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Sample records for ach receptor channels

  1. Nicotinic ACh receptors as therapeutic targets in CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Dineley, Kelly T; Pandya, Anshul A; Yakel, Jerrel L

    2015-02-01

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) can regulate neuronal excitability by acting on the cys-loop cation-conducting ligand-gated nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) channels. These receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS), being expressed on neurons and non-neuronal cells, where they participate in a variety of physiological responses such as anxiety, the central processing of pain, food intake, nicotine seeking behavior, and cognitive functions. In the mammalian brain, nine different subunits have been found thus far, which assemble into pentameric complexes with much subunit diversity; however, the α7 and α4β2 subtypes predominate in the CNS. Neuronal nAChR dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of many neurological disorders. Here we will briefly discuss the functional makeup and expression of the nAChRs in mammalian brain, and their role as targets in neurodegenerative diseases (in particular Alzheimer's disease, AD), neurodevelopmental disorders (in particular autism and schizophrenia), and neuropathic pain.

  2. Photolabeling a Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) with an (α4)3(β2)2 nAChR-Selective Positive Allosteric Modulator.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Deba, Farah; Wang, Ze-Jun; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2016-05-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs) have potential clinical applications in the treatment of nicotine dependence and many neuropsychiatric conditions associated with decreased brain cholinergic activity, and 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-5-(5-methyl-1-(piperidin-4-yl)-1H-pyrrazol-4-yl)isoxazole (CMPI) has been identified as a PAM selective for neuronal nAChRs containing theα4 subunit. In this report, we compare CMPI interactions with low-sensitivity (α4)3(β2)2 and high-sensitivity (α4)2(β2)3 nAChRs, and with muscle-type nAChRs. In addition, we use the intrinsic reactivity of [(3)H]CMPI upon photolysis at 312 nm to identify its binding sites inTorpedonAChRs. Recording fromXenopusoocytes, we found that CMPI potentiated maximally the responses of (α4)3(β2)2nAChR to 10μM ACh (EC10) by 400% and with anEC50of ∼1µM. CMPI produced a left shift of the ACh concentration-response curve without altering ACh efficacy. In contrast, CMPI inhibited (∼35% at 10µM) ACh responses of (α4)2(β2)3nAChRs and fully inhibited human muscle andTorpedonAChRs with IC50values of ∼0.5µM. Upon irradiation at 312 nm, [(3)H]CMPI photoincorporated into eachTorpedo[(α1)2β1γδ] nAChR subunit. Sequencing of peptide fragments isolated from [(3)H]CMPI-photolabeled nAChR subunits established photolabeling of amino acids contributing to the ACh binding sites (αTyr(190),αTyr(198),γTrp(55),γTyr(111),γTyr(117),δTrp(57)) that was fully inhibitable by agonist and lower-efficiency, state-dependent [(3)H]CMPI photolabeling within the ion channel. Our results establish that CMPI is a potent potentiator of nAChRs containing anα4:α4 subunit interface, and that its intrinsic photoreactivy makes it of potential use to identify its binding sites in the (α4)3(β2)2nAChR. PMID:26976945

  3. Muscarinic ACh Receptors Contribute to Aversive Olfactory Learning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bryon; Molina-Fernández, Claudia; Ugalde, María Beatriz; Tognarelli, Eduardo I.; Angel, Cristian; Campusano, Jorge M.

    2015-01-01

    The most studied form of associative learning in Drosophila consists in pairing an odorant, the conditioned stimulus (CS), with an unconditioned stimulus (US). The timely arrival of the CS and US information to a specific Drosophila brain association region, the mushroom bodies (MB), can induce new olfactory memories. Thus, the MB is considered a coincidence detector. It has been shown that olfactory information is conveyed to the MB through cholinergic inputs that activate acetylcholine (ACh) receptors, while the US is encoded by biogenic amine (BA) systems. In recent years, we have advanced our understanding on the specific neural BA pathways and receptors involved in olfactory learning and memory. However, little information exists on the contribution of cholinergic receptors to this process. Here we evaluate for the first time the proposition that, as in mammals, muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) contribute to memory formation in Drosophila. Our results show that pharmacological and genetic blockade of mAChRs in MB disrupts olfactory aversive memory in larvae. This effect is not explained by an alteration in the ability of animals to respond to odorants or to execute motor programs. These results show that mAChRs in MB contribute to generating olfactory memories in Drosophila. PMID:26380118

  4. Functional Human α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Generated from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tillman, Tommy S; Alvarez, Frances J D; Reinert, Nathan J; Liu, Chuang; Wang, Dawei; Xu, Yan; Xiao, Kunhong; Zhang, Peijun; Tang, Pei

    2016-08-26

    Human Cys-loop receptors are important therapeutic targets. High-resolution structures are essential for rational drug design, but only a few are available due to difficulties in obtaining sufficient quantities of protein suitable for structural studies. Although expression of proteins in E. coli offers advantages of high yield, low cost, and fast turnover, this approach has not been thoroughly explored for full-length human Cys-loop receptors because of the conventional wisdom that E. coli lacks the specific chaperones and post-translational modifications potentially required for expression of human Cys-loop receptors. Here we report the successful production of full-length wild type human α7nAChR from E. coli Chemically induced chaperones promote high expression levels of well-folded proteins. The choice of detergents, lipids, and ligands during purification determines the final protein quality. The purified α7nAChR not only forms pentamers as imaged by negative-stain electron microscopy, but also retains pharmacological characteristics of native α7nAChR, including binding to bungarotoxin and positive allosteric modulators specific to α7nAChR. Moreover, the purified α7nAChR injected into Xenopus oocytes can be activated by acetylcholine, choline, and nicotine, inhibited by the channel blockers QX-222 and phencyclidine, and potentiated by the α7nAChR specific modulators PNU-120596 and TQS. The successful generation of functional human α7nAChR from E. coli opens a new avenue for producing mammalian Cys-loop receptors to facilitate structure-based rational drug design. PMID:27385587

  5. Mutations Causing Slow-Channel Myasthenia Reveal That a Valine Ring in the Channel Pore of Muscle AChR is Optimized for Stabilizing Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Ming; Okuno, Tatsuya; Milone, Margherita; Otsuka, Kenji; Takahashi, Koji; Komaki, Hirofumi; Giles, Elizabeth; Ohno, Kinji; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-10-01

    We identify two novel mutations in acetylcholine receptor (AChR) causing a slow-channel congenital myasthenia syndrome (CMS) in three unrelated patients (Pts). Pt 1 harbors a heterozygous βV266A mutation (p.Val289Ala) in the second transmembrane domain (M2) of the AChR β subunit (CHRNB1). Pts 2 and 3 carry the same mutation at an equivalent site in the ε subunit (CHRNE), εV265A (p.Val285Ala). The mutant residues are conserved across all AChR subunits of all species and are components of a valine ring in the channel pore, which is positioned four residues above the leucine ring. Both βV266A and εV265A reduce the amino acid size and lengthen the channel opening bursts by fourfold by enhancing gating efficiency by approximately 30-fold. Substitution of alanine for valine at the corresponding position in the δ and α subunit prolongs the burst duration four- and eightfold, respectively. Replacing valine at ε codon 265 either by a still smaller glycine or by a larger leucine also lengthens the burst duration. Our analysis reveals that each valine in the valine ring contributes to channel kinetics equally, and the valine ring has been optimized in the course of evolution to govern channel gating. PMID:27375219

  6. Mutations Causing Slow-Channel Myasthenia Reveal That a Valine Ring in the Channel Pore of Muscle AChR is Optimized for Stabilizing Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Ming; Okuno, Tatsuya; Milone, Margherita; Otsuka, Kenji; Takahashi, Koji; Komaki, Hirofumi; Giles, Elizabeth; Ohno, Kinji; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-10-01

    We identify two novel mutations in acetylcholine receptor (AChR) causing a slow-channel congenital myasthenia syndrome (CMS) in three unrelated patients (Pts). Pt 1 harbors a heterozygous βV266A mutation (p.Val289Ala) in the second transmembrane domain (M2) of the AChR β subunit (CHRNB1). Pts 2 and 3 carry the same mutation at an equivalent site in the ε subunit (CHRNE), εV265A (p.Val285Ala). The mutant residues are conserved across all AChR subunits of all species and are components of a valine ring in the channel pore, which is positioned four residues above the leucine ring. Both βV266A and εV265A reduce the amino acid size and lengthen the channel opening bursts by fourfold by enhancing gating efficiency by approximately 30-fold. Substitution of alanine for valine at the corresponding position in the δ and α subunit prolongs the burst duration four- and eightfold, respectively. Replacing valine at ε codon 265 either by a still smaller glycine or by a larger leucine also lengthens the burst duration. Our analysis reveals that each valine in the valine ring contributes to channel kinetics equally, and the valine ring has been optimized in the course of evolution to govern channel gating.

  7. Otilonium: a potent blocker of neuronal nicotinic ACh receptors in bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gandía, L.; Villarroya, M.; Lara, B.; Olmos, V.; Gilabert, J. A.; López, M. G.; Martínez-Sierra, R.; Borges, R.; García, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    1. Otilonium, a clinically useful spasmolytic, behaves as a potent blocker of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) as well as a mild wide-spectrum Ca2+ channel blocker in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. 2. 45Ca2+ uptake into chromaffin cells stimulated with high K+ (70 mM, 1 min) was blocked by otilonium with an IC50 of 7.6 microM. The drug inhibited the 45Ca2+ uptake stimulated by the nicotinic AChR agonist, dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) with a 79 fold higher potency (IC50 = 0.096 microM). 3. Whole-cell Ba2+ currents (IBa) through Ca2+ channels of voltage-clamped chromaffin cells were blocked by otilonium with an IC50 of 6.4 microM, very close to that of K(+)-evoked 45Ca2+ uptake. Blockade developed in 10-20 s, almost as a single step and was rapidly and almost fully reversible. 4. Whole-cell nicotinic AChR-mediated currents (250 ms pulses of 100 microM DMPP) applied at 30 s intervals were blocked by otilonium in a concentration-dependent manner, showing an IC50 of 0.36 microM. Blockade was induced in a step-wise manner. Wash out of otilonium allowed a slow recovery of the current, also in discrete steps. 5. In experiments with recordings in the same cells of whole-cell IDMPP, Na+ currents (INa) and Ca2+ currents (ICa), 1 microM otilonium blocked 87% IDMPP, 7% INa and 13% ICa. 6. Otilonium inhibited the K(+)-evoked catecholamine secretory response of superfused bovine chromaffin cells with an IC50 of 10 microM, very close to the IC50 for blockade of K(+)-induced 45Ca2+ uptake and IBa. 7. Otilonium inhibited the secretory responses induced by 10 s pulses of 50 microM DMPP with an IC50 of 7.4 nM. Hexamethonium blocked the DMPP-evoked responses with an IC50 of 29.8 microM, 4,000 fold higher than that of otilonium. 8. In conclusion, otilonium is a potent blocker of nicotinic AChR-mediated responses. The drugs also blocked various subtypes of neuronal voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels at a considerably lower potency. Na+ channels were unaffected by

  8. The regulation of hippocampal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) after a protracted treatment with selective or nonselective nAChR agonists.

    PubMed

    Auta, J; Longone, P; Guidotti, A; Costa, E

    1999-01-01

    In rats, 1 mg/kg twice daily for 10 d of nicotine, a nonselective agonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), fails to change alpha4 and beta2 nAChR subunit mRNA but significantly decreased alpha7 nAChR subunit mRNA and protein expression, which is associated with a 35-40% decrease in the number of 125I-alpha-Bgtx binding sites in hippocampus. In addition, this schedule of nicotine treatment produced a 40% increase in the number of high- (K(D) 1 nM), but decreased by 25% the number of low-affinity (K(D) 30 nM) binding sites for 3H-epibatidine in hippocampus. In contrast, repeated treatment with lobeline (2.7 mg/kg twice daily for 10 d), which selectively binds to high-affinity binding nAChRs, fails to change the expression of high- or low-affinity nAChRs. These data suggest that a simultaneous upregulation of high-affinity nAChRs and downregulation of low-affinity nAChRs is elicited by ligands that can bind to both low- and high-affinity nAChRs, but not by selective agonists of high-affinity nAChRs. One might infer that in hippocampus, high- and low-affinity nAChRs may be located in the same cells. When these two receptor types are stimulated simultaneously by nonselective ligands for high- and low-affinity nAChRs, they interact, bringing about an increase in binding site density of the high-affinity nAChRs.

  9. Improved resolution of single channel dwell times reveals mechanisms of binding, priming, and gating in muscle AChR.

    PubMed

    Mukhtasimova, Nuriya; daCosta, Corrie J B; Sine, Steven M

    2016-07-01

    The acetylcholine receptor (AChR) from vertebrate skeletal muscle initiates voluntary movement, and its kinetics of activation are crucial for maintaining the safety margin for neuromuscular transmission. Furthermore, the kinetic mechanism of the muscle AChR serves as an archetype for understanding activation mechanisms of related receptors from the Cys-loop superfamily. Here we record currents through single muscle AChR channels with improved temporal resolution approaching half an order of magnitude over our previous best. A range of concentrations of full and partial agonists are used to elicit currents from human wild-type and gain-of-function mutant AChRs. For each agonist-receptor combination, rate constants are estimated from maximum likelihood analysis using a kinetic scheme comprised of agonist binding, priming, and channel gating steps. The kinetic scheme and rate constants are tested by stochastic simulation, followed by incorporation of the experimental step response, sampling rate, background noise, and filter bandwidth. Analyses of the simulated data confirm all rate constants except those for channel gating, which are overestimated because of the established effect of noise on the briefest dwell times. Estimates of the gating rate constants were obtained through iterative simulation followed by kinetic fitting. The results reveal that the agonist association rate constants are independent of agonist occupancy but depend on receptor state, whereas those for agonist dissociation depend on occupancy but not on state. The priming rate and equilibrium constants increase with successive agonist occupancy, and for a full agonist, the forward rate constant increases more than the equilibrium constant; for a partial agonist, the forward rate and equilibrium constants increase equally. The gating rate and equilibrium constants also increase with successive agonist occupancy, but unlike priming, the equilibrium constants increase more than the forward rate

  10. Automated Patch Clamp Analysis of nAChα7 and Na(V)1.7 Channels.

    PubMed

    Obergrussberger, Alison; Haarmann, Claudia; Rinke, Ilka; Becker, Nadine; Guinot, David; Brueggemann, Andrea; Stoelzle-Feix, Sonja; George, Michael; Fertig, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Automated patch clamp devices are now commonly used for studying ion channels. A useful modification of this approach is the replacement of the glass pipet with a thin planar glass layer with a small hole in the middle. Planar patch clamp devices, such as the three described in this unit, are overtaking glass pipets in popularity because they increase throughput, are easier to use, provide for the acquisition of high-quality and information-rich data, and allow for rapid perfusion and temperature control. Covered in this unit are two challenging targets in drug discovery: voltage-gated sodium subtype 1.7 (Na(V)1.7) and nicotinic acetylcholine α7 receptors (nAChα7R). Provided herein are protocols for recording activation and inactivation kinetics of Na(V)1.7, and activation and allosteric modulation of nAChα7R. PMID:24934604

  11. Conotoxin Interactions with α9α10-nAChRs: Is the α9α10-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor an Important Therapeutic Target for Pain Management?

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Sarasa A.; Christie, MacDonald J.

    2015-01-01

    The α9α10-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated in pain and has been proposed to be a novel target for analgesics. However, the evidence to support the involvement of the α9α10-nAChR in pain is conflicted. This receptor was first implicated in pain with the characterisation of conotoxin Vc1.1, which is highly selective for α9α10-nAChRs and is an efficacious analgesic in chronic pain models with restorative capacities and no reported side effects. Numerous other analgesic conotoxin and non-conotoxin molecules have been subsequently characterised that also inhibit α9α10-nAChRs. However, there is evidence that α9α10-nAChR inhibition is neither necessary nor sufficient for analgesia. α9α10-nAChR-inhibiting analogues of Vc1.1 have no analgesic effects. Genetically-modified α9-nAChR knockout mice have a phenotype that is markedly different from the analgesic profile of Vc1.1 and similar conotoxins, suggesting that the conotoxin effects are largely independent of α9α10-nAChRs. Furthermore, an alternative mechanism of analgesia by Vc1.1 and other similar conotoxins involving non-canonical coupling of GABAB receptors to voltage-gated calcium channels is known. Additional incongruities regarding α9α10-nAChRs in analgesia are discussed. A more comprehensive characterisation of the role of α9α10-nAChRs in pain is crucial for understanding the analgesic action of conotoxins and for improved drug design. PMID:26426047

  12. Analysis of free ACh and 5-HT in milk from four different species and their bioactivity on 5-HT(3) and nACh receptors.

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Perez, Jose-Luis; Limon, Agenor; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge M; Alshanqeeti, Ali S; Aljohi, Mohammad A; Miledi, Ricardo

    2014-07-25

    Milk is one of the most beneficial aliments and is highly recommended in normal conditions; however, in certain disorders, like irritable bowel syndrome, cow milk and dairy products worsen the gastric symptoms and their use is not recommended. Among the most recognized milk-induced gatrointestinal symptoms are abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, which are processes controlled by cholinergic and serotonergic transmission. Whether the presence of bioavailable ACh and 5-HT in milk may contribute to normal peristalsis, or to the developing of these symptoms, is not known. In this work we attempt to determine whether the content of free ACh and 5-HT is of physiological significance in milk from four different species: cow (bovine), goat, camel and human. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to identify and quantify free ACh and 5-HT in milk, and activation of the serotonergic and cholinergic ionotropic receptors was investigated using electrophysiological experiments. Our principal hypothesis was that milk from these four species had sufficient free ACh and 5-HT to activate their correspondent receptors expressed in a heterologous system. Our results showed a more complex picture, in which free ACh and 5-HT and their ability to activate cholinergic and serotonergic receptors are not correlated. This work is a first step to elucidate whether 5-HT and ACh, at the concentrations present in the milk, can be associated to a direct function in the GI.

  13. Activation of nicotinic ACh receptors with α4 subunits induces adenosine release at the rat carotid body

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Sílvia V; Monteiro, Emília C

    2006-01-01

    The effect of ACh on the release of adenosine was studied in rat whole carotid bodies, and the nicotinic ACh receptors involved in the stimulation of this release were characterized. ACh and nicotinic ACh receptor agonists, cytisine, DMPP and nicotine, caused a concentration-dependent increase in adenosine production during normoxia, with nicotine being more potent and efficient in stimulating adenosine release from rat CB than cytisine and DMPP. D-Tubocurarine, mecamylamine, DHβE and α-bungarotoxin, nicotinic ACh receptor antagonists, caused a concentration-dependent reduction in the release of adenosine evoked by hypoxia. The rank order of potency for nicotinic ACh receptor antagonists that inhibit adenosine release was DHβE>mecamylamine>D-tubocurarine>α-bungarotoxin. The effect of the endogenous agonist, ACh, which was mimicked by nicotine, was antagonized by DHβE, a selective nicotinic receptor antagonist. The ecto-5′-nucleotidase inhibitor AOPCP produces a 72% inhibition in the release of adenosine from CB evoked by nicotine. Taken together, these data indicate that ACh induced the production of adenosine, mainly from extracellular ATP catabolism at the CB through a mechanism that involves the activation of nicotinic receptors with α4 and β2 receptor subunits. PMID:16444287

  14. Agonists with supraphysiological efficacy at the muscarinic M2 ACh receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schrage, R; Seemann, WK; Klöckner, J; Dallanoce, C; Racké, K; Kostenis, E; De Amici, M; Holzgrabe, U; Mohr, K

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Artificial agonists may have higher efficacy for receptor activation than the physiological agonist. Until now, such ‘superagonism’ has rarely been reported for GPCRs. Iperoxo is an extremely potent muscarinic receptor agonist. We hypothesized that iperoxo is a ‘superagonist’. Experimental Approach Signalling of iperoxo and newly synthesized structural analogues was compared with that of ACh at label-free M2 muscarinic receptors applying whole cell dynamic mass redistribution, measurement of G-protein activation, evaluation of cell surface agonist binding and computation of operational efficacies. Key Results In CHO-hM2 cells, iperoxo significantly exceeds ACh in Gi/Gs signalling competence. In the orthosteric loss-of-function mutant M2-Y1043.33A, the maximum effect of iperoxo is hardly compromised in contrast to ACh. ‘Superagonism’ is preserved in the physiological cellular context of MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts. Structure–signalling relationships including iperoxo derivatives with either modified positively charged head group or altered tail suggest that ‘superagonism’ of iperoxo is mechanistically based on parallel activation of the receptor protein via two orthosteric interaction points. Conclusion and Implications Supraphysiological agonist efficacy at muscarinic M2 ACh receptors is demonstrated for the first time. In addition, a possible underlying molecular mechanism of GPCR ‘superagonism’ is provided. We suggest that iperoxo-like orthosteric GPCR activation is a new avenue towards a novel class of receptor activators. Linked Article This article is commented on by Langmead and Christopoulos, pp. 353–356 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.12142 PMID:23062057

  15. The α3β4* nicotinic ACh receptor subtype mediates physical dependence to morphine: mouse and human studies

    PubMed Central

    Muldoon, P P; Jackson, K J; Perez, E; Harenza, J L; Molas, S; Rais, B; Anwar, H; Zaveri, N T; Maldonado, R; Maskos, U; McIntosh, J M; Dierssen, M; Miles, M F; Chen, X; De Biasi, M; Damaj, M I

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Recent data have indicated that α3β4* neuronal nicotinic (n) ACh receptors may play a role in morphine dependence. Here we investigated if nACh receptors modulate morphine physical withdrawal. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACHES To assess the role of α3β4* nACh receptors in morphine withdrawal, we used a genetic correlation approach using publically available datasets within the GeneNetwork web resource, genetic knockout and pharmacological tools. Male and female European-American (n = 2772) and African-American (n = 1309) subjects from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment dataset were assessed for possible associations of polymorphisms in the 15q25 gene cluster and opioid dependence. KEY RESULTS BXD recombinant mouse lines demonstrated an increased expression of α3, β4 and α5 nACh receptor mRNA in the forebrain and midbrain, which significantly correlated with increased defecation in mice undergoing morphine withdrawal. Mice overexpressing the gene cluster CHRNA5/A3/B4 exhibited increased somatic signs of withdrawal. Furthermore, α5 and β4 nACh receptor knockout mice expressed decreased somatic withdrawal signs compared with their wild-type counterparts. Moreover, selective α3β4* nACh receptor antagonists, α-conotoxin AuIB and AT-1001, attenuated somatic signs of morphine withdrawal in a dose-related manner. In addition, two human datasets revealed a protective role for variants in the CHRNA3 gene, which codes for the α3 nACh receptor subunit, in opioid dependence and withdrawal. In contrast, we found that the α4β2* nACh receptor subtype is not involved in morphine somatic withdrawal signs. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Overall, our findings suggest an important role for the α3β4* nACh receptor subtype in morphine physical dependence. PMID:24750073

  16. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) at zebrafish red and white muscle show different properties during development.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kazi T; Ali, Declan W

    2016-08-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are highly expressed at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction (NMJ) where they are required for muscle activation. Understanding the factors that underlie NMJ development is critical for a full understanding of muscle function. In this study we performed whole cell and outside-out patch clamp recordings, and single-cell RT-qPCR from zebrafish red and white muscle to examine the properties of nAChRs during the first 5 days of development. In red fibers miniature endplate currents (mEPCs) exhibit single exponential time courses at 1.5 days postfertilization (dpf) and double exponential time courses from 2 dpf onwards. In white fibers, mEPCs decay relatively slowly, with a single exponential component at 1.5 dpf. By 2 and 3 dpf, mEPC kinetics speed up, and decay with a double exponential component, and by 4 dpf the exponential decay reverts back to a single component. Single channel recordings confirm the presence of two main conductance classes of nAChRs (∼45 pS and ∼65 pS) in red fibers with multiple time courses. Two main conductance classes are also present in white fibers (∼55 pS and ∼73 pS), but they exhibit shorter mean open times by 5 dpf compared with red muscle. RT-qPCR of mRNA for nicotinic receptor subunits supports a switch from γ to ε subunits in white fibers but not in red. Our findings provide a developmental profile of mEPC properties from red and white fibers in embryonic and larval zebrafish, and reveal previously unknown differences between the NMJs of these muscle fibers.© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 916-936, 2016.

  17. Investigation of Acetylcholine Receptor Diversity in a Nematode Parasite Leads to Characterization of Tribendimidine- and Derquantel-Sensitive nAChRs

    PubMed Central

    Neveu, Cedric; Cabaret, Jacques; Cortet, Jacques; Peineau, Nicolas; Abongwa, Melanie; Courtot, Elise; Robertson, Alan P.; Martin, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) of parasitic nematodes are required for body movement and are targets of important “classical” anthelmintics like levamisole and pyrantel, as well as “novel” anthelmintics like tribendimidine and derquantel. Four biophysical subtypes of nAChR have been observed electrophysiologically in body muscle of the nematode parasite Oesophagostomum dentatum, but their molecular basis was not understood. Additionally, loss of one of these subtypes (G 35 pS) was found to be associated with levamisole resistance. In the present study, we identified and expressed in Xenopus oocytes, four O. dentatum nAChR subunit genes, Ode-unc-38, Ode-unc-63, Ode-unc-29 and Ode-acr-8, to explore the origin of the receptor diversity. When different combinations of subunits were injected in Xenopus oocytes, we reconstituted and characterized four pharmacologically different types of nAChRs with different sensitivities to the cholinergic anthelmintics. Moreover, we demonstrate that the receptor diversity may be affected by the stoichiometric arrangement of the subunits. We show, for the first time, different combinations of subunits from a parasitic nematode that make up receptors sensitive to tribendimidine and derquantel. In addition, we report that the recombinant levamisole-sensitive receptor made up of Ode-UNC-29, Ode-UNC-63, Ode-UNC-38 and Ode-ACR-8 subunits has the same single-channel conductance, 35 pS and 2.4 ms mean open-time properties, as the levamisole-AChR (G35) subtype previously identified in vivo. These data highlight the flexible arrangements of the receptor subunits and their effects on sensitivity and resistance to the cholinergic anthelmintics; pyrantel, tribendimidine and/or derquantel may still be effective on levamisole-resistant worms. PMID:24497826

  18. Modulation of nicotinic receptor channels by adrenergic stimulation in rat pinealocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jin-Young; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Hille, Bertil

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin secretion from the pineal gland is triggered by norepinephrine released from sympathetic terminals at night. In contrast, cholinergic and parasympathetic inputs, by activating nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR), have been suggested to counterbalance the noradrenergic input. Here we investigated whether adrenergic signaling regulates nAChR channels in rat pinealocytes. Acetylcholine or the selective nicotinic receptor agonist 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP) activated large nAChR currents in whole cell patch-clamp experiments. Norepinephrine (NE) reduced the nAChR currents, an effect partially mimicked by a β-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol, and blocked by a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol. Increasing intracellular cAMP levels using membrane-permeable 8-bromoadenosine (8-Br)-cAMP or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphorothioate (cBIMPS) also reduced nAChR activity, mimicking the effects of NE and isoproterenol. Further, removal of ATP from the intracellular pipette solution blocked the reduction of nAChR currents, suggesting involvement of protein kinases. Indeed protein kinase A inhibitors, H-89 and Rp-cAMPS, blocked the modulation of nAChR by adrenergic stimulation. After the downmodulation by NE, nAChR channels mediated a smaller Ca2+ influx and less membrane depolarization from the resting potential. Together these results suggest that NE released from sympathetic terminals at night attenuates nicotinic cholinergic signaling. PMID:24553185

  19. Gentamicin blocks the ACh-induced BK current in guinea pig type II vestibular hair cells by competing with Ca²⁺ at the L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Guo, Chang-Kai; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Tao; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2014-04-22

    Type II vestibular hair cells (VHCs II) contain big-conductance Ca²⁺-dependent K⁺ channels (BK) and L-type calcium channels. Our previous studies in guinea pig VHCs II indicated that acetylcholine (ACh) evoked the BK current by triggering the influx of Ca²⁺ ions through L-type Ca²⁺ channels, which was mediated by M2 muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChRs). Aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as gentamicin (GM), are known to have vestibulotoxicity, including damaging effects on the efferent nerve endings on VHCs II. This study used the whole-cell patch clamp technique to determine whether GM affects the vestibular efferent system at postsynaptic M2-mAChRs or the membrane ion channels. We found that GM could block the ACh-induced BK current and that inhibition was reversible, voltage-independent, and dose-dependent with an IC₅₀ value of 36.3 ± 7.8 µM. Increasing the ACh concentration had little influence on GM blocking effect, but increasing the extracellular Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺]₀) could antagonize it. Moreover, 50 µM GM potently blocked Ca²⁺ currents activated by (-)-Bay-K8644, but did not block BK currents induced by NS1619. These observations indicate that GM most likely blocks the M2 mAChR-mediated response by competing with Ca²⁺ at the L-type calcium channel. These results provide insights into the vestibulotoxicity of aminoglycoside antibiotics on mammalian VHCs II.

  20. Selective activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRα7) inhibits muscular degeneration in mdx dystrophic mice.

    PubMed

    Leite, Paulo Emílio Correa; Gandía, Luís; de Pascual, Ricardo; Nanclares, Carmen; Colmena, Inés; Santos, Wilson C; Lagrota-Candido, Jussara; Quirico-Santos, Thereza

    2014-07-21

    Amount evidence indicates that α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRα7) activation reduces production of inflammatory mediators. This work aimed to verify the influence of endogenous nAChRα7 activation on the regulation of full-blown muscular inflammation in mdx mouse with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We used mdx mice with 3 weeks-old at the height myonecrosis, and C57 nAChRα7(+/+) wild-type and nAChRα7(-/-) knockout mice with muscular injury induced with 60µL 0.5% bupivacaine (bp) in the gastrocnemius muscle. Pharmacological treatment included selective nAChRα7 agonist PNU282987 (0.3mg/kg and 1.0mg/kg) and the antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA at 1.0mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally for 7 days. Selective nAChRα7 activation of mdx mice with PNU282987 reduced circulating levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, a marker of cell death by necrosis) and the area of perivascular inflammatory infiltrate, and production of inflammatory mediators TNFα and metalloprotease MMP-9 activity. Conversely, PNU282987 treatment increased MMP-2 activity, an indication of muscular tissue remodeling associated with regeneration, in both mdx mice and WTα7 mice with bp-induced muscular lesion. Treatment with PNU282987 had no effect on α7KO, and MLA abolished the nAChRα7 agonist-induced anti-inflammatory effect in both mdx and WT. In conclusion, nAChRα7 activation inhibits muscular inflammation and activates tissue remodeling by increasing muscular regeneration. These effects were not accompanied with fibrosis and/or deposition of non-functional collagen. The nAChRα7 activation may be considered as a potential target for pharmacological strategies to reduce inflammation and activate mechanisms of muscular regeneration. PMID:24833065

  1. Integrin receptors and ligand-gated channels.

    PubMed

    Morini, Raffaella; Becchetti, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Plastic expression of different integrin subunits controls the different stages of neural development, whereas in the adult integrins regulate synaptic stability. Evidence of integrin-channel crosstalk exists for ionotropic glutamate receptors. As is often the case in other tissues, integrin engagement regulates channel activity through complex signaling pathways that often include tyrosine phosphorylation cascades. The specific pathways recruited by integrin activation depend on cerebral region and cell type. In turn, ion channels control integrin expression onto the plasma membrane and their ligand binding affinity. The most extensive studies concern the hippocampus and suggest implications for neuronal circuit plasticity. The physiological relevance of these findings depends on whether adhesion molecules, aside from determining tissue stability, contribute to synaptogenesis and the responsiveness of mature synapses, thus contributing to long-term circuit consolidation. Little evidence is available for other ligand-gated channels, with the exception of nicotinic receptors. These exert a variety of functions in neurons and non neural tissue, both in development and in the adult, by regulating cell cycle, synaptogenesis and synaptic circuit refinement. Detailed studies in epidermal keratinocytes have shed some light on the possible mechanisms through which ACh can regulate cell motility, which may be of general relevance for morphogenetic processes. As to the control of mature synapses, most results concern the integrinic control of nicotinic receptors in the neuromuscular junction. Following this lead, a few studies have addressed similar topics in adult cerebral synapses. However, pursuing and interpreting these results in the brain is especially difficult because of the complexity of the nicotinic roles and the widespread contribution of nonsynaptic, paracrine transmission. From a pathological point of view, considering the well-known contribution of both

  2. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a comparison of the nAChRs of Caenorhabditis elegans and parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Holden-Dye, Lindy; Joyner, Michelle; O'Connor, Vincent; Walker, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play a key role in the normal physiology of nematodes and provide an established target site for anthelmintics. The free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, has a large number of nAChR subunit genes in its genome and so provides an experimental model for testing novel anthelmintics which act at these sites. However, many parasitic nematodes lack specific genes present in C. elegans, and so care is required in extrapolating from studies using C. elegans to the situation in other nematodes. In this review the properties of C. elegans nAChRs are reviewed and compared to those of parasitic nematodes. This forms the basis for a discussion of the possible subunit composition of nAChRs from different species of parasitic nematodes. Currently our knowledge on this is largely based on studies using heterologous expression and pharmacological analysis of receptor subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes. It is concluded that more information is required regarding the subunit composition and pharmacology of endogenous nAChRs in parasitic nematodes. PMID:23500392

  3. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Dependent Chorda Tympani Taste Nerve Responses to Nicotine, Ethanol and Acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zuo Jun; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Qian, Jie; Baumgarten, Clive M; DeSimone, John A; Lyall, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine elicits bitter taste by activating TRPM5-dependent and TRPM5-independent but neuronal nAChR-dependent pathways. The nAChRs represent common targets at which acetylcholine, nicotine and ethanol functionally interact in the central nervous system. Here, we investigated if the nAChRs also represent a common pathway through which the bitter taste of nicotine, ethanol and acetylcholine is transduced. To this end, chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve responses were monitored in rats, wild-type mice and TRPM5 knockout (KO) mice following lingual stimulation with nicotine free base, ethanol, and acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of nAChR agonists and antagonists. The nAChR modulators: mecamylamine, dihydro-β-erythroidine, and CP-601932 (a partial agonist of the α3β4* nAChR), inhibited CT responses to nicotine, ethanol, and acetylcholine. CT responses to nicotine and ethanol were also inhibited by topical lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio (CPT)-cAMP and loading taste cells with [Ca2+]i by topical lingual application of ionomycin + CaCl2. In contrast, CT responses to nicotine were enhanced when TRC [Ca2+]i was reduced by topical lingual application of BAPTA-AM. In patch-clamp experiments, only a subset of isolated rat fungiform taste cells exposed to nicotine responded with an increase in mecamylamine-sensitive inward currents. We conclude that nAChRs expressed in a subset of taste cells serve as common receptors for the detection of the TRPM5-independent bitter taste of nicotine, acetylcholine and ethanol.

  4. GIRK channel activation via adenosine or muscarinic receptors has similar effects on rat atrial electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaodong; Liang, Bo; Skibsbye, Lasse; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K⁺ channels (GIRK) are important in the regulation of heart rate and atrial electrophysiology. GIRK channels are activated by G protein-coupled receptors, including muscarinic M₂ receptors and adenosine A₁ receptors. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare the electrophysiological effects of acetylcholine (ACh) and adenosine on GIRK channels in rat atria. Action potential duration at 90% repolarization (APD₉₀), effective refractory period (ERP), and resting membrane potential (RMP) were investigated in isolated rat atria by intracellular recordings. Both the adenosine analog N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) and ACh profoundly shortened APD₉₀ and ERP and hyperpolarized the RMP. No additive or synergistic effect of CPA and ACh coapplication was observed. To antagonize GIRK channel activation, the specific inhibitor rTertiapin Q (TTQ) was applied. The coapplication of TTQ reversed the CPA and ACh-induced effects. When TTQ was applied without exogenous receptor activator, both APD₉₀ and ERP were prolonged and RMP was depolarized, confirming a basal activity of the GIRK current. The results reveal that activation of A₁ and M₂ receptors has a profound and equal effect on the electrophysiology in rat atrium. This effect is to a major extent mediated through GIRK channels. Furthermore, these results support the notion that atrial GIRK currents from healthy hearts have a basal component and additional activation can be mediated via at least 2 different receptor mechanisms. PMID:23609329

  5. Effect of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 1 (nAChRα1) peptides on rabies virus infection in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Sajjanar, Basavaraj; Saxena, Shikha; Bisht, Deepika; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Manjunatha Reddy, G B; Singh, Rajendra; Singh, R P; Kumar, Satish

    2016-06-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) is neurotropic and causes acute progressive encephalitis. Herein, we report the interaction of nAChRα1-subunit peptides with RABV and the effect of these peptides on RABV infection in cultured neuronal cells. Peptide sequences derived from torpedo, bovine, human and rats were synthesized and studied for their interactions with RABV using virus capture ELISA and peptide immunofluorescence. The results showed specific binding of the nAChRα1-subunit peptides to the RABV. In the virus adsorption assay, these peptides were found to inhibit the attachment of the RABV to the neuronal cells. The nAChRα1-subunit peptides inhibited the RABV infection and reduced viral gene expression in the cultured neuroblastoma (N2A) cells. Torpedo peptide sequence (T-32) had highest antiviral effect (IC50=14±3.01μM) compared to the other peptides studied. The results of the study indicated that nAChRα1-subunit peptides may act as receptor decoy molecules and inhibit the binding of virus to the native host cell receptors and hence may reduce viral infection. PMID:26656837

  6. The analgesic-like properties of the alpha7 nAChR silent agonist NS6740 is associated with non-conducting conformations of the receptor

    PubMed Central

    Papke, Roger L.; Bagdas, Deniz; Kulkarni, Abhijit R.; Gould, Timothy; AlSharari, Shakir D.; Thakur, Ganesh A.; Damaj, M. Imad

    2014-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of neurological disorders including chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Since α7 can function as a ligand-gated ion channel, drug development initially focused on ligands that were selective activators of the α7 ion channel. However, the best α7 drugs for chronic pain and inflammation indications may not be ion channel activators but rather “silent agonists”, which bind to the receptor but preferentially induce non-conducting states that modulate signal transduction in non-neuronal cells. One such compound is NS6740. We show that NS6740 selectively induces prolonged desensitization of α7 nAChRs. There are two forms of α7 desensitization that can be distinguished by their sensitivity to the positive allosteric modulators (PAMs). At high concentrations, NS6740 preferentially induces PAM-insensitive desensitization, which over the course of several minutes reverts to the sensitive form. NS6740 was tested in several pain models after in vivo administration in the mouse. Although it had no effects in acute thermal pain, NS6740 induced significant dose- and time-dependent antinociceptive activity in formalin- and acetic acid-induced nociceptive behaviors as well as in the chronic constrictive nerve injury (CCI) model for neuropathic pain. The antinociceptive activity of NS6740 in these models was α7-dependent. In addition, NS6740 administration reversed pain-induced aversion, an important affective component of pain. The time and concentration dependence of the effects were consistent with NS6740 induction of PAM-insensitive non-conducting states, suggesting that signal transduction required for analgesia is accomplished by α7 receptors in that conformation. PMID:25497451

  7. Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) autoantibodies suppress the MuSK pathway and ACh receptor retention at the mouse neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Morsch, Marco; Reddel, Stephen W; Liang, Simon X; Phillips, William D

    2014-01-01

    Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) autoantibodies from myasthenia gravis patients can block the activation of MuSK in vitro and/or reduce the postsynaptic localization of MuSK. Here we use a mouse model to examine the effects of MuSK autoantibodies upon some key components of the postsynaptic MuSK pathway and upon the regulation of junctional ACh receptor (AChR) numbers. Mice became weak after 14 daily injections of anti-MuSK-positive patient IgG. The intensity and area of AChR staining at the motor endplate was markedly reduced. Pulse-labelling of AChRs revealed an accelerated loss of pre-existing AChRs from postsynaptic AChR clusters without a compensatory increase in incorporation of (newly synthesized) replacement AChRs. Large, postsynaptic AChR clusters were replaced by a constellation of tiny AChR microaggregates. Puncta of AChR staining also appeared in the cytoplasm beneath the endplate. Endplate staining for MuSK, activated Src, rapsyn and AChR were all reduced in intensity. In the tibialis anterior muscle there was also evidence that phosphorylation of the AChR β-subunit-Y390 was reduced at endplates. In contrast, endplate staining for β-dystroglycan (through which rapsyn couples AChR to the synaptic basement membrane) remained intense. The results suggest that anti-MuSK IgG suppresses the endplate density of MuSK, thereby down-regulating MuSK signalling activity and the retention of junctional AChRs locally within the postsynaptic membrane scaffold. PMID:24860174

  8. Effects of a7nAChR agonist on the tissue estrogen receptor expression of castrated rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Feng; Gong, Fan; Lv, Jinhan; Gao, Jun; Ma, Jingzu

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one common disease in postmenopausal women due to depressed estrogen level. It has been known that inflammatory factors are involved in osteoporosis pathogenesis. One regulator of inflammatory cascade reaction, a7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR), therefore, may exert certain role in osteoporosis. This study thus investigated this question on an osteoporosis rat model after castration. Rats were firstly castrated to induce osteoporosis, and then received a7nAChR agonist (PNU-282987), diethylstilbestrol or saline via intraperitoneal injection. After 6 or 12 weeks, bone samples were collected for counting osteoblast number, bone density and estrogen receptor (ERα and ERβ) expression, in addition to the serum laboratory of inflammatory factors. Bone density, osteoclast number, ERα and ERβ expression level were significantly depressed in model group, and were remarkable potentiated in the drug treatment group (P<0.05). The levels of BGP and PTH in drug treatment group were decreased compared to diethylstilbestrol group, while E2 and IGF-1 showed up-regulation. Agonist of a7nAChR can up-regulate estrogen receptor expression and may prevent the occurrence and development of osteoporosis. PMID:26722551

  9. The linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA increases membrane surface localization of the α7 ACh receptor in a protein 4.1N-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Ayako; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2013-03-01

    In yeast two-hybrid screening, protein 4.1N, a scaffolding protein, was identified as a binding partner of the α7 ACh (acetylcholine) receptor. For rat hippocampal slices, the linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA {8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid} increased the association of the α7 ACh receptor with 4.1N, and the effect was inhibited by GF109203X, an inhibitor of PKC (protein kinase C), although DCP-LA did not induce PKC phosphorylation of 4.1N. For PC-12 cells, the presence of the α7 ACh receptor in the plasma membrane fraction was significantly suppressed by knocking down 4.1N. DCP-LA increased the presence of the α7 ACh receptor in the plasma membrane fraction, and the effect was still inhibited by knocking down 4.1N. In the monitoring of α7 ACh receptor mobilization, DCP-LA enhanced signal intensities for the α7 ACh receptor at the membrane surface in PC-12 cells, which was clearly prevented by knocking down 4.1N. Taken together, the results of the present study show that 4.1N interacts with the α7 ACh receptor and participates in the receptor tethering to the plasma membrane. The results also indicate that DCP-LA increases membrane surface localization of the α7 ACh receptor in a 4.1N-dependent manner under the control of PKC, but without phosphorylating 4.1N.

  10. The dual-acting H3 receptor antagonist and AChE inhibitor UW-MD-71 dose-dependently enhances memory retrieval and reverses dizocilpine-induced memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nadia; Saad, Ali; Nurulain, Syed M; Darras, Fouad H; Decker, Michael; Sadek, Bassem

    2016-01-15

    Both the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) and acetylcholine esterase (AChE) are involved in the regulation of release and metabolism of acetylcholine and several other central neurotransmitters. Therefore, dual-active H3R antagonists and AChE inhibitors (AChEIs) have shown in several studies to hold promise to treat cognitive disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). The novel dual-acting H3R antagonist and AChEI 7-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)-1,2,3,9-tetrahydropyrrolo[2,1-b]quinazoline (UW-MD-71) with excellent selectivity profiles over both the three other HRs as well as the AChE's isoenzyme butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) shows high and balanced in vitro affinities at both H3R and AChE with IC50 of 33.9nM and hH3R antagonism with Ki of 76.2nM, respectively. In the present study, the effects of UW-MD-71 (1.25-5mg/kg, i.p.) on acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval in a one-trial inhibitory avoidance task in male rats were investigated applying donepezil (DOZ) and pitolisant (PIT) as reference drugs. Furthermore, the effects of UW-MD-71 on memory deficits induced by the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist dizocilpine (DIZ) were tested. Our results indicate that administration of UW-MD-71 before the test session dose-dependently increased performance and enhanced procognitive effect on retrieval. However neither pre- nor post-training acute systemic administration of UW-MD-71 facilitated acquisition or consolidation. More importantly, UW-MD-71 (2.5mg/kg, i.p.) ameliorated the DIZ-induced amnesic effects. Furthermore, the procognitive activity of UW-MD-71 in retrieval was completely reversed and partly abrogated in DIZ-induced amnesia when rats were pretreated with the centrally-acting H2R antagonist zolantidine (ZOL), but not with the CNS penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR). These results demonstrate the procognitive effects of UW-MD-71 in two in vivo memory models, and are to our knowledge the first demonstration in vivo that a potent dual

  11. Association between Anti-Ganglionic Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (gAChR) Antibodies and HLA-DRB1 Alleles in the Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Yasuhiro; Migita, Kiyoshi; Higuchi, Osamu; Mukaino, Akihiro; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Komori, Atsumasa; Nakamura, Minoru; Hashimoto, Satoru; Nagaoka, Shinya; Abiru, Seigo; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Hidenori; Kawakami, Atsushi; Yasunami, Michio; Nakane, Shunya

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Anti-ganglionic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (gAChR) antibodies are observed in autoimmune diseases, as well as in patients with autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy. However, the genetic background of anti-gAChR antibodies is unclear. Here, we investigated HLA alleles in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) patients with or without anti-gAChR antibodies. Methodology/Principal Findings Genomic DNA from 260 patients with type-1 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) were genotyped for HLA-A, B, DRB1, and DQB1 loci. Anti-gAChR antibodies in the sera form AIH patients were measured using the luciferase immunoprecipitation system, and examined allelic association in patients with or without anti-gAChR antibodies. Methodology/ Methods We detected anti-α3 or -β4 gAChR antibodies in 11.5% (30/260) of patients with AIH. Among AIH patients there was no significant association between HLA-A, B DQB1 alleles and the positivity for anti-gAChR antibodies. Whereas the HLA-DRB1*0403 allele showed a significantly increased frequency in AIH patients with anti-gAChR antibodies compared with those without anti-gAChR antibodies. Conclusions/Significance The frequency of the HLA-DRB1*0403 allele differed among Japanese patients with AIH according to the presence or absence of anti-gAChR antibodies. Our findings suggest that particular HLA class II molecules might control the development of anti-gAChR antibodies in the autoimmune response to gAChR. PMID:26807576

  12. A mutational analysis of the acetylcholine receptor channel transmitter binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Akk, G; Zhou, M; Auerbach, A

    1999-01-01

    Mutagenesis and single-channel kinetic analysis were used to investigate the roles of four acetylcholine receptor channel (AChR) residues that are candidates for interacting directly with the agonist. The EC50 of the ACh dose-response curve was increased following alpha-subunit mutations Y93F and Y198F and epsilon-subunit mutations D175N and E184Q. Single-channel kinetic modeling indicates that the increase was caused mainly by a reduced gating equilibrium constant (Theta) in alphaY198F and epsilonD175N, by an increase in the equilibrium dissociation constant for ACh (KD) and a reduction in Theta in alphaY93F, and only by a reduction in KD in epsilonE184Q. This mutation altered the affinity of only one of the two binding sites and was the only mutation that reduced competition by extracellular K+. Additional mutations of epsilonE184 showed that K+ competition was unaltered in epsilonE184D and was virtually eliminated in epsilonE184K, but that neither of these mutations altered the intrinsic affinity for ACh. Thus there is an apparent electrostatic interaction between the epsilonE184 side chain and K+ ( approximately 1.7kBT), but not ACh+. The results are discussed in terms of multisite and induced-fit models of ligand binding to the AChR. PMID:9876135

  13. The Revolution in Migraine Genetics: From Aching Channels Disorders to a Next-Generation Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pellacani, Simona; Sicca, Federico; Di Lorenzo, Cherubino; Grieco, Gaetano S; Valvo, Giulia; Cereda, Cristina; Rubegni, Anna; Santorelli, Filippo M

    2016-01-01

    Channelopathies are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders resulting from dysfunction of ion channels located in cell membranes and organelles. The clinical scenario is broad and symptoms such as generalized epilepsy (with or without fever), migraine (with or without aura), episodic ataxia and periodic muscle paralysis are some of the best known consequences of gain- or loss-of-function mutations in ion channels. We review the main clinical effects of ion channel mutations associated with a significant impact on migraine headache. Given the increasing and evolving use of genetic analysis in migraine research-greater emphasis is now placed on genetic markers of dysfunctional biological systems-we also show how novel information in rare monogenic forms of migraine might help to clarify the disease mechanisms in the general population of migraineurs. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and more accurate and precise phenotyping strategies are expected to further increase understanding of migraine pathophysiology and genetics. PMID:27378853

  14. The Revolution in Migraine Genetics: From Aching Channels Disorders to a Next-Generation Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pellacani, Simona; Sicca, Federico; Di Lorenzo, Cherubino; Grieco, Gaetano S.; Valvo, Giulia; Cereda, Cristina; Rubegni, Anna; Santorelli, Filippo M.

    2016-01-01

    Channelopathies are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders resulting from dysfunction of ion channels located in cell membranes and organelles. The clinical scenario is broad and symptoms such as generalized epilepsy (with or without fever), migraine (with or without aura), episodic ataxia and periodic muscle paralysis are some of the best known consequences of gain- or loss-of-function mutations in ion channels. We review the main clinical effects of ion channel mutations associated with a significant impact on migraine headache. Given the increasing and evolving use of genetic analysis in migraine research—greater emphasis is now placed on genetic markers of dysfunctional biological systems—we also show how novel information in rare monogenic forms of migraine might help to clarify the disease mechanisms in the general population of migraineurs. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and more accurate and precise phenotyping strategies are expected to further increase understanding of migraine pathophysiology and genetics. PMID:27378853

  15. Vector-averaged gravity does not alter acetylcholine receptor single channel properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitstetter, R.; Gruener, R.

    1994-01-01

    To examine the physiological sensitivity of membrane receptors to altered gravity, we examined the single channel properties of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), in co-cultures of Xenopus myocytes and neurons, to vector-averaged gravity in the clinostat. This experimental paradigm produces an environment in which, from the cell's perspective, the gravitational vector is "nulled" by continuous averaging. In that respect, the clinostat simulates one aspect of space microgravity where the gravity force is greatly reduced. After clinorotation, the AChR channel mean open-time and conductance were statistically not different from control values but showed a rotation-dependent trend that suggests a process of cellular adaptation to clinorotation. These findings therefore suggest that the ACHR channel function may not be affected in the microgravity of space despite changes in the receptor's cellular organization.

  16. The impact of adenosine and an A2A adenosine receptor agonist on the ACh-induced increase in intracellular calcium of the glomus cells of the cat carotid body.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Robert S; Shirahata, Machiko; Chang, Irene

    2009-12-01

    The carotid body (CB) is a polymodal chemosensor of arterial blood located next to the internal carotid artery. The basic chemosensing unit is composed of the neurotransmitter (NT)-containing glomus cells (GCs) and the sensory afferent fibers synapsing onto the GCs. Nicotinic and muscarinic receptors have been found on both the sensory afferent fibers and on the GCs. Neural output from the CB (CBNO) increases when arterial blood perfusing it is hypoxic, hypoglycemic, hypercapnic, or acidic. The increased CBNO due to GC release of excitatory NTs must be preceded by an entrance of calcium into the GCs. With repeated release of ACh from the GCs, cholinergic receptors could become desensitized, particularly nicotinic receptors which function as calcium channels. The purpose of the present study was to see if adenosine (ADO), known to alter receptor sensitivities, could attenuate or eliminate any desensitization of the nicotinic receptors occurring during the repeated application of ACh. Cat CBs were harvested with techniques approved by the University's Animal Care/Use Committee. The GCs were cultured and prepared for detecting [Ca(++)](i) with standard techniques. Repeated application of ACh produced a progressively decreasing increase in [Ca(++)](i). With the use of ADO or an A2(A) ADO receptor agonist the decrease was avoided. Though ADO also increased GC [Ca(++)](i), the sum of ADO increase and ACh increase, when superfused separately, was less than the increase when they were both included in the same superfusion. This suggested the possible involvement of a new path in the action. Potential mechanisms to explain the phenomena are discussed. PMID:19761761

  17. Biochemical and functional properties of distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the superior cervical ganglion of mice with targeted deletions of nAChR subunit genes.

    PubMed

    David, Reinhard; Ciuraszkiewicz, Anna; Simeone, Xenia; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Papke, Roger L; McIntosh, J M; Huck, Sigismund; Scholze, Petra

    2010-03-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast synaptic transmission in ganglia of the autonomic nervous system. Here, we determined the subunit composition of hetero-pentameric nAChRs in the mouse superior cervical ganglion (SCG), the function of distinct receptors (obtained by deletions of nAChR subunit genes) and mechanisms at the level of nAChRs that might compensate for the loss of subunits. As shown by immunoprecipitation and Western blots, wild-type (WT) mice expressed: alpha 3 beta 4 (55%), alpha 3 beta 4 alpha 5 (24%) and alpha 3 beta 4 beta 2 (21%) nAChRs. nAChRs in beta 4 knockout (KO) mice were reduced to < 15% of controls and no longer contained the alpha 5 subunit. Compound action potentials, recorded from the postganglionic (internal carotid) nerve and induced by preganglionic nerve stimulation, did not differ between alpha 5 beta 4 KO and WT mice, suggesting that the reduced number of receptors in the KO mice did not impair transganglionic transmission. Deletions of alpha 5 or beta2 did not affect the overall number of receptors and we found no evidence that the two subunits substitute for each other. In addition, dual KOs allowed us to study the functional properties of distinct alpha 3 beta4 and alpha 3 beta 2 receptors that have previously only been investigated in heterologous expression systems. The two receptors strikingly differed in the decay of macroscopic currents, the efficacy of cytisine, and their responses to the alpha-conotoxins AuIB and MII. Our data, based on biochemical and functional experiments and several mouse KO models, clarify and significantly extend previous observations on the function of nAChRs in heterologous systems and the SCG. PMID:20377613

  18. Calcium Channel Signaling Complexes with Receptors and Channels.

    PubMed

    Zamponi, Gerald W

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are not only mediators of cell signalling events, but also are recipients of signalling inputs from G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and their associated second messenger pathways. The coupling of GPCRs to calcium channels is optimized through the formation of receptor-channel complexes. In addition, this provides a mechanism for receptorchannel co-trafficking to and from the plasma membrane. On the other hand, voltage-gated calcium channel activity affects other types of ion channels such as voltage-and calcium-activated potassium channels. Coupling efficiency between these two families of channels is also enhanced through the formation of channel-channel complexes. This review provides a concise overview of the current state of knowledge on the physical interactions between voltage-gated calcium channels and members of the GPCR family, and with other types of ion channels.

  19. The dual-acting AChE inhibitor and H3 receptor antagonist UW-MD-72 reverses amnesia induced by scopolamine or dizocilpine in passive avoidance paradigm in rats.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Khan, Nadia; Darras, Fouad H; Pockes, Steffen; Decker, Michael

    2016-10-15

    Both the acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) are involved in the metabolism and modulation of acetylcholine release and numerous other centrally acting neurotransmitters. Hence, dual-active AChE inhibitors (AChEIs) and H3R antagonists hold potential to treat cognitive disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). The novel dual-acting AChEI and H3R antagonist 7-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)-2,3-dihydropyrrolo[2,1-b]quinazolin-9(1H)-one (UW-MD-72) shows excellent selectivity profiles over the AChE's isoenzyme butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) as well as high and balanced in-vitro affinities at both AChE and hH3R with IC50 of 5.4μM on hAChE and hH3R antagonism with Ki of 2.54μM, respectively. In the current study, the effects of UW-MD-72 (1.25, 2.5, and 5mg/kg, i.p.) on memory deficits induced by the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist scopolamine (SCO) and the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist dizocilpine (DIZ) were investigated in a step-through type passive avoidance paradigm in adult male rats applying donepezil (DOZ) and pitolisant (PIT) as reference drugs. The results observed show that SCO (2mg/kg, i.p.) and DIZ (0.1mg/kg, i.p.) significantly impaired learning and memory in rats. However, acute systemic administration of UW-MD-72 significantly ameliorated the SCO- and DIZ-induced amnesic effects. Furthermore, the ameliorating activity of UW-MD-72 (1.25mg/kg, i.p.) in DIZ-induced amnesia was partly reversed when rats were pretreated with the centrally-acting H2R antagonist zolantidine (ZOL, 10mg/kg, i.p.), but not with the CNS penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR, 10mg/kg, i.p.). Moreover, ameliorative effect of UW-MD-72 (1.25mg/kg, i.p.) in DIZ-induced amnesia was strongly reversed when rats were pretreated with a combination of ZOL (10mg/kg, i.p.) and SCO (1.0mg/kg, i.p.), indicating that these memory enhancing effects were, in addition to other neural circuits, observed through histaminergic H2R as well as

  20. Chronic ethanol (EtOH) feeding increases muscarinic receptor (mAChR) density in esophagus without parallel change in dose response (D-R) to cholinergic agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarzian, A.; Gordon, J.H.; Urban, G.; Fields, J.Z. VA Hospital, Hines, IL )

    1991-03-11

    The mAChR/effector pathway for signal transduction is important in the physiology of esophagus and mAChR alterations are involved in EtOH induced changes in several organs. To see if EtOH-induced increases in lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) are due to upregulation of mAChR, the authors evaluated mAChR binding and D-R curves for bethanechol (IV) induced increases in LESP, and compared these values to changes in LESP after acute and chronic EtOH. EtOH was given to cats acutely or chronically. The number of mAChR sites (Bmax) in esophagus was lowered by acute EtOH, withdrawal from chronic EtOH raised Bmax. Acute injection of EtOH to cats in withdrawal reversed this increase in mAChR density. These changes correlated with the earlier data on EtOH-induced changes in LESP. In contrast, the D-R curve for bethanechol shifted to the right. Thus, the withdrawal-associated increase in Bmax is more likely to be a compensatory response to deficits distal to the receptor recognition site than to proximal deficits and doesn't cause LESP hyperactivity. Also, receptor binding changes do not necessarily translate into physiological changes.

  1. Spontaneous opening of the acetylcholine receptor channel in developing muscle cells from normal and dystrophic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Obregon, A.; Lansman, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    Single-channel activity was recorded from cell-attached patches on skeletal muscle cells isolated from wild-type mice and from mice carrying the dy or mdx mutations. Spontaneous openings of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channel (nAChR) were detected in virtually all recordings from either 4v/dy or dyl + myotubes. but only infrequently from wild-type or mdx myotubes. Spontaneous openings were also present in most recordings from undifferentiated myoblasts from all of the mouse strains studied. The biophysical properties of the spontaneous activity were similar to those of the embryonic form of the nAChR in the presence of acetylcholine (ACh). Examination of the single-channel currents evoked by low concentrations of ACh showed a reduced sensitivity to the agonist in the dystrophic dy and mdx myotubes. but not in wild- type myotubes. The results suggest that alterations in nAChR function are associated with the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy in the dy mouse.

  2. Neuroprotective effect of cellular prion protein (PrPC) is related with activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR)-mediated autophagy flux.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Park, Sang-Youel

    2015-09-22

    Activation of the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR) is regulated by prion protein (PrPC) expression and has a neuroprotective effect by modulating autophagic flux. In this study, we hypothesized that PrPC may regulate α7nAchR activation and that may prevent prion-related neurodegenerative diseases by regulating autophagic flux. PrP(106-126) treatment decreased α7nAchR expression and activation of autophagic flux. In addition, the α7nAchR activator PNU-282987 enhanced autophagic flux and protected neuron cells against PrP(106-126)-induced apoptosis. However, activation of autophagy and the protective effects of PNU-282987 were inhibited in PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells. In addition, PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells showed decreased α7nAchR expression levels. Adenoviral overexpression of PrPC in PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells resulted in activation of autophagic flux and inhibition of prion peptide-mediated cell death via α7nAchR activation. This is the first report demonstrating that activation of α7nAchR-mediated autophagic flux is regulated by PrPC, and that activation of α7nAchR regulated by PrPC expression may play a pivotal role in protection of neuron cells against prion peptide-induced neuron cell death by autophagy. These results suggest that α7nAchR-mediated autophagic flux may be involved in the pathogenesis of prion-related diseases and may be a therapeutic target for prion-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Neuroprotective effect of cellular prion protein (PrPC) is related with activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR)-mediated autophagy flux.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Park, Sang-Youel

    2015-09-22

    Activation of the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR) is regulated by prion protein (PrPC) expression and has a neuroprotective effect by modulating autophagic flux. In this study, we hypothesized that PrPC may regulate α7nAchR activation and that may prevent prion-related neurodegenerative diseases by regulating autophagic flux. PrP(106-126) treatment decreased α7nAchR expression and activation of autophagic flux. In addition, the α7nAchR activator PNU-282987 enhanced autophagic flux and protected neuron cells against PrP(106-126)-induced apoptosis. However, activation of autophagy and the protective effects of PNU-282987 were inhibited in PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells. In addition, PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells showed decreased α7nAchR expression levels. Adenoviral overexpression of PrPC in PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells resulted in activation of autophagic flux and inhibition of prion peptide-mediated cell death via α7nAchR activation. This is the first report demonstrating that activation of α7nAchR-mediated autophagic flux is regulated by PrPC, and that activation of α7nAchR regulated by PrPC expression may play a pivotal role in protection of neuron cells against prion peptide-induced neuron cell death by autophagy. These results suggest that α7nAchR-mediated autophagic flux may be involved in the pathogenesis of prion-related diseases and may be a therapeutic target for prion-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26295309

  4. Pyridostigmine but not 3,4-diaminopyridine exacerbates ACh receptor loss and myasthenia induced in mice by muscle-specific kinase autoantibody

    PubMed Central

    Morsch, Marco; Reddel, Stephen W; Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Toyka, Klaus V; Phillips, William D

    2013-01-01

    In myasthenia gravis, the neuromuscular junction is impaired by the antibody-mediated loss of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). Muscle weakness can be improved upon treatment with pyridostigmine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, or with 3,4-diaminopyridine, which increases the release of ACh quanta. The clinical efficacy of pyridostigmine is in doubt for certain forms of myasthenia. Here we formally examined the effects of these compounds in the antibody-induced mouse model of anti-muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis. Mice received 14 daily injections of IgG from patients with anti-MuSK myasthenia gravis. This caused reductions in postsynaptic AChR densities and in endplate potential amplitudes. Systemic delivery of pyridostigmine at therapeutically relevant levels from days 7 to 14 exacerbated the anti-MuSK-induced structural alterations and functional impairment at motor endplates in the diaphragm muscle. No such effect of pyridostigmine was found in mice receiving control human IgG. Mice receiving smaller amounts of MuSK autoantibodies did not display overt weakness, but 9 days of pyridostigmine treatment precipitated generalised muscle weakness. In contrast, one week of treatment with 3,4-diaminopyridine enhanced neuromuscular transmission in the diaphragm muscle. Both pyridostigmine and 3,4-diaminopyridine increase ACh in the synaptic cleft yet only pyridostigmine potentiated the anti-MuSK-induced decline in endplate ACh receptor density. These results thus suggest that ongoing pyridostigmine treatment potentiates anti-MuSK-induced AChR loss by prolonging the activity of ACh in the synaptic cleft. PMID:23440963

  5. Real Time Ligand-Induced Motion Mappings of AChBP and nAChR Using X-ray Single Molecule Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Yasuhito; Nishino, Yuri; Kobayashi, Suzuko; Shimoyama, Yoshiko; Cai, Weiyan; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Ohta, Noboru; Yagi, Naoto; Miyazawa, Atsuo; Kubo, Tai; Sasaki, Yuji C.

    2014-01-01

    We observed the dynamic three-dimensional (3D) single molecule behaviour of acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) using a single molecule tracking technique, diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT) with atomic scale and 100 μs time resolution. We found that the combined tilting and twisting motions of the proteins were enhanced upon acetylcholine (ACh) binding. We present the internal motion maps of AChBP and nAChR in the presence of either ACh or α-bungarotoxin (αBtx), with views from two rotational axes. Our findings indicate that specific motion patterns represented as biaxial angular motion maps are associated with channel function in real time and on an atomic scale. PMID:25223459

  6. Endogenous ion channel complexes: the NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Frank, René A W

    2011-06-01

    Ionotropic receptors, including the NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor) mediate fast neurotransmission, neurodevelopment, neuronal excitability and learning. In the present article, the structure and function of the NMDAR is reviewed with the aim to condense our current understanding and highlight frontiers where important questions regarding the biology of this receptor remain unanswered. In the second part of the present review, new biochemical and genetic approaches for the investigation of ion channel receptor complexes will be discussed.

  7. α4β2 nicotinic receptors play a role in the nAChR-mediated decline in L-dopa-induced dyskinesias in parkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    Quik, Maryka; Campos, Carla; Bordia, Tanuja; Strachan, Jon-Paul; Zhang, Jenny; McIntosh, J. Michael; Letchworth, Sharon; Jordan, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    L-dopa-induced dyskinesias are a serious long-term side effect of dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson’s disease for which there are few treatment options. Our previous studies showed that nicotine decreased L-dopa-induced abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs). Subsequent work with knockout mice demonstrated that α6β2* nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) play a key role. The present experiments were done to determine if α4β2* nAChRs are also involved in L-dopa-induced dyskinesias. To approach this, we took advantage of the finding that α6β2* nAChRs are predominantly present on striatal dopaminergic nerve terminals, while a significant population of α4β2* nAChRs are located on other neurons. Thus, a severe dopaminergic lesion would cause a major loss in α6β2*, but not α4β2* nAChRs. Experiments were therefore done in which rats were unilaterally lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine, at a dose that lead to severe nigrostriatal damage. The dopamine transporter, a dopamine nerve terminal marker, was decreased by >99%. This lesion also decreased striatal α6β2* nAChRs by 97%, while α4β2* nAChRs were reduced by only 12% compared to control. A series of β2* nAChR compounds, including TC-2696, TI-10165, TC-8831, TC-10600 and sazetidine reduced L-dopa-induced AIMs in these rats by 23–32%. TC-2696, TI-10165, TC-8831 were also tested for parkinsonism, with no effect on this behavior. Tolerance did not develop with up to 3 months of treatment. Since α4a5β2 nAChRs are also predominantly on striatal dopamine terminals, these data suggest that drugs targeting α4β2 nAChRs may reduce L-dopa-induced dyskinesias in late stage Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23583932

  8. Acetylcholine receptors and sodium channels in denervated and botulinum-toxin-treated adult rat muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Bambrick, L; Gordon, T

    1987-01-01

    1. The number of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors and Na channels was measured in adult rat hind-limb muscles after denervation or injection of botulinum toxin type A (BoTX), using specific binding of radiolabelled neurotoxins. 2. Denervation by sciatic nerve section increased the number of [125I]iodo-alpha-bungarotoxin ([125I]BTX) binding sites from low, unmeasurable levels to 39 +/- 3 fmol of toxin bound per milligram muscle protein at 21 days. 3. Subcutaneous injection of BoTX produced complete neuromuscular blockade for 11-14 days over which time the number of [125I]BTX binding sites increased with the same time course and to the same extent as following denervation. 4. Neither denervation nor BoTX treatment significantly altered the number of tritiated saxitoxin ([3H]STX) binding sites from normal values of 7.8 fmol/mg muscle weight or 57 +/- 3 fmol/mg homogenate protein. This may, however, correspond to a lower density of [3H]STX sites in the muscle membrane. 5. It was concluded that neuromuscular blockade with BoTX is equivalent to denervation in its effects on synthesis of ACh receptors. Numbers of Na channels are more stable than ACh receptors but may also be modulated by neuromuscular activity. PMID:2442368

  9. Transient Receptor Potential Channels in the Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Earley, Scott; Brayden, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian genome encodes 28 distinct members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily of cation channels, which exhibit varying degrees of selectivity for different ionic species. Multiple TRP channels are present in all cells and are involved in diverse aspects of cellular function, including sensory perception and signal transduction. Notably, TRP channels are involved in regulating vascular function and pathophysiology, the focus of this review. TRP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells participate in regulating contractility and proliferation, whereas endothelial TRP channel activity is an important contributor to endothelium-dependent vasodilation, vascular wall permeability, and angiogenesis. TRP channels are also present in perivascular sensory neurons and astrocytic endfeet proximal to cerebral arterioles, where they participate in the regulation of vascular tone. Almost all of these functions are mediated by changes in global intracellular Ca2+ levels or subcellular Ca2+ signaling events. In addition to directly mediating Ca2+ entry, TRP channels influence intracellular Ca2+ dynamics through membrane depolarization associated with the influx of cations or through receptor- or store-operated mechanisms. Dysregulation of TRP channels is associated with vascular-related pathologies, including hypertension, neointimal injury, ischemia-reperfusion injury, pulmonary edema, and neurogenic inflammation. In this review, we briefly consider general aspects of TRP channel biology and provide an in-depth discussion of the functions of TRP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and perivascular cells under normal and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:25834234

  10. The intrinsic energy of the gating isomerization of a neuromuscular acetylcholine receptor channel.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Tapan K; Purohit, Prasad G; Auerbach, Anthony

    2012-05-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) channels at neuromuscular synapses rarely open in the absence of agonists, but many different mutations increase the unliganded gating equilibrium constant (E0) to generate AChRs that are active constitutively. We measured E0 for two different sets of mutant combinations and by extrapolation estimated E0 for wild-type AChRs. The estimates were 7.6 and 7.8×10(-7) in adult-type mouse AChRs (-100 mV at 23°C). The values are in excellent agreement with one obtained previously by using a completely different method (6.5×10(-7), from monoliganded gating). E0 decreases with depolarization to the same extent as does the diliganded gating equilibrium constant, e-fold with ∼60 mV. We estimate that at -100 mV the intrinsic energy of the unliganded gating isomerization is +8.4 kcal/mol (35 kJ/mol), and that in the absence of a membrane potential, the intrinsic chemical energy of this global conformational change is +9.4 kcal/mol (39 kJ/mol). Na+ and K+ in the extracellular solution have no measureable effect on E0, which suggests that unliganded gating occurs with only water occupying the transmitter binding sites. The results are discussed with regard to the energy changes in receptor activation and the competitive antagonism of ions in agonist binding.

  11. Activation of the alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR) reverses referred mechanical hyperalgesia induced by colonic inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Costa, Robson; Motta, Emerson M; Manjavachi, Marianne N; Cola, Maíra; Calixto, João B

    2012-10-01

    In the current study, we investigated the effect of the activation of the alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR) on dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis and referred mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. Colitis was induced in CD1 male mice through the intake of 4% DSS in tap water for 7 days. Control mice received unadulterated water. Referred mechanical hyperalgesia was evaluated for 7 days after the beginning of 4% DSS intake. Referred mechanical hyperalgesia started within 1 day after beginning DSS drinking, peaked at 3 days and persisted for 7 days. This time course profile perfectly matched with the appearance of signs of colitis. Both acute and chronic oral treatments with nicotine (0.1-1.0 mg/kg, p.o.) were effective in inhibiting the established referred mechanical hyperalgesia. The antinociceptive effect of nicotine was completely abrogated by cotreatment with the selective α7 nAchR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) (1.0 mg/kg). Consistent with these results, i.p. treatment with the selective α7 nAchR agonist PNU 282987 (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) reduced referred mechanical hyperalgesia at all periods of evaluation. Despite their antinociceptive effects, nicotinic agonists did not affect DSS-induced colonic damage or inflammation. Taken together, the data generated in the present study show the potential relevance of using α7 nAchR agonists to treat referred pain and discomfort associated with inflammatory bowel diseases.

  12. α7nAchR/NMDAR coupling affects NMDAR function and object recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Shupeng; Nai, Qiang; Lipina, Tatiana V; Roder, John C; Liu, Fang

    2013-12-20

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAchR) and NMDA glutamate receptor (NMDAR) are both ligand-gated ion channels permeable to Ca2+ and Na+. Previous studies have demonstrated functional modulation of NMDARs by nAchRs, although the molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. We have previously reported that α7nAchR forms a protein complex with the NMDAR through a protein-protein interaction. We also developed an interfering peptide that is able to disrupt the α7nAchR-NMDAR complex and blocks cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking in rat models of relapse. In the present study, we investigated whether the α7nAchR-NMDAR interaction is responsible for the functional modulation of NMDAR by α7nAchR using both electrophysiological and behavioral tests. We have found that activation of α7nAchR upregulates NMDAR-mediated whole cell currents and LTP of mEPSC in cultured hippocampal neurons, which can be abolished by the interfering peptide that disrupts the α7nAchR-NMDAR interaction. Moreover, administration of the interfering peptide in mice impairs novel object recognition but not Morris water maze performance. Our results suggest that α7nAchR/NMDAR coupling may selectively affect some aspects of learning and memory.

  13. Domain-based identification and analysis of glutamate receptor ion channels and their relatives in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ger, Mao-Feng; Rendon, Gloria; Tilson, Jeffrey L; Jakobsson, Eric

    2010-10-06

    Voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channels are used in eukaryotic organisms for the purpose of electrochemical signaling. There are prokaryotic homologues to major eukaryotic channels of these sorts, including voltage-gated sodium, potassium, and calcium channels, Ach-receptor and glutamate-receptor channels. The prokaryotic homologues have been less well characterized functionally than their eukaryotic counterparts. In this study we identify likely prokaryotic functional counterparts of eukaryotic glutamate receptor channels by comprehensive analysis of the prokaryotic sequences in the context of known functional domains present in the eukaryotic members of this family. In particular, we searched the nonredundant protein database for all proteins containing the following motif: the two sections of the extracellular glutamate binding domain flanking two transmembrane helices. We discovered 100 prokaryotic sequences containing this motif, with a wide variety of functional annotations. Two groups within this family have the same topology as eukaryotic glutamate receptor channels. Group 1 has a potassium-like selectivity filter. Group 2 is most closely related to eukaryotic glutamate receptor channels. We present analysis of the functional domain architecture for the group of 100, a putative phylogenetic tree, comparison of the protein phylogeny with the corresponding species phylogeny, consideration of the distribution of these proteins among classes of prokaryotes, and orthologous relationships between prokaryotic and human glutamate receptor channels. We introduce a construct called the Evolutionary Domain Network, which represents a putative pathway of domain rearrangements underlying the domain composition of present channels. We believe that scientists interested in ion channels in general, and ligand-gated ion channels in particular, will be interested in this work. The work should also be of interest to bioinformatics researchers who are interested in the use

  14. Cigarette smoking during pregnancy regulates the expression of specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits in the human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Machaalani, R.; Ghazavi, E.; Hinton, T.; Waters, K.A.; Hennessy, A.

    2014-05-01

    Smoking during pregnancy is associated with low birth weight, premature delivery, and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Nicotine, a major pathogenic compound of cigarette smoke, binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). A total of 16 nAChR subunits have been identified in mammals (9 α, 4 β, and 1 δ, γ and ε subunits). The effect of cigarette smoking on the expression of these subunits in the placenta has not yet been determined, thus constituting the aim of this study. Using RT-qPCR and western blotting, this study investigated all 16 mammalian nAChR subunits in the normal healthy human placenta, and compared mRNA and protein expressions in the placentas from smokers (n = 8) to controls (n = 8). Our data show that all 16 subunit mRNAs are expressed in the normal, non-diseased human placenta and that the expression of α2, α3, α4, α9, β2 and β4 subunits is greater than the other subunits. For mRNA, cigarette smoke exposure was associated with increased expression of the α9 subunit, and decreased expression of the δ subunit. At the protein level, expression of both α9 and δ was increased. Thus, cigarette smoking in pregnancy is sufficient to regulate nAChR subunits in the placenta, specifically α9 and δ subunits, and could contribute to the adverse effects of vasoconstriction and decreased re-epithelialisation (α9), and increased calcification and apoptosis (δ), seen in the placentas of smoking women. - Highlights: • All 16 mammalian nAChR subunits are expressed in the human placenta. • Cigarette smoking increases α9 mRNA and protein in the placenta. • Cigarette smoking decreases δ mRNA but increases δ protein in the placenta.

  15. Functional link between muscarinic receptors and large-conductance Ca2+ -activated K+ channels in freshly isolated human detrusor smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Shankar P; Hristov, Kiril L; Cheng, Qiuping; Malysz, John; Rovner, Eric S; Petkov, Georgi V

    2015-04-01

    Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) constitutes the primary mechanism for enhancing excitability and contractility of human detrusor smooth muscle (DSM). Since the large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (KCa1.1) channels are key regulators of human DSM function, we investigated whether mAChR activation increases human DSM excitability by inhibiting KCa1.1 channels. We used the mAChR agonist, carbachol, to determine the changes in KCa1.1 channel activity upon mAChR activation in freshly isolated human DSM cells obtained from open bladder surgeries using the perforated whole cell and single KCa1.1 channel patch-clamp recordings. Human DSM cells were collected from 29 patients (23 males and 6 females, average age of 65.9 ± 1.5 years). Carbachol inhibited the amplitude and frequency of KCa1.1 channel-mediated spontaneous transient outward currents and spontaneous transient hyperpolarizations, which are triggered by the release of Ca(2+) from ryanodine receptors. Carbachol also caused membrane potential depolarization, which was not observed in the presence of iberiotoxin, a KCa1.1 channel inhibitor, indicating the critical role of the KCa1.1 channels. The potential direct carbachol effects on KCa1.1 channels were examined under conditions of removing the major cellular Ca(2+) sources for KCa1.1 channel activation with pharmacological inhibitors (thapsigargin, ryanodine, and nifedipine). In the presence of these inhibitors, carbachol did not affect the single KCa1.1 channel open probability and mean KCa1.1 channel conductance (cell-attached configuration) or depolarization-induced whole cell steady-state KCa1.1 currents. The data support the concept that mAChR activation triggers indirect functional KCa1.1 channel inhibition mediated by intracellular Ca(2+), thus increasing the excitability in human DSM cells.

  16. Inhibition of ACh release at an Aplysia synapse by neurotoxic phospholipases A2: specific receptors and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed Central

    Fossier, P; Lambeau, G; Lazdunski, M; Baux, G

    1995-01-01

    1. Monochain (OS2) and multichain (taipoxin) neurotoxic phospholipases A2 (PLA2), purified from taipan snake venom, both inhibited ACh release at a concentration of 20 nM (90% inhibition in 2 h) at an identified synapse from buccal ganglion of Aplysia californica. 2. The Na+ current was unchanged upon application of either OS2 or taipoxin. Conversely, presynaptic K+ currents (IA and IK) were increased by taipoxin but not by OS2. In addition, OS2 induced a significant decrease of the presynaptic Ca2+ current (30%) while taipoxin increased this latter current by 20-30%. 3. Bee venom PLA2, another monochain neurotoxic PLA2, also inhibited ACh release while non-toxic enzymatically active PLA2s like OS1 (also purified from taipan snake venom) or porcine pancreatic PLA2 elicited a much weaker inhibition of ACh release, suggesting a specific action of neurotoxic PLA2s versus non-toxic PLA2s on ACh release. 4. Using iodinated OS2, specific high affinity binding sites with molecular masses of 140 and 18 kDa have been identified on Aplysia ganglia. The maximal binding capacities were 55 and 300-400 fmol (mg protein)-1 for membrane preparations from whole and buccal ganglia, respectively. These binding sites are of high affinity for neurotoxic PLA2s (Kd values, 100-800 pM) and of very low affinity for non-toxic PLA2s (Kd values in the micromolar range), thus indicating that these binding sites are presumably involved in the blockade of ACh release by neurotoxic PLA2s. Images Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8583413

  17. Escherichia coli Protein Expression System for Acetylcholine Binding Proteins (AChBPs)

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Nikita; Paul, Blessy; Ragnarsson, Lotten; Lewis, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand gated ion channels, identified as therapeutic targets for a range of human diseases. Drug design for nAChR related disorders is increasingly using structure-based approaches. Many of these structural insights for therapeutic lead development have been obtained from co-crystal structures of nAChR agonists and antagonists with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP). AChBP is a water soluble, structural and functional homolog of the extracellular, ligand-binding domain of nAChRs. Currently, AChBPs are recombinantly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems for structural and biophysical studies. Here, we report the establishment of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system that significantly reduces the cost and time of production compared to the existing expression systems. E. coli can efficiently express unglycosylated AChBP for crystallography and makes the expression of isotopically labelled forms feasible for NMR. We used a pHUE vector containing an N-terminal His-tagged ubiquitin fusion protein to facilitate AChBP expression in the soluble fractions, and thus avoid the need to recover protein from inclusion bodies. The purified protein yield obtained from the E. coli expression system is comparable to that obtained from existing AChBP expression systems. E. coli expressed AChBP bound nAChR agonists and antagonists with affinities matching those previously reported. Thus, the E. coli expression system significantly simplifies the expression and purification of functional AChBP for structural and biophysical studies. PMID:27304486

  18. Enhancing the Reliability of GPCR Models by Accounting for Flexibility of Their Pro-Containing Helices: the Case of the Human mAChR1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Pedretti, Alessandro; Mazzolari, Angelica; Ricci, Chiara; Vistoli, Giulio

    2015-04-01

    To better investigate the GPCR structures, we have recently proposed to explore their flexibility by simulating the bending of their Pro-containing TM helices so generating a set of models (the so-called chimeras) which exhaustively combine the two conformations (bent and straight) of these helices. The primary objective of the study is to investigate whether such an approach can be exploited to enhance the reliability of the GPCR models generated by distant templates. The study was focused on the human mAChR1 receptor for which a presumably reliable model was generated using the congener mAChR3 as the template along with a second less reliable model based on the distant β2-AR template. The second model was then utilized to produce the chimeras by combining the conformations of its Pro-containing helices (i.e., TM4, TM5, TM6 and TM7 with 16 modeled chimeras). The reliability of such chimeras was assessed by virtual screening campaigns as evaluated using a novel skewness metric where they surpassed the predictive power of the more reliable mAChR1 model. Finally, the virtual screening campaigns emphasize the opportunity of synergistically combining the scores of more chimeras using a specially developed tool which generates highly predictive consensus functions by maximizing the corresponding enrichment factors. PMID:27490167

  19. Kinetic evidence that desensitized nAChR may promote transitions of active nAChR to desensitized states during sustained exposure to agonists in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Manthey, Arthur A

    2006-06-01

    During prolonged exposure of postjunctional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) of skeletal muscle to acetylcholine (ACh), agonist-activated nAChR (nAChRa) gradually fall into a refractory "desensitized" state (nAChRd), which no longer supports the high-conductance channel openings characteristic of the initially active nAChRa. In the present study, the possibility was examined that nAChRd, rather than simply constituting a passive "trap" for nAChRa, may actively promote further conversions of nAChRa to nAChRd in a formally autocatalytic manner. Single-ion whole-cell voltage-clamp currents (Na+ and Li+ in separate trials) were measured using two KCl-filled capillary electrodes (5-10 MOmega) implanted at the postjunctional locus of single frog skeletal muscle fibers (Rana pipiens) equilibrated in 30 mM K+ bath media to eliminate mechanical responses. Various nAChR agonists (carbamylcholine, acetylcholine, suberyldicholine) at different concentrations were delivered focally by positive pressure microjet. It was found that the decline of postmaximal agonist-induced currents under these different conditions (driven by the growth of the subpool of nAChRd) consistently followed an autocatalytic logistic rule modified for population growth of fixed units in a planar array: [Formula: see text] (where y represents the remaining agonist-induced current at time t, A=initial maximum current, and n is a constant). Some further experimental features that might result from a self-promoting growth of nAChRd were also tested, namely, (1) the effect of increased nAChRa and (2) the effect of increased nAChRd. Increase in agonist concentration of the superfusate, by increasing the planar density of active nAChRa at the outset, should enhance the probability of autocatalytic interactions with emerging nAChRd, hence, the rate of decline of agonist-induced current, and this was a consistent finding under all conditions tested. Raising the initial level of desensitized nAChRd by

  20. AChE for DNA degradation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Osuna, María; Yuste, Victor J

    2015-06-01

    DNA hydrolysis is a biochemical process often associated with different forms of cell death, including apoptosis. In a recent paper published in Cell Discovery, Du et al. report that synaptic acetylcholinesterase (AChE-S) shows an unexpected enzymatic activity as DNase switched on after cytotoxic insults. PMID:25930710

  1. Acetylcholine Receptor (AChR) Clustering Is Regulated Both by Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β (GSK3β)-dependent Phosphorylation and the Level of CLIP-associated Protein 2 (CLASP2) Mediating the Capture of Microtubule Plus-ends*

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sreya; Sladecek, Stefan; Pemble, Hayley; Wittmann, Torsten; Slotman, Johan A.; van Cappellen, Wiggert; Brenner, Hans-Rudolf; Galjart, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The postsynaptic apparatus of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) traps and anchors acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at high density at the synapse. We have previously shown that microtubule (MT) capture by CLASP2, a MT plus-end-tracking protein (+TIP), increases the size and receptor density of AChR clusters at the NMJ through the delivery of AChRs and that this is regulated by a pathway involving neuronal agrin and several postsynaptic kinases, including GSK3. Phosphorylation by GSK3 has been shown to cause CLASP2 dissociation from MT ends, and nine potential phosphorylation sites for GSK3 have been mapped on CLASP2. How CLASP2 phosphorylation regulates MT capture at the NMJ and how this controls the size of AChR clusters are not yet understood. To examine this, we used myotubes cultured on agrin patches that induce AChR clustering in a two-dimensional manner. We show that expression of a CLASP2 mutant, in which the nine GSK3 target serines are mutated to alanine (CLASP2–9XS/9XA) and are resistant to GSK3β-dependent phosphorylation, promotes MT capture at clusters and increases AChR cluster size, compared with myotubes that express similar levels of wild type CLASP2 or that are noninfected. Conversely, myotubes expressing a phosphomimetic form of CLASP2 (CLASP2–8XS/D) show enrichment of immobile mutant CLASP2 in clusters, but MT capture and AChR cluster size are reduced. Taken together, our data suggest that both GSK3β-dependent phosphorylation and the level of CLASP2 play a role in the maintenance of AChR cluster size through the regulated capture and release of MT plus-ends. PMID:25231989

  2. A neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit (alpha 7) is developmentally regulated and forms a homo-oligomeric channel blocked by alpha-BTX.

    PubMed

    Couturier, S; Bertrand, D; Matter, J M; Hernandez, M C; Bertrand, S; Millar, N; Valera, S; Barkas, T; Ballivet, M

    1990-12-01

    cDNA and genomic clones encoding alpha 7, a novel neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) alpha subunit, were isolated and sequenced. The mature alpha 7 protein (479 residues) has moderate homology with all other alpha and non-alpha nAChR subunits and probably assumes the same transmembrane topology. alpha 7 transcripts transiently accumulate in the developing optic tectum between E5 and E16. They are present in both the deep and the superficial layers of E12 tectum. In Xenopus oocytes, the alpha 7 protein assembles into a homo-oligomeric channel responding to acetylcholine and nicotine. The alpha 7 channel desensitizes very rapidly, rectifies strongly above -20 mV, and is blocked by alpha-bungarotoxin. A bacterial fusion protein encompassing residues 124-239 of alpha 7 binds labeled alpha-bungarotoxin. We conclude that alpha-bungarotoxin binding proteins in the vertebrate nervous system can function as nAChRs.

  3. Lateral diffusion, function, and expression of the slow channel congenital myasthenia syndrome αC418W nicotinic receptor mutation with changes in lipid raft components.

    PubMed

    Oyola-Cintrón, Jessica; Caballero-Rivera, Daniel; Ballester, Leomar; Baéz-Pagán, Carlos A; Martínez, Hernán L; Vélez-Arroyo, Karla P; Quesada, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2015-10-30

    Lipid rafts, specialized membrane microdomains in the plasma membrane rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids, are hot spots for a number of important cellular processes. The novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) mutation αC418W, the first lipid-exposed mutation identified in a patient that causes slow channel congenital myasthenia syndrome was shown to be cholesterol-sensitive and to accumulate in microdomains rich in the membrane raft marker protein caveolin-1. The objective of this study is to gain insight into the mechanism by which lateral segregation into specialized raft membrane microdomains regulates the activable pool of nAChRs. We performed fluorescent recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), quantitative RT-PCR, and whole cell patch clamp recordings of GFP-encoding Mus musculus nAChRs transfected into HEK 293 cells to assess the role of cholesterol and caveolin-1 (CAV-1) in the diffusion, expression, and functionality of the nAChR (WT and αC418W). Our findings support the hypothesis that a cholesterol-sensitive nAChR might reside in specialized membrane microdomains that upon cholesterol depletion become disrupted and release the cholesterol-sensitive nAChRs to the pool of activable receptors. In addition, our results in HEK 293 cells show an interdependence between CAV-1 and αC418W that could confer end plates rich in αC418W nAChRs to a susceptibility to changes in cholesterol levels that could cause adverse drug reactions to cholesterol-lowering drugs such as statins. The current work suggests that the interplay between cholesterol and CAV-1 provides the molecular basis for modulating the function and dynamics of the cholesterol-sensitive αC418W nAChR.

  4. Pathways and Barriers for Ion Translocation through the 5-HT3A Receptor Channel

    PubMed Central

    Di Maio, Danilo; Chandramouli, Balasubramanian; Brancato, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs) are ionotropic receptors that mediate fast intercellular communications at synaptic level and include either cation selective (e.g., nAChR and 5-HT3) or anion selective (e.g., GlyR, GABAA and GluCl) membrane channels. Among others, 5-HT3 is one of the most studied members, since its first cloning back in 1991, and a large number of studies have successfully pinpointed protein residues critical for its activation and channel gating. In addition, 5-HT3 is also the target of a few pharmacological treatments due to the demonstrated benefits of its modulation in clinical trials. Nonetheless, a detailed molecular analysis of important protein features, such as the origin of its ion selectivity and the rather low conductance as compared to other channel homologues, has been unfeasible until the recent crystallization of the mouse 5-HT3A receptor. Here, we present extended molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations of the whole 5-HT3A protein with the aim of better understanding its ion transport properties, such as the pathways for ion permeation into the receptor body and the complex nature of the selectivity filter. Our investigation unravels previously unpredicted structural features of the 5-HT3A receptor, such as the existence of alternative intersubunit pathways for ion translocation at the interface between the extracellular and the transmembrane domains, in addition to the one along the channel main axis. Moreover, our study offers a molecular interpretation of the role played by an arginine triplet located in the intracellular domain on determining the characteristic low conductance of the 5-HT3A receptor, as evidenced in previous experiments. In view of these results, possible implications on other members of the superfamily are suggested. PMID:26465896

  5. Pathways and Barriers for Ion Translocation through the 5-HT3A Receptor Channel.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, Danilo; Chandramouli, Balasubramanian; Brancato, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs) are ionotropic receptors that mediate fast intercellular communications at synaptic level and include either cation selective (e.g., nAChR and 5-HT3) or anion selective (e.g., GlyR, GABAA and GluCl) membrane channels. Among others, 5-HT3 is one of the most studied members, since its first cloning back in 1991, and a large number of studies have successfully pinpointed protein residues critical for its activation and channel gating. In addition, 5-HT3 is also the target of a few pharmacological treatments due to the demonstrated benefits of its modulation in clinical trials. Nonetheless, a detailed molecular analysis of important protein features, such as the origin of its ion selectivity and the rather low conductance as compared to other channel homologues, has been unfeasible until the recent crystallization of the mouse 5-HT3A receptor. Here, we present extended molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations of the whole 5-HT3A protein with the aim of better understanding its ion transport properties, such as the pathways for ion permeation into the receptor body and the complex nature of the selectivity filter. Our investigation unravels previously unpredicted structural features of the 5-HT3A receptor, such as the existence of alternative intersubunit pathways for ion translocation at the interface between the extracellular and the transmembrane domains, in addition to the one along the channel main axis. Moreover, our study offers a molecular interpretation of the role played by an arginine triplet located in the intracellular domain on determining the characteristic low conductance of the 5-HT3A receptor, as evidenced in previous experiments. In view of these results, possible implications on other members of the superfamily are suggested. PMID:26465896

  6. Inositol trisphosphate receptor and ion channel models based on single-channel data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gin, Elan; Wagner, Larry E.; Yule, David I.; Sneyd, James

    2009-09-01

    The inositol trisphosphate receptor (IPR) plays an important role in controlling the dynamics of intracellular Ca2+. Single-channel patch-clamp recordings are a typical way to study these receptors as well as other ion channels. Methods for analyzing and using this type of data have been developed to fit Markov models of the receptor. The usual method of parameter fitting is based on maximum-likelihood techniques. However, Bayesian inference and Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques are becoming more popular. We describe the application of the Bayesian methods to real experimental single-channel data in three ion channels: the ryanodine receptor, the K+ channel, and the IPR. One of the main aims of all three studies was that of model selection with different approaches taken. We also discuss the modeling implications for single-channel data that display different levels of channel activity within one recording.

  7. Crystal structure of a heterotetrameric NMDA receptor ion channel.

    PubMed

    Karakas, Erkan; Furukawa, Hiro

    2014-05-30

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors belong to the family of ionotropic glutamate receptors, which mediate most excitatory synaptic transmission in mammalian brains. Calcium permeation triggered by activation of NMDA receptors is the pivotal event for initiation of neuronal plasticity. Here, we show the crystal structure of the intact heterotetrameric GluN1-GluN2B NMDA receptor ion channel at 4 angstroms. The NMDA receptors are arranged as a dimer of GluN1-GluN2B heterodimers with the twofold symmetry axis running through the entire molecule composed of an amino terminal domain (ATD), a ligand-binding domain (LBD), and a transmembrane domain (TMD). The ATD and LBD are much more highly packed in the NMDA receptors than non-NMDA receptors, which may explain why ATD regulates ion channel activity in NMDA receptors but not in non-NMDA receptors.

  8. Mechanism of muscarinic receptor-induced K+ channel activation as revealed by hydrolysis-resistant GTP analogues

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (Gk) in the coupling between muscarinic receptor activation and opening of an inwardly rectifying K+ channel [IK(M)] was examined in cardiac atrial myocytes, using hydrolysis-resistant GTP analogues. In the absence of muscarinic agonist, GTP analogues produced a membrane current characteristic of IK(M). The initial rate of appearance of this receptor-independent IK(M) was measured for the various analogues in order to explore the kinetic properties of IK(M) activation. We found that IK(M) activation is controlled solely by the intracellular analogue/GTP ratio and not by the absolute concentrations of the nucleotides. Analogues competed with GTP for binding to Gk with the following relative affinities: GTP gamma S greater than GTP greater than GppNHp greater than GppCH2p. At sufficiently high intracellular concentrations, however, all GTP analogues produced the same rate of IK(M) activation. This analogue- independent limiting rate is likely to correspond to the rate of GDP release from inactive, GDP-bound Gk. Muscarinic receptor stimulation by nanomolar concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh), which do not elicit IK(M) under control conditions, catalyzed IK(M) activation in the presence of GTP analogues. The rate of Gk activation by ACh (kACh) was found to be described by the simple relationship kACh = 8.4 X 10(8) min- 1 M-1.[ACh] + 0.44 min-1, the first term of which presumably reflects the agonist-catalyzed rate of GDP release from the Gk.GDP complex, while the second term corresponds to the basal rate of receptor- independent GDP release. Combined with the estimated K0.5 of the IK(M)- [ACh] dose-effect relationship, 160 nM, this result also allowed us to estimate the rate of Gk.GTP hydrolysis, kcat, to be near 135 min-1. These results provide, for the first time, a quantitative description of the salient features of G-protein function in vivo. PMID:2455765

  9. Concomitant alpha7 and beta2 nicotinic AChR subunit deficiency leads to impaired energy homeostasis and increased physical activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Somm, Emmanuel; Guérardel, Audrey; Maouche, Kamel; Toulotte, Audrey; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Maskos, Uwe; Hüppi, Petra S; Schwitzgebel, Valérie M

    2014-05-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are pentameric ligand-gated cation channels well characterized in neuronal signal transmission. Moreover, recent studies have revealed nAChR expression in nonneuronal cell types throughout the body, including tissues involved in metabolism. In the present study, we screen gene expression of nAChR subunits in pancreatic islets and adipose tissues. Mice pancreatic islets present predominant expression of α7 and β2 nAChR subunits but at a lower level than in central structures. Characterization of glucose and energy homeostasis in α7β2nAChR(-/-) mice revealed no major defect in insulin secretion and sensitivity but decreased glycemia apparently unrelated to gluconeogenesis or glycogenolysis. α7β2nAChR(-/-) mice presented an increase in lean and bone body mass and a decrease in fat storage with normal body weight. These observations were associated with elevated spontaneous physical activity in α7β2nAChR(-/-) mice, mainly due to elevation in fine vertical (rearing) activity while their horizontal (ambulatory) activity remained unchanged. In contrast to α7nAChR(-/-) mice presenting glucose intolerance and insulin resistance associated to excessive inflammation of adipose tissue, the present metabolic phenotyping of α7β2nAChR(-/-) mice revealed a metabolic improvement possibly linked to the increase in spontaneous physical activity related to central β2nAChR deficiency.

  10. Nicotine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone induce cyclooxygenase-2 activity in human gastric cancer cells: Involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and {beta}-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Vivian Yvonne; Jin, H.C.; Ng, Enders K.O.; Yu Jun; Leung, W.K.; Cho, C.H.; Sung, J.J.Y.

    2008-12-01

    Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) associates with cigarette smoke exposure in many malignancies. Nicotine and its derivative, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), are the two important components in cigarette smoke that contributes to cancer development. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which nicotine or NNK promotes gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We found that nicotine and NNK significantly enhanced cell proliferation in AGS cells that expressed both alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7 nAChR) and {beta}-adrenergic receptors. Treatment of cells with {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX, {alpha}7nAChR antagonist) or propranolol ({beta}-adrenergic receptor antagonist) blocked NNK-induced COX-2/PGE{sub 2} and cell proliferation, while nicotine-mediated cell growth and COX-2/PGE{sub 2} induction can only be suppressed by propranolol, but not {alpha}-BTX. Moreover, in contrast to the dependence of growth promoting effect of nicotine on Erk activation, inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) repressed NNK-induced COX-2 upregulation and resulted in suppression of cell growth. In addition, nicotine and NNK mediated COX-2 induction via different receptors to modulate several G1/S transition regulatory proteins and promote gastric cancer cell growth. Selective COX-2 inhibitor (SC-236) caused G1 arrest and abrogated nicotine/NNK-induced cell proliferation. Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 and other G1 regulatory proteins are reversed by blockade of COX-2. These results pointed to the importance of adrenergic and nicotinic receptors in gastric tumor growth through MAPK/COX-2 activation, which may perhaps provide a chemoprevention strategy for cigarette smoke-related gastric carcinogenesis.

  11. A combined molecular docking and charge density analysis is a new approach for medicinal research to understand drug-receptor interaction: curcumin-AChE model.

    PubMed

    Renuga Parameswari, A; Rajalakshmi, G; Kumaradhas, P

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a molecular docking analysis has been performed on diketone form of curcumin molecule with acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The calculated lowest docked energy of curcumin molecule in the active site of AChE is -11.21 kcal/mol; this high negative value indicates that the molecule exhibits large binding affinity towards AChE. When the curcumin molecule present in the active site of AChE, subsequently, its conformation has altered significantly and the molecule adopts a U-shape geometry as it is linear in gas phase (before entering into the active site). This conformational transition facilitates curcumin to form strong interaction with Phe330 of acyl-binding pocket and the choline binding site with indole ring of Trp84 and Asp72. The gas phase and the active site analysis of curcumin allows to understand the conformational geometry, nature of molecular flexibility, charge density redistribution and the variation of electrostatic properties of curcumin in the active site. To obtain the gas phase structure, the curcumin molecule was optimized using Hartree-Fock and density functional methods (B3LYP) with the basis set 6-311G(∗∗). A charge density analysis on both gas phase as well as the molecule lifted from the active site was carried out using Bader's theory of atoms in molecules (AIM). The difference in molecular electrostatic potential between the two forms of curcumin displays the difference in charge distribution. The large dipole moment of curcumin (7.54 D) in the active site reflects the charge redistribution as it is much less in the gas phase (4.34 D).

  12. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-01

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action. PMID:27297398

  13. Natural killer cells and single nucleotide polymorphisms of specific ion channels and receptor genes in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya; Huth, Teilah; Chacko, Anu; Johnston, Samantha; Smith, Pete; Staines, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this paper was to determine natural killer (NK) cytotoxic activity and if single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genotypes in transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels and acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) were present in isolated NK cells from previously identified myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME)/chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) patients. Subjects and methods A total of 39 ME/CFS patients (51.69±2 years old) and 30 unfatigued controls (47.60±2.39 years old) were included in this study. Patients were defined according to the 1994 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. Flow cytometry protocols were used to examine NK cytotoxic activity. A total of 678 SNPs from isolated NK cells were examined for 21 mammalian TRP ion channel genes and for nine mammalian AChR genes via the Agena Bioscience iPlex Gold assay. SNP association and genotype was determined using analysis of variance and Plink software. Results ME/CFS patients had a significant reduction in NK percentage lysis of target cells (17%±4.68%) compared with the unfatigued control group (31%±6.78%). Of the 678 SNPs examined, eleven SNPs for TRP ion channel genes (TRPC4, TRPC2, TRPM3, and TRPM8) were identified in the ME/CFS group. Five of these SNPs were associated with TRPM3, while the remainder were associated with TRPM8, TRPC2, and TRPC4 (P<0.05). Fourteen SNPs were associated with nicotinic and muscarinic AChR genes: six with CHRNA3, while the remainder were associated with CHRNA2, CHRNB4, CHRNA5, and CHRNE (P<0.05). There were sixteen genotypes identified from SNPs in TRP ion channels and AChRs for TRPM3 (n=5), TRPM8 (n=2), TRPC4 (n=3), TRPC2 (n=1), CHRNE (n=1), CHRNA2 (n=2), CHRNA3 (n=1), and CHRNB4 (n=1) (P<0.05). Conclusion We identified a number of SNPs and genotypes for TRP ion channels and AChRs from isolated NK cells in patients with ME/CFS, suggesting these SNPs and genotypes may be involved in changes in NK cell function and the development of ME/CFS pathology

  14. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel's ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators. PMID:27384555

  15. Acetylcholine receptor in planar lipid bilayers. Characterization of the channel properties of the purified nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Labarca, P; Lindstrom, J; Montal, M

    1984-04-01

    The properties of the channel of the purified acetylcholine receptor (AChR) were investigated after reconstitution in planar lipid bilayers. The time course of the agonist-induced conductance exhibits a transient peak that relaxes to a steady state value. The macroscopic steady state membrane conductance increases with agonist concentration, reaching saturation at 10(-5) M for carbamylcholine (CCh). The agonist-induced membrane conductance was inhibited by d-tubocurarine (50% inhibition, IC50, at approximately 10(-6) M) and hexamethonium (IC50 approximately 10(-5) M). The single channel conductance, gamma, is ohmic and independent of the agonist. At 0.3 M monovalent salt concentrations, gamma = 28 pS for Na+, 30 pS for Rb+, 38 pS for Cs+, and 50 pS for NH+4. The distribution of channel open times was fit by a sum of two exponentials, reflecting the existence of two distinct open states. tau o1 and tau o2, the fast and slow components of the distribution of open times, are independent of the agonist concentration: for CCh this was verified in the range of 10(-6) M less than C less than 10(-3)M. tau 01 and tau o2 are approximately three times longer for suberyldicholine ( SubCh ) than for CCh. tau o1 and tau o2 are moderately voltage dependent, increasing as the applied voltage in the compartment containing agonist is made more positive with respect to the other. At desensitizing concentrations of agonist, the AChR channel openings occurred in a characteristic pattern of sudden paroxysms of channel activity followed by quiescent periods. A local anesthetic derivative of lidocaine ( QX -222) reduced both tau o1 and tau o2. This effect was dependent on both the concentration of QX -222 and the applied voltage. Thus, the AChR purified from Torpedo electric organ and reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers exhibits ion conduction and kinetic and pharmacological properties similar to AChR in intact muscle postsynaptic membranes.

  16. New insights into TRP channels: Interaction with pattern recognition receptors.

    PubMed

    Han, Huirong; Yi, Fan

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have implicated that the activation of innate immune system and inflammatory mechanisms are of importance in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases. The innate immune system is present in almost all multicellular organisms in response to pathogens or tissue injury, which is performed via germ-line encoded pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or dangers-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Intracellular pathways linking immune and inflammatory response to ion channel expression and function have been recently identified. Among ion channels, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are a major family of non-selective cation-permeable channels that function as polymodal cellular sensors involved in many physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about classifications, functions, and interactions of TRP channels and PRRs, which may provide new insights into their roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases.

  17. Calcium Channels and Associated Receptors in Malignant Brain Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Fernanda B; Gehring, Marina P; Nicoletti, Natália F

    2016-09-01

    Malignant brain tumors are highly lethal and aggressive. Despite recent advances in the current therapies, which include the combination of surgery and radio/chemotherapy, the average survival rate remains poor. Altered regulation of ion channels is part of the neoplastic transformation, which suggests that ion channels are involved in cancer. Distinct classes of calcium-permeable channels are abnormally expressed in cancer and are likely involved in the alterations underlying malignant growth. Specifically, cytosolic Ca(2+) activity plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation, and Ca(2+) signaling is altered in proliferating tumor cells. A series of previous studies emphasized the importance of the T-type low-voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) in different cancer types, including gliomas, and remarkably, pharmacologic inhibition of T-type VGCC caused antiproliferative effects and triggered apoptosis of human glioma cells. Other calcium permeable channels, such as transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, contribute to changes in Ca(2+) by modulating the driving force for Ca(2+) entry, and some TRP channels are required for proliferation and migration in gliomas. Furthermore, recent evidence shows that TRP channels contribute to the progression and survival of the glioblastoma patients. Likewise, the purinergic P2X7 receptor acts as a direct conduit for Ca(2+)-influx and an indirect activator of voltage-gated Ca(2+)-channel. Evidence also shows that P2X7 receptor activation is linked to elevated expression of inflammation promoting factors, tumor cell migration, an increase in intracellular mobilization of Ca(2+), and membrane depolarization in gliomas. Therefore, this review summarizes the recent findings on calcium channels and associated receptors as potential targets to treat malignant gliomas. PMID:27418672

  18. Caenorhabditis elegans nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are required for nociception

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Emiliano; Chatzigeorgiou, Marios; Husson, Steven J.; Steuer-Costa, Wagner; Gottschalk, Alexander; Schafer, William R.; Treinin, Millet

    2014-01-01

    Polymodal nociceptors sense and integrate information on injurious mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli. Chemical signals either activate nociceptors or modulate their responses to other stimuli. One chemical known to activate or modulate responses of nociceptors is acetylcholine (ACh). Across evolution nociceptors express subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) family, a family of ACh-gated ion channels. The roles of ACh and nAChRs in nociceptor function are, however, poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans polymodal nociceptors, PVD, express nAChR subunits on their sensory arbor. Here we show that mutations reducing ACh synthesis and mutations in nAChR subunits lead to defects in PVD function and morphology. A likely cause for these defects is a reduction in cytosolic calcium measured in ACh and nAChR mutants. Indeed, overexpression of a calcium pump in PVD mimics defects in PVD function and morphology found in nAChR mutants. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, a central role for nAChRs and ACh in nociceptor function and suggest that calcium permeating via nAChRs facilitates activity of several signaling pathways within this neuron. PMID:24518198

  19. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel’s ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators. PMID:27384555

  20. Neuromodulatory propensity of Bacopa monniera against scopolamine-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells via down-regulation of AChE and up-regulation of BDNF and muscarnic-1 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Pandareesh, M D; Anand, T

    2013-10-01

    Scopolamine is a competitive antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, and thus classified as an anti-muscarinic and anti-cholinergic drug. PC12 cell lines possess muscarinic receptors and mimic the neuronal cells. These cells were treated with different concentrations of scopolamine for 24 h and were protected from the cellular damage by pretreatment with Bacopa monniera extract (BME). In current study, we have explored the molecular mechanism of neuromodulatory and antioxidant propensity of (BME) to attenuate scopolamine-induced cytotoxicity using PC12 cells. Our results elucidate that pretreatment of PC12 cells with BME ameliorates the mitochondrial and plasma membrane damage induced by 3 μg/ml scopolamine to 54.83 and 30.30 % as evidenced by MTT and lactate dehydrogenase assays respectively. BME (100 μg/ml) ameliorated scopolamine effect by down-regulating acetylcholine esterase and up-regulating brain-derived neurotropic factor and muscarinic muscarinic-1 receptor expression. BME pretreated cells also showed significant protection against scopolamine-induced toxicity by restoring the levels of antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation. This result indicates that the scopolamine-induced cytotoxicity and neuromodulatory changes were restored with the pretreatment of BME.

  1. Modification of Glutamate Receptor Channels: Molecular Mechanisms and Functional Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatt, Hanns

    Of the many possible mechanisms for modulating the efficiency of ion channels, the phosphorylation of receptor channel proteins may be the primary one. Changes in the set of molecular subunits of which the channels are composed are also important, especially for long-term regulation. In the central nervous system synaptic plasticity may be altered by modulating the ligand-activated neuronal ion channels involved in synaptic transmission; among them are channels gated directly by glutamate, the regulation of which we are only beginning to understand. This paper focuses on modulation of these channels [α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleprionic acid (AMPA), kainate, and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) types] by phosphorylation and changes in subunit composition. AMPA- and kainate-activated receptors are modulated by adenosine 3, 5-monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinase A (PKA) coupled via D1 dopamine receptors. An increase in the intracellular concentration of cAMP and protein kinase A potentiates kainate-activated currents in α-motoneurons of the spinal cord by increasing the affinity of the ligand (glutamate) for the phosphorylated receptor protein (GluR6 and 7). The rapid desensitization of AMPA-evoked currents normally observed in horizontal cells of the retina is completely blocked by increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP. The effects of changes in subunit composition were examined in rat hippocampal neurons. The subunit composition of the NMDA receptor determines the kinetic properties of synaptic currents and can be regulated by the type of innervating neuron. Similar changes also occur during development. An important determinant here is the activity of the system. Dynamic regulation of excitatory receptors by both mechanisms may well be associated with some forms of learning and memory in the mammalian brain.

  2. Procaine rapidly inactivates acetylcholine receptors from Torpedo and competes with agonist for inhibition sites

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.; Miller, K.W. )

    1989-02-21

    The relationship between the high-affinity procaine channel inhibition site and the agonist self-inhibition site on acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) from Torpedo electroplaque was investigated by using rapid {sup 86}Rb{sup +} quenched-flux assays at 4 {degree}C in native AChR-rich vesicles on which 50-60% of ACh activation sites were blocked with {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX). In the presence of channel-activating acetylcholine (ACh) concentrations alone, AChR undergoes one phase of inactivation in under a second. Addition of procaine produces two-phase inactivation similar to that seen with self-inhibiting ACh concentrations rapid inactivation complete in 30-75 ms is followed by fast desensitization at the same k{sub d} observed without procaine. The dependence of k{sub r} on (procaine) is consistent with a bimolecular association between procaine and its AChR site. Inhibition of AChR function by mixtures of procaine plus self-inhibiting concentrations of ACh or suberyldicholine was studied by reducing the level of {alpha}-BTX block in vesicles. The data support a mechanism where procaine binds preferentially to the open-channel AChR state, since no procaine-induced inactivation is observed without agonist and k{sub r}'s dependence on (ACh) in channel-activating range closely parallels that of {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux response to ACh.

  3. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and cancer

    PubMed Central

    DANG, NINGNING; MENG, XIANGUANG; SONG, HAIYAN

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine, the primary addictive constituent of cigarettes, is believed to contribute to cancer promotion and progression through the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which are membrane ligand-gated cation channels. nAChRs activation can be triggered by the neurotransmitter Ach, or certain other biological compounds, such as nicotine. In recent years, genome-wide association studies have indicated that allelic variation in the α5-α3-β4 nAChR cluster on chromosome 15q24-15q25.1 is associated with lung cancer risk. The role of nAChRs in other types of cancer has also been reported. The present review highlights the role of nAChRs in types of human cancer. PMID:27123240

  4. Coupled gating between cardiac calcium release channels (ryanodine receptors).

    PubMed

    Marx, S O; Gaburjakova, J; Gaburjakova, M; Henrikson, C; Ondrias, K; Marks, A R

    2001-06-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling in heart muscle requires the activation of Ca(2+)-release channels/type 2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2s) by Ca(2+) influx. RyR2s are arranged on the sarcoplasmic reticular membrane in closely packed arrays such that their large cytoplasmic domains contact one another. We now show that multiple RyR2s can be isolated under conditions such that they remain physically coupled to one another. When these coupled channels are examined in planar lipid bilayers, multiple channels exhibit simultaneous gating, termed "coupled gating." Removal of the regulatory subunit, the FK506 binding protein (FKBP12.6), functionally but not physically uncouples multiple RyR2 channels. Coupled gating between RyR2 channels may be an important regulatory mechanism in excitation-contraction coupling as well as in other signaling pathways involving intracellular Ca(2+) release. PMID:11397781

  5. Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels in T cells.

    PubMed

    Bertin, Samuel; Raz, Eyal

    2016-05-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ion channels is widely expressed in many cell types and plays various physiological roles. Growing evidence suggests that certain TRP channels are functionally expressed in the immune system. Indeed, an increasing number of reports have demonstrated the functional expression of several TRP channels in innate and adaptive immune cells and have highlighted their critical role in the activation and function of these cells. However, very few reviews have been entirely dedicated to this subject. Here, we will summarize the recent findings with regards to TRP channel expression in T cells and discuss their emerging role as regulators of T cell activation and functions. Moreover, these studies suggest that beyond their pharmaceutical interest in pain management, certain TRP channels may represent potential novel therapeutic targets for various immune-related diseases.

  6. The 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane scaffold for subtype selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligands. Part 1: the influence of different hydrogen bond acceptor systems on alkyl and (hetero)aryl substituents.

    PubMed

    Eibl, Christoph; Tomassoli, Isabelle; Munoz, Lenka; Stokes, Clare; Papke, Roger L; Gündisch, Daniela

    2013-12-01

    3,7-Diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane is a naturally occurring scaffold interacting with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). When one nitrogen of the 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane scaffold was implemented in a carboxamide motif displaying a hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) functionality, compounds with higher affinities and subtype selectivity for α4β2(∗) were obtained. The nature of the HBA system (carboxamide, sulfonamide, urea) had a strong impact on nAChR interaction. High affinity ligands for α4β2(∗) possessed small alkyl chains, small un-substituted hetero-aryl groups or para-substituted phenyl ring systems along with a carboxamide group. Electrophysiological responses of selected 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane derivatives to Xenopus oocytes expressing various nAChR subtypes showed diverse activation profiles. Compounds with strongest agonistic profiles were obtained with small alkyl groups whereas a shift to partial agonism/antagonism was observed for aryl substituents. PMID:24156938

  7. Glutamate Receptor Ion Channels: Structure, Regulation, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wollmuth, Lonnie P.; McBain, Chris J.; Menniti, Frank S.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Yuan, Hongjie; Myers, Scott J.; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptor family encodes 18 gene products that coassemble to form ligand-gated ion channels containing an agonist recognition site, a transmembrane ion permeation pathway, and gating elements that couple agonist-induced conformational changes to the opening or closing of the permeation pore. Glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and are localized on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. These receptors regulate a broad spectrum of processes in the brain, spinal cord, retina, and peripheral nervous system. Glutamate receptors are postulated to play important roles in numerous neurological diseases and have attracted intense scrutiny. The description of glutamate receptor structure, including its transmembrane elements, reveals a complex assembly of multiple semiautonomous extracellular domains linked to a pore-forming element with striking resemblance to an inverted potassium channel. In this review we discuss International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology glutamate receptor nomenclature, structure, assembly, accessory subunits, interacting proteins, gene expression and translation, post-translational modifications, agonist and antagonist pharmacology, allosteric modulation, mechanisms of gating and permeation, roles in normal physiological function, as well as the potential therapeutic use of pharmacological agents acting at glutamate receptors. PMID:20716669

  8. Effect of calcium on nicotine-induced current expressed by an atypical alpha-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2.

    PubMed

    Thany, Steeve H; Courjaret, Raphael; Lapied, Bruno

    2008-06-27

    Two distinct native alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-Bgt)-insensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), named nAChR1 and nAChR2, were identified in the cockroach Periplaneta americana dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons. They differed in their electrophysiological, pharmacological properties and intracellular regulation pathways. nAChR2 being an atypical nicotinic receptor closed upon agonist application and its current-voltage relationship resulted from a reduction in potassium conductance. In this study, using whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that calcium modulated nAChR2-mediated nicotine response. Under 0.5 microM alpha-Bgt and 20 mM d-tubocurarine, the nicotine-induced inward current amplitude was strongly reduced in the presence of intracellularly applied BAPTA or bath application of calcium-free solution. In addition, using cadmium chloride, we showed that nicotine response was modulated by extracellular calcium through plasma membrane calcium channels. Moreover, extracellular application of caffeine and thapsigargin reduced nAChR2-mediated response. Together these experiments revealed a complex calcium-dependent regulation of nAChR2. PMID:18485593

  9. Ion selectivity in the ryanodine receptor and other calcium channels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Dirk

    2006-03-01

    Biological ion channels passively conduct ions across cell membranes, some with great specificity. Calcium channels are selective channels that range in their Ca^2+ affinity depending on the channel's physiological role. For example, the L-type calcium channel has micromolar affinity while the ryanodine receptor (RyR) has millimolar affinity. On the other hand, both of these channels have the chemically-similar EEEE and DDDD amino acid motifs in their selectivity filters. An electrodiffusion model of RyR that reproduces and predicts >50 data curves will be presented. In this model, ions are charged, hard spheres and the chemical potential is computed using density functional theory of fluids. Ion selectivity arises from a competition between the need for cations to screen the negative charges of the channel and the crowding of ions in the tiny space of the channel. Charge/space competition implies that selectivity increases as the channel volume decreases (thereby increasing the protein charge density), something that has recently been experimentally confirmed in mutant channels. Dielectric properties can also increase selectivity. In Monte Carlo simulations, Ca^2+ affinity is much higher when the channel protein has a low dielectric constant. This counterintuitive result occurs because calcium channel selectivity filters are lined with negatively-charged (acidic) amino acids (EEEE or DDDD). These permanent negative charges induce negative polarization charge at the protein/lumen interface. The total negative charge of the protein (polarization plus permanent) is increased, resulting in increased ion densities, increased charge/space competition, and there in increased Ca^2+ affinity. If no negative protein charges were present, cations would induce enough positive polarization charge to prevent flux.

  10. Kir3 channel signaling complexes: focus on opioid receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nagi, Karim; Pineyro, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Opioids are among the most effective drugs to treat severe pain. They produce their analgesic actions by specifically activating opioid receptors located along the pain perception pathway where they inhibit the flow of nociceptive information. This inhibition is partly accomplished by activation of hyperpolarizing G protein-coupled inwardly-rectifying potassium (GIRK or Kir3) channels. Kir3 channels control cellular excitability in the central nervous system and in the heart and, because of their ubiquitous distribution, they mediate the effects of a large range of hormones and neurotransmitters which, upon activation of corresponding G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) lead to channel opening. Here we analyze GPCR signaling via these effectors in reference to precoupling and collision models. Existing knowledge on signaling bias is discussed in relation to these models as a means of developing strategies to produce novel opioid analgesics with an improved side effects profile. PMID:25071446

  11. Prolactin receptor in regulation of neuronal excitability and channels.

    PubMed

    Patil, Mayur J; Henry, Michael A; Akopian, Armen N

    2014-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) activates PRL receptor isoforms to exert regulation of specific neuronal circuitries, and to control numerous physiological and clinically-relevant functions including; maternal behavior, energy balance and food intake, stress and trauma responses, anxiety, neurogenesis, migraine and pain. PRL controls these critical functions by regulating receptor potential thresholds, neuronal excitability and/or neurotransmission efficiency. PRL also influences neuronal functions via activation of certain neurons, resulting in Ca(2+) influx and/or electrical firing with subsequent release of neurotransmitters. Although PRL was identified almost a century ago, very little specific information is known about how PRL regulates neuronal functions. Nevertheless, important initial steps have recently been made including the identification of PRL-induced transient signaling pathways in neurons and the modulation of neuronal transient receptor potential (TRP) and Ca(2+) -dependent K(+) channels by PRL. In this review, we summarize current knowledge and recent progress in understanding the regulation of neuronal excitability and channels by PRL.

  12. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition aggravates fasting-induced triglyceride accumulation in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shin-Ichi; Nakamura, Kaai; Ando, Midori; Kamei, Hiroyasu; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Although fasting induces hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation in both rodents and humans, little is known about the underlying mechanism. Because parasympathetic nervous system activity tends to attenuate the secretion of very-low-density-lipoprotein-triglyceride (VLDL-TG) and increase TG stores in the liver, and serum cholinesterase activity is elevated in fatty liver disease, the inhibition of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter acetylcholinesterase (AChE) may have some influence on hepatic lipid metabolism. To assess the influence of AChE inhibition on lipid metabolism, the effect of physostigmine, an AChE inhibitor, on fasting-induced increase in liver TG was investigated in mice. In comparison with ad libitum-fed mice, 30 h fasting increased liver TG accumulation accompanied by a downregulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP-1) and liver-fatty acid binding-protein (L-FABP). Physostigmine promoted the 30 h fasting-induced increase in liver TG levels in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by a significant fall in plasma insulin levels, without a fall in plasma TG. Furthermore, physostigmine significantly attenuated the fasting-induced decrease of both mRNA and protein levels of SREBP-1 and L-FABP, and increased IRS-2 protein levels in the liver. The muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine blocked these effects of physostigmine on liver TG, serum insulin, and hepatic protein levels of SREBP-1 and L-FABP. These results demonstrate that AChE inhibition facilitated fasting-induced TG accumulation with up regulation of the hepatic L-FABP and SREBP-1 in mice, at least in part via the activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Our studies highlight the crucial role of parasympathetic regulation in fasting-induced TG accumulation, and may be an important source of information on the mechanism of hepatic disorders of lipid metabolism. PMID:25383314

  13. Lipid modulation of thermal transient receptor potential channels.

    PubMed

    Hernández-García, Enrique; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    There is a subgroup of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels that are responsive to temperature (thermo-TRP channels). These are important to a variety of sensory and physiological phenomena such as pain and taste perception. All thermo-TRP channels known to date are subject to modulation by lipidic molecules of many kinds, from the ubiquitous cholesterol to more specialized molecules such as prostaglandins. Although the mechanisms and sites of binding of lipids on thermo-TRPs are largely unknown, the explosion on research of lipids and ion channels has revealed previously unsuspected roles for them. Diacyl glycerol is a lipid produced by phospholipase C (PLC) and it was discovered to modulate TRP channels in the eye of the fly, and many mammal TRP channels have been found to interact with lipids. While most of the lipids acting on thermo-TRP channels have been found to activate them, there are a few capable of inhibition. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate is even capable of both inhibition and activation on a couple of thermo-TRPs, depending on the cellular context. More data is required to assess the mechanism through which lipids affect thermo-TRP channel activity and the physiological importance of this interaction.

  14. Lipid modulation of thermal transient receptor potential channels.

    PubMed

    Hernández-García, Enrique; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    There is a subgroup of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels that are responsive to temperature (thermo-TRP channels). These are important to a variety of sensory and physiological phenomena such as pain and taste perception. All thermo-TRP channels known to date are subject to modulation by lipidic molecules of many kinds, from the ubiquitous cholesterol to more specialized molecules such as prostaglandins. Although the mechanisms and sites of binding of lipids on thermo-TRPs are largely unknown, the explosion on research of lipids and ion channels has revealed previously unsuspected roles for them. Diacyl glycerol is a lipid produced by phospholipase C (PLC) and it was discovered to modulate TRP channels in the eye of the fly, and many mammal TRP channels have been found to interact with lipids. While most of the lipids acting on thermo-TRP channels have been found to activate them, there are a few capable of inhibition. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate is even capable of both inhibition and activation on a couple of thermo-TRPs, depending on the cellular context. More data is required to assess the mechanism through which lipids affect thermo-TRP channel activity and the physiological importance of this interaction. PMID:25366236

  15. Transient receptor potential channels and regulation of lung endothelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This review highlights our current knowledge regarding expression of transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels in lung endothelium and evidence for their involvement in regulation of lung endothelial permeability. Six mammalian TRP families have been identified and organized on the basis of sequence homology: TRPC (canonical), TRPV (vanilloid), TRPM (melastatin), TRPML (mucolipin), TRPP (polycystin), and TRPA (ankyrin). To date, only TRPC1/4, TRPC6, TRPV4, and TRPM2 have been extensively studied in lung endothelium. Calcium influx through each of these channels has been documented to increase lung endothelial permeability, although their channel-gating mechanisms, downstream signaling mechanisms, and impact on endothelial structure and barrier integrity differ. While other members of the TRPC, TRPV, and TRPM families may be expressed in lung endothelium, we have little or no evidence linking these to regulation of lung endothelial permeability. Further, neither the expression nor functional role(s) of any TRPML, TRPP, and TRPA family members has been studied in lung endothelium. In addition to this assessment organized by TRP channel family, we also discuss TRP channels and lung endothelial permeability from the perspective of lung endothelial heterogeneity, using outcomes of studies focused on TRPC1/4 and TRPV4 channels. The diversity within the TRP channel family and the relative paucity of information regarding roles of a number of these channels in lung endothelium make this field ripe for continued investigation. PMID:25006396

  16. Functional expression of purinergic P2 receptors and transient receptor potential channels by the human urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Shabir, Saqib; Cross, William; Kirkwood, Lisa A.; Pearson, Joanna F.; Appleby, Peter A.; Walker, Dawn; Eardley, Ian

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its role as a physical barrier, the urothelium is considered to play an active role in mechanosensation. A key mechanism is the release of transient mediators that activate purinergic P2 receptors and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to effect changes in intracellular Ca2+. Despite the implied importance of these receptors and channels in urothelial tissue homeostasis and dysfunctional bladder disease, little is known about their functional expression by the human urothelium. To evaluate the expression and function of P2X and P2Y receptors and TRP channels, the human ureter and bladder were used to separate urothelial and stromal tissues for RNA isolation and cell culture. RT-PCR using stringently designed primer sets was used to establish which P2 and TRP species were expressed at the transcript level, and selective agonists/antagonists were used to confirm functional expression by monitoring changes in intracellular Ca2+ and in a scratch repair assay. The results confirmed the functional expression of P2Y4 receptors and excluded nonexpressed receptors/channels (P2X1, P2X3, P2X6, P2Y6, P2Y11, TRPV5, and TRPM8), while a dearth of specific agonists confounded the functional validation of expressed P2X2, P2X4, P2Y1, P2Y2, TRPV2, TRPV3, TRPV6 and TRPM7 receptors/channels. Although a conventional response was elicited in control stromal-derived cells, the urothelial cell response to well-characterized TRPV1 and TRPV4 agonists/antagonists revealed unexpected anomalies. In addition, agonists that invoked an increase in intracellular Ca2+ promoted urothelial scratch repair, presumably through the release of ATP. The study raises important questions about the ligand selectivity of receptor/channel targets expressed by the urothelium. These pathways are important in urothelial tissue homeostasis, and this opens the possibility of selective drug targeting. PMID:23720349

  17. Residues Responsible for the Selectivity of α-Conotoxins for Ac-AChBP or nAChRs

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bo; Xiang, Shihua; Li, Mengsen

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are targets for developing new drugs to treat severe pain, nicotine addiction, Alzheimer disease, epilepsy, etc. α-Conotoxins are biologically and chemically diverse. With 12–19 residues and two disulfides, they can be specifically selected for different nAChRs. Acetylcholine-binding proteins from Aplysia californica (Ac-AChBP) are homologous to the ligand-binding domains of nAChRs and pharmacologically similar. X-ray structures of the α-conotoxin in complex with Ac-AChBP in addition to computer modeling have helped to determine the binding site of the important residues of α-conotoxin and its affinity for nAChR subtypes. Here, we present the various α-conotoxin residues that are selective for Ac-AChBP or nAChRs by comparing the structures of α-conotoxins in complex with Ac-AChBP and by modeling α-conotoxins in complex with nAChRs. The knowledge of these binding sites will assist in the discovery and design of more potent and selective α-conotoxins as drug leads. PMID:27727162

  18. Ligand Binding at the α4-α4 Agonist-Binding Site of the α4β2 nAChR Triggers Receptor Activation through a Pre-Activated Conformational State

    PubMed Central

    Indurthi, Dinesh C.; Lewis, Trevor M.; Ahring, Philip K.; Balle, Thomas; Chebib, Mary; Absalom, Nathan L.

    2016-01-01

    The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the most abundant subtype in the brain and exists in two functional stoichiometries: (α4)3(β2)2 and (α4)2(β2)3. A distinct feature of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor is the biphasic activation response to the endogenous agonist acetylcholine, where it is activated with high potency and low efficacy when two α4-β2 binding sites are occupied and with low potency/high efficacy when a third α4-α4 binding site is occupied. Further, exogenous ligands can bind to the third α4-α4 binding site and potentiate the activation of the receptor by ACh that is bound at the two α4-β2 sites. We propose that perturbations of the recently described pre-activation step when a third binding site is occupied are a key driver of these distinct activation properties. To investigate this, we used a combination of simple linear kinetic models and voltage clamp electrophysiology to determine whether transitions into the pre-activated state were increased when three binding sites were occupied. We separated the binding at the two different sites with ligands selective for the α4-β2 site (Sazetidine-A and TC-2559) and the α4-α4 site (NS9283) and identified that when a third binding site was occupied, changes in the concentration-response curves were best explained by an increase in transitions into a pre-activated state. We propose that perturbations of transitions into a pre-activated state are essential to explain the activation properties of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor by acetylcholine and other ligands. Considering the widespread clinical use of benzodiazepines, this discovery of a conserved mechanism that benzodiazepines and ACh potentiate receptor activation via a third binding site can be exploited to develop therapeutics with similar properties at other cys-loop receptors. PMID:27552221

  19. Receptor for protons: First observations on Acid Sensing Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Krishtal, Oleg

    2015-07-01

    The history of ASICs began in 1980 with unexpected observation. The concept of highly selective Na(+) current gated by specific receptors for protons was not easily accepted. It took 16 years to get these receptor/channels cloned and start a new stage in their investigation. "The receptor for protons" became ASIC comprising under this name a family of receptor/channels ubiquitous for mammalian nervous system, both peripheral and central. The role of ASICs as putative nociceptors was suggested almost immediately after their discovery. This role subsequently was proven in many forms of pain-related phenomena. Many other functions of ASICs have been also found or primed for speculations both in physiology and in disease. Despite the width of field and strength of efforts, numerous basic questions are to be answered before we understand how the local changes in pH in the nervous tissue transform into electric and messenger signaling via ASICs as transducers. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'.

  20. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Yosuke; Szallasi, Arpad

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are important mediators of sensory signals with marked effects on cellular functions and signalling pathways. Indeed, mutations in genes encoding TRP channels are the cause of several inherited diseases in humans (the so-called ‘TRP channelopathies’) that affect the cardiovascular, renal, skeletal and nervous systems. TRP channels are also promising targets for drug discovery. The initial focus of research was on TRP channels that are expressed on nociceptive neurons. Indeed, a number of potent, small-molecule TRPV1, TRPV3 and TRPA1 antagonists have already entered clinical trials as novel analgesic agents. There has been a recent upsurge in the amount of work that expands TRP channel drug discovery efforts into new disease areas such as asthma, cancer, anxiety, cardiac hypertrophy, as well as obesity and metabolic disorders. A better understanding of TRP channel functions in health and disease should lead to the discovery of first-in-class drugs for these intractable diseases. With this review, we hope to capture the current state of this rapidly expanding and changing field. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24102319

  1. Transient Receptor Potential Channels as Targets for Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To date, 28 mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been cloned and characterized. They are grouped into six subfamilies on the basis of their amino acid sequence homology: TRP Ankyrin (TRPA), TRP Canonical (TRPC), TRP Melastatin (TRPM), TRP Mucolipin (TRPML), TRP Polycystin (TRPP), and TRP Vanilloid (TRPV). Most of the TRP channels are nonselective cation channels expressed on the cell membrane and exhibit variable permeability ratios for Ca2+ versus Na+. They mediate sensory functions (such as vision, nociception, taste transduction, temperature sensation, and pheromone signaling) and homeostatic functions (such as divalent cation flux, hormone release, and osmoregulation). Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the specific roles of these TRP channels and their activation mechanisms. In this Review, the emphasis will be on the activation of TRP channels by phytochemicals that are claimed to exert health benefits. Recent findings complement the anecdotal evidence that some of these phytochemicals have specific receptors and the activation of which is responsible for the physiological effects. Now, the targets for these phytochemicals are being unveiled; a specific hypothesis can be proposed and tested experimentally to infer a scientific validity of the claims of the health benefits. The broader and pressing issues that have to be addressed are related to the quantities of the active ingredients in a given preparation, their bioavailability, metabolism, adverse effects, excretion, and systemic versus local effects. PMID:24926802

  2. Acetylcholine receptor channel imaged in the open state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Nigel

    1995-01-01

    The structure of the open-channel form of the acetylcholine receptor has been determined from electron images of Torpedo ray postsynaptic membranes activated by brief (<5ms) mixing with droplets containing acetylcholine. Comparison with the closed-channel form shows that acetylcholine initiates small rotations of the subunits in the extracellular domain, which trigger a change in configuration of α-helices lining the membrane-spanning pore. The open pore tapers towards the intracellular membrane face, where it is shaped by a 'barrel' of α-helices having a pronounced right-handed twist.

  3. Hot channels in airways: pharmacology of the vanilloid receptor.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sun Wook; Oh, Uhtaek

    2002-06-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness of the tracheobronchial path is recognized as the critical feature of bronchial asthma. Sensory nerves in the airway are implicated strongly in this hyperresponsiveness. The vanilloid VR1 receptor, a cloned capsaicin receptor and a nociceptor-specific cation channel, is known to detect and transduce various harmful stimuli to electrical signals. Recent findings suggest that bradykinin can activate VR1 through generation of lipoxygenase products and that protein kinase C and phospholipase C mediate the sensitization of VR1 by many key inflammatory mediators. Such findings will lead to a better understanding of the enigmatic etiology of asthma.

  4. Functional ryanodine receptor channels in flatworm muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Day, T A; Haithcock, J; Kimber, M; Maule, A G

    2000-04-01

    Caffeine, which stimulates intracellular Ca2+ release channels known as ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels, induces contraction of individual muscle fibres dissociated from the trematode Schistosoma mansoni, and the turbellarians Dugesia tigrina and Procerodes littoralis. Caffeine is much more potent on S. mansoni fibres (EC50 0.7 mM) than those from D. tigrina or P. littoralis (3.2 mM and 4.6 mM, respectively). These caffeine-induced contractions are blocked by ryanodine, confirming the presence of functional RyR channels in these flatworm muscles. However, the contractions are not blocked by typical RyR channel blockers ruthenium red or neomycin, indicating that there may be important pharmacological differences between the RyR channels in this early-diverging phylum and those of later animals. These studies demonstrate that RyR channels are present in the muscle of these flatworms, and that the sarcoplasmic reticulum stores sufficient Ca2+ to support contraction.

  5. Positive allosteric modulators of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors affect neither the function of other ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels and acetylcholinesterase, nor β-amyloid content.

    PubMed

    Arias, Hugo R; Ravazzini, Federica; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Feuerbach, Dominik; Boffi, Juan C; Draczkowski, Piotr; Montag, Dirk; Brown, Brandon M; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Puia, Giulia

    2016-07-01

    The activity of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), including 3-furan-2-yl-N-p-tolyl-acrylamide (PAM-2), 3-furan-2-yl-N-o-tolylacrylamide (PAM-3), and 3-furan-2-yl-N-phenylacrylamide (PAM-4), was tested on a variety of ligand- [i.e., human (h) α7, rat (r) α9α10, hα3-containing AChRs, mouse (m) 5-HT3AR, and several glutamate receptors (GluRs)] and voltage-gated (i.e., sodium and potassium) ion channels, as well as on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and β-amyloid (Aβ) content. The functional results indicate that PAM-2 inhibits hα3-containing AChRs (IC50=26±6μM) with higher potency than that for NR1aNR2B and NR1aNR2A, two NMDA-sensitive GluRs. PAM-2 affects neither the activity of m5-HT3ARs, GluR5/KA2 (a kainate-sensitive GluR), nor AChE, and PAM-4 does not affect agonist-activated rα9α10 AChRs. Relevant clinical concentrations of PAM-2-4 do not inhibit Nav1.2 and Kv3.1 ion channels. These PAMs slightly enhance the activity of GluR1 and GluR2, two AMPA-sensitive GluRs. PAM-2 does not change the levels of Aβ42 in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model (i.e., 5XFAD). The molecular docking and dynamics results using the hα7 model suggest that the active sites for PAM-2 include the intrasubunit (i.e., PNU-120596 locus) and intersubunit sites. These results support our previous study showing that these PAMs are selective for the α7 AChR, and clarify that the procognitive/promnesic/antidepressant activity of PAM-2 is not mediated by other targets.

  6. Positive allosteric modulators of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors affect neither the function of other ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels and acetylcholinesterase, nor β-amyloid content.

    PubMed

    Arias, Hugo R; Ravazzini, Federica; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Feuerbach, Dominik; Boffi, Juan C; Draczkowski, Piotr; Montag, Dirk; Brown, Brandon M; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Puia, Giulia

    2016-07-01

    The activity of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), including 3-furan-2-yl-N-p-tolyl-acrylamide (PAM-2), 3-furan-2-yl-N-o-tolylacrylamide (PAM-3), and 3-furan-2-yl-N-phenylacrylamide (PAM-4), was tested on a variety of ligand- [i.e., human (h) α7, rat (r) α9α10, hα3-containing AChRs, mouse (m) 5-HT3AR, and several glutamate receptors (GluRs)] and voltage-gated (i.e., sodium and potassium) ion channels, as well as on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and β-amyloid (Aβ) content. The functional results indicate that PAM-2 inhibits hα3-containing AChRs (IC50=26±6μM) with higher potency than that for NR1aNR2B and NR1aNR2A, two NMDA-sensitive GluRs. PAM-2 affects neither the activity of m5-HT3ARs, GluR5/KA2 (a kainate-sensitive GluR), nor AChE, and PAM-4 does not affect agonist-activated rα9α10 AChRs. Relevant clinical concentrations of PAM-2-4 do not inhibit Nav1.2 and Kv3.1 ion channels. These PAMs slightly enhance the activity of GluR1 and GluR2, two AMPA-sensitive GluRs. PAM-2 does not change the levels of Aβ42 in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model (i.e., 5XFAD). The molecular docking and dynamics results using the hα7 model suggest that the active sites for PAM-2 include the intrasubunit (i.e., PNU-120596 locus) and intersubunit sites. These results support our previous study showing that these PAMs are selective for the α7 AChR, and clarify that the procognitive/promnesic/antidepressant activity of PAM-2 is not mediated by other targets. PMID:27129924

  7. Transient receptor potential channel C5 in cancer chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    He, Dong-xu; Ma, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily contains at least 28 homologs in mammalian. These proteins form TRP channels are permeable to monovalent and divalent cations and participate in a variety of physiological functions. Dysregulation of TRP channels is responsible for numerous diseases. This review provides a brief short overview of mammalian TRP channels with a focus on TRPC5 and its role in cancers. Dysregulation of TRPC5 interrupts Ca2+ homeostasis in cancer cells, which activates signaling pathways that are highly associated with cancer progression, especially cancer chemoresistance. Based on the important role of TRPC5, we also discuss the potential of TRPC5 as a target for therapeutic intervention. Either direct targeting of TRPC5 or indirect interruption of TRPC5-related signaling pathways may effectively overcome cancer chemoresistance. PMID:26657058

  8. Post-transcriptional regulation of GABAB receptor and GIRK1 channels by Nogo receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Type B GABA receptors (GABA Rs) play a critical role in synaptic transmission. We carried out studies to determine whether neuronal cell surface expression of GABAB-Rs might be regulated by the Nogo receptor 1 (NgR1). Results siRNA knock-down of NgR1 resulted in a selective increase of GABAB R1 and GABAB R2 protein without altering the expression of GABAA receptor or GAD65. The increase in GABAB receptor subunits was unaccompanied by a change in mRNA, but inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin blocked the increase in GABAB protein. NgR1 siRNA also caused an increase in G protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK1). The increase in GABAB receptor and GIRK1 channel proteins was in the plasma membrane, determined by cell surface biotinylation. In NgR1 knockout mice, the amount of GABAB R2 and GIRK1 in hippocampus-derived synaptosomes was increased. Conclusions Together these findings suggest that NgR1 mediated modulation of synaptic transmission may be accomplished, at least in part, through modulation of G protein coupled receptors and channels. PMID:23829864

  9. α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a therapeutic target in the structure era.

    PubMed

    Taly, Antoine; Charon, Sebastien

    2012-05-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand-gated ion channels involved in cognitive processes and are associated with brain disorders which makes them interesting drug targets. This article presents a general overview of the receptor to introduce the α7 nAChR as a drug target. The advances in understanding of the structure/function properties of the nAChR produced during the last decade are detailed as they are crucial for rational drug design. The allosteric properties of the nAChR will also be described because they also have important consequences for drug design.

  10. Inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptors mediate activity-induced synaptic Ca2+ signals in muscle fibers and Ca2+ overload in slow-channel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Roberto; Groshong, Jason S; Gomez, Christopher M

    2007-04-01

    Strict control of calcium entry through excitatory synaptic receptors is important for shaping synaptic responses, gene expression, and cell survival. Disruption of this control may lead to pathological accumulation of Ca2+. The slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCS), due to mutations in muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR), perturbs the kinetics of synaptic currents, leading to post-synaptic Ca2+ accumulation. To understand the regulation of calcium signaling at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and the etiology of Ca2+ overload in SCS we studied the role of sarcoplasmic Ca2+ stores in SCS. Using fura-2 loaded dissociated fibers activated with acetylcholine puffs, we confirmed that Ca2+ accumulates around wild type NMJ and discovered that Ca2+ accumulates significantly faster around the NMJ of SCS transgenic dissociated muscle fibers. Additionally, we determined that this process is dependant on the activation, altered kinetics, and movement of Ca2+ ions through the AChR, although, surprisingly, depletion of intracellular stores also prevents the accumulation of this cation around the NMJ. Finally, we concluded that the sarcoplasmic reticulum is the main source of Ca2+ and that inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3R), and to a lesser degree L-type voltage gated Ca2+ channels, are responsible for the efflux of this cation from intracellular stores. These results suggest that a signaling system mediated by the activation of AChR, Ca2+, and IP3R is responsible for localized Ca2+ signals observed in muscle fibers and the Ca2+ overload observed in SCS.

  11. Effect of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChR located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The...

  12. Bimodal concentration-response of nicotine involves the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, and transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channels in mouse trachea and sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kichko, Tatjana I; Lennerz, Jochen; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Babes, Ramona M; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kobal, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W

    2013-11-01

    High concentrations of nicotine, as in the saliva of oral tobacco consumers or in smoking cessation aids, have been shown to sensitize/activate recombinant transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (rTRPV1) and mouse TRPA1 (mTRPA1) channels. By measuring stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from the isolated mouse trachea, we established a bimodal concentration-response relationship with a threshold below 10 µM (-)-nicotine, a maximum at 100 µM, an apparent nadir between 0.5 and 10 mM, and a renewed increase at 20 mM. The first peak was unchanged in TRPV1/A1 double-null mutants as compared with wild-types and was abolished by specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) inhibitors and by camphor, discovered to act as nicotinic antagonist. The nicotine response at 20 mM was strongly pHe-dependent, - five times greater at pH 9.0 than 7.4, indicating that intracellular permeation of the (uncharged) alkaloid was required to reach the TRPV1/A1 binding sites. The response was strongly reduced in both null mutants, and more so in double-null mutants. Upon measuring calcium transients in nodose/jugular and dorsal root ganglion neurons in response to 100 µM nicotine, 48% of the vagal (but only 14% of the somatic) sensory neurons were activated, the latter very weakly. However, nicotine 20 mM at pH 9.0 repeatedly activated almost every single cultured neuron, partly by releasing intracellular calcium and independent of TRPV1/A1 and nAChRs. In conclusion, in mouse tracheal sensory nerves nAChRs are 200-fold more sensitive to nicotine than TRPV1/A1; they are widely coexpressed with the capsaicin receptor among vagal sensory neurons and twice as abundant as TRPA1. Nicotine is the major stimulant in tobacco, and its sensory impact through nAChRs should not be disregarded.

  13. Role of mouse cerebellar nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α(4)β(2)- and α(7) subtypes in the behavioral cross-tolerance between nicotine and ethanol-induced ataxia.

    PubMed

    Taslim, Najla; Soderstrom, Ken; Dar, M Saeed

    2011-03-01

    We have demonstrated that nicotine attenuated ethanol-induced ataxia via nicotinic-acetylcholine-receptor (nAChR) subtypes α(4)β(2) and α(7). In the present study, ethanol (2g/kg; i.p.)-induced ataxia was assessed by Rotorod performance following repeated intracerebellar infusion of α(4)β(2)- and α(7)-selective agonists. Localization of α(4)β(2) and α(7) nAChRs was confirmed immunohistochemically. Cerebellar NO(x) (nitrite+nitrate) was determined flurometrically. Repeated intracerebellar microinfusion of the α(4)β(2)-selective agonist, RJR-2403 (for 1, 2, 3, 5 or 7 days) or the α(7)-selective agonist, PNU-282987 (1, 2, 3 or 5 days), dose-dependently attenuated ethanol-induced ataxia. These results suggest the development of cross-tolerance between ethanol-induced ataxia and α(4)β(2) and α(7) nAChR agonists. With RJR-2403, the cross-tolerance was maximal after a 5-day treatment and lasted 48h. Cross-tolerance was maximal after a 1-day treatment with PNU-282987 and lasted 72h. Pretreatment with α(4)β(2)- and α(7)-selective antagonists, dihydro-β-erythroidine and methyllycaconitine, respectively, prevented the development of cross-tolerance confirming α(4)β(2) and α(7) involvement. Repeated agonist infusions elevated cerebellar NO(x) 16h after the last treatment while acute ethanol exposure decreased it. Pretreatment with repeated RJR-2403 or PNU-282987 reversed ethanol-induced decrease in NOx. The NO(x) data suggests the involvement of the nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP signaling pathway in the cross-tolerance that develops between α(4)β(2)- and α(7)-selective agonists and ethanol ataxia. Both α(4)β(2) and α(7) subtypes exhibited high immunoreactivity in Purkinje but sparse expression in molecular and granular cell layers. Our results support a role for α(4)β(2) and α(7) nAChR subtypes in the development of cross-tolerance between nicotine and ethanol with the NO signaling pathway as a potential mechanism.

  14. Assessment of the functionality and stability of detergent purified nAChR from Torpedo using lipidic matrixes and macroscopic electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Morales, Luis F; Colón-Sáez, José O; González-Nieves, Joel E; Quesada-González, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study we examined the functionality and stability of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-detergent complexes (nAChR-DCs) from affinity-purified Torpedo californica (Tc) using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) in Lipidic Cubic Phase (LCP) and planar lipid bilayer (PLB) recordings for phospholipid and cholesterol like detergents. In the present study we enhanced the functional characterization of nAChR-DCs by recording macroscopic ion channel currents in Xenopus oocytes using the two electrode voltage clamp (TEVC). The use of TEVC allows for the recording of macroscopic currents elicited by agonist activation of nAChR-DCs that assemble in the oocyte plasma membrane. Furthermore, we examined the stability of nAChR-DCs, which is obligatory for the nAChR crystallization, using a 30 day FRAP assay in LCP for each detergent. The present results indicate a marked difference in the fractional fluorescence recovery (ΔFFR) within the same detergent family during the 30 day period assayed. Within the cholesterol analog family, sodium cholate and CHAPSO displayed a minimum ΔFFR and a mobile fraction (MF) over 80%. In contrast, CHAPS and BigCHAP showed a marked decay in both the mobile fraction and diffusion coefficient. nAChR-DCs containing phospholipid analog detergents with an alkylphosphocholine (FC) and lysofoscholine (LFC) of 16 carbon chains (FC-16, LFC-16) were more effective in maintaining a mobile fraction of over 80% compared to their counterparts with shorter acyl chain (C12, C14). The significant differences in macroscopic current amplitudes, activation and desensitization rates among the different nAChR-DCs evaluated in the present study allow to dissect which detergent preserves both, agonist activation and ion channel function. Functionality assays using TEVC demonstrated that LFC16, LFC14, and cholate were the most effective detergents in preserving macroscopic ion channel function, however, the nAChR-cholate complex

  15. Assessment of the functionality and stability of detergent purified nAChR from Torpedo using lipidic matrixes and macroscopic electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Morales, Luis F; Colón-Sáez, José O; González-Nieves, Joel E; Quesada-González, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study we examined the functionality and stability of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-detergent complexes (nAChR-DCs) from affinity-purified Torpedo californica (Tc) using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) in Lipidic Cubic Phase (LCP) and planar lipid bilayer (PLB) recordings for phospholipid and cholesterol like detergents. In the present study we enhanced the functional characterization of nAChR-DCs by recording macroscopic ion channel currents in Xenopus oocytes using the two electrode voltage clamp (TEVC). The use of TEVC allows for the recording of macroscopic currents elicited by agonist activation of nAChR-DCs that assemble in the oocyte plasma membrane. Furthermore, we examined the stability of nAChR-DCs, which is obligatory for the nAChR crystallization, using a 30 day FRAP assay in LCP for each detergent. The present results indicate a marked difference in the fractional fluorescence recovery (ΔFFR) within the same detergent family during the 30 day period assayed. Within the cholesterol analog family, sodium cholate and CHAPSO displayed a minimum ΔFFR and a mobile fraction (MF) over 80%. In contrast, CHAPS and BigCHAP showed a marked decay in both the mobile fraction and diffusion coefficient. nAChR-DCs containing phospholipid analog detergents with an alkylphosphocholine (FC) and lysofoscholine (LFC) of 16 carbon chains (FC-16, LFC-16) were more effective in maintaining a mobile fraction of over 80% compared to their counterparts with shorter acyl chain (C12, C14). The significant differences in macroscopic current amplitudes, activation and desensitization rates among the different nAChR-DCs evaluated in the present study allow to dissect which detergent preserves both, agonist activation and ion channel function. Functionality assays using TEVC demonstrated that LFC16, LFC14, and cholate were the most effective detergents in preserving macroscopic ion channel function, however, the nAChR-cholate complex

  16. Physiology and pathophysiology of canonical transient receptor potential channels

    PubMed Central

    Abramowitz, Joel; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2009-01-01

    The existence of a mammalian family of TRPC ion channels, direct homologues of TRP, the visual transduction channel of flies, was discovered during 1995–1996 as a consequence of research into the mechanism by which the stimulation of the receptor-Gq-phospholipase Cβ signaling pathway leads to sustained increases in intracellular calcium. Mammalian TRPs, TRPCs, turned out to be nonselective, calcium-permeable cation channels, which cause both a collapse of the cell’s membrane potential and entry of calcium. The family comprises 7 members and is widely expressed. Many cells and tissues express between 3 and 4 of the 7 TRPCs. Despite their recent discovery, a wealth of information has accumulated, showing that TRPCs have widespread roles in almost all cells studied, including cells from excitable and nonexcitable tissues, such as the nervous and cardiovascular systems, the kidney and the liver, and cells from endothelia, epithelia, and the bone marrow compartment. Disruption of TRPC function is at the root of some familial diseases. More often, TRPCs are contributing risk factors in complex diseases. The present article reviews what has been uncovered about physiological roles of mammalian TRPC channels since the time of their discovery. This analysis reveals TRPCs as major and unsuspected gates of Ca2+ entry that contribute, depending on context, to activation of transcription factors, apoptosis, vascular contractility, platelet activation, and cardiac hypertrophy, as well as to normal and abnormal cell proliferation. TRPCs emerge as targets for a thus far nonexistent field of pharmacological intervention that may ameliorate complex diseases.—Abramowitz, J., Birnbaumer, L. Physiology and pathophysiology of canonical transient receptor potential channels. PMID:18940894

  17. Acid-sensing ion channels and transient-receptor potential ion channels in zebrafish taste buds.

    PubMed

    Levanti, M; Randazzo, B; Viña, E; Montalbano, G; Garcia-Suarez, O; Germanà, A; Vega, J A; Abbate, F

    2016-09-01

    Sensory information from the environment is required for life and survival, and it is detected by specialized cells which together make up the sensory system. The fish sensory system includes specialized organs that are able to detect mechanical and chemical stimuli. In particular, taste buds are small organs located on the tongue in terrestrial vertebrates that function in the perception of taste. In fish, taste buds occur on the lips, the flanks, and the caudal (tail) fins of some species and on the barbels of others. In fish taste receptor cells, different classes of ion channels have been detected which, like in mammals, presumably participate in the detection and/or transduction of chemical gustatory signals. However, since some of these ion channels are involved in the detection of additional sensory modalities, it can be hypothesized that taste cells sense stimuli other than those specific for taste. This mini-review summarizes current knowledge on the presence of transient-receptor potential (TRP) and acid-sensing (ASIC) ion channels in the taste buds of teleosts, especially adult zebrafish. Up to now ASIC4, TRPC2, TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPV4 ion channels have been found in the sensory cells, while ASIC2 was detected in the nerves supplying the taste buds. PMID:27513962

  18. Activation and Regulation of Purinergic P2X Receptor Channels

    PubMed Central

    Coddou, Claudio; Yan, Zonghe; Obsil, Tomas; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian ATP-gated nonselective cation channels (P2XRs) can be composed of seven possible subunits, denoted P2X1 to P2X7. Each subunit contains a large ectodomain, two transmembrane domains, and intracellular N and C termini. Functional P2XRs are organized as homomeric and heteromeric trimers. This review focuses on the binding sites involved in the activation (orthosteric) and regulation (allosteric) of P2XRs. The ectodomains contain three ATP binding sites, presumably located between neighboring subunits and formed by highly conserved residues. The detection and coordination of three ATP phosphate residues by positively charged amino acids are likely to play a dominant role in determining agonist potency, whereas an AsnPheArg motif may contribute to binding by coordinating the adenine ring. Nonconserved ectodomain histidines provide the binding sites for trace metals, divalent cations, and protons. The transmembrane domains account not only for the formation of the channel pore but also for the binding of ivermectin (a specific P2X4R allosteric regulator) and alcohols. The N- and C- domains provide the structures that determine the kinetics of receptor desensitization and/or pore dilation and are critical for the regulation of receptor functions by intracellular messengers, kinases, reactive oxygen species and mercury. The recent publication of the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4.1R in a closed state provides a major advance in the understanding of this family of receptor channels. We will discuss data obtained from numerous site-directed mutagenesis experiments accumulated during the last 15 years with reference to the crystal structure, allowing a structural interpretation of the molecular basis of orthosteric and allosteric ligand actions. PMID:21737531

  19. Structure and function of glutamate receptor ion channels.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Mark L; Armstrong, Neali

    2004-01-01

    A vast number of proteins are involved in synaptic function. Many have been cloned and their functional role defined with varying degrees of success, but their number and complexity currently defy any molecular understanding of the physiology of synapses. A beacon of success in this medieval era of synaptic biology is an emerging understanding of the mechanisms underlying the activity of the neurotransmitter receptors for glutamate. Largely as a result of structural studies performed in the past three years we now have a mechanistic explanation for the activation of channel gating by agonists and partial agonists; the process of desensitization, and its block by allosteric modulators, is also mostly explained; and the basis of receptor subtype selectivity is emerging with clarity as more and more structures are solved. In the space of months we have gone from cartoons of postulated mechanisms to hard fact. It is anticipated that this level of understanding will emerge for other synaptic proteins in the coming decade.

  20. Receptors, Ion Channels, and Signaling Mechanisms Underlying Microglial Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Christian; Attwell, David

    2015-01-01

    Microglia, the innate immune cells of the CNS, play a pivotal role in brain injury and disease. Microglia are extremely motile; their highly ramified processes constantly survey the brain parenchyma, and they respond promptly to brain damage with targeted process movement toward the injury site. Microglia play a key role in brain development and function by pruning synapses during development, phagocytosing apoptotic newborn neurons, and regulating neuronal activity by direct microglia-neuron or indirect microglia-astrocyte-neuron interactions, which all depend on their process motility. This review highlights recent discoveries about microglial dynamics, focusing on the receptors, ion channels, and signaling pathways involved. PMID:25855789

  1. Structural Analysis and Deletion Mutagenesis Define Regions of QUIVER/SLEEPLESS that Are Responsible for Interactions with Shaker-Type Potassium Channels and Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meilin; Liu, Clifford Z.; Joiner, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Ly6 proteins are endogenous prototoxins found in most animals. They show striking structural and functional parallels to snake α-neurotoxins, including regulation of ion channels and cholinergic signaling. However, the structural contributions of Ly6 proteins to regulation of effector molecules is poorly understood. This question is particularly relevant to the Ly6 protein QUIVER/SLEEPLESS (QVR/SSS), which has previously been shown to suppress excitability and synaptic transmission by upregulating potassium (K) channels and downregulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in wake-promoting neurons to facilitate sleep in Drosophila. Using deletion mutagenesis, co-immunoprecipitations, ion flux assays, surface labeling and confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that only loop 2 is required for many of the previously described properties of SSS in transfected cells, including interactions with K channels and nAChRs. Collectively our data suggest that QVR/SSS, and by extension perhaps other Ly6 proteins, target effector molecules using limited protein motifs. Mapping these motifs may be useful in rational design of drugs that mimic or suppress Ly6-effector interactions to modulate nervous system function. PMID:26828958

  2. The Role of nAChR and Calcium Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer Initiation and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Schaal, Courtney; Padmanabhan, Jaya; Chellappan, Srikumar

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer shows a strong correlation with smoking and the current therapeutic strategies have been relatively ineffective in improving the survival of patients. Efforts have been made over the past many years to understand the molecular events that drive the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer, especially in the context of smoking. It has become clear that components of tobacco smoke not only initiate these cancers, especially pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) through their mutagenic properties, but can also promote the growth and metastasis of these tumors by stimulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Studies in cell culture systems, animal models and human samples have shown that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activation enhances these tumor-promoting events by channeling signaling through multiple pathways. In this context, signaling through calcium channels appear to facilitate pancreatic cancer growth by itself or downstream of nAChRs. This review article highlights the role of nAChR downstream signaling events and calcium signaling in the growth, metastasis as well as drug resistance of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26264026

  3. Alpha3* and alpha 7 nAChR-mediated Ca2+ transient generation in IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ween, Hilde; Thorin-Hagene, Kirsten; Andersen, Elisabeth; Grønlien, Jens Halvard; Lee, Chih-Hung; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Malysz, John

    2010-10-01

    Alpha3-containing (alpha 3*) and alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed in human IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells and implicated in Ca(2+) signaling. In this study, we investigated the intracellular Ca(2+) transient generation evoked by selective activation of alpha 3* (agonist potency rank order: epibatidine>varenicline>nicotine approximately cytisine) and alpha 7 (rank order in the presence of alpha 7 positive allosteric modulator or PAM: A-795723>NS6784 approximately PNU-282987) using, respectively, varenicline and NS6784 (+alpha 7 PAM) by Ca(2+) imaging. Effects of inhibitors of nAChRs (MLA and mecamylamine), ER Ca(2+) ATPase pump (CPA and thapsigargin), Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (ryanodine and dantrolene), Ca(2+) channels (nitrendipine, diltiazem, and Cd(2+)), and removal of extracellular Ca(2+) were examined. alpha 7 PAMs, when tested in the presence of NS6784, were more active when added first, followed by the agonist, than in the reverse order. Removal of extracellular Ca(2+) - but not CPA, thapsigargin, ryanodine, dantrolene, nitrendipine, diltiazem, or Cd(2+) - diminished the alpha 7 agonist-evoked Ca(2+) transients. In contrast, only diltiazem and nitrendipine and removal of extracellular Ca(2+) inhibited the alpha 3*-mediated Ca(2+) transients. The differential effect of diltiazem and nitrendipine versus Cd(2+) was due to direct inhibition of alpha 3* nAChRs as revealed by Ca(2+) imaging in HEK-293 cells expressing human alpha 3 beta 4 nAChRs and patch clamp in IMR-32 cells. In summary, this study provides evidence that alpha 3* and alpha 7 nAChR agonist-evoked global Ca(2+) transient generation in IMR-32 cells does not primarily involve voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, intracellular Ca(2+) stores, or Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. These mechanisms may, however, be still involved in other forms of nAChR-mediated Ca(2+) signaling.

  4. Membrane coordination of receptors and channels mediating the inhibition of neuronal ion currents by ADP.

    PubMed

    Gafar, Hend; Dominguez Rodriguez, Manuel; Chandaka, Giri K; Salzer, Isabella; Boehm, Stefan; Schicker, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    ADP and other nucleotides control ion currents in the nervous system via various P2Y receptors. In this respect, Cav2 and Kv7 channels have been investigated most frequently. The fine tuning of neuronal ion channel gating via G protein coupled receptors frequently relies on the formation of higher order protein complexes that are organized by scaffolding proteins and harbor receptors and channels together with interposed signaling components. However, ion channel complexes containing P2Y receptors have not been described. Therefore, the regulation of Cav2.2 and Kv7.2/7.3 channels via P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors and the coordination of these ion channels and receptors in the plasma membranes of tsA 201 cells have been investigated here. ADP inhibited currents through Cav2.2 channels via both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors with phospholipase C and pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins being involved, respectively. The nucleotide controlled the gating of Kv7 channels only via P2Y1 and phospholipase C. In fluorescence energy transfer assays using conventional as well as total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy, both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors were found juxtaposed to Cav2.2 channels, but only P2Y1, and not P2Y12, was in close proximity to Kv7 channels. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in TIRF microscopy, evidence for a physical interaction was obtained for the pair P2Y12/Cav2.2, but not for any other receptor/channel combination. These results reveal a membrane juxtaposition of P2Y receptors and ion channels in parallel with the control of neuronal ion currents by ADP. This juxtaposition may even result in apparent physical interactions between receptors and channels.

  5. Modulation of cardiac ryanodine receptor channels by alkaline earth cations.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Sylvester, Paula L; Porta, Maura; Copello, Julio A

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) function is modulated by Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). To better characterize Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) binding sites involved in RyR2 regulation, the effects of cytosolic and luminal earth alkaline divalent cations (M(2+): Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+)) were studied on RyR2 from pig ventricle reconstituted in bilayers. RyR2 were activated by M(2+) binding to high affinity activating sites at the cytosolic channel surface, specific for Ca(2+) or Sr(2+). This activation was interfered by Mg(2+) and Ba(2+) acting at low affinity M(2+)-unspecific binding sites. When testing the effects of luminal M(2+) as current carriers, all M(2+) increased maximal RyR2 open probability (compared to Cs(+)), suggesting the existence of low affinity activating M(2+)-unspecific sites at the luminal surface. Responses to M(2+) vary from channel to channel (heterogeneity). However, with luminal Ba(2+)or Mg(2+), RyR2 were less sensitive to cytosolic Ca(2+) and caffeine-mediated activation, openings were shorter and voltage-dependence was more marked (compared to RyR2 with luminal Ca(2+)or Sr(2+)). Kinetics of RyR2 with mixtures of luminal Ba(2+)/Ca(2+) and additive action of luminal plus cytosolic Ba(2+) or Mg(2+) suggest luminal M(2+) differentially act on luminal sites rather than accessing cytosolic sites through the pore. This suggests the presence of additional luminal activating Ca(2+)/Sr(2+)-specific sites, which stabilize high P(o) mode (less voltage-dependent) and increase RyR2 sensitivity to cytosolic Ca(2+) activation. In summary, RyR2 luminal and cytosolic surfaces have at least two sets of M(2+) binding sites (specific for Ca(2+) and unspecific for Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)) that dynamically modulate channel activity and gating status, depending on SR voltage. PMID:22039534

  6. The sigma receptor as a ligand-regulated auxiliary potassium channel subunit.

    PubMed

    Aydar, Ebru; Palmer, Christopher P; Klyachko, Vitaly A; Jackson, Meyer B

    2002-04-25

    The sigma receptor is a novel protein that mediates the modulation of ion channels by psychotropic drugs through a unique transduction mechanism depending neither on G proteins nor protein phosphorylation. The present study investigated sigma receptor signal transduction by reconstituting responses in Xenopus oocytes. Sigma receptors modulated voltage-gated K+ channels (Kv1.4 or Kv1.5) in different ways in the presence and absence of ligands. Association between Kv1.4 channels and sigma receptors was demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation. These results indicate a novel mechanism of signal transduction dependent on protein-protein interactions. Domain accessibility experiments suggested a structure for the sigma receptor with two cytoplasmic termini and two membrane-spanning segments. The ligand-independent effects on channels suggest that sigma receptors serve as auxiliary subunits to voltage-gated K+ channels with distinct functional interactions, depending on the presence or absence of ligand.

  7. A ligand channel through the G protein coupled receptor opsin.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Peter W; Scheerer, Patrick; Park, Jung Hee; Choe, Hui-Woog; Piechnick, Ronny; Ernst, Oliver P; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Heck, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The G protein coupled receptor rhodopsin contains a pocket within its seven-transmembrane helix (TM) structure, which bears the inactivating 11-cis-retinal bound by a protonated Schiff-base to Lys296 in TM7. Light-induced 11-cis-/all-trans-isomerization leads to the Schiff-base deprotonated active Meta II intermediate. With Meta II decay, the Schiff-base bond is hydrolyzed, all-trans-retinal is released from the pocket, and the apoprotein opsin reloaded with new 11-cis-retinal. The crystal structure of opsin in its active Ops* conformation provides the basis for computational modeling of retinal release and uptake. The ligand-free 7TM bundle of opsin opens into the hydrophobic membrane layer through openings A (between TM1 and 7), and B (between TM5 and 6), respectively. Using skeleton search and molecular docking, we find a continuous channel through the protein that connects these two openings and comprises in its central part the retinal binding pocket. The channel traverses the receptor over a distance of ca. 70 A and is between 11.6 and 3.2 A wide. Both openings are lined with aromatic residues, while the central part is highly polar. Four constrictions within the channel are so narrow that they must stretch to allow passage of the retinal beta-ionone-ring. Constrictions are at openings A and B, respectively, and at Trp265 and Lys296 within the retinal pocket. The lysine enforces a 90 degrees elbow-like kink in the channel which limits retinal passage. With a favorable Lys side chain conformation, 11-cis-retinal can take the turn, whereas passage of the all-trans isomer would require more global conformational changes. We discuss possible scenarios for the uptake of 11-cis- and release of all-trans-retinal. If the uptake gate of 11-cis-retinal is assigned to opening B, all-trans is likely to leave through the same gate. The unidirectional passage proposed previously requires uptake of 11-cis-retinal through A and release of photolyzed all-trans-retinal through

  8. Characterization of a T-superfamily conotoxin TxVC from Conus textile that selectively targets neuronal nAChR subtypes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Du, Tianpeng; Liu, Zhuguo; Wang, Sheng; Wu, Ying; Ding, Jiuping; Jiang, Ling; Dai, Qiuyun

    2014-11-01

    T-superfamily conotoxins have a typical cysteine pattern of "CC-CC", and are known to mainly target calcium or sodium ion channels. Recently, we screened the targets of a series of T-superfamily conotoxins and found that a new T-superfamily conotoxin TxVC (KPCCSIHDNSCCGL-NH2) from the venom of Conus textile. It selectively targeted the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes α4β2 and α3β2, with IC50 values of 343.4 and 1047.2nM, respectively, but did not exhibit obvious pharmacological effects on voltage-gated potassium, sodium or calcium channel in DRG cells, the BK channels expressed in HEK293 cells, or the Kv channels in LβT2 cells. The changes in the inhibitory activities of its Ala mutants, the NMR structure, and molecular simulation results based on other conotoxins targeting nAChR α4β2, all demonstrated that the residues Ile(6) and Leu(14) were the main hydrophobic pharmacophores. To our best knowledge, this is the first T-superfamily conotoxin that inhibits neuronal nAChRs and possesses high binding affinity to α4β2. This finding will expand the knowledge of the targets of T-superfamily conotoxins and the motif information could help the design of new nAChR inhibitors.

  9. Nicotinic Receptors in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; López-Hernández, Beatriz; Ceña, Valentín

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have focused on expanding our knowledge of the structure and diversity of peripheral and central nicotinic receptors. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the Cys-loop superfamily of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, which include GABA (A and C), serotonin, and glycine receptors. Currently, 9 alpha (α2-α10) and 3 beta (β2-β4) subunits have been identified in the central nervous system (CNS), and these subunits assemble to form a variety of functional nAChRs. The pentameric combination of several alpha and beta subunits leads to a great number of nicotinic receptors that vary in their properties, including their sensitivity to nicotine, permeability to calcium and propensity to desensitize. In the CNS, nAChRs play crucial roles in modulating presynaptic, postsynaptic, and extrasynaptic signaling, and have been found to be involved in a complex range of CNS disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), schizophrenia, Tourette´s syndrome, anxiety, depression and epilepsy. Therefore, there is growing interest in the development of drugs that modulate nAChR functions with optimal benefits and minimal adverse effects. The present review describes the main characteristics of nAChRs in the CNS and focuses on the various compounds that have been tested and are currently in phase I and phase II trials for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases including PD, AD and age-associated memory and mild cognitive impairment. PMID:24179465

  10. AMPA receptors undergo channel arrest in the anoxic turtle cortex.

    PubMed

    Pamenter, Matthew Edward; Shin, Damian Seung-Ho; Buck, Leslie Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Without oxygen, all mammals suffer neuronal injury and excitotoxic cell death mediated by overactivation of the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). The western painted turtle can survive anoxia for months, and downregulation of NMDAR activity is thought to be neuroprotective during anoxia. NMDAR activity is related to the activity of another glutamate receptor, the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor (AMPAR). AMPAR blockade is neuroprotective against anoxic insult in mammals, but the role of AMPARs in the turtle's anoxia tolerance has not been investigated. To determine whether AMPAR activity changes during hypoxia or anoxia in the turtle cortex, whole cell AMPAR currents, AMPAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), and excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were measured. The effect of AMPAR blockade on normoxic and anoxic NMDAR currents was also examined. During 60 min of normoxia, evoked peak AMPAR currents and the frequencies and amplitudes of EPSPs and EPSCs did not change. During anoxic perfusion, evoked AMPAR peak currents decreased 59.2 +/- 5.5 and 60.2 +/- 3.5% at 20 and 40 min, respectively. EPSP frequency (EPSP(f)) and amplitude decreased 28.7 +/- 6.4% and 13.2 +/- 1.7%, respectively, and EPSC(f) and amplitude decreased 50.7 +/- 5.1% and 51.3 +/- 4.7%, respectively. In contrast, hypoxic (Po(2) = 5%) AMPAR peak currents were potentiated 56.6 +/- 20.5 and 54.6 +/- 15.8% at 20 and 40 min, respectively. All changes were reversed by reoxygenation. AMPAR currents and EPSPs were abolished by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). In neurons pretreated with CNQX, anoxic NMDAR currents were reversibly depressed by 49.8 +/- 7.9%. These data suggest that AMPARs may undergo channel arrest in the anoxic turtle cortex. PMID:18056983

  11. Immunological studies on the structure and function of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in mammalian muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The specificity of the antibodies in the serum of a patient with myasthenia gravis for a the {alpha}-bungarotoxin binding sites of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) was examined using AChRs in the C2 mouse muscle cell line as a model. The antibodies were shown to be specific for one of the two toxin-binding sites. The effect of the antibodies in this myasthenic serum on the functional response of the receptor to cholinergic agonists was also examined using carbamylcholine-induced {sup 22}Na uptake into C2 myotubes as a measured of the receptor function. Antibodies specific for the {gamma}, {delta}, and {epsilon} subunit, respectively, of mammalian muscle AChRs were developed using subunit-specific synthetic peptides as antigens. Using these antibodies and monoclonal antibodies for other subunits as probes, I have identified four ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, and {delta}) subunits of mammalian muscle AChRs on immunoblots. When AChRs from embryonic, neonatal, normal and denervated adult muscles were compared on immunoblots, the {alpha}, {beta}, and {delta} subunits were identical in all four receptor preparations, with or without endoglycosidase digestion. The spatial and temporal distribution of the {gamma}- and {epsilon}- AChRs in developing and in denervated muscles corresponds to the distribution of AChRs with slow and fast channels, respectively, and that the development changes in the channel properties of the receptor arise from a change in the subunit composition of the receptor, in which the {gamma} is replaced by {epsilon}.

  12. Expression of cloned α6* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are ACh-gated ion channels formed from five homologous subunits in subtypes defined by their subunit composition and stoichiometry. Some subtypes readily produce functional AChRs in Xenopus oocytes and transfected cell lines. α6β2β3* AChRs (subtypes formed from these subunits and perhaps others) are not easily expressed. This may be because the types of neurons in which they are expressed (typically dopaminergic neurons) have unique chaperones for assembling α6β2β3* AChRs, especially in the presence of the other AChR subtypes. Because these relatively minor brain AChR subtypes are of major importance in addiction to nicotine, it is important for drug development as well as investigation of their functional properties to be able to efficiently express human α6β2β3* AChRs. We review the issues and progress in expressing α6* AChRs. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'.

  13. Discovery of Highly Potent and Selective α4β2-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Partial Agonists Containing an Isoxazolylpyridine Ether Scaffold that Demonstrate Antidepressant-like Activity. Part II

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li-Fang; Eaton, J. Brek; Fedolak, Allison; Zhang, Han-Kun; Hanania, Taleen; Brunner, Dani; Lukas, Ronald J.; Kozikowski, Alan P.

    2012-01-01

    In our continued efforts to develop α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonists as novel antidepressants having a unique mechanism of action, structure activity relationship (SAR) exploration of certain isoxazolylpyridine ethers is presented. In particular, modifications to both the azetidine ring present in the starting structure 4 and its metabolically liable hydroxyl side chain substituent have been explored to improve compound druggability. The pharmacological characterization of all new compounds has been carried out using [3H]epibatidine binding studies together with functional assays based on 86Rb+ ion flux measurements. We found that the deletion of the metabolically liable hydroxyl group or its replacement by a fluoromethyl group not only maintained potency and selectivity, but also resulted in compounds showing antidepressant-like properties in the mouse forced swim test. These isoxazolylpyridine ethers appear to represent promising lead candidates in the design of innovative chemical tools containing reporter groups for imaging purposes and of possible therapeutics. PMID:23092294

  14. Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Structure and Function and Response to Nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Dani, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) belong to the “Cys-loop” superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels that includes GABAA, glycine, and serotonin (5-HT3) receptors. There are 16 homologous mammalian nAChR subunits encoded by a multigene family. These subunits combine to form many different nAChR subtypes with various expression patterns, diverse functional properties, and differing pharmacological characteristics. Because cholinergic innervation is pervasive and nAChR expression is extremely broad, practically every area of the brain is impinged upon by nicotinic mechanisms. This review briefly examines the structural and functional properties of the receptor/channel complex itself. The review also summarizes activation and desensitization of nAChRs by the low nicotine concentrations obtained from tobacco. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure and the structural characteristics of channel gating has reached an advanced stage. Likewise, the basic functional properties of the channel also are reasonably well understood. It is these receptor/channel properties that underlie the participation of nAChRs in nearly every anatomical region of the mammalian brain. PMID:26472524

  15. Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Structure and Function and Response to Nicotine.

    PubMed

    Dani, John A

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) belong to the "Cys-loop" superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels that includes GABAA, glycine, and serotonin (5-HT3) receptors. There are 16 homologous mammalian nAChR subunits encoded by a multigene family. These subunits combine to form many different nAChR subtypes with various expression patterns, diverse functional properties, and differing pharmacological characteristics. Because cholinergic innervation is pervasive and nAChR expression is extremely broad, practically every area of the brain is impinged upon by nicotinic mechanisms. This review briefly examines the structural and functional properties of the receptor/channel complex itself. The review also summarizes activation and desensitization of nAChRs by the low nicotine concentrations obtained from tobacco. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure and the structural characteristics of channel gating has reached an advanced stage. Likewise, the basic functional properties of the channel also are reasonably well understood. It is these receptor/channel properties that underlie the participation of nAChRs in nearly every anatomical region of the mammalian brain.

  16. Electrochemical evaluation of chemical selectivity of glutamate receptor ion channel proteins with a multi-channel sensor.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, M; Hirano, A; Rehák, M; Nakanishi, J; Kawai, K; Sato, H; Umezawa, Y

    1997-01-01

    A new method for evaluating chemical selectivity of agonists towards receptor ion channel proteins is proposed by using glutamate receptor (GluR) ion channel proteins and their agonists N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA), L-glutamate, and (2S, 3R, 4S) isomer of 2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-IV). Integrated multi-channel currents, corresponding to the sum of total amount of ions passed through the multiple open channels, were used as a measure of agonists' selectivity to recognize ion channel proteins and induce channel currents. GluRs isolated from rat synaptic plasma membranes were incorporated into planar bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) formed by the folding method. The empirical factors that affect the selectivity were demonstrated: (i) the number of GluRs incorporated into BLMs varied from one membrane to another; (ii) each BLM contained different subtypes of GluRs (NMDA and/or non-NMDA subtypes); and (iii) the magnitude of multi-channel responses induced by L-glutamate at negative applied potentials was larger than at positive potentials, while those by NMDA and L-CCG-IV were linearly related to applied potentials. The chemical selectivity among NMDA, L-glutamate and L-CCG-IV for NMDA subtype of GluRs was determined with each single BLM in which only NMDA subtype of GluRs was designed to be active by inhibiting the non-NMDA subtypes using a specific antagonist DNQX. The order of selectivity among the relevant agonists for the NMDA receptor subtype was found to be L-CCG-IV > L-glutamate > NMDA, which is consistent with the order of binding affinity of these agonists towards the same NMDA subtypes. The potential use of this approach for evaluating chemical selectivity towards non-NMDA receptor subtypes of GluRs and other receptor ion channel proteins is discussed.

  17. Fluoxetine is neuroprotective in slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haipeng; Grajales-Reyes, Gary E; Alicea-Vázquez, Vivianette; Grajales-Reyes, Jose G; Robinson, KaReisha; Pytel, Peter; Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Lasalde-Dominicci, Jose A; Gomez, Christopher M

    2015-08-01

    The slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCS) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that caused mutations in the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) affecting neuromuscular transmission. Leaky AChRs lead to Ca(2+) overload and degeneration of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) attributed to activation of cysteine proteases and apoptotic changes of synaptic nuclei. Here we use transgenic mouse models expressing two different mutations found in SCS to demonstrate that inhibition of prolonged opening of mutant AChRs using fluoxetine not only improves motor performance and neuromuscular transmission but also prevents Ca(2+) overload, the activation of cysteine proteases, calpain, caspase-3 and 9 at endplates, and as a consequence, reduces subsynaptic DNA damage at endplates, suggesting a long term benefit to therapy. These studies suggest that prolonged treatment of SCS patients with open ion channel blockers that preferentially block mutant AChRs is neuroprotective.

  18. Fluoxetine is neuroprotective in slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haipeng; Grajales-Reyes, E.; Vázquez, Vivianette Alicea; Robinson, KaReisha; Pytel, Peter; Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Lasalde-Dominicci, Jose A; Gomez, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    The slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCS) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused mutations in the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) affecting neuromuscular transmission. Leaky AChRs lead to Ca2+ overload and degeneration of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) attributed to activation of cysteine proteases and apoptotic changes of synaptic nuclei. Here we use transgenic mouse models expressing two different mutations found in SCS to demonstrate that inhibition of prolonged opening of mutant AChRs using fluoxetine not only improves motor performance and neuromuscular transmission but also prevents Ca2+ overload, activation of cysteine proteases, calpain, caspase-3 and 9 at endplates, and as a consequence, reduces subsynaptic DNA damage at endplates, suggesting a long term benefit to therapy. These studies suggest that prolonged treatment of SCS patients with open ion channel blockers that preferentially block mutant AChRs is neuroprotective. PMID:25448156

  19. Combined single channel and single molecule detection identifies subunit composition of STIM1-activated transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels.

    PubMed

    Asanov, Alexander; Sampieri, Alicia; Moreno, Claudia; Pacheco, Jonathan; Salgado, Alfonso; Sherry, Ryan; Vaca, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Depletion of intracellular calcium ion stores initiates a rapid cascade of events culminating with the activation of the so-called Store-Operated Channels (SOC) at the plasma membrane. Calcium influx via SOC is essential in the initiation of calcium-dependent intracellular signaling and for the refilling of internal calcium stores, ensuring the regeneration of the signaling cascade. In spite of the significance of this evolutionary conserved mechanism, the molecular identity of SOC has been the center of a heated controversy spanning over the last 20 years. Initial studies positioned some members of the transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channel superfamily of channels (with the more robust evidence pointing to TRPC1) as a putative SOC. Recent evidence indicates that Stromal Interacting Molecule 1 (STIM1) activates some members from the TRPC family of channels. However, the exact subunit composition of TRPC channels remains undetermined to this date. To identify the subunit composition of STIM1-activated TRPC channels, we developed novel method, which combines single channel electrophysiological measurements based on the patch clamp technique with single molecule fluorescence imaging. We termed this method Single ion Channel Single Molecule Detection technique (SC-SMD). Using SC-SMD method, we have obtained direct evidence of the subunit composition of TRPC channels activated by STIM1. Furthermore, our electrophysiological-imaging SC-SMD method provides evidence at the molecular level of the mechanism by which STIM1 and calmodulin antagonize to modulate TRPC channel activity.

  20. Functional Coupling of Ca2+ Channels and Ryanodine Receptors in Cardiac Myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, James S. K.; Cleemann, Lars; Morad, Martin

    1995-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, dihydropyridine receptors are functionally coupled to ryanodine receptors of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in triadic or diadic junctional complexes. In cardiac muscle direct physical or functional couplings have not been demonstrated. We have tested the hypothesis of functional coupling of L-type Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors in rat cardiac myocytes by comparing the efficacies of Ca2+ in triggering Ca2+ release when the ion enters the cell via the Ca2+ channels or the Na^+/Ca2+ exchanger. Ca2+ transported through the Ca2+ channels was 20-160 times more effective than Ca2+ influx via the Na^+/Ca2+ exchanger in gating Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, suggesting privileged communication between Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors. In support of this hypothesis we found that Ca2+ channels were inactivated by Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, even though the myoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations were buffered with 10 mM EGTA. The data thus suggest privileged cross signaling between the dihydropyridine and ryanodine receptors such that Ca2+ flux through either the Ca2+ channel or the ryanodine receptor alters the gating kinetics of the other channel.

  1. NR2 subunit-dependence of NMDA receptor channel block by external Mg2+

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Anqi; Buller, Amy L; Johnson, Jon W

    2005-01-01

    The vital roles played by NMDA receptors in CNS physiology depend critically on powerful voltage-dependent channel block by external Mg2+ (Mg2+o). NMDA receptor channel block by Mg2+o depends on receptor subunit composition: NR1/2A receptors (receptors composed of NR1 and NR2A subunits) and NR1/2B receptors are more strongly inhibited by Mg2+o than are NR1/2C or NR1/2D receptors. We investigated the effects of Mg2+o on single-channel and whole-cell currents recorded from recombinant NR1/2D and NR1/2A receptors expressed in HEK293 and 293T cells. The main conclusions are as follows: (1) Voltage-dependent inhibition by Mg2+o of whole-cell NR1/2D receptor responses was at least 4-fold weaker than inhibition of NR1/2A receptor responses at all voltages tested. (2) Channel block by Mg2+o reduced the duration of NR1/2D receptor single-channel openings; this reduction was used to estimate the apparent blocking rate of Mg2+o (k+,app). The k+,app for NR1/2D receptors was similar to but moderately slower than the k+,app obtained from cortical NMDA receptors composed of NR1, NR2A and NR2B subunits at all voltages tested. (3) Mg2+o blocking events induced an additional component in the closed-duration distribution; this component was used to estimate the apparent unblocking rate of Mg2+o (k−,app). The k−,app for NR1/2D receptors was much faster than the k−,app for cortical receptors at all voltages tested. The voltage-dependence of the k−,app of NR1/2D and cortical receptors differed in a manner that suggested that Mg2+o may permeate NR1/2D receptors more easily than cortical receptors. (4) Mg2+o inhibits NR1/2D receptors less effectively than cortical receptors chiefly because Mg2+o unbinds much more rapidly from NR1/2D receptors. PMID:15513936

  2. The N-terminal domain of GluR6-subtype glutamate receptor ion channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Janesh; Schuck, Peter; Jin, Rongsheng; Mayer, Mark L.

    2009-09-25

    The amino-terminal domain (ATD) of glutamate receptor ion channels, which controls their selective assembly into AMPA, kainate and NMDA receptor subtypes, is also the site of action of NMDA receptor allosteric modulators. Here we report the crystal structure of the ATD from the kainate receptor GluR6. The ATD forms dimers in solution at micromolar protein concentrations and crystallizes as a dimer. Unexpectedly, each subunit adopts an intermediate extent of domain closure compared to the apo and ligand-bound complexes of LIVBP and G protein-coupled glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and the dimer assembly has a markedly different conformation from that found in mGluRs. This conformation is stabilized by contacts between large hydrophobic patches in the R2 domain that are absent in NMDA receptors, suggesting that the ATDs of individual glutamate receptor ion channels have evolved into functionally distinct families.

  3. The Oncogenic Functions of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ion channels that are expressed in the cell membrane of all mammalian cells, including cancer cells. Recent findings suggest that nAChRs not only mediate nicotine addiction in the brain but also contribute to the development and progression of cancers directly induced by nicotine and its derived carcinogenic nitrosamines whereas deregulation of the nAChRs is observed in many cancers, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) indicate that SNPs nAChRs associate with risks of lung cancers and nicotine addiction. Emerging evidences suggest nAChRs are posited at the central regulatory loops of numerous cell growth and prosurvival signal pathways and also mediate the synthesis and release of stimulatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters induced by their agonists. Thus nAChRs mediated cell signaling plays an important role in stimulating the growth and angiogenic and neurogenic factors and mediating oncogenic signal transduction during cancer development in a cell type specific manner. In this review, we provide an integrated view of nAChRs signaling in cancer, heightening on the oncogenic properties of nAChRs that may be targeted for cancer treatment. PMID:26981122

  4. The Oncogenic Functions of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ion channels that are expressed in the cell membrane of all mammalian cells, including cancer cells. Recent findings suggest that nAChRs not only mediate nicotine addiction in the brain but also contribute to the development and progression of cancers directly induced by nicotine and its derived carcinogenic nitrosamines whereas deregulation of the nAChRs is observed in many cancers, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) indicate that SNPs nAChRs associate with risks of lung cancers and nicotine addiction. Emerging evidences suggest nAChRs are posited at the central regulatory loops of numerous cell growth and prosurvival signal pathways and also mediate the synthesis and release of stimulatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters induced by their agonists. Thus nAChRs mediated cell signaling plays an important role in stimulating the growth and angiogenic and neurogenic factors and mediating oncogenic signal transduction during cancer development in a cell type specific manner. In this review, we provide an integrated view of nAChRs signaling in cancer, heightening on the oncogenic properties of nAChRs that may be targeted for cancer treatment. PMID:26981122

  5. A Transient Receptor Potential Ion Channel in Chlamydomonas Shares Key Features with Sensory Transduction-Associated TRP Channels in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Darraz, Luis; Cabezas, Deny; Colenso, Charlotte K.; Alegría-Arcos, Melissa; Bravo-Moraga, Felipe; Varas-Concha, Ignacio; Almonacid, Daniel E.; Madrid, Rodolfo; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Sensory modalities are essential for navigating through an ever-changing environment. From insects to mammals, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are known mediators for cellular sensing. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a motile single-celled freshwater green alga that is guided by photosensory, mechanosensory, and chemosensory cues. In this type of alga, sensory input is first detected by membrane receptors located in the cell body and then transduced to the beating cilia by membrane depolarization. Although TRP channels seem to be absent in plants, C. reinhardtii possesses genomic sequences encoding TRP proteins. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of a C. reinhardtii version of a TRP channel sharing key features present in mammalian TRP channels associated with sensory transduction. In silico sequence-structure analysis unveiled the modular design of TRP channels, and electrophysiological experiments conducted on Human Embryonic Kidney-293T cells expressing the Cr-TRP1 clone showed that many of the core functional features of metazoan TRP channels are present in Cr-TRP1, suggesting that basic TRP channel gating characteristics evolved early in the history of eukaryotes. PMID:25595824

  6. Transient Receptor Potential Ion Channels Control Thermoregulatory Behaviour in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Seebacher, Frank; Murray, Shauna A.

    2007-01-01

    Biological functions are governed by thermodynamics, and animals regulate their body temperature to optimise cellular performance and to avoid harmful extremes. The capacity to sense environmental and internal temperatures is a prerequisite for the evolution of thermoregulation. However, the mechanisms that enable ectothermic vertebrates to sense heat remain unknown. The recently discovered thermal characteristics of transient receptor potential ion channels (TRP) render these proteins suitable to act as temperature sensors. Here we test the hypothesis that TRPs are present in reptiles and function to control thermoregulatory behaviour. We show that the hot-sensing TRPV1 is expressed in a crocodile (Crocodylus porosus), an agamid (Amphibolurus muricatus) and a scincid (Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii) lizard, as well as in the quail and zebrafinch (Coturnix chinensis and Poephila guttata). The TRPV1 genes from all reptiles form a unique clade that is delineated from the mammalian and the ancestral Xenopus sequences by an insertion of two amino acids. TRPV1 and the cool-sensing TRPM8 are expressed in liver, muscle (transversospinalis complex), and heart tissues of the crocodile, and have the potential to act as internal thermometer and as external temperatures sensors. Inhibition of TRPV1 and TRPM8 in C. porosus abolishes the typically reptilian shuttling behaviour between cooling and heating environments, and leads to significantly altered body temperature patterns. Our results provide the proximate mechanism of thermal selection in terrestrial ectotherms, which heralds a fundamental change in interpretation, because TRPs provide the mechanism for a tissue-specific input into the animals' thermoregulatory response. PMID:17356692

  7. From The Cover: Microtransplantation of functional receptors and channels from the Alzheimer's brain to frog oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miledi, R.; Dueñas, Z.; Martinez-Torres, A.; Kawas, C. H.; Eusebi, F.

    2004-02-01

    About a decade ago, cell membranes from the electric organ of Torpedo and from the rat brain were transplanted to frog oocytes, which thus acquired functional Torpedo and rat neurotransmitter receptors. Nevertheless, the great potential that this method has for studying human diseases has remained virtually untapped. Here, we show that cell membranes from the postmortem brains of humans that suffered Alzheimer's disease can be microtransplanted to the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes. We show also that these postmortem membranes carry neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-operated channels that are still functional, even after they have been kept frozen for many years. This method provides a new and powerful approach to study directly the functional characteristics and structure of receptors, channels, and other membrane proteins of the Alzheimer's brain. This knowledge may help in understanding the basis of Alzheimer's disease and also help in developing new treatments. -aminobutyric acid receptors | sodium channels | calcium channels | postmortem brain

  8. Heterologously expressed serotonin 1A receptors couple to muscarinic K+ channels in heart.

    PubMed Central

    Karschin, A; Ho, B Y; Labarca, C; Elroy-Stein, O; Moss, B; Davidson, N; Lester, H A

    1991-01-01

    In cardiac atrial cells, muscarinic acetylcholine receptors activate a K+ current directly via a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein). Serotonin type 1A receptors may activate a similar pathway in hippocampal neurons. To develop a system in which receptor/G protein/K+ channel coupling can be experimentally manipulated, we have used a highly efficient recombinant vaccinia virus vector system to express human serotonin 1A receptors in primary cultures of rat atrial myocytes. The expressed 1A receptors activated the inwardly rectifying K+ conductance that is normally activated by the endogenous muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Maximal responses to either agonist occluded further activation by the other agonist. The average activation time constants for serotonin were about 5 times slower than for acetylcholine. The data support suggestions that the intracellular signaling pathway from seven-helix receptors to G proteins and directly to ion channels is widespread in excitable cells. After a fraction of the G proteins are activated irreversibly by guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate, subsequent transduction proceeds more efficiently. One possible interpretation is that multiple G-protein molecules are required to activate each channel. Vaccinia virus expression vectors are thus useful for expressing seven-helix receptors in primary cultures of postmitotic cells and have provided a heterologous expression system for the signaling pathway from seven-helix receptors to G proteins and directly to ion channels. Images PMID:1905814

  9. Structure-Driven Pharmacology of Transient Receptor Potential Channel Vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Caceres-Molina, Javier; Sepulveda, Romina V; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Latorre, Ramon

    2016-09-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal receptor that mediates the flux of cations across the membrane in response to several stimuli, including heat, voltage, and ligands. The best known agonist of TRPV1 channels is capsaicin, the pungent component of "hot" chili peppers. In addition, peptides found in the venom of poisonous animals, along with the lipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate, lysophosphatidic acid, and cholesterol, bind to TRPV1 with high affinity to modulate channel gating. Here, we discuss the functional evidence regarding ligand-dependent activation of TRPV1 channels in light of structural data recently obtained by cryoelectron microscopy. This review focuses on the mechanistic insights into ligand binding and allosteric gating of TRPV1 channels and the relevance of accurate polymodal receptor biophysical characterization for drug design in novel pain therapies. PMID:27335334

  10. Thinking in cycles: MWC is a good model for acetylcholine receptor-channels

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Neuromuscular acetylcholine receptors have long been a model system for understanding the mechanisms of operation of ligand-gated ion channels and fast chemical synapses. These five subunit membrane proteins have two allosteric (transmitter) binding sites and a distant ion channel domain. Occupation of the binding sites by agonist molecules transiently increases the probability that the channel is ion-permeable. Recent experiments show that the Monod, Wyman and Changeux formalism for allosteric proteins, originally developed for haemoglobin, is an excellent model for acetylcholine receptors. By using mutations and single-channel electrophysiology, the gating equilibrium constants for receptors with zero, one or two bound agonist molecules, and the agonist association and dissociation rate constants from both the closed- and open-channel conformations, have been estimated experimentally. The change in affinity for each transmitter molecule between closed and open conformations provides ∼–5.1 kcal mol−1 towards the global gating isomerization of the protein. PMID:21807612

  11. Structure-Driven Pharmacology of Transient Receptor Potential Channel Vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Caceres-Molina, Javier; Sepulveda, Romina V; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Latorre, Ramon

    2016-09-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal receptor that mediates the flux of cations across the membrane in response to several stimuli, including heat, voltage, and ligands. The best known agonist of TRPV1 channels is capsaicin, the pungent component of "hot" chili peppers. In addition, peptides found in the venom of poisonous animals, along with the lipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate, lysophosphatidic acid, and cholesterol, bind to TRPV1 with high affinity to modulate channel gating. Here, we discuss the functional evidence regarding ligand-dependent activation of TRPV1 channels in light of structural data recently obtained by cryoelectron microscopy. This review focuses on the mechanistic insights into ligand binding and allosteric gating of TRPV1 channels and the relevance of accurate polymodal receptor biophysical characterization for drug design in novel pain therapies.

  12. Structure-activity relationships of amantadine. I. Interaction of the N-alkyl analogues with the ionic channels of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and electrically excitable membrane.

    PubMed

    Warnick, J E; Maleque, M A; Bakry, N; Eldefrawi, A T; Albuquerque, E X

    1982-07-01

    In this study the effects of amantadine (1-adamantanamine) and its N-alkyl-substituted analogues [N-methyl- (NMA), N-ethyl- (NEA), N-propyl- (NPA), N-butyl- (NBA), and N,N-diethyl-amantidine (NNDEA)] were investigated on ionic channels of the electrically excitable membrane and of the nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors in frog sartorius muscles and on the binding of perhydrohistrionicotoxin (H12-HTX) to isolated membranes of the electric organ of the electric ray Torpedo. Amantadine and each analogue blocked the indirectly elicited twitch, but NPA, NBA, and NNDEA also potentiated the directly elicited twitch. The order of potency in inhibiting the indirect twitch was: NEA = NPA = NNDEA (10 microM) greater than NMA (15 microM) greater than NBA (40 microM) much greater than amantadine (130 microM). Neither amantadine nor its N-alkyl analogues affected miniature end-plate potential frequency or resting membrane potential but decreased miniature end-plate potential amplitude. Each compound prolonged the directly elicited action potential but did not alter delayed rectification. All of the compounds induced a concentration-dependent depression of the peak end-plate current (EPC) amplitude at negative membrane potentials and induced nonlinearity in the response at membrane potentials more negative than -40 mV. The order of potency in inhibiting the EPC (at -90 mV) was NNDEA (less than 0.5 microM) greater than NPA (less than 1.0 microM) greater than NBA (less than 2.0 microM) greater than NEA (19 microM) greater than NMA (42 microM) greater than amantadine (64 microM). Only NPA, NBA, and NNDEA depressed the peak EPC amplitude at positive membrane potentials as well. The shortening of the time constant of EPC decay by all compounds was concentration-dependent. At the higher concentrations examined, the slope of the relationship between the time constant of decay and membrane potential was reversed for all compounds. Only NPA induced a double-exponential decay of the

  13. ATP-dependent desensitization of the muscarinic K+ channel in rat atrial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Z; Boyett, M R; Zang, W J

    1997-01-01

    1. Fast desensitization of the muscarinic K+ channel has been studied in excised patches from rat atrial cells. 2. In inside-out patches, ACh was present in the pipette and GTP was applied via the bath to activate the channel. In outside-out patches, GTP was present in the pipette and ACh was applied via the bath to activate the channel. In both cases, during a 30 s exposure to GTP or ACh there was a decline in channel activity as a result of fast desensitization if ATP was present. 3. In inside-out patches, fast desensitization was still observed if the muscarinic ACh receptor was bypassed and the channel was activated by GTP gamma S. This suggests that fast desensitization is a result of a modification of the channel (or the connecting G protein) and not the receptor. 4. In both inside-out and outside-out patches, channel activity was depressed and fast desensitization was reduced or absent, if ATP was not present. 5. The non-hydrolysable analogue of ATP, AMP-PNP, did not substitute for ATP in its effects on the channel. 6. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that fast desensitization of the muscarinic K+ channel is the result of a dephosphorylation of the channel. Images Figure 12 PMID:9409473

  14. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  15. Involvement of HCN Channel in Muscarinic Inhibitory Action on Tonic Firing of Dorsolateral Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhe; Zhang, Kang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yan, Haitao; Ma, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Shuzhuo; Zheng, Jianquan; Wang, Liyun; Wei, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    The striatum is the most prominent nucleus in the basal ganglia and plays an important role in motor movement regulation. The cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) in striatum are involved in the motion regulation by releasing acetylcholine (ACh) and modulating the output of striatal projection neurons. Here, we report that muscarinic ACh receptor (M receptor) agonists, ACh and Oxotremorine (OXO-M), decreased the firing frequency of ChIs by blocking the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. Scopolamine (SCO), a nonselective antagonist of M receptors, abolished the inhibition. OXO-M exerted its function by activating the Gi/o cAMP signaling cascade. The single-cell reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (scRT-PCR) revealed that all the five subtypes of M receptors and four subtypes of HCN channels were expressed on ChIs. Among them, M2 receptors and HCN2 channels were the most dominant ones and expressed in every single studied cholinergic interneuron (ChI).Our results suggest that ACh regulates not only the output of striatal projection neurons, but also the firing activity of ChIs themselves by activating presynaptic M receptors in the dorsal striatum. The activation of M2 receptors and blockage of HCN2 channels may play an important role in ACh inhibition on the excitability of ChIs. This finding adds a new G-protein coupled receptor mediated regulation on ChIs and provides a cellular mechanism for control of cholinergic activity and ACh release in the dorsal striatum. PMID:27047336

  16. Principal pathway coupling agonist binding to channel gating in nicotinic receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won Yong; Sine, Steven M.

    2005-11-01

    Synaptic receptors respond to neurotransmitters by opening an intrinsic ion channel in the final step in synaptic transmission. How binding of the neurotransmitter is conveyed over the long distance to the channel remains a central question in neurobiology. Here we delineate a principal pathway that links neurotransmitter binding to channel gating by using a structural model of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor at 4-Å resolution, recordings of currents through single receptor channels and determinations of energetic coupling between pairs of residues. We show that a pair of invariant arginine and glutamate residues in each receptor α-subunit electrostatically links peripheral and inner β-sheets from the binding domain and positions them to engage with the channel. The key glutamate and flanking valine residues energetically couple to conserved proline and serine residues emerging from the top of the channel-forming α-helix, suggesting that this is the point at which the binding domain triggers opening of the channel. The series of interresidue couplings identified here constitutes a primary allosteric pathway that links neurotransmitter binding to channel gating.

  17. Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, chemokine receptor CXCR4 cDNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemokine receptor CXCR4, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, binds selectively CXCL12. This protein plays many important roles in immunological as well as pathophysiological functions. In this communication, we identified and characterized the channel catfish CXCR4 transcript....

  18. Autocrine activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors contributes to Ca2+ spikes in mouse myotubes during myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bandi, Elena; Bernareggi, Annalisa; Grandolfo, Micaela; Mozzetta, Chiara; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Ruzzier, Fabio; Lorenzon, Paola

    2005-01-01

    It is widely accepted that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) channel activity controls myoblast fusion into myotubes during myogenesis. In this study we explored the possible role of nAChR channels after cell fusion in a murine cell model. Using videoimaging techniques we showed that embryonic muscle nAChR channel openings contribute to the spontaneous transients of intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) and to twitches characteristic of developing myotubes before innervation. Moreover, we observed a choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity in the myotubes and we detected an acetylcholine-like compound in the extracellular solution. Therefore, we suggest that the autocrine activation of nAChR channels gives rise to [Ca2+]i spikes and contractions. Spontaneous openings of the nAChR channels may be an alternative, although less efficient, mechanism. We report also that blocking the nAChRs causes a significant reduction in cell survival, detectable as a decreased number of myotubes in culture. This led us to hypothesize a possible functional role for the autocrine activation of the nAChRs. By triggering mechanical activity, such activation could represent a strategy to ensure the trophism of myotubes in the absence of nerves. PMID:16037088

  19. The opioid peptide dynorphin directly blocks NMDA receptor channels in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Gu, Y; Huang, L Y

    1995-01-01

    1. The actions of dynorphin on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) responses were examined in acutely dissociated trigeminal neurons in rat. Whole-cell and single-channel currents were recorded using the patch clamp technique. 2. Dynorphins reduced NMDA-activated currents (INMDA). The IC50 was 0.25 microM for dynorphin (1-32), 1.65 microM for dynorphin (1-17) and 1.8 microM for dynorphin (1-13). 3. The blocking action of dynorphin is voltage independent. 4. The inhibitory action of dynorphin cannot be blocked by high concentration of the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, nor by the specific kappa-opioid receptor antagonist nor-Binaltorphimine (nor-BNI). 5. Single-channel analyses indicate that dynorphin reduces the fraction of time the channel is open without altering the channel conductance. 6. We propose that dynorphin acts directly on NMDA receptors. PMID:7537820

  20. Menthol Alone Upregulates Midbrain nAChRs, Alters nAChR Subtype Stoichiometry, Alters Dopamine Neuron Firing Frequency, and Prevents Nicotine Reward.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Brandon J; Wall, Teagan R; Henley, Beverley M; Kim, Charlene H; Nichols, Weston A; Moaddel, Ruin; Xiao, Cheng; Lester, Henry A

    2016-03-01

    Upregulation of β2 subunit-containing (β2*) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is implicated in several aspects of nicotine addiction, and menthol cigarette smokers tend to upregulate β2* nAChRs more than nonmenthol cigarette smokers. We investigated the effect of long-term menthol alone on midbrain neurons containing nAChRs. In midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons from mice containing fluorescent nAChR subunits, menthol alone increased the number of α4 and α6 nAChR subunits, but this upregulation did not occur in midbrain GABAergic neurons. Thus, chronic menthol produces a cell-type-selective upregulation of α4* nAChRs, complementing that of chronic nicotine alone, which upregulates α4 subunit-containing (α4*) nAChRs in GABAergic but not DA neurons. In mouse brain slices and cultured midbrain neurons, menthol reduced DA neuron firing frequency and altered DA neuron excitability following nAChR activation. Furthermore, menthol exposure before nicotine abolished nicotine reward-related behavior in mice. In neuroblastoma cells transfected with fluorescent nAChR subunits, exposure to 500 nm menthol alone also increased nAChR number and favored the formation of (α4)3(β2)2 nAChRs; this contrasts with the action of nicotine itself, which favors (α4)2(β2)3 nAChRs. Menthol alone also increases the number of α6β2 receptors that exclude the β3 subunit. Thus, menthol stabilizes lower-sensitivity α4* and α6 subunit-containing nAChRs, possibly by acting as a chemical chaperone. The abolition of nicotine reward-related behavior may be mediated through menthol's ability to stabilize lower-sensitivity nAChRs and alter DA neuron excitability. We conclude that menthol is more than a tobacco flavorant: administered alone chronically, it alters midbrain DA neurons of the nicotine reward-related pathway.

  1. Peptide fragments of the dihydropyridine receptor can modulate cardiac ryanodine receptor channel activity and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release.

    PubMed Central

    Dulhunty, Angela F; Curtis, Suzanne M; Cengia, Louise; Sakowska, Magdalena; Casarotto, Marco G

    2004-01-01

    We show that peptide fragments of the dihydropyridine receptor II-III loop alter cardiac RyR (ryanodine receptor) channel activity in a cytoplasmic Ca2+-dependent manner. The peptides were AC (Thr-793-Ala-812 of the cardiac dihydropyridine receptor), AS (Thr-671-Leu-690 of the skeletal dihydropyridine receptor), and a modified AS peptide [AS(D-R18)], with an extended helical structure. The peptides added to the cytoplasmic side of channels in lipid bilayers at > or = 10 nM activated channels when the cytoplasmic [Ca2+] was 100 nM, but either inhibited or did not affect channel activity when the cytoplasmic [Ca2+] was 10 or 100 microM. Both activation and inhibition were independent of bilayer potential. Activation by AS, but not by AC or AS(D-R18), was reduced at peptide concentrations >1 mM in a voltage-dependent manner (at +40 mV). In control experiments, channels were not activated by the scrambled AS sequence (ASS) or skeletal II-III loop peptide (NB). Resting Ca2+ release from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum was not altered by peptide AC, but Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release was depressed. Resting and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release were enhanced by both the native and modified AS peptides. NMR revealed (i) that the structure of peptide AS(D-R18) is not influenced by [Ca2+] and (ii) that peptide AC adopts a helical structure, particularly in the region containing positively charged residues. This is the first report of specific functional interactions between dihydropyridine receptor A region peptides and cardiac RyR ion channels in lipid bilayers. PMID:14678014

  2. Ion channel profile of TRPM8 cold receptors reveals a role of TASK-3 potassium channels in thermosensation.

    PubMed

    Morenilla-Palao, Cruz; Luis, Enoch; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Quintero, Eva; Weaver, Janelle L; Bayliss, Douglas A; Viana, Félix

    2014-09-11

    Animals sense cold ambient temperatures through the activation of peripheral thermoreceptors that express TRPM8, a cold- and menthol-activated ion channel. These receptors can discriminate a very wide range of temperatures from innocuous to noxious. The molecular mechanism responsible for the variable sensitivity of individual cold receptors to temperature is unclear. To address this question, we performed a detailed ion channel expression analysis of cold-sensitive neurons, combining bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis with a molecular-profiling approach in fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-purified TRPM8 neurons. We found that TASK-3 leak potassium channels are highly enriched in a subpopulation of these sensory neurons. The thermal threshold of TRPM8 cold neurons is decreased during TASK-3 blockade and in mice lacking TASK-3, and, most importantly, these mice display hypersensitivity to cold. Our results demonstrate a role of TASK-3 channels in thermosensation, showing that a channel-based combinatorial strategy in TRPM8 cold thermoreceptors leads to molecular specialization and functional diversity. PMID:25199828

  3. Regulation of Transient Receptor Potential channels by the phospholipase C pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rohacs, Tibor

    2013-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels were discovered while analyzing visual mutants in drosophila. The protein encoded by the transient receptor potential (trp) gene is a Ca2+ permeable cation channel activated downstream of the phospholipase C (PLC) pathway. While searching for homologues in other organisms, a surprisingly large number of mammalian TRP channels were cloned. The regulation of TRP channels is quite diverse, but many of them are either activated downstream of the PLC pathway, or modulated by it. This review will summarize the current knowledge on regulation of TRP channels by the PLC pathway, with special focus on TRPC-s, which can be considered as effectors of the PLC pathway, and the heat and capsaicin sensitive TRPV1, which is modulated by the PLC pathway in a complex manner. PMID:23916247

  4. Muscle-Type Nicotinic Receptor Blockade by Diethylamine, the Hydrophilic Moiety of Lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Alberola-Die, Armando; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; González-Ros, José M; Ivorra, Isabel; Morales, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine bears in its structure both an aromatic ring and a terminal amine, which can be protonated at physiological pH, linked by an amide group. Since lidocaine causes multiple inhibitory actions on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), this work was aimed to determine the inhibitory effects of diethylamine (DEA), a small molecule resembling the hydrophilic moiety of lidocaine, on Torpedo marmorata nAChRs microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes. Similarly to lidocaine, DEA reversibly blocked acetylcholine-elicited currents (I ACh ) in a dose-dependent manner (IC 50 close to 70 μM), but unlike lidocaine, DEA did not affect I ACh desensitization. I ACh inhibition by DEA was more pronounced at negative potentials, suggesting an open-channel blockade of nAChRs, although roughly 30% inhibition persisted at positive potentials, indicating additional binding sites outside the pore. DEA block of nAChRs in the resting state (closed channel) was confirmed by the enhanced I ACh inhibition when pre-applying DEA before its co-application with ACh, as compared with solely DEA and ACh co-application. Virtual docking assays provide a plausible explanation to the experimental observations in terms of the involvement of different sets of drug binding sites. So, at the nAChR transmembrane (TM) domain, DEA and lidocaine shared binding sites within the channel pore, giving support to their open-channel blockade; besides, lidocaine, but not DEA, interacted with residues at cavities among the M1, M2, M3, and M4 segments of each subunit and also at intersubunit crevices. At the extracellular (EC) domain, DEA and lidocaine binding sites were broadly distributed, which aids to explain the closed channel blockade observed. Interestingly, some DEA clusters were located at the α-γ interphase of the EC domain, in a cavity near the orthosteric binding site pocket; by contrast, lidocaine contacted with all α-subunit loops conforming the ACh binding site, both in α-γ and α-δ and

  5. Muscle-Type Nicotinic Receptor Blockade by Diethylamine, the Hydrophilic Moiety of Lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Alberola-Die, Armando; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; González-Ros, José M; Ivorra, Isabel; Morales, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine bears in its structure both an aromatic ring and a terminal amine, which can be protonated at physiological pH, linked by an amide group. Since lidocaine causes multiple inhibitory actions on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), this work was aimed to determine the inhibitory effects of diethylamine (DEA), a small molecule resembling the hydrophilic moiety of lidocaine, on Torpedo marmorata nAChRs microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes. Similarly to lidocaine, DEA reversibly blocked acetylcholine-elicited currents (I ACh ) in a dose-dependent manner (IC 50 close to 70 μM), but unlike lidocaine, DEA did not affect I ACh desensitization. I ACh inhibition by DEA was more pronounced at negative potentials, suggesting an open-channel blockade of nAChRs, although roughly 30% inhibition persisted at positive potentials, indicating additional binding sites outside the pore. DEA block of nAChRs in the resting state (closed channel) was confirmed by the enhanced I ACh inhibition when pre-applying DEA before its co-application with ACh, as compared with solely DEA and ACh co-application. Virtual docking assays provide a plausible explanation to the experimental observations in terms of the involvement of different sets of drug binding sites. So, at the nAChR transmembrane (TM) domain, DEA and lidocaine shared binding sites within the channel pore, giving support to their open-channel blockade; besides, lidocaine, but not DEA, interacted with residues at cavities among the M1, M2, M3, and M4 segments of each subunit and also at intersubunit crevices. At the extracellular (EC) domain, DEA and lidocaine binding sites were broadly distributed, which aids to explain the closed channel blockade observed. Interestingly, some DEA clusters were located at the α-γ interphase of the EC domain, in a cavity near the orthosteric binding site pocket; by contrast, lidocaine contacted with all α-subunit loops conforming the ACh binding site, both in α-γ and α-δ and

  6. Effects of lipid-analog detergent solubilization on the functionality and lipidic cubic phase mobility of the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Morales, Luis F; Morales-Pérez, Claudio L; De La Cruz-Rivera, Pamela C; Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo; Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Quesada, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2011-10-01

    Over the past three decades, the Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been one of the most extensively studied membrane protein systems. However, the effects of detergent solubilization on nAChR stability and function are poorly understood. The use of lipid-analog detergents for nAChR solubilization has been shown to preserve receptor stability and functionality. The present study used lipid-analog detergents from phospholipid-analog and cholesterol-analog detergent families for solubilization and affinity purification of the receptor and probed nAChR ion channel function using planar lipid bilayers (PLBs) and stability using analytical size exclusion chromatography (A-SEC) in the detergent-solubilized state. We also examined receptor mobility on the lipidic cubic phase (LCP) by measuring the nAChR mobile fraction and diffusion coefficient through fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments using lipid-analog and non-lipid-analog detergents. Our results show that it is possible to isolate stable and functional nAChRs using lipid-analog detergents, with characteristic ion channel currents in PLBs and minimal aggregation as observed in A-SEC. Furthermore, fractional mobility and diffusion coefficient values observed in FRAP experiments were similar to the values observed for these parameters in the recently LCP-crystallized β(2)-adrenergic receptor. The overall results show that phospholipid-analog detergents with 16 carbon acyl-chains support nAChR stability, functionality and LCP mobility.

  7. Functional analysis of Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in multiple activation states by SSM-based electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Niessen, K V; Muschik, S; Langguth, F; Rappenglück, S; Seeger, T; Thiermann, H; Worek, F

    2016-04-15

    Organophosphorus compounds (OPC), i.e. nerve agents or pesticides, are highly toxic due to their strong inhibition potency against acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Inhibited AChE results in accumulation of acetylcholine in the synaptic cleft and thus the desensitisation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in the postsynaptic membrane is provoked. Direct targeting of nAChR to reduce receptor desensitisation might be an alternative therapeutic approach. For drug discovery, functional properties of potent therapeutic candidates need to be investigated in addition to affinity properties. Solid supported membrane (SSM)-based electrophysiology is useful for functional characterisation of ligand-gated ion channels like nAChRs, as charge translocations via capacitive coupling of the supporting membrane can be measured. By varying the agonist (carbamoylcholine) concentration, different functional states of the nAChR were initiated. Using plasma membrane preparations obtained from Torpedo californica electric organ, functional properties of selected nAChR ligands and non-oxime bispyridinium compounds were investigated. Depending on overall-size, the bispyridinium compounds enhanced or inhibited cholinergic signals induced by 100 μM carbamoylcholine. Applying excessive concentrations of the agonist carbamoylcholine provoked desensitisation of the nAChRs, whereas addition of bispyridinium compounds bearing short alkyl linkers exhibited functional recovery of previously desensitised nAChRs. The results suggest that these non-oxime bispyridinium compounds possibly interacted with nAChR subtypes in a manner of a positive allosteric modulator (PAM). The described newly developed functional assay is a valuable tool for the assessment of functional properties of potential compounds such as nAChR modulating ligands, which might be a promising approach in the therapeutically treatment of OPC-poisonings. PMID:26851639

  8. The human histamine H3 receptor couples to GIRK channels in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Sahlholm, Kristoffer; Nilsson, Johanna; Marcellino, Daniel; Fuxe, Kjell; Arhem, Peter

    2007-07-19

    The histamine H(3) receptor mediates inhibitory responses in the nervous system. Here, we demonstrate the coupling of the human histamine H(3) receptor to G protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium (GIRK) channels in Xenopus oocytes, using voltage-clamp. The histamine H(3) receptor agonist (R)-alpha-methylhistamine increased GIRK currents with an EC(50) of 2.5 nM. The response to (R)-alpha-methylhistamine was inhibited by the specific antagonist/inverse agonist clobenpropit. GIRK channels represent a novel effector pathway for the histamine H(3) receptor, also suggesting the use of electrophysiology assays in histamine H(3) receptor drug screening, allowing for the resolution of G protein activation kinetics.

  9. Structure-function studies of the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by site-directed mutagenesis in the pore region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiyun

    In nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), as in glycine, GABA A, serotonin 5-HT3, and GluCl glutamate receptors, a leucine residue at the approximate midpoint (the 9' position) of the M2 transmembrane domain is conserved across all known subunits. We expressed the embryonic mouse muscle nAChRs with varying numbers (m* s) of subunits (2 αs, 1 β, 1 γ, and 1 δ) mutated at this position in Xenopus oocytes and discovered that mutations to serine (Leu9'Ser) result in a tenfold higher receptor sensitivity to acetylcholine (ACh) for each subunit mutated. Moreover, increases of side-chain polarity increase the sensitivity to ACh when other natural and unnatural residues are incorporated into this position. The data also indicated an especially strong interaction between the γ and δ subunits in the pore region, suggesting a specific arrangement of subunits within the pentamer. Detailed single-channel kinetic studies reveal that Leu9'Ser AChRs have (1) longer voltage- relaxation time constants, (2) longer ACh-induced openings and bursts, and (3) more frequent spontaneous openings. These effects increase with m* s. Synthesized postsynaptic currents were produced with a piezoelectric micromanipulator that delivered brief ACh pulses to multi-channel patches. Their decay time constants were, as expected, similar to the channel burst duration. Thus, both longer and more frequent openings contribute to the >=104-fold increase in the receptor sensitivity to ACh from the wild-type receptor to the receptor with m*s=4; and the highly conserved 9' leucine is crucial for the brief synaptic events that are normally observed. We also explored the effects of ligand-binding domain mutations: γD174N and δD180N (aspartic acid (D) to asparagine (N)). Macroscopic dose-response relations revealed that these mutations decrease the receptor's sensitivity to ACh. The combined effect with Leu9'Ser, however, differs from that predicted from a linear or independent sum of effects from

  10. Nitric oxide/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway activated by M1-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptor cascade inhibits Na+-activated K+ currents in Kenyon cells.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Masaharu; Yoshino, Masami

    2016-06-01

    The interneurons of the mushroom body, known as Kenyon cells, are essential for the long-term memory of olfactory associative learning in some insects. Some studies have reported that nitric oxide (NO) is strongly related to this long-term memory in Kenyon cells. However, the target molecules and upstream and downstream NO signaling cascades are not completely understood. Here we analyzed the effect of the NO signaling cascade on Na(+)-activated K(+) (KNa) channel activity in Kenyon cells of crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus). We found that two different NO donors, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine (SNAP), strongly suppressed KNa channel currents. Additionally, this inhibitory effect of GSNO on KNa channel activity was diminished by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), and KT5823, an inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG). Next, we analyzed the role of ACh in the NO signaling cascade. ACh strongly suppressed KNa channel currents, similar to NO donors. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of ACh was blocked by pirenzepine, an M1 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist, but not by 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP) and mecamylamine, an M3 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist and a nicotinic ACh receptor antagonist, respectively. The ACh-induced inhibition of KNa channel currents was also diminished by the PLC inhibitor U73122 and the calmodulin antagonist W-7. Finally, we found that ACh inhibition was blocked by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). These results suggested that the ACh signaling cascade promotes NO production by activating NOS and NO inhibits KNa channel currents via the sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling cascade in Kenyon cells. PMID:26984419

  11. Electron density topography based model to explore N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel blockers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingle, Snehal V.; Joshi, Kaustubh A.

    2016-03-01

    The dwell time of a molecule in a voltage dependent NMDA receptor channel is an important factor in defining its activity as channel blocker. A model has been designed, based on quantum chemical descriptors like geometrical parameters, charge distribution, electron density topography and global reactivity descriptors, to shed lights on the dwell time of a channel blocker. Structure and charge distribution studies indicate polarization of molecules with the electron density located at the core of the molecule. Electron density topography reveals ring critical point (ρrcp), emerging as a signature parameter to understand the dwell time of a channel blocker molecule.

  12. AChR-specific immunosuppressive therapy of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-10-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease characterized by muscle fatigability. In most cases, it is mediated by autoantibodies targeting muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at the neuromuscular junction. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) is an animal model for MG, which is usually induced by immunization with AChR purified from fish electric organ. Pathological autoantibodies to AChRs are directed at the extracellular surface, especially the main immunogenic region (MIR). Current treatments for MG can help many but not all patients. Antigen-specific immunosuppressive therapy for MG that specifically suppresses the autoimmune response without affecting the entire immune system and avoids side effects of general immunosuppression is currently unavailable. Early attempts at antigen-specific immunosuppression for EAMG using AChR extracellular domain sequences that form epitopes for pathological autoantibodies risked provoking autoimmunity rather than suppressing it. We discovered a novel approach to specific immunosuppression of EAMG with a therapeutic vaccine consisting of bacterially-expressed human AChR cytoplasmic domains, which has the potential to specifically suppress MG without danger of causing exacerbation. This approach prevents development of chronic EAMG when initiated immediately after the acute phase of EAMG, and rapidly reverses established chronic EAMG when started during the chronic phase of EAMG. Successfully treated rats exhibited long-term resistance to re-induction of EAMG. In this review we also discuss the current understanding of the mechanisms by which the therapy works. Vaccination with AChR cytoplasmic domains in adjuvant is promising as a safe, antigen-specific, potent, effective, rapidly acting, and long lasting approach to therapy of MG.

  13. Clinical application of clustered-AChR for the detection of SNMG

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guang; Wang, Xiaoqing; Yu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiutian; Guan, Yangtai; Jiang, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoantibody-mediated disease of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). However, accumulating evidence has indicated that MG patients whose serum anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies are not detectable (serumnegative MG; SNMG) in routine assays share similar clinical features with anti-AChR antibody-positive MG patients. We hypothesized that SNMG patients would have low-affinity antibodies to AChRs that would not be detectable using traditional methods but that might be detected by binding to AChR on the cell membrane, particularly if they were clustered at the high density observed at the NMJ. We expressed AChR subunits with the clustering protein rapsyn (an AChR-associated protein at the synapse) in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells, and we tested the binding of the antibodies using immunofluorescence. With this approach, AChR antibodies to rapsyn-clustered AChR could be detected in the sera from 45.83% (11/24) of SNMG patients, as confirmed with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). This was the first application in China of cell-based AChR antibody detection. More importantly, this sensitive (and specific) approach could significantly increase the diagnosis rate of SNMG. PMID:26068604

  14. Block of NMDA receptor channels by endogenous neurosteroids: implications for the agonist induced conformational states of the channel vestibule

    PubMed Central

    Vyklicky, Vojtech; Krausova, Barbora; Cerny, Jiri; Balik, Ales; Zapotocky, Martin; Novotny, Marian; Lichnerova, Katarina; Smejkalova, Tereza; Kaniakova, Martina; Korinek, Miloslav; Petrovic, Milos; Kacer, Petr; Horak, Martin; Chodounska, Hana; Vyklicky, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) mediate synaptic plasticity, and their dysfunction is implicated in multiple brain disorders. NMDARs can be allosterically modulated by numerous compounds, including endogenous neurosteroid pregnanolone sulfate. Here, we identify the molecular basis of the use-dependent and voltage-independent inhibitory effect of neurosteroids on NMDAR responses. The site of action is located at the extracellular vestibule of the receptor’s ion channel pore and is accessible after receptor activation. Mutations in the extracellular vestibule in the SYTANLAAF motif disrupt the inhibitory effect of negatively charged steroids. In contrast, positively charged steroids inhibit mutated NMDAR responses in a voltage-dependent manner. These results, in combination with molecular modeling, characterize structure details of the open configuration of the NMDAR channel. Our results provide a unique opportunity for the development of new therapeutic neurosteroid-based ligands to treat diseases associated with dysfunction of the glutamate system. PMID:26086919

  15. Liposome reconstitution and modulation of recombinant N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor channels by membrane stretch

    PubMed Central

    Kloda, Anna; Lua, Linda; Hall, Rhonda; Adams, David J.; Martinac, Boris

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the heteromeric N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channels composed of NR1a and NR2A subunits were expressed, purified, reconstituted into liposomes, and characterized by using the patch clamp technique. The protein exhibited the expected electrophysiological profile of activation by glutamate and glycine and internal Mg2+ blockade. We demonstrated that the mechanical energy transmitted to membrane-bound NMDA receptor channels can be exerted directly by tension developed in the lipid bilayer. Membrane stretch and application of arachidonic acid potentiated currents through NMDA receptor channels in the presence of intracellular Mg2+. The correlation of membrane tension induced by either mechanical or chemical stimuli with the physiological Mg2+ block of the channel suggests that the synaptic transmission can be altered if NMDA receptor complexes experience local changes in bilayer thickness caused by dynamic targeting to lipid microdomains, electrocompression, or chemical modification of the cell membranes. The ability to study gating properties of NMDA receptor channels in artificial bilayers should prove useful in further study of structure–function relationships and facilitate discoveries of new therapeutic agents for treatment of glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity or analgesic therapies. PMID:17242368

  16. Temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential channels in corneal tissue layers and cells.

    PubMed

    Mergler, Stefan; Valtink, Monika; Takayoshi, Sumioka; Okada, Yuka; Miyajima, Masayasu; Saika, Shizuya; Reinach, Peter S

    2014-01-01

    We here provide a brief summary of the characteristics of transient receptor potential channels (TRPs) identified in corneal tissue layers and cells. In general, TRPs are nonselective cation channels which are Ca(2+) permeable. Most TRPs serve as thermosensitive molecular sensors (thermo-TRPs). Based on their functional importance, the possibilities are described for drug-targeting TRP activity in a clinical setting. TRPs are expressed in various tissues of the eye including both human corneal epithelial and endothelial layers as well as stromal fibroblasts and stromal nerve fibers. TRP vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) heat receptor, also known as capsaicin receptor, along with TRP melastatin type 8 (TRPM8) cold receptor, which is also known as menthol receptor, are prototypes of the thermo-TRP family. The TRPV1 functional channel is the most investigated TRP channel in these tissues, owing to its contribution to maintaining tissue homeostasis as well as eliciting wound healing responses to injury. Other thermo-TRP family members identified in these tissues are TRPV2, 3 and 4. Finally, there is the TRP ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) cold receptor. All of these thermo-TRPs can be activated within specific temperature ranges and transduce such inputs into chemical and electrical signals. Although several recent studies have begun to unravel complex roles for thermo-TRPs such as TRPV1 in corneal layers and resident cells, additional studies are needed to further elucidate their roles in health and disease.

  17. LE135, a retinoid acid receptor antagonist, produces pain through direct activation of TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shijin; Luo, Jialie; Qian, Aihua; Yu, Weihua; Hu, Hongzhen

    2014-01-01

    Background and PurposeRetinoids, through their activation of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors, regulate diverse cellular processes, and pharmacological intervention in their actions has been successful in the treatment of skin disorders and cancers. Despite the many beneficial effects, administration of retinoids causes irritating side effects with unknown mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that LE135 [4-(7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-5,7,7,10,10-pentamethyl-5H-benzo[e]naphtho[2,3-b][1,4]diazepin-13-yl)benzoic acid], a selective antagonist of RARβ, is a potent activator of the capsaicin (TRPV1) and wasabi (TRPA1) receptors, two critical pain-initiating cation channels. Experimental ApproachWe performed to investigate the excitatory effects of LE135 on TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels expressed in HEK293T cells and in dorsal root ganglia neurons with calcium imaging and patch-clamp recordings. We also used site-directed mutagenesis of the channels to determine the structural basis of LE135-induced activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels and behavioural testing to examine if pharmacological inhibition and genetic deletion of the channels affected LE135-evoked pain-related behaviours. Key ResultsLE135 activated both the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) and the allyl isothiocyanate receptor (TRPA1) heterologously expressed in HEK293T cells and endogenously expressed by sensory nociceptors. Mutations disrupting the capsaicin-binding site attenuated LE135 activation of TRPV1 channels and a single mutation (K170R) eliminated TRPA1 activity evoked by LE135. Intraplantar injection of LE135 evoked pain-related behaviours. Both TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels were involved in LE135-elicited pain-related responses, as shown by pharmacological and genetic ablation studies. Conclusions and ImplicationsThis blocker of retinoid acid signalling also exerted non-genomic effects through activating the pain-initiating TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels. PMID:24308840

  18. A novel µ-conopeptide, CnIIIC, exerts potent and preferential inhibition of NaV1.2/1.4 channels and blocks neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Favreau, Philippe; Benoit, Evelyne; Hocking, Henry G; Carlier, Ludovic; D' hoedt, Dieter; Leipold, Enrico; Markgraf, René; Schlumberger, Sébastien; Córdova, Marco A; Gaertner, Hubert; Paolini-Bertrand, Marianne; Hartley, Oliver; Tytgat, Jan; Heinemann, Stefan H; Bertrand, Daniel; Boelens, Rolf; Stöcklin, Reto; Molgó, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The µ-conopeptide family is defined by its ability to block voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), a property that can be used for the development of myorelaxants and analgesics. We characterized the pharmacology of a new µ-conopeptide (µ-CnIIIC) on a range of preparations and molecular targets to assess its potential as a myorelaxant. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH µ-CnIIIC was sequenced, synthesized and characterized by its direct block of elicited twitch tension in mouse skeletal muscle and action potentials in mouse sciatic and pike olfactory nerves. µ-CnIIIC was also studied on HEK-293 cells expressing various rodent VGSCs and also on voltage-gated potassium channels and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) to assess cross-interactions. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments were carried out for structural data. KEY RESULTS Synthetic µ-CnIIIC decreased twitch tension in mouse hemidiaphragms (IC50= 150 nM), and displayed a higher blocking effect in mouse extensor digitorum longus muscles (IC = 46 nM), compared with µ-SIIIA, µ-SmIIIA and µ-PIIIA. µ-CnIIIC blocked NaV1.4 (IC50= 1.3 nM) and NaV1.2 channels in a long-lasting manner. Cardiac NaV1.5 and DRG-specific NaV1.8 channels were not blocked at 1 µM. µ-CnIIIC also blocked the α3β2 nAChR subtype (IC50= 450 nM) and, to a lesser extent, on the α7 and α4β2 subtypes. Structure determination of µ-CnIIIC revealed some similarities to α-conotoxins acting on nAChRs. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS µ-CnIIIC potently blocked VGSCs in skeletal muscle and nerve, and hence is applicable to myorelaxation. Its atypical pharmacological profile suggests some common structural features between VGSCs and nAChR channels. PMID:22229737

  19. Transient Receptor Potential Channel Polymorphisms Are Associated with the Somatosensory Function in Neuropathic Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Ralf; Maier, Christoph; Tölle, Thomas R.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Berthele, Achim; Faltraco, Frank; Flor, Herta; Gierthmühlen, Janne; Haenisch, Sierk; Huge, Volker; Magerl, Walter; Maihöfner, Christian; Richter, Helmut; Rolke, Roman; Scherens, Andrea; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Ufer, Mike; Wasner, Gunnar; Zhu, Jihong; Cascorbi, Ingolf

    2011-01-01

    Transient receptor potential channels are important mediators of thermal and mechanical stimuli and play an important role in neuropathic pain. The contribution of hereditary variants in the genes of transient receptor potential channels to neuropathic pain is unknown. We investigated the frequency of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1, transient receptor potential melastin 8 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms and their impact on somatosensory abnormalities in neuropathic pain patients. Within the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (Deutscher Forscbungsverbund Neuropathischer Schmerz) 371 neuropathic pain patients were phenotypically characterized using standardized quantitative sensory testing. Pyrosequencing was employed to determine a total of eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms in transient receptor potential channel genes of the neuropathic pain patients and a cohort of 253 German healthy volunteers. Associations of quantitative sensory testing parameters and single nucleotide polymorphisms between and within groups and subgroups, based on sensory phenotypes, were analyzed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms frequencies did not differ between both the cohorts. However, in neuropathic pain patients transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 710G>A (rs920829, E179K) was associated with the presence of paradoxical heat sensation (p = 0.03), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G (rs8065080, I585V) with cold hypoalgesia (p = 0.0035). Two main subgroups characterized by preserved (1) and impaired (2) sensory function were identified. In subgroup 1 transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G led to significantly less heat hyperalgesia, pinprick hyperalgesia and mechanical hypaesthesia (p = 0.006, p = 0.005 and p<0.001) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1103C>G (rs222747, M315I) to cold hypaesthesia (p = 0.002), but there was absence of associations in subgroup 2. In

  20. Structural Insights into Divalent Cation Modulations of ATP-Gated P2X Receptor Channels.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Go; Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Takemoto, Mizuki; Dohmae, Naoshi; Nakada-Nakura, Yoshiko; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Hattori, Motoyuki; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-02-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-gated cation channels involved in physiological processes ranging widely from neurotransmission to pain and taste signal transduction. The modulation of the channel gating, including that by divalent cations, contributes to these diverse physiological functions of P2X receptors. Here, we report the crystal structure of an invertebrate P2X receptor from the Gulf Coast tick Amblyomma maculatum in the presence of ATP and Zn(2+) ion, together with electrophysiological and computational analyses. The structure revealed two distinct metal binding sites, M1 and M2, in the extracellular region. The M1 site, located at the trimer interface, is responsible for Zn(2+) potentiation by facilitating the structural change of the extracellular domain for pore opening. In contrast, the M2 site, coupled with the ATP binding site, might contribute to regulation by Mg(2+). Overall, our work provides structural insights into the divalent cation modulations of P2X receptors. PMID:26804916

  1. Single Expressed Glycine Receptor Domains Reconstitute Functional Ion Channels without Subunit-specific Desensitization Behavior*

    PubMed Central

    Meiselbach, Heike; Vogel, Nico; Langlhofer, Georg; Stangl, Sabine; Schleyer, Barbara; Bahnassawy, Lamia'a; Sticht, Heinrich; Breitinger, Hans-Georg; Becker, Cord-Michael; Villmann, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Cys loop receptors are pentameric arrangements of independent subunits that assemble into functional ion channels. Each subunit shows a domain architecture. Functional ion channels can be reconstituted even from independent, nonfunctional subunit domains, as shown previously for GlyRα1 receptors. Here, we demonstrate that this reconstitution is not restricted to α1 but can be transferred to other members of the Cys loop receptor family. A nonfunctional GlyR subunit, truncated at the intracellular TM3–4 loop by a premature stop codon, can be complemented by co-expression of the missing tail portion of the receptor. Compared with α1 subunits, rescue by domain complementation was less efficient when GlyRα3 or the GABAA/C subunit ρ1 was used. If truncation disrupted an alternative splicing cassette within the intracellular TM3–4 loop of α3 subunits, which also regulates receptor desensitization, functional rescue was not possible. When α3 receptors were restored by complementation using domains with and without the spliced insert, no difference in desensitization was found. In contrast, desensitization properties could even be transferred between α1/α3 receptor chimeras harboring or lacking the α3 splice cassette proving that functional rescue depends on the integrity of the alternative splicing cassette in α3. Thus, an intact α3 splicing cassette in the TM3–4 loop environment is indispensable for functional rescue, and the quality of receptor restoration can be assessed from desensitization properties. PMID:25143388

  2. Identification and Characterization of a G Protein-binding Cluster in α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    King, Justin R.; Nordman, Jacob C.; Bridges, Samuel P.; Lin, Ming-Kuan; Kabbani, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play an important role in synaptic transmission and inflammation. In response to ligands, this receptor channel opens to conduct cations into the cell but desensitizes rapidly. In recent studies we show that α7 nAChRs bind signaling proteins such as heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins). Here, we demonstrate that direct coupling of α7 nAChRs to G proteins enables a downstream calcium signaling response that can persist beyond the expected time course of channel activation. This process depends on a G protein-binding cluster (GPBC) in the M3-M4 loop of the receptor. A mutation of the GPBC in the α7 nAChR (α7345–348A) abolishes interaction with Gαq as well as Gβγ while having no effect on receptor synthesis, cell-surface trafficking, or α-bungarotoxin binding. Expression of α7345–348A, however, did significantly attenuate the α7 nAChR-induced Gαq calcium signaling response as evidenced by a decrease in PLC-β activation and IP3R-mediated calcium store release in the presence of the α7 selective agonist choline. Taken together, the data provides new evidence for the existence of a GPBC in nAChRs serving to promote intracellular signaling. PMID:26088141

  3. Single-Particle Cryo-EM of the Ryanodine Receptor Channel in an Aqueous Environment.

    PubMed

    Baker, Mariah R; Fan, Guizhen; Serysheva, Irina I

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are tetrameric ligand-gated Ca(2+) release channels that are responsible for the increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration leading to muscle contraction. Our current understanding of RyR channel gating and regulation is greatly limited due to the lack of a high-resolution structure of the channel protein. The enormous size and unwieldy shape of Ca(2+) release channels make X-ray or NMR methods difficult to apply for high-resolution structural analysis of the full-length functional channel. Single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) is one of the only effective techniques for the study of such a large integral membrane protein and its molecular interactions. Despite recent developments in cryo-EM technologies and break-through single-particle cryo-EM studies of ion channels, cryospecimen preparation, particularly the presence of detergent in the buffer, remains the main impediment to obtaining atomic-resolution structures of ion channels and a multitude of other integral membrane protein complexes. In this review we will discuss properties of several detergents that have been successfully utilized in cryo-EM studies of ion channels and the emergence of the detergent alternative amphipol to stabilize ion channels for structure-function characterization. Future structural studies of challenging specimen like ion channels are likely to be facilitated by cryo-EM amenable detergents or alternative surfactants.

  4. Insights into the channel gating of P2X receptors from structures, dynamics and small molecules

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Yu, Ye

    2016-01-01

    P2X receptors, as ATP-gated non-selective trimeric ion channels, are permeable to Na+, K+ and Ca2+. Comparing with other ligand-gated ion channel families, P2X receptors are distinct in their unique gating properties and pathophysiological roles, and have attracted attention as promising drug targets for a variety of diseases, such as neuropathic pain, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and thrombus. Several small molecule inhibitors for distinct P2X subtypes have entered into clinical trials. However, many questions regarding the gating mechanism of P2X remain unsolved. The structural determinations of P2X receptors at the resting and ATP-bound open states revealed that P2X receptor gating is a cooperative allosteric process involving multiple domains, which marks the beginning of the post-structure era of P2X research at atomic level. Here, we review the current knowledge on the structure-function relationship of P2X receptors, depict the whole picture of allosteric changes during the channel gating, and summarize the active sites that may contribute to new strategies for developing novel allosteric drugs targeting P2X receptors. PMID:26725734

  5. Nicotinic receptors in addiction pathways.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Frances M; Mojica, Celina Y; Reynaga, Daisy D

    2013-04-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that consist of pentameric combinations of α and β subunits. These receptors are widely distributed throughout the brain and are highly expressed in addiction circuitry. The role of nAChRs in regulating neuronal activity and motivated behavior is complex and varies both in and among brain regions. The rich diversity of central nAChRs has hampered the characterization of their structure and function with use of classic pharmacological techniques. However, recent molecular approaches using null mutant mice with specific regional lentiviral re-expression, in combination with neuroanatomical and electrophysiological techniques, have allowed the elucidation of the influence of different nAChR types on neuronal circuit activity and behavior. This review will address the influence of nAChRs on limbic dopamine circuitry and the medial habenula-interpeduncular nucleus complex, which are critical mediators of reinforced behavior. Characterization of the mechanisms underlying regulation of addiction pathways by endogenous cholinergic transmission and by nicotine may lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for treating tobacco dependence and other addictions. PMID:23247824

  6. Dual action of isoflurane on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated currents through recombinant alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2L)-GABA(A)-receptor channels.

    PubMed

    Neumahr, S; Hapfelmeier, G; Scheller, M; Schneck, H; Franke, C; Kochs, E

    2000-05-01

    Isoflurane (ISO) increased the agonist-induced chloride flux through the gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABA(A)R). This may reflect an anesthetic-induced increase in the apparent agonist affinity. A dual effect of anesthetics was postulated for both the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and the GABA(A)R. We tested the hypothesis that, in addition to a blocking effect, ISO increases gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated currents through recombinant GABA(A)R channels. HEK293 cells were transfected with rat cDNA for alpha(1),beta(2),gamma(2L) subunits. Currents elicited by 1 mM or 0. 01 mM GABA, respectively, alone, or with increasing concentrations of ISO, were recorded by using standard patch clamp techniques. ISO reduced the peak current elicited by 1 mM GABA. Currents induced by 0.01 mM GABA were potentiated by small ISO (twofold at 0.5 mM ISO) and inhibited by larger concentrations. Withdrawal of ISO and GABA induced rebound currents, suggesting an open-channel block by ISO. These currents increased with increasing concentrations of ISO. At large concentrations of ISO, the inhibitory effect predominated and was caused by, at least partly, an open-channel block. At small concentrations of ISO, potentiation of the GABA-gated currents was more prominent. This dual action of ISO indicates different binding sites at the GABA(A)R. The balance between potentiation and block depends on the concentrations of both ISO and GABA.

  7. Calcium signalling mediated by the α9 acetylcholine receptor in a cochlear cell line from the Immortomouse

    PubMed Central

    Jagger, D J; Griesinger, C B; Rivolta, M N; Holley, M C; Ashmore, J F

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of the α9 acetylcholine receptor (α9AChR) expressed in hair cell precursors in an immortalized cell line UB/OC-2 developed from the organ of Corti of the transgenic H-2Kb-tsA58 mouse (the Immortomouse) using both calcium imaging and whole-cell recording. Ratiometric measurements of fura-2 fluorescence revealed an increase of intracellular calcium concentration in cells when challenged with 10 μM ACh. The calcium increase was seen in 66 % of the cells grown at 39 °C in differentiated conditions. A smaller fraction (34 %) of cells grown at 33 °C in proliferative conditions responded. Caffeine (10 mM) elevated cell calcium. In the absence of caffeine, the majority of imaged cells responded only once to ACh. A small proportion (< 2 % of the total) responded with an increase in intracellular calcium to multiple ACh presentations. Pretreatment with caffeine inhibited all calcium responses to ACh. In whole-cell tight-seal recordings 10 μM ACh activated an inward, non-selective cation current. The reversal potential of the ACh-activated inward current was dependent on the extracellular calcium concentration with an estimated PCa/PNa of 80 for the α9 receptor at physiological calcium levels. The data indicate that ACh activates a calcium-permeable channel α9AChR in UB/OC-2 cells and that the channel has a significantly higher calcium permeability than other AChRs. The results indicate that the α9AChR may be able to elevate intracellular calcium levels in hair cells both directly and via store release. PMID:10944169

  8. Biophysical analysis of thermosensitive TRP channels with a special focus on the cold receptor TRPM8.

    PubMed

    Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Moldenhauer, Hans; Castillo, Juan Pablo; Latorre, Ramón; Alvarez, Osvaldo

    2015-01-01

    Mammals maintain homeostatic control of their body temperature. Therefore, these organisms are expected to have adaptations that confer the ability to detect and react to both self and ambient temperature. Temperature-activated ion channels have been discovered to be the primary molecular determinants of thermosensation. The most representative group of these determinants constitutes members of the transient receptor potential superfamily, TRP, which are activated by either low or high temperatures covering the whole range of physiologically relevant temperatures. This review makes a critical assessment of existing analytical methods of temperature-activated TRP channel mechanisms using the cold-activated TRPM8 channel as a paradigm. PMID:27227023

  9. Biophysical analysis of thermosensitive TRP channels with a special focus on the cold receptor TRPM8

    PubMed Central

    Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Moldenhauer, Hans; Castillo, Juan Pablo; Latorre, Ramón; Alvarez, Osvaldo

    2015-01-01

    Mammals maintain homeostatic control of their body temperature. Therefore, these organisms are expected to have adaptations that confer the ability to detect and react to both self and ambient temperature. Temperature-activated ion channels have been discovered to be the primary molecular determinants of thermosensation. The most representative group of these determinants constitutes members of the transient receptor potential superfamily, TRP, which are activated by either low or high temperatures covering the whole range of physiologically relevant temperatures. This review makes a critical assessment of existing analytical methods of temperature-activated TRP channel mechanisms using the cold-activated TRPM8 channel as a paradigm. PMID:27227023

  10. A common mechanism underlies stretch activation and receptor activation of TRPC6 channels

    PubMed Central

    Spassova, Maria A.; Hewavitharana, Thamara; Xu, Wen; Soboloff, Jonathan; Gill, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    The TRP family of ion channels transduce an extensive range of chemical and physical signals. TRPC6 is a receptor-activated nonselective cation channel expressed widely in vascular smooth muscle and other cell types. We report here that TRPC6 is also a sensor of mechanically and osmotically induced membrane stretch. Pressure-induced activation of TRPC6 was independent of phospholipase C. The stretch responses were blocked by the tarantula peptide, GsMTx-4, known to specifically inhibit mechanosensitive channels by modifying the external lipid-channel boundary. The GsMTx-4 peptide also blocked the activation of TRPC6 channels by either receptor-induced PLC activation or by direct application of diacylglycerol. The effects of the peptide on both stretch- and diacylglycerol-mediated TRPC6 activation indicate that the mechanical and chemical lipid sensing by the channel has a common molecular mechanism that may involve lateral-lipid tension. The mechanosensing properties of TRPC6 channels highly expressed in smooth muscle cells are likely to play a key role in regulating myogenic tone in vascular tissue. PMID:17056714

  11. AChE inhibition: one dominant factor for swimming behavior changes of Daphnia magna under DDVP exposure.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zongming; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Xiaoguang; Qi, Pingping; Zhang, Biao; Zeng, Yang; Fu, Rongshu; Miao, Mingsheng

    2015-02-01

    As a key enzyme that hydrolyzes the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in cholinergic synapses of both vertebrates and invertebrates, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is strongly inhibited by organophosphates. AChE inhibition may induce the decrease of swimming ability. According to previous research, swimming behavior of different aquatic organisms could be affected by different chemicals, and there is a shortage of research on direct correlation analysis between swimming behavior and biochemical indicators. Therefore, swimming behavior and whole-body AChE activity of Daphnia magna under dichlorvos (DDVP) exposure were identified in order to clarify the relationship between behavioral responses and AChE inhibition in this study. In the beginning, AChE activity was similar in all treatments with the control. During all exposures, the tendency of AChE activity inhibition was the same as the behavioral responses of D. magna. The AChE activity of individuals without movement would decrease to about zero in several minutes. The correlation analysis between swimming behavior of D. magna and AChE activity showed that the stepwise behavioral response was mainly decided by AChE activity. All of these results suggested that the toxicity characteristics of DDVP as an inhibitor of AChE on the swimming behavior of organisms were the same, and the AChE activity inhibition could induce loss of the nerve conduction ability, causing hyperactivity, loss of coordination, convulsions, paralysis and other kinds of behavioral changes, which was illustrated by the stepwise behavioral responses under different environmental stresses.

  12. Transient Receptor Potential Channels in Microglia: Roles in Physiology and Disease.

    PubMed

    Echeverry, Santiago; Rodriguez, María Juliana; Torres, Yolima P

    2016-10-01

    Microglia modulate the nervous system cellular environment and induce neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects. Various molecules are involved in these processes, including families of ion channels expressed in microglial cells, such as transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. TRP channels comprise a family of non-selective cation channels that can be activated by mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli, and which contribute to the regulation of intracellular calcium concentrations. TRP channels have been shown to be involved in cellular processes such as osmotic regulation, cytokine production, proliferation, activation, cell death, and oxidative stress responses. Given the significance of these processes in microglial activity, studies of TRP channels in microglia have focused on determining their roles in both neuroprotective and neurotoxic processes. TRP channel activity has been proposed to play an important function in neurodegenerative diseases, ischemia, inflammatory responses, and neuropathic pain. Modulation of TRP channel activity may thus be considered as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various diseases associated with alterations of the central nervous system (CNS). In this review, we describe the expression of different subfamilies of TRP channels in microglia, focusing on their physiological and pathophysiological roles, and consider their potential use as therapeutic targets in CNS diseases. PMID:27260222

  13. Transient Receptor Potential Channels in Microglia: Roles in Physiology and Disease.

    PubMed

    Echeverry, Santiago; Rodriguez, María Juliana; Torres, Yolima P

    2016-10-01

    Microglia modulate the nervous system cellular environment and induce neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects. Various molecules are involved in these processes, including families of ion channels expressed in microglial cells, such as transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. TRP channels comprise a family of non-selective cation channels that can be activated by mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli, and which contribute to the regulation of intracellular calcium concentrations. TRP channels have been shown to be involved in cellular processes such as osmotic regulation, cytokine production, proliferation, activation, cell death, and oxidative stress responses. Given the significance of these processes in microglial activity, studies of TRP channels in microglia have focused on determining their roles in both neuroprotective and neurotoxic processes. TRP channel activity has been proposed to play an important function in neurodegenerative diseases, ischemia, inflammatory responses, and neuropathic pain. Modulation of TRP channel activity may thus be considered as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various diseases associated with alterations of the central nervous system (CNS). In this review, we describe the expression of different subfamilies of TRP channels in microglia, focusing on their physiological and pathophysiological roles, and consider their potential use as therapeutic targets in CNS diseases.

  14. From crystal structure of α-conotoxin GIC in complex with Ac-AChBP to molecular determinants of its high selectivity for α3β2 nAChR

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bo; Xu, Manyu; Zhu, Xiaopeng; Wu, Yong; Liu, Xi; Zhangsun, Dongting; Hu, Yuanyan; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Kasheverov, Igor E.; Tsetlin, Victor I.; Wang, Xinquan; Luo, Sulan

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine binding proteins (AChBPs) are unique spatial homologs of the ligand-binding domains of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and they reproduce some pharmacological properties of nAChRs. X-ray crystal structures of AСhBP in complex with α-conotoxins provide important insights into the interactions of α-conotoxins with distinct nAChR subtypes. Although considerable efforts have been made to understand why α-conotoxin GIC is strongly selective for α3β2 nAChR, this question has not yet been solved. Here we present the structure of α-conotoxin GIC in complex with Aplysia californica AChBP (Ac-AChBP) at a resolution of 2.1 Å. Based on this co-crystal structure complemented with molecular docking data, we suggest the key residues of GIC in determining its high affinity and selectivity for human α3β2 vs α3β4 nAChRs. These suggestions were checked by radioligand and electrophysiology experiments, which confirmed the functional role of detected contacts for GIC interactions with Ac-AChBP and α3β2 nAChR subtypes. While GIC elements responsible for its high affinity binding with Ac-AChBP and α3β2 nAChR were identified, our study also showed the limitations of computer modelling in extending the data from the X-ray structures of the AChBP complexes to all nAChR subtypes. PMID:26925840

  15. Effect of pharmaceuticals exposure on acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity and on the expression of AchE gene in the monogonont rotifer, Brachionus koreanus.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jae-Sung; Kim, Bo-Mi; Jeong, Chang-Bum; Park, Heum Gi; Leung, Kenneth Mei Yee; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2013-11-01

    Pharmaceuticals are widely used in human and veterinary medicine. However, they are emerging as a significant contaminant in aquatic environments through wastewater. Due to the persistent and accumulated properties of pharmaceuticals via the food web, their potential harmful effects on aquatic animals are a great concern. In this study, we investigated the effects of six pharmaceuticals: acetaminophen, ATP; atenolol, ATN; carbamazepine, CBZ; oxytetracycline, OTC; sulfamethoxazole, SMX; and trimethoprim, TMP on acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7) activity and its transcript expression with chlorpyrifos (as a positive control) in the monogonont rotifer, Brachionus koreanus. ATP, CBZ, and TMP exposure also remarkably inhibited Bk-AChE activity at 100 μg/L (24 h) and 1000 μg/L (12 h and 24 h). ATP, CBZ, and TMP exposure showed a significant decrease in the Bk-AChE mRNA level in a concentration-dependent manner. However, in the case of OTC and SMX, a slight decrease in Bk-AChE mRNA expression was found but only at the highest concentration. The time-course experiments showed that ATP positively induced Bk-AChE mRNA 12 h after exposure at both 100 and 1000 μg/L, while the Bk-AChE mRNA expression was significantly downregulated over 6 to 24 h after exposure to 1000 μg/L of CBZ, OTC, SMX, and TMP. Our findings suggest that Bk-AChE would be a useful biomarker for risk assessment of pharmaceutical compounds as an early signal of their toxicity in aquatic environments. Particularly, ATP, CBZ, and TMP may have a toxic cholinergic effect on rotifer B. koreanus by inhibiting AChE activity. PMID:24028855

  16. Circannual rhythms of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the freshwater fish Cnesterodon decemmaculatus.

    PubMed

    Menéndez-Helman, Renata J; Ferreyroa, Gisele V; dos Santos Afonso, Maria; Salibián, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The use of biomarkers as a tool to assess responses of organisms exposed to pollutants in toxicity bioassays, as well as in aquatic environmental risk assessment protocols, requires the understanding of the natural fluctuation of the particular biomarker. The aim of this study was to characterize the intrinsic variations of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in tissues of a native freshwater teleost fish to be used as biomarker in toxicity tests, taking into account both seasonal influence and fish size. Specific AChE activity was measured by the method of Ellman et al. (1961) in homogenates of fish anterior section finding a seasonal variability. The highest activity was observed in summer, decreasing significantly below 40% in winter. The annual AChE activity cycle in the anterior section was fitted to a sinusoidal function with a period of 11.2 months. Moreover, an inverse relationship between enzymatic activity and the animal size was established. The results showed that both the fish length and seasonal variability affect AChE activity. AChE activity in fish posterior section showed a similar trend to that in the anterior section, while seasonal variations of the activity in midsection were observed but differences were not statistically significant. In addition, no relationship between AChE and total tissue protein was established in the anterior and posterior sections suggesting that the circannual rhythms observed are AChE-specific responses. Results highlight the importance of considering both the fish size and season variations to reach valid conclusions when AChE activity is employed as neurotoxicity biomarker.

  17. Cholinesterases in development: AChE as a firewall to inhibit cell proliferation and support differentiation.

    PubMed

    Layer, Paul G; Klaczinski, Janine; Salfelder, Anika; Sperling, Laura E; Thangaraj, Gopenath; Tuschl, Corina; Vogel-Höpker, Astrid

    2013-03-25

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a most remarkable protein, not only because it is one of the fastest enzymes in nature, but also since it appears in many molecular forms and is regulated by elaborate genetic networks. AChE is expressed in many tissues during development and in mature organisms, as well as in healthy and diseased states. In search for alternative, "non-classical" functions of cholinesterases (ChEs), AChE could either work within the frame of classic cholinergic systems, but in non-neural tissues ("non-synaptic function"), or act non-enzymatically. Here, we review briefly some of the major ideas and advances of this field, and report on some recent progress from our own experimental work, e.g. that (i) non-neural ChEs have pronounced, predominantly enzymatic effects on early embryonic (limb) development in chick and mouse, that (ii) retinal R28 cells of the rat overexpressing synaptic AChE present a significantly decreased cell proliferation, and that (iii) in developing chick retina ACh-synthesizing and ACh-degrading cells originate from the same postmitotic precursor cells, which later form two locally opposing cell populations. We suggest that such distinct distributions of ChAT(+) vs. AChE(+) cells in the inner half retina provide graded distributions of ACh, which can direct cell differentiation and network formation. Thus, as corroborated by works from many labs, AChE can be considered a highly co-opting protein, which can combine enzymatic and non-enzymatic functions within one molecule. PMID:23047026

  18. Characterization of additional novel immune type receptors in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mining of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) expressed sequence tag databases identified seven new novel immune type receptors (IpNITRs). These differed in sequence, but not structure, from previously described IpNITR1-11. IpNITR12a, 12b, 13 and 14, encode proteins containing a single variable (V...

  19. Reconstitution of Purified Acetylcholine Receptors with Functional Ion Channels in Planar Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, N.; Anholt, R.; Lindstrom, J.; Montal, M.

    1980-05-01

    Acetylcholine receptor, solubilized and purified from Torpedo californica electric organ under conditions that preserve the activity of its ion channel, was reconstituted into vesicles of soybean lipid by the cholate-dialysis technique. The reconstituted vesicles were then spread into monolayers at an air-water interface and planar bilayers were subsequently formed by apposition of two monolayers. Addition of carbamoylcholine caused an increase in membrane conductance that was transient and relaxed spontaneously to the base level (i.e., became desensitized). The response to carbamoylcholine was dose dependent and competitively inhibited by curare. Fluctuations of membrane conductance corresponding to the opening and closing of receptor channels were observed. Fluctuation analysis indicated a single-channel conductance of 16± 3 pS (in 0.1 M NaCl) with a mean channel open time estimated to be 35± 5 ms. Thus, purified acetylcholine receptor reconstituted into lipid bilayers exhibited the pharmacological specificity, activation, and desensitization properties expected of this receptor in native membranes.

  20. Main ion channels and receptors associated with visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Rocha, Heraldo Arcela; Dantas, Bruna Priscilla Vasconcelos; Rolim, Thaísa Leite; Costa, Bagnólia Araújo; de Medeiros, Arnaldo Correia

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a very frequent functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort and alteration of bowel habits. The IBS physiopathology is extremely complex. Visceral hypersensitivity plays an important role in the pathogenesis of abdominal pain in both in vitro and in vivo models of this functional disorder. In order to obtain a general view of the participation of the main ion channels and receptors regarding the visceral hypersensitivity in the IBS and to describe their chemical structure, a literature review was carried out. A bibliographical research in the following electronic databases: Pubmed and Virtual Library in Health (BVS) was fulfilled by using the search terms “ion channels” “or” “receptors” “and” “visceral hypersensitivity” “or” “visceral nociception” “and” “irritable bowel syndrome”. Original and review articles were considered for data acquisition. The activation of the ATP ion-gated channels, voltage-gated sodium (Nav) and calcium (Cav) channels, as well as the activation of protease-activated receptors (PAR2), transient receptor potential vanilloide-1, serotonin, cannabinoids and cholecystokinin are involved in the genesis of visceral hypersensitivity in IBS. The involvement of ion channels and receptors concerning visceral hypersensitivity is noteworthy in IBS models. PMID:24976114

  1. Regulation of Calcium Channels and Exocytosis in Mouse Adrenal Chromaffin Cells by Prostaglandin EP3 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, Mark L.; Breyer, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2 controls numerous physiological functions through a family of cognate G protein-coupled receptors (EP1–EP4). Targeting specific EP receptors might be therapeutically useful and reduce side effects associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors that block prostanoid synthesis. Systemic immune challenge and inflammatory cytokines have been shown to increase expression of the synthetic enzymes for PGE2 in the adrenal gland. Catecholamines and other hormones, released from adrenal chromaffin cells in response to Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, play central roles in homeostatic function and the coordinated stress response. However, long-term elevation of circulating catecholamines contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and heart failure. Here, we investigated the EP receptor(s) and cellular mechanisms by which PGE2 might modulate chromaffin cell function. PGE2 did not alter resting intracellular [Ca2+] or the peak amplitude of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor currents, but it did inhibit CaV2 voltage-gated Ca2+ channel currents (ICa). This inhibition was voltage-dependent and mediated by pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins, consistent with a direct Gβγ subunit-mediated mechanism common to other Gi/o-coupled receptors. mRNA for all four EP receptors was detected, but using selective pharmacological tools and EP receptor knockout mice, we demonstrated that EP3 receptors mediate the inhibition of ICa. Finally, changes in membrane capacitance showed that Ca2+-dependent exocytosis was reduced in parallel with ICa. To our knowledge, this is the first study of EP receptor signaling in mouse chromaffin cells and identifies a molecular mechanism for paracrine regulation of neuroendocrine function by PGE2. PMID:21383044

  2. Purification and reconstitution of the calcium antagonist receptor of the voltage-sensitive calcium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment with digitonin solubilized the calcium antagonist receptor as a stable complex with (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine from rat brain membranes. The solubilized complex retains allosteric coupling to binding sites for diltiazem, verapamil, and inorganic calcium antagonist sites. The calcium antagonist receptor from cardiac sarcolemma and the transverse-tubule membrane of skeletal muscle is also efficiently solubilized with digitonin and the receptor in all three tissues is a large glycoprotein with a sedimentation coefficient of 20 S. The T-tubule calcium antagonist receptor complex was extensively purified by a combination of chromatography on WGA-Sepharose, ion exchange chromatography, and sedimentation on sucrose gradients to yield preparations estimated to be 41% homogeneous by specific activity and 63% homogeneous by SDS gel electrophoresis. Analysis of SDS gels detect three polypeptides termed ..cap alpha..(Mr 135,000), ..beta..(Mr 50,000), and ..gamma..(Mr 32,000) as noncovalently associated subunits of the calcium antagonist receptor. The ..cap alpha.. and ..gamma.. subunits are glycosylated polypeptides, and the molecular weight of the core polypeptides are 108,000 and 24,000 respectively. The calcium antagonist receptor was reconstituted into a phospholipid bilayer by adding CHAPS and exogeneous lipid to the purified receptor followed by rapid detergent removal. This procedure resulted in the incorporation of 45% of the calcium antagonist receptor into closed phospholipid vesicles. Data suggests that the ..cap alpha.., ..beta.., and ..gamma.. subunits of the T-tubule calcium antagonist receptor are sufficient to form a functional calcium channel.

  3. Evaluation of benzyltetrahydroisoquinolines as ligands for neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Exley, Richard; Iturriaga-Vásquez, Patricio; Lukas, Ronald J; Sher, Emanuele; Cassels, Bruce K; Bermudez, Isabel

    2005-01-01

    Effects of derivatives of coclaurine (C), which mimic the ‘eastern' or the nonquaternary halves of the alkaloids tetrandrine or d-tubocurarine, respectively, both of which are inhibitors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nACh), were examined on recombinant, human α7, α4β2 and α4β4 nACh receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and clonal cell lines using two-electrode voltage clamping and radioligand binding techniques. In this limited series, Cs have higher affinity and are most potent at α4 subunit-containing-nACh receptors and least potent at homomeric α7 receptors, and this trend is very marked for the N-unsubstituted C and its O,O′-bisbenzyl derivative. 7-O-Benzyl-N-methylcoclaurine (BBCM) and its 12-O-methyl derivative showed the highest affinities and potencies at all three receptor subtypes, and this suggests that lipophilicity at C7 and/or C12 increases potency. Laudanosine and armepavine (A) were noncompetitive and voltage-dependent inhibitors of α7, α4β2 or α4β4 receptors, but the bulkier C7-benzylated 7BNMC (7-O-benzyl-N-methylcoclaurine) and 7B12MNMC (7-O-benzyl-N,12-O-dimethyl coclaurine) were voltage-independent, noncompetitive inhibitors of nACh receptors. Voltage-dependence was also lost on going from A to its N-ethyl analogue. These studies suggest that C derivatives may be useful tools for studies characterising the antagonist and ion channel sites on human α7, α4β2 or α4β4 nACh receptors and for revealing structure–function relationships for nACh receptor antagonists. PMID:15980871

  4. Receptor model for the molecular basis of tissue selectivity of 1, 4-dihydropyridine calcium channel drugs.

    PubMed

    Langs, D A; Strong, P D; Triggle, D J

    1990-09-01

    Our analysis of the solid state conformations of nifedipine [dimethyl 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-4-(2-nitrophenyl)-3,5-pyridinecarboxylate ] and its 1,4-dihydropyridine (1,4-DHP) analogues produced a cartoon description of the important interactions between these drugs and their voltage-dependent calcium channel receptor. In the present study a molecular-level detailed model of the 1,4-DHP receptor binding site has been built from the published amino acid sequence of the alpha 1 subunit of the voltage-dependent calcium channel isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle transverse tubule membranes. The voltage-sensing component of the channel described in this work differs from other reported for the homologous sodium channel in that it incorporates a water structure and a staggered, rather than eclipsed, hydrogen bonded S4 helix conformation. The major recognition surfaces of the receptor lie in helical grooves on the S4 or voltage-sensing alpha-helix that is positioned in the center of the bundle of transmembrane helices that define each of the four calcium channel domains. Multiple binding clefts defined by Arg-X-X-Arg-P-X-X-S 'reading frames' exist on the S4 strand. The tissue selectivity of nifedipine and its analogues may arise, in part, from conservative changes in the amino acid residues at the P and S positions of the reading frame that define the ester-binding regions of receptors from different tissues. The crystal structures of two tissue-selective nifedipine analogues, nimodipine [isopropyl (2-methoxyethyl) 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-4-(3-nitrophenyl)-3,5-pyridinecarboxylate ] and nitrendipine [ethyl methyl 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-4-(3-nitrophenyl)-3, 5-pyridinecarboxylate] are reported. Nimodipine was observed to have an unusual ester side chain conformation that enhances the fit to the proposed ester-sensing region of the receptor.

  5. Natural AChE Inhibitors from Plants and their Contribution to Alzheimer’s Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Ana Paula; Faraoni, María Belén; Castro, María Julia; Alza, Natalia Paola; Cavallaro, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    As acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are an important therapeutic strategy in Alzheimer’s disease, efforts are being made in search of new molecules with anti-AChE activity. The fact that naturally-occurring compounds from plants are considered to be a potential source of new inhibitors has led to the discovery of an important number of secondary metabolites and plant extracts with the ability of inhibiting the enzyme AChE, which, according to the cholinergic hypothesis, increases the levels of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the brain, thus improving cholinergic functions in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and alleviating the symptoms of this neurological disorder. This review summarizes a total of 128 studies which correspond to the most relevant research work published during 2006-2012 (1st semester) on plant-derived compounds, plant extracts and essential oils found to elicit AChE inhibition. PMID:24381530

  6. Optochemical control of genetically engineered neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tochitsky, Ivan; Banghart, Matthew R.; Mourot, Alexandre; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Gaub, Benjamin; Kramer, Richard H.; Trauner, Dirk

    2012-02-01

    Advances in synthetic chemistry, structural biology, molecular modelling and molecular cloning have enabled the systematic functional manipulation of transmembrane proteins. By combining genetically manipulated proteins with light-sensitive ligands, innately ‘blind’ neurobiological receptors can be converted into photoreceptors, which allows them to be photoregulated with high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we present the optochemical control of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with photoswitchable tethered agonists and antagonists. Using structure-based design, we produced heteromeric α3β4 and α4β2 nAChRs that can be activated or inhibited with deep-violet light, but respond normally to acetylcholine in the dark. The generation of these engineered receptors should facilitate investigation of the physiological and pathological functions of neuronal nAChRs and open a general pathway to photosensitizing pentameric ligand-gated ion channels.

  7. Menthol Alone Upregulates Midbrain nAChRs, Alters nAChR Subtype Stoichiometry, Alters Dopamine Neuron Firing Frequency, and Prevents Nicotine Reward

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Brandon J.; Wall, Teagan R.; Henley, Beverley M.; Kim, Charlene H.; Nichols, Weston A.; Moaddel, Ruin; Xiao, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Upregulation of β2 subunit-containing (β2*) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is implicated in several aspects of nicotine addiction, and menthol cigarette smokers tend to upregulate β2* nAChRs more than nonmenthol cigarette smokers. We investigated the effect of long-term menthol alone on midbrain neurons containing nAChRs. In midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons from mice containing fluorescent nAChR subunits, menthol alone increased the number of α4 and α6 nAChR subunits, but this upregulation did not occur in midbrain GABAergic neurons. Thus, chronic menthol produces a cell-type-selective upregulation of α4* nAChRs, complementing that of chronic nicotine alone, which upregulates α4 subunit-containing (α4*) nAChRs in GABAergic but not DA neurons. In mouse brain slices and cultured midbrain neurons, menthol reduced DA neuron firing frequency and altered DA neuron excitability following nAChR activation. Furthermore, menthol exposure before nicotine abolished nicotine reward-related behavior in mice. In neuroblastoma cells transfected with fluorescent nAChR subunits, exposure to 500 nm menthol alone also increased nAChR number and favored the formation of (α4)3(β2)2 nAChRs; this contrasts with the action of nicotine itself, which favors (α4)2(β2)3 nAChRs. Menthol alone also increases the number of α6β2 receptors that exclude the β3 subunit. Thus, menthol stabilizes lower-sensitivity α4* and α6 subunit-containing nAChRs, possibly by acting as a chemical chaperone. The abolition of nicotine reward-related behavior may be mediated through menthol's ability to stabilize lower-sensitivity nAChRs and alter DA neuron excitability. We conclude that menthol is more than a tobacco flavorant: administered alone chronically, it alters midbrain DA neurons of the nicotine reward-related pathway. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Menthol, the most popular flavorant for tobacco products, has been considered simply a benign flavor additive. However, as we show here

  8. Molecular mechanism of the assembly of an acid-sensing receptor ion channel complex.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong; Ulbrich, Maximilian H; Li, Ming-Hui; Dobbins, Scott; Zhang, Wei K; Tong, Liang; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Yang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) family proteins associate with transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family proteins to form functionally important complexes. PKD proteins differ from known ion channel-forming proteins and are generally thought to act as membrane receptors. Here we find that PKD1L3, a PKD protein, functions as a channel-forming subunit in an acid-sensing heteromeric complex formed by PKD1L3 and TRPP3, a TRP channel protein. Single amino-acid mutations in the putative pore region of both proteins alter the channel's ion selectivity. The PKD1L3/TRPP3 complex in the plasma membrane of live cells contains one PKD1L3 and three TRPP3. A TRPP3 C-terminal coiled-coil domain forms a trimer in solution and in crystal, and has a crucial role in the assembly and surface expression of the PKD1L3/TRPP3 complex. These results demonstrate that PKD subunits constitute a new class of channel-forming proteins, enriching our understanding of the function of PKD proteins and PKD/TRPP complexes. PMID:23212381

  9. Kainate receptor pore‐forming and auxiliary subunits regulate channel block by a novel mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Patricia M. G. E.; Aurousseau, Mark R. P.; Musgaard, Maria; Biggin, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Kainate receptor heteromerization and auxiliary subunits, Neto1 and Neto2, attenuate polyamine ion‐channel block by facilitating blocker permeation.Relief of polyamine block in GluK2/GluK5 heteromers results from a key proline residue that produces architectural changes in the channel pore α‐helical region.Auxiliary subunits exert an additive effect to heteromerization, and thus relief of polyamine block is due to a different mechanism.Our findings have broad implications for work on polyamine block of other cation‐selective ion channels. Abstract Channel block and permeation by cytoplasmic polyamines is a common feature of many cation‐selective ion channels. Although the channel block mechanism has been studied extensively, polyamine permeation has been considered less significant as it occurs at extreme positive membrane potentials. Here, we show that kainate receptor (KAR) heteromerization and association with auxiliary proteins, Neto1 and Neto2, attenuate polyamine block by enhancing blocker permeation. Consequently, polyamine permeation and unblock occur at more negative and physiologically relevant membrane potentials. In GluK2/GluK5 heteromers, enhanced permeation is due to a single proline residue in GluK5 that alters the dynamics of the α‐helical region of the selectivity filter. The effect of auxiliary proteins is additive, and therefore the structural basis of polyamine permeation and unblock is through a different mechanism. As native receptors are thought to assemble as heteromers in complex with auxiliary proteins, our data identify an unappreciated impact of polyamine permeation in shaping the signalling properties of neuronal KARs and point to a structural mechanism that may be shared amongst other cation‐selective ion channels. PMID:26682513

  10. Activation of endplate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by agonists.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Anthony

    2015-10-15

    The interaction of a small molecule made in one cell with a large receptor made in another is the signature event of cell signaling. Understanding the structure and energy changes associated with agonist activation is important for engineering drugs, receptors and synapses. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is a ∼300kD ion channel that binds the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and other cholinergic agonists to elicit electrical responses in the central and peripheral nervous systems. This mini-review is in two sections. First, general concepts of skeletal muscle AChR operation are discussed in terms of energy landscapes for conformational change. Second, adult vs. fetal AChRs are compared with regard to interaction energies between ACh and agonist-site side chains, measured by single-channel electrophysiology and molecular dynamics simulations. The five aromatic residues that form the core of each agonist binding site can be divided into two working groups, a triad (led by αY190) that behaves similarly at all sites and a coupled pair (led by γW55) that has a large influence on affinity only in fetal AChRs. Each endplate AChR has 5 homologous subunits, two of α(1) and one each of β, δ, and either γ (fetal) or ϵ (adult). These nicotinic AChRs have only 2 functional agonist binding sites located in the extracellular domain, at αδ and either αγ or αϵ subunit interfaces. The receptor undergoes a reversible, global isomerization between structures called C and O. The C shape does not conduct ions and has a relatively low affinity for ACh, whereas O conducts cations and has a higher affinity. When both agonist sites are empty (filled only with water) the probability of taking on the O conformation (PO) is low, <10(-6). When ACh molecules occupy the agonist sites the C→O opening rate constant and C↔O gating equilibrium constant increase dramatically. Following a pulse of ACh at the nerve-muscle synapse, the endplate current rises rapidly

  11. Non-selective cation channels mediate chloroquine-induced relaxation in precontracted mouse airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Luo, Xiao-Jing; Sai, Wen-Bo; Yu, Meng-Fei; Li, Wen-Er; Ma, Yun-Fei; Chen, Weiwei; Zhai, Kui; Qin, Gangjian; Guo, Donglin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao; Shen, Jin-Hua; Ji, Guangju; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Bitter tastants can induce relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle by activating big-conductance potassium channels (BKs) or by inactivating voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (VDLCCs). In this study, a new pathway for bitter tastant-induced relaxation was defined and investigated. We found nifedipine-insensitive and bitter tastant chloroquine-sensitive relaxation in epithelium-denuded mouse tracheal rings (TRs) precontracted with acetylcholine (ACH). In the presence of nifedipine (10 µM), ACH induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and cell shortening in single airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), and these changes were inhibited by chloroquine. In TRs, ACH triggered a transient contraction under Ca2+-free conditions, and, following a restoration of Ca2+, a strong contraction occurred, which was inhibited by chloroquine. Moreover, the ACH-activated whole-cell and single channel currents of non-selective cation channels (NSCCs) were blocked by chloroquine. Pyrazole 3 (Pyr3), an inhibitor of transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) channels, partially inhibited ACH-induced contraction, intracellular Ca2+ elevation, and NSCC currents. These results demonstrate that NSCCs play a role in bitter tastant-induced relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle.

  12. Receptors, channels, and signalling in the urothelial sensory system in the bladder.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Liana; Gonzalez, Eric J; Girard, Beatrice M; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2016-04-01

    The storage and periodic elimination of urine, termed micturition, requires a complex neural control system to coordinate the activities of the urinary bladder, urethra, and urethral sphincters. At the level of the lumbosacral spinal cord, lower urinary tract reflex mechanisms are modulated by supraspinal controls with mechanosensory input from the urothelium, resulting in regulation of bladder contractile activity. The specific identity of the mechanical sensor is not yet known, but considerable interest exists in the contribution of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to the mechanosensory functions of the urothelium. The sensory, transduction, and signalling properties of the urothelium can influence adjacent urinary bladder tissues including the suburothelial nerve plexus, interstitial cells of Cajal, and detrusor smooth muscle cells. Diverse stimuli, including those that activate TRP channels expressed by the urothelium, can influence urothelial release of chemical mediators (such as ATP). Changes to the urothelium are associated with a number of bladder pathologies that underlie urinary bladder dysfunction. Urothelial receptor and/or ion channel expression and the release of signalling molecules (such as ATP and nitric oxide) can be altered with bladder disease, neural injury, target organ inflammation, or psychogenic stress. Urothelial receptors and channels represent novel targets for potential therapies that are intended to modulate micturition function or bladder sensation. PMID:26926246

  13. Pharmacological characterization of muscarinic receptor-activated cation channels in guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S.; Inoue, R.; Ito, Y.

    1993-01-01

    1. The pharmacological properties of cationic currents activated by acetylcholine (ACh) (Icat) in guinea-pig ileal smooth muscle cells were investigated, with conventional single patch electrode or nystatin-perforated whole-cell recording. Cs-aspartate was used as the internal solution to allow selective measurement of Icat. 2. Well-known K channel blockers, tetraethylammonium (TEA), 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), procaine and quinine as well as a Ca releasing agent, caffeine, all produced concentration-dependent inhibition of Icat with rapid onset (time constant approximately 100 ms), when applied externally. The recovery from the inhibition on washout also occurred rapidly in the order of 100 ms except in the case of quinine. Approximate values of the half inhibitory concentrations (IC50) were 10 nM for TEA and caffeine, 1-5 mM for 4-AP and procaine, and 1 microM for quinine. The mode of inhibition was voltage-dependent, i.e., depolarization relieved the inhibition with no change in reversal potential. 3. Externally applied diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC) derivatives, DCDPC and flufenamic acid, produced potent inhibition of Icat at micromolar concentrations (IC50s were < 30 microM for DCDPC and 32 microM for flufenamic acid). The onset of and recovery from inhibition occurred slowly and the degree of inhibition depended on the membrane potential only weakly, without any discernible change in the reversal potential. 4. All of the above-tested drugs exhibited comparable inhibitory actions on the voltage-dependent Ca current in the concentration ranges effective at inhibiting Icat. However, amongst them, quinine and flufenamic acid seemed to have several-fold better selectivity for the Icat channel than for the voltage-dependent Ca channel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7689404

  14. Purification and characterization of an. alpha. -bungarotoxin receptor that forms a functional nicotinic channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gotti, C.; Ogando, A.E.; Moretti, M.; Clementi, F. ); Hanke, W.; Schlue, R. )

    1991-04-15

    Neither the structure nor the function of {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}Bgtx) binding molecules in the nervous system have yet been completely defined, although it is known that some of these molecules are related to cation channels and some are not. Using an improved method of affinity chromatography, the authors have isolated a toxin binding molecule from chicken optic lobe that contains at least three subunits with apparent M{sub r} values of 52,000, 57,000, and 67,000. The M{sub r} 57,000 subunit binds {alpha}Bgtx receptors of human neuroblastoma cells, fetal calf muscle, and chicken optic lobe but not by antibodies raised against Torpedo acetylcholine receptor, the serum of myasthenic patients, or monoclonal antibody 35. {sup 125}I-labeled {alpha}Bgtx binding to the isolated receptor is blocked, with the same potency, by nicotinic agonists and antagonists, such as nicotine, neuronal bungarotoxin and, d-tubocurarine. When reconstituted in a planar lipid bilayer, the purified {alpha}Bgtx receptor forms cationic channels with a conductance of 50 pS. These channels are activated in a dose-dependent manner by carbamylcholine and blocked by d-tubocurarine.

  15. Calcium entry through nicotinic receptor channels and calcium channels in cultured rat superior cervical ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Trouslard, J; Marsh, S J; Brown, D A

    1993-01-01

    1. Patch-clamp techniques in conjunction with indo-1 fluorescent measurements were used to measure increases in intracellular free calcium concentration and membrane conductance induced by the activation of nicotinic and calcium channels in cultured rat sympathetic neurons. 2. Under voltage-clamp conditions, pressure application of the nicotinic agonist DMPP (1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide, 100 microM, 100 ms) increased [Ca2+]i by 193 +/- 26 nM at a clamp potential of -60 mV. This was accompanied by an inward current of -4.53 +/- 0.89 nA, giving a mean ratio of the delta (Ca2+]i to the total inward charge transfer of 42.7 nmoles per litre of free calcium per nanocoulomb of charge (M/q ratio). 3. The DMPP-induced current and associated delta [Ca2+]i were reduced by mecamylamine (100 nM-10 microM) but were unaffected by alpha-bungarotoxin (100 nM) or cadmium (100 microM). 4. The M/q ratio was not affected by the holding potential (from -80 to -40 mV) but was a function of the external calcium concentration. 5. The M/q ratio was reduced by increasing the intracellular calcium buffering capacity and increased by heparin but not affected by ryanodine or by depletion of the caffeine-sensitive calcium store. 6. Under the same recording conditions, we quantified the increase in [Ca2+]i associated with activation of the voltage-dependent calcium current. On average at -60 mV, the M/q ratio of this highly calcium-selective permeability was 1961 mM nC-1, which is 46 times that obtained for the nicotinic channel. 7. Assuming constant-field theory, ion-substitution experiments suggest that in 2.5 mM external calcium, the permeability sequence for the nicotinic conductance was Cs+ < Li+ < Na+ < K+ < Ca2+. 8. We conclude that the nicotinic channels in rat sympathetic neurones are significantly permeant to Ca2+ and that the influx of Ca2+ through these channels is the principal cause of the rise in [Ca2+]i seen under voltage clamp. PMID:8254522

  16. Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161188.html Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice Treatment might one ... News) -- New research in mice suggests that tiny nanoparticles might one day be a better way to ...

  17. Temperature and voltage coupling to channel opening in transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8).

    PubMed

    Raddatz, Natalia; Castillo, Juan P; Gonzalez, Carlos; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Latorre, Ramon

    2014-12-19

    Expressed in somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglion, the transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel activated by cold, voltage, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and menthol. Although TRPM8 channel gating has been characterized at the single channel and macroscopic current levels, there is currently no consensus regarding the extent to which temperature and voltage sensors couple to the conduction gate. In this study, we extended the range of voltages where TRPM8-induced ionic currents were measured and made careful measurements of the maximum open probability the channel can attain at different temperatures by means of fluctuation analysis. The first direct measurements of TRPM8 channel temperature-driven conformational rearrangements provided here suggest that temperature alone is able to open the channel and that the opening reaction is voltage-independent. Voltage is a partial activator of TRPM8 channels, because absolute open probability values measured with fully activated voltage sensors are less than 1, and they decrease as temperature rises. By unveiling the fast temperature-dependent deactivation process, we show that TRPM8 channel deactivation is well described by a double exponential time course. The fast and slow deactivation processes are temperature-dependent with enthalpy changes of 27.2 and 30.8 kcal mol(-1). The overall Q10 for the closing reaction is about 33. A three-tiered allosteric model containing four voltage sensors and four temperature sensors can account for the complex deactivation kinetics and coupling between voltage and temperature sensor activation and channel opening. PMID:25352597

  18. Evidence for Novel Pharmacological Sensitivities of Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Channels in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Bais, Swarna; Churgin, Matthew A.; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Greenberg, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma, is a neglected tropical disease affecting hundreds of millions globally. Praziquantel (PZQ), the only drug currently available for treatment and control, is largely ineffective against juvenile worms, and reports of PZQ resistance lend added urgency to the need for development of new therapeutics. Ion channels, which underlie electrical excitability in cells, are validated targets for many current anthelmintics. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are a large family of non-selective cation channels. TRP channels play key roles in sensory transduction and other critical functions, yet the properties of these channels have remained essentially unexplored in parasitic helminths. TRP channels fall into several (7–8) subfamilies, including TRPA and TRPV. Though schistosomes contain genes predicted to encode representatives of most of the TRP channel subfamilies, they do not appear to have genes for any TRPV channels. Nonetheless, we find that the TRPV1-selective activators capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX) induce dramatic hyperactivity in adult worms; capsaicin also increases motility in schistosomula. SB 366719, a highly-selective TRPV1 antagonist, blocks the capsaicin-induced hyperactivity in adults. Mammalian TRPA1 is not activated by capsaicin, yet knockdown of the single predicted TRPA1-like gene (SmTRPA) in S. mansoni effectively abolishes capsaicin-induced responses in adult worms, suggesting that SmTRPA is required for capsaicin sensitivity in these parasites. Based on these results, we hypothesize that some schistosome TRP channels have novel pharmacological sensitivities that can be targeted to disrupt normal parasite neuromuscular function. These results also have implications for understanding the phylogeny of metazoan TRP channels and may help identify novel targets for new or repurposed therapeutics. PMID:26655809

  19. Temperature and voltage coupling to channel opening in transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8).

    PubMed

    Raddatz, Natalia; Castillo, Juan P; Gonzalez, Carlos; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Latorre, Ramon

    2014-12-19

    Expressed in somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglion, the transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel activated by cold, voltage, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and menthol. Although TRPM8 channel gating has been characterized at the single channel and macroscopic current levels, there is currently no consensus regarding the extent to which temperature and voltage sensors couple to the conduction gate. In this study, we extended the range of voltages where TRPM8-induced ionic currents were measured and made careful measurements of the maximum open probability the channel can attain at different temperatures by means of fluctuation analysis. The first direct measurements of TRPM8 channel temperature-driven conformational rearrangements provided here suggest that temperature alone is able to open the channel and that the opening reaction is voltage-independent. Voltage is a partial activator of TRPM8 channels, because absolute open probability values measured with fully activated voltage sensors are less than 1, and they decrease as temperature rises. By unveiling the fast temperature-dependent deactivation process, we show that TRPM8 channel deactivation is well described by a double exponential time course. The fast and slow deactivation processes are temperature-dependent with enthalpy changes of 27.2 and 30.8 kcal mol(-1). The overall Q10 for the closing reaction is about 33. A three-tiered allosteric model containing four voltage sensors and four temperature sensors can account for the complex deactivation kinetics and coupling between voltage and temperature sensor activation and channel opening.

  20. Characterization of ryanodine receptor type 1 single channel activity using "on-nucleus" patch clamp.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Larry E; Groom, Linda A; Dirksen, Robert T; Yule, David I

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we provide the first description of the biophysical and pharmacological properties of ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) expressed in a native membrane using the on-nucleus configuration of the patch clamp technique. A stable cell line expressing rabbit RyR1 was established (HEK-RyR1) using the FLP-in 293 cell system. In contrast to untransfected cells, RyR1 expression was readily demonstrated by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry in HEK-RyR1 cells. In addition, the RyR1 agonists 4-CMC and caffeine activated Ca(2+) release that was inhibited by high concentrations of ryanodine. On nucleus patch clamp was performed in nuclei prepared from HEK-RyR1 cells. Raising the [Ca(2+)] in the patch pipette resulted in the appearance of a large conductance cation channel with well resolved kinetics and the absence of prominent subconductance states. Current versus voltage relationships were ohmic and revealed a chord conductance of ∼750pS or 450pS in symmetrical 250mM KCl or CsCl, respectively. The channel activity was markedly enhanced by caffeine and exposure to ryanodine resulted in the appearance of a subconductance state with a conductance ∼40% of the full channel opening with a Po near unity. In total, these properties are entirely consistent with RyR1 channel activity. Exposure of RyR1 channels to cyclic ADP ribose (cADPr), nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) or dantrolene did not alter the single channel activity stimulated by Ca(2+), and thus, it is unlikely these molecules directly modulate RyR1 channel activity. In summary, we describe an experimental platform to monitor the single channel properties of RyR channels. We envision that this system will be influential in characterizing disease-associated RyR mutations and the molecular determinants of RyR channel modulation.

  1. Temperature and Voltage Coupling to Channel Opening in Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 8 (TRPM8)*♦

    PubMed Central

    Raddatz, Natalia; Castillo, Juan P.; Gonzalez, Carlos; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Latorre, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Expressed in somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglion, the transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel is a Ca2+-permeable cation channel activated by cold, voltage, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and menthol. Although TRPM8 channel gating has been characterized at the single channel and macroscopic current levels, there is currently no consensus regarding the extent to which temperature and voltage sensors couple to the conduction gate. In this study, we extended the range of voltages where TRPM8-induced ionic currents were measured and made careful measurements of the maximum open probability the channel can attain at different temperatures by means of fluctuation analysis. The first direct measurements of TRPM8 channel temperature-driven conformational rearrangements provided here suggest that temperature alone is able to open the channel and that the opening reaction is voltage-independent. Voltage is a partial activator of TRPM8 channels, because absolute open probability values measured with fully activated voltage sensors are less than 1, and they decrease as temperature rises. By unveiling the fast temperature-dependent deactivation process, we show that TRPM8 channel deactivation is well described by a double exponential time course. The fast and slow deactivation processes are temperature-dependent with enthalpy changes of 27.2 and 30.8 kcal mol−1. The overall Q10 for the closing reaction is about 33. A three-tiered allosteric model containing four voltage sensors and four temperature sensors can account for the complex deactivation kinetics and coupling between voltage and temperature sensor activation and channel opening. PMID:25352597

  2. Ca(2+)-BK channel clusters in olfactory receptor neurons and their role in odour coding.

    PubMed

    Bao, Guobin; de Jong, Daniëlle; Alevra, Mihai; Schild, Detlev

    2015-12-01

    Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) have high-voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels whose physiological impact has remained enigmatic since the voltage-gated conductances in this cell type were first described in the 1980s. Here we show that in ORN somata of Xenopus laevis tadpoles these channels are clustered and co-expressed with large-conductance potassium (BK) channels. We found approximately five clusters per ORN and twelve Ca(2+) channels per cluster. The action potential-triggered activation of BK channels accelerates the repolarization of action potentials and shortens interspike intervals during odour responses. This increases the sensitivity of individual ORNs to odorants. At the level of mitral cells of the olfactory bulb, odour qualities have been shown to be coded by first-spike-latency patterns. The system of Ca(2+) and BK channels in ORNs appears to be important for correct odour coding because the blockage of BK channels not only affects ORN spiking patterns but also changes the latency pattern representation of odours in the olfactory bulb.

  3. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as drug targets for diseases of the digestive system

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 20 of the 30 mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channel subunits are expressed by specific neurons and cells within the alimentary canal. They subserve important roles in taste, chemesthesis, mechanosensation, pain and hyperalgesia and contribute to the regulation of gastrointestinal motility, absorptive and secretory processes, blood flow, and mucosal homeostasis. In a cellular perspective, TRP channels operate either as primary detectors of chemical and physical stimuli, as secondary transducers of ionotropic or metabotropic receptors, or as ion transport channels. The polymodal sensory function of TRPA1, TRPM5, TRPM8, TRPP2, TRPV1, TRPV3 and TRPV4 enables the digestive system to survey its physical and chemical environment, which is relevant to all processes of digestion. TRPV5 and TRPV6 as well as TRPM6 and TRPM7 contribute to the absorption of Ca2+ and Mg2+, respectively. TRPM7 participates in intestinal pacemaker activity, and TRPC4 transduces muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation to smooth muscle contraction. Changes in TRP channel expression or function are associated with a variety of diseases/disorders of the digestive system, notably gastro-esophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, pain and hyperalgesia in heartburn, functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome, cholera, hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia, infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, esophageal, gastrointestinal and pancreatic cancer, and polycystic liver disease. These implications identify TRP channels as promising drug targets for the management of a number of gastrointestinal pathologies. As a result, major efforts are put into the development of selective TRP channel agonists and antagonists and the assessment of their therapeutic potential. PMID:21420431

  4. Physiological functions of transient receptor potential channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Ru; Lin, Mo-Jun; Sham, James S K

    2010-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) gene superfamily, which consists of 7 subfamilies with at least 28 mammalian homologues, is known to encode a wide variety of cation channels with diverse biophysical properties, activation mechanisms, and physiological functions. Recent studies have identified multiple TRP channel subtypes, belonging to the canonical (TRPC), melastatin-related (TRPM), and vanilloid-related (TRPV) subfamilies, in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). They operate as specific Ca(2+) pathways responsive to stimuli, including Ca(2+) store depletion, receptor activation, reactive oxygen species, growth factors, and mechanical stress. Increasing evidence suggests that these channels play crucial roles in agonist-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction, hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell proliferation, vascular remodeling, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. This chapter highlighted and discussed these putative physiological functions of TRP channels in pulmonary vasculatures. Since Ca(2+) ions regulate many cellular processes via specific Ca(2+) signals, future investigations of these novel channels will likely uncover more important regulatory mechanisms of pulmonary vascular functions in health and in disease states. PMID:20204726

  5. Transient Receptor Potential Channels Contribute to Pathological Structural and Functional Remodeling After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jennifer; Correll, Robert N.; Trappanese, Danielle M.; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Troupes, Constantine D.; Berretta, Remus M.; Kubo, Hajime; Madesh, Muniswamy; Chen, Xiongwen; Gao, Erhe; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Houser, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The cellular and molecular basis for post myocardial infarction (MI) structural and functional remodeling is not well understood. Objective To determine if Ca2+ influx through transient receptor potential (canonical) (TRPC) channels contributes to post-MI structural and functional remodeling. Methods and Results TRPC1/3/4/6 channel mRNA increased after MI in mice and was associated with TRPC-mediated Ca2+ entry. Cardiac myocyte specific expression of a dominant negative (dn: loss of function) TRPC4 channel increased basal myocyte contractility and reduced hypertrophy and cardiac structural and functional remodeling after MI while increasing survival. We used adenovirus-mediated expression of TRPC3/4/6 channels in cultured adult feline myocytes (AFMs) to define mechanistic aspects of these TRPC-related effects. TRPC3/4/6 over expression in AFMs induced calcineurin (Cn)-Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) mediated hypertrophic signaling, which was reliant on caveolae targeting of TRPCs. TRPC3/4/6 expression in AFMs increased rested state contractions and increased spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ sparks mediated by enhanced phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor. TRPC3/4/6 expression was associated with reduced contractility and response to catecholamines during steady state pacing, likely due to enhanced SR Ca2+ leak. Conclusions Ca2+ influx through TRPC channels expressed after MI activates pathological cardiac hypertrophy and reduces contractility reserve. Blocking post-MI TRPC activity improved post-MI cardiac structure and function. PMID:25047165

  6. An overview of trafficking and assembly of neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels (Review).

    PubMed

    Schwappach, Blanche

    2008-05-01

    Ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-gated ion channels assemble from several homologous and non-homologous subunits. Assembly of these multimeric membrane proteins is a tightly controlled process subject to primary and secondary quality control mechanisms. An assembly pathway involving a dimerization of dimers has been demonstrated for a voltage-gated potassium channel and for different types of glutamate receptors. While many novel C-terminal assembly domains have been identified in various members of the voltage-gated cation channel superfamily, the assembly pathways followed by these proteins remain largely elusive. Recent progress on the recognition of polar residues in the transmembrane segments of membrane proteins by the retrieval factor Rer1 is likely to be relevant for the further investigation of trafficking defects in channelopathies. This mechanism might also contribute to controlling the assembly of ion channels by retrieving unassembled subunits to the endoplasmic reticulum. The endoplasmic reticulum is a metabolic compartment studded with small molecule transporters. This environment provides ligands that have recently been shown to act as pharmacological chaperones in the biogenesis of ligand-gated ion channels. Future progress depends on the improvement of tools, in particular the antibodies used by the field, and the continued exploitation of genetically tractable model organisms in screens and physiological experiments. PMID:18446613

  7. Interaction between positive allosteric modulators and trapping blockers of the NMDA receptor channel

    PubMed Central

    Emnett, Christine M; Eisenman, Lawrence N; Mohan, Jayaram; Taylor, Amanda A; Doherty, James J; Paul, Steven M; Zorumski, Charles F; Mennerick, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Memantine and ketamine are clinically used, open-channel blockers of NMDA receptors exhibiting remarkable pharmacodynamic similarities despite strikingly different clinical profiles. Although NMDA channel gating constitutes an important difference between memantine and ketamine, it is unclear how positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) might affect the pharmacodynamics of these NMDA blockers. Experimental Approach We used two different PAMs: SGE-201, an analogue of an endogenous oxysterol, 24S-hydroxycholesterol, along with pregnenolone sulphate (PS), to test on memantine and ketamine responses in single cells (oocytes and cultured neurons) and networks (hippocampal slices), using standard electrophysiological techniques. Key Results SGE-201 and PS had no effect on steady-state block or voltage dependence of a channel blocker. However, both PAMs increased the actions of memantine and ketamine on phasic excitatory post-synaptic currents, but neither revealed underlying pharmacodynamic differences. SGE-201 accelerated the re-equilibration of blockers during voltage jumps. SGE-201 also unmasked differences among the blockers in neuronal networks – measured either by suppression of activity in multi-electrode arrays or by neuroprotection against a mild excitotoxic insult. Either potentiating NMDA receptors while maintaining the basal activity level or increasing activity/depolarization without potentiating NMDA receptor function is sufficient to expose pharmacodynamic blocker differences in suppressing network function and in neuroprotection. Conclusions and Implications Positive modulation revealed no pharmacodynamic differences between NMDA receptor blockers at a constant voltage, but did expose differences during spontaneous network activity. Endogenous modulator tone of NMDA receptors in different brain regions may underlie differences in the effects of NMDA receptor blockers on behaviour. PMID:25377730

  8. Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) Channel and Neurogenic Inflammation in Pathogenesis of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hang; Li, ShuZhuang

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, airway obstruction, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and it affects 300 million people worldwide. However, our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie asthma remains limited. Recent studies have suggested that transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), one of the transient receptor potential cation channels, may be involved in airway inflammation in asthma. The present review discusses the relationship between TRPA1 and neurogenic inflammation in asthma, hoping to enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of airway inflammation in asthma. PMID:27539812

  9. Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) Channel and Neurogenic Inflammation in Pathogenesis of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hang; Li, ShuZhuang

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, airway obstruction, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and it affects 300 million people worldwide. However, our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie asthma remains limited. Recent studies have suggested that transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), one of the transient receptor potential cation channels, may be involved in airway inflammation in asthma. The present review discusses the relationship between TRPA1 and neurogenic inflammation in asthma, hoping to enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of airway inflammation in asthma. PMID:27539812

  10. Crystallization scale purification of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from mammalian cells using a BacMam expression system

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hao; Fan, Chen; Zhang, Si-wei; Wu, Zhong-shan; Cui, Zhi-cheng; Melcher, Karsten; Zhang, Cheng-hai; Jiang, Yi; Cong, Yao; Xu, H Eric

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To report our methods for expression and purification of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR), a ligand-gated pentameric ion channel and an important drug target. Methods: α7-nAChRs of 10 different species were cloned into an inducible BacMam vector with an N-terminal tag of a tandem maltose-binding protein (MBP) and a TEV cleavage site. This α7-nAChR fusion receptor was expressed in mammalian HEK293F cells and detected by Western blot. The expression was scaled up to liters. The receptor was purified using amylose resin and size-exclusion chromatography. The quality of the purified receptor was assessed using SDS-PAGE gels, thermal stability analysis, and negative stain electron microscopy (EM). The expression construct was optimized through terminal truncations and site-directed mutagenesis. Results: Expression screening revealed that α7-nAChR from Taeniopygia guttata had the highest expression levels. The fusion receptor was expressed mostly on the cell surface, and it could be efficiently purified using one-step amylose affinity chromatography. One to two milligrams of the optimized α7-nAChR expression construct were purified from one liter of cell culture. The purified α7-nAChR samples displayed high thermal stability with a Tm of 60 °C, which was further enhanced by antagonist binding but decreased in the presence of agonist. EM analysis revealed ring-like structures with a central hydrophilic hole, which was consistent with the pentameric assembly of the α7-nAChR channel. Conclusion: We have established methods for crystallization scale expression and purification of α7-nAChR, which lays a foundation for high-resolution structural studies using X-ray crystallography or single particle cryo-EM analysis. PMID:26073323

  11. Analysis of AchE and LDH in mollusc, Lamellidens marginalis after exposure to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Amanullah, B; Stalin, A; Prabu, P; Dhanapal, S

    2010-07-01

    The enzymes Acetylcholinesterase (AchE) and Lactatedehydrogenase (LDH) are used as biological markers in the present study. Enzymes are highly sensitive and used to evaluate the biological effects of organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos in freshwater mussel Lamellidens marginalis. The test organisms were exposed to sub-lethal concentration (5 ppm) of chlorpyrifos for 30 days and allowed to recover for seven days. A distinct reduction of the enzyme AchE (34 +/- 3.3 U l(-1)) was found in the treated hepatopancreas. A significant increase in LDH activity in gill, hepatopancreas and muscle was observed. There was a significant recovery in AchE and LDH in the different tissues, after seven days recovery period.. Hence, the changes in the enzymes are found as the best biomarkering tool to evaluate the effect of organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos on the aquatic biota.

  12. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor modulation of mu (mu) opioid receptors in adult rat sphenopalatine ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Margas, Wojciech; Mahmoud, Saifeldin; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor

    2010-01-01

    The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) neurons represent the parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system involved in controlling cerebral blood flow. In the present study, we examined the coupling mechanism between mu (mu) opioid receptors (MOR) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) with Ca(2+) channels in acutely dissociated adult rat SPG neurons. Successful MOR activation was recorded in approximately 40-45% of SPG neurons employing the whole cell variant of the patch-clamp technique. In addition, immunofluorescence assays indicated that MOR are not expressed in all SPG neurons while M(2) mAChR staining was evident in all neurons. The concentration-response relationships generated with morphine and [d-Ala2-N-Me-Phe4-Glycol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) showed IC(50) values of 15.2 and 56.1 nM and maximal Ca(2+) current inhibition of 26.0 and 38.7%, respectively. Activation of MOR or M(2) mAChR with morphine or oxotremorine-methiodide (Oxo-M), respectively, resulted in voltage-dependent inhibition of Ca(2+) currents via coupling with Galpha(i/o) protein subunits. The acute prolonged exposure (10 min) of neurons to morphine or Oxo-M led to the homologous desensitization of MOR and M(2) mAChR, respectively. The prolonged stimulation of M(2) mAChR with Oxo-M resulted in heterologous desensitization of morphine-mediated Ca(2+) current inhibition, and was sensitive to the M(2) mAChR blocker methoctramine. On the other hand, when the neurons were exposed to morphine or DAMGO for 10 min, heterologous desensitization of M(2) mAChR was not observed. These results suggest that in rat SPG neurons activation of M(2) mAChR likely modulates opioid transmission in the brain vasculature to adequately maintain cerebral blood flow. PMID:19889856

  13. Nicotinic receptor modulation to treat alcohol and drug dependence

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Shafiqur; Engleman, Eric A.; Bell, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol and drug dependence are serious public health problems worldwide. The prevalence of alcohol and drug dependence in the United States and other parts of the world is significant. Given the limitations in the efficacy of current pharmacotherapies to treat these disorders, research in developing alternative pharmacotherapies continues. Preclinical and clinical evidence thus far has indicated that brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are important pharmacological targets for the development of medications to treat alcohol and drug dependence. The nAChRs are a super family of ligand gated ion channels, and are expressed throughout the brain with twelve neuronal nAChR subunits (α2–α10 and β2–β4) identified. Here, we review preclinical and clinical evidence involving a number of nAChR ligands that target different nAChR subtypes in alcohol and nicotine addiction. The important ligands include cytisine, lobeline, mecamylamine, varenicline, sazetidine A and others that target α4β2* nAChR subtypes as small molecule modulators of the brain nicotinic cholinergic system are also discussed. Taken together, both preclinical and clinical data exist that support nAChR–based ligands as promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of alcohol and drug dependence. PMID:25642160

  14. Role of acetylcholine receptors in proliferation and differentiation of P19 embryonal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Resende, R.R.; Alves, A.S.; Britto, L.R.G; Ulrich, H.

    2008-04-15

    Coordinated proliferation and differentiation of progenitor cells is the base for production of appropriate numbers of neurons and glia during neuronal development in order to establish normal brain functions. We have used murine embryonal carcinoma P19 cells as an in vitro model for early differentiation to study participation of nicotinic (nAChR) and muscarinic acetylcholine (mAChR) receptors in the proliferation of neural progenitor cells and their differentiation to neurons. We have previously shown that functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) already expressed in embryonic cells mediate elevations in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) via calcium influx through nAChR channels whereas intracellular stores contribute to nAChR- and mAChR-mediated calcium fluxes in differentiated cells [Resende et al., Cell Calcium 43 (2008) 107-121]. In the present study, we have demonstrated that nicotine provoked inhibition of proliferation in embryonic cells as determined by BrdU labeling. However, in neural progenitor cells nicotine stimulated proliferation which was reversed in the presence of inhibitors of calcium mobilization from intracellular stores, indicating that liberation of intracellular calcium contributed to this proliferation induction. Muscarine induced proliferation stimulation in progenitor cells by activation of G{alpha}{sub q/11}-coupled M{sub 1}, M{sub 3} and M{sub 5} receptors and intracellular calcium stores, whereas G{alpha}{sub i/o}-protein coupled M{sub 2} receptor activity mediated neuronal differentiation.

  15. A functional tandem between transient receptor potential canonical channels 6 and calcium-dependent chloride channels in human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Johanna; Dannhoffer, Luc; Antigny, Fabrice; Vachel, Laura; Jayle, Christophe; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Becq, Frédéric; Norez, Caroline

    2015-10-15

    TRPC6 plays important human physiological functions, notably in artery and arterioles constriction, in regulation of vascular volume and in bronchial muscle constriction. It is implicated in pulmonary hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and seems to play a role in cancer development. Previously, we identified Guanabenz, an α2-adrenergic agonist used for hypertension treatment (Wytensin®), as an activator of calcium-dependent chloride channels (CaCC) in human Cystic Fibrosis (CF) nasal epithelial cells by transiently increasing [Ca2+]i via an influx of extracellular Ca2+. In this study, using assays to measure chloride channel activity, we show that guanabenz is an activator of CaCC in freshly dissociated human bronchial epithelial cells from three CF patients with various genotypes (F508del/F508del, F508del/R1066C, F508del/H1085R). We further characterised the effect of guanabenz and show that it is independent of α-adrenergic receptors, is inhibited by the TRPC family inhibitor SKF-96365 but not by the TRPV family inhibitor ruthenium red. Using western-blotting, Ca2+ measurements and iodide efflux assay, we found that TRPC1 siRNA has no effect on guanabenz induced responses whereas TRPC6 siRNA prevented the guanabenz-dependent Ca2+ influx and the CaCC-dependent activity stimulated by guanabenz. In conclusion, we show that TRPC6 channel is pivotal for the activation of CaCC by guanabenz through a α2-adrenergic-independent pathway in human airway epithelial cells. We suggest propose a functional coupling between TRPC6 and CaCC and guanabenz as a potential TRPC6 activator for exploring TRPC6 and CaCC channel functions and corresponding channelopathies.

  16. Atomic interactions of neonicotinoid agonists with AChBP: Molecular recognition of the distinctive electronegative pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, Todd T.; Harel, Michal; Hibbs, Ryan E.; Radi, Zoran; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E.; Taylor, Palmer

    2008-07-28

    Acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) from mollusks are suitable structural and functional surrogates of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors when combined with transmembrane spans of the nicotinic receptor. These proteins assemble as a pentamer with identical ACh binding sites at the subunit interfaces and show ligand specificities resembling those of the nicotinic receptor for agonists and antagonists. A subset of ligands, termed the neonicotinoids, exhibit specificity for insect nicotinic receptors and selective toxicity as insecticides. AChBPs are of neither mammalian nor insect origin and exhibit a distinctive pattern of selectivity for the neonicotinoid ligands. We define here the binding orientation and determinants of differential molecular recognition for the neonicotinoids and classical nicotinoids by estimates of kinetic and equilibrium binding parameters and crystallographic analysis. Neonicotinoid complex formation is rapid and accompanied by quenching of the AChBP tryptophan fluorescence. Comparisons of the neonicotinoids imidacloprid and thiacloprid in the binding site from Aplysia californica AChBP at 2.48 and 1.94 {angstrom} in resolution reveal a single conformation of the bound ligands with four of the five sites occupied in the pentameric crystal structure. The neonicotinoid electronegative pharmacophore is nestled in an inverted direction compared with the nicotinoid cationic functionality at the subunit interfacial binding pocket. Characteristic of several agonists, loop C largely envelops the ligand, positioning aromatic side chains to interact optimally with conjugated and hydrophobic regions of the neonicotinoid. This template defines the association of interacting amino acids and their energetic contributions to the distinctive interactions of neonicotinoids.

  17. Ion permeation properties of the glutamate receptor channel in cultured embryonic Drosophila myotubes.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, H; Ciani, S; Kidokoro, Y

    1994-01-01

    Ion permeation properties of the glutamate receptor channel in cultured myotubes of Drosophila embryos were studied using the inside-out configuration of the patch-clamp technique. Lowering the NaCl concentration in the bath (intracellular solution), while maintaining that of the external solution constant, caused a shift of the reversal potential in the positive direction, thus indicating a higher permeability of the channel to Na+ than to Cl- (PCl/PNa < 0.04), and suggesting that the channel is cation selective. With 145 mM Na+ on both sides of the membrane, the single-channel current-voltage relation was almost linear in the voltage range between -80 and +80 mV, the conductance showing some variability in the range between 140 and 170 pS. All monovalent alkali cations tested, as well as NH4+, permeated the channel effectively. Using the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation for the reversal potential, the permeability ratios with respect to Na+ were estimated to be: 1.32 for K+, 1.18 for NH4+, 1.15 for Rb+, 1.09 for Cs+, and 0.57 for Li+. Divalent cations, i.e. Mg2+ and Ca2+, in the external solution depressed not only the inward but also the outward Na+ currents, although reversal potential measurements indicated that both ions have considerably higher permeabilities than Na+ (PMg/PNa = 2.31; PCa/PNa = 9.55). The conductance-activity relation for Na+ was described by a hyperbolic curve. The maximal conductance was about 195 pS and the half-saturating activity 45 mM. This result suggests that Na+ ions bind to sites in the channel. All data were fitted by a model based on the Eyring's reaction rate theory, in which the receptor channel is a one-ion pore with three energy barriers and two internal sites. PMID:7519261

  18. Role of Src in C3 transient receptor potential channel function and evidence for a heterogeneous makeup of receptor- and store-operated Ca2+ entry channels.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Brian T; Liao, Yanhong; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2006-01-10

    Receptor-operated Ca2+ entry (ROCE) and store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) are known to be inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitors and activation of C-type transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) isoform 3 (TRPC3), a cation channel thought to be involved in SOCE and/or ROCE, was recently shown to depend on src tyrosine kinase activity. What is not known is the step at which src acts on TRPC3 and whether the role for tyrosine kinases in ROCE or SOCE is a general phenomenon. Using in vitro and in cell protein-protein interaction assays we now report that src phosphorylates TRPC3 at Y226 and that formation of phospho-Y226 is essential for TRPC3 activation. This requirement is unique for TRPC3 because (i) mutation of the cognate tyrosines of the closely related TRPC6 and TRPC7 had no effect; (ii) TRPC6 and TRPC7 were activated in src-, yes-, and fyn-deficient cells; and (iii) src, but not yes or fyn, rescued TRPC3 activation in src-, yes-, and fyn-deficient cells. The Src homology 2 domain of src was found to interact with either the N or the C termini of all TRPCs, suggesting that other tyrosine kinases may play a role in ion fluxes mediated by TRPCs other than TRPC3. A side-by-side comparison of the effects of genistein (a general tyrosine kinase inhibitor) on endogenous ROCE and SOCE in mouse fibroblasts, HEK and COS-7 cells, and ROCE in HEK cells mediated by TRPC3, TRPC6, TRPC7, and TRPC5 showed differences that argue for ROCE and SOCE channels to be heterogeneous.

  19. Lymphocyte-derived ACh regulates local innate but not adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Colin; Duncan, Gordon S.; Brüstle, Anne; Brenner, Dirk; Tusche, Michael W.; Olofsson, Peder S.; Rosas-Ballina, Mauricio; Tracey, Kevin J.; Mak, Tak W.

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate control of immune responses is a critical determinant of health. Here, we show that choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) is expressed and ACh is produced by B cells and other immune cells that have an impact on innate immunity. ChAT expression occurs in mucosal-associated lymph tissue, subsequent to microbial colonization, and is reduced by antibiotic treatment. MyD88-dependent Toll-like receptor up-regulates ChAT in a transient manner. Unlike the previously described CD4+ T-cell population that is stimulated by norepinephrine to release ACh, ChAT+ B cells release ACh after stimulation with sulfated cholecystokinin but not norepinephrine. ACh-producing B-cells reduce peritoneal neutrophil recruitment during sterile endotoxemia independent of the vagus nerve, without affecting innate immune cell activation. Endothelial cells treated with ACh in vitro reduced endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression in a muscarinic receptor-dependent manner. Despite this ability, ChAT+ B cells were unable to suppress effector T-cell function in vivo. Therefore, ACh produced by lymphocytes has specific functions, with ChAT+ B cells controlling the local recruitment of neutrophils. PMID:23297238

  20. Modulation of defensive behavior by Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, D C; Moreira, F A; Terzian, A L; Fogaça, M V; Lisboa, S F; Wotjak, C T; Guimaraes, F S

    2014-10-01

    The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) was first characterized in primary afferent fibers as a receptor for capsaicin (the pungent ingredient of chili peppers). Later on, this cation-permeable ion channel was also described in the central nervous system, where its main putative endogenous ligand is N-arachidonoyl ethanolamide (an endocannabinoid, also known as anandamide). Recent results employing genetic, pharmacological and histochemical techniques indicate that TRPV1 tonically modulate anxiety, fear and panic responses in brain regions related to defensive responses, such as the dorsal periaqueductal gray, the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex. Genetic deletion or antagonism of this ion channel induces anxiolytic-like effects in several animal models. The main mechanism responsible for TRPV1-mediated effects on anxiety seems to involve facilitation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. In addition, there is evidence for interactions with other neurotransmitter systems, such as nitric oxide and endocannabinoids. PMID:24726577

  1. Modulation of defensive behavior by Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, D C; Moreira, F A; Terzian, A L; Fogaça, M V; Lisboa, S F; Wotjak, C T; Guimaraes, F S

    2014-10-01

    The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) was first characterized in primary afferent fibers as a receptor for capsaicin (the pungent ingredient of chili peppers). Later on, this cation-permeable ion channel was also described in the central nervous system, where its main putative endogenous ligand is N-arachidonoyl ethanolamide (an endocannabinoid, also known as anandamide). Recent results employing genetic, pharmacological and histochemical techniques indicate that TRPV1 tonically modulate anxiety, fear and panic responses in brain regions related to defensive responses, such as the dorsal periaqueductal gray, the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex. Genetic deletion or antagonism of this ion channel induces anxiolytic-like effects in several animal models. The main mechanism responsible for TRPV1-mediated effects on anxiety seems to involve facilitation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. In addition, there is evidence for interactions with other neurotransmitter systems, such as nitric oxide and endocannabinoids.

  2. Menthol Binding and Inhibition of α7-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C.; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Al Kury, Lina; Shuba, Yaroslav; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Howarth, Frank C.; Sadek, Bassem; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Menthol is a common compound in pharmaceutical and commercial products and a popular additive to cigarettes. The molecular targets of menthol remain poorly defined. In this study we show an effect of menthol on the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor function. Using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, menthol was found to reversibly inhibit α7-nACh receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Inhibition by menthol was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve endogenous Ca2+-dependent Cl− channels, since menthol inhibition remained unchanged by intracellular injection of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca2+-free bathing solution containing Ba2+. Furthermore, increasing ACh concentrations did not reverse menthol inhibition and the specific binding of [125I] α-bungarotoxin was not attenuated by menthol. Studies of α7- nACh receptors endogenously expressed in neural cells demonstrate that menthol attenuates α7 mediated Ca2+ transients in the cell body and neurite. In conclusion, our results suggest that menthol inhibits α7-nACh receptors in a noncompetitive manner. PMID:23935840

  3. Inhibition of transient receptor potential canonical channels impairs cytokinesis in human malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Bomben, V. C.; Sontheimer, H. W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Glial-derived primary brain tumours, gliomas, are among the fastest growing malignancies and present a huge clinical challenge. Research suggests an important, yet poorly understood, role of ion channels in growth control of normal and malignant cells. In this study, we sought to functionally characterize Transient Receptor Potential Canoncial (TRPC) channels in glioma cell proliferation. TRPC channels form non-selective cation channels that have been suggested to represent a Ca2+ influx pathway impacting cellular growth. Materials and Methods Employing a combination of molecular, biochemical and biophysical techniques, we characterized TRPC channels in glioma cells. Results We showed consistent expression of four channel family members (TRPC-1, -3, -5, -6) in glioma cell lines and acute patient-derived tissues. These channels gave rise to small, non-voltage-dependent cation currents that were blocked by the TRPC inhibitors GdCl3, 2-APB, or SKF96365. Importantly, TRPC channels contributed to the resting conductance of glioma cells and their acute pharmacological inhibition caused an ~10 mV hyperpolarization of the cells’ resting potential. Additionally, chronic application of the TRPC inhibitor SKF96365 caused near complete growth arrest. A detailed analysis, by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and time-lapse microscopy, showed that growth inhibition occurred at the G2 + M phase of the cell cycle with cytokinesis defects. Cells underwent incomplete cell divisions and became multinucleate, enlarged cells. Conclusions Nuclear atypia and enlarged cells are histopathological hallmarks for glioblastoma multiforme, the highest grade glioma, suggesting that a defect in TRPC channel function may contribute to cellular abnormalities in these tumours. PMID:18211288

  4. AChE biosensor based on zinc oxide sol-gel for the detection of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ravi; Ganesana, Mallikarjunarao; Andreescu, Silvana; Stanciu, Lia

    2010-02-28

    Zinc oxide has been used as a matrix for immobilization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and detection of the pesticide paraoxon. The immobilized enzyme retained its enzymatic activity up to three months when stored in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) at 4 degrees C. An amperometric biosensor for the detection of paraoxon was designed. The biosensor detected paraoxon in the range 0.035-1.38 ppm and can be used to detect other AChE inhibiting organophosphate pesticides. PMID:20113735

  5. Acetylcholine induces GABA release onto rod bipolar cells through heteromeric nicotinic receptors expressed in A17 amacrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Elgueta, Claudio; Vielma, Alex H.; Palacios, Adrian G.; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a major retinal neurotransmitter that modulates visual processing through a large repertoire of cholinergic receptors expressed on different retinal cell types. ACh is released from starburst amacrine cells (SACs) under scotopic conditions, but its effects on cells of the rod pathway have not been investigated. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings in slices of rat retina, we found that ACh application triggers GABA release onto rod bipolar (RB) cells. GABA was released from A17 amacrine cells and activated postsynaptic GABAA and GABAC receptors in RB cells. The sensitivity of ACh-induced currents to nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) antagonists (TMPH ~ mecamylamine > erysodine > DhβE > MLA) together with the differential potency of specific agonists to mimic ACh responses (cytisine >> RJR2403 ~ choline), suggest that A17 cells express heteromeric nAChRs containing the β4 subunit. Activation of nAChRs induced GABA release after Ca2+ accumulation in A17 cell dendrites and varicosities mediated by L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and intracellular Ca2+ stores. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase depolarized A17 cells and increased spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in RB cells, indicating that endogenous ACh enhances GABAergic inhibition of RB cells. Moreover, injection of neostigmine or cytisine reduced the b-wave of the scotopic flash electroretinogram (ERG), suggesting that cholinergic modulation of GABA release controls RB cell activity in vivo. These results describe a novel regulatory mechanism of RB cell inhibition and complement our understanding of the neuromodulatory control of retinal signal processing. PMID:25709566

  6. Remarkably increased resistin levels in anti-AChR antibody-positive myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-Qi; Wang, Rong; Li, Ting; Li, Xin; Qi, Yuan; Wang, Jing; Yang, Li

    2015-06-15

    Resistin is a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. To investigate serum resistin levels in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) and determine if there are associations between resistin levels and disease severity, we measured serum resistin levels in 102 patients with anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive MG (AChR-MG). We further analyzed associations between serum resistin levels and clinical variables in patients with MG. Our findings demonstrate that serum resistin levels are elevated in patients with AChR-generalized MG and AChR-MG with thymoma and are correlated with disease severity. Resistin has potential as a useful serum biomarker for inflammation in AChR-MG.

  7. Transient receptor potential ion channels in primary sensory neurons as targets for novel analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Sousa-Valente, J; Andreou, A P; Urban, L; Nagy, I

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an explosion in novel findings relating to the molecules involved in mediating the sensation of pain in humans. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels emerged as the greatest group of molecules involved in the transduction of various physical stimuli into neuronal signals in primary sensory neurons, as well as, in the development of pain. Here, we review the role of TRP ion channels in primary sensory neurons in the development of pain associated with peripheral pathologies and possible strategies to translate preclinical data into the development of effective new analgesics. Based on available evidence, we argue that nociception-related TRP channels on primary sensory neurons provide highly valuable targets for the development of novel analgesics and that, in order to reduce possible undesirable side effects, novel analgesics should prevent the translocation from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane and the sensitization of the channels rather than blocking the channel pore or binding sites for exogenous or endogenous activators. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24283624

  8. Mammalian Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: From Structure to Function

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Edson X.; Pereira, Edna F. R.; Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Rogers, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    The classical studies of nicotine by Langley at the turn of the 20th century introduced the concept of a “receptive substance,” from which the idea of a “receptor” came to light. Subsequent studies aided by the Torpedo electric organ, a rich source of muscle-type nicotinic receptors (nAChRs), and the discovery of α-bungarotoxin, a snake toxin that binds pseudo-irreversibly to the muscle nAChR, resulted in the muscle nAChR being the best characterized ligand-gated ion channel hitherto. With the advancement of functional and genetic studies in the late 1980s, the existence of nAChRs in the mammalian brain was confirmed and the realization that the numerous nAChR subtypes contribute to the psychoactive properties of nicotine and other drugs of abuse and to the neuropathology of various diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and schizophrenia, has since emerged. This review provides a comprehensive overview of these findings and the more recent revelations of the impact that the rich diversity in function and expression of this receptor family has on neuronal and nonneuronal cells throughout the body. Despite these numerous developments, our understanding of the contributions of specific neuronal nAChR subtypes to the many facets of physiology throughout the body remains in its infancy. PMID:19126755

  9. Micromolar-Affinity Benzodiazepine Receptors Regulate Voltage-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Nerve Terminal Preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taft, William C.; Delorenzo, Robert J.

    1984-05-01

    Benzodiazepines in micromolar concentrations significantly inhibit depolarization-sensitive Ca2+ uptake in intact nerve-terminal preparations. Benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake is concentration dependent and stereospecific. Micromolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors have been identified and characterized in brain membrane and shown to be distinct from nanomolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors. Evidence is presented that micromolar, and not nanomolar, benzodiazepine binding sites mediate benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake. Irreversible binding to micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites also irreversibly blocked depolarization-dependent Ca2+ uptake in synaptosomes, indicating that these compounds may represent a useful marker for identifying the molecular components of Ca2+ channels in brain. Characterization of benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake demonstrates that these drugs function as Ca2+ channel antagonists, because benzodiazepines effectively blocked voltage-sensitive Ca2+ uptake inhibited by Mn2+, Co2+, verapamil, nitrendipine, and nimodipine. These results indicate that micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites regulate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in brain membrane and suggest that some of the neuronal stabilizing effects of micromolar benzodiazepine receptors may be mediated by the regulation of Ca2+ conductance.

  10. Blockade of P2X7 receptors or pannexin-1 channels similarly attenuates postischemic damage

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros-Mejorado, Abraham; Gottlieb, Miroslav; Cavaliere, Fabio; Magnus, Tim; Koch-Nolte, Friederich; Scemes, Eliana; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Matute, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The role of P2X7 receptors and pannexin-1 channels in ischemic damage remains controversial. Here, we analyzed their contribution to postanoxic depolarization after ischemia in cultured neurons and in brain slices. We observed that pharmacological blockade of P2X7 receptors or pannexin-1 channels delayed the onset of postanoxic currents and reduced their slope, and that simultaneous inhibition did not further enhance the effects of blocking either one. These results were confirmed in acute cortical slices from P2X7 and pannexin-1 knockout mice. Oxygen-glucose deprivation in cortical organotypic cultures caused neuronal death that was reduced with P2X7 and pannexin-1 blockers as well as in organotypic cultures derived from mice lacking P2X7 and pannexin 1. Subsequently, we used transient middle cerebral artery occlusion to monitor the neuroprotective effect of those drugs in vivo. We found that P2X7 and pannexin-1 antagonists, and their ablation in knockout mice, substantially attenuated the motor symptoms and reduced the infarct volume to ~50% of that in vehicle-treated or wild-type animals. These results show that P2X7 receptors and pannexin-1 channels are major mediators of postanoxic depolarization in neurons and of brain damage after ischemia, and that they operate in the same deleterious signaling cascade leading to neuronal and tissue demise. PMID:25605289

  11. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in the airway: role in airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Grace, M S; Baxter, M; Dubuis, E; Birrell, M A; Belvisi, M G

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, there has been an explosion of scientific publications reporting the many and varied roles of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels in physiological and pathological systems throughout the body. The aim of this review is to summarize the existing literature on the role of TRP channels in the lungs and discuss what is known about their function under normal and diseased conditions. The review will focus mainly on the pathogenesis and symptoms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and the role of four members of the TRP family: TRPA1, TRPV1, TRPV4 and TRPM8. We hope that the article will help the reader understand the role of TRP channels in the normal airway and how their function may be changed in the context of respiratory disease. PMID:24286227

  12. [The action of ionotropic glutamate receptor channel blockers on effects of sleep deprivation in rats].

    PubMed

    Vataev, S I; Oganesian, G A; Lukomskaia, N Ia; Magazanik, L G

    2013-05-01

    The action of non-competitive glutamate receptor antagonists on the effects of sleep deprivation has been studied on Krushinskii-Molodkina rats having an inherited predisposition to audiogenic seizures and Wistar rats deprived to this respond. Two types of glutamate receptor open channels blockers were used: the selective blockers of NMDA-receptors (memantine and IEM-1921) and blockers of mixed type, impacting both on the NMDA- and presumably Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA/kainate receptors (IEM-1754 and IEM 1925). Rats were subjected to 12 hours long sleep deprivation. Immediatly after that memantine and IEM-1921 were injected, and during the first 3 hours the total or partial reduction of fast-wave (paradoxical) sleep and a significant increase of the representation of wakefulness at the cost of reducing the total time of slow-wave sleep were observed. These effects are most likely to be a consequence of the blockade of NMDA-receptors functioning in the systems of the rat brain responsible for the launch and maintenance of fast-wave sleep. Injection of IEM-1754 and IEM-1925 on background of sleep deprivation did not affect the organization of sleep during the first 3 hours of their action. During the second three-hour period the rebound effect was observed. The obtained results indicate the involvement of NMDA glutamate receptors in the functioning of various parts of the sleep system of both rat lines.

  13. Avarol derivatives as competitive AChE inhibitors, non hepatotoxic and neuroprotective agents for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tommonaro, Giuseppina; García-Font, Nuria; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Pejin, Boris; Iodice, Carmine; Cañadas, Sixta; Marco-Contelles, José; Oset-Gasque, María Jesús

    2016-10-21

    Avarol is a marine sesquiterpenoid hydroquinone, previously isolated from the marine sponge Dysidea avara Schmidt (Dictyoceratida), with antiinflammatory, antitumor, antioxidant, antiplatelet, anti-HIV, and antipsoriatic effects. Recent findings indicate that some thio-avarol derivatives exhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity. The multiple pharmacological properties of avarol, thio-avarol and/or their derivatives prompted us to continue the in vitro screening, focusing on their AChE inhibitory and neuroprotective effects. Due to the complex nature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is a renewed search for new, non hepatotoxic anticholinesterasic compounds. This paper describes the synthesis and in vitro biological evaluation of avarol-3'-thiosalicylate (TAVA) and thiosalycil-prenyl-hydroquinones (TPHs), as non hepatotoxic anticholinesterasic agents, showing a good neuroprotective effect on the decreased viability of SHSY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced by oligomycin A/rotenone and okadaic acid. A molecular modeling study was also undertaken on the most promising molecules within the series to elucidate their AChE binding modes and in particular the role played by the carboxylate group in enzyme inhibition. Among them, TPH4, bearing a geranylgeraniol substituent, is the most significant Electrophorus electricus AChE (EeAChE) inhibitor (IC50 = 6.77 ± 0.24 μM), also endowed with a moderate serum horse butyrylcholinesterase (eqBuChE) inhibitory activity, being also the least hepatotoxic and the best neuroprotective compound of the series. Thus, TPHs represents a new family of synthetic compounds, chemically related to the natural compound avarol, which has been discovered for the potential treatment of AD. Findings prove the relevance of TPHs as a new possible generation of competitive AChE inhibitors pointing out the importance of the salycilic substituents on the hydroquinone ring. Since these compounds do not belong to the class of

  14. Avarol derivatives as competitive AChE inhibitors, non hepatotoxic and neuroprotective agents for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tommonaro, Giuseppina; García-Font, Nuria; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Pejin, Boris; Iodice, Carmine; Cañadas, Sixta; Marco-Contelles, José; Oset-Gasque, María Jesús

    2016-10-21

    Avarol is a marine sesquiterpenoid hydroquinone, previously isolated from the marine sponge Dysidea avara Schmidt (Dictyoceratida), with antiinflammatory, antitumor, antioxidant, antiplatelet, anti-HIV, and antipsoriatic effects. Recent findings indicate that some thio-avarol derivatives exhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity. The multiple pharmacological properties of avarol, thio-avarol and/or their derivatives prompted us to continue the in vitro screening, focusing on their AChE inhibitory and neuroprotective effects. Due to the complex nature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is a renewed search for new, non hepatotoxic anticholinesterasic compounds. This paper describes the synthesis and in vitro biological evaluation of avarol-3'-thiosalicylate (TAVA) and thiosalycil-prenyl-hydroquinones (TPHs), as non hepatotoxic anticholinesterasic agents, showing a good neuroprotective effect on the decreased viability of SHSY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced by oligomycin A/rotenone and okadaic acid. A molecular modeling study was also undertaken on the most promising molecules within the series to elucidate their AChE binding modes and in particular the role played by the carboxylate group in enzyme inhibition. Among them, TPH4, bearing a geranylgeraniol substituent, is the most significant Electrophorus electricus AChE (EeAChE) inhibitor (IC50 = 6.77 ± 0.24 μM), also endowed with a moderate serum horse butyrylcholinesterase (eqBuChE) inhibitory activity, being also the least hepatotoxic and the best neuroprotective compound of the series. Thus, TPHs represents a new family of synthetic compounds, chemically related to the natural compound avarol, which has been discovered for the potential treatment of AD. Findings prove the relevance of TPHs as a new possible generation of competitive AChE inhibitors pointing out the importance of the salycilic substituents on the hydroquinone ring. Since these compounds do not belong to the class of

  15. What we don't know about the structure of ryanodine receptor calcium release channels.

    PubMed

    Dulhunty, Angela F; Pouliquin, Pierre

    2003-10-01

    1. The ryanodine receptor (RyR) is the Ca2+ release channel in the sarcoplamic reticulum of skeletal and cardiac muscle and is essential for respiration and heart beat. The RyR channel releases Ca2+ from intracellular stores in a variety of other cell types, where it normally coexists with the inositiol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R). The RyR and IP3R, forming a superfamily of homotetrameric ligand-gated intracellular Ca2+ channels, serve discrete functions: they can be located in independent Ca2+ stores with different activation mechanisms and can be coupled to different signalling pathways. 2. Although functional characteristics of the RyR have been investigated intensely, there remain major gaps in our knowledge about the structure of the protein, its ion-conducting pore, its ligand-binding sites and sites supporting the many protein/protein interactions that underlie the in vivo function of the channel. 3. Of particular importance are the transmembrane segments that form the membrane-spanning domain of the protein and the pore, define the conductance and selectivity of the channel and dictate the cytoplasmic and luminal domains and the overall protein structure. Hydropathy profiles predict between four and 12 transmembrane segments. One popular model shows four transmembrane segments in the C-terminal one-tenth of the protein. However, there is substantial evidence for a larger number of membrane-spanning segments located in both the C-terminal and central parts of the protein. 4. A model of the RyR pore based on the Streptomyces lividans KcsA channel structure is presented. Protein/protein interactions between the RyR and other regulatory proteins, as well as within the RyR subunit, are discussed. PMID:14516409

  16. Channel Gating Dependence on Pore Lining Helix Glycine Residues in Skeletal Muscle Ryanodine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yingwu; Xu, Le; Mowrey, David D; Mendez Giraldez, Raul; Wang, Ying; Pasek, Daniel A; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Meissner, Gerhard

    2015-07-10

    Type 1 ryanodine receptors (RyR1s) release Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to initiate skeletal muscle contraction. The role of RyR1-G4934 and -G4941 in the pore-lining helix in channel gating and ion permeation was probed by replacing them with amino acid residues of increasing side chain volume. RyR1-G4934A, -G4941A, and -G4941V mutant channels exhibited a caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release response in HEK293 cells and bound the RyR-specific ligand [(3)H]ryanodine. In single channel recordings, significant differences in the number of channel events and mean open and close times were observed between WT and RyR1-G4934A and -G4941A. RyR1-G4934A had reduced K(+) conductance and ion selectivity compared with WT. Mutations further increasing the side chain volume at these positions (G4934V and G4941I) resulted in reduced caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release in HEK293 cells, low [(3)H]ryanodine binding levels, and channels that were not regulated by Ca(2+) and did not conduct Ca(2+) in single channel measurements. Computational predictions of the thermodynamic impact of mutations on protein stability indicated that although the G4934A mutation was tolerated, the G4934V mutation decreased protein stability by introducing clashes with neighboring amino acid residues. In similar fashion, the G4941A mutation did not introduce clashes, whereas the G4941I mutation resulted in intersubunit clashes among the mutated isoleucines. Co-expression of RyR1-WT with RyR1-G4934V or -G4941I partially restored the WT phenotype, which suggested lessening of amino acid clashes in heterotetrameric channel complexes. The results indicate that both glycines are important for RyR1 channel function by providing flexibility and minimizing amino acid clashes. PMID:25998124

  17. Structural requirements of steroidal agonists of transient receptor potential melastatin 3 (TRPM3) cation channels

    PubMed Central

    Drews, A; Mohr, F; Rizun, O; Wagner, T F J; Dembla, S; Rudolph, S; Lambert, S; Konrad, M; Philipp, S E; Behrendt, M; Marchais-Oberwinkler, S; Covey, D F; Oberwinkler, J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Transient receptor potential melastatin 3 (TRPM3) proteins form non-selective but calcium-permeable membrane channels, rapidly activated by extracellular application of the steroid pregnenolone sulphate and the dihydropyridine nifedipine. Our aim was to characterize the steroid binding site by analysing the structural chemical requirements for TRPM3 activation. Experimental Approach Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and measurements of intracellular calcium concentrations were performed on HEK293 cells transfected with TRPM3 (or untransfected controls) during superfusion with pharmacological substances. Key Results Pregnenolone sulphate and nifedipine activated TRPM3 channels supra-additively over a wide concentration range. Other dihydropyridines inhibited TRPM3 channels. The natural enantiomer of pregnenolone sulphate was more efficient in activating TRPM3 channels than its synthetic mirror image. However, both enantiomers exerted very similar inhibitory effects on proton-activated outwardly rectifying anion channels. Epiallopregnanolone sulphate activated TRPM3 almost equally as well as pregnenolone sulphate. Exchanging the sulphate for other chemical moieties showed that a negative charge at this position is required for activating TRPM3 channels. Conclusions and Implications Our data demonstrate that nifedipine and pregnenolone sulphate act at different binding sites when activating TRPM3. The latter activates TRPM3 by binding to a chiral and thus proteinaceous binding site, as inferred from the differential effects of the enantiomers. The double bond between position C5 and C6 of pregnenolone sulphate is not strictly necessary for the activation of TRPM3 channels, but a negative charge at position C3 of the steroid is highly important. These results provide a solid basis for understanding mechanistically the rapid chemical activation of TRPM3 channels. PMID:24251620

  18. Effects of chronic nicotine treatment on expression of diverse nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. I. Dose- and time-dependent effects of nicotine treatment.

    PubMed

    Ke, L; Eisenhour, C M; Bencherif, M; Lukas, R J

    1998-08-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) exist as a diverse family of physiologically important ligand-gated ion channels active in classic, excitatory neurotransmission and perhaps in more novel forms of neurochemical signaling. Because of their critical functional roles centrally and peripherally, nAChRs are ideal targets for the regulation of nervous system function. nAChRs also are targets of nicotine, which acts acutely like acetylcholine to stimulate nAChR function. Here, we report studies using model cell culture systems testing the general hypothesis that more chronic nicotine exposure has unique effects on nAChRs. Chronic nicotine treatment induces increases in numbers of human muscle-type nAChRs containing alpha-1, beta-1, gamma and delta subunits, a human ganglionic nAChR subtype containing alpha-3 and beta-4 subunits and a human ganglionic nAChR containing alpha-7 subunits in intracellular and (except for alpha-7 nAChRs) in cell surface pools. However, the half-maximal potency with which nicotine has these effects differs across these nAChR subtypes, as do rates and magnitudes of the "nicotine-induced nAChR up-regulation." These changes in nAChR numbers are not attributable to either transient or sustained changes in nAChR subunit mRNA levels. Nicotine exposure more potently, more rapidly, and with nAChR-subtype specificity, induces two phases of losses in functional responsiveness of muscle-type nAChRs and alpha-3 beta-4 nAChRs, including a "persistent inactivation" that is distinct from classicly defined "desensitization." Based on these results, we hypothesize that chronic nicotine treatment induces persistent functional inactivation and numerical up-regulation of all nAChR subtypes via distinct post-transcriptional mechanisms and with potencies, at rates and with magnitudes that are nAChR-subtype specific. We also hypothesize that chronic nicotine exposure produces long-lasting changes in nervous system function, at least in part, by disabling

  19. The unliganded long isoform of estrogen receptor beta stimulates brain ryanodine receptor single channel activity alongside with cytosolic Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Rybalchenko, Volodymyr; Grillo, Michael A.; Gastinger, Matthew J.; Rybalchenko, Nataliya; Payne, Andrew J.; Koulen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+ release from intracellular stores mediated by endoplasmic reticulum membrane ryanodine receptors (RyR) plays a key role in activating and synchronizing downstream Ca2+-dependent mechanisms, in different cells varying from apoptosis to nuclear transcription and development of defensive responses. Recently discovered, atypical “non-genomic” effects mediated by estrogen receptors (ER) include rapid Ca2+ release upon estrogen exposure in conditions implicitly suggesting involvement of RyRs. In the present study, we report various levels of co-localization between RyR type 2 (RyR2) and ER type β (ERβ) in the neuronal cell line HT-22, indicating a possible functional interaction. Electrophysiological analyses revealed a significant increase in single channel ionic currents generated by mouse brain RyRs after application of the soluble monomer of the long form ERβ (ERβ1). The effect was due to a strong increase in open probability of RyR higher open channel sublevels at cytosolic [Ca2+] concentrations of 100 nM, suggesting a synergistic action of ERβ1 and Ca2+ in RyR activation, and a potential contribution to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release rather than to basal intracellular Ca2+ concentration level at rest. This RyR/ERβ interaction has potential effects on cellular physiology, including roles of shorter ERβ isoforms and modulation of the RyR/ERβ complexes by exogenous estrogens. PMID:19899956

  20. [Effects of ionotropic glutamate receptor channel blockers ON sleep-waking organization in rats].

    PubMed

    Vataev, S I; Oganesian, G A; Gmiro, V E; Lukomskaia, N Ia; Magazanik, L G

    2012-07-01

    The effects of non-competitive glutamate receptor antagonists on sleep-waking organization have been studied on Krushinskii-Molodkina rats having an inherited predisposition to audiogenic seizures and Wistar ones which are resistant to this action of sound. Two types of blockers of glutamate receptor open channels were used: selective blockers of NMDA receptors (memantine and IEM-1921) and blockers of mixed type, impacting both on the NMDA and Ca-permeable AMPA/ kainate receptors (IEM-1754 and IEM 1925). During the first 3 hours after administration of these glutamate antagonists the total or partial deprivation of fast-wave sleep was provoked. Additionally the selective NMDA receptor blocking drugs (memantine, IEM-1921) induced in the same period a significant increase of the representation of wakefulness at the cost of reducing of the total time of slow-wave sleep. These effects are most likely to be a consequence of the blockade of NMDA receptors responsible for the launch and maintenance of wakefulness, slow- and fast-wave sleep. In the same first 3 hours period after the administration of IEM-1754 and IEM-1925 the organization of sleep was not significantly affected. The evident reduction of wakefulness, total duration and increase of slow-wave sleep impact was observed, during the second three-hour period. It, apparently, can be caused by the blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors. The obtained results indicate the involvement of NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptors in the functioning of various parts of the sleep system of rats belonging to both lines.

  1. Transient receptor potential channel A1 and noxious cold responses in rat cutaneous nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Dunham, J P; Leith, J L; Lumb, B M; Donaldson, L F

    2010-02-17

    The role of transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) in noxious cold sensation remains unclear. Some data support the hypothesis that TRPA1 is a transducer of noxious cold whilst other data contest it. In this study we investigated the role of TRPA1 in cold detection in cutaneous nociceptors in vivo using complementary experimental approaches. We used noxious withdrawal reflex electromyography, and single fibre recordings in vivo, to test the hypothesis that TRPA1-expressing primary afferents mediate noxious cold responses in anaesthetised rats. TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists sensitise their cognate receptors to heat and cold stimuli respectively. Herein we show that the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde applied to the skin in anaesthetised rats did not sensitise noxious cold evoked hind limb withdrawal. In contrast, cinnamaldehyde did sensitise the C fibre-mediated noxious heat withdrawal, indicated by a significant drop in the withdrawal temperature. TRPA1 agonist thus sensitised the noxious reflex withdrawal to heat, but not cold. Thermal stimuli also sensitise transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to agonist. Activity evoked by capsaicin in teased primary afferent fibres showed a significant positive correlation with receptive field temperature, in both normal and Freund's complete adjuvant-induced cutaneous inflammation. Altering the temperature of the receptive field did not modulate TRPA1 agonist evoked-activity in cutaneous primary afferents, in either normal or inflamed skin. In addition, block of the TRPA1 channel with Ruthenium Red did not inhibit cold evoked activity in either cinnamaldehyde sensitive or insensitive cold responsive nociceptors. In cinnamaldehyde-sensitive-cold-sensitive afferents, although TRPA1 agonist-evoked activity was totally abolished by Ruthenium Red, cold evoked activity was unaffected by channel blockade. We conclude that these results do not support the hypothesis that TRPA1-expressing cutaneous afferents play an important

  2. Functional characterization of transient receptor potential channels in mouse urothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Everaerts, Wouter; Vriens, Joris; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Appendino, Giovanni; Voets, Thomas; De Ridder, Dirk; Nilius, Bernd

    2010-03-01

    The bladder urothelium is currently believed to be a sensory structure, contributing to mechano- and chemosensation in the bladder. Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels act as polymodal sensors and may underlie some of the receptive properties of urothelial cells. However, the exact TRP channel expression profile of urothelial cells is unclear. In this study, we have performed a systematic analysis of the molecular and functional expression of various TRP channels in mouse urothelium. Urothelial cells from control and trpv4-/- mice were isolated, cultured (12-48 h), and used for quantitative real-time PCR, immunocytochemistry, calcium imaging, and whole cell patch-clamp experiments. At the mRNA level, TRPV4, TRPV2, and TRPM7 were the most abundantly expressed TRP genes. Immunohistochemistry showed a clear expression of TRPV4 in the plasma membrane, whereas TRPV2 was more prominent in the cytoplasm. TRPM7 was detected in the plasma membrane as well as cytoplasmic vesicles. Calcium imaging and patch-clamp experiments using TRP channel agonists and antagonists provided evidence for the functional expression of TRPV4, TRPV2, and TRPM7 but not of TRPA1, TRPV1, and TRPM8. In conclusion, we have demonstrated functional expression of TRPV4, TRPV2, and TRPM7 in mouse urothelial cells. These channels may contribute to the (mechano)sensory function of the urothelial layer and represent potential targets for the treatment of bladder dysfunction. PMID:20015940

  3. Ca sup 2+ channel blockers interact with. alpha. sub 2 -adrenergic receptors in rabbit ileum

    SciTech Connect

    Homaidan, F.R.; Donowitz, M.; Wicks, J.; Cusolito, S.; El Sabban, M.E.; Weiland, G.A.; Sharp, G.W.G. Tufts Univ. School of Medicine and New England Medical Center Hospital, Boston, MA )

    1988-04-01

    An interaction between Ca{sup 2+} channel blockers and {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors has been demonstrated in rabbit ileum by studying the effect of clonidine on active electrolyte transport, under short-circuited conditions, in the presence and absence of several Ca{sup 2+} channel blocking agents. Clonidine, verapamil, diltiazem, cadmium, and nitrendipine all decrease short-circuit current and stimulate NaCl absorption to different extents with clonidine having the largest effect. Exposure to verapamil, diltiazem, and cadmium inhibited the effects of clonidine on transport, whereas nitrendipine had no such effect. Verapamil, diltiazem, and cadmium, but not nitrendipine, also decreased the specific binding of ({sup 3}H){alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic agents to a preparation of ileal basolateral membranes explaining the observed decrease in the transport effects of clonidine. The effective concentrations of the Ca{sup 2+} channel blockers that inhibited the effects of clonidine on transport were fairly similar to the concentrations needed to inhibit its specific binding. The displacement of clonidine by calcium channel blockers is ascribed to a nonspecific effect of these agents, although the possibility that their effects are exerted via their binding to the calcium channels is not excluded.

  4. Energetics of divalent selectivity in a calcium channel: the ryanodine receptor case study.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Dirk

    2008-02-15

    A model of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) calcium channel is used to study the energetics of binding selectivity of Ca(2+) versus monovalent cations. RyR is a calcium-selective channel with a DDDD locus in the selectivity filter, similar to the EEEE locus of the L-type calcium channel. While the affinity of RyR for Ca(2+) is in the millimolar range (as opposed to the micromolar range of the L-type channel), the ease of single-channel measurements compared to L-type and its similar selectivity filter make RyR an excellent candidate for studying calcium selectivity. A Poisson-Nernst-Planck/density functional theory model of RyR is used to calculate the energetics of selectivity. Ca(2+) versus monovalent selectivity is driven by the charge/space competition mechanism in which selectivity arises from a balance of electrostatics and the excluded volume of ions in the crowded selectivity filter. While electrostatic terms dominate the selectivity, the much smaller excluded-volume term also plays a substantial role. In the D4899N and D4938N mutations of RyR that are analyzed, substantial changes in specific components of the chemical potential profiles are found far from the mutation site. These changes result in the significant reduction of Ca(2+) selectivity found in both theory and experiments.

  5. Modulation of BK channel activities by calcium-sensing receptor in rat bronchopulmonary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Vysotskaya, Zhanna V; Moss, Charles R; Gilbert, Carolyn A; Gabriel, Sabry A; Gu, Qihai

    2014-11-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the expression of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels and to explore the possible modulation of BK channel activities by calcium-sensing receptors (CaSR) in rat bronchopulmonary sensory neurons. The expression of BK channels was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Results from whole-cell patch-clamp recordings demonstrated that activation of CaSR with its agonist spermine or NPS R-568 showed a dual regulating effect on BK channel activities: it potentiated BK currents in cells exhibiting low baseline BK activity while slightly inhibited BK currents in cells with high baseline BK activity. Blocking CaSR with its antagonist NPS 2143 significantly inhibited BK currents. Our results further showed that the modulation of BK currents by CaSR activation or blockade was completely abolished when the intracellular Ca(2+) was chelated by BAPTA-AM. In summary, our data suggest that CaSR plays an integrative role in bronchopulmonary afferent signaling, at least partially through the regulation of BK channel activities.

  6. Cross-talk and co-trafficking between rho1/GABA receptors and ATP-gated channels.

    PubMed

    Boué-Grabot, Eric; Emerit, Michel B; Toulmé, Estelle; Séguéla, Philippe; Garret, Maurice

    2004-02-20

    Gamma-aminobutyric-acid (GABA) and ATP ionotropic receptors represent two structurally and functionally different classes of neurotransmitter-gated channels involved in fast synaptic transmission. We demonstrate here that, when the inhibitory rho1/GABA and the excitatory P2X2 receptor channels are co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, activation of one channel reduces the currents mediated by the other one. This reciprocal inhibitory cross-talk is a receptor-mediated phenomenon independent of agonist cross-modulation, membrane potential, direction of ionic flux, or channel densities. Functional interaction is disrupted when the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain of P2X2 is deleted or in competition experiments with minigenes coding for the C-terminal domain of P2X2 or the main intracellular loop of rho1 subunits. We also show a physical interaction between P2X2 and rho1 receptors expressed in oocytes and the co-clustering of these receptors in transfected hippocampal neurons. Co-expression with P2X2 induces retargeting and recruitment of mainly intracellular rho1/GABA receptors to surface clusters. Therefore, molecular and functional cross-talk between inhibitory and excitatory ligand-gated channels may regulate synaptic strength both by activity-dependent current occlusion and synaptic receptors co-trafficking.

  7. Altered GPI modification of insect AChE improves tolerance to organophosphate insecticides.

    PubMed

    Kakani, Evdoxia G; Bon, Suzanne; Massoulié, Jean; Mathiopoulos, Kostas D

    2011-03-01

    The olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae is the most destructive and intractable pest of olives. The management of B. oleae has been based on the use of organophosphate (OP) insecticides, a practice that induced resistance. OP-resistance in the olive fly was previously shown to be associated with two mutations in the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme that, apparently, hinder the entrance of the OP into the active site. The search for additional mutations in the ace gene that encodes AChE revealed a short deletion of three glutamines (Δ3Q) from a stretch of five glutamines, in the C-terminal peptide that is normally cleaved and substituted by a GPI anchor. We verified that AChEs from B. oleae and other Dipterans are actually GPI-anchored, although this is not predicted by the "big-PI" algorithm. The Δ3Q mutation shortens the unusually long hydrophilic spacer that follows the predicted GPI attachment site and may thus improve the efficiency of GPI anchor addition. We expressed the wild type B. oleae AChE, the natural mutant Δ3Q and a constructed mutant lacking all 5 consecutive glutamines (Δ5Q) in COS cells and compared their kinetic properties. All constructs presented identical K(m) and k(cat) values, in agreement with the fact that the mutations did not affect the catalytic domain of the enzyme. In contrast, the mutants produced higher AChE activity, suggesting that a higher proportion of the precursor protein becomes GPI-anchored. An increase in the number of GPI-anchored molecules in the synaptic cleft may reduce the sensitivity to insecticides.

  8. Antibody probe study of Ca2+ channel regulation by interdomain interaction within the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Parness, Jerome; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2004-01-01

    N-terminal and central domains of ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1), where many reported malignant hyperthermia (MH) mutations are localized, represent putative channel regulatory domains. Recent domain peptide (DP) probe studies led us to the hypothesis that these domains interact to stabilize the closed state of channel (zipping), while weakening of domain-domain interactions (unzipping) by mutation de-stabilizes the channel, making it leaky to Ca2+ or sensitive to the agonists of RyR1. As shown previously, DP1 (N-terminal domain peptide) and DP4 (central domain peptide) produced MH-like channel activation/sensitization effects, presumably by peptide binding to sites critical to stabilizing domain-domain interactions and resultant loss of conformational constraints. Here we report that polyclonal anti-DP1 and anti-DP4 antibodies also produce MH-like channel activation and sensitization effects as evidenced by about 4-fold enhancement of high affinity [3H]ryanodine binding to RyR1 and by a significant left-shift of the concentration-dependence of activation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release by polylysine. Fluorescence quenching experiments demonstrate that the accessibility of a DP4-directed, conformationally sensitive fluorescence probe linked to the RyR1 N-terminal domain is increased in the presence of domain-specific antibodies, consistent with the view that these antibodies produce unzipping of interacting domains that are of hindered accessibility to the surrounding aqueous environment. Our results suggest that domain-specific antibody binding induces a conformational change resulting in channel activation, and are consistent with the hypothesis that interacting N-terminal and central domains are intimately involved in the regulation of RyR1 channel function. PMID:15027895

  9. Prolactin stimulates cell proliferation through a long form of prolactin receptor and K+ channel activation.

    PubMed Central

    Van Coppenolle, Fabien; Skryma, Roman; Ouadid-Ahidouch, Halima; Slomianny, Christian; Roudbaraki, Morad; Delcourt, Philippe; Dewailly, Etienne; Humez, Sandrine; Crépin, Alexandre; Gourdou, Isabelle; Djiane, Jean; Bonnal, Jean-Louis; Mauroy, Brigitte; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2004-01-01

    PRL (prolactin) has been implicated in the proliferation and differentiation of numerous tissues, including the prostate gland. However, the PRL-R (PRL receptor) signal transduction pathway, leading to the stimulation of cell proliferation, remains unclear and has yet to be mapped. The present study was undertaken to develop a clear understanding of the mechanisms involved in this pathway and, in particular, to determine the role of K(+) channels. We used androgen-sensitive prostate cancer (LNCaP) cells whose proliferation is known to be stimulated by PRL. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that LNCaP cells express a long form of PRL-R, but do not produce its intermediate isoform. Patch-clamp techniques showed that the application of 5 nM PRL increased both the macroscopic K(+) current amplitude and the single K(+)-channel open probability. This single-channel activity increase was reduced by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein, herbimycin A and lavandustine A, thereby indicating that tyrosine kinase phosphorylation is required in PRL-induced K(+) channel stimulation. PRL enhances p59( fyn ) phosphorylation by a factor of 2 after a 10 min application in culture. In addition, where an antip59( fyn ) antibody is present in the patch pipette, PRL no longer increases K(+) current amplitude. Furthermore, the PRL-stimulated proliferation is inhibited by the K(+) channel inhibitors alpha-dendrotoxin and tetraethylammonium. Thus, as K(+) channels are known to be involved in LNCaP cell proliferation, we suggest that K(+) channel modulation by PRL, via p59( fyn ) pathway, is the primary ionic event in PRL signal transduction, triggering cell proliferation. PMID:14565846

  10. Menthol suppresses nicotinic acetylcholine receptor functioning in sensory neurons via allosteric modulation.

    PubMed

    Hans, M; Wilhelm, M; Swandulla, D

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we have investigated how the function of native and recombinant nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is modulated by the monoterpenoid alcohol from peppermint (-) menthol. In trigeminal neurons (TG), we found that nicotine (75 μM)-activated whole-cell currents through nAChRs were reversibly reduced by menthol in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC₅₀ of 111 μM. To analyze the mechanism underlying menthol's action in more detail, we used single channel and whole-cell recordings from recombinant human α4β2 nAChR expressed in HEK tsA201 cells. Here, we found a shortening of channel open time and a prolongation of channel closed time, and an increase in single channel amplitude leading in summary to a reduction in single channel current. Furthermore, menthol did not affect nicotine's EC₅₀ value for currents through recombinant human α4β2 nAChRs but caused a significant reduction in nicotine's efficacy. Taken together, these findings indicate that menthol is a negative allosteric modulator of nAChRs.

  11. Pharmacological properties of the homomeric alpha 7 receptor.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, D; Bertrand, S; Ballivet, M

    1992-10-26

    The pharmacological properties of the alpha-bungarotoxin sensitive alpha 7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) were studied upon reconstitution in Xenopus oocytes. Channels formed by alpha 7 are about 10-fold more sensitive to nicotine and cytisine than to ACh but are little, if at all, activated by the ganglionic agonist 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP). Tubocurarine (TC) was found to act as a non-competitive inhibitor, whereas dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DH beta E) behaves as a pure competitive inhibitor whose blockade is fast and fully reversible. In addition, the alpha 7 receptor displays a poor sensitivity to methonium salts. The pharmacological properties of the alpha 7 channels are readily distinguishable from those of other identified neuronal nicotinic receptors.

  12. Conotoxins Targeting Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Lebbe, Eline K. M.; Peigneur, Steve; Wijesekara, Isuru; Tytgat, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Marine snails of the genus Conus are a large family of predatory gastropods with an unparalleled molecular diversity of pharmacologically active compounds in their venom. Cone snail venom comprises of a rich and diverse cocktail of peptide toxins which act on a wide variety of ion channels such as voltage-gated sodium- (NaV), potassium- (KV), and calcium- (CaV) channels as well as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) which are classified as ligand-gated ion channels. The mode of action of several conotoxins has been the subject of investigation, while for many others this remains unknown. This review aims to give an overview of the knowledge we have today on the molecular pharmacology of conotoxins specifically interacting with nAChRs along with the structure–function relationship data. PMID:24857959

  13. Evolution of Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channels: Pro-Loop Receptors.

    PubMed

    Jaiteh, Mariama; Taly, Antoine; Hénin, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are ubiquitous neurotransmitter receptors in Bilateria, with a small number of known prokaryotic homologues. Here we describe a new inventory and phylogenetic analysis of pLGIC genes across all kingdoms of life. Our main finding is a set of pLGIC genes in unicellular eukaryotes, some of which are metazoan-like Cys-loop receptors, and others devoid of Cys-loop cysteines, like their prokaryotic relatives. A number of such "Cys-less" receptors also appears in invertebrate metazoans. Together, those findings draw a new distribution of pLGICs in eukaryotes. A broader distribution of prokaryotic channels also emerges, including a major new archaeal taxon, Thaumarchaeota. More generally, pLGICs now appear nearly ubiquitous in major taxonomic groups except multicellular plants and fungi. However, pLGICs are sparsely present in unicellular taxa, suggesting a high rate of gene loss and a non-essential character, contrasting with their essential role as synaptic receptors of the bilaterian nervous system. Multiple alignments of these highly divergent sequences reveal a small number of conserved residues clustered at the interface between the extracellular and transmembrane domains. Only the "Cys-loop" proline is absolutely conserved, suggesting the more fitting name "Pro loop" for that motif, and "Pro-loop receptors" for the superfamily. The infered molecular phylogeny shows a Cys-loop and a Cys-less clade in eukaryotes, both containing metazoans and unicellular members. This suggests new hypotheses on the evolutionary history of the superfamily, such as a possible origin of the Cys-loop cysteines in an ancient unicellular eukaryote. Deeper phylogenetic relationships remain uncertain, particularly around the split between bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. PMID:26986966

  14. A selective molecularly imprinted polymer for immobilization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE): an active enzyme targeted and efficient method.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Gökhan; Doğaç, Yasemin İspirli; Teke, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we immobilized acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme onto acetylcholine removed imprinted polymer and acetylcholine containing polymer. First, the polymers were produced with acetylcholine, substrate of AChE, by dispersion polymerization. Then, the enzyme was immobilized onto the polymers by using two different methods: In the first method (method A), acetylcholine was removed from the polymer, and then AChE was immobilized onto this polymer (acetylcholine removed imprinted polymer). In the second method (method B), AChE was immobilized onto acetylcholine containing polymer by affinity. In method A, enzyme-specific species (binding sites) occurred by removing acetylcholine from the polymer. The immobilized AChE reached 240% relative specific activity comparison with free AChE because the active enzyme molecules bounded onto the polymer. Transmission electron microscopy results were taken before and after immobilization of AChE for the assessment of morphological structure of polymer. Also, the experiments, which include optimum temperature (25-65 °C), optimum pH (3-10), thermal stability (4-70 °C), kinetic parameters, operational stability and reusability, were performed to determine the characteristic of the immobilized AChE.

  15. Metabotropic glutamate receptor modulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels involves multiple receptor subtypes in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Choi, S; Lovinger, D M

    1996-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) modulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels was examined in isolated deep layer frontoparietal cortical neurons under conditions designed to isolate calcium-independent modulatory pathways. Trans-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylate (t-ACPD), a nonspecific mGluR agonist, produced rapid and reversible inhibition of Ca2+ channels. This effect was mimicked by agonists for group I and group II, but not group III, mGluRs. Effects of group I and II agonists often were observed in the same neurons, but separate subgroups of neurons were unresponsive to the group I agonist quisqualate or the group II agonist 2-(2,3-dicarboxycyclopropyl) glycine (DCG-IV). Inhibition by quisqualate and DCG-IV was nonocclusive in neurons responding to both agonists. These agonists thus appear to act on different mGluRs. The mGluR antagonist alpha-methyl-4-carboxylphenylglycine attenuated inhibition by t-ACPD, quisqualate, and DCG-IV. Inhibition by quisqualate and DCG-IV was voltage-dependent. Although the effects of both agonists were greatly reduced by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), inhibition by DCG-IV was more sensitive to NEM than inhibition by quisqualate. t-ACPD-induced inhibition was reduced by omega-conotoxin GVIA (omega-CgTx) and omega-agatoxin IVA (omega-AgTx) but was affected little by nifedipine. Inhibition by DCG-IV and quisqualate also was reduced by omega-CgTx. We conclude that multiple mGluR subtypes inhibit Ca2+ channels in cortical neurons and that N- and possibly P-type channels are inhibited. Modulation is via a rapid-onset, voltage-dependent mechanism that likely involves a pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G-protein. Type I mGluRs may work via additional PTX-insensitive pathways.

  16. Resistance to Inhibitors of Cholinesterase 3 (Ric-3) Expression Promotes Selective Protein Associations with the Human α7-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Mulcahy, Matthew J.; Blattman, Sydney B.; Barrantes, Francisco J.; Lukas, Ronald J.; Hawrot, Edward

    2015-01-01

    The α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) is a ligand-gated ion channel widely expressed in vertebrates and is associated with numerous physiological functions. As transmembrane ion channels, α7-nAChRs need to be expressed on the surface of the plasma membrane to function. The receptor has been reported to associate with proteins involved with receptor biogenesis, modulation of receptor properties, as well as intracellular signaling cascades and some of these associated proteins may affect surface expression of α7-nAChRs. The putative chaperone resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase 3 (Ric-3) has been reported to interact with, and enhance the surface expression of, α7-nAChRs. In this study, we identified proteins that associate with α7-nAChRs when Ric-3 is expressed. Using α-bungarotoxin (α-bgtx), we isolated and compared α7-nAChR-associated proteins from two stably transfected, human tumor-derived cell lines: SH-EP1-hα7 expressing human α7-nAChRs and the same cell line further transfected to express Ric-3, SH-EP1-hα7-Ric-3. Mass spectrometric analysis of peptides identified thirty-nine proteins that are associated with α7-nAChRs only when Ric-3 was expressed. Significantly, and consistent with reports of Ric-3 function in the literature, several of the identified proteins are involved in biological processes that may affect nAChR surface expression such as post-translational processing of proteins, protein trafficking, and protein transport. Additionally, proteins affecting the cell cycle, the cytoskeleton, stress responses, as well as cyclic AMP- and inositol triphosphate-dependent signaling cascades were identified. These results illuminate how α-bgtx may be used to isolate and identify α7-nAChRs as well as how the expression of chaperones such as Ric-3 can influence proteins associating with α7-nAChRs. These associating proteins may alter activities of α7-nAChRs to expand their functionally-relevant repertoire as well as to affect

  17. Polymodal Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) Ion Channels in Chondrogenic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Szűcs Somogyi, Csilla; Matta, Csaba; Foldvari, Zsofia; Juhász, Tamás; Katona, Éva; Takács, Ádám Roland; Hajdú, Tibor; Dobrosi, Nóra; Gergely, Pál; Zákány, Róza

    2015-01-01

    Mature and developing chondrocytes exist in a microenvironment where mechanical load, changes of temperature, osmolarity and acidic pH may influence cellular metabolism. Polymodal Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) receptors are environmental sensors mediating responses through activation of linked intracellular signalling pathways. In chondrogenic high density cultures established from limb buds of chicken and mouse embryos, we identified TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV3, TRPV4 and TRPV6 mRNA expression with RT-PCR. In both cultures, a switch in the expression pattern of TRPVs was observed during cartilage formation. The inhibition of TRPVs with the non-selective calcium channel blocker ruthenium red diminished chondrogenesis and caused significant inhibition of proliferation. Incubating cell cultures at 41 °C elevated the expression of TRPV1, and increased cartilage matrix production. When chondrogenic cells were exposed to mechanical load at the time of their differentiation into matrix producing chondrocytes, we detected increased mRNA levels of TRPV3. Our results demonstrate that developing chondrocytes express a full palette of TRPV channels and the switch in the expression pattern suggests differentiation stage-dependent roles of TRPVs during cartilage formation. As TRPV1 and TRPV3 expression was altered by thermal and mechanical stimuli, respectively, these are candidate channels that contribute to the transduction of environmental stimuli in chondrogenic cells. PMID:26262612

  18. Modulation of nociceptive ion channels and receptors via protein-protein interactions: implications for pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Rouwette, Tom; Avenali, Luca; Sondermann, Julia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Gomez-Varela, David; Schmidt, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    In the last 2 decades biomedical research has provided great insights into the molecular signatures underlying painful conditions. However, chronic pain still imposes substantial challenges to researchers, clinicians and patients alike. Under pathological conditions, pain therapeutics often lack efficacy and exhibit only minimal safety profiles, which can be largely attributed to the targeting of molecules with key physiological functions throughout the body. In light of these difficulties, the identification of molecules and associated protein complexes specifically involved in chronic pain states is of paramount importance for designing selective interventions. Ion channels and receptors represent primary targets, as they critically shape nociceptive signaling from the periphery to the brain. Moreover, their function requires tight control, which is usually implemented by protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Indeed, manipulation of such PPIs entails the modulation of ion channel activity with widespread implications for influencing nociceptive signaling in a more specific way. In this review, we highlight recent advances in modulating ion channels and receptors via their PPI networks in the pursuit of relieving chronic pain. Moreover, we critically discuss the potential of targeting PPIs for developing novel pain therapies exhibiting higher efficacy and improved safety profiles. PMID:26039491

  19. Molecular modeling of human pentameric alpha(7) neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and its interaction with its agonist and competitive antagonist.

    PubMed

    Parthiban, Marimuthu; Rajasekaran, Mohan Babu; Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Shanmughavel, Piramanayagam

    2009-04-01

    The nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) is the major class of neurotransmitter receptors that is involved in many neurodegenerative conditions such as schizophrenia, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The N-terminal region or Ligand Binding Domain (LBD) of nAChR is located at pre- and post-synaptic nervous system, which mediates synaptic transmission. nAChR acts as the drug target for agonist and competitive antagonist molecules that modulate signal transmission at the nerve terminals. Based on Acetylcholine Binding Protein (AChBP) from Lymnea stagnalis as the structural template, the homology modeling approach was carried out to build three dimensional model of the N-terminal region of human alpha(7)nAChR. This theoretical model is an assembly of five alpha(7) subunits with 5 fold axis symmetry, constituting a channel, with the binding pocket present at the interface region of the subunits. alpha-neurotoxin is a potent nAChR competitive antagonist that readily blocks the channel resulting in paralysis. The molecular interaction of alpha-Bungarotoxin, a long chain alpha-neurotoxin from (Bungarus multicinctus) and human alpha(7)nAChR was studied. Agonists such as acetylcholine, nicotine, which are used in a diverse array of biological activities, such as enhancements of cognitive performances, were also docked with the theoretical model of human alpha(7)nAChR. These docked complexes were analyzed further for identifying the crucial residues involved in interaction. These results provide the details of interaction of agonists and competitive antagonists with three dimensional model of the N-terminal region of human alpha(7)nAChR and thereby point to the design of novel lead compounds.

  20. Thromboxane A2 receptor and MaxiK-channel intimate interaction supports channel trans-inhibition independent of G-protein activation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshio; Alioua, Abderrahmane; Wu, Yong; Lu, Rong; Kundu, Pallob; Sanchez-Pastor, Enrique; Marijic, Jure; Stefani, Enrico; Toro, Ligia

    2010-01-01

    Large conductance voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channels (MaxiK, BKCa) are well known for sustaining cerebral and coronary arterial tone and for their linkage to vasodilator β-adrenergic receptors. However, how MaxiK channels are linked to counterbalancing vasoconstrictor receptors is unknown. Here, we show that vasopressive thromboxane A2 receptors (TP) can intimately couple with and inhibit MaxiK channels. Activation of the receptor with its agonist trans-inhibits MaxiK independently of G-protein activation. This unconventional mechanism is supported by independent lines of evidence: (i) inhibition of MaxiK current by thromboxane A2 mimetic, U46619, occurs even when G-protein activity is suppressed; (ii) MaxiK and TP physically associate and display a high degree of proximity; and (iii) Förster resonance energy transfer occurs between fluorescently labeled MaxiK and TP, supporting a direct interaction. The molecular mechanism of MaxiK–TP intimate interaction involves the receptor's first intracellular loop and C terminus, and it entails the voltage-sensing conduction cassette of MaxiK channel. Further, physiological evidence of MaxiK–TP physical interaction is given in human coronaries and rat aorta, and by confirming TP role (with antagonist SQ29,548) in the U46619-induced MaxiK inhibition in human coronaries. We propose that vasoconstrictor TP receptor and MaxiK-channel direct interaction facilitates G-protein–independent TP to MaxiK trans-inhibition, which would promote vasoconstriction. PMID:20959415

  1. A C. elegans model of nicotine-dependent behavior: regulation by TRP-family channels.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhaoyang; Li, Wei; Ward, Alex; Piggott, Beverly J; Larkspur, Erin R; Sternberg, Paul W; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2006-11-01

    Nicotine, the primary addictive substance in tobacco, induces profound behavioral responses in mammals, but the underlying genetic mechanisms are not well understood. Here we develop a C. elegans model of nicotine-dependent behavior. We show that worms exhibit behavioral responses to nicotine that parallel those observed in mammals, including acute response, tolerance, withdrawal, and sensitization. These nicotine responses require nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) family genes that are known to mediate nicotine dependence in mammals, suggesting functional conservation of nAChRs in nicotine responses. Importantly, we find that mutant worms lacking TRPC (transient receptor potential canonical) channels are defective in their response to nicotine and that such a defect can be rescued by a human TRPC channel, revealing an unexpected role for TRPC channels in regulating nicotine-dependent behavior. Thus, C. elegans can be used to characterize known genes as well as to identify new genes regulating nicotine responses.

  2. Vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction in diabetes: nuclear receptors channel to relaxation.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Geneviève; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular relaxation represent a common cause of microvascular disease in patients with diabetes. Although multiple mechanisms underlying altered endothelial cell function in diabetes have been described, there is currently no specific and approved pharmacological treatment. In this edition of Clinical Science, Morales-Cano et al. characterize voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels as genes regulated by pharmacological activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-b/d (PPARb/d). Diabetes altered Kv channel function leading to impaired coronary artery relaxation, which was prevented by pharmacological activation of PPARb/d. These studies highlight an important mechanism of vascular dysfunction in diabetes and point to a potential approach for therapy, particularly considering that PPARb/d ligands have been developed and tested in small clinical trials.

  3. Vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction in diabetes: nuclear receptors channel to relaxation.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Geneviève; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular relaxation represent a common cause of microvascular disease in patients with diabetes. Although multiple mechanisms underlying altered endothelial cell function in diabetes have been described, there is currently no specific and approved pharmacological treatment. In this edition of Clinical Science, Morales-Cano et al. characterize voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels as genes regulated by pharmacological activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-b/d (PPARb/d). Diabetes altered Kv channel function leading to impaired coronary artery relaxation, which was prevented by pharmacological activation of PPARb/d. These studies highlight an important mechanism of vascular dysfunction in diabetes and point to a potential approach for therapy, particularly considering that PPARb/d ligands have been developed and tested in small clinical trials. PMID:27634843

  4. Non-neuronal release of ACh plays a key role in secretory response to luminal propionate in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Takaji; Inoue, Ryo; Matsumoto, Megumi; Yajima, Masako

    2011-02-15

    Colonic chloride secretion is induced by chemical stimuli via the enteric nervous reflex. We have previously demonstrated that propionate stimulates chloride secretion via sensory and cholinergic systems of the mucosa in rat distal colon. In this study, we demonstrate non-neuronal release of ACh in the secretory response to propionate using an Ussing chamber. Mucosa preparations from the colon, not including the myenteric and submucosal plexuses, were used. Luminal addition of propionate and serosal addition of ACh caused biphasic changes in short-circuit current (Isc). TTX (1 μm) had no effects, while atropine (10 μm) significantly inhibited the Isc response to propionate and abolished that to ACh. In response to luminal propionate stimulation, ACh was released into the serosal fluid. A linear relationship was observed between the maximal increase in Isc and the amounts of ACh released 5 min after propionate stimulation. This ACh release induced by propionate was not affected by atropine and bumetanide, although both drugs significantly reduced the Isc responses to propionate. Luminal addition of 3-chloropropionate, an inactive analogue of propionate, abolished both ACh release and Isc response produced by propionate. RT-PCR analysis indicated that isolated crypt cells from the distal colon expressed an enzyme of ACh synthesis (ChAT) and transporters of organic cation (OCTs), but not neuronal CHT1 and VAChT. The isolated crypt cells contained comparable amounts of ACh to the residual muscle tissues including nerve plexuses. In conclusion, the non-neuronal release of ACh from colonocytes coupled with propionate stimulation plays a key role in chloride secretion, via the paracrine action of ACh on muscarinic receptors of colonocytes.

  5. 5-HT3 receptor-channels coupled with Na+ influx in human T cells: role in T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Khan, N A; Poisson, J P

    1999-09-01

    The study was conducted on a human (Jurkat) T cell line, loaded with a Na+ fluorescent probe, SBFI/AM. Serotonin and an agonist of 5-HT3 receptor-channels, 2-methyl-5HT, evoked Na+ influx, whereas the agonists of other serotonergic receptor subtypes, i.e., 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors, failed to induce Na+ influx in these cells. By using 3H-BRL43694, an agonist of 5-HT3 receptor-channels, we characterized 5-HT3 lymphocyte receptors which exhibited a density (Bmax) of 300 +/- 20 fmol/10(6) cells and a Kd of 30 nM in Jurkat T cells. The T-cell 5-HT3 receptor-channel is not regulated either by the protein kinase C or by the free intracellular calcium concentrations as the agents known to activate the PKC and to induce increases in intracellular free calcium concentrations failed to influence the free intracellular Na+ concentrations, [Na+]i, in these cells. Furthermore, an increase in [Na+]i, induced by 2-methyl-5HT, via 5-HT3 receptor-channels seems to stimulate T-cell activation by facilitating the progression of T cells from S to G2/M phase of the cell cycle.

  6. Evolution of Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channels: Pro-Loop Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jaiteh, Mariama; Taly, Antoine; Hénin, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are ubiquitous neurotransmitter receptors in Bilateria, with a small number of known prokaryotic homologues. Here we describe a new inventory and phylogenetic analysis of pLGIC genes across all kingdoms of life. Our main finding is a set of pLGIC genes in unicellular eukaryotes, some of which are metazoan-like Cys-loop receptors, and others devoid of Cys-loop cysteines, like their prokaryotic relatives. A number of such “Cys-less” receptors also appears in invertebrate metazoans. Together, those findings draw a new distribution of pLGICs in eukaryotes. A broader distribution of prokaryotic channels also emerges, including a major new archaeal taxon, Thaumarchaeota. More generally, pLGICs now appear nearly ubiquitous in major taxonomic groups except multicellular plants and fungi. However, pLGICs are sparsely present in unicellular taxa, suggesting a high rate of gene loss and a non-essential character, contrasting with their essential role as synaptic receptors of the bilaterian nervous system. Multiple alignments of these highly divergent sequences reveal a small number of conserved residues clustered at the interface between the extracellular and transmembrane domains. Only the “Cys-loop” proline is absolutely conserved, suggesting the more fitting name “Pro loop” for that motif, and “Pro-loop receptors” for the superfamily. The infered molecular phylogeny shows a Cys-loop and a Cys-less clade in eukaryotes, both containing metazoans and unicellular members. This suggests new hypotheses on the evolutionary history of the superfamily, such as a possible origin of the Cys-loop cysteines in an ancient unicellular eukaryote. Deeper phylogenetic relationships remain uncertain, particularly around the split between bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. PMID:26986966

  7. Muscle-Type Nicotinic Receptor Blockade by Diethylamine, the Hydrophilic Moiety of Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Alberola-Die, Armando; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; González-Ros, José M.; Ivorra, Isabel; Morales, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Lidocaine bears in its structure both an aromatic ring and a terminal amine, which can be protonated at physiological pH, linked by an amide group. Since lidocaine causes multiple inhibitory actions on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), this work was aimed to determine the inhibitory effects of diethylamine (DEA), a small molecule resembling the hydrophilic moiety of lidocaine, on Torpedo marmorata nAChRs microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes. Similarly to lidocaine, DEA reversibly blocked acetylcholine-elicited currents (IACh) in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 close to 70 μM), but unlike lidocaine, DEA did not affect IACh desensitization. IACh inhibition by DEA was more pronounced at negative potentials, suggesting an open-channel blockade of nAChRs, although roughly 30% inhibition persisted at positive potentials, indicating additional binding sites outside the pore. DEA block of nAChRs in the resting state (closed channel) was confirmed by the enhanced IACh inhibition when pre-applying DEA before its co-application with ACh, as compared with solely DEA and ACh co-application. Virtual docking assays provide a plausible explanation to the experimental observations in terms of the involvement of different sets of drug binding sites. So, at the nAChR transmembrane (TM) domain, DEA and lidocaine shared binding sites within the channel pore, giving support to their open-channel blockade; besides, lidocaine, but not DEA, interacted with residues at cavities among the M1, M2, M3, and M4 segments of each subunit and also at intersubunit crevices. At the extracellular (EC) domain, DEA and lidocaine binding sites were broadly distributed, which aids to explain the closed channel blockade observed. Interestingly, some DEA clusters were located at the α-γ interphase of the EC domain, in a cavity near the orthosteric binding site pocket; by contrast, lidocaine contacted with all α-subunit loops conforming the ACh binding site, both in α-γ and α-δ and

  8. Transmembrane potential polarization, calcium influx, and receptor conformational state modulate the sensitivity of the imidacloprid-insensitive neuronal insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor to neonicotinoid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Bodereau-Dubois, Béatrice; List, Olivier; Calas-List, Delphine; Marques, Olivier; Communal, Pierre-Yves; Thany, Steeve H; Lapied, Bruno

    2012-05-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides act selectively on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Recent studies revealed that their efficiency was altered by the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation process and the intracellular signaling pathway involved in the regulation of nAChRs. Using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology adapted for dissociated cockroach dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons, we demonstrated that intracellular factors involved in the regulation of nAChR function modulated neonicotinoid sensitivity. DUM neurons were known to express two α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR subtypes: nAChR1 and nAChR2. Whereas nAChR1 was sensitive to imidacloprid, nAChR2 was insensitive to this insecticide. Here, we demonstrated that, like nicotine, acetamiprid and clothianidin, other types of neonicotinoid insecticides, acted as agonists on the nAChR2 subtype. Using acetamiprid, we revealed that both steady-state depolarization and hyperpolarization affected nAChR2 sensitivity. The measurement of the input membrane resistance indicated that change in the acetamiprid-induced agonist activity was related to the receptor conformational state. Using cadmium chloride, ω-conotoxin GVIA, and (R,S)-(3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-isoquinoline-1-yl)-2-phenyl-N,N-di-acetamide (LOE 908), we found that inhibition of calcium influx through high voltage-activated calcium channels and transient receptor potential γ (TRPγ) activated by both depolarization and hyperpolarization increased nAChR2 sensitivity to acetamiprid. Finally, using N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W7), forskolin, and cAMP, we demonstrated that adenylyl cyclase sensitive to the calcium/calmodulin complex regulated internal cAMP concentration, which in turn modulated TRPγ function and nAChR2 sensitivity to acetamiprid. Similar TRPγ-induced modulatory effects were also obtained when clothianidin was tested. These findings bring insights into the signaling pathway modulating

  9. Transmembrane potential polarization, calcium influx, and receptor conformational state modulate the sensitivity of the imidacloprid-insensitive neuronal insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor to neonicotinoid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Bodereau-Dubois, Béatrice; List, Olivier; Calas-List, Delphine; Marques, Olivier; Communal, Pierre-Yves; Thany, Steeve H; Lapied, Bruno

    2012-05-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides act selectively on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Recent studies revealed that their efficiency was altered by the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation process and the intracellular signaling pathway involved in the regulation of nAChRs. Using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology adapted for dissociated cockroach dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons, we demonstrated that intracellular factors involved in the regulation of nAChR function modulated neonicotinoid sensitivity. DUM neurons were known to express two α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR subtypes: nAChR1 and nAChR2. Whereas nAChR1 was sensitive to imidacloprid, nAChR2 was insensitive to this insecticide. Here, we demonstrated that, like nicotine, acetamiprid and clothianidin, other types of neonicotinoid insecticides, acted as agonists on the nAChR2 subtype. Using acetamiprid, we revealed that both steady-state depolarization and hyperpolarization affected nAChR2 sensitivity. The measurement of the input membrane resistance indicated that change in the acetamiprid-induced agonist activity was related to the receptor conformational state. Using cadmium chloride, ω-conotoxin GVIA, and (R,S)-(3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-isoquinoline-1-yl)-2-phenyl-N,N-di-acetamide (LOE 908), we found that inhibition of calcium influx through high voltage-activated calcium channels and transient receptor potential γ (TRPγ) activated by both depolarization and hyperpolarization increased nAChR2 sensitivity to acetamiprid. Finally, using N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W7), forskolin, and cAMP, we demonstrated that adenylyl cyclase sensitive to the calcium/calmodulin complex regulated internal cAMP concentration, which in turn modulated TRPγ function and nAChR2 sensitivity to acetamiprid. Similar TRPγ-induced modulatory effects were also obtained when clothianidin was tested. These findings bring insights into the signaling pathway modulating

  10. Evolution of vertebrate transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 channels: opposite temperature sensitivity between mammals and western clawed frogs.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shigeru; Fukuta, Naomi; Shingai, Ryuzo; Tominaga, Makoto

    2011-04-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels serve as temperature receptors in a wide variety of animals and must have played crucial roles in thermal adaptation. The TRP vanilloid (TRPV) subfamily contains several temperature receptors with different temperature sensitivities. The TRPV3 channel is known to be highly expressed in skin, where it is activated by warm temperatures and serves as a sensor to detect ambient temperatures near the body temperature of homeothermic animals such as mammals. Here we performed comprehensive comparative analyses of the TRPV subfamily in order to understand the evolutionary process; we identified novel TRPV genes and also characterized the evolutionary flexibility of TRPV3 during vertebrate evolution. We cloned the TRPV3 channel from the western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis to understand the functional evolution of the TRPV3 channel. The amino acid sequences of the N- and C-terminal regions of the TRPV3 channel were highly diversified from those of other terrestrial vertebrate TRPV3 channels, although central portions were well conserved. In a heterologous expression system, several mammalian TRPV3 agonists did not activate the TRPV3 channel of the western clawed frog. Moreover, the frog TRPV3 channel did not respond to heat stimuli, instead it was activated by cold temperatures. Temperature thresholds for activation were about 16 °C, slightly below the lower temperature limit for the western clawed frog. Given that the TRPV3 channel is expressed in skin, its likely role is to detect noxious cold temperatures. Thus, the western clawed frog and mammals acquired opposite temperature sensitivity of the TRPV3 channel in order to detect environmental temperatures suitable for their respective species, indicating that temperature receptors can dynamically change properties to adapt to different thermal environments during evolution.

  11. Nicotine enhances expression of the alpha 3, alpha 4, alpha 5, and alpha 7 nicotinic receptors modulating calcium metabolism and regulating adhesion and motility of respiratory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zia, S; Ndoye, A; Nguyen, V T; Grando, S A

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of direct toxic effects of nicotine (Nic) on human bronchial epithelial cells (BEC) suggested by our previous findings of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the epithelial cells lining mucocutaneous membranes. We now demonstrate for the first time that human and murine BEC both in vivo and in vitro express functional nAChRs, and that classic alpha 3, alpha 4, alpha 5 and alpha 7 subunits can contribute to formation of these acetylcholine-gated ion channels. In human bronchial and mouse lung tissues, and in cultures of human BEC, the nAChRs were visualized by subunit-specific antibodies on the cell membranes, particularly at the sites of cell-to-cell contacts. The epithelial cells of submucosal glands abundantly expressed alpha 7 nAChRs. Smoking significantly (p < 0.05) increased the relative numbers of nAChRs, and this effects could be reproduced in cultures of BEC exposed to 10 microM Nic. At a higher dose, Nic decreased the relative numbers of alpha 5-containing nAChRs, suggesting a role for receptor desensitization. The function of the nAChR channels expressed by BEC was demonstrated by biphasic increase in the concentrations of intracellular calcium ([Ca++]i) in response to activation of the channel by Nic and fluctuations of [Ca++]i due to channel blockade by mecamylamine (Mec). Long-term exposure to milimolar concentrations of Nic resulted in a steady increase of [Ca++]i, which may lead to cell damage. The biological roles of epithelial nAChRs apparently involve regulation of cell-to-cell communications, adhesion and motility, because Mec caused rapid and profound changes in these cell functions which were reversible by Nic. An over exposure of BEC to Nic, however, produced an antagonist-like effect, suggesting that the pathobiological effects of Nic toxicity might result from both activation of nAChR channels and nAChR desensitization. We conclude that medical consequences of

  12. Cocaine inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors influences dopamine release

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Rodriguez, Alexandra; Zhang, Lifen; Zhou, Fuwen; Gong, Suzhen; Gu, Howard; De Biasi, Mariella; Zhou, Fu-Ming; Dani, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) potently regulate dopamine (DA) release in the striatum and alter cocaine's ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit nAChR-mediated currents in midbrain DA neurons and consequently alter DA release in the dorsal and ventral striatum. At very high concentrations, cocaine also inhibits voltage-gated Na channels in DA neurons. Furthermore, our results show that partial inhibition of nAChRs by cocaine reduces evoked DA release. This diminution of DA release via nAChR inhibition more strongly influences release evoked at low or tonic stimulation frequencies than at higher (phasic) stimulation frequencies, particularly in the dorsolateral striatum. This cocaine-induced shift favoring phasic DA release may contribute to the enhanced saliency and motivational value of cocaine-associated memories and behaviors. PMID:25237305

  13. Cocaine inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors influences dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Rodriguez, Alexandra; Zhang, Lifen; Zhou, Fuwen; Gong, Suzhen; Gu, Howard; De Biasi, Mariella; Zhou, Fu-Ming; Dani, John A

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) potently regulate dopamine (DA) release in the striatum and alter cocaine's ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit nAChR-mediated currents in midbrain DA neurons and consequently alter DA release in the dorsal and ventral striatum. At very high concentrations, cocaine also inhibits voltage-gated Na channels in DA neurons. Furthermore, our results show that partial inhibition of nAChRs by cocaine reduces evoked DA release. This diminution of DA release via nAChR inhibition more strongly influences release evoked at low or tonic stimulation frequencies than at higher (phasic) stimulation frequencies, particularly in the dorsolateral striatum. This cocaine-induced shift favoring phasic DA release may contribute to the enhanced saliency and motivational value of cocaine-associated memories and behaviors. PMID:25237305

  14. Proteolytic fragmentation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors: a novel mechanism regulating channel activity?

    PubMed

    Wang, Liwei; Alzayady, Kamil J; Yule, David I

    2016-06-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3 Rs) are a family of ubiquitously expressed intracellular Ca(2+) release channels. Regulation of channel activity by Ca(2+) , nucleotides, phosphorylation, protein binding partners and other cellular factors is thought to play a major role in defining the specific spatiotemporal characteristics of intracellular Ca(2+) signals. These properties are, in turn, believed pivotal for the selective and specific physiological activation of Ca(2+) -dependent effectors. IP3 Rs are also substrates for the intracellular cysteine proteases, calpain and caspase. Cleavage of the IP3 R has been proposed to play a role in apoptotic cell death by uncoupling regions important for IP3 binding from the channel domain, leaving an unregulated leaky Ca(2+) pore. Contrary to this hypothesis, we demonstrate following proteolysis that N- and C-termini of IP3 R1 remain associated, presumably through non-covalent interactions. Further, we show that complementary fragments of IP3 R1 assemble into tetrameric structures and retain their ability to be regulated robustly by IP3 . While peptide continuity is clearly not necessary for IP3 -gating of the channel, we propose that cleavage of the IP3 R peptide chain may alter other important regulatory events to modulate channel activity. In this scenario, stimulation of the cleaved IP3 R may support distinct spatiotemporal Ca(2+) signals and activation of specific effectors. Notably, in many adaptive physiological events, the non-apoptotic activities of caspase and calpain are demonstrated to be important, but the substrates of the proteases are poorly defined. We speculate that proteolytic fragmentation may represent a novel form of IP3 R regulation, which plays a role in varied adaptive physiological processes.

  15. (De)constructing the ryanodine receptor: modeling ion permeation and selectivity of the calcium release channel.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Dirk; Xu, Le; Wang, Ying; Meissner, Gerhard

    2005-08-18

    Biological ion channels are proteins that passively conduct ions across membranes that are otherwise impermeable to ions. Here, we present a model of ion permeation and selectivity through a single, open ryanodine receptor (RyR) ion channel. Combining recent mutation data with electrodiffusion of finite-sized ions, the model reproduces the current/voltage curves of cardiac RyR (RyR2) in KCl, LiCl, NaCl, RbCl, CsCl, CaCl(2), MgCl(2), and their mixtures over large concentrations and applied voltage ranges. It also reproduces the reduced K(+) conductances and Ca(2+) selectivity of two skeletal muscle RyR (RyR1) mutants (D4899N and E4900Q). The model suggests that the selectivity filter of RyR contains the negatively charged residue D4899 that dominates the permeation and selectivity properties and gives RyR a DDDD locus similar to the EEEE locus of the L-type calcium channel. In contrast to previously applied barrier models, the current model describes RyR as a multi-ion channel with approximately three monovalent cations in the selectivity filter at all times. Reasons for the contradicting occupancy predictions are discussed. In addition, the model predicted an anomalous mole fraction effect for Na(+)/Cs(+) mixtures, which was later verified by experiment. Combining these results, the binding selectivity of RyR appears to be driven by the same charge/space competition mechanism of other highly charged channels.

  16. Pre-clinical studies in cough research: Role of Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Megan S.; Dubuis, Eric; Birrell, Mark A.; Belvisi, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    Cough is a protective reflex and defence mechanism in healthy individuals, which helps clear excessive secretions and foreign material from the lungs. Cough often presents as the first and most persistent symptom of many respiratory diseases and some non-respiratory disorders, but can also be idiopathic, and is a common respiratory complaint for which medical attention is sought. Chronic cough of various aetiologies is a regular presentation to specialist respiratory clinics, and is reported as a troublesome symptom by a significant proportion of the population. Despite this, the treatment options for cough are limited. The lack of effective anti-tussives likely stems from our incomplete understanding of how the tussive reflex is mediated. However, research over the last decade has begun to shed some light on the mechanisms which provoke cough, and may ultimately provide us with better anti-tussive therapies. This review will focus on the in vitro and in vivo models that are currently used to further our understanding of the sensory innervation of the respiratory tract, and how these nerves are involved in controlling the cough response. Central to this are the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels, a family of polymodal receptors that can be activated by such diverse stimuli as chemicals, temperature, osmotic stress, and mechanical perturbation. These ion channels are thought to be molecular pain integrators and targets for novel analgesic agents for the treatment of various pain disorders but some are also being developed as anti-tussives. PMID:23474212

  17. Pre-clinical studies in cough research: role of Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels.

    PubMed

    Grace, Megan S; Dubuis, Eric; Birrell, Mark A; Belvisi, Maria G

    2013-10-01

    Cough is a protective reflex and defence mechanism in healthy individuals, which helps clear excessive secretions and foreign material from the lungs. Cough often presents as the first and most persistent symptom of many respiratory diseases and some non-respiratory disorders, but can also be idiopathic, and is a common respiratory complaint for which medical attention is sought. Chronic cough of various aetiologies is a regular presentation to specialist respiratory clinics, and is reported as a troublesome symptom by a significant proportion of the population. Despite this, the treatment options for cough are limited. The lack of effective anti-tussives likely stems from our incomplete understanding of how the tussive reflex is mediated. However, research over the last decade has begun to shed some light on the mechanisms which provoke cough, and may ultimately provide us with better anti-tussive therapies. This review will focus on the in vitro and in vivo models that are currently used to further our understanding of the sensory innervation of the respiratory tract, and how these nerves are involved in controlling the cough response. Central to this are the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels, a family of polymodal receptors that can be activated by such diverse stimuli as chemicals, temperature, osmotic stress, and mechanical perturbation. These ion channels are thought to be molecular pain integrators and targets for novel analgesic agents for the treatment of various pain disorders but some are also being developed as anti-tussives. PMID:23474212

  18. Interaction between Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonists and. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in rabbit ileal cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Homeidan, F.R.; Wicks, J.; Cusolito, S.; El-Sabban, M.E.; Sharp, G.W.G.; Donowitz, M.

    1986-03-05

    An interaction between Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonists and the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor on active electrolyte transport was demonstrated in rabbit ileum. Clonidine, an ..cap alpha../sub 2/-agonist, stimulated NaCl absorption apparently by Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonism since it inhibited /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ uptake across the basolateral membrane and decreased total ileal calcium content. This stimulation was inhibited by the Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonists dl- and l-verapamil and cadmium but not by nifedipine. The binding of /sup 3/H-yohimbine, a specific ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic antagonist, was studied on purified ileal cell membranes using a rapid filtration technique. dl-Verapamil and Cd/sup + +/ inhibited the specific binding of /sup 3/H-yohimbine over the same concentration range in which they affected transport. In contrast, nifedipine had no effect on binding, just as it had no effect on clonidine-stimulated NaCl absorption. These data demonstrate that there is an interaction between Ca/sup + +/-channels and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in ileal basolateral membranes. Some Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonists alter ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic binding to the receptor and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-agonist binding leads to changes in Ca/sup + +/ entry. A close spatial relationship between the Ca/sup + +/-channel and the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-receptor could explain the data.

  19. Inhibitory effect of oleanolic acid from the rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus on transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joo Hyun; Lee, Dong-Ung

    2015-01-01

    Cyperus rotundus is used as an analgesic and sedative in oriental medicine and has been reported to exhibit antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. On the other hand, the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel is a nonselective cation channel that senses various noxious chemical and thermal stimuli. However, it has recently been reported that the epidermally expressed transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel is involved in heat- and UV-induced skin aging. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether C. rotundus extract and its constituents can inhibit this channel. Ethylacetate and hexane fractions of the methanol extract were found to partially inhibit transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel activity, and at a concentration of 90 µM, oleanolic acid, which was one of three constituents isolated from the ethylacetate fraction, inhibited this activity by 61.4 ± 8.0 %. This is first electrophysiological study to be conducted on the effects of C. rotundus extract and its constituents on the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel. The results obtained provide insight of the potential therapeutic effects of C. rotundus in the contexts of analgesia and UV-induced photoaging. PMID:25402944

  20. Membrane-delimited coupling between sigma receptors and K+ channels in rat neurohypophysial terminals requires neither G-protein nor ATP

    PubMed Central

    Lupardus, Patrick J; Wilke, Russell A; Aydar, Ebru; Palmer, Chris P; Chen, Yuenmu; Ruoho, Arnold E; Jackson, Meyer B

    2000-01-01

    Receptor-mediated modulation of ion channels generally involves G-proteins, phosphorylation, or both in combination. The sigma receptor, which modulates voltage-gated K+ channels, is a novel protein with no homology to other receptors known to modulate ion channels. In the present study patch clamp and photolabelling techniques were used to investigate the mechanism by which sigma receptors modulate K+ channels in peptidergic nerve terminals. The sigma receptor photoprobe iodoazidococaine labelled a protein with the same molecular mass (26 kDa) as the sigma receptor protein identified by cloning. The sigma receptor ligands pentazocine and SKF10047 modulated K+ channels, despite intra-terminal perfusion with GTP-free solutions, a G-protein inhibitor (GDPβS), a G-protein activator (GTPγS) or a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue (AMPPcP). Channels in excised outside-out patches were modulated by ligand, indicating that soluble cytoplasmic factors are not required. In contrast, channels within cell-attached patches were not modulated by ligand outside a patch, indicating that receptors and channels must be in close proximity for functional interactions. Channels expressed in oocytes without receptors were unresponsive to sigma receptor agonists, ruling out inhibition through a direct drug interaction with channels. These experiments indicate that sigma receptor-mediated signal transduction is membrane delimited, and requires neither G-protein activation nor protein phosphorylation. This novel transduction mechanism is mediated by membrane proteins in close proximity, possibly through direct interactions between the receptor and channel. This would allow for more rapid signal transduction than other ion channel modulation mechanisms, which in the present case of neurohypophysial nerve terminals would lead to the enhancement of neuropeptide release. PMID:10922005

  1. Desformylflustrabromine (dFBr) and [3H]dFBr-Labeled Binding Sites in a Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Wang, Ze-Jun; Stewart, Deirdre S; Jain, Atul D; Glennon, Richard A; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2015-07-01

    Desformylflustrabromine (dFBr) is a positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of α4β2 and α2β2 nAChRs that, at concentrations >1 µM, also inhibits these receptors and α7 nAChRs. However, its interactions with muscle-type nAChRs have not been characterized, and the locations of its binding site(s) in any nAChR are not known. We report here that dFBr inhibits human muscle (αβεδ) and Torpedo (αβγδ) nAChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes with IC50 values of ∼ 1 μM. dFBr also inhibited the equilibrium binding of ion channel blockers to Torpedo nAChRs with higher affinity in the nAChR desensitized state ([(3)H]phencyclidine; IC50 = 4 μM) than in the resting state ([(3)H]tetracaine; IC50 = 60 μM), whereas it bound with only very low affinity to the ACh binding sites ([(3)H]ACh, IC50 = 1 mM). Upon irradiation at 312 nm, [(3)H]dFBr photoincorporated into amino acids within the Torpedo nAChR ion channel with the efficiency of photoincorporation enhanced in the presence of agonist and the agonist-enhanced photolabeling inhibitable by phencyclidine. In the presence of agonist, [(3)H]dFBr also photolabeled amino acids in the nAChR extracellular domain within binding pockets identified previously for the nonselective nAChR PAMs galantamine and physostigmine at the canonical α-γ interface containing the transmitter binding sites and at the noncanonical δ-β subunit interface. These results establish that dFBr inhibits muscle-type nAChR by binding in the ion channel and that [(3)H]dFBr is a photoaffinity probe with broad amino acid side chain reactivity. PMID:25870334

  2. Targeting brain α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in Alzheimer's disease: rationale and current status.

    PubMed

    Vallés, Ana Sofía; Borroni, María Virginia; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2014-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older persons. Pathognomonic hallmarks of the disease include the development of amyloid senile plaques and deposits of neurofibrillary tangles. These changes occur in the brain long before the clinical manifestations of AD (cognitive impairment in particular) become apparent. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), particularly the α7 subtype, are highly expressed in brain regions relevant to cognitive and memory functions and involved in the processing of sensory information. There is strong evidence that implicates the participation of AChRs in AD. This review briefly introduces current strategies addressing the pathophysiologic findings (amyloid-β-peptide plaques, neurofibrillary tangles) and then focuses on more recent efforts of pharmacologic intervention in AD, specifically targeted to the α7 AChR. Whereas cholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil, galantamine, or rivastigmine, together with the non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist memantine are at the forefront of present-day clinical intervention for AD, new insights into AChR molecular pharmacology are bringing other drugs, directed at AChRs, to center stage. Among these are the positive allosteric modulators that selectively target α7 AChRs and are aimed at unleashing the factors that hinder agonist-mediated, α7 AChR channel activation. This calls for more detailed knowledge of the distribution, functional properties, and involvement of AChRs in various signaling cascades-together with the corresponding abnormalities in all these properties-to be able to engineer strategies in drug design and evaluate the therapeutic possibilities of new compounds targeting this class of neurotransmitter receptors. PMID:25248971

  3. Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA and NMDA receptor channels in basket cells of rat hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    PubMed Central

    Koh, D S; Geiger, J R; Jonas, P; Sakmann, B

    1995-01-01

    1. Glutamate receptor (GluR) channels were studied in basket cells in the dentate gyrus of rat hippocampal slices. Basket cells were identified by their location, dendritic morphology and high frequency of action potentials generated during sustained current injection. 2. Dual-component currents were activated by fast application of glutamate to outside-out membrane patches isolated from basket cell somata (10 microM glycine, no external Mg2+). The fast component was selectively blocked by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), the slow component by D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5). This suggests that the two components were mediated by alpha-amino-3- hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR)/kainate receptor and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) channels, respectively. The mean ratio of the peak current of the NMDAR component to that of the AMPAR/kainate receptor component was 0.22 (1 ms pulses of 10 mM glutamate). 3. The AMPAR/kainate receptor component, which was studied in isolation in the presence of D-AP5, was identified as AMPAR mediated on the basis of the preferential activation by AMPA as compared with kainate, the weak desensitization of kainate-activated currents, the cross-desensitization between AMPA and kainate, and the reduction of desensitization by cyclothiazide. 4. Deactivation of basket cell AMPARs following 1 ms pulses of glutamate occurred with a time constant (tau) of 1.2 +/- 0.1 ms (mean +/- S.E.M.). During 100 ms glutamate pulses AMPARs desensitized with a tau of 3.7 +/- 0.2ms. 5. The peak current-voltage (I-V) relation of AMPAR-mediated currents in Na(+)-rich extracellular solution showed a reversal potential of -4.0 +/- 2.6 mV and was characterized by a a doubly rectifying shape. The conductance of single AMPAR channels was estimated as 22.6 +/- 1.6 pS using non-stationary fluctuation analysis. AMPARs expressed in hippocampal basket cells were highly Ca2+ permeable (PCa/PK = 1.79). 6. NMDARs in

  4. Regulation of the transient receptor potential channel TRPM3 by phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Balázs I; Konrad, Maik; Ghosh, Debapriya; Mohr, Florian; Halaszovich, Christian R; Leitner, Michael G; Vriens, Joris; Oberwinkler, Johannes; Voets, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channel TRPM3 is a calcium-permeable cation channel activated by heat and by the neurosteroid pregnenolone sulfate (PregS). TRPM3 is highly expressed in sensory neurons, where it plays a key role in heat sensing and inflammatory hyperalgesia, and in pancreatic β cells, where its activation enhances glucose-induced insulin release. However, despite its functional importance, little is known about the cellular mechanisms that regulate TRPM3 activity. Here, we provide evidence for a dynamic regulation of TRPM3 by membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs). Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI[4,5]P2) and ATP applied to the intracellular side of excised membrane patches promote recovery of TRPM3 from desensitization. The stimulatory effect of cytosolic ATP on TRPM3 reflects activation of phosphatidylinositol kinases (PI-Ks), leading to resynthesis of PIPs in the plasma membrane. Various PIPs directly enhance TRPM3 activity in cell-free inside-out patches, with a potency order PI(3,4,5)P3 > PI(3,5)P2 > PI(4,5)P2 ≈ PI(3,4)P2 > PI(4)P. Conversely, TRPM3 activity is rapidly and reversibly inhibited by activation of phosphatases that remove the 5-phosphate from PIPs. Finally, we show that recombinant TRPM3, as well as the endogenous TRPM3 in insuloma cells, is rapidly and reversibly inhibited by activation of phospholipase C-coupled muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Our results reveal basic cellular mechanisms whereby membrane receptors can regulate TRPM3 activity. PMID:26123194

  5. Analysis of factors influencing moxibustion efficacy by affecting heat-activated transient receptor potential vanilloid channels.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinfeng; Wang, Xinjun; Wu, Xiaojing; Yu, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Moxibustion is an important component part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Among differ- ent kinds of moxibustion methods, thermal stimulation seems to be a pivotal impact factor to the theraputic efficacy. Based on its thermal characteristic and treated area-skin, we hypothesize that the thermosensitive TRPV channels may involve in the mechanism of moxibustion. This study, by referring to various experimental and clinical data, analyzes the properties and features of transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) subfamily 1-4 and the impact of moxibustion on these channels. The factors impacting the efficacy of moxibustion treatment were analyzed on three levels: the independent basic factors of moxibustion (temperature, space and time); moxibustion intensity (a compound factor achieved through comprehensive control of the three individual basic factors mentioned above); and moxibustion quantity (the amount of temperature stimulation applied within a certain unit of time, including the total amount of moxibustion treatment). The results from present study show that the effect of moxibustion therapy appears to be determined by the activation of TRPV1-4, mainly TRPV1 and TRPV2. Temperature (the degree of heat stimulation), time and area (how long the treatment lasts and how many TRPV1-4 channels are activated) affect the intensity of moxibustion treatment to form effective moxibustion quantity; this should be considered in clinical moxibustion application.

  6. Analysis of factors influencing moxibustion efficacy by affecting heat-activated transient receptor potential vanilloid channels.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinfeng; Wang, Xinjun; Wu, Xiaojing; Yu, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Moxibustion is an important component part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Among differ- ent kinds of moxibustion methods, thermal stimulation seems to be a pivotal impact factor to the theraputic efficacy. Based on its thermal characteristic and treated area-skin, we hypothesize that the thermosensitive TRPV channels may involve in the mechanism of moxibustion. This study, by referring to various experimental and clinical data, analyzes the properties and features of transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) subfamily 1-4 and the impact of moxibustion on these channels. The factors impacting the efficacy of moxibustion treatment were analyzed on three levels: the independent basic factors of moxibustion (temperature, space and time); moxibustion intensity (a compound factor achieved through comprehensive control of the three individual basic factors mentioned above); and moxibustion quantity (the amount of temperature stimulation applied within a certain unit of time, including the total amount of moxibustion treatment). The results from present study show that the effect of moxibustion therapy appears to be determined by the activation of TRPV1-4, mainly TRPV1 and TRPV2. Temperature (the degree of heat stimulation), time and area (how long the treatment lasts and how many TRPV1-4 channels are activated) affect the intensity of moxibustion treatment to form effective moxibustion quantity; this should be considered in clinical moxibustion application. PMID:27400483

  7. Canonical transient receptor potential 1 channel is involved in contractile function of glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Sours-Brothers, Sherry; Coleman, Rashadd; Ding, Min; Graham, Sarabeth; Kong, De-Hu; Ma, Rong

    2007-05-01

    Contractility of mesangial cells (MC) is tightly controlled by [Ca(2+)](i). Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane constitutes a major component of mesangial responses to vasoconstrictors. Canonical transient receptor potential 1 (TRPC1) is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel in a variety of cell types. This study was performed to investigate whether TRPC1 takes part in vasoconstrictor-induced mesangial contraction by mediating Ca(2+) entry. It was found that angiotensin II (AngII) evoked remarkable contraction of the cultured MC. Downregulation of TRPC1 using RNA interference significantly attenuated the contractile response. Infusion of AngII or endothelin-1 in rats caused a decrease in GFR. The GFR decline was significantly reduced by infusion of TRPC1 antibody that targets an extracellular domain in the pore region of TRPC1 channel. However, the treatment of TRPC1 antibody did not affect the AngII-induced vasopressing effect. Electrophysiologic experiments revealed that functional or biologic inhibition of TRPC1 significantly depressed AngII-induced channel activation. Fura-2 fluorescence-indicated that Ca(2+) entry in response to AngII stimulation was also dramatically inhibited by TRPC1 antibody and TRPC1-specific RNA interference. These results suggest that TRPC1 plays an important role in controlling contractile function of MC. Mediation of Ca(2+) entry might be the underlying mechanism for the TRPC1-associated MC contraction. PMID:17389736

  8. Upregulation of Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Channels Contributes to Endotoxin-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gui-Lan; Jiang, Hongni; Zou, Fangdong

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic shock is a pathologic condition caused by endotoxin-producing bacteria, and often associated with severe pulmonary hypertension. Inflammation is a major systemic response to endotoxin; however, it is unknown whether endotoxin has a direct impact on pulmonary arteries that contributes to pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Material/Methods Rat pulmonary arteries and primary pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were cultured in vitro and treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and blockers of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels. Neointimal growth and arterial stenosis were observed on cryosections of cultured pulmonary arteries. Proliferation of PASMCs was examined by a WST-1 (water-soluble tetrazolium salt) assay. Expression of TRPC genes in pulmonary arteries and PASMCs were detected and quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Results LPS significantly induced neointimal growth and stenosis of pulmonary arteries and promoted proliferation of PASMCs. TRPC channel blockers 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and SKF-96365 inhibited LPS-induced remodeling of pulmonary arteries and PASMC proliferation. Expression of TRPC1/3/4/6 was detected in pulmonary arteries and PASMCs. LPS treatment dramatically increased the expression of TRPC3 and TRPC4 at both messenger RNA and protein levels. Conclusions LPS stimulates stenosis of pulmonary arteries through enhancement of TRPC-mediated Ca2+ entry into PASMCs, which is caused by upregulation of TRPC3 and TRPC4 channels. PMID:27471122

  9. Verrucotoxin inhibits KATP channels in cardiac myocytes through a muscarinic M3 receptor-PKC pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Wu; Yazawa, Kazuto; Hao, Li-Ying; Onoue, Yoshio; Kameyama, Masaki

    2007-06-01

    Verrucotoxin is the major component of venom from the stonefish (Synanceia verrucosa). Stings from the dorsal spines of the stonefish produce intensive pain, convulsions, hypotension, paralysis, respiratory weakness and collapse of the cardiovascular system, occasionally leading to death. It has been reported that verrucotoxin might modulate ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) current in frog atrial fibers. However, the mechanism by which verrucotoxin acts on KATP current remains unclear. In this study, we examined whether verrucotoxin inhibited KATP current in guinea pig ventricular myocytes, using the patch clamp method. Verrucotoxin suppressed KATP current induced by pinacidil (KATP channel opener) in a concentration-dependent manner, with a half maximum concentration of 16.3 microg/ml. The effect of verrucotoxin on KATP current was suppressed by atropine (1 microM), a muscarinic receptor antagonist, or by 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (100 nM), a muscarinic M3 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the effect of verrucotoxin on KATP current was attenuated by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor chelerythrine (10 microM) and calphostin C (10 microM), yet not by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor H-89 (0.5 microM). These results suggest that verrucotoxin inhibits KATP current through the muscarinic M3 receptor-PKC pathway. These findings enhance our understanding of the toxic effects of verrucotoxin from the stonefish. PMID:17362922

  10. α5-nAChR modulates nicotine-induced cell migration and invasion in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haiji; Ma, Xiaoli

    2015-09-01

    Cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor in the development of human lung cancer. Nicotine, the major component in tobacco, not only contributes to carcinogenesis but also promotes tumor metastasis. By binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), nicotine induces the proliferation and migration of non-small cell lung cancer. Recently studies have indicated that α5-nAChR is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether nicotine promotes the migration and invasion through activation of α5-nAChR in lung cancer. In the present study, A549 cell was exposed to 1μN nicotine for 8, 24 or 48h. Wound-healing assay and transwell assay were used to evaluate the capability of A549 cell migration and cell invasion, respectively. Silencing of α5-nAChR was done by siRNA. Western blotting and PCR were used to detect α5-nAChR expression. Nicotine can induce activation of α5-nAChR in association with increased migration and invasion of human lung cancer A549 cell. Treatment of cells with α5-nAChR specific siRNA blocks nicotine-stimulated activation of α5-nAChR and suppresses A549 cell migration and invasion. Reduction of α5-nAChR resulted in upregulation of E-cadherin, consistent with E-cadherin being inhibitive of cancer cell invasion. These findings suggest that nicotine-induced migration and invasion may occur in a mechanism through activation of α5-nAChR, which can contribute to metastasis or development of human lung cancer.

  11. Dimensions and ion selectivity of recombinant AMPA and kainate receptor channels and their dependence on Q/R site residues.

    PubMed Central

    Burnashev, N; Villarroel, A; Sakmann, B

    1996-01-01

    1. Recombinant alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR) subunits (GluR-A or GluR-B) and kainate receptor (KAR) subunit (GluR-6) in their unedited (Q)- and edited (R)-forms were expressed in HEK 293 cells. To estimate the dimensions of the narrow portion of these channels, biionic reversal potentials for organic cations of different mean diameters were determined with Cs+ as the internal reference ion. 2. Homomeric channels assembled from Q-form subunits were cation selective. The relation between the relative permeability and the mean size of different organic cations suggests that the diameter of the narrow portion of Q-form channels is approximately 0.78 nm for AMPAR and 0.75 nm for KAR channels. 3. Homomeric channels assembled from R-form subunits were permeant for anions and cations. When probed with CsC1 gradients the relative chloride permeability (PC1/PCs) was estimated as 0.14 for GluR-B(R) and 0.74 for GluR-6(R)-subunit channels. The permeability versus mean size relation for large cations measured with the weakly permeant F- as anion, indicates that for the R-form KAR channels the apparent pore diameter is close to 0.76 nm. 4. Heteromeric AMPAR and KAR channels co-assembled from Q- and R-form subunits were cation selective. The diameter of the narrow portion of these channels is estimated to be in the range between 0.70 and 0.74 nm. 5. The results indicated that the diameters of the narrow portion of AMPAR and KAR channels of different subunit composition and of widely different ion selectivity are comparable. Therefore, the differences in the anion versus cation selectivity, in Ca2+ permeability and in channel conductance are likely to be determined by the difference in charge density of the channel. PMID:8910205

  12. Evidence for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling to activate ATP-sensitive potassium channels in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hye-Jung; Park, Hyun-Sun; Park, Sung-Hee; Park, Jae-Hyung; Shin, Su-Kyung; Song, Seung Eun; Hwang, Meeyul; Cho, Ho-Chan; Song, Dae-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut peptide that promotes insulin release from pancreatic beta cells. GLP-1 has been shown to confer glucose-insensitive beta cells with glucose sensitivity by modulation of the activity of the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel. The channel closing effect of GLP-1, interacting with corresponding G-protein-coupled receptors, has been well established; however, to our knowledge, no study has shown whether GLP-1 directly induces activation of beta-cell KATP channels. Here, we aimed to evaluate whether the activation of beta-cell KATP channels by GLP-1 exists and affects intracellular Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i). KATP channel activity was measured in isolated rat pancreatic beta cells by whole-cell perforated patch-clamp recordings with a diazoxide-containing pipette solution. Changes in [Ca(2+)]i and the subcellular localization of KATP channels were observed using the calcium-sensitive dye fura-4/AM and anti-Kir6.2 antibodies in INS-1 beta cells, respectively. To eliminate the well-known inhibitory effects of GLP-1 on KATP channel activity, channels were fully inhibited by pretreatment with methyl pyruvate and epigallocatechin-3-gallate. In the pretreated beta cells, GLP-1 and exendin-4 promptly activated the channels, reducing [Ca(2+)]i. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 blocked the effects of GLP-1 on channel activity. Moreover, phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate mimicked the effects of GLP-1. These results suggested that beta-cell GLP-1 receptor signaling involved activation of KATP channels via a PI3K-dependent pathway. This alternative mechanism of GLP-1 function may act as a negative feedback pathway, modulating the glucose-dependent GLP-1 inhibition on KATP channel activity. PMID:26655814

  13. Restricted usefulness of tetraethylammonium and 4-aminopyridine for the characterization of receptor-operated K+-channels.

    PubMed Central

    Drukarch, B.; Kits, K. S.; Leysen, J. E.; Schepens, E.; Stoof, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    1. Recently, we suggested that the D2-dopamine receptor involved in the inhibition of evoked [3H]-acetylcholine release from rat striatum is coupled to K+-channels. 2. In the present study, an attempt was made to elucidate further the role of these K+-channels, using the K+-channel blocking agents tetraethylammonium and 4-aminopyridine. With a superfusion method, the effects of both drugs on the D2-dopamine receptor-mediated inhibition of the electrically evoked release of [3H]-acetylcholine from rat striatal tissue slices was investigated. 3. Both tetraethylammonium (30 mM) and 4-aminopyridine (0.1 mM) significantly stimulated the electrically evoked release of [3H]-acetylcholine and completely abolished the effect of the selective D2-receptor agonist LY 171555 (1 microM) on evoked acetylcholine release. In addition, tetraethylammonium (0.03-30 mM) and 4-aminopyridine (0.003-1 mM) strongly increased the basal (non-evoked) release of radioactivity in a concentration-dependent manner. The results suggest that the effect of the drugs on the basal release of radioactivity and on the electrically evoked release of acetylcholine cannot exclusively be explained by their action on K+-channels. 4. Furthermore, with the use of a receptor binding assay, data were obtained on the affinity of tetraethylammonium and 4-aminopyridine for D2-receptors and various other neurotransmitter recognition sites. At concentrations in which both drugs are known to block K+-channels, they were found to inhibit the specific binding of selective radioligands to their respective recognition sites. 5. It is concluded that due to their 'side-effects', both tetraethylammonium and 4-aminopyridine are of only limited value in the investigation of the alleged interaction between neurotransmitter receptors and K+-channels. PMID:2553183

  14. Coarse architecture of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel determined by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    De-la-Rosa, Víctor; Rangel-Yescas, Gisela E; Ladrón-de-Guevara, Ernesto; Rosenbaum, Tamara; Islas, León D

    2013-10-11

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ion channel is responsible for the perception of high temperatures and low extracellular pH, and it is also involved in the response to some pungent compounds. Importantly, it is also associated with the perception of pain and noxious stimuli. Here, we attempt to discern the molecular organization and location of the N and C termini of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ion channel by measuring FRET between genetically attached enhanced yellow and cyan fluorescent protein to the N or C terminus of the channel protein, expressed in transfected HEK 293 cells or Xenopus laevis oocytes. The static measurements of the domain organization were mapped into an available cryo-electron microscopy density of the channel with good agreement. These measurements also provide novel insights into the organization of terminal domains and their proximity to the plasma membrane. PMID:23965996

  15. Evaluation of agonist selectivity for the NMDA receptor ion channel in bilayer lipid membranes based on integrated single-channel currents.

    PubMed

    Hirano, A; Sugawara, M; Umezawa, Y; Uchino, S; Nakajima-Iijima, S

    2000-06-01

    A new method for evaluating chemical selectivity of agonists to activate the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was presented by using typical agonists NMDA, L-glutamate and (2S, 3R, 4S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-IV) and the mouse epsilon1/zeta1 NMDA receptor incorporated in bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) as an illustrative example. The method was based on the magnitude of an agonist-induced integrated single-channel current corresponding to the number of total ions passed through the open channel. The very magnitudes of the integrated single-channel currents were compared with the different BLMs as a new measure of agonist selectivity. The epsilon1/zeta1 NMDA receptor was partially purified from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the epsilon1/zeta1 NMDA receptor and incorporated in BLMs formed by the tip-dip method. The agonist-induced integrated single-channel currents were obtained at 50 microM agonist concentration, where the integrated current for NMDA was shown to reach its saturated value. The obtained integrated currents were found to be (4.5 +/- 0.55) x 10(-13) C/s for NMDA, (5.8 +/- 0.72) x 10(-13) C/s for L-glutamate and (6.6 +/- 0.61) x 10(-13) C/s for L-CCG-IV, respectively. These results suggest that the agonist selectivity in terms of the total ion flux through the single epsilon1/zeta1 NMDA receptor is in the order of L-CCG-IV approximately = L-glutamate > NMDA.

  16. Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Type 3 Channels Control the Vascular Contractility of Mouse Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Yeon, Soo-In; Kim, Joo Young; Yeon, Dong-Soo; Abramowitz, Joel; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Muallem, Shmuel; Lee, Young-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) channels are non-selective cation channels and regulate intracellular Ca2+ concentration. We examined the role of TRPC3 channels in agonist-, membrane depolarization (high K+)-, and mechanical (pressure)-induced vasoconstriction and vasorelaxation in mouse mesenteric arteries. Vasoconstriction and vasorelaxation of endothelial cells intact mesenteric arteries were measured in TRPC3 wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice. Calcium concentration ([Ca2+]) was measured in isolated arteries from TRPC3 WT and KO mice as well as in the mouse endothelial cell line bEnd.3. Nitric oxide (NO) production and nitrate/nitrite concentrations were also measured in TRPC3 WT and KO mice. Phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction was reduced in TRPC3 KO mice when compared to that of WT mice, but neither high K+- nor pressure-induced vasoconstriction was altered in TRPC3 KO mice. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited in TRPC3 KO mice and by the selective TRPC3 blocker pyrazole-3. Acetylcholine blocked the phenylephrine-induced increase in Ca2+ ratio and then relaxation in TRPC3 WT mice but had little effect on those outcomes in KO mice. Acetylcholine evoked a Ca2+ increase in endothelial cells, which was inhibited by pyrazole-3. Acetylcholine induced increased NO release in TRPC3 WT mice, but not in KO mice. Acetylcholine also increased the nitrate/nitrite concentration in TRPC3 WT mice, but not in KO mice. The present study directly demonstrated that the TRPC3 channel is involved in agonist-induced vasoconstriction and plays important role in NO-mediated vasorelaxation of intact mesenteric arteries. PMID:25310225

  17. Transient receptor potential channel ankyrin-1 is not a cold sensor for autonomic thermoregulation in rodents.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Cristiane; Garami, Andras; Lehto, Sonya G; Pakai, Eszter; Tekus, Valeria; Pohoczky, Krisztina; Youngblood, Beth D; Wang, Weiya; Kort, Michael E; Kym, Philip R; Pinter, Erika; Gavva, Narender R; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2014-03-26

    The rodent transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) channel has been hypothesized to serve as a temperature sensor for thermoregulation in the cold. We tested this hypothesis by using deletion of the Trpa1 gene in mice and pharmacological blockade of the TRPA1 channel in rats. In both Trpa1(-/-) and Trpa1(+/+) mice, severe cold exposure (8°C) resulted in decreases of skin and deep body temperatures to ∼8°C and 13°C, respectively, both temperatures being below the reported 17°C threshold temperature for TRPA1 activation. Under these conditions, Trpa1(-/-) mice had the same dynamics of body temperature as Trpa1(+/+) mice and showed no weakness in the tail skin vasoconstriction response or thermogenic response to cold. In rats, the effects of pharmacological blockade were studied by using two chemically unrelated TRPA1 antagonists: the highly potent and selective compound A967079, which had been characterized earlier, and the relatively new compound 43 ((4R)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-4-[3-(3-methoxypropoxy)phenyl]-2-thioxo-5H-indeno[1,2-d]pyrimidin-5-one), which we further characterized in the present study and found to be highly potent (IC50 against cold of ∼8 nm) and selective. Intragastric administration of either antagonist at 30 mg/kg before severe (3°C) cold exposure did not affect the thermoregulatory responses (deep body and tail skin temperatures) of rats, even though plasma concentrations of both antagonists well exceeded their IC50 value at the end of the experiment. In the same experimental setup, blocking the melastatin-8 (TRPM8) channel with AMG2850 (30 mg/kg) attenuated cold-defense mechanisms and led to hypothermia. We conclude that TRPA1 channels do not drive autonomic thermoregulatory responses to cold in rodents.

  18. Bisphenol A binds to the local anesthetic receptor site to block the human cardiac sodium channel.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Andrias O; Eberhardt, Esther; Weidner, Christian; Alzheimer, Christian; Wallace, B A; Lampert, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has attracted considerable public attention as it leaches from plastic used in food containers, is detectable in human fluids and recent epidemiologic studies link BPA exposure with diseases including cardiovascular disorders. As heart-toxicity may derive from modified cardiac electrophysiology, we investigated the interaction between BPA and hNav1.5, the predominant voltage-gated sodium channel subtype expressed in the human heart. Electrophysiology studies of heterologously-expressed hNav1.5 determined that BPA blocks the channel with a K(d) of 25.4±1.3 µM. By comparing the effects of BPA and the local anesthetic mexiletine on wild type hNav1.5 and the F1760A mutant, we demonstrate that both compounds share an overlapping binding site. With a key binding determinant thus identified, an homology model of hNav1.5 was generated based on the recently-reported crystal structure of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NavAb. Docking predictions position both ligands in a cavity delimited by F1760 and contiguous with the DIII-IV pore fenestration. Steered molecular dynamics simulations used to assess routes of ligand ingress indicate that the DIII-IV pore fenestration is a viable access pathway. Therefore BPA block of the human heart sodium channel involves the local anesthetic receptor and both BPA and mexiletine may enter the closed-state pore via membrane-located side fenestrations. PMID:22848561

  19. Effects of chlorpromazine and phencyclidine on mouse C2 acetylcholine receptor kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Changeux, J P; Pinset, C; Ribera, A B

    1986-01-01

    Patch-clamp techniques were used to record acetylcholine- (ACh) activated single-channel currents in cell-attached membrane patches from myotubes of the mouse cell line, C2. The effects of the phenothiazine derivative chlorpromazine (CPZ) and of the hallucinogen phencyclidine (PCP) on ACh-activated single-channel properties were studied under conditions where both compounds are positively charged (pH 7.2). The single-channel conductance was unaffected by either CPZ or PCP at concentrations ranging from 10 to 500 nM. 10-200 nM-CPZ and PCP led to shortened mean burst times. CPZ and PCP effects on mean burst times were voltage independent and did not vary in a simple linear manner with concentration. 10-200 nM-CPZ and PCP did not reduce channel opening frequencies, suggesting that the fraction of non-conducting state (occupied, blocked or desensitized) favoured at equilibrium was not significant at these concentrations. On the other hand, concentrations of CPZ and PCP higher than 300 nM did lead to depressed channel opening frequencies. In addition, we observed that, at these concentrations, the shortened burst duration reverses to the longer values found at lower effector concentrations. The effects of CPZ and PCP on ACh-activated single-channel kinetics are interpreted in terms of current models of ACh-receptor structure and conformational transitions. PMID:2432254

  20. Serotonin stimulates lateral habenula via activation of the post-synaptic serotonin 2/3 receptors and transient receptor potential channels.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wanhong; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Guiqin; Gregor, Danielle; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-02-01

    There is growing interest on the role of the lateral habenula (LHb) in depression, because it closely and bilaterally connects with the serotoninergic raphe nuclei. The LHb sends glutamate efferents to the raphe nuclei, while it receives serotoninergic afferents, and expresses a high density of serotonin (5-HT) receptors. Recent studies suggest that 5-HT receptors exist both in the presynaptic and postsynaptic sites of LHb neurons, and activation of these receptors may have different effects on the activity of LHb neurons. The current study focused on the effect of 5-HT on the postsynaptic membrane. We found that 5-HT initiated a depolarizing inward current (I((5-HTi))) and accelerated spontaneous firing in ∼80% of LHb neurons in rat brain slices. I((5-HTi)) was also induced by the 5-HT uptake blocker citalopram, indicating activity of endogenous 5-HT. I((5-HTi)) was diminished by 5-HT(2/3) receptor antagonists (ritanserin, SB-200646 or ondansetron), and activated by the selective 5-HT(2/3) agonists 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) piperazine hydrochloride or 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) biguanide hydrochloride. Furthermore, I((5-HTi)) was attenuated by 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate, a blocker of transient receptor potential channels, and an IP3 receptor inhibitor, indicating the involvement of transient receptor potential channels. These results demonstrate that the reciprocal connection between the LHb and the 5-HT system highlights a key role for 5-HT stimulation of LHb neurons that may be important in the pathogenesis of depression.

  1. An in vitro AChE inhibition assay combined with UF-HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF/MS approach for screening and characterizing of AChE inhibitors from roots of Coptis chinensis Franch.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hengqiang; Zhou, Siduo; Zhang, Minmin; Feng, Jinhong; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Daijie; Geng, Yanling; Wang, Xiao

    2016-02-20

    In this study, an in vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition assay based on microplate reader combined with ultrafiltration high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray quadrupole time of flight mass (UF-HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF/MS) was developed for the rapid screening and identification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEI) from roots of Coptis chinensis Franch. Incubation conditions such as enzyme concentration, incubation time, incubation temperature and co-solvent was optimized so as to get better screening results. Five alkaloids including columbamine, jatrorrhizine, coptisine, palmatine and berberine were found with AChE inhibition activity in the 80% ethanol extract of C. chinensis Franch. The screened compounds were identified by HPLC-DAD-ESI-Q-TOF/MS compared with the reference stands and literatures. The screened results were verified by in vitro AChE inhibition assays, palmatine showed the best AChE inhibitory activities with IC50 values of 36.6μM among the five compounds. Results of the present study indicated that the combinative method using in vitro AChE inhibition assay and UF-HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF/MS could be widely applied for rapid screening and identification of AChEI from complex TCM extract.

  2. Phylogenetic sequence analysis, recombinant expression, and tissue distribution of a channel catfish estrogen receptor beta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, Zhenfang; Gale, William L.; Chang, Xiaotian; Langenau, David; Patino, Reynaldo; Maule, Alec G.; Densmore, Llewellyn D.

    2000-01-01

    An estrogen receptor β (ERβ) cDNA fragment was amplified by RT-PCR of total RNAextracted from liver and ovary of immature channel catfish. This cDNA fragment was used to screen an ovarian cDNA library made from an immature female fish. A clone was obtained that contained an open reading frame encoding a 575-amino-acid protein with a deduced molecular weight of 63.9 kDa. Maximum parsimony and Neighbor Joining analyses were used to generate a phylogenetic classification of channel catfish ERβ on the basis of 25 full-length teleost and tetrapod ER sequences. The consensus tree obtained indicated the existence of two major vertebrate ER subtypes, α and β. Within each subtype, and in accordance with established phylogenetic relationships, teleost and tetrapod ER were monophyletic confirming the results of a previous analysis (Z. Xiaet al., 1999, Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. 113, 360–368). Extracts of COS-7 cells transfectedwith channel catfish ERβ cDNA bound estrogen with high affinity (Kd = 0.21 nM) and specificity. The affinity of channel catfish ERβ for estrogen was higher than previously reported for channel catfish ERα. As determined by qualitative RT-PCR, the tissue distributions of ERα and ERβ were similar but not identical. Both ER subtypes were present in ovary and testis. ERα was found in all other tissues examined from juvenile and mature fish of both sexes. ERβ was also found in most tissues except, in most cases, whole blood and head kidney. Interestingly, the pattern of expression of ER subtypes in head kidney always corresponded to the pattern in whole blood. In conclusion, we isolated a channel catfish ERβ with ligand-binding affinity and tissue expression patterns different from ERα. Also, we confirmed the validity of our previously proposed general classification scheme for vertebrate ER into α and β subtypes and within each subtype, into teleost and tetrapod clades.

  3. Analysis of G-protein-activated inward rectifying K(+) (GIRK) channel currents upon GABAB receptor activation in rat supraoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Harayama, Nobuya; Kayano, Tomohiko; Moriya, Taiki; Kitamura, Naoki; Shibuya, Izumi; Tanaka-Yamamoto, Keiko; Uezono, Yasuhito; Ueta, Yoichi; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2014-12-01

    While magnocellular neurons in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) possess rich Gi/o-mediated mechanisms, molecular and cellular properties of G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying K(+) (GIRK) channels have been controversial. Here, properties of GIRK channels are examined by RT-PCR and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in rat SON neurons. Patch clamp experiments showed that the selective GABAB agonist, baclofen, enhanced currents in a high K(+) condition. The baclofen-enhanced currents exhibited evident inward rectification and were blocked by the selective GABAB antagonist, CGP55845A, the IRK channel blocker, Ba(2+), and the selective GIRK channel blocker, tertiapin, indicating that baclofen activates GIRK channels via GABAB receptors. The GIRK currents were abolished by N-ethylmaleimide pretreatment, and prolonged by GTPγS inclusion in the patch pipette, suggesting that Gi/o proteins are involved. RT-PCR analysis revealed mRNAs for all four GIRK 1-4 channels and for both GABABR1 and GABABR2 receptors in rat SON. However, the concentration-dependency of the baclofen-induced activation of GIRK currents had an EC50 of 110 µM, which is about 100 times higher than that of baclofen-induced inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. Moreover, baclofen caused no significant changes in the membrane potential and the firing rate. These results suggest that although GIRK channels can be activated by GABAB receptors via the Gi/o pathway, this occurs at high agonist concentrations, and thus may not be a physiological mechanism regulating the function of SON neurons. This property that the membrane potential receives little influence from GIRK currents seems to be uncommon for CNS neurons possessing rich Gi/o-coupled receptors, and could be a special feature of rat SON neurons.

  4. Neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels encoded by mRNA from the adult corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Matute, C; Miledi, R

    1993-04-15

    The presence of mRNAs encoding neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-gated channels in the adult human and bovine corpus callosum was investigated using Xenopus oocytes. Oocytes injected with mRNA extracted from the corpus callosum expressed functional receptors to glutamate, acetylcholine, and serotonin, and also voltage-operated Ca2+ channels, all with similar properties in the two species studied. Acetylcholine and serotonin elicited oscillatory Cl- currents due to activation of the inositol phosphate-Ca2+ receptor-channel coupling system. Glutamate and its analogs N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), kainate, quisqualate, and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) induced smooth currents. The non-NMDA responses showed a strong inward rectification at positive potentials and were potently blocked by 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, as observed for the AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors GLUR1 and GLUR3. Furthermore, in situ hybridization experiments showed that GLUR1 and GLUR3 mRNAs are present in corpus callosum cells that were labeled with antiserum to glial fibrillary acid protein and that, in primary cell cultures, had the morphology of type 2 astrocytes. These results indicate that glial cells in the adult corpus callosum possess mRNA encoding functional neurotransmitter receptors and Ca2+ channels. These molecules may provide a mechanism for glial-neuronal interactions. PMID:7682696

  5. GLUCOSE-INDUCED INTESTINAL VASODILATION VIA ADENOSINE A1 RECEPTORS REQUIRES NITRIC OXIDE BUT NOT K+ATP CHANNELS

    PubMed Central

    Matheson, Paul J.; Li, Na; Harris, Patrick D.; Zakaria, El Rasheid; Garrison, R. Neal

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Both nitric oxide (NO) and adenosine A1 receptor activation mediate microvascular vasodilation during intestinal glucose absorption. Our overall hypothesis is that ATP utilization during glucose absorption would increase adenosine metabolite release, which acts on adenosine A1 receptors to alter endothelial production of NO and/or activate ATP-dependent potassium channels (K+ATP) to dilate intestinal microvessels. METHODS Intravital videomicroscopy of the rat jejunum was used to record the vascular responses of inflow (termed 1A) arterioles and proximal (p3A) and distal (d3A) premucosal arterioles during exposure to isotonic glucose or mannitol solutions alone or in the presence of the selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (L-NMMA), an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX)), or a K+ATP channel inhibitor (glibenclamide). RESULTS As expected, glucose exposure caused rapid dilation of both p3A and d3A arterioles, while mannitol exposure had no effect on microvascular diameters. Adenosine A1 receptor blockade completely prevented glucose-induced dilation of the premucosal arterioles. NOS inhibition significantly blunted the glucose-induced vasodilation of the premucosal arterioles, but had little effect in the mannitol group. Simultaneous application of both the NOS inhibitor and the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist gave the same reduction in glucose-induced dilation of the premucosal arterioles as the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist alone. Blockade of K+ATP channels with glibenclamide did not attenuate glucose-induced vasodilation of the premucosal arterioles. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that glucose-induced vasodilation of premucosal jejunal arterioles is mediated through adenosine A1 receptors, and NO at least partially mediates the adenosine A1 receptor-induced vasodilation. In addition, K+ATP channels are not involved in premucosal arteriolar vasodilation during intestinal glucose exposure. PMID

  6. Transmembrane Communication: General Principles and Lessons from the Structure and Function of the M2 Proton Channel, K+ Channels, and Integrin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryan, Gevorg; Moore, David T.; DeGrado, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Signal transduction across biological membranes is central to life. This process generally happens through communication between different domains and hierarchical coupling of information. Here, we review structural and thermodynamic principles behind transmembrane (TM) signal transduction and discuss common themes. Communication between signaling domains can be understood in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic principles, and complex signaling patterns can arise from simple wiring of thermodynamically coupled domains. We relate this to functions of several signal transduction systems: the M2 proton channel from influenza A virus, potassium channels, integrin receptors, and bacterial kinases. We also discuss key features in the structural rearrangements responsible for signal transduction in these systems. PMID:21548783

  7. Transmembrane communication: general principles and lessons from the structure and function of the M2 proton channel, K⁺ channels, and integrin receptors.

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, Gevorg; Moore, David T; DeGrado, William F

    2011-01-01

    Signal transduction across biological membranes is central to life. This process generally happens through communication between different domains and hierarchical coupling of information. Here, we review structural and thermodynamic principles behind transmembrane (TM) signal transduction and discuss common themes. Communication between signaling domains can be understood in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic principles, and complex signaling patterns can arise from simple wiring of thermodynamically coupled domains. We relate this to functions of several signal transduction systems: the M2 proton channel from influenza A virus, potassium channels, integrin receptors, and bacterial kinases. We also discuss key features in the structural rearrangements responsible for signal transduction in these systems.

  8. A novel positive allosteric modulator of the alpha7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: in vitro and in vivo characterization.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Raymond S; Hajós, Mihaly; Raggenbass, Mario; Wall, Theron M; Higdon, Nicole R; Lawson, Judy A; Rutherford-Root, Karen L; Berkenpas, Mitchell B; Hoffmann, W E; Piotrowski, David W; Groppi, Vincent E; Allaman, Geraldine; Ogier, Roch; Bertrand, Sonia; Bertrand, Daniel; Arneric, Stephen P

    2005-04-27

    Several lines of evidence suggest a link between the alpha7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and brain disorders including schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and traumatic brain injury. The present work describes a novel molecule, 1-(5-chloro-2,4-dimethoxy-phenyl)-3-(5-methyl-isoxazol-3-yl)-urea (PNU-120596), which acts as a powerful positive allosteric modulator of the alpha7 nAChR. Discovered in a high-throughput screen, PNU-120596 increased agonist-evoked calcium flux mediated by an engineered variant of the human alpha7 nAChR. Electrophysiology studies confirmed that PNU-120596 increased peak agonist-evoked currents mediated by wild-type receptors and also demonstrated a pronounced prolongation of the evoked response in the continued presence of agonist. In contrast, PNU-120596 produced no detectable change in currents mediated by alpha4beta2, alpha3beta4, and alpha9alpha10 nAChRs. PNU-120596 increased the channel mean open time of alpha7 nAChRs but had no effect on ion selectivity and relatively little, if any, effect on unitary conductance. When applied to acute hippocampal slices, PNU-120596 increased the frequency of ACh-evoked GABAergic postsynaptic currents measured in pyramidal neurons; this effect was suppressed by TTX, suggesting that PNU-120596 modulated the function of alpha7 nAChRs located on the somatodendritic membrane of hippocampal interneurons. Accordingly, PNU-120596 greatly enhanced the ACh-evoked inward currents in these interneurons. Systemic administration of PNU-120596 to rats improved the auditory gating deficit caused by amphetamine, a model proposed to reflect a circuit level disturbance associated with schizophrenia. Together, these results suggest that PNU-120596 represents a new class of molecule that enhances alpha7 nAChR function and thus has the potential to treat psychiatric and neurological disorders. PMID:15858066

  9. Activity-dependent bidirectional regulation of GABAA receptor channels by the 5-HT4 receptor-mediated signalling in rat prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiang; Flores-Hernandez, Jorge; Feng, Jian; Yan, Zhen

    2002-01-01

    Emerging evidence has implicated a potential role for 5-HT4 receptors in cognition and anxiolysis. One of the main target structures of 5-HT4 receptors on ‘cognitive and emotional’ pathways is the prefrontal cortex (PFC). As GABAergic signalling plays a key role in regulating PFC functions, we examined the effect of 5-HT4 receptors on GABAA receptor channels in PFC pyramidal neurons. Application of 5-HT4 receptor agonists produced either an enhancement or a reduction of GABA-evoked currents in PFC neurons, which are both mediated by anchored protein kinase A (PKA). Although PKA phosphorylation of GABAA receptor β3 or β1 subunits leads to current enhancement or reduction respectively in heterologous expression systems, we found that β3 and β1 subunits are co-expressed in PFC pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, altering PKA activation levels can change the direction of the dual effect, switching enhancement to reduction and vice versa. In addition, increased neuronal activity in PFC slices elevated the PKA activation level, changing the enhancing effect of 5-HT4 receptors on the amplitude of GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) to a reduction. These results suggest that 5-HT4 receptors can modulate GABAergic signalling bidirectionally, depending on the basal PKA activation levels that are determined by neuronal activity. This modulation provides a unique and flexible mechanism for 5-HT4 receptors to dynamically regulate synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability in the PFC network. PMID:11986365

  10. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands; a patent review (2006-2011)

    PubMed Central

    Gündisch, Daniela; Eibl, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), pentameric ligand-gated cation channels, are potential targets for the development of therapeutics for a variety of disease states. Areas covered This article is reviewing recent advances in the development of small molecule ligands for diverse nAChR subtypes and is a continuation of an earlier review in this journal. Expert opinion The development of nAChR ligands with preference for α4β2 or α7 subtypes for the treatment of CNS disorders are in the most advanced developmental stage. In addition, there is a fast growing interest to generate so-called PAMs, positive allosteric modulators, to influence the channels’ functionalities. PMID:22098319

  11. Age-related functional changes of the glutamate receptor channels in rat Meynert neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Akaike, N; Rhee, J S

    1997-01-01

    1. The developmental changes of glutamate receptors (GluRs) in acutely dissociated rat Meynert neurones were investigated using the conventional whole cell and nystatin perforated patch recording modes under voltage-clamp conditions. 2. The neurones became less responsive to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) with age, most dramatically between 1 day and 2 weeks, while the responses to kainic acid (KA) and L-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) gradually increased. The metabotropic GluR response appeared a few days after birth, but thereafter no further change was observed. 3. The decrease in the NMDA response during postnatal development was due to an abrupt reduction in the number of receptors without affecting the affinity, voltage-dependent Mg2+ blockade or high Ca2+ permeability (PCa/PCs approximately 7.0). 4. PCa/PCs in the presence of KA decreased from 2.8 in the 1-day-old (1D) rat neurones to 1.1 and 0.44 in the 2-week-old (2W) and 6-month-old (6M) rat neurones, respectively. The concentration-response relationship for KA shifted to the left with age. The KA response was not affected by NS-102, a KA-selective antagonist, thus indicating that the increased affinity of the receptor for the ligand resulted from the change in the AMPA receptor channel subunits. 5. The AMPA response in the presence of 10(-4) M cyclothiazide showed a change in the inward rectifying current-voltage relationship with age. The KA response was strongly cross-desensitized by the addition of AMPA and was also blocked by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), whereas a rapid desensitization of the AMPA response was removed in a concentration-dependent manner by cyclothiazide. These results indicate that the non-NMDA receptor channels are assembled from the subunits of the AMPA receptor family without the GluR-2 subunit, thus resulting in a high Ca2+ permeability. 6. The L-glutamate (Glu)-induced responses were more sensitive to DL-2-amino-5

  12. Positive allosteric modulators as an approach to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-targeted therapeutics: advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dustin K; Wang, Jingyi; Papke, Roger L

    2011-10-15

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), recognized targets for drug development in cognitive and neuro-degenerative disorders, are allosteric proteins with dynamic interconversions between multiple functional states. Activation of the nAChR ion channel is primarily controlled by the binding of ligands (agonists, partial agonists, competitive antagonists) at conventional agonist binding sites, but is also regulated in either negative or positive ways by the binding of ligands to other modulatory sites. In this review, we discuss models for the activation and desensitization of nAChR, and the discovery of multiple types of ligands that influence those processes in both heteromeric nAChR, such as the high-affinity nicotine receptors of the brain, and homomeric α7-type receptors. In recent years, α7 nAChRs have been identified as a potential target for therapeutic indications leading to the development of α7-selective agonists and partial agonists. However, unique properties of α7 nAChR, including low probability of channel opening and rapid desensitization, may limit the therapeutic usefulness of ligands binding exclusively to conventional agonist binding sites. New enthusiasm for the therapeutic targeting of α7 has come from the identification of α7-selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that work effectively on the intrinsic factors that limit α7 ion channel activation. While these new drugs appear promising for therapeutic development, we also consider potential caveats and possible limitations for their use, including PAM-insensitive forms of desensitization and cytotoxicity issues.

  13. Evidence for the exclusive expression of functional homomeric α7 nAChRs in hypothalamic histaminergic tuberomammillary neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Tischkau, Shelley; Mhaskar, Yashanad; Uteshev, Victor V

    2014-03-20

    Hypothalamic histaminergic tuberomammillary (TM) neurons in rats express high densities of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) whose Ca(2+) permeability, kinetic and pharmacological properties are similar to those of heterologous homomeric α7 nAChRs. However, native α7 nAChR subunits can co-assemble with β or α5 nAChR subunits to form functional heteromeric α7-containing α7β or α7α5 nAChRs with kinetics and pharmacology similar to those of α7 homomers. Therefore, although TM nAChRs have been used as an ex vivo model of functional α7 homomers, the molecular makeup of TM nAChRs has not been determined and the expression of functional α7-containing heteromers in TM neurons has not been excluded. To determine the profile of TM nAChR subunit transcripts, we have conducted single-cell qRT-PCR experiments using acutely dissociated TM neurons in rats. TM neurons were found to express transcripts of only principal α3, α6 and α7 nAChR subunits. Transcripts of other known mammalian neuronal subunits (α2, α4-5, α9-10, β2-4) were not detected. In the absence of β and α5 subunits, the expression of functional α7-containing heteromers in TM neurons is highly unlikely because principal α3, α6 and α7 nAChR subunits alone are not known to form functional heteromeric nAChRs. These results support the exclusive expression of native functional α7 homomers in rat TM neurons and introduce these neurons as a unique reliable source of native functional homomeric α7 nAChRs suitable for ex vivo and in vitro pharmacological assays in developing selective α7 nAChR agents.

  14. Discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2016-06-15

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics is a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important molecular targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large potential target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these target proteins. Given this opportunity, substantial effort has been applied to address the technical challenges of targeting these complex membrane proteins with monoclonal antibodies. In this review recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies for these challenging membrane protein targets is addressed. PMID:27284048

  15. Changes in Membrane Receptors and Ion Channels as Potential Biomarkers for Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a degenerative joint condition, is currently difficult to detect early enough for any of the current treatment options to be completely successful. Early diagnosis of this disease could increase the numbers of patients who are able to slow its progression. There are now several diseases where membrane protein biomarkers are used for early diagnosis. The numbers of proteins in the membrane is vast and so it is a rich source of potential biomarkers for OA but we need more knowledge of these before they can be considered practical biomarkers. How are they best measured and are they selective to OA or even certain types of OA? The first step in this process is to identify membrane proteins that change in OA. Here, we summarize several ion channels and receptors that change in OA models and/or OA patients, and may thus be considered candidates as novel membrane biomarkers of OA. PMID:26648874

  16. Marine snail venoms: use and trends in receptor and channel neuropharmacology.

    PubMed

    Favreau, Philippe; Stöcklin, Reto

    2009-10-01

    Venoms are rich mixtures of mainly peptides and proteins evolved by nature to catch and digest preys or for protection against predators. They represent extensive sources of potent and selective bioactive compounds that can lead to original active ingredients, for use as drugs, as pharmacological tools in research and for the biotechnology industry. Among the most fascinating venomous animals, marine snails offer a unique set of pharmacologically active components, targeting a wide diversity of receptors and ion channels. Recent advances still continue to demonstrate their huge neuropharmacological potential. In the quest for interesting pharmacological profiles, researchers face a vast number of venom components to investigate within time and technological constraints. A brief perspective on marine snail venom's complexity and features is given followed by the different discovery strategies and pharmacological approaches, exemplified with some recent developments. These advances will hopefully help further uncovering new pharmacologically important venom molecules.

  17. Structural determinants of the transient receptor potential 1 (TRPV1) channel activation by phospholipid analogs.

    PubMed

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Serrano-Flores, Barbara; Llorente, Itzel; Hernández-García, Enrique; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Banerjee, Souvik; Miller, Duane; Gududuru, Veeresh; Fells, James; Norman, Derek; Tigyi, Gabor; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-08-29

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal protein that responds to various stimuli, including capsaicin (the pungent compound found in chili peppers), extracellular acid, and basic intracellular pH, temperatures close to 42 °C, and several lipids. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an endogenous lipid widely associated with neuropathic pain, is an agonist of the TRPV1 channel found in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by other noxious stimuli. Agonists or antagonists of lipid and other chemical natures are known to possess specific structural requirements for producing functional effects on their targets. To better understand how LPA and other lipid analogs might interact and affect the function of TRPV1, we set out to determine the structural features of these lipids that result in the activation of TRPV1. By changing the acyl chain length, saturation, and headgroup of these LPA analogs, we established strict requirements for activation of TRPV1. Among the natural LPA analogs, we found that only LPA 18:1, alkylglycerophosphate 18:1, and cyclic phosphatidic acid 18:1, all with a monounsaturated C18 hydrocarbon chain activate TRPV1, whereas polyunsaturated and saturated analogs do not. Thus, TRPV1 shows a more restricted ligand specificity compared with LPA G-protein-coupled receptors. We synthesized fatty alcohol phosphates and thiophosphates and found that many of them with a single double bond in position Δ9, 10, or 11 and Δ9 cyclopropyl group can activate TRPV1 with efficacy similar to capsaicin. Finally, we developed a pharmacophore and proposed a mechanistic model for how these lipids could induce a conformational change that activates TRPV1. PMID:25035428

  18. Structural Determinants of the Transient Receptor Potential 1 (TRPV1) Channel Activation by Phospholipid Analogs*

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L.; Serrano-Flores, Barbara; Llorente, Itzel; Hernández-García, Enrique; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Banerjee, Souvik; Miller, Duane; Gududuru, Veeresh; Fells, James; Norman, Derek; Tigyi, Gabor; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal protein that responds to various stimuli, including capsaicin (the pungent compound found in chili peppers), extracellular acid, and basic intracellular pH, temperatures close to 42 °C, and several lipids. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an endogenous lipid widely associated with neuropathic pain, is an agonist of the TRPV1 channel found in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by other noxious stimuli. Agonists or antagonists of lipid and other chemical natures are known to possess specific structural requirements for producing functional effects on their targets. To better understand how LPA and other lipid analogs might interact and affect the function of TRPV1, we set out to determine the structural features of these lipids that result in the activation of TRPV1. By changing the acyl chain length, saturation, and headgroup of these LPA analogs, we established strict requirements for activation of TRPV1. Among the natural LPA analogs, we found that only LPA 18:1, alkylglycerophosphate 18:1, and cyclic phosphatidic acid 18:1, all with a monounsaturated C18 hydrocarbon chain activate TRPV1, whereas polyunsaturated and saturated analogs do not. Thus, TRPV1 shows a more restricted ligand specificity compared with LPA G-protein-coupled receptors. We synthesized fatty alcohol phosphates and thiophosphates and found that many of them with a single double bond in position Δ9, 10, or 11 and Δ9 cyclopropyl group can activate TRPV1 with efficacy similar to capsaicin. Finally, we developed a pharmacophore and proposed a mechanistic model for how these lipids could induce a conformational change that activates TRPV1. PMID:25035428

  19. Structural determinants of the transient receptor potential 1 (TRPV1) channel activation by phospholipid analogs.

    PubMed

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Serrano-Flores, Barbara; Llorente, Itzel; Hernández-García, Enrique; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Banerjee, Souvik; Miller, Duane; Gududuru, Veeresh; Fells, James; Norman, Derek; Tigyi, Gabor; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-08-29

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal protein that responds to various stimuli, including capsaicin (the pungent compound found in chili peppers), extracellular acid, and basic intracellular pH, temperatures close to 42 °C, and several lipids. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an endogenous lipid widely associated with neuropathic pain, is an agonist of the TRPV1 channel found in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by other noxious stimuli. Agonists or antagonists of lipid and other chemical natures are known to possess specific structural requirements for producing functional effects on their targets. To better understand how LPA and other lipid analogs might interact and affect the function of TRPV1, we set out to determine the structural features of these lipids that result in the activation of TRPV1. By changing the acyl chain length, saturation, and headgroup of these LPA analogs, we established strict requirements for activation of TRPV1. Among the natural LPA analogs, we found that only LPA 18:1, alkylglycerophosphate 18:1, and cyclic phosphatidic acid 18:1, all with a monounsaturated C18 hydrocarbon chain activate TRPV1, whereas polyunsaturated and saturated analogs do not. Thus, TRPV1 shows a more restricted ligand specificity compared with LPA G-protein-coupled receptors. We synthesized fatty alcohol phosphates and thiophosphates and found that many of them with a single double bond in position Δ9, 10, or 11 and Δ9 cyclopropyl group can activate TRPV1 with efficacy similar to capsaicin. Finally, we developed a pharmacophore and proposed a mechanistic model for how these lipids could induce a conformational change that activates TRPV1.

  20. Calcium regulation by temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential channels in human uveal melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mergler, Stefan; Derckx, Raissa; Reinach, Peter S; Garreis, Fabian; Böhm, Arina; Schmelzer, Lisa; Skosyrski, Sergej; Ramesh, Niraja; Abdelmessih, Suzette; Polat, Onur Kerem; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Riechardt, Aline Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is both the most common and fatal intraocular cancer among adults worldwide. As with all types of neoplasia, changes in Ca(2+) channel regulation can contribute to the onset and progression of this pathological condition. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPs) and cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) are two different types of Ca(2+) permeation pathways that can be dysregulated during neoplasia. We determined in malignant human UM and healthy uvea and four different UM cell lines whether there is gene and functional expression of TRP subtypes and CB1 since they could serve as drug targets to either prevent or inhibit initiation and progression of UM. RT-PCR, Ca(2+) transients, immunohistochemistry and planar patch-clamp analysis probed for their gene expression and functional activity, respectively. In UM cells, TRPV1 and TRPM8 gene expression was identified. Capsaicin (CAP), menthol or icilin induced Ca(2+) transients as well as changes in ion current behavior characteristic of TRPV1 and TRPM8 expression. Such effects were blocked with either La(3+), capsazepine (CPZ) or BCTC. TRPA1 and CB1 are highly expressed in human uvea, but TRPA1 is not expressed in all UM cell lines. In UM cells, the CB1 agonist, WIN 55,212-2, induced Ca(2+) transients, which were suppressed by La(3+) and CPZ whereas CAP-induced Ca(2+) transients could also be suppressed by CB1 activation. Identification of functional TRPV1, TRPM8, TRPA1 and CB1 expression in these tissues may provide novel drug targets for treatment of this aggressive neoplastic disease.

  1. Theoretical investigation of interaction between the set of ligands and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Prytkova, T. R.; Shmygin, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are neuron receptor proteins that provide a transmission of nerve impulse through the synapses. They are composed of a pentametric assembly of five homologous subunits (5 α7 subunits for α7nAChR, for example), oriented around the central pore. These receptors might be found in the chemical synapses of central and peripheral nervous system, and also in the neuromuscular synapses. Transmembrane domain of the one of such receptors constitutes ion channel. The conductive properties of ion channel strongly depend on the receptor conformation changes in the response of binding with some molecule, f.e. acetylcholine. Investigation of interaction between ligands and acetylcholine receptor is important for drug design. In this work we investigate theoretically the interaction between the set of different ligands (such as vanillin, thymoquinone, etc.) and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (primarily with subunit of the α7nAChR) by different methods and packages (AutodockVina, GROMACS, KVAZAR, HARLEM, VMD). We calculate interaction energy between different ligands in the subunit using molecular dynamics. On the base of obtained calculation results and using molecular docking we found an optimal location of different ligands in the subunit.

  2. Control of sensory neuron excitability by serotonin involves 5HT2C receptors and Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Isabella; Gantumur, Enkhbileg; Yousuf, Arsalan; Boehm, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Serotonin (5HT) is a constituent of the so-called "inflammatory soup" that sensitizes nociceptors during inflammation. Nevertheless, receptors and signaling mechanisms that mediate an excitation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by 5HT remained controversial. Therefore, capsaicin-sensitive nociceptive neurons dissociated from rat DRGs were used to investigate effects of 5HT on membrane excitability and currents through ligand- as well as voltage-gated ion channels. In 58% of the neurons tested, 5HT increased action potential firing, an effect that was abolished by the 5HT2 receptor antagonist ritanserin, but not by the 5HT3 antagonist tropisetron. Unlike other algogenic mediators, such as PGE2 and bradykinin, 5HT did not affect currents through TTX-resistant Na(+) channels or Kv7 K(+) channels. In all neurons investigated, 5HT potentiated capsaicin-evoked currents through TRPV1 channels, an effect that was attenuated by antagonists at 5HT2A (4 F 4 PP), 5HT2B (SB 204741), as well as 5HT2C (RS 102221) receptors. 5HT triggered slowly arising inward Cl(-) currents in 53% of the neurons. This effect was antagonized by the 5HT2C receptor blocker only, and the current was prevented by an inhibitor of Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels (CaCC). The 5HT-induced increase in action potential firing was also abolished by this CaCC blocker and by the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine. Amongst the subtype selective 5HT2 antagonists, only RS 102221 (5HT2C-selectively) counteracted the rise in action potential firing elicited by 5HT. These results show that 5HT excites DRG neurons mainly via 5HT2C receptors which concomitantly mediate a sensitization of TRPV1 channels and an opening of CaCCs.

  3. Intracellular calcium level is an important factor influencing ion channel modulations by PLC-coupled metabotropic receptors in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Yuto; Echigo, Ryousuke; Kashima, Kousuke; Minami, Hanae; Watanabe, Megumi; Nishikawa, Yuiko; Muranishi, Miho; Yoneda, Mitsugu; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako

    2013-05-28

    Signaling pathways involving phospholipase C (PLC) are involved in various neural functions. Understanding how these pathways are regulated will lead to a better understanding of their roles in neural functions. Previous studies demonstrated that receptor-driven PLCβ activation depends on intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), suggesting the possibility that PLCβ-dependent cellular responses are basically Ca(2+) dependent. To test this possibility, we examined whether modulations of ion channels driven by PLC-coupled metabotropic receptors are sensitive to [Ca(2+)]i using cultured hippocampal neurons. Muscarinic activation triggered an inward current at -100 mV (the equilibrium potential for K(+)) in a subpopulation of neurons. This current response was suppressed by pirenzepine (an M1-preferring antagonist), PLC inhibitor, non-selective cation channel blocker, and lowering [Ca(2+)]i. Using the neurons showing no response at -100 mV, effects of muscarinic activation on K(+) channels were examined at -40 mV. Muscarinic activation induced a transient decrease of the holding outward current. This current response was mimicked and occluded by XE991, an M-current K(+) channel blocker, suppressed by pirenzepine, PLC inhibitor and lowering [Ca(2+)]i, and enhanced by elevating [Ca(2+)]i. Similar results were obtained when group I metabotropic glutamate receptors were activated instead of muscarinic receptors. These results clearly show that ion channel modulations driven by PLC-coupled metabotropic receptors are dependent on [Ca(2+)]i, supporting the hypothesis that cellular responses induced by receptor-driven PLCβ activation are basically Ca(2+) dependent.

  4. Functional Impact of 14 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Causing Missense Mutations of Human α7 Nicotinic Receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinhui; Du, Yingjie; Zhang, Jianliang; Xu, Xiaojun; Xue, Fenqin; Guo, Cong; Huang, Yao; Lukas, Ronald J; Chang, Yongchang

    2015-01-01

    The α7nicotinic receptor (nAChR) is a major subtype of the nAChRs in the central nervous system, and the receptor plays an important role in brain function. In the dbSNP database, there are 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that cause missense mutations of the human α7nAChR in the coding region. In this study, we tested the impact of 14 SNPs that cause missense mutations in the agonist binding site or the coupling region between binding site and channel gate on the receptor function. The wild type or mutant receptors were expressed or co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the agonist-induced currents were tested using two-electrode voltage clamp. Our results demonstrated that 6 mutants were nonfunctional, 4 mutants had reduced current expression, and 1 mutants altered ACh and nicotine efficacy in the opposite direction, and one additional mutant had slightly reduced agonist sensitivity. Interestingly, the function of most of these nonfunctional mutants could be rescued by α7nAChR positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 and agonist-PAM 4BP-TQS. Finally, when coexpressed with the wild type, the nonfunctional mutants could also influence the receptor function. These changes of the receptor properties by the mutations could potentially have an impact on the physiological function of the α7nAChR-mediated cholinergic synaptic transmission and anti-inflammatory effects in the human SNP carriers. Rescuing the nonfunctional mutants could provide a novel way to treat the related disorders. PMID:26340537

  5. Functional Impact of 14 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Causing Missense Mutations of Human α7 Nicotinic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinhui; Du, Yingjie; Zhang, Jianliang; Xu, Xiaojun; Xue, Fenqin; Guo, Cong; Huang, Yao; Lukas, Ronald J.; Chang, Yongchang

    2015-01-01

    The α7nicotinic receptor (nAChR) is a major subtype of the nAChRs in the central nervous system, and the receptor plays an important role in brain function. In the dbSNP database, there are 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that cause missense mutations of the human α7nAChR in the coding region. In this study, we tested the impact of 14 SNPs that cause missense mutations in the agonist binding site or the coupling region between binding site and channel gate on the receptor function. The wild type or mutant receptors were expressed or co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the agonist-induced currents were tested using two-electrode voltage clamp. Our results demonstrated that 6 mutants were nonfunctional, 4 mutants had reduced current expression, and 1 mutants altered ACh and nicotine efficacy in the opposite direction, and one additional mutant had slightly reduced agonist sensitivity. Interestingly, the function of most of these nonfunctional mutants could be rescued by α7nAChR positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 and agonist-PAM 4BP-TQS. Finally, when coexpressed with the wild type, the nonfunctional mutants could also influence the receptor function. These changes of the receptor properties by the mutations could potentially have an impact on the physiological function of the α7nAChR-mediated cholinergic synaptic transmission and anti-inflammatory effects in the human SNP carriers. Rescuing the nonfunctional mutants could provide a novel way to treat the related disorders. PMID:26340537

  6. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: Binding of nitroxide analogs of a local anesthetic and a photoactivatable analog of phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    Electron spin resonance was used to contrast the accessibility of tertiary and quaternary amine local anesthetics to their high affinity binding site in the desensitized Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor (AchR). Preincubation of AchR-rich membranes with agonist resulted in a substantial reduction in the initial association of the quaternary amine local anesthetic C6SLMEI with the receptor. The time-dependent reduction in association follows a biphasic exponential function having rate constants of 0.19 min{sup {minus}1} and 0.03 min{sup {minus}1}. In contrast, agonist preincubation did not produce a comparable decrease in the association of C6SL, a tertiary amine analog, with the AchR. The results are modeled in two ways: (1) A charge gate near the channel mouth in the desensitized receptor limits access of the permanently charged cationic local anesthetic (C6SLMEI), but not for the uncharged form of the tertiary amine anesthetic C6SL. (2) A hydrophobic pathway, possibly through a corridor in the annular lipid surrounding receptor subunits, allows the uncharged form of C6SL to reach the high affinity binding site in the AchR. A photoactivatable analog of phosphatidylserine {sup 125}I 4-azido salicylic acid-phosphatidylserine ({sup 125}I ASA-PS) was use to label both Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor-rich membranes and reconstituted AchR membranes. All four subunits of the AchR were found to incorporate label, with the {alpha} subunit incorporating approximately twice as much as each of the other subunits on a per mole basis. The regions of the AchR {alpha} subunit that incorporate {sup 125}I ASA-PS were mapped by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion. Eighty-one per cent of the incorporated label was localized to 11.7 and 10.1 kdal V8 cleavage fragments.

  7. Purification and subunit structure of the [3H]phenamil receptor associated with the renal apical Na+ channel.

    PubMed Central

    Barbry, P; Chassande, O; Vigne, P; Frelin, C; Ellory, C; Cragoe, E J; Lazdunski, M

    1987-01-01

    Sodium crosses the apical membrane of tight epithelia through a sodium channel, which is inhibited by the diuretic amiloride and by analogs such as phenamil. Target size analysis indicated that the functional size of the [3H]phenamil binding sites associated with the epithelial Na+ channel from pig kidney is 92 +/- 10 kDa. The [3H]phenamil receptor was solubilized by using 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate. The solubilized material displayed the same properties of interaction with amiloride and its derivatives as the membrane-bound receptor. A two-step purification of the epithelial Na+ channel was achieved by using QAE Sephadex chromatography and affinity chromatography on a Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin column. It results in an 1100-fold purification of the Na+ channel as compared to pig kidney microsomes with a yield of 15% +/- 5%. The maximal specific activity was 3.7 nmol/mg of protein. NaDodSO4/poly-acrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified Na+ channel under nonreducing conditions showed the presence of a single major polypeptide chain of apparent molecular mass 185 kDa. Under disulfide-reducing conditions, the purified epithelial Na+ channel migrated as a single band of apparent molecular mass 105 kDa. It is suggested that the epithelial Na+ channel from pig kidney has a total molecular mass of 185 kDa and consists of two nearly identical 90- to 105-kDa polypeptide chains crosslinked by disulfide bridges. Images PMID:2440032

  8. Transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV-1) channels contribute to cutaneous thermal hyperaemia in humans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Brett J; Fieger, Sarah M

    2010-11-01

    The initial, rapid increase in skin blood flow in response to direct application of heat is thought to be mediated by an axon reflex, which is dependent on intact cutaneous sensory nerves. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV-1) channels, which are putative channels located on sensory nerves, would attenuate the skin blood flow response to local heating in humans. Ten subjects were equipped with four microdialysis fibres which were randomly assigned one of four treatments: (1) vehicle control (90% propylene glycol + 10% lactated Ringer solution); (2) 20 mm capsazepine to inhibit TRPV-1 channels; (3) 10 mm l-NAME to inhibit NO synthase; and (4) combined 20 mm capsazepine + 10 mm l-NAME. Following baseline measurements, the temperature of skin heaters was increased from 33°C to 42°C at a rate of 1.0°C every 10 s and local temperature was held at 42°C for 20-30 min until a stable plateau in skin blood flow was achieved. An index of skin blood flow was measured directly over each microdialysis site via laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Beat-by-beat blood pressure was measured via photoplethysmography and verified via automated brachial auscultation. At the end of the local heating protocol, temperature of the heaters was increased to 43°C and 28 mm nitroprusside was infused to achieve maximal vasodilatation. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as LDF/mean arterial pressure and normalized to maximal values (%CVCmax). Initial peak in capsazepine (44 ± 4%CVCmax), l-NAME (56 ± 4%CVCmax) and capsazepine + l-NAME (32 ± 6%CVCmax) sites was significantly attenuated compared to control (87 ± 5%CVCmax; P < 0.001 for all conditions). The plateau phase of thermal hyperaemia was significantly attenuated in capsazepine (73 ± 6%CVCmax), l-NAME (47 ± 5%CVCmax) and capsazepine + l-NAME (31 ± 7%CVCmax) sites compared to control (92 ± 5%CVCmax; P < 0.001 for all conditions). These data suggest TRPV-1

  9. Phosphocholine – an agonist of metabotropic but not of ionotropic functions of α9-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Richter, K.; Mathes, V.; Fronius, M.; Althaus, M.; Hecker, A.; Krasteva-Christ, G.; Padberg, W.; Hone, A. J.; McIntosh, J. M.; Zakrzewicz, A.; Grau, V.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that phosphocholine and phosphocholine-modified macromolecules efficiently inhibit ATP-dependent release of interleukin-1β from human and murine monocytes by a mechanism involving nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Interleukin-1β is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine of innate immunity that plays pivotal roles in host defence. Control of interleukin-1β release is vital as excessively high systemic levels cause life threatening inflammatory diseases. In spite of its structural similarity to acetylcholine, there are no other reports on interactions of phosphocholine with nAChR. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphocholine inhibits ion-channel function of ATP receptor P2X7 in monocytic cells via nAChR containing α9 and α10 subunits. In stark contrast to choline, phosphocholine does not evoke ion current responses in Xenopus laevis oocytes, which heterologously express functional homomeric nAChR composed of α9 subunits or heteromeric receptors containing α9 and α10 subunits. Preincubation of these oocytes with phosphocholine, however, attenuated choline-induced ion current changes, suggesting that phosphocholine may act as a silent agonist. We conclude that phophocholine activates immuno-modulatory nAChR expressed by monocytes but does not stimulate canonical ionotropic receptor functions. PMID:27349288

  10. Phosphocholine - an agonist of metabotropic but not of ionotropic functions of α9-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Richter, K; Mathes, V; Fronius, M; Althaus, M; Hecker, A; Krasteva-Christ, G; Padberg, W; Hone, A J; McIntosh, J M; Zakrzewicz, A; Grau, V

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that phosphocholine and phosphocholine-modified macromolecules efficiently inhibit ATP-dependent release of interleukin-1β from human and murine monocytes by a mechanism involving nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Interleukin-1β is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine of innate immunity that plays pivotal roles in host defence. Control of interleukin-1β release is vital as excessively high systemic levels cause life threatening inflammatory diseases. In spite of its structural similarity to acetylcholine, there are no other reports on interactions of phosphocholine with nAChR. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphocholine inhibits ion-channel function of ATP receptor P2X7 in monocytic cells via nAChR containing α9 and α10 subunits. In stark contrast to choline, phosphocholine does not evoke ion current responses in Xenopus laevis oocytes, which heterologously express functional homomeric nAChR composed of α9 subunits or heteromeric receptors containing α9 and α10 subunits. Preincubation of these oocytes with phosphocholine, however, attenuated choline-induced ion current changes, suggesting that phosphocholine may act as a silent agonist. We conclude that phophocholine activates immuno-modulatory nAChR expressed by monocytes but does not stimulate canonical ionotropic receptor functions. PMID:27349288

  11. Diabetes Stimulates Osteoclastogenesis by Acidosis-Induced Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channels

    PubMed Central

    Reni, Carlotta; Mangialardi, Giuseppe; Meloni, Marco; Madeddu, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes have lower bone mineral density and higher risk of fractures. The role of osteoblasts in diabetes-related osteoporosis is well acknowledged whereas the role of osteoclasts (OCLs) is still unclear. We hypothesize that OCLs participate in pathological bone remodeling. We conducted studies in animals (streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice) and cellular models to investigate canonical and non-canonical mechanisms underlying excessive OCL activation. Diabetic mice show an increased number of active OCLs. In vitro studies demonstrate the involvement of acidosis in OCL activation and the implication of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). In vivo studies confirm the establishment of local acidosis in the diabetic bone marrow (BM) as well as the ineffectiveness of insulin in correcting the pH variation and osteoclast activation. Conversely, treatment with TRPV1 receptor antagonists re-establishes a physiological OCL availability. These data suggest that diabetes causes local acidosis in the BM that in turn increases osteoclast activation through the modulation of TRPV1. The use of clinically available TRPV1 antagonists may provide a new means to combat bone problems associated with diabetes. PMID:27468810

  12. Neurosteroids shift partial agonist activation of GABA(A) receptor channels from low- to high-efficacy gating patterns.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Matt T; Macdonald, Robert L

    2003-11-26

    Although GABA activates synaptic (alphabetagamma) GABA(A) receptors with high efficacy, partial agonist activation of alphabetagamma isoforms and GABA activation of the primary extrasynaptic (alphabetadelta) GABA(A) receptors are limited to low-efficacy activity, characterized by minimal desensitization and brief openings. The unusual sensitivity of alphabetadelta receptor channels to neurosteroid modulation prompted investigation of whether this high sensitivity was dependent on the delta subunit or the low-efficacy channel function that it confers. We show that the isoform specificity (alphabetadelta > alphabetagamma) of neurosteroid modulation could be reversed by conditions that reversed isoform-specific activity modes, including the use of beta-alanine to achieve increased efficacy with alphabetadelta receptors and taurine to render alphabetagamma receptors low efficacy. We suggest that neurosteroids preferentially enhance low-efficacy GABA(A) receptor activity independent of subunit composition. Allosteric conversion of partial to full agonism may be a general mechanism for reversibly scaling the efficacy of GABA(A) receptors to endogenous partial agonists.

  13. Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 Channel Involved in Atherosclerosis and Macrophage-Foam Cell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jin-Feng; Shyue, Song-Kun; Kou, Yu Ru; Lu, Tse-Min; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel (TRPA1) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, yet its role and the underlying mechanism in atherosclerosis remain unclear. We aimed to investigate the role of TRPA1 in atherosclerosis and foam-cell formation in vivo in mice and in vitro in mouse macrophages. Histopathology was examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining, levels of cytokines and lipid profile were evaluated by assay kits, and protein expression was determined by western blot analysis. TRPA1 expression was increased in macrophage foam cells in atherosclerotic aortas of apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE-/-) mice. Atherosclerotic lesions, hyperlipidemia and systemic inflammation were worsened with chronic administration of the TRPA1 channel antagonist HC030031 or genetic ablation of TRPA1 (TRPA1-/-) in apoE-/- mice. Treatment with allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, a TRPA1 agonist) retarded the progression of atherosclerosis in apoE-/- mice but not apoE-/-TRPA1-/- mice. Mouse macrophages showed oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) activated TRPA1 channels. OxLDL-induced lipid accumulation of macrophages was exacerbated by HC030031 or loss of function of TRPA1. Inhibition of TRPA1 activity did not alter oxLDL internalization but impaired cholesterol efflux by downregulating the ATP-binding cassette transporters. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor-α-induced inflammatory response was attenuated in AITC-activated macrophages. TRPA1 may be a pivotal regulator in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cholesterol metabolism of macrophage foam cells. PMID:27313495

  14. A new cytoplasmic interaction between junctin and ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Linwei; Mirza, Shamaruh; Richardson, Spencer J; Gallant, Esther M; Thekkedam, Chris; Pace, Suzy M; Zorzato, Francesco; Liu, Dan; Beard, Nicole A; Dulhunty, Angela F

    2015-03-01

    Junctin, a non-catalytic splice variant encoded by the aspartate-β-hydroxylase (Asph) gene, is inserted into the membrane of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) store where it modifies Ca(2+) signalling in the heart and skeletal muscle through its regulation of ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca(2+) release channels. Junctin is required for normal muscle function as its knockout leads to abnormal Ca(2+) signalling, muscle dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmia. However, the nature of the molecular interaction between junctin and RyRs is largely unknown and was assumed to occur only in the SR lumen. We find that there is substantial binding of RyRs to full junctin, and the junctin luminal and, unexpectedly, cytoplasmic domains. Binding of these different junctin domains had distinct effects on RyR1 and RyR2 activity: full junctin in the luminal solution increased RyR channel activity by ∼threefold, the C-terminal luminal interaction inhibited RyR channel activity by ∼50%, and the N-terminal cytoplasmic binding produced an ∼fivefold increase in RyR activity. The cytoplasmic interaction between junctin and RyR is required for luminal binding to replicate the influence of full junctin on RyR1 and RyR2 activity. The C-terminal domain of junctin binds to residues including the S1-S2 linker of RyR1 and N-terminal domain of junctin binds between RyR1 residues 1078 and 2156. PMID:25609705

  15. Structural Studies of Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor COUPLING LIGAND BINDING TO CHANNEL GATING

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Jenny; Yamazaki, Haruka; Ishiyama, Noboru; Seo, Min-Duk; Mal, Tapas K.; Michikawa, Takayuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2010-11-22

    The three isoforms of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP{sub 3}R) exhibit distinct IP{sub 3} sensitivities and cooperativities in calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) channel function. The determinants underlying this isoform-specific channel gating mechanism have been localized to the N-terminal suppressor region of IP3R. We determined the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of the suppressor domain from type 3 IP{sub 3}R (IP{sub 3}R3{sub SUP}, amino acids 1-224) and revealed structural features contributing to isoform-specific functionality of IP{sub 3}R by comparing it with our previously determined structure of the type 1 suppressor domain (IP{sub 3}R1{sub SUP}). The molecular surface known to associate with the ligand binding domain (amino acids 224-604) showed marked differences between IP{sub 3}R3{sub SUP} and IP{sub 3}R1{sub SUP}. Our NMR and biochemical studies showed that three spatially clustered residues (Glu-20, Tyr-167, and Ser-217 in IP{sub 3}R1 and Glu-19, Trp-168, and Ser-218 in IP{sub 3}R3) within the N-terminal suppressor domains of IP{sub 3}R1{sub SUP} and IP{sub 3}R3{sub SUP} interact directly with their respective C-terminal fragments. Together with the accompanying paper (Yamazaki, H., Chan, J., Ikura, M., Michikawa, T., and Mikoshiba, K. (2010) J. Biol. Chem. 285, 36081-36091), we demonstrate that the single aromatic residue in this region (Tyr-167 in IP{sub 3}R1 and Trp-168 in IP{sub 3}R3) plays a critical role in the coupling between ligand binding and channel gating.

  16. Thermosensitive transient receptor potential channels (thermo-TRPs) in human corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mergler, Stefan; Garreis, Fabian; Sahlmüller, Monika; Reinach, Peter S.; Paulsen, Friedrich; Pleyer, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Thermosensitive transient receptor potential proteins (TRPs) such as TRPV1-TRPV4 are all heat-activated non-selective cation channels that are modestly permeable to Ca2+. TRPV1, TRPV3 and TRPV4 functional expression were previously identified in human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC). However, the membrane currents were not described underlying their activation by either selective agonists or thermal variation. This study characterized the membrane currents and [Ca 2+]i transients induced by thermal and agonist TRPV1 and 4 stimulation. TRPV1 and 4 expressions were confirmed by RT-PCR and TRPV2 transcripts were also detected. In fura2-loaded HCEC, a TRPV1-3 selective agonist, 100 µM 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), induced intracellular Ca2+ transients and an increase in non-selective cation outward currents that were suppressed by ruthenium-red (RuR) (10–20 µM), a nonselective TRPV channel blocker. These changes were also elicited by rises in ambient temperature from 25 °C to over 40 °C. RuR (5 µM) and a selective TRPV1 channel blocker capsazepine (CPZ) (10 µM) or another related blocker, lanthanum chloride (La3+) (100 µM) suppressed these temperature-induced Ca2+ increases. Planar patch-clamp technique was used to characterize the currents underlying Ca2+ transients. Increasing the temperature to over 40 °C induced reversible rises in non-selective cation currents. Moreover, a hypotonic challenge (25 %) increased non-selective cation currents confirming TRPV4 activity. We conclude that HCEC possess in addition to thermo-sensitive TRPV3 activity TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPV4 activity. Their activation confers temperature sensitivity at the ocular surface, which may protect the cornea against such stress. PMID:21506114

  17. A new cytoplasmic interaction between junctin and ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linwei; Mirza, Shamaruh; Richardson, Spencer J.; Gallant, Esther M.; Thekkedam, Chris; Pace, Suzy M.; Zorzato, Francesco; Liu, Dan; Beard, Nicole A.; Dulhunty, Angela F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Junctin, a non-catalytic splice variant encoded by the aspartate-β-hydroxylase (Asph) gene, is inserted into the membrane of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ store where it modifies Ca2+ signalling in the heart and skeletal muscle through its regulation of ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca2+ release channels. Junctin is required for normal muscle function as its knockout leads to abnormal Ca2+ signalling, muscle dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmia. However, the nature of the molecular interaction between junctin and RyRs is largely unknown and was assumed to occur only in the SR lumen. We find that there is substantial binding of RyRs to full junctin, and the junctin luminal and, unexpectedly, cytoplasmic domains. Binding of these different junctin domains had distinct effects on RyR1 and RyR2 activity: full junctin in the luminal solution increased RyR channel activity by ∼threefold, the C-terminal luminal interaction inhibited RyR channel activity by ∼50%, and the N-terminal cytoplasmic binding produced an ∼fivefold increase in RyR activity. The cytoplasmic interaction between junctin and RyR is required for luminal binding to replicate the influence of full junctin on RyR1 and RyR2 activity. The C-terminal domain of junctin binds to residues including the S1–S2 linker of RyR1 and N-terminal domain of junctin binds between RyR1 residues 1078 and 2156. PMID:25609705

  18. Effect of α₇ nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice.

    PubMed

    Welch, Kevin D; Pfister, James A; Lima, Flavia G; Green, Benedict T; Gardner, Dale R

    2013-02-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChRs located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The toxicity and teratogenicity of many plants (which results in millions of dollars in losses annually to the livestock industry) are due to various toxins that bind to nAChRs including deltaline and methyllycaconitine (MLA) from larkspur (Delphinium) species, and nicotine and anabasine from tobacco (Nicotiana) species. The primary result of the actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs is neuromuscular paralysis and respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to further characterize the motor coordination deficiencies that occur upon exposure to a non-lethal dose of nAChR antagonists MLA and deltaline as well as nAChR agonists nicotine and anabasine. We evaluated the effect of nAChR agonists and antagonists on the motor function and coordination in mice using a balance beam, grip strength meter, rotarod, open field analysis and tremor monitor. These analyses demonstrated that within seconds after treatment the mice had significant loss of motor function and coordination that lasted up to 1 min, followed by a short period of quiescence. Recovery to normal muscle coordination was rapid, typically within approximately 10 min post-dosing. However, mice treated with the nAChR agonist nicotine and anabasine required a slightly longer time to recover some aspects of normal muscle function in comparison to mice treated with the nAChR antagonist MLA or deltaline.

  19. Propacetamol-Induced Injection Pain Is Associated with Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Schillers, Florian; Eberhardt, Esther; Leffler, Andreas; Eberhardt, Mirjam

    2016-10-01

    Propacetamol (PPCM) is a prodrug of paracetamol (PCM), which was generated to increase water solubility of PCM for intravenous delivery. PPCM is rapidly hydrolyzed by plasma esterases to PCM and diethylglycine and shares some structural and metabolic properties with lidocaine. Although PPCM is considered to be comparable to PCM regarding its analgesic properties, injection pain is a common side effect described for PPCM but not PCM. Injection pain is a frequent and unpleasant side effect of numerous drugs in clinical use, and previous reports have indicated that the ligand gated ion channels transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) can mediate this effect on sensory neurons. This study aimed to investigate molecular mechanisms by which PPCM, in contrast to PCM, causes injection pain. Therefore, human TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors were expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and investigated by means of whole-cell patch clamp and ratiometric calcium imaging. PPCM (but not PCM) activated TRPV1, sensitized heat-induced currents, and caused an increase in intracellular calcium. In TRPA1-expressing cells however, both PPCM and PCM evoked calcium responses but failed to induce inward currents. Intracutaneous injection of PPCM, but not of PCM, in human volunteers induced an intense and short-lasting pain and an increase in superficial blood flow, indicating activation of nociceptive C fibers and subsequent neuropeptide release. In conclusion, activation of human TRPV1 by PPCM seems to be a relevant mechanism for induction of pain upon intracutaneous injection and thus also for pain reported as an adverse side effect upon intravenous administration. PMID:27457427

  20. Propacetamol-Induced Injection Pain Is Associated with Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Schillers, Florian; Eberhardt, Esther; Leffler, Andreas; Eberhardt, Mirjam

    2016-10-01

    Propacetamol (PPCM) is a prodrug of paracetamol (PCM), which was generated to increase water solubility of PCM for intravenous delivery. PPCM is rapidly hydrolyzed by plasma esterases to PCM and diethylglycine and shares some structural and metabolic properties with lidocaine. Although PPCM is considered to be comparable to PCM regarding its analgesic properties, injection pain is a common side effect described for PPCM but not PCM. Injection pain is a frequent and unpleasant side effect of numerous drugs in clinical use, and previous reports have indicated that the ligand gated ion channels transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) can mediate this effect on sensory neurons. This study aimed to investigate molecular mechanisms by which PPCM, in contrast to PCM, causes injection pain. Therefore, human TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors were expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and investigated by means of whole-cell patch clamp and ratiometric calcium imaging. PPCM (but not PCM) activated TRPV1, sensitized heat-induced currents, and caused an increase in intracellular calcium. In TRPA1-expressing cells however, both PPCM and PCM evoked calcium responses but failed to induce inward currents. Intracutaneous injection of PPCM, but not of PCM, in human volunteers induced an intense and short-lasting pain and an increase in superficial blood flow, indicating activation of nociceptive C fibers and subsequent neuropeptide release. In conclusion, activation of human TRPV1 by PPCM seems to be a relevant mechanism for induction of pain upon intracutaneous injection and thus also for pain reported as an adverse side effect upon intravenous administration.

  1. Stable expression of a functional GluR6 homomeric glutamate receptor channel in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tygesen, C K; Rasmussen, J S; Jones, S V; Hansen, A; Hansen, K; Andersen, P H

    1994-01-01

    This study demonstrates the stable expression of a functional ionotropic glutamate receptor in a mammalian cell line of non-neuronal origin. The kainate-selective glutamate receptor GluR6 was constitutively expressed under the control of a metallothionein promoter. Clones were isolated expressing approximately 3 pmol of receptor per mg of protein. Functionality of the recombinant GluR6 was demonstrated both by electrophysiology and by Ca2+ imaging. Application of kainate to the GluR6-transfected cells activated an inward current response at a holding potential of -60 mV. The kainate concentration needed to evoke 50% of the maximal response (EC50) was calculated to be 0.82 +/- 0.39 microM. The current-voltage relationship was found to be almost linear, with a reversal potential of -2.5 +/- 4.8 mV. Application of kainate also resulted in an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration measured by Ca2+ imaging. The pharmacological profile of [3H]kainate binding to the recombinant GluR6 resembled the high-affinity [3H]kainate binding sites in rat brain, showing high affinity for domoate (Ki = 5.1 +/- 3.0 nM) and kainate (Kd = 12.9 +/- 2.4 nM). No decrease in GluR6 expression level was observed over > 75 passages of the transfected cells. When domoate, a slowly desensitizing GluR6 agonist, was included in the growth medium for 3 weeks, the number of GluR6 binding sites decreased by 30%, indicating the importance of complete channel closure for stable expression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:7528929

  2. Drosophila Photoreceptor Cells Exploited for the Production of Eukaryotic Membrane Proteins: Receptors, Transporters and Channels

    PubMed Central

    Panneels, Valérie; Kock, Ines; Krijnse-Locker, Jacomine; Rezgaoui, Meriem; Sinning, Irmgard

    2011-01-01

    Background Membrane proteins (MPs) play key roles in signal transduction. However, understanding their function at a molecular level is mostly hampered by the lack of protein in suitable amount and quality. Despite impressive developments in the expression of prokaryotic MPs, eukaryotic MP production has lagged behind and there is a need for new expression strategies. In a pilot study, we produced a Drosophila glutamate receptor specifically in the eyes of transgenic flies, exploiting the naturally abundant membrane stacks in the photoreceptor cells (PRCs). Now we address the question whether the PRCs also process different classes of medically relevant target MPs which were so far notoriously difficult to handle with conventional expression strategies. Principal Findings We describe the homologous and heterologous expression of 10 different targets from the three major MP classes - G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), transporters and channels in Drosophila eyes. PRCs offered an extraordinary capacity to produce, fold and accommodate massive amounts of MPs. The expression of some MPs reached similar levels as the endogenous rhodopsin, indicating that the PRC membranes were almost unsaturable. Expression of endogenous rhodopsin was not affected by the target MPs and both could coexist in the membrane stacks. Heterologous expression levels reached about 270 to 500 pmol/mg total MP, resulting in 0.2–0.4 mg purified target MP from 1 g of fly heads. The metabotropic glutamate receptor and human serotonin transporter - both involved in synaptic transmission - showed native pharmacological characteristics and could be purified to homogeneity as a prerequisite for further studies. Significance We demonstrate expression in Drosophila PRCs as an efficient and inexpensive tool for the large scale production of functional eukaryotic MPs. The fly eye system offers a number of advantages over conventional expression systems and paves the way for in-depth analyses of

  3. A leukocyte immune-type receptor (LITR) subset is a marker of antiviral cytotoxic cells in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, leukocyte immune type-receptors (LITRs) represent a multigene family that encodes immunoglobulin superfamily proteins that mediate activating or inhibitory signaling. Here we demonstrate the utility of mAb CC41 to monitor viral cytotoxic responses in catfish an...

  4. Single-channel recording of inositol trisphosphate receptor in the isolated nucleus of a muscle cell line.

    PubMed

    Kusnier, Carlos; Cárdenas, César; Hidalgo, Jorge; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear calcium appears to have an important role in the regulation of gene expression in many cells, but the mechanisms involved in controlling nuclear Ca2+ signaling are controversial and still poorly understood. We have described the presence of inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate (IP3) receptors in the nuclei of skeletal muscle cells. Now, we have characterized the properties of the IP3 receptors channels present in the nuclei of the 1B5 cell line, which do not express any isoforms of the ryanodine receptor. Immunocytochemistry of isolated nuclei confirmed the presence of IP3R in the nuclear envelope and fluorescence measurements in nuclei suspensions allowed us to document ATP-dependent calcium loading by the nucleus and its release upon IP3 addition. Patch clamp of nuclear membranes was performed, and single-channel activity recorded was dependent on the presence of IP3 in the pipette; single-channel conductance was in the range reported in the literature for these channels, and the open probability was shown to be dependent on IP3 concentration. The presence of functional IP3 receptors in the nuclear envelope membrane is likely to have an important function in the regulation of nucleoplasmic calcium concentration and consequently in the regulation of transcription in muscle cells. PMID:17106585

  5. Inhibition of muscarinic K+ current in guinea-pig atrial myocytes by PD 81,723, an allosteric enhancer of adenosine binding to A1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brandts, B; Bünemann, M; Hluchy, J; Sabin, G V; Pott, L

    1997-01-01

    PD 81,723 has been shown to enhance binding of adenosine to A1 receptors by stabilizing G protein-receptor coupling (‘allosteric enhancement'). Evidence has been provided that in the perfused hearts and isolated atria PD 81,723 causes a sensitization to adenosine via this mechanism. We have studied the effect of PD 81,723 in guinea-pig isolated atrial myocytes by use of whole-cell measurement of the muscarinic K+ current (IK(ACh)) activated by different Gi-coupled receptors (A1, M2, sphingolipid). PD 81,273 caused inhibition of IK(ACh) (IC50≃5 μM) activated by either of the three receptors. Receptor-independent IK(ACh) in cells loaded with GTP-γ-S and background IK(ACh), which contributes to the resting conductance of atrial myocytes, were equally sensitive to PD 81,723. At no combination of concentrations of adenosine and PD 81,723 could an enhancing effect be detected. The compound was active from the outside only. Loading of the cells with PD 81,723 (50 μM) via the patch pipette did not affect either IK(ACh) or its sensitivity to adenosine. We suggest that PD 81,723 acts as an inhibitor of inward rectifying K+ channels; this is supported by the finding that ventricular IK1, which shares a large degree of homology with the proteins (GIRK1/GIRK4) forming IK(ACh) but is not G protein-gated, was also blocked by this compound. It is concluded that the functional effects of PD 81,723 described in the literature are not mediated by the A1 adenosine receptor-Gi-IK(ACh) pathway. PMID:9249260

  6. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) leukocytes express estrogen receptor isoforms ERα and ERβ2 and are functionally modulated by estrogens.

    PubMed

    Iwanowicz, Luke R; Stafford, James L; Patiño, Reynaldo; Bengten, Eva; Miller, Norman W; Blazer, Vicki S

    2014-09-01

    Estrogens are recognized as modulators of immune responses in mammals and teleosts. While it is known that the effects of estrogens are mediated via leukocyte-specific estrogen receptors (ERs) in humans and mice, leucocyte-specific estrogen receptor expression and the effects of estrogens on this cell population is less explored and poorly understood in teleosts. Here in, we verify that channel catfish (Ictalurus punctaus) leukocytes express ERα and ERβ2. Transcripts of these isoforms were detected in tissue-associated leukocyte populations by PCR, but ERβ2 was rarely detected in PBLs. Expression of these receptors was temporally regulated in PBLs following polyclonal activation by concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide or alloantigen based on evaluation by quantitative and end-point PCR. Examination of long-term leukocyte cell lines demonstrated that these receptors are differentially expressed depending on leukocyte lineage and phenotype. Expression of ERs was also temporally dynamic in some leukocyte lineages and may reflect stage of cell maturity. Estrogens affect the responsiveness of channel catfish peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) to mitogens in vitro. Similarly, bactericidal activity and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate induced respiratory burst was modulated by 17β-estradiol. These actions were blocked by the pure ER antagonist ICI 182780 indicating that response is, in part, mediated via ERα. In summary, estrogen receptors are expressed in channel catfish leukocytes and participate in the regulation of the immune response. This is the first time leukocyte lineage expression has been reported in teleost cell lines.

  7. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) leukocytes express estrogen receptor isoforms ERα and ERβ2 and are functionally modulated by estrogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Stafford, James L.; Patiño, Reynaldo; Bengten, Eva; Miller, Norman W.; Blazer, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens are recognized as modulators of immune responses in mammals and teleosts. While it is known that the effects of estrogens are mediated via leukocyte-specific estrogen receptors (ERs) in humans and mice, leucocyte-specific estrogen receptor expression and the effects of estrogens on this cell population is less explored and poorly understood in teleosts. Here in, we verify that channel catfish (Ictalurus punctaus) leukocytes express ERα and ERβ2. Transcripts of these isoforms were detected in tissue-associated leukocyte populations by PCR, but ERβ2 was rarely detected in PBLs. Expression of these receptors was temporally regulated in PBLs following polyclonal activation by concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide or alloantigen based on evaluation by quantitative and end-point PCR. Examination of long-term leukocyte cell lines demonstrated that these receptors are differentially expressed depending on leukocyte lineage and phenotype. Expression of ERs was also temporally dynamic in some leukocyte lineages and may reflect stage of cell maturity. Estrogens affect the responsiveness of channel catfish peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) to mitogens in vitro. Similarly, bactericidal activity and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate induced respiratory burst was modulated by 17β-estradiol. These actions were blocked by the pure ER antagonist ICI 182780 indicating that response is, in part, mediated via ERα. In summary, estrogen receptors are expressed in channel catfish leukocytes and participate in the regulation of the immune response. This is the first time leukocyte lineage expression has been reported in teleost cell lines.

  8. Fluorescently labelled Na+ channels are localized and immobilized to synapses of innervated muscle fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelides, Kimon J.

    1986-05-01

    Segregation of voltage-dependent sodium channels to the hillock of motoneurones and nodes of Ranvier in myelinated axons is crucial for conduction of the nerve impulse1,2. Much less is known, however, about the distribution of voltage-dependent Na+ channels on muscle fibres. Recently, Beam et al.3 have shown that Na+ channels are concentrated near the neuromuscular junction. To determine the topography and mechanisms governing the distribution of voltage-dependent Na+ channels on muscle, microfluorimetry and fluorescence photobleach recovery (FPR) have now been used to measure the density and lateral mobility of fluorescently labelled Na+ channels on uninnervated and innervated muscle fibres. On uninnervated myotubes, Na+ channels are diffusely distributed and freely mobile, whereas after innervation the channels concentrate at neuronal contact sites. These channels are immobile and co-localize with acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). At extrajunctional regions the Na+ channel density is lower and the channels more mobile. The results suggest that the nerve induces Na+ channels to redistribute, immobilize and co-localize with AChRs at sites of neuronal contact.

  9. Ion-channel-coupled receptor-based platform for a real-time measurement of G-protein-coupled receptor activities.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jong Hyun; Oh, Eun Hae; Park, Juhun; Hong, Seunghun; Park, Tai Hyun

    2015-02-24

    A simple but efficient measurement platform based on ion-channel-coupled receptors and nanovesicles was developed for monitoring the real-time activity of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In this work, an olfactory receptor (OR), the most common class A GPCR, was covalently fused with a Kir6.2 channel so that the GPCR action directly induced the opening of the ion channels and changes in the electrical membrane potential without complex cellular signaling processes. This strategy reduced the measurement errors caused by instability of various cellular components. In addition, rather than using whole cells, a cell-surface-derived nanovesicle was used to preserve the membrane-integrated structure of GPCRs and to exclude case-dependent cellular conditions. Another merit of using the nanovesicle is that nanovesicles can be easily combined with nanomaterial-based field-effect transistors (FETs) to build a sensitive and stable measurement platform to monitor GPCR activities with high sensitivity in real-time. Using a platform based on carbon nanotube FETs and nanovesicles carrying Kir6.2-channel-coupled ORs, we monitored the real-time response of ORs to their ligand molecules. Significantly, since this platform does not rely on rather unstable cell signaling pathways, our platform could be utilized for a rather long time period without losing its functionality. This system can be utilized extensively for simple and sensitive analysis of the activities of various GPCRs and should enable various academic and practical applications.

  10. G protein-coupled receptor signaling via Src kinase induces endogenous human transient receptor potential vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) channel activation.

    PubMed

    Spehr, Jennifer; Gelis, Lian; Osterloh, Markus; Oberland, Sonja; Hatt, Hanns; Spehr, Marc; Neuhaus, Eva M

    2011-04-15

    Ca(2+) homeostasis plays a critical role in a variety of cellular processes. We showed previously that stimulation of the prostate-specific G protein-coupled receptor (PSGR) enhances cytosolic Ca(2+) and inhibits proliferation of prostate cells. Here, we analyzed the signaling mechanisms underlying the PSGR-mediated Ca(2+) increase. Using complementary molecular, biochemical, electrophysiological, and live-cell imaging techniques, we found that endogenous Ca(2+)-selective transient receptor potential vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) channels are critically involved in the PSGR-induced Ca(2+) signal. Biophysical characterization of the current activated by PSGR stimulation revealed characteristic properties of TRPV6. The molecular identity of the involved channel was confirmed using RNA interference targeting TrpV6. TRPV6-mediated Ca(2+) influx depended on Src kinase activity. Src kinase activation occurred independently of G protein activation, presumably by direct interaction with PSGR. Taken together, we report that endogenous TRPV6 channels are activated downstream of a G protein-coupled receptor and present the first physiological characterization of these channels in situ. PMID:21349844

  11. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene modification in transgenic animals: functional consequences of selected exon and regulatory region deletion.

    PubMed

    Camp, Shelley; Zhang, Limin; Marquez, Michael; de la Torre, Brian; Long, Jeffery M; Bucht, Goran; Taylor, Palmer

    2005-12-15

    AChE is an alternatively spliced gene. Exons 2, 3 and 4 are invariantly spliced, and this sequence is responsible for catalytic function. The 3' alternatively spliced exons, 5 and 6, are responsible for AChE disposition in tissue [J. Massoulie, The origin of the molecular diversity and functional anchoring of cholinesterases. Neurosignals 11 (3) (2002) 130-143; Y. Li, S. Camp, P. Taylor, Tissue-specific expression and alternative mRNA processing of the mammalian acetylcholinesterase gene. J. Biol. Chem. 268 (8) (1993) 5790-5797]. The splice to exon 5 produces the GPI anchored form of AChE found in the hematopoietic system, whereas the splice to exon 6 produces a sequence that binds to the structural subunits PRiMA and ColQ, producing AChE expression in brain and muscle. A third alternative RNA species is present that is not spliced at the 3' end; the intron 3' of exon 4 is used as coding sequence and produces the read-through, unanchored form of AChE. In order to further understand the role of alternative splicing in the expression of the AChE gene, we have used homologous recombination in stem cells to produce gene specific deletions in mice. Alternatively and together exon 5 and exon 6 were deleted. A cassette containing the neomycin gene flanked by loxP sites was used to replace the exon(s) of interest. Tissue analysis of mice with exon 5 deleted and the neomycin cassette retained showed very low levels of AChE expression, far less than would have been anticipated. Only the read-through species of the enzyme was produced; clearly the inclusion of the selection cassette disrupted splicing of exon 4 to exon 6. The selection cassette was then deleted in exon 5, exon 6 and exons 5 + 6 deleted mice by breeding to Ella-cre transgenic mice. AChE expression in serum, brain and muscle has been analyzed. Another AChE gene targeted mouse strain involving a region in the first intron, found to be critical for AChE expression in muscle cells [S. Camp, L. Zhang, M. Marquez, B

  12. The Roles of Rasd1 small G proteins and leptin in the activation of TRPC4 transient receptor potential channels

    PubMed Central

    Wie, Jinhong; Kim, Byung Joo; Myeong, Jongyun; Ha, Kotdaji; Jeong, Seung Joo; Yang, Dongki; Kim, Euiyong; Jeon, Ju-Hong; So, Insuk

    2015-01-01

    TRPC4 is important regulators of electrical excitability in gastrointestinal myocytes, pancreatic β-cells and neurons. Much is known regarding the assembly and function of these channels including TRPC1 as a homotetramer or a heteromultimer and the roles that their interacting proteins play in controlling these events. Further, they are one of the best-studied targets of G protein-coupled receptors and growth factors in general and Gαi/o and Gαq protein coupled receptor or epidermal growth factor and leptin in particular. However, our understanding of the roles of small G proteins and leptin on TRPC4 channels is still rudimentary. We discuss potential roles for Rasd1 small G protein and leptin in channel activation in addition to their known role in cellular signaling. PMID:26083271

  13. Phytochemicals from Ruta graveolens Activate TAS2R Bitter Taste Receptors and TRP Channels Involved in Gustation and Nociception.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Giuseppe; Borgonovo, Gigliola; Scaglioni, Leonardo; Bassoli, Angela

    2015-10-16

    Ruta graveolens (rue) is a spontaneous plant in the Mediterranean area with a strong aroma and a very intense bitter taste, used in gastronomy and in folk medicine. From the leaves, stems and fruits of rue, we isolated rutin, rutamarin, three furanocoumarins, two quinolinic alkaloids, a dicoumarin and two long chain ketones. Bitter taste and chemesthetic properties have been evaluated by in vitro assays with twenty receptors of the TAS2R family and four TRP ion channels involved in gustation and nociception. Among the alkaloids, skimmianine was active as a specific agonist of T2R14, whereas kokusaginin did not activate any of the tested receptors. The furanocoumarins activates TAS2R10, 14, and 49 with different degrees of selectivity, as well as the TRPA1 somatosensory ion channel. Rutamarin is an agonist of TRPM5 and TRPV1 and a strong antagonist of TRPM8 ion channels.

  14. Phytochemicals from Ruta graveolens Activate TAS2R Bitter Taste Receptors and TRP Channels Involved in Gustation and Nociception.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Giuseppe; Borgonovo, Gigliola; Scaglioni, Leonardo; Bassoli, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Ruta graveolens (rue) is a spontaneous plant in the Mediterranean area with a strong aroma and a very intense bitter taste, used in gastronomy and in folk medicine. From the leaves, stems and fruits of rue, we isolated rutin, rutamarin, three furanocoumarins, two quinolinic alkaloids, a dicoumarin and two long chain ketones. Bitter taste and chemesthetic properties have been evaluated by in vitro assays with twenty receptors of the TAS2R family and four TRP ion channels involved in gustation and nociception. Among the alkaloids, skimmianine was active as a specific agonist of T2R14, whereas kokusaginin did not activate any of the tested receptors. The furanocoumarins activates TAS2R10, 14, and 49 with different degrees of selectivity, as well as the TRPA1 somatosensory ion channel. Rutamarin is an agonist of TRPM5 and TRPV1 and a strong antagonist of TRPM8 ion channels. PMID:26501253

  15. Regulation of transient receptor potential channels of melastatin type 8 (TRPM8): effect of cAMP, cannabinoid CB(1) receptors and endovanilloids.

    PubMed

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Starowicz, Katarzyna; Moriello, Aniello Schiano; Vivese, Marta; Orlando, Pierangelo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2007-05-15

    The transient receptor potential channel of melastatin type 8 (TRPM8), which is gated by low (<25 degrees C) temperature and chemical compounds, is regulated by protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation in a way opposite to that observed with the transient receptor potential channel of vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), i.e. by being desensitized and not sensitized. As TRPV1 is sensitized also by protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation, we investigated the effect of two activators of the PKA pathway, 8-Br-cAMP and forskolin, on the activity of menthol and icilin at TRPM8 in HEK-293 cells stably overexpressing the channel (TRPM8-HEK-293 cells). We also studied the effect on TRPM8 of: (1) a series of compounds previously shown to activate or antagonize TRPV1, and (2) co-stimulation of transiently co-expressed cannabinoid CB(1) receptors. Both 8-Br-cAMP (100 microM) and forskolin (10 microM) right-shifted the dose-response curves for the TRPM8-mediated effect of icilin and menthol on intracellular Ca(2+). The inhibitory effects of 8-Br-cAMP and forskolin were attenuated by the selective PKA inhibitor Rp-cAMP-S. Stimulation of human CB(1) receptors transiently co-expressed in TRPM8-HEK-293 cells also inhibited TRPM8 response to icilin. Finally, some TRPV1 agonists and antagonists, but not iodinated antagonists, antagonized icilin- and much less so menthol-, induced TRPM8 activation. Importantly, the endovanilloids/endocannabinoids, anandamide and NADA, also antagonized TRPM8 at submicromolar concentrations. Although these findings need to be confirmed by experiments directly measuring TRPM8 activity in natively TRPM8-expressing cells, they support the notion that the same regulatory events have opposing actions on TRPM8 and TRPV1 receptors and identify anandamide and NADA as the first potential endogenous functional antagonists of TRPM8 channels.

  16. Gating Movement of Acetylcholine Receptor Caught by Plunge-Freezing

    PubMed Central

    Unwin, Nigel; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor converts transiently to an open-channel form when activated by ACh released into the synaptic cleft. We describe here the conformational change underlying this event, determined by electron microscopy of ACh-sprayed and freeze-trapped postsynaptic membranes. ACh binding to the α subunits triggers a concerted rearrangement in the ligand-binding domain, involving an ~ 1‐Å outward displacement of the extracellular portion of the β subunit where it interacts with the juxtaposed ends of α-helices shaping the narrow membrane-spanning pore. The β-subunit helices tilt outward to accommodate this displacement, destabilising the arrangement of pore-lining helices, which in the closed channel bend inward symmetrically to form a central hydrophobic gate. Straightening and tangential motion of the pore-lining helices effect channel opening by widening the pore asymmetrically and increasing its polarity in the region of the gate. The pore-lining helices of the αγ and δ subunits, by flexing between alternative bent and straight conformations, undergo the greatest movements. This coupled allosteric transition shifts the structure from a tense (closed) state toward a more relaxed (open) state. PMID:22841691

  17. Menthol derivative WS-12 selectively activates transient receptor potential melastatin-8 (TRPM8) ion channels.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sherkheli; G, Gisselmann; Ak, Vogt-Eisele; Jf, Doerner; H, Hatt

    2008-10-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin-8 (TRPM8), a cationic ion channel is involved in detection of normal cooling-sensation in mammals. TRPM8 activation by cooling or chemical agonists have been shown to produce profound, mechanistically novel analgesia in chronic pain states such as neuropathic pain in rodents. Known TRPM8 agonists such as menthol and icilin have a relatively low potency and cross-activate nociceptors like TRPA1; thus bearing a limited therapeutic usefulness. For that reason, characterising ligands, which selectively activate TRPM8, presents a clinical need. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes as expression system, we evaluated WS-12, a menthol derivative, for its potential interaction with all six thermo-sensitive TRP ion channels. Oocytes were injected with cRNA of gene of interest and incubated for 3-5 days (at 16 degrees C) before testing for functional characterisation of the recombinant ion channels. Oocytes were superfused with the test and standard substances respectively. Responses were measured by two-electrode voltage clamp technique and the amplitudes of evoked currents were compared with baseline values. WS-12 robustly activated TRPM8 in low micromolar concentrations (EC50 12+/-5 microM) thereby displaying a higher potency and efficacy compared to menthol (EC50 196+/-22 microM). Any of the other described thermo-sensitive TRP ion channel including TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV3, TRPV4 and TRPA1 were not activated at a concentration (1 mM) optimally effective for TRPM8 responses; a characteristic which is in sharp contrast to menthol as it activates TRPA1 and TRPV3 in addition to TRPM8. Unlike icilin (75% reduction; p<0.001, n=6), WS-12 does not induce tachyphylaxis (4+/-2.3% increase in responses; p<0.08, n=6) of TRPM8 mediated currents to repeated exposure of 1 mM doses. In addition, acidosis or variations in extracellular calcium have no influence on potency/efficacy of WS-12 for TRPM8. The selectivity profile of WS-12, its several-fold higher

  18. Multiple binding sites in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: An opportunity for polypharmacolgy.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga-Vásquez, Patricio; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Bermudez, Isabel; Varas, Rodrigo; Reyes-Parada, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    For decades, the development of selective compounds has been the main goal for chemists and biologists involved in drug discovery. However, diverse lines of evidence indicate that polypharmacological agents, i.e. those that act simultaneously at various protein targets, might show better profiles than selective ligands, regarding both efficacy and side effects. On the other hand, the availability of the crystal structure of different receptors allows a detailed analysis of the main interactions between drugs and receptors in a specific binding site. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) constitute a large and diverse family of ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) that, as a product of its modulation, regulate neurotransmitter release, which in turns produce a global neuromodulation of the central nervous system. nAChRs are pentameric protein complexes in such a way that expression of compatible subunits can lead to various receptor assemblies or subtypes. The agonist binding site, located at the extracellular region, exhibits different properties depending on the subunits that conform the receptor. In the last years, it has been recognized that nAChRs could also contain one or more allosteric sites which could bind non-classical nicotinic ligands including several therapeutically useful drugs. The presence of multiple binding sites in nAChRs offers an interesting possibility for the development of novel polypharmacological agents with a wide spectrum of actions. PMID:26318763

  19. Heterologously-expressed and Liposome-reconstituted Human Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 4 Channel (TRPM4) is a Functional Tetramer

    PubMed Central

    Constantine, Maryrose; Liew, Chu Kong; Lo, Victor; Macmillan, Alex; Cranfield, Charles G.; Sunde, Margaret; Whan, Renee; Graham, Robert M.; Martinac, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Mutation, irregular expression and sustained activation of the Transient Receptor Potential Channel, type Melastatin 4 (TRPM4), have been linked to various cardiovascular diseases. However, much remains unknown about the structure of this important ion channel. Here, we have purified a heterologously expressed TRPM4-eGFP fusion protein and investigated the oligomeric state of TRPM4-eGFP in detergent micelles using crosslinking, native gel electrophoresis, multi-angle laser light scattering and electron microscopy. Our data indicate that TRPM4 is tetrameric, like other TRP channels studied to date. Furthermore, the functionality of liposome reconstituted TRPM4-eGFP was examined using electrophysiology. Single-channel recordings from TRPM4-eGFP proteoliposomes showed inhibition of the channel using Flufenamic acid, a well-established inhibitor of TRPM4, suggesting that the channels are functional upon reconstitution. Our characterisation of the oligomeric structure of TRPM4 and the ability to reconstitute functional channels in liposomes should facilitate future studies into the structure, function and pharmacology of this therapeutically relevant channel. PMID:26785754

  20. Heterologously-expressed and Liposome-reconstituted Human Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 4 Channel (TRPM4) is a Functional Tetramer.

    PubMed

    Constantine, Maryrose; Liew, Chu Kong; Lo, Victor; Macmillan, Alex; Cranfield, Charles G; Sunde, Margaret; Whan, Renee; Graham, Robert M; Martinac, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Mutation, irregular expression and sustained activation of the Transient Receptor Potential Channel, type Melastatin 4 (TRPM4), have been linked to various cardiovascular diseases. However, much remains unknown about the structure of this important ion channel. Here, we have purified a heterologously expressed TRPM4-eGFP fusion protein and investigated the oligomeric state of TRPM4-eGFP in detergent micelles using crosslinking, native gel electrophoresis, multi-angle laser light scattering and electron microscopy. Our data indicate that TRPM4 is tetrameric, like other TRP channels studied to date. Furthermore, the functionality of liposome reconstituted TRPM4-eGFP was examined using electrophysiology. Single-channel recordings from TRPM4-eGFP proteoliposomes showed inhibition of the channel using Flufenamic acid, a well-established inhibitor of TRPM4, suggesting that the channels are functional upon reconstitution. Our characterisation of the oligomeric structure of TRPM4 and the ability to reconstitute functional channels in liposomes should facilitate future studies into the structure, function and pharmacology of this therapeutically relevant channel. PMID:26785754

  1. Antagonism of ligand-gated ion channel receptors: two domains of the glycine receptor alpha subunit form the strychnine-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberg, R J; French, C R; Barry, P H; Shine, J; Schofield, P R

    1992-01-01

    The inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR) is a member of the ligand-gated ion channel receptor superfamily. Glycine activation of the receptor is antagonized by the convulsant alkaloid strychnine. Using in vitro mutagenesis and functional analysis of the cDNA encoding the alpha 1 subunit of the human GlyR, we have identified several amino acid residues that form the strychnine-binding site. These residues were identified by transient expression of mutated cDNAs in mammalian (293) cells and examination of resultant [3H]strychnine binding, glycine displacement of [3H]strychnine, and electrophysiological responses to the application of glycine and strychnine. This mutational analysis revealed that residues from two separate domains within the alpha 1 subunit form the binding site for the antagonist strychnine. The first domain includes the amino acid residues Gly-160 and Tyr-161, and the second domain includes the residues Lys-200 and Tyr-202. These results, combined with analyses of other ligand-gated ion channel receptors, suggest a conserved tertiary structure and a common mechanism for antagonism in this receptor superfamily. PMID:1311851

  2. Inter- and intrasubunit interactions between transmembrane helices in the open state of P2X receptor channels

    PubMed Central

    Heymann, Gabriel; Dai, Jian; Silberberg, Shai D.; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Swartz, Kenton J.

    2013-01-01

    P2X receptor channels open in response to the binding of extracellular ATP, a property that is essential for purinergic sensory signaling. Apo and ATP-bound X-ray structures of the detergent-solubilized zebrafish P2X4 receptor provide a blueprint for receptor mechanisms but unexpectedly showed large crevices between subunits within the transmembrane (TM) domain of the ATP-bound structure. Here we investigate both intersubunit and intrasubunit interactions between TM helices of P2X receptors in membranes using both computational and functional approaches. Our results suggest that intersubunit crevices found in the TM domain of the ATP-bound crystal structure are not present in membrane-embedded receptors but substantiate helix interactions within individual subunits and identify a hot spot at the internal end of the pore where both the gating and permeation properties of P2X receptors can be tuned. We propose a model for the structure of the open state that has stabilizing intersubunit interactions and that is compatible with available structural constraints from functional channels in membrane environments. PMID:24082111

  3. Spinal transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel contributes to central pain hypersensitivity in various pathophysiological conditions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong; Koivisto, Ari; Saarnilehto, Marja; Chapman, Hugh; Kuokkanen, Katja; Hao, Bin; Huang, Jin-Lu; Wang, Yong-Xiang; Pertovaara, Antti

    2011-03-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel is expressed on nociceptive primary afferent neurons. On the proximal nerve ending within the spinal dorsal horn, TRPA1 regulates transmission to spinal interneurons, and thereby pain hypersensitivity. Here we assessed whether the contribution of the spinal TRPA1 channel to pain hypersensitivity varies with the experimental pain model, properties of test stimulation or the behavioral pain response. The antihypersensitivity effect of intrathecally (i.t.) administered Chembridge-5861528 (CHEM; a selective TRPA1 channel antagonist; 5-10μg) was determined in various experimental models of pain hypersensitivity in the rat. In spinal nerve ligation and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation models, i.t. CHEM attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity. Capsaicin-induced secondary (central) but not primary (peripheral) mechanical hypersensitivity was also reduced by i.t. administration of CHEM or A-967079, another TRPA1 channel antagonist. Formalin-induced secondary mechanical hypersensitivity, but not spontaneous pain, was suppressed by i.t. CHEM. Moreover, mechanical hypersensitivity induced by cholekystokinin in the rostroventromedial medulla was attenuated by i.t. pretreatment with CHEM. Independent of the model, the antihypersensitivity effect induced by i.t. CHEM was predominant on responses evoked by low-intensity stimuli (⩽6g). CHEM (10μg i.t.) failed to attenuate pain behavior in healthy controls or mechanical hypersensitivities induced by i.t. administrations of a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, or NMDA or 5-HT(3) receptor agonists. Conversely, i.t. administration of a TRPA1 channel agonist, cinnamon aldehyde, induced mechanical hypersensitivity. The results indicate that the spinal TRPA1 channel exerts an important role in secondary (central) pain hypersensitivity to low-intensity mechanical stimulation in various pain hypersensitivity conditions. The spinal TRPA1 channel provides a promising target

  4. Use of Label-free Optical Biosensors to Detect Modulation of Potassium Channels by G-protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Matthew R.; Shamah, Steven M.; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels control the electrical properties of neurons and other excitable cell types by selectively allowing ions to flow through the plasma membrane1. To regulate neuronal excitability, the biophysical properties of ion channels are modified by signaling proteins and molecules, which often bind to the channels themselves to form a heteromeric channel complex2,3. Traditional assays examining the interaction between channels and regulatory proteins require exogenous labels that can potentially alter the protein's behavior and decrease the physiological relevance of the target, while providing little information on the time course of interactions in living cells. Optical biosensors, such as the X-BODY Biosciences BIND Scanner system, use a novel label-free technology, resonance wavelength grating (RWG) optical biosensors, to detect changes in resonant reflected light near the biosensor. This assay allows the detection of the relative change in mass within the bottom portion of living cells adherent to the biosensor surface resulting from ligand induced changes in cell adhesion and spreading, toxicity, proliferation, and changes in protein-protein interactions near the plasma membrane. RWG optical biosensors have been used to detect changes in mass near the plasma membrane of cells following activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases, and other cell surface receptors. Ligand-induced changes in ion channel-protein interactions can also be studied using this assay. In this paper, we will describe the experimental procedure used to detect the modulation of Slack-B sodium-activated potassium (KNa) channels by GPCRs. PMID:24562095

  5. α7nAChR is expressed in satellite cells at different myogenic status during skeletal muscle wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhi-Ling; Jiang, Shu-Kun; Zhang, Miao; Wang, Meng; Li, Jiao-Yong; Zhao, Rui; Wang, Lin-Lin; Liu, Min; Li, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Meng-Zhou; Guan, Da-Wei

    2015-12-01

    Recent study has reported that α7 nicotine acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) is expressed in regenerated multinucleated myotubes. But the distribution of α7nAChR in satellite cells in different myogenic status is unknown. A preliminary study on the dynamic distribution of α7nAChR in satellite cells was performed by double indirect immunofluorescent procedures during skeletal muscle wound healing in rats. An animal model of skeletal muscle contusion was established in 40 Sprague-Dawley male rats. Samples were taken at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17 and 21 days after injury, respectively (five rats in each posttraumatic interval). Five rats were employed as control. In normal muscle specimens, weak immunoreactivity for α7nAChR was detected in a few satellite cells (considered as quiescent). α7nAChR-positive signals were observed in proliferated and differentiated satellite cells and regenerated multinucleated myotubes in the wounded areas. By morphometric analysis, the average number of α7nAChR+/Pax7+ and α7nAChR+/MyoD+ cells climaxed at 5 days post-injury. The average number of α7nAChR+/myogenin+ cells was significantly increased from 3 to 9 days post-injury as compared with other posttraumatic intervals. The protein level of α7nAChR maximized at 9 days post-injury, which implies that α7nAChR was associated with the satellite cells status. Our observations on expression of α7nAChR in satellite cells from quiescence to myotube formation suggest that α7nAChR may be involved in muscle regeneration by regulating satellite cell status.

  6. C-terminal Domains of N-Methyl-d-aspartic Acid Receptor Modulate Unitary Channel Conductance and Gating*

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Bruce A.; Aman, Teresa K.; Amico-Ruvio, Stacy A.; Kussius, Cassandra L.; Popescu, Gabriela K.

    2012-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NRs) are glutamate-gated calcium-permeable channels that are essential for normal synaptic transmssion and contribute to neurodegeneration. Tetrameric proteins consist of two obligatory GluN1 (N1) and two GluN2 (N2) subunits, of which GluN2A (2A) and GluN2B (2B) are prevalent in adult brain. The intracellularly located C-terminal domains (CTDs) make a significant portion of mass of the receptors and are essential for plasticity and excitotoxicity, but their functions are incompletely defined. Recent evidence shows that truncation of the N2 CTD alters channel kinetics; however, the mechanism by which this occurs is unclear. Here we recorded activity from individual NRs lacking the CTDs of N1, 2A, or 2B and determined the gating mechanisms of these receptors. Receptors lacking the N1 CTDs had larger unitary conductance and faster deactivation kinetics, receptors lacking the 2A or 2B CTDs had longer openings and longer desensitized intervals, and the first 100 amino acids of the N2 CTD were essential for these changes. In addition, receptors lacking the CTDs of either 2A or 2B maintained isoform-specific kinetic differences and swapping CTDs between 2A and 2B had no effect on single-channel properties. Based on these results, we suggest that perturbations in the CTD can modify the NR-mediated signal in a subunit-dependent manner, in 2A these effects are most likely mediated by membrane-proximal residues, and the isoform-specific biophysical properties conferred by 2A and 2B are CTD-independent. The kinetic mechanisms we developed afford a quantitative approach to understanding how the intracellular domains of NR subunits can modulate the responses of the receptor. PMID:22948148

  7. Action of nicotine and analogs on acetylcholine receptors having mutations of transmitter-binding site residue αG153.

    PubMed

    Jadey, Snehal; Purohit, Prasad; Auerbach, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    A primary target for nicotine is the acetylcholine receptor channel (AChR). Some of the ability of nicotine to activate differentially AChR subtypes has been traced to a transmitter-binding site amino acid that is glycine in lower affinity and lysine in higher affinity AChRs. We studied the effects of mutations of this residue (αG153) in neuromuscular AChRs activated by nicotine and eight other agonists including nornicotine and anabasine. All of the mutations increased the unliganded gating equilibrium constant. The affinity of the resting receptor (K(d)) and the net binding energy from the agonist for gating (ΔG(B)) were estimated by cross-concentration fitting of single-channel currents. In all but one of the agonist/mutant combinations there was a moderate decrease in K(d) and essentially no change in ΔG(B). The exceptional case was nicotine plus lysine, which showed a large, >8,000-fold decrease in K(d) but no change in ΔG(B). The extraordinary specificity of this combination leads us to speculate that AChRs with a lysine at position αG153 may be exposed to a nicotine-like compound in vivo.

  8. A signal peptide missense mutation associated with nicotine dependence alters α2*-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function.

    PubMed

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Lukas, Ronald J; Li, Ming D

    2014-04-01

    A cytosine to thymidine (C → T) missense mutation in the signal peptide (SP) sequence (rs2472553) of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α2 subunit produces a threonine-to-isoleucine substitution (T22I) often associated with nicotine dependence (ND). We assessed effects on function of α2*-nAChR ('*'indicates presence of additional subunits) of this mutation, which could alter SP cleavage, RNA/protein secondary structure, and/or efficiency of transcription, translation, subunit assembly, receptor trafficking or cell surface expression. Two-electrode voltage clamp analyses indicate peak current responses to ACh or nicotine are decreased 2.8-5.8-fold for putative low sensitivity (LS; 10:1 ratio of α:β subunit cRNAs injected) α2β2- or α2β4-nAChR and increased for putative high sensitivity (HS; 1:10 α:β subunit ratio) α2β2- (5.7-15-fold) or α2β4- (1.9-2.2-fold) nAChR as a result of the mutation. Agonist potencies are decreased 1.6-4-fold for putative LS or HS α2(T22I)β2-nAChR or for either α2*-nAChR subtype formed in the presence of equal amounts of subunit cRNA, slightly decreased for LS α2(T22I)β4-nAChR, but increased 1.4-2.4-fold for HS α2(T22I)β4-nAChR relative to receptors containing wild-type α2 subunits. These effects suggest that the α2 subunit SP mutation generally favors formation of LS receptor isoforms. We hypothesize that lower sensitivity of human α2*-nAChR to nicotine could contribute to increased susceptibility to ND. To our knowledge this is the first report of a SP mutation having a functional effect in a member of cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels.

  9. Mode switching is the major mechanism of ligand regulation of InsP3 receptor calcium release channels.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Lucian; White, Carl; Cheung, King-Ho; Shuai, Jianwei; Parker, Ian; Pearson, John E; Foskett, J Kevin; Mak, Don-On Daniel

    2007-12-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) receptor (InsP(3)R) plays a critical role in generation of complex Ca(2+) signals in many cell types. In patch clamp recordings of isolated nuclei from insect Sf9 cells, InsP(3)R channels were consistently detected with regulation by cytoplasmic InsP(3) and free Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) very similar to that observed for vertebrate InsP(3)R. Long channel activity durations of the Sf9-InsP(3)R have now enabled identification of a novel aspect of InsP(3)R gating: modal gating. Using a novel algorithm to analyze channel modal gating kinetics, InsP(3)R gating can be separated into three distinct modes: a low activity mode, a fast kinetic mode, and a burst mode with channel open probability (P(o)) within each mode of 0.007 +/- 0.002, 0.24 +/- 0.03, and 0.85 +/- 0.02, respectively. Channels reside in each mode for long periods (tens of opening and closing events), and transitions between modes can be discerned with high resolution (within two channel opening and closing events). Remarkably, regulation of channel gating by [Ca(2+)](i) and [InsP(3)] does not substantially alter channel P(o) within a mode. Instead, [Ca(2+)](i) and [InsP(3)] affect overall channel P(o) primarily by changing the relative probability of the channel being in each mode, especially the high and low P(o) modes. This novel observation therefore reveals modal switching as the major mechanism of physiological regulation of InsP(3)R channel activity, with implications for the kinetics of Ca(2+) release events in cells.

  10. Yeast gain-of-function mutations reveal structure-function relationships conserved among different subfamilies of transient receptor potential channels.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhenwei; Zhou, Xinliang; Haynes, W John; Loukin, Stephen H; Anishkin, Andriy; Saimi, Yoshiro; Kung, Ching

    2007-12-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels found in animals, protists, and fungi are primary chemo-, thermo-, or mechanosensors. Current research emphasizes the characteristics of individual channels in each animal TRP subfamily but not the mechanisms common across subfamilies. A forward genetic screen of the TrpY1, the yeast TRP channel, recovered gain-of-function (GOF) mutations with phenotype in vivo and in vitro. Single-channel patch-clamp analyses of these GOF-mutant channels show prominent aberrations in open probability and channel kinetics. These mutations revealed functionally important aromatic amino acid residues in four locations: at the intracellular end of the fifth transmembrane helix (TM5), at both ends of TM6, and at the immediate extension of TM6. These aromatics have counterparts in most TRP subfamilies. The one in TM5 (F380L) aligns precisely with an exceptional Drosophila mutant allele (F550I) that causes constitutive activity in the canonical TRP channel, resulting in rapid and severe retinal degeneration beyond mere loss of phototaxis. Thus, this phenylalanine maintains the balance of various functional states (conformations) of a channel for insect phototransduction as well as one for fungal mechanotransduction. This residue is among a small cluster of phenylalanines found in all known subfamilies of TRP channels. This unique case illustrates that GOF mutations can reveal structure-function principles that can be generalized across different TRP subfamilies. It appears that the conserved aromatics in the four locations have conserved functions in most TRP channels. The possible mechanistic roles of these aromatics and the further use of yeast genetics to dissect TRP channels are discussed.

  11. Modal gating of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vij, Ridhima

    Many ion channels exhibit multiple patterns of kinetic activity in single-channel currents. This behavior is rare in WT mouse muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), where A2C↔A2O gating events are well-described by single exponentials. Also, single-channel open probability (PO) is essentially homogeneous at a given agonist concentration in the WT receptors. Here I report that perturbations of almost all the residues in loop C (alpha188-alpha199, at the agonist binding site) generate heterogeneity in PO ('modes'). Such unsettled activity was apparent with an alanine substitution at all positions in loop C (except alphaY190 and alphaY198) and with different side chain substitutions at alphaP197 for both adult- and fetal-type AChRs. I used single channel electrophysiology along with site-directed mutagenesis to study modal gating in AChRs consequent to mutations/deletions in loop C. The multiple patterns of kinetic activity arose from the difference in agonist affinity rather than in intrinsic AChR gating. Out of the four different agonists used to study the modal behavior, acetylcholine (ACh) showed a higher degree of kinetic heterogeneity compared to others. The time constant for switching between modes was long (~mins), suggesting that they arise from alternative, stable protein conformations. By studying AChRs having only 1 functional binding site, I attempted to find the source of the affinity difference, which was traced mainly to the alphadelta agonist site. Affinity at the neurotransmitter binding site is mainly determined by a core of five aromatic residues (alphaY93, alphaW149, alphaY190, alphaY198 and deltaW57). Phenylalanine substitutions at all aromatic residues except alphaY93 resulted in elimination of modes. Modes were also eliminated by alanine mutation at deltaW57 on the complementary side but not at other aromatics. Also, by substituting four gamma subunit residues into the delta subunit on the complementary beta sheet, I found that

  12. Raloxifene inhibits cloned Kv4.3 channels in an estrogen receptor-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Ju; Kim, Dae Hun; Lee, Hong Joon; Sung, Ki-Wug; Kwon, Oh-Joo; Hahn, Sang June

    2015-08-01

    Raloxifene is widely used for the treatment and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. We examined the effects of raloxifene on the Kv4.3 currents expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique and on the long-term modulation of Kv4.3 messenger RNA (mRNA) by real-time PCR analysis. Raloxifene decreased the Kv4.3 currents with an IC50 of 2.0 μM and accelerated the inactivation and activation kinetics in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of raloxifene on Kv4.3 were time-dependent: the association and dissociation rate constants for raloxifene were 9.5 μM(-1) s(-1) and 23.0 s(-1), respectively. The inhibition by raloxifene was voltage-dependent (δ = 0.13). Raloxifene shifted the steady-state inactivation curves in a hyperpolarizing direction and accelerated the closed-state inactivation of Kv4.3. Raloxifene slowed the time course of recovery from inactivation, thus producing a use-dependent inhibition of Kv4.3. β-Estradiol and tamoxifen had little effect on Kv4.3. A preincubation of ICI 182,780, an estrogen receptor antagonist, for 1 h had no effect on the inhibitory effect of raloxifene on Kv4.3. The metabolites of raloxifene, raloxifene-4'-glucuronide and raloxifene-6'-glucuronide, had little or no effect on Kv4.3. Coexpression of KChIP2 subunits did not alter the drug potency and steady-state inactivation of Kv4.3 channels. Long-term exposure to raloxifene (24 h) significantly decreased the expression level of Kv4.3 mRNA. This effect was not abolished by the coincubation with ICI 182,780. Raloxifene inhibited Kv4.3 channels by interacting with their open state during depolarization and with the closed state at subthreshold potentials. This effect was not mediated via an estrogen receptor. PMID:25231973

  13. Silencing A7-nAChR levels increases the sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to ixabepilone treatment.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chao-Chiang; Huang, Chien-Yu; Cheng, Wan-Li; Hung, Chin-Sheng; Chang, Yu-Jia; Wei, Po-Li

    2016-07-01

    Gastric cancer is an important health issue worldwide. Currently, improving the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy drugs is an important goal of cancer research. Alpha-7 nicotine acetylcholine receptor (A7-nAChR) is the key molecule that mediates gastric cancer progression, metastasis, and therapy responses; however, the role of A7-nAChR in the therapeutic efficacy of ixabepilone remains unclear. A7-nAChR expression was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology. The cytotoxicity of ixabepilone was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and ixabepilone-induced apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry and annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) apoptotic assay. The expression patterns of anti-apoptotic proteins (AKT, phospho-AKT, Mcl-1, and Bcl-2) and pro-apoptotic proteins (Bad and Bax) were determined by western blot. Our study found that A7-nAChR knockdown (A7-nAChR-KD) AGS cells were more sensitive to ixabepilone administration than scrambled control AGS cells. We found that A7-nAChR knockdown enhanced ixabepilone-induced cell death as evidenced by the increased number of annexin V-positive (apoptotic) cells. After scrambled control and A7-nAChR-KD cells were treated with ixabepilone, we found that pAKT and AKT levels were significantly reduced in both groups of cells. The levels of Bcl-2 and the anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 isoform increased dramatically after ixabepilone treatment in scrambled control cells but not in A7-nAChR-KD cells. Bad and Bax levels did not change between the treatment group and vehicle group in both A7-nAChR-KD and scrambled control cells, whereas cleaved PARP levels dramatically increased in ixabepilone-treated A7-nAChR-KD cells. Our results demonstrated that knockdown of A7-nAChR enhanced the sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to ixabepilone administration. Thus, the A7-nAChR expression level in patients with gastric cancer may be a good indicator of ixabepilone sensitivity.

  14. Dopamine D1 receptor modulation of calcium channel currents in horizontal cells of mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue; Grove, James C R; Hirano, Arlene A; Brecha, Nicholas C; Barnes, Steven

    2016-08-01

    Horizontal cells form the first laterally interacting network of inhibitory interneurons in the retina. Dopamine released onto horizontal cells under photic and circadian control modulates horizontal cell function. Using isolated, identified horizontal cells from a connexin-57-iCre × ROSA26-tdTomato transgenic mouse line, we investigated dopaminergic modulation of calcium channel currents (ICa) with whole cell patch-clamp techniques. Dopamine (10 μM) blocked 27% of steady-state ICa, an action blunted to 9% in the presence of the L-type Ca channel blocker verapamil (50 μM). The dopamine type 1 receptor (D1R) agonist SKF38393 (20 μM) inhibited ICa by 24%. The D1R antagonist SCH23390 (20 μM) reduced dopamine and SKF38393 inhibition. Dopamine slowed ICa activation, blocking ICa by 38% early in a voltage step. Enhanced early inhibition of ICa was eliminated by applying voltage prepulses to +120 mV for 100 ms, increasing ICa by 31% and 11% for early and steady-state currents, respectively. Voltage-dependent facilitation of ICa and block of dopamine inhibition after preincubation with a Gβγ-blocking peptide suggested involvement of Gβγ proteins in the D1R-mediated modulation. When the G protein activator guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS) was added intracellularly, ICa was smaller and showed the same slowed kinetics seen during D1R activation. With GTPγS in the pipette, additional block of ICa by dopamine was only 6%. Strong depolarizing voltage prepulses restored the GTPγS-reduced early ICa amplitude by 36% and steady-state ICa amplitude by 3%. These results suggest that dopaminergic inhibition of ICa via D1Rs is primarily mediated through the action of Gβγ proteins in horizontal cells. PMID:27193322

  15. Cloning, in Vitro expression, and novel phylogenetic classification of a channel catfish estrogen receptor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, Z.; Patino, R.; Gale, W.L.; Maule, A.G.; Densmore, L.D.

    1999-01-01

    We obtained two channel catfish estrogen receptor (ccER) cDNA from liver of female fish using RT–PCR. The two fragments were identical in sequence except that the smaller one had an out-of-frame deletion in the E domain, suggesting the existence of ccER splice variants. The larger fragment was used to screen a cDNA library from liver of a prepubescent female. A cDNA was obtained that encoded a 581-amino-acid ER with a deduced molecular weight of 63.8 kDa. Extracts of COS-7 cells transfected with ccER cDNA bound estrogen with high affinity (Kd = 4.7 nM) and specificity. Maximum parsimony and Neighbor Joining analyses were used to generate a phylogenetic classification of ccER on the basis of 18 full-length ER sequences. The tree suggested the existence of two major ER branches. One branch contained two clearly divergent clades which included all piscine ER (except Japanese eel ER) and all tetrapod ERα, respectively. The second major branch contained the eel ER and the mammalian ERβ. The high degree of divergence between the eel ER and mammalian ERβ suggested that they also represent distinct piscine and tetrapod ER. These data suggest that ERα and ERβ are present throughout vertebrates and that these two major ER types evolved by duplication of an ancestral ER gene. Sequence alignments with other members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily indicated the presence of 8 amino acids in the E domain that align exclusively among ER. Four of these amino acids have not received prior research attention and their function is unknown. The novel finding of putative ER splice variants in a nonmammalian vertebrate and the novel phylogenetic classification of ER offer new perspectives in understanding the diversification and function of ER.

  16. Trapping of glutamate and glycine during open channel block of rat hippocampal neuron NMDA receptors by 9-aminoacridine.

    PubMed Central

    Benveniste, M; Mayer, M L

    1995-01-01

    1. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor responses were recorded from rat hippocampal neurons grown in dissociated culture, using whole-cell, outside-out and nucleated patch recording techniques. Rapid perfusion was used to study voltage-dependent block of NMDA receptors by 9-aminoacridine (9-AA) and by Mg2+. 2. Large amplitude tail currents were evoked on depolarization to +60 mV after application at -100 mV of NMDA and 9-AA but not NMDA and Mg2+. These tail currents were resistant to block by competitive antagonists to the glutamate and glycine binding sites on NMDA receptors and were not evoked when either NMDA or 9-AA were applied alone. 3. The decay kinetics of the tail current were dependent on agonist affinity; the time required for 80% charge transfer was 10-fold briefer for NMDA than for glutamate and 7-fold briefer for L-alanine than for glycine. These results are in accord with a sequential model for block of NMDA receptors by 9-AA, in which neither glutamate nor glycine can dissociate from the open-blocked state of the receptor. 4. Tail current responses had amplitudes 2- to 4-fold larger than responses to maximally effective concentrations of glutamate and glycine, indicating that NMDA receptor channels accumulate in the open-blocked state during co-application of agonist and 9-AA. The rise time and decay kinetics of tail current responses were faster than the response to brief applications of a maximally effective concentration of glutamate. Together, these results suggest that at +60 mV recovery from block by 9-AA occurs faster than the rate of opening of NMDA receptors in response to glutamate. 5. Our experiments suggest that open channel block of NMDA receptors can provide a novel approach for measurement of both open probability and the first latency distribution for ion channel opening in response to the binding of agonists, and provide additional evidence suggesting that the delayed opening of NMDA receptor channels underlies slow activation and

  17. Heat Avoidance Is Regulated by Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Channels and a Neuropeptide Signaling Pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Glauser, Dominique A.; Chen, Will C.; Agin, Rebecca; MacInnis, Bronwyn L.; Hellman, Andrew B.; Garrity, Paul A.; Tan, Man-Wah; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to avoid noxious extremes of hot and cold is critical for survival and depends on thermal nociception. The TRPV subset of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels is heat activated and proposed to be responsible for heat detection in vertebrates and fruit flies. To gain insight into the genetic and neural basis of thermal nociception, we developed assays that quantify noxious heat avoidance in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and used them to investigate the genetic basis of this behavior. First, we screened mutants for 18 TRP channel genes (including all TRPV orthologs) and found only minor defects in heat avoidance in single and selected double and triple mutants, indicating that other genes are involved. Next, we compared two wild isolates of C. elegans that diverge in their threshold for heat avoidance and linked this phenotypic variation to a polymorphism in the neuropeptide receptor gene npr-1. Further analysis revealed that loss of either the NPR-1 receptor or its ligand, FLP-21, increases the threshold for heat avoidance. Cell-specific rescue of npr-1 implicates the interneuron RMG in the circuit regulating heat avoidance. This neuropeptide signaling pathway operates independently of the TRPV genes, osm-9 and ocr-2, since mutants lacking npr-1 and both TRPV channels had more severe defects in heat avoidance than mutants lacking only npr-1 or both osm-9 and ocr-2. Our results show that TRPV channels and the FLP-21/NPR-1 neuropeptide signaling pathway determine the threshold for heat avoidance in C. elegans. PMID:21368276

  18. Properties of transient K+ currents and underlying single K+ channels in rat olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The transient potassium current, IK(t), of enzymatically dissociated rat olfactory receptor neurons was studied using patch-clamp techniques. Upon depolarization from negative holding potentials, IK(t) activated rapidly and then inactivated with a time course described by the sum of two exponential components with time constants of 22.4 and 143 ms. Single-channel analysis revealed a further small component with a time constant of several seconds. Steady-state inactivation was complete at -20 mV and completely removed at -80 mV (midpoint -45 mV). Activation was significant at -40 mV and appeared to reach a maximum conductance at +40 mV (midpoint -13 mV). Deactivation was described by the sum of two voltage-dependent exponential components. Recovery from inactivation was extraordinarily slow (50 s at -100 mV) and the underlying processes appeared complex. IK(t) was reduced by 4- aminopyridine and tetraethylammonium applied externally. Increasing the external K+ concentration ([K+]o) from 5 to 25 mM partially removed IK(t) inactivation, usually without affecting activation kinetics. The elevated [K+]o also hyperpolarized the steady-state inactivation curve by 9 mV and significantly depolarized the voltage dependence of activation. Single transient K+ channels, with conductances of 17 and 26 pS, were observed in excised patches and often appeared to be localized into large clusters. These channels were similar to IK(t) in their kinetic, pharmacological, and voltage-dependent properties and their inactivation was also subject to modulation by [K+]o. The properties of IK(t) imply a role in action potential repolarization and suggest it may also be important in modulating spike parameters during neuronal burst firing. A simple method is also presented to correct for errors in the measurement of whole-cell resistance (Ro) that can result when patch-clamping very small cells. The analysis revealed a mean corrected Ro of 26 G omega for these cells. PMID:1865174

  19. Novel transcripts of the estrogen receptor α gene in channel catfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, Reynaldo; Xia, Zhenfang; Gale, William L.; Wu, Chunfa; Maule, Alec G.; Chang, Xiaotian

    2000-01-01

    Complementary DNA libraries from liver and ovary of an immature female channel catfish were screened with a homologous ERα cDNA probe. The hepatic library yielded two new channel catfish ER cDNAs that encode N-terminal ERα variants of different sizes. Relative to the catfish ERα (medium size; 581 residues) previously reported, these new cDNAs encode Long-ERα (36 residues longer) and Short-ERα (389 residues shorter). The 5′-end of Long-ERα cDNA is identical to that of Medium-ERα but has an additional 503-bp segment with an upstream, in-frame translation-start codon. Recombinant Long-ERα binds estrogen with high affinity (Kd = 3.4 nM), similar to that previously reported for Medium-ERα but lower than reported for catfish ERβ. Short-ERα cDNA encodes a protein that lacks most of the receptor protein and does not bind estrogen. Northern hybridization confirmed the existence of multiple hepatic ERα RNAs that include the size range of the ERα cDNAs obtained from the libraries as well as additional sizes. Using primers for RT-PCR that target locations internal to the protein-coding sequence, we also established the presence of several ERα cDNA variants with in-frame insertions in the ligand-binding and DNA-binding domains and in-frame or out-of-frame deletions in the ligand-binding domain. These internal variants showed patterns of expression that differed between the ovary and liver. Further, the ovarian library yielded a full-length, ERα antisense cDNA containing a poly(A) signal and tail. A limited survey of histological preparations from juvenile catfish by in situ hybridization using directionally synthesized cRNA probes also suggested the expression of ERα antisense RNA in a tissue-specific manner. In conclusion, channel catfish seemingly have three broad classes of ERα mRNA variants: those encoding N-terminal truncated variants, those encoding internal variants (including C-terminal truncated variants), and antisense mRNA. The sense variants may

  20. Batrachotoxin changes the properties of the muscarinic receptor in rat brain and heart: possible interaction(s) between muscarinic receptors and sodium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Armon, M; Kloog, Y; Henis, Y I; Sokolovsky, M

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Na+-channel activator batrachotoxin (BTX) on the binding properties of muscarinic receptors in homogenates of rat brain and heart were studied. BTX enhanced the affinity for the binding of the agonists carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine to the muscarinic receptors in brainstem and ventricle, but not in the cerebral cortex. Analysis of the data according to a two-site model for agonist binding indicated that the effect of BTX was to increase the affinity of the agonists to the high-affinity site. Guanyl nucleotides, known to induce interconversion of high-affinity agonist binding sites to the low-affinity state, canceled the effect of BTX on carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine binding. BTX had no effect on the binding of the agonist oxotremorine or on the binding of the antagonist [3H]-N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate. The local anesthetics dibucaine and tetracaine antagonized the effect of BTX on the binding of muscarinic agonists at concentrations known to inhibit the activation of Na+ channels by BTX. On the basis of these findings, we propose that in specific tissues the muscarinic receptors may interact with the BTX binding site (Na+ channels). PMID:2582418

  1. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Sensory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metherate, Raju

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholine release in sensory neocortex contributes to higher-order sensory function, in part by activating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Molecular studies have revealed a bewildering array of nAChR subtypes and cellular actions; however, there is some consensus emerging about the major nAChR subtypes and their functions in…

  2. ThermoTRP Channels in Nociceptors: Taking a Lead from Capsaicin Receptor TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Mandadi, Sravan; Roufogalis, Basil D.

    2008-01-01

    Nociceptors with peripheral and central projections express temperature sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, also called thermoTRP’s. Chemosensitivity of thermoTRP’s to certain natural compounds eliciting pain or exhibiting thermal properties has proven to be a good tool in characterizing these receptors. Capsaicin, a pungent chemical in hot peppers, has assisted in the cloning of the first thermoTRP, TRPV1. This discovery initiated the search for other receptors encoding the response to a wide range of temperatures encountered by the body. Of these, TRPV1 and TRPV2 encode unique modalities of thermal pain when exposed to noxious heat. The ability of TRPA1 to encode noxious cold is presently being debated. The role of TRPV1 in peripheral inflammatory pain and central sensitization during chronic pain is well known. In addition to endogenous agonists, a wide variety of chemical agonists and antagonists have been discovered to activate and inhibit TRPV1. Efforts are underway to determine conditions under which agonist-mediated desensitization of TRPV1 or inhibition by antagonists can produce analgesia. Also, identification of specific second messenger molecules that regulate phosphorylation of TRPV1 has been the focus of intense research, to exploit a broader approach to pain treatment. The search for a role of TRPV2 in pain remains dormant due to the lack of suitable experimental models. However, progress into TRPA1’s role in pain has received much attention recently. Another thermoTRP, TRPM8, encoding for the cool sensation and also expressed in nociceptors, has recently been shown to reduce pain via a central mechanism, thus opening a novel strategy for achieving analgesia. The role of other thermoTRP’s (TRPV3 and TRPV4) encoding for detection of warm temperatures and expressed in nociceptors cannot be excluded. This review will discuss current knowledge on the role of nociceptor thermoTRPs in pain and therapy and describes the

  3. Anisotropic a-C:H from Compression of Polyacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, M.; Parrinello, M.; Chiarotti, G. L.; Focher, P.; Tosatti, E.

    1996-03-01

    We have simulated the transformation of crystalline trans-polyacetylene into a-C:H under pressure by constant pressure ab initio molecular dynamics. Polyacetylene undergoes a gradual saturation of C-C bonds via chain interlinks, ending up at ~50 GPa with a-C:H containing 80% sp3 carbon atoms. The sp2-->sp3 conversion is irreversible and does not reverse by returning to zero pressure. The final a-C:H is a wide gap insulator and, at variance with the conventionally generated a-C:H, is highly anisotropic keeping some memory of the original polyacetylene chain axis.

  4. Receptor-mediated activation of a plant Ca2+-permeable ion channel involved in pathogen defense

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Sabine; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Frachisse, Jean-Marie; Wirtz, Wolfgang; Guern, Jean; Hedrich, Rainer; Scheel, Dierk

    1997-01-01

    Pathogen recognition at the plant cell surface typically results in the initiation of a multicomponent defense response. Transient influx of Ca2+ across the plasma membrane is postulated to be part of the signaling chain leading to pathogen resistance. Patch-clamp analysis of parsley protoplasts revealed a novel Ca2+-permeable, La3+-sensitive plasma membrane ion channel of large conductance (309 pS in 240 mM CaCl2). At an extracellular Ca2+ concentration of 1 mM, which is representative of the plant cell apoplast, unitary channel conductance was determined to be 80 pS. This ion channel (LEAC, for large conductance elicitor-activated ion channel) is reversibly activated upon treatment of parsley protoplasts with an oligopeptide elicitor derived from a cell wall protein of Phytophthora sojae. Structural features of the elicitor found previously to be essential for receptor binding, induction of defense-related gene expression, and phytoalexin formation are identical to those required for activation of LEAC. Thus, receptor-mediated stimulation of this channel appears to be causally involved in the signaling cascade triggering pathogen defense in parsley. PMID:11038609

  5. Synthesis, in vitro and in vivo studies, and molecular modeling of N-alkylated dextromethorphan derivatives as non-competitive inhibitors of α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Kozak, Joanna; Ligeza, Agnieszka; Szacon, Elzbieta; Wrobel, Tomasz M; Budzynska, Barbara; Biala, Grazyna; Fornal, Emilia; Poso, Antti; Wainer, Irving W; Matosiuk, Dariusz

    2014-12-15

    9 N-alkylated derivatives of dextromethorphan are synthesized and studied as non-competitive inhibitors of α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In vitro activity towards α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is determined using a patch-clamp technique and is in the micromolar range. Homology modeling, molecular docking and molecular dynamics of ligand-receptor complexes in POPC membrane are used to find the mode of interactions of N-alkylated dextromethorphan derivatives with α3β4 nAChR. The compounds, similarly as dextromethorphan, interact with the middle portion of α3β4 nAChR ion channel. Finally, behavioral tests confirmed potential application of the studied compounds for the treatment of addiction.

  6. Desensitization contributes to the synaptic response of gain-of-function mutants of the muscle nicotinic receptor.

    PubMed

    Elenes, Sergio; Ni, Ying; Cymes, Gisela D; Grosman, Claudio

    2006-11-01

    Although the muscle nicotinic receptor (AChR) desensitizes almost completely in the steady presence of high concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh), it is well established that AChRs do not accumulate in desensitized states under normal physiological conditions of neurotransmitter release and clearance. Quantitative considerations in the framework of plausible kinetic schemes, however, lead us to predict that mutations that speed up channel opening, slow down channel closure, and/or slow down the dissociation of neurotransmitter (i.e., gain-of-function mutations) increase the extent to which AChRs desensitize upon ACh removal. In this paper, we confirm this prediction by applying high-frequency trains of brief ( approximately 1 ms) ACh pulses to outside-out membrane patches expressing either lab-engineered or naturally occurring (disease-causing) gain-of-function mutants. Entry into desensitization was evident in our experiments as a frequency-dependent depression in the peak value of succesive macroscopic current responses, in a manner that is remarkably consistent with the theoretical expectation. We conclude that the comparatively small depression of the macroscopic currents observed upon repetitive stimulation of the wild-type AChR is due, not to desensitization being exceedingly slow but, rather, to the particular balance between gating, entry into desensitization, and ACh dissociation rate constants. Disruption of this fine balance by, for example, mutations can lead to enhanced desensitization even if the kinetics of entry into, and recovery from, desensitization themselves are not affected. It follows that accounting for the (usually overlooked) desensitization phenomenon is essential for the correct interpretation of mutagenesis-driven structure-function relationships and for the understanding of pathological synaptic transmission at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction.

  7. Electrophysiology-based analysis of human histamine H(4) receptor pharmacology using GIRK channel coupling in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Sahlholm, Kristoffer; Nilsson, Johanna; Marcellino, Daniel; Fuxe, Kjell; Arhem, Peter

    2008-09-01

    The recently cloned histamine H(4) receptor is expressed predominantly in haematopoietic cells and has been found to modulate the function of mast cells, eosinophils, dendritic cells and T lymphocytes. It represents an attractive target for pharmacological interventions against a number of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. In the present work we used two-electrode voltage-clamp to demonstrate histamine H(4) receptor modulation of G protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium (GIRK) channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In accordance with earlier findings in other effector systems, full agonism by histamine and (R)-alpha-methylhistamine, partial agonism by clobenpropit and inverse agonism by thioperamide were observed. Furthermore, in oocytes injected with low amounts of receptor cRNA, clobenpropit apparently acted as a neutral antagonist. We also used the high temporal resolution afforded by this system to study the differential time courses of response deactivation upon ligand washout for clobenpropit and (R)-alpha-methylhistamine. GIRK channels represent a novel effector system for histamine H(4) receptor modulation, which may be of physiological relevance and prove useful in the development of compounds targeting this receptor.

  8. Phenylalanine in the pore of the Erwinia ligand-gated ion channel modulates picrotoxinin potency but not receptor function.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew J; Alqazzaz, Mona; Price, Kerry L; Weston, David A; Lummis, Sarah C R

    2014-10-01

    The Erwinia ligand-gated ion channel (ELIC) is a bacterial homologue of eukaryotic Cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels. This protein has the potential to be a useful model for Cys-loop receptors but is unusual in that it has an aromatic residue (Phe) facing into the pore, leading to some predictions that this protein is incapable of ion flux. Subsequent studies have shown this is not the case, so here we probe the role of this residue by examining the function of the ELIC in cases in which the Phe has been substituted with a range of alternative amino acids, expressed in Xenopus oocytes and functionally examined. Most of the mutations have little effect on the GABA EC50, but the potency of the weak pore-blocking antagonist picrotoxinin at F16'A-, F16'D-, F16'S-, and F16'T-containing receptors was increased to levels comparable with those of Cys-loop receptors, suggesting that this antagonist can enter the pore only when residue 16' is small. T6'S has no effect on picrotoxinin potency when expressed alone but abolishes the increased potency when combined with F16'S, indicating that the inhibitor binds at position 6', as in Cys-loop receptors, if it can enter the pore. Overall, the data support the proposal that the ELIC pore is a good model for Cys-loop receptor pores if the role of F16' is taken into consideration.

  9. nAChR agonist-induced cognition enhancement: integration of cognitive and neuronal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sarter, Martin; Parikh, Vinay; Howe, William M

    2009-10-01

    The identification and characterization of drugs for the treatment of cognitive disorders has been hampered by the absence of comprehensive hypotheses. Such hypotheses consist of (a) a precisely defined cognitive operation that fundamentally underlies a range of cognitive abilities and capacities and, if impaired, contributes to the manifestation of diverse cognitive symptoms; (b) defined neuronal mechanisms proposed to mediate the cognitive operation of interest; (c) evidence indicating that the putative cognition enhancer facilitates these neuronal mechanisms; (d) and evidence indicating that the cognition enhancer facilitates cognitive performance by modulating these underlying neuronal mechanisms. The evidence on the neuronal and attentional effects of nAChR agonists, specifically agonists selective for alpha4beta2* nAChRs, has begun to support such a hypothesis. nAChR agonists facilitate the detection of signals by augmenting the transient increases in prefrontal cholinergic activity that are necessary for a signal to gain control over behavior in attentional contexts. The prefrontal microcircuitry mediating these effects include alpha4beta2* nAChRs situated on the terminals of thalamic inputs and the glutamatergic stimulation of cholinergic terminals via ionotropic glutamate receptors. Collectively, this evidence forms the basis for hypothesis-guided development and characterization of cognition enhancers.

  10. Molecular recognition of thiaclopride by Aplysia californica AChBP: new insights from a computational investigation.

    PubMed

    Alamiddine, Zakaria; Selvam, Balaji; Cerón-Carrasco, José P; Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Lebreton, Jacques; Thany, Steeve H; Laurent, Adèle D; Graton, Jérôme; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2015-12-01

    The binding of thiaclopride (THI), a neonicotinoid insecticide, with Aplysia californica acetylcholine binding protein (Ac-AChBP), the surrogate of the extracellular domain of insects nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, has been studied with a QM/QM' hybrid methodology using the ONIOM approach (M06-2X/6-311G(d):PM6). The contributions of Ac-AChBP key residues for THI binding are accurately quantified from a structural and energetic point of view. The importance of water mediated hydrogen-bond (H-bond) interactions involving two water molecules and Tyr55 and Ser189 residues in the vicinity of the THI nitrile group, is specially highlighted. A larger stabilization energy is obtained with the THI-Ac-AChBP complex compared to imidacloprid (IMI), the forerunner of neonicotinoid insecticides. Pairwise interaction energy calculations rationalize this result with, in particular, a significantly more important contribution of the pivotal aromatic residues Trp147 and Tyr188 with THI through CH···π/CH···O and π-π stacking interactions, respectively. These trends are confirmed through a complementary non-covalent interaction (NCI) analysis of selected THI-Ac-AChBP amino acid pairs. PMID:26589615

  11. Transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channel contributes to migration of androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kilch, Tatiana; Jochum, Marcus Martin; Urban, Sabine Katharina; Jung, Volker; Stöckle, Michael; Rother, Karen; Greiner, Markus; Peinelt, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Impaired Ca2+ signaling in prostate cancer contributes to several cancer hallmarks, such as enhanced proliferation and migration and a decreased ability to induce apoptosis. Na+ influx via transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channel (TRPM4) can reduce store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) by decreasing the driving force for Ca2+. In patients with prostate cancer, gene expression of TRPM4 is elevated. Recently, TRPM4 was identified as a cancer driver gene in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer. We investigated TRPM4 protein expression in cancer tissue samples from 20 patients with prostate cancer. We found elevated TRPM4 protein levels in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostate cancer tissue compared to healthy tissue. In primary human prostate epithelial cells (hPEC) from healthy tissue and in the androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3, TRPM4 mediated large Na+ currents. We demonstrated significantly increased SOCE after siRNA targeting of TRPM4 in hPEC and DU145 cells. In addition, knockdown of TRPM4 reduced migration but not proliferation of DU145 and PC3 cells. Taken together, our data identify TRPM4 as a regulator of SOCE in hPEC and DU145 cells, demonstrate a role for TRPM4 in cancer cell migration and suggest that TRPM4 is a promising potential therapeutic target. PMID:26496025

  12. Receptor channel TRPC6 orchestrate the activation of human hepatic stellate cell under hypoxia condition

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Soumya C; Kannan, Anbarasu; Gopal, Ashidha; Devaraj, Niranjali; Halagowder, Devaraj

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a specialized stromal cytotype have a great impact on the biological behaviors of liver diseases. Despite this fact, the underlying mechanism that regulates HSC still remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to understand the role of TRPC6 signaling in regulating the molecular mechanism of HSCs in response to hypoxia. In the present study we showed that under hypoxia condition, the upregulated Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α (HIF1α) increases NICD activation, which in turn induces the expression of transient receptor potential channel 6 (TRPC6) in HSC line lx-2. TRPC6 causes a sustained elevation of intracellular calcium which is coupled with the activation of the calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT) pathway which activates the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. TRPC6 also activates SMAD2/3 dependent TGF-β signaling in facilitating upregulated expression of αSMA and collagen. As activated HSCs may be a suitable target for HCC therapy and targeting these cells rather than the HCC cells may result in a greater response. Collectively, our studies indicate for the first time the detailed mechanism of activation of HSC through TRPC6 signaling and thus being a promising therapeutic target. - Highlights: • HIF1α increases NICD, induces TRPC6 in lx2 cells. • TRPC6 a novel regulator in the activation of HSC. • HSCs as target for HCC therapy.

  13. Involvement of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in Myoblast Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, Mitsutoshi; Ogura, Yuji; Funabashi, Toshiya; Akema, Tatsuo

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the complex process of muscle regeneration after injury remain unknown. Transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is expressed in several cell types, including skeletal muscle, and is activated by high temperature and by certain molecules secreted during tissue inflammation. Severe inflammation and local temperature perturbations are induced during muscle regeneration, which suggests that TRPV1 might be activated and involved in the process. The aim of this study, was to clarify the role of TRPV1 in the myogenic potential of satellite cells responsible for muscle regeneration. We found that mRNA and protein levels of TRPV1 increased during regeneration after cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury in mice. Using isolated mouse satellite cells (i.e., myoblasts), we observed that activation of TRPV1 by its agonist capsaicin (CAP) augmented myogenin protein levels. Whereas CAP did not alter myoblast proliferation, it facilitated myoblast fusion (evaluated using myonucleii number per myotube and fusion index). In contrast, suppression of TRPV1 by siRNA impaired myoblast fusion. Using mice, we also demonstrated that intramuscular injection of CAP facilitated muscle repair after CTX-induced muscle injury. Moreover, we showed that these roles of TRPV1 might be mediated by interleukin-4 and calcium signaling during myoblast fusion. Collectively, these results suggest that TRPV1 underlies normal myogenesis through promotion of myoblast fusion. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2275-2285, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26892397

  14. Involvement of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in Myoblast Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, Mitsutoshi; Ogura, Yuji; Funabashi, Toshiya; Akema, Tatsuo

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the complex process of muscle regeneration after injury remain unknown. Transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is expressed in several cell types, including skeletal muscle, and is activated by high temperature and by certain molecules secreted during tissue inflammation. Severe inflammation and local temperature perturbations are induced during muscle regeneration, which suggests that TRPV1 might be activated and involved in the process. The aim of this study, was to clarify the role of TRPV1 in the myogenic potential of satellite cells responsible for muscle regeneration. We found that mRNA and protein levels of TRPV1 increased during regeneration after cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury in mice. Using isolated mouse satellite cells (i.e., myoblasts), we observed that activation of TRPV1 by its agonist capsaicin (CAP) augmented myogenin protein levels. Whereas CAP did not alter myoblast proliferation, it facilitated myoblast fusion (evaluated using myonucleii number per myotube and fusion index). In contrast, suppression of TRPV1 by siRNA impaired myoblast fusion. Using mice, we also demonstrated that intramuscular injection of CAP facilitated muscle repair after CTX-induced muscle injury. Moreover, we showed that these roles of TRPV1 might be mediated by interleukin-4 and calcium signaling during myoblast fusion. Collectively, these results suggest that TRPV1 underlies normal myogenesis through promotion of myoblast fusion. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2275-2285, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Novel role for the transient receptor potential channel TRPM2 in prostate cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, X; Sikka, S C; Huang, L; Sun, C; Xu, C; Jia, D; Abdel-Mageed, A B; Pottle, J E; Taylor, J T; Li, M

    2009-01-01

    We have identified a novel function for a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) protein super-family, TRPM2, in prostate cancer cell proliferation. TRPM2 encodes a non-selective cation-permeable ion channel. We found that selectively knocking down TRPM2 with the small interfering RNA technique inhibited the growth of prostate cancer cells but not of non-cancerous cells. The subcellular localization of this protein is also remarkably different between cancerous and non-cancerous cells. In BPH-1 (benign), TRPM2 protein is homogenously located near the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm, whereas in the cancerous cells (PC-3 and DU-145), a significant amount of the TRPM2 protein is located in the nuclei in a clustered pattern. Furthermore, we have found that TRPM2 inhibited nuclear ADP-ribosylation in prostate cancer cells. However, TRPM2 knockdown-induced inhibition of proliferation is independent of the activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. We conclude that TRPM2 is essential for prostate cancer cell proliferation and may be a potential target for the selective treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:20029400

  16. Methylglyoxal Activates Nociceptors through Transient Receptor Potential Channel A1 (TRPA1)

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Mirjam J.; Filipovic, Milos R.; Leffler, Andreas; de la Roche, Jeanne; Kistner, Katrin; Fischer, Michael J.; Fleming, Thomas; Zimmermann, Katharina; Ivanovic-Burmazovic, Ivana; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; Reeh, Peter W.; Sauer, Susanne K.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain can develop as an agonizing sequela of diabetes mellitus and chronic uremia. A chemical link between both conditions of altered metabolism is the highly reactive compound methylglyoxal (MG), which accumulates in all cells, in particular neurons, and leaks into plasma as an index of the severity of the disorder. The electrophilic structure of this cytotoxic ketoaldehyde suggests TRPA1, a receptor channel deeply involved in inflammatory and neuropathic pain, as a molecular target. We demonstrate that extracellularly applied MG accesses specific intracellular binding sites of TRPA1, activating inward currents and calcium influx in transfected cells and sensory neurons, slowing conduction velocity in unmyelinated peripheral nerve fibers, and stimulating release of proinflammatory neuropeptides from and action potential firing in cutaneous nociceptors. Using a model peptide of the N terminus of human TRPA1, we demonstrate the formation of disulfide bonds based on MG-induced modification of cysteines as a novel mechanism. In conclusion, MG is proposed to be a candidate metabolite that causes neuropathic pain in metabolic disorders and thus is a promising target for medicinal chemistry. PMID:22740698

  17. Modelling interactions between Loop1 of Fasciculin2 (Fas2) and Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase ( Tc AChE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Jiande; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2006-11-01

    Four interaction models for the binding of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase ( TcAChE) with Loop1 of Fasciculin2 are investigated at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. The total binding energy of three fragments (P1-P3) which belong to the omega loop Cys67-Cys94 of TcAChE contributes almost 67% of the entire binding, suggesting the domination of this omega loop on the interaction between AChE and Loop1 of Fas2. The energy decomposition illustrates that the interactions mainly consist of electrostatic components. The polar solvent which reduces the binding energies of the studied models implies the significant impact of the solvent on the binding of Fas2 and AChE.

  18. Identification and functional expression of a family of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the central nervous system of the mollusc Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    van Nierop, Pim; Bertrand, Sonia; Munno, David W; Gouwenberg, Yvonne; van Minnen, Jan; Spafford, J David; Syed, Naweed I; Bertrand, Daniel; Smit, August B

    2006-01-20

    We described a family of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits underlying cholinergic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS) of the mollusc Lymnaea stagnalis. By using degenerate PCR cloning, we identified 12 subunits that display a high sequence similarity to nAChR subunits, of which 10 are of the alpha-type, 1 is of the beta-type, and 1 was not classified because of insufficient sequence information. Heterologous expression of identified subunits confirms their capacity to form functional receptors responding to acetylcholine. The alpha-type subunits can be divided into groups that appear to underlie cation-conducting (excitatory) and anion-conducting (inhibitory) channels involved in synaptic cholinergic transmission. The expression of the Lymnaea nAChR subunits, assessed by real time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization, indicates that it is localized to neurons and widespread in the CNS, with the number and localization of expressing neurons differing considerably between subunit types. At least 10% of the CNS neurons showed detectable nAChR subunit expression. In addition, cholinergic neurons, as indicated by the expression of the vesicular ACh transporter, comprise approximately 10% of the neurons in all ganglia. Together, our data suggested a prominent role for fast cholinergic transmission in the Lymnaea CNS by using a number of neuronal nAChR subtypes comparable with vertebrate species but with a functional complexity that may be much higher.

  19. Neurophysiological predictors of long term response to AChE inhibitors in AD patients

    PubMed Central

    Di, L; Oliviero, A; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Marra, C; Ghirlanda, S; Ranieri, F; Gainotti, G; Tonali, P

    2005-01-01

    Background: In vivo evaluation of cholinergic circuits of the human brain has recently been introduced using a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol based on coupling peripheral nerve stimulation with motor cortex TMS (short latency afferent inhibition, SAI). SAI is reduced in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and drugs enhancing cholinergic transmission increase SAI. Methods: We evaluated whether SAI testing, together with SAI test-retest, after a single dose of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor rivastigmine, might be useful in predicting the response after 1 year treatment with rivastigmine in 16 AD patients. Results: Fourteen AD patients had pathologically reduced SAI. SAI was increased after administration of a single oral dose of rivastigmine in AD patients with abnormal baseline SAI, but individual responses to rivastigmine varied widely, with SAI change ranging from an increase in inhibition of ∼50% of test size to no change. Baseline SAI and the increase in SAI after a single dose of rivastigmine were correlated with response to long term treatment. A normal SAI in baseline conditions, or an abnormal SAI in baseline conditions that was not greatly increased by a single oral dose of rivastigmine, were invariably associated with poor response to long term treatment, while an abnormal SAI in baseline conditions in conjunction with a large increase in SAI after a single dose of rivastigmine was associated with good response to long term treatment in most of the patients. Conclusions: Evaluation of SAI may be useful for identifying AD patients likely to respond to treatment with AChE inhibitors. PMID:16024879

  20. Functional properties of homomeric, human alpha 7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors heterologously expressed in the SH-EP1 human epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingke; Kuo, Yen-Ping; George, Andrew A; Peng, Jian-Hong; Purandare, Madhuri Singh; Schroeder, Katherine M; Lukas, Ronald J; Wu, Jie

    2003-06-01

    alpha 7-Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha 7-nAChRs) are broadly distributed in the central nervous system, where they play important roles in chemical and electrical signaling, and perhaps in neurite outgrowth, synaptic plasticity, and neuronal death/survival. To help elucidate their normal and pathophysiological roles, we have heterologously expressed human alpha 7-nAChR in transfected SH-EP1 human epithelial cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses demonstrate expression of human alpha 7 subunits as messenger RNA. Patch-clamp recordings exploiting a novel strategy to prevent functional rundown of whole-cell peak current responses to repeated acute challenges with nicotinic agonists show successful expression of functional alpha 7-nAChR that mediate inward currents characterized by rapid phases of activation and inactivation. Concentration-response curves show that nicotine, acetylcholine, and choline are efficacious agonists at human alpha 7-nAChRs. Current-voltage relationships show inward rectification for agonist-induced currents. Human alpha 7-nAChRs exhibit some sensitivity to alpha 7-nAChR antagonists alpha-bungarotoxin (Bgt) or methyllycaconitine (MLA) when applied coincidentally with agonist, but much higher affinity block occurs when cells and alpha 7-nAChRs are pre-exposed to antagonists for 2 min before challenge with agonist. Both Bgt and MLA are competitive inhibitors of alpha 7-nAChR function. Whole-cell current peak amplitudes and half-times for inactivation of alpha 7-nAChR functional responses to nicotine are dramatically reduced in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, suggestive of high Ca2+ permeability of the alpha 7-nAChR channel. Thus, heterologously expressed human alpha 7-nAChR in mammalian cells have properties of native alpha 7-nAChR or of alpha 7-nAChR heterologously expressed in other systems and serve as excellent models for studies of molecular bases of alpha 7-nACh

  1. [Development of physical dependence on nicotine and endogenous opioid system--participation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor].

    PubMed

    Kishioka, Shiroh; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Saika, Fumihiro; Yamamoto, Chizuko

    2014-10-01

    Nicotine (NIC) regulates various cellular functions acting on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). And nAChR consists of ligand-gated cation channels with pentameric structure and composed of α and β subunits. In the central nervous system, α 4 β 2 and α 7 nAChRs are the most abundantly expressed as nAChR subtypes. There are several lines of evidence indicating that systemic administration of NIC elicits the release of endogenous opioids, such as, endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins, in the brain. NIC exerts numerous acute effects, for example, antinociceptive effects and the activating effects of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. In these effects, NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation, was inhibited by opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone (NLX), and was also suppressed in morphine tolerated mice, indicating the participation of the endogenous opioid system in NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation. Moreover, NIC-induced antinociception was antagonized by both α 4 β 2 and α 7 nAChR antagonists, while NIC-induced HPA axis activation was antagonized by α 4 β 2 nAChR antagonist, but not by α 7 nAChR antagonist. These results suggest that the endogenous opioid system may not be located on the downstream of α 4 β 2 nAChR. On the other hand, NIC has substantial physical dependence liability. NLX elicits NIC withdrawal after repeated NIC administration evaluated by corticosterone increase as a withdrawal sign, and NLX-precipitated NIC withdrawal is inhibited by concomitant administration of other opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone, indicating the participation of endogenous opioid system in the development of physical dependence on NIC. NLX-precipitated NIC withdrawal was also inhibited by concomitant administration of an α 7 nAChR antagonist, but not an α 4 β 2 nAChR antagonist. Taken together, these findings suggest that the endogenous opioid system may be located on the downstream of α 7

  2. [Development of physical dependence on nicotine and endogenous opioid system--participation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor].

    PubMed

    Kishioka, Shiroh; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Saika, Fumihiro; Yamamoto, Chizuko

    2014-10-01

    Nicotine (NIC) regulates various cellular functions acting on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). And nAChR consists of ligand-gated cation channels with pentameric structure and composed of α and β subunits. In the central nervous system, α 4 β 2 and α 7 nAChRs are the most abundantly expressed as nAChR subtypes. There are several lines of evidence indicating that systemic administration of NIC elicits the release of endogenous opioids, such as, endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins, in the brain. NIC exerts numerous acute effects, for example, antinociceptive effects and the activating effects of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. In these effects, NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation, was inhibited by opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone (NLX), and was also suppressed in morphine tolerated mice, indicating the participation of the endogenous opioid system in NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation. Moreover, NIC-induced antinociception was antagonized by both α 4 β 2 and α 7 nAChR antagonists, while NIC-induced HPA axis activation was antagonized by α 4 β 2 nAChR antagonist, but not by α 7 nAChR antagonist. These results suggest that the endogenous opioid system may not be located on the downstream of α 4 β 2 nAChR. On the other hand, NIC has substantial physical dependence liability. NLX elicits NIC withdrawal after repeated NIC administration evaluated by corticosterone increase as a withdrawal sign, and NLX-precipitated NIC withdrawal is inhibited by concomitant administration of other opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone, indicating the participation of endogenous opioid system in the development of physical dependence on NIC. NLX-precipitated NIC withdrawal was also inhibited by concomitant administration of an α 7 nAChR antagonist, but not an α 4 β 2 nAChR antagonist. Taken together, these findings suggest that the endogenous opioid system may be located on the downstream of α 7

  3. Congenital myasthenic syndromes: I. Deficiency and short open-time of the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Engel, A G; Nagel, A; Walls, T J; Harper, C M; Waisburg, H A

    1993-12-01

    A 5.5-year-old girl had myasthenic symptoms since birth. Tests for antiacetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies were negative. To investigate the character of the neuromuscular transmission defect, an intercostal muscle specimen was obtained at age 27 months. Immune deposits were absent from the endplates. On electron microscopy, most postsynaptic regions appeared normal, but the density of AChR on the junctional folds was diffusely reduced. In vitro microelectrode studies revealed that the number of transmitter quanta released by nerve impulse was normal. The amplitude of miniature of endplate potentials and currents was abnormally low. A study of the kinetic properties of AChR by analysis of acetylcholine-induced current noise demonstrated a significant decrease in mean channel open-time; the mean channel conductance was normal. The safety margin of neuromuscular transmission in this disorder is likely to be compromised by the deficiency and abnormal kinetic properties of AChR. The findings are unique among those patients with congenital AChR deficiency described to date. PMID:8232383

  4. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor reconstitution in Au(111)-supported thiolipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Pissinis, Diego E; Diaz, Carolina; Maza, Eliana; Bonini, Ida C; Barrantes, Francisco J; Salvarezza, Roberto C; Schilardi, Patricia L

    2015-10-14

    The insertion and function of the muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in Au(111)-supported thiolipid self-assembled monolayers have been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and electrochemical techniques. It was possible for the first time to resolve the supramolecular arrangement of the protein spontaneously inserted in a thiolipid monolayer in an aqueous solution. Geometric supramolecular arrays of nAChRs were observed, most commonly in a triangular form compatible with three nAChR dimers of ∼20 nm each. Addition of the full agonist carbamoylcholine activated and opened the nAChR ion channel, as revealed by the increase in capacitance relative to that of the nAChR-thiolipid system under basal conditions. Thus, the self-assembled system appears to be a viable biomimetic model to measure ionic conductance mediated by ion-gated ion channels under different experimental conditions, with potential applications in biotechnology and pharmacology. PMID:26355753

  5. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor reconstitution in Au(111)-supported thiolipid monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pissinis, Diego E.; Diaz, Carolina; Maza, Eliana; Bonini, Ida C.; Barrantes, Francisco J.; Salvarezza, Roberto C.; Schilardi, Patricia L.

    2015-09-01

    The insertion and function of the muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in Au(111)-supported thiolipid self-assembled monolayers have been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and electrochemical techniques. It was possible for the first time to resolve the supramolecular arrangement of the protein spontaneously inserted in a thiolipid monolayer in an aqueous solution. Geometric supramolecular arrays of nAChRs were observed, most commonly in a triangular form compatible with three nAChR dimers of ~20 nm each. Addition of the full agonist carbamoylcholine activated and opened the nAChR ion channel, as revealed by the increase in capacitance relative to that of the nAChR-thiolipid system under basal conditions. Thus, the self-assembled system appears to be a viable biomimetic model to measure ionic conductance mediated by ion-gated ion channels under different experimental conditions, with potential applications in biotechnology and pharmacology.

  6. Electron microscopic evidence for nucleation and growth of 3D acetylcholine receptor microcrystals in structured lipid-detergent matrices.

    PubMed

    Paas, Yoav; Cartaud, Jean; Recouvreur, Michel; Grailhe, Regis; Dufresne, Virginie; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Landau, Ehud M; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2003-09-30

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) belong to a superfamily of oligomeric proteins that transduce electric signals across the cell membrane on binding of neurotransmitters. These receptors harbor a large extracellular ligand-binding domain directly linked to an ion-conducting channel-forming domain that spans the cell membrane 20 times and considerably extends into the cytoplasm. Thus far, none of these receptor channels has been crystallized in three dimensions. The crystallization of the AChR from Torpedo marmorata electric organs is challenged here in lipidic-detergent matrices. Detergent-soluble AChR complexed with alpha-bungarotoxin (alphaBTx), a polypeptidic competitive antagonist, was purified. The AChR-alphaBTx complex was reconstituted in a lipidic matrix composed of monoolein bilayers that are structured in three dimensions. The alphaBTx was conjugated to a photo-stable fluorophore, enabling us to monitor the physical behavior of the receptor-toxin complex in the lipidic matrix under light stereomicroscope, and to freeze fracture regions containing the receptor-toxin complex for visualization under a transmission electron microscope. Conditions were established for forming 2D receptor-toxin lattices that are stacked in the third dimension. 3D AChR nanocrystals were thereby grown inside the highly viscous lipidic 3D matrix. Slow emulsification of the lipidic matrix converted these nanocrystals into 3D elongated thin crystal plates of micrometer size. The latter are stable in detergent-containing aqueous solutions and can currently be used for seeding and epitaxial growth, en route to crystals of appropriate dimensions for x-ray diffraction studies.

  7. Conformational Dynamics of Kir3.1/Kir3.2 Channel Activation Via δ-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Richard-Lalonde, Melissa; Nagi, Karim; Audet, Nicolas; Sleno, Rory; Amraei, Mohammad; Hogue, Mireille; Balboni, Gianfranco; Schiller, Peter W.; Bouvier, Michel; Hébert, Terence E.; Pineyro, Graciela

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed how conformational information encoded by ligand binding to δ-opioid receptors (DORs) is transmitted to Kir3.1/Kir3.2 channels. Human embryonic kidney 293 cells were transfected with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) donor/acceptor pairs that allowed us to evaluate independently reciprocal interactions among signaling partners. These and coimmunoprecipitation studies indicated that DORs, Gβγ, and Kir3 subunits constitutively interacted with one another. GαoA associated with DORs and Gβγ, but despite being part of the complex, no evidence of its direct association with the channel was obtained. DOR activation by different ligands left DOR-Kir3 interactions unmodified but modulated BRET between DOR-GαoA, DOR-Gβγ, GαoA-Gβγ, and Gβγ-Kir3 interfaces. Ligand-induced BRET changes assessing Gβγ-Kir3.1 subunit interaction 1) followed similar kinetics to those monitoring the GαoA-Gβγ interface, 2) displayed the same order of efficacy as those observed at the DOR-Gβγ interface, 3) were sensitive to pertussis toxin, and 4) were predictive of whether a ligand could evoke channel currents. Conformational changes at the Gβγ/Kir3 interface were lost when Kir3.1 subunits were replaced by a mutant lacking essential sites for Gβγ-mediated activation. Thus, conformational information encoded by agonist binding to the receptor is relayed to the channel via structural rearrangements that involve repositioning of Gβγ with respect to DORs, GαoA, and channel subunits. Further, the fact that BRET changes at the Gβγ-Kir3 interface are predictive of a ligand’s ability to induce channel currents points to these conformational biosensors as screening tools for identifying GPCR ligands that induce Kir3 channel activation. PMID:23175530

  8. Direct Proof of the In Vivo Pathogenic Role of the AChR Autoantibodies from Myasthenia Gravis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kordas, Gregory; Lagoumintzis, George; Sideris, Sotirios; Poulas, Konstantinos; Tzartos, Socrates J.

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that the autoantibodies (autoAbs) against muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients are the main pathogenic factor in MG; however, this belief has not yet been confirmed with direct observations. Although animals immunized with AChR or injected with anti-AChR monoclonal Abs, or with crude human MG Ig fractions exhibit MG symptoms, the pathogenic role of isolated anti-AChR autoAbs, and, more importantly, the absence of pathogenic factor(s) in the autoAb-depleted MG sera has not yet been shown by in vivo studies. Using recombinant extracellular domains of the human AChR α and β subunits, we have isolated autoAbs from the sera of four MG patients. The ability of these isolated anti-subunit Abs and of the Ab-depleted sera to passively transfer experimental autoimmune MG in Lewis rats was investigated. We found that the isolated anti-subunit Abs were at least as efficient as the corresponding whole sera or whole Ig in causing experimental MG. Abs to both α- and β-subunit were pathogenic although the anti-α-subunit were much more efficient than the anti-β-subunit ones. Interestingly, the autoAb-depleted sera were free of pathogenic activity. The later suggests that the myasthenogenic potency of the studied anti-AChR MG sera is totally due to their anti-AChR autoAbs, and therefore selective elimination of the anti-AChR autoAbs from MG patients may be an efficient therapy for MG. PMID:25259739

  9. The Ca2+-release channel/ryanodine receptor is localized in junctional and corbular sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of the Ca(2+)-release channel/ryanodine receptor in adult rat papillary myofibers has been determined by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopical studies using affinity purified antibodies against the ryanodine receptor. The receptor is confined to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) where it is localized to interior and peripheral junctional SR and the corbular SR, but it is absent from the network SR where the SR-Ca(2+)-ATPase and phospholamban are densely distributed. Immunofluorescence labeling of sheep Purkinje fibers show that the ryanodine receptor is confined to discrete foci while the SR-Ca(2+)-ATPase is distributed in a continuous network-like structure present at the periphery as well as throughout interior regions of these myofibers. Because Purkinje fibers lack T- tubules, these results indicate that the ryanodine receptor is localized not only to the peripheral junctional SR but also to corbular SR densely distributed in interfibrillar spaces of the I-band regions. We have previously identified both corbular SR and junctional SR in cardiac muscle as potential Ca(2+)-storage/Ca(2+)-release sites by demonstrating that the Ca2+ binding protein calsequestrin and calcium are very densely distributed in these two specialized domains of cardiac SR in situ. The results presented here provide strong evidence in support of the hypothesis that corbular SR is indeed a site of Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+