trial centres for pharmacotherapeutical trials and the German interdisciplinary Parkinson Study Group (neurology and neurosurgery) for deep brain stimulation (GPS-DBS), and carried out several pharmacoeconomic and health care studies on PD in Germany. Sustainability of the infrastructure CNP has in part been achieved in form of the GPS-Pharma and the GPS-DBS, as well as in the German Study Group on REM Sleep Behaviour Disorder (RBD), a prodromal phase of PD. Part of the CNP activities, such as genetic research and research on cohorts of PD patients, have been incorporated into the German Center for Neurodegenerative Disorders (DZNE). Furthermore, topics such as health care research are funded within projects of the EU research program. The article describes problems in setting up a competence network from scratch and contains recommendations how to avoid them in the future.

  19. Developing competencies for pediatric hospice and palliative medicine.

    PubMed

    Klick, Jeffrey C; Friebert, Sarah; Hutton, Nancy; Osenga, Kaci; Pituch, Kenneth J; Vesel, Tamara; Weidner, Norbert; Block, Susan D; Morrison, Laura J

    2014-12-01

    In 2006, hospice and palliative medicine (HPM) became an officially recognized subspecialty. This designation helped initiate the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education Outcomes Project in HPM. As part of this process, a group of expert clinician-educators in HPM defined the initial competency-based outcomes for HPM fellows (General HPM Competencies). Concurrently, these experts recognized and acknowledged that additional expertise in pediatric HPM would ensure that the competencies for pediatric HPM were optimally represented. To fill this gap, a group of pediatric HPM experts used a product development method to define specific Pediatric HPM Competencies. This article describes the development process. With the ongoing evolution of HPM, these competencies will evolve. As part of the Next Accreditation System, the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education uses milestones as a framework to better define competency-based, measurable outcomes for trainees. Currently, there are no milestones specific to HPM, although the field is designing curricular milestones with multispecialty involvement, including pediatrics. These competencies are the conceptual framework for the pediatric content in the HPM milestones. They are specific to the pediatric HPM subspecialist and should be integrated into the training of pediatric HPM subspecialists. They will serve a foundational role in HPM and should inform a wide range of emerging innovations, including the next evolution of HPM Competencies, development of HPM curricular milestones, and training of adult HPM and other pediatric subspecialists. They may also inform pediatric HPM outcome measures, as well as standards of practice and performance for pediatric HPM interdisciplinary teams.

  20. Parental attitudes and social competence in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Drózdz, E; Pokorski, M

    2007-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationships among perceived parental attitudes and domains of social competence in late adolescents. Forty boys and 40 girls, all aged 18, representing a population sample of high school second graders were examined. Self-report data were collected using questionnaires of parent-child relations and of social competence. Analyses detected a significant association between the maternal loving or protective attitude and competence in interpersonal relations in the combined sample of adolescents. However, gender was a moderator of this general relationship. Maternal control fostered their sons' interpersonal relations, and no such relationship was observed toward daughters. Adolescents' behavior was somehow less influenced by fatherly control. The findings are in line with the concept of familism as a dominant form of family organization, but implicate constraints in parental sentiments whose overly expression may backfire and do more harm than good in other domains of social competence of adolescents, such as assertiveness and performance during social exposure. The study may contribute to future research on how parenting style shapes adolescent social outcomes.

  1. Exploring the 'cultural' in cultural competencies in Pacific mental health.

    PubMed

    Samu, Kathleen Seataoai; Suaalii-Sauni, Tamasailau

    2009-02-01

    Cultural competency is about the ability of individuals and systems to respond respectfully and effectively to the cultural needs of peoples of all cultures. Its general attributes include knowledge, attitudes, skills and professional judgment. In Pacific mental health, 'the cultural' is generally understood to be ethnic culture. Accordingly, Pacific cultural competencies assume ethnic specific markers. In mental health Pacific cultural competencies has seen a blending of cultural and clinical beliefs and practices. This paper provides an overview of five key theme areas arising from Auckland-based ethnic-specific Pacific workshop data: language, family, tapu relationships, skills and organisation policy. Workshop participants comprised of Pacific mental health providers, Pacific consumers, family members of Pacific consumers and members of the Pacific community members. This paper purports that identifying the perceptions of different Pacific groups on ethnic-specific elements of cultural competencies are necessary to build and strengthen the capacity and capability of mental health services to provide culturally relevant services.

  2. Culturally competent practice with African American juvenile sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Venable, Victoria M; Guada, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    African American juveniles adjudicated for sexual offenses may struggle with the mistrust of both the judicial and treatment systems. Unlike general mental health services, juvenile sex offender treatment is often mandated by the court or child welfare services, thus these youths and their families must engage in the treatment process. Without clinicians and services that can acknowledge and respond to a minority youth's experience in a sensitive, culturally competent manner, there could be significant resistance to treatment. Traditional treatment approaches fail to prioritize issues involving cultural competence. This article addresses the unique challenges of African American juvenile sex offenders and makes recommendations for creating culturally competent practice for these youth and their families.

  3. Giving Context to the Physician Competency Reference Set: Adapting to the Needs of Diverse Populations

    PubMed Central

    Eckstrand, Kristen L.; Potter, Jennifer; Bayer, Carey Roth; Englander, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Delineating the requisite competencies of a 21st-century physician is the first step in the paradigm shift to competency-based medical education. Over the past two decades, more than 150 lists of competencies have emerged. In a synthesis of these lists, the Physician Competency Reference Set (PCRS) provided a unifying framework of competencies that define the general physician. The PCRS is not context or population specific; however, competently caring for certain underrepresented populations or specific medical conditions can require more specific context. Previously developed competency lists describing care for these populations have been disconnected from an overarching competency framework, limiting their uptake. To address this gap, the Association of American Medical Colleges Advisory Committee on Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Sex Development adapted the PCRS by adding context- and content-specific qualifying statements to existing PCRS competencies to better meet the needs of diverse patient populations. This Article describes the committee’s process in developing these qualifiers of competence. To facilitate widespread adoption of the contextualized competencies in U.S. medical schools, the committee used an established competency framework to develop qualifiers of competence to improve the health of individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender; gender nonconforming; or born with differences in sexual development. This process can be applied to other underrepresented populations or medical conditions, ensuring that relevant topics are included in medical education and, ultimately, health care outcomes are improved for all patients inclusive of diversity, background, and ability. PMID:26796092

  4. Sources of Individual Differences in Emerging Competence with Numeration Understanding versus Multidigit Calculation Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Geary, David C.; Fuchs, Douglas; Compton, Donald L.; Hamlett, Carol L.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated contributions of general cognitive abilities and foundational mathematical competencies to numeration understanding (i.e., base-10 structure) versus multidigit calculation skill. Children (n = 394, M = 6.5 years) were assessed on general cognitive abilities and foundational numerical competencies at start of 1st grade; on…

  5. The development and validation of the Perceived Health Competence Scale.

    PubMed

    Smith, M S; Wallston, K A; Smith, C A

    1995-03-01

    A sense of competence or self-efficacy is associated with many positive outcomes, particularly in the area of health behavior. A measure of a sense of competence in the domain of health behavior has not been developed. Most measures are either general measures of a general sense of self-efficacy or are very specific to a particular health behavior. The Perceived Health Competence Scale (PHCS), a domain-specific measure of the degree to which an individual feels capable of effectively managing his or her health outcomes, was developed to provide a measure of perceived competence at an intermediate level of specificity. Five studies using three different types of samples (students, adults and persons with a chronic illness) provide evidence for the reliability and validity of the PHCS. The eight items of the PHCS combine both outcome and behavioral expectancies. Results from the five studies indicate that the scale has good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The construct validity of the scale is demonstrated through the support obtained for substantive hypotheses regarding the correlates of perceived health competence, such as health behavior intentions, general sense of competence and health locus of control.

  6. Competence and Competency-based Training: What the Literature Says

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    This literature review, commissioned by the National Quality Council, provides a historical account of the development of competency-based training in Australia and summarises the issues arising from the range of reviews conducted on elements of the national training system. It also explores the variety of ways in which competence is conceived…

  7. Eating Competence: Nutrition Education with the Satter Eating Competence Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satter, Ellyn

    2007-01-01

    The Satter Eating Competence Model (ecSatter) conceptualizes eating competence as having 4 components: eating attitudes, food acceptance, regulation of food intake and body weight, and management of the eating context (including family meals). According to ecSatter, supporting nutritional health requires establishing and maintaining positive…

  8. Building Intercultural Competence through Intercultural Competency Certification of Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janeiro, Maria G. Fabregas; Fabre, Ricardo Lopez; Nuno de la Parra, Jose Pablo

    2014-01-01

    The Intercultural Competency Certificate (CCI in Spanish) designed for the Universidad Popular Autonoma del Estado de Puebla (UPAEP University) is a theory based comprehensive plan to develop undergraduate students' intercultural competence. This Certificate is based in the Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity (DMIS) developed by…

  9. Competencies: The Competencies Debate in Australian Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Cherry, Ed.

    Competencies are the focal concept in the world of education and training in Australia at this moment in 1993. This book is a collection of papers and has three purposes. First, it aims to provide basic information about education and training. Second, the book aims to explore something of what competency-based education and training looks like in…

  10. What Does Competence Entail in Interventional Radiology?

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Kamran; Keeling, Aoife N.; Khan, Reenam S.; Ashrafian, Hutan; Arora, Sonal; Nagpal, Kamal; Burrill, Joshua; Darzi, Ara; Athanasiou, Thanos; Hamady, Mohamad

    2010-02-15

    Interventional radiology is a relatively new speciality and may be referred to as 'image-guided surgery without a scalpel.' Training and accreditation bodies regard interventional radiology training as being 'different' from general radiology because of the additional need for dexterity and clinical acumen. Due to the multidimensional role of an interventional radiologist, a practitioner in this discipline must have a number of the competencies of anesthetists, surgeons, and radiologists. The attributes required of an interventional radiologist are akin to those required of a surgeon. This paper gives an overview of the skills required to be a competent interventional radiologist along with a succinct introduction to methods of assessment of technical and non-technical skills.

  11. Collaborate, compete and share

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, Emanuele; Castellano, Claudio; Marsili, Matteo; Pietronero, Luciano

    2009-02-01

    We introduce and study a model of an interacting population of agents who collaborate in groups which compete for limited resources. Groups are formed by random matching agents and their worth is determined by the sum of the efforts deployed by agents in group formation. Agents, on their side, have to share their effort between contributing to their group’s chances to outcompete other groups and resource sharing among partners, when the group is successful. A simple implementation of this strategic interaction gives rise to static and evolutionary properties with a very rich phenomenology. A robust emerging feature is the separation of the population between agents who invest mainly in the success of their group and agents who concentrate in getting the largest share of their group’s profits.

  12. Competent and Warm?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Karolina; Rakić, Tamara; Steffens, Melanie C

    2017-01-01

    Most research on ethnicity has focused on visual cues. However, accents are strong social cues that can match or contradict visual cues. We examined understudied reactions to people whose one cue suggests one ethnicity, whereas the other cue contradicts it. In an experiment conducted in Germany, job candidates spoke with an accent either congruent or incongruent with their (German or Turkish) appearance. Based on ethnolinguistic identity theory, we predicted that accents would be strong cues for categorization and evaluation. Based on expectancy violations theory we expected that incongruent targets would be evaluated more extremely than congruent targets. Both predictions were confirmed: accents strongly influenced perceptions and Turkish-looking German-accented targets were perceived as most competent of all targets (and additionally most warm). The findings show that bringing together visual and auditory information yields a more complete picture of the processes underlying impression formation.

  13. Competing on talent analytics.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Thomas H; Harris, Jeanne; Shapiro, Jeremy

    2010-10-01

    Do investments in your employees actually affect workforce performance? Who are your top performers? How can you empower and motivate other employees to excel? Leading-edge companies such as Google, Best Buy, Procter & Gamble, and Sysco use sophisticated data-collection technology and analysis to answer these questions, leveraging a range of analytics to improve the way they attract and retain talent, connect their employee data to business performance, differentiate themselves from competitors, and more. The authors present the six key ways in which companies track, analyze, and use data about their people-ranging from a simple baseline of metrics to monitor the organization's overall health to custom modeling for predicting future head count depending on various "what if" scenarios. They go on to show that companies competing on talent analytics manage data and technology at an enterprise level, support what analytical leaders do, choose realistic targets for analysis, and hire analysts with strong interpersonal skills as well as broad expertise.

  14. Social Competence: A Developmental Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Harris, Jerry D.

    1984-01-01

    Effective peer relations and the enhancement of social interactions in young children play a central role in the discussion of social competence. Developmental issues relevant to the assessment of social competence including perspective taking, conceptions of friendship, interpersonal strategies and problem solving, moral judgments, and…

  15. Competency in Allied Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beemsterboer, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    Implications of competency-based education for dental assistants and hygienists are examined. Such an approach would provide assistance in defining evolving roles in delivery of dental care; help in defining national competencies and analyzing appropriateness of current care; and a mechanism for developing curriculum that responds to community…

  16. Horticulture. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Wooster. Agricultural Technical Inst.

    This tech prep competency profile (TCP), which was developed by a consortium of Ohio educators and business/industry representatives, lists the competencies that have been identified as necessary for employment in the following occupations: nursery technician; golf course superintendent; landscape designer/manager; lawn care specialist; tree care…

  17. Horticulture. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This list consists of essential competencies from the following specialized Ohio Competency Analysis Profiles: Floriculutre and Greenhouse Worker; Nursery and Garden Center Worker; and Turf and Landscape Worker. Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency…

  18. Institutional Racism and Community Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbarin, Oscar A., Ed.; And Others

    This is a collection of papers and research reports presented at a conference that focused on mental health issues and on individual, organizational, and community competence in relation to institutional racism. The report is divided into five sections. Section 1 discusses theoretical models of racism and community competence (community…

  19. Six Areas of Teacher Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Teachers Association, Burlingame.

    This is the third edition of the "California definition" of teacher competence, superseding "Measures of a Good Teacher" (1952) and "Teacher Competence: Its Nature and Scope" (1957). It defines the six areas as 1) director of learning, 2) counselor and guidance work, 3) mediator of the culture, 4) link with the community, 5) member of the school…

  20. Competence: Commodification of Human Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Soonghee

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the meaning and presumptions of competence in the concrete context of knowledge capitalism. First, the nature of competence as a "commodification of human ability" that obtains a standardized monetary value to sell in the labor market, is elucidated by applying Karl Marx's critical theory. Second, it is…

  1. Assessing Competence in Pediatric Cardiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Apul E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In response to the need to assure physician competence, a rating scale was developed at the University of Minnesota Medical School for use in evaluating clinical competence in pediatric cardiology. It was tested on first- and second-year specialists. Development and testing procedures are described. (JT)

  2. Experience, Competence and Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paloniemi, Susanna

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine employees' conceptions of the meaning of experience in job-competence and its development in workplace context. The aim is to bring out the variety of conceptions related to experience, competence and workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on interview data from six Finnish small and…

  3. Cultural competency training in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, A; Collazos, F; Ramos, M; Casas, M

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that the quality of care provided to immigrant and ethnic minority patients is not at the same level as that provided to majority group patients. Although the European Board of Medical Specialists recognizes awareness of cultural issues as a core component of the psychiatry specialization, few medical schools provide training in cultural issues. Cultural competence represents a comprehensive response to the mental health care needs of immigrant and ethnic minority patients. Cultural competence training involves the development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that can improve the effectiveness of psychiatric treatment. Cognitive cultural competence involves awareness of the various ways in which culture, immigration status, and race impact psychosocial development, psychopathology, and therapeutic transactions. Technical cultural competence involves the application of cognitive cultural competence, and requires proficiency in intercultural communication, the capacity to develop a therapeutic relationship with a culturally different patient, and the ability to adapt diagnosis and treatment in response to cultural difference. Perhaps the greatest challenge in cultural competence training involves the development of attitudinal competence inasmuch as it requires exploration of cultural and racial preconceptions. Although research is in its infancy, there are increasing indications that cultural competence can improve key aspects of the psychiatric treatment of immigrant and minority group patients.

  4. Key Skills and Competencies. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers on key skills and competencies and human resource development (HRD). "Career Related Competencies" (Marinka A.C.T. Kuijpers) reports findings from surveys completed by Dutch employees who identified these issues: self-reflection is more important than career control; age and gender influence attitude…

  5. Youth Swimmers' Understanding of Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bocksnick, Jochen; Belyk, Joi; Napier, Linea

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the way in which youth swimmers viewed their competence and factors they associated with obtaining competence. Interviews with Canadian swimmers age 8-13 years indicated that respondents focused on what they deemed performance-relevant factors (e.g., personal effort) rather than outcome-related comparisons with other swimmers (e.g.,…

  6. [Core competencies in internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M; Casademont, J; Conthe, P; Pinilla, B; Pujol, R; García-Alegría, J

    2011-06-01

    The working group of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) on "Competencies of the Internist" has defined the basic medical knowledge, skills and attitudes that all internists in Spain should have. This list of competencies represents the Internal Medicine core curriculum within the context of the future educational framework of medical specialties in Health Sciences.

  7. Personal Competencies in Personalized Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redding, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Personal competencies--cognitive, metacognitive, motivational, and social/emotional--are applied by students in learning (mastery of knowledge and skills). These competencies are both acquired through learning and applied in the learning process. Personalized learning--a promising approach to education made practical by advances in…

  8. Masonry. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) for masonry occupations contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability…

  9. Microcomputer Competencies for Vocational Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Gene L.; Tesolowski, Dennis G.

    1984-01-01

    This joint research and development project of two state departments of education used the DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process to identify microcomputer competencies for vocational instructors. Brainstorming techniques were used to identify five categories of microcomputer applications and to determine which competencies belonged in each…

  10. Conversational Competence in Academic Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Conversational competence is a process, not a state. Ithaca does not exist, only the voyage to Ithaca. Vibrant campuses are a series of productive conversations. At its core, communicative competence in academic settings mirrors a collective search for meaning regarding the purpose and direction of a campus community. Communicative competence…

  11. Employability. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) is one of a series of competency lists, verified by expert workers, that have evolved from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) job analysis process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from throughout Ohio. This OCAP identifies the employability skills…

  12. Drafting. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Drafting Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) is one of a series of competency lists, verified by expert workers, that have evolved from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) job analysis process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from throughout Ohio. This OCAP identifies the…

  13. Accounting. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Accounting Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) is one of a series of competency lists, verified by expert workers, that have evolved from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) job analysis process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from throughout Ohio. This OCAP identifies the…

  14. Conditions for Developing Communicative Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zascerinska, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Individuals need communicative competence for personal fulfillment and development, active citizenship, social inclusion and employment. Materials and Methods. The meaning of the key concepts of "communicative competence" and "opportunities" is studied within the search for conditions to develop. Conclusion. The theoretical findings…

  15. Holistic Competence: Putting Judgements First

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckett, David

    2008-01-01

    Professional practice can be conceptualised holistically, and in fact during the 1990s the "Australian model" of integrated or holistic competence emerged empirically. This piece outlines that story, and then develops a more rigorous conceptual analysis of what it is to make competent practical judgements, through inferences, in…

  16. Mathematics. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This competency analysis profile contains eight lists of mathematics skills that have been identified by employers and verified by math-certified instructors as being core competencies for eight groups of occupational areas. Each list is organized into subsections dealing with the following: numbers and number relations, measurement, data analysis…

  17. Workforce Readiness: Competencies and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Harold F., Jr., Ed.

    This book, which is intended for professionals in the assessment/evaluation/measurement, vocational and technical education, and educational psychology communities, contains 16 papers examining specifications of work force competencies and assessment of competencies. The following papers are included: "Review of Workforce Readiness…

  18. Competencies Identification for Robotics Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Le D.

    A study focused on the task of identifying competencies for robotics training. The level of robotics training was limited to that of robot technicians. Study objectives were to obtain a list of occupational competencies; to rank their order of importance; and to compare opinions from robot manufacturers, robot users, and robotics educators…

  19. Testing Communicative Competence: Problems and Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courchene, Robert J.; De Bagheera, Jean Ivan

    1981-01-01

    A model for communicative competence, developed by Swain and Canale describes four competences within the concept of communicative competence. These are linguistic, sociolinguistic, discourse, and strategic competence. Each one involves knowledge of and ability to use the competence in question. This model raises questions on several counts; for…

  20. Reproductive competence: a recurrent logic module in eukaryotic development

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Luke M.; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Developmental competence is the ability to differentiate in response to an appropriate stimulus, as first elaborated by Waddington in relation to organs and tissues. Competence thresholds operate at all levels of biological systems from the molecular (e.g. the cell cycle) to the ontological (e.g. metamorphosis and reproduction). Reproductive competence, an organismal process, is well studied in mammals (sexual maturity) and plants (vegetative phase change), though far less than later stages of terminal differentiation. The phenomenon has also been documented in multiple species of multicellular fungi, mostly in early, disparate literature, providing a clear example of physiological differentiation in the absence of morphological change. This review brings together data on reproductive competence in Ascomycete fungi, particularly the model filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, contrasting mechanisms within Unikonts and plants. We posit reproductive competence is an elementary logic module necessary for coordinated development of multicellular organisms or functional units. This includes unitary multicellular life as well as colonial species both unicellular and multicellular (e.g. social insects such as ants). We discuss adaptive hypotheses for developmental and reproductive competence systems and suggest experimental work to address the evolutionary origins, generality and genetic basis of competence in the fungal kingdom. PMID:23864594

  1. Sodium nitroprusside impairs sexual competence of male rats.

    PubMed

    Ratnasooriya, W D; Jayakody, J R A C; Dharmasiri, M G

    2004-04-01

    Recently, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a potent nitric oxide (NO) donor and a clinically used antihypertensive, has been introduced as a penile self-injection medical therapy for erectile dysfunction. However, it is known that many antihypertensives impairs sexual competence; NO regulates sexual competence and NO is cytostatic and cytotoxic for human sperm. Thus, a possibility exists that SNP may impair male reproductive competence. Testing this aspect is the aim of this study. This was assessed in male rats (using three i.p. doses: 60, 30 or 20 microg/kg) using noncompetitive copulation tests. The results show that the highest dose of SNP was toxic and caused rapid mortality of treated rats (within 30 min). The mid and low doses of SNP reversibly impaired several parameters of sexual competence in a dose-related fashion: sexual arousability, libido and sexual vigour. Some parameters of sexual behaviour remained unaltered: sexual motivation and intromission ratio, whilst one parameter was improved: sexual performance. In complete contrast, the ejaculatory competence and fertility remained unchanged. The SNP-induced impairments in sexual competence may be attributable to lowered testosterone levels and sedation mediated via its specific action and/or side effect. Further, this impairment of sexual function was not due to general toxicity, inhibition of penile sensitivity, penile erection or analgesic activity. It is concluded that SNP impairs male sexual competence, at least, in rats although it promotes penile erection.

  2. Management and leadership competence in hospitals: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Pihlainen, Vuokko; Kivinen, Tuula; Lammintakanen, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this study is to describe the characteristics of management and leadership competence of health-care leaders and managers, especially in the hospital environment. Health-care leaders and managers in this study were both nursing and physician managers. Competence was assessed by evaluating the knowledge, skills, attitudes and abilities that enable management and leadership tasks. Design/methodology/approach - A systematic literature review was performed to find articles that identify and describe the characteristics of management and leadership competence. Searches of electronic databases were conducted using set criteria for article selection. Altogether, 13 papers underwent an inductive content analysis. Findings - The characteristics of management and leadership competence were categorized into the following groups: health-care-context-related, operational and general. Research limitations/implications - One limitation of the study is that only 13 articles were found in the literature regarding the characteristics of management and leadership competence. However, the search terms were relevant, and the search process was endorsed by an information specialist. The study findings imply the need to shift away from the individual approach to leadership and management competence. Management and leadership need to be assessed more frequently from a holistic perspective, and not merely on the basis of position in the organizational hierarchy or of profession in health care. Originality/value - The authors' evaluation of the characteristics of management and leadership competence without a concentrated profession-based approach is original.

  3. Constructivism in cultural competence education.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jennifer L; Krantz, Steven

    2010-04-01

    A graduate course on cultural diversity, based in constructivist theory and structured on the Process of Cultural Competence in the Delivery of Healthcare Services model, was developed and taught through classroom and online methods. The following research questions were explored: 1) Can an educational experience, built on constructivist learning theory tenets, change students' perceptions, attitudes, knowledge, and skills in the area of cultural competence? 2) Does the delivery method, online or traditional classroom, influence the degree of change? The study used a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest control group design using the Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among healthcare Professionals Revised. Findings showed significant changes (p<0.001) in cultural competence scores and subscores for all learners with both teaching modalities based on interval scale and in categories of cultural knowledge, skills, desire, and overall competence based on a nominal scale. The untaught construct of cultural desire showed the most significant improvement.

  4. Cultural competence: a constructivist definition.

    PubMed

    Blanchet Garneau, Amélie; Pepin, Jacinthe

    2015-01-01

    In nursing education, most of the current teaching practices perpetuate an essentialist perspective of culture and make it imperative to refresh the concept of cultural competence in nursing. The purpose of this article is to propose a constructivist definition of cultural competence that stems from the conclusions of an extensive critical review of the literature on the concepts of culture, cultural competence, and cultural safety among nurses and other health professionals. The proposed constructivist definition is situated in the unitary-transformative paradigm in nursing as defined by Newman and colleagues. It makes the connection between the field of competency-based education and the nursing discipline. Cultural competence in a constructivist paradigm that is oriented toward critical, reflective practice can help us develop knowledge about the role of nurses in reducing health inequalities and lead to a comprehensive ethical reflection about the social mandate of health care professionals.

  5. Nursing informatics competencies: bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kokol, Peter; Blažun, Helena; Vošner, Janez; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technology is developing rapidly and it is incorporated in many health care processes, but in spite of that fact we can still notice that nursing informatics competencies had received limited attention in basic nursing education curricula in Europe and especially in Eastern European countries. The purpose of the present paper is to present the results of a bibliometric analysis of the nursing informatics competencies scientific literature production. We applied the bibliometrics analysis to the corpus of 332 papers found in SCOPUS, related to nursing informatics competencies. The results showed that there is a positive trend in the number of published papers per year, indicating the increased research interest in nursing informatics competencies. Despite the fact that the first paper was published in Denmark, the most prolific country regarding the research in nursing informatics competencies is United States as are their institutions and authors.

  6. Continued professional competence and portfolios.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Michelle; Delarose, Teresa; King, Cecil A; Leske, Jane; Sapnas, Kathryn G; Schroeter, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    It is traditionally assumed that licensure of healthcare professionals means that they are minimally competent. Many nursing specialty organizations offer examinations and other processes for certification, suggesting that certification is associated with continued competency. Can standardized examination for certification and continuing education for recertification ensure continued competency? Continuing education and testing provide a limited picture of an individual's knowledge and/or skill acquisition in a limited area at one point in time. However, portfolios promote critical thinking, self-assessment, and individual accountability. A portfolio is a portable mechanism for evaluating competencies that may otherwise be difficult to assess. This article summarizes some of the literature addressing portfolios, including aspects of portfolio development process, the value of portfolios versus continuing education for competency assessment, evidence associated with portfolio usage, and suggestions for organizing nursing portfolios.

  7. The Satter Eating Competence Inventory for Low-income persons is a valid measure of eating competence for persons of higher socioeconomic position.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    Eating competence is an important behavioral construct, shown to be associated with healthful lifestyle practices, including dietary quality, weight management, physical activity, and sleep duration. A 16-item instrument to measure eating competence, the Satter Eating Competence Inventory was previously validated in a general sample and subsequently, a 16-item instrument was developed to address specific concerns of low-income persons; 12 items were common to both instruments. The purpose of this study was to determine if the low-income version could be applied to a general audience, simplifying intervention evaluation and facilitating cross-study comparison. Both surveys were fully completed by 127 parents (89% white; 35.8 ± 5.3 y; 86% college graduates; 51% eating competent) of preschool-age children; 96 of whom were not considered low-income. Cognitive interviews with 14 parents of varying eating competence levels clarified and confirmed findings. Scores were highly correlated (r = .98) and only 2 of the 96 were not congruently classified for eating competence. Mean difference between the two versions was .24 ± 1.55. The general audience version explained 95% of the variance in the low-income version score. Findings support the low-income version of the Satter Eating Competence Inventory for general audience use as the Satter Eating Competence Inventory 2.0.

  8. Assessing pharmacy students' self-perception of cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Echeverri, Margarita; Brookover, Cecile; Kennedy, Kathleen

    2013-02-01

    Pharmacists play an increasingly important role in medication therapy management, which requires communicating effectively with patients. Pharmacy students completed the Self-Assessment of Perceived Level of Cultural Competence (SAPLCC) questionnaire, and their results were used to identify patterns in self-assessment of cultural competence. In general, students rated their knowledge as less than their skills and attitudes. Important differences were found by race, comparing each group with its counterparts: African American students rated their perceived competencies regarding patient discrimination and barriers to health care at a significantly higher level; Asian American students rated their attitudes to engaging in self-reflection and their knowledge in multicultural issues at significantly lower level; and White students rated their awareness regarding racial dynamics at a significantly lower level. It is recommended to consider the students' cultural, racial, and ethnic backgrounds before developing curriculum in cultural competence and, perhaps, to develop targeted educational interventions for specific groups.

  9. Competencies for the 21st Century Information Professional: Translating the SLA Competencies into Business Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henczel, Sue

    This paper examines how the Special Libraries Association competencies can be mapped to the broader business competencies of marketing (promoting), packaging (product development), persuading and performing (sales/customer service), and positioning (strategic maneuvering). It introduces a process whereby the skills, knowledge, understandings, and…

  10. Water Treatment Technology - General Plant Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on general plant operations provides instructional materials for seven competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: water supply regulations, water plant…

  11. 48 CFR 19.601 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... BUSINESS PROGRAMS Certificates of Competency and Determinations of Responsibility 19.601 General. (a) A Certificate of Competency (COC) is the certificate issued by the Small Business Administration (SBA) stating...) The COC program empowers the Small Business Administration (SBA) to certify to Government...

  12. Competency Model 101. The Process of Developing Core Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichelberger, Lisa Wright; Hewlett, Peggy O'Neill

    1999-01-01

    The Mississippi Competency Model defines nurses' roles as provider (caregiver, teacher, counselor, advocate), professional (scholar, collaborator, ethicist, researcher), and manager (leader, facilitator, intrapreneur, decision maker, technology user) for four levels of nursing: licensed practical nurse, associate degree, bachelor's degree, and…

  13. A dyadic study of multicultural counseling competence.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Frank R; Odera, Lilian; Fons-Scheyd, Alia; Sheu, Hung-Bin; Ebersole, Ryan C; Spanierman, Lisa B

    2016-01-01

    Using the Kenny, Kashy, and Cook (2006) one-with-many method, we investigated client and counselor reports of counselors' level of multicultural counseling competence (MCC) across 4 therapy sessions at a university counseling center. Specifically, we analyzed the association between counselor MCC and client psychological well-being among 133 clients of color receiving psychotherapy from 24 counselors. We found that both client and counselor perspectives suggested that some counselors possessed generally higher MCC than others. Counselors' self-assessments of MCC, however, did not relate with their clients' assessments of counselor MCC-replicating findings from past studies of MCC. On average, counselors whose clients generally perceived them as more multiculturally competent did not report improved psychological well-being at the fourth session. Likewise, counselors who generally reported more MCC did not have clients who improved more in psychological well-being than would be expected over 4 sessions. Notably, at the dyad-level, clients who rated their counselor more highly on MCC than their counselors' other clients tended to report greater improvement in well-being. Suggestions for future MCC research involving dyadic analytic designs are described. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Core competencies in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Porcel, José Manuel; Casademont, Jordi; Conthe, Pedro; Pinilla, Blanca; Pujol, Ramón; García-Alegría, Javier

    2012-06-01

    The working group on Competencies of Internal Medicine from the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) proposes a series of core competencies that we consider should be common to all European internal medicine specialists. The competencies include aspects related to patient care, clinical knowledge, technical skills, communication skills, professionalism, cost-awareness in medical care and academic activities. The proposal could be used as a working document for the Internal Medicine core curriculum in the context of the educational framework of medical specialties in Europe.

  15. Genetic competence in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Dubnau, D

    1991-01-01

    Genetic competence may be defined as a physiological state enabling a bacterial culture to bind and take up high-molecular-weight exogenous DNA (transformation). In Bacillus subtilis, competence develops postexponentially and only in certain media. In addition, only a minority of the cells in a competent culture become competent, and these are physiologically distinct. Thus, competence is subject to three regulatory modalities: growth stage specific, nutritionally responsive, and cell type specific. This review summarizes the present state of knowledge concerning competence in B. subtilis. The study of genes required for transformability has permitted their classification into two broad categories. Late competence genes are expressed under competence control and specify products required for the binding, uptake, and processing of transforming DNA. Regulatory genes specify products that are needed for the expression of the late genes. Several of the late competence gene products have been shown to be membrane localized, and others are predicted to be membrane associated on the basis of amino acid sequence data. Several of these predicted protein sequences show a striking resemblance to gene products that are involved in the export and/or assembly of extracellular proteins and structures in gram-negative organisms. This observation is consistent with the idea that the late products are directly involved in transport of DNA and is equally consistent with the notion that they play a morphogenetic role in the assembly of a transport apparatus. The competence regulatory apparatus constitutes an elaborate signal transduction system that senses and interprets environmental information and passes this information to the competence-specific transcriptional machinery. Many of the regulatory gene products have been identified and partially characterized, and their interactions have been studied genetically and in some cases biochemically as well. These include several

  16. The Swiss Health Literacy Survey: development and psychometric properties of a multidimensional instrument to assess competencies for health

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jen; Thombs, Brett D.; Schmid, Margareta R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background  Growing recognition of the role of citizens and patients in health and health care has placed a spotlight on health literacy and patient education. Objective  To identify specific competencies for health in definitions of health literacy and patient‐centred concepts and empirically test their dimensionality in the general population. Methods  A thorough review of the literature on health literacy, self‐management, patient empowerment, patient education and shared decision making revealed considerable conceptual overlap as competencies for health and identified a corpus of 30 generic competencies for health. A questionnaire containing 127 items covering the 30 competencies was fielded as a telephone interview in German, French and Italian among 1255 respondents randomly selected from the resident population in Switzerland. Findings  Analyses with the software MPlus to model items with mixed response categories showed that the items do not load onto a single factor. Multifactorial models with good fit could be erected for each of five dimensions defined a priori and their corresponding competencies: information and knowledge (four competencies, 17 items), general cognitive skills (four competencies, 17 items), social roles (two competencies, seven items), medical management (four competencies, 27 items) and healthy lifestyle (two competencies, six items). Multiple indicators and multiple causes models identified problematic differential item functioning for only six items belonging to two competencies. Conclusions  The psychometric analyses of this instrument support broader conceptualization of health literacy not as a single competence but rather as a package of competencies for health. PMID:22390287

  17. Toddlers: Competence and Behavioral Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Norejane; Hansen, Sally L.

    1977-01-01

    An interaction analysis observation instrument, with categories found in the definition of "executive competence" by Wenar and related to R. White's effectance motivation, was used to observe 37 toddlers with their mothers. (SB)

  18. Competencies for Information Systems Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Donna R.; O'Neil, Sharon Lund

    1990-01-01

    Through survey research using the DACUM approach and the Delphi technique, 8 broad skill categories and 278 competencies were determined to have some degree of importance for information systems workers. (Author)

  19. Teacher Educators' Digital Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumsvik, Rune Johan

    2014-01-01

    This position paper focuses on how the new national curriculum for school and the new general plan for teacher education in Norway change the underlying premises for teaching and learning in today's teacher education. This has become particularly pressing as a result of the new educational reform "Knowledge Promotion" in schools, whereby…

  20. Competency-Based Achievement System

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Shelley; Poth, Cheryl N.; Donoff, Michel; Humphries, Paul; Steiner, Ivan; Schipper, Shirley; Janke, Fred; Nichols, Darren

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed Family medicine residency programs require innovative means to assess residents’ competence in “soft” skills (eg, patient-centred care, communication, and professionalism) and to identify residents who are having difficulty early enough in their residency to provide remedial training. Objective of program To develop a method to assess residents’ competence in various skills and to identify residents who are having difficulty. Program description The Competency-Based Achievement System (CBAS) was designed to measure competence using 3 main principles: formative feedback, guided self-assessment, and regular face-to-face meetings. The CBAS is resident driven and provides a framework for meaningful interactions between residents and advisors. Residents use the CBAS to organize and review their feedback, to guide their own assessment of their progress, and to discern their future learning needs. Advisors use the CBAS to monitor, guide, and verify residents’ knowledge of and competence in important skills. Conclusion By focusing on specific skills and behaviour, the CBAS enables residents and advisors to make formative assessments and to communicate their findings. Feedback indicates that the CBAS is a user-friendly and helpful system to assess competence. PMID:21918129

  1. Competency-Based Curriculum in Transportation. General Industrial Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Dept. of Education, Nashville. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

    Designed and written for industrial arts instructors and students, this teacher-developed curriculum offers both a model for instructors and practical guidelines for classroom activities that explore the field of transportation. Various aspects of course design and delivery are covered in the introductory section, including course goals and…

  2. Competency-Based Curriculum in Communications. General Industrial Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Dept. of Education, Nashville. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

    Designed and written for industrial arts instructors and students, this teacher-developed curriculum offers both a model for instructors and practical guidelines for classroom activities that explore the field of communications. Various aspects of course design and delivery are covered in the introductory section, including course goals and…

  3. (Re)Introducing Communication Competence to the Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    Spitzberg, Brian H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the central role that communication skills play in contemporary accounts of effective health care delivery in general, and the communication of medical error specifically, there is no common or consensual core in the health professions regarding the nature of such skills. This lack of consensus reflects, in part, the tendency for disciplines to reinvent concepts and measures without first situating such development in disciplines with more cognate specialization in such concepts. In this essay, an integrative model of communication competence is introduced, along with its theoretical background and rationale. Communication competence is defined as an impression of appropriateness and effectiveness, which is functionally related to individual motivation, knowledge, skills, and contextual facilitators and constraints. Within this conceptualization, error disclosure contexts are utilized to illustrate the heuristic value of the theory, and implications for assessment are suggested. Significance for public health Models matter, as do the presuppositions that underlie their architecture. Research indicates that judgments of competence moderate outcomes such as satisfaction, trust, understanding, and power-sharing in relationships and in individual encounters. If the outcomes of health care encounters depend on the impression of competence that patients or their family members have of health care professionals, then knowing which specific communicative behaviors contribute to such impressions is not merely important – it is essential. To pursue such a research agenda requires that competence assessment and operationalization becomes better aligned with conceptual assumptions that separate behavioral performance from the judgments of the competence of that performance. PMID:25170494

  4. Rethinking cultural competence: insights from indigenous community treatment settings.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Dennis C; Gone, Joseph P

    2012-04-01

    Multicultural professional psychologists routinely assert that psychotherapeutic interventions require culturally competent delivery for ethnoracial minority clients to protect the distinctive cultural orientations of these clients. Dominant disciplinary conceptualizations of cultural competence are "kind of person" models that emphasize specialized awareness, knowledge, and skills on the part of the practitioner. Even within psychology, this approach to cultural competence is controversial owing to professional misgivings concerning its culturally essentialist assumptions. Unfortunately, alternative "process-oriented" models of cultural competence emphasize such generic aspects of therapeutic interaction that they remain in danger of losing sight of culture altogether. Thus, for cultural competence to persist as a meaningful construct, an alternative approach that avoids both essentialism and generalism must be recovered. One means to capture this alternative is to shift focus away from culturally competent therapists toward culturally commensurate therapies. Indigenous communities in North America represent interesting sites for exploring this shift, owing to widespread political commitments to Aboriginal cultural reclamation in the context of postcoloniality. Two examples from indigenous communities illustrate a continuum of cultural commensurability that ranges from global psychotherapeutic approaches at one end to local healing traditions at the other. Location of culturally integrative efforts by indigenous communities along this continuum illustrates the possibility for local, agentic, and intentional deconstructions and reconstructions of mental health interventions in a culturally hybrid fashion.

  5. (Re)Introducing communication competence to the health professions.

    PubMed

    Spitzberg, Brian H

    2013-12-01

    Despite the central role that communication skills play in contemporary accounts of effective health care delivery in general, and the communication of medical error specifically, there is no common or consensual core in the health professions regarding the nature of such skills. This lack of consensus reflects, in part, the tendency for disciplines to reinvent concepts and measures without first situating such development in disciplines with more cognate specialization in such concepts. In this essay, an integrative model of communication competence is introduced, along with its theoretical background and rationale. Communication competence is defined as an impression of appropriateness and effectiveness, which is functionally related to individual motivation, knowledge, skills, and contextual facilitators and constraints. Within this conceptualization, error disclosure contexts are utilized to illustrate the heuristic value of the theory, and implications for assessment are suggested. Significance for public healthModels matter, as do the presuppositions that underlie their architecture. Research indicates that judgments of competence moderate outcomes such as satisfaction, trust, understanding, and power-sharing in relationships and in individual encounters. If the outcomes of health care encounters depend on the impression of competence that patients or their family members have of health care professionals, then knowing which specific communicative behaviors contribute to such impressions is not merely important - it is essential. To pursue such a research agenda requires that competence assessment and operationalization becomes better aligned with conceptual assumptions that separate behavioral performance from the judgments of the competence of that performance.

  6. 46 CFR 11.901 - General provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ENDORSEMENTS Subjects of Examinations and Practical Demonstrations of Competence § 11.901 General provisions... also furnish sufficient documentary evidence that he or she has made a practical demonstration(s)...

  7. 46 CFR 11.901 - General provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ENDORSEMENTS Subjects of Examinations and Practical Demonstrations of Competence § 11.901 General provisions... also furnish sufficient documentary evidence that he or she has made a practical demonstration(s)...

  8. Establishing Competence: Qualification of Power Plant Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Colin R.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the International Atomic Energy Agency's definition of competence for nuclear power plant operations personnel, how competence can be identified with intellectual, physical, and psychological attributes, how levels of competence are determined, how education, training, and experience establish competence, objectives and costs of training…

  9. Swine Producer. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a comprehensive and verified employer competency list for a swine producer program. It contains units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability skills…

  10. Competency Based Education Curriculum for Data Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia State Vocational Curriculum Lab., Cedar Lakes.

    This curriculum for data processing is organized into four learning modules. Each module is comprised of four to seven competencies. A student competency sheet provided for each competency is organized into this format: module and competency number and name, performance guide, learning activities, and an evaluation. Where appropriate, student…

  11. Diesel Mechanics. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for diesel mechanics. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  12. Machine Trades. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for machine trades. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  13. Poultry Producer. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a comprehensive and verified employer competency list for a poultry producer program. It contains units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  14. Entertainment Marketing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for entertainment marketing. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and…

  15. Dairy Producer. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Ohio Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), derived from a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process, is a current comprehensive and verified employer competency program list for dairy producers. Each unit (with or without subunits) contains competencies and competency builders that identify the occupational, academic, and employability…

  16. Administrator Preparation Programs: Problems in Evaluating Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Edgar A.

    Judgments about competence are always relative, tentative, and situation-specific. An effective competency-based program for preparation of school administrators must base judgments about competency development on the same sources that will judge on-the-job administrative competency. The four most common instructional orientations to administrator…

  17. Auto Mechanics. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This comprehensive and verified employer competency list was developed from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This competency list contains 11 units (with or without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify the occupational,…

  18. Nurse Aide. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) for nurse aide (NA) is a competency list verified by expert workers that evolved from a job analysis. It identifies occupational, academic, and employability competencies needed to enter the occupation; lists and clusters them into broader units; and details the competency builders needed to…

  19. Cogenerating a Competency-based HRM Degree: A Model and Some Lessons from Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooten, Kevin C.; Elden, Max

    2001-01-01

    A competency-based degree program in human resource management was co-generated by six groups of stakeholders who synthesized competency models using group decision support software. The program focuses on core human resource processes, general business management, strategic decision making and problem solving, change management, and personal…

  20. Developing a Competency-Based Component for the Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Curriculum. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    Competencies are identified for the four primary instructional areas of the Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Curriculum: plant science, agricultural mechanics, natural resources, and animal science. The competencies for each instructional area are divided into those for exploratory units generally appropriate for instruction at the…

  1. A Self-Assessment of Cultural Competence in Military Mental Health Providers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-31

    framework) of multicultural counseling competencies (i.e., cultural competence): (1) beliefs- attitudes , (2) knowledge , and (3) skills (Sue et al., 1982...and techniques. By cross-classifying these three general characteristics with the three earlier proposed dimensions (beliefs- attitudes , knowledge ...Counseling Knowledge and Awareness Scale (MCKAS; Ponterotto et al., 2002). Multicultural Awareness/ Knowledge /Skills Survey (MAKSS) The Multicultural

  2. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Therapist Effectiveness: A Conceptualization and Initial Study of Cultural Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Zac E.; Baldwin, Scott; Atkins, David C.; Owen, Jesse; Baardseth, Tim; Wampold, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    As a result of mental health disparities between White and racial/ethnic minority clients, researchers have argued that some therapists may be generally competent to provide effective services but lack cultural competence. This distinction assumes that client racial/ethnic background is a source of variability in therapist effectiveness. However,…

  3. Croatian Teacher Competencies Related to the Creation and Implementation of Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovac, Vesna; Rafajac, Branko; Buchberger, Iva

    2014-01-01

    This research was conducted in order to gain a preliminary insight into the general orientation and range of opinions of 396 primary and secondary school teachers in Croatia toward the a) importance of their competencies related to the education policies; b) cognition and mastering of the competencies related to the education policies; c) the…

  4. Update on Emotional Competency: Helping To Prepare Our Youth To Become Effective Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPont, Norman C.

    This report is one in a continuing series of progress reports on the effort to increase the general level of emotional competency in the state of Rhode Island. This initiative, involving several departments of state government and other agencies comprising the Rhode Island Emotional Competency Partnership, is being targeted at various segments of…

  5. "WebGrader": An Online Instrument for Evaluation and Assessment of Oral Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Lynn O.

    2011-01-01

    "WebGrader" is an online instrument developed to evaluate and assess oral competency in the basic course. It is the result of a 15-year study, using Morreale and Hackman's (1994) work as a general model, and "The Competent Speaker" speech rating criteria in particular (Morreale, Moore, Taylor, Surges-Tatum, & Hulbert-Johnson, 1990; Morreale,…

  6. Teacher-Child Relationships and Social Competence: A Two-Year Longitudinal Study of Chinese Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiao; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Based on a two-year and three-wave longitudinal sample of 118 Chinese preschoolers, the present study examined the cross-lagged associations between teacher-child relationships and social competence, and the cross-system generalization of social competence between home and school. At each of the three waves, teachers rated the children's…

  7. Long-Term Effects of Athletics Meet on the Perceived Competence of Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ninot, Gregory; Maiano, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    The purpose was to examine the effects of the type of athletic program (integrated versus segregated) and of the type of sport (basketball versus swimming) on two domains of perceived competence (athletic competence and social acceptance), and general self-worth. Participants were 48 adolescent females with intellectual disabilities (ID) divided…

  8. 18 CFR 16.5 - Site access for a competing applicant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Site access for a competing applicant. 16.5 Section 16.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... RELICENSING OF LICENSED PROJECTS General Provisions § 16.5 Site access for a competing applicant. (a)...

  9. Cultural Differences and Cultivation of Cross-Cultural Communicative Competence in Chinese FLT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Xiaobo

    2009-01-01

    In order to improve their abilities in cross-cultural communication, language learners should develop not only their language competence, but also communicative competence. This paper presents an understanding on the general cultural differences between the west and China by applying the cultural dimensions of Hofstede and Bond, and points out…

  10. Competency assessment of residents in surgical pathology using virtual microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bruch, Leslie A; De Young, Barry R; Kreiter, Clarence D; Haugen, Thomas H; Leaven, Timothy C; Dee, Fred R

    2009-08-01

    Our goal was to develop an efficient and reliable performance-based virtual slide competency examination in general surgical pathology that objectively measures pathology resident's morphologic diagnostic skill. A Perl scripted MySQL database was used to develop the test editor and test interface. Virtual slides were created with the Aperio ScanScope. The examination consisted of 20 questions using 20 virtual slides. Slides were chosen to represent general surgical pathology specimens from a variety of organ systems. The examination was administered in a secure environment and was completed in 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Examination reliability, as an indicator of the test's ability to discriminate between trainee ability levels, was excellent (r = 0.84). The linear correlation coefficient of virtual slide competency examination score versus months of surgical pathology training was 0.83 (P = .0001). The learning curve was much steeper early in training. Correlation of virtual slide competency examination performance with resident's performance on the 64 item Resident In-Service Examination surgical pathology subsection was 0.70. Correlation of virtual slide competency examination performance with global end of rotation ratings was 0.28. This pilot implementation demonstrates that it is possible to create a short, reliable performance-based assessment tool for measuring morphologic diagnostic skill using a virtual slide competency examination. Furthermore, the examination as implemented in our program will be a valid measure of an individual resident's progress in morphologic competency. Virtual slide technology and computer accessibility have advanced to the point that the virtual slide competency examination model implemented in our program could have applicability across multiple residency programs.

  11. Intercultural Communication Competence: Implications of "Old" and "New" Paradigms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairley, Michael

    Approaches to intercultural communication competence display such diversity in method and perspective that the term "paradigm" can be used to describe them. There is evidence that a shift is occurring from "old" perspectives of intercultural communication in general and intercultural communication specifically, characterized by…

  12. Academically Gifted Students' Perceived Interpersonal Competence and Peer Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Seon-Young; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Thomson, Dana Turner

    2012-01-01

    Perceptions of the interpersonal competence and peer relationships of 1,526 gifted adolescents who had previously participated in academic gifted programs at the Center for Talent Development were examined, using an online survey. Major findings included that the gifted students had generally positive perceptions of their abilities to initiate,…

  13. Bilingual Competence and Bilingual Proficiency in Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    When two or more languages are part of a child's world, we are presented with a rich opportunity to learn something about language in general and about how the mind works. In this book, Norbert Francis examines the development of bilingual proficiency and the different kinds of competence that come together in making up its component parts. In…

  14. Moroccan Arabic: A Competency Based Curriculum, Beginning & Intermediate Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Rabat (Morocco).

    The textbook in introductory and intermediate Moroccan Arabic is designed for the language and cultural training of Peace Corps volunteers in Morocco and is intended for both teacher and student use. The contents and design are based on a competency-based curriculum model. An introductory section presents general principles for use of Arabic…

  15. Developing Intercultural Competence in University Staff: Augmenting Internationalisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, Helen

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of this research was to consider the benefit of providing professional development in intercultural competence for general staff at Deakin University. While the question arose from a disparity identified in the University policies, the importance of this consideration was highlighted in an impending audit to be conducted by AUQA,…

  16. Learning through Business Games: Acquiring Competences within Virtual Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortmuller, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The didactic function of business games is often seen only in the development of sociocommunicative competences and general problem-solving strategies. An equally important aspect of business games lies in the acquirement of technical and problem-oriented knowledge, which is the focus of this article. Moreover, this knowledge dimension is further…

  17. Learning about the Cultural Competence of Indiana's Special Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Nationally and in Indiana, the cultural mismatch can be seen in special education programs where minority students are overrepresented and most special educators are white (Arnold, 2003; Artiles et.al, 2005; Gaviria-Soto & Castro-Morera, 2005). Teachers in general and special education teachers in particular need to be culturally competent.…

  18. Assessing Talking and Writing: Linguistic Competence for Students at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Judy K

    1998-01-01

    Suggests coordinated assessment and intervention strategies that speech language pathologists, special educators, and general educators, in co-teaching or inclusive settings, can use to assist at-risk students to achieve both oral and written linguistic competence. Proposes a strong link between talking and writing in the normal developmental…

  19. Measurement of Workforce Readiness Competencies: Design of Prototype Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Harold F., Jr.; And Others

    A general methodology approach is suggested for measurement of workforce readiness competencies in the context of overall work by the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing on the domain-independent measurement of workforce readiness skills. The methodology consists of 14 steps, from the initial selection of a…

  20. ICT Competencies of Higher Education Teachers in Puducherry Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Ramganesh, E.

    2010-01-01

    Higher education professionals generally work in an information and communication technology (ICT) rich environment. In this paper, we present the findings of a study of computer competencies of higher education teachers working in the arts and science colleges of Puducherry region. The present research is aimed at answering the research questions…

  1. Student Material for Competency-Based Education Curriculum for Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Associated Educational Consultants, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA.

    This student welding competency-based education curriculum consists of six units dealing with general areas related to trade occupations and nine units covering specific aspects of working with welding equipment and performing welding operations. Topics covered in the first six units are welding opportunities, human relations, safety, basic…

  2. Getting to Grips with On-the-Job Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foyster, John

    This booklet is one in a series that has been written for the general reader who wants to understand important trends in vocational education and training in Australia. Its focus is competency-based training and assessment. The booklet starts with the specific working environment of a blackjack dealer in a casino and explores the meaning of…

  3. Juvenile offenders: competence to stand trial.

    PubMed

    Soulier, Matthew

    2012-12-01

    This article details the legal background and assists the reader in the preparation and practical conduct of evaluations regarding juvenile adjudicative competency. The material is presented to be useful as a guide to direct questions of competency and covers aspects of evaluation that include: legal standard for competency to stand trial, developmental immaturity, current practice in juvenile competency to stand trial, forensic evaluation of juvenile competency to stand trial, organizing the evaluation, collateral sources of information, psychiatric evaluation of juvenile adjudicative competency, assessment of mental disorder and intellectual disability, assessment of developmental status, assessment of functional abilities for adjudicative competence, and reaching the forensic opinion.

  4. [The debate on the development of advanced competences].

    PubMed

    Dimonte, Valerio; Palese, Alvisa; Chiari, Paolo; Laquintana, Dario; Tognoni, Gianni; Di Giulio, Paola

    2016-01-01

    . The debate on the development of advanced nursing competences. The dossier aims to describe and disentagle the present Italian and international debate on the development and recognition of advanced nursing competences. Following a general brief description of the legislative national background, the attention is first of all focused on the lack of clarity on the definition of advanced competence, which is further complicated by the issue of their formal, contractual and economic recognition. To explore these issues a list of contributions is presented and some proposals are formulated to favor a better oriented development of the debate: a. A convenience sample of 139 nurses were interviewed asking to describe problems occurred in the last month that could prompt the intervention of an expert nurse and to list the clinical, managerial and educational competences of a specialized nurse in their ward. The results document the quality and the dispersion of the definitions which are perceived and applied in the general settings of care. b. The issue the post basic courses (master, specialization) offered to nurses in 2015-2016 by Italian universities were described and their aims. While the contribution of the courses in increasing the theoretical knowledge is well defined, the aims and the description of the clinical training are badly developed and an acquisition of advanced competences would seem unlikely. c. The definition of advanced competences was explored in the international literature: while evidences are available on the impact of advanced nursing on patients' outcomes, what is advanced nursing is far from being clear, and an impressive list of roles, activities and functions are considered advanced. d. Although at national level there is no formal recognition for nurses with advanced competences (with the exception of the head nurse that holds mostly an organizational rather than clinical role), the opportunities for promoting the role of specialistic

  5. The need for a systematic approach to disaster psychosocial response: a suggested competency framework.

    PubMed

    Cox, Robin S; Danford, Taryn

    2014-04-01

    Competency models attempt to define what makes expert performers "experts." Successful disaster psychosocial planning and the institutionalizing of psychosocial response within emergency management require clearly-defined skill sets. This necessitates anticipating both the short- and long-term psychosocial implications of a disaster or health emergency (ie, pandemic) by developing effective and sustained working relationships among psychosocial providers, programs, and other planning partners. The following article outlines recommended competencies for psychosocial responders to enable communities and organizations to prepare for and effectively manage a disaster response. Competency-based models are founded on observable performance or behavioral indicators, attitudes, traits, or personalities related to effective performance in a specific role or job. After analyzing the literature regarding competency-based frameworks, a proposed competency framework that details 13 competency domains is suggested. Each domain describes a series of competencies and suggests behavioral indicators for each competency and, where relevant, associated training expectations. These domains have been organized under three distinct categories or types of competencies: general competency domains; disaster psychosocial intervention competency domains; and disaster psychosocial program leadership and coordination competency domains. Competencies do not replace job descriptions nor should they be confused with performance assessments. What they can do is update and revise job descriptions; orient existing and new employees to their disaster/emergency roles and responsibilities; target training needs; provide the basis for ongoing self-assessment by agencies and individuals as they evaluate their readiness to respond; and provide a job- or role-relevant basis for performance appraisal dimensions or standards and review discussions. Using a modular approach to psychosocial planning, service

  6. Competence formation and post-graduate education in the public water sector in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspersma, J. M.; Alaerts, G. J.; Slinger, J. H.

    2012-07-01

    The water sector is dependent on effective institutions and organisations, and, therefore, on strong competences at the individual level. In this paper we describe competence formation and competence needs in a case study of the Directorate General of Water Resources (DGWR) in the Ministry of Public Works in Indonesia. A framework is introduced for the water sector comprising three aggregate competences for technical issues, management, and governance, and a meta-competence for continuous learning and innovation. The four competences are further organised in a T-shaped competence profile. Though DGWR professionals have a firmly "technical" orientation, both surveys and interviews reveal a strong perceived requirement for other competences: in particular the learning meta-competence, as well as the aggregate competence for management. The aggregate competence for governance systematically scores lower. Further, a discrepancy appears to exist between the competences that staff perceive as needed in daily work, and those that can be acquired during post-graduate water education. In both locally-based and international post-graduate water education, the aggregate competences for management as well as governance are reportedly addressed modestly, if at all. With low competence in these fields, it is difficult for professionals to communicate and collaborate effectively in a multidisciplinary way. As a result, the horizontal bar of the T-shaped profile remains weakly developed. In international post-graduate education, this is partially compensated by the attention to continuous learning and innovation. The exposure to a different culture and learning format is experienced as fundamentally formative.

  7. Assessing Core Competencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marches in 1987. Assessment in the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). It is widely recognized that sophisticated computing technologies are becoming a key element in today's classroom instructional techniques. Regardless, the Professor must be held responsible for creating an instructional environment in which the technology actually supplements learning outcomes of the students. Almost all academic disciplines have found a niche for computer-based instruction in their respective professional domain. In many cases, it is viewed as an essential and integral part of the educational process. Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology

  8. Is your doctor competent?

    PubMed

    Condor, B

    1997-01-01

    HIV-positive patients are consistently healthier and live longer when their care is managed by a physician with significant experience in treating HIV and AIDS, and it is essential for patients to seek out health care providers who keep up with current treatment guidelines. Experienced doctors generally offer more aggressive treatments, and are willing to abandon treatment regimens that are not effective. Communication is essential between the patient and doctor, and must include a review of side effects and the necessity of strict adherence to treatments. A series of questions is included to help patients assess whether their doctor is up to date on current treatments.

  9. One Health Core Competency Domains

    PubMed Central

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting “One Health” approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches. PMID:27679794

  10. The development of stereotype content: The use of warmth and competence in assessing social groups.

    PubMed

    Roussos, Gina; Dunham, Yarrow

    2016-01-01

    Past research suggests that warmth and competence are primary dimensions of social perception used by adults to understand social groups. The current study investigated whether children use these two dimensions to structure their representations of familiar groups. Results indicated that adult warmth and competence judgments were independent from one another and placed groups in warmth by competence space in ways consistent with past work. However, children showed some sensitivity to both dimensions but did not treat them as independent. Children's judgments of competence were closely aligned with adult judgments, but their judgments of warmth were influenced by factors that solely influenced adult judgments of competence. These data suggest that children develop an understanding of competence as an independent dimension prior to developing an understanding of warmth as an independent dimension and that their judgments of warmth may reflect a more general summing of all available evaluative information. Implications for children's developing understanding of the broader intergroup landscape are discussed.

  11. Association between selected physical fitness parameters and esthetic competence in contemporary dancers.

    PubMed

    Angioi, Manuela; Metsios, George S; Twitchett, Emily; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The physical demands imposed on contemporary dancers by choreographers and performance schedules make their physical fitness just as important to them as skill development. Nevertheless, it remains to be confirmed which physical fitness components are associated with aesthetic competence. The aim of this study was to: 1. replicate and test a novel aesthetic competence tool for reliability, and 2. investigate the association between selected physical fitness components and aesthetic competence by using this new tool. Seventeen volunteers underwent a series of physical fitness tests (body composition, flexibility, muscular power and endurance, and aerobic capacity) and aesthetic competence assessments (seven individual criteria commonly used by selected dance companies). Inter-rater reliability of the aesthetic competence tool was very high (r = 0.96). There were significant correlations between the aesthetic competence score and jump ability and push-ups (r = 0.55 and r = 0.55, respectively). Stepwise backward multiple regression analysis revealed that the best predictor of aesthetic competence was push-ups (R(2) = 0.30, p = 0.03). Univariate analyses also revealed that the interaction of push-ups and jump ability improved the prediction power of aesthetic competence (R(2) = 0.44, p = 0.004). It is concluded that upper body muscular endurance and jump ability best predict aesthetic competence of the present sample of contemporary dancers. Further research is required to investigate the contribution of other components of aesthetic competence, including upper body strength, lower body muscular endurance, general coordination, and static and dynamic balance.

  12. Initial Development and Validation of the Mexican Intercultural Competence Scale.

    PubMed

    Torres, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    The current project sought to develop the Mexican Intercultural Competence Scale (MICS), which assesses group-specific skills and attributes that facilitate effective cultural interactions, among adults of Mexican descent. Study 1 involved an Exploratory Factor Analysis (N = 184) that identified five factors including Ambition/Perseverance, Networking, the Traditional Latino Culture, Family Relationships, and Communication. In Study 2, a Confirmatory Factor Analysis provided evidence for the 5-factor model for adults of Mexican origin living in the Midwest (N = 341) region of the U.S. The general findings are discussed in terms of a competence-based formulation of cultural adaptation and include theoretical and clinical implications.

  13. [Competence in biocentric ethics.

    PubMed

    Stepke, Fernando Lolas

    2012-07-01

    ResumenEste artículo explora el origen y la conceptualización de la bioética en tanto ética biocéntrica, definida por el pionero Fritz Jahr como un imperativo hipotético que llama a respetar la vida en todas sus formas. Tras describirla como proceso social, procedimiento técnico y producto académico, se enumeran y comentan algunas competencias que debieran presidir el empleo del discurso bioético en cualquier punto del complejo social "investigación médica": miembros de comités de ética de investigación, investigadores, empresarios, administradores. Cada uno de estos grupos, en su "cultura epistémica" propia, define y explicita los principios básicos en tanto expresión de valores y leyes generales.

  14. Public health financial management competencies.

    PubMed

    Honoré, Peggy A; Costich, Julia F

    2009-01-01

    The absence of appropriate financial management competencies has impeded progress in advancing the field of public health finance. It also inhibits the ability to professionalize this sector of the workforce. Financial managers should play a critical role by providing information relevant to decision making. The lack of fundamental financial management knowledge and skills is a barrier to fulfilling this role. A national expert committee was convened to examine this issue. The committee reviewed standards related to financial and business management practices within public health and closely related areas. Alignments were made with national standards such as those established for government chief financial officers. On the basis of this analysis, a comprehensive set of public health financial management competencies was identified and examined further by a review panel. At a minimum, the competencies can be used to define job descriptions, assess job performance, identify critical gaps in financial analysis, create career paths, and design educational programs.

  15. Successful strategies for competing networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, J.; Papo, D.; Buldú, J. M.

    2013-04-01

    Competitive interactions represent one of the driving forces behind evolution and natural selection in biological and sociological systems. For example, animals in an ecosystem may vie for food or mates; in a market economy, firms may compete over the same group of customers; sensory stimuli may compete for limited neural resources to enter the focus of attention. Here, we derive rules based on the spectral properties of the network governing the competitive interactions between groups of agents organized in networks. In the scenario studied here the winner of the competition, and the time needed to prevail, essentially depend on the way a given network connects to its competitors and on its internal structure. Our results allow assessment of the extent to which real networks optimize the outcome of their interaction, but also provide strategies through which competing networks can improve on their situation. The proposed approach is applicable to a wide range of systems that can be modelled as networks.

  16. Comparisons of Social Competence in Young Children With and Without Hearing Loss: A Dynamic Systems Framework

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Michael F.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Cejas, Ivette

    2015-01-01

    This study compared levels of social competence and language development in 74 young children with hearing loss and 38 hearing peers aged 2.5–5.3 years. This study was the first to examine the relationship between oral language and social competence using a dynamic systems framework in children with and without hearing loss. We hypothesized that, due to deficits in oral language, children who were deaf would display lower levels of social competence than their hearing peers. Furthermore, language age would predict social competence scores. Social competence was measured with a general and deaf-specific measure. Results showed that children with hearing loss performed significantly worse than hearing peers on the general measure but better than the norms on the deaf-specific measure. Controlling for maternal education and income, regression analyses indicated that hearing status and language age predicted social competence in both groups. Among children with hearing loss, correlations were also found between age at diagnosis, age at amplification, and two of the general social competence measures. Results supported our hypothesis that deficits in language would have cascading negative effects on the development of social competence in young deaf children. Development of early intervention programs that target both language and social skills are needed for this population. PMID:25583707

  17. Comparisons of social competence in young children with and without hearing loss: a dynamic systems framework.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Michael F; Quittner, Alexandra L; Cejas, Ivette

    2015-04-01

    This study compared levels of social competence and language development in 74 young children with hearing loss and 38 hearing peers aged 2.5-5.3 years. This study was the first to examine the relationship between oral language and social competence using a dynamic systems framework in children with and without hearing loss. We hypothesized that, due to deficits in oral language, children who were deaf would display lower levels of social competence than their hearing peers. Furthermore, language age would predict social competence scores. Social competence was measured with a general and deaf-specific measure. Results showed that children with hearing loss performed significantly worse than hearing peers on the general measure but better than the norms on the deaf-specific measure. Controlling for maternal education and income, regression analyses indicated that hearing status and language age predicted social competence in both groups. Among children with hearing loss, correlations were also found between age at diagnosis, age at amplification, and two of the general social competence measures. Results supported our hypothesis that deficits in language would have cascading negative effects on the development of social competence in young deaf children. Development of early intervention programs that target both language and social skills are needed for this population.

  18. Competence, continuing education, and computers.

    PubMed

    Hegge, Margaret; Powers, Penny; Hendrickx, Lori; Vinson, Judith

    2002-01-01

    A survey of RNs in South Dakota was performed to determine their perceived level of competence, the extent to which their continuing nursing education (CNE) needs are being met, and their use of computers for CNE. Nationally certified nurses rated themselves significantly more competent than nurses who are not nationally certified. Fewer than half of the RNs reported their CNE needs were being met despite geographic access to CNE and programs available in their specialty. Three-fourths of nurses had computers at home while 76% had computers at work, yet fewer than 20% of nurses used these computers for CNE.

  19. Children's Perceived Competence Scale: Reference values in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yukiyo; Nomura, Kayo; Nagata, Masako; Ohgi, Shohei; Iwasa, Mitsuji

    2015-12-01

    To support children with chronic diseases, reference values to measure developmental changes in self-perception and self-esteem are considered a useful yardstick. To develop reference values to measure self-perceived competence and self-esteem in Japanese children, the Children's Perceived Competence Scale (CPCS) was administered to 768 children of elementary school grade 1 (6 years) to grade 6 (11 years) at four public schools in Japan, from November to December 2012. After excluding 74 with chronic diseases and/or incomplete responses, 694 children were included. CPCS measures children's self-perceived competence in cognitive, social, physical domains, and general self-worth, namely self-esteem. There was a tendency for scores of cognitive and general self-worth to decrease with increasing grade. Scores among grade 5 respondents were significantly lower than those among grade 4 respondents for both social and physical domains. Scores among boys and girls differed significantly, with boys scoring higher for physical domain in grades 3 and 6 and for general self-worth domain in grade 6. The CPCS reference values to measure self-perceived competence and self-esteem in Japanese children were developed in this study. These reference values are useful to inform practitioners supporting children with psychological or psychiatric problems or those with chronic diseases.

  20. Cultural Competency Revised: The California Brief Multicultural Competence Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamst, Glenn; Dana, Richard H.; Der-Karabetian, Aghop; Aragon, Myriam; Arellano, Leticia; Morrow, Gloria; Martenson, Luann

    2004-01-01

    The authors describe the development of the California Brief Multicultural Competence Scale (CBMCS). The 21-item CBMCS was derived from principal component analysis, item content validated by a panel of experts, and confirmatory factor analyses. Several studies provided internal consistency, subscale intercorrelations, criterion-related…

  1. Competence formation and post-graduate education in the public water sector in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspersma, J. M.; Alaerts, G. J.; Slinger, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    A framework is introduced, describing three aggregate competences for technical issues, management and governance, and a meta-competence for continuous learning and innovation, for the water sector. The four competences are further organised in a T-shaped competence profile. The framework and an assessment methodology were tested in a case study on post-graduate water education for professional staff in the Directorate General Water Resources (DGWR) in Indonesia. Though DGWR professionals have a firmly "technical" orientation, both the surveys and interviews show strong interest in the other competences: in particular the learning meta-competence, as well as the aggregate competence for management. The aggregate competence for governance systematically scores lower. A discrepancy appears to exist between the competences that staff perceive as needed in daily work, and those that could be acquired during post-graduate water education. In both locally-based and international post-graduate water education, the aggregate competences for management as well as governance are reportedly addressed modestly, if at all. With only little competence in these disciplines, it will be difficult for professionals to communicate and collaborate effectively in an interdisciplinary way. As a result, the horizontal bar of the T-shaped profile remains weakly developed. In international post-graduate education, this seems partly compensated by the attention for continuous learning and innovation. The exposure to a different culture and learning format is reported as fundamentally formative. The policies of DGWR have gone through three distinct phases. In the first phase (1970-1987) technical competence and learning were valued highly and training was arranged effectively; in the current phase the need to develop new competences is raising new challenges.

  2. Caring, competence and professional identities in medical education.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Anna

    2011-08-01

    This paper considers the multiple discourses that influence medical education with a focus on the discourses of competence and caring. Discourses of competence are largely constituted through, and related to, biomedical and clinical issues whereas discourses of caring generally focus on social concerns. These discourses are not necessarily equal partners in the enterprise of medical education. Discourses of competence tend to be privileged while those discourses of caring are often marginalised. Medical students learn to be physicians, and develop professional identities, in the context of these competing discourses. This paper documents a qualitative study designed to explore how professional identities are developed in the context of competing discourses. The study included a Foucauldian discourse analysis of medical education curriculum documents (67 problem-based learning cases in total), 26 h of observation of a small group learning experience (a problem-based learning tutorial), and in-depth, open-ended interviews with five medical students and nine medical educators at a Canadian medical school. The paper describes how professional identities are developed in relation to discourses of competence, noting that students displayed what they considered to be desirable professional identities of confidence, capability and suitability. Also explored are the professional identities demonstrated in relation to discourses of caring, including those of benevolence and humbleness. Despite current conceptualisations, medical education is ripe with potential. The data indicate Foucauldian "spaces of freedom"-sites at which the complexity of the practice of medicine and the interwoven natures of the discourses of competence and caring might be taken into account as a means of challenging taken for granted cultural norms and broadening the medical gaze.

  3. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile. Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This index contains the unit titles from all 60 Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) lists. It is intended to facilitate the combination of units from different OCAPs in order to develop curricula that meet specific program needs (e.g., learner differences, labor market demands, and technological developments). OCAP titles are as follows:…

  4. Teaching and Assessing Civic Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Bonnie

    1993-01-01

    Maintains that the primary goal of social studies instruction is the development of civic competence. Describes a Vietnam War interview project incorporating oral history techniques. Includes a grading sheet, a project description sheet, a list of interview questions, and a sample interview. (CFR)

  5. Competency Based Refresher Nurse Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Mary C.

    This competency-based course is designed to update the skills and knowledge of inactive nurses desiring to return to active practice. Focus of the course is on organizing and managing patient care using the nursing process; performing nursing procedures, including medication administration; and reintegrating oneself into the professional…

  6. Ohio Information Technology Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus.

    This profile includes a comprehensive set of information technology competencies that are grounded in core academic subject areas and built around four occupational clusters (information services and support, network systems, programming and software development, and interactive media) that reflect the job opportunities and skills required for…

  7. The Social Competence of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fein, Greta G.

    This is a study of how young children gain social competence through pretend play or role playing. Subjects were 38 Caucasian children (19 females, 19 males) who were observed at four ages: 12, 18, 24 and 30 months. The same set of toys, which included a doll, a saucepan, doll bottles, coffee mug, teacup, teaspoon, doll crib, blanket, toy phone…

  8. Implementing Competence Frameworks in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Anda, Maria Luisa

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on the Mexican case study undertaken as part of the comparative study of the implementation and impact of National Qualifications Frameworks (NQF). Even though Mexico does not have a comprehensive NQF, the country has considerable experience in the development of labour competence technical standards; these share some aims…

  9. Ohio Construction Technologies Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lavonna; Bowermeister, Bob

    This document, which lists construction technologies competencies as identified by representatives from government agencies and labor organizations as well as secondary and postsecondary educators throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing both college tech prep programs and apprenticeship training/education…

  10. Teacher Competencies in Community Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Brian P.

    A project identified and validated minimal competencies that describe what K-8 classroom teachers actually do in community education. A total of 27 participants from four Phoenix elementary schools, each of which had an active community education program, identified tasks in five areas related to community education. These were program planning,…

  11. Residential Construction. Competencies for Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeast Community Coll., Lincoln, NE.

    Developed by high school teachers and junior college instructors in cooperation with representatives of business and industry, these materials are designed to help students move from class to class, from secondary to postsecondary education, and from school to employment. The materials consist of student outcomes; competencies for job or advanced…

  12. Instruction of Competent Psychomotor Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Valerie Dong

    2008-01-01

    Instruction of competent psychomotor skill necessitates an eclectic approach. The principles of learning, complemented with learning styles and sensory modalities preferences, provide a background for teaching physical skills. The use of the psychomotor domain of Bloom's Taxonomy as a map and corresponding behavioral objectives foster the mastery…

  13. Death Competence: An Ethical Imperative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamino, Louis A.; Ritter, R. Hal, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The authors argued that death competence, defined as specialized skill in tolerating and managing clients' problems related to dying, death, and bereavement, is a necessary prerequisite for ethical practice in grief counseling. A selected review of the literature tracing the underpinnings of this concept reveals how a robust construct of death…

  14. Competency-Based Behavioral Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrigues, Sarah M.

    2012-01-01

    Directors too often rely primarily on their hunches to guide them in employee selection. But what if their hunches are only 30 percent correct? Potentially, one bad hire could be responsible for a noticeable decrease in enrollment and, as a result, the school's net revenue. In this article, the author discusses the Competency-Based Behavioral…

  15. Automotive Technologies. State Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus.

    This document, which lists the technical automotive technologies competencies identified by representatives from business, industry, and labor as well as technical educators throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing college tech prep programs that will prepare students from secondary through post-secondary…

  16. Welding. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), which is one of a series of OCAPs developed to identify the skills that Ohio employers deem necessary to entering a given occupation/occupational area, lists the occupational, academic, and employability skills required of individuals entering the occupation of welder. The introduction explains…

  17. Handwriting Development, Competency, and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feder, Katya P.; Majnemer, Annette

    2007-01-01

    Failure to attain handwriting competency during the school-age years often has far-reaching negative effects on both academic success and self-esteem. This complex occupational task has many underlying component skills that may interfere with handwriting performance. Fine motor control, bilateral and visual-motor integration, motor planning,…

  18. Ohio Engineering Technologies Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lavonna; Draeger, Meg; Bowermeister, Bob; Wancho, Richard

    This document, which lists engineering technologies competencies as identified by representatives from business and industry as well as secondary and post-secondary educators throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing college tech prep programs that will prepare students from secondary through post-secondary…

  19. Competing Explanations of Undergraduate Noncompletion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attewell, Paul; Heil, Scott; Reisel, Liza

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyze longitudinal data from a nationally representative panel of college entrants to test and compare several theoretical explanations of college degree attainment and noncompletion. So far, relatively little emphasis has been placed on determining the relative and combined predictive power of competing explanations or…

  20. Science Competencies That Go Unassessed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmer, Penny J.; Sherdan, Danielle M.; Oosterhof, Albert; Rohani, Faranak; Rouby, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Present large-scale assessments require the use of item formats, such as multiple choice, that can be administered and scored efficiently. This limits competencies that can be measured by these assessments. An alternative approach to large-scale assessments is being investigated that would include the use of complex performance assessments. As…

  1. Methods of Identifying Marketing Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Lucy C.; Ertel, Kenneth A.

    1970-01-01

    The competency pattern and the task analysis are two approaches used to identify content that affects the distributive education curriculum. These and other research tools provide essential information about capabilities required for entrance into and persistence in careers at prescribed levels of distributive jobs. (Author)

  2. Multivariate Model of Infant Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kierscht, Marcia Selland; Vietze, Peter M.

    This paper describes a multivariate model of early infant competence formulated from variables representing infant-environment transaction including: birthweight, habituation index, personality ratings of infant social orientation and task orientation, ratings of maternal responsiveness to infant distress and social signals, and observational…

  3. Fundamental Contradictions in Cultural Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Yvonne M.; Munch, Shari

    2009-01-01

    Cultural competence (CC) is considered highly relevant to social work practice with clients belonging to ethnic and racial minority groups, as the burgeoning literature and creation of practice standards on CC attest. However, examination of the conceptual underpinnings of CC reveals several major anomalies. The authors argue that several aspects…

  4. What Core Competencies Are Related to Teachers' Innovative Teaching?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Chang; Wang, Di; Cai, Yonghong; Engels, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate teachers' core competencies in relation to their innovative teaching performance. Based on the literature and previous studies in this field, four competencies (learning competency, educational competency, social competency and technological competency) are theorised as core competencies for teachers'…

  5. Theoretical Analysis of the Professional Competence's Formation and Development in the Light of Ukrainian and Foreign Scientists (In Terms of the Marketers' Professional Skills and Abilities)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levkovych, Uliana

    2014-01-01

    This paper defines formation of the concept of "competence", attaches importance to the invariant of professional qualification, and explains core competencies of the marketer. The general and extensive use of the term "competence" in professional education and training has been indicated. It has been noted that recently the…

  6. Competencies in occupational and environmental health nursing.

    PubMed

    2007-11-01

    The American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc. has delineated nine categories of competency in occupational and environmental health nursing. Within each category, three levels of achievement or competence are identified.

  7. Concerning National Competency Examinations in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoemaker, David M.

    1979-01-01

    Several aspects of national competency tests are discussed: two conceptualizations; arguments pro and con; the federal perspective; a distillation of support and opposition to arguments judged unique to national competency tests; and a hypothetical procedure for implementation. (MH)

  8. Preceptors' views of assessing nursing students using a competency based approach.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Irene; Butler, Mary Pat; Quillinan, Bernie; Egan, Geraldine; Mc Namara, Mary C; Tuohy, Dympna; Bradshaw, Carmel; Fahy, Anne; Connor, Maureen O'; Tierney, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical competence assessment in BSc nursing registration education programmes. This research was undertaken in two phases and incorporated both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. In the first phase, two focus groups were conducted with preceptors working in general, mental health and intellectual disability nursing (n=16). In the second phase, a survey was undertaken with preceptors (n=837) in these disciplines. This paper reports on the focus group findings of preceptors' views and experiences of assessing undergraduate nursing degree students using a competency based approach. A semi-structured interview guide was used to focus the discussions. Three higher order categories that emerged included: attitudes to competencies, being a preceptor and competencies in practice. Competing demands in the clinical environment impacted on preceptors' experiences of the assessment process. Difficulties such as the wording of competency documentation and incorporation of skills into the assessment were articulated. The importance of a regional and national review of competency assessment systems to find a common language for student assessment as well as promoting greater student skill development within competency frameworks is recommended. These findings; highlight the importance of making assessments more workable within the current environment and aim to inform future development of competence assessment.

  9. Online cultural competency education for millennial dental students.

    PubMed

    Evans, Lorraine; Hanes, Philip J

    2014-06-01

    Teaching cultural competence is now an educational requirement for U.S. dental curricula to meet 2013 accreditation standards. The question now is, given time restrictions, limited resources, and budget constraints faced by the majority of dental schools, how can they provide effective cultural competency education to prepare future dental professionals? An additional concern regarding instruction is the recent focus on techniques to engage Millennial learners since this generation is characterized as technologically savvy with a preference for multimedia and general dislike of traditional lectures. With these issues in mind, Georgia Regents University developed Healthy Perspectives, an online, interactive course in cultural competence designed to engage Millennial students. Both before and after the course, the students were asked to complete a modified version of the Clinical Cultural Competency Questionnaire. Of the eighty-eight students in the course (eighty-one first-year dental students and seven entering radiology students), seventy-one completed the questionnaire both before and after the course, for an 81 percent response rate. Seventy-five students also completed the course evaluation. The pre and post questionnaires showed statistically significant gains for students across the four primary areas of self-awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and skills. Student evaluations of the course were generally positive, particularly regarding content, but somewhat surprisingly their assessment of the interactive components (which were designed to meet generational expectations) was ambivalent.

  10. Evaluating Adult's Competency: Application of the Competency Assessment Process

    PubMed Central

    Giroux, Dominique; Tétreault, Sylvie; Landry, Marie-Pier

    2015-01-01

    Competency assessment of adults with cognitive impairment or mental illness is a complex process that can have significant consequences for their rights. Some models put forth in the scientific literature have been proposed to guide health and social service professionals with this assessment process, but none of these appear to be complete. A new model, the Competency Assessment Process (CAP), was presented and validated in other studies. This paper adds to this corpus by presenting both the CAP model and the results of a survey given to health and social service professionals on its practical application in their clinical practice. The survey was administered to 35 participants trained in assessing competency following the CAP model. The results show that 40% of participants use the CAP to guide their assessment and the majority of those who do not yet use it plan to do so in the future. A large majority of participants consider this to be a relevant model and believe that all interdisciplinary teams should use it. These results support the relevance of the CAP model. Further research is planned to continue the study of the application of CAP in healthcare facilities. PMID:26257978

  11. Competency-based postgraduate training: can we bridge the gap between theory and clinical practice?

    PubMed

    ten Cate, Olle; Scheele, Fedde

    2007-06-01

    The introduction of competency-based postgraduate medical training, as recently stimulated by national governing bodies in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, The Netherlands, and other countries, is a major advancement, but at the same time it evokes critical issues of curricular implementation. A source of concern is the translation of general competencies into the practice of clinical teaching. The authors observe confusion around the term competency, which may have adverse effects when a teaching and assessment program is to be designed. This article aims to clarify the competency terminology. To connect the ideas behind a competency framework with the work environment of patient care, the authors propose to analyze the critical activities of professional practice and relate these to predetermined competencies. The use of entrustable professional activities (EPAs) and statements of awarded responsibility (STARs) may bridge a potential gap between the theory of competency-based education and clinical practice. EPAs reflect those activities that together constitute the profession. Carrying out most of these EPAs requires the possession of several competencies. The authors propose not to go to great lengths to assess competencies as such, in the way they are abstractly defined in competency frameworks but, instead, to focus on the observation of concrete critical clinical activities and to infer the presence of multiple competencies from several observed activities. Residents may then be awarded responsibility for EPAs. This can serve to move toward competency-based training, in which a flexible length of training is possible and the outcome of training becomes more important than its length.

  12. Keynote Address: Developing and Measuring Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otter, Sue

    1992-01-01

    In distinguishing it from occupational competence, this article defines competence in higher education as a cluster of qualities, characteristics, and abilities that may or may not have clear vocational applications. Suggests that a competence model based on industry's clearly defined roles and performances would be inappropriate for higher…

  13. Practical Nursing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for practical nursing. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  14. Teacher Technology Competencies: Early Indicators and Benchmarks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Julie; Knuth, Randy; Borse, Jennifer; Mitchell, Marlon

    Two recent trends in education--increased technology and accountability--are driving efforts to define technology competencies and standards for teachers. The first lists of competencies from these efforts are just now being completed. While some of these competencies are linked to teacher certification and re-certification, others are developed…

  15. Medical Assistant. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability skills (competencies)…

  16. Health Technologies State Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This "tech prep" state competency profile contains all the competencies required and recommended for entry-level employees in occupations in the health technologies cluster. Introductory materials include the following: descriptions of the different types of competencies (essential ones that must be included in all new tech prep programs…

  17. Business Information Systems. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) for business information systems is an employer-verified competency list that evolved from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) job analysis process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives throughout Ohio. The competency list consists of 10 units: (1) data…

  18. Cultural Competence of International Humanitarian Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Wei-Wen

    2007-01-01

    As global interaction and cultural diversity become prominent, cultural competence has received more attention. To understand nonprofit organizations' (NPO's) international workers' learning process in terms of cultural competence, this study used a cultural competence attainment model as a theoretical framework, enlisted 10 Taiwanese…

  19. Meat Processor. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for meat processing occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders…

  20. Marketing Management. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability skills (competencies)…

  1. Evaluating Positive Social Competence in Preschool Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joy, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Social competence is seen as a critical aspect of academic and social success; however, the construct is often minimized to a set of social skills or the absence of negative behaviors. The current study aims to broaden the understanding of social competence by incorporating the factors associated with the development of social competence and the…

  2. Information Competency: Challenges and Strategies for Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, Sacramento.

    In 1996, the California Community College Board of Governors (BOG) issued a policy statement identifying information competency as a priority. Recognizing information competency as an academic and professional matter, in May 1999 the Chancellor delegated the issue of information competency as a graduation requirement to the Academic Senate for…

  3. Systematic approach in petroleum personnel competence assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanyuk, Vera; Nekhoda, Evgeniya; Dmitriev, Andrey; Khudyakov, Dmitriy; Pozdeeva, Galina

    2016-09-01

    The article is devoted to professional competence improvement of personnel in the petroleum industry. The technique for competence assessment optimization in oil and gas well drilling is developed. The specification for the oil and gas industry competence profiles has been provided.

  4. The Perceived Competence Scale for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harter, Susan

    1982-01-01

    A new self-report instrument, the Perceived Competence Scale for Children, is described. Emphasis is placed on the assessment of a child's sense of competence across different domains, instead of on viewing perceived competence as a unitary construct. (Author/RH)

  5. Science Unlimited: Grades K-6 Competency Matrix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Div. of Arts and Sciences.

    This competency matrix matches the primary and intermediate Science Unlimited lessons with the established competencies which appear in the Science Unlimited competency continuum. Primary lessons deal with: investigating dripping faucets; classification/sorting; smell; eyes; color; air; weather; observation and description; mystery boxes; change;…

  6. Forest Industry Worker. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for forest industry occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders…

  7. Agriculture Products Processing. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability skills (competencies)…

  8. Expanding Multicultural Competence through Social Justice Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arredondo, Patricia; Perez, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Social justice and multicultural competence have been inextricably linked for nearly four decades, influencing the development of multicultural competency standards and guidelines and organizational change in psychology. This response provides a historical perspective on the evolution of competencies and offers clarifications regarding their…

  9. Competencies and Higher Education Policy Analysts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Mario

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this study is on higher education policy analysts and the competencies they employ to perform their work. The research focuses on responses from a U.S. sample of policy analysts to (a) define a meaningful list of competencies for higher education policy analysts and (b) empirically test whether those competencies meaningfully…

  10. Domestic Violence, Emotional Competence, and Child Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Hessler, Danielle M.; Annest, Amalia

    2007-01-01

    This article examined emotion competence in children exposed to domestic violence (DV). It also examined the hypothesis that children's emotional competence mediates relations between DV and children's later difficulties with peers and behavioral adjustment. DV was assessed when children were at the age of five, emotional competence was assessed…

  11. Dell Hymes's Construct of "Communicative Competence"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cazden, Courtney B.

    2011-01-01

    Cazden reflects on theoretical and sociopolitical origins of Hymes's construct of communicative competence in events occurring just before and after 1960 in the U.S. She comments on Hymes's emphasis on competence not as abstract systemic potential of a language, but as capability located in individual persons; and she explores competence as both…

  12. Environmental Management. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability skills (competencies)…

  13. Dental Assistant. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for dental assistants. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  14. Dental Assistant. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability skills (competencies)…

  15. Commercial Photography. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) for commercial photography is an employer-verified competency list that evolved from a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) job analysis process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives throughout Ohio. The competency list consists of 12 units: (1) business…

  16. Practitioners Formulate Competencies for Developmental Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickens, Mary Ellen

    1980-01-01

    Describes the Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) process which involved 10 panelists in a three-day seminar to define "developmental educators" and identify the competencies they need. Provides and lists eight uses for a chart which enumerates, in order of importance, eight competency areas and specific competencies within each area. (CAM)

  17. Minimum Competency Testing and the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildemuth, Barbara M.

    This brief overview of minimum competency testing and disabled high school students discusses: the inclusion or exclusion of handicapped students in minimum competency testing programs; approaches to accommodating the individual needs of handicapped students; and legal issues. Surveys of states that have mandated minimum competency tests indicate…

  18. Animal Management Technician. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) for animal management technician (AMT) is a competency list verified by expert workers that evolved from a job analysis. It identifies occupational, academic, and employability competencies needed to enter the occupation; lists and clusters them into broader units; and details the competency…

  19. Nurse Aide. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for nurses' aides. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that identify…

  20. Business/Computer Technologies. State Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 272 competencies, grouped into 36 units, for tech prep programs in the business/computer technology cluster. The competencies were developed through collaboration of Ohio business, industry, and labor representatives and secondary and associate degree educators. The competencies are rated either "essential"…

  1. Interactive Media Technologies. State Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 143 competencies, grouped into 25 units, for tech prep programs in the interactive media technologies cluster. The competencies were developed through collaboration of Ohio business, industry, and labor representatives and secondary and associate degree educators. The competencies are rated either "essential"…

  2. Examining Factors Predicting Students' Digital Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatlevik, Ove Edvard; Guðmundsdóttir, Gréta Björk; Loi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors predicting lower secondary school students' digital competence and to explore differences between students when it comes to digital competence. Results from a digital competence test and survey in lower secondary school will be presented. It is important to learn more about and investigate what…

  3. 18 CFR 5.28 - Competing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Competing applications. 5.28 Section 5.28 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... Competing applications. (a) Site access for a competing applicant. The provisions of § 16.5 of this...

  4. Ethics competencies in the business of dentistry.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, A B

    2001-03-01

    Ethics is the systematic study of human conduct examined in the light of moral values and principles. It is the most important competency in dentistry, in business, and in life. Competency in ethics requires an understanding of its accepted principles, and such competency is the obligation of every dental professional.

  5. Developing Communicative Competence in University Language Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Šajgalíková, Helena; Breeze, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with university language teaching in the perspective of its shift from linguistic competence towards communicative competence, and presents some aspects of the underlying process. It analyses the findings from a survey conducted within the Leonardo project "Transparency in the Acquired Language Competences" (TALC;…

  6. Competence: Conceptual Approach and Practice in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Deist, Francoise

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to analyse the conceptual approaches to competence and practice in competence management in France. Design/methodology/approach: Extensive literature review, discussion with academic experts in the French competence network of AGRH and interviews concerning developments following the 2003 national agreement…

  7. Observing and Planning for Play and Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Eva A.

    This paper presents a framework useful for preschool and elementary teachers in developing a basic understanding of competency and play and their interrelationship. Specific guidelines are given for observing and planning toward increasing opportunities for competency and play. Competency is viewed as consisting of growth, risk-taking, and a…

  8. Competences for All: Recognizing and Developing Competences of Young People with Fewer Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usakli, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study clarifies opinion of 32 European volunteer youth leaders on concepts of competence, fewer opportunities and enlargement strategies on competence of fewer opportunities. Leaders underline main competencies as follows: tongue, languages, mathematical, digital, learning, social, entrepreneurship, cultural. Key competences are…

  9. Does Protected Research Time During General Surgery Training Contribute to Graduates’ Career Choice?

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Syamal D.; Williams, Judson B.; de la Fuente, Sebastian G.; Kuo, Paul C.; Seigler, Hilliard F.

    2013-01-01

    A number of general surgery training programs offer a dedicated research experience during the training period. There is much debate over the importance of these experiences with the added constraints placed on training surgeons including length of training, ACGME limitations, and financial barriers. We seek to quantify the impact of a protected research experience on graduates of a university affiliated general surgery training program. Methods We surveyed all graduates of a single university affiliated general surgery training program who completed training from 1989–1999. Data was obtained for 100% of the subjects. Results 98.6% of graduates (72/73) completed a dedicated research experience (range: 1–5 years). Currently, 72.6% (53/73) are practicing academic surgery and 82.5% (60/73) are engaged research activities. 69.5% (51/73) of graduates have current research funding including 32.9% (24/73) with NIH funding. Of all graduates, 42.5% (31/73) have become full professors with 20.2% (15/73) division chiefs and 14.3% (10/73) department chairmen or vice chairmen. Those trainees achieving a career in academic surgery were statistically more likely to have committed two or more years to a protected research experience during training (p< 0.05), fellowship training after general surgery residency (p<0.01), and a first job at an academic institution upon completion of training (p<0.001). Conclusions Understanding the importance of resident research experiences while highlighting critical factors during the formative training period may help to ensure continued academic interest and productivity of future trainees. PMID:21944357

  10. Phytochromes in photosynthetically competent plants

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.H.

    1990-07-01

    Plants utilize light as a source of information in photomorphogenesis and of free energy in photosynthesis, two processes that are interrelated in that the former serves to increase the efficiency with which plants can perform the latter. Only one pigment involved in photomorphogenesis has been identified unequivocally, namely phytochrome. The thrust of this proposal is to investigate this pigment and its mode(s) of action in photosynthetically competent plants. Our long term objective is to characterize phytochrome and its functions in photosynthetically competent plants from molecular, biochemical and cellular perspectives. It is anticipated that others will continue to contribute indirectly to these efforts at the physiological level. The ultimate goal will be to develop this information from a comparative perspective in order to learn whether the different phytochromes have significantly different physicochemical properties, whether they fulfill independent functions and if so what these different functions are, and how each of the different phytochromes acts at primary molecular and cellular levels.

  11. Competencies Framework for Climate Services.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Enric

    2016-04-01

    The World Climate Conference-3 (Geneva, 2009) established the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) to enable better management of the risks of climate variability and change and adaptation to climate change at all levels, through development and incorporation of science-based climate information and prediction into planning, policy and practice. The GFCS defines Climate Services as the result of transforming climate data into climate information in a way that responds to user needs and assists decision-making by individuals and organizations. Capacity Development is a cross-cutting pillar of the GFCS to ensure that services are provided by institutions with professionals whom achieved the adequate set of competencies recommended by WMO, which are yet to be fully defined. The WMO-Commission for Climatology Expert Team on Education and Training, ET-ETR, has been working to define a Competencies Framework for Climate Services to help the institutions to deliver high quality climate services in compliance with WMO standards and regulations, specifically those defined by WMO's Commission for Climatology and the GFCS. This framework is based in 5 areas or competence, closely associated to the areas of work of climate services providers: create and manage climate data sets; derive products from climate data; create and/or interpret climate forecasts and model output; ensure the quality of climate information and services; communicate climatological information with users. With this contribution, we intend to introduce to a wider audience the rationale behind these 5 top-level competency statements and the performance criteria associated with them, as well as the plans of the ET-ETR for further developing them into an instrument to support education and training within the WMO members, specially the National Meteorological and Hydrological Services.

  12. Competence and competency-based nursing education: finding our way through the issues.

    PubMed

    Pijl-Zieber, Em M; Barton, Sylvia; Konkin, Jill; Awosoga, Olu; Caine, Vera

    2014-05-01

    The language of competence is widely utilized in both the regulation of nursing practice and curricular design in nursing education. The notion of competence defines what it means to be a professional, although it is not the only way of describing nursing practice. Unfortunately, there is much confusion about the concepts of competence, competency, and competency-based education. As well, the notion of competence, despite its global popularity, has flaws. In this paper we will disentangle these terms and critique the use of competence frameworks in nursing education.

  13. General Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    General anesthesia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Under general anesthesia, you are completely unconscious and unable to feel pain during medical procedures. General anesthesia usually uses a combination of intravenous drugs and ...

  14. Competence and the occupational therapy entrepreneur.

    PubMed

    Foto, M

    1998-10-01

    That which constitutes competence in an occupational therapy entrepreneur is not well delineated, even though the role of entrepreneur requires that such a person possess a particular set of knowledge and skills in order to be competent. The question of competence in an occupational therapy entrepreneur is increasingly important because the number of practitioners assuming this role has grown in recent times. Indeed, a connection exists between the competence of occupational therapy entrepreneurs and the future stature of the profession. Still, the issue remains: How will occupational therapy entrepreneurs be judged competent? Peer evaluation is one possibility, but the ultimate measure will be marketplace success.

  15. 75 FR 52596 - Financial Education Core Competencies; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Financial Education Core Competencies; Comment Request AGENCY: Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice... proposed set of financial education core competencies (``Core Competencies''). Comments are requested specifically on whether the list of Core Competencies referenced in the Supplementary Section is complete...

  16. Competency-based medical education: An overview and application in pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilima; Desai, Chetna; Jorwekar, Gokul; Badyal, Dinesh; Singh, Tejinder

    2016-01-01

    Competency-based medical education (CBME) is gaining momentum across the globe. The Medical Council of India has described the basic competencies required of an Indian Medical Graduate and designed a competency-based module on attitudes and communication. Widespread adoption of a competency-based approach would mean a paradigm shift in the current approach to medical education. CBME, hence, needs to be reviewed for its usefulness and limitations in the Indian context. This article describes the rationale of CBME and provides an overview of its components, i.e., competency, entrustable professional activity, and milestones. It elaborates how CBME could be implemented in an institute, in the context of basic sciences in general and pharmacology in particular. The promises and perils of CBME that need to be kept in mind to maximize its gains are described. PMID:28031599

  17. General Marketing. A Guide to Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide, which was written for general marketing instructors in Ohio, lists more than 600 resources for use in conjunction with the General Marketing Occupational Competency Analysis Profile. The texts, workbooks, modules, software, videos, and learning activities packets listed are categorized by the following topics: human resource…

  18. Evaluating continuing competency: a challenge for nursing.

    PubMed

    Alien, Patricia; Lauchner, Kathryn; Bridges, Ruth Ann; Francis-Johnson, Patricia; McBride, Susan G; Olivarez, Arturo

    2008-02-01

    Twenty-five nurse leaders met at an invitational conference in Texas to discuss professional nurse competency evaluation. Conference attendees who were statewide nursing leaders in practice, education, and administration identified ways to evaluate competency. Responses were recorded and clustered into the following patterns: (1) components of competency evaluation, (2) barriers and challenges to evaluating competency, and (3) recommendations for evaluating competency. Conference attendees reported competency includes the abilities to think in action, have confidence and clarity in decision making, and retrieve information throughout the career trajectory. Nurses must demonstrate the ability to access evidence-based information and synthesize it within the context of practice situations. Self-reflection and self-assessment are necessary components to competency evaluation for the improvement of nursing practice.

  19. Components of competence in the community aged.

    PubMed

    Thomae, H

    1992-12-01

    Following a discussion of different approaches to the definition of 'competence' and their theoretical background, the need for both situation-specific and global conceptualizations of this construct is stressed. Aside from competencies for physical and social survival, those related to psychological survival should be considered. A battery of indicators of competence, as used in the Bonn Longitudinal Study on Aging (BOLSA), was helpful in identifying six groups of elderly people with different levels of competence in the range of 'normal' aging. Cognitive and personality variables most significantly differentiated the competence groups. On the basis of these findings, the value of complex competence models and the need for situation-specific and person-specific assessments of competence is stressed.

  20. Integrated case scripts to enhance diagnostic competency

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, Phagalvarthy; Sathasivasubramanian, Sankarapandiyan; Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam

    2015-01-01

    Background The overwhelmingly high burden of disease and disorder especially in developing countries requires oral physicians to provide optimal dental treatment without complicating individuals’ general health. The opportunity for learners to extract the multiple aspects of a systemic condition and to relate them with the presenting complaint in order to devise an appropriate dental treatment plan is limited by time in chair- side teaching. To overcome the necessity of exposing students to real patients with varying degrees of underlying disease, those in medical and nursing education unanimously employ imaginary scenarios similar to real cases. However, such clinical scripts are seldom practiced in dental education, and the prospect of structured integration is almost never addressed. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of applying systematic and integrated case-based discussion in dental education in terms of enhancing five essential skills to novice Indian dental students. Methods A mixed- methods study was carried out with thirty graduating third-year students in 5 focus groups. The integrated case-based focused group training occurred in 6 weeks and lasted approximately 90 minutes per discussion. Ten case scripts of hypothetical situations were discussed and five integrated modules were organized as a part of this program. Revised Bloom’s taxonomy was adopted to achieve the expected level of competency. Results Students performance following integrated case-based discussions was improved and their acceptance to this practice is positive. Conclusions The present study supports the need for course specific, basic science integrated seminars with concurrent case scripts discussion to enhance students’ competencies. Key words:Case scripts, Revised Bloom’s taxonomy, chair-side teaching, integrated teaching. PMID:26330929

  1. Assessment in the Use of Excel Competency for Problem Solving Using the Approach of Expert and Novice Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallardo, Katherina Edith; González, Jaime Ricardo Valenzuela

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of Competency-­Based Learning (CBL) generally lacks a foundation to guide the construction of instruments that accords the nature and goals of this educational model. The measurement instruments normally used in CBL only provide a numerical score with limited information about the levels of competencies reached. This research aims…

  2. Gross Motor Performance and Self-Perceived Motor Competence in Children with Emotional, Behavioural, and Pervasive Developmental Disorders: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emck, Claudia; Bosscher, Ruud; Beek, Peter; Doreleijers, Theo

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Motor performance and self-perceived motor competence have a great impact on the psychosocial development of children in general. In this review, empirical studies of gross motor performance and self-perception of motor competence in children with emotional (depression and anxiety), behavioural, and pervasive developmental disorders are…

  3. [How to promote health competence at work].

    PubMed

    Eickholt, Clarissa; Hamacher, W; Lenartz, N

    2015-09-01

    Health competence is a key concept in occupational health and safety and workplace health promotion for maintaining and enhancing health resources. The effects of governmental or occupational measures to protect or improve health fall short of what is required with regard to the challenges of a changing workplace, e.g., due to the delimitation of work. To secure employability it is becoming more and more important to encourage the personal responsibility of employees. To offer new conclusions on how employers and employees can promote health competence, a survey is required of the research within the fields of health competence and competence development, and of the status quo in enterprises. In this context, a Delphi Study provides an important contribution, with a focus on small and medium-sized enterprises. The development of an extensive understanding of health competence is essential in a work-related context. Beyond knowledge-based health literacy, an action-oriented concept of competence implies the ability and willingness to act in a reasonable and creative manner in complex situations. The development of health competence requires learning embedded in working processes, which challenges competent behaviour. Enabling informal learning is a promising innovative approach and therefore coordinated operational activities are necessary. Ultimately, this is a matter of suitable organisational measures being implemented to meet the health competence needs of an enterprise. Even though the each individual employee bears his or her own health competence, the development potential lies largely within the prevailing working conditions.

  4. Leadership and Cultural Competence of Healthcare Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Dauvrin, Marie; Lorant, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Background International migration is a global phenomenon challenging healthcare professionals to provide culturally competent care. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of leaders on the cultural competence of healthcare professionals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted from 2010 to 2012 to obtain data for a social network analysis in 19 inpatient services and five primary care services in Belgium. The Competences in Ethnicity and Health questionnaire was used. A total of 507 healthcare professionals, including 302 nurses, identified their social relationships with other healthcare professionals working in their service. Highest in-degree centrality was used to identify the leaders within each health service. Multiple regressions with the Huber sandwich estimator were used to link cultural competence of leaders with the cultural competence of the rest of the healthcare staff. Results Cultural competence of the healthcare staff was associated with the cultural competence of the leaders. This association remained significant for two specific domains of cultural competence—mediation and paradigm—after controlling for contextual and sociodemographic variables. Interaction analysis suggested that the leadership effect varied with the degree of cultural competence of the leaders. Discussion Cultural competence among healthcare professionals is acquired partly through leadership. Social relationships and leadership effects within health services should be considered when developing and implementing culturally competent strategies. This requires a cautious approach as the most central individuals are not always the same persons as the formal leaders. PMID:25871625

  5. Implementation of nephrology subspecialty curricular milestones.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Christina M; Prince, Lisa K; Oliver, James D; Abbott, Kevin C; Nee, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Beginning in the 2014-2015 training year, the US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) required that nephrology Clinical Competency Committees assess fellows' progress toward 23 subcompetency "context nonspecific" internal medicine subspecialty milestones. Fellows' advancement toward the "ready for unsupervised practice" target milestone now is tracked in each of the 6 competencies: Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, Professionalism, Interpersonal Communication Skills, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, and Systems-Based Practice. Nephrology program directors and subspecialty societies must define nephrology-specific "curricular milestones," mapped to the nonspecific ACGME milestones. Although the ACGME goal is to produce data that can discriminate between successful and underperforming training programs, the approach is at risk to produce biased, inaccurate, and unhelpful information. We map the ACGME internal medicine subspecialty milestones to our previously published nephrology-specific milestone schema and describe entrustable professional activities and other objective assessment tools that inform milestone decisions. Mapping our schema onto the ACGME subspecialty milestone reporting form allows comparison with the ACGME subspecialty milestones and the curricular milestones developed by the American Society of Nephrology Program Directors. Clinical Competency Committees may easily adapt and directly translate milestone decisions reached using our schema onto the ACGME internal medicine subspecialty competency milestone-reporting format.

  6. Preschoolers' dot enumeration abilities are markers of their arithmetic competence.

    PubMed

    Gray, Sarah A; Reeve, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The abilities to enumerate small sets of items (e.g., dots) and to compare magnitudes are claimed to be indexes of core numerical competences that scaffold early math development. Insofar as this is correct, these abilities may be diagnostic markers of math competence in preschoolers. However, unlike magnitude comparison abilities, little research has examined preschoolers' ability to enumerate small sets, or its significance for emerging math abilities; which is surprising since dot enumeration is a marker of school-aged children's math competence. It is nevertheless possible that general cognitive functions (working memory, response inhibition in particular) are associated with preschoolers' math abilities and underlie nascent dot enumeration abilities. We investigated whether preschoolers' dot enumeration abilities predict their non-verbal arithmetic ability, over and above the influence of working memory and response inhibition. Two measures of dot enumeration ability were examined-inverse efficiency and paradigm specific (response time profiles) measures-to determine which has the better diagnostic utility as a marker of math competence. Seventy-eight 42-to-57 month-olds completed dot enumeration, working memory, response inhibition, and non-verbal addition and subtraction tasks. Dot enumeration efficiency predicted arithmetic ability over and above the influence of general cognitive functions. While dot enumeration efficiency was a better predictor of arithmetic ability than paradigm specific response time profiles; the response time profile displaying the smallest subitizing range and steepest subitizing slope, also displayed poor addition abilities, suggesting a weak subitizing profile may have diagnostic significance in preschoolers. Overall, the findings support the claim that dot enumeration abilities and general cognitive functions are markers of preschoolers' math ability.

  7. Workforce competencies in behavioral health: an overview.

    PubMed

    Hoge, Michael A; Paris, Manuel; Adger, Hoover; Collins, Frank L; Finn, Cherry V; Fricks, Larry; Gill, Kenneth J; Haber, Judith; Hansen, Marsali; Ida, D J; Kaplan, Linda; Northey, William F; O'Connell, Maria J; Rosen, Anita L; Taintor, Zebulon; Tondora, Janis; Young, Alexander S

    2005-01-01

    Competency-based training approaches are being used more in healthcare to guide curriculum content and ensure accountability and outcomes in the educational process. This article provides an overview of the state of competency development in the field of behavioral health. Specifically, it identifies the groups and organizations that have conducted and supported this work, summarizes their progress in defining and assessing competencies, and discusses both the obstacles and future directions for such initiatives. A major purpose of this article is to provide a compendium of current competency efforts so that these might inform and enhance ongoing competency development in the varied behavioral health disciplines and specialties. These varied resources may also be useful in identifying the core competencies that are common to the multiple disciplines and specialties.

  8. Important computer competencies for the nursing profession.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wey-Wen; Chen, Wei; Chen, Yu-Chih

    2004-09-01

    Nursing requires computer competencies. This study aimed at identifying those competencies required for the nursing profession in Taiwan. The Delphi technique was deployed in this study. In the Delphi questionnaires, computer competencies were sorted into seven domains: concepts of hardware, software, and networks; principles of computer applications; skills of computer usage; program design; limitations of the computer; personal and social issues; attitudes toward the computer. In three Delphi questionnaires, nursing informatics experts gave us their opinions on the importance of each computer competency for the nursing profession. The experts also designated when the competency should be cultivated. This study provides a comprehensive list for nursing professionals to check on their computer competence. The results of this study should also serve as good references for teachers and schools in designing related curriculums.

  9. General anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007410.htm General anesthesia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. General anesthesia is treatment with certain medicines that puts you ...

  10. Evaluating medico-legal decisional competency criteria.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Demian

    2015-06-01

    In this paper I get clearer on the considerations that ought to inform the evaluation and development of medico-legal competency criteria-where this is taken to be a question regarding the abilities that ought to be needed for a patient to be found competent in medico-legal contexts. In the "Decisional Competency in Medico-Legal Contexts" section I explore how the question regarding the abilities that ought to be needed for decisional competence is to be interpreted. I begin by considering an interpretation that takes the question to be asking about the abilities needed to satisfy an idealized view of competent decision-making, according to which decisional competency is a matter of possessing those abilities or attributes that are needed to engage in good or effective or, perhaps, substantially autonomous or rational decision-making. The view has some plausibility-it accords with the way decisional competency is understood in a number of everyday contexts-but fails as an interpretation of the question regarding the abilities that should be needed for decisional competence in medico-legal contexts. Nevertheless, consideration of why it is mistaken suggests a more accurate interpretation and points the way in which the question regarding the evaluation of medico-legal competency criteria is to be answered. Building on other scholarly work in the area, I outline in the "Primary and Secondary Requirements" section several requirements that decisional competence criteria ought to satisfy. Then, in the "Applying the Framework" section, I say something about the extent to which medico-legal competency criteria, as well as some models of decisional competency proposed in the academic literature, fulfil those requirements.

  11. Training Emotional and Social Competences in Higher Education: The Seminar Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberst, Ursula; Gallifa, Josep; Farriols, Nuria; Vilaregut, Anna

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of emotional and social competences in higher education and presents a training model. In 1991, Ramon Llull University of Barcelona (Spain) created the Seminar methodology to tackle these challenges. A general model derived from the Emotional Intelligence concept and the general principles of this methodology…

  12. Competency Education and Evaluation: Issues and Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Ronald R.

    1977-01-01

    Competency education in the applied behavioral sciences can be enhanced by synethesizing the values of humanistic psychology with the measurement, evaluation, and accountability that characterize behavioral psychology. (Author)

  13. Core competencies for UK occupational health nurses: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Demou, E.; Kiran, S.; Gaffney, M.; Stevenson, M.; Macdonald, E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Occupational health nurses (OHNs) play a pivotal role in the delivery of occupational health (OH) services. Specific competency guidance has been developed in a number of countries, including the UK. While it is acknowledged that UK OHN practice has evolved in recent years, there has been no formal research to capture these developments to ensure that training and curricula remain up-to-date and reflect current practice. Aims To identify current priorities among UK OHNs of the competencies required for OH practice. Methods A modified Delphi study undertaken among representative OHN networks in the UK. This formed part of a larger study including UK and international occupational physicians. The study was conducted in two rounds using a questionnaire based on available guidance on training competencies for OH practice, the published literature, expert panel reviews and conference discussions. Results Consensus among OHNs was high with 7 out of the 12 domains scoring 100% in rating. ‘Good clinical care’ was the principal domain ranked most important, followed by ‘general principles of assessment & management of occupational hazards to health’. ‘Research methods’ and ‘teaching & educational supervision’ were considered least important. Conclusions This study has established UK OHNs’ current priorities on the competencies required for OH practice. The timing of this paper is opportune with the formal launch of the Faculty of Occupational Health Nursing planned in 2018 and should inform the development of competency requirements as part of the Faculty’s goals for standard setting in OHN education and training. PMID:27492470

  14. [The use of operational criteria for evaluations of mental competency].

    PubMed

    Kocha, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    Today, either the DSM-IV or the ICD-10 is generally used for forensic purposes, especially for evaluations of mental competency. The use of operational criteria, such as the DSM-IV, in forensic settings has some risks. Here, these risks, as well as the advantages of operational criteria and precautions for their use, are discussed. Compared with the DSM-IV, the ICD-10 is preferred because this tool is less likely to complicate evaluations of the mental status of a criminal at the time of the crime when sufficient information is not available to make a diagnosis. The evaluation consists of two steps. The first step, which is based on empirical science, is to provide a psychiatric diagnosis. The second step, which is based on normative science, is to allocate the diagnosis to one of four categories of a forensic frame of reference and to provide useful information for judicial members to make a judgment about the mental competency of the criminal. To standardize evaluations, the use of not only global standard criteria, but also a general rule for the judgment of mental competency within each allocated category is needed.

  15. Evaluating Community Health Advisor (CHA) Core Competencies: The CHA Core Competency Retrospective Pretest/Posttest (CCCRP).

    PubMed

    Story, Lachel; To, Yen M

    2016-05-01

    Health care and academic systems are increasingly collaborating with community health advisors (CHAs) to provide culturally relevant health interventions that promote sustained community transformation. Little attention has been placed on CHA training evaluation, including core competency attainment. This study identified common CHA core competencies, generated a theoretically based measure of those competencies, and explored psychometric properties of that measure. A concept synthesis revealed five CHA core competencies (leadership, translation, guidance, advocacy, and caring). The CHA Core Competency Retrospective Pretest/Posttest (CCCRP) resulted from that synthesis, which was administered using multiple approaches to individuals who previously received CHA training (N= 142). Exploratory factor analyses revealed a two-factor structure underlying the posttraining data, and Cronbach's alpha indicated high internal consistency. This study suggested some CHA core competencies might be more interrelated than previously thought, and two major competencies exist rather than five and supported the CCCRP's use to evaluate core competency attainment resulting from training.

  16. 18 CFR 4.36 - Competing applications: deadlines for filing; notices of intent; comparisons of plans of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT LICENSES, PERMITS, EXEMPTIONS, AND DETERMINATION OF PROJECT COSTS Application for Preliminary Permit, License or Exemption: General Provisions § 4.36 Competing applications... initial preliminary permit application or an initial development application shall prescribe the...

  17. 18 CFR 4.36 - Competing applications: deadlines for filing; notices of intent; comparisons of plans of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT LICENSES, PERMITS, EXEMPTIONS, AND DETERMINATION OF PROJECT COSTS Application for Preliminary Permit, License or Exemption: General Provisions § 4.36 Competing applications... initial preliminary permit application or an initial development application shall prescribe the...

  18. New Directions in Library and Information Science Education. Final Report. Volume 2.8: Records and Information Manager Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Jose-Marie; And Others

    This document contains validated activities and competencies needed by information professionals working as records and information managers. The activities of information professionals are listed by function: records and information program management; systems analysis; records center administration; general administration; planning; financial…

  19. The Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced-Level General Paper Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Nurul Huda; Shih, Chih-Min

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and reviews the Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced Level General Paper (GP) examination. As a written test that is administered to preuniversity students, the GP examination is internationally recognised and accepted by universities and employers as proof of English competence. In this article, the…

  20. Competing discourses of workplace health.

    PubMed

    Allender, Steven; Colquhoun, Derek; Kelly, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of workplace health programme discourses within an international information technology company. Discourse refers to a system of statements that share a common force and coherence and which are socially constitutive. The representation of entities such as workplace health can be subject to competition between discourses. A critical discourse analysis was undertaken on semi-structured interviews, participant observation and workplace health programme documents. Two competing discourses were identified: health as safety and health as lifestyle. Each discourse is described and shown to both implicitly and explicitly define health within this particular workplace. Lifestyle discourse encouraged moves towards linking of the employees' working and private lives while safety discourse defined health in the relationship between workers and their physical environment. Competition between discourses both constricts and opens spaces for alternative understandings of health in the workplace. The implications of this competition for workplace health policy and practice are discussed.

  1. Competing signals drive telencephalon diversity.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, J B; Rich, C A; Yi, C; Peres, J N; Houart, C; Streelman, J T

    2013-01-01

    The telencephalon is the most complex brain region, controlling communication, emotion, movement and memory. Its adult derivatives develop from the dorsal pallium and ventral subpallium. Despite knowledge of genes required in these territories, we do not understand how evolution has shaped telencephalon diversity. Here, using rock- and sand-dwelling cichlid fishes from Lake Malawi, we demonstrate that differences in strength and timing of opposing Hedgehog and Wingless signals establish evolutionary divergence in dorsal-ventral telencephalon patterning. Rock dwellers exhibit early, extensive Hedgehog activity in the ventral forebrain resulting in expression of foxg1 before dorsal Wingless signals, and a larger subpallium. Sand dwellers show rapid deployment of Wingless, later foxg1 expression and a larger pallium. Manipulation of the Hedgehog and Wingless pathways in cichlid and zebrafish embryos is sufficient to mimic differences between rock- versus sand-dweller brains. Our data suggest that competing ventral Hedgehog and dorsal Wingless signals mediate evolutionary diversification of the telencephalon.

  2. Mechanisms for Human Spatial Competence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunzelmann, Glenn; Lyon, Don R.

    Research spanning decades has generated a long list of phenomena associated with human spatial information processing. Additionally, a number of theories have been proposed about the representation, organization and processing of spatial information by humans. This paper presents a broad account of human spatial competence, integrated with the ACT-R cognitive architecture. Using a cognitive architecture grounds the research in a validated theory of human cognition, enhancing the plausibility of the overall account. This work posits a close link of aspects of spatial information processing to vision and motor planning, and integrates theoretical perspectives that have been proposed over the history of research in this area. In addition, the account is supported by evidence from neuropsychological investigations of human spatial ability. The mechanisms provide a means of accounting for a broad range of phenomena described in the experimental literature.

  3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Core Competencies

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, J.B.; Anderson, T.D.; Berven, B.A.; Hildebrand, S.G.; Hartman, F.C.; Honea, R.B.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Moon, R.M. Jr.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shelton, R.B.

    1994-12-01

    A core competency is a distinguishing integration of capabilities which enables an organization to deliver mission results. Core competencies represent the collective learning of an organization and provide the capacity to perform present and future missions. Core competencies are distinguishing characteristics which offer comparative advantage and are difficult to reproduce. They exhibit customer focus, mission relevance, and vertical integration from research through applications. They are demonstrable by metrics such as level of investment, uniqueness of facilities and expertise, and national impact. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has identified four core competencies which satisfy the above criteria. Each core competency represents an annual investment of at least $100M and is characterized by an integration of Laboratory technical foundations in physical, chemical, and materials sciences; biological, environmental, and social sciences; engineering sciences; and computational sciences and informatics. The ability to integrate broad technical foundations to develop and sustain core competencies in support of national R&D goals is a distinguishing strength of the national laboratories. The ORNL core competencies are: 9 Energy Production and End-Use Technologies o Biological and Environmental Sciences and Technology o Advanced Materials Synthesis, Processing, and Characterization & Neutron-Based Science and Technology. The distinguishing characteristics of each ORNL core competency are described. In addition, written material is provided for two emerging competencies: Manufacturing Technologies and Computational Science and Advanced Computing. Distinguishing institutional competencies in the Development and Operation of National Research Facilities, R&D Integration and Partnerships, Technology Transfer, and Science Education are also described. Finally, financial data for the ORNL core competencies are summarized in the appendices.

  4. An International Study in Competency Education: Postcards from Abroad. CompetencyWorks Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bristow, Sara Frank; Patrick, Susan

    2014-01-01

    "An International Study in Competency Education: Postcards from Abroad" seeks to highlight components of competency education in international practice, to inform US policymakers and decision makers seeking to implement high-quality competency pathways at the state or local level. Other countries are studying our innovations, and we are…

  5. The Assessment of Occupational Competence. l. Competence Assessment in Personnel Selection: Current Practices and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlan, Anne; And Others

    One of seven sections of a report that examines the assessment of occupational competence, this chapter presents competence assessment as it is defined in practice by selection techniques currently used by employers. The chapter begins with a discussion of the major techniques used in employee selection, focusing on the competencies employers…

  6. Competencies for the Contemporary Career: Development and Preliminary Validation of the Career Competencies Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkermans, Jos; Brenninkmeijer, Veerle; Huibers, Marthe; Blonk, Roland W. B.

    2013-01-01

    A new and promising area of research has recently emerged in the field of career development: career competencies. The present article provides a framework of career competencies that integrates several perspectives from the literature. The framework distinguishes between reflective, communicative, and behavioral career competencies. Six career…

  7. Industrial Arts Instructional Tasks/Competencies for Energy and Power. Competency-Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA.

    This instructional task/competency package is designed to help teachers and administrators in developing competency-based instructional materials for an energy and power course. Part 1 contains a description of the industrial arts program and a course description, instructional task/competency list, and content outline for energy and power. The…

  8. Employees' Perceptions of the Opportunities to Utilize Their Competences: Exploring the Role of Perceived Competence Mobilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Perceived competence mobilization is the degree to which employees perceive that they have adequate opportunities to utilize their competences in their current jobs. The findings of the research reported here suggest that employees' perceived competence mobilization is associated with a number of favourable employee attitudes, including intrinsic…

  9. Teaching Competences Necessary for Developing Key Competences of Primary Education Students in Spain: Teacher Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De-Juanas Oliva, Ángel; Martín del Pozo, Rosa; Pesquero Franco, Encarnación

    2016-01-01

    In Spain the syllabus of primary education students and their future teachers is broken down by competences. As teacher educators we were interested in finding out "which teaching competences teachers consider are most necessary to facilitate learning of student key competences." Therefore, we conducted a study with a sample of 286…

  10. Social Competence and Obesity in Elementary School.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sandra L; Cunningham, Solveig A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the relationship between children's weight and social competence. Methods. We used data from the third- and fifth-grade waves of the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (n = 8346) to examine changes in children's weight and social competence. Results. Obesity in third grade was not associated with subsequent changes in social competence between third and fifth grade, but social competence in third grade was associated with subsequent development of obesity. Among normal-weight children, having higher social competence in third grade was associated with lower odds of becoming overweight (odds ratio [OR] = 0.80 ±0.09; P < .05) or obese (OR = 0.20 ±0.08; P < .001). In addition, obese children with higher social competence were more likely to lose weight between third and fifth grade (OR = 1.43 ±0.25; P < .05). Conclusions. Obesity and impaired social competence often occur together and have serious implications for children's well-being. More knowledge about how weight and social competence affect one another could inform interventions to promote children's social development and reduce obesity.

  11. Reinforcement of competing behavior during extinction.

    PubMed

    Leitenberg, H; Rawson, R A; Bath, K

    1970-07-17

    Conditioned behavior declines in frequency when reinforcement is discontinued. In two experiments this extinction process was facilitated when competing behavior was reinforced as the original response was extinguished. When reinforcement for competing behavior was withdrawn, however, rats resumed their original behavior and there were no overall savings in total responses to extinction.

  12. Competency Index. [Business/Computer Technologies Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This index allows the user to scan the competencies under each title for the 28 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Titles of the 28 units are as follows: employability skills; professionalism; teamwork; professional and ethical standards; economic and business…

  13. Competency-Based Adult Education: Florida Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Elizabeth

    This compilation of program materials serves as an introduction to Florida's Brevard Community College's (BCC's) Competency-Based Adult High School Completion Project, a multi-year project designed to teach adult administrators, counselors, and teachers how to organize and implement a competency-based adult education (CBAE) program; to critique…

  14. Automotive Technician. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This occupational competency analysis profile (OCAP), which is one a series of employer-verified competency lists that were developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) job analysis process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives across Ohio, identifies the occupational, academic, and employability…

  15. Auto Collision Technician. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This occupational competency analysis profile (OCAP), which is one a series of employer-verified competency lists that were developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) job analysis process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives across Ohio, identifies the occupational, academic, and employability…

  16. Competency-Based Curricula: Another Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willems, Arnold L.; Brown, Max H.

    1980-01-01

    Points out that man lives in a three-dimensional universe with three-dimensional problems. A competency-based curriculum cannot get the job done by itself. A type of thinking which transcends that required for a competency-based curriculum is called for. (JOW)

  17. Technical Communication Competence and Projected Teacher Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, William G.; Lowry, David N.

    Technical Communication Competence (TCC)is the competence involved in communicating mental images to others in such a manner as to result in their constructing comparable mental images, a process similar to the primary task demanded of teachers at all levels. In a study designed to discover the extent to which a positive relationship existed…

  18. Competency-Based Horticulture: Gardening--Groundskeeping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL.

    This competency-based horticulture curriculum guide is designed to provide secondary and postsecondary horticulture teachers with a task-oriented program in gardening/groundskeeping. It contains a master resource list, a listing of gardening/groundskeeping resources available from various states, and 87 competency task sheets organized into 10…

  19. How Scientists Develop Competence in Visual Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostergren, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Visuals (maps, charts, diagrams and illustrations) are an important tool for communication in most scientific disciplines, which means that scientists benefit from having strong visual communication skills. This dissertation examines the nature of competence in visual communication and the means by which scientists acquire this competence. This…

  20. How Does Pragmatic Competence Develop in Bilinguals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kecskes, Istvan

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss how the emerging new language with its own developing socio-cultural foundation affects the existing L1-governed knowledge and pragmatic competence of "adult sequential bilinguals." It is assumed that these bilinguals already have an L1-governed pragmatic competence at place, which will be adjusted to…

  1. Competency Based Vocational Education Workshop Facilitators Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Michigan Center for Career and Technical Education.

    This workshop facilitator's guide is designed to inform professional staff about competency-based vocational education (CBVE) to help eligible persons on public assistance acquire competencies necessary for gainful employment in the following occupational areas: airline reservations and travel services; computer applications; dental care;…

  2. Developing Ethical Competence in Healthcare Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falkenström, Erica; Ohlsson, Jon; Höglund, Anna T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to explore what kind of ethical competence healthcare managers need in handling conflicts of interest (COI). The aim is also to highlight essential learning processes to develop healthcare managers' ethical competence. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative study was performed. Semi-structured interviews…

  3. Power Equipment Technology. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for power equipment technology occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and…

  4. Agricultural Production. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This list consists of essential competencies from the following specialized Ohio Competency Analysis Profiles: Beef and Sheep Producers; Crop Producer; Dairy Producer; Poultry Producer; and Swine Producer. Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives…

  5. Confronting the Politics of Multicultural Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Dafina Lazarus

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how she challenged her class to think critically about multicultural competence and to analyze objectively the liberal perspectives of Allan G. Johnson and conservative ideas of Dinesh D'Souza using Raechele Pope, Amy Reynolds, and John Mueller's characteristics of multiculturally competent student affairs…

  6. Cultural Competence Integration in the Nursing Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stegman, Boniface C.

    2013-01-01

    With an increasingly diverse population, it is important to ensure that graduates of nursing programs are able to deliver culturally competent care (Krainovich-Miller et al., 2008; Allen, 2010). This study was undertaken to address this call to include cultural competence integration into nursing curriculum. The purpose of this study was to…

  7. Competency-Based Human Resource Development Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangani, Noordeen T.; McLean, Gary N.; Braden, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores issues in developing and implementing a competency-based human resource development strategy. The paper summarizes a literature review on how competency models can improve HR performance. A case study is presented of American Medical Systems (AMS), a mid-sized health-care and medical device company, where the model is being…

  8. Social Competence and Obesity in Elementary School

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Solveig A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the relationship between children’s weight and social competence. Methods. We used data from the third- and fifth-grade waves of the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998–1999 (n = 8346) to examine changes in children’s weight and social competence. Results. Obesity in third grade was not associated with subsequent changes in social competence between third and fifth grade, but social competence in third grade was associated with subsequent development of obesity. Among normal-weight children, having higher social competence in third grade was associated with lower odds of becoming overweight (odds ratio [OR] = 0.80 ±0.09; P < .05) or obese (OR = 0.20 ±0.08; P < .001). In addition, obese children with higher social competence were more likely to lose weight between third and fifth grade (OR = 1.43 ±0.25; P < .05). Conclusions. Obesity and impaired social competence often occur together and have serious implications for children's well-being. More knowledge about how weight and social competence affect one another could inform interventions to promote children’s social development and reduce obesity. PMID:25393191

  9. Indiana Distributive Education Competency Based Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Rod; And Others

    This Indiana distributive education competency-based curriculum model is designed to help teachers and local administrators plan and conduct a comprehensive marketing and distributive education program. It is divided into three levels--one level for each year of a three-year program. The competencies common to a variety of marketing and…

  10. Fostering Communicative Competence in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Lilian G.

    Four research-based principles offer guidance to educators aiming to facilitate young children's acquisition of communicative competence. These principles concern the effect of interaction on the development of competence; the necessity for content in interaction; the requirement that content be ecologically valid to participants; and the impact…

  11. Animal Management Technician. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for animal management technician occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and…

  12. A Method for Defining Competency in Pediatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burg, Fredric D.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In 1972 the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) initiated studies leading to a report that identifies the important components of competency needed in pediatrics. Three dimensions of competence were identified: subject matter, abilities, and tasks. Each of these is discussed. (LBH)

  13. Improving Representational Competence with Concrete Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stieff, Mike; Scopelitis, Stephanie; Lira, Matthew E.; DeSutter, Dane

    2016-01-01

    Representational competence is a primary contributor to student learning in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines and an optimal target for instruction at all educational levels. We describe the design and implementation of a learning activity that uses concrete models to improve students' representational competence and…

  14. Taxonomy for Assessing Evaluation Competencies in Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Michelle S.; Hillaker, Barbara D.; Haas, Bruce E.; Peters, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of public service programming is becoming increasingly important with current funding realities. The taxonomy of evaluation competencies compiled by Ghere et al. (2006) provided the starting place for Taxonomy for Assessing Evaluation Competencies in Extension. The Michigan State University Extension case study described here presents a…

  15. Ranking Workplace Competencies: Student and Graduate Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainsbury, Elizabeth; Hodges, Dave; Burchell, Noel; Lay, Mark

    2002-01-01

    New Zealand business students and graduates made similar rankings of the five most important workplace competencies: computer literacy, customer service orientation, teamwork and cooperation, self-confidence, and willingness to learn. Graduates placed greater importance on most of the 24 competencies, resulting in a statistically significant…

  16. Can Reflection Boost Competences Development in Organizations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nansubuga, Florence; Munene, John C.; Ntayi, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the gaps in some existing competence frameworks and investigate the power of reflection on one's behavior to improve the process of the competences development. Design/methodology/approach: The authors used a correlational design and a quasi-experimental non-equivalent group design involving a…

  17. Resource Conservation. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for resource conservation occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency…

  18. Competency-Based Education: Leadership Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nodine, Thad; Johnstone, Sally M.

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based education (CBE) refers to online and hybrid courses and programs that offer credit or degrees based on evidence of student learning, or competencies, rather than on the amount of time spent in a course. Students work at their own pace, receive personalized academic support, and demonstrate mastery as they progress through their…

  19. Special Issue: Competencies from the Individual's Viewpoint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Career Planning and Adult Development Journal, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Ten articles in this special issue deal with competencies and how their use is revolutionizing human resource management and the work of career practitioners. Topics include competency technology, models, and mapping; behavioral interviewing; talent management; emotional intelligence; succession planning; and lifelong learning. (JOW)

  20. Sheep Production Occupations. Skills and Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabol, Joe

    This report summarizes the findings of a national study to determine what skills and competencies are needed by beginning employees on sheep ranches and farms, lamb feedlots, and in the sheep shearing industry. The research procedure, which involved determining from the sheep industry the competencies needed by beginning employees in the thirteen…

  1. Examining Intercultural Competency through Social Exchange Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Soma; James, Reynold

    2015-01-01

    Intercultural competency (ICC) has been an extensively researched area within the past decade, given the broad consensus that this trait constitutes one of the key competencies of the 21st century manager. However, somewhat under-explored are aspects including the implications and effects that pedagogies such as blended learning have on the…

  2. Strategic Imperative of Human Resource Leadership Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajini, G.; Gomathi, S.

    2010-01-01

    Using multiple constituencies approach, variances in competencies in human resource leadership have been studied as this is becoming highly significant in India's globalisation efforts. Previous research in leadership orientation focused on localisation of human resource competencies rather than its globalisation. For this, human resource…

  3. Competencies: Fuzzy Concepts to Context. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium titled "Competence: Fuzzy Concepts to Context.""Sales Superstars: Defining Competencies Needed for Sales Performance" (Darlene Russ-Eft, Edward Del Gaizo, Jeannie Moulton, Ruth Pangilinan) discusses a study in which an analysis of 1,688 critical incidents revealed 16…

  4. Integrating Research Competencies in Massage Therapy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hymel, Glenn M.

    The massage therapy profession is currently engaged in a competency-based education movement that includes an emphasis on promoting massage therapy research competencies (MTRCs). A systems-based model for integrating MTRCs into massage therapy education was therefore proposed. The model and an accompanying checklist describe an approach to…

  5. Issues in Competency Based Assessment: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrell, Lori J.

    Although the competency based assessment "movement" has undergone intense examination and much change, the concept of the competent communicator and the difficulties associated with measuring such proficiencies remain. The progression of terminology used in the literature reflects that what began as lists of skills to be tested so that…

  6. Competency-Based Horticulture: Turfgrass Maintenance Worker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL.

    This competency-based horticulture curriculum guide is designed to provide secondary and postsecondary horticulture teachers with a task-oriented program for training turfgrass maintenance workers. It contains a master resource list, a listing of turfgrass maintenance resources available from various states, and 59 competency task sheets organized…

  7. Developing Intercultural Communicative Competence through Online Exchanges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chun, Dorothy M.

    2011-01-01

    Based on Byram's (1997) definition of intercultural communicative competence (ICC) and on specific types of discourse analysis proposed by Kramsch and Thorne (2002) and Ware and Kramsch (2005), this article explores how online exchanges can play a role in second language learners' development of pragmatic competence and ICC. With data obtained…

  8. Competency-Based Early Childhood Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosberg, Merilee

    This paper describes the competency-based early childhood preservice program at Iowa's Mount Mercy College, which is for people working with children from birth through age 8, including children with special needs. Program content encompasses five competency areas: child growth and development; developmentally appropriate learning; health, safety,…

  9. Developing Cultural Competence in Human Service Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krajewski-Jaime, Elvia R.; And Others

    Cultural competence assumes greater importance in the United States as international relations shift and the United States changes its own demographic makeup. Hispanics have significant health care needs and cultural beliefs that influence their acceptance of service. As part of an effort to build cultural competence in undergraduate social work…

  10. Diversified Health Occupations. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This list consists of essential competencies from the following specialized Ohio Competency Analysis Profile: Dental Assistant; Medical Assistant; and Nurse Aide. Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive…

  11. Competency Reference for Computer Assisted Drafting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Div. of Vocational Technical Education.

    This guide, developed in Oregon, lists competencies essential for students in computer-assisted drafting (CAD). Competencies are organized in eight categories: computer hardware, file usage and manipulation, basic drafting techniques, mechanical drafting, specialty disciplines, three dimensional drawing/design, plotting/printing, and advanced CAD.…

  12. A Conversation on Multicultural Competence in Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Joseph; Trickett, Ed; Fisher, Celia; Goodyear, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    This contribution to the Ethics section is intended to foster discussion about the relationship between multicultural competence and ethics; a timely discussion especially in view of the release in 2011 of the American Evaluation Association's Public Statement on Cultural Competence (http://www.eval.org/ccstatement.asp). Over the course of 2011,…

  13. Industrial Maintenance. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for industrial maintenance occupations. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency…

  14. Developing the Intercultural Competence of Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitrov, Nanda; Dawson, Debra L.; Olsen, Karyn C.; Meadows, Ken N.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores how teaching development programs may facilitate the development of intercultural competence in graduate students and prepare them for communicating effectively in the global workplace after graduation. First, we describe the concept of intercultural teaching competence and examine the skills that graduate students may need to…

  15. Global Leadership Competencies: A Review and Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokinen, Tiina

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: From the competency point of view, this article aims to review and discuss existing global leadership and other related literature, and to combine findings and suggestions provided in previous literature in a more integrative framework of global leadership competencies. Design/methodology/approach: The paper reviews and discusses the…

  16. Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACPA College Student Educators International, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This set of "Professional Competency Areas" is intended to define the broad professional knowledge, skills, and for some competencies, attitudes expected of student affairs professionals working in the U.S., regardless of their area of specialization or positional role within the field. All student affairs professionals should be able to…

  17. Professional Competencies for Student Affairs Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munsch, Patty; Cortez, Lori

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to explore the integration of the ACPA/NASPA Professional Competency Areas for Student Affairs Practitioners (ACPA/NASPA, 2010) on community college campuses. The competencies provide specific skill sets for a broad range of student affairs practice areas that should be met by professionals throughout their careers.…

  18. Occupational Competency Profiles for Vocational Home Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    This package consists of occupational competency profiles for evaluation of students in vocational home economics courses in Texas. The package begins with a rating sheet of essential elements for all vocational programs, with space for instructors to rate students on a four-point scale, followed by a competency profile sheet. Competency…

  19. Teaching Competencies for the Online Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Heather M.; Ramsdale, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this study are to identify key competency areas that lead to success in online instruction and to develop a framework that supports professional development and self-assessment. To identify the key competency areas, skills and behaviours presented within current literature were analyzed. Secondly, gaps were identified and levels of…

  20. Beyond Bilingualism: A Quest for Communicative Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Li-Rong Lilly

    1996-01-01

    Cross-cultural communicative competence requires more than learning the language; social cultural competence also is necessary. Challenges beyond semantics (word connotations), beyond phonology (significance of subtle pronunciation differences), beyond pragmatics (relating to cognitive style), and beyond translation (the cultural imperatives of…

  1. A Chinese Perspective of Communication Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Guo-Ming

    To avoid the Anglo-Saxon culture mode, which dominates the current study of human communication in all contexts, the concept of communication competence can be examined from the perspective of Chinese culture. The conceptualization and empirical indicators used for the measurement of communication competence strongly reflect a Western cultural…

  2. Scottish Visitor Attractions: Managerial Competence Requirements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Sandra; McCracken, Martin; Hughes, Moira

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a study into managerial competence in the Scottish visitor attraction sector. It provides an insight into the range, diversity and perceived importance of current and future competences highlighting differences based on gender, age, size, level of training and location. Although the main findings reveal a…

  3. Sustainable Competence: A Study of a Bank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagstrom, Tom; Backstrom, Tomas; Goransson, Susanna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Decentralization and company cultures have emerged to master increasing external flexibility, as in a competitive bank in Sweden, raising issues of the sustainability in terms of competence and competence development. The purpose of this paper is to study how the staff members in a bank perceive a company culture and how this perception…

  4. Competence: A Tale of Two Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the "integrated conception of competence" as conceived by Paul Hager and David Beckett and suggests that its characterization in terms intended to distance it from behaviouristic and reductionist notions of competence is not sufficient to differentiate it from other models. Taking up Hager and Beckett's idea that…

  5. Global health language and culture competency.

    PubMed

    Beadling, Charles; Maza, John; Nakano, Gregg; Mahmood, Maysaa; Jawad, Shakir; Al-Ameri, Ali; Zuerlein, Scott; Anderson, Warner

    2012-01-01

    This article presents findings from a survey conducted to examine the availability of foreign language and culture training to Civil Affairs health personnel and the relevance of that training to the tasks they perform. Civil Affairs forces recognize the value of cross-cultural communication competence because their missions involve a significant level of interaction with foreign governments? officials, military, and civilians. Members of the 95th Civil Affairs Brigade (Airborne) who had a health-related military occupational specialty code were invited to participate in the survey. More than 45% of those surveyed were foreign language qualified. Many also received predeployment language and culture training specific to the area of deployment. Significantly more respondents reported receiving cultural training and training on how to work effectively with interpreters than having received foreign language training. Respondents perceived interpreters as important assets and were generally satisfied with their performance. Findings from the survey highlight a need to identify standard requirements for predeployment language training that focuses on medical and health terminology and to determine the best delivery platform(s). Civil Affairs health personnel would benefit from additional cultural training that focuses on health and healthcare in the country or region of deployment. Investing in the development of distance learning capabilities as a platform for delivering health-specific language and culture training may help ease the time and resources constraints that limit the ability of Civil Affairs health personnel to access the training they need.

  6. Determination of mental competency, a neurological perspective.

    PubMed

    Kirshner, Howard S

    2013-06-01

    This article discusses the evaluation of the capacity of a person to make informed decisions about financial matters, independent living, and informed consent for medical treatment and research. Determination of capacity is a function for which most physicians have little training. The determination of competency for a general medical patient may be assessed by a combination of a bedside mental status examination such as the MMSE and a questionnaire such as the Aid To Capacity Evaluation (ACE 1999). For patients with focal neurological deficits such as aphasia, further evaluation of specific cognitive and language functions is needed; Alexander (Arch Neurol 45:23-6, 1988) suggested 7 specific functions to be assessed. Finally, in dementing illnesses, evaluation by the MMSE and a questionnaire such as the CCTI, or Capacity to Consent to Treatment Instrument (Marson et al. Arch Neurol 52:949-54, 1995) is needed. Dementia includes several separate syndromes of neurodegenerative disease, and in many of these conditions, focal deficits such as aphasia may necessitate a more thorough neuropsychological evaluation.

  7. Accounting for competing risks in randomized controlled trials: a review and recommendations for improvement

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Jason P.

    2017-01-01

    In studies with survival or time‐to‐event outcomes, a competing risk is an event whose occurrence precludes the occurrence of the primary event of interest. Specialized statistical methods must be used to analyze survival data in the presence of competing risks. We conducted a review of randomized controlled trials with survival outcomes that were published in high‐impact general medical journals. Of 40 studies that we identified, 31 (77.5%) were potentially susceptible to competing risks. However, in the majority of these studies, the potential presence of competing risks was not accounted for in the statistical analyses that were described. Of the 31 studies potentially susceptible to competing risks, 24 (77.4%) reported the results of a Kaplan–Meier survival analysis, while only five (16.1%) reported using cumulative incidence functions to estimate the incidence of the outcome over time in the presence of competing risks. The former approach will tend to result in an overestimate of the incidence of the outcome over time, while the latter approach will result in unbiased estimation of the incidence of the primary outcome over time. We provide recommendations on the analysis and reporting of randomized controlled trials with survival outcomes in the presence of competing risks. © 2017 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:28102550

  8. Competency-based training: who benefits?

    PubMed

    Brightwell, Alexandra; Grant, Janet

    2013-02-01

    Competency based training describes progression through training referenced to the demonstrated ability to perform certain tasks. In recent years, this has become the dominant curriculum model. We seek to examine who benefits from a competency based approach to medical education. For the regulators and service, the apparent advantage is in terms of apparent measurable accountability and flexibility. For assessors, the promise of competence based assessments in the workplace to provide a reliable and objective measurement of a trainee's performance has not been demonstrated in practice. For the doctor in training, there is very little evidence to show benefit from competency based training. Competency based training places emphasis on individual skills rather than overall learning experience thus risks diminishing the role of the trainee in the workplace. Any form of medical education that devalues workplace based learning will ultimately harm the profession and, in turn, patient care.

  9. Competency assessment in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Susan E; Elder, B Laurel

    2004-07-01

    The laboratory comprises an invaluable part of the total health care provided to patients. Competency assessment is one method by which we can verify that our employees are competent to perform laboratory testing and report accurate and timely results. To derive the greatest benefit from the inclusion of competency assessment in the laboratory, we must be sure that we are addressing areas where our efforts can be best utilized to optimize patient care. To be competent, an employee must know how to perform a test, must have the ability to perform the test, must be able to perform the test properly without supervision, and know when there is a problem with the test that must be solved. In some cases, competency assessment protocols may demonstrate areas of competence but can fail to disclose incompetence. For example, challenges of low-complexity tasks (such as reading the technical procedure manual) are inferior to challenges that measure understanding and execution of a protocol, and poorly designed competency challenges will probably not detect substandard laboratory performance. Thus, if we are to receive the greatest benefit from our competency assessment programs, which may be time-consuming for the supervisors and the staff as well, we must not only meet the letter of the law but also find a way to make these assessments meaningful, instructive, and able to detect areas of concern. As we address competency assessment in our laboratories, we must understand that when done properly, competency assessment will reward our organizations and assist us in providing the best possible care to our patients.

  10. Multi-Cultural Competency-Based Vocational Curricula. Clerical Clusters. Multi-Cultural Competency-Based Vocational/Technical Curricula Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepburn, Larry; Shin, Masako

    This document, one of eight in a multi-cultural competency-based vocational/technical curricula series, is on clerical occupations. This program is designed to run 36 weeks and cover 10 instructional areas: beginning typing, typing I, typing II, duplicating, receptionist activities, general office procedures, operation of electronic calculator,…

  11. Children's social competence, academic competence, and aggressiveness as related to ability to make judgments of fairness.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, T

    2001-08-01

    The relationship of 102 fifth and sixth graders' judgments of fairness with their academic and social competence and aggressiveness was studied. Children were given self-report and peer-nomination inventories measuring academic competence, social competence, and aggressiveness at a single point in time at the public school they attended. These measures were related to children's prediction of fairness on a distributive justice measure. Children who saw themselves as academically and socially competent scored higher on the distributive justice measure. Children whose peers saw them as less academically competent and more aggressive scored lower on the distributive justice measure. Analyses showed an association between children's academic competence, social competence, and aggressiveness scores and their scores on judgments of fairness.

  12. [Competencies of the nurse in the management of cognitive and capital knowledge].

    PubMed

    Ruthes, Rosa Maria; Cunha, Isabel Cristina Kowal Olm

    2009-01-01

    The article presents a review of nurse's management competencies and the practical management of knowledge and the human capital and the applicability of the management for competencies. Globalization and competitiveness makes health organizations to search adaptative forms to the transformations of the management. For the nurse it is expected to consider solutions nursing team related to health organizations problems. The management of the intellectual capital must take care that the personnel is applying the knowing in benefit of the organization and the professional growth. If it will not have necessary competences for generalized application of knowledge, this is useless. The nurses must be prepared to evaluate technological, organizational and human resources and to develop competencies, knowledge, abilities, attitudes, and values to plan, to organize, to direct, to control the knowledge in the organizations.

  13. Nursing accounting competencies related to HIV in a Papua New Guinea context.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alistair M

    2013-01-01

    Nursing administration is an important part of the campaign to eliminate HIV across Papua New Guinea (PNG). This paper considers the critical importance of developing nursing leadership in effective accounting competencies in relation to HIV projects in PNG. The results of the study's textual analysis of audit reports of the Auditor General of PNG revealed a failure on the part of PNG's main health agencies involved with its national HIV program to provide competent financial reporting. In light of these results, this study shows how improving accounting and other financial competencies among nursing leaders would benefit the implementation of the PNG HIV national strategy. The findings of this study have implications not only for the internal control of HIV nursing competencies but also for nursing leadership related to HIV issues in a developing-country context.

  14. Developing Navigation Competencies to Care for Older Rural Adults with Advanced Illness.

    PubMed

    Duggleby, Wendy; Robinson, Carole A; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Pesut, Barbara; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl; MacLeod, Roderick; Keating, Norah C; Santos Salas, Anna; Hallstrom, Lars K; Fraser, Kimberly D; Williams, Allison; Struthers-Montford, Kelly; Swindle, Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    Navigators help rural older adults with advanced illness and their families connect to needed resources, information, and people to improve their quality of life. This article describes the process used to engage experts - in rural aging, rural palliative care, and navigation - as well as rural community stakeholders to develop a conceptual definition of navigation and delineate navigation competencies for the care of this population. A discussion paper on the important considerations for navigation in this population was developed followed by a four-phased Delphi process with 30 expert panel members. Study results culminated in five general navigation competencies for health care providers caring for older rural persons and their families at end of life: provide patient/family screening; advocate for the patient/family; facilitate community connections; coordinate access to services and resources; and promote active engagement. Specific competencies were also developed. These competencies provide the foundation for research and curriculum development in navigation.

  15. Longitudinal analysis of intrinsic motivation and competence beliefs: is there a relation over time?

    PubMed

    Spinath, Birgit; Steinmayr, Ricarda

    2008-01-01

    The present study explored whether competence beliefs and intrinsic motivation for different school domains show reciprocal effects over time. A sample of 670 German elementary school pupils (M= 8.8 years, SD= 0.51) was followed over 1 year. At 4 measurement occasions, children completed self-reports on their intrinsic motivation and competence beliefs for math, German, and school in general. Latent growth models revealed that intrinsic motivation and competence beliefs decreased over time. Comparing correlational and cross-lagged structural equation models yielded only weak evidence for cross-lagged influences between the 2 constructs. Results suggest that the developmental curves of competence beliefs and intrinsic motivation might be less inextricably interwoven than frequently assumed.

  16. Identification and evaluation of competencies of health professionals in the hospital emergency management of the radiation accident victim

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary list of ten competency and forty-six sub-competency statements derived from literature and consultation with experts and based on the general areas of clinical performance defined by the National Board of Medical Examiners were the concern of Phase I of this study. Forty-eight experts in nuclear medicine, radiology, radiotherapy, health physics, medical physics, radiation biology, public and occupational health, surgery, and emergency medicine and nursing considered this preliminary list of competencies and sub-competencies to determine which were essential for health professionals who may be caring for radiation accident victims in hospital emergency departments. Eight competencies and thirty-three sub-competencies were rated as Essential competencies. Competencies dealing with establishing priorities in patient care and initiating treatment, assessment, contamination control, and decontamination were highly rated. In the second part of this study, the Essential competencies were utilized in the development of an original evaluation instrument designed to identify deficiencies and continuing education needs during radiation accident drills or exercises. The instrument was designed for use in sixteen possible patient care situations in which the radiation accident victims have varying medical and radiological conditions. Development of the evaluation instrument was described.

  17. Acquired and Participatory Competencies in Health Professions Education: Definition and Assessment in Global Health.

    PubMed

    Eichbaum, Quentin

    2016-09-06

    Many health professions education programs in high-income countries (HICs) have adopted a competency-based approach to learning. Although global health programs have followed this trend, defining and assessing competencies has proven problematic, particularly in resource-constrained settings of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where HIC students and trainees perform elective work. In part, this is due to programs failing to take sufficient account of local learning, cultural, and health contexts.A major divide between HIC and LMIC settings is that the learning contexts of HICs are predominantly individualist, whereas those of LMICs are generally collectivist. Individualist cultures view learning as something that the individual acquires independent of context and can possess; collectivist cultures view learning as arising dynamically from specific contexts through group participation.To bridge the individualist-collectivist learning divide, the author proposes that competencies be classified as either acquired or participatory. Acquired competencies can be transferred across contexts and assessed using traditional psychometric approaches; participatory competencies are linked to contexts and require alternative assessment approaches. The author proposes assessing participatory competencies through the approach of self-directed assessment seeking, which includes multiple members of the health care team as assessors.The proposed classification of competencies as acquired or participatory may apply across health professions. The author suggests advancing participatory competencies through mental models of sharing. In global health education, the author recommends developing three new competency domains rooted in participatory learning, collectivism, and sharing: resourceful learning; transprofessionalism and transformative learning; and social justice and health equity.

  18. Prevalence and Cost of Full-Time Research Fellowships During General Surgery Residency – A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Charles M.; Klingensmith, Mary E.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objective To quantify the prevalence, outcomes, and cost of surgical resident research. Summary Background Data General surgery is unique among graduate medical education programs because a large percentage of residents interrupt their clinical training to spend 1-3 years performing full-time research. No comprehensive data exists on the scope of this practice. Methods Survey sent to all 239 program directors of general surgery residencies participating in the National Resident Matching Program. Results Response rate was 200/239 (84%). A total of 381 out of 1052 trainees (36%) interrupt residency to pursue full-time research. The mean research fellowship length is 1.7 years, with 72% of trainees performing basic science research. A significant association was found between fellowship length and post-residency activity, with a 14.7% increase in clinical fellowship training and a 15.2% decrease in private practice positions for each year of full-time research (p<0.0001). Program directors at 31% of programs reported increased clinical duties for research fellows as a result of ACGME work hour regulations for clinical residents, while a further 10% of programs are currently considering such changes. It costs $41.5 million to pay the 634 trainees who perform research fellowships each year, the majority of which is paid for by departmental funds (40%) and institutional training grants (24%). Conclusions Interrupting residency to perform a research fellowship is a common and costly practice among general surgery residents. While performing a research fellowship is associated with clinical fellowship training after residency, it is unclear to what extent this practice leads to the development of surgical investigators after post-graduate training. PMID:19106692

  19. Handwriting development, competency, and intervention.

    PubMed

    Feder, Katya P; Majnemer, Annette

    2007-04-01

    Failure to attain handwriting competency during the school-age years often has far-reaching negative effects on both academic success and self-esteem. This complex occupational task has many underlying component skills that may interfere with handwriting performance. Fine motor control, bilateral and visual-motor integration, motor planning, in-hand manipulation, proprioception, visual perception, sustained attention, and sensory awareness of the fingers are some of the component skills identified. Poor handwriting may be related to intrinsic factors, which refer to the child's actual handwriting capabilities, or extrinsic factors which are related to environmental or biomechanical components, or both. It is important that handwriting performance be evaluated using a valid, reliable, standardized tool combined with informal classroom observation and teacher consultation. Studies of handwriting remediation suggest that intervention is effective. There is evidence to indicate that handwriting difficulties do not resolve without intervention and affect between 10 and 30% of school-aged children. Despite the widespread use of computers, legible handwriting remains an important life skill that deserves greater attention from educators and health practitioners.

  20. EPA guidance on cultural competence training.

    PubMed

    Schouler-Ocak, Meryam; Graef-Calliess, Iris T; Tarricone, Ilaria; Qureshi, Adil; Kastrup, Marianne C; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2015-03-01

    The stress of migration as well as social factors and changes related to the receiving society may lead to the manifestation of psychiatric disorders in vulnerable individuals after migration. The diversity of cultures, ethnicities, races and reasons for migration poses a challenge for those seeking to understand how illness is experienced by immigrants whose backgrounds differ significantly from their clinicians. Cultural competence represents good clinical practice and can be defined as such that a clinician regards each patient in the context of the patient's own culture as well as from the perspective of the clinician's cultural values and prejudices. The EPA Guidance on cultural competence training outlines some of the key issues related to cultural competence and how to deal with these. It points out that cultural competence represents a comprehensive response to the mental health care needs of immigrant patients and requires knowledge, skills and attitudes which can improve the effectiveness of psychiatric treatment. To reach these aims, both individual and organizational competence are needed, as well as teaching competence in terms of educational leadership. The WPA Guidance on Mental Health and Mental Health Care for Migrants and the EPA Guidance on Mental Health Care for Migrants list a series of recommendations for policy makers, service providers and clinicians; these are aimed at improving mental health care for immigrants. The authors of this paper would like to underline these recommendations and, focusing on cultural competency and training, believe that they will be of positive value.

  1. Competence areas of nursing students in Europe.

    PubMed

    Satu, Kajander-Unkuri; Leena, Salminen; Mikko, Saarikoski; Riitta, Suhonen; Helena, Leino-Kilpi

    2013-06-01

    The focus of this study is on European nursing education, where there have been several reforms over the last two decades attempting to harmonise curricula and degree structures. One of the most powerful reforms was started by the Bologna Declaration in 1999; since then, significant progress has been made towards achieving the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) and the implementation of the European Qualifications Framework (EQF) in education practice. The Directive of recognition of professional qualifications (2005/36/EC) regulates nursing education. All these strategies aim to harmonise nursing education, but specific competence areas in nursing are still missing within the European Union (EU). The purpose of this review was to seek competence areas for nursing students within the EU as identified in previous studies and other documents. Altogether, 67 competence areas were identified and classified into eight main categories: (1) professional and ethical values and practice, (2) nursing skills and intervention, (3) communication and interpersonal skills, (4) knowledge and cognitive ability, (5) assessment and improving quality in nursing, (6) professional development, (7) leadership, management and teamwork, and (8) research utilisation. In order to obtain a comprehensive concept of competence, more research is needed on nursing students' competence areas across the EU due to the fact that the EU is a common labour market and nurses are educated for the EU as a whole. Nursing is a global profession and nurse competence is central to patient care outcomes, so it is also internationally important that nurses have good competence.

  2. New engineering: from knowledge to competences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartagena, M. C.; Tarquis, A. M.; Arce, A.

    2009-04-01

    One of the main innovations of Bologna system has been to link learning outcomes, ECTS workload based credits and competences. Competences represent a dynamic combination of knowledge, understanding, skills and abilities. Competences can be distinguished in subject specific and generic ones (instrumental, interpersonal and systemic competences). Actually in Spain Engineering degrees are changing to the new University educational system and should aim to satisfy the real needs of European society. This change has been long and complex, particularly. on the issue that have influenced curricular change Consultation with "actors" and "stakeholders", the definition of academic and professionals profiles and the translation of these into desired learning outcomes. Generic competences or transferable skills are relevant for preparing students well for their future role in society in terms of employability and citizenship. The criteria used by the companies to select their engineers are based in a good background and capacity to adapt and to acquire new knowledge, better than specific education, even postgraduate. It was interesting to note the great importance of generic competences However, Spanish government has regulated conditions of core curriculum need for to guarantee the acquisition of the competences needs to exercise the correspondent professional activities. The new degrees should comply with the core curriculum if the graduates want maintain the legal attributions guaranteed actually by the Spanish Professional Associations. After these degrees, students can access to professional master with actually horizontal attributions of regulated professions.

  3. EI competencies as a related but different characteristic than intelligence.

    PubMed

    Boyatzis, Richard E; Batista-Foguet, Joan M; Fernández-I-Marín, Xavier; Truninger, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Amid the swarm of debate about emotional intelligence (EI) among academics are claims that cognitive intelligence, or general mental ability (g), is a stronger predictor of life and work outcomes as well as the counter claims that EI is their strongest predictor. Nested within the tempest in a teapot are scientific questions as to what the relationship is between g and EI. Using a behavioral approach to EI, we examined the relationship of a parametric measure of g as the person's GMAT scores and collected observations from others who live and work with the person as to the frequency of his or her EI behavior, as well as the person's self-assessment. The results show that EI, as seen by others, is slightly related to g, especially for males with assessment from professional relations. Further, we found that cognitive competencies are more strongly related to GMAT than EI competencies. For observations from personal relationships or self-assessment, there is no relationship between EI and GMAT. Observations from professional relations reveal a positive relationship between cognitive competencies and GMAT and EI and GMAT for males, but a negative relationship between EI and GMAT for females.

  4. EI competencies as a related but different characteristic than intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Boyatzis, Richard E.; Batista-Foguet, Joan M.; Fernández-i-Marín, Xavier; Truninger, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Amid the swarm of debate about emotional intelligence (EI) among academics are claims that cognitive intelligence, or general mental ability (g), is a stronger predictor of life and work outcomes as well as the counter claims that EI is their strongest predictor. Nested within the tempest in a teapot are scientific questions as to what the relationship is between g and EI. Using a behavioral approach to EI, we examined the relationship of a parametric measure of g as the person’s GMAT scores and collected observations from others who live and work with the person as to the frequency of his or her EI behavior, as well as the person’s self-assessment. The results show that EI, as seen by others, is slightly related to g, especially for males with assessment from professional relations. Further, we found that cognitive competencies are more strongly related to GMAT than EI competencies. For observations from personal relationships or self-assessment, there is no relationship between EI and GMAT. Observations from professional relations reveal a positive relationship between cognitive competencies and GMAT and EI and GMAT for males, but a negative relationship between EI and GMAT for females. PMID:25713545

  5. Increasing School Success Through Partnership-Based Family Competency Training

    PubMed Central

    Spoth, Richard; Randall, G. Kevin; Shin, Chungyeol

    2008-01-01

    An expanding body of research suggests an important role for parent or family competency training in children’s social-emotional learning and related school success. This article summarizes a test of a longitudinal model examining partnership-based family competency training effects on academic success in a general population. Specifically, it examines indirect effects of the Iowa Strengthening Families Program (ISFP) on school engagement in 8th grade and academic success in the 12th grade, through direct ISFP effects on intervention-targeted outcomes—parenting competencies and student substance-related risk—in 6th grade. Twenty-two rural schools were randomly assigned to either ISFP or a minimal-contact control group; data were collected from 445 families. Following examination of the equivalence of the measurement model across group and time, a structural equation modeling approach was used to test the hypothesized model and corresponding hypothesized structural paths. Significant effects of the ISFP were found on proximal intervention outcomes, intermediate school engagement, and the academic success of high school seniors. PMID:20376279

  6. [Competence Network Stroke. A successful model for stroke research].

    PubMed

    Lachmann, Ulrike; Villringer, Arno

    2016-04-01

    In 1999 the German Ministry of Education and Research initiated a funding initiative for competence networks in health research in order to improve research and health care for major diseases with high morbidity and relevance to public health. All major players in a given field were invited to cooperate. The aims were to improve horizontal as well as vertical networking in order to improve research quality and the transfer of new results into general clinical practice. Another aim was to establish sustainable structures for lasting cooperation. After a highly competitive application round, the Competence Network Stroke was among the very first to be funded. The incidence of stroke in Germany is about 250,000 new patients per year, it is the leading cause of adult impairment and its societal impact is dramatic.This article describes how the Competence Network Stroke managed to meet the above-mentioned goals and how cooperation among stroke researchers and caregivers in Germany has improved. Furthermore it provides examples of researcher achievements in the network, which have advanced research and benefited patients.

  7. Semantic Generalization in Implicit Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paciorek, Albertyna; Williams, John N.

    2015-01-01

    Despite many years of investigation into implicit learning in nonlinguistic domains, the potential for implicit learning to deliver the kinds of generalizations that underlie natural language competence remains unclear. In a series of experiments, we investigated implicit learning of the semantic preferences of novel verbs, specifically, whether…

  8. Listening in the General Education Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolvin, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Research supports the point that listening skills play an important role in 21st century personal, academic, and professional success. This article argues that educators should include listening, a critical communication competency, in the oral communication course in the general education curriculum. (Contains 1 table.)

  9. Healthcare worker competencies for disaster training

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Edbert B; Thomas, Tamara L; Bass, Eric B; Whyne, Dianne; Kelen, Gabor D; Green, Gary B

    2006-01-01

    Background Although training and education have long been accepted as integral to disaster preparedness, many currently taught practices are neither evidence-based nor standardized. The need for effective evidence-based disaster training of healthcare staff at all levels, including the development of standards and guidelines for training in the multi-disciplinary health response to major events, has been designated by the disaster response community as a high priority. We describe the application of systematic evidence-based consensus building methods to derive educational competencies and objectives in criteria-based preparedness and response relevant to all hospital healthcare workers. Methods The conceptual development of cross-cutting competencies incorporated current evidence through a systematic consensus building process with the following steps: (1) review of peer-reviewed literature on relevant content areas and educational theory; (2) structured review of existing competencies, national level courses and published training objectives; (3) synthesis of new cross-cutting competencies; (4) expert panel review; (5) refinement of new competencies and; (6) development of testable terminal objectives for each competency using similar processes covering requisite knowledge, attitudes, and skills. Results Seven cross-cutting competencies were developed: (1) Recognize a potential critical event and implement initial actions; (2) Apply the principles of critical event management; (3) Demonstrate critical event safety principles; (4) Understand the institutional emergency operations plan; (5) Demonstrate effective critical event communications; (6) Understand the incident command system and your role in it; (7) Demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to fulfill your role during a critical event. For each of the cross-cutting competencies, comprehensive terminal objectives are described. Conclusion Cross-cutting competencies and objectives developed through a

  10. Coaches’ Perceptions of Competence and Acknowledgement of Training Needs Related to Professional Competences

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Sofia; Mesquita, Isabel; GRAÇA, Amândio; Rosado, António

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine coaches’ perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs related to professional competences according to the professional experience and academic education. The participants were 343 coaches from several sports, who answered to a questionnaire that includes a scale focused on perceptions of competence and another scale on acknowledgment of training needs. An exploratory factor analysis with Maximum Likelihood Factoring was used with Oblimin rotation for the identification of emergent factors. Comparison on coaches’ perceptions in function of coaching experience and coaches’ academic background were made applying One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc multiple comparisons. Factor analysis on coaches’ perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs made apparent three main areas of competences, i.e. competences related to annual and multi-annual planning; competences related to orientation towards practice and competition; and personal and coaching education competences. Coaches’ perceptions were influenced by their experience, as low experienced coaches rated themselves at lower levels of competence and with more training needs; also coaches with high education, in Physical Education or others, perceived themselves as more competent than coaches with no higher education. Finally, the majority of the coaches perceived themselves to be competent but, nevertheless, they indicated to have training needs, which brings an important feedback to coach education. This suggests that coaches are interested in increasing their knowledge and competence in a broad range of areas which should be considered in future coach education programs. Key points Coaches’ perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs resulted in three main areas: competences related to annual and multi-annual planning, competences related to practice and competition orientation and, finally, personal

  11. Coaches' perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs related to professional competences.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sofia; Mesquita, Isabel; Graça, Amândio; Rosado, António

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine coaches' perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs related to professional competences according to the professional experience and academic education. The participants were 343 coaches from several sports, who answered to a questionnaire that includes a scale focused on perceptions of competence and another scale on acknowledgment of training needs. An exploratory factor analysis with Maximum Likelihood Factoring was used with Oblimin rotation for the identification of emergent factors. Comparison on coaches' perceptions in function of coaching experience and coaches' academic background were made applying One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparisons. Factor analysis on coaches' perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs made apparent three main areas of competences, i.e. competences related to annual and multi-annual planning; competences related to orientation towards practice and competition; and personal and coaching education competences. Coaches' perceptions were influenced by their experience, as low experienced coaches rated themselves at lower levels of competence and with more training needs; also coaches with high education, in Physical Education or others, perceived themselves as more competent than coaches with no higher education. Finally, the majority of the coaches perceived themselves to be competent but, nevertheless, they indicated to have training needs, which brings an important feedback to coach education. This suggests that coaches are interested in increasing their knowledge and competence in a broad range of areas which should be considered in future coach education programs. Key pointsCoaches' perceptions of competence and acknowledgement of training needs resulted in three main areas: competences related to annual and multi-annual planning, competences related to practice and competition orientation and, finally, personal and coaching

  12. General Conformity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The General Conformity requirements ensure that the actions taken by federal agencies in nonattainment and maintenance areas do not interfere with a state’s plans to meet national standards for air quality.

  13. General paresis

    MedlinePlus

    ... due to damage to the brain from untreated syphilis. Causes General paresis is one form of neurosyphilis . ... usually occurs in people who have had untreated syphilis for many years. Syphilis is bacterial infection that ...

  14. General Dentist

    MedlinePlus

    ... information you need from the Academy of General Dentistry Sunday, April 9, 2017 About | Contact InfoBites Quick ... Instead of specializing in just one area of dentistry, they can provide plenty of different services for ...

  15. Assessing cultural competence of policy organizations.

    PubMed

    Mays, Rose M; Siantz, Mary Lou de Leon; Viehweg, Stephan A

    2002-04-01

    Assessment of the capabilities of human service providers to care for individuals from diverse cultures has been widely discussed in the literature. However, a less examined area is the appraisal of the cultural competence of the administrative or policy bodies whose actions shape the character of these human services. This article demonstrates an approach for evaluating a policy organization's cultural competence using a governmental agency as a case study. Findings from this assessment prompted this agency to generate plans to further enhance its cultural competence.

  16. Cultural competence in three human service agencies.

    PubMed

    Dana, R H

    1998-08-01

    This paper summarizes findings from applications of the Agency Cultural Competence Checklist in three human service agencies. This checklist was developed on the basis of published literature and culture-specific agencies were chosen to document checklist findings in settings known to be culturally competent. As anticipated, all three agencies were culturally competent in attitudes, although the range of services differed. This paper provides some baseline data for using the checklist in mainstream agencies in which predominantly Euro-American providers serve minority populations.

  17. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Compete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisken, Barbara J.; Bailey, Arthur E.; Weitz, David A.

    2008-01-01

    The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Compete (BCAT-5-Compete) investigation will photograph andomized colloidal samples onboard the International Space Station (ISS) to determine their resulting structure over time. The use of EarthKAM software and hardware will allow the scientists to capture the kinetics (evolution) of their samples, as well as the final equilibrium state of each sample. BCAT-5-Compete will utilize samples 6 - 8 in the BCAT-5 hardware to study the competition between phase separation and crystallization, which is important in the manufacture of plastics and other materials.

  18. Assessing Competencies in a Master of Science in Clinical Research Program: The Comprehensive Competency Review.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Georgeanna F W B; Moore, Charity G; McTigue, Kathleen M; Rubio, Doris M; Kapoor, Wishwa N

    2015-12-01

    Competencies in Master of Science Clinical Research programs are becoming increasingly common. However, students and programs can only benefit fully from competency-based education if students' competence is formally assessed. Prior to a summative assessment, students must have at least one formative, formal assessment to be sure they are developing competence appropriate for their stage of training. This paper describes the comprehensive competency review (CCR), a milestone for MS students in Clinical Research at the University of Pittsburgh's Institute for Clinical Research Education. The CCR involves metacognitive reflection of the student's learning as a whole, written evidence of each competency, a narrative explaining the choice of evidence for demonstrating competencies, and a meeting in which two faculty members review the evidence and solicit further oral evidence of competence. CCRs allow for individualized feedback at the midpoint in degree programs, providing students with confidence that they will have the means and strategies to develop competence in all areas by the summative assessment of competence at their thesis defense. CCRs have also provided programmatic insight on the need for curricular revisions and additions. These benefits outweigh the time cost on the part of students and faculty in the CCR process.

  19. Assessing Competencies in a Master of Science in Clinical Research Program: The Comprehensive Competency Review

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Georgeanna FWB; Moore, Charity G; McTigue, Kathleen M; Rubio, Doris M; Kapoor, Wishwa N

    2015-01-01

    Competencies in Master of Science Clinical Research programs are becoming increasingly common. However, students and programs can only benefit fully from competency-based education if students’ competence is formally assessed. Prior to a summative assessment, students must have at least one formative, formal assessment to be sure they are developing competence appropriate for their stage of training. This paper describes the Comprehensive Competency Review (CCR), a milestone for MS students in Clinical Research at the University of Pittsburgh’s Institute for Clinical Research Education. The CCR involves metacognitive reflection of the student’s learning as a whole, written evidence of each competency, a narrative explaining the choice of evidence for demonstrating competencies, and a meeting in which two faculty members review the evidence and solicit further oral evidence of competence. CCRs allow for individualized feedback at the midpoint in degree programs, providing students with confidence that they will have the means and strategies to develop competence in all areas by the summative assessment of competence at their thesis defense. CCRs have also provided programmatic insight on the need for curricular revisions and additions. These benefits outweigh the time cost on the part of students and faculty in the CCR process. PMID:26332763

  20. Beyond NAVMEC: competency-based veterinary education and assessment of the professional competencies.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Jennifer L; Pelzer, Jacquelyn M; Inzana, Karen D

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of competency-based curricula within the health sciences has been an important paradigm shift over the past 30 years. As a result, one of the five strategic goals recommended by the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium (NAVMEC) report was to graduate career-ready veterinarians who are proficient in, and have the confidence to use, an agreed-upon set of core competencies. Of the nine competencies identified as essential for veterinary graduates, seven could be classified as professional or non-technical competencies: communication; collaboration; management (self, team, system); lifelong learning, scholarship, value of research; leadership; diversity and multicultural awareness; and adaptation to changing environments. Traditionally, the professional competencies have received less attention in veterinary curricula and their assessment is often sporadic or inconsistent. In contrast, the same or similar competencies are being increasingly recognized in other health professions as essential skills and abilities, and their assessment is being undertaken with enhanced scrutiny and critical appraisal. Several challenges have been associated with the assessment of professional competencies, including agreement as to their definition and therefore their evaluation, the fact that they are frequently complex and require multiple integrative assessments, and the ability and/or desire of faculty to teach and assess these competencies. To provide an improved context for assessment of the seven professional competencies identified in the NAVMEC report, this article describes a broad framework for their evaluation as well as specific examples of how these or similar competencies are currently being measured in medical and veterinary curricula.