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Sample records for ach transporter vacht

  1. Vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR): effect of treatment with an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tayebati, S K; Di Tullio, M A; Amenta, F

    2008-11-01

    The cholinergic marker vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) was investigated in different cerebral areas of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) by immunochemistry (Western blot analysis) and by immunohistochemistry. SHR were used as an animal model of hypertensive brain damage. The sensitivity of manipulation of cholinergic system on VAChT was assessed in rats treated for four weeks with the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor galantamine (3 mg/Kg/day). VAChT concentrations were increased in the brain of control SHR compared to age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats. This increase probably represents an up-regulation of VAChT to oppose cholinergic deficits reported in SHR and is countered by galantamine administration. The possibility that cholinergic neurotransmission enhancement may represent a therapeutic strategy in cerebrovascular disease is discussed.

  2. Mice deficient for striatal Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT) display impaired short-term but normal long-term object recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Daniel; Creighton, Samantha; Prado, Vania F; Prado, Marco A M; Choleris, Elena; Winters, Boyer D

    2016-09-15

    Substantial evidence implicates Acetylcholine (ACh) in the acquisition of object memories. While most research has focused on the role of the cholinergic basal forebrain and its cortical targets, there are additional cholinergic networks that may contribute to object recognition. The striatum contains an independent cholinergic network comprised of interneurons. In the current study, we investigated the role of this cholinergic signalling in object recognition using mice deficient for Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT) within interneurons of the striatum. We tested whether these striatal VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice would display normal short-term (5 or 15min retention delay) and long-term (3h retention delay) object recognition memory. In a home cage object recognition task, male and female VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice were impaired selectively with a 15min retention delay. When tested on an object location task, VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice displayed intact spatial memory. Finally, when object recognition was tested in a Y-shaped apparatus, designed to minimize the influence of spatial and contextual cues, only females displayed impaired recognition with a 5min retention delay, but when males were challenged with a 15min retention delay, they were also impaired; neither males nor females were impaired with the 3h delay. The pattern of results suggests that striatal cholinergic transmission plays a role in the short-term memory for object features, but not spatial location. PMID:27233822

  3. Mice deficient for striatal Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT) display impaired short-term but normal long-term object recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Daniel; Creighton, Samantha; Prado, Vania F; Prado, Marco A M; Choleris, Elena; Winters, Boyer D

    2016-09-15

    Substantial evidence implicates Acetylcholine (ACh) in the acquisition of object memories. While most research has focused on the role of the cholinergic basal forebrain and its cortical targets, there are additional cholinergic networks that may contribute to object recognition. The striatum contains an independent cholinergic network comprised of interneurons. In the current study, we investigated the role of this cholinergic signalling in object recognition using mice deficient for Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT) within interneurons of the striatum. We tested whether these striatal VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice would display normal short-term (5 or 15min retention delay) and long-term (3h retention delay) object recognition memory. In a home cage object recognition task, male and female VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice were impaired selectively with a 15min retention delay. When tested on an object location task, VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice displayed intact spatial memory. Finally, when object recognition was tested in a Y-shaped apparatus, designed to minimize the influence of spatial and contextual cues, only females displayed impaired recognition with a 5min retention delay, but when males were challenged with a 15min retention delay, they were also impaired; neither males nor females were impaired with the 3h delay. The pattern of results suggests that striatal cholinergic transmission plays a role in the short-term memory for object features, but not spatial location.

  4. Spatial and intracellular relationships between the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the prefrontal cortex of rat and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Aine M.; Zhou, Ping; Milner, Teresa A.; Pickel, Virginia M.

    2009-01-01

    The alpha-7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) is expressed in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), a brain region where these receptors are implicated in cognitive function and in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Activation of this receptor is dependent on release of acetylcholine (ACh) from axon terminals that contain the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Since rat and mouse models are widely used for studies of specific abnormalities in schizophrenia, we sought to determine the subcellular location of the α7nAChR with respect to VAChT storage vesicles in axon terminals in the PFC in both species. For this, we used dual electron microscopic immunogold and immunoperoxidase labeling of antisera raised against the α7nAChR and VAChT. In both species, the α7nAChR-immunoreactivity (-ir) was principally identified within dendrites and dendritic spines, receptive to axon terminals forming asymmetric excitatory-type synapses, but lacking detectable α7nAChR or VAChT-ir. Quantitative analysis of the rat PFC revealed that of α7nAChR labeled neuronal profiles, 65% (299/463) were postsynaptic structures (dendrites and dendritic spine) and only 22% (104/463) were axon terminals or small unmyelinated axons. In contrast, VAChT was principally localized to varicose vesicle-filled axonal profiles, without recognized synaptic specializations (n = 240). Of the α7nAChR-labeled axons, 47% (37/79) also contained VAChT, suggesting that ACh release is autoregulated through the presynaptic α7nAChR. The VAChT-labeled terminals rarely formed synapses, but frequently apposed α7nAChR-containing neuronal profiles. These results suggest that in rodent PFC, the α7nAChR plays a major role in modulation of the postsynaptic excitation in spiny dendrites in contact with VAChT containing axons. PMID:19374941

  5. Reduced Expression of the Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter and Neurotransmitter Content Affects Synaptic Vesicle Distribution and Shape in Mouse Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Hermann A.; Fonseca, Matheus de C.; Camargo, Wallace L.; Lima, Patrícia M. A.; Martinelli, Patrícia M.; Naves, Lígia A.; Prado, Vânia F.; Prado, Marco A. M.; Guatimosim, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates, nerve muscle communication is mediated by the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine packed inside synaptic vesicles by a specific vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Here we used a mouse model (VAChT KDHOM) with 70% reduction in the expression of VAChT to investigate the morphological and functional consequences of a decreased acetylcholine uptake and release in neuromuscular synapses. Upon hypertonic stimulation, VAChT KDHOM mice presented a reduction in the amplitude and frequency of miniature endplate potentials, FM 1–43 staining intensity, total number of synaptic vesicles and altered distribution of vesicles within the synaptic terminal. In contrast, under electrical stimulation or no stimulation, VAChT KDHOM neuromuscular junctions did not differ from WT on total number of vesicles but showed altered distribution. Additionally, motor nerve terminals in VAChT KDHOM exhibited small and flattened synaptic vesicles similar to that observed in WT mice treated with vesamicol that blocks acetylcholine uptake. Based on these results, we propose that decreased VAChT levels affect synaptic vesicle biogenesis and distribution whereas a lower ACh content affects vesicles shape. PMID:24260111

  6. Reduced expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter and neurotransmitter content affects synaptic vesicle distribution and shape in mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Hermann A; Fonseca, Matheus de C; Camargo, Wallace L; Lima, Patrícia M A; Martinelli, Patrícia M; Naves, Lígia A; Prado, Vânia F; Prado, Marco A M; Guatimosim, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates, nerve muscle communication is mediated by the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine packed inside synaptic vesicles by a specific vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Here we used a mouse model (VAChT KD(HOM)) with 70% reduction in the expression of VAChT to investigate the morphological and functional consequences of a decreased acetylcholine uptake and release in neuromuscular synapses. Upon hypertonic stimulation, VAChT KD(HOM) mice presented a reduction in the amplitude and frequency of miniature endplate potentials, FM 1-43 staining intensity, total number of synaptic vesicles and altered distribution of vesicles within the synaptic terminal. In contrast, under electrical stimulation or no stimulation, VAChT KD(HOM) neuromuscular junctions did not differ from WT on total number of vesicles but showed altered distribution. Additionally, motor nerve terminals in VAChT KD(HOM) exhibited small and flattened synaptic vesicles similar to that observed in WT mice treated with vesamicol that blocks acetylcholine uptake. Based on these results, we propose that decreased VAChT levels affect synaptic vesicle biogenesis and distribution whereas a lower ACh content affects vesicles shape. PMID:24260111

  7. Non-neuronal release of ACh plays a key role in secretory response to luminal propionate in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Takaji; Inoue, Ryo; Matsumoto, Megumi; Yajima, Masako

    2011-02-15

    Colonic chloride secretion is induced by chemical stimuli via the enteric nervous reflex. We have previously demonstrated that propionate stimulates chloride secretion via sensory and cholinergic systems of the mucosa in rat distal colon. In this study, we demonstrate non-neuronal release of ACh in the secretory response to propionate using an Ussing chamber. Mucosa preparations from the colon, not including the myenteric and submucosal plexuses, were used. Luminal addition of propionate and serosal addition of ACh caused biphasic changes in short-circuit current (Isc). TTX (1 μm) had no effects, while atropine (10 μm) significantly inhibited the Isc response to propionate and abolished that to ACh. In response to luminal propionate stimulation, ACh was released into the serosal fluid. A linear relationship was observed between the maximal increase in Isc and the amounts of ACh released 5 min after propionate stimulation. This ACh release induced by propionate was not affected by atropine and bumetanide, although both drugs significantly reduced the Isc responses to propionate. Luminal addition of 3-chloropropionate, an inactive analogue of propionate, abolished both ACh release and Isc response produced by propionate. RT-PCR analysis indicated that isolated crypt cells from the distal colon expressed an enzyme of ACh synthesis (ChAT) and transporters of organic cation (OCTs), but not neuronal CHT1 and VAChT. The isolated crypt cells contained comparable amounts of ACh to the residual muscle tissues including nerve plexuses. In conclusion, the non-neuronal release of ACh from colonocytes coupled with propionate stimulation plays a key role in chloride secretion, via the paracrine action of ACh on muscarinic receptors of colonocytes.

  8. Heterogeneity of neuromuscular junctions in striated muscle of human esophagus demonstrated by triple staining for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, alpha-bungarotoxin, and acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Kallmünzer, Bernd; Sörensen, Björn; Neuhuber, Winfried L; Wörl, Jürgen

    2006-05-01

    During studies on enteric co-innervation in the human esophagus, we found that not all acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-positive motor endplates stained for alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BT) and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), respectively. Therefore, we probed for differences in neuromuscular junctions in human esophagus by using triple staining for VAChT, alpha-BT, and AChE followed by qualitative and quantitative analysis. To exclude that the results were caused by processing artifacts, we additionally examined the influence of a number of factors including post-mortem changes and the type and duration of fixation on the staining results. Four types of neuromuscular junction could be distinguished in human esophagus: type I with VAChT-positive and type II with VAChT-negative nerve terminals on a alpha-BT-positive and AChE-positive endplate area, type III with VAChT-positive nerve terminals on a alpha-BT-negative but AChE-positive endplate area, and type IV with VAChT-negative nerve terminals on a alpha-BT-negative but AChE-positive endplate area. On average, 32% of evaluated AChE-positive motor endplates were type I, 6% type II, 24% type III, and 38% type IV. Based on these results, we suggest that, in human esophagus, (1) the most reliable method for staining motor endplates is presently AChE histochemistry, (2) alpha-BT-sensitive and alpha-BT-resistant nicotinic acetylcholine receptors exist in neuromuscular junctions, and (3) different types of VAChT or transport mechanisms for acetylcholine probably exist in neuromuscular junctions.

  9. Co-existence of Functionally Different Vesicular Neurotransmitter Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Münster-Wandowski, Agnieszka; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Richter, Karin; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The vesicular transmitter transporters VGLUT, VGAT, VMAT2 and VAChT, define phenotype and physiological properties of neuronal subtypes. VGLUTs concentrate the excitatory amino acid glutamate, VGAT the inhibitory amino acid GABA, VMAT2 monoamines, and VAChT acetylcholine (ACh) into synaptic vesicle (SV). Following membrane depolarization SV release their content into the synaptic cleft. A strict segregation of vesicular transporters is mandatory for the precise functioning of synaptic communication and of neuronal circuits. In the last years, evidence accumulates that subsets of neurons express more than one of these transporters leading to synaptic co-release of different and functionally opposing transmitters and modulation of synaptic plasticity. Synaptic co-existence of transporters may change during pathological scenarios in order to ameliorate misbalances in neuronal activity. In addition, evidence increases that transporters also co-exist on the same vesicle providing another layer of regulation. Generally, vesicular transmitter loading relies on an electrochemical gradient ΔμH+ driven by the proton ATPase rendering the lumen of the vesicle with respect to the cytosol positive (Δψ) and acidic (ΔpH). While the activity of VGLUT mainly depends on the Δψ component, VMAT, VGAT and VAChT work best at a high ΔpH. Thus, a vesicular synergy of transporters depending on the combination may increase or decrease the filling of SV with the principal transmitter. We provide an overview on synaptic co-existence of vesicular transmitter transporters including changes in the excitatory/inhibitory balance under pathological conditions. Additionally, we discuss functional aspects of vesicular synergy of transmitter transporters. PMID:26909036

  10. Comparative analyses of the cholinergic locus of ChAT and VAChT and its expression in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Banzai, Kota; Adachi, Takeshi; Izumi, Susumu

    2015-07-01

    The cholinergic locus, which encodes choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), is specifically expressed in cholinergic neurons, maintaining the cholinergic phenotype. The organization of the locus is conserved in Bilateria. Here we examined the structure of cholinergic locus and cDNA coding for ChAT and VAChT in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The B. mori ChAT (BmChAT) cDNA encodes a deduced polypeptide including a putative choline/carnitine O-acyltransferase domain and a conserved His residue required for catalysis. The B. mori VAChT (BmVAChT) cDNA encodes a polypeptide including a putative major facilitator superfamily domain and 10 putative transmembrane domains. BmChAT and BmVAChT cDNAs share the 5'-region corresponding to the first and second exon of cholinergic locus. Polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that BmChAT and BmVAChT mRNAs were specifically expressed in the brain and segmental ganglia. The expression of BmChAT was detected 3 days after oviposition. The expression level was almost constant during the larval stage, decreased in the early pupal stage, and increased toward eclosion. The average ratios of BmChAT mRNA to BmVAChT mRNA in brain-subesophageal ganglion complexes were 0.54±0.10 in the larvae and 1.92±0.11 in adults. In addition, we examined promoter activity of the cholinergic locus and localization of cholinergic neurons, using a baculovirus-mediated gene transfer system. The promoter sequence, located 2kb upstream from the start of transcription, was essential for cholinergic neuron-specific gene õexpression. Cholinergic neurons were found in several regions of the brain and segmental ganglia in the larvae and pharate adults.

  11. AChE for DNA degradation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Osuna, María; Yuste, Victor J

    2015-06-01

    DNA hydrolysis is a biochemical process often associated with different forms of cell death, including apoptosis. In a recent paper published in Cell Discovery, Du et al. report that synaptic acetylcholinesterase (AChE-S) shows an unexpected enzymatic activity as DNase switched on after cytotoxic insults. PMID:25930710

  12. Vesicular acetylcholine transporter knock down-mice are more susceptible to inflammation, c-Fos expression and sickness behavior induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Leite, Hércules Ribeiro; Oliveira-Lima, Onésia Cristina de; Pereira, Luciana de Melo; Oliveira, Vinícius Elias de Moura; Prado, Vania Ferreira; Prado, Marco Antônio Máximo; Pereira, Grace Schenatto; Massensini, André Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    In addition to the well-known functions as a neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh) can modulate of the immune system. Nonetheless, how endogenous ACh release inflammatory responses is still not clear. To address this question, we took advantage of an animal model with a decreased ACh release due a reduction (knockdown) in vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) expression (VAChT-KD(HOM)). These animals were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Afterwards, we evaluated sickness behavior and quantified systemic and cerebral inflammation as well as neuronal activation in the dorsal vagal complex (DVC). VAChT-KD(HOM) mice that were injected with LPS (10mg/kg) showed increased mortality rate as compared to control mice. In line with this result, a low dose of LPS (0.1mg/kg) increased the levels of pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines in the spleen and brain of VAChT-KD(HOM) mice in comparison with controls. Similarly, serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were increased in VAChT-KD(HOM) mice. This excessive cytokine production was completely prevented by administration of a nicotinic receptor agonist (0.4mg/kg) prior to the LPS injection. Three hours after the LPS injection, c-Fos expression increased in the DVC region of VAChT-KD(HOM) mice compared to controls. In addition, VAChT-KD(HOM) mice showed behavioral changes such as lowered locomotor and exploratory activity and reduced social interaction after the LPS challenge, when compared to control mice. Taken together, our results show that the decreased ability to release ACh exacerbates systemic and cerebral inflammation and promotes neural activation and behavioral changes induced by LPS. In conclusion, our findings support the notion that activity of cholinergic pathways, which can be modulated by VAChT expression, controls inflammatory and neural responses to LPS challenge.

  13. Synthesis and in Vitro Biological Evaluation of Carbonyl Group-Containing Inhibitors of Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Efange, Simon M. N.; Khare, Anil B.; von Hohenberg, Krystyna; Mach, Robert H.; Parsons, Stanley M.; Tu, Zhude

    2010-01-01

    To identify selective high-affinity inhibitors of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), we have interposed a carbonyl group between the phenyl and piperidyl groups of the prototypical VAChT ligand vesamicol, and its more potent analogues benzovesamicol and 5-aminobenzovesamicol. Of 33 compounds synthesized and tested, six display very high affinity for VAChT (Ki, 0.25 – 0.66 nM) and greater than 500-fold selectivity for VAChT over σ1 and σ2 receptors. Twelve compounds have high affinity (Ki, 1.0–10 nM) and good selectivity for VAChT. Furthermore, three halogenated compounds, namely, trans-3-[4-(4-fluorobenzoyl)piperidinyl]-2-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (28b) (Ki = 2.7 nM, VAChT/sigma selectivity index = 70), trans-3-[4-(5-iodothienylcarbonyl)piperidinyl]-2-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (28h) (Ki = 0.66 nM, VAChT/sigma selectivity index = 294), and 5-amino-3-[4-(p-fluorobenzoyl)piperidinyl]-2-hydroxy-1,2,3,4,-tetrahydronaphthalene (30b) (Ki = 2.40 nM, VAChT/sigma selectivity index = 410) display moderate to high selectivity for VAChT. These three compounds can be synthesized with the corresponding radioisotopes so as to serve as PET/SPECT probes for imaging the VAChT in vivo. PMID:20218624

  14. Synthesis and Evaluation of in Vitro Bioactivity for Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter Inhibitors Containing Two Carbonyl Groups

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhude; Wang, Wei; Cui, Jinquan; Zhang, Xiang; Lu, Xiaoxia; Xu, Jinbin; Parsons, Stanley M.

    2012-01-01

    To identify selective high-affinity ligands for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), we have incorporated a carbonyl group into the structures of trozamicol and prezamicol scaffolds, and also converted the secondary amines of the piperidines of trozamicols and prezamicols into amides. Of 18 new racemic compounds, 4 compounds displayed high affinity for VAChT (Ki = 10 - 20 nM) and greater than 300-fold selectivity for VAChT over σ1 and σ2 receptors, namely (4-(4-fluorobenzoyl)-4'-hydroxy-[1,3'-bipiperidin]-1'-yl)(3-methylthiophen-2-yl)methanone oxalate (9g) (Ki-VAChT = 11.4 nM, VAChT/σ1 = 1063, VAChT/σ2 = 370), (1'-benzoyl-4'-hydroxy-[1,3'-bipiperidin]-4-yl)(4-methoxyphenyl)methanone oxalate (10c) (Ki-VAChT = 15.4 nM, VAChT/σ1 = 374, VAChT/ σ2 = 315), (4'-hydroxy-1'-(thiophene-2-carbonyl)-[1,3'-bipiperidin]-4-yl)(4-methoxyphenyl)methanone oxalate (10e) (Ki-VAChT = 19.0 nM, VAChT/σ1 = 1787, VAChT/ σ2 = 335), and (4'-hydroxy-1'-(3-methylthiophene-2-carbonyl)-[1,3'-bipiperidin]-4-yl)(4-methoxyphenyl)methanone oxalate (10g) (Ki-VAChT = 10.2 nM, VAChT/σ1 = 1500, VAChT/ σ2 = 2030). These 4 compounds can be radiosynthesized with C-11 or F-18 to validate their possibilities of serving as PET probes for quantifying the levels of VAChT in vivo. PMID:22739089

  15. AChE inhibition: one dominant factor for swimming behavior changes of Daphnia magna under DDVP exposure.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zongming; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Xiaoguang; Qi, Pingping; Zhang, Biao; Zeng, Yang; Fu, Rongshu; Miao, Mingsheng

    2015-02-01

    As a key enzyme that hydrolyzes the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in cholinergic synapses of both vertebrates and invertebrates, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is strongly inhibited by organophosphates. AChE inhibition may induce the decrease of swimming ability. According to previous research, swimming behavior of different aquatic organisms could be affected by different chemicals, and there is a shortage of research on direct correlation analysis between swimming behavior and biochemical indicators. Therefore, swimming behavior and whole-body AChE activity of Daphnia magna under dichlorvos (DDVP) exposure were identified in order to clarify the relationship between behavioral responses and AChE inhibition in this study. In the beginning, AChE activity was similar in all treatments with the control. During all exposures, the tendency of AChE activity inhibition was the same as the behavioral responses of D. magna. The AChE activity of individuals without movement would decrease to about zero in several minutes. The correlation analysis between swimming behavior of D. magna and AChE activity showed that the stepwise behavioral response was mainly decided by AChE activity. All of these results suggested that the toxicity characteristics of DDVP as an inhibitor of AChE on the swimming behavior of organisms were the same, and the AChE activity inhibition could induce loss of the nerve conduction ability, causing hyperactivity, loss of coordination, convulsions, paralysis and other kinds of behavioral changes, which was illustrated by the stepwise behavioral responses under different environmental stresses.

  16. Effect of pharmaceuticals exposure on acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity and on the expression of AchE gene in the monogonont rotifer, Brachionus koreanus.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jae-Sung; Kim, Bo-Mi; Jeong, Chang-Bum; Park, Heum Gi; Leung, Kenneth Mei Yee; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2013-11-01

    Pharmaceuticals are widely used in human and veterinary medicine. However, they are emerging as a significant contaminant in aquatic environments through wastewater. Due to the persistent and accumulated properties of pharmaceuticals via the food web, their potential harmful effects on aquatic animals are a great concern. In this study, we investigated the effects of six pharmaceuticals: acetaminophen, ATP; atenolol, ATN; carbamazepine, CBZ; oxytetracycline, OTC; sulfamethoxazole, SMX; and trimethoprim, TMP on acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7) activity and its transcript expression with chlorpyrifos (as a positive control) in the monogonont rotifer, Brachionus koreanus. ATP, CBZ, and TMP exposure also remarkably inhibited Bk-AChE activity at 100 μg/L (24 h) and 1000 μg/L (12 h and 24 h). ATP, CBZ, and TMP exposure showed a significant decrease in the Bk-AChE mRNA level in a concentration-dependent manner. However, in the case of OTC and SMX, a slight decrease in Bk-AChE mRNA expression was found but only at the highest concentration. The time-course experiments showed that ATP positively induced Bk-AChE mRNA 12 h after exposure at both 100 and 1000 μg/L, while the Bk-AChE mRNA expression was significantly downregulated over 6 to 24 h after exposure to 1000 μg/L of CBZ, OTC, SMX, and TMP. Our findings suggest that Bk-AChE would be a useful biomarker for risk assessment of pharmaceutical compounds as an early signal of their toxicity in aquatic environments. Particularly, ATP, CBZ, and TMP may have a toxic cholinergic effect on rotifer B. koreanus by inhibiting AChE activity. PMID:24028855

  17. Circannual rhythms of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the freshwater fish Cnesterodon decemmaculatus.

    PubMed

    Menéndez-Helman, Renata J; Ferreyroa, Gisele V; dos Santos Afonso, Maria; Salibián, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The use of biomarkers as a tool to assess responses of organisms exposed to pollutants in toxicity bioassays, as well as in aquatic environmental risk assessment protocols, requires the understanding of the natural fluctuation of the particular biomarker. The aim of this study was to characterize the intrinsic variations of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in tissues of a native freshwater teleost fish to be used as biomarker in toxicity tests, taking into account both seasonal influence and fish size. Specific AChE activity was measured by the method of Ellman et al. (1961) in homogenates of fish anterior section finding a seasonal variability. The highest activity was observed in summer, decreasing significantly below 40% in winter. The annual AChE activity cycle in the anterior section was fitted to a sinusoidal function with a period of 11.2 months. Moreover, an inverse relationship between enzymatic activity and the animal size was established. The results showed that both the fish length and seasonal variability affect AChE activity. AChE activity in fish posterior section showed a similar trend to that in the anterior section, while seasonal variations of the activity in midsection were observed but differences were not statistically significant. In addition, no relationship between AChE and total tissue protein was established in the anterior and posterior sections suggesting that the circannual rhythms observed are AChE-specific responses. Results highlight the importance of considering both the fish size and season variations to reach valid conclusions when AChE activity is employed as neurotoxicity biomarker.

  18. Cholinesterases in development: AChE as a firewall to inhibit cell proliferation and support differentiation.

    PubMed

    Layer, Paul G; Klaczinski, Janine; Salfelder, Anika; Sperling, Laura E; Thangaraj, Gopenath; Tuschl, Corina; Vogel-Höpker, Astrid

    2013-03-25

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a most remarkable protein, not only because it is one of the fastest enzymes in nature, but also since it appears in many molecular forms and is regulated by elaborate genetic networks. AChE is expressed in many tissues during development and in mature organisms, as well as in healthy and diseased states. In search for alternative, "non-classical" functions of cholinesterases (ChEs), AChE could either work within the frame of classic cholinergic systems, but in non-neural tissues ("non-synaptic function"), or act non-enzymatically. Here, we review briefly some of the major ideas and advances of this field, and report on some recent progress from our own experimental work, e.g. that (i) non-neural ChEs have pronounced, predominantly enzymatic effects on early embryonic (limb) development in chick and mouse, that (ii) retinal R28 cells of the rat overexpressing synaptic AChE present a significantly decreased cell proliferation, and that (iii) in developing chick retina ACh-synthesizing and ACh-degrading cells originate from the same postmitotic precursor cells, which later form two locally opposing cell populations. We suggest that such distinct distributions of ChAT(+) vs. AChE(+) cells in the inner half retina provide graded distributions of ACh, which can direct cell differentiation and network formation. Thus, as corroborated by works from many labs, AChE can be considered a highly co-opting protein, which can combine enzymatic and non-enzymatic functions within one molecule. PMID:23047026

  19. Heteroaromatic and aniline derivatives of piperidines as potent ligands for vesicular acetylcholine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junfeng; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Zhanbin; Padakanti, Prashanth K.; Jin, Hongjun; Cui, Jinquan; Li, Aixiao; Zeng, Dexing; Rath, Nigam P.; Flores, Hubert; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Parsons, Stanley M.; Tu, Zhude

    2013-01-01

    To identify suitable lipophilic compounds having high potency and selectivity for vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), a heteroaromatic ring or a phenyl group was introduced into the carbonyl-containing scaffold for VAChT ligands. Twenty new compounds with ALog D values between 0.53-3.2 were synthesized, and their in vitro binding affinities were assayed. Six of them (19a, 19e, 19g, 19k and 24a-b) displayed high affinity for VAChT (Ki = 0.93 – 18 nM for racemates) and moderate to high selectivity for VAChT over σ1 and σ2 receptors (Ki = 44 – 4400-fold). These compounds have a methyl or a fluoro substitution that provides the position for incorporating PET radioisotopes C-11 or F-18. Compound (-)-[11C]24b (Ki = 0.78 for VAChT, 900-fold over σ receptors) was successfully synthesized and evaluated in vivo in rats and nonhuman primates. The data revealed that (-)-[11C]24b has highest binding in striatum and has favorable pharmacokinetics in the brain. PMID:23802889

  20. Natural AChE Inhibitors from Plants and their Contribution to Alzheimer’s Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Ana Paula; Faraoni, María Belén; Castro, María Julia; Alza, Natalia Paola; Cavallaro, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    As acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are an important therapeutic strategy in Alzheimer’s disease, efforts are being made in search of new molecules with anti-AChE activity. The fact that naturally-occurring compounds from plants are considered to be a potential source of new inhibitors has led to the discovery of an important number of secondary metabolites and plant extracts with the ability of inhibiting the enzyme AChE, which, according to the cholinergic hypothesis, increases the levels of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the brain, thus improving cholinergic functions in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and alleviating the symptoms of this neurological disorder. This review summarizes a total of 128 studies which correspond to the most relevant research work published during 2006-2012 (1st semester) on plant-derived compounds, plant extracts and essential oils found to elicit AChE inhibition. PMID:24381530

  1. Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161188.html Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice Treatment might one ... News) -- New research in mice suggests that tiny nanoparticles might one day be a better way to ...

  2. Analysis of AchE and LDH in mollusc, Lamellidens marginalis after exposure to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Amanullah, B; Stalin, A; Prabu, P; Dhanapal, S

    2010-07-01

    The enzymes Acetylcholinesterase (AchE) and Lactatedehydrogenase (LDH) are used as biological markers in the present study. Enzymes are highly sensitive and used to evaluate the biological effects of organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos in freshwater mussel Lamellidens marginalis. The test organisms were exposed to sub-lethal concentration (5 ppm) of chlorpyrifos for 30 days and allowed to recover for seven days. A distinct reduction of the enzyme AchE (34 +/- 3.3 U l(-1)) was found in the treated hepatopancreas. A significant increase in LDH activity in gill, hepatopancreas and muscle was observed. There was a significant recovery in AchE and LDH in the different tissues, after seven days recovery period.. Hence, the changes in the enzymes are found as the best biomarkering tool to evaluate the effect of organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos on the aquatic biota.

  3. AChE biosensor based on zinc oxide sol-gel for the detection of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ravi; Ganesana, Mallikarjunarao; Andreescu, Silvana; Stanciu, Lia

    2010-02-28

    Zinc oxide has been used as a matrix for immobilization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and detection of the pesticide paraoxon. The immobilized enzyme retained its enzymatic activity up to three months when stored in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) at 4 degrees C. An amperometric biosensor for the detection of paraoxon was designed. The biosensor detected paraoxon in the range 0.035-1.38 ppm and can be used to detect other AChE inhibiting organophosphate pesticides. PMID:20113735

  4. Avarol derivatives as competitive AChE inhibitors, non hepatotoxic and neuroprotective agents for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tommonaro, Giuseppina; García-Font, Nuria; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Pejin, Boris; Iodice, Carmine; Cañadas, Sixta; Marco-Contelles, José; Oset-Gasque, María Jesús

    2016-10-21

    Avarol is a marine sesquiterpenoid hydroquinone, previously isolated from the marine sponge Dysidea avara Schmidt (Dictyoceratida), with antiinflammatory, antitumor, antioxidant, antiplatelet, anti-HIV, and antipsoriatic effects. Recent findings indicate that some thio-avarol derivatives exhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity. The multiple pharmacological properties of avarol, thio-avarol and/or their derivatives prompted us to continue the in vitro screening, focusing on their AChE inhibitory and neuroprotective effects. Due to the complex nature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is a renewed search for new, non hepatotoxic anticholinesterasic compounds. This paper describes the synthesis and in vitro biological evaluation of avarol-3'-thiosalicylate (TAVA) and thiosalycil-prenyl-hydroquinones (TPHs), as non hepatotoxic anticholinesterasic agents, showing a good neuroprotective effect on the decreased viability of SHSY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced by oligomycin A/rotenone and okadaic acid. A molecular modeling study was also undertaken on the most promising molecules within the series to elucidate their AChE binding modes and in particular the role played by the carboxylate group in enzyme inhibition. Among them, TPH4, bearing a geranylgeraniol substituent, is the most significant Electrophorus electricus AChE (EeAChE) inhibitor (IC50 = 6.77 ± 0.24 μM), also endowed with a moderate serum horse butyrylcholinesterase (eqBuChE) inhibitory activity, being also the least hepatotoxic and the best neuroprotective compound of the series. Thus, TPHs represents a new family of synthetic compounds, chemically related to the natural compound avarol, which has been discovered for the potential treatment of AD. Findings prove the relevance of TPHs as a new possible generation of competitive AChE inhibitors pointing out the importance of the salycilic substituents on the hydroquinone ring. Since these compounds do not belong to the class of

  5. Avarol derivatives as competitive AChE inhibitors, non hepatotoxic and neuroprotective agents for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tommonaro, Giuseppina; García-Font, Nuria; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Pejin, Boris; Iodice, Carmine; Cañadas, Sixta; Marco-Contelles, José; Oset-Gasque, María Jesús

    2016-10-21

    Avarol is a marine sesquiterpenoid hydroquinone, previously isolated from the marine sponge Dysidea avara Schmidt (Dictyoceratida), with antiinflammatory, antitumor, antioxidant, antiplatelet, anti-HIV, and antipsoriatic effects. Recent findings indicate that some thio-avarol derivatives exhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity. The multiple pharmacological properties of avarol, thio-avarol and/or their derivatives prompted us to continue the in vitro screening, focusing on their AChE inhibitory and neuroprotective effects. Due to the complex nature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is a renewed search for new, non hepatotoxic anticholinesterasic compounds. This paper describes the synthesis and in vitro biological evaluation of avarol-3'-thiosalicylate (TAVA) and thiosalycil-prenyl-hydroquinones (TPHs), as non hepatotoxic anticholinesterasic agents, showing a good neuroprotective effect on the decreased viability of SHSY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced by oligomycin A/rotenone and okadaic acid. A molecular modeling study was also undertaken on the most promising molecules within the series to elucidate their AChE binding modes and in particular the role played by the carboxylate group in enzyme inhibition. Among them, TPH4, bearing a geranylgeraniol substituent, is the most significant Electrophorus electricus AChE (EeAChE) inhibitor (IC50 = 6.77 ± 0.24 μM), also endowed with a moderate serum horse butyrylcholinesterase (eqBuChE) inhibitory activity, being also the least hepatotoxic and the best neuroprotective compound of the series. Thus, TPHs represents a new family of synthetic compounds, chemically related to the natural compound avarol, which has been discovered for the potential treatment of AD. Findings prove the relevance of TPHs as a new possible generation of competitive AChE inhibitors pointing out the importance of the salycilic substituents on the hydroquinone ring. Since these compounds do not belong to the class of

  6. Altered GPI modification of insect AChE improves tolerance to organophosphate insecticides.

    PubMed

    Kakani, Evdoxia G; Bon, Suzanne; Massoulié, Jean; Mathiopoulos, Kostas D

    2011-03-01

    The olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae is the most destructive and intractable pest of olives. The management of B. oleae has been based on the use of organophosphate (OP) insecticides, a practice that induced resistance. OP-resistance in the olive fly was previously shown to be associated with two mutations in the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme that, apparently, hinder the entrance of the OP into the active site. The search for additional mutations in the ace gene that encodes AChE revealed a short deletion of three glutamines (Δ3Q) from a stretch of five glutamines, in the C-terminal peptide that is normally cleaved and substituted by a GPI anchor. We verified that AChEs from B. oleae and other Dipterans are actually GPI-anchored, although this is not predicted by the "big-PI" algorithm. The Δ3Q mutation shortens the unusually long hydrophilic spacer that follows the predicted GPI attachment site and may thus improve the efficiency of GPI anchor addition. We expressed the wild type B. oleae AChE, the natural mutant Δ3Q and a constructed mutant lacking all 5 consecutive glutamines (Δ5Q) in COS cells and compared their kinetic properties. All constructs presented identical K(m) and k(cat) values, in agreement with the fact that the mutations did not affect the catalytic domain of the enzyme. In contrast, the mutants produced higher AChE activity, suggesting that a higher proportion of the precursor protein becomes GPI-anchored. An increase in the number of GPI-anchored molecules in the synaptic cleft may reduce the sensitivity to insecticides.

  7. A selective molecularly imprinted polymer for immobilization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE): an active enzyme targeted and efficient method.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Gökhan; Doğaç, Yasemin İspirli; Teke, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we immobilized acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme onto acetylcholine removed imprinted polymer and acetylcholine containing polymer. First, the polymers were produced with acetylcholine, substrate of AChE, by dispersion polymerization. Then, the enzyme was immobilized onto the polymers by using two different methods: In the first method (method A), acetylcholine was removed from the polymer, and then AChE was immobilized onto this polymer (acetylcholine removed imprinted polymer). In the second method (method B), AChE was immobilized onto acetylcholine containing polymer by affinity. In method A, enzyme-specific species (binding sites) occurred by removing acetylcholine from the polymer. The immobilized AChE reached 240% relative specific activity comparison with free AChE because the active enzyme molecules bounded onto the polymer. Transmission electron microscopy results were taken before and after immobilization of AChE for the assessment of morphological structure of polymer. Also, the experiments, which include optimum temperature (25-65 °C), optimum pH (3-10), thermal stability (4-70 °C), kinetic parameters, operational stability and reusability, were performed to determine the characteristic of the immobilized AChE.

  8. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition aggravates fasting-induced triglyceride accumulation in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shin-Ichi; Nakamura, Kaai; Ando, Midori; Kamei, Hiroyasu; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Although fasting induces hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation in both rodents and humans, little is known about the underlying mechanism. Because parasympathetic nervous system activity tends to attenuate the secretion of very-low-density-lipoprotein-triglyceride (VLDL-TG) and increase TG stores in the liver, and serum cholinesterase activity is elevated in fatty liver disease, the inhibition of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter acetylcholinesterase (AChE) may have some influence on hepatic lipid metabolism. To assess the influence of AChE inhibition on lipid metabolism, the effect of physostigmine, an AChE inhibitor, on fasting-induced increase in liver TG was investigated in mice. In comparison with ad libitum-fed mice, 30 h fasting increased liver TG accumulation accompanied by a downregulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP-1) and liver-fatty acid binding-protein (L-FABP). Physostigmine promoted the 30 h fasting-induced increase in liver TG levels in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by a significant fall in plasma insulin levels, without a fall in plasma TG. Furthermore, physostigmine significantly attenuated the fasting-induced decrease of both mRNA and protein levels of SREBP-1 and L-FABP, and increased IRS-2 protein levels in the liver. The muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine blocked these effects of physostigmine on liver TG, serum insulin, and hepatic protein levels of SREBP-1 and L-FABP. These results demonstrate that AChE inhibition facilitated fasting-induced TG accumulation with up regulation of the hepatic L-FABP and SREBP-1 in mice, at least in part via the activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Our studies highlight the crucial role of parasympathetic regulation in fasting-induced TG accumulation, and may be an important source of information on the mechanism of hepatic disorders of lipid metabolism. PMID:25383314

  9. Acetylcholine as a signaling system to environmental stimuli in plants. III. Asymmetric solute distribution controlled by ACh in gravistimulated maize seedlings.

    PubMed

    Momonoki, Y S; Hineno, C; Noguchi, K

    1998-01-01

    Asymmetric distribution of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity has previously been demonstrated to occur in the lower side of the gravity-stimulated maize shoot. The localization of immunoreacted IAA-inositol synthase, AChE and safranin was detected in selected organs of gravistimulated dark grown maize seedlings using a light microscope. Immunoreacted IAA-inositol synthase was asymmetrically distributed in the lower side of the stele of coleoptile node and mesocotyl in maize seedlings placed horizontally. The positive AChE spots in the coleoptile node and mesocotyl were apparently localized in the lower half of the gravistimulated seedlings. Safranin was also asymmetrically distributed in the lower half of the endodermis and stele cells of coleoptile node and mesocotyl. Namely, transport of safranin in the upper half of the coleoptile node and mesocotyl was blocked by gravistimulation. Furthermore, the asymmetric distribution of immunoreacted IAA-inositol synthase was inhibited by neostigmine bromide, AChE inhibitor. These results show that an asymmetric environmental stimulus induces changes in AChE activity, affecting IAA-inositol synthase localization and safranin transport. PMID:12162322

  10. An in vitro AChE inhibition assay combined with UF-HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF/MS approach for screening and characterizing of AChE inhibitors from roots of Coptis chinensis Franch.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hengqiang; Zhou, Siduo; Zhang, Minmin; Feng, Jinhong; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Daijie; Geng, Yanling; Wang, Xiao

    2016-02-20

    In this study, an in vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition assay based on microplate reader combined with ultrafiltration high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray quadrupole time of flight mass (UF-HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF/MS) was developed for the rapid screening and identification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEI) from roots of Coptis chinensis Franch. Incubation conditions such as enzyme concentration, incubation time, incubation temperature and co-solvent was optimized so as to get better screening results. Five alkaloids including columbamine, jatrorrhizine, coptisine, palmatine and berberine were found with AChE inhibition activity in the 80% ethanol extract of C. chinensis Franch. The screened compounds were identified by HPLC-DAD-ESI-Q-TOF/MS compared with the reference stands and literatures. The screened results were verified by in vitro AChE inhibition assays, palmatine showed the best AChE inhibitory activities with IC50 values of 36.6μM among the five compounds. Results of the present study indicated that the combinative method using in vitro AChE inhibition assay and UF-HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF/MS could be widely applied for rapid screening and identification of AChEI from complex TCM extract.

  11. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene modification in transgenic animals: functional consequences of selected exon and regulatory region deletion.

    PubMed

    Camp, Shelley; Zhang, Limin; Marquez, Michael; de la Torre, Brian; Long, Jeffery M; Bucht, Goran; Taylor, Palmer

    2005-12-15

    AChE is an alternatively spliced gene. Exons 2, 3 and 4 are invariantly spliced, and this sequence is responsible for catalytic function. The 3' alternatively spliced exons, 5 and 6, are responsible for AChE disposition in tissue [J. Massoulie, The origin of the molecular diversity and functional anchoring of cholinesterases. Neurosignals 11 (3) (2002) 130-143; Y. Li, S. Camp, P. Taylor, Tissue-specific expression and alternative mRNA processing of the mammalian acetylcholinesterase gene. J. Biol. Chem. 268 (8) (1993) 5790-5797]. The splice to exon 5 produces the GPI anchored form of AChE found in the hematopoietic system, whereas the splice to exon 6 produces a sequence that binds to the structural subunits PRiMA and ColQ, producing AChE expression in brain and muscle. A third alternative RNA species is present that is not spliced at the 3' end; the intron 3' of exon 4 is used as coding sequence and produces the read-through, unanchored form of AChE. In order to further understand the role of alternative splicing in the expression of the AChE gene, we have used homologous recombination in stem cells to produce gene specific deletions in mice. Alternatively and together exon 5 and exon 6 were deleted. A cassette containing the neomycin gene flanked by loxP sites was used to replace the exon(s) of interest. Tissue analysis of mice with exon 5 deleted and the neomycin cassette retained showed very low levels of AChE expression, far less than would have been anticipated. Only the read-through species of the enzyme was produced; clearly the inclusion of the selection cassette disrupted splicing of exon 4 to exon 6. The selection cassette was then deleted in exon 5, exon 6 and exons 5 + 6 deleted mice by breeding to Ella-cre transgenic mice. AChE expression in serum, brain and muscle has been analyzed. Another AChE gene targeted mouse strain involving a region in the first intron, found to be critical for AChE expression in muscle cells [S. Camp, L. Zhang, M. Marquez, B

  12. Syntheses and Radiosyntheses of Two Carbon-11 Labeled Potent and Selective Radioligands for Imaging Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Padakanti, Prashanth K.; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Junfeng; Parsons, Stanley M.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Tu, Zhude

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) is a specific biomarker for imaging presynaptic cholinergic neurons. The syntheses and C-11 labeling of two potent enantiopure VAChT inhibitors are reported here. Procedures Two VAChT inhibitors, (±)-2 and (±)-6, were successfully synthesized. A chiral HPLC column was used to resolve the enantiomers from each corresponding racemic mixture for in vitro characterization. The radiosyntheses of (−)-[11C]2 and (−)-[11C]6 from the corresponding desmethyl phenol precursor was accomplished using [11C]methyl iodide or [11C]methyl triflate, respectively. Results The synthesis of (−)-[11C]2 was accomplished with 40–50 % radiochemical yield (decay-corrected), SA>480 GBq/μmol (EOB), and radiochemical purity >99 %. Synthesis of (−)-[11C]6 was accomplished with 5–10 % yield, SA>140 GBq/μmol (EOB), and radiochemical purity >97 %. The radiosynthesis and dose formulation of each tracer was completed in 55–60 min. Conclusions Two potent enantiopure VAChT ligands were synthesized and 11C-labeled with good radiochemical yield and specific activity. PMID:24875230

  13. Residues Responsible for the Selectivity of α-Conotoxins for Ac-AChBP or nAChRs

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bo; Xiang, Shihua; Li, Mengsen

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are targets for developing new drugs to treat severe pain, nicotine addiction, Alzheimer disease, epilepsy, etc. α-Conotoxins are biologically and chemically diverse. With 12–19 residues and two disulfides, they can be specifically selected for different nAChRs. Acetylcholine-binding proteins from Aplysia californica (Ac-AChBP) are homologous to the ligand-binding domains of nAChRs and pharmacologically similar. X-ray structures of the α-conotoxin in complex with Ac-AChBP in addition to computer modeling have helped to determine the binding site of the important residues of α-conotoxin and its affinity for nAChR subtypes. Here, we present the various α-conotoxin residues that are selective for Ac-AChBP or nAChRs by comparing the structures of α-conotoxins in complex with Ac-AChBP and by modeling α-conotoxins in complex with nAChRs. The knowledge of these binding sites will assist in the discovery and design of more potent and selective α-conotoxins as drug leads. PMID:27727162

  14. Anisotropic a-C:H from Compression of Polyacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, M.; Parrinello, M.; Chiarotti, G. L.; Focher, P.; Tosatti, E.

    1996-03-01

    We have simulated the transformation of crystalline trans-polyacetylene into a-C:H under pressure by constant pressure ab initio molecular dynamics. Polyacetylene undergoes a gradual saturation of C-C bonds via chain interlinks, ending up at ~50 GPa with a-C:H containing 80% sp3 carbon atoms. The sp2-->sp3 conversion is irreversible and does not reverse by returning to zero pressure. The final a-C:H is a wide gap insulator and, at variance with the conventionally generated a-C:H, is highly anisotropic keeping some memory of the original polyacetylene chain axis.

  15. Modelling interactions between Loop1 of Fasciculin2 (Fas2) and Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase ( Tc AChE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Jiande; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2006-11-01

    Four interaction models for the binding of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase ( TcAChE) with Loop1 of Fasciculin2 are investigated at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. The total binding energy of three fragments (P1-P3) which belong to the omega loop Cys67-Cys94 of TcAChE contributes almost 67% of the entire binding, suggesting the domination of this omega loop on the interaction between AChE and Loop1 of Fas2. The energy decomposition illustrates that the interactions mainly consist of electrostatic components. The polar solvent which reduces the binding energies of the studied models implies the significant impact of the solvent on the binding of Fas2 and AChE.

  16. Trafficking of Vesicular Neurotransmitter Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Hao; Grygoruk, Anna; Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Chen, Audrey; Krantz, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Vesicular neurotransmitter transporters are required for the storage of all classical and amino acid neurotransmitters in secretory vesicles. Transporter expression can influence neurotransmitter storage and release, and trafficking targets the transporters to different types of secretory vesicles. Vesicular transporters traffic to synaptic vesicles as well as large dense core vesicles, and are recycled to synaptic vesicles at the nerve terminal. Some of the intrinsic signals for these trafficking events have been defined and include a dileucine motif present in multiple transporter subtypes, an acidic cluster in the neural isoform of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) and a polyproline motif in the vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT1. The sorting of VMAT2 and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) to secretory vesicles is regulated by phosphorylation. In addition, VGLUT1 uses alternative endocytic pathways for recycling back to synaptic vesicles following exocytosis. Regulation of these sorting events has the potential to influence synaptic transmission and behavior. PMID:18507811

  17. Individual synaptic vesicles from the electroplaque of Torpedo californica, a classic cholinergic synapse, also contain transporters for glutamate and ATP.

    PubMed

    Li, Huinan; Harlow, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    The type of neurotransmitter secreted by a neuron is a product of the vesicular transporters present on its synaptic vesicle membranes and the available transmitters in the local cytosolic environment where the synaptic vesicles reside. Synaptic vesicles isolated from electroplaques of the marine ray, Torpedo californica, have served as model vesicles for cholinergic neurotransmission. Many lines of evidence support the idea that in addition to acetylcholine, additional neurotransmitters and/or neuromodulators are also released from cholinergic synapses. We identified the types of vesicular neurotransmitter transporters present at the electroplaque using immunoblot and immunofluoresence techniques with antibodies against the vesicle acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1, 2, and 3), and the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT). We found that VAChT, VNUT, VGLUT 1 and 2, but not 3 were present by immunoblot, and confirmed that the antibodies were specific to proteins of the axons and terminals of the electroplaque. We used a single-vesicle imaging technique to determine whether these neurotransmitter transporters were present on the same or different populations of synaptic vesicles. We found that greater than 85% of vesicles that labeled for VAChT colabeled with VGLUT1 or VGLUT2, and approximately 70% colabeled with VNUT. Based upon confidence intervals, at least 52% of cholinergic vesicles isolated are likely to contain all four transporters. The presence of multiple types of neurotransmitter transporters - and potentially neurotransmitters - in individual synaptic vesicles raises fundamental questions about the role of cotransmitter release and neurotransmitter synergy at cholinergic synapses.

  18. Neurophysiological predictors of long term response to AChE inhibitors in AD patients

    PubMed Central

    Di, L; Oliviero, A; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Marra, C; Ghirlanda, S; Ranieri, F; Gainotti, G; Tonali, P

    2005-01-01

    Background: In vivo evaluation of cholinergic circuits of the human brain has recently been introduced using a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol based on coupling peripheral nerve stimulation with motor cortex TMS (short latency afferent inhibition, SAI). SAI is reduced in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and drugs enhancing cholinergic transmission increase SAI. Methods: We evaluated whether SAI testing, together with SAI test-retest, after a single dose of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor rivastigmine, might be useful in predicting the response after 1 year treatment with rivastigmine in 16 AD patients. Results: Fourteen AD patients had pathologically reduced SAI. SAI was increased after administration of a single oral dose of rivastigmine in AD patients with abnormal baseline SAI, but individual responses to rivastigmine varied widely, with SAI change ranging from an increase in inhibition of ∼50% of test size to no change. Baseline SAI and the increase in SAI after a single dose of rivastigmine were correlated with response to long term treatment. A normal SAI in baseline conditions, or an abnormal SAI in baseline conditions that was not greatly increased by a single oral dose of rivastigmine, were invariably associated with poor response to long term treatment, while an abnormal SAI in baseline conditions in conjunction with a large increase in SAI after a single dose of rivastigmine was associated with good response to long term treatment in most of the patients. Conclusions: Evaluation of SAI may be useful for identifying AD patients likely to respond to treatment with AChE inhibitors. PMID:16024879

  19. In Vivo Differences between Two Optical Isomers of Radioiodinated o-iodo-trans-decalinvesamicol for Use as a Radioligand for the Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Izumi; Kozaka, Takashi; Miwa, Daisuke; Kitamura, Yoji; Azim, Mohammad Anwar-ul; Ogawa, Kazuma; Taki, Junichi; Kinuya, Seigo; Shiba, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a superior VAChT imaging probe for SPECT, radiolabeled (-)-OIDV and (+)-OIDV were isolated and investigated for differences in their binding affinity and selectivity to VAChT, as well as their in vivo activities. Procedures Radioiodinated o-iodo-trans-decalinvesamicol ([125I]OIDV) has a high binding affinity for vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) both in vitro and in vivo. Racemic [125I]OIDV was separated into its two optical isomers (-)-[125I]OIDV and (+)-[125I]OIDV by HPLC. To investigate VAChT binding affinity (Ki) of two OIDV isomers, in vitro binding assays were performed. In vivo biodistribution study of each [125I]OIDV isomer in blood, brain regions and major organs of rats was performed at 2,30 and 60 min post-injection. In vivo blocking study were performed to reveal the binding selectivity of two [125I]OIDV isomers to VAChT in vivo. Ex vivo autoradiography were performed to reveal the regional brain distribution of two [125I]OIDV isomers and (-)-[123I]OIDV for SPECT at 60 min postinjection. Results VAChT binding affinity (Ki) of (-)-[125I]OIDV and (+)-[125I]OIDV was 22.1 nM and 79.0 nM, respectively. At 2 min post-injection, accumulation of (-)-[125I]OIDV was the same as that of (+)-[125I]OIDV. However, (+)-[125I]OIDV clearance from the brain was faster than (-)-[125I]OIDV. At 30 min post-injection, accumulation of (-)-[125I]OIDV (0.62 ± 0.10%ID/g) was higher than (+)-[125I]OIDV (0.46 ± 0.07%ID/g) in the cortex. Inhibition of OIDV binding showed that (-)-[125I]OIDV was selectively accumulated in regions known to express VAChT in the rat brain, and ex vivo autoradiography further confirmed these results showing similar accumulation of (-)-[125I]OIDV in these regions. Furthermore, (-)-[123I]OIDV for SPECT showed the same regional brain distribution as (-)-[125I]OIDV. Conclusion These results suggest that radioiodinated (-)-OIDV may be a potentially useful tool for studying presynaptic cholinergic neurons in the brain. PMID

  20. Gripped by Gout: Avoiding the Ache and Agony

    MedlinePlus

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Gripped by Gout Avoiding the Ache and Agony Sudden, painful swelling ... toe is often the first warning sign of gout. It can affect other joints as well. Without ...

  1. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important link in the apoptotic pathway induced by hyperglycemia in Y79 retinoblastoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Masha'our, R. Shehadeh; Heinrich, R.; Garzozi, H. J.; Perlman, I.

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) expression was found to be induced in the mammalian CNS, including the retina, by different types of stress leading to cellular apoptosis. Here, we tested possible involvement of AChE in hyperglycemia-induced apoptosis in a retinal cell line. Y79 retinoblastoma cells were incubated in starvation media (1% FBS and 1 mg/ml glucose) for 16–24 h, and then exposed to hyperglycemic environment by raising extracellular glucose concentrations to a final level of 3.5 mg/ml or 6 mg/ml. Similar levels of mannitol were used as control for hyperosmolarity. Cells were harvested at different time intervals for analysis of apoptosis and AChE protein expression. Apoptosis was detected by the cleavage of Poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) using western blot, and by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. AChE protein expression and activity was detected by western blot and by the Karnovsky and Roots method, respectively. MissionTM shRNA for AChE was used to inhibit AChE protein expression. Treating Y79 cells with 3.5 mg/ml of glucose, but not with 3.5 mg/ml mannitol, induced apoptosis which was confirmed by TUNEL assay and by cleavage of PARP. A part of the signaling pathway accompanying the apoptotic process involved up-regulation of the AChE-R variant and an N-extended AChE variant as verified at the mRNA and protein level. Inhibition of AChE protein expression by shRNA protected Y79 cell from entering the apoptotic pathway. Our data suggest that expression of an N-extended AChE variant, most probably an R isoform, is involved in the apoptotic pathway caused by hyperglycemia in Y79 cells. PMID:22685426

  2. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important link in the apoptotic pathway induced by hyperglycemia in Y79 retinoblastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Masha'our, R Shehadeh; Heinrich, R; Garzozi, H J; Perlman, I

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) expression was found to be induced in the mammalian CNS, including the retina, by different types of stress leading to cellular apoptosis. Here, we tested possible involvement of AChE in hyperglycemia-induced apoptosis in a retinal cell line. Y79 retinoblastoma cells were incubated in starvation media (1% FBS and 1 mg/ml glucose) for 16-24 h, and then exposed to hyperglycemic environment by raising extracellular glucose concentrations to a final level of 3.5 mg/ml or 6 mg/ml. Similar levels of mannitol were used as control for hyperosmolarity. Cells were harvested at different time intervals for analysis of apoptosis and AChE protein expression. Apoptosis was detected by the cleavage of Poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) using western blot, and by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. AChE protein expression and activity was detected by western blot and by the Karnovsky and Roots method, respectively. Mission(TM) shRNA for AChE was used to inhibit AChE protein expression. Treating Y79 cells with 3.5 mg/ml of glucose, but not with 3.5 mg/ml mannitol, induced apoptosis which was confirmed by TUNEL assay and by cleavage of PARP. A part of the signaling pathway accompanying the apoptotic process involved up-regulation of the AChE-R variant and an N-extended AChE variant as verified at the mRNA and protein level. Inhibition of AChE protein expression by shRNA protected Y79 cell from entering the apoptotic pathway. Our data suggest that expression of an N-extended AChE variant, most probably an R isoform, is involved in the apoptotic pathway caused by hyperglycemia in Y79 cells. PMID:22685426

  3. Evaluation of the Toxicity, AChE Activity and DNA Damage Caused by Imidacloprid on Earthworms, Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Qi, Suzhen; Mu, Xiyan; Chai, Tingting; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dandan; Li, Dongzhi; Che, Wunan; Wang, Chengju

    2015-10-01

    Imidacloprid is a well-known pesticide and it is timely to evaluate its toxicity to earthworms (Eisenia fetida). In the present study, the effect of imidacloprid on reproduction, growth, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and DNA damage in earthworms was assessed using an artificial soil medium. The median lethal concentration (LC50) and the median number of hatched cocoons (EC50) of imidacloprid to earthworms was 3.05 and 0.92 mg/kg respectively, the lowest observed effect concentration of imidacloprid about hatchability, growth, AChE activity and DNA damage was 0.02, 0.5, 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg, respectively.

  4. Intensified vmPFC surveillance over PTSS under perturbed microRNA-608/AChE interaction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, T; Simchovitz, A; Shenhar-Tsarfaty, S; Vaisvaser, S; Admon, R; Hanin, G; Hanan, M; Kliper, E; Bar-Haim, Y; Shomron, N; Fernandez, G; Lubin, G; Fruchter, E; Hendler, T; Soreq, H

    2016-01-01

    Trauma causes variable risk of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) owing to yet-unknown genome–neuronal interactions. Here, we report co-intensified amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) emotional responses that may overcome PTSS in individuals with the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs17228616 in the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene. We have recently shown that in individuals with the minor rs17228616 allele, this SNP interrupts AChE suppression by microRNA (miRNA)-608, leading to cortical elevation of brain AChE and reduced cortisol and the miRNA-608 target GABAergic modulator CDC42, all stress-associated. To examine whether this SNP has effects on PTSS and threat-related brain circuits, we exposed 76 healthy Israel Defense Forces soldiers who experienced chronic military stress to a functional magnetic resonance imaging task of emotional and neutral visual stimuli. Minor allele individuals predictably reacted to emotional stimuli by hyperactivated amygdala, a hallmark of PTSS and a predisposing factor of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Despite this, minor allele individuals showed no difference in PTSS levels. Mediation analyses indicated that the potentiated amygdala reactivity in minor allele soldiers promoted enhanced vmPFC recruitment that was associated with their limited PTSS. Furthermore, we found interrelated expression levels of several miRNA-608 targets including CD44, CDC42 and interleukin 6 in human amygdala samples (N=7). Our findings suggest that miRNA-608/AChE interaction is involved in the threat circuitry and PTSS and support a model where greater vmPFC regulatory activity compensates for amygdala hyperactivation in minor allele individuals to neutralize their PTSS susceptibility. PMID:27138800

  5. An acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor with enhanced solvent resistance based on chitosan for the detection of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Warner, John; Andreescu, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    Solvent tolerance of immobilized enzymes is important for many biosensing and biotechnological applications. In this paper we report an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor based on chitosan that exhibits high solvent resistance and enables sensitive detection of pesticides in presence of a high content of organic solvents. The solvent effect was established comparatively for the enzyme immobilized in chitosan and covalently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. The activity of the immobilized AChE was dependent on the immobilization method and solvent type. The enzyme entrapped in chitosan fully conserved its activity in up to 25% methanol, 15% acetonitrile and 100% cyclohexane while the enzyme cross-linked with glutaraldehyde gradually lost its activity starting at 5% acetonitrile and methanol, and showed variable levels in cyclohexane. The detection limits of the biosensor for paraoxon were: 7.5 nM in 25% methanol, 100 nM in 15% acetonitrile and 2.5 μM in 100% cyclohexane. This study demonstrates that chitosan provides an excellent immobilization environment for AChE biosensors designed to operate in environments containing high amounts of organic solvents. It also highlights the effect of the immobilization material and solvent type on enzyme stability. These findings can enable future selection of the immobilization matrix and solvent type for the development of organic phase enzyme based systems.

  6. An acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor with enhanced solvent resistance based on chitosan for the detection of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Warner, John; Andreescu, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    Solvent tolerance of immobilized enzymes is important for many biosensing and biotechnological applications. In this paper we report an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor based on chitosan that exhibits high solvent resistance and enables sensitive detection of pesticides in presence of a high content of organic solvents. The solvent effect was established comparatively for the enzyme immobilized in chitosan and covalently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. The activity of the immobilized AChE was dependent on the immobilization method and solvent type. The enzyme entrapped in chitosan fully conserved its activity in up to 25% methanol, 15% acetonitrile and 100% cyclohexane while the enzyme cross-linked with glutaraldehyde gradually lost its activity starting at 5% acetonitrile and methanol, and showed variable levels in cyclohexane. The detection limits of the biosensor for paraoxon were: 7.5 nM in 25% methanol, 100 nM in 15% acetonitrile and 2.5 μM in 100% cyclohexane. This study demonstrates that chitosan provides an excellent immobilization environment for AChE biosensors designed to operate in environments containing high amounts of organic solvents. It also highlights the effect of the immobilization material and solvent type on enzyme stability. These findings can enable future selection of the immobilization matrix and solvent type for the development of organic phase enzyme based systems. PMID:26695264

  7. Selenofuranoside Ameliorates Memory Loss in Alzheimer-Like Sporadic Dementia: AChE Activity, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation Involvement.

    PubMed

    Chiapinotto Spiazzi, Cristiano; Bucco Soares, Melina; Pinto Izaguirry, Aryele; Musacchio Vargas, Laura; Zanchi, Mariane Magalhães; Frasson Pavin, Natasha; Ferreira Affeldt, Ricardo; Seibert Lüdtke, Diogo; Prigol, Marina; Santos, Francielli Weber

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming more common due to the increase in life expectancy. This study evaluated the effect of selenofuranoside (Se) in an Alzheimer-like sporadic dementia animal model. Male mice were divided into 4 groups: control, Aβ, Se, and Aβ + Se. Single administration of Aβ peptide (fragments 25-35; 3 nmol/3 μL) or distilled water was administered via intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection. Selenofuranoside (5 mg/kg) or vehicle (canola oil) was administered orally 30 min before Aβ and for 7 subsequent days. Memory was tested through the Morris water maze (MWM) and step-down passive-avoidance (SDPA) tests. Antioxidant defenses along with reactive species (RS) were assessed. Inflammatory cytokines levels and AChE activity were measured. SOD activity was inhibited in the Aβ group whereas RS were increased. AChE activity, GSH, and IL-6 levels were increased in the Aβ group. These changes were reflected in impaired cognition and memory loss, observed in both behavioral tests. Se compound was able to protect against memory loss in mice in both behavioral tests. SOD and AChE activities as well as RS and IL-6 levels were also protected by Se administration. Therefore, Se is promising for further studies.

  8. Screening of POP pollution by AChE and EROD activities in Zebra mussels from the Italian Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Binelli, A; Ricciardi, Francesco; Riva, Consuelo; Provini, Alfredo

    2005-12-01

    The increase of ethoxyresorufin dealkylation (EROD) and the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as biomarkers have been commonly used in vertebrates for the persistent organic pollutants (POPs) biomonitoring of aquatic environments, but very few studies have been performed for invertebrates. Previous researches demonstrated the interference due to some chemicals on EROD and AChE activities of the freshwater bivalve Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) in laboratory and field studies, showing its possible use for the screening of POP effects. We investigated the contamination of the Italian sub-alpine great lakes (Maggiore, Lugano, Como, Iseo, Garda) by the biomarker approach on Zebra mussel specimens collected at 17 sampling sites with different morphometric characteristics and anthropization levels. Results showed a homogeneous contamination of AChE inhibitors in Lake Garda, Maggiore, Como and Iseo with values ranging from 0.5 to 3 nmol/min/mg proteins and with an average inhibition of about 66% to controls. The planar compounds pollution, able to activate the EROD activity, seems higher in some sampling stations of Lake Garda, Como and Iseo (2-4 pmol/min/mg proteins) than that measured in Lake Lugano (1.5-3 pmol/min/mg proteins). On the contrary, the enzyme activity in Lake Maggiore showed an interesting opposite effect of AhR-binding compounds and trace metals. Finally, the possible use of Zebra mussel specimens maintained at laboratory conditions as controls against the selection of the less polluted sampling site is discussed.

  9. Forebrain deletion of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter results in deficits in executive function, metabolic, and RNA splicing abnormalities in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kolisnyk, Benjamin; Al-Onaizi, Mohammed A; Hirata, Pedro H F; Guzman, Monica S; Nikolova, Simona; Barbash, Shahar; Soreq, Hermona; Bartha, Robert; Prado, Marco A M; Prado, Vania F

    2013-09-11

    One of the key brain regions in cognitive processing and executive function is the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which receives cholinergic input from basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. We evaluated the contribution of synaptically released acetylcholine (ACh) to executive function by genetically targeting the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) in the mouse forebrain. Executive function was assessed using a pairwise visual discrimination paradigm and the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRT). In the pairwise test, VAChT-deficient mice were able to learn, but were impaired in reversal learning, suggesting that these mice present cognitive inflexibility. Interestingly, VAChT-targeted mice took longer to reach criteria in the 5-CSRT. Although their performance was indistinguishable from that of control mice during low attentional demand, increased attentional demand revealed striking deficits in VAChT-deleted mice. Galantamine, a cholinesterase inhibitor used in Alzheimer's disease, significantly improved the performance of control mice, but not of VAChT-deficient mice on the 5-CSRT. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed altered levels of two neurochemical markers of neuronal function, taurine and lactate, suggesting altered PFC metabolism in VAChT-deficient mice. The PFC of these mice displayed a drastic reduction in the splicing factor heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNPA2/B1), whose cholinergic-mediated reduction was previously demonstrated in Alzheimer's disease. Consequently, several key hnRNPA2/B1 target transcripts involved in neuronal function present changes in alternative splicing in VAChT-deficient mice, including pyruvate kinase M, a key enzyme involved in lactate metabolism. We propose that VAChT-targeted mice can be used to model and to dissect the neurochemical basis of executive abnormalities. PMID:24027290

  10. Toxicological and Biochemical Characterizations of AChE in Phosalone-Susceptible and Resistant Populations of the Common Pistachio Psyllid, Agonoscena pistaciae

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Ali; Talebi-Jahromi, Khalil; Hosseininaveh, Vahid; Ghadamyari, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The toxicological and biochemical characteristics of acetylcholinesterases (AChE) in nine populations of the common pistachio psyllid, Agonoscena pistaciae Burckhardt and Lauterer (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), were investigated in Kerman Province, Iran. Nine A. pistaciae populations were collected from pistachio orchards, Pistacia vera L. (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae), located in Rafsanjan, Anar, Bam, Kerman, Shahrbabak, Herat, Sirjan, Pariz, and Paghaleh regions of Kerman province. The previous bioassay results showed these populations were susceptible or resistant to phosalone, and the Rafsanjan population was most resistant, with a resistance ratio of 11.3. The specific activity of AChE in the Rafsanjan population was significantly higher than in the susceptible population (Bam). The affinity (KM) and hydrolyzing efficiency (Vmax) of AChE on acetylthiocholine iodide, butyrylthiocholine iodide, and propionylthiocholine odide as artificial substrates were clearly lower in the Bam population than that in the Rafsanjan population. These results indicated that the AChE of the Rafsanjan population had lower affinity to these substrates than that of the susceptible population. The higher Vmax value in the Rafsanjan population compared to the susceptible population suggests a possible over expression of AChE in the Rafsanjan population. The in vitro inhibitory effect of several organophosphates and carbamates on AChE of the Rafsanjan and Bam populations was determined. Based on I50, the results showed that the ratios of AChE insensitivity of the resistant to susceptible populations were 23 and 21.7-fold to monocrotophos and phosphamidon, respectively. Whereas, the insensitivity ratios for Rafsanjan population were 0.86, 0.8, 0.78, 0.46, and 0.43 for carbaryl, eserine, propoxur, m-tolyl methyl carbamate, and carbofuran, respectively, suggesting negatively correlated sensitivity to organophosphate-insensitive AChE. Therefore, AChE from the Rafsanjan population showed negatively

  11. Toxicological and biochemical characterizations of AChE in phosalone-susceptible and resistant populations of the common pistachio psyllid, Agonoscena pistaciae.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Ali; Talebi-Jahromi, Khalil; Hosseininaveh, Vahid; Ghadamyari, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The toxicological and biochemical characteristics of acetylcholinesterases (AChE) in nine populations of the common pistachio psyllid, Agonoscena pistaciae Burckhardt and Lauterer (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), were investigated in Kerman Province, Iran. Nine A. pistaciae populations were collected from pistachio orchards, Pistacia vera L. (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae), located in Rafsanjan, Anar, Bam, Kerman, Shahrbabak, Herat, Sirjan, Pariz, and Paghaleh regions of Kerman province. The previous bioassay results showed these populations were susceptible or resistant to phosalone, and the Rafsanjan population was most resistant, with a resistance ratio of 11.3. The specific activity of AChE in the Rafsanjan population was significantly higher than in the susceptible population (Bam). The affinity (K(M)) and hydrolyzing efficiency (Vmax) of AChE on acetylthiocholine iodide, butyrylthiocholine iodide, and propionylthiocholine odide as artificial substrates were clearly lower in the Bam population than that in the Rafsanjan population. These results indicated that the AChE of the Rafsanjan population had lower affinity to these substrates than that of the susceptible population. The higher Vmax value in the Rafsanjan population compared to the susceptible population suggests a possible over expression of AChE in the Rafsanjan population. The in vitro inhibitory effect of several organophosphates and carbamates on AChE of the Rafsanjan and Bam populations was determined. Based on I50, the results showed that the ratios of AChE insensitivity of the resistant to susceptible populations were 23 and 21.7-fold to monocrotophos and phosphamidon, respectively. Whereas, the insensitivity ratios for Rafsanjan population were 0.86, 0.8, 0.78, 0.46, and 0.43 for carbaryl, eserine, propoxur, m-tolyl methyl carbamate, and carbofuran, respectively, suggesting negatively correlated sensitivity to organophosphate-insensitive AChE. Therefore, AChE from the Rafsanjan population showed negatively

  12. STEREOLOGICAL ESTIMATES OF THE BASAL FOREBRAIN CELL POPULATION IN THE RAT, INCLUDING NEURONS CONTAINING CHOLINE ACETYLTRANSFERASE (ChAT), GLUTAMIC ACID DECARBOXYLASE (GAD) OR PHOSPHATE-ACTIVATED GLUTAMINASE (PAG) AND COLOCALIZING VESICULAR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTERS (VGluTs)

    PubMed Central

    GRITTI, I.; HENNY, P.; GALLONI, F.; MAINVILLE, L.; MARIOTTI, M.; JONES, B. E.

    2006-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in modulating cortical activity and influencing attention, learning and memory. These activities are fulfilled importantly yet not entirely by cholinergic neurons. Noncholinergic neurons also contribute and are comprised by GABAergic neurons and other possibly glutamatergic neurons. The aim of the present study was to estimate the total number of cells in the BF of the rat and the proportions of that total represented by cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. For this purpose, cells were counted using unbiased stereological methods within the medial septum, diagonal band, magnocellular preoptic nucleus, substantia innominata and globus pallidus in sections stained for Nissl substance and/or the neurotransmitter enzymes, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). In Nissl-stained sections, the total number of neurons in the BF was estimated as ~355,000 and the numbers of ChAT-immuno-positive (+) as ~22,000, GAD+ ~119,000 and PAG+ ~316,000, corresponding to ~5%, ~35% and ~90% of the total. Thus, of the large population of BF neurons, only a small proportion has the capacity to synthesize acetylcholine (ACh), one third to synthesize GABA and the vast majority to synthesize glutamate (Glu). Moreover, through the presence of PAG, a proportion of ACh- and GABA-synthesizing neurons also have the capacity to synthesize Glu. In sections dual fluorescent immunostained for vesicular transporters, VGluT3 and not VGluT2 was present in the cell bodies of most PAG+ and ChAT+ and half the GAD+ cells. Given previous results showing that VGluT2 and not VGluT3 was present in BF axon terminals and not colocalized with VAChT or VGAT, we conclude that the BF cell population influences cortical and subcortical regions through neurons which release ACh, GABA or Glu from their terminals but which in part can also synthesize and release Glu from their soma or

  13. Comparative study on short- and long-term behavioral consequences of organophosphate exposure: relationship to AChE mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    López-Granero, Caridad; Cardona, Diana; Giménez, Estela; Lozano, Rafael; Barril, José; Aschner, Michael; Sánchez-Santed, Fernando; Cañadas, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) affect behavior by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). While the cognitive short-term effects may be directly attributed to this inhibition, the mechanisms that underlie OP's long-term cognitive effects remain controversial and poorly understood. Accordingly, two experiments were designed to assess the effects of OPs on cognition, and to ascertain whether both the short- and long-term effects of are AChE-dependent. A single subcutaneous dose of 250 mg/kg chlorpyrifos (CPF), 1.5mg/kg diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) or 15 mg/kg parathion (PTN) was administered to male Wistar rats. Spatial learning was evaluated 72 h or 23 weeks after exposure, and impulsive choice was tested at 10 and 30 weeks following OPs administration (experiment 1 and 2, respectively). Brain soluble and membrane-bound AChE activity, synaptic AChE-S mRNA, read-through AChE-R mRNA and brain acylpeptide hydrolase (APH) activity (as alternative non-cholinergic target) were analyzed upon completion of the behavioral testing (17 and 37 weeks after OPs exposure). Both short- and long-term CPF treatment caused statistically significant effects on spatial learning, while PTN treatment led only to statistically significant short-term effects. Neither CPF, DFP nor PTN affected the long-term impulsivity response. Long-term exposure to CPF and DFP significantly decreased AChE-S and AChE-R mRNA, while in the PTN treated group only AChE-S mRNA levels were decreased. However, after long-term OP exposure, soluble and membrane-bound AChE activity was indistinguishable from controls. Finally, no changes were noted in brain APH activity in response to OP treatment. Taken together, this study demonstrates long-term effects of OPs on AChE-S and AChE-R mRNA in the absence of changes in AChE soluble and membrane-bound activity. Thus, changes in AChE mRNA expression imply non-catalytic properties of the AChE enzyme.

  14. Muscarinic ACh Receptors Contribute to Aversive Olfactory Learning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bryon; Molina-Fernández, Claudia; Ugalde, María Beatriz; Tognarelli, Eduardo I.; Angel, Cristian; Campusano, Jorge M.

    2015-01-01

    The most studied form of associative learning in Drosophila consists in pairing an odorant, the conditioned stimulus (CS), with an unconditioned stimulus (US). The timely arrival of the CS and US information to a specific Drosophila brain association region, the mushroom bodies (MB), can induce new olfactory memories. Thus, the MB is considered a coincidence detector. It has been shown that olfactory information is conveyed to the MB through cholinergic inputs that activate acetylcholine (ACh) receptors, while the US is encoded by biogenic amine (BA) systems. In recent years, we have advanced our understanding on the specific neural BA pathways and receptors involved in olfactory learning and memory. However, little information exists on the contribution of cholinergic receptors to this process. Here we evaluate for the first time the proposition that, as in mammals, muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) contribute to memory formation in Drosophila. Our results show that pharmacological and genetic blockade of mAChRs in MB disrupts olfactory aversive memory in larvae. This effect is not explained by an alteration in the ability of animals to respond to odorants or to execute motor programs. These results show that mAChRs in MB contribute to generating olfactory memories in Drosophila. PMID:26380118

  15. Nicotinic ACh receptors as therapeutic targets in CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Dineley, Kelly T; Pandya, Anshul A; Yakel, Jerrel L

    2015-02-01

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) can regulate neuronal excitability by acting on the cys-loop cation-conducting ligand-gated nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) channels. These receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS), being expressed on neurons and non-neuronal cells, where they participate in a variety of physiological responses such as anxiety, the central processing of pain, food intake, nicotine seeking behavior, and cognitive functions. In the mammalian brain, nine different subunits have been found thus far, which assemble into pentameric complexes with much subunit diversity; however, the α7 and α4β2 subtypes predominate in the CNS. Neuronal nAChR dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of many neurological disorders. Here we will briefly discuss the functional makeup and expression of the nAChRs in mammalian brain, and their role as targets in neurodegenerative diseases (in particular Alzheimer's disease, AD), neurodevelopmental disorders (in particular autism and schizophrenia), and neuropathic pain.

  16. Cardiac acetylcholine inhibits ventricular remodeling and dysfunction under pathologic conditions.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ashbeel; Dakroub, Mouhamed; Tezini, Geisa C S V; Liu, Yin; Guatimosim, Silvia; Feng, Qingping; Salgado, Helio C; Prado, Vania F; Prado, Marco A M; Gros, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is a characteristic of cardiac disease and decreased vagal activity is observed in heart failure. Rodent cardiomyocytes produce de novo ACh, which is critical in maintaining cardiac homeostasis. We report that this nonneuronal cholinergic system is also found in human cardiomyocytes, which expressed choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Furthermore, VAChT expression was increased 3- and 1.5-fold at the mRNA and protein level, respectively, in ventricular tissue from patients with heart failure, suggesting increased ACh secretion in disease. We used mice with genetic deletion of cardiomyocyte-specific VAChT or ChAT and mice overexpressing VAChT to test the functional significance of cholinergic signaling. Mice deficient for VAChT displayed an 8% decrease in fractional shortening and 13% decrease in ejection fraction compared with angiotensin II (Ang II)-treated control animals, suggesting enhanced ventricular dysfunction and pathologic remodeling in response to Ang II. Similar results were observed in ChAT-deficient mice. Conversely, no decline in ventricular function was observed in Ang II-treated VAChT overexpressors. Furthermore, the fibrotic area was significantly greater (P < 0.05) in Ang II-treated VAChT-deficient mice (3.61 ± 0.64%) compared with wild-type animals (2.24 ± 0.11%). In contrast, VAChT overexpressing mice did not display an increase in collagen deposition. Our results provide new insight into cholinergic regulation of cardiac function, suggesting that a compensatory increase in cardiomyocyte VAChT levels may help offset cardiac remodeling in heart failure.

  17. AChR-specific immunosuppressive therapy of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-10-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease characterized by muscle fatigability. In most cases, it is mediated by autoantibodies targeting muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at the neuromuscular junction. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) is an animal model for MG, which is usually induced by immunization with AChR purified from fish electric organ. Pathological autoantibodies to AChRs are directed at the extracellular surface, especially the main immunogenic region (MIR). Current treatments for MG can help many but not all patients. Antigen-specific immunosuppressive therapy for MG that specifically suppresses the autoimmune response without affecting the entire immune system and avoids side effects of general immunosuppression is currently unavailable. Early attempts at antigen-specific immunosuppression for EAMG using AChR extracellular domain sequences that form epitopes for pathological autoantibodies risked provoking autoimmunity rather than suppressing it. We discovered a novel approach to specific immunosuppression of EAMG with a therapeutic vaccine consisting of bacterially-expressed human AChR cytoplasmic domains, which has the potential to specifically suppress MG without danger of causing exacerbation. This approach prevents development of chronic EAMG when initiated immediately after the acute phase of EAMG, and rapidly reverses established chronic EAMG when started during the chronic phase of EAMG. Successfully treated rats exhibited long-term resistance to re-induction of EAMG. In this review we also discuss the current understanding of the mechanisms by which the therapy works. Vaccination with AChR cytoplasmic domains in adjuvant is promising as a safe, antigen-specific, potent, effective, rapidly acting, and long lasting approach to therapy of MG.

  18. Bactericidal activity of ACH-702 against nondividing and biofilm Staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Podos, Steven D; Thanassi, Jane A; Leggio, Melissa; Pucci, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    Many bacterial infections involve slow or nondividing bacterial growth states and localized high cell densities. Antibiotics with demonstrated bactericidal activity rarely remain bactericidal at therapeutic concentrations under these conditions. The isothiazoloquinolone (ITQ) ACH-702 is a potent, bactericidal compound with activity against many antibiotic-resistant pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We evaluated its bactericidal activity under conditions where bacterial cells were not dividing and/or had slowed their growth. Against S. aureus cultures in stationary phase, ACH-702 showed concentration-dependent bactericidal activity and achieved a 3-log-unit reduction in viable cell counts within 6 h of treatment at ≥ 16× MIC values; in comparison, the bactericidal quinolone moxifloxacin and the additional comparator compounds vancomycin, linezolid, and rifampin at 16× to 32× MICs showed little or no bactericidal activity against stationary-phase cells. ACH-702 at 32× MIC retained bactericidal activity against stationary-phase S. aureus across a range of inoculum densities. ACH-702 did not kill cold-arrested cells yet remained bactericidal against cells arrested by protein synthesis inhibitors, suggesting that its bactericidal activity against nondividing cells requires active metabolism but not de novo protein synthesis. ACH-702 also showed a degree of bactericidal activity at 16× MIC against S. epidermidis biofilm cells that was superior to that of moxifloxacin, rifampin, and vancomycin. The bactericidal activity of ACH-702 against stationary-phase staphylococci and biofilms suggests potential clinical utility in infections containing cells in these physiological states. PMID:22547614

  19. Acetylcholinesterase Regulates Skeletal In Ovo Development of Chicken Limbs by ACh-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Spieker, Janine; Ackermann, Anica; Salfelder, Anika; Vogel-Höpker, Astrid; Layer, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of the vertebrate limb presents an excellent model to analyze a non-neuronal cholinergic system (NNCS). Here, we first analyzed the expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by IHC and of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) by ISH in developing embryonic chicken limbs (stages HH17-37). AChE outlined formation of bones, being strongest at their distal tips, and later also marked areas of cell death. At onset, AChE and ChAT were elevated in two organizing centers of the limb anlage, the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) and zone of polarizing activity (ZPA), respectively. Thereby ChAT was expressed shortly after AChE, thus strongly supporting a leading role of AChE in limb formation. Then, we conducted loss-of-function studies via unilateral implantation of beads into chicken limb anlagen, which were soaked in cholinergic components. After varying periods, the formation of cartilage matrix and of mineralizing bones was followed by Alcian blue (AB) and Alizarin red (AR) stainings, respectively. Both acetylcholine (ACh)- and ChAT-soaked beads accelerated bone formation in ovo. Notably, inhibition of AChE by BW284c51, or by the monoclonal antibody MAB304 delayed cartilage formation. Since bead inhibition of BChE was mostly ineffective, an ACh-independent action during BW284c51 and MAB304 inhibition was indicated, which possibly could be due to an enzymatic side activity of AChE. In conclusion, skeletogenesis in chick is regulated by an ACh-dependent cholinergic system, but to some extent also by an ACh-independent aspect of the AChE protein. PMID:27574787

  20. Acetylcholinesterase Regulates Skeletal In Ovo Development of Chicken Limbs by ACh-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Spieker, Janine; Ackermann, Anica; Salfelder, Anika; Vogel-Höpker, Astrid; Layer, Paul G

    2016-01-01

    Formation of the vertebrate limb presents an excellent model to analyze a non-neuronal cholinergic system (NNCS). Here, we first analyzed the expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by IHC and of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) by ISH in developing embryonic chicken limbs (stages HH17-37). AChE outlined formation of bones, being strongest at their distal tips, and later also marked areas of cell death. At onset, AChE and ChAT were elevated in two organizing centers of the limb anlage, the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) and zone of polarizing activity (ZPA), respectively. Thereby ChAT was expressed shortly after AChE, thus strongly supporting a leading role of AChE in limb formation. Then, we conducted loss-of-function studies via unilateral implantation of beads into chicken limb anlagen, which were soaked in cholinergic components. After varying periods, the formation of cartilage matrix and of mineralizing bones was followed by Alcian blue (AB) and Alizarin red (AR) stainings, respectively. Both acetylcholine (ACh)- and ChAT-soaked beads accelerated bone formation in ovo. Notably, inhibition of AChE by BW284c51, or by the monoclonal antibody MAB304 delayed cartilage formation. Since bead inhibition of BChE was mostly ineffective, an ACh-independent action during BW284c51 and MAB304 inhibition was indicated, which possibly could be due to an enzymatic side activity of AChE. In conclusion, skeletogenesis in chick is regulated by an ACh-dependent cholinergic system, but to some extent also by an ACh-independent aspect of the AChE protein. PMID:27574787

  1. Enhanced synthesis and release of dopamine in transgenic mice with gain-of-function α6* nAChRs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexiang; Lee, Jang-Won; Oh, Gyeon; Grady, Sharon R.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Brunzell, Darlene H.; Cannon, Jason R.; Drenan, Ryan M.

    2014-01-01

    α6β2* nAChRs in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to nucleus accumbens (NAc) pathway are implicated in the response to nicotine, and recent work suggests these receptors play a role in the rewarding action of ethanol. Here, we studied mice expressing gain-of-function α6β2* nAChRs (α6L9’S mice) that are hypersensitive to nicotine and endogenous acetylcholine (ACh). Evoked extracellular dopamine (DA) levels were enhanced in α6L9’S NAc slices compared to control, non-transgenic (nonTg) slices. Extracellular DA levels in both nonTg and α6L9’S slices were further enhanced in the presence of GBR12909, suggesting intact DA transporter function in both mouse strains. Ongoing α6β2* nAChR activation by ACh plays a role in enhancing DA levels, as α-conotoxin MII completely abolished evoked DA release in α6L9’S slices and decreased spontaneous DA release from striatal synaptosomes. In HPLC experiments, α6L9’S NAc tissue contained significantly more DA, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and homovanillic acid (HVA) compared to nonTg NAc tissue. Serotonin (5-HT), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and norepinephrine (NE) were unchanged in α6L9’S compared to nonTg tissue. Western blot analysis revealed increased tyrosine hydroxylase expression in α6L9’S NAc. Overall, these results show that enhanced α6β2* nAChR activity in NAc can stimulate DA production and lead to increased extracellular DA levels. PMID:24266758

  2. Combined 3D-QSAR, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics study of tacrine derivatives as potential acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, An; Hu, Jianping; Wang, Lirong; Zhong, Guochen; Pan, Jian; Wu, Zeyu; Hui, Ailing

    2015-10-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is one of the key targets of drugs for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tacrine is an approved drug with AChE-inhibitory activity. In this paper, 3D-QSAR, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics were carried out in order to study 60 tacrine derivatives and their AChE-inhibitory activities. 3D-QSAR modeling resulted in an optimal CoMFA model with q(2) = 0.552 and r(2) = 0.983 and an optimal CoMSIA model with q(2) = 0.581 and r(2) = 0.989. These QSAR models also showed that the steric and H-bond fields of these compounds are important influences on their activities. The interactions between these inhibitors and AChE were further explored through molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. A few key residues (Tyr70, Trp84, Tyr121, Trp279, and Phe330) at the binding site of AChE were identified. The results of this study improve our understanding of the mechanisms of AChE inhibitors and afford valuable information that should aid the design of novel potential AChE inhibitors. Graphical Abstract Superposition of backbone atoms of the lowest-energy structure obtained from MD simulation (magenta) onto those of the structure of the initial molecular docking model (green).

  3. Sesquiterpenes and a monoterpenoid with acetylcholinesterase (AchE) inhibitory activity from Valeriana officinalis var. latiofolia in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Heng-Wen; He, Xuan-Hui; Yuan, Rong; Wei, Ben-Jun; Chen, Zhong; Dong, Jun-Xing; Wang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor (AchEI) is the most extensive in all anti-dementia drugs. The extracts and isolated compounds from the Valeriana genus have shown anti-dementia bioactivity. Four new sesquiterpenoids (1-4) and a new monoterpenoid (5) were isolated from the root of Valeriana officinalis var. latiofolia. The acetylcholinesterase (AchE) inhibitory activity of isolates was evaluated by modified Ellman method in vitro. Learning and memory ability of compound 4 on mice was evaluated by the Morris water maze. The contents of acetylcholine (Ach), acetylcholine transferase (ChAT) and AchE in mice brains were determined by colorimetry. The results showed IC50 of compound 4 was 0.161 μM in vitro. Compared with the normal group, the learning and memory ability of mice and the contents of Ach and ChAT decreased in model group mice (P<0.01), while the AchE increased (P<0.01). Compared with the model group, Ach and ChAT in the positive control group, the high-dose group and the medium-dose group increased (P<0.01), while the AchE decreased (P<0.01). Compound 4 can improve the learning and memory abilities of APPswe/PSΔE9 double-transgenic mice, and the mechanism may be related to the regulation of the relative enzyme in the cholinergic system. PMID:26976216

  4. Cardanol-derived AChE inhibitors: Towards the development of dual binding derivatives for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lemes, Laís Flávia Nunes; de Andrade Ramos, Giselle; de Oliveira, Andressa Souza; da Silva, Fernanda Motta R; de Castro Couto, Gina; da Silva Boni, Marina; Guimarães, Marcos Jorge R; Souza, Isis Nem O; Bartolini, Manuela; Andrisano, Vincenza; do Nascimento Nogueira, Patrícia Coelho; Silveira, Edilberto Rocha; Brand, Guilherme D; Soukup, Ondřej; Korábečný, Jan; Romeiro, Nelilma C; Castro, Newton G; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Romeiro, Luiz Antonio Soares

    2016-01-27

    Cardanol is a phenolic lipid component of cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), obtained as the byproduct of cashew nut food processing. Being a waste product, it has attracted much attention as a precursor for the production of high-value chemicals, including drugs. On the basis of these findings and in connection with our previous studies on cardanol derivatives as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, we designed a novel series of analogues by including a protonable amino moiety belonging to different systems. Properly addressed docking studies suggested that the proposed structural modifications would allow the new molecules to interact with both the catalytic active site (CAS) and the peripheral anionic site (PAS) of AChE, thus being able to act as dual binding inhibitors. To disclose whether the new molecules showed the desired profile, they were first tested for their cholinesterase inhibitory activity towards EeAChE and eqBuChE. Compound 26, bearing an N-ethyl-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)amine moiety, showed the highest inhibitory activity against EeAChE, with a promising IC50 of 6.6 μM, and a similar inhibition profile of the human isoform (IC50 = 5.7 μM). As another positive feature, most of the derivatives did not show appreciable toxicity against HT-29 cells, up to a concentration of 100 μM, which indicates drug-conform behavior. Also, compound 26 is capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as predicted by a PAMPA-BBB assay. Collectively, the data suggest that the approach to obtain potential anti-Alzheimer drugs from CNSL is worth of further pursuit and development. PMID:26735910

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ach5.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Yi; Cho, Shu-Ting; Lo, Wen-Sui; Wang, Yi-Chieh; Lai, Erh-Min; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2015-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a phytopathogenic bacterium that causes crown gall disease. The strain Ach5 was isolated from yarrow (Achillea ptarmica L.) and is the wild-type progenitor of other derived strains widely used for plant transformation. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of this bacterium. PMID:26044425

  6. The Ache: Genocide Continues in Paraguay. IWGIA Document No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munzel, Mark

    In 1972, the Paraguayan Roman Catholic Church protested against the massacre of Indians in Paraguay. This was followed by further protests from Paraguayan intellectuals. These protests led to the removal of Jesus de Pereira, one of the executors of the official Ache policy. Thus, the critics were appeased. Since the beginning of 1973, new protests…

  7. Synthesis, In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of 18F-labeled PET Ligands for Imaging the Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhude; Efange, Simon M. N.; Xu, Jinbin; Li, Shihong; Jones, Lynne A.; Parsons, Stanley M.; Mach, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    A new class of vesicular acetylcholine transporter inhibitor that incorporates a carbonyl group into the benzovesamicol structure was synthesized and analogs were evaluated in vitro. (±)-trans-2-Hydroxy-3-(4-(4-[18F]fluorobenzoyl)piperidino)tetralin (9e) has Ki values of 2.70 nM for VAChT, 191 nM for σ1 and 251 nM for σ2. The racemic precursor (9d) was resolved via chiral HPLC and (±)-[18F]9e, (-)-[18F]9e, and (+)-[18F]9e were respectively radiolabeled via microwave irradiation of the appropriate precursors with [18F]/F- and Kryptofix/K2CO3 in DMSO with radiochemical yields ∼50-60% and specific activities >2000 mCi/μmol. (-)-[18F]9e uptake in rat brain was consistent with in vivo selectivity for the VAChT with an initial uptake of 0.911 %ID/g in rat striatum and a striatum: cerebellum ratio of 1.88 by 30 min p.i.. MicroPET imaging of macaques demonstrated a 2.1 ratio of (-)-[18F]9e in putamen versus cerebellum at 2 h. p.i. (-)-[18F]9e has potential to be a PET tracer for clinical imaging of the VAChT. PMID:19203271

  8. Photolabeling a Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) with an (α4)3(β2)2 nAChR-Selective Positive Allosteric Modulator.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Deba, Farah; Wang, Ze-Jun; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2016-05-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs) have potential clinical applications in the treatment of nicotine dependence and many neuropsychiatric conditions associated with decreased brain cholinergic activity, and 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-5-(5-methyl-1-(piperidin-4-yl)-1H-pyrrazol-4-yl)isoxazole (CMPI) has been identified as a PAM selective for neuronal nAChRs containing theα4 subunit. In this report, we compare CMPI interactions with low-sensitivity (α4)3(β2)2 and high-sensitivity (α4)2(β2)3 nAChRs, and with muscle-type nAChRs. In addition, we use the intrinsic reactivity of [(3)H]CMPI upon photolysis at 312 nm to identify its binding sites inTorpedonAChRs. Recording fromXenopusoocytes, we found that CMPI potentiated maximally the responses of (α4)3(β2)2nAChR to 10μM ACh (EC10) by 400% and with anEC50of ∼1µM. CMPI produced a left shift of the ACh concentration-response curve without altering ACh efficacy. In contrast, CMPI inhibited (∼35% at 10µM) ACh responses of (α4)2(β2)3nAChRs and fully inhibited human muscle andTorpedonAChRs with IC50values of ∼0.5µM. Upon irradiation at 312 nm, [(3)H]CMPI photoincorporated into eachTorpedo[(α1)2β1γδ] nAChR subunit. Sequencing of peptide fragments isolated from [(3)H]CMPI-photolabeled nAChR subunits established photolabeling of amino acids contributing to the ACh binding sites (αTyr(190),αTyr(198),γTrp(55),γTyr(111),γTyr(117),δTrp(57)) that was fully inhibitable by agonist and lower-efficiency, state-dependent [(3)H]CMPI photolabeling within the ion channel. Our results establish that CMPI is a potent potentiator of nAChRs containing anα4:α4 subunit interface, and that its intrinsic photoreactivy makes it of potential use to identify its binding sites in the (α4)3(β2)2nAChR. PMID:26976945

  9. Functional Analysis and Molecular Docking studies of Medicinal Compounds for AChE and BChE in Alzheimer’s Disease and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kaladhar, Dowluru SVGK; Yarla, Nagendra Sastry; Anusha, N.

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase share unravelling link with components of metabolic syndromes that’s characterised by low levels of HDL cholesterol, obesity, high fast aldohexose levels, hyper-trigliceridaemia and high blood pressure, by regulation of cholinergic transmission and therefore the enzyme activity within a living system. The phosphomotifs associated with amino acid and tyrosine binding motifs in AChE and BChE were known to be common. Phylogenetic tree was constructed to these proteins usinf UPGMA and Maximum Likelihood methods in MEGA software has shown interaction of AChE and BChE with ageing diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and Diabetes. AChE has shown closely related to BChE, retinol dehydrogenase and β-polypeptide. The present studies is also accomplished that AChE, BChE, COLQ, HAND1, APP, NLGN2 and NGF proteins has interactions with diseases such as Alzheimer’s and D2M using Pathwaylinker and STRING. Medicinal compounds like Ortho-7, Dibucaine and HI-6 are predicted as good targets for modeled AChE and BChE proteins based on docking studies. Hence perceptive studies of cholinesterase structure and the biological mechanisms of inhibition are necessary for effective drug development. PMID:23936743

  10. Real Time Ligand-Induced Motion Mappings of AChBP and nAChR Using X-ray Single Molecule Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Yasuhito; Nishino, Yuri; Kobayashi, Suzuko; Shimoyama, Yoshiko; Cai, Weiyan; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Ohta, Noboru; Yagi, Naoto; Miyazawa, Atsuo; Kubo, Tai; Sasaki, Yuji C.

    2014-01-01

    We observed the dynamic three-dimensional (3D) single molecule behaviour of acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) using a single molecule tracking technique, diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT) with atomic scale and 100 μs time resolution. We found that the combined tilting and twisting motions of the proteins were enhanced upon acetylcholine (ACh) binding. We present the internal motion maps of AChBP and nAChR in the presence of either ACh or α-bungarotoxin (αBtx), with views from two rotational axes. Our findings indicate that specific motion patterns represented as biaxial angular motion maps are associated with channel function in real time and on an atomic scale. PMID:25223459

  11. Kinetic evidence that desensitized nAChR may promote transitions of active nAChR to desensitized states during sustained exposure to agonists in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Manthey, Arthur A

    2006-06-01

    During prolonged exposure of postjunctional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) of skeletal muscle to acetylcholine (ACh), agonist-activated nAChR (nAChRa) gradually fall into a refractory "desensitized" state (nAChRd), which no longer supports the high-conductance channel openings characteristic of the initially active nAChRa. In the present study, the possibility was examined that nAChRd, rather than simply constituting a passive "trap" for nAChRa, may actively promote further conversions of nAChRa to nAChRd in a formally autocatalytic manner. Single-ion whole-cell voltage-clamp currents (Na+ and Li+ in separate trials) were measured using two KCl-filled capillary electrodes (5-10 MOmega) implanted at the postjunctional locus of single frog skeletal muscle fibers (Rana pipiens) equilibrated in 30 mM K+ bath media to eliminate mechanical responses. Various nAChR agonists (carbamylcholine, acetylcholine, suberyldicholine) at different concentrations were delivered focally by positive pressure microjet. It was found that the decline of postmaximal agonist-induced currents under these different conditions (driven by the growth of the subpool of nAChRd) consistently followed an autocatalytic logistic rule modified for population growth of fixed units in a planar array: [Formula: see text] (where y represents the remaining agonist-induced current at time t, A=initial maximum current, and n is a constant). Some further experimental features that might result from a self-promoting growth of nAChRd were also tested, namely, (1) the effect of increased nAChRa and (2) the effect of increased nAChRd. Increase in agonist concentration of the superfusate, by increasing the planar density of active nAChRa at the outset, should enhance the probability of autocatalytic interactions with emerging nAChRd, hence, the rate of decline of agonist-induced current, and this was a consistent finding under all conditions tested. Raising the initial level of desensitized nAChRd by

  12. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and heat shock proteins (Hsp70) of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) larvae in response to long-term fluoranthene exposure.

    PubMed

    Mrdaković, Marija; Ilijin, Larisa; Vlahović, Milena; Matić, Dragana; Gavrilović, Anja; Mrkonja, Aleksandra; Perić-Mataruga, Vesna

    2016-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may affect biochemical and physiological processes in living organisms, thus impairing fitness related traits and influencing their populations. This imposes the need for providing early-warning signals of pollution. Our study aimed to examine changes in the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the concentration of heat shock proteins (Hsp70) in homogenates of brain tissues of fifth instar gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) larvae, exposed to the ubiquitous PAH, fluoranthene, supplemented to the rearing diet. Significantly increased activity of AChE in larvae fed on the diets with high fluoranthene concentrations suggests the necessity for elucidation of the role of AChE in these insects when exposed to PAH pollution. Significant induction of Hsp70 in gypsy moth larvae reared on the diets containing low fluoranthene concentrations, indicate that changes in the level of Hsp70 might be useful as an indicator of pollution in this widespread forest species. PMID:27343862

  13. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and heat shock proteins (Hsp70) of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) larvae in response to long-term fluoranthene exposure.

    PubMed

    Mrdaković, Marija; Ilijin, Larisa; Vlahović, Milena; Matić, Dragana; Gavrilović, Anja; Mrkonja, Aleksandra; Perić-Mataruga, Vesna

    2016-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may affect biochemical and physiological processes in living organisms, thus impairing fitness related traits and influencing their populations. This imposes the need for providing early-warning signals of pollution. Our study aimed to examine changes in the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the concentration of heat shock proteins (Hsp70) in homogenates of brain tissues of fifth instar gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) larvae, exposed to the ubiquitous PAH, fluoranthene, supplemented to the rearing diet. Significantly increased activity of AChE in larvae fed on the diets with high fluoranthene concentrations suggests the necessity for elucidation of the role of AChE in these insects when exposed to PAH pollution. Significant induction of Hsp70 in gypsy moth larvae reared on the diets containing low fluoranthene concentrations, indicate that changes in the level of Hsp70 might be useful as an indicator of pollution in this widespread forest species.

  14. Target site insensitivity mutations in the AChE enzyme confer resistance to organophosphorous insecticides in Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say).

    PubMed

    Malekmohammadi, M; Galehdari, H

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we demonstrated the use and optimization of the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR procedure to detect and analyze the frequency of the R30K and I392T mutations in resistant field populations of CPB. The R30K mutation was detected in 72%, 84%, 52% and 64% of Bahar, Dehpiaz, Aliabad and Yengijeh populations, respectively. Overall frequencies of the I392T mutation were 12%, 8% and 16% of Bahar, Aliabad and Yengijeh populations, respectively. No I392T point mutation was found among samples from Dehpiaz field population. Moreover, only 31% and 2% of samples from the resistant field populations were homozygous for R30K and I392T mutations, respectively. No individual simultaneously had both I392T and S291G/R30K point mutations. The incidence of individuals with both S291G and R30K point mutations in the samples from Bahar, Dehpiaz, Aliabad, and Yengijeh populations were 31.5%, 44.7%, 41.6%, and 27.3% respectively. Genotypes determined by the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR method were consistent with those determined by PCR sequencing. There was no significant correlation between the mutation frequencies and resistance levels in the resistant populations, indicating that other mutations may contribute to this variation. Polymorphism in the partial L. decemlineata cDNA AChE gene Ldace2 of four field populations was identified by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments. Among 45 novel mutations detected in this study, T29P mutation was found across all four field populations that likely contribute to the AChE insensitivity. Site-directed mutagenesis and protein expression experiments are needed for a more complete evaluation. PMID:26778439

  15. The regulation of hippocampal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) after a protracted treatment with selective or nonselective nAChR agonists.

    PubMed

    Auta, J; Longone, P; Guidotti, A; Costa, E

    1999-01-01

    In rats, 1 mg/kg twice daily for 10 d of nicotine, a nonselective agonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), fails to change alpha4 and beta2 nAChR subunit mRNA but significantly decreased alpha7 nAChR subunit mRNA and protein expression, which is associated with a 35-40% decrease in the number of 125I-alpha-Bgtx binding sites in hippocampus. In addition, this schedule of nicotine treatment produced a 40% increase in the number of high- (K(D) 1 nM), but decreased by 25% the number of low-affinity (K(D) 30 nM) binding sites for 3H-epibatidine in hippocampus. In contrast, repeated treatment with lobeline (2.7 mg/kg twice daily for 10 d), which selectively binds to high-affinity binding nAChRs, fails to change the expression of high- or low-affinity nAChRs. These data suggest that a simultaneous upregulation of high-affinity nAChRs and downregulation of low-affinity nAChRs is elicited by ligands that can bind to both low- and high-affinity nAChRs, but not by selective agonists of high-affinity nAChRs. One might infer that in hippocampus, high- and low-affinity nAChRs may be located in the same cells. When these two receptor types are stimulated simultaneously by nonselective ligands for high- and low-affinity nAChRs, they interact, bringing about an increase in binding site density of the high-affinity nAChRs.

  16. α4β2 nicotinic receptors play a role in the nAChR-mediated decline in L-dopa-induced dyskinesias in parkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    Quik, Maryka; Campos, Carla; Bordia, Tanuja; Strachan, Jon-Paul; Zhang, Jenny; McIntosh, J. Michael; Letchworth, Sharon; Jordan, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    L-dopa-induced dyskinesias are a serious long-term side effect of dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson’s disease for which there are few treatment options. Our previous studies showed that nicotine decreased L-dopa-induced abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs). Subsequent work with knockout mice demonstrated that α6β2* nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) play a key role. The present experiments were done to determine if α4β2* nAChRs are also involved in L-dopa-induced dyskinesias. To approach this, we took advantage of the finding that α6β2* nAChRs are predominantly present on striatal dopaminergic nerve terminals, while a significant population of α4β2* nAChRs are located on other neurons. Thus, a severe dopaminergic lesion would cause a major loss in α6β2*, but not α4β2* nAChRs. Experiments were therefore done in which rats were unilaterally lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine, at a dose that lead to severe nigrostriatal damage. The dopamine transporter, a dopamine nerve terminal marker, was decreased by >99%. This lesion also decreased striatal α6β2* nAChRs by 97%, while α4β2* nAChRs were reduced by only 12% compared to control. A series of β2* nAChR compounds, including TC-2696, TI-10165, TC-8831, TC-10600 and sazetidine reduced L-dopa-induced AIMs in these rats by 23–32%. TC-2696, TI-10165, TC-8831 were also tested for parkinsonism, with no effect on this behavior. Tolerance did not develop with up to 3 months of treatment. Since α4a5β2 nAChRs are also predominantly on striatal dopamine terminals, these data suggest that drugs targeting α4β2 nAChRs may reduce L-dopa-induced dyskinesias in late stage Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23583932

  17. Novel bis-(−)-nor-meptazinol derivatives act as dual binding site AChE inhibitors with metal-complexing property

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Juan; Qiu, Zhuibai; Xia, Zheng; Li, Wei; Yu, Lining; Chen, Hailin; Chen, Jianxing; Chen, Yan; Hu, Zhuqin; Zhou, Wei; Shao, Biyun; Cui, Yongyao; Xie, Qiong; Chen, Hongzhuan

    2012-10-01

    The strategy of dual binding site acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition along with metal chelation may represent a promising direction for multi-targeted interventions in the pathophysiological processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, two derivatives (ZLA and ZLB) of a potent dual binding site AChE inhibitor bis-(−)-nor-meptazinol (bis-MEP) were designed and synthesized by introducing metal chelating pharmacophores into the middle chain of bis-MEP. They could inhibit human AChE activity with IC{sub 50} values of 9.63 μM (for ZLA) and 8.64 μM (for ZLB), and prevent AChE-induced amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation with IC{sub 50} values of 49.1 μM (for ZLA) and 55.3 μM (for ZLB). In parallel, molecular docking analysis showed that they are capable of interacting with both the catalytic and peripheral anionic sites of AChE. Furthermore, they exhibited abilities to complex metal ions such as Cu(II) and Zn(II), and inhibit Aβ aggregation triggered by these metals. Collectively, these results suggest that ZLA and ZLB may act as dual binding site AChEIs with metal-chelating potency, and may be potential leads of value for further study on disease-modifying treatment of AD. -- Highlights: ► Two novel bis-(−)-nor-meptazinol derivatives are designed and synthesized. ► ZLA and ZLB may act as dual binding site AChEIs with metal-chelating potency. ► They are potential leads for disease-modifying treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Chlorpyrifos and Malathion have opposite effects on behaviors and brain size that are not correlated to changes in AChE activity

    PubMed Central

    Richendrfer, Holly; Creton, Robbert

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphates, a type of neurotoxicant pesticide, are used globally for the treatment of pests on croplands and are therefore found in a large number of conventional foods. These pesticides are harmful and potentially deadly if ingested or inhaled in large quantities by causing a significant reduction in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the central and peripheral nervous system. However, much less is known about the effects of exposure to small quantities of the pesticides on neural systems and behavior during development. In the current study we used zebrafish larvae in order to determine the effects of two of the most widely used organophosphates, chlorpyrifos and malathion, on zebrafish behavior and AChE activity. Embryos and larvae were exposed to the organophosphates during different time points in development and then tested at 5 days post-fertilization for behavioral, neurodevelopmental and AChE abnormalities. The results of the study indicate that chlorpyrifos and malathion cause opposing behaviors in the larvae such as swim speed (hypoactivity vs. hyperactivity) and rest. Additionally, the pesticides affect only certain behaviors, such as thigmotaxis, during specific time points in development that are unrelated to changes in AChE activity. Larvae treated with malathion but not chlorpyrifos also had significantly smaller forebrain and hindbrain regions compared to controls by 5 days post-fertilization. We conclude that exposure to very low concentrations of organophosphate pesticides during development cause abnormalities in behavior and brain size. PMID:25983063

  19. Menthol Alone Upregulates Midbrain nAChRs, Alters nAChR Subtype Stoichiometry, Alters Dopamine Neuron Firing Frequency, and Prevents Nicotine Reward.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Brandon J; Wall, Teagan R; Henley, Beverley M; Kim, Charlene H; Nichols, Weston A; Moaddel, Ruin; Xiao, Cheng; Lester, Henry A

    2016-03-01

    Upregulation of β2 subunit-containing (β2*) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is implicated in several aspects of nicotine addiction, and menthol cigarette smokers tend to upregulate β2* nAChRs more than nonmenthol cigarette smokers. We investigated the effect of long-term menthol alone on midbrain neurons containing nAChRs. In midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons from mice containing fluorescent nAChR subunits, menthol alone increased the number of α4 and α6 nAChR subunits, but this upregulation did not occur in midbrain GABAergic neurons. Thus, chronic menthol produces a cell-type-selective upregulation of α4* nAChRs, complementing that of chronic nicotine alone, which upregulates α4 subunit-containing (α4*) nAChRs in GABAergic but not DA neurons. In mouse brain slices and cultured midbrain neurons, menthol reduced DA neuron firing frequency and altered DA neuron excitability following nAChR activation. Furthermore, menthol exposure before nicotine abolished nicotine reward-related behavior in mice. In neuroblastoma cells transfected with fluorescent nAChR subunits, exposure to 500 nm menthol alone also increased nAChR number and favored the formation of (α4)3(β2)2 nAChRs; this contrasts with the action of nicotine itself, which favors (α4)2(β2)3 nAChRs. Menthol alone also increases the number of α6β2 receptors that exclude the β3 subunit. Thus, menthol stabilizes lower-sensitivity α4* and α6 subunit-containing nAChRs, possibly by acting as a chemical chaperone. The abolition of nicotine reward-related behavior may be mediated through menthol's ability to stabilize lower-sensitivity nAChRs and alter DA neuron excitability. We conclude that menthol is more than a tobacco flavorant: administered alone chronically, it alters midbrain DA neurons of the nicotine reward-related pathway.

  20. Escherichia coli Protein Expression System for Acetylcholine Binding Proteins (AChBPs)

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Nikita; Paul, Blessy; Ragnarsson, Lotten; Lewis, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand gated ion channels, identified as therapeutic targets for a range of human diseases. Drug design for nAChR related disorders is increasingly using structure-based approaches. Many of these structural insights for therapeutic lead development have been obtained from co-crystal structures of nAChR agonists and antagonists with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP). AChBP is a water soluble, structural and functional homolog of the extracellular, ligand-binding domain of nAChRs. Currently, AChBPs are recombinantly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems for structural and biophysical studies. Here, we report the establishment of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system that significantly reduces the cost and time of production compared to the existing expression systems. E. coli can efficiently express unglycosylated AChBP for crystallography and makes the expression of isotopically labelled forms feasible for NMR. We used a pHUE vector containing an N-terminal His-tagged ubiquitin fusion protein to facilitate AChBP expression in the soluble fractions, and thus avoid the need to recover protein from inclusion bodies. The purified protein yield obtained from the E. coli expression system is comparable to that obtained from existing AChBP expression systems. E. coli expressed AChBP bound nAChR agonists and antagonists with affinities matching those previously reported. Thus, the E. coli expression system significantly simplifies the expression and purification of functional AChBP for structural and biophysical studies. PMID:27304486

  1. Phe362Tyr in AChE: A Major Factor Responsible for Azamethiphos Resistance in Lepeophtheirus salmonis in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Jansen, Peder Andreas; Aspehaug, Vidar Teis; Horsberg, Tor Einar

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphates (OP) are one of the major treatments used against the salmon louse (Lepeophtherius salmonis) in Norwegian salmonid aquaculture. The use of OP since the late 1970s has resulted in widespread resistant parasites. Recently, we reported a single mutation (Phe362Tyr) in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as the major mechanism behind resistance in salmon louse towards OP. The present study was carried out to validate this mechanism at the field level. A total of 6658 salmon louse samples were enrolled from 56 different fish farms across the Norwegian coast, from Vest Agder in the south to Finnmark in the north. All the samples were genotyped using a TaqMan probe assay for the Phe362Tyr mutation. A strong association was observed between areas with frequent use of the OP (azamethiphos) and the Phe362Tyr mutation. This was confirmed at 15 sites where results from independently conducted bioassays and genotyping of parasites correlated well. Furthermore, genotyping of surviving and moribund parasites from six bioassay experiments demonstrated a highly significant negative correlation between the frequency of resistance alleles and the probability of dying when exposed to azamethiphos in a bioassay. Based on these observations, we could strongly conclude that the Phe362Tyr mutation is a major factor responsible for OP resistance in salmon louse on Norwegian fish farms. PMID:26882536

  2. Phe362Tyr in AChE: A Major Factor Responsible for Azamethiphos Resistance in Lepeophtheirus salmonis in Norway.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Jansen, Peder Andreas; Aspehaug, Vidar Teis; Horsberg, Tor Einar

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphates (OP) are one of the major treatments used against the salmon louse (Lepeophtherius salmonis) in Norwegian salmonid aquaculture. The use of OP since the late 1970s has resulted in widespread resistant parasites. Recently, we reported a single mutation (Phe362Tyr) in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as the major mechanism behind resistance in salmon louse towards OP. The present study was carried out to validate this mechanism at the field level. A total of 6658 salmon louse samples were enrolled from 56 different fish farms across the Norwegian coast, from Vest Agder in the south to Finnmark in the north. All the samples were genotyped using a TaqMan probe assay for the Phe362Tyr mutation. A strong association was observed between areas with frequent use of the OP (azamethiphos) and the Phe362Tyr mutation. This was confirmed at 15 sites where results from independently conducted bioassays and genotyping of parasites correlated well. Furthermore, genotyping of surviving and moribund parasites from six bioassay experiments demonstrated a highly significant negative correlation between the frequency of resistance alleles and the probability of dying when exposed to azamethiphos in a bioassay. Based on these observations, we could strongly conclude that the Phe362Tyr mutation is a major factor responsible for OP resistance in salmon louse on Norwegian fish farms. PMID:26882536

  3. α7nAchR/NMDAR coupling affects NMDAR function and object recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Shupeng; Nai, Qiang; Lipina, Tatiana V; Roder, John C; Liu, Fang

    2013-12-20

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAchR) and NMDA glutamate receptor (NMDAR) are both ligand-gated ion channels permeable to Ca2+ and Na+. Previous studies have demonstrated functional modulation of NMDARs by nAchRs, although the molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. We have previously reported that α7nAchR forms a protein complex with the NMDAR through a protein-protein interaction. We also developed an interfering peptide that is able to disrupt the α7nAchR-NMDAR complex and blocks cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking in rat models of relapse. In the present study, we investigated whether the α7nAchR-NMDAR interaction is responsible for the functional modulation of NMDAR by α7nAchR using both electrophysiological and behavioral tests. We have found that activation of α7nAchR upregulates NMDAR-mediated whole cell currents and LTP of mEPSC in cultured hippocampal neurons, which can be abolished by the interfering peptide that disrupts the α7nAchR-NMDAR interaction. Moreover, administration of the interfering peptide in mice impairs novel object recognition but not Morris water maze performance. Our results suggest that α7nAchR/NMDAR coupling may selectively affect some aspects of learning and memory.

  4. Clinical application of clustered-AChR for the detection of SNMG

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guang; Wang, Xiaoqing; Yu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiutian; Guan, Yangtai; Jiang, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoantibody-mediated disease of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). However, accumulating evidence has indicated that MG patients whose serum anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies are not detectable (serumnegative MG; SNMG) in routine assays share similar clinical features with anti-AChR antibody-positive MG patients. We hypothesized that SNMG patients would have low-affinity antibodies to AChRs that would not be detectable using traditional methods but that might be detected by binding to AChR on the cell membrane, particularly if they were clustered at the high density observed at the NMJ. We expressed AChR subunits with the clustering protein rapsyn (an AChR-associated protein at the synapse) in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells, and we tested the binding of the antibodies using immunofluorescence. With this approach, AChR antibodies to rapsyn-clustered AChR could be detected in the sera from 45.83% (11/24) of SNMG patients, as confirmed with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). This was the first application in China of cell-based AChR antibody detection. More importantly, this sensitive (and specific) approach could significantly increase the diagnosis rate of SNMG. PMID:26068604

  5. The SLC32 transporter, a key protein for the synaptic release of inhibitory amino acids.

    PubMed

    Gasnier, Bruno

    2004-02-01

    The SLC32 family comprises a single member: the vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter (VIAAT) or vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT). It belongs to a eukaryotic-specific superfamily of H(+)-coupled amino acid transporters, which also comprises the mammalian SLC36 and SLC38 transporters. VIAAT exchanges GABA or glycine for protons. It is present on synaptic vesicles of GABAergic and glycinergic neurons, and in some endocrine cells, where it ensures the H(+)-ATPase-driven uptake, and subsequent exocytotic release, of inhibitory amino acids. Despite a similar function in vesicular neurotransmitter loading, VIAAT is not related to the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT, SLC17) or the vesicular monoamine transporter/vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VMAT/VACHT, SLC18) proteins.

  6. Rodent habenulo-interpeduncular pathway expresses a large variety of uncommon nAChR subtypes, but only the α3β4* and α3β3β4* subtypes mediate acetylcholine release

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Sharon R.; Moretti, Milena; Zoli, Michele; Marks, Michael J.; Zanardi, Alessio; Pucci, Luca; Clementi, Francesco; Gotti, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the neuronal nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) present in the habenulo-interpeduncular (Hb-IPn) system can modulate the reinforcing effect of addictive drugs and the anxiolytic effect of nicotine. Hb and IPn neurons express mRNAs for most nAChR subunits thus making it difficult to establish the subunit composition of functional receptors. We used immunoprecipitation and immunopurification studies performed in rat, and wildtype (+/+) and β2 knockout (−/−) mice to establish that the Hb and IPn contain significant β2* and β4* populations of nAChR receptors (each of which is heterogeneous). The β4* nAChR are more highly expressed in the IPn. We also identified novel native subtypes (α2β2*, α4β3β2*α3β3β4*, α6β3β4*). Our studies on IPn synaptosomes obtained from +/+ and α2, α4, α5, α6, α7, β2, β3 and β4−/− mice, show that only the α3β4 and α3β3β4 subtypes facilitate acetylcholine (ACh) release. Ligand binding, immunoprecipitation and Western blotting studies in β3−/− mice showed that in the IPn of these mice there is a concomitant reduction of ACh release and α3β4* receptors, while the receptor number remains the same in the Hb. We suggest that in habenular cholinergic neurons the β3 subunit may be important for transporting the α3β4* subtype from the medial habenula (MHb) to the IPn. Overall, these studies highlight the presence of a wealth of uncommon nAChR subtypes in the Hb-IPn system and identify α3β4 and α3β3β4, transported from the Hb and highly enriched in the IPn, as the subtypes modulating ACh release in the IPn. PMID:19228980

  7. Menthol Alone Upregulates Midbrain nAChRs, Alters nAChR Subtype Stoichiometry, Alters Dopamine Neuron Firing Frequency, and Prevents Nicotine Reward

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Brandon J.; Wall, Teagan R.; Henley, Beverley M.; Kim, Charlene H.; Nichols, Weston A.; Moaddel, Ruin; Xiao, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Upregulation of β2 subunit-containing (β2*) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is implicated in several aspects of nicotine addiction, and menthol cigarette smokers tend to upregulate β2* nAChRs more than nonmenthol cigarette smokers. We investigated the effect of long-term menthol alone on midbrain neurons containing nAChRs. In midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons from mice containing fluorescent nAChR subunits, menthol alone increased the number of α4 and α6 nAChR subunits, but this upregulation did not occur in midbrain GABAergic neurons. Thus, chronic menthol produces a cell-type-selective upregulation of α4* nAChRs, complementing that of chronic nicotine alone, which upregulates α4 subunit-containing (α4*) nAChRs in GABAergic but not DA neurons. In mouse brain slices and cultured midbrain neurons, menthol reduced DA neuron firing frequency and altered DA neuron excitability following nAChR activation. Furthermore, menthol exposure before nicotine abolished nicotine reward-related behavior in mice. In neuroblastoma cells transfected with fluorescent nAChR subunits, exposure to 500 nm menthol alone also increased nAChR number and favored the formation of (α4)3(β2)2 nAChRs; this contrasts with the action of nicotine itself, which favors (α4)2(β2)3 nAChRs. Menthol alone also increases the number of α6β2 receptors that exclude the β3 subunit. Thus, menthol stabilizes lower-sensitivity α4* and α6 subunit-containing nAChRs, possibly by acting as a chemical chaperone. The abolition of nicotine reward-related behavior may be mediated through menthol's ability to stabilize lower-sensitivity nAChRs and alter DA neuron excitability. We conclude that menthol is more than a tobacco flavorant: administered alone chronically, it alters midbrain DA neurons of the nicotine reward-related pathway. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Menthol, the most popular flavorant for tobacco products, has been considered simply a benign flavor additive. However, as we show here

  8. Extracts and constituents of Leontopodium alpinum enhance cholinergic transmission: Brain ACh increasing and memory improving properties

    PubMed Central

    Hornick, Ariane; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Vo, Nguyen Phung; Prast, Helmut; Stuppner, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    Leontopodium alpinum (‘Edelweiss’) was phytochemically investigated for constituents that might enhance cholinergic neurotransmission. The potency to increase synaptic availability of acetylcholine (ACh) in rat brain served as key property for the bioguided isolation of cholinergically active compounds using different chromatographic techniques. The dichlormethane (DCM) extract of the root, fractions and isolated constituents were injected i.c.v. and the effect on brain ACh was detected via the push–pull technique. The DCM extract enhanced extracellular ACh concentration in rat brain and inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in vitro. The extracellular level of brain ACh was significantly increased by the isolated sesquiterpenes, isocomene and 14-acetoxyisocomene, while silphiperfolene acetate and silphinene caused a small increasing tendency. Only silphiperfolene acetate showed in vitro AChE inhibitory activity, thus suggesting the other sesquiterpenes to stimulate cholinergic transmission by an alternative mechanism of action. Isocomene was further investigated with behavioural tasks in mice. It restored object recognition in scopolamine-impaired mice and showed nootropic effects in the T-maze alternation task in normal and scopolamine-treated mice. Additionally, this sesquiterpene reduced locomotor activity of untreated mice in the open field task, while the activity induced by scopolamine was abolished. The enhancement of synaptic availability of ACh, the promotion of alternation, and the amelioration of scopolamine-induced deficit are in accordance with a substance that amplifies cholinergic transmission. Whether the mechanism of action is inhibition of AChE or another pro-cholinergic property remains to be elucidated. Taken together, isocomene and related constituents of L. alpinum deserve further interest as potential antidementia agents in brain diseases associated with cholinergic deficits. PMID:18541221

  9. Analysis of free ACh and 5-HT in milk from four different species and their bioactivity on 5-HT(3) and nACh receptors.

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Perez, Jose-Luis; Limon, Agenor; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge M; Alshanqeeti, Ali S; Aljohi, Mohammad A; Miledi, Ricardo

    2014-07-25

    Milk is one of the most beneficial aliments and is highly recommended in normal conditions; however, in certain disorders, like irritable bowel syndrome, cow milk and dairy products worsen the gastric symptoms and their use is not recommended. Among the most recognized milk-induced gatrointestinal symptoms are abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, which are processes controlled by cholinergic and serotonergic transmission. Whether the presence of bioavailable ACh and 5-HT in milk may contribute to normal peristalsis, or to the developing of these symptoms, is not known. In this work we attempt to determine whether the content of free ACh and 5-HT is of physiological significance in milk from four different species: cow (bovine), goat, camel and human. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to identify and quantify free ACh and 5-HT in milk, and activation of the serotonergic and cholinergic ionotropic receptors was investigated using electrophysiological experiments. Our principal hypothesis was that milk from these four species had sufficient free ACh and 5-HT to activate their correspondent receptors expressed in a heterologous system. Our results showed a more complex picture, in which free ACh and 5-HT and their ability to activate cholinergic and serotonergic receptors are not correlated. This work is a first step to elucidate whether 5-HT and ACh, at the concentrations present in the milk, can be associated to a direct function in the GI.

  10. Design of multi-target compounds as AChE, BACE1, and amyloid-β(1-42) oligomerization inhibitors: in silico and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Maricarmen; Correa-Basurto, José; Martínez-Ramos, Federico; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia Irene; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia G; Mera-Jiménez, Elvia; Rosales-Hernández, Martha Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Despite great efforts to develop new therapeutic strategies against Alzheimer's disease (AD), the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs): donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine, have been used only as a palliative therapeutic approach. However, the pathogenesis of AD includes several factors such as cholinergic hypothesis, amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation, and oxidative stress. For this reason, the design of compounds that target the genesis and progression of AD could offer a therapeutic benefit. We have designed a set of compounds (M-1 to M-5) with pharmacophore moieties to inhibit the release, aggregation, or toxicity of Aβ, act as AChEIs and have antioxidant properties. Once the compounds were designed, we analyzed their physicochemical parameters and performed docking studies to determine their affinity values for AChE, β-site amyloid-protein precursor cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), and the Aβ monomer. The best ligands, M-1 and M-4, were then synthesized, chemically characterized, and evaluated in vitro. The in vitro studies showed that these compounds inhibit AChE (M-1 Ki = 0.12 and M-4 Ki = 0.17 μM) and BACE1 (M-1 IC50 = 15.1 and M-4 IC50 = 15.4 nM). They also inhibit Aβ oligomerization and exhibit antioxidant activity. In addition, these compounds showed low cytotoxicity in microglial cells. For these reasons, they are promising for future use as drugs in AD mice transgenic models.

  11. Design of multi-target compounds as AChE, BACE1, and amyloid-β(1-42) oligomerization inhibitors: in silico and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Maricarmen; Correa-Basurto, José; Martínez-Ramos, Federico; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia Irene; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia G; Mera-Jiménez, Elvia; Rosales-Hernández, Martha Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Despite great efforts to develop new therapeutic strategies against Alzheimer's disease (AD), the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs): donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine, have been used only as a palliative therapeutic approach. However, the pathogenesis of AD includes several factors such as cholinergic hypothesis, amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation, and oxidative stress. For this reason, the design of compounds that target the genesis and progression of AD could offer a therapeutic benefit. We have designed a set of compounds (M-1 to M-5) with pharmacophore moieties to inhibit the release, aggregation, or toxicity of Aβ, act as AChEIs and have antioxidant properties. Once the compounds were designed, we analyzed their physicochemical parameters and performed docking studies to determine their affinity values for AChE, β-site amyloid-protein precursor cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), and the Aβ monomer. The best ligands, M-1 and M-4, were then synthesized, chemically characterized, and evaluated in vitro. The in vitro studies showed that these compounds inhibit AChE (M-1 Ki = 0.12 and M-4 Ki = 0.17 μM) and BACE1 (M-1 IC50 = 15.1 and M-4 IC50 = 15.4 nM). They also inhibit Aβ oligomerization and exhibit antioxidant activity. In addition, these compounds showed low cytotoxicity in microglial cells. For these reasons, they are promising for future use as drugs in AD mice transgenic models. PMID:24762947

  12. SLC18: Vesicular neurotransmitter transporters for monoamines and acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Hakeem O; Krantz, David E

    2013-01-01

    The exocytotic release of neurotransmitters requires active transport into synaptic vesicles and other types of secretory vesicles. Members of the SLC18 family perform this function for acetylcholine (SLC18A3, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter or VAChT) and monoamines such as dopamine and serotonin (SLC18A1 and 2, the vesicular monoamine transporters VMAT1 and 2, respectively). To date, no specific diseases have been attributed to a mutation in an SLC18 family member; however, polymorphisms in SLC18A1 and SLC18A2 may confer risk for some neuropsychiatric disorders. Additional members of this family include SLC18A4, expressed in insects, and SLC18B1, the function of which is not known. SLC18 is part of the Drug:H(+) Antiporter-1 Family (DHA1, TCID 2.A.1.2) within the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS, TCID 2.A.1).

  13. SLC18: Vesicular neurotransmitter transporters for monoamines and acetylcholine ☆

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hakeem O.; Krantz, David E.

    2012-01-01

    The exocytotic release of neurotransmitters requires active transport into synaptic vesicles and other types of secretory vesicles. Members of the SLC18 family perform this function for acetylcholine (SLC18A3, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter or VAChT) and monoamines such as dopamine and serotonin (SLC18A1 and 2, the vesicular monoamine transporters VMAT1 and 2, respectively). To date, no specific diseases have been attributed to a mutation in an SLC18 family member; however, polymorphisms in SLC18A1 and SLC18A2 may confer risk for some neuropsychiatric disorders. Additional members of this family include SLC18A4, expressed in insects, and SLC18B1, the function of which is not known. SLC18 is part of the Drug:H+ Antiporter-1 Family (DHA1, TCID 2.A.1.2) within the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS, TCID 2.A.1). PMID:23506877

  14. THE ACHES THAT TAKE YOUR BREATH (AND TEARS) AWAY.

    PubMed

    Becerril, J; Gonzales, H; Saketkoo, L A

    2015-01-01

    An 80-year-old man presented with a complaint of three months of fatigue and aching of his shoulders and hips, as well as pain, swelling, and stiffness in bilateral fingers that was worse in the morning but improved with movement. Associated symptoms included worsening dry mouth and eyes, dysphagia, exertional dyspnea, and right foot drop. Physical exam was significant for edematous and tender bilateral proximal interphalangeal joints, metacarpophalangeal joints and wrists with decreased grip, extension and flexion, as well as bilateral pulmonary crackles. Laboratory analysis revealed Anti-Ro (SSA) and Anti-La (SSB) positivity with elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (70mm/hr) and C-reactive peptide (13mg/L). Pulmonary function testing was notable for a forced vital capacity (FVC) of 64% and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO) of 44%. High resolution chest computed tomography demonstrated fibrotic changes consistent with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis. The patient was started on mycophenolate mofetil, hydroxychloroquine, and prednisone for Sjögren's syndrome (SjS). Symptoms improved and repeat FVC revealed a 20 percent improvement, however subsequent tapering of prednisone resulted in worsening dyspnea and increase of FVC to 60 prcent. Prednisone was restarted and rituximab 2g divided in two doses was administered with overall symptom improvement. Symptoms and FVC continued to wax and wane over the following 18 months requiring re-dosing of rituximab with most recent FVC improved to 71 percent and DLCO 41 percent. PMID:27159479

  15. Ni nanoparticle catalyzed growth of MWCNTs on Cu NPs @ a-C:H substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodselahi, T.; Solaymani, S.; Akbarzadeh Pasha, M.; Vesaghi, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    NiCu NPs @ a-C:H thin films with different Cu content were prepared by co-deposition by RF-sputtering and RF-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) from acetylene gas and Cu and Ni targets. The prepared samples were used as catalysts for growing multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) from liquid petroleum gas (LPG) at 825 °C by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD). By addition of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer as substrate for Ni NPs catalyst, the density of the grown CNTs is greatly enhanced in comparison to bare Si substrate. Furthermore the average diameter of the grown CNTs decreases by decreasing of Cu content of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer. However Cu NPs @ a-C:H by itself has no catalytic property in MWCNTs growth. Morphology and electrical and optical properties of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer is affected by Cu content and each of them is effective parameter on growth of MWCNTs based on Ni NPs catalyst. Moreover, adding of a low amount of Ni NPs doesn't vary optical, electrical and morphology properties of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer but it has a profound effect on its catalytic activity. Finally the density and diameter of MWCNTs can be optimized by selection of the Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer as substrate of Ni NPs.

  16. mAChRs activation induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition on lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been proposed as a mechanism in the progression of airway diseases and cancer. Here, we explored the role of acetylcholine (ACh) and the pathway involved in the process of EMT, as well as the effects of mAChRs antagonist. Methods Human lung epithelial cells were stimulated with carbachol, an analogue of ACh, and epithelial and mesenchymal marker proteins were evaluated using western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. Results Decreased E-cadherin expression and increased vimentin and α-SMA expression induced by TGF-β1 in alveolar epithelial cell (A549) were significantly abrogated by the non-selective mAChR antagonist atropine and enhanced by the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine. An EMT event also occurred in response to physostigmine alone. Furthermore, ChAT express and ACh release by A549 cells were enhanced by TGF-β1. Interestingly, ACh analogue carbachol also induced EMT in A549 cells as well as in bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, the induction of carbachol was abrogated by selective antagonist of M1 (pirenzepine) and M3 (4-DAMP) mAChRs, but not by M2 (methoctramine) antagonist. Moreover, carbachol induced TGF-β1 production from A549 cells concomitantly with the EMT process. Carbachol-induced EMT occurred through phosphorylation of Smad2/3 and ERK, which was inhibited by pirenzepine and 4-DAMP. Conclusions Our findings for the first time indicated that mAChR activation, perhaps via M1 and M3 mAChR, induced lung epithelial cells to undergo EMT and provided insights into novel therapeutic strategies for airway diseases in which lung remodeling occurs. PMID:24678619

  17. Whole-Retina Reduced Electrophysiological Activity in Mice Bearing Retina-Specific Deletion of Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Bedore, Jake; Martyn, Amanda C.; Li, Anson K. C.; Dolinar, Eric A.; McDonald, Ian S.; Coupland, Stuart G.; Prado, Vania F.; Prado, Marco A.; Hill, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite rigorous characterization of the role of acetylcholine in retinal development, long-term effects of its absence as a neurotransmitter are unknown. One of the unanswered questions is how acetylcholine contributes to the functional capacity of mature retinal circuits. The current study investigates the effects of disrupting cholinergic signalling in mice, through deletion of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) in the developing retina, pigmented epithelium, optic nerve and optic stalk, on electrophysiology and structure of the mature retina. Methods & Results A combination of electroretinography, optical coherence tomography imaging and histological evaluation assessed retinal integrity in mice bearing retina- targeted (embryonic day 12.5) deletion of VAChT (VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox) and littermate controls at 5 and 12 months of age. VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice did not show any gross changes in nuclear layer cellularity or synaptic layer thickness. However, VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice showed reduced electrophysiological response of the retina to light stimulus under scotopic conditions at 5 and 12 months of age, including reduced a-wave, b-wave, and oscillatory potential (OP) amplitudes and decreased OP peak power and total energy. Reduced a-wave amplitude was proportional to the reduction in b-wave amplitude and not associated with altered a-wave 10%-90% rise time or inner and outer segment thicknesses. Significance This study used a novel genetic model in the first examination of function and structure of the mature mouse retina with disruption of cholinergic signalling. Reduced amplitude across the electroretinogram wave form does not suggest dysfunction in specific retinal cell types and could reflect underlying changes in the retinal and/or extraretinal microenvironment. Our findings suggest that release of acetylcholine by VAChT is essential for the normal electrophysiological response of the mature mouse retina. PMID:26226617

  18. Remarkably increased resistin levels in anti-AChR antibody-positive myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-Qi; Wang, Rong; Li, Ting; Li, Xin; Qi, Yuan; Wang, Jing; Yang, Li

    2015-06-15

    Resistin is a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. To investigate serum resistin levels in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) and determine if there are associations between resistin levels and disease severity, we measured serum resistin levels in 102 patients with anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive MG (AChR-MG). We further analyzed associations between serum resistin levels and clinical variables in patients with MG. Our findings demonstrate that serum resistin levels are elevated in patients with AChR-generalized MG and AChR-MG with thymoma and are correlated with disease severity. Resistin has potential as a useful serum biomarker for inflammation in AChR-MG.

  19. Lymphocyte-derived ACh regulates local innate but not adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Colin; Duncan, Gordon S.; Brüstle, Anne; Brenner, Dirk; Tusche, Michael W.; Olofsson, Peder S.; Rosas-Ballina, Mauricio; Tracey, Kevin J.; Mak, Tak W.

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate control of immune responses is a critical determinant of health. Here, we show that choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) is expressed and ACh is produced by B cells and other immune cells that have an impact on innate immunity. ChAT expression occurs in mucosal-associated lymph tissue, subsequent to microbial colonization, and is reduced by antibiotic treatment. MyD88-dependent Toll-like receptor up-regulates ChAT in a transient manner. Unlike the previously described CD4+ T-cell population that is stimulated by norepinephrine to release ACh, ChAT+ B cells release ACh after stimulation with sulfated cholecystokinin but not norepinephrine. ACh-producing B-cells reduce peritoneal neutrophil recruitment during sterile endotoxemia independent of the vagus nerve, without affecting innate immune cell activation. Endothelial cells treated with ACh in vitro reduced endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression in a muscarinic receptor-dependent manner. Despite this ability, ChAT+ B cells were unable to suppress effector T-cell function in vivo. Therefore, ACh produced by lymphocytes has specific functions, with ChAT+ B cells controlling the local recruitment of neutrophils. PMID:23297238

  20. From crystal structure of α-conotoxin GIC in complex with Ac-AChBP to molecular determinants of its high selectivity for α3β2 nAChR

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bo; Xu, Manyu; Zhu, Xiaopeng; Wu, Yong; Liu, Xi; Zhangsun, Dongting; Hu, Yuanyan; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Kasheverov, Igor E.; Tsetlin, Victor I.; Wang, Xinquan; Luo, Sulan

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine binding proteins (AChBPs) are unique spatial homologs of the ligand-binding domains of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and they reproduce some pharmacological properties of nAChRs. X-ray crystal structures of AСhBP in complex with α-conotoxins provide important insights into the interactions of α-conotoxins with distinct nAChR subtypes. Although considerable efforts have been made to understand why α-conotoxin GIC is strongly selective for α3β2 nAChR, this question has not yet been solved. Here we present the structure of α-conotoxin GIC in complex with Aplysia californica AChBP (Ac-AChBP) at a resolution of 2.1 Å. Based on this co-crystal structure complemented with molecular docking data, we suggest the key residues of GIC in determining its high affinity and selectivity for human α3β2 vs α3β4 nAChRs. These suggestions were checked by radioligand and electrophysiology experiments, which confirmed the functional role of detected contacts for GIC interactions with Ac-AChBP and α3β2 nAChR subtypes. While GIC elements responsible for its high affinity binding with Ac-AChBP and α3β2 nAChR were identified, our study also showed the limitations of computer modelling in extending the data from the X-ray structures of the AChBP complexes to all nAChR subtypes. PMID:26925840

  1. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  2. Functional Human α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Generated from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tillman, Tommy S; Alvarez, Frances J D; Reinert, Nathan J; Liu, Chuang; Wang, Dawei; Xu, Yan; Xiao, Kunhong; Zhang, Peijun; Tang, Pei

    2016-08-26

    Human Cys-loop receptors are important therapeutic targets. High-resolution structures are essential for rational drug design, but only a few are available due to difficulties in obtaining sufficient quantities of protein suitable for structural studies. Although expression of proteins in E. coli offers advantages of high yield, low cost, and fast turnover, this approach has not been thoroughly explored for full-length human Cys-loop receptors because of the conventional wisdom that E. coli lacks the specific chaperones and post-translational modifications potentially required for expression of human Cys-loop receptors. Here we report the successful production of full-length wild type human α7nAChR from E. coli Chemically induced chaperones promote high expression levels of well-folded proteins. The choice of detergents, lipids, and ligands during purification determines the final protein quality. The purified α7nAChR not only forms pentamers as imaged by negative-stain electron microscopy, but also retains pharmacological characteristics of native α7nAChR, including binding to bungarotoxin and positive allosteric modulators specific to α7nAChR. Moreover, the purified α7nAChR injected into Xenopus oocytes can be activated by acetylcholine, choline, and nicotine, inhibited by the channel blockers QX-222 and phencyclidine, and potentiated by the α7nAChR specific modulators PNU-120596 and TQS. The successful generation of functional human α7nAChR from E. coli opens a new avenue for producing mammalian Cys-loop receptors to facilitate structure-based rational drug design. PMID:27385587

  3. Identification and Expression of Acetylcholinesterase in Octopus vulgaris Arm Development and Regeneration: a Conserved Role for ACHE?

    PubMed

    Fossati, Sara Maria; Candiani, Simona; Nödl, Marie-Therese; Maragliano, Luca; Pennuto, Maria; Domingues, Pedro; Benfenati, Fabio; Pestarino, Mario; Zullo, Letizia

    2015-08-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) is a glycoprotein with a key role in terminating synaptic transmission in cholinergic neurons of both vertebrates and invertebrates. ACHE is also involved in the regulation of cell growth and morphogenesis during embryogenesis and regeneration acting through its non-cholinergic sites. The mollusk Octopus vulgaris provides a powerful model for investigating the mechanisms underlying tissue morphogenesis due to its high regenerative power. Here, we performed a comparative investigation of arm morphogenesis during adult arm regeneration and embryonic arm development which may provide insights on the conserved ACHE pathways. In this study, we cloned and characterized O. vulgaris ACHE, finding a single highly conserved ACHE hydrophobic variant, characterized by prototypical catalytic sites and a putative consensus region for a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor attachment at the COOH-terminus. We then show that its expression level is correlated to the stage of morphogenesis in both adult and embryonic arm. In particular, ACHE is localized in typical neuronal sites when adult-like arm morphology is established and in differentiating cell locations during the early stages of arm morphogenesis. This possibility is also supported by the presence in the ACHE sequence and model structure of both cholinergic and non-cholinergic sites. This study provides insights into ACHE conserved roles during processes of arm morphogenesis. In addition, our modeling study offers a solid basis for predicting the interaction of the ACHE domains with pharmacological blockers for in vivo investigations. We therefore suggest ACHE as a target for the regulation of tissue morphogenesis.

  4. Identification and Expression of Acetylcholinesterase in Octopus vulgaris Arm Development and Regeneration: a Conserved Role for ACHE?

    PubMed

    Fossati, Sara Maria; Candiani, Simona; Nödl, Marie-Therese; Maragliano, Luca; Pennuto, Maria; Domingues, Pedro; Benfenati, Fabio; Pestarino, Mario; Zullo, Letizia

    2015-08-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) is a glycoprotein with a key role in terminating synaptic transmission in cholinergic neurons of both vertebrates and invertebrates. ACHE is also involved in the regulation of cell growth and morphogenesis during embryogenesis and regeneration acting through its non-cholinergic sites. The mollusk Octopus vulgaris provides a powerful model for investigating the mechanisms underlying tissue morphogenesis due to its high regenerative power. Here, we performed a comparative investigation of arm morphogenesis during adult arm regeneration and embryonic arm development which may provide insights on the conserved ACHE pathways. In this study, we cloned and characterized O. vulgaris ACHE, finding a single highly conserved ACHE hydrophobic variant, characterized by prototypical catalytic sites and a putative consensus region for a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor attachment at the COOH-terminus. We then show that its expression level is correlated to the stage of morphogenesis in both adult and embryonic arm. In particular, ACHE is localized in typical neuronal sites when adult-like arm morphology is established and in differentiating cell locations during the early stages of arm morphogenesis. This possibility is also supported by the presence in the ACHE sequence and model structure of both cholinergic and non-cholinergic sites. This study provides insights into ACHE conserved roles during processes of arm morphogenesis. In addition, our modeling study offers a solid basis for predicting the interaction of the ACHE domains with pharmacological blockers for in vivo investigations. We therefore suggest ACHE as a target for the regulation of tissue morphogenesis. PMID:25112677

  5. Atomic interactions of neonicotinoid agonists with AChBP: Molecular recognition of the distinctive electronegative pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, Todd T.; Harel, Michal; Hibbs, Ryan E.; Radi, Zoran; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E.; Taylor, Palmer

    2008-07-28

    Acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) from mollusks are suitable structural and functional surrogates of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors when combined with transmembrane spans of the nicotinic receptor. These proteins assemble as a pentamer with identical ACh binding sites at the subunit interfaces and show ligand specificities resembling those of the nicotinic receptor for agonists and antagonists. A subset of ligands, termed the neonicotinoids, exhibit specificity for insect nicotinic receptors and selective toxicity as insecticides. AChBPs are of neither mammalian nor insect origin and exhibit a distinctive pattern of selectivity for the neonicotinoid ligands. We define here the binding orientation and determinants of differential molecular recognition for the neonicotinoids and classical nicotinoids by estimates of kinetic and equilibrium binding parameters and crystallographic analysis. Neonicotinoid complex formation is rapid and accompanied by quenching of the AChBP tryptophan fluorescence. Comparisons of the neonicotinoids imidacloprid and thiacloprid in the binding site from Aplysia californica AChBP at 2.48 and 1.94 {angstrom} in resolution reveal a single conformation of the bound ligands with four of the five sites occupied in the pentameric crystal structure. The neonicotinoid electronegative pharmacophore is nestled in an inverted direction compared with the nicotinoid cationic functionality at the subunit interfacial binding pocket. Characteristic of several agonists, loop C largely envelops the ligand, positioning aromatic side chains to interact optimally with conjugated and hydrophobic regions of the neonicotinoid. This template defines the association of interacting amino acids and their energetic contributions to the distinctive interactions of neonicotinoids.

  6. Expression of APP, BACE1, AChE and ChAT in an AD model in rats and the effect of donepezil hydrochloride treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Chen, Min; Liu, Hongmin; Yang, Liqun; Yang, Guiying

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pathological changes in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the effect of donepezil hydrochloride (HCl) treatment. The rat model of AD was established by the bilateral injection of amyloid β₁₋₄₀ (Aβ₁₋₄₀) into the hippocampus. Changes in spatial learning and memory functions were examined using the Morris water maze test and changes in catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were determined using chemical colorimetry. Moreover, the changes in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) expression were analyzed using immunohistochemical staining. The mRNA expression levels of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and β-secreted enzyme 1 (BACE1) were evaluated using RT-PCR. The effects of donepezil HCl on the aforementioned indices were also observed. The rat memories of the platform quadrants in the blank, sham and donepezil HCl groups were improved compared with those of the rats in the model group. The ratio of swim distance in the fourth platform quadrant (l₄) to the total swim distance (l total) for the model group rats (l₄/l total) was significantly decreased compared with that for the blank and sham group rats. Following donepezil HCl treatment, the ratio of l₄/l total significantly increased. AD modeling caused a significant decrease in the CAT and GSH-Px activities in the brain tissues of the rats. The CAT and GSH-Px activities in the AD model rats significantly increased following donepezil HCl treatment. Moreover, donepezil HCl treatment significantly decreased the AChE, APP and BACE1 mRNA expression levels and increased the ChAT expression levels. Therefore, donepezil HCl was able to significantly decrease learning and memory damage in a rat model of AD.

  7. Erosion of a-C:H films under interaction with nitrous oxide afterglow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalavutdinov, R. Kh.; Gorodetsky, A. E.; Bukhovets, V. L.; Zakharov, A. P.; Mazul, I. V.

    2009-06-01

    Hydrocarbon film removal using chemically active oxygen formed in a direct current glow discharge with a hollow cathode in nitrous oxide was investigated. In the afterglow region sufficiently fast removal of a-C:H films about 500 nm thick during about 8 h was achieved at N 2O pressure of 12 Pa and 370 K. The erosion rate in the afterglow region was directly proportional to the initial pressure and increased two orders of magnitude at temperature rising from 300 to 500 K. The products of a-C:H film plasmolysis were CO, CO 2, H 2O, and H 2. After removal of a-C:H films previously deposited on stainless steel, molybdenum or tungsten 3-30 nm thick oxide films were formed on the substrates. Reactions of oxygen ion neutralization and atomic oxygen recombination suppressed further oxidation of the materials.

  8. Intracellular activity of tedizolid phosphate and ACH-702 versus Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to the emergency of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is necessary the evaluation of new compounds. Findings Tedizolid, a novel oxazolidinone, and ACH-702, a new isothiazoloquinolone, were tested against M. tuberculosis infected THP-1 macrophages. These two compounds significantly decreased the number of intracellular mycobacteria at 0.25X, 1X, 4X and 16X the MIC value. The drugs were tested either in nanoparticules or in free solution. Conclusion Tedizolid and ACH-702 have a good intracellular killing activity comparable to that of rifampin or moxifloxacin. PMID:24708819

  9. nAChR agonist-induced cognition enhancement: integration of cognitive and neuronal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sarter, Martin; Parikh, Vinay; Howe, William M

    2009-10-01

    The identification and characterization of drugs for the treatment of cognitive disorders has been hampered by the absence of comprehensive hypotheses. Such hypotheses consist of (a) a precisely defined cognitive operation that fundamentally underlies a range of cognitive abilities and capacities and, if impaired, contributes to the manifestation of diverse cognitive symptoms; (b) defined neuronal mechanisms proposed to mediate the cognitive operation of interest; (c) evidence indicating that the putative cognition enhancer facilitates these neuronal mechanisms; (d) and evidence indicating that the cognition enhancer facilitates cognitive performance by modulating these underlying neuronal mechanisms. The evidence on the neuronal and attentional effects of nAChR agonists, specifically agonists selective for alpha4beta2* nAChRs, has begun to support such a hypothesis. nAChR agonists facilitate the detection of signals by augmenting the transient increases in prefrontal cholinergic activity that are necessary for a signal to gain control over behavior in attentional contexts. The prefrontal microcircuitry mediating these effects include alpha4beta2* nAChRs situated on the terminals of thalamic inputs and the glutamatergic stimulation of cholinergic terminals via ionotropic glutamate receptors. Collectively, this evidence forms the basis for hypothesis-guided development and characterization of cognition enhancers.

  10. Genome Sequence of the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacterium Streptomyces sp. Strain AcH 505.

    PubMed

    Tarkka, M T; Feldhahn, L; Buscot, F; Wubet, T

    2015-04-02

    A draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain AcH 505 is presented here. The genome encodes 22 secondary metabolite gene clusters and a large arsenal of secreted proteins, and their comparative and functional analyses will help to advance our knowledge of symbiotic interactions and fungal and plant biomass degradation.

  11. Genome Sequence of the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacterium Streptomyces sp. Strain AcH 505

    PubMed Central

    Feldhahn, L.; Buscot, F.; Wubet, T.

    2015-01-01

    A draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain AcH 505 is presented here. The genome encodes 22 secondary metabolite gene clusters and a large arsenal of secreted proteins, and their comparative and functional analyses will help to advance our knowledge of symbiotic interactions and fungal and plant biomass degradation. PMID:25838498

  12. Carbonaceous dust in interstellar shock waves: hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) vs. graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra Díaz-Cano, L.; Jones, A. P.

    2008-12-01

    Context: Observations of regions of the interstellar medium affected by shock waves indicate gas phase abundances of carbon that are close to solar. In quiescent regions less than half of the carbon is in the gas phase. Aims: We propose that hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H), in its many guises, is the most probable form of carbonaceous grain material in the interstellar medium and study its erosion in shock waves. Methods: We have used the physical properties typical of a-C:H materials, rather than graphite/amorphous carbon, to study a-C:H erosion during ion irradiation and fragmentation in grain-grain collisions. Using SRIM we study material-, surface- and size-dependent sputtering effects and introduce these effects into a shock model. Results: We find significantly greater destruction for a-C:H, than for graphite, a result that brings the models into better agreement with existing observations of shocked regions of the ISM. Carbon grain erosion in shock waves therefore appears to be much more efficient than predicted by existing models. Conclusions: Interstellar hydrogenated amorphous carbon dust is, apparently, rather easily destroyed in shocks and must therefore be more rapidly re-cycled and re-formed during its journey through the interstellar medium than previously-thought.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Aldehyde-Degrading Strain Halomonas axialensis ACH-L-8

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jun; Ren, Chong; Shan, Xiexie

    2016-01-01

    Halomonas axialensis ACH-L-8, a deep-sea strain isolated from the South China Sea, has the ability to degrade aldehydes. Here, we present an annotated draft genome sequence of this species, which could provide fundamental molecular information on the aldehydes-degrading mechanism. PMID:27081145

  14. Molecular recognition of thiaclopride by Aplysia californica AChBP: new insights from a computational investigation.

    PubMed

    Alamiddine, Zakaria; Selvam, Balaji; Cerón-Carrasco, José P; Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Lebreton, Jacques; Thany, Steeve H; Laurent, Adèle D; Graton, Jérôme; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2015-12-01

    The binding of thiaclopride (THI), a neonicotinoid insecticide, with Aplysia californica acetylcholine binding protein (Ac-AChBP), the surrogate of the extracellular domain of insects nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, has been studied with a QM/QM' hybrid methodology using the ONIOM approach (M06-2X/6-311G(d):PM6). The contributions of Ac-AChBP key residues for THI binding are accurately quantified from a structural and energetic point of view. The importance of water mediated hydrogen-bond (H-bond) interactions involving two water molecules and Tyr55 and Ser189 residues in the vicinity of the THI nitrile group, is specially highlighted. A larger stabilization energy is obtained with the THI-Ac-AChBP complex compared to imidacloprid (IMI), the forerunner of neonicotinoid insecticides. Pairwise interaction energy calculations rationalize this result with, in particular, a significantly more important contribution of the pivotal aromatic residues Trp147 and Tyr188 with THI through CH···π/CH···O and π-π stacking interactions, respectively. These trends are confirmed through a complementary non-covalent interaction (NCI) analysis of selected THI-Ac-AChBP amino acid pairs. PMID:26589615

  15. 31 CFR 363.41 - What happens if an ACH payment is returned to Public Debt?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... returned to Public Debt? 363.41 Section 363.41 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT... TreasuryDirect § 363.41 What happens if an ACH payment is returned to Public Debt? We will notify...

  16. 31 CFR 363.41 - What happens if an ACH payment is returned to Public Debt?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... returned to Public Debt? 363.41 Section 363.41 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT... TreasuryDirect § 363.41 What happens if an ACH payment is returned to Public Debt? We will notify...

  17. 31 CFR 363.41 - What happens if an ACH payment is returned to Public Debt?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... returned to Public Debt? 363.41 Section 363.41 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT... TreasuryDirect § 363.41 What happens if an ACH payment is returned to Public Debt? We will notify...

  18. 31 CFR 363.41 - What happens if an ACH payment is returned to Public Debt?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... returned to Public Debt? 363.41 Section 363.41 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT... TreasuryDirect § 363.41 What happens if an ACH payment is returned to Public Debt? We will notify...

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Aldehyde-Degrading Strain Halomonas axialensis ACH-L-8.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jun; Ren, Chong; Shan, Xiexie; Zeng, Runying

    2016-01-01

    Halomonas axialensisACH-L-8, a deep-sea strain isolated from the South China Sea, has the ability to degrade aldehydes. Here, we present an annotated draft genome sequence of this species, which could provide fundamental molecular information on the aldehydes-degrading mechanism.

  20. Searching for the Multi-Target-Directed Ligands against Alzheimer's disease: discovery of quinoxaline-based hybrid compounds with AChE, H₃R and BACE 1 inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenhai; Tang, Li; Shi, Ying; Huang, Shufang; Xu, Lei; Sheng, Rong; Wu, Peng; Li, Jia; Zhou, Naiming; Hu, Yongzhou

    2011-12-01

    A novel series of quinoxaline derivatives, as Multi-Target-Directed Ligands (MTDLs) for AD treatment, were designed by lending the core structural elements required for H(3)R antagonists and hybridizing BACE 1 inhibitor 1 with AChE inhibitor BYYT-25. A virtual database consisting of quinoxaline derivatives was first screened on a pharmacophore model of BACE 1 inhibitors, and then filtered by a molecular docking model of AChE. Seventeen quinoxaline derivatives with high score values were picked out, synthesized and evaluated for their biological activities. Compound 11a, the most effective MTDL, showed the potent activity to H(3)R/AChE/BACE 1 (H(3)R antagonism, IC(50)=280.0 ± 98.0 nM; H(3)R inverse agonism, IC(50)=189.3 ± 95.7 nM; AChE, IC(50)=483 ± 5 nM; BACE 1, 46.64±2.55% inhibitory rate at 20 μM) and high selectivity over H(1)R/H(2)R/H(4)R. Furthermore, the protein binding patterns between 11a and AChE/BACE 1 showed that it makes several essential interactions with the enzymes.

  1. Acetylcholinesterase-Fc Fusion Protein (AChE-Fc): A Novel Potential Organophosphate Bioscavenger with Extended Plasma Half-Life.

    PubMed

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Cohen, Ofer; Ehrlich, Sharon; Epstein, Eyal; Alcalay, Ron; Mazor, Ohad

    2015-08-19

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the physiological target of organophosphate nerve agent compounds. Currently, the development of a formulation for prophylactic administration of cholinesterases as bioscavengers in established risk situations of exposure to nerve agents is the incentive for many efforts. While cholinesterase bioscavengers were found to be highly effective in conferring protection against nerve agent exposure in animal models, their therapeutic use is complicated by short circulatory residence time. To create a bioscavenger with prolonged plasma half-life, compatible with biotechnological production and purification, a chimeric recombinant molecule of HuAChE coupled to the Fc region of human IgG1 was designed. The novel fusion protein, expressed in cultured cells under optimized conditions, maintains its full enzymatic activity, at levels similar to those of the recombinant AChE enzyme. Thus, this novel fusion product retained its binding affinity toward BW284c5 and propidium, and its bioscavenging reactivity toward the organophosphate-AChE inhibitors sarin and VX. Furthermore, when administered to mice, AChE-Fc exhibits exceptional circulatory residence longevity (MRT of 6000 min), superior to any other known cholinesterase-based recombinant bioscavengers. Owing to its optimized pharmacokinetic performance, high reactivity toward nerve agents, and ease of production, AChE-Fc emerges as a promising next-generation organophosphate bioscavenger.

  2. Activation of nicotinic ACh receptors with α4 subunits induces adenosine release at the rat carotid body

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Sílvia V; Monteiro, Emília C

    2006-01-01

    The effect of ACh on the release of adenosine was studied in rat whole carotid bodies, and the nicotinic ACh receptors involved in the stimulation of this release were characterized. ACh and nicotinic ACh receptor agonists, cytisine, DMPP and nicotine, caused a concentration-dependent increase in adenosine production during normoxia, with nicotine being more potent and efficient in stimulating adenosine release from rat CB than cytisine and DMPP. D-Tubocurarine, mecamylamine, DHβE and α-bungarotoxin, nicotinic ACh receptor antagonists, caused a concentration-dependent reduction in the release of adenosine evoked by hypoxia. The rank order of potency for nicotinic ACh receptor antagonists that inhibit adenosine release was DHβE>mecamylamine>D-tubocurarine>α-bungarotoxin. The effect of the endogenous agonist, ACh, which was mimicked by nicotine, was antagonized by DHβE, a selective nicotinic receptor antagonist. The ecto-5′-nucleotidase inhibitor AOPCP produces a 72% inhibition in the release of adenosine from CB evoked by nicotine. Taken together, these data indicate that ACh induced the production of adenosine, mainly from extracellular ATP catabolism at the CB through a mechanism that involves the activation of nicotinic receptors with α4 and β2 receptor subunits. PMID:16444287

  3. Acetylcholine receptors enable the transport of rapsyn from the Golgi complex to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jee-Young; Ikeda, Hiromi; Ikenaga, Takanori; Ono, Fumihito

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at nerve terminals is critical for signal transmission at the neuromuscular junction, and rapsyn is essential for this process. Previous studies suggest that AChRs might direct rapsyn self-clusters to the synapse. In vivo experiments with fluorescently tagged AChR or rapsyn in zebrafish larvae revealed that rapsyn self-clusters separate from AChRs did not exist before synapse formation. Examination of rapsyn in the AChR-less mutant sofa potato revealed that rapsyn in the absence of AChR was localized in the Golgi complex. Expression of muscle-type AChR in sofa potato restored synaptic clustering of rapsyn, while neuronal type AChR had no effect. To determine if this requirement of protein interaction is reciprocal, we examined the mutant twitch once, which has a missense mutation in rapsyn. While the AChRs distributed non-synaptically on the plasma membrane in twitch once, mutant rapsyn was retained in the Golgi complex. We conclude that AChRs enable the transport of rapsyn from the Golgi complex to the plasma membrane through a molecule-specific interaction. PMID:22623681

  4. Cholinergic activation of the murine trachealis muscle via non-vesicular acetylcholine release involving low-affinity choline transporters.

    PubMed

    Nassenstein, Christina; Wiegand, Silke; Lips, Katrin S; Li, Guanfeng; Klein, Jochen; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    In addition to quantal, vesicular release of acetylcholine (ACh), there is also non-quantal release at the motor endplate which is insufficient to evoke postsynaptic responses unless acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is inhibited. We here addressed potential non-quantal release in the mouse trachea by organ bath experiments and (immuno)histochemical methods. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) of nerve terminals elicited tracheal constriction that is largely due to ACh release. Classical enzyme histochemistry demonstrated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in nerve fibers in the muscle and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity in the smooth muscle cells. Acute inhibition of both esterases by eserine significantly raised tracheal tone which was fully sensitive to atropine. This effect was reduced, but not abolished, in AChE, but not in BChE gene-deficient mice. The eserine-induced increase in tracheal tone was unaffected by vesamicol (10(-5)M), an inhibitor of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, and by corticosterone (10(-4)M), an inhibitor of organic cation transporters. Hemicholinium-3, in low concentrations an inhibitor of the high-affinity choline transporter-1 (CHT1), completely abrogated the eserine effects when applied in high concentrations (10(-4)M) pointing towards an involvement of low-affinity choline transporters. To evaluate the cellular sources of non-quantal ACh release in the trachea, expression of low-affinity choline transporter-like family (CTL1-5) was evaluated by RT-PCR analysis. Even though these transporters were largely abundant in the epithelium, denudation of airway epithelial cells had no effect on eserine-induced tracheal contraction, indicating a non-quantal release of ACh from non-epithelial sources in the airways. These data provide evidence for an epithelium-independent non-vesicular, non-quantal ACh release in the mouse trachea involving low-affinity choline transporters. PMID:26278668

  5. α5-nAChR modulates nicotine-induced cell migration and invasion in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haiji; Ma, Xiaoli

    2015-09-01

    Cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor in the development of human lung cancer. Nicotine, the major component in tobacco, not only contributes to carcinogenesis but also promotes tumor metastasis. By binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), nicotine induces the proliferation and migration of non-small cell lung cancer. Recently studies have indicated that α5-nAChR is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether nicotine promotes the migration and invasion through activation of α5-nAChR in lung cancer. In the present study, A549 cell was exposed to 1μN nicotine for 8, 24 or 48h. Wound-healing assay and transwell assay were used to evaluate the capability of A549 cell migration and cell invasion, respectively. Silencing of α5-nAChR was done by siRNA. Western blotting and PCR were used to detect α5-nAChR expression. Nicotine can induce activation of α5-nAChR in association with increased migration and invasion of human lung cancer A549 cell. Treatment of cells with α5-nAChR specific siRNA blocks nicotine-stimulated activation of α5-nAChR and suppresses A549 cell migration and invasion. Reduction of α5-nAChR resulted in upregulation of E-cadherin, consistent with E-cadherin being inhibitive of cancer cell invasion. These findings suggest that nicotine-induced migration and invasion may occur in a mechanism through activation of α5-nAChR, which can contribute to metastasis or development of human lung cancer.

  6. Deposition of a-C:H films on a nanotrench pattern by bipolar PBII&D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Yuki; Nakahara, Yuya; Nagato, Keisuke; Choi, Junho

    2016-06-01

    In this study, hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were deposited on a nanotrench pattern (300 nm pitch, aspect ratio: 2.0) by bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation and deposition technique (bipolar PBII&D), and the effects of bipolar pulse on the film properties were investigated. Moreover, the behaviour of ions and radicals surrounding the nanotrench was analyzed to clarify the coating mechanism and properties of the a-C:H films on the nanotrench. Further, thermal nanoimprint lithography was carried out using the nanotrench pattern coated with a-C:H films as the mold, and the mold release properties were evaluated. All nanotrench surfaces were successfully coated with the a-C:H films, but the film thickness on the top, sidewall, and bottom surfaces of the trench were not uniform. The surface roughness of the a-C:H films was found to decrease at a higher positive voltage; this happens due to the higher electron temperature around the nanotrench because of the surface migration of plasma particles arrived on the trench. The effects of the negative voltage on the behaviour of ions and radicals near the sidewall of the nanotrench are quite similar to those near the microtrench reported previously (Park et al 2014 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 47 335306). However, the positive pulse voltage was also found to affect the behaviour of ions and radicals near the sidewall surface. The incident angles of ions on the sidewall surface increased with the positive pulse voltage because the energy of incoming ions on the trench decreases with increasing positive voltage. Moreover, the incident ion flux on the sidewall is affected by the positive voltage history. Further, the radical flux decreases with increasing positive voltage. It can be concluded that a higher positive voltage at a lower negative voltage condition is good to obtain better film properties and higher film thickness on the sidewall surface. Pattern transfer properties for the nanoimprint formed by

  7. Muscle aches

    MedlinePlus

    ... and fibromyalgia often respond well to massage. Gentle stretching exercises after a long rest period are also ... to try. A physical therapist can teach you stretching, toning, and aerobic exercises to help you feel ...

  8. Can hydroxylamine be a more potent nucleophile for the reactivation of tabun-inhibited AChE than prototype oxime drugs? An answer derived from quantum chemical and steered molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2014-07-29

    Organophosphorus nerve agents are highly toxic compounds which strongly inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the blood and in the central nervous system (CNS). Tabun is one of the highly toxic organophosphorus (OP) compounds and is resistant to many oxime drugs formulated for the reactivation of AChE. The reactivation mechanism of tabun-conjugated AChE with various drugs has been examined with density functional theory and ab initio quantum chemical calculations. The presence of a lone-pair located on the amidic group resists the nucleophilic attack at the phosphorus center of the tabun-conjugated AChE. We have shown that the newly designed drug candidate N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine, at the MP2/6-31+G*//M05-2X/6-31G* level in the aqueous phase with the polarizable continuum solvation model (PCM), is more effective in reactivating the tabun-conjugated AChE than typical oxime drugs. The rate determining activation barrier with N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine was found to be ∼1.7 kcal mol(-1), which is 7.2 kcal mol(-1) lower than the charged oxime trimedoxime (one of the most efficient reactivators in tabun poisonings). The greater nucleophilicity index (ω(-)) and higher CHelpG charge of pyridinylhydroxylamine compared to TMB4 support this observation. Furthermore, we have also examined the reactivation process of tabun-inhibited AChE with some other bis-quaternary oxime drug candidates such as methoxime (MMB4) and obidoxime. The docking analysis suggests that charged bis-quaternary pyridinium oximes have greater binding affinity inside the active-site gorge of AChE compared to the neutral pyridinylhydroxylamine. The peripheral ligand attached to the neutral pyridinylhydroxylamine enhanced the binding with the aromatic residues in the active-site gorge of AChE through effective π-π interactions. Steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations have also been performed with the charged oxime (TMB4) and the neutral hydroxylamine. From protein-drug interaction

  9. Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons have a cholinergic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Meister, Björn; Gömüç, Burçak; Suarez, Elisabet; Ishii, Yuko; Dürr, Katrin; Gillberg, Linda

    2006-11-01

    Neuronal networks originating in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus play fundamental roles in the control of energy balance. Neuropeptide Y (NPY)-producing neurons in the arcuate nucleus stimulate food intake, whereas arcuate nucleus neurons that release the proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived peptide alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) potently reduce food intake. Relatively little attention has been focused on classical neurotransmitters in regulation of food intake. Here, we have investigated the potential presence of acetylcholine (ACh) in NPY- and POMC-containing neuronal populations of the arcuate nucleus. Antisera to proteins required for cholinergic neurotransmission, including choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), were employed in double-labeling immunohistochemical experiments. In colchicine-treated rats, ChAT- and VAChT-immunopositive cell bodies were located in the ventral aspect of the arcuate nucleus. ChAT and VAChT immunoreactivities were demonstrated in alpha-MSH- and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART)-containing cell bodies of the arcuate nucleus, whereas cell bodies containing NPY or agouti-related peptide (AGRP) were distinct from VAChT-immunoreactive neuronal perikarya. VAChT immunoreactivity was also present in a large number of alpha-MSH-containing nerve fiber varicosities throughout the central nervous system. In the commissural part of the nucleus tractus solitarius, no alpha-MSH-containing cell bodies were found to have ChAT or VAChT immunoreactivity. The presence of markers for cholinergic neurotransmission in a subpopulation of hypothalamic POMC/CART neurons suggests co-release of ACh with peptides derived from the POMC precursor and CART. The results indicate a role for ACh in control of energy balance, mediating the effects of peripheral hormones such as leptin and insulin.

  10. Microdemographic Determinants of Population Recovery among the Northern Aché.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jack D; Hill, Kim; Hurtado, A Magdalena; Alcantara, Adelamar; Hunsinger, Eddie; Sprague, Webb

    2015-01-01

    A pattern of population crash and rapid recovery is a common feature of the pacification and settlement experience of the indigenous peoples of tropical South America. Despite the obvious importance of these events to the demographic and anthropological sciences as a whole, as well as their significant practical implications, little is known about the microdemographic determinants of these paired phenomena. Using methods of asymptotic and stochastic demographic analysis, we reconstructed the microdemographic drivers of this history among one indigenous population: the Northern Aché of eastern Paraguay. This article explores the implications of these relationships for understanding the overall demographic turnaround observed within similar groups, as well as for the future trajectory of the Northern Aché in particular.

  11. Sound localisation ability of soldiers wearing infantry ACH and PASGT helmets.

    PubMed

    Scharine, Angelique A; Binseel, Mary S; Mermagen, Timothy; Letowski, Tomasz R

    2014-01-01

    Helmets provide soldiers with ballistic and fragmentation protection but impair auditory spatial processing. Missed auditory information can be fatal for a soldier; therefore, helmet design requires compromise between protection and optimal acoustics. Twelve soldiers localised two sound signals presented from six azimuth angles and three levels of elevation presented at two intensity levels and with three background noises. Each participant completed the task while wearing no helmet and with two U.S. Army infantry helmets - the Personnel Armor System for Ground Troops (PASGT) helmet and the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH). Results showed a significant effect of helmet type on the size of both azimuth and elevation error. The effects of level, background noise, azimuth and elevation were found to be significant. There was no effect of sound signal type. As hypothesised, localisation accuracy was greatest when soldiers did not wear helmet, followed by the ACH. Performance was worst with the PASGT helmet.

  12. Deposition of a-C:H films on UHMWPE substrate and its wear-resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Dong; Liu, Hengjun; Deng, Xingrui; Leng, Y. X.; Huang, Nan

    2009-10-01

    In prosthetic hip replacements, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear debris is identified as the main factor limiting the lifetime of the artificial joints. Especially UHMWPE debris from the joint can induce tissue reactions and bone resorption that may lead to the joint loosening. The diamond like carbon (DLC) film has attracted a great deal of interest in recent years mainly because of its excellent tribological property, biocompatibility and chemically inert property. In order to improve the wear-resistance of UHMWPE, a-C:H films were deposited on UHMWPE substrate by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (ECR-PECVD) technology. During deposition, the working gases were argon and acetylene, the microwave power was set to 800 W, the biased pulsed voltage was set to -200 V (frequency 15 kHz, duty ratio 20%), the pressure in vacuum chamber was set to 0.5 Pa, and the process time was 60 min. The films were analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, nano-indentation, anti-scratch and wear test. The results showed that a typical amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) film was successfully deposited on UHMWPE with thickness up to 2 μm. The nano-hardness of the UHMWPE coated with a-C:H films, measured at an applied load of 200 μN, was increased from 10 MPa (untreated UHMWPE) to 139 MPa. The wear test was carried out using a ball (Ø 6 mm, SiC) on disk tribometer with an applied load of 1 N for 10000 cycles, and the results showed a reduction of worn cross-sectional area from 193 μm 2 of untreated UHMWPE to 26 μm 2 of DLC coated sample. In addition the influence of argon/acetylene gas flow ratio on the growth of a-C:H films was studied.

  13. Mechanism of interaction of novel uncharged, centrally active reactivators with OP-hAChE conjugates.

    PubMed

    Radić, Zoran; Sit, Rakesh K; Garcia, Edzna; Zhang, Limin; Berend, Suzana; Kovarik, Zrinka; Amitai, Gabriel; Fokin, Valery V; Barry Sharpless, K; Taylor, Palmer

    2013-03-25

    A library of more than 200 novel uncharged oxime reactivators was used to select and refine lead reactivators of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) covalently conjugated with sarin, cyclosarin, VX, paraoxon and tabun. N-substituted 2-hydroxyiminoacetamido alkylamines were identified as best reactivators and reactivation kinetics of the lead oximes, RS41A and RS194B, were analyzed in detail. Compared to reference pyridinium reactivators, 2PAM and MMB4, molecular recognition of RS41A reflected in its Kox constant was compromised by an order of magnitude on average for different OP-hAChE conjugates, without significant differences in the first order maximal phosphorylation rate constant k(2). Systematic structural modifications of the RS41A lead resulted in several-fold improvement with reactivator, RS194B. Kinetic analysis indicated K(ox) reduction for RS194B as the main kinetic constant leading to efficient reactivation. Subtle structural modifications of RS194B were used to identify essential determinants for efficient reactivation. Computational molecular modeling of RS41A and RS194B interactions with VX inhibited hAChE, bound reversibly in Michaelis type complex and covalently in the pentacoordinate reaction intermediate suggests that the faster reactivation reaction is a consequence of a tighter RS194B interactions with hAChE peripheral site (PAS) residues, in particular with D74, resulting in lower interaction energies for formation of both the binding and reactivation states. Desirable in vitro reactivation properties of RS194B, when coupled with its in vivo pharmacokinetics and disposition in the body, reveal the potential of this oxime design as promising centrally and peripherally active antidotes for OP toxicity.

  14. Evidence for aging theories from the study of a hunter-gatherer people (Ache of Paraguay).

    PubMed

    Libertini, G

    2013-09-01

    In the late seventies, a small tribal population of Paraguay, the Ache, living under natural conditions, was studied. Data from this population turn out to be useful for considerations about evolutionary hypotheses on the aging phenomenon. 1) Ache show an age-related increasing mortality, which strongly limits the mean duration of life, as observed in other studies on mammal and bird species. 2) According to current theories on aging, in the wild very few or no individual reach old age and, so, aging cannot be directly influenced by natural selection. However, data from our population show that a significant proportion of the population reaches in the wild 60 and 70 years of age. 3) Data from Ache are also in agreement with the observation about an inverse correlation between extrinsic mortality and deaths due to the age-related increasing mortality. 4) For many gerontologists, the age-related decline of vital functions is a consequence of the gradual decline of cell turnover, genetically determined and regulated by the declining duplication capacities of stem cells. The current interpretation is that these restrictions are a general defense against the proliferation of any tumoral mass. However, among wild Ache cancer is virtually unknown in non-elderly subjects, and only among older individuals are there deaths attributable to oncological diseases. Moreover, fitness decline begins long before oncological diseases have fatal effects in significant numbers. This completely disproves the current hypothesis, because a supposed defense against a deadly disease cannot exterminate a population before the disease begins to kill. These data are consistent with similar data from other species studied under natural conditions, and they bring new arguments against the non-adaptive interpretation of aging and in support of the adaptive interpretation.

  15. Circadian variation in salivary testosterone across age classes in Ache Amerindian males of Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Bribiescas, Richard G; Hill, Kim R

    2010-01-01

    Testosterone levels exhibit a circadian rhythm in healthy men, with morning levels tending to be higher compared to evening titers. However, circadian rhythms wane with age. Although this has been described in males living within industrialized settings, age-related changes have not received similar attention in populations outside these contexts. Because many nonindustrialized populations, such as Ache Amerindians of Paraguay, exhibit testosterone levels that are lower than what is commonly reported in the clinical literature and lack age-associated variation in testosterone, it was hypothesized that Ache men would not show age-related variation in testosterone circadian rhythms. Diurnal rhythmicity in testosterone within and between Ache men in association with age (n = 52; age range, 18-64) was therefore examined. A significant negative association was evident between the ratio of morning and evening salivary testosterone and age (r = -0.28, P = 0.04). Men in their third decade of life exhibited significant diurnal variation (P = 0.0003), whereas older and younger age classes did not. Men between the ages of 30 and 39 also exhibited a higher AM:PM testosterone ratio compared to 40-49 and 50< year old men (P = 0.002, 0.006). Overall, declines in testosterone with aging may not be universal among human males, however, within-individual analyses of diurnal variation capture age-related contrasts in daily testosterone fluctuations. Circadian rhythmicity differs with age among the Ache and may be a common aspect of reproductive senescence among men regardless of ecological context.

  16. Agonists with supraphysiological efficacy at the muscarinic M2 ACh receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schrage, R; Seemann, WK; Klöckner, J; Dallanoce, C; Racké, K; Kostenis, E; De Amici, M; Holzgrabe, U; Mohr, K

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Artificial agonists may have higher efficacy for receptor activation than the physiological agonist. Until now, such ‘superagonism’ has rarely been reported for GPCRs. Iperoxo is an extremely potent muscarinic receptor agonist. We hypothesized that iperoxo is a ‘superagonist’. Experimental Approach Signalling of iperoxo and newly synthesized structural analogues was compared with that of ACh at label-free M2 muscarinic receptors applying whole cell dynamic mass redistribution, measurement of G-protein activation, evaluation of cell surface agonist binding and computation of operational efficacies. Key Results In CHO-hM2 cells, iperoxo significantly exceeds ACh in Gi/Gs signalling competence. In the orthosteric loss-of-function mutant M2-Y1043.33A, the maximum effect of iperoxo is hardly compromised in contrast to ACh. ‘Superagonism’ is preserved in the physiological cellular context of MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts. Structure–signalling relationships including iperoxo derivatives with either modified positively charged head group or altered tail suggest that ‘superagonism’ of iperoxo is mechanistically based on parallel activation of the receptor protein via two orthosteric interaction points. Conclusion and Implications Supraphysiological agonist efficacy at muscarinic M2 ACh receptors is demonstrated for the first time. In addition, a possible underlying molecular mechanism of GPCR ‘superagonism’ is provided. We suggest that iperoxo-like orthosteric GPCR activation is a new avenue towards a novel class of receptor activators. Linked Article This article is commented on by Langmead and Christopoulos, pp. 353–356 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.12142 PMID:23062057

  17. The stabilization of Au NP-AChE nanocomposites by biosilica encapsulation for the development of a thiocholine biosensor.

    PubMed

    Buiculescu, Raluca; Chaniotakis, Nikos A

    2012-08-01

    We report on the construction of an amperometric biosensor based on the immobilization of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) onto gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The active enzyme is covalently bound directly onto the surface of the Au NPs via a thiol bond. This immobilization provides increased stability and high electron-transfer between the colloidal Au NPs, the catalyst and the transducer surface. To further increase the biosensor stability by protecting the enzyme from denaturation and protease attack, a layer of biosilica was grown around the Au NP enzyme nanocomposite. All steps, i.e., the conjugation of the enzyme to the gold nanoparticles and the encapsulation into biosilica, are monitored and confirmed by ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy. The stabilizing effect of the entrapment was evaluated amperometrically, while the operation of the biosensor was monitored over a period of 4 months. The initial sensitivity of the biosensor was calculated to be 27.58 nA mM(-1) with a linear response to the concentration of the substrate in the range from 0.04 to 0.4 mM. It is thus shown that the biosilica nanocomposites doped with Au NPs-AChE conjugates create a system that provides both signal mediation and significant enzyme stabilization over the existing AChE biosensor. The biosensor had retained all its activity at the end of the 4 months, compared with the normal AChE biosensor whose activity reached 50% after only 42 days of operation.

  18. Expression of human AChR extracellular domain mutants with improved characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Zisimopoulou, Paraskevi; Giastas, Petros; Bitzopoulou, Kalliopi; Evangelakou, Panagiota; Sideri, Anastasia; Tzartos, Socrates J

    2014-02-01

    The muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) has a central role in neuromuscular transmission, and is the major target in the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis (MG). We created mutants of the extracellular domains (ECDs) of the human α1, β1, δ and ε AChR subunits, whereby their Cys-loop was exchanged for that of the acetylcholine binding protein. The mutants were expressed in Pichia pastoris and had improved solubility resulting in 2- to 43-fold higher expression yields compared to the wild type. An additional mutant was created for the α1 ECD restoring its glycosylation site within the Cys-loop and its α-bungarotoxin binding ability. Furthermore, we constructed dimeric and pentameric concatamers of the mutant ECDs. All concatamers were successfully expressed as soluble secreted proteins, although the pentamers had about 10-fold lower expression than the dimers and were more susceptible to fragmentation. Initial crystallizations with the mutant ECDs were promising, and we reproducibly obtained crystals of the β1 ECD, diffracting at ~12 Å. Further optimization is underway to obtain crystals suitable for high resolution crystallography. The proteins described herein are useful tools in structural studies of the human muscle AChR and can be used in applications requiring high yields such as therapeutic adsorbents for MG autoantibodies. PMID:24246999

  19. The Role of nAChR and Calcium Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer Initiation and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Schaal, Courtney; Padmanabhan, Jaya; Chellappan, Srikumar

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer shows a strong correlation with smoking and the current therapeutic strategies have been relatively ineffective in improving the survival of patients. Efforts have been made over the past many years to understand the molecular events that drive the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer, especially in the context of smoking. It has become clear that components of tobacco smoke not only initiate these cancers, especially pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) through their mutagenic properties, but can also promote the growth and metastasis of these tumors by stimulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Studies in cell culture systems, animal models and human samples have shown that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activation enhances these tumor-promoting events by channeling signaling through multiple pathways. In this context, signaling through calcium channels appear to facilitate pancreatic cancer growth by itself or downstream of nAChRs. This review article highlights the role of nAChR downstream signaling events and calcium signaling in the growth, metastasis as well as drug resistance of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26264026

  20. Selective activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRα7) inhibits muscular degeneration in mdx dystrophic mice.

    PubMed

    Leite, Paulo Emílio Correa; Gandía, Luís; de Pascual, Ricardo; Nanclares, Carmen; Colmena, Inés; Santos, Wilson C; Lagrota-Candido, Jussara; Quirico-Santos, Thereza

    2014-07-21

    Amount evidence indicates that α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRα7) activation reduces production of inflammatory mediators. This work aimed to verify the influence of endogenous nAChRα7 activation on the regulation of full-blown muscular inflammation in mdx mouse with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We used mdx mice with 3 weeks-old at the height myonecrosis, and C57 nAChRα7(+/+) wild-type and nAChRα7(-/-) knockout mice with muscular injury induced with 60µL 0.5% bupivacaine (bp) in the gastrocnemius muscle. Pharmacological treatment included selective nAChRα7 agonist PNU282987 (0.3mg/kg and 1.0mg/kg) and the antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA at 1.0mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally for 7 days. Selective nAChRα7 activation of mdx mice with PNU282987 reduced circulating levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, a marker of cell death by necrosis) and the area of perivascular inflammatory infiltrate, and production of inflammatory mediators TNFα and metalloprotease MMP-9 activity. Conversely, PNU282987 treatment increased MMP-2 activity, an indication of muscular tissue remodeling associated with regeneration, in both mdx mice and WTα7 mice with bp-induced muscular lesion. Treatment with PNU282987 had no effect on α7KO, and MLA abolished the nAChRα7 agonist-induced anti-inflammatory effect in both mdx and WT. In conclusion, nAChRα7 activation inhibits muscular inflammation and activates tissue remodeling by increasing muscular regeneration. These effects were not accompanied with fibrosis and/or deposition of non-functional collagen. The nAChRα7 activation may be considered as a potential target for pharmacological strategies to reduce inflammation and activate mechanisms of muscular regeneration. PMID:24833065

  1. The α3β4* nicotinic ACh receptor subtype mediates physical dependence to morphine: mouse and human studies

    PubMed Central

    Muldoon, P P; Jackson, K J; Perez, E; Harenza, J L; Molas, S; Rais, B; Anwar, H; Zaveri, N T; Maldonado, R; Maskos, U; McIntosh, J M; Dierssen, M; Miles, M F; Chen, X; De Biasi, M; Damaj, M I

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Recent data have indicated that α3β4* neuronal nicotinic (n) ACh receptors may play a role in morphine dependence. Here we investigated if nACh receptors modulate morphine physical withdrawal. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACHES To assess the role of α3β4* nACh receptors in morphine withdrawal, we used a genetic correlation approach using publically available datasets within the GeneNetwork web resource, genetic knockout and pharmacological tools. Male and female European-American (n = 2772) and African-American (n = 1309) subjects from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment dataset were assessed for possible associations of polymorphisms in the 15q25 gene cluster and opioid dependence. KEY RESULTS BXD recombinant mouse lines demonstrated an increased expression of α3, β4 and α5 nACh receptor mRNA in the forebrain and midbrain, which significantly correlated with increased defecation in mice undergoing morphine withdrawal. Mice overexpressing the gene cluster CHRNA5/A3/B4 exhibited increased somatic signs of withdrawal. Furthermore, α5 and β4 nACh receptor knockout mice expressed decreased somatic withdrawal signs compared with their wild-type counterparts. Moreover, selective α3β4* nACh receptor antagonists, α-conotoxin AuIB and AT-1001, attenuated somatic signs of morphine withdrawal in a dose-related manner. In addition, two human datasets revealed a protective role for variants in the CHRNA3 gene, which codes for the α3 nACh receptor subunit, in opioid dependence and withdrawal. In contrast, we found that the α4β2* nACh receptor subtype is not involved in morphine somatic withdrawal signs. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Overall, our findings suggest an important role for the α3β4* nACh receptor subtype in morphine physical dependence. PMID:24750073

  2. Choline acetyltransferase and organic cation transporters are responsible for synthesis and propionate-induced release of acetylcholine in colon epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bader, Sandra; Klein, Jochen; Diener, Martin

    2014-06-15

    Acetylcholine is not only a neurotransmitter, but is found in a variety of non-neuronal cells. For example, the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), catalyzing acetylcholine synthesis, is expressed by the colonic epithelium of different species. These cells release acetylcholine across the basolateral membrane after luminal exposure to propionate, a short-chain fatty acid. The functional consequence is the induction of chloride secretion, measurable as increase in short-circuit current (Isc) in Ussing chamber experiments. It is unclear how acetylcholine is produced and released by colonic epithelium. Therefore, the aim of the present study was the identification (on mRNA and protein level) and functional characterization (in Ussing chamber experiments combined with HPLC detection of acetylcholine) of transporters/enzymes in the cholinergic system of rat colonic epithelium. Immunohistochemical staining as well as RT-PCR revealed the expression of high-affinity choline transporter, ChAT, carnitine acetyltransferase (CarAT), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), and organic cation transporters (OCT 1, 2, 3) in colonic epithelium. In contrast to blockade of ChAT with bromoacetylcholine, inhibition of CarAT with mildronate did not inhibit the propionate-induced increase in Isc, suggesting a predominant synthesis of epithelial acetylcholine by ChAT. Although being expressed, blockade of VAChT with vesamicol was ineffective, whereas inhibition of OCTs with omeprazole and corticosterone inhibited propionate-induced Isc and the release of acetylcholine into the basolateral compartment. In summary, OCTs seem to be involved in regulated acetylcholine release by colonic epithelium, which is assumed to be involved in chemosensing of luminal short-chain fatty acids by the intestinal epithelium.

  3. Silencing A7-nAChR levels increases the sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to ixabepilone treatment.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chao-Chiang; Huang, Chien-Yu; Cheng, Wan-Li; Hung, Chin-Sheng; Chang, Yu-Jia; Wei, Po-Li

    2016-07-01

    Gastric cancer is an important health issue worldwide. Currently, improving the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy drugs is an important goal of cancer research. Alpha-7 nicotine acetylcholine receptor (A7-nAChR) is the key molecule that mediates gastric cancer progression, metastasis, and therapy responses; however, the role of A7-nAChR in the therapeutic efficacy of ixabepilone remains unclear. A7-nAChR expression was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology. The cytotoxicity of ixabepilone was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and ixabepilone-induced apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry and annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) apoptotic assay. The expression patterns of anti-apoptotic proteins (AKT, phospho-AKT, Mcl-1, and Bcl-2) and pro-apoptotic proteins (Bad and Bax) were determined by western blot. Our study found that A7-nAChR knockdown (A7-nAChR-KD) AGS cells were more sensitive to ixabepilone administration than scrambled control AGS cells. We found that A7-nAChR knockdown enhanced ixabepilone-induced cell death as evidenced by the increased number of annexin V-positive (apoptotic) cells. After scrambled control and A7-nAChR-KD cells were treated with ixabepilone, we found that pAKT and AKT levels were significantly reduced in both groups of cells. The levels of Bcl-2 and the anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 isoform increased dramatically after ixabepilone treatment in scrambled control cells but not in A7-nAChR-KD cells. Bad and Bax levels did not change between the treatment group and vehicle group in both A7-nAChR-KD and scrambled control cells, whereas cleaved PARP levels dramatically increased in ixabepilone-treated A7-nAChR-KD cells. Our results demonstrated that knockdown of A7-nAChR enhanced the sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to ixabepilone administration. Thus, the A7-nAChR expression level in patients with gastric cancer may be a good indicator of ixabepilone sensitivity.

  4. Otilonium: a potent blocker of neuronal nicotinic ACh receptors in bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gandía, L.; Villarroya, M.; Lara, B.; Olmos, V.; Gilabert, J. A.; López, M. G.; Martínez-Sierra, R.; Borges, R.; García, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    1. Otilonium, a clinically useful spasmolytic, behaves as a potent blocker of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) as well as a mild wide-spectrum Ca2+ channel blocker in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. 2. 45Ca2+ uptake into chromaffin cells stimulated with high K+ (70 mM, 1 min) was blocked by otilonium with an IC50 of 7.6 microM. The drug inhibited the 45Ca2+ uptake stimulated by the nicotinic AChR agonist, dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) with a 79 fold higher potency (IC50 = 0.096 microM). 3. Whole-cell Ba2+ currents (IBa) through Ca2+ channels of voltage-clamped chromaffin cells were blocked by otilonium with an IC50 of 6.4 microM, very close to that of K(+)-evoked 45Ca2+ uptake. Blockade developed in 10-20 s, almost as a single step and was rapidly and almost fully reversible. 4. Whole-cell nicotinic AChR-mediated currents (250 ms pulses of 100 microM DMPP) applied at 30 s intervals were blocked by otilonium in a concentration-dependent manner, showing an IC50 of 0.36 microM. Blockade was induced in a step-wise manner. Wash out of otilonium allowed a slow recovery of the current, also in discrete steps. 5. In experiments with recordings in the same cells of whole-cell IDMPP, Na+ currents (INa) and Ca2+ currents (ICa), 1 microM otilonium blocked 87% IDMPP, 7% INa and 13% ICa. 6. Otilonium inhibited the K(+)-evoked catecholamine secretory response of superfused bovine chromaffin cells with an IC50 of 10 microM, very close to the IC50 for blockade of K(+)-induced 45Ca2+ uptake and IBa. 7. Otilonium inhibited the secretory responses induced by 10 s pulses of 50 microM DMPP with an IC50 of 7.4 nM. Hexamethonium blocked the DMPP-evoked responses with an IC50 of 29.8 microM, 4,000 fold higher than that of otilonium. 8. In conclusion, otilonium is a potent blocker of nicotinic AChR-mediated responses. The drugs also blocked various subtypes of neuronal voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels at a considerably lower potency. Na+ channels were unaffected by

  5. The dual-acting H3 receptor antagonist and AChE inhibitor UW-MD-71 dose-dependently enhances memory retrieval and reverses dizocilpine-induced memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nadia; Saad, Ali; Nurulain, Syed M; Darras, Fouad H; Decker, Michael; Sadek, Bassem

    2016-01-15

    Both the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) and acetylcholine esterase (AChE) are involved in the regulation of release and metabolism of acetylcholine and several other central neurotransmitters. Therefore, dual-active H3R antagonists and AChE inhibitors (AChEIs) have shown in several studies to hold promise to treat cognitive disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). The novel dual-acting H3R antagonist and AChEI 7-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)-1,2,3,9-tetrahydropyrrolo[2,1-b]quinazoline (UW-MD-71) with excellent selectivity profiles over both the three other HRs as well as the AChE's isoenzyme butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) shows high and balanced in vitro affinities at both H3R and AChE with IC50 of 33.9nM and hH3R antagonism with Ki of 76.2nM, respectively. In the present study, the effects of UW-MD-71 (1.25-5mg/kg, i.p.) on acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval in a one-trial inhibitory avoidance task in male rats were investigated applying donepezil (DOZ) and pitolisant (PIT) as reference drugs. Furthermore, the effects of UW-MD-71 on memory deficits induced by the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist dizocilpine (DIZ) were tested. Our results indicate that administration of UW-MD-71 before the test session dose-dependently increased performance and enhanced procognitive effect on retrieval. However neither pre- nor post-training acute systemic administration of UW-MD-71 facilitated acquisition or consolidation. More importantly, UW-MD-71 (2.5mg/kg, i.p.) ameliorated the DIZ-induced amnesic effects. Furthermore, the procognitive activity of UW-MD-71 in retrieval was completely reversed and partly abrogated in DIZ-induced amnesia when rats were pretreated with the centrally-acting H2R antagonist zolantidine (ZOL), but not with the CNS penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR). These results demonstrate the procognitive effects of UW-MD-71 in two in vivo memory models, and are to our knowledge the first demonstration in vivo that a potent dual

  6. Biochemical effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content on teleostean fishes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Palas; Pal, Sandipan; Mukherjee, Aloke Kumar; Ghosh, Apurba Ratan

    2014-09-01

    Effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 at a dose of 17.20mg/l on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content were measured in different tissues of two Indian air-breathing teleosts, Anabas testudineus (Bloch) and Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) during an exposure period of 30 days under laboratory condition. AChE activity was significantly increased in all the investigated tissues of both fish species and maximum elevation was observed in brain of H. fossilis, while spinal cord of A. testudineus showed minimum increment. Fishes showed significant increase LPO levels in all the tissues; highest was observed in gill of A. testudineus but lowest LPO level was observed in muscle of H. fossilis. CAT was also enhanced in both the fishes, while GST activity in liver diminished substantially and minimum was observed in liver of A. testudineus. Total protein content showed decreased value in all the tissues, maximum reduction was observed in liver and minimum in brain of A. testudineus and H. fossilis respectively. The results indicated that Excel Mera 71 caused serious alterations in the enzyme activities resulting into severe deterioration of fish health; so, AChE, LPO, CAT and GST can be used as suitable indicators of herbicidal toxicity. PMID:24927388

  7. Biochemical effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content on teleostean fishes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Palas; Pal, Sandipan; Mukherjee, Aloke Kumar; Ghosh, Apurba Ratan

    2014-09-01

    Effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 at a dose of 17.20mg/l on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content were measured in different tissues of two Indian air-breathing teleosts, Anabas testudineus (Bloch) and Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) during an exposure period of 30 days under laboratory condition. AChE activity was significantly increased in all the investigated tissues of both fish species and maximum elevation was observed in brain of H. fossilis, while spinal cord of A. testudineus showed minimum increment. Fishes showed significant increase LPO levels in all the tissues; highest was observed in gill of A. testudineus but lowest LPO level was observed in muscle of H. fossilis. CAT was also enhanced in both the fishes, while GST activity in liver diminished substantially and minimum was observed in liver of A. testudineus. Total protein content showed decreased value in all the tissues, maximum reduction was observed in liver and minimum in brain of A. testudineus and H. fossilis respectively. The results indicated that Excel Mera 71 caused serious alterations in the enzyme activities resulting into severe deterioration of fish health; so, AChE, LPO, CAT and GST can be used as suitable indicators of herbicidal toxicity.

  8. Sympathetic α₃β₂-nAChRs mediate cerebral neurogenic nitrergic vasodilation in the swine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Reggie Hui-Chao; Liu, Yi-Qing; Chen, Po-Yi; Liu, Chin-Hung; Chen, Mei-Fang; Lin, Hung-Wen; Kuo, Jon-Son; Premkumar, Louis S; Lee, Tony Jer-Fu

    2011-08-01

    The α(7)-nicotinic ACh receptor (α(7)-nAChR) on sympathetic neurons innervating basilar arteries of pigs crossed bred between Landrace and Yorkshire (LY) is known to mediate nicotine-induced, β-amyloid (Aβ)-sensitive nitrergic neurogenic vasodilation. Preliminary studies, however, demonstrated that nicotine-induced cerebral vasodilation in pigs crossbred among Landrace, Yorkshire, and Duroc (LYD) was insensitive to Aβ and α-bungarotoxin (α-BGTX). We investigated nAChR subtype on sympathetic neurons innervating LYD basilar arteries. Nicotine-induced relaxation of porcine isolated basilar arteries was examined by tissue bath myography, inward currents on nAChR-expressing oocytes by two-electrode voltage recording, and mRNA and protein expression in the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) and middle cervical ganglion (MCG) by reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine-induced basilar arterial relaxation was not affected by Aβ, α-BGTX, and α-conotoxin IMI (α(7)-nAChR antagonists), or α-conotoxin AuIB (α(3)β(4)-nAChR antagonist) but was inhibited by tropinone and tropane (α(3)-containing nAChR antagonists) and α-conotoxin MII (selective α(3)β(2)-nAChR antagonist). Nicotine-induced inward currents in α(3)β(2)-nAChR-expressing oocytes were inhibited by α-conotoxin MII but not by α-BGTX, Aβ, or α-conotoxin AuIB. mRNAs of α(3)-, α(7)-, β(2)-, and β(4)-subunits were expressed in both SCGs and MCGs with significantly higher mRNAs of α(3)-, β(2)-, and β(4)-subunits than that of α(7)-subunit. The Aβ-insensitive sympathetic α(3)β(2)-nAChR mediates nicotine-induced cerebral nitrergic neurogenic vasodilation in LYD pigs. The different finding from Aβ-sensitive α(7)-nAChR in basilar arteries of LY pigs may offer a partial explanation for different sensitivities of individuals to Aβ in causing diminished cerebral nitrergic vasodilation in diseases involving Aβ.

  9. Skeletal parasympathetic innervation communicates central IL-1 signals regulating bone mass accrual.

    PubMed

    Bajayo, Alon; Bar, Arik; Denes, Adam; Bachar, Marilyn; Kram, Vardit; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Zallone, Alberta; Kovács, Krisztina J; Yirmiya, Raz; Bab, Itai

    2012-09-18

    Bone mass accrual is a major determinant of skeletal mass, governed by bone remodeling, which consists of bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Bone mass accrual is inhibited by sympathetic signaling centrally regulated through activation of receptors for serotonin, leptin, and ACh. However, skeletal activity of the parasympathetic nervous system (PSNS) has not been reported at the bone level. Here we report skeletal immune-positive fibers for the PSNS marker vesicular ACh transporter (VAChT). Pseudorabies virus inoculated into the distal femoral metaphysis is identifiable in the sacral intermediolateral cell column and central autonomic nucleus, demonstrating PSNS femoral innervation originating in the spinal cord. The PSNS neurotransmitter ACh targets nicotinic (nAChRs), but not muscarinic receptors in bone cells, affecting mainly osteoclasts. nAChR agonists up-regulate osteoclast apoptosis and restrain bone resorption. Mice deficient of the α(2)nAChR subunit have increased bone resorption and low bone mass. Silencing of the IL-1 receptor signaling in the central nervous system by brain-specific overexpression of the human IL-1 receptor antagonist (hIL1ra(Ast)(+/+) mice) leads to very low skeletal VAChT expression and ACh levels. These mice also exhibit increased bone resorption and low bone mass. In WT but not in hIL1ra(Ast)(+/+) mice, the cholinergic ACh esterase inhibitor pyridostigmine increases ACh levels and bone mass apparently by inhibiting bone resorption. Taken together, these results identify a previously unexplored key central IL-1-parasympathetic-bone axis that antagonizes the skeletal sympathetic tone, thus potently favoring bone mass accrual.

  10. Direct Proof of the In Vivo Pathogenic Role of the AChR Autoantibodies from Myasthenia Gravis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kordas, Gregory; Lagoumintzis, George; Sideris, Sotirios; Poulas, Konstantinos; Tzartos, Socrates J.

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that the autoantibodies (autoAbs) against muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients are the main pathogenic factor in MG; however, this belief has not yet been confirmed with direct observations. Although animals immunized with AChR or injected with anti-AChR monoclonal Abs, or with crude human MG Ig fractions exhibit MG symptoms, the pathogenic role of isolated anti-AChR autoAbs, and, more importantly, the absence of pathogenic factor(s) in the autoAb-depleted MG sera has not yet been shown by in vivo studies. Using recombinant extracellular domains of the human AChR α and β subunits, we have isolated autoAbs from the sera of four MG patients. The ability of these isolated anti-subunit Abs and of the Ab-depleted sera to passively transfer experimental autoimmune MG in Lewis rats was investigated. We found that the isolated anti-subunit Abs were at least as efficient as the corresponding whole sera or whole Ig in causing experimental MG. Abs to both α- and β-subunit were pathogenic although the anti-α-subunit were much more efficient than the anti-β-subunit ones. Interestingly, the autoAb-depleted sera were free of pathogenic activity. The later suggests that the myasthenogenic potency of the studied anti-AChR MG sera is totally due to their anti-AChR autoAbs, and therefore selective elimination of the anti-AChR autoAbs from MG patients may be an efficient therapy for MG. PMID:25259739

  11. In Vitro Anti-AChE, Anti-BuChE, and Antioxidant Activity of 12 Extracts of Eleutherococcus Species

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are one of the most occurring diseases in developed and developing countries. The aim of this work focused on the screening of the natural inhibitors of AChE and BuChE and antioxidants in Eleutherococcus species. We found that the ethanol extracts of E. setchuenensis and E. sessiliflorus showed the strongest inhibition towards AChE (IC50: 0.3 and 0.3 mg/mL, resp.). Among chloroform extracts, the most active appeared to be E. gracilistylus (IC50: 0.37 mg/mL). In turn, the ethanol extract of E. henryi inhibited the strongest BuChE with IC50 value of 0.13 mg/mL. Among chloroform extracts, E. gracilistylus, E. setchuenensis, and E. sessiliflorus appeared to be the strongest with IC50 values of 0.12, 0.18, and 0.19 mg/mL. HPTLC screening confirmed the presence of inhibitors in extracts. All extracts exhibited anti-DPPH⁎ activity and single antioxidants have been identified. To the best of our knowledge, no information was available on this activity of compounds in Eleutherococcus. These studies provide a biochemical basis for the regulation of AChE and BuChE and encourage us to continue isolation of active compounds. PMID:27803761

  12. In Vitro and In Vivo Profiles of ACH-702, an Isothiazoloquinolone, against Bacterial Pathogens▿

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Michael J.; Podos, Steven D.; Thanassi, Jane A.; Leggio, Melissa J.; Bradbury, Barton J.; Deshpande, Milind

    2011-01-01

    ACH-702, a novel isothiazoloquinolone (ITQ), was assessed for antibacterial activity against a panel of Gram-positive and Gram-negative clinical isolates and found to possess broad-spectrum activity, especially against antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive strains, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). For Gram-negative bacteria, ACH-702 showed exceptional potency against Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and a Neisseria sp. but was less active against members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Good antibacterial activity was also evident against several anaerobes as well as Legionella pneumophila and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Excellent bactericidal activity was observed for ACH-702 against several bacterial pathogens in time-kill assays, and postantibiotic effects (PAEs) of >1 h were evident with both laboratory and clinical strains of staphylococci at 10× MIC and similar in most cases to those observed for moxifloxacin at the same MIC multiple. In vivo efficacy was demonstrated against S. aureus with murine sepsis and thigh infection models, with decreases in the number of CFU/thigh equal to or greater than those observed after vancomycin treatment. Macromolecular synthesis assays showed specific dose-dependent inhibition of DNA replication in staphylococci, and biochemical analyses indicated potent dual inhibition of two essential DNA replication enzymes: DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Additional biological data in support of an effective dual targeting mechanism of action include the following: low MIC values (≤0.25 μg/ml) against staphylococcal strains with single mutations in both gyrA and grlA (parC), retention of good antibacterial activity (MICs of ≤0.5 μg/ml) against staphylococcal strains with two mutations in both gyrA and grlA, and low frequencies for the selection of higher-level resistance (<10−10). These promising initial data support further study of isothiazoloquinolones as potential clinical candidates. PMID

  13. Isolation and characterization of pediocin AcH chimeric protein mutants with altered bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Miller, K W; Schamber, R; Osmanagaoglu, O; Ray, B

    1998-06-01

    A collection of pediocin AcH amino acid substitution mutants was generated by PCR random mutagenesis of DNA encoding the bacteriocin. Mutants were isolated by cloning mutagenized DNA into an Escherichia coli malE plasmid that directs the secretion of maltose binding protein-pediocin AcH chimeric proteins and by screening transformant colonies for bactericidal activity against Lactobacillus plantarum NCDO955 (K. W. Miller, R. Schamber, Y. Chen, and B. Ray, 1998. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:14-20, 1998). In all, 17 substitution mutants were isolated at 14 of the 44 amino acids of pediocin AcH. Seven mutants (N5K, C9R, C14S, C14Y, G37E, G37R, and C44W) were completely inactive against the pediocin AcH-sensitive strains L. plantarum NCDO955, Listeria innocua Lin11, Enterococcus faecalis M1, Pediococcus acidilactici LB42, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides Ly. A C24S substitution mutant constructed by other means also was inactive against these bacteria. Nine other mutants (K1N, W18R, I26T, M31T, A34D, N41K, H42L, K43N, and K43E) retained from <1% to approximately 60% of wild-type activity when assayed against L. innocua Lin11. One mutant, K11E, displayed approximately 2. 8-fold-higher activity against this indicator. About one half of the mutations mapped to amino acids that are conserved in the pediocin-like family of bacteriocins. All four cysteines were found to be required for activity, although only C9 and C14 are conserved among pediocin-like bacteriocins. Several basic amino acids as well as nonpolar amino acids located within the hydrophobic C-terminal region also were found to be important. The mutations are discussed in the context of structural models that have been proposed for the bacteriocin.

  14. Segregation of the classical transmitters norepinephrine and acetylcholine and the neuropeptide Y in sympathetic neurons: modulation by ciliary neurotrophic factor or prolonged growth in culture.

    PubMed

    Vega, A; Luther, J A; Birren, S J; Morales, M A

    2010-12-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated that cotransmission from mammalian neurons is not uniquely achieved by costorage and corelease of transmitters and cotransmitters from single varicosities, but also by the concurrent release of mediators segregated in separate synapses of individual neurons. An important question to be addressed is whether neurons show defined patterns of segregation or whether this is a plastic feature. We addressed this question by exploring the segregation pattern of the classical sympathetic transmitters norepinephrine (NE) and acetylcholine (ACh) and the cotransmitter neuropeptide Y (NPY) in sympathetic ganglionic neurons cocultured with cardiac myocytes. Using antibodies against NPY and the vesicular NE and ACh transporters VMAT2 and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), we investigated the effect of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) or long (three weeks) culture periods on the segregation of VMAT2, VAChT, and NPY to separate varicosities. We found that although ganglionic neurons showed cell body coexpression of all the markers examined after three days, VMAT2 was segregated from VAChT in 43% of the VAChT-positive varicosities. In contrast, VMAT2 was only segregated from NPY in 16.3% of the NPY-positive varicosities. Cotransmitter segregation and VAChT expression was potentiated by both CNTF and longer times in culture. We also found two types of varicosities: one was smaller and located further from neuronal somata, and the other was larger, proximal to neuronal somata and had a higher level of segregation. These data demonstrate segregation of classical transmitters in sympathetic neurons and plasticity of neurotransmitter segregation. Finally, we discuss a possible functional correlate of segregation in sympathetic neurons.

  15. Preliminary Geological Maps of the Ac-H-10 Rongo and Ac-H-15 Zadeni Quadrangles: An integrated Mapping Study Using Dawn Spacecraft Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, T.; Nathues, A.; Crown, D. A.; Mest, S. C.; Williams, D. A.; Hoffmann, M.; Schäfer, M.; Sizemore, H. G.; Yingst, R. A.; Ruesch, O.; Buczkowski, D.; Kneissl, T.; Schmedemann, N.; Hughson, K.; Preusker, F.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    We used geologic mapping applied to Dawn spacecraft data as a tool to understand the geologic history of the Ac-H-10 Rongo and Ac-H-15 Zadeni quadrangles of dwarf planet Ceres. These regions, Rongo and Zadeni, are located between 22°S-22°N and 288°-360°E and 65-90°S and 0°-360°E, respectively. The Rongo Quadrangle hosts a number of features: 1) the southwest portion is dissected by curvilinear structures likely caused by Yalode basin formation; 2) the central part is marked by dome-like constructs up to 100 km across; 3) a peculiar bright, c.4 km tall, conical structure informally known as the 'pyramid'; 4) impact craters of various diameters appear moderately to highly degraded or are partially buried; and 5) bright material is primarily exposed in the central portion and often associated with craters. Rongo crater (68 km across) exhibits a central peak and scalloped walls indicative of its degraded appearance. The Zadeni Quadrangle is characterised by impact craters up to 130 km in diameter of which Zadeni crater is the largest. Impact craters across all sizes exhibit fresh to highly degraded morphologies or are partially buried. Many craters developed central peaks. Inter-crater plains are generally hummocky with isolated regions of smooth-textured surfaces. The south pole area (85-90°S) is poorly illuminated and may host a large impact structure. At the time of this writing geologic mapping was performed on Framing Camera (FC) mosaics from Approach (1.3 km/px) and Survey (415 m/px) orbits, including clear filter and colour images and digital terrain models derived from stereo images. In Fall 2015 images from the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (140 m/px) will be used to refine the mapping, followed by Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (35 m/px) starting in December 2015. Support of the Dawn Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams is acknowledged. This work is supported by grants from NASA through the Dawn project, and from the German and Italian Space Agencies.

  16. Age-dependency in hunting ability among the Ache of eastern Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert; Hill, Kim; Kaplan, Hillard; McMillan, Garnett

    2002-06-01

    This paper examines changes in hunting ability across the lifespan for the Ache of eastern Paraguay. Hunting ability is decomposed into two components-finding prey and probability of kill upon encounter- and analyzed for important prey species. Results support the argument that skill acquisition is an important aspect of the human foraging niche with hunting outcome variables reaching peaks surprisingly late in life, significantly after peaks in strength. The implications of this study are important for modeling the role of the human foraging niche in the co-evolution of various outstanding human life history characteristics such as large brains, long lifespans, and extended juvenile periods.

  17. Are vesicular neurotransmitter transporters potential treatment targets for temporal lobe epilepsy?

    PubMed

    Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Massie, Ann; Portelli, Jeanelle; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Smolders, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    The vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (VNTs) are small proteins responsible for packing synaptic vesicles with neurotransmitters thereby determining the amount of neurotransmitter released per vesicle through fusion in both neurons and glial cells. Each transporter subtype was classically seen as a specific neuronal marker of the respective nerve cells containing that particular neurotransmitter or structurally related neurotransmitters. More recently, however, it has become apparent that common neurotransmitters can also act as co-transmitters, adding complexity to neurotransmitter release and suggesting intriguing roles for VNTs therein. We will first describe the current knowledge on vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1/2/3), the vesicular excitatory amino acid transporter (VEAT), the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1/2), the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and the vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (VGAT) in the brain. We will focus on evidence regarding transgenic mice with disruptions in VNTs in different models of seizures and epilepsy. We will also describe the known alterations and reorganizations in the expression levels of these VNTs in rodent models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in human tissue resected for epilepsy surgery. Finally, we will discuss perspectives on opportunities and challenges for VNTs as targets for possible future epilepsy therapies.

  18. Are vesicular neurotransmitter transporters potential treatment targets for temporal lobe epilepsy?

    PubMed Central

    Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Massie, Ann; Portelli, Jeanelle; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Smolders, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    The vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (VNTs) are small proteins responsible for packing synaptic vesicles with neurotransmitters thereby determining the amount of neurotransmitter released per vesicle through fusion in both neurons and glial cells. Each transporter subtype was classically seen as a specific neuronal marker of the respective nerve cells containing that particular neurotransmitter or structurally related neurotransmitters. More recently, however, it has become apparent that common neurotransmitters can also act as co-transmitters, adding complexity to neurotransmitter release and suggesting intriguing roles for VNTs therein. We will first describe the current knowledge on vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1/2/3), the vesicular excitatory amino acid transporter (VEAT), the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1/2), the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and the vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (VGAT) in the brain. We will focus on evidence regarding transgenic mice with disruptions in VNTs in different models of seizures and epilepsy. We will also describe the known alterations and reorganizations in the expression levels of these VNTs in rodent models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in human tissue resected for epilepsy surgery. Finally, we will discuss perspectives on opportunities and challenges for VNTs as targets for possible future epilepsy therapies. PMID:24009559

  19. Automated production of [¹⁸F]VAT suitable for clinical PET study of vesicular acetylcholine transporter.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xuyi; Bognar, Christopher; Zhang, Xiang; Gaehle, Gregory G; Moerlein, Stephen M; Perlmutter, Joel S; Tu, Zhude

    2016-01-01

    Automated production of a promising radiopharmaceutical (-)-(1-(8-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethoxy)-3-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-yl)-piperidin-4-yl)(4-fluorophenyl)methanone ([(18)F]VAT) for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter(VAChT) was achieved using a two-step procedure in a current Good Manufacturing Practices fashion. The production of [(18)F]VAT was accomplished in approximately 140 min, with radiochemical yield of ~15.0% (decay corrected), specific activity>111 GBq/µmol, radiochemical purity>99% and mass of VAT ~3.4 μg/batch (n>10). The radiopharmaceutical product meets all quality control criteria for human use, and is suitable for clinical PET studies of VAChT. PMID:26408913

  20. Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) autoantibodies suppress the MuSK pathway and ACh receptor retention at the mouse neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Morsch, Marco; Reddel, Stephen W; Liang, Simon X; Phillips, William D

    2014-01-01

    Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) autoantibodies from myasthenia gravis patients can block the activation of MuSK in vitro and/or reduce the postsynaptic localization of MuSK. Here we use a mouse model to examine the effects of MuSK autoantibodies upon some key components of the postsynaptic MuSK pathway and upon the regulation of junctional ACh receptor (AChR) numbers. Mice became weak after 14 daily injections of anti-MuSK-positive patient IgG. The intensity and area of AChR staining at the motor endplate was markedly reduced. Pulse-labelling of AChRs revealed an accelerated loss of pre-existing AChRs from postsynaptic AChR clusters without a compensatory increase in incorporation of (newly synthesized) replacement AChRs. Large, postsynaptic AChR clusters were replaced by a constellation of tiny AChR microaggregates. Puncta of AChR staining also appeared in the cytoplasm beneath the endplate. Endplate staining for MuSK, activated Src, rapsyn and AChR were all reduced in intensity. In the tibialis anterior muscle there was also evidence that phosphorylation of the AChR β-subunit-Y390 was reduced at endplates. In contrast, endplate staining for β-dystroglycan (through which rapsyn couples AChR to the synaptic basement membrane) remained intense. The results suggest that anti-MuSK IgG suppresses the endplate density of MuSK, thereby down-regulating MuSK signalling activity and the retention of junctional AChRs locally within the postsynaptic membrane scaffold. PMID:24860174

  1. Methadone's effect on nAChRs--a link between methadone use and smoking?

    PubMed

    Talka, Reeta; Tuominen, Raimo K; Salminen, Outi

    2015-10-15

    Methadone is a long-acting opioid agonist that is frequently prescribed as a treatment for opioid addiction. Almost all methadone maintenance patients are smokers, and there is a correlation between smoking habit and use of methadone. Methadone administration increases tobacco smoking, and heavy smokers use higher doses of methadone. Nevertheless, methadone maintenance patients are willing to quit smoking although their quit rates are low. Studies on nicotine-methadone interactions provide an example of the bedside-to-bench approach, i.e., observations in clinical settings have been studied experimentally in vivo and in vitro. In vivo studies have revealed the interplay between nicotine and the endogenous opioid system. At the receptor level, methadone has been shown to be an agonist of human α7 nAChRs and a non-competitive antagonist of human α4β2 and α3* nAChRs. These drugs do not have significant interactions at the level of drug metabolism, and thus the interaction is most likely pharmacodynamic. The net effect of the interaction may depend on individual characteristics because pharmacogenetic factors influence the disposition of both methadone and nicotine. PMID:26231941

  2. The significance of aches/pains among workers in an electronics factory.

    PubMed

    Ho, S F; Phoon, W H

    1997-06-01

    Three hundred and fifteen female workers with at least three months' employment history in a factory manufacturing disk drives were studied. Each worker completed a self-administered questionnaire on their personal particulars, hours of work, opinion on the work and the workplace and the presence and severity of aches/pains experienced over the past one month. One hundred and forty one (44.8%) of the workers had complaints of aches/pains. Of these, 81 (57.5%) reported an improvement in their symptoms during their off-days. 59 (41.8%) had symptoms affecting two or more sites. The most commonly affected sites were the hands and shoulders, followed by the head and back. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of symptoms between workers from the different work stations. Ninety four (66.7%) of these workers reported that the pains that were severe enough to affect their activities. 76 (53.9%) had to seek some form of medical treatment while 33 (23.4%) had to be on medical leave. However, the physical examinations of this group of workers were normal. The symptoms appeared to be influenced by their attitude towards work. A significantly higher number of workers with symptoms expressed dissatisfaction with work and had complaints of a noisy and cold environment. The study showed that workers' morale and the quality of the work environment may play an important role in improving their general well-being.

  3. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Dependent Chorda Tympani Taste Nerve Responses to Nicotine, Ethanol and Acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zuo Jun; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Qian, Jie; Baumgarten, Clive M; DeSimone, John A; Lyall, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine elicits bitter taste by activating TRPM5-dependent and TRPM5-independent but neuronal nAChR-dependent pathways. The nAChRs represent common targets at which acetylcholine, nicotine and ethanol functionally interact in the central nervous system. Here, we investigated if the nAChRs also represent a common pathway through which the bitter taste of nicotine, ethanol and acetylcholine is transduced. To this end, chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve responses were monitored in rats, wild-type mice and TRPM5 knockout (KO) mice following lingual stimulation with nicotine free base, ethanol, and acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of nAChR agonists and antagonists. The nAChR modulators: mecamylamine, dihydro-β-erythroidine, and CP-601932 (a partial agonist of the α3β4* nAChR), inhibited CT responses to nicotine, ethanol, and acetylcholine. CT responses to nicotine and ethanol were also inhibited by topical lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio (CPT)-cAMP and loading taste cells with [Ca2+]i by topical lingual application of ionomycin + CaCl2. In contrast, CT responses to nicotine were enhanced when TRC [Ca2+]i was reduced by topical lingual application of BAPTA-AM. In patch-clamp experiments, only a subset of isolated rat fungiform taste cells exposed to nicotine responded with an increase in mecamylamine-sensitive inward currents. We conclude that nAChRs expressed in a subset of taste cells serve as common receptors for the detection of the TRPM5-independent bitter taste of nicotine, acetylcholine and ethanol.

  4. ACh and 5-HT stimulated thermogenesis at different core temperatures in the He-Cold hypothermic hamster.

    PubMed

    Simpson, C W; Resch, G E

    1985-08-01

    Hamsters in deep experimentally induced hypothermia, at body temperatures between 7 degrees C and 11.5 degrees C, were microinjected with 5-HT and ACh at brain sites in the anterior-preoptic area of the hypothalamus (AH/POA). ACh or 5-HT was injected into an AH/POA site at different starting core temperatures in different groups of hypothermic hamsters. Colonic temperatures (Tc) were maintained, following He-Cold induction, in a temperature controlled environmental chamber and measured with a YSI thermister probe and YSI telethermometer. Injections of either 5-HT or ACh at Tc's between 7.0 degrees C and 9.0 degrees C elicited only modest increases in Tc i.e., 0.3 degrees C--0.6 degrees C, respectively. As Tc increased, however, to ranges between 9.1 degrees C--10.0 degrees C and in different animals to greater than 10 degrees C both ACh and 5-HT at the same sites elicited significant increases in Tc, 1.5 degrees C for 5-HT and 2.2 degrees C for ACh compared to saline injections. These data suggest that at the lowest Tc's we are observing a "cold block" of temperature sensitive sites in the AH/POA. Increasing the starting Tc beyond 9.0 degrees C however, evokes significant increases in heat-gain following AH/POA injection of either ACh or 5-HT. These data are consistent with Myers' observations concerning the organization of heat-gain mechanisms at AH/POA sites. In addition, they suggest that both the afferent limb of the heat-gain circuit (5-HT) and the efferent limb of the circuit (ACh) are functionally impaired when Tc is close to the physiological limit in the He-Cold hypothermic hamster.

  5. Activity of nAChRs Containing α9 Subunits Modulates Synapse Stabilization via Bidirectional Signaling Programs

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Vidya; Taranda, Julián; Elgoyhen, A. Belén; Vetter, Douglas E.

    2010-01-01

    Although the synaptogenic program for cholinergic synapses of the neuromuscular junction is well known, little is known of the identity or dynamic expression patterns of proteins involved in non-neuromuscular nicotinic synapse development. We have previously demonstrated abnormal presynaptic terminal morphology following loss of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α9 subunit expression in adult cochleae. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes have remained obscure. To better understand synapse formation and the role of cholinergic activity in the synaptogenesis of the inner ear, we exploit the nAChR α9 subunit null mouse. In this mouse, functional acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmission to the hair cells is completely silenced. Results demonstrate a premature, effusive innervation to the synaptic pole of the outer hair cells in α9 null mice coinciding with delayed expression of cell adhesion proteins during the period of effusive contact. Collapse of the ectopic innervation coincides with an age-related hyperexpression pattern in the null mice. In addition, we document changes in expression of presynaptic vesicle recycling/trafficking machinery in the α9 null mice that suggests a bidirectional information flow between the target of the neural innervation (the hair cells) and the presynaptic terminal that is modified by hair cell nAChR activity. Loss of nAChR activity may alter transcriptional activity, as CREB binding protein expression is decreased coincident with the increased expression of N-Cadherin in the adult α9 null mice. Finally, by using mice expressing the nondesensitizing α9 L9′T point mutant nAChR subunit, we show that increased nAChR activity drives synaptic hyperinnervation. PMID:19790106

  6. Concomitant alpha7 and beta2 nicotinic AChR subunit deficiency leads to impaired energy homeostasis and increased physical activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Somm, Emmanuel; Guérardel, Audrey; Maouche, Kamel; Toulotte, Audrey; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Maskos, Uwe; Hüppi, Petra S; Schwitzgebel, Valérie M

    2014-05-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are pentameric ligand-gated cation channels well characterized in neuronal signal transmission. Moreover, recent studies have revealed nAChR expression in nonneuronal cell types throughout the body, including tissues involved in metabolism. In the present study, we screen gene expression of nAChR subunits in pancreatic islets and adipose tissues. Mice pancreatic islets present predominant expression of α7 and β2 nAChR subunits but at a lower level than in central structures. Characterization of glucose and energy homeostasis in α7β2nAChR(-/-) mice revealed no major defect in insulin secretion and sensitivity but decreased glycemia apparently unrelated to gluconeogenesis or glycogenolysis. α7β2nAChR(-/-) mice presented an increase in lean and bone body mass and a decrease in fat storage with normal body weight. These observations were associated with elevated spontaneous physical activity in α7β2nAChR(-/-) mice, mainly due to elevation in fine vertical (rearing) activity while their horizontal (ambulatory) activity remained unchanged. In contrast to α7nAChR(-/-) mice presenting glucose intolerance and insulin resistance associated to excessive inflammation of adipose tissue, the present metabolic phenotyping of α7β2nAChR(-/-) mice revealed a metabolic improvement possibly linked to the increase in spontaneous physical activity related to central β2nAChR deficiency.

  7. Searching for Multi-Targeting Neurotherapeutics against Alzheimer's: Discovery of Potent AChE-MAO B Inhibitors through the Decoration of the 2H-Chromen-2-one Structural Motif.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Leonardo; Farina, Roberta; Soto-Otero, Ramon; Denora, Nunzio; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe Felice; Nicolotti, Orazio; Mendez-Alvarez, Estefania; Altomare, Cosimo Damiano; Catto, Marco; Carotti, Angelo

    2016-03-17

    The need for developing real disease-modifying drugs against neurodegenerative syndromes, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD), shifted research towards reliable drug discovery strategies to unveil clinical candidates with higher therapeutic efficacy than single-targeting drugs. By following the multi-target approach, we designed and synthesized a novel class of dual acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitors through the decoration of the 2H-chromen-2-one skeleton. Compounds bearing a propargylamine moiety at position 3 displayed the highest in vitro inhibitory activities against MAO-B. Within this series, derivative 3h emerged as the most interesting hit compound, being a moderate AChE inhibitor (IC50 = 8.99 µM) and a potent and selective MAO-B inhibitor (IC50 = 2.8 nM). Preliminary studies in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell lines demonstrated its low cytotoxicity and disclosed a promising neuroprotective effect at low doses (0.1 µM) under oxidative stress conditions promoted by two mitochondrial toxins (oligomycin-A and rotenone). In a Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK)II-MDR1 cell-based transport study, Compound 3h was able to permeate the BBB-mimicking monolayer and did not result in a glycoprotein-p (P-gp) substrate, showing an efflux ratio = 0.96, close to that of diazepam.

  8. Evidence for the exclusive expression of functional homomeric α7 nAChRs in hypothalamic histaminergic tuberomammillary neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Tischkau, Shelley; Mhaskar, Yashanad; Uteshev, Victor V

    2014-03-20

    Hypothalamic histaminergic tuberomammillary (TM) neurons in rats express high densities of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) whose Ca(2+) permeability, kinetic and pharmacological properties are similar to those of heterologous homomeric α7 nAChRs. However, native α7 nAChR subunits can co-assemble with β or α5 nAChR subunits to form functional heteromeric α7-containing α7β or α7α5 nAChRs with kinetics and pharmacology similar to those of α7 homomers. Therefore, although TM nAChRs have been used as an ex vivo model of functional α7 homomers, the molecular makeup of TM nAChRs has not been determined and the expression of functional α7-containing heteromers in TM neurons has not been excluded. To determine the profile of TM nAChR subunit transcripts, we have conducted single-cell qRT-PCR experiments using acutely dissociated TM neurons in rats. TM neurons were found to express transcripts of only principal α3, α6 and α7 nAChR subunits. Transcripts of other known mammalian neuronal subunits (α2, α4-5, α9-10, β2-4) were not detected. In the absence of β and α5 subunits, the expression of functional α7-containing heteromers in TM neurons is highly unlikely because principal α3, α6 and α7 nAChR subunits alone are not known to form functional heteromeric nAChRs. These results support the exclusive expression of native functional α7 homomers in rat TM neurons and introduce these neurons as a unique reliable source of native functional homomeric α7 nAChRs suitable for ex vivo and in vitro pharmacological assays in developing selective α7 nAChR agents.

  9. Going up in Smoke? A Review of nAChRs-based Treatment Strategies for Improving Cognition in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Boggs, Douglas L.; Carlson, Jon; Cortes-Briones, Jose; Krystal, John H.; D’Souza, D. Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is known to be a core deficit in schizophrenia. Existing treatments for schizophrenia have limited efficacy against cognitive impairment. The ubiquitous use of nicotine in this population is thought to reflect an attempt by patients to self-medicate certain symptoms associated with the illness. Concurrently there is evidence that nicotinic receptors that have lower affinity for nicotine are more important in cognition. Therefore, a number of medications that target nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been tested or are in development. In this article we summarize the clinical evidence of nAChRs dysfunction in schizophrenia and review clinical studies testing either nicotine or nicotinic medications for the treatment of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. Some evidence suggests beneficial effects of nAChRs based treatments for the attentional deficits associated with schizophrenia. Standardized cognitive test batteries have failed to capture consistent improvements from drugs acting at nAChRs. However, more proximal measures of brain function, such as ERPs relevant to information processing impairments in schizophrenia, have shown some benefit. Further work is necessary to conclude that nAChRs based treatments are of clinical utility in the treatment of cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. PMID:24345265

  10. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a comparison of the nAChRs of Caenorhabditis elegans and parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Holden-Dye, Lindy; Joyner, Michelle; O'Connor, Vincent; Walker, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play a key role in the normal physiology of nematodes and provide an established target site for anthelmintics. The free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, has a large number of nAChR subunit genes in its genome and so provides an experimental model for testing novel anthelmintics which act at these sites. However, many parasitic nematodes lack specific genes present in C. elegans, and so care is required in extrapolating from studies using C. elegans to the situation in other nematodes. In this review the properties of C. elegans nAChRs are reviewed and compared to those of parasitic nematodes. This forms the basis for a discussion of the possible subunit composition of nAChRs from different species of parasitic nematodes. Currently our knowledge on this is largely based on studies using heterologous expression and pharmacological analysis of receptor subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes. It is concluded that more information is required regarding the subunit composition and pharmacology of endogenous nAChRs in parasitic nematodes. PMID:23500392

  11. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-10 Rongo and Ac-H-15 Zadeni quadrangles of Ceres from NASA's Dawn Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, Thomas; Nathues, Andreas; Sizemore, Hanna; Ruesch, Ottaviano; Hoffmann, Martin; Schaefer, Michael; Crown, David; Mest, Scott; Aileen Yingst, R.; Williams, David; Buczkowski, Debra; Hughson, Kynan; Kneissl, Thomas; Schmedemann, Nico; Schorghofer, Norbert; Nass, Andrea; Preusker, Frank; Russell, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    On March 6, 2015 NASA's Dawn spacecraft arrived at (1) Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt. Dawn is studying the dwarf planet more than one year through successively lower orbits at increasing resolution. Main orbital phases include Survey Orbit, High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO), and Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) where Framing Camera (FC) [1] resolution increased from c.400 m/px to c.140 m/px and c.35 m/px, respectively. The Dawn Science Team is conducting geological mapping campaigns for Ceres (as done before for Vesta [2,3]) and includes the production of a Survey/HAMO-based global geological map and a series of 15 LAMO-based geological quadrangle maps. This abstract presents HAMO-based geological maps of Ac-H-10 Rongo (22°N-22°S, 288-360°E) and Ac-H-15 Zadeni (65°-90°S, 0°-360°E) quadrangles. The Rongo Quadrangle is located at the equatorial region and comprises the unique isolated mountain Ahuna Mons (10.5°S/316.0°E; formerly known as the pyramid), abundant impact craters spanning a range in diameters and states of preservation - from fresh to highly degraded - , and a number of tholi, which may represent surface expressions of sub-surface diapir intrusions. The SW portion of the quandrangle is characterised by Yalode (D=260 km) sourced ejecta. The Zadeni Quadrangle is dominated by the 122-km-diameter crater Zadeni located at 70.2°S/37.4°E) and a suite of mid-sized craters whose morphologies range from fresh to highly degraded. Portions of the quadrangle are covered by Urvara [4] and Yalode [5] ejecta materials. The South Polar Region is poorly illuminated and the South Pole itself is likely located within a larger impact structure. Future work of this mapping campaign includes revision of HAMO-based line work (e.g., contacts) with higher resolution LAMO data. Final interpretations regarding the geological histories of these two quadrangles will also be based on FC colour and stereo-derived topography data, VIR spectra as well

  12. The dual-acting AChE inhibitor and H3 receptor antagonist UW-MD-72 reverses amnesia induced by scopolamine or dizocilpine in passive avoidance paradigm in rats.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Khan, Nadia; Darras, Fouad H; Pockes, Steffen; Decker, Michael

    2016-10-15

    Both the acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) are involved in the metabolism and modulation of acetylcholine release and numerous other centrally acting neurotransmitters. Hence, dual-active AChE inhibitors (AChEIs) and H3R antagonists hold potential to treat cognitive disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). The novel dual-acting AChEI and H3R antagonist 7-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)-2,3-dihydropyrrolo[2,1-b]quinazolin-9(1H)-one (UW-MD-72) shows excellent selectivity profiles over the AChE's isoenzyme butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) as well as high and balanced in-vitro affinities at both AChE and hH3R with IC50 of 5.4μM on hAChE and hH3R antagonism with Ki of 2.54μM, respectively. In the current study, the effects of UW-MD-72 (1.25, 2.5, and 5mg/kg, i.p.) on memory deficits induced by the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist scopolamine (SCO) and the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist dizocilpine (DIZ) were investigated in a step-through type passive avoidance paradigm in adult male rats applying donepezil (DOZ) and pitolisant (PIT) as reference drugs. The results observed show that SCO (2mg/kg, i.p.) and DIZ (0.1mg/kg, i.p.) significantly impaired learning and memory in rats. However, acute systemic administration of UW-MD-72 significantly ameliorated the SCO- and DIZ-induced amnesic effects. Furthermore, the ameliorating activity of UW-MD-72 (1.25mg/kg, i.p.) in DIZ-induced amnesia was partly reversed when rats were pretreated with the centrally-acting H2R antagonist zolantidine (ZOL, 10mg/kg, i.p.), but not with the CNS penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR, 10mg/kg, i.p.). Moreover, ameliorative effect of UW-MD-72 (1.25mg/kg, i.p.) in DIZ-induced amnesia was strongly reversed when rats were pretreated with a combination of ZOL (10mg/kg, i.p.) and SCO (1.0mg/kg, i.p.), indicating that these memory enhancing effects were, in addition to other neural circuits, observed through histaminergic H2R as well as

  13. Geologic Mapping of the Ac-H-1 quadrangle of Ceres from NASA's Dawn mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüsch, Ottaviano; McFadden, Lucy A.; Hiesinger, Harald; Scully, Jennifer; Kneissl, Thomas; Hughson, Kynan; Williams, David A.; Roatsch, Thomas; Platz, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Schmedemann, Nico; Marchi, Simone; Jaumann, Ralf; Nathues, Andreas; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-04-01

    The Dawn Science Team is conducting a geologic mapping campaign for Ceres similar to that done for Vesta (1, 2), including production of a Survey- and High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO)-based global map, and a series of 15 Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO)-based quadrangle maps. In this abstract, we present the geologic map and geologic evolution of the Ac-H-1 Asari Quadrangle. At the time of writing, LAMO images (35 m/pixel) are just becoming available. Thus, our geologic maps are based on HAMO images (140 m/pixel) and HAMO and Survey (400 m/pixel) digital terrain models (for topographic information) (3). Dawn Framing Camera (FC) color images are also used to provide context for map unit identification. The maps to be presented as posters will be updated from analyses of LAMO images. Ac-H-1 quadrangle covers the North Pole area: 65°N-90°N. Key characteristics of the study area are: (i) a high density of impact craters and (ii) only moderate topographic variations across the quadrangle. We measured a crater density of 9.8E-04 km-2 for crater diameters >10 km, the highest on Ceres measured so far. Topographic lows, reaching -4 km, correspond to the floors of impact craters with diameters up to 64 km. A few isolated topographic highs (plateaus), reaching ~5 km in altitude relative to the ellipsoid are present. Their irregular shape is often sculpted by impacts. A peculiar topographic rise is represented by Ysolo Mons: a ~5 km high and ~20 km wide mountain. No downslope striations are preserved on the Mons flanks, indicating an older surface relative to Ahuna Mons, a similar but morphologically fresh appearing mountain at the equator (quadrangle Ac-H-10, (4)). Several impact craters show central peaks and/or mass wasting deposits on their floor. Crater rims often display terraces. These morphologies show varying degrees of degradation. Uncommon crater morphologies are a smooth crater floor (crater located at 79°N-170°E) and a large mass wasting landform inside

  14. Functionality and stability data of detergent purified nAChR from Torpedo using lipidic matrixes and macroscopic electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Morales, Luis F; Colón-Sáez, José O; González-Nieves, Joel E; Quesada-González, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2016-03-01

    The presented data provides additional information about the assessment of affinity purified nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) rich membrane solubilized with long chain (16 saturated carbons) lysophospholipid with glycerol headgroup (LFG-16). The assessment of stability and functionality of solubilized membrane protein is a critical step prior to further crystallization trails. One of the key factors for this task is the appropriate choice of a detergent that can support nAChR activity and stability comparable to the crude membranes. The stability of the nAChR-LFG-16 complex incorporated into lipid cubic phase (LCP) was monitored for a period of 30 days by means of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and the functionality was evaluated after its incorporation into Xenopus oocyte by means of the two electrode voltage clamp technique. PMID:26870753

  15. Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy and optical characterization of a-C-H and BN films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, J. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Warner, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The amorphous dielectrics a-C:H and BN were deposited on III-V semiconductors. Optical band gaps as high as 3 eV were measured for a-C:H generated by C4H10 plasmas; a comparison was made with bad gaps obtained from films prepared by CH4 glow discharges. The ion beam deposited BN films exhibited amorphous behavior with band gaps on the order of 5 eV. Film compositions were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The optical properties were characterized by ellipsometry, UV/VIS absorption, and IR reflection and transmission. Etching rates of a-C:H subjected to O2 dicharges were determined.

  16. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition and plasma diagnostics of a-Si:H and a-C:H films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.

    1989-01-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films deposited by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition are discussed. It is shown that the ECR microwave plasma deposition technique can produce a-Si:H films with material qualities similar to and with a deposition rate one order of magnitude higher than for films deposited by radio-frequency glow discharge. The ECR-deposited a-C:H films are characterized by fluorescence, IR, and Raman spectroscopy. In situ optical emission spectroscopy plasma diagnostics indicates that ECR plasmas have a strong emission at 434 nm, which indicates a higher chemical reactivity than radio-frequency glow discharge plasmas. The radio frequency bias to the substrate is found to play a critical role in determining the film structure and the carbon bonding configuration of ECR-deposited a-C:H films.

  17. Erosion of a-C:H in the afterglow of ammonia plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drenik, Aleksander; Mourkas, Angelos; Zaplotnik, Rok; Primc, Gregor; Mozetič, Miran; Panjan, Peter; Alegre, Daniel; Tabarés, Francisco L.

    2016-07-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) deposits were eroded in the afterglow of a NH3 plasma, created with an inductively coupled RF generator in pure NH3 at the gas pressure of 50 Pa. The plasma system was characterised by optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, and the erosion process was monitored in-situ with a laser interferometry system. Based on the mass spectrometry measurements, the degree of dissociation of the NH3 molecules was estimated at 90% at the highest generator forward power in the discharge region, however the densities of N and H atoms were significantly smaller at the location of the sample holder. The erosion rates were found to increase with surface temperature and forward generator power. In the high dissociation regime, the composition of the afterglow and the reaction products highlight the role of N atoms in the erosion process.

  18. Rapid thermal annealing of Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon (a-C:H) films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Pouch, John J.; Warner, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films were deposited on silicon and quartz substrates by a 30 kHz plasma discharge technique using methane. Rapid thermal processing of the films was accomplished in nitrogen gas using tungsten halogen light. The rapid thermal processing was done at several fixed temperatures (up to 600 C), as a function of time (up to 1800 sec). The films were characterized by optical absorption and by ellipsometry in the near UV and the visible. The bandgap, estimated from extrapolation of the linear part of a Tauc plot, decreases both with the annealing temperature and the annealing time, with the temperature dependence being the dominating factor. The density of states parameter increases up to 25 percent and the refractive index changes up to 20 percent with temperature increase. Possible explanations of the mechanisms involved in these processes are discussed.

  19. Deposition of a-C:H films on inner surface of high-aspect-ratio microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Yuki; Choi, Junho

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were prepared on inner surface of 100-μm-width microchannel by using a bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation and deposition. The microchannel was fabricated using a silicon plate, and two kinds of microchannels were prepared, namely, with a bottom layer (open at one end) and without a bottom layer (open at both ends). The distribution of thickness and hardness of films was evaluated by SEM and nanoindentation measurements, respectively, and the microstructures of films were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, the behavior of ions and radicals was analyzed simultaneously by combining the calculation methods of Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Collision and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo to investigate the coating mechanism for the microchannel. It was found that the film thickness decreased as the depth of the coating position increased in the microchannels where it is open at one end. The uniformity of the film thickness improved by increasing the negative pulse voltage because ions can arrive at the deeper part of the microchannel. In addition, the hardness increased as the depth of the coating position increased. This is because the radicals do not arrive at the deeper part of the microchannel, and the incident proportion of ions relative to that of radicals increases, resulting in a high hardness due to the amorphization of the film. The opening area of the microchannel where the aspect ratio is very small, radicals dominate the incident flux, whereas ions prevail over radicals above an aspect ratio of about 7.5. On the other hand, in the microchannels that are open at both ends, there were great improvements in uniformity of the film thickness, hardness, and the film structure. The a-C:H films were successfully deposited on the entire inner surface of a microchannel with an aspect ratio of 20.

  20. Alpha3* and alpha 7 nAChR-mediated Ca2+ transient generation in IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ween, Hilde; Thorin-Hagene, Kirsten; Andersen, Elisabeth; Grønlien, Jens Halvard; Lee, Chih-Hung; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Malysz, John

    2010-10-01

    Alpha3-containing (alpha 3*) and alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed in human IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells and implicated in Ca(2+) signaling. In this study, we investigated the intracellular Ca(2+) transient generation evoked by selective activation of alpha 3* (agonist potency rank order: epibatidine>varenicline>nicotine approximately cytisine) and alpha 7 (rank order in the presence of alpha 7 positive allosteric modulator or PAM: A-795723>NS6784 approximately PNU-282987) using, respectively, varenicline and NS6784 (+alpha 7 PAM) by Ca(2+) imaging. Effects of inhibitors of nAChRs (MLA and mecamylamine), ER Ca(2+) ATPase pump (CPA and thapsigargin), Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (ryanodine and dantrolene), Ca(2+) channels (nitrendipine, diltiazem, and Cd(2+)), and removal of extracellular Ca(2+) were examined. alpha 7 PAMs, when tested in the presence of NS6784, were more active when added first, followed by the agonist, than in the reverse order. Removal of extracellular Ca(2+) - but not CPA, thapsigargin, ryanodine, dantrolene, nitrendipine, diltiazem, or Cd(2+) - diminished the alpha 7 agonist-evoked Ca(2+) transients. In contrast, only diltiazem and nitrendipine and removal of extracellular Ca(2+) inhibited the alpha 3*-mediated Ca(2+) transients. The differential effect of diltiazem and nitrendipine versus Cd(2+) was due to direct inhibition of alpha 3* nAChRs as revealed by Ca(2+) imaging in HEK-293 cells expressing human alpha 3 beta 4 nAChRs and patch clamp in IMR-32 cells. In summary, this study provides evidence that alpha 3* and alpha 7 nAChR agonist-evoked global Ca(2+) transient generation in IMR-32 cells does not primarily involve voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, intracellular Ca(2+) stores, or Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. These mechanisms may, however, be still involved in other forms of nAChR-mediated Ca(2+) signaling.

  1. α7nAChR is expressed in satellite cells at different myogenic status during skeletal muscle wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhi-Ling; Jiang, Shu-Kun; Zhang, Miao; Wang, Meng; Li, Jiao-Yong; Zhao, Rui; Wang, Lin-Lin; Liu, Min; Li, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Meng-Zhou; Guan, Da-Wei

    2015-12-01

    Recent study has reported that α7 nicotine acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) is expressed in regenerated multinucleated myotubes. But the distribution of α7nAChR in satellite cells in different myogenic status is unknown. A preliminary study on the dynamic distribution of α7nAChR in satellite cells was performed by double indirect immunofluorescent procedures during skeletal muscle wound healing in rats. An animal model of skeletal muscle contusion was established in 40 Sprague-Dawley male rats. Samples were taken at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17 and 21 days after injury, respectively (five rats in each posttraumatic interval). Five rats were employed as control. In normal muscle specimens, weak immunoreactivity for α7nAChR was detected in a few satellite cells (considered as quiescent). α7nAChR-positive signals were observed in proliferated and differentiated satellite cells and regenerated multinucleated myotubes in the wounded areas. By morphometric analysis, the average number of α7nAChR+/Pax7+ and α7nAChR+/MyoD+ cells climaxed at 5 days post-injury. The average number of α7nAChR+/myogenin+ cells was significantly increased from 3 to 9 days post-injury as compared with other posttraumatic intervals. The protein level of α7nAChR maximized at 9 days post-injury, which implies that α7nAChR was associated with the satellite cells status. Our observations on expression of α7nAChR in satellite cells from quiescence to myotube formation suggest that α7nAChR may be involved in muscle regeneration by regulating satellite cell status.

  2. Association between Anti-Ganglionic Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (gAChR) Antibodies and HLA-DRB1 Alleles in the Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Yasuhiro; Migita, Kiyoshi; Higuchi, Osamu; Mukaino, Akihiro; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Komori, Atsumasa; Nakamura, Minoru; Hashimoto, Satoru; Nagaoka, Shinya; Abiru, Seigo; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Hidenori; Kawakami, Atsushi; Yasunami, Michio; Nakane, Shunya

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Anti-ganglionic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (gAChR) antibodies are observed in autoimmune diseases, as well as in patients with autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy. However, the genetic background of anti-gAChR antibodies is unclear. Here, we investigated HLA alleles in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) patients with or without anti-gAChR antibodies. Methodology/Principal Findings Genomic DNA from 260 patients with type-1 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) were genotyped for HLA-A, B, DRB1, and DQB1 loci. Anti-gAChR antibodies in the sera form AIH patients were measured using the luciferase immunoprecipitation system, and examined allelic association in patients with or without anti-gAChR antibodies. Methodology/ Methods We detected anti-α3 or -β4 gAChR antibodies in 11.5% (30/260) of patients with AIH. Among AIH patients there was no significant association between HLA-A, B DQB1 alleles and the positivity for anti-gAChR antibodies. Whereas the HLA-DRB1*0403 allele showed a significantly increased frequency in AIH patients with anti-gAChR antibodies compared with those without anti-gAChR antibodies. Conclusions/Significance The frequency of the HLA-DRB1*0403 allele differed among Japanese patients with AIH according to the presence or absence of anti-gAChR antibodies. Our findings suggest that particular HLA class II molecules might control the development of anti-gAChR antibodies in the autoimmune response to gAChR. PMID:26807576

  3. Differential Cytokine Changes in Patients with Myasthenia Gravis with Antibodies against AChR and MuSK

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Vuslat; Oflazer, Piraye; Aysal, Fikret; Durmus, Hacer; Poulas, Kostas; Yentur, Sibel P.; Gulsen-Parman, Yesim; Tzartos, Socrates; Marx, Alexander; Tuzun, Erdem; Deymeer, Feza; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular transmission failure in myasthenia gravis (MG) is most commonly elicited by autoantibodies (ab) to the acetylcholine receptor or the muscle-specific kinase, constituting AChR-MG and MuSK-MG. It is controversial whether these MG subtypes arise through different T helper (Th) 1, Th2 or Th17 polarized immune reactions and how these reactions are blunted by immunosuppression. To address these questions, plasma levels of cytokines related to various Th subtypes were determined in patients with AChR-MG, MuSK-MG and healthy controls (CON). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were activated in vitro by anti-CD3, and cytokines were quantified in supernatants. In purified blood CD4+ T cells, RNA of various cytokines, Th subtype specific transcription factors and the co-stimulatory molecule, CD40L, were quantified by qRT-PCR. Plasma levels of Th1, Th2 and Th17 related cytokines were overall not significantly different between MG subtypes and CON. By contrast, in vitro stimulated PBMC from MuSK-MG but not AChR-MG patients showed significantly increased secretion of the Th1, Th17 and T follicular helper cell related cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-21. Stimulated expression of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13 was not significantly different. At the RNA level, expression of CD40L by CD4+ T cells was reduced in both AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients while expression of Th subset related cytokines and transcription factors were normal. Immunosuppression treatment had two effects: First, it reduced levels of IL12p40 in the plasma of AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients, leaving other cytokine levels unchanged; second, it reduced spontaneous secretion of IFN-γ and increased secretion of IL-6 and IL-10 by cultured PBMC from AChR-MG, but not MuSK-MG patients. We conclude that Th1 and Th17 immune reactions play a role in MuSK-MG. Immunosuppression attenuates the Th1 response in AChR-MG and MuSK-MG, but otherwise modulates immune responses in AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients

  4. Vagus nerve stimulation mediates protection from kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury through α7nAChR+ splenocytes

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Chikara; Sung, Sun-sang J.; Moscalu, Stefan; Jankowski, Jakub; Huang, Liping; Ye, Hong; Guyenet, Patrice G.

    2016-01-01

    The nervous and immune systems interact in complex ways to maintain homeostasis and respond to stress or injury, and rapid nerve conduction can provide instantaneous input for modulating inflammation. The inflammatory reflex referred to as the cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway regulates innate and adaptive immunity, and modulation of this reflex by vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is effective in various inflammatory disease models, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Effectiveness of VNS in these models necessitates the integration of neural signals and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) on splenic macrophages. Here, we sought to determine whether electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve attenuates kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), which promotes the release of proinflammatory molecules. Stimulation of vagal afferents or efferents in mice 24 hours before IRI markedly attenuated acute kidney injury (AKI) and decreased plasma TNF. Furthermore, this protection was abolished in animals in which splenectomy was performed 7 days before VNS and IRI. In mice lacking α7nAChR, prior VNS did not prevent IRI. Conversely, adoptive transfer of VNS-conditioned α7nAChR splenocytes conferred protection to recipient mice subjected to IRI. Together, these results demonstrate that VNS-mediated attenuation of AKI and systemic inflammation depends on α7nAChR-positive splenocytes. PMID:27088805

  5. Effect of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 1 (nAChRα1) peptides on rabies virus infection in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Sajjanar, Basavaraj; Saxena, Shikha; Bisht, Deepika; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Manjunatha Reddy, G B; Singh, Rajendra; Singh, R P; Kumar, Satish

    2016-06-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) is neurotropic and causes acute progressive encephalitis. Herein, we report the interaction of nAChRα1-subunit peptides with RABV and the effect of these peptides on RABV infection in cultured neuronal cells. Peptide sequences derived from torpedo, bovine, human and rats were synthesized and studied for their interactions with RABV using virus capture ELISA and peptide immunofluorescence. The results showed specific binding of the nAChRα1-subunit peptides to the RABV. In the virus adsorption assay, these peptides were found to inhibit the attachment of the RABV to the neuronal cells. The nAChRα1-subunit peptides inhibited the RABV infection and reduced viral gene expression in the cultured neuroblastoma (N2A) cells. Torpedo peptide sequence (T-32) had highest antiviral effect (IC50=14±3.01μM) compared to the other peptides studied. The results of the study indicated that nAChRα1-subunit peptides may act as receptor decoy molecules and inhibit the binding of virus to the native host cell receptors and hence may reduce viral infection. PMID:26656837

  6. R86Q, a mutation in BmAChE3 yielding a Rhipicephalus microplus organophosphate-insensitive acetylcholinesterase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutations were identified in the sequence encoding the acetylcholinesterase, BmAChE3, in strains of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini) resistant or susceptible to orgaonphosphorus acaricide. The mutation which appeared most frequently in the organophosphorus-resistant San Román strain...

  7. Myopathic changes detected by quantitative electromyography in patients with MuSK and AChR positive myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Ana; Basta, Ivana; Stojanovic, Vidosava Rakocevic; Stevic, Zorica; Peric, Stojan; Lavrnic, Dragana

    2016-05-01

    Myopathic changes are frequent a electrophysiological finding in patients with muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) positive myasthenia gravis (MG). The aim of this study was to explore the importance of quantitative electromyography (EMG) in the detection of myopathic changes in MuSK MG patients. Classical and quantitative EMG were performed in 31 MuSK and 28 acetylcholine receptor (AChR) positive MG patients, matched by sex, age, disease duration and severity. Classical EMG revealed the presence of myopathic changes more frequently in MuSK MG compared to AChR MG patients, especially in the facial muscles. Quantitative EMG registered myopathic lesions more frequently than classical EMG, but the frequency was similar between MuSK and AChR MG patients. Quantitative EMG revealed myopathic changes in the majority of both MuSK and AChR positive MG patients. This examination is sensitive, but it cannot be used to differentiate between MG patients belonging to the different disease groups. It should not be used in isolation. Rather, it should complement classical EMG in the detection of myopathic changes.

  8. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-9 Occator Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA Dawn Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczkowski, Debra; Williams, David; Scully, Jennifer; Mest, Scott; Crown, David; Aileen Yingst, R.; Schenk, Paul; Jaumann, Ralf; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Platz, Thomas; Nathues, Andreas; Hoffmann, Martin; Schaefer, Michael; Marchi, Simone; De Sanctis, M. Cristina; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Chris

    2016-04-01

    As was done at Vesta [1], the Dawn Science Team is conducting a geological mapping cam-paign at Ceres during the nominal mission, including iterative mapping using data obtained dur-ing each orbital phase. We are using geological mapping as a method to identify the geologic processes that have modified the surface of dwarf planet Ceres. We here present the geology of the Ac-H-9 Occator quadrangle, located between 22°S-22°N and 216-288°E. The Ac-H-9 map area is completely within the topographically high region on Ceres named Erntedank Planum. It is one of two longitudinally distinct regions where ESA Herschel space telescope data suggested a release of water vapor [2]. The quadrangle includes several other notable features, including those discussed below. Occator is the 92 km diameter crater that hosts the "Bright Spot 5" that was identified in Hubble Space Telescope data [3], which is actually comprised of multiple bright spots on the crater floor. The floor of Occator is cut by linear fractures, while circumferential fractures are found in the ejecta and on the crater walls. The bright spots are noticeably associated with the floor fractures, although the brightest spot is associated with a central pit [4]. Multiple lobate flows are observed on the crater floor; these appear to be sourced from the center of the crater. The crater has a scalloped rim that is cut by regional linear structures, displaying a cross-section of one structure in the crater wall. Color data show that the Occator ejecta have multiple colors, generally related to changes in morphology. Azacca is a 50 km diameter crater that has a central peak and bright spots on its floor and within its ejecta. Like Occator, Azacca has both floor fractures and circumferential fractures in its ejecta and crater walls. Also like Occator, the Azacca ejecta is multi-colored with variable morphology. Linear structures - including grooves, pit crater chains, fractures and troughs - cross much of the eastern

  9. Mechanisms of flow and ACh-induced dilation in rat soleus arterioles are altered by hindlimb unweighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrage, William G.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Laughlin, M. Harold

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that endothelium-dependent dilation (flow-induced dilation and ACh-induced dilation) in rat soleus muscle arterioles is impaired by hindlimb unweighting (HLU). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (approximately 300 g) were exposed to HLU or weight-bearing control (Con) conditions for 14 days. Soleus first-order (1A) and second-order (2A) arterioles were isolated, cannulated, and exposed to step increases in luminal flow at constant pressure. Flow-induced dilation was not impaired by HLU in 1A or 2A arterioles. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (Indo; 50 microM) did not alter flow-induced dilation in 1As or 2As. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) with N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA; 300 microM) reduced flow-induced dilation by 65-70% in Con and HLU 1As. In contrast, L-NNA abolished flow-induced dilation in 2As from Con rats but had no effect in HLU 2As. Combined treatment with L-NNA + Indo reduced tone in 1As and 2As from Con rats, but flow-induced dilation in the presence of L-NNA + Indo was not different from responses without inhibitors in either Con or HLU 1As or 2As. HLU also did not impair ACh-induced dilation (10(-9)-10(-4) M) in soleus 2As. L-NNA reduced ACh-induced dilation by approximately 40% in Con 2As but abolished dilation in HLU 2As. Indo did not alter ACh-induced dilation in Con or HLU 2As, whereas combined treatment with L-NNA + Indo abolished ACh-induced dilation in 2As from both groups. We conclude that flow-induced dilation (1As and 2As) was preserved after 2 wk HLU, but HLU decreased the contribution of NOS in mediating flow-induced dilation and increased the contribution of a NOS- and cyclooxygenase-independent mechanism (possibly endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor). In soleus 2As, ACh-induced dilation was preserved after 2-wk HLU but the contribution of NOS in mediating ACh-induced dilation was increased.

  10. Development of radiohalogenated muscarinic ligands for the in vivo imaging of m-AChR by nuclear medicine techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    Alterations in the density of acetylcholinergic muscarinic receptors (m-AChR) have been observed in various dementias. This has spurred interest in the development of radiohalogenated ligands which can be used for the non-invasive in vivo detection of m-AChR by nuclear medicine techniques. We have developed a new ligand 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl ({alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (IQNP,12) which demonstrates high affinity for the muscarinic receptor. When labeled with radioiodine it has been shown to be selective and specific for m-ACHR. Initial studies on the separation and in vivo evaluation of the various isomers of IQNP have shown that the stereochemistry of the chiral centers and the configuration around the double bond play an important role in m-AChR subtype specificity. In vivo evaluation of these stereoisomers demonstrate that E-(R,R)-IQNP has a high affinity for the M{sub 1} muscarinic subtype while Z-(R,R)-IQNP demonstrate a high affinity for M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} receptor subtypes. These data demonstrate IQNP (12) has potential for use in the non-evasive in vivo detection of m-AChR by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A brominated analogue, ``BrQNP,`` in which the iodine has been replaced by a bromine atom, has also been prepared and was shown to block the in vivo uptake of IQNP in the brain and heart and therefore has potential for positron emission tomographic (PET) studies of m-AChR.

  11. Inhibition of ACh release at an Aplysia synapse by neurotoxic phospholipases A2: specific receptors and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed Central

    Fossier, P; Lambeau, G; Lazdunski, M; Baux, G

    1995-01-01

    1. Monochain (OS2) and multichain (taipoxin) neurotoxic phospholipases A2 (PLA2), purified from taipan snake venom, both inhibited ACh release at a concentration of 20 nM (90% inhibition in 2 h) at an identified synapse from buccal ganglion of Aplysia californica. 2. The Na+ current was unchanged upon application of either OS2 or taipoxin. Conversely, presynaptic K+ currents (IA and IK) were increased by taipoxin but not by OS2. In addition, OS2 induced a significant decrease of the presynaptic Ca2+ current (30%) while taipoxin increased this latter current by 20-30%. 3. Bee venom PLA2, another monochain neurotoxic PLA2, also inhibited ACh release while non-toxic enzymatically active PLA2s like OS1 (also purified from taipan snake venom) or porcine pancreatic PLA2 elicited a much weaker inhibition of ACh release, suggesting a specific action of neurotoxic PLA2s versus non-toxic PLA2s on ACh release. 4. Using iodinated OS2, specific high affinity binding sites with molecular masses of 140 and 18 kDa have been identified on Aplysia ganglia. The maximal binding capacities were 55 and 300-400 fmol (mg protein)-1 for membrane preparations from whole and buccal ganglia, respectively. These binding sites are of high affinity for neurotoxic PLA2s (Kd values, 100-800 pM) and of very low affinity for non-toxic PLA2s (Kd values in the micromolar range), thus indicating that these binding sites are presumably involved in the blockade of ACh release by neurotoxic PLA2s. Images Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8583413

  12. Continuing Education in the Era of Quantum Change. 2003 ACHE Proceedings. (65th Annual Meeting, Charlottesville, VA, November 8-12, 2003)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrineau, Irene T., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This document presents the proceedings of the 2003 annual meeting of the Association for Continuing Higher Education (ACHE). These proceedings record the 65th Annual Meeting of ACHE held in Charlottesville, Virginia. President Allen Varner's theme for this annual meeting was, "Continuing Education in the Era of Quantum Change." The theme was…

  13. Crystal structure of a human neuronal nAChR extracellular domain in pentameric assembly: Ligand-bound α2 homopentamer.

    PubMed

    Kouvatsos, Nikolaos; Giastas, Petros; Chroni-Tzartou, Dafni; Poulopoulou, Cornelia; Tzartos, Socrates J

    2016-08-23

    In this study we report the X-ray crystal structure of the extracellular domain (ECD) of the human neuronal α2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit in complex with the agonist epibatidine at 3.2 Å. Interestingly, α2 was crystallized as a pentamer, revealing the intersubunit interactions in a wild type neuronal nAChR ECD and the full ligand binding pocket conferred by two adjacent α subunits. The pentameric assembly presents the conserved structural scaffold observed in homologous proteins, as well as distinctive features, providing unique structural information of the binding site between principal and complementary faces. Structure-guided mutagenesis and electrophysiological data confirmed the presence of the α2(+)/α2(-) binding site on the heteromeric low sensitivity α2β2 nAChR and validated the functional importance of specific residues in α2 and β2 nAChR subunits. Given the pathological importance of the α2 nAChR subunit and the high sequence identity with α4 (78%) and other neuronal nAChR subunits, our findings offer valuable information for modeling several nAChRs and ultimately for structure-based design of subtype specific drugs against the nAChR associated diseases. PMID:27493220

  14. Surface-Wave Plasma Deposition of a-C:H Films for Field Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Toru; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Takada, Noriharu; Toyoda, Hirotaka; Sugai, Hideo; Guang, W. X.; Hirao, Takashi; Toyoda, Naoki

    2000-10-01

    Recently crystalline diamond or diamondlike carbon (DLC) thin films prepared by the plasma enhanced CVD techniques have been widely studied as a new material of electron emitter for the next generation large-area field emission display. Among them, DLC films grown at low temperature are more attractive from an aspect of industrial manufacturing. In this study, we have carried out the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous carbon(a-C:H) films using a high density, low pressure surface-wave plasma (SWP). The SWP was produced in a 40cm-diameter vacuum chamber by introducing 2.45 GHz microwave through a quartz window via slot antennas. The a-C:H films were deposited on a silicon substrate immersed in He/CH4 plasma, under discharge conditions of 700 W microwave power and 200 mTorr total pressure. Excellent field emission characteristics were obtained: the threshold electric field defined at an emission current density of 1 μA/cm^2 was obtained to be 4 V/μm. Other film characteristics measured with the XPS and FT-IR are also presented. This work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Science Research from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture in Japan.

  15. Biocompatible Silver-containing a-C:H and a-C coatings: AComparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Endrino, Jose Luis; Allen, Matthew; Escobar Galindo, Ramon; Zhang, Hanshen; Anders, Andre; Albella, Jose Maria

    2007-04-01

    Hydrogenated diamond-like-carbon (a-C:H) and hydrogen-free amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings are known to be biocompatible and have good chemical inertness. For this reason, both of these materials are strong candidates to be used as a matrix that embeds metallic elements with antimicrobial effect. In this comparative study, we have incorporated silver into diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings by plasma based ion implantation and deposition (PBII&D) using methane (CH4) plasma and simultaneously depositing Ag from a pulsed cathodic arc source. In addition, we have grown amorphous carbon - silver composite coatings using a dual-cathode pulsed filtered cathodic-arc (FCA) source. The silver atomic content of the deposited samples was analyzed using glow discharge optical spectroscopy (GDOES). In both cases, the arc pulse frequency of the silver cathode was adjusted in order to obtain samples with approximately 5 at.% of Ag. Surface hardness of the deposited films was analyzed using the nanoindentation technique. Cell viability for both a-C:H/Ag and a-C:/Ag samples deposited on 24-well tissue culture plates has been evaluated.

  16. Adsorption of alcohols and fatty acids onto hydrogenated (a-C:H) DLC coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simič, R.; Kalin, M.; Kovač, J.; Jakša, G.

    2016-02-01

    Information about the interactions between lubricants and DLC coatings is scarce, despite there having been many studies over the years. In this investigation we used ToF-SIMS, XPS and contact-angle analyses to examine the adsorption ability and mechanisms with respect to two oiliness additives, i.e., hexadecanol and hexadecanoic acid, on an a-C:H coating. In addition, we analyzed the resistance of the adsorbed films to external influences like solvent cleaning. The results show that both molecules adsorb onto surface oxides and hydroxides present on the initial DLC surface and shield these structures with their hydrocarbon tails. This makes the surfaces less polar, which is manifested in a smaller polar component of the surface energy. We also showed that ultrasonic cleaning in heptane has no significant effect on the quantity of adsorbed molecules or on their chemical state. This not only shows the relatively strong adsorption of these molecules, but also provides useful information for future experimental work. Of the two examined molecules, the acid showed a greater adsorption ability than the alcohol, which explains some of the previously reported better tribological properties in the case of the acid with respect to the alcohol.

  17. Conotoxin Interactions with α9α10-nAChRs: Is the α9α10-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor an Important Therapeutic Target for Pain Management?

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Sarasa A.; Christie, MacDonald J.

    2015-01-01

    The α9α10-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated in pain and has been proposed to be a novel target for analgesics. However, the evidence to support the involvement of the α9α10-nAChR in pain is conflicted. This receptor was first implicated in pain with the characterisation of conotoxin Vc1.1, which is highly selective for α9α10-nAChRs and is an efficacious analgesic in chronic pain models with restorative capacities and no reported side effects. Numerous other analgesic conotoxin and non-conotoxin molecules have been subsequently characterised that also inhibit α9α10-nAChRs. However, there is evidence that α9α10-nAChR inhibition is neither necessary nor sufficient for analgesia. α9α10-nAChR-inhibiting analogues of Vc1.1 have no analgesic effects. Genetically-modified α9-nAChR knockout mice have a phenotype that is markedly different from the analgesic profile of Vc1.1 and similar conotoxins, suggesting that the conotoxin effects are largely independent of α9α10-nAChRs. Furthermore, an alternative mechanism of analgesia by Vc1.1 and other similar conotoxins involving non-canonical coupling of GABAB receptors to voltage-gated calcium channels is known. Additional incongruities regarding α9α10-nAChRs in analgesia are discussed. A more comprehensive characterisation of the role of α9α10-nAChRs in pain is crucial for understanding the analgesic action of conotoxins and for improved drug design. PMID:26426047

  18. Microstructure of a-C:H films prepared on a microtrench and analysis of ions and radicals behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Yuki; Choi, Junho

    2015-08-01

    Amorphous carbon films (a-C:H) were prepared on a microtrench (4-μm pitch and 4-μm depth), and the uniformity of film thickness and microstructure of the films on the top, sidewall, and bottom surfaces of the microtrench were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The a-C:H films were prepared by bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation and deposition (bipolar PBII&D), and the negative pulse voltage, which is the main parameter dominating the film structure, was changed from -1.0 to -15 kV. Moreover, the behavior of ions and radicals was analyzed simultaneously by combining the calculation methods of Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Collision (PIC-MCC) and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to investigate the coating mechanism for the microtrench. The results reveal that the thickness uniformity of a-C:H films improves with decreasing negative pulse voltage due to the decreasing inertia of incoming ions from the trench mouth, although the film thickness on the sidewall tends to be much smaller than that on the top and bottom surfaces of the trench. The normalized flux and the film thickness show similar behavior, i.e., the normalized flux or thickness at the bottom surface increases at low negative pulse voltages and then saturates at a certain value, whereas at the sidewall it monotonically decreases with increasing negative voltage. The microstructure of a-C:H films on the sidewall surface is very different from that on the top and bottom surfaces. The film structure at a low negative pulse voltage shifts to more of a polymer-like carbon (PLC) structure due to the lower incident energy of ions. Although the radical flux on the sidewall increases slightly, the overall film structure is not significantly changed because this film formation at a low negative voltage is originally dominated by radicals. On the other hand, the flux of radicals is dominant on the sidewall in the case of high negative pulse voltage, resulting in a deviation

  19. Microstructure of a-C:H films prepared on a microtrench and analysis of ions and radicals behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Yuki; Choi, Junho

    2015-08-28

    Amorphous carbon films (a-C:H) were prepared on a microtrench (4-μm pitch and 4-μm depth), and the uniformity of film thickness and microstructure of the films on the top, sidewall, and bottom surfaces of the microtrench were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The a-C:H films were prepared by bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation and deposition (bipolar PBII&D), and the negative pulse voltage, which is the main parameter dominating the film structure, was changed from −1.0 to −15 kV. Moreover, the behavior of ions and radicals was analyzed simultaneously by combining the calculation methods of Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Collision (PIC-MCC) and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to investigate the coating mechanism for the microtrench. The results reveal that the thickness uniformity of a-C:H films improves with decreasing negative pulse voltage due to the decreasing inertia of incoming ions from the trench mouth, although the film thickness on the sidewall tends to be much smaller than that on the top and bottom surfaces of the trench. The normalized flux and the film thickness show similar behavior, i.e., the normalized flux or thickness at the bottom surface increases at low negative pulse voltages and then saturates at a certain value, whereas at the sidewall it monotonically decreases with increasing negative voltage. The microstructure of a-C:H films on the sidewall surface is very different from that on the top and bottom surfaces. The film structure at a low negative pulse voltage shifts to more of a polymer-like carbon (PLC) structure due to the lower incident energy of ions. Although the radical flux on the sidewall increases slightly, the overall film structure is not significantly changed because this film formation at a low negative voltage is originally dominated by radicals. On the other hand, the flux of radicals is dominant on the sidewall in the case of high negative pulse voltage, resulting in a

  20. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-12 Toharu Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA Dawn Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mest, Scott; Williams, David; Crown, David; Yingst, Aileen; Buczkowski, Debra; Scully, Jennifer; Jaumann, Ralf; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Nathues, Andres; Hoffmann, Martin; Schaefer, Michael; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The Dawn Science Team is conducting a geologic mapping campaign for Ceres similar to that done for Vesta [1,2], including production of a Survey- and High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO)-based global map and a series of 15 Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO)-based quadrangle maps. In this abstract we discuss the surface geology and geologic evolution of the Ac-H-12 Toharu Quadrangle (21-66°S, 90-180°E). At the time of this writing LAMO images (35 m/pixel) are just becoming available. The current geologic map of Ac-H-12 was produced using ArcGIS software, and is based on HAMO images (140 m/pixel) and Survey (400 m/pixel) digital terrain models (for topographic information). Dawn Framing Camera (FC) color images were also used to provide context for map unit identification. The map (to be presented as a poster) will be updated from analyses of LAMO images. The Toharu Quadrangle is named after crater Toharu (86 km diameter; 48.3°S, 156°E), and is dominated by smooth terrain in the north, and more heavily cratered terrain in the south. The quad exhibits ~9 km of relief, with the highest elevations (~3.5-4.6 km) found among the western plateau and eastern crater rims, and the lowest elevation found on the floor of crater Chaminuka. Preliminary geologic mapping has defined three regional units (smooth material, smooth Kerwan floor material, and cratered terrain) that dominate the quadrangle, as well as a series of impact crater material units. Smooth materials form nearly flat-lying plains in the northwest part of the quad, and overlies hummocky materials in some areas. These smooth materials extend over a much broader area outside of the quad, and appear to contain some of the lowest crater densities on Ceres. Cratered terrain forms much of the map area and contains rugged surfaces formed largely by the structures and deposits of impact features. In addition to geologic units, a number of geologic features - including crater rims, furrows, scarps, troughs, and impact

  1. Toxicity and mAChRs binding activity of Cassiopea xamachana venom from Puerto Rican coasts.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Faisal F Y; Román, Laura G; Baksi, Krishna; Burnett, Joseph W

    2005-01-01

    A separation of toxic components from the upside down jellyfish Cassiopea xamachana (Cx) was carried out to study their cytotoxic effects and examine whether these effects are combined with a binding activity to cell membrane receptors. Nematocysts containing toxins were isolated from the autolysed tentacles, ruptured by sonication, and the crude venom (CxTX) was separated from the pellets by ultracentrifugation. For identifying its bioactive components, CxTX was fractionated by gel filtration chromatography into six fractions (named fraction I-VI). The toxicity of CxTX and fractions was tested on mice; however, the hemolytic activity was tested on saline washed human erythrocytes. The LD50 of CxTX was 0.75 microg/g of mouse body and for fraction III, IV and VI were 0.28, 0.25 and 0.12 microg/g, respectively. Fractions I, II and V were not lethal at doses equivalent to LD50 1 microg/g. The hemolytic and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activities of most fractions were well correlated with their mice toxicity. However, fraction VI, which contains the low molecular mass protein components (< or =10 kDa), has shown no PLA2 activity but highest toxicity to mice, highest hemolytic activity, and bound significantly to the acetylcholine muscarinic receptors (mAChRs) isolated from rat brain. The results suggested that fraction VI contains proteinaceous components contributing to most of cytolysis as well as membrane binding events. Meanwhile, fraction IV has shown high PLA2 that may contribute to the venom lethality and paralytic effects. PMID:15581689

  2. Heritability and Fitness Correlates of Personality in the Ache, a Natural-Fertility Population in Paraguay

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Drew H.; Walker, Robert S.; Blomquist, Gregory E.; Hill, Kim R.; Hurtado, A. Magdalena; Geary, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The current study assessed the heritability of personality in a traditional natural-fertility population, the Ache of eastern Paraguay. Self-reports (n = 110) and other-reports (n = 66) on the commonly used Big Five Personality Inventory (i.e., extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, openness) were collected. Self-reports did not support the Five Factor Model developed with Western samples, and did not correlate with other-reports for three of the five measured personality factors. Heritability was assessed using factors that were consistent across self- and other-reports and factors assessed using other-reports that showed reliabilities similar to those found in Western samples. Analyses of these items in combination with a multi-generation pedigree (n = 2,132) revealed heritability estimates similar to those found in most Western samples, although we were not able to separately estimate the influence of the common environment on these traits. We also assessed relations between personality and reproductive success (RS), allowing for a test of several mechanisms that might be maintaining heritable variation in personality. Phenotypic analyses, based largely on other-reports, revealed that extraverted men had higher RS than other men, but no other dimensions of personality predicted RS in either sex. Mothers with more agreeable children had more children, and parents mated assortatively on personality. Of the evolutionary processes proposed to maintain variation in personality, assortative mating, selective neutrality, and temporal variation in selection pressures received the most support. However, the current study does not rule out other processes affecting the evolution and maintenance of individual differences in human personality. PMID:23527163

  3. Heritability and fitness correlates of personality in the Ache, a natural-fertility population in Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Drew H; Walker, Robert S; Blomquist, Gregory E; Hill, Kim R; Hurtado, A Magdalena; Geary, David C

    2013-01-01

    The current study assessed the heritability of personality in a traditional natural-fertility population, the Ache of eastern Paraguay. Self-reports (n = 110) and other-reports (n = 66) on the commonly used Big Five Personality Inventory (i.e., extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, openness) were collected. Self-reports did not support the Five Factor Model developed with Western samples, and did not correlate with other-reports for three of the five measured personality factors. Heritability was assessed using factors that were consistent across self- and other-reports and factors assessed using other-reports that showed reliabilities similar to those found in Western samples. Analyses of these items in combination with a multi-generation pedigree (n = 2,132) revealed heritability estimates similar to those found in most Western samples, although we were not able to separately estimate the influence of the common environment on these traits. We also assessed relations between personality and reproductive success (RS), allowing for a test of several mechanisms that might be maintaining heritable variation in personality. Phenotypic analyses, based largely on other-reports, revealed that extraverted men had higher RS than other men, but no other dimensions of personality predicted RS in either sex. Mothers with more agreeable children had more children, and parents mated assortatively on personality. Of the evolutionary processes proposed to maintain variation in personality, assortative mating, selective neutrality, and temporal variation in selection pressures received the most support. However, the current study does not rule out other processes affecting the evolution and maintenance of individual differences in human personality.

  4. Haemocompatibility of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films synthesized by plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, P.; Kwok, S. C. H.; Chu, P. K.; Leng, Y. X.; Chen, J. Y.; Wang, J.; Huang, N.

    2003-05-01

    Diamond-like-carbon has attracted much attention recently as a potential biomaterial in blood contacting biomedical devices. However, previous reports in this area have not adequately addressed the biocompatibility and acceptability of the materials in blood contacting applications. In this study, hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were fabricated on silicon wafers (1 0 0) using plasma immersion ion implantation-deposition. A series of a-C:H films with different structures and chemical bonds were fabricated under different substrate voltages. The results indicate that film graphitization is promoted at higher substrate bias. The film deposited at a lower substrate bias of -75 V possesses better blood compatibility than the films at higher bias and stainless steel. Our results suggest two possible paths to improve the blood compatibility, suppression of the endogenic clotting system and reduction of platelet activation.

  5. Automated Patch Clamp Analysis of nAChα7 and Na(V)1.7 Channels.

    PubMed

    Obergrussberger, Alison; Haarmann, Claudia; Rinke, Ilka; Becker, Nadine; Guinot, David; Brueggemann, Andrea; Stoelzle-Feix, Sonja; George, Michael; Fertig, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Automated patch clamp devices are now commonly used for studying ion channels. A useful modification of this approach is the replacement of the glass pipet with a thin planar glass layer with a small hole in the middle. Planar patch clamp devices, such as the three described in this unit, are overtaking glass pipets in popularity because they increase throughput, are easier to use, provide for the acquisition of high-quality and information-rich data, and allow for rapid perfusion and temperature control. Covered in this unit are two challenging targets in drug discovery: voltage-gated sodium subtype 1.7 (Na(V)1.7) and nicotinic acetylcholine α7 receptors (nAChα7R). Provided herein are protocols for recording activation and inactivation kinetics of Na(V)1.7, and activation and allosteric modulation of nAChα7R. PMID:24934604

  6. Effect of calcium on nicotine-induced current expressed by an atypical alpha-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2.

    PubMed

    Thany, Steeve H; Courjaret, Raphael; Lapied, Bruno

    2008-06-27

    Two distinct native alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-Bgt)-insensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), named nAChR1 and nAChR2, were identified in the cockroach Periplaneta americana dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons. They differed in their electrophysiological, pharmacological properties and intracellular regulation pathways. nAChR2 being an atypical nicotinic receptor closed upon agonist application and its current-voltage relationship resulted from a reduction in potassium conductance. In this study, using whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that calcium modulated nAChR2-mediated nicotine response. Under 0.5 microM alpha-Bgt and 20 mM d-tubocurarine, the nicotine-induced inward current amplitude was strongly reduced in the presence of intracellularly applied BAPTA or bath application of calcium-free solution. In addition, using cadmium chloride, we showed that nicotine response was modulated by extracellular calcium through plasma membrane calcium channels. Moreover, extracellular application of caffeine and thapsigargin reduced nAChR2-mediated response. Together these experiments revealed a complex calcium-dependent regulation of nAChR2. PMID:18485593

  7. The vesicular amine transporter family (SLC18): amine/proton antiporters required for vesicular accumulation and regulated exocytotic secretion of monoamines and acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Eiden, Lee E; Schäfer, Martin K-H; Weihe, Eberhard; Schütz, Burkhard

    2004-02-01

    The vesicular amine transporters (VATs) are expressed as integral proteins of the lipid bilayer membrane of secretory vesicles in neuronal and endocrine cells. Their function is to allow the transport of acetylcholine (by the vesicular acetylcholine transporter VAChT; SLC18A3) and biogenic amines (by the vesicular monoamine transporters VMAT1 and VMAT2; SLC18A1 and SLC18A2) into secretory vesicles, which then discharge them into the extracellular space by exocytosis. Transport of positively charged amines by members of the SLC18 family in all cases utilizes an electrochemical gradient across the vesicular membrane established by proton pumping into the vesicle via a vacuolar ATPase; the amine is accumulated in the vesicle at the expense of the proton gradient, at a ratio of one translocated amine per two translocated protons. The members of the SLC18 family have become important histochemical markers for chemical coding in neuroendocrine tissues and cells. The structural basis of their remarkable ability to transport positively charged amines against a very large concentration gradient, as well as potential disease association with impaired transporter function and expression, are under intense investigation.

  8. Effects of a7nAChR agonist on the tissue estrogen receptor expression of castrated rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Feng; Gong, Fan; Lv, Jinhan; Gao, Jun; Ma, Jingzu

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one common disease in postmenopausal women due to depressed estrogen level. It has been known that inflammatory factors are involved in osteoporosis pathogenesis. One regulator of inflammatory cascade reaction, a7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR), therefore, may exert certain role in osteoporosis. This study thus investigated this question on an osteoporosis rat model after castration. Rats were firstly castrated to induce osteoporosis, and then received a7nAChR agonist (PNU-282987), diethylstilbestrol or saline via intraperitoneal injection. After 6 or 12 weeks, bone samples were collected for counting osteoblast number, bone density and estrogen receptor (ERα and ERβ) expression, in addition to the serum laboratory of inflammatory factors. Bone density, osteoclast number, ERα and ERβ expression level were significantly depressed in model group, and were remarkable potentiated in the drug treatment group (P<0.05). The levels of BGP and PTH in drug treatment group were decreased compared to diethylstilbestrol group, while E2 and IGF-1 showed up-regulation. Agonist of a7nAChR can up-regulate estrogen receptor expression and may prevent the occurrence and development of osteoporosis. PMID:26722551

  9. Endogenously released ACh and exogenous nicotine differentially facilitate long-term potentiation induction in the hippocampal CA1 region of mice.

    PubMed

    Nakauchi, Sakura; Sumikawa, Katumi

    2012-05-01

    We examined the role of α7- and β2-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS), mimicking the brain's naturally occurring theta rhythm, induced robust LTP in hippocampal slices from α7 and β2 knockout mice. This suggests TBS is capable of inducing LTP without activation of α7- or β2-containing nAChRs. However, when weak TBS was applied, the modulatory effects of nicotinic receptors on LTP induction became visible. We showed that during weak TBS, activation of α7 nAChRs occurs by the release of ACh, contributing to LTP induction. Additionally, bath-application of nicotine activated β2-containing nAChRs to promote LTP induction. Despite predicted nicotine-induced desensitization, synaptically mediated activation of α7 nAChRs still occurs in the presence of nicotine and contributed to LTP induction. Optical recording of single-stimulation-evoked excitatory activity with a voltage-sensitive dye revealed enhanced excitatory activity in the presence of nicotine. This effect of nicotine was robust during high-frequency stimulation, and was accompanied by enhanced burst excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Nicotine-induced enhancement of excitatory activity was observed in slices from α7 knockout mice, but was absent in β2 knockout mice. These results suggest that the nicotine-induced enhancement of excitatory activity is mediated by β2-containing nAChRs, and is related to the nicotine-induced facilitation of LTP induction. Thus, our study demonstrates that the activation of α7- and β2-containing nAChRs differentially facilitates LTP induction via endogenously released ACh and exogenous nicotine, respectively, in the hippocampal CA1 region of mice.

  10. Contribution of α4β2 nAChR in nicotine-induced intracellular calcium response and excitability of MSDB neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiangang; Wang, Yali; Wang, Yang; Wang, Ran; Zhang, Yunpeng; Zhang, Qian; Lu, Chengbiao

    2014-12-10

    The neurons of medial septal diagonal band of broca (MSDB) project to hippocampus and play an important role in MSDB-hippocampal synaptic transmission, plasticity and network oscillation. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits, α4β2 and α7 nAChRs, are expressed in MSDB neurons and permeable to calcium ions, which may modulate the function of MSDB neurons. The aims of this study are to determine the roles of selective nAChR activation on the calcium responses and membrane currents in MSDB neurons. Our results showed that nicotine increased calcium responses in the majority of MSDB neurons, pre-treatment of MSDB slices with a α4β2 nAChR antagonist, DhβE but not a α7 nAChR antagonist, MLA prevented nicotine-induced calcium responses. The whole cell patch clamp recordings showed that nicotine-induced inward current and acetylcholine (ACh) induced-firing activity can be largely reduced or prevented by DhβE in MSDB neurons. Surprisingly, post-treatment of α4β2 or α7 nAChR antagonists failed to block nicotine׳s role, they increased calcium responses instead. Application of calcium chelator EGTA reduced calcium responses in all neurons tested. These results suggest that there was a subtype specific modulation of nAChRs on calcium signaling and membrane currents in MSDB neurons and nAChR antagonists were also able to induce calcium responses involving a distinct mechanism.

  11. Neuroprotective effect of cellular prion protein (PrPC) is related with activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR)-mediated autophagy flux.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Park, Sang-Youel

    2015-09-22

    Activation of the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR) is regulated by prion protein (PrPC) expression and has a neuroprotective effect by modulating autophagic flux. In this study, we hypothesized that PrPC may regulate α7nAchR activation and that may prevent prion-related neurodegenerative diseases by regulating autophagic flux. PrP(106-126) treatment decreased α7nAchR expression and activation of autophagic flux. In addition, the α7nAchR activator PNU-282987 enhanced autophagic flux and protected neuron cells against PrP(106-126)-induced apoptosis. However, activation of autophagy and the protective effects of PNU-282987 were inhibited in PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells. In addition, PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells showed decreased α7nAchR expression levels. Adenoviral overexpression of PrPC in PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells resulted in activation of autophagic flux and inhibition of prion peptide-mediated cell death via α7nAchR activation. This is the first report demonstrating that activation of α7nAchR-mediated autophagic flux is regulated by PrPC, and that activation of α7nAchR regulated by PrPC expression may play a pivotal role in protection of neuron cells against prion peptide-induced neuron cell death by autophagy. These results suggest that α7nAchR-mediated autophagic flux may be involved in the pathogenesis of prion-related diseases and may be a therapeutic target for prion-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Neuroprotective effect of cellular prion protein (PrPC) is related with activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR)-mediated autophagy flux.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Park, Sang-Youel

    2015-09-22

    Activation of the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR) is regulated by prion protein (PrPC) expression and has a neuroprotective effect by modulating autophagic flux. In this study, we hypothesized that PrPC may regulate α7nAchR activation and that may prevent prion-related neurodegenerative diseases by regulating autophagic flux. PrP(106-126) treatment decreased α7nAchR expression and activation of autophagic flux. In addition, the α7nAchR activator PNU-282987 enhanced autophagic flux and protected neuron cells against PrP(106-126)-induced apoptosis. However, activation of autophagy and the protective effects of PNU-282987 were inhibited in PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells. In addition, PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells showed decreased α7nAchR expression levels. Adenoviral overexpression of PrPC in PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells resulted in activation of autophagic flux and inhibition of prion peptide-mediated cell death via α7nAchR activation. This is the first report demonstrating that activation of α7nAchR-mediated autophagic flux is regulated by PrPC, and that activation of α7nAchR regulated by PrPC expression may play a pivotal role in protection of neuron cells against prion peptide-induced neuron cell death by autophagy. These results suggest that α7nAchR-mediated autophagic flux may be involved in the pathogenesis of prion-related diseases and may be a therapeutic target for prion-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26295309

  13. Central nervous system adaptation to exercise training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Lois Anne

    Exercise training causes physiological changes in skeletal muscle that results in enhanced performance in humans and animals. Despite numerous studies on exercise effects on skeletal muscle, relatively little is known about adaptive changes in the central nervous system. This study investigated whether spinal pathways that mediate locomotor activity undergo functional adaptation after 28 days of exercise training. Ventral horn spinal cord expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a trophic factor at the neuromuscular junction, choline acetyltransferase (Chat), the synthetic enzyme for acetylcholine, vesicular acetylcholine transporter (Vacht), a transporter of ACh into synaptic vesicles and calcineurin (CaN), a protein phosphatase that phosphorylates ion channels and exocytosis machinery were measured to determine if changes in expression occurred in response to physical activity. Expression of these proteins was determined by western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Comparisons between sedentary controls and animals that underwent either endurance training or resistance training were made. Control rats received no exercise other than normal cage activity. Endurance-trained rats were exercised 6 days/wk at 31m/min on a treadmill (8% incline) for 100 minutes. Resistance-trained rats supported their weight plus an additional load (70--80% body weight) on a 60° incline (3 x 3 min, 5 days/wk). CGRP expression was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). CGRP expression in the spinal dorsal and ventral horn of exercise-trained animals was not significantly different than controls. Chat expression measured by Western blot and IHC was not significantly different between runners and controls but expression in resistance-trained animals assayed by IHC was significantly less than controls and runners. Vacht and CaN immunoreactivity in motor neurons of endurance-trained rats was significantly elevated relative to control and resistance-trained animals. Ventral

  14. Expression and function of striatal nAChRs differ in the flinders sensitive (FSL) and resistant (FRL) rat lines.

    PubMed

    Auta, J; Lecca, D; Nelson, M; Guidotti, A; Overstreet, D H; Costa, E; Javaid, J I

    2000-10-01

    Rats of Flinders Sensitive (FSL) and Flinders Resistant lines (FRL) differ in their susceptibility to physiological and associated behavioral responses elicited by nicotine. In the present study, we measured dopamine (DA) content in striatal dialysates to investigate the sensitivity of FSL and FRL rats to nicotine delivered locally through a microdialysis probe placed in the striatum. We also measured the expression density of striatal high-affinity nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and that of mRNAs encoding for alpha3, alpha4, alpha7 and beta2 nAChR subunits in both lines. The DA content of dialysates was measured before and after a 1-min perfusion of nicotine (6, 10 or 20 nmoles/min) and the resulting DA increase was taken as a measure of the alkaloid's intrinsic activity for nAChRs involved in the release of DA. The nicotine-induced increase of striatal DA release was greater in FSL than in FRL rats for all concentrations of nicotine, suggesting that the intrinsic activity of nicotine was greater in the FSL than in the FRL rats. This was further supported by our finding that the density of high-affinity nAChRs in the striatum of FSL rats was 44% greater than in the FRL rats, whereas affinity (K(D)) was virtually the same in the two lines of rats. Also the expression of mRNAs encoding for alpha(4), alpha(7), and beta(2) subunits in the striatum was greater in FSL than in FRL rats (attomol/microg total RNA, alpha(4):98+/-10 vs. 77+/-7; alpha(7):279+/-16 vs. 184+/-16; beta(2):310+/-19 vs. 201+/-12). We hypothesize that the difference in nicotine-induced DA release in the striatum of FSL and FRL rats depends on the difference in nAChR subunit expression in the striatum between the two lines. The Flinders rats could be used as a model for nicotine self-administration studies to evaluate the susceptibilities of FSL and FRL rats to nicotine dependence.

  15. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-13 Urvara Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA's Dawn Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizemore, Hanna; Williams, David; Platz, Thomas; Mest, Scott; Yingst, Aileen; Crown, David; O'Brien, David; Buczkowski, Debra; Schenk, Paul; Scully, Jennifer; Jaumann, Ralf; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Nathues, Andreas; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Russell, Christopher; Raymond, Carol

    2016-04-01

    The Dawn Science Team is conducting a geologic mapping campaign for Ceres similar to that done for Vesta [1,2], including production of a Survey- and High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO)-based global map, and a series of 15 Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO)-based quadrangle maps. In this abstract we discuss the geologic evolution of the Ac-H-13 Urvara Quadrangle. At the time of this writing LAMO images (35 m/pixel) are just becoming available. Thus, our geologic maps are based on HAMO images (140 m/pixel) and Survey (400 m/pixel) digital ter-rain models (for topographic information). Dawn Framing Camera (FC) color images are also used to provide context for map unit identification. The maps to be presented as posters will be updated from analyses of LAMO images. The Urvara Quadrangle is dominated by the 170-km diameter impact basin Urvara (46.4°S, 248.6°E) and includes cratered terrain to the west. Named features include the impact craters Meanderi (40.9°S, 193.7°E, 103 km diameter), Sekhet (66.4°S, 254.9°E, 41 km diameter), and Fluusa (31.5°S, 277.9°E), as well as the crater chains Gerber Catena (38.1°S, 214.8°E) and Sam-hain Catena (19.6°S, 210.3°E). Based on preliminary geologic mapping [3,4], we interpret the two prominent catenae as pit craters associated with large scale tectonism rather than secondary impacts. We interpret two large curvilinear depressions near the eastern quadrangle boundary as secondary crater chains resulting from the Urvara impact. Textural and morphological asymme-tries in crater materials within the quadrangle indicate heterogeneities in subsurface composition and volatile content. Features on the Urvara basin floor are consistent with impact fluidization of target materials; post impact extrusion of volatile rich material may have also played a minor role. References: [1] Williams D.A. et al. (2014) Icarus, 244, 1-12. [2] Yingst R.A. et al. (2014) PSS, 103, 2-23. [3] Sizemore et al. (2015) GSA Abstracts with Program

  16. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-7 Kerwan Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA Dawn Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David; Mest, Scott; Kneissl, Thomas; Hendrik Pasckert, Jan; Hiesinger, Harald; Neesemann, Adrian; Schmedemann, Nico; Buczkowski, Debra; Scully, Jennifer; Marchi, Simone; Schenk, Paul; Jaumann, Ralf; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Nathues, Andreas; Schaefer, Michael; Hoffmann, Martin; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    NASA's Dawn Science Team is conducting a geologic mapping campaign for Ceres similar to that done for Vesta [1,2], including a series of 15 Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO)-based quadrangle maps. Ac-H-7 Kerwan Quadrangle is located between 22°S-22°N and 72-144°E, and hosts several primary features and terrains: 1) The 280 km diameter impact basin Kerwan occur in the center and SE corner of the quad-rangle. Kerwan's rim is very degraded and there is no obvious ejecta field, indicating it is one of the oldest visible large impact basins on Ceres. Kerwan's interior is filled with a 'smooth terrain' that also extends beyond the rim to the east and west. This smooth terrain hosts a significantly lower impact crater density than most of the rest of Ceres' surface. Preliminary crater counts of the Kerwan smooth terrain derive cratering model ages of ~3 Ga using the lunar-derived chronology and ~600-800 Ma using the asteroid flux-derived chronology (H. Hiesinger, pers. comm., 2016). Our working interpretation is that the Kerwan impact occurred when Ceres' crust had a greater proportion of ice than at present, and that impact heating melted crustal material resulting in resurfacing of the Kerwan region by an icy impact melt, or possibly initiated cryovolcanic flows. There are hints of possible flow margins on the Kerwan floor in HAMO images, that have to be confirmed or denied by study of LAMO images. 2) Part of the 126 km diameter crater Dantu and its ejecta field covers the NE corner of the quadrangle. FC color data show both bright and dark materials in the ejecta field, suggesting ex-cavation of terrains of different compositions. Alternatively, because Dantu is one of two longitudes on Ceres where water vapor release has been detected [3], another interpretation is that the bright and/or dark deposits in the Dantu region could result from explosive cryovolcanism. Further study of LAMO data is required to investigate these hypotheses. 3) Other features include the

  17. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-2 Coniraya Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA's Dawn Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrik Pasckert, Jan; Hiesinger, Harald; Williams, David; Crown, David; Mest, Scott; Buczkowski, Debra; Scully, Jennifer; Schmedemann, Nico; Jaumann, Ralf; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Naß, Andrea; Nathues, Andreas; Hoffmann, Martin; Schäfer, Michael; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Dwarf planet Ceres (˜950 km) is located at ˜2.8 AU in the main asteroid belt [1], and is currently orbited by NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Similar to Vesta [2], the 15 quadrangles of Ceres will be mapped on the basis of Framing Camera mosaics from Low Altitude Mapping Orbits (LAMO) with a spatial resolution of ˜35 m/px. Here we report on our preliminary geological map of the Ac-H-2 Coniraya Quadrangle (located between 21-66 ° N and 0-90 ° E) based on High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) data (˜120 m/px), as LAMO images are just becoming available. The Coniraya Quadrangle is dominated by craters of different sizes and degradation stages. Most of the craters are highly degraded and no ejecta blankets are visible (e.g., Coniraya: 136 km; 65.8° E/40.5° N). Only some craters like Gaue and Ikapati seem to be relatively fresh, and still have ejecta blankets. Such fresher impact craters could already be mapped in detail on HAMO data, and subdivided into crater ejecta, crater wall, crater floor, and crater central peak materials. At the crater floor and around Ikapati crater we also identified smooth materials that fill local depressions. The formation of the smooth material seems to be related to the formation of the impact crater, as crater densities of the smooth materials and the ejecta blanket are similar, as are their absolute model ages (AMAs), derived from crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements. Using the lunar derived chronology, CSFD measurements of Ikapati's ejecta blanket and the smooth materials located in and around the crater show AMAs of 300 to 390 Ma. CSFD measurements of Gaue crater show AMAs of 910-980 Ma. Both craters show background AMAs of 3.1 to 3.5 Ga, which might be related to old large craters (e.g., Coniraya or Kerwan). Apart from crater related units, we identified one dome-like structure (˜65 km wide; ˜3 km high) at the crater floor of a large degraded crater at the western edge of this quadrangle. This might be an indication

  18. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-11 Sintana Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA's Dawn Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulzeck, Franziska; Krohn, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Williams, David A.; Buczkowski, Debra L.; Mest, Scott C.; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Gathen, Isabel v. d.; Kersten, Elke; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Naß, Andrea; Otto, Katharina; Pieters, Carle M.; Preusker, Frank; Roatsch, Thomas; De Sanctis, Maria C.; Schenk, Paul; Schröder, Stefanus; Stephan, Katrin; Wagner, Roland

    2016-04-01

    In December 2015, the Dawn spacecraft delivered the first images of the Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) of the dwarf planet Ceres at a resolution of 35 m/pixel. This data will be used to finish the geological mapping of Ceres' surface in order to identify composition and surface forming processes. Mapping was already done using Survey Orbit and High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) data. With the new images, an updated map will be presented. To this point, the data material consists of a HAMO clear-filter mosaic (140 m/pixel) [1], a digital elevation model (DTM) [2] derived from Survey orbit (415 m/pixel) data, color-filter ratios and photometrically corrected images. Ceres' surface has been divided into 15 mapping quadrangles. The Ac-H-11 Sintana quadrangle is located in the southern hemisphere of Ceres between 21 66°S and 0 90°E. Geological units identified so far are cratered terrain, which covers most of the area, and a younger unit of relatively smooth material. The latter is characterized by a low crater density. Material of the same unit was found in adjacent quadrangles as well. Interest is taken in the diversity of crater shapes. Many craters show different forms of asymmetries. One and the same crater for instance displays different stages of rim degradation and some crater walls are partly terraced and their slopes' steepness is varying alongside the crater rim. Several mass wasting features, which partly cause the observed asymmetries, have been identified. Next to the multiple collapsed rims, landslides due to later cratering on the primary crater rim are observed. Whereas collapse structures are mostly blocky, single landslides are characterized by lobate margins. Occurrence and type of mass wasting feature might hint to subsurface differences. Further, there is a diversity of inner crater structures, like relaxed crater floors, ridges, central peaks, mounds and smooth plains. Processes like mass wasting and relaxation have modified many craters

  19. Alzheimer's Disease: Targeting the Cholinergic System

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H.; Guimaraes, Isabella M.; Silva, Flavia R.; Ribeiro, Fabiola M.

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) has a crucial role in the peripheral and central nervous systems. The enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) is responsible for synthesizing ACh from acetyl-CoA and choline in the cytoplasm and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) uptakes the neurotransmitter into synaptic vesicles. Following depolarization, ACh undergoes exocytosis reaching the synaptic cleft, where it can bind its receptors, including muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. ACh present at the synaptic cleft is promptly hydrolyzed by the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE), forming acetate and choline, which is recycled into the presynaptic nerve terminal by the high-affinity choline transporter (CHT1). Cholinergic neurons located in the basal forebrain, including the neurons that form the nucleus basalis of Meynert, are severely lost in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD is the most ordinary cause of dementia affecting 25 million people worldwide. The hallmarks of the disease are the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques. However, there is no real correlation between levels of cortical plaques and AD-related cognitive impairment. Nevertheless, synaptic loss is the principal correlate of disease progression and loss of cholinergic neurons contributes to memory and attention deficits. Thus, drugs that act on the cholinergic system represent a promising option to treat AD patients. PMID:26813123

  20. Assessment of the functionality and stability of detergent purified nAChR from Torpedo using lipidic matrixes and macroscopic electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Morales, Luis F; Colón-Sáez, José O; González-Nieves, Joel E; Quesada-González, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study we examined the functionality and stability of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-detergent complexes (nAChR-DCs) from affinity-purified Torpedo californica (Tc) using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) in Lipidic Cubic Phase (LCP) and planar lipid bilayer (PLB) recordings for phospholipid and cholesterol like detergents. In the present study we enhanced the functional characterization of nAChR-DCs by recording macroscopic ion channel currents in Xenopus oocytes using the two electrode voltage clamp (TEVC). The use of TEVC allows for the recording of macroscopic currents elicited by agonist activation of nAChR-DCs that assemble in the oocyte plasma membrane. Furthermore, we examined the stability of nAChR-DCs, which is obligatory for the nAChR crystallization, using a 30 day FRAP assay in LCP for each detergent. The present results indicate a marked difference in the fractional fluorescence recovery (ΔFFR) within the same detergent family during the 30 day period assayed. Within the cholesterol analog family, sodium cholate and CHAPSO displayed a minimum ΔFFR and a mobile fraction (MF) over 80%. In contrast, CHAPS and BigCHAP showed a marked decay in both the mobile fraction and diffusion coefficient. nAChR-DCs containing phospholipid analog detergents with an alkylphosphocholine (FC) and lysofoscholine (LFC) of 16 carbon chains (FC-16, LFC-16) were more effective in maintaining a mobile fraction of over 80% compared to their counterparts with shorter acyl chain (C12, C14). The significant differences in macroscopic current amplitudes, activation and desensitization rates among the different nAChR-DCs evaluated in the present study allow to dissect which detergent preserves both, agonist activation and ion channel function. Functionality assays using TEVC demonstrated that LFC16, LFC14, and cholate were the most effective detergents in preserving macroscopic ion channel function, however, the nAChR-cholate complex

  1. Assessment of the functionality and stability of detergent purified nAChR from Torpedo using lipidic matrixes and macroscopic electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Morales, Luis F; Colón-Sáez, José O; González-Nieves, Joel E; Quesada-González, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study we examined the functionality and stability of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-detergent complexes (nAChR-DCs) from affinity-purified Torpedo californica (Tc) using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) in Lipidic Cubic Phase (LCP) and planar lipid bilayer (PLB) recordings for phospholipid and cholesterol like detergents. In the present study we enhanced the functional characterization of nAChR-DCs by recording macroscopic ion channel currents in Xenopus oocytes using the two electrode voltage clamp (TEVC). The use of TEVC allows for the recording of macroscopic currents elicited by agonist activation of nAChR-DCs that assemble in the oocyte plasma membrane. Furthermore, we examined the stability of nAChR-DCs, which is obligatory for the nAChR crystallization, using a 30 day FRAP assay in LCP for each detergent. The present results indicate a marked difference in the fractional fluorescence recovery (ΔFFR) within the same detergent family during the 30 day period assayed. Within the cholesterol analog family, sodium cholate and CHAPSO displayed a minimum ΔFFR and a mobile fraction (MF) over 80%. In contrast, CHAPS and BigCHAP showed a marked decay in both the mobile fraction and diffusion coefficient. nAChR-DCs containing phospholipid analog detergents with an alkylphosphocholine (FC) and lysofoscholine (LFC) of 16 carbon chains (FC-16, LFC-16) were more effective in maintaining a mobile fraction of over 80% compared to their counterparts with shorter acyl chain (C12, C14). The significant differences in macroscopic current amplitudes, activation and desensitization rates among the different nAChR-DCs evaluated in the present study allow to dissect which detergent preserves both, agonist activation and ion channel function. Functionality assays using TEVC demonstrated that LFC16, LFC14, and cholate were the most effective detergents in preserving macroscopic ion channel function, however, the nAChR-cholate complex

  2. Nicotine Inhibits Cisplatin-Induced Apoptosis via Regulating α5-nAChR/AKT Signaling in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongqiao; Zhang, Huilin; Zhang, Xiuping; Xiao, Dongjie; Ma, Xiaoli; Wang, Yunshan

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer incidence demonstrates a strong etiologic association with smoking. Nicotine, the major component in tobacco, is a survival agonist that inhibits apoptosis induced by certain chemotherapeutic agents, but the precise mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. Recently studies have indicated that α5-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α5-nAChR) is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. Nevertheless, no information has been available about whether nicotine also affects proliferation of human gastric cancer cells through regulation of α5-nAChR. To evaluate the hypothesis that α5-nAChR may play a role in gastric cancer, we investigated its expression in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines. The expression of α5-nAChR increased in gastric cancer tissue compared with para-carcinoma tissues. In view of the results, we proceeded to investigate whether nicotine inhibits cisplatin-induced apoptosis via regulating α5-nAChR in gastric cancer cell. The results showed that nicotine significantly promoted cell proliferation in a dose and time-dependent manner through α5-nAChR activation in human gastric cells. Furthermore, nicotine inhibited apoptosis induced by cisplatin. Silence of α5-nAChR ablated the protective effects of nicotine. However, when co-administrating LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K/AKT pathway, an increased apoptosis was observed. This effect correlated with the induction of Bcl-2, Bax, Survivin and Caspase-3 by nicotine in gastric cell lines. These results suggest that exposure to nicotine might negatively impact the apoptotic potential of chemotherapeutic drugs and that α5-nAChR/AKT signaling plays a key role in the anti-apoptotic activity of nicotine induced by cisplatin. PMID:26909550

  3. A combined molecular docking and charge density analysis is a new approach for medicinal research to understand drug-receptor interaction: curcumin-AChE model.

    PubMed

    Renuga Parameswari, A; Rajalakshmi, G; Kumaradhas, P

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a molecular docking analysis has been performed on diketone form of curcumin molecule with acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The calculated lowest docked energy of curcumin molecule in the active site of AChE is -11.21 kcal/mol; this high negative value indicates that the molecule exhibits large binding affinity towards AChE. When the curcumin molecule present in the active site of AChE, subsequently, its conformation has altered significantly and the molecule adopts a U-shape geometry as it is linear in gas phase (before entering into the active site). This conformational transition facilitates curcumin to form strong interaction with Phe330 of acyl-binding pocket and the choline binding site with indole ring of Trp84 and Asp72. The gas phase and the active site analysis of curcumin allows to understand the conformational geometry, nature of molecular flexibility, charge density redistribution and the variation of electrostatic properties of curcumin in the active site. To obtain the gas phase structure, the curcumin molecule was optimized using Hartree-Fock and density functional methods (B3LYP) with the basis set 6-311G(∗∗). A charge density analysis on both gas phase as well as the molecule lifted from the active site was carried out using Bader's theory of atoms in molecules (AIM). The difference in molecular electrostatic potential between the two forms of curcumin displays the difference in charge distribution. The large dipole moment of curcumin (7.54 D) in the active site reflects the charge redistribution as it is much less in the gas phase (4.34 D).

  4. Nicotine Inhibits Cisplatin-Induced Apoptosis via Regulating α5-nAChR/AKT Signaling in Human Gastric Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanfei; Sun, Haiji; Wu, Hongqiao; Zhang, Huilin; Zhang, Xiuping; Xiao, Dongjie; Ma, Xiaoli; Wang, Yunshan

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer incidence demonstrates a strong etiologic association with smoking. Nicotine, the major component in tobacco, is a survival agonist that inhibits apoptosis induced by certain chemotherapeutic agents, but the precise mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. Recently studies have indicated that α5-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α5-nAChR) is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. Nevertheless, no information has been available about whether nicotine also affects proliferation of human gastric cancer cells through regulation of α5-nAChR. To evaluate the hypothesis that α5-nAChR may play a role in gastric cancer, we investigated its expression in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines. The expression of α5-nAChR increased in gastric cancer tissue compared with para-carcinoma tissues. In view of the results, we proceeded to investigate whether nicotine inhibits cisplatin-induced apoptosis via regulating α5-nAChR in gastric cancer cell. The results showed that nicotine significantly promoted cell proliferation in a dose and time-dependent manner through α5-nAChR activation in human gastric cells. Furthermore, nicotine inhibited apoptosis induced by cisplatin. Silence of α5-nAChR ablated the protective effects of nicotine. However, when co-administrating LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K/AKT pathway, an increased apoptosis was observed. This effect correlated with the induction of Bcl-2, Bax, Survivin and Caspase-3 by nicotine in gastric cell lines. These results suggest that exposure to nicotine might negatively impact the apoptotic potential of chemotherapeutic drugs and that α5-nAChR/AKT signaling plays a key role in the anti-apoptotic activity of nicotine induced by cisplatin. PMID:26909550

  5. The linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA increases membrane surface localization of the α7 ACh receptor in a protein 4.1N-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Ayako; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2013-03-01

    In yeast two-hybrid screening, protein 4.1N, a scaffolding protein, was identified as a binding partner of the α7 ACh (acetylcholine) receptor. For rat hippocampal slices, the linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA {8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid} increased the association of the α7 ACh receptor with 4.1N, and the effect was inhibited by GF109203X, an inhibitor of PKC (protein kinase C), although DCP-LA did not induce PKC phosphorylation of 4.1N. For PC-12 cells, the presence of the α7 ACh receptor in the plasma membrane fraction was significantly suppressed by knocking down 4.1N. DCP-LA increased the presence of the α7 ACh receptor in the plasma membrane fraction, and the effect was still inhibited by knocking down 4.1N. In the monitoring of α7 ACh receptor mobilization, DCP-LA enhanced signal intensities for the α7 ACh receptor at the membrane surface in PC-12 cells, which was clearly prevented by knocking down 4.1N. Taken together, the results of the present study show that 4.1N interacts with the α7 ACh receptor and participates in the receptor tethering to the plasma membrane. The results also indicate that DCP-LA increases membrane surface localization of the α7 ACh receptor in a 4.1N-dependent manner under the control of PKC, but without phosphorylating 4.1N.

  6. Nicotine Inhibits Cisplatin-Induced Apoptosis via Regulating α5-nAChR/AKT Signaling in Human Gastric Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanfei; Sun, Haiji; Wu, Hongqiao; Zhang, Huilin; Zhang, Xiuping; Xiao, Dongjie; Ma, Xiaoli; Wang, Yunshan

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer incidence demonstrates a strong etiologic association with smoking. Nicotine, the major component in tobacco, is a survival agonist that inhibits apoptosis induced by certain chemotherapeutic agents, but the precise mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. Recently studies have indicated that α5-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α5-nAChR) is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. Nevertheless, no information has been available about whether nicotine also affects proliferation of human gastric cancer cells through regulation of α5-nAChR. To evaluate the hypothesis that α5-nAChR may play a role in gastric cancer, we investigated its expression in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines. The expression of α5-nAChR increased in gastric cancer tissue compared with para-carcinoma tissues. In view of the results, we proceeded to investigate whether nicotine inhibits cisplatin-induced apoptosis via regulating α5-nAChR in gastric cancer cell. The results showed that nicotine significantly promoted cell proliferation in a dose and time-dependent manner through α5-nAChR activation in human gastric cells. Furthermore, nicotine inhibited apoptosis induced by cisplatin. Silence of α5-nAChR ablated the protective effects of nicotine. However, when co-administrating LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K/AKT pathway, an increased apoptosis was observed. This effect correlated with the induction of Bcl-2, Bax, Survivin and Caspase-3 by nicotine in gastric cell lines. These results suggest that exposure to nicotine might negatively impact the apoptotic potential of chemotherapeutic drugs and that α5-nAChR/AKT signaling plays a key role in the anti-apoptotic activity of nicotine induced by cisplatin.

  7. Chronic ethanol (EtOH) feeding increases muscarinic receptor (mAChR) density in esophagus without parallel change in dose response (D-R) to cholinergic agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarzian, A.; Gordon, J.H.; Urban, G.; Fields, J.Z. VA Hospital, Hines, IL )

    1991-03-11

    The mAChR/effector pathway for signal transduction is important in the physiology of esophagus and mAChR alterations are involved in EtOH induced changes in several organs. To see if EtOH-induced increases in lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) are due to upregulation of mAChR, the authors evaluated mAChR binding and D-R curves for bethanechol (IV) induced increases in LESP, and compared these values to changes in LESP after acute and chronic EtOH. EtOH was given to cats acutely or chronically. The number of mAChR sites (Bmax) in esophagus was lowered by acute EtOH, withdrawal from chronic EtOH raised Bmax. Acute injection of EtOH to cats in withdrawal reversed this increase in mAChR density. These changes correlated with the earlier data on EtOH-induced changes in LESP. In contrast, the D-R curve for bethanechol shifted to the right. Thus, the withdrawal-associated increase in Bmax is more likely to be a compensatory response to deficits distal to the receptor recognition site than to proximal deficits and doesn't cause LESP hyperactivity. Also, receptor binding changes do not necessarily translate into physiological changes.

  8. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-5 Fejokoo Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA's Dawn Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughson, Kynan; Russell, Christopher; Williams, David; Buczkowski, Debra; Mest, Scott; Scully, Jennifer; Kneissl, Thomas; Ruesch, Ottaviano; Frigeri, Alessandro; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Jaumann, Ralf; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Platz, Thomas; Nathues, Andreas; Hoffmann, Martin; Schaefer, Michael; Park, Ryan; Marchi, Simone; Raymond, Carol

    2016-04-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft arrived at Ceres on March 6, 2015, and has been studying the dwarf planet through a series of successively lower orbits, obtaining morphological & topographical image, mineralogical, elemental abundance, and gravity data. Ceres is the largest object in the asteroid belt with a mean diameter of ~950 km. The Dawn Science Team is conducting a geologic mapping campaign for Ceres similar to that done for the asteroid Vesta [1, 2], including production of a Survey- and High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO)-based global map, and a series of 15 Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO)-based quadrangle maps. In this abstract we present the LAMO-based geologic map of the Ac-H-5 Fejokoo quadrangle (21-66 °N and 270-360 °E) and discuss its geologic evolution. At the time of this writing LAMO images (35 m/pixel) are just becoming available. Thus, our geologic maps are based on HAMO images (~140 m/pixel) and Survey (~400 m/pixel) digital terrain models (for topographic information) [3, 4]. Dawn Framing Camera (FC) color images are also used to provide context for map unit identification. The maps to be presented as posters will be updated from analyses of LAMO images (~35 m/pixel). The Fejokoo quadrangle hosts six primary geologic features: (1) the centrally located, ~80 km diameter, distinctly hexagonal impact crater Fejokoo; (2) Victa crater with its large exterior dark lobate flow feature, and interior lobate and furrowed deposits; (3) Abellio crater, which exhibits a well formed ejecta blanket and has an arcuately textured infilled floor whose morphology is similar to those of homologously sized craters on some of the icy Saturnian satellites [5]; (4) Cozobi crater, whose floor is filled with an unusually bulbous and smooth deposit, thin sheeted multi-lobed flow-like features that are reminiscent of fluidized ejecta as seen on Mars are also observed to be emanating outwards from the N and S rims of this crater [6]; (5) the peculiar Oxo crater on the eastern

  9. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-3 Dantu Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA's Dawn Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneissl, Thomas; Schmedemann, Nico; Neesemann, Adrian; Williams, David A.; Crown, David A.; Mest, Scott C.; Buczkowski, Debra L.; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Frigeri, Allessandro; Ruesch, Ottaviano; Hiesinger, Harald; Walter, Sebastian H. G.; Jaumann, Ralf; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Kersten, Elke; Naß, Andrea; Nathues, Andreas; Platz, Thomas; Russell, Chistopher T.

    2016-04-01

    The Dawn Science Team is conducting a geologic mapping campaign for Ceres similar to that done for Vesta [1,2], including production of a Survey- and High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO)-based global map and a series of 15 Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO)-based quadrangle maps. In this abstract we discuss the geologic evolution of the Ac-H-3 Dantu Quadrangle. The current map is based on a Framing Camera (FC) clear-filter image mosaic from HAMO data (~140 m/px) as well as a digital terrain model (DTM) derived from imagery of the Survey phase [3]. Albedo variations were identified and mapped using a mosaic of photometrically corrected HAMO images provided by DLR. FC color images provided further context for map unit identification. LAMO images (35m/pixel), which have just become available at the time of writing, will be used to update the map to be presented as a poster. The quadrangle is located between 21-66°N and 90-180°E in a large-scale depression north of the impact basin Kerwan. The northern and southeastern parts of the quadrangle are characterized by cratered terrain while the south and southwest are dominated by the partially smooth ejecta blankets of craters Dantu and Gaue. East-west oriented pit/crater chains in the southern half of the quadrangle might be related to tectonic processes [4,5]. Dantu crater (d=~126 km) is a complex impact crater showing slump terraces and a partially smooth crater floor with concentric and radial fractures. Furthermore, Dantu shows a central pit structure with pitted terrain on its floor as well as several bright spots in the interior and exterior of the crater. High-resolution measurements of crater size-frequency distributions (CSFDs) superposed on Dantu indicate a formation/modification age of ~200 - 700 Ma. Most of the ejecta appear to be relatively bright and correspond to parts of the #2 high albedo region observed with the Hubble Space Telescope [6]. However, the southwestern portion of the ejecta blanket is

  10. Geological Mapping of the Ac-H-14 Yalode Quadrangle of Ceres from NASA's Dawn Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crown, David; Yingst, Aileen; Mest, Scott; Platz, Thomas; Sizemore, Hanna; Berman, Daniel; Williams, David; Roatsch, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Nathues, Andreas; Hoffman, Martin; Schäfer, Michael; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The Dawn Science Team is conducting a geologic mapping campaign for Ceres that includes production of a Survey- and High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO)-based global map and a series of 15 Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO)-based quadrangle maps. In this abstract we discuss the surface geology and geologic evolution of the Ac-H-14 Yalode Quadrangle (21-66°S, 270-360°E). The current geologic map was produced using ArcGIS software based on HAMO images (140 m/pixel) for surface morphology and stratigraphic relationships, Survey (400 m/pixel) digital terrain models for topographic information, and Dawn Framing Camera (FC) color images as context for map unit identification. The map will be updated through analysis of LAMO images (35 m/pixel) that are just becoming available. The Yalode Quadrangle is dominated by the 260-km diameter impact basin Yalode (42.3°S, 293.6°E) and includes rugged and smooth terrains to the east. Preliminary geologic mapping defined two regional units (cratered terrain and smooth material), which dominate the quadrangle, as well as a series of impact crater material units. Mapped geologic features include crater rims, graben, ridges, troughs, scarp, lineaments, and impact crater chains. Geologic contacts are typically not distinct in Survey and HAMO images. Impact craters in Yalode Quadrangle display a range of preservation states. Degraded features, including Yalode basin and numerous smaller craters, exhibit subdued rims, lack discrete ejecta deposits, and have infilled interiors. More pristine features (including Mondamin, Besua, Lono and craters on the Yalode basin floor) have well-defined, quasi-circular forms with prominent rims and in some cases discernible ejecta. Some of these craters have bowl-shaped interiors, and others contain hills or mounds on their floors that are interpreted as central peaks. Yalode basin has a variably preserved rim, which is continuous and sharply defined to the north/northwest and is irregular or degraded

  11. {alpha}7-nAChR-mediated suppression of hyperexcitability of colonic dorsal root ganglia neurons in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Abdrakhmanova, Galya R; AlSharari, Shakir; Kang, Minho; Damaj, M Imad; Akbarali, Hamid I

    2010-09-01

    Controlled clinical trials of nicotine transdermal patch for treatment of ulcerative colitis have been shown to improve histological and global clinical scores of colitis. Here we report that nicotine (1 microM) suppresses in vitro hyperexcitability of colonic dorsal root ganglia (DRG) (L(1)-L(2)) neurons in the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced mouse model of acute colonic inflammation. Nicotine gradually reduced regenerative multiple-spike action potentials in colitis mice to a single action potential. Nicotine's effect on hyperexcitability of inflamed neurons was blocked in the presence of an alpha(7)-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist, methyllicaconitine, while choline, the alpha(7)-nAChR agonist, induced a similar effect to that of nicotine. Consistent with these findings, nicotine failed to suppress hyperexcitability in colonic DRG neurons from DSS-treated alpha(7) knockout mice. Furthermore, colonic DRG neurons from DSS-treated alpha(7) knockout mice were characterized by lower rheobase (10 +/- 5 vs. 77 +/- 13 pA, respectively) and current threshold (28 +/- 4 vs. 103 +/- 8 pA, respectively) levels than DSS-treated C57BL/J6 mice. An interesting observation of this study is that 8 of 12 colonic DRG (L(1)-L(2)) neurons from control alpha(7) knockout mice exhibited multiple-spike action potential firing while no wild-type neurons did. Overall, our findings suggest that nicotine at low 1 microM concentration suppresses in vitro hyperexcitability of inflamed colonic DRG neurons in a mouse model of acute colonic inflammation via activation of alpha(7)-nAChRs.

  12. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) at zebrafish red and white muscle show different properties during development.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kazi T; Ali, Declan W

    2016-08-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are highly expressed at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction (NMJ) where they are required for muscle activation. Understanding the factors that underlie NMJ development is critical for a full understanding of muscle function. In this study we performed whole cell and outside-out patch clamp recordings, and single-cell RT-qPCR from zebrafish red and white muscle to examine the properties of nAChRs during the first 5 days of development. In red fibers miniature endplate currents (mEPCs) exhibit single exponential time courses at 1.5 days postfertilization (dpf) and double exponential time courses from 2 dpf onwards. In white fibers, mEPCs decay relatively slowly, with a single exponential component at 1.5 dpf. By 2 and 3 dpf, mEPC kinetics speed up, and decay with a double exponential component, and by 4 dpf the exponential decay reverts back to a single component. Single channel recordings confirm the presence of two main conductance classes of nAChRs (∼45 pS and ∼65 pS) in red fibers with multiple time courses. Two main conductance classes are also present in white fibers (∼55 pS and ∼73 pS), but they exhibit shorter mean open times by 5 dpf compared with red muscle. RT-qPCR of mRNA for nicotinic receptor subunits supports a switch from γ to ε subunits in white fibers but not in red. Our findings provide a developmental profile of mEPC properties from red and white fibers in embryonic and larval zebrafish, and reveal previously unknown differences between the NMJs of these muscle fibers.© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 916-936, 2016.

  13. Topographic Characterization of Cu-Ni NPs @ a-C:H Films by AFM and Multifractal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Ghodselahi, Tayebeh; Ghaderi, Atefeh; Solaymani, Shahram; Boochani, Arash; Garczyk, Żaneta

    2015-04-30

    In the present work three-dimensional (3-D) surface topography of Cu-Ni nanoparticles in hydrogenated amorphous carbon (Cu-Ni NPs @ a-C:H) with constant thickness of Cu and three thicknesses of Ni prepared by RF-Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (RF-PECVD) system were investigated. The thin films of Cu-Ni NPs @ a-C:H with constant thickness of Cu and three thicknesses of Ni deposited by radio frequency (RF)-sputtering and RF-PECVD systems, were characterized. To determine the mass thickness and atomic structure of the films, the Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) spectra was applied. The absorption spectra were applied to study localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peaks of Cu-Ni NPs (observed around 608 nm in visible spectra), which is widened and shifted to lower wavelengths as the thickness of Ni over layer increases, and their changes are also evaluated by the 3-D surface topography. These nanostructures were investigated over square areas of 1 μm × 1 μm using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and multifractal analysis. Topographic characterization of surface samples (in amplitude, spatial distribution, and pattern of surface characteristics) highlighted 3-D surfaces with multifractal features which can be quantitatively estimated by the multifractal measures. The 3-D surface topography Cu-Ni NPs @ a-C:H with constant thickness of Cu and three thicknesses of Ni prepared by RF-PECVD system can be characterized using the multifractal geometry in correlation with the surface statistical parameters. PMID:25839675

  14. Nicotine activates YAP1 through nAChRs mediated signaling in esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Zhou, Wei; Xue, Liyan; Zhang, Weimin; Zhan, Qimin

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is an established risk factor for esophageal cancers. Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1), the key transcription factor of the mammalian Hippo pathway, has been reported to be an oncogenic factor for many cancers. In this study, we find nicotine administration can induce nuclear translocation and activation of YAP1 in ESCC. Consistently, we observed nuclear translocation and activation of YAP1 by knockdown of CHRNA3, which is a negative regulator of nicotine signaling in bronchial and esophageal cancer cells. Nicotine administration or CHRNA3 depletion substantially increased proliferation and migration in esophageal cancer cells. Interestingly, we find that YAP1 physically interacts with nAChRs, and nAChRs-signaling dissociates YAP1 from its negative regulatory complex composed with α-catenin, β-catenin and 14-3-3 in the cytoplasm, leading to upregulation and nuclear translocation of YAP1. This process likely requires PKC activation, as PKC specific inhibitor Enzastaurin can block nicotine induced YAP1 activation. In addition, we find nicotine signaling also inhibits the interaction of YAP1 with P63, which contributes to the inhibitory effect of nicotine on apoptosis. Using immunohistochemistry analysis we observed upregulation of YAP1 in a significant portion of esophageal cancer samples. Consistently, we have found a significant association between YAP1 upregulation and cigarette smoking in the clinical esophageal cancer samples. Together, these findings suggest that the nicotine activated nAChRs signaling pathway which further activates YAP1 plays an important role in the development of esophageal cancer, and this mechanism may be of a general significance for the carcinogenesis of smoking related cancers.

  15. The identification and restitution of human remains from an Aché girl named "Damiana": an interdisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Koel-Abt, Katrin; Winkelmann, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    In June 2010, the postcranial skeleton of an adolescent girl was returned by the Natural History Museum of La Plata, Argentina, to the Aché community in Paraguay. In March 2011 the missing skull was identified in the anatomical collection of Charité in Berlin. We initiated a historical and anthropological investigation to confirm the identity of the human remains and to reconstruct the fate of the individual in question in its historical context. Anthropological publications from Argentina had indicated that the girl named "Damiana" was abducted by colonising settlers in Southern Paraguay in 1897 at the age of 3-4 years, later taken to La Plata in Argentina where she grew up as a "maidservant", and died in 1907 of "galloping consumption". In accordance with these reports, the present palaeopathological investigation confirms tuberculous meningitis as a likely cause of death. It also demonstrates some markers of "stress", the nature of which, however, is difficult to determine. Surviving letters and publications by Berlin anatomist Hans Virchow reveal that the girl's preserved head was sent from La Plata to Berlin in January 1908 for comparative investigations in the context of the racial theories of the time. We were convinced that the justified wishes of the Aché community to bury these remains alongside those restituted in 2010 outweighed any future scientific interest in these remains. In April 2012, the skull and two related specimens were returned from the Charité to the Aché community, mediated by the Paraguayan ambassador in Berlin.

  16. Topographic Characterization of Cu-Ni NPs @ a-C:H Films by AFM and Multifractal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Ghodselahi, Tayebeh; Ghaderi, Atefeh; Solaymani, Shahram; Boochani, Arash; Garczyk, Żaneta

    2015-04-30

    In the present work three-dimensional (3-D) surface topography of Cu-Ni nanoparticles in hydrogenated amorphous carbon (Cu-Ni NPs @ a-C:H) with constant thickness of Cu and three thicknesses of Ni prepared by RF-Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (RF-PECVD) system were investigated. The thin films of Cu-Ni NPs @ a-C:H with constant thickness of Cu and three thicknesses of Ni deposited by radio frequency (RF)-sputtering and RF-PECVD systems, were characterized. To determine the mass thickness and atomic structure of the films, the Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) spectra was applied. The absorption spectra were applied to study localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peaks of Cu-Ni NPs (observed around 608 nm in visible spectra), which is widened and shifted to lower wavelengths as the thickness of Ni over layer increases, and their changes are also evaluated by the 3-D surface topography. These nanostructures were investigated over square areas of 1 μm × 1 μm using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and multifractal analysis. Topographic characterization of surface samples (in amplitude, spatial distribution, and pattern of surface characteristics) highlighted 3-D surfaces with multifractal features which can be quantitatively estimated by the multifractal measures. The 3-D surface topography Cu-Ni NPs @ a-C:H with constant thickness of Cu and three thicknesses of Ni prepared by RF-PECVD system can be characterized using the multifractal geometry in correlation with the surface statistical parameters.

  17. Improved resolution of single channel dwell times reveals mechanisms of binding, priming, and gating in muscle AChR.

    PubMed

    Mukhtasimova, Nuriya; daCosta, Corrie J B; Sine, Steven M

    2016-07-01

    The acetylcholine receptor (AChR) from vertebrate skeletal muscle initiates voluntary movement, and its kinetics of activation are crucial for maintaining the safety margin for neuromuscular transmission. Furthermore, the kinetic mechanism of the muscle AChR serves as an archetype for understanding activation mechanisms of related receptors from the Cys-loop superfamily. Here we record currents through single muscle AChR channels with improved temporal resolution approaching half an order of magnitude over our previous best. A range of concentrations of full and partial agonists are used to elicit currents from human wild-type and gain-of-function mutant AChRs. For each agonist-receptor combination, rate constants are estimated from maximum likelihood analysis using a kinetic scheme comprised of agonist binding, priming, and channel gating steps. The kinetic scheme and rate constants are tested by stochastic simulation, followed by incorporation of the experimental step response, sampling rate, background noise, and filter bandwidth. Analyses of the simulated data confirm all rate constants except those for channel gating, which are overestimated because of the established effect of noise on the briefest dwell times. Estimates of the gating rate constants were obtained through iterative simulation followed by kinetic fitting. The results reveal that the agonist association rate constants are independent of agonist occupancy but depend on receptor state, whereas those for agonist dissociation depend on occupancy but not on state. The priming rate and equilibrium constants increase with successive agonist occupancy, and for a full agonist, the forward rate constant increases more than the equilibrium constant; for a partial agonist, the forward rate and equilibrium constants increase equally. The gating rate and equilibrium constants also increase with successive agonist occupancy, but unlike priming, the equilibrium constants increase more than the forward rate

  18. A geometricla error in some Computer Programs based on the Aki-Christofferson-Husebye (ACH) Method of Teleseismic Tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, B.R.; Evans, J.R.; Pritchard, M.J.; Foulger, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    Some computer programs based on the Aki-Christofferson-Husebye (ACH) method of teleseismic tomography contain an error caused by identifying local grid directions with azimuths on the spherical Earth. This error, which is most severe in high latitudes, introduces systematic errors into computed ray paths and distorts inferred Earth models. It is best dealt with by explicity correcting for the difference between true and grid directions. Methods for computing these directions are presented in this article and are likely to be useful in many other kinds of regional geophysical studies that use Cartesian coordinates and flat-earth approximations.

  19. Acute toxicity of a commercial glyphosate formulation on European sea bass juveniles (Dicentrarchus labrax L.): gene expressions of heme oxygenase-1 (ho-1), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and aromatases (cyp19a and cyp19b).

    PubMed

    Prevot-D'Alvise, N; Richard, S; Coupé, S; Bunet, R; Grillasca, J P

    2013-12-31

    Acute toxicity of Roundup, a commercial glyphosate--based herbicide, was evaluated in a teleost marine fish, the European sea bass, after 96 h of exposure. The LC50 96-h value of Roundup was 529 mg/L. Juveniles (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) were exposed to a sublethal concentration (35% of the LC50, i.e. 193 mg/L) of Roundup for 96-h. The study of heme oxygenase-1 (ho-1) gene expression was performed in four tissues (liver, gills, brain and gonads) and highlighted the disruption of antioxidant defence system. Results showed that ho-1 mRNA levels in liver and gills significantly decreased (p<0.001 and p<0.01 respectively) in fish exposed to 193 mg/L of Roundup, whereas in brain and gonads, ho-1 mRNA level was not altered. The analysis of acetylcholinesterase expression was used to evaluate the overall neurotoxicity of the herbicide and aromatase genes to assess the alteration of the endocrine system. Results showed that AChE and cyp19b gene transcriptions significantly increased (p<0.01) in brain of sea bass, whereas aromatase gene expression (cyp19a) in gonads was not significantly altered. Our results showed complex tissue-specific transcriptional responses after 96 h of exposure to a sublethal concentration. All these disruptions confirmed the deleterious effects of this glyphosate-based herbicide in a marine species.

  20. Monitoring cholinergic activity during attentional performance in mice heterozygous for the choline transporter: a model of cholinergic capacity limits.

    PubMed

    Paolone, Giovanna; Mallory, Caitlin S; Koshy Cherian, Ajeesh; Miller, Thomas R; Blakely, Randy D; Sarter, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Reductions in the capacity of the human choline transporter (SLC5A7, CHT) have been hypothesized to diminish cortical cholinergic neurotransmission, leading to risk for cognitive and mood disorders. To determine the acetylcholine (ACh) release capacity of cortical cholinergic projections in a mouse model of cholinergic hypofunction, the CHT+/- mouse, we assessed extracellular ACh levels while mice performed an operant sustained attention task (SAT). We found that whereas SAT-performance-associated increases in extracellular ACh levels of CHT+/- mice were significantly attenuated relative to wildtype littermates, performance on the SAT was normal. Tetrodotoxin-induced blockade of neuronal excitability reduced both dialysate ACh levels and SAT performance similarly in both genotypes. Likewise, lesions of cholinergic neurons abolished SAT performance in both genotypes. However, cholinergic activation remained more vulnerable to the reverse-dialyzed muscarinic antagonist atropine in CHT+/- mice. Additionally, CHT+/- mice displayed greater SAT-disrupting effects of reverse dialysis of the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine. Receptor binding assays revealed a higher density of α4β2* nAChRs in the cortex of CHT+/- mice compared to controls. These findings reveal compensatory mechanisms that, in the context of moderate cognitive challenges, can overcome the performance deficits expected from the significantly reduced ACh capacity of CHT+/- cholinergic terminals. Further analyses of molecular and functional compensations in the CHT+/- model may provide insights into both risk and resiliency factors involved in cognitive and mood disorders.

  1. Monitoring cholinergic activity during attentional performance in mice heterozygous for the choline transporter: a model of cholinergic capacity limits

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Ajeesh Koshy; Miller, Thomas R.; Blakely, Randy D.; Sarter, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Reductions in the capacity of the human choline transporter (SLC5A7, CHT) have been hypothesized to diminish cortical cholinergic neurotransmission, leading to risk for cognitive and mood disorders. To determine the acetylcholine (ACh) release capacity of cortical cholinergic projections in a mouse model of cholinergic hypofunction, the CHT+/− mouse, we assessed extracellular ACh levels while mice performed an operant sustained attention task (SAT). We found that whereas SAT-performance-associated increases in extracellular ACh levels of CHT+/− mice were significantly attenuated relative to wildtype littermates, performance on the SAT was normal. Tetrodotoxin-induced blockade of neuronal excitability reduced both dialysate ACh levels and SAT performance similarly in both genotypes. Likewise, lesions of cholinergic neurons abolished SAT performance in both genotypes. However, cholinergic activation remained more vulnerable to the reverse-dialyzed muscarinic antagonist atropine in CHT+/− mice. Additionally, CHT+/− mice displayed greater SAT-disrupting effects of reverse dialysis of the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine. Receptor binding assays revealed a higher density of α4β2* nAChRs in the cortex of CHT+/− mice compared to controls. These findings reveal compensatory mechanisms that, in the context of moderate cognitive challenges, can overcome the performance deficits expected from the significantly reduced ACh capacity of CHT+/− cholinergic terminals. Further analyses of molecular and functional compensations in the CHT +/− model may provide insights into both risk and resiliency factors involved in cognitive and mood disorders. PMID:23958450

  2. Biochemical and functional properties of distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the superior cervical ganglion of mice with targeted deletions of nAChR subunit genes.

    PubMed

    David, Reinhard; Ciuraszkiewicz, Anna; Simeone, Xenia; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Papke, Roger L; McIntosh, J M; Huck, Sigismund; Scholze, Petra

    2010-03-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast synaptic transmission in ganglia of the autonomic nervous system. Here, we determined the subunit composition of hetero-pentameric nAChRs in the mouse superior cervical ganglion (SCG), the function of distinct receptors (obtained by deletions of nAChR subunit genes) and mechanisms at the level of nAChRs that might compensate for the loss of subunits. As shown by immunoprecipitation and Western blots, wild-type (WT) mice expressed: alpha 3 beta 4 (55%), alpha 3 beta 4 alpha 5 (24%) and alpha 3 beta 4 beta 2 (21%) nAChRs. nAChRs in beta 4 knockout (KO) mice were reduced to < 15% of controls and no longer contained the alpha 5 subunit. Compound action potentials, recorded from the postganglionic (internal carotid) nerve and induced by preganglionic nerve stimulation, did not differ between alpha 5 beta 4 KO and WT mice, suggesting that the reduced number of receptors in the KO mice did not impair transganglionic transmission. Deletions of alpha 5 or beta2 did not affect the overall number of receptors and we found no evidence that the two subunits substitute for each other. In addition, dual KOs allowed us to study the functional properties of distinct alpha 3 beta4 and alpha 3 beta 2 receptors that have previously only been investigated in heterologous expression systems. The two receptors strikingly differed in the decay of macroscopic currents, the efficacy of cytisine, and their responses to the alpha-conotoxins AuIB and MII. Our data, based on biochemical and functional experiments and several mouse KO models, clarify and significantly extend previous observations on the function of nAChRs in heterologous systems and the SCG. PMID:20377613

  3. Pyridostigmine but not 3,4-diaminopyridine exacerbates ACh receptor loss and myasthenia induced in mice by muscle-specific kinase autoantibody

    PubMed Central

    Morsch, Marco; Reddel, Stephen W; Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Toyka, Klaus V; Phillips, William D

    2013-01-01

    In myasthenia gravis, the neuromuscular junction is impaired by the antibody-mediated loss of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). Muscle weakness can be improved upon treatment with pyridostigmine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, or with 3,4-diaminopyridine, which increases the release of ACh quanta. The clinical efficacy of pyridostigmine is in doubt for certain forms of myasthenia. Here we formally examined the effects of these compounds in the antibody-induced mouse model of anti-muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis. Mice received 14 daily injections of IgG from patients with anti-MuSK myasthenia gravis. This caused reductions in postsynaptic AChR densities and in endplate potential amplitudes. Systemic delivery of pyridostigmine at therapeutically relevant levels from days 7 to 14 exacerbated the anti-MuSK-induced structural alterations and functional impairment at motor endplates in the diaphragm muscle. No such effect of pyridostigmine was found in mice receiving control human IgG. Mice receiving smaller amounts of MuSK autoantibodies did not display overt weakness, but 9 days of pyridostigmine treatment precipitated generalised muscle weakness. In contrast, one week of treatment with 3,4-diaminopyridine enhanced neuromuscular transmission in the diaphragm muscle. Both pyridostigmine and 3,4-diaminopyridine increase ACh in the synaptic cleft yet only pyridostigmine potentiated the anti-MuSK-induced decline in endplate ACh receptor density. These results thus suggest that ongoing pyridostigmine treatment potentiates anti-MuSK-induced AChR loss by prolonging the activity of ACh in the synaptic cleft. PMID:23440963

  4. The distribution and chemical coding of intramural neurons supplying the porcine stomach - the study on normal pigs and on animals suffering from swine dysentery.

    PubMed

    Kaleczyc, J; Klimczuk, M; Franke-Radowiecka, A; Sienkiewicz, W; Majewski, M; Łakomy, M

    2007-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the expression of biologically active substances by intramural neurons supplying the stomach in normal (control) pigs and in pigs suffering from dysentery. Eight juvenile female pigs were used. Both dysenteric (n = 4; inoculated with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae) and control (n = 4) animals were deeply anaesthetized, transcardially perfused with buffered paraformalehyde, and tissue samples comprising all layers of the wall of the ventricular fundus were collected. The cryostat sections were processed for double-labelling immunofluorescence to study the distribution of the intramural nerve structures (visualized with antibodies against protein gene-product 9.5) and their chemical coding using antibodies against vesicular acetylcholine (ACh) transporter (VAChT), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), galanin (GAL), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), somatostatin (SOM), Leu(5)-enkephalin (LENK), substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). In both inner and outer submucosal plexuses of the control pigs, the majority of neurons were SP (55% and 58%, respectively)- or VAChT (54%)-positive. Many neurons stained also for CGRP (43 and 45%) or GAL (20% and 18%) and solitary perikarya were NOS-, SOM- or VIP-positive. The myenteric plexus neurons stained for NOS (20%), VAChT (15%), GAL (10%), VIP (7%), SP (6%) or CGRP (solitary neurons), but they were SOM-negative. No intramural neurons immunoreactive to LENK were found. The most remarkable difference in the chemical coding of enteric neurons between the control and dysenteric pigs was a very increased number of GAL- and VAChT-positive nerve cells (up to 61% and 85%, respectively) in submucosal plexuses of the infected animals. The present results suggest that GAL and ACh have a specific role in local neural circuits of the inflamed porcine stomach in the course of swine dysentery.

  5. PACAP induces plasticity at autonomic synapses by nAChR-dependent NOS1 activation and AKAP-mediated PKA targeting.

    PubMed

    Jayakar, Selwyn S; Pugh, Phyllis C; Dale, Zack; Starr, Eric R; Cole, Samantha; Margiotta, Joseph F

    2014-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a pleiotropic neuropeptide found at synapses throughout the central and autonomic nervous system. We previously found that PACAP engages a selective G-protein coupled receptor (PAC1R) on ciliary ganglion neurons to rapidly enhance quantal acetylcholine (ACh) release from presynaptic terminals via neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) and cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (PKA) dependent processes. Here, we examined how PACAP stimulates NO production and targets resultant outcomes to synapses. Scavenging extracellular NO blocked PACAP-induced plasticity supporting a retrograde (post- to presynaptic) NO action on ACh release. Live-cell imaging revealed that PACAP stimulates NO production by mechanisms requiring NOS1, PKA and Ca(2+) influx. Ca(2+)-permeable nicotinic ACh receptors composed of α7 subunits (α7-nAChRs) are potentiated by PKA-dependent PACAP/PAC1R signaling and were required for PACAP-induced NO production and synaptic plasticity since both outcomes were drastically reduced following their selective inhibition. Co-precipitation experiments showed that NOS1 associates with α7-nAChRs, many of which are perisynaptic, as well as with heteromeric α3*-nAChRs that generate the bulk of synaptic activity. NOS1-nAChR physical association could facilitate NO production at perisynaptic and adjacent postsynaptic sites to enhance focal ACh release from juxtaposed presynaptic terminals. The synaptic outcomes of PACAP/PAC1R signaling are localized by PKA anchoring proteins (AKAPs). PKA regulatory-subunit overlay assays identified five AKAPs in ganglion lysates, including a prominent neuronal subtype. Moreover, PACAP-induced synaptic plasticity was selectively blocked when PKA regulatory-subunit binding to AKAPs was inhibited. Taken together, our findings indicate that PACAP/PAC1R signaling coordinates nAChR, NOS1 and AKAP activities to induce targeted, retrograde plasticity at autonomic synapses. Such

  6. 3D MI-DRAGON: new model for the reconstruction of US FDA drug- target network and theoretical-experimental studies of inhibitors of rasagiline derivatives for AChE.

    PubMed

    Prado-Prado, Francisco; García-Mera, Xerardo; Escobar, Manuel; Alonso, Nerea; Caamaño, Olga; Yañez, Matilde; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2012-01-01

    The number of neurodegenerative diseases has been increasing in recent years. Many of the drug candidates to be used in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases present specific 3D structural features. An important protein in this sense is the acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which is the target of many Alzheimer's dementia drugs. Consequently, the prediction of Drug-Protein Interactions (DPIs/nDPIs) between new drug candidates and specific 3D structure and targets is of major importance. To this end, we can use Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) models to carry out a rational DPIs prediction. Unfortunately, many previous QSAR models developed to predict DPIs take into consideration only 2D structural information and codify the activity against only one target. To solve this problem we can develop some 3D multi-target QSAR (3D mt-QSAR) models. In this study, using the 3D MI-DRAGON technique, we have introduced a new predictor for DPIs based on two different well-known software. We have used the MARCH-INSIDE (MI) and DRAGON software to calculate 3D structural parameters for drugs and targets respectively. Both classes of 3D parameters were used as input to train Artificial Neuronal Network (ANN) algorithms using as benchmark dataset the complex network (CN) made up of all DPIs between US FDA approved drugs and their targets. The entire dataset was downloaded from the DrugBank database. The best 3D mt-QSAR predictor found was an ANN of Multi-Layer Perceptron-type (MLP) with profile MLP 37:37-24-1:1. This MLP classifies correctly 274 out of 321 DPIs (Sensitivity = 85.35%) and 1041 out of 1190 nDPIs (Specificity = 87.48%), corresponding to training Accuracy = 87.03%. We have validated the model with external predicting series with Sensitivity = 84.16% (542/644 DPIs; Specificity = 87.51% (2039/2330 nDPIs) and Accuracy = 86.78%. The new CNs of DPIs reconstructed from US FDA can be used to explore large DPI databases in order to discover both new drugs

  7. α6 nAChR subunit residues that confer α-conotoxin BuIA selectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Woo; McIntosh, J Michael

    2012-10-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) containing α6 and/or α4 subunits modulate the release of dopamine. However, few compounds can effectively discriminate between ligand-binding sites that contain α6 vs. α4 nAChR subunits. Using a chimeric (α6/α4) subunit, we showed that α-conotoxin BuIA binds the extracellular rat α6β2 vs. α4β2 interface with ∼60,000-fold selectivity. Chimeras containing residues from the α6 subunit were inserted into the homologous position of the α4 subunit to identify critical sequence segments. The region between residues 184 and 207 in the α6 subunit accounted for the potency difference. Chimeras within this region followed by point mutations were constructed for further definition. α6 Lys185, Thr187, and Ile188 form a triad of key residues that influence BuIA binding; when these 3 α6 residues were inserted into the α4 subunit, there was an ∼2000-fold increase in toxin potency. We used a crystal structure of BuIA bound to the acetylcholine-binding protein together with the structure of the Torepedo marmorata nAChR to build a homology model of BuIA bound to the interface between α6 and β2 subunits. The results indicate that the triad of α6 residues lies outside the C loop and is distantly located from bound BuIA (>10 Å). This suggests that alterations in potency are not caused by the direct interaction between the triad and BuIA. Instead, alterations in C-loop 3-dimensional structure and/or flexibility may account for differential potency. Thr198 and Tyr205 also contributed to BuIA potency. In addition, Thr198 caused BuIA potency differences between the closely related α6 and α3 subunits. Together, the findings provide insight into differences between the α6 and other α subunits that may be exploited by α-conotoxins to achieve binding selectivity. PMID:22751014

  8. From the Cajal alumni Achúcarro and Río-Hortega to the rediscovery of never-resting microglia

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Marie-Ève; Lecours, Cynthia; Samson, Louis; Sánchez-Zafra, Víctor; Sierra, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Under the guidance of Ramón y Cajal, a plethora of students flourished and began to apply his silver impregnation methods to study brain cells other than neurons: the neuroglia. In the first decades of the twentieth century, Nicolás Achúcarro was one of the first researchers to visualize the brain cells with phagocytic capacity that we know today as microglia. Later, his pupil Pío del Río-Hortega developed modifications of Achúcarro's methods and was able to specifically observe the fine morphological intricacies of microglia. These findings contradicted Cajal's own views on cells that he thought belonged to the same class as oligodendroglia (the so called “third element” of the nervous system), leading to a long-standing discussion. It was only in 1924 that Río-Hortega's observations prevailed worldwide, thus recognizing microglia as a unique cell type. This late landing in the Neuroscience arena still has repercussions in the twenty first century, as microglia remain one of the least understood cell populations of the healthy brain. For decades, microglia in normal, physiological conditions in the adult brain were considered to be merely “resting,” and their contribution as “activated” cells to the neuroinflammatory response in pathological conditions mostly detrimental. It was not until microglia were imaged in real time in the intact brain using two-photon in vivo imaging that the extreme motility of their fine processes was revealed. These findings led to a conceptual revolution in the field: “resting” microglia are constantly surveying the brain parenchyma in normal physiological conditions. Today, following Cajal's school of thought, structural and functional investigations of microglial morphology, dynamics, and relationships with neurons and other glial cells are experiencing a renaissance and we stand at the brink of discovering new roles for these unique immune cells in the healthy brain, an essential step to understand their

  9. Contributions of β2 subunit-containing nAChRs to chronic nicotine-induced alterations in cognitive flexibility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Robert D.; Poole, Rachel L.; Guzman, Dawn M.; Gould, Thomas J.; Parikh, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Deficits in executive functions underlie compulsive drug use and understanding how nicotine influences these cognitive processes may provide important information on neurobiological substrates of nicotine addiction. Accumulating evidence suggests that β2 subunit-containing nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) are involved in the reinforcing process of nicotine addiction. Whether these nAChRs also contributes to the detrimental effects of chronic nicotine on flexible decision-making is not known. Objectives In the present study, the effects of chronic nicotine were assessed in mice with partial or complete deletion of the β2-subunit containing nAChR gene (β2+/- or β2-/-) performing an operant cognitive flexibility task. Results Visual discrimination learning was not affected in saline-treated β2 nAChR mutants as compared to the wild-type (β2+/+) mice; yet, chronic nicotine facilitated acquisition of visual discrimination in all genotypes. The acquisition of new egocentric response strategy set-shifting remained similar in all genotypes and there was no effect of treatment. Chronic nicotine treatment impaired reversal learning in β2+/+ mice by increasing response perseveration to the previously rewarded stimulus. Moreover, the acquisition of inverted stimulus-reward contingencies did not differ between β2+/+ and β2-/- mice exposed to chronic nicotine. Interestingly, nicotine-induced reversal learning deficits were not observed in β2+/- mice. Conclusions Collectively, these findings suggest that β2 subunit-containing nAChRs are not critical for visual discrimination learning and extradimensional rule shift. However, sustained activation of these nAChRs with nicotine may interfere with inhibitory control processes influencing affective shifts in stimulus-reward contingencies. PMID:25281224

  10. Activation of the alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR) reverses referred mechanical hyperalgesia induced by colonic inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Costa, Robson; Motta, Emerson M; Manjavachi, Marianne N; Cola, Maíra; Calixto, João B

    2012-10-01

    In the current study, we investigated the effect of the activation of the alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR) on dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis and referred mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. Colitis was induced in CD1 male mice through the intake of 4% DSS in tap water for 7 days. Control mice received unadulterated water. Referred mechanical hyperalgesia was evaluated for 7 days after the beginning of 4% DSS intake. Referred mechanical hyperalgesia started within 1 day after beginning DSS drinking, peaked at 3 days and persisted for 7 days. This time course profile perfectly matched with the appearance of signs of colitis. Both acute and chronic oral treatments with nicotine (0.1-1.0 mg/kg, p.o.) were effective in inhibiting the established referred mechanical hyperalgesia. The antinociceptive effect of nicotine was completely abrogated by cotreatment with the selective α7 nAchR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) (1.0 mg/kg). Consistent with these results, i.p. treatment with the selective α7 nAchR agonist PNU 282987 (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) reduced referred mechanical hyperalgesia at all periods of evaluation. Despite their antinociceptive effects, nicotinic agonists did not affect DSS-induced colonic damage or inflammation. Taken together, the data generated in the present study show the potential relevance of using α7 nAchR agonists to treat referred pain and discomfort associated with inflammatory bowel diseases.

  11. Auxofuran, a Novel Metabolite That Stimulates the Growth of Fly Agaric, Is Produced by the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacterium Streptomyces Strain AcH 505†

    PubMed Central

    Riedlinger, Julia; Schrey, Silvia D.; Tarkka, Mika T.; Hampp, Rüdiger; Kapur, Manmohan; Fiedler, Hans-Peter

    2006-01-01

    The mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces strain AcH 505 improves mycelial growth of ectomycorrhizal fungi and formation of ectomycorrhizas between Amanita muscaria and spruce but suppresses the growth of plant-pathogenic fungi, suggesting that it produces both fungal growth-stimulating and -suppressing compounds. The dominant fungal-growth-promoting substance produced by strain AcH 505, auxofuran, was isolated, and its effect on the levels of gene expression of A. muscaria was investigated. Auxofuran and its synthetic analogue 7-dehydroxy-auxofuran were most effective at a concentration of 15 μM, and application of these compounds led to increased lipid metabolism-related gene expression. Cocultivation of strain AcH 505 and A. muscaria stimulated auxofuran production by the streptomycete. The antifungal substances produced by strain AcH 505 were identified as the antibiotics WS-5995 B and C. WS-5995 B completely blocked mycelial growth at a concentration of 60 μM and caused a cell stress-related gene expression response in A. muscaria. Characterization of these compounds provides the foundation for molecular analysis of the fungus-bacterium interaction in the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between fly agaric and spruce. PMID:16672502

  12. Characterization of a T-superfamily conotoxin TxVC from Conus textile that selectively targets neuronal nAChR subtypes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Du, Tianpeng; Liu, Zhuguo; Wang, Sheng; Wu, Ying; Ding, Jiuping; Jiang, Ling; Dai, Qiuyun

    2014-11-01

    T-superfamily conotoxins have a typical cysteine pattern of "CC-CC", and are known to mainly target calcium or sodium ion channels. Recently, we screened the targets of a series of T-superfamily conotoxins and found that a new T-superfamily conotoxin TxVC (KPCCSIHDNSCCGL-NH2) from the venom of Conus textile. It selectively targeted the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes α4β2 and α3β2, with IC50 values of 343.4 and 1047.2nM, respectively, but did not exhibit obvious pharmacological effects on voltage-gated potassium, sodium or calcium channel in DRG cells, the BK channels expressed in HEK293 cells, or the Kv channels in LβT2 cells. The changes in the inhibitory activities of its Ala mutants, the NMR structure, and molecular simulation results based on other conotoxins targeting nAChR α4β2, all demonstrated that the residues Ile(6) and Leu(14) were the main hydrophobic pharmacophores. To our best knowledge, this is the first T-superfamily conotoxin that inhibits neuronal nAChRs and possesses high binding affinity to α4β2. This finding will expand the knowledge of the targets of T-superfamily conotoxins and the motif information could help the design of new nAChR inhibitors.

  13. Electrical and Optical Properties of Si-Incorporated a-C:H Films via the Radio Frequency Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Jun; Choi, Won Seok; Hong, Byungyou

    2016-05-01

    The optical and electrical properties of silicon-incorporated hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H:Si) films deposited via the radio frequency (RF) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method using a mixture of CH4, H2, and SiH4 were observed. The silane gas whose ranged from 0 to 25 vol.% [SiH4/(SiH4 + CH4) was fed into the reactor while the other deposition parameters were kept constant. The basic properties of these films were investigated via Raman spectroscopy, UV-visible spectrometry, I-V measurement, and surface profiling. The experiment results showed that the film thickness increased from 300 nm to 800 nm for the same deposition time as the silane gas increased. The Raman spectrum obtained from the silicon-incorporated a-C:H films suggested that the film property changed from graphitic-like to more diamond-like. As the silane gas increased, the optical gap, E04, slightly increased from 1.98 eV to 2.62 eV. It was shown that the Si atoms incorporated into the a-C:H films reduced the size of the sp2 clusters. As for the I-V characteristics, the Si-incorporated a-C:H films had a lower leakage current than the a-C:H films without Si. PMID:27483937

  14. Notes on three new immigrant species of spilanthes jacq. (Asteraceae) in India and the identity of the common 'tooth - ache plant'.

    PubMed

    Sivarajan, V V; Mathew, P

    1984-01-01

    Three new immigrant species of Spilanthes Jacq. (Asteraceae) is described for the first time from India. Their current nomenclature and an artificial key for the identification of the 5 Indian species are provided. The identity of the commonly used 'tooth-ache' plant is also discussed. PMID:22557401

  15. Sharing the Vision, Leading the Way: Continuing Educators in the New Millennium. ACHE Proceedings (62nd, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, October 14-17, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrineau, Irene T., Ed.

    This document presents the proceedings of the 2000 annual meeting of the Association for Continuing Higher Education (ACHE). Part 1 contains the text of the presidential address, "Building Solid Communities within Higher Education" (Nancy Thomason), as well as summaries of the following addresses: "Riding the Rapids of Change: Survival Tactics for…

  16. Cigarette smoking during pregnancy regulates the expression of specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits in the human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Machaalani, R.; Ghazavi, E.; Hinton, T.; Waters, K.A.; Hennessy, A.

    2014-05-01

    Smoking during pregnancy is associated with low birth weight, premature delivery, and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Nicotine, a major pathogenic compound of cigarette smoke, binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). A total of 16 nAChR subunits have been identified in mammals (9 α, 4 β, and 1 δ, γ and ε subunits). The effect of cigarette smoking on the expression of these subunits in the placenta has not yet been determined, thus constituting the aim of this study. Using RT-qPCR and western blotting, this study investigated all 16 mammalian nAChR subunits in the normal healthy human placenta, and compared mRNA and protein expressions in the placentas from smokers (n = 8) to controls (n = 8). Our data show that all 16 subunit mRNAs are expressed in the normal, non-diseased human placenta and that the expression of α2, α3, α4, α9, β2 and β4 subunits is greater than the other subunits. For mRNA, cigarette smoke exposure was associated with increased expression of the α9 subunit, and decreased expression of the δ subunit. At the protein level, expression of both α9 and δ was increased. Thus, cigarette smoking in pregnancy is sufficient to regulate nAChR subunits in the placenta, specifically α9 and δ subunits, and could contribute to the adverse effects of vasoconstriction and decreased re-epithelialisation (α9), and increased calcification and apoptosis (δ), seen in the placentas of smoking women. - Highlights: • All 16 mammalian nAChR subunits are expressed in the human placenta. • Cigarette smoking increases α9 mRNA and protein in the placenta. • Cigarette smoking decreases δ mRNA but increases δ protein in the placenta.

  17. Pharmacological stress is required for the anti-alcohol effect of the α3β4* nAChR partial agonist AT-1001.

    PubMed

    Cippitelli, Andrea; Brunori, Gloria; Gaiolini, Kelly A; Zaveri, Nurulain T; Toll, Lawrence

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol and nicotine are often taken together. The mechanisms underlying this frequent co-abuse are not well known. Genetic and pharmacological evidence suggests that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) containing the α3 and β4 subunits play a role in alcohol as well as nicotine addiction. AT-1001 is a high affinity α3β4 nAChR partial agonist recently found to block nicotine self-administration and relapse-like behavior in rats. Here, to study the involvement of α3β4 nAChRs in the mechanisms that regulate alcohol abuse we evaluated the effects of AT-1001 on alcohol taking and seeking in Sprague-Dawley rats. AT-1001 reduced operant alcohol self-administration at the highest dose examined (3.0 mg/kg), an effect also observed for food self-administration. A dose of 1.5 mg/kg AT-1001, which had no effect on alcohol or food self-administration, essentially eliminated reinstatement of alcohol seeking induced by yohimbine (0.625 mg/kg) whereas, reinstatement induced by alcohol-associated cues was not altered, nor did AT-1001 induce reinstatement of extinguished self-administration on its own. Finally, AT-1001 showed an anxiolytic activity when measured in the presence or absence of yohimbine stress in the elevated plus maze paradigm. Together, these observations do not support a specific involvement of the α3β4 nAChR in mediating alcohol reward or cue-induced relapse to alcohol seeking but rather indicate that the α3β4 nAChR partial agonism may constitute an attractive approach for treating alcohol use disorders exacerbated by elevated stress response.

  18. Investigation of Acetylcholine Receptor Diversity in a Nematode Parasite Leads to Characterization of Tribendimidine- and Derquantel-Sensitive nAChRs

    PubMed Central

    Neveu, Cedric; Cabaret, Jacques; Cortet, Jacques; Peineau, Nicolas; Abongwa, Melanie; Courtot, Elise; Robertson, Alan P.; Martin, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) of parasitic nematodes are required for body movement and are targets of important “classical” anthelmintics like levamisole and pyrantel, as well as “novel” anthelmintics like tribendimidine and derquantel. Four biophysical subtypes of nAChR have been observed electrophysiologically in body muscle of the nematode parasite Oesophagostomum dentatum, but their molecular basis was not understood. Additionally, loss of one of these subtypes (G 35 pS) was found to be associated with levamisole resistance. In the present study, we identified and expressed in Xenopus oocytes, four O. dentatum nAChR subunit genes, Ode-unc-38, Ode-unc-63, Ode-unc-29 and Ode-acr-8, to explore the origin of the receptor diversity. When different combinations of subunits were injected in Xenopus oocytes, we reconstituted and characterized four pharmacologically different types of nAChRs with different sensitivities to the cholinergic anthelmintics. Moreover, we demonstrate that the receptor diversity may be affected by the stoichiometric arrangement of the subunits. We show, for the first time, different combinations of subunits from a parasitic nematode that make up receptors sensitive to tribendimidine and derquantel. In addition, we report that the recombinant levamisole-sensitive receptor made up of Ode-UNC-29, Ode-UNC-63, Ode-UNC-38 and Ode-ACR-8 subunits has the same single-channel conductance, 35 pS and 2.4 ms mean open-time properties, as the levamisole-AChR (G35) subtype previously identified in vivo. These data highlight the flexible arrangements of the receptor subunits and their effects on sensitivity and resistance to the cholinergic anthelmintics; pyrantel, tribendimidine and/or derquantel may still be effective on levamisole-resistant worms. PMID:24497826

  19. Mucociliary transport in porcine trachea: differential effects of inhibiting chloride and bicarbonate secretion.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jeffrey L; Quinton, Paul M; Ballard, Stephen T

    2013-02-01

    This study was designed to assess the relative importance of Cl(-) and HCO(3)(-) secretion to mucociliary transport rate (MCT) in ex vivo porcine tracheas. MCT was measured in one group of tissues that was exposed to adventitial HCO(3)(-)-free solution while a parallel group was exposed to adventitial HCO(3)(-)-replete solution. After measurement of baseline MCT rates, acetylcholine (ACh) was added to stimulate submucosal gland mucous liquid secretion, and MCT rates were again measured. Before ACh addition, the mean MCT was higher in the HCO(3)(-)-free group (4.2 ± 0.9 mm/min) than in the HCO(3)(-)-replete group (2.3 ± 0.3 mm/min), but this difference was not statistically significant. ACh addition significantly increased MCT in both groups, but ACh-stimulated MCT was significantly lower in the HCO(3)(-)-free group (11.0 ± 1.5 mm/min) than in the HCO(3)(-)-replete group (17.0 ± 2.0 mm/min). A second series of experiments examined the effect on MCT of blocking Cl(-) secretion with 100 μM bumetanide. Before adding ACh, MCT in the bumetanide-treated group (1.0 ± 0.2 mm/min) was significantly lower than in the control group (3.8 ± 1.1 mm/min). ACh addition significantly increased MCT in both groups, but there was no significant difference between the bumetanide-treated group (21.4 ± 1.7 mm/min) and control group (19.5 ± 3.4 mm/min). These results indicate that ACh-stimulated MCT has greater dependence on HCO(3)(-) secretion, whereas the basal MCT rate has greater dependence on Cl(-) secretion. PMID:23204069

  20. Evaluation of Z-(R,R)-IQNP for the potential imaging of m2 mAChR rich regions of the brain and heart.

    PubMed

    McPherson, D W; Greenbaum, M; Luo, H; Beets, A L; Knapp, F F

    2000-01-01

    Alterations in the function or density of the m2 muscarinic (mAChR) subtype have been postulated to play an important role in various dementias such as Alzheimer's disease. The ability to image and quantify the m2 mAChR subtype is of importance for a better understanding of the m2 subtype function in various dementias. Z-(R)-1-Azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-y (R)-alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-alpha-phenylacetate (Z-(R,R)-IQNP) has demonstrated significant uptake in cerebral regions that contain a high concentration of m2 mAChR subtype in addition to heart tissue. The present study was undertaken to determine if the uptake of Z-(R,R)-IQNP in these regions is a receptor mediated process and to identify the radiospecies responsible for binding at the receptor site. A blocking study demonstrated cerebral and cardiac levels of activity were significantly reduced by pretreatment (2-3 mg/kg) of (R)-3-quinuclidinyl benzilate, dexetimide and scopolamine, established muscarinic antagonists. A direct comparison of the cerebral and cardiac uptake of [I-125]-Z-(R,R)-IQNP and [I-131]-E-(R,R)-IQNP (high uptake in ml, m4 rich mAChR cerebral regions) demonstrated Z-(R,R)-IQNP localized to a higher degree in cerebral and cardiac regions containing a high concentration of the m2 mAChR subtype as directly compared to E-(R,R)-IQNP. In addition, a study utilizing [I-123]-Z-(R,R)-IQNP, [I-131]-iododexetimide and [I-125]-R-3-quinuclidinyl S-4-iodobenzilate, Z-(R,R)-IQNP demonstrated significantly higher uptake and longer residence time in those regions which contain a high concentration of the m2 receptor subtype. Folch extraction of global brain and heart tissue at various times post injection of [I-125]-Z-(R,R)-IQNP demonstrated that approximately 80% of the activity was extracted in the lipid soluble fraction and identified as the parent ligand by TLC and HPLC analysis. These results demonstrate Z-(R,R)-IQNP has significant uptake, long residence time and high stability in

  1. Oooh, Your Aching Head!

    MedlinePlus

    ... RYE SIN-drome). previous continue When Should You Go to a Doctor? Headaches are very rarely a ... is particularly painful when a headache doesn't go away easily when a headache follows an injury, ...

  2. Transgenic overexpression of the presynaptic choline transporter elevates acetylcholine levels and augments motor endurance

    PubMed Central

    Holmstrand, Ericka C.; Lund, David; Cherian, Ajeesh Koshy; Wright, Jane; Martin, Rolicia F.; Ennis, Elizabeth A.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Sarter, Martin; Blakely, Randy D.

    2014-01-01

    The hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) sustains cholinergic signaling via the presynaptic uptake of choline derived from dietary sources or from acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-mediated hydrolysis of acetylcholine (ACh). Loss of cholinergic signaling capacity is associated with cognitive and motor deficits in humans and in animal models. Whereas genetic elimination of CHT has revealed the critical nature of CHT in maintaining ACh stores and sustaining cholinergic signaling, the consequences of elevating CHT expression have yet to be studied. Using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated transgenic methods, we generated mice with integrated additional copies of the mouse Slc5a7 gene. BAC–CHT mice are viable, appear to develop normally, and breed at wild-type (WT) rates. Biochemical studies revealed a 2 to 3-fold elevation in CHT protein levels in the CNS and periphery, paralleled by significant increases in [3H]HC-3 binding and synaptosomal choline transport activity. Elevations of ACh in the BAC–CHT mice occurred without compensatory changes in the activity of either choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) or AChE. Immunohistochemistry for CHT in BAC–CHT brain sections revealed markedly elevated CHT expression in the cell bodies of cholinergic neurons and in axons projecting to regions known to receive cholinergic innervation. Behaviorally, BAC–CHT mice exhibited diminished fatigue and increased speeds on the treadmill test without evidence of increased strength. Finally, BAC–CHT mice displayed elevated horizontal activity in the open field test, diminished spontaneous alteration in the Y-maze, and reduced time in the open arms of the elevated plus maze. Together, these studies provide biochemical, pharmacological and behavioral evidence that CHT protein expression and activity can be elevated beyond that seen in wild-type animals. BAC–CHT mice thus represent a novel tool to examine both the positive and negative

  3. Impaired terrestrial and arboreal locomotor performance in the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) after exposure to an AChE-inhibiting pesticide.

    PubMed

    DuRant, Sarah E; Hopkins, William A; Talent, Larry G

    2007-09-01

    We examined the effects of a commonly used AChE-inhibiting pesticide on terrestrial and arboreal sprint performance, important traits for predator avoidance and prey capture, in the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis). Lizards were exposed to carbaryl (2.5, 25, and 250 microg/g) and were raced before and 4, 24, and 96 h after dosing. In the terrestrial setting, exposure to low concentrations of carbaryl had stimulatory effects on performance, but exposure to the highest concentration was inhibitory. No stimulatory effects of carbaryl were noted in the arboreal environment and performance in lizards was reduced after exposure to both the medium and highest dose of carbaryl. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to high concentrations of carbaryl can have important sublethal consequences on fitness-related traits in reptiles and that arboreal locomotor performance is a more sensitive indicator of AChE-inhibiting pesticide poisoning than terrestrial locomotor performance. PMID:17360091

  4. The Frequency of Calcium Oscillations Induced by 5-HT, ACH, and KCl Determine the Contraction of Smooth Muscle Cells of Intrapulmonary Bronchioles

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jose F.; Sanderson, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Increased resistance of airways or blood vessels within the lung is associated with asthma or pulmonary hypertension and results from contraction of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). To study the mechanisms regulating these contractions, we developed a mouse lung slice preparation containing bronchioles and arterioles and used phase-contrast and confocal microscopy to correlate the contractile responses with changes in [Ca2+]i of the SMCs. The airways are the focus of this study. The agonists, 5-hydroxytrypamine (5-HT) and acetylcholine (ACH) induced a concentration-dependent contraction of the airways. High concentrations of KCl induced twitching of the airway SMCs but had little effect on airway size. 5-HT and ACH induced asynchronous oscillations in [Ca2+]i that propagated as Ca2+ waves within the airway SMCs. The frequency of the Ca2+ oscillations was dependent on the agonist concentration and correlated with the extent of sustained airway contraction. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+ or in the presence of Ni2+, the frequency of the Ca2+ oscillations declined and the airway relaxed. By contrast, KCl induced low frequency Ca2+ oscillations that were associated with SMC twitching. Each KCl-induced Ca2+ oscillation consisted of a large Ca2+ wave that was preceded by multiple localized Ca2+ transients. KCl-induced responses were resistant to neurotransmitter blockers but were abolished by Ni2+ or nifedipine and the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Caffeine abolished the contractile effects of 5-HT, ACH, and KCl. These results indicate that (a) 5-HT and ACH induce airway SMC contraction by initiating Ca2+ oscillations, (b) KCl induces Ca2+ transients and twitching by overloading and releasing Ca2+ from intracellular stores, (c) a sustained, Ni2+-sensitive, influx of Ca2+ mediates the refilling of stores to maintain Ca2+ oscillations and, in turn, SMC contraction, and (d) the magnitude of sustained airway SMC contraction is regulated by the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations

  5. Enhancing the Reliability of GPCR Models by Accounting for Flexibility of Their Pro-Containing Helices: the Case of the Human mAChR1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Pedretti, Alessandro; Mazzolari, Angelica; Ricci, Chiara; Vistoli, Giulio

    2015-04-01

    To better investigate the GPCR structures, we have recently proposed to explore their flexibility by simulating the bending of their Pro-containing TM helices so generating a set of models (the so-called chimeras) which exhaustively combine the two conformations (bent and straight) of these helices. The primary objective of the study is to investigate whether such an approach can be exploited to enhance the reliability of the GPCR models generated by distant templates. The study was focused on the human mAChR1 receptor for which a presumably reliable model was generated using the congener mAChR3 as the template along with a second less reliable model based on the distant β2-AR template. The second model was then utilized to produce the chimeras by combining the conformations of its Pro-containing helices (i.e., TM4, TM5, TM6 and TM7 with 16 modeled chimeras). The reliability of such chimeras was assessed by virtual screening campaigns as evaluated using a novel skewness metric where they surpassed the predictive power of the more reliable mAChR1 model. Finally, the virtual screening campaigns emphasize the opportunity of synergistically combining the scores of more chimeras using a specially developed tool which generates highly predictive consensus functions by maximizing the corresponding enrichment factors. PMID:27490167

  6. Mutations Causing Slow-Channel Myasthenia Reveal That a Valine Ring in the Channel Pore of Muscle AChR is Optimized for Stabilizing Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Ming; Okuno, Tatsuya; Milone, Margherita; Otsuka, Kenji; Takahashi, Koji; Komaki, Hirofumi; Giles, Elizabeth; Ohno, Kinji; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-10-01

    We identify two novel mutations in acetylcholine receptor (AChR) causing a slow-channel congenital myasthenia syndrome (CMS) in three unrelated patients (Pts). Pt 1 harbors a heterozygous βV266A mutation (p.Val289Ala) in the second transmembrane domain (M2) of the AChR β subunit (CHRNB1). Pts 2 and 3 carry the same mutation at an equivalent site in the ε subunit (CHRNE), εV265A (p.Val285Ala). The mutant residues are conserved across all AChR subunits of all species and are components of a valine ring in the channel pore, which is positioned four residues above the leucine ring. Both βV266A and εV265A reduce the amino acid size and lengthen the channel opening bursts by fourfold by enhancing gating efficiency by approximately 30-fold. Substitution of alanine for valine at the corresponding position in the δ and α subunit prolongs the burst duration four- and eightfold, respectively. Replacing valine at ε codon 265 either by a still smaller glycine or by a larger leucine also lengthens the burst duration. Our analysis reveals that each valine in the valine ring contributes to channel kinetics equally, and the valine ring has been optimized in the course of evolution to govern channel gating. PMID:27375219

  7. Mutations Causing Slow-Channel Myasthenia Reveal That a Valine Ring in the Channel Pore of Muscle AChR is Optimized for Stabilizing Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Ming; Okuno, Tatsuya; Milone, Margherita; Otsuka, Kenji; Takahashi, Koji; Komaki, Hirofumi; Giles, Elizabeth; Ohno, Kinji; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-10-01

    We identify two novel mutations in acetylcholine receptor (AChR) causing a slow-channel congenital myasthenia syndrome (CMS) in three unrelated patients (Pts). Pt 1 harbors a heterozygous βV266A mutation (p.Val289Ala) in the second transmembrane domain (M2) of the AChR β subunit (CHRNB1). Pts 2 and 3 carry the same mutation at an equivalent site in the ε subunit (CHRNE), εV265A (p.Val285Ala). The mutant residues are conserved across all AChR subunits of all species and are components of a valine ring in the channel pore, which is positioned four residues above the leucine ring. Both βV266A and εV265A reduce the amino acid size and lengthen the channel opening bursts by fourfold by enhancing gating efficiency by approximately 30-fold. Substitution of alanine for valine at the corresponding position in the δ and α subunit prolongs the burst duration four- and eightfold, respectively. Replacing valine at ε codon 265 either by a still smaller glycine or by a larger leucine also lengthens the burst duration. Our analysis reveals that each valine in the valine ring contributes to channel kinetics equally, and the valine ring has been optimized in the course of evolution to govern channel gating.

  8. External-Field-Induced Growth Effect of an a-C:H Film for Manipulating Its Medium-Range Nanostructures and Properties.

    PubMed

    Song, Hui; Ji, Li; Li, Hongxuan; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Weiqi; Zhou, Huidi; Chen, Jianmin

    2016-03-01

    A special catalytic growth effect (called the "external-field-induced effect") was found to exist on the poisoning target surface during the reactive sputtering process of a-C:H films. Enlightened by this effect, we demonstrate a facile approach to manipulate the medium-range-ordered nanostructure and mechanical and tribological properties of a-C:H films. By adjusting the plasma ionization degree, a graphene precursor was successfully produced at the graphite target surface through the synergistic catalytic effects of both the catalyst and plasma. Then, graphene was further sputtered into amorphous carbon films to form graphene-like nanoclusters. This special graphene-like nanostructure endows the a-C:H film with outstanding hardness, high elasticity, and excellent tribological properties. The elastic recovery of the film was improved to 92.5%, and the wear life in a vacuum environment was also prolonged to 8.8 × 10(5) cycles at a contact stress of 0.9 GPa, which suggests that medium-range-ordered clusters in an amorphous carbon matrix provide an important way to improve the properties of carbon films. PMID:26895554

  9. Impairment of contextual fear extinction by chronic nicotine and withdrawal from chronic nicotine is associated with hippocampal nAChR upregulation.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Oliver, Chicora; Huang, Peng; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-10-01

    Chronic nicotine and withdrawal from chronic nicotine have been shown to be major modulators of fear learning behavior. Moreover, recent studies from our laboratory have shown that acute nicotine impaired fear extinction and safety learning in mice. However, the effects of chronic nicotine and withdrawal on fear extinction are unknown. Therefore, the current experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of chronic nicotine as well as withdrawal from chronic nicotine on contextual fear extinction in mice. C57BL6/J mice were given contextual fear conditioning training and retention testing during chronic nicotine administration. Mice then received contextual fear extinction either during chronic nicotine or during withdrawal from chronic nicotine. Our results showed that contextual fear extinction was impaired both during chronic nicotine administration and subsequent withdrawal. However, it was also observed that the effects of prior chronic nicotine disappeared after 72 h in withdrawal, a timeline that closely matches with the timing of the chronic nicotine-induced upregulation of hippocampal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) density. Additional experiments found that 4 days, but not 1 day, of continuous nicotine administration upregulated hippocampal nAChRs and impaired contextual fear extinction. These effects disappeared following 72 h withdrawal. Overall, these experiments provide a potential link between nicotine-induced upregulation of hippocampal nAChRs and fear extinction deficits observed in patients with anxiety disorders, which may lead to advancements in the pharmacological treatment methods for this disorder. PMID:27378334

  10. Identification and Characterization of ML352: A Novel, Noncompetitive Inhibitor of the Presynaptic Choline Transporter

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) is the rate-limiting determinant of acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis, yet the transporter remains a largely undeveloped target for the detection and manipulation of synaptic cholinergic signaling. To expand CHT pharmacology, we pursued a high-throughput screen for novel CHT-targeted small molecules based on the electrogenic properties of transporter-mediated choline transport. In this effort, we identified five novel, structural classes of CHT-specific inhibitors. Chemical diversification and functional analysis of one of these classes identified ML352 as a high-affinity (Ki = 92 nM) and selective CHT inhibitor. At concentrations that fully antagonized CHT in transfected cells and nerve terminal preparations, ML352 exhibited no inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) or cholineacetyltransferase (ChAT) and also lacked activity at dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine transporters, as well as many receptors and ion channels. ML352 exhibited noncompetitive choline uptake inhibition in intact cells and synaptosomes and reduced the apparent density of hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) binding sites in membrane assays, suggesting allosteric transporter interactions. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed limited in vitro metabolism and significant CNS penetration, with features predicting rapid clearance. ML352 represents a novel, potent, and specific tool for the manipulation of CHT, providing a possible platform for the development of cholinergic imaging and therapeutic agents. PMID:25560927

  11. Critical metabolic roles of β-cell M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    de Azua, Inigo Ruiz; Gautam, Dinesh; Jain, Shalini; Guettier, Jean-Marc; Wess, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (mAChRs; M1–M5) regulate the activity of an extraordinarily large number of important physiological processes. We and others previously demonstrated that pancreatic β-cells are endowed with M3 mAChRs which are linked to G proteins of the Gq family. The activation of these receptors by ACh or other muscarinic agonists leads to the augmentation of glucose-induced insulin release via multiple mechanisms. Interestingly, in humans, ACh acting on human β-cell mAChRs is released from adjacent α-cells which express both choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (vAChT), indicative of the presence of a non-neuronal cholinergic system in human pancreatic islets. In order to shed light on the physiological roles of β-cell M3 receptors, we recently generated and analyzed various mutant mouse models. Specifically, we carried out studies with mice which overexpressed M3 receptors or mutant M3 receptors in pancreatic β-cells or which selectively lacked M3 receptors or M3-receptor-associated proteins in pancreatic β-cells. Our findings indicate that β-cell M3 receptors play a key role in maintaining proper insulin release and whole body glucose homeostasis and that strategies aimed at enhancing signaling through β-cell M3 receptors may prove useful to improve β-cell function for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). PMID:22525375

  12. Suppression of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in IL-10 gene-disrupted mice is associated with reduced B cells and serum cytotoxicity on mouse cell line expressing AChR.

    PubMed

    Poussin, M A; Goluszko, E; Hughes, T K; Duchicella, S I; Christadoss, P

    2000-11-01

    To analyze the role of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) pathogenesis, we induced clinical EAMG in C57BL/6 and IL-10 gene-knockout (KO) mice. IL-10 KO mice had a lower incidence and severity of EAMG, with less muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) loss. AChR-immunized IL-10 KO mice showed a significantly higher AChR-specific proliferative response, altered cytokine response, lower number of class II-positive cells and B-cells, but a greater CD5(+)CD19(+) population than C57BL/6 mice. The lower clinical incidence in IL-10 KO could be explained not by a reduction of the quantity, but by a possible difference in the pathogenicity of anti-AChR antibodies.

  13. Acetylcholine Receptor (AChR) Clustering Is Regulated Both by Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β (GSK3β)-dependent Phosphorylation and the Level of CLIP-associated Protein 2 (CLASP2) Mediating the Capture of Microtubule Plus-ends*

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sreya; Sladecek, Stefan; Pemble, Hayley; Wittmann, Torsten; Slotman, Johan A.; van Cappellen, Wiggert; Brenner, Hans-Rudolf; Galjart, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The postsynaptic apparatus of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) traps and anchors acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at high density at the synapse. We have previously shown that microtubule (MT) capture by CLASP2, a MT plus-end-tracking protein (+TIP), increases the size and receptor density of AChR clusters at the NMJ through the delivery of AChRs and that this is regulated by a pathway involving neuronal agrin and several postsynaptic kinases, including GSK3. Phosphorylation by GSK3 has been shown to cause CLASP2 dissociation from MT ends, and nine potential phosphorylation sites for GSK3 have been mapped on CLASP2. How CLASP2 phosphorylation regulates MT capture at the NMJ and how this controls the size of AChR clusters are not yet understood. To examine this, we used myotubes cultured on agrin patches that induce AChR clustering in a two-dimensional manner. We show that expression of a CLASP2 mutant, in which the nine GSK3 target serines are mutated to alanine (CLASP2–9XS/9XA) and are resistant to GSK3β-dependent phosphorylation, promotes MT capture at clusters and increases AChR cluster size, compared with myotubes that express similar levels of wild type CLASP2 or that are noninfected. Conversely, myotubes expressing a phosphomimetic form of CLASP2 (CLASP2–8XS/D) show enrichment of immobile mutant CLASP2 in clusters, but MT capture and AChR cluster size are reduced. Taken together, our data suggest that both GSK3β-dependent phosphorylation and the level of CLASP2 play a role in the maintenance of AChR cluster size through the regulated capture and release of MT plus-ends. PMID:25231989

  14. Preliminary Geological Map of the Ac-H-8 Nawish Quadrangle of Ceres: An Integrated Mapping Study Using Dawn Spacecraft Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigeri, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Carrozzo, Giacomo; Ammannito, Eleonora; Williams, David; Mest, Scott; Buczkowski, Debra; Preusker, Frank; Jaumann, Ralf; Roatsch, Thomas; Scully, Jennifer; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Herein we present the geologic mapping of the Ac-H-8 Nawish Quadrangle of dwarf planet Ceres, produced on the basis of the Dawn spacecraft data. The Ac-H-08 Nawish quadrangle is located between -22°S and 22°N and between 144°E and 216°E. At the north-east border, a polygonal, 75km-wide crater named Nawish gives the name to the whole quadrangle. An unamed, partially degraded, 100km-diameter crater is evident in the lower central sector of the quadrangle. Bright materials have been mapped and are associated with craters. For example, bright materials occur in the central peak region of Nawish crater and in the ejecta of an unnamed crater, which is located in the nearby quadrangle Ac-H-09. The topography of the area obtained from stereo-processing of imagery shows an highland in the middle of the quadrangle. Topography is lower in the northern and southern borders, with a altitude span of about 9500 meters. At the time of this writing geologic mapping was based on Framing Camera (FC) mosaics from the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO, 140 m/px) and Survey (415 m/px) orbits, including grayscale and color images and digital terrain models derived from stereo images. The first sessions of Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO, 35 m/px) images have been received as we are writing this abstract in the first half of January 2016. LAMO images represent the maximum spatial resolution images available for Ceres from the Dawn mission. Support of the Dawn Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams is acknowledged. This work is supported by grants from NASA, and from the German and Italian Space Agencies.

  15. Identification of the Chemical Bonding Prompting Adhesion of a-C:H Thin Films on Ferrous Alloy Intermediated by a SiCx:H Buffer Layer.

    PubMed

    Cemin, F; Bim, L T; Leidens, L M; Morales, M; Baumvol, I J R; Alvarez, F; Figueroa, C A

    2015-07-29

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) and several related materials (DLCs) may have ultralow friction coefficients that can be used for saving-energy applications. However, poor chemical bonding of a-C/DLC films on metallic alloys is expected, due to the stability of carbon-carbon bonds. Silicon-based intermediate layers are employed to enhance the adherence of a-C:H films on ferrous alloys, although the role of such buffer layers is not yet fully understood in chemical terms. The chemical bonding of a-C:H thin films on ferrous alloy intermediated by a nanometric SiCx:H buffer layer was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The chemical profile was inspected by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES), and the chemical structure was evaluated by Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The nature of adhesion is discussed by analyzing the chemical bonding at the interfaces of the a-C:H/SiCx:H/ferrous alloy sandwich structure. The adhesion phenomenon is ascribed to specifically chemical bonding character at the buffer layer. Whereas carbon-carbon (C-C) and carbon-silicon (C-Si) bonds are formed at the outermost interface, the innermost interface is constituted mainly by silicon-iron (Si-Fe) bonds. The oxygen presence degrades the adhesion up to totally delaminate the a-C:H thin films. The SiCx:H deposition temperature determines the type of chemical bonding and the amount of oxygen contained in the buffer layer.

  16. Preliminary Geological Map of the Ac-H-8 Nawish Quadrangle of Ceres: An Integrated Mapping Study Using Dawn Spacecraft Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigeri, A.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Carrorro, F. G.; Ammannito, E.; Williams, D. A.; Mest, S. C.; Buczkowski, D.; Preusker, F.; Jaumann, R.; Roatsch, T.; Scully, J. E. C.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Herein we present the geologic mapping of the Ac-H-8 Nawish Quadrangle of dwarf planet Ceres, produced on the basis of the Dawn spacecraft data. The Ac-H-08 Nawish quadrangle is located between -22°S and 22°N and between 144°E and 216°E. At the north-east border, a polygonal, 75km-wide crater named Nawish gives the name to the whole quadrangle. An unamed, partially degraded, 100km-diameter crater is evident in the lower central sector of the quadrangle. Bright materials have been mapped and are associated with craters. For example, bright materials occur in the central peak region of Nawish crater and in the ejecta of an unnamed crater, which is located in the nearby quadrangle Ac-H-09. The topography of the area obtained from stereo-processing of imagery shows an highland in the middle of the quadrangle. Topography is lower in the northern and southern borders, with a altitude span of about 9500 meters. At the time of this writing geologic mapping was performed on Framing Camera (FC) mosaics from the Approach (1.3 km/px) and Survey (415 m/px) orbits, including grayscale and color images and digital terrain models derived from stereo images. In Fall 2015 images from the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (140 m/px) will be used to refine the mapping, followed by Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (35 m/px) images in January 2016. Support of the Dawn Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams is acknowledged. This work is supported by grants from NASA, and from the German and Italian Space Agencies.

  17. Molecular dynamical simulations on a-C:H film growth from atomic flux of C and H: Effect of H fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, W. L.; Li, H. X.; Zhao, F.; Ji, L.; Du, W.; Zhou, H. D.; Chen, J. M.

    2010-04-01

    Molecular dynamical simulations are carried out to studying the hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) film growth from C and H atoms. The effects of the H fraction in source atoms and incident energy on the film formation are investigated. Our simulations show that almost all the H atoms incorporating into the films bond to carbon and the amount of H 2 molecules is very slight. Increasing the H fraction in source atoms raises the sp 3-C fraction, leads to a linear increase of H concentration in film, but decreases the film growth rate. The influence of H fraction on the film growth mechanism is also discussed.

  18. Sub-micro a-C:H patterning of silicon surfaces assisted by atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boileau, Alexis; Gries, Thomas; Noël, Cédric; Perito Cardoso, Rodrigo; Belmonte, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Micro and nano-patterning of surfaces is an increasingly popular challenge in the field of the miniaturization of devices assembled via top-down approaches. This study demonstrates the possibility of depositing sub-micrometric localized coatings—spots, lines or even more complex shapes—made of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) thanks to a moving XY stage. Deposition was performed on silicon substrates using chemical vapor deposition assisted by an argon atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. Acetylene was injected into the post-discharge region as a precursor by means of a glass capillary with a sub-micrometric diameter. A parametric study was carried out to study the influence of the geometric configurations (capillary diameter and capillary-plasma distance) on the deposited coating. Thus, the patterns formed were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, the chemical composition of large coated areas was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy according to the chosen atmospheric environment. The observed chemical bonds show that reactions of the gaseous precursor in the discharge region and both chemical and morphological stability of the patterns after treatment are strongly dependent on the surrounding gas. Various sub-micrometric a-C:H shapes were successfully deposited under controlled atmospheric conditions using argon as inerting gas. Overall, this new process of micro-scale additive manufacturing by atmospheric plasma offers unusually high-resolution at low cost.

  19. Acetylsalicylic acid and ascorbic acid combination improves cognition; via antioxidant effect or increased expression of NMDARs and nAChRs?

    PubMed

    Kara, Yusuf; Doguc, Duygu Kumbul; Kulac, Esin; Gultekin, Fatih

    2014-05-01

    Chronic inflammation occurs systematically in the central nervous system during ageing, it has been shown that neuroinflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative disorders. Aspirin, a nonselective COX inhibitor, as well as ascorbic acid, has been purported to protect cerebral tissue. We investigated the effects of subchronic aspirin and ascorbic acid usage on spatial learning, oxidative stress and expressions of NR2A, NR2B, nAChRα7, α4 and β2. Forty male rats (16-18 months) were divided into 4 groups, namely, control, aspirin-treated, ascorbic acid-treated, aspirin+ascorbic acid-treated groups. Following 10-weeks administration period, rats were trained and tested in the Morris water maze. 8-Hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine and malondialdehyde were evaluated by ELISA and HPLC, respectively. Receptor expressions were assessed by western blotting of hippocampi. Spatial learning performance improved partially in the aspirin group, but significant improvement was seen in the aspirin+ascorbic acid group (p < 0.05). While 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine and malondialdehyde levels were significantly decreased, NR2B and nAChRα7 expressions were significantly increased in the aspirin+ascorbic acid group as compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Subchronic treatment with aspirin+ascorbic acid in aged rats was shown to enhance cognitive performance and increase the expressions of several receptors related to learning and memory process.

  20. The influence of DC biasing on the uniformity of a-C:H films for three-dimensional substrates by using a plasma-based ion implantation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tsuda, Osamu; Tanaka, Akihiro; Koga, Yoshinori; Takai, Osamu

    2003-05-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films were synthesized by the use of a PBII technique using an electron cyclotron resonance plasma source with a mirror field, and the influence of the biasing conditions on the properties and the uniformity of the three-dimensional surfaces of a-C:H films was investigated. For convex faces, the film thickness was almost constant, independent of the deposition conditions, because a uniform plasma surrounded the substrates. For concave faces, the thickness of the films that formed without biasing and with only the application of a pulse bias decreased when the microwave-incident angle was decreased. On the other hand, when a DC bias was applied to the substrate in addition to a pulse bias, the uniformity of the thickness was much improved with a distribution within ±10%. The improvement in the uniformity was assumed to be the result of the continuous supply of ions in the plasma to the surfaces by the DC biasing.

  1. Electrical And OES Diagnostics Of A Magnetized RF Discharge In CH{sub 4} Created By A Multihole Cathode Used For a-C:H Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Djerourou, S.; Henda, K.; Ouchabane, M.

    2008-09-23

    The present work is carried out in the context of the electrical and spectroscopic study of a reactor used for a-C:H deposition. We have studied the influence of the operation system parameters (incident power, pressure) on the self-bias voltage and on the saturation ion current density. The optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is used for the diagnostic by actinometry to determine the relative concentration of species (CH, H) present in the discharge. These measurements have been made over a wide range of incident power inputs of 50-300 W and pressures of 20-100 mTorr. For electrical diagnostic, the results obtained showed that the energy and ion flow bombarding the substrate presented a maximum values at high incident power and decreased with pressure. For spectroscopic diagnostic, the relative concentration of hydrogen and the kinetic of methylidyne radical versus the operation system parameters are studied. The first correlation between electrical and spectroscopic parameters and a-C:H deposition was found, polymer-like thin films with high deposition rates can be obtained at low pressure and with grounded substrate holder.

  2. A type-II positive allosteric modulator of α7 nAChRs reduces brain injury and improves neurological function after focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fen; Jin, Kunlin; Uteshev, Victor V

    2013-01-01

    In the absence of clinically-efficacious therapies for ischemic stroke there is a critical need for development of new therapeutic concepts and approaches for prevention of brain injury secondary to cerebral ischemia. This study tests the hypothesis that administration of PNU-120596, a type-II positive allosteric modulator (PAM-II) of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), as long as 6 hours after the onset of focal cerebral ischemia significantly reduces brain injury and neurological deficits in an animal model of ischemic stroke. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by a transient (90 min) middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Animals were then subdivided into two groups and injected intravenously (i.v.) 6 hours post-MCAO with either 1 mg/kg PNU-120596 (treated group) or vehicle only (untreated group). Measurements of cerebral infarct volumes and neurological behavioral tests were performed 24 hrs post-MCAO. PNU-120596 significantly reduced cerebral infarct volume and improved neurological function as evidenced by the results of Bederson, rolling cylinder and ladder rung walking tests. These results forecast a high therapeutic potential for PAMs-II as effective recruiters and activators of endogenous α7 nAChR-dependent cholinergic pathways to reduce brain injury and improve neurological function after cerebral ischemic stroke. PMID:23951360

  3. Gentamicin blocks the ACh-induced BK current in guinea pig type II vestibular hair cells by competing with Ca²⁺ at the L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Guo, Chang-Kai; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Tao; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2014-04-22

    Type II vestibular hair cells (VHCs II) contain big-conductance Ca²⁺-dependent K⁺ channels (BK) and L-type calcium channels. Our previous studies in guinea pig VHCs II indicated that acetylcholine (ACh) evoked the BK current by triggering the influx of Ca²⁺ ions through L-type Ca²⁺ channels, which was mediated by M2 muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChRs). Aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as gentamicin (GM), are known to have vestibulotoxicity, including damaging effects on the efferent nerve endings on VHCs II. This study used the whole-cell patch clamp technique to determine whether GM affects the vestibular efferent system at postsynaptic M2-mAChRs or the membrane ion channels. We found that GM could block the ACh-induced BK current and that inhibition was reversible, voltage-independent, and dose-dependent with an IC₅₀ value of 36.3 ± 7.8 µM. Increasing the ACh concentration had little influence on GM blocking effect, but increasing the extracellular Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺]₀) could antagonize it. Moreover, 50 µM GM potently blocked Ca²⁺ currents activated by (-)-Bay-K8644, but did not block BK currents induced by NS1619. These observations indicate that GM most likely blocks the M2 mAChR-mediated response by competing with Ca²⁺ at the L-type calcium channel. These results provide insights into the vestibulotoxicity of aminoglycoside antibiotics on mammalian VHCs II.

  4. Energy Carriers Use in the World: Natural Gas - Conventional and Unconventional Gas Resources / Wykorzystanie Nośników Energii w Świecie: Zasoby Gazu Ziemnego w Złożach Konwencjonalnych i Niekonwencjonalnych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemek, Jakub; Nagy, Stanisław

    2012-11-01

    This paper discusses forecasts of energy carrier use with particular emphasis on the changing position of natural gas due to global climatic conditions and the increasing role of unconventional natural gas reservoirs. Allocation of natural gas resources in the world are discussed as well as global gas consumption and conditions for development of transport infrastructure and storage. The most important indicators of the energy security of countries are presented. The basic properties of unconventional deposits, and differences in the production/extraction of gas from the conventional and unconventional fields are given. In the paper are also discussed natural gas reserves in Poland, including possible non-conventional resources in the fields and issues of increasing the role of gas as an energy carrier in Poland in the background of the energy changes in Europe and the world. W pracy omówiono prognozy energetyczne wykorzystania energii ze szczególnym uwzględnieniem zmieniającej się pozycji gazu ziemnego z uwagi na uwarunkowania klimatyczne oraz wzrastającą role niekonwencjonalnych złóż gazu ziemnego. Omówiono alokację zasobów gazu ziemnego w świecie, zużycie gazu w regionach oraz warunki rozbudowy infrastruktury transportu i magazynowania. Przedstawiono najważniejsze wskaźniki dotyczące bezpieczeństwa energetycznego krajów. Omówiono podstawowe własności złóż niekonwencjonalnych oraz różnice w charakterze wydobycia gazu ze złóż konwencjonalnych i niekonwencjonalnych. Omówiono zasoby gazu w Polsce, w tym możliwe zasoby w złożach niekonwencjonalnych oraz zagadnienia zwiększenia roli gazu jako nośnika energii w Polsce w tle energetycznych zmian Europy i świata.

  5. Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  6. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  7. Evidence for a carotid body homolog in the lizard Tupinambis merianae.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Michelle N; Brink, Deidre L; Milsom, William K

    2015-01-15

    The homolog to the mammalian carotid body has not yet been identified in lizards. Observational studies and evolutionary history provide indirect evidence for the existence of a chemoreceptor population at the first major bifurcation of the common carotid artery in lizards, but a chemoreceptive role for this area has not yet been definitively demonstrated. We explored this possibility by measuring changes in cardiorespiratory variables in response to focal arterial injections of the hypoxia mimic sodium cyanide (NaCN) into the carotid artery of 12 unanesthetized specimens of Tupinambis merianae. These injections elicited increases in heart rate (f(H); 101±35% increase) and respiratory rate (f(R); 620±119% increase), but not mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). These responses were eliminated by vagal denervation. Similar responses were elicited by injections of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh) and serotonin (5-HT) but not norepinephrine. Heart rate and respiratory rate increases in response to NaCN could be blocked or reduced by antagonists to ACh (atropine) and/or 5-HT (methysergide). Finally, using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrate the presence of putative chemoreceptive cells immunopositive for the cholinergic cell marker vesicular ACh transporter (VAChT) and 5-HT on internal lattice-like structures at the carotid bifurcation. These results provide evidence in lizards for the existence of dispersed chemoreceptor cells at the first carotid bifurcation in the central cardiovascular area that have similar properties to known carotid body homologs, adding to the picture of chemoreceptor evolution in vertebrates.

  8. Cloning of eight Rhopalosiphum padi (Hemiptera: Aphididae) nAChR subunit genes and mutation detection of the β1 subunit in field samples from China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Qiao, Xianfeng; Li, Yuting; Fang, Bing; Zuo, Yayun; Chen, Maohua

    2016-09-01

    The bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi (L.), is one of the most important wheat pests. This aphid damages through direct feeding and by transmitting the Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV). Both types of damage significantly reduce the quality and yield of wheat crops globally. Insecticides are the primary method of controlling the bird cherry-oat aphid in China, yet this aphid species has developed resistance to different types of insecticides, especially organophosphates and carbamates. In the last decade, control of R. padi depends primarily on the spray of neonicotinoid insecticides, however, research on the resistance of R. padi to neonicotinoids has been limited. In this study, the full lengths of seven α-subunit (Rpα1, Rpα2, Rpα3, Rpα4, Rpα5, Rpα7-1, and Rpα7-2) and one β-subunit (Rpβ1) genes from R. padi were obtained with RT-PCR and RACE techniques. Sequence analysis showed that these genes had all the characteristics of the nAChR gene family and were highly homologous with the reported nAChR genes from other insects, and alternative splicing was detected in Rpα3 and Rpα5 subunits. Analysis of the cDNA sequence of the extracellular region of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor β1 subunit gene from 120 R. padi field samples collected in 11 Provinces revealed 17 single nucleotides polymorphism (SNP) sites, of which seven were amino acid polymorphism sites (V53I, V53G, N54T, A60T, F61L, W79C, and V83I) and two were in the loop D region (W79C and V83I). The current study will facilitate further studies on the molecular mechanisms of targeted resistance of the aphid to neonicotinoid insecticides. PMID:27521918

  9. Comparative analysis of the gene-dense ACHE/TFR2 region on human chromosome 7q22 with the orthologous region on mouse chromosome 5

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael D.; Riemer, Cathy; Martindale, Duane W.; Schnupf, Pamela; Boright, Andrew P.; Cheung, Tony L.; Hardy, Daniel M.; Schwartz, Scott; Scherer, Stephen W.; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Miller, Webb; Koop, Ben F.

    2001-01-01

    Chromosome 7q22 has been the focus of many cytogenetic and molecular studies aimed at delineating regions commonly deleted in myeloid leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes. We have compared a gene-dense, GC-rich sub-region of 7q22 with the orthologous region on mouse chromosome 5. A physical map of 640 kb of genomic DNA from mouse chromosome 5 was derived from a series of overlapping bacterial artificial chromosomes. A 296 kb segment from the physical map, spanning Ache to Tfr2, was compared with 267 kb of human sequence. We identified a conserved linkage of 12 genes including an open reading frame flanked by Ache and Asr2, a novel cation-chloride cotransporter interacting protein Cip1, Ephb4, Zan and Perq1. While some of these genes have been previously described, in each case we present new data derived from our comparative sequence analysis. Adjacent unfinished sequence data from the mouse contains an orthologous block of 10 additional genes including three novel cDNA sequences that we subsequently mapped to human 7q22. Methods for displaying comparative genomic information, including unfinished sequence data, are becoming increasingly important. We supplement our printed comparative analysis with a new, Web-based program called Laj (local alignments with java). Laj provides interactive access to archived pairwise sequence alignments via the WWW. It displays synchronized views of a dot-plot, a percent identity plot, a nucleotide-level local alignment and a variety of relevant annotations. Our mouse–human comparison can be viewed at http://web.uvic.ca/~bioweb/laj.html. Laj is available at http://bio.cse.psu.edu/, along with online documentation and additional examples of annotated genomic regions. PMID:11239002

  10. Optimisation and establishment of separation conditions of organic acids from Usnea longissima Ach. by pH-zone-refining counter-current chromatography: Discussion of the eluotropic sequence.

    PubMed

    Sun, Changlei; Liu, Feng; Sun, Jie; Li, Jia; Wang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The major bioactive constituents of Usnea longissima Ach. are organic acids. However, few recent literatures involve the preparative separation of these organic acids. In the present study, pH zone-refining counter-current chromatography is used to separate organic acids from crude sample of U. longissima Ach. The crude extract was separated with the two-phase solvent system Pet-EtAc-MeOH-H2O (5:5:3:7, v/v) with 10mM TFA in organic stationary phase and different concentration of the eluter in aqueous mobile phase for the screening of the most suitable separation conditions. From the crude extract (1.2g), 74.0mg of orsellinic acid at 92.7% purity, 55.5mg of 4-O-methylorsellinic acid at 97.7% purity, 353.5mg of evernic acid at 93.8% purity, 102.0mg of barbatic acid at 94.8% purity, 19.4 mg of diffractaic acid at 92.2% purity, and 44.9 mg of usnic acid at 95.7% purity were obtained using the selected conditions in which the concentration of TFA in stationary phase was 10mM and the concentration of NaOH in mobile phase was 10-20mM. The purities of the separated organic acids were measured by HPLC. And the data of electrospray ionization-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (ESI-LC/MS), (1)H NMR, and (13)C NMR were used for confirming chemical structures.

  11. Identification of key amino acid differences contributing to neonicotinoid sensitivity between two nAChR α subunits from Pardosa pseudoannulata.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangkun; Zhang, Yixi; Guo, Beina; Sun, Huahua; Liu, Chuanjun; Liu, Zewen

    2015-01-01

    Chemical insecticides are still primary methods to control rice planthoppers in China, which not only cause environmental pollution, insecticide residue and insecticide resistance, but also have negative effects on natural enemies, such as Pardosa pseudoannulata (the pond wolf spider), an important predatory enemy of rice planthoppers. Neonicotinoids insecticides, such as imidacloprid and thiacloprid, are insect-selective nAChRs agonists that are used extensively in the areas of crop protection and animal health, but have hypotoxicity to P. pseudoannulata. In the present study, two nAChR α subunits, Ppα1 or Ppα8, were found to be successfully expressed with rβ2 in Xenopus oocytes, but with much different sensitivity to imidacloprid and thiacloprid on two recombinant receptors Ppα1/rβ2 and Ppα8/rβ2. Key amino acid differences were found in and between the important loops for ligand binding. In order to well understand the relationship between the amino acid differences and neonicotinoid sensitivities, different segments in Ppα8 or Ppα1 with key amino acid differences were introduced into the corresponding regions of Ppα1 or Ppα8 to construct chimeras and then co-expressed with rβ2 subunit in Xenopus oocytes. The results from chimeras of both Ppα8 and Ppα1 showed that segments Δ5, Δ6, and Δ7 contributed to neonicotinoid sensitivities directly between two receptors. Although the segment Δ4 including all loop B region had no direct influences on neonicotinoid sensitivities, it could more remarkably influence neonicotinoid sensitivities when co-introductions with Δ5, Δ6 or Δ7. So, key amino acid differences in these four segments were important to neonicotinoid sensitivities, but the difference in Δ4 was likely ignored because of its indirect effects.

  12. The analgesic-like properties of the alpha7 nAChR silent agonist NS6740 is associated with non-conducting conformations of the receptor

    PubMed Central

    Papke, Roger L.; Bagdas, Deniz; Kulkarni, Abhijit R.; Gould, Timothy; AlSharari, Shakir D.; Thakur, Ganesh A.; Damaj, M. Imad

    2014-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of neurological disorders including chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Since α7 can function as a ligand-gated ion channel, drug development initially focused on ligands that were selective activators of the α7 ion channel. However, the best α7 drugs for chronic pain and inflammation indications may not be ion channel activators but rather “silent agonists”, which bind to the receptor but preferentially induce non-conducting states that modulate signal transduction in non-neuronal cells. One such compound is NS6740. We show that NS6740 selectively induces prolonged desensitization of α7 nAChRs. There are two forms of α7 desensitization that can be distinguished by their sensitivity to the positive allosteric modulators (PAMs). At high concentrations, NS6740 preferentially induces PAM-insensitive desensitization, which over the course of several minutes reverts to the sensitive form. NS6740 was tested in several pain models after in vivo administration in the mouse. Although it had no effects in acute thermal pain, NS6740 induced significant dose- and time-dependent antinociceptive activity in formalin- and acetic acid-induced nociceptive behaviors as well as in the chronic constrictive nerve injury (CCI) model for neuropathic pain. The antinociceptive activity of NS6740 in these models was α7-dependent. In addition, NS6740 administration reversed pain-induced aversion, an important affective component of pain. The time and concentration dependence of the effects were consistent with NS6740 induction of PAM-insensitive non-conducting states, suggesting that signal transduction required for analgesia is accomplished by α7 receptors in that conformation. PMID:25497451

  13. Transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2013-04-16

    This Teaching Resource provides and describes two animated lessons that illustrate general properties of transport proteins. The lesson called "transport protein classes" depicts major classes and subclasses of transport proteins. The "transporters, mechanism of action" lesson explains how transporters and P class ATPase (adenosine triphosphatase) pumps function. These animations serve as valuable resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these important factors. Courses that might use them include introductory biology, biochemistry, cell biology, physiology, and biophysics.

  14. In Vitro Activity of ACH-702, a New Isothiazoloquinolone, against Nocardia brasiliensis Compared with Econazole and the Carbapenems Imipenem and Meropenem Alone or in Combination with Clavulanic Acid ▿

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Campos-Rivera, Mayra Paola; Escalante-Fuentes, Wendy G.; Pucci, Michael J.; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Welsh, Oliverio

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro activities of ACH-702 and other antimicrobials against 30 Nocardia brasiliensis isolates were tested. The MIC50 (MIC for 50% of the strains tested) and MIC90 values of ACH-702 were 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml. The same values for econazole were 2 and 4 μg/ml. The MIC50 and MIC90 values of imipenem and meropenem were 64 and >64 μg/ml and 2 and 8 μg/ml, respectively; the addition of clavulanic acid to the carbapenems had no effect. PMID:20308390

  15. School Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Executive Educator, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This special section on student transportation offers a case study of a school system that recycles buses for safety drills; articles on fuel-saving strategies, the pros and cons of contracting for transportation services or operating a publicly owned bus fleet, and advice on full cost accounting for transportation costs; and a transportation…

  16. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  17. Synthesis and in vitro reactivation study of isonicotinamide derivatives of 2-(hydroxyimino)-N-(pyridin-3-yl)acetamide as reactivators of Sarin and VX inhibited human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE).

    PubMed

    Karade, Hitendra N; Raviraju, G; Acharya, B N; Valiveti, Aditya Kapil; Bhalerao, Uma; Acharya, Jyotiranjan

    2016-09-15

    Previously (Karade et al., 2014), we have reported the synthesis and in vitro evaluation of bis-pyridinium derivatives of pyridine-3-yl-(2-hydroxyimino acetamide), as reactivators of sarin and VX inhibited hAChE. Few of the molecules showed superior in vivo protection efficacy (mice model) (Kumar et al., 2014; Swami et al., 2016) in comparison to 2-PAM against DFP and sarin poisoning. Encouraged by these results, herein we report the synthesis and in vitro evaluation of isonicotinamide derivatives of pyridine-3-yl-(2-hydroxyimino acetamide) (4a-4d) against sarin and VX inhibited erythrocyte ghost hAChE. Reactivation kinetics of these compounds was studied and the determined kinetic parameters were compared with that of commercial reactivators viz. 2-PAM and obidoxime. In comparison to 2-PAM and obidoxime, oxime 4a and 4b exhibited enhanced reactivation efficacy toward sarin inhibited hAChE while oxime 4c showed far greater reactivation efficacy toward VX inhibited hAChE. The acid dissociation constant and IC50 values of these oximes were determined and correlated with the observed reactivation potential. PMID:27450532

  18. Preliminary Geological Map of the Ac-H-3 Dantu Quadrangle of Ceres: An Integrated Mapping Study Using Dawn Spacecraft Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneissl, T.; Schmedemann, N.; Neesemann, A.; Williams, D. A.; Crown, D. A.; Mest, S. C.; Buczkowski, D.; Scully, J. E. C.; Frigeri, A.; Ruesch, O.; Hiesinger, H.; Walter, S. H. G.; Jaumann, R.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Nathues, A.; Platz, T.; Hoffmann, M.; Schäfer, M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.; Kersten, E.; Naß, A.

    2015-12-01

    We are using Dawn spacecraft data to create a geologic map of the Ac-H-3 Dantu Quadrangle of dwarf planet Ceres. The quadrangle is located between 21-66˚N and 90-180˚E and includes the following dominant features: 1) the central and northern portion of the 124.6 km diameter impact crater Dantu; 2) crater chains and/or grooves oriented in an east-west direction; 3) a portion of the 84 km diameter impact crater Gaue, whose ejecta blanket covers the SW corner of the quadrangle. Dantu is a complex impact crater showing terraces, a central pit structure, concentric fractures, and smooth deposits on the crater floor. The materials interpreted to be ejecta deposits of Dantu show low crater frequencies and dominate the southern half of the quadrangle. These deposits appear to be relatively bright and correspond to parts of the #2 high albedo region observed by (1) with the HST indicating different composition and/or material properties than the surroundings. The east-west striking crater chains and grooves are mainly found in the southern half of the quadrangle. They seem to be connected to the crater chains found in Ac-H-4 Ezinu, the neighboring quadrangle to the east, and are potentially related to ballistic ejecta emplacement (see 2). Further work will be focused on Dantu crater and its complex interior and exterior. The current geologic map is based on Framing Camera (FC) image mosaics derived from Approach (~1.3 km/px) and Survey (~400 m/px) data as well as digital terrain models (DTMs) derived from stereo imagery. In the course of the mission, we will incorporate mosaics from the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (~140 m/px, Fall 2015) and Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (~35 m/px, Spring 2016) phases. We acknowledge the support of the Dawn Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams. This work is partly supported by the German Space Agency (DLR), grant 50 OW 1101. (1) Li, J-Y. et al. (2006), Icarus, 182, 143-160. (2) Scully, J.E.C. et al. (2015), this conference.

  19. Electronic structure calculations toward new potentially AChE inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, A. A. N.; Martins, J. B. L.; Gargano, R.; dos Santos, M. L.; Romeiro, L. A. S.

    2007-10-01

    The main purpose of this study was the use of natural non-isoprenoid phenolic lipid of cashew nut shell liquid from Anacardium occidentale as lead material for generating new potentially candidates of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Therefore, we studied the electronic structure of 15 molecules derivatives from the cardanol using the following groups: methyl, acetyl, N, N-dimethylcarbamoyl, N, N-dimethylamine, N, N-diethylamine, piperidine, pyrrolidine, and N-benzylamine. The calculations were performed at RHF level using 6-31G, 6-31G(d), 6-31+G(d) and 6-311G(d,p) basis functions. Among the proposed compounds we found that the structures with substitution by acetyl, N, N-dimethylcarbamoyl, N, N-dimethylamine, and pyrrolidine groups were better correlated to rivastigmine indicating possible activity.

  20. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  1. Aches and pains during pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy strains your back and posture. To avoid or reduce backaches, you can: Stay physically fit, walk, and stretch regularly. Wear low-heeled shoes. Sleep on your side with a pillow between your legs. Sit in a chair ...

  2. Keele Aches and Pains Study protocol: validity, acceptability, and feasibility of the Keele STarT MSK tool for subgrouping musculoskeletal patients in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Paul; Hill, Jonathan C; Protheroe, Joanne; Afolabi, Ebenezer K; Lewis, Martyn; Beardmore, Ruth; Hay, Elaine M; Mallen, Christian D; Bartlam, Bernadette; Saunders, Benjamin; van der Windt, Danielle A; Jowett, Sue; Foster, Nadine E; Dunn, Kate M

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions represent a considerable burden worldwide, and are predominantly managed in primary care. Evidence suggests that many musculoskeletal conditions share similar prognostic factors. Systematically assessing patient’s prognosis and matching treatments based on prognostic subgroups (stratified care) has been shown to be both clinically effective and cost-effective. This study (Keele Aches and Pains Study) aims to refine and examine the validity of a brief questionnaire (Keele STarT MSK tool) designed to enable risk stratification of primary care patients with the five most common musculoskeletal pain presentations. We also describe the subgroups of patients, and explore the acceptability and feasibility of using the tool and how the tool is best implemented in clinical practice. The study design is mixed methods: a prospective, quantitative observational cohort study with a linked qualitative focus group and interview study. Patients who have consulted their GP or health care practitioner about a relevant musculoskeletal condition will be recruited from general practice. Participating patients will complete a baseline questionnaire (shortly after consultation), plus questionnaires 2 and 6 months later. A subsample of patients, along with participating GPs and health care practitioners, will be invited to take part in qualitative focus groups and interviews. The Keele STarT MSK tool will be refined based on face, discriminant, construct, and predictive validity at baseline and 2 months, and validated using data from 6-month follow-up. Patient and clinician perspectives about using the tool will be explored. This study will provide a validated prognostic tool (Keele STarT MSK) with established cutoff points to stratify patients with the five most common musculoskeletal presentations into low-, medium-, and high-risk subgroups. The qualitative analysis of patient and health care perspectives will inform practitioners on how to embed the tool

  3. Developmental plasticity in fat patterning of Ache children in response to variation in interbirth intervals: a preliminary test of the roles of external environment and maternal reproductive strategies.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jack; Hurtado, Ana Magdalena; Pearson, Osbjorn M; Hill, Kim R; Jones, Troy; Frey, M Anderson

    2009-01-01

    A firm link between small size at birth and later more centralized fat patterning has been established in previous research. Relationships between shortened interbirth intervals and small size at birth suggest that maternal energetic prioritization may be an important, but unexplored determinant of offspring fat patterning. Potential adaptive advantages to centralized fat storage (Baker et al., 2008: In: Trevathan W, McKenna J, Smith EO, editors. Evolutionary Medicine and Health: New Perspectives. New York: Oxford) suggest that relationships with interbirth intervals may reflect adaptive responses to variation in patterns of maternal reproductive effort. Kuzawa (2005: Am J Hum Biol 17:5-21; 2008: In: Trevathan W, McKenna J, Smith EO, editors. Evolutionary Medicine and Health: New Perspectives. New York: Oxford) has argued that maternal mediation of the energetic quality of the environment is a necessary component of developmental plasticity models invoking predictive adaptive responses (Gluckman and Hanson 2004: Trends Endocrinol Metab 15:183-187). This study tested the general hypothesis that shortened interbirth intervals would predict more centralized fat patterning in offspring. If long-term maternally mediated signals are important determinants of offspring responses, then we expected to observe a relationship between the average interbirth interval of mothers and offspring adiposity, with no relationship with the preceding interval. Such a finding would suggest that maternal, endogenous resource allocation decisions are related to offspring physiology in a manner consistent with Kuzawa's description. We observed exactly such a relationship among the Ache of Paraguay, suggesting that maternally mediated in utero signals of postnatal environments may be important determinants of later physiology. The implications of these findings are reviewed in light of life history and developmental plasticity theories and ourability to generalize the results to other

  4. Preliminary Geological Map of the Ac-H-1 Asari Quadrangle of Ceres: An Integrated Mapping Study Using Dawn Spacecraft Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruesch, O.; McFadden, L. A.; Hiesinger, H.; Scully, J. E. C.; Kneissl, T.; Hughson, K.; Williams, D. A.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Schmedemann, N.; Marchi, S.; Jaumann, R.; Nathues, A.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    We used geologic mapping applied to Dawn spacecraft data as a tool to understand the geologic history of the Ac-H-1 Asari quadrangle of dwarf planet Ceres. The Dawn Framing Camera observed the quadrangle (north polar area: 66°N-90°N) from an altitude of 4424 km and a clear-filter mosaic was produced at a spatial resolution of 400 m/pixel. A stereo-photogrammetric digital elevation model was calculated from images acquired during a higher altitude resulting in a spatial resolution of 1.4 km/pixel. Key characteristics of the study area are (1) a high density of impact craters and (2) moderate topographic variations. We measured a crater density of 9.8E-04 (km-2) for crater diameters >10 km, the highest on Ceres. Few isolated topographic highs (plateaus), reaching ~5 km in altitude relative to the ellipsoid, are present. Their irregular shape is often sculpted by impacts. We also note a positive relief with relatively steep slopes (~13°) and a cone-like shape centered at 85°N/8°E. Topographic lows, reaching -4 km, correspond to the floors of impact craters with diameters up to 64 km. The morphology of impact craters exhibits varying degrees of degradation. Degraded crater floors show central peaks and mass wasting deposits. The largest morphologically fresh deposit (78°N/38°E) is 20 km long, and has a lobate shape with striations on its surface. It extends from a crater rim downslope. No extensive ejecta deposits are present in the study area. In the course of the ongoing mission, we will incorporate mosaics from the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (~140 m/pixel) and Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (~35 m/pixel) phases to complete the preliminary photo-geological map and stratigraphy.

  5. Preliminary Geological Map of the Ac-H-9 Occator Quadrangle of Ceres: An Integrated Mapping Study Using Dawn Spacecraft Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczkowski, D.; Yingst, R. A.; Williams, D. A.; Mest, S. C.; Scully, J. E. C.; Crown, D. A.; Schenk, P.; Jaumann, R.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Platz, T.; Nathues, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Schäfer, M.; Marchi, S.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    We used geologic mapping applied to Dawn spacecraft data as a tool to understand the geologic history of the Ac-H-9 Occator quadrangle of dwarf planet Ceres. This region, located between 22˚S-22˚N and 216-288˚E, is one of two longitudinally distinct regions on Ceres where ESA Herschel space telescope data suggested a release of water vapor [1] and hosts: 1) the 92 km diameter impact crater Occator in the NW of the quadrangle, whose rim is scalloped and whose interior encompasses Hubble "Bright Spot 5"; 2) the 115 km diameter crater Kirnis, a degraded crater that contains a large dome-like feature on the western half of its floor; and 3) regional linear structures, that both cut crater rims (including Occator and Kirnis) and affect crater shapes. Key goals of the ongoing mapping are to 1) determine the source of the bright spots in Occator; 2) determine if the dome-like feature in Kirnis resulted from a mass-wasting or is a product of uplift; and 3) assess the relationships between linear structural features and impact craters, including the effects of surface stress regimes on crater formation and modification. At the time of this writing geologic mapping was performed on Framing Camera (FC) mosaics from late Approach (1.3 km/px) and Survey (415 m/px) orbits, including clear filter and color images and digital terrain models derived from stereo images. In Fall 2015 images from the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (140 m/px) will be used to refine the mapping, followed by Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (35 m/px) images starting in December 2015. Support of the Dawn Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams is acknowledged. This work is supported by grants from NASA through the Dawn project, and from the German and Italian Space Agencies. Reference: [1] Küppers, M., et al. (2014). Nature, v. 505, 525-527.

  6. The impact of adenosine and an A2A adenosine receptor agonist on the ACh-induced increase in intracellular calcium of the glomus cells of the cat carotid body.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Robert S; Shirahata, Machiko; Chang, Irene

    2009-12-01

    The carotid body (CB) is a polymodal chemosensor of arterial blood located next to the internal carotid artery. The basic chemosensing unit is composed of the neurotransmitter (NT)-containing glomus cells (GCs) and the sensory afferent fibers synapsing onto the GCs. Nicotinic and muscarinic receptors have been found on both the sensory afferent fibers and on the GCs. Neural output from the CB (CBNO) increases when arterial blood perfusing it is hypoxic, hypoglycemic, hypercapnic, or acidic. The increased CBNO due to GC release of excitatory NTs must be preceded by an entrance of calcium into the GCs. With repeated release of ACh from the GCs, cholinergic receptors could become desensitized, particularly nicotinic receptors which function as calcium channels. The purpose of the present study was to see if adenosine (ADO), known to alter receptor sensitivities, could attenuate or eliminate any desensitization of the nicotinic receptors occurring during the repeated application of ACh. Cat CBs were harvested with techniques approved by the University's Animal Care/Use Committee. The GCs were cultured and prepared for detecting [Ca(++)](i) with standard techniques. Repeated application of ACh produced a progressively decreasing increase in [Ca(++)](i). With the use of ADO or an A2(A) ADO receptor agonist the decrease was avoided. Though ADO also increased GC [Ca(++)](i), the sum of ADO increase and ACh increase, when superfused separately, was less than the increase when they were both included in the same superfusion. This suggested the possible involvement of a new path in the action. Potential mechanisms to explain the phenomena are discussed. PMID:19761761

  7. miR-434-3p and DNA hypomethylation co-regulate eIF5A1 to increase AChRs and to improve plasticity in SCT rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Fei-Fei; Xia, Qing-Jie; Liu, Wei; Xia, Lei; Qian, Bao-Jiang; You, Ling; He, Mu; Yang, Jin-Liang; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) serve as connections between motor neurons and skeletal muscle and are essential for recovery from spinal cord transection (SCT). Recently, microRNAs have emerged as important potential biotherapeutics for several diseases; however, whether miRNAs operate in the modulation of AChRs remains unknown. We found increased AChRs numbers and function scores in rats with SCT; these increases were reduced following the injection of a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A1 (eIF5A1) shRNA lentivirus into the hindlimb muscle. Then, high-throughput screening for microRNAs targeting eIF5A1 was performed, and miR-434-3p was found to be robustly depleted in SCT rat skeletal muscle. Furthermore, a highly conserved miR-434-3p binding site was identified within the mRNA encoding eIF5A1 through bioinformatics analysis and dual-luciferase assay. Overexpression or knockdown of miR-434-3p in vivo demonstrated it was a negative post-transcriptional regulator of eIF5A1 expression and influenced AChRs expression. The microarray-enriched Gene Ontology (GO) terms regulated by miR-434-3p were muscle development terms. Using a lentivirus, one functional gene (map2k6) was confirmed to have a similar function to that of miR-434-3p in GO terms. Finally, HRM and MeDIP-PCR analyses revealed that DNA demethylation also up-regulated eIF5A1 after SCT. Consequently, miR-434-3p/eIF5A1 in muscle is a promising potential biotherapy for SCI repair. PMID:26964899

  8. The 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane scaffold for subtype selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligands. Part 1: the influence of different hydrogen bond acceptor systems on alkyl and (hetero)aryl substituents.

    PubMed

    Eibl, Christoph; Tomassoli, Isabelle; Munoz, Lenka; Stokes, Clare; Papke, Roger L; Gündisch, Daniela

    2013-12-01

    3,7-Diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane is a naturally occurring scaffold interacting with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). When one nitrogen of the 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane scaffold was implemented in a carboxamide motif displaying a hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) functionality, compounds with higher affinities and subtype selectivity for α4β2(∗) were obtained. The nature of the HBA system (carboxamide, sulfonamide, urea) had a strong impact on nAChR interaction. High affinity ligands for α4β2(∗) possessed small alkyl chains, small un-substituted hetero-aryl groups or para-substituted phenyl ring systems along with a carboxamide group. Electrophysiological responses of selected 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane derivatives to Xenopus oocytes expressing various nAChR subtypes showed diverse activation profiles. Compounds with strongest agonistic profiles were obtained with small alkyl groups whereas a shift to partial agonism/antagonism was observed for aryl substituents. PMID:24156938

  9. Choline Transporter Hemizygosity Results in Diminished Basal Extracellular Dopamine Levels in Nucleus Accumbens and Blunts Dopamine Elevations Following Cocaine or Nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yu; Dani, John A.; Blakely, Randy D.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) signaling in the central nervous system mediates the addictive capacities of multiple commonly abused substances, including cocaine, amphetamine, heroin and nicotine. The firing of DA neurons residing in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and the release of DA by the projections of these neurons in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), is under tight control by cholinergic signaling mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs). The capacity for cholinergic signaling is dictated by the availability and activity of the presynaptic, high-affinity, choline transporter (CHT, SLC5A7) that acquires choline in an activity-dependent matter to sustain ACh synthesis. Here, we present evidence that a constitutive loss of CHT expression, mediated by genetic elimination of one copy of the Slc5a7 gene in mice (CHT+/−), leads to a significant reduction in basal extracellular DA levels in the NAc, as measured by in vivo microdialysis. Moreover, CHT heterozygosity results in blunted DA elevations following systemic nicotine or cocaine administration. These findings reinforce a critical role of ACh signaling capacity in both tonic and drug-modulated DA signaling and argue that genetically-imposed reductions in CHT that lead to diminished DA signaling may lead to poor responses to reinforcing stimuli, possibly contributing to disorders linked to perturbed cholinergic signaling including depression and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). PMID:23939187

  10. Intercellular transport.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2013-04-16

    These animations depict generalities of intercellular transport. The animation called "permeability and transport" demonstrates the permeability of four classes of molecules. The "gap junctions" animation shows how these intercellular complexes exclude large factors while they allow small factors to diffuse between cells. These animations serve as useful resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these processes. Courses that might use them include biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, introductory biology, and physiology.

  11. Distribution and innervation of putative peripheral arterial chemoreceptors in the red-eared slider (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    PubMed

    Reyes, Catalina; Fong, Angelina Y; Milsom, William K

    2015-06-15

    Peripheral arterial chemoreceptors have been isolated to the common carotid artery, aorta, and pulmonary artery of turtles. However, the putative neurotransmitters associated with these chemoreceptors have not yet been described. The goal of the present study was to determine the neurochemical content, innervations, and distribution of putative oxygen-sensing cells in the central vasculature of turtles and to derive homologies with peripheral arterial chemoreceptors of other vertebrates. We used tract tracing together with immunohistochemical markers for cholinergic cells (vesicular acetylcholine transporter [VAChT]), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine synthesis), and serotonin (5HT) to identify putative oxygen-sensing cells and to determine their anatomical relation to branches of the vagus nerve (Xth cranial nerve). We found potential oxygen-sensing cells in all three chemosensory areas innervated by branches of the Xth cranial nerve. Cells containing either 5HT or VAChT were found in all three sites. The morphology and size of these cells resemble glomus cells found in amphibians, mammals, tortoises, and lizards. Furthermore, we found populations of cholinergic cells located at the base of the aorta and pulmonary artery that are likely involved in efferent regulation of vessel resistance. Catecholamine-containing cells were not found in any of the putative chemosensitive areas. The presence of 5HT- and VAChT-immunoreactive cells in segments of the common carotid artery, aorta, and pulmonary artery appears to reflect a transition between cells containing the major neurotransmitters seen in fish (5HT) and mammals (ACh and adenosine).

  12. Preliminary Geological Map of the Ac-H-13 Urvara Quadrangle of Ceres: An Integrated Mapping Study Using Dawn Spacecraft Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. A.; Sizemore, H. G.; Platz, T.; O'Brien, D. P.; Mest, S. C.; Yingst, R. A.; Crown, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Schenk, P.; Scully, J. E. C.; Jaumann, R.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Nathues, A.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We used geologic mapping applied to Dawn spacecraft data as a tool to understand the geologic history of the Ac-H-13 Urvara Quadrangle of dwarf planet Ceres. This region, located between 21˚S-66˚S and 180-270˚E, is dominated by the Urvara basin in the east and cratered plains in the west. The elevation of the cratered plains is intermediate between the identified "highland" and "lowland" units of Ceres. Plains in the SW corner of the quadrangle are hummocky and heavily cratered, while the NW corner is smoother and less densely cratered. Features of note include 1) the 200 km diameter Urvara basin, which includes a degraded northern rim and smooth interior and exterior material that hosts a significantly lower impact crater density than most of the rest of Ceres' surface; 2) semi-radial curvilinear structures extending to the east and west of Urvara; 3) two large-scale dome structures 10s of km in diameter exterior to Urvara; and 4) numerous small-scale domical structures (<12 km diameter) associated with the smooth material interior to the basin. Key goals of the ongoing mapping are to assess the types of resurfacing processes that might be responsible for producing the smooth units, and to assess the processes responsible for the development of large and small dome structures. At the time of this writing geologic mapping was performed on Framing Camera (FC) mosaics from the Approach (1.3 km/px) and Survey (415 m/px) orbits, including clear filter and color images and digital terrain models derived from stereo images. In Fall 2015 images from the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (140 m/px) will be used to refine the mapping, followed by Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (35 m/px) images starting in December 2015. Support of the Dawn Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams is acknowledged. This work is supported by grants from NASA, the Max Planck Society and from the German and Italian Space Agencies.

  13. Preliminary Geological Map of the Ac-H-11 Sintana Quadrangle of Ceres: An Integrated Mapping Study Using Dawn Spacecraft Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roatsch, T.; Schulzeck, F.; Jaumann, R.; Krohn, K.; Williams, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Mest, S. C.; Scully, J. E. C.; von der Gathen, I.; Kersten, E.; Matz, K. D.; Naß, A.; Otto, K.; Pieters, C. M.; Preusker, F.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Schroeder, S.; Stephan, K.; Wagner, R. J.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Ac-H-11 Sintana is one of 15 geologic mapping quadrangles on the dwarf planet Ceres, which are used to identify geologic units and features. The quadrangle is located in the southern hemisphere of Ceres between 21-66°S and 0-90°E Results of our geologic mapping will contribute to the understanding of the geologic history and surface-forming processes of this quadrangle. The dominant feature is an alignment of three craters in the topographically lower center of the quadrangle. These craters illustrate the diversity of crater forms, inner structures and symmetries, such as terraced walls and elongated central structures. There are numerous central peaks inside craters of different sizes. The largest craters in the quadrangle reveal more complex inner structures and flat floors. Great variation in the slopes of crater walls and degradation states of crater rims can be found, as well as mass wasting features, such as landslides. Several linear structures are evident, which will be distinguished and analyzed. Possible explanations for these structures include secondary crater chains and pit chains. A positive topography feature is found to the south of the Sintana crater. Examining aforementioned features will help to assess surface composition and local tectonics. Different ratios of color-filter images suggest a major geological boundary in the NE of the quadrangle. Visible and infrared spectroscopic data will contribute to the compositional interpretation. The mapping is based on a stereo digital terrain model, clear-filter images and images of different color-filter ratios derived from the Framing Camera onboard the Dawn spacecraft. To date, resolutions of 1.3 km/px from the approach phase in Spring 2015, and 415 m/px from the Survey Orbit, in June 2015, are used in geological mapping. Higher resolution images will be obtained during the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (140 m/px) in Fall 2015, followed by the Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (35 m/px) in the beginning of

  14. Preliminary Geological Map of the Ac-H-6 Haulani Quadrangle of Ceres: An Integrated Mapping Study Using Dawn Spacecraft Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roatsch, T.; Krohn, K.; Jaumann, R.; Naß, A.; Otto, K.; Schroeder, S.; Williams, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Mest, S. C.; Scully, J. E. C.; von der Gathen, I.; Kersten, E.; Matz, K. D.; Pieters, C. M.; Preusker, F.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Schulzeck, F.; Stephan, K.; Tosi, F.; Wagner, R. J.; Zambon, F.; Russell, C.; Raymond, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We used geologic mapping applied to Dawn spacecraft data as a tool to understand the geologic history of the Ac-H-6 Haulani Quadrangle of dwarf planet Ceres. This region, located between 22˚S-22˚N and 0-72˚E, is dominated by the 31km diameter Haulani impact crater in the west. Haulani shows a bright interior and is surrounded by bright ejecta, which preferentially extends westward. Photometrically corrected data show that small rays radially extend over several hundred kilometers to the west. A heavily cratered elevated plain extends around the equator to the NE, interrupted by a trough in the east. This plain seems to be part of a dominant geological unit crossing Ceres. A crater in the southern part of the plain reveals possible flow features extending to the NW, maybe of volcanic origin. The quadrangle is also affected by many impact craters with modified floors: smooth infilling, melted material, central peaks, possible domes and mass wasting. Some candidate volcanic domes occur in the northwestern and southern parts of the quadrangle. Linear depressions cross the quadrangle in W-E direction, with a slight tendency to NW. A set of small linear depressions close to each other are found in the SE. They are orientated in NW direction crossed by one in WE direction. At the time of writing, geologic mapping was performed on Framing Camera (FC) mosaics from the Approach (1.3 km/px) and Survey (415 m/px) orbits, including grayscale and color images and digital terrain models derived from stereo images. In Fall 2015 images from the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (140 m/px) will be available to refine the mapping, followed by Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (35 m/px) images in January 2016. The key goal of the ongoing mapping is to analyze, whether the origin of the bright material of the Haulani crater is endogenic or exogenic. Additionally, domes and linear depressions could be of volcanic and volcanic-tectonic origin. This work is supported by the HGF Postdoc Program.

  15. Preliminary Geological Map of the Ac-H-12 Toharu Quadrangle of Ceres: An Integrated Mapping Study Using Dawn Spacecraft Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mest, S. C.; Williams, D. A.; Crown, D. A.; Yingst, R. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Schenk, P.; Scully, J. E. C.; Jaumann, R.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Platz, T.; Nathues, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Schäfer, M.; Marchi, S.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We are using recent data from the Dawn spacecraft to map the geology of the Ac-H-12 Toharu Quadrangle (21-66°S, 90-180°E) of the dwarf planet Ceres in order to examine its surface geology and understand its geologic history. At the time of this writing, mapping was performed on Framing Camera (FC) mosaics from late Approach (1.3 km/px) and Survey (415 m/px) orbits, including clear filter and color images and digital terrain models derived from stereo images. Images from the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (140 m/px) will be used to refine the map in Fall 2015, followed by the Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (35 m/px) starting in December 2015. The quad is named after crater Toharu (87 km diameter; 49°S, 155°E). The southern rim of Kerwan basin (284 km diameter) is visible along the northern edge of the quad, which is preserved as a low-relief scarp. The quad exhibits smooth terrain in the north, and more heavily cratered terrain in the south. The smooth terrain forms nearly flat-lying plains in some areas, such as on the floor and to the southeast of Kerwan, and overlies hummocky materials in other areas. These smooth materials extend over a much broader area outside of the quad, and appear to contain some of the lowest crater densities on Ceres. Impact craters exhibit a range of coinciding sizes and preservation styles. Smaller craters (<40 km) generally appear morphologically "fresh", and their rims are nearly circular and raised above the surrounding terrain. Larger craters, such as Toharu, appear more degraded, exhibiting irregularly shaped, sometimes scalloped, rim structures, and debris lobes on their floors. Numerous craters (> 20 km) contain central mounds; at current FC resolution, it is difficult to discern if these are primary structures (i.e., central peaks) or secondary features. Support of the Dawn Instrument, Operations, & Science Teams is acknowledged. This work is supported by grants from NASA, DLR and MPG.

  16. Preliminary Geological Map of the Ac-H-7 Kerwan Quadrangle of Ceres: An Integrated Mapping Study Using Dawn Spacecraft Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. A.; Crown, D. A.; Mest, S. C.; Buczkowski, D.; Schenk, P.; Scully, J. E. C.; Jaumann, R.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Platz, T.; Nathues, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Schäfer, M.; Marchi, S.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We used geologic mapping applied to Dawn spacecraft data as a tool to understand the geologic history of the Ac-H-7 Kerwan Quadrangle of dwarf planet Ceres. This region, located between 22˚S-22˚N and 72-144˚E, hosts four primary features: 1) the northern part of the 284 km diameter impact basin Kerwan in the center and SE corner of the quadrangle, whose rim is degraded and whose interior has been filled with a 'smooth material' that hosts a significantly lower impact crater density than most of the rest of Ceres' surface; 2) a portion of the 125 km diameter crater Dantu, whose ejecta field covers the NE corner of the quadrangle and where color data show both bright and dark materials, suggesting excavation of terrains of different compositions; 3) an unnamed double crater in the NW corner of the quadrangle surrounded by an ejecta field; and 4) a heavily cratered plains unit in the SW corner of the quadrangle that appears to be part of the dominant unit across Ceres surface. Key goals of the ongoing mapping are to assess the types of processes that might be responsible for resurfacing by the smooth unit, and understanding the nature of the variably-colored Dantu ejecta. The Dantu region is one of two longitudinally distinct regions on Ceres where ESA Hershel space telescope data suggested a release of water vapor (1). At the time of this writing geologic mapping was performed on Framing Camera (FC) mosaics from the Approach (1.3 km/px) and Survey (415 m/px) orbits, including grayscale and color images and digital terrain models derived from stereo images. In Fall 2015 images from the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (140 m/px) will be used to refine the mapping, followed by Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (35 m/px) images in January 2016. Support of the Dawn Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams is acknowledged. This work is supported by grants from NASA, and from the German and Italian Space Agencies. Reference: (1) Küppers, M., et al. (2014). Nature, v. 505, 525-527.

  17. Preliminary Geological Map of the Ac-H-14 Yalode Quadrangle of Ceres: An Integrated Mapping Study Using Dawn Spacecraft Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crown, D. A.; Yingst, R. A.; Mest, S. C.; Platz, T.; Williams, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Schenk, P.; Scully, J. E. C.; Jaumann, R.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Nathues, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Schäfer, M.; Marchi, S.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Russell, C.; Raymond, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We are conducting a geologic mapping investigation of the Ac-H-14 Yalode Quadrangle (21-66°S, 270-360°E) of Ceres to examine its surface geology and geologic history. At the time of this writing, geologic mapping has been performed on Dawn Framing Camera (FC) mosaics from the late Approach phase (up to 1.3 km/px) and Survey orbit (415 m/px), including clear filter and color images and digital terrain models derived from stereo images. In Fall 2015 images from the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (140 m/px) will be used to refine the mapping, followed by the Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (35 m/px) starting in December 2015. The Yalode Quadrangle is dominated by the ~300-km diameter impact basin Yalode and includes rugged and smooth terrains to the east. Yalode basin has a variably preserved rim, which is continuous and sharply defined to the north/northwest and is irregular or degraded elsewhere, and may have an interior ring structure. The basin floor includes hummocky and smooth areas (some bounded by scarps), crater chains, and a lineated zone. High-resolution images will be used to search for volcanic features on the basin floor and in association with basin structures. Yalode basin and its floor deposits appear to have been strongly affected by the Urvara impact to the west. Impact craters in Yalode Quadrangle display a range of preservation states. Degraded features, including Yalode basin and numerous smaller craters, exhibit subdued rims, lack discrete ejecta deposits, and have infilled interiors. More pristine features (including the large unnamed basin in the SE corner of the quadrangle and craters on Yalode basin floor) have well-defined, quasi-circular forms with prominent rims and in some cases discernible ejecta. Some of these craters have bowl-shaped interiors and others contain hills or mounds on their floors. Support of the Dawn Instrument, Operations, and Science Teams is acknowledged. This work is supported by grants from NASA, MPG, and DLR.

  18. Primary cultures of rat cortical microglia treated with nicotine increases in the expression of excitatory amino acid transporter 1 (GLAST) via the activation of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Morioka, N; Tokuhara, M; Nakamura, Y; Idenoshita, Y; Harano, S; Zhang, F F; Hisaoka-Nakashima, K; Nakata, Y

    2014-01-31

    Although the clearance of glutamate from the synapse under physiological conditions is performed by astrocytic glutamate transporters, their expression might be diminished under pathological conditions. Microglia glutamate transporters, however, might serve as a back-up system when astrocytic glutamate uptake is impaired, and could have a prominent neuroprotective function under pathological conditions. In the current study, the effect of nicotine, well known as a neuroprotective molecule, on the function of glutamate transporters in cultured rat cortical microglia was examined. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and pharmacological approaches demonstrated that, glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST), not glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1), is the major functional glutamate transporter in cultured cortical microglia. Furthermore, the α7 subunit was demonstrated to be the key subunit comprising nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors in these cells. Treatment of cortical microglia with nicotine led to a significant increase of GLAST mRNA expression and (14)C-glutamate uptake in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, which were markedly inhibited by pretreatment with methyllycaconitine, a selective α7 nACh receptor antagonist. The nicotine-induced expression of GLAST mRNA and protein is mediated through an inositol trisphosphate (IP3) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) depend intracellular pathway, since pretreatment with either xestospongin C, an IP3 receptor antagonist, or KN-93, a CaMKII inhibitor, blocked GLAST expression. Together, these findings indicate that activation of nACh receptors, specifically those expressing the α7 subunit, on cortical microglia could be a key mechanism of the neuroprotective effect of nACh receptor ligands such as nicotine.

  19. Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the opinions of four transportation experts on issues related to school buses. The experts respond to the following questions: will advertisements placed on buses be used to generate district revenue; will compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas become standard fuel for school buses; and will school bus seat belts be mandatory and…

  20. Membrane Transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The selective movement and redistribution of ions and small organic molecules is essential for plant growth and cellular homeostasis. Because of this, plants have evolved numerous proteins that facilitate the transport of minerals, sugars, metabolites, and other compounds through the limiting membra...

  1. Stimulation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor regulates glutamate transporter GLAST via basic fibroblast growth factor production in cultured cortical microglia.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Norimitsu; Harano, Sakura; Tokuhara, Masato; Idenoshita, Yuko; Zhang, Fang Fang; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2015-11-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor expressed in microglia has a crucial role in neuroprotection. Simulation of α7 nACh receptor leads to increased expression of glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST), which in turn decreases synaptic glutamate levels. However, the upregulation of GLAST in cultured rat cortical microglia appears long after (over 18 h) stimulation of the α7 nACh receptor with nicotine. Thus, the current study elucidated the pathway responsible for the induction of GLAST expression in cultured cortical microglia. Nicotine-induced GLAST mRNA expression was significantly inhibited by cycloheximide pretreatment, indicating that a protein intermediary, such as a growth factor, is required for GLAST expression. The expression of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) mRNA in cortical microglia was significantly increased 6 and 12h after treatment with nicotine, and this increase was potently inhibited by pretreatment with methyllycaconitine, a selective α7 nACh receptor antagonist. The treatment with nicotine also significantly increased FGF-2 protein expression. Furthermore, treatment with recombinant FGF-2 increased GLAST mRNA, protein expression and (14)C-glutamate uptake, a functional measurement of GLAST activity. Conversely, pretreatment with PD173074, an inhibitor of FGF receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase, significantly prevented the nicotine-induced expression of GLAST mRNA, its protein and (14)C-glutamate uptake. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed FGFR1 mRNA expression was confined to cultured cortical microglia. Together, the current findings demonstrate that the neuroprotective effect of activation of microglial α7 nACh receptors could be due to the expression of FGF-2, which in turn increases GLAST expression, thereby clearing glutamate from synapse and decreasing glutamate neurotransmission.

  2. The JACS prospective cohort study of newly diagnosed women with breast cancer investigating joint and muscle pain, aches, and stiffness: pain and quality of life after primary surgery and before adjuvant treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer affects one in eight UK women during their lifetime: many of these women now receive adjuvant chemotherapy and hormone therapy. Joint and muscle pains, aches, and stiffness are common but the natural history, aetiology and impact of these symptoms are unknown. A cohort study of newly diagnosed women with primary breast cancer was established to explore this. In this paper we present study methods and sample characteristics, describe participants’ experience of musculoskeletal pain at baseline interview, and explore its impact on quality of life. Methods Women with non-metastatic breast cancer were recruited following primary surgery into a multi-centre cohort study. They received questionnaires by post five times (baseline, 3, 6 , 9 and 12 months) to investigate prevalence, severity, location and correlates of musculoskeletal pain, and impact on quality-of-life. Pain was measured by the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire, the Brief Pain Inventory, and MSK-specific questions, and quality of life by the SF-36 and FACIT scales. Results 543 women (mean age 57 years, range 28–87, 64% postmenopausal) were recruited following surgery for primary breast cancer from breast cancer clinics in eight hospitals. Fifteen per cent of the eligible cohort was missed; 28% declined to participate. Joint or muscle aches, pains or stiffness were reported by 69% women with 28% specifically reporting joint pain/aches/stiffness. Quality of life, as measured by the FACT-B and adjusted for age, depression, surgery and analgesic use, is significantly worse in all domains in those with musculoskeletal problems than those without. Conclusions Our findings highlights the importance of a better understanding of these symptoms and their impact on the lives of women with primary breast cancer so that healthcare professionals are better equipped to support patients and to provide accurate information to inform treatment decisions. Further papers from this study will

  3. Apolipoprotein E4 reduces evoked hippocampal acetylcholine release in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Dolejší, Eva; Liraz, Ori; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; Michaelson, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) is the most prevalent genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. We utilized apoE4-targeted replacement mice (approved by the Tel Aviv University Animal Care Committee) to investigate whether cholinergic dysfunction, which increases during aging and is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, is accentuated by apoE4. This revealed that levels of the pre-synaptic cholinergic marker, vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the hippocampus and the corresponding electrically evoked release of acetylcholine, are similar in 4-month-old apoE4 and apolipoprotein E3 (apoE3) mice. Both parameters decrease with age. This decrease is, however, significantly more pronounced in the apoE4 mice. The levels of cholinacetyltransferase (ChAT), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) were similar in the hippocampus of young apoE4 and apoE3 mice and decreased during aging. For ChAT, this decrease was similar in the apoE4 and apoE3 mice, whereas it was more pronounced in the apoE4 mice, regarding their corresponding AChE and BuChE levels. The level of muscarinic receptors was higher in the apoE4 than in the apoE3 mice at 4 months and increased to similar levels with age. However, the relative representation of the M1 receptor subtype decreased during aging in apoE4 mice. These results demonstrate impairment of the evoked release of acetylcholine in hippocampus by apoE4 in 12-month-old mice but not in 4-month-old mice. The levels of ChAT and the extent of the M2 receptor-mediated autoregulation of ACh release were similar in the adult mice, suggesting that the apoE4-related inhibition of hippocampal ACh release in these mice is not driven by these parameters. Evoked ACh release from hippocampal and cortical slices is similar in 4-month-old apoE4 and apoE3 mice but is specifically and significantly reduced in hippocampus, but not cortex, of 12-month-old apoE4 mice. This effect is accompanied by decreased VAChT levels. These findings show that

  4. Role of mouse cerebellar nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α(4)β(2)- and α(7) subtypes in the behavioral cross-tolerance between nicotine and ethanol-induced ataxia.

    PubMed

    Taslim, Najla; Soderstrom, Ken; Dar, M Saeed

    2011-03-01

    We have demonstrated that nicotine attenuated ethanol-induced ataxia via nicotinic-acetylcholine-receptor (nAChR) subtypes α(4)β(2) and α(7). In the present study, ethanol (2g/kg; i.p.)-induced ataxia was assessed by Rotorod performance following repeated intracerebellar infusion of α(4)β(2)- and α(7)-selective agonists. Localization of α(4)β(2) and α(7) nAChRs was confirmed immunohistochemically. Cerebellar NO(x) (nitrite+nitrate) was determined flurometrically. Repeated intracerebellar microinfusion of the α(4)β(2)-selective agonist, RJR-2403 (for 1, 2, 3, 5 or 7 days) or the α(7)-selective agonist, PNU-282987 (1, 2, 3 or 5 days), dose-dependently attenuated ethanol-induced ataxia. These results suggest the development of cross-tolerance between ethanol-induced ataxia and α(4)β(2) and α(7) nAChR agonists. With RJR-2403, the cross-tolerance was maximal after a 5-day treatment and lasted 48h. Cross-tolerance was maximal after a 1-day treatment with PNU-282987 and lasted 72h. Pretreatment with α(4)β(2)- and α(7)-selective antagonists, dihydro-β-erythroidine and methyllycaconitine, respectively, prevented the development of cross-tolerance confirming α(4)β(2) and α(7) involvement. Repeated agonist infusions elevated cerebellar NO(x) 16h after the last treatment while acute ethanol exposure decreased it. Pretreatment with repeated RJR-2403 or PNU-282987 reversed ethanol-induced decrease in NOx. The NO(x) data suggests the involvement of the nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP signaling pathway in the cross-tolerance that develops between α(4)β(2)- and α(7)-selective agonists and ethanol ataxia. Both α(4)β(2) and α(7) subtypes exhibited high immunoreactivity in Purkinje but sparse expression in molecular and granular cell layers. Our results support a role for α(4)β(2) and α(7) nAChR subtypes in the development of cross-tolerance between nicotine and ethanol with the NO signaling pathway as a potential mechanism.

  5. LNG transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, J.

    1988-01-01

    In the beginning of 1965, the participants to the starting up of first French LNG transportation system between ARZEW and LE HAVRE were indeed pioneers when they started the cool-down of the three tanks of LE HAVRE, with a LNG freight delivered by old liberty-ship ''BEAUVAIS''. Could they forecast the development of LNG industry in FRANCE and in the world and imagine that modest 'JULES VERNE' and his two english brothers would have, 25 years later, 80 successors - more than five times as big, for the main part of them, that 12 liquefaction plants would be running in the world, supplying about twenty LNG terminals. For the first time, a country - FRANCE - can draw the lessons from the exploitation of the 3 LNG transportation systems during a long period. That is the subject of the present paper.

  6. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats. PMID:9587137

  7. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats.

  8. Transcriptional Changes in nAChRs, Interactive Proteins and P450s in Locusta migratoria manilensis (Orthoptera: Acrididae) CNS in Response to High and Low Oral Doses of Imidacloprid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Huahua; Zhang, Yixi; Liu, Chuanjun; Liu, Zewen

    2015-01-01

    The insect central nervous system (CNS) is the target for many insecticides, and changes in transcript levels could be expected after insecticide applications. In this study, differentially expressed genes in the locust (Locusta migratoria manilensis) CNS in response to imidacloprid treatments at low dose (LD, 10% mortality) and high dose (HD, 80% mortality) were identified. Two nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits genes and 18 interacting protein genes were regulated at LD, and only one nAChR subunit gene and 11 interacting proteins were regulated at HD. Among the 110 annotated P450 unigenes, 43 unigenes were regulated at LD and 34 unigenes were regulated at HD. Most of the differentially expressed P450 unigenes were mapped to CYP4, in which most unigenes were upregulated at LD, but downregulated at HD. Totally, the numbers and regulation levels of the regulated genes were more at LD than that at HD. Seventeen unigenes were selected to test their expression changes following insecticide treatments by qRT-PCR, in which the changes in more than half of the selected genes were verified. The results revealed the variation in the response of locusts to different insecticide pressure, such as different doses. PMID:26180048

  9. Mobile Transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis, STS-110 mission, deployed this railcar, called the Mobile Transporter, and an initial 43-foot section of track, the S0 (S-zero) truss, preparing the International Space Station (ISS) for future spacewalks. The first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The 27,000-pound S0 truss is the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002. STS-110's Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station.

  10. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  11. Memory-Relevant Mushroom Body Output Synapses Are Cholinergic.

    PubMed

    Barnstedt, Oliver; Owald, David; Felsenberg, Johannes; Brain, Ruth; Moszynski, John-Paul; Talbot, Clifford B; Perrat, Paola N; Waddell, Scott

    2016-03-16

    Memories are stored in the fan-out fan-in neural architectures of the mammalian cerebellum and hippocampus and the insect mushroom bodies. However, whereas key plasticity occurs at glutamatergic synapses in mammals, the neurochemistry of the memory-storing mushroom body Kenyon cell output synapses is unknown. Here we demonstrate a role for acetylcholine (ACh) in Drosophila. Kenyon cells express the ACh-processing proteins ChAT and VAChT, and reducing their expression impairs learned olfactory-driven behavior. Local ACh application, or direct Kenyon cell activation, evokes activity in mushroom body output neurons (MBONs). MBON activation depends on VAChT expression in Kenyon cells and is blocked by ACh receptor antagonism. Furthermore, reducing nicotinic ACh receptor subunit expression in MBONs compromises odor-evoked activation and redirects odor-driven behavior. Lastly, peptidergic corelease enhances ACh-evoked responses in MBONs, suggesting an interaction between the fast- and slow-acting transmitters. Therefore, olfactory memories in Drosophila are likely stored as plasticity of cholinergic synapses. PMID:26948892

  12. Memory-Relevant Mushroom Body Output Synapses Are Cholinergic

    PubMed Central

    Barnstedt, Oliver; Owald, David; Felsenberg, Johannes; Brain, Ruth; Moszynski, John-Paul; Talbot, Clifford B.; Perrat, Paola N.; Waddell, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Summary Memories are stored in the fan-out fan-in neural architectures of the mammalian cerebellum and hippocampus and the insect mushroom bodies. However, whereas key plasticity occurs at glutamatergic synapses in mammals, the neurochemistry of the memory-storing mushroom body Kenyon cell output synapses is unknown. Here we demonstrate a role for acetylcholine (ACh) in Drosophila. Kenyon cells express the ACh-processing proteins ChAT and VAChT, and reducing their expression impairs learned olfactory-driven behavior. Local ACh application, or direct Kenyon cell activation, evokes activity in mushroom body output neurons (MBONs). MBON activation depends on VAChT expression in Kenyon cells and is blocked by ACh receptor antagonism. Furthermore, reducing nicotinic ACh receptor subunit expression in MBONs compromises odor-evoked activation and redirects odor-driven behavior. Lastly, peptidergic corelease enhances ACh-evoked responses in MBONs, suggesting an interaction between the fast- and slow-acting transmitters. Therefore, olfactory memories in Drosophila are likely stored as plasticity of cholinergic synapses. PMID:26948892

  13. Memory-Relevant Mushroom Body Output Synapses Are Cholinergic.

    PubMed

    Barnstedt, Oliver; Owald, David; Felsenberg, Johannes; Brain, Ruth; Moszynski, John-Paul; Talbot, Clifford B; Perrat, Paola N; Waddell, Scott

    2016-03-16

    Memories are stored in the fan-out fan-in neural architectures of the mammalian cerebellum and hippocampus and the insect mushroom bodies. However, whereas key plasticity occurs at glutamatergic synapses in mammals, the neurochemistry of the memory-storing mushroom body Kenyon cell output synapses is unknown. Here we demonstrate a role for acetylcholine (ACh) in Drosophila. Kenyon cells express the ACh-processing proteins ChAT and VAChT, and reducing their expression impairs learned olfactory-driven behavior. Local ACh application, or direct Kenyon cell activation, evokes activity in mushroom body output neurons (MBONs). MBON activation depends on VAChT expression in Kenyon cells and is blocked by ACh receptor antagonism. Furthermore, reducing nicotinic ACh receptor subunit expression in MBONs compromises odor-evoked activation and redirects odor-driven behavior. Lastly, peptidergic corelease enhances ACh-evoked responses in MBONs, suggesting an interaction between the fast- and slow-acting transmitters. Therefore, olfactory memories in Drosophila are likely stored as plasticity of cholinergic synapses.

  14. Nonoisotopic Assay for the Presynaptic Choline Transporter Reveals Capacity for Allosteric Modulation of Choline Uptake

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Current therapies to enhance CNS cholinergic function rely primarily on extracellular acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, a pharmacotherapeutic strategy that produces dose-limiting side effects. The Na+-dependent, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) is an unexplored target for cholinergic medication development. Although functional at the plasma membrane, CHT at steady-state is localized to synaptic vesicles such that vesicular fusion can support a biosynthetic response to neuronal excitation. To identify allosteric potentiators of CHT activity, we mapped endocytic sequences in the C-terminus of human CHT, identifying transporter mutants that exhibit significantly increased transport function. A stable HEK-293 cell line was generated from one of these mutants (CHT LV-AA) and used to establish a high-throughput screen (HTS) compatible assay based on the electrogenic nature of the transporter. We established that the addition of choline to these cells, at concentrations appropriate for high-affinity choline transport at presynaptic terminals, generates a hemicholinium-3 (HC-3)-sensitive, membrane depolarization that can be used for the screening of CHT inhibitors and activators. Using this assay, we discovered that staurosporine increased CHT LV-AA choline uptake activity, an effect mediated by a decrease in choline KM with no change in Vmax. As staurosporine did not change surface levels of CHT, nor inhibit HC-3 binding, we propose that its action is directly or indirectly allosteric in nature. Surprisingly, staurosporine reduced choline-induced membrane depolarization, suggesting that increased substrate coupling to ion gradients, arising at the expense of nonstoichiometric ion flow, accompanies a shift of CHT to a higher-affinity state. Our findings provide a new approach for the identification of CHT modulators that is compatible with high-throughput screening approaches and presents a novel model by which small molecules can enhance substrate flux

  15. Ligand Binding at the α4-α4 Agonist-Binding Site of the α4β2 nAChR Triggers Receptor Activation through a Pre-Activated Conformational State

    PubMed Central

    Indurthi, Dinesh C.; Lewis, Trevor M.; Ahring, Philip K.; Balle, Thomas; Chebib, Mary; Absalom, Nathan L.

    2016-01-01

    The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the most abundant subtype in the brain and exists in two functional stoichiometries: (α4)3(β2)2 and (α4)2(β2)3. A distinct feature of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor is the biphasic activation response to the endogenous agonist acetylcholine, where it is activated with high potency and low efficacy when two α4-β2 binding sites are occupied and with low potency/high efficacy when a third α4-α4 binding site is occupied. Further, exogenous ligands can bind to the third α4-α4 binding site and potentiate the activation of the receptor by ACh that is bound at the two α4-β2 sites. We propose that perturbations of the recently described pre-activation step when a third binding site is occupied are a key driver of these distinct activation properties. To investigate this, we used a combination of simple linear kinetic models and voltage clamp electrophysiology to determine whether transitions into the pre-activated state were increased when three binding sites were occupied. We separated the binding at the two different sites with ligands selective for the α4-β2 site (Sazetidine-A and TC-2559) and the α4-α4 site (NS9283) and identified that when a third binding site was occupied, changes in the concentration-response curves were best explained by an increase in transitions into a pre-activated state. We propose that perturbations of transitions into a pre-activated state are essential to explain the activation properties of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor by acetylcholine and other ligands. Considering the widespread clinical use of benzodiazepines, this discovery of a conserved mechanism that benzodiazepines and ACh potentiate receptor activation via a third binding site can be exploited to develop therapeutics with similar properties at other cys-loop receptors. PMID:27552221

  16. Neuroprotective effects of donepezil against Aβ42-induced neuronal toxicity are mediated through not only enhancing PP2A activity but also regulating GSK-3β and nAChRs activity.

    PubMed

    Noh, Min-Young; Koh, Seong H; Kim, Sung-Min; Maurice, Tangui; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kim, Seung H

    2013-11-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate whether donepezil, acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, shown to play a protective role through inhibiting glycogen synthesis kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activity, could also exert neuroprotective effects by stimulating protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity in the amyloid-beta (Aβ)42-induced neuronal toxicity model of Alzheimer's disease. In Aβ42-induced toxic conditions, each PP2A and GSK-3β activity measured at different times showed time-dependent reverse pattern toward the direction of accelerating neuronal deaths with the passage of time. In addition, donepezil pre-treatment showed dose-dependent stepwise increase of neuronal viability and stimulation of PP2A activity. However, such effects on them were significantly reduced through the depletion of PP2A activity with either okadaic acid or PP2Ac siRNA. In spite of blocked PP2A activity in this Aβ42 insult, however, donepezil pretreatment showed additional significant recovering effect on neuronal viability when compared to the value without donepezil. Moreover, donepezil partially recovered its dephosphorylating effect on hyperphosphorylated tau induced by Aβ42. This observation led us to assume that additional mechanisms of donepezil, including its inhibitory effect on GSK-3β activity and/or the activation role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), might be involved. Taken together, our results suggest that the neuroprotective effects of donepezil against Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity are mediated through activation of PP2A, but its additional mechanisms including regulation of GSK-3β and nAChRs activity would partially contribute to its effects. We investigated neuroprotective mechanisms of donepezil against Aβ42 toxicity: Donepezil increased neuronal viability with reduced p-tau by enhancing PP2A activity. Despite of blocked PP2A activity, donepezil showed additional recovering effect on neuronal viability, which findings led us to assume that additional

  17. Robotic transportation.

    PubMed

    Lob, W S

    1990-09-01

    Mobile robots perform fetch-and-carry tasks autonomously. An intelligent, sensor-equipped mobile robot does not require dedicated pathways or extensive facility modification. In the hospital, mobile robots can be used to carry specimens, pharmaceuticals, meals, etc. between supply centers, patient areas, and laboratories. The HelpMate (Transitions Research Corp.) mobile robot was developed specifically for hospital environments. To reach a desired destination, Help-Mate navigates with an on-board computer that continuously polls a suite of sensors, matches the sensor data against a pre-programmed map of the environment, and issues drive commands and path corrections. A sender operates the robot with a user-friendly menu that prompts for payload insertion and desired destination(s). Upon arrival at its selected destination, the robot prompts the recipient for a security code or physical key and awaits acknowledgement of payload removal. In the future, the integration of HelpMate with robot manipulators, test equipment, and central institutional information systems will open new applications in more localized areas and should help overcome difficulties in filling transport staff positions.

  18. Robotic transportation.

    PubMed

    Lob, W S

    1990-09-01

    Mobile robots perform fetch-and-carry tasks autonomously. An intelligent, sensor-equipped mobile robot does not require dedicated pathways or extensive facility modification. In the hospital, mobile robots can be used to carry specimens, pharmaceuticals, meals, etc. between supply centers, patient areas, and laboratories. The HelpMate (Transitions Research Corp.) mobile robot was developed specifically for hospital environments. To reach a desired destination, Help-Mate navigates with an on-board computer that continuously polls a suite of sensors, matches the sensor data against a pre-programmed map of the environment, and issues drive commands and path corrections. A sender operates the robot with a user-friendly menu that prompts for payload insertion and desired destination(s). Upon arrival at its selected destination, the robot prompts the recipient for a security code or physical key and awaits acknowledgement of payload removal. In the future, the integration of HelpMate with robot manipulators, test equipment, and central institutional information systems will open new applications in more localized areas and should help overcome difficulties in filling transport staff positions. PMID:2208684

  19. Tribological properties of amorphous hydrogenated (a-C:H) and hydrogen-free tetrahedral (ta-C) diamond-like carbon coatings under jatropha biodegradable lubricating oil at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobarak, H. M.; Masjuki, H. H.; Mohamad, E. Niza; Kalam, M. A.; Rashedul, H. K.; Rashed, M. M.; Habibullah, M.

    2014-10-01

    The application of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on automotive components is emerging as a favorable strategy to address the recent challenges in the industry. DLC coatings can effectively lower the coefficient of friction (CoF) and wear rate of engine components, thereby improving their fuel efficiency and durability. The lubrication of ferrous materials can be enhanced by a large amount of unsaturated and polar components of oils. Therefore, the interaction between nonferrous coatings (e.g., DLC) and vegetable oil should be investigated. A ball-on-plate tribotester was used to run the experiments. Stainless steel plates coated with amorphous hydrogenated (a-C:H) DLC and hydrogen-free tetrahedral (ta-C) DLC that slide against 440C stainless steel ball were used to create a ball-on-plate tribotester. The wear track was investigated through scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies were used to analyze the tribofilm inside the wear track. Raman analysis was performed to investigate the structural changes in the coatings. At high temperatures, the CoF in both coatings decreased. The wear rate, however, increased in the a-C:H but decreased in the ta-C DLC-coated plates. The CoF and the wear rate (coated layer and counter surface) were primarily influenced by the graphitization of the coating. Tribochemical films, such as polyphosphate glass, were formed in ta-C and acted as protective layers. Therefore, the wear rate of the ta-C DLC was lower than that of the-C:H DLC.

  20. Nicotine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone induce cyclooxygenase-2 activity in human gastric cancer cells: Involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and {beta}-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Vivian Yvonne; Jin, H.C.; Ng, Enders K.O.; Yu Jun; Leung, W.K.; Cho, C.H.; Sung, J.J.Y.

    2008-12-01

    Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) associates with cigarette smoke exposure in many malignancies. Nicotine and its derivative, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), are the two important components in cigarette smoke that contributes to cancer development. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which nicotine or NNK promotes gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We found that nicotine and NNK significantly enhanced cell proliferation in AGS cells that expressed both alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7 nAChR) and {beta}-adrenergic receptors. Treatment of cells with {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX, {alpha}7nAChR antagonist) or propranolol ({beta}-adrenergic receptor antagonist) blocked NNK-induced COX-2/PGE{sub 2} and cell proliferation, while nicotine-mediated cell growth and COX-2/PGE{sub 2} induction can only be suppressed by propranolol, but not {alpha}-BTX. Moreover, in contrast to the dependence of growth promoting effect of nicotine on Erk activation, inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) repressed NNK-induced COX-2 upregulation and resulted in suppression of cell growth. In addition, nicotine and NNK mediated COX-2 induction via different receptors to modulate several G1/S transition regulatory proteins and promote gastric cancer cell growth. Selective COX-2 inhibitor (SC-236) caused G1 arrest and abrogated nicotine/NNK-induced cell proliferation. Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 and other G1 regulatory proteins are reversed by blockade of COX-2. These results pointed to the importance of adrenergic and nicotinic receptors in gastric tumor growth through MAPK/COX-2 activation, which may perhaps provide a chemoprevention strategy for cigarette smoke-related gastric carcinogenesis.

  1. Serotonergic involvement in the amelioration of behavioral abnormalities in dopamine transporter knockout mice by nicotine.

    PubMed

    Uchiumi, Osamu; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Fukui, Asami; Hall, F Scott; Uhl, George R; Sora, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine transporter knockout (DAT KO) mice exhibit elevated extracellular dopamine levels in brain regions that include the striatum and the nucleus accumbens, but not the prefrontal cortex. DAT KO mice model some aspects of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Smoking is more common in patients with schizophrenia, suggesting that nicotine might ameliorate aspects of the behavioral abnormalities and/or treatment side effects seen in these individuals. We report nicotine-induced normalization of effects on locomotion and prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle (PPI) in DAT KO mice that require intact serotonin 5-HT1A systems. First, we observed that the marked hyperactivity displayed by DAT KO mice was reduced by administration of nicotine. This nicotine effect was blocked by pretreatment with the non-specific nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor antagonist mecamylamine, or the 5-HT1A antagonist WAY100635. Secondly, we examined the effects of nicotine on PPI in DAT KO mice. Treatment with nicotine significantly ameliorated the PPI deficits observed in DAT KO mice. The ameliorating action of nicotine on PPI deficits in DAT KO mice was blocked by mecamylamine, the α₇ nACh receptor antagonist methyllycaconitine or WAY100635, while the α₄β₂ nACh receptor antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidinehydrobromide (DHβE) produced only a non-significant trend toward attenuation of nicotine effects. Finally, we observed that administration of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT also ameliorated the deficit in PPI observed in DAT KO mice. This amelioration was antagonized by pretreatment with WAY100635. These data support the idea that nicotine might ameliorate some of the cognitive dysfunctions found in schizophrenia in a 5-HT1A-dependent fashion. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'.

  2. Transporting particulate material

    DOEpatents

    Aldred, Derek Leslie; Rader, Jeffrey A.; Saunders, Timothy W.

    2011-08-30

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  3. MuSK Myasthenia Gravis IgG4 Disrupts the Interaction of LRP4 with MuSK but Both IgG4 and IgG1-3 Can Disperse Preformed Agrin-Independent AChR Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Koneczny, Inga; Cossins, Judith; Waters, Patrick; Beeson, David; Vincent, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A variable proportion of patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (MG) have autoantibodies to muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). During development agrin, released from the motor nerve, interacts with low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4 (LRP4), which then binds to MuSK; MuSK interaction with the intracellular protein Dok7 results in clustering of the acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on the postsynaptic membrane. In mature muscle, MuSK helps maintain the high density of AChRs at the neuromuscular junction. MuSK antibodies are mainly IgG4 subclass, which does not activate complement and can be monovalent, thus it is not clear how the antibodies cause disruption of AChR numbers or function to cause MG. We hypothesised that MuSK antibodies either reduce surface MuSK expression and/or inhibit the interaction with LRP4. We prepared MuSK IgG, monovalent Fab fragments, IgG1-3 and IgG4 fractions from MuSK-MG plasmas. We asked whether the antibodies caused endocytosis of MuSK in MuSK-transfected cells or if they inhibited binding of LRP4 to MuSK in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. In parallel, we investigated their ability to reduce AChR clusters in C2C12 myotubes induced by a) agrin, reflecting neuromuscular development, and b) by Dok7- overexpression, producing AChR clusters that more closely resemble the adult neuromuscular synapse. Total IgG, IgG4 or IgG1-3 MuSK antibodies were not endocytosed unless cross-linked by divalent anti-human IgG. MuSK IgG, Fab fragments and IgG4 inhibited the binding of LRP4 to MuSK and reduced agrin-induced AChR clustering in C2C12 cells. By contrast, IgG1-3 antibodies did not inhibit LRP4-MuSK binding but, surprisingly, did inhibit agrin-induced clustering. Moreover, both IgG4 and IgG1-3 preparations dispersed agrin-independent AChR clusters in Dok7-overexpressing C2C12 cells. Thus interference by IgG4 antibodies of the LRP4-MuSK interaction will be one pathogenic mechanism of MuSK antibodies, but IgG1-3 Mu

  4. Transporting Handicapped Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Dayton Ray

    The book presents guidelines for adaptive transportation measures for handicapped students. Part 1 considers the transportation cycle as a means to evaluate individual student competencies at all logical points during the transportation experience. The transportation cycle is reviewed from deciding to transport the student to gaining access to…

  5. One-year study of spatial memory performance, brain morphology, and cholinergic markers after moderate controlled cortical impact in rats.

    PubMed

    Dixon, C E; Kochanek, P M; Yan, H Q; Schiding, J K; Griffith, R G; Baum, E; Marion, D W; DeKosky, S T

    1999-02-01

    Persistent cognitive deficits are one of the most important sequelae of head injury in humans. In an effort to model some of the structural and neuropharmacological changes that occur in chronic postinjury brains, we examined the longitudinal effects of moderate vertical controlled cortical impact (CCI) on place learning and memory using the Morris water maze (MWM) test, morphology, and vesicular acetylcholine (ACh) transporter (VAChT) and muscarinic receptor subtype 2 (M2) immunohistochemistry. Vertical CCI (left parietal cortex, 4 m/sec, 2.5 mm; n = 10) or craniotomy (sham) was produced in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 10). Place learning was tested at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months postinjury with the escape platform in a different maze quadrant for each time point. At each interval, rats received 5 days of water maze acquisition (latency to find hidden platform), a probe trial to measure place memory, and 2 days of visible platform trials to control for nonspecific deficits. At 3 weeks, half the animals were sacrificed for histology. At these injury parameters, CCI produced no significant differences in place learning between injured and sham rats at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, or 6 months after injury. However, at 3 and 12 months, the injured rats took significantly longer to find the hidden platform than the sham rats. Probe trial performance differed only at 12 months postinjury between injured (25.73+/-2.1%, standard error of the mean) and sham rats (44.09+/-7.0%, p < 0.05). The maze deficits at 1 year were not due to a worsening of performance, but may have resulted from a reduced ability of injured rats to benefit from previous water maze experience. Hemispheric loss of 30.4+/-5.5 mm3 was seen at 3 weeks after injury (versus respective sham). However, hemispheric loss almost doubled by 1 year after injury (51.5+/-8.5 mm3, p < 0.05 versus all other groups). Progressive tissue loss was also reflected by a three- to fourfold increase in

  6. Discovery of Highly Potent and Selective α4β2-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Partial Agonists Containing an Isoxazolylpyridine Ether Scaffold that Demonstrate Antidepressant-like Activity. Part II

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li-Fang; Eaton, J. Brek; Fedolak, Allison; Zhang, Han-Kun; Hanania, Taleen; Brunner, Dani; Lukas, Ronald J.; Kozikowski, Alan P.

    2012-01-01

    In our continued efforts to develop α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonists as novel antidepressants having a unique mechanism of action, structure activity relationship (SAR) exploration of certain isoxazolylpyridine ethers is presented. In particular, modifications to both the azetidine ring present in the starting structure 4 and its metabolically liable hydroxyl side chain substituent have been explored to improve compound druggability. The pharmacological characterization of all new compounds has been carried out using [3H]epibatidine binding studies together with functional assays based on 86Rb+ ion flux measurements. We found that the deletion of the metabolically liable hydroxyl group or its replacement by a fluoromethyl group not only maintained potency and selectivity, but also resulted in compounds showing antidepressant-like properties in the mouse forced swim test. These isoxazolylpyridine ethers appear to represent promising lead candidates in the design of innovative chemical tools containing reporter groups for imaging purposes and of possible therapeutics. PMID:23092294

  7. Molecular Size Effect in the Chemical Sputtering of a-C:H Thin Films by Low Energy H+, H2+, and H3+ Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Peter R; Meyer, Fred W; Jacob, W.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Von Toussaint, U.

    2011-01-01

    We have experimentally determined total carbon yields per incident H atom in the energy range 36-300 eV/H for H{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}, and H{sub 3}{sup +} projectiles incident normally on {approx}60 nm thick a-C:H films, using 2-D ellipsometry determination of erosion crater volumes ex vacuo, the separately characterized thin film carbon density, and the incident beam current integration accumulated on target during the crater evolution. During each beam exposure, methane production was monitored using in situ quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS). The present total carbon yields/H for incident H{sub 3}{sup +} ions obtained via ellipsometry are in agreement with total mass loss measurements for H{sub 3}{sup +} by Balden and Roth over the investigated energy range. The observed methane production per incident H for the molecular ions exhibits molecular size effects over the entire energy range investigated, confirming the trend observed in the ellipsometry-based total C yields/H.

  8. Anti-listeria activity of poly(lactic acid)/sawdust particle biocomposite film impregnated with pediocin PA-1/AcH and its use in raw sliced pork.

    PubMed

    Woraprayote, Weerapong; Kingcha, Yutthana; Amonphanpokin, Pannawit; Kruenate, Jittiporn; Zendo, Takeshi; Sonomoto, Kenji; Benjakul, Soottawat; Visessanguan, Wonnop

    2013-10-15

    A novel poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/sawdust particle (SP) biocomposite film with anti-listeria activity was developed by incorporation of pediocin PA-1/AcH (Ped) using diffusion coating method. Sawdust particle played an important role in embedding pediocin into the hydrophobic PLA film. The anti-listeria activity of the PLA/SP biocomposite film incorporated with Ped (PLA/SP+Ped) was detected, while no activity against the tested pathogen was observed for the control PLA films (without SP and/or Ped). Dry-heat treatment of film before coating with Ped resulted in the highest Ped adsorption (11.63 ± 3.07 μg protein/cm(2)) and the highest anti-listeria activity. A model study of PLA/SP+Ped as a food-contact antimicrobial packaging on raw sliced pork suggests a potential inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes (99% of total listerial population) on raw sliced pork during the chilled storage. This study supports the feasibility of using PLA/SP+Ped film to reduce the initial load of L. monocytogenes on the surface of raw pork.

  9. Transportation Technology: Rail Transport and Logistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Aaron B.

    2011-01-01

    Transportation can simply be defined as the movement of goods, services, and people from one location to another. Without an efficient means to transport goods from place to place, the economy would be nothing like it is today. Throughout the history of the United States, American railroads have paved the way toward creating a nation of great…

  10. Secure Transportation Management

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, P. W.

    2014-10-15

    Secure Transport Management Course (STMC) course provides managers with information related to procedures and equipment used to successfully transport special nuclear material. This workshop outlines these procedures and reinforces the information presented with the aid of numerous practical examples. The course focuses on understanding the regulatory framework for secure transportation of special nuclear materials, identifying the insider and outsider threat(s) to secure transportation, organization of a secure transportation unit, management and supervision of secure transportation units, equipment and facilities required, training and qualification needed.

  11. Motor neuron-specific overexpression of the presynaptic choline transporter: impact on motor endurance and evoked muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Lund, D; Ruggiero, A M; Ferguson, S M; Wright, J; English, B A; Reisz, P A; Whitaker, S M; Peltier, A C; Blakely, R D

    2010-12-29

    The presynaptic, hemicholinium-3 sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) supplies choline for acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis. In mice, a homozygous deletion of CHT (CHT-/-) leads to premature cessation of spontaneous or evoked neuromuscular signaling and is associated with perinatal cyanosis and lethality within 1 h. Heterozygous (CHT+/-) mice exhibit diminished brain ACh levels and demonstrate an inability to sustain vigorous motor activity. We sought to explore the contribution of CHT gene dosage to motor function in greater detail using transgenic mice where CHT is expressed under control of the motor neuron promoter Hb9 (Hb9:CHT). On a CHT-/- background, the Hb9:CHT transgene conferred mice with the ability to move and breath for a postnatal period of ∼24 h, thus increasing survival. Conversely, Hb9:CHT expression on a wild-type background (CHT+/+;Hb9:CHT) leads to an increased capacity for treadmill running compared to wild-type littermates. Analysis of the stimulated compound muscle action potential (CMAP) in these animals under basal conditions established that CHT+/+;Hb9:CHT mice display an unexpected, bidirectional change, producing either elevated or reduced CMAP amplitude, relative to CHT+/+ animals. To examine whether these two groups arise from underlying changes in synaptic properties, we used high-frequency stimulation of motor axons to assess CMAP recovery kinetics. Although CHT+/+; Hb9:CHT mice in the two groups display an equivalent, time-dependent reduction in CMAP amplitude, animals with a higher basal CMAP amplitude demonstrate a significantly enhanced rate of recovery. To explain our findings, we propose a model whereby CHT support for neuromuscular signaling involves contributions to ACh synthesis as well as cholinergic synaptic vesicle availability.

  12. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  13. Transportation and handling loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrem, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    Criteria and recommended practices are presented for the prediction and verification of transportation and handling loads for the space vehicle structure and for monitoring these loads during transportation and handling of the vehicle or major vehicle segments. Elements of the transportation and handling systems, and the forcing functions and associated loads are described. The forcing functions for common carriers and typical handling devices are assessed, and emphasis is given to the assessment of loads at the points where the space vehicle is supported during transportation and handling. Factors which must be considered when predicting the loads include the transportation and handling medium; type of handling fixture; transport vehicle speed; types of terrain; weather (changes in pressure of temperature, wind, etc.); and dynamics of the transportation modes or handling devices (acceleration, deceleration, and rotations of the transporter or handling device).

  14. Thermodynamics of nuclear transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Hao; Mehta, Pankaj; Elbaum, Michael

    Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope is important for eukaryotes for gene expression and signaling. Experimental studies have revealed that nuclear transport is inherently a nonequilibrium process and actively consumes energy. In this work we present a thermodynamics theory of nuclear transport for a major class of nuclear transporters that are mediated by the small GTPase Ran. We identify the molecular elements responsible for powering nuclear transport, which we term the ``Ran battery'' and find that the efficiency of transport, measured by the cargo nuclear localization ratio, is limited by competition between cargo molecules and RanGTP to bind transport receptors, as well as the amount of NTF2 (i.e. RanGDP carrier) available to circulate the energy flow. This picture complements our current understanding of nuclear transport by providing a comprehensive thermodynamics framework to decipher the underlying biochemical machinery. Pm and CHW were supported by a Simons Investigator in the Mathematical Modeling in Living Systems grant (to PM).

  15. Mixing and Transport.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chein-Chi; Chapman, Tom; Siverts-Wong, Elena; Wei, Li; Mei, Ying

    2016-10-01

    This section covers research published during the calendar year 2015 on mixing and transport processes. The review covers mixing of anaerobic digesters, mixing of heat transfer, and environmental fate and transport. PMID:27620101

  16. Basic Transportation Economics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kneafsey, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    Transportation economics is an integral part of all transportation activities. Refined, detailed, and careful economic analyses consider conduct-performance methodology and the specifications of production, cost and demand functions.

  17. Subseabed disposal transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Jr., G. C.; Vernon, M. E.; Anderson, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Transportation requirements and interfaces are being considered in the evaluation of the seabed disposal option. Technical direction and planning are on-going to ensure the development of major transportation systems in support of the seabed disposal option. Factors which affect the risk and effectiveness of transportation are being included in site selection criteria. However, detailed development of port facilities and transport/emplacement equipment is still several years into the future. (DMC)

  18. Cabrillo College Transportation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Terrence

    This report provides results of the survey and other sources of information which have been used to develop a transportation management plan at Cabrillo College (California). In 2000, Cabrillo College organized a Transportation Management Committee to review the existing transportation situation and develop and implement a plan with the goal of…

  19. Transportation in African Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altschul, Robert D.

    1980-01-01

    Examines the structure, role, and needs of Africa's national and intracontinental transportation system. Characteristics of rail, water, road, and air transportation are examined. The conclusion is that high investment in transportation systems is essential to the development process. (Author/KC)

  20. N Ach at Home and Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Vernon L.

    1971-01-01

    A review of Achievement-Related Motives in Children (Russell Sage Foundation, 1969) Charles P. Smith, Editor, and The Achievement Motive in High School Boys (National Council of Educational Research and Training, 1969) by Prayag Mehto. (CK)

  1. Serotonin syndrome: pills, thrills and shoulder aches.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Malcolm; Gormley, Joe

    2013-01-01

    This case demonstrates an acute presentation of unwitnessed seizure causing typical injuries. Progress in hospital was complicated by worsening autonomic disturbance and agitation, typical for serotonin syndrome, suspected in light of recent selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant initiation. Supportive care required treatment in the intensive care unit setting but full recovery ensued. This case not only reminds clinicians of the potential pitfalls in assessing postictal injured patients, but also that serotonin syndrome requires a high-index of diagnostic suspicion given the range of presenting features. Management ranges from simple withdrawal of the offending agent to specific therapies such as a cyproheptadine. PMID:23429023

  2. Intrinsic Cholinergic Neurons in the Hippocampus: Fact or Artifact?

    PubMed

    Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof; Rinnofner, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    It is generally agreed that hippocampal acetylcholine (ACh) is synthesized and released exclusively from the terminals of the long-axon afferents whose cell bodies reside in the medial septum and diagonal band. The search for intrinsic cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus has a long history; however evidence for the existence of these neurons has been inconsistent, with most investigators failing to detect them using in situ hybridization or immunohistochemical staining of the cholinergic markers, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) or vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Advances in the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mice expressing a reporter protein under the control of the genomic elements of the Chat gene (Chat-BAC mice) have facilitated studies of cholinergic neurons. Such mice show robust and faithful expression of the reporter proteins in all known cholinergic cell populations. The availability of the Chat-BAC mice re-ignited interest in hippocampal cholinergic interneurons, because a small number of such reporter-expressing cells is frequently observed in the hippocampus of these mice. However, to date, attempts to confirm that these neurons co-express the endogenous cholinergic marker ChAT, or release ACh, have been unsuccessful. Without such confirmatory evidence it is best to conclude that there are no cholinergic neurons in the hippocampus. Similar considerations apply to other BAC transgenic lines, whose utility as a discovery tool for cell populations heretofore not known to express the genes of interest encoded by the BACs, must be validated by methods that detect expression of the endogenous genes. PMID:27014052

  3. Chagas’ disease parasite-derived neurotrophic factor activates cholinergic gene expression in neuronal PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Akpan, Nsikan; Caradonna, Kacey; Chuenkova, Marina V.; PereiraPerrin, Mercio

    2008-01-01

    A parasite-derived neurotrophic factor (PDNF) produced by the Chagas’ disease parasite Trypanosoma cruzi binds nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor TrkA, increasing receptor autophosphorylation, activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/Erk) pathways, and transcription factor CREB. The end-result is enhanced survival and neuritogenesis of various types of neurons. PDNF also enhances the expression and activity of tyrosine hydroxylase, a rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of dopamine and other catecholamine neurotransmitters. It remains unknown, however, if PDNF alters expression and metabolism of acetylcholine (ACh), a neurotransmitter thought to play a role in Chagas’ disease progression. Here we demonstrate that PDNF stimulates mRNA and protein expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), which are critical for synthesis and storage of ACh. Stimulation requires functional TrkA because it did not occur in cell mutants that lack the receptor and in TrkA-expressing wild-type cells treated with K252a, an inhibitor of TrkA kinase activity. It also requires TrkA-dependent PI3K and MAPK/Erk signaling pathways because PDNF stimulation of cholinergic transcripts is abolished by specific pharmacological inhibitors. Furthermore, the cholinergic actions of PDNF were reproduced by PDNF-expressing extracellular T. cruzi trypomastigotes at the start of host cell invasion. In contrast, host cells bearing intracellular T. cruzi showed decreased, rather than increased, cholinergic gene expression. These results suggest that T. cruzi invasion of the nervous system alters cholinergic gene expression and that could play a role in neuropathology, and/or lack thereof, in Chagas’ disease patients. PMID:18502403

  4. Chagas' disease parasite-derived neurotrophic factor activates cholinergic gene expression in neuronal PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Akpan, Nsikan; Caradonna, Kacey; Chuenkova, Marina V; PereiraPerrin, Mercio

    2008-06-27

    A parasite-derived neurotrophic factor (PDNF) produced by the Chagas' disease parasite Trypanosoma cruzi binds nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor TrkA, increasing receptor autophosphorylation, and activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/Erk) pathways, and transcription factor CREB. The end-result is enhanced survival and neuritogenesis of various types of neurons. PDNF also enhances the expression and activity of tyrosine hydroxylase, a rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of dopamine and other catecholamine neurotransmitters. It remains unknown, however, if PDNF alters expression and metabolism of acetylcholine (ACh), a neurotransmitter thought to play a role in Chagas' disease progression. Here we demonstrate that PDNF stimulates mRNA and protein expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), which are critical for synthesis and storage of ACh. Stimulation requires functional TrkA because it did not occur in cell mutants that lack the receptor and in TrkA-expressing wild-type cells treated with K252a, an inhibitor of TrkA kinase activity. It also requires TrkA-dependent PI3K and MAPK/Erk signaling pathways because PDNF stimulation of cholinergic transcripts is abolished by specific pharmacological inhibitors. Furthermore, the cholinergic actions of PDNF were reproduced by PDNF-expressing extracellular T. cruzi trypomastigotes at the start of host cell invasion. In contrast, host cells bearing intracellular T. cruzi showed decreased, rather than increased, cholinergic gene expression. These results suggest that T. cruzi invasion of the nervous system alters cholinergic gene expression and that could play a role in neuropathology, and/or lack thereof, in Chagas' disease patients. PMID:18502403

  5. Bicarbonate transport in sheep parotid secretory cells.

    PubMed Central

    Steward, M C; Poronnik, P; Cook, D I

    1996-01-01

    1. Intracellular pH (pH1) was measured by microfluorimetry in secretory endpieces isolated from sheep parotid glands and loaded with the pH-sensitive fluoroprobe 2', 7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). 2. Stimulation with 1 microM acetylcholine (ACh) caused a large, transient decrease in pH1 of 0.37 +/- 0.02 pH units followed by a slower recovery. The transient, which was reduced by 60% in the absence of HCO3-, could be attributed mainly to HCO3- efflux. During sustained stimulation, pH1 increased to a value that exceeded the resting value by 0.083 +/- 0.023 pH units after 20 min. 3. The anion channel blocker NPPB (0.1 mM) reduced the transient acidification in response to ACh by 48% and raised pH1 during sustained stimulation. Simultaneous application of NPPB and ACh accelerated the re-alkalinization following the initial acidification, indicating that NPPB inhibits HCO3- efflux. 4. The stilbene derivative H2DIDS (0.5 mM) reduced the transient acidification in response to ACh by 76% but caused a marked decrease in pH1 during sustained stimulation. Simultaneous application of H2DIDS and ACh slowed the re-alkalinization following the initial acidification, indicating that the main effect of H2DIDS was to inhibit HCO3- accumulation. 5. In the absence of HCO3-, the recovery from an acid load was unaffected by ACh stimulation. Acid extrusion, although dependent on Na+, was not inhibited by amiloride (1 mM), clonidine (1 mM) or H2DIDS (0.5 mM) and was therefore provisionally attributed to a Na(+)-H+ exchanger isoform other than NHE1 or NHE2. 6. In the presence of HCO3-, the rate of recovery from an acid load was reduced during ACh stimulation, probably as a result of the increased efflux of HCO3-. Acid extrusion was dependent on Na+ and was significantly inhibited by H2DIDS. 7. We conclude that ACh-evoked HCO3- secretion in the sheep parotid gland differs from that in many other salivary glands by being driven predominantly by basolateral Na(+)-HCO3

  6. Escherichia coli ehl1 gene-positive serotype O18ac:H31 associated with an outbreak of diarrhea in a neonatal nursery in Neuquén City, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Isabel; Rivas, Marta; Soriano, Viviana; Miliwebsky, Elizabeth; Galvez, Gabriel Fernández; Chillemi, Germán; Baschkier, Ariela; Wang, Gehua; Caldeira, Richard; Woodward, David L; Rodgers, Frank G

    2002-04-01

    Between 9 October and 12 November 1996, an outbreak of bloody diarrhea occurred in the neonatal nursery ward of the Policlínico Neuquén, in Neuquén, a city in the southwestern region of Argentina. Seven patients of the intermediate care unit were affected. Isolates of Escherichia coli O18ac:H31 that were non-lactose and -sorbitol fermenting were recovered from outbreak cases. Although the strains were negative for a number of virulence factors typically found in diarrheagenic groups of E. coli, all isolates from the present neonatal outbreak possessed the enterohemolysin gene, ehl1. All isolates showed resistance to the antibiotics ampicillin and chloramphenicol. These isolates showed a low adherence property in HeLa cells without any recognizable pattern. In order to evaluate the outbreak dissemination in the neonatology ward, a prevalence study was conducted on 13 November. Stool specimens were obtained from 16 neonates hospitalized in the sector and from 33 medical staff members. E. coli isolates with identical biochemical characteristics of the outbreak strain were recovered from 11 of 16 inpatients and from 4 of 33 staff members during the prevalence study. A total of 15 E. coli strains recovered both from the outbreak and the prevalence study were processed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). By RAPD-PCR 14 of 15 strains showed patterns with 85 to 100% similarity, and by PFGE these strains were identical, each showing a unique pattern with 15 bands between 40 and 400 kb. One strain isolated from a nurse during the prevalence study presented a pattern not related to the others, and this was characterized as E. coli O81:HNM resistant to ampicillin only and negative for all the virulence factors studied. This outbreak occurred despite strict regulations in place to prevent cross-infection in the hospital. Postoutbreak prevalence studies were performed weekly thereafter without detecting new cases.

  7. Theory of contributon transport

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, J.W.; Gerstl, S.A.W.; Pomraning, G.C.

    1980-10-01

    A general discussion of the physics of contributon transport is presented. To facilitate this discussion, a Boltzmann-like transport equation for contributons is obtained, and special contributon cross sections are defined. However, the main goal of this study is to identify contributon transport equations and investigate possible deterministic solution techniques. Four approaches to the deterministic solution of the contributon transport problem are investigated. These approaches are an attempt to exploit certain attractive properties of the contributon flux, psi = phi phi/sup +/, where phi and phi/sup +/ are the solutions to the forward and adjoint Boltzmann transport equations.

  8. Pharmacology of Iron Transport

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Shaina L.; Krishnamurthy, Divya; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular basis for the regulation of iron uptake, storage, and distribution is necessary to understand iron homeostasis. Pharmacological tools are emerging to identify and distinguish among different iron transport pathways. Stimulatory or inhibitory small molecules with effects on iron uptake can help characterize the mechanistic elements of iron transport and the roles of the transporters involved in these processes. In particular, iron chelators can serve as potential pharmacological tools to alleviate diseases of iron overload. This review focuses on the pharmacology of iron transport, introducing iron transport membrane proteins and known inhibitors. PMID:23020294

  9. Transportation Business Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The Transportation Business Plan is a step in the process of procuring the transportation system. It sets the context for business strategy decisions by providing pertinent background information, describing the legislation and policies governing transportation under the NWPA, and describing requirements of the transportation system. Included in the document are strategies for procuring shipping casks and transportation support services. In the spirit of the NWPA directive to utilize the private sector to the maximum extent possible, opportunities for business ventures are obvious throughout the system development cycle.

  10. Transportation safety training

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.

    1990-01-01

    Over the past 25 years extensive federal legislation involving the handling and transport of hazardous materials/waste has been passed that has resulted in numerous overlapping regulations administered and enforced by different federal agencies. The handling and transport of hazardous materials/waste involves a significant number of workers who are subject to a varying degree of risk should an accident occur during handling or transport. Effective transportation training can help workers address these risks and mitigate them, and at the same time enable ORNL to comply with the federal regulations concerning the transport of hazardous materials/waste. This presentation will outline how the Environmental and Health Protection Division's Technical Resources and Training Section at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, working with transportation and waste disposal personnel, have developed and implemented a comprehensive transportation safety training program to meet the needs of our workers while satisfying appropriate federal regulations. 8 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Urban public transport today

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, B. )

    1994-01-01

    It is widely recognized that there are many people for whom public transport is essential, particularly among the elderly, children and teenagers. Less obvious is the dependence of our cities for their existence on high capacity public transport. Although there is still a prevalent view that local public transport is only for those who do not have a car, we are slowly beginning to realize that we need to find ways of restricting use of the private car more severely and that will involve some transfer to public transport. Urban Public Transport Today gives an honest appraisal of the pros and cons of new public transport technologies. It shows how public transport can be made a less unacceptable alternative to the private car than it is now.

  12. Transportation System Requirements Document

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

  13. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  14. Transportation technology at Sandia

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Industrial and military activities in the US produce large amounts of hazardous mixed waste, which includes both radioactive and toxic substances. The already overburdened environment is faced with the task of safely disposing of these complex wastes. A very important aspect of this effort is the safe and economical transportation of radioactive and toxic chemical wastes to projected repositories. Movement of wastes to the repository sites is accomplished by a combination of truck, rail, ship, and air. The DOE directs transportation activities including cask development technology for use in single or multimode transport. Sandia National Laboratories` Transportation Technology programs provide the technology and know-how to support DOE in achieving safe, efficient, and economical packaging and transportation of nuclear and other hazardous waste materials. This brochure describes the Transportation Technology programs and the specialized techniques and capabilities they offer to prospective users.

  15. Payload transportation system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A standard size set of shuttle payload transportation equipment was defined that will substantially reduce the cost of payload transportation and accommodate a wide range of payloads with minimum impact on payload design. The system was designed to accommodate payload shipments between the level 4 payload integration sites and the launch site during the calendar years 1979-1982. In addition to defining transportation multi-use mission support equipment (T-MMSE) the mode of travel, prime movers, and ancillary equipment required in the transportation process were also considered. Consistent with the STS goals of low cost and the use of standardized interfaces, the transportation system was designed to commercial grade standards and uses the payload flight mounting interfaces for transportation. The technical, cost, and programmatic data required to permit selection of a baseline system of MMSE for intersite movement of shuttle payloads were developed.

  16. The vesicular monoamine transporter-2: an important pharmacological target for the discovery of novel therapeutics to treat methamphetamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Justin R; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Vartak, Ashish; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine abuse escalates, but no approved therapeutics are available to treat addicted individuals. Methamphetamine increases extracellular dopamine in reward-relevant pathways by interacting at vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2) to inhibit dopamine uptake and promote dopamine release from synaptic vesicles, increasing cytosolic dopamine available for reverse transport by the dopamine transporter (DAT). VMAT2 is the target of our iterative drug discovery efforts to identify pharmacotherapeutics for methamphetamine addiction. Lobeline, the major alkaloid in Lobelia inflata, potently inhibited VMAT2, methamphetamine-evoked striatal dopamine release, and methamphetamine self-administration in rats but exhibited high affinity for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Defunctionalized, unsaturated lobeline analog, meso-transdiene (MTD), exhibited lobeline-like in vitro pharmacology, lacked nAChR affinity, but exhibited high affinity for DAT, suggesting potential abuse liability. The 2,4-dicholorophenyl MTD analog, UKMH-106, exhibited selectivity for VMAT2 over DAT, inhibited methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release, but required a difficult synthetic approach. Lobelane, a saturated, defunctionalized lobeline analog, inhibited the neurochemical and behavioral effects of methamphetamine; tolerance developed to the lobelane-induced decrease in methamphetamine self-administration. Improved drug-likeness was afforded by the incorporation of a chiral N-1,2-dihydroxypropyl moiety into lobelane to afford GZ-793A, which inhibited the neurochemical and behavioral effects of methamphetamine, without tolerance. From a series of 2,5-disubstituted pyrrolidine analogs, AV-2-192 emerged as a lead, exhibiting high affinity for VMAT2 and inhibiting methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release. Current results support the hypothesis that potent, selective VMAT2 inhibitors provide the requisite preclinical behavioral profile for evaluation as pharmacotherapeutics for

  17. The Vesicular Monoamine Transporter-2: An Important Pharmacological Target for the Discovery of Novel Therapeutics to Treat Methamphetamine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, Justin R.; Siripurapu, Kiran B.; Vartak, Ashish; Crooks, Peter A.; Dwoskin, Linda P.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine abuse escalates, but no approved therapeutics are available to treat addicted individuals. Methamphetamine increases extracellular dopamine in reward-relevant pathways by interacting at vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2) to inhibit dopamine uptake and promote dopamine release from synaptic vesicles, increasing cytosolic dopamine available for reverse transport by the dopamine transporter (DAT). VMAT2 is the target of our iterative drug discovery efforts to identify pharmacotherapeutics for methamphetamine addiction. Lobeline, the major alkaloid in Lobelia inflata, potently inhibited VMAT2, methamphetamine-evoked striatal dopamine release, and methamphetamine self-administration in rats but exhibited high affinity for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Defunctionalized, unsaturated lobeline analog, meso-transdiene (MTD), exhibited lobeline-like in vitro pharmacology, lacked nAChR affinity, but exhibited high affinity for DAT, suggesting potential abuse liability. The 2,4-dicholorophenyl MTD analog, UKMH-106, exhibited selectivity for VMAT2 over DAT, inhibited methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release, but required a difficult synthetic approach. Lobelane, a saturated, defunctionalized lobeline analog, inhibited the neurochemical and behavioral effects of methamphetamine; tolerance developed to the lobelane-induced decrease in methamphetamine self-administration. Improved drug-likeness was afforded by the incorporation of a chiral N-1,2-dihydroxypropyl moiety into lobelane to afford GZ-793A, which inhibited the neurochemical and behavioral effects of methamphetamine, without tolerance. From a series of 2,5-disubstituted pyrrolidine analogs, AV-2-192 emerged as a lead, exhibiting high affinity for VMAT2 and inhibiting methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release. Current results support the hypothesis that potent, selective VMAT2 inhibitors provide the requisite preclinical behavioral profile for evaluation as pharmacotherapeutics for

  18. Coal transportation and handling

    SciTech Connect

    Mahr, D.

    1985-11-01

    Coal transport is represented here as a major cost in energy production. The system, itself, is complex but thorough analysis can produce positive results. Minemouth costs increase as do transportation costs, and the understanding of the system can lead to costs control. Short hauls represent major savings, longer ones more expenses. Some terminals blend various coals to benefit power companies, according to need. Specific examples are given, as are differentials between shipping and railroad transportation. For instance, significant savings can be achieved between railroad-owned and transporter-owned railcar.

  19. Transportation Baseline Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; John, Mark Earl

    2000-01-01

    The “1999 National Transportation Program - Transportation Baseline Report” presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste/material transportation. The companion “1999 Transportation ‘Barriers’ Analysis” analyzes the data and identifies existing and potential problems that may prevent or delay transportation activities based on the data presented. The “1999 Transportation Baseline Schedule” (this report) uses the same data to provide an overview of the transportation activities of DOE EM waste/materials. This report can be used to identify areas where stakeholder interface is needed, and to communicate to stakeholders the quantity/schedule of shipments going through their area. Potential bottlenecks in the transportation system can be identified; the number of packages needed, and the capacity needed at receiving facilities can be planned. This report offers a visualization of baseline DOE EM transportation activities for the 11 major sites and the “Geologic Repository Disposal” site (GRD).

  20. Thermodynamics of ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejun C; Han, Lei; Zhao, Yan

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters form the largest of all transporter families, and their structural study has made tremendous progress over recent years. However, despite such advances, the precise mechanisms that determine the energy-coupling between ATP hydrolysis and the conformational changes following substrate binding remain to be elucidated. Here, we present our thermodynamic analysis for both ABC importers and exporters, and introduce the two new concepts of differential-binding energy and elastic conformational energy into the discussion. We hope that the structural analysis of ABC transporters will henceforth take thermodynamic aspects of transport mechanisms into account as well.

  1. Space Transportation Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Stewart, Mark E.; Suresh, Ambady; Owen, A. Karl

    2001-01-01

    This report outlines the Space Transportation Propulsion Systems for the NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) program. Topics include: 1) a review of Engine/Inlet Coupling Work; 2) Background/Organization of Space Transportation Initiative; 3) Synergy between High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCCP) and Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP); 4) Status of Space Transportation Effort, including planned deliverables for FY01-FY06, FY00 accomplishments (HPCCP Funded) and FY01 Major Milestones (HPCCP and ASTP); and 5) a review current technical efforts, including a review of the Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC), Scope of Work, RBCC Concept Aerodynamic Analysis and RBCC Concept Multidisciplinary Analysis.

  2. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  3. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    D.C. Weddle; R. Novotny; J. Cron

    1998-09-23

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''.

  4. Transport characteristics of urea transporter-B.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baoxue

    2014-01-01

    UT-B represents the major urea transporter in erythrocytes, in addition to being expressed in kidney descending vasa recta, brain, spleen, ureter, bladder, and testis. Expression of urea transporter UT-B confers high urea permeability to mammalian erythrocytes. Erythrocyte membranes are also permeable to various urea analogues, suggesting common transport pathways for urea and structurally similar solutes. UT-B is highly permeable to urea and the chemical analogues formamide, acetamide, methylurea, methylformamide, ammonium carbamate, and acrylamide, each with a Ps > 5.0 × 10(-6) cm/s at 10 °C. The amides formamide, acetamide, acrylamide, and butyramide efficiently diffuse across lipid bilayers. The urea analogues dimethylurea, acryalmide, methylurea, thiourea, and methylformamide inhibit UT-B-mediated urea transport by >60 % by a pore-blocking mechanism. UT-B is also a water channel in erythrocytes and has a single-channel water permeability that is similar to aquaporin-1. Whether UT-B is an NH3 channel still needs further study. Urea permeability (Purea) in erythrocytes differs between different mammals. Carnivores (dog, fox, cat) exhibit high Purea. In contrast, herbivores (cow, donkey, sheep) show much lower Purea. Erythrocyte Purea in human and pig (omnivores) was intermediate. Rodents and lagomorphs (mouse, rat, rabbit) have Purea intermediate between carnivores and omnivores. Birds that do not excrete urea and do not express UT-B in their erythrocytes have very low values. In contrast to Purea, water permeability is relatively similar in all mammals studied. This chapter will provide information about the transporter characteristics of UT-B. PMID:25298342

  5. Transport characteristics of urea transporter-B.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baoxue

    2014-01-01

    UT-B represents the major urea transporter in erythrocytes, in addition to being expressed in kidney descending vasa recta, brain, spleen, ureter, bladder, and testis. Expression of urea transporter UT-B confers high urea permeability to mammalian erythrocytes. Erythrocyte membranes are also permeable to various urea analogues, suggesting common transport pathways for urea and structurally similar solutes. UT-B is highly permeable to urea and the chemical analogues formamide, acetamide, methylurea, methylformamide, ammonium carbamate, and acrylamide, each with a Ps > 5.0 × 10(-6) cm/s at 10 °C. The amides formamide, acetamide, acrylamide, and butyramide efficiently diffuse across lipid bilayers. The urea analogues dimethylurea, acryalmide, methylurea, thiourea, and methylformamide inhibit UT-B-mediated urea transport by >60 % by a pore-blocking mechanism. UT-B is also a water channel in erythrocytes and has a single-channel water permeability that is similar to aquaporin-1. Whether UT-B is an NH3 channel still needs further study. Urea permeability (Purea) in erythrocytes differs between different mammals. Carnivores (dog, fox, cat) exhibit high Purea. In contrast, herbivores (cow, donkey, sheep) show much lower Purea. Erythrocyte Purea in human and pig (omnivores) was intermediate. Rodents and lagomorphs (mouse, rat, rabbit) have Purea intermediate between carnivores and omnivores. Birds that do not excrete urea and do not express UT-B in their erythrocytes have very low values. In contrast to Purea, water permeability is relatively similar in all mammals studied. This chapter will provide information about the transporter characteristics of UT-B.

  6. Transport Version 3

    2008-05-16

    The Transport version 3 (T3) system uses the Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP) to move data from sources to a Data Reporisoty (DR). Interested recipients subscribe to newsgroups to retrieve data. Data in transport is protected by AES-256 and RSA cryptographic services provided by the external OpenSSL cryptographic libraries.

  7. Transportation: Topic Paper E.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    As one of a series of topic papers assessing federal laws and programs affecting persons with disabilities, this paper reviews the issue of transportation services. In the area of urban mass transit, four relevant pieces of legislation and public transportation accessibility regulations are cited, and cost issues are explored. Paratransit systems,…

  8. Issues in Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of School Business Officials International, Reston, VA.

    The primary purpose of this book is to present the critical issues in pupil transportation that will confront pupil transportation supervisors in local school districts. The following issues are discussed: (1) demands for extended service from community pressure groups; (2) reductions in budget requests by governing bodies; (3) unrest among driver…

  9. Pupil Transportation Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Anthony R.

    The safest means of transportation in the United States is the school bus fleet. Each school day, over 350,000 school buses transport about 22,000,000 children ages 3 to 21--from wheelchair pupils to varsity football players--to and from school in weather conditions ranging from those for Fairbanks, Alaska, to those typical of Cave Creek, Arizona.…

  10. Transport of sugars.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Qing; Cheung, Lily S; Feng, Liang; Tanner, Widmar; Frommer, Wolf B

    2015-01-01

    Soluble sugars serve five main purposes in multicellular organisms: as sources of carbon skeletons, osmolytes, signals, and transient energy storage and as transport molecules. Most sugars are derived from photosynthetic organisms, particularly plants. In multicellular organisms, some cells specialize in providing sugars to other cells (e.g., intestinal and liver cells in animals, photosynthetic cells in plants), whereas others depend completely on an external supply (e.g., brain cells, roots and seeds). This cellular exchange of sugars requires transport proteins to mediate uptake or release from cells or subcellular compartments. Thus, not surprisingly, sugar transport is critical for plants, animals, and humans. At present, three classes of eukaryotic sugar transporters have been characterized, namely the glucose transporters (GLUTs), sodium-glucose symporters (SGLTs), and SWEETs. This review presents the history and state of the art of sugar transporter research, covering genetics, biochemistry, and physiology-from their identification and characterization to their structure, function, and physiology. In humans, understanding sugar transport has therapeutic importance (e.g., addressing diabetes or limiting access of cancer cells to sugars), and in plants, these transporters are critical for crop yield and pathogen susceptibility.

  11. International Air Transport Policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.

    1972-01-01

    The actions of the Civil Aviation Board in providing assistance and advice to the State Department regarding international air transport policy are discussed. The policies and guidelines of the Civil Aviation Board are defined. The relationship with the policies of the Executive Branch of the Government and the interpretations of the Department of Transportation are reported.

  12. Transportation energy conservation fairs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    An energy conservation fair sponsored by the Department of Transportation was described. It demonstrated how average drivers can save transportation dollars by changing driving habits at little or no cost. Exhibitors are listed. Methods for disseminating information and recommendations on how to set up such fairs are discussed. (MCW)

  13. Conservation in transportation

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-30

    A nationwide examination was made of grassroots energy conservation programs related to transportation. Information compiled from civic groups, trade associations, and corporations is included on driver awareness/mass transit; travel; and ride sharing. It is concluded that a willingness by the public to cooperate in transportation energy conservation exists and should be exploited. (LCL)

  14. Trajectory structures and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, Madalina; Spineanu, Florin

    2004-11-01

    The special problem of transport in two-dimensional divergence-free stochastic velocity fields is studied by developing a statistical approach, the nested subensemble method. The nonlinear process of trapping determined by such fields generates trajectory structures whose statistical characteristics are determined. These structures strongly influence the transport.

  15. Defect chemistry and electronic transport in low-κ dielectrics studied with electrically detected magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutch, Michael J.; Lenahan, Patrick M.; King, Sean W.

    2016-03-01

    Defect mediated electronic transport phenomena in low-κ dielectric films are of great technological interest for state-of-the-art and next generation microprocessors. At the present time, the leading low-κ interlayer dielectrics and etch-stop layers are based upon a-SiOC:H and a-SiCN:H, respectively. In this study, we utilize electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR), a derivative of electron paramagnetic resonance, to provide physical insight into electronic transport, as well as the nature and origin of defects in dense and porous a-SiOC:H and dense a-SiCN:H films. Resonance measurements are performed before and after the removal of sacrificial porogens via UV treatments to understand the role of specific defect centers in electronic transport in a-SiOC:H systems, and the nature of defects created by UV treatments. Unfortunately, a-SiOC:H and a-SiCN:H EDMR spectra are relatively broad and featureless. These featureless spectra are consistent with fairly complex a-SiOC:H and a-SiCN:H systems. We argue that physical insight may be gleaned from featureless spectra via multiple frequency EDMR. Baseline multiple frequency EDMR measurements are performed in a-Si:H and a-C:H to illustrate the nature of line broadening mechanisms of silicon and carbon related defects.

  16. Cooperative transport in nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Wolfgang R; Nadler, Walter

    2013-07-01

    Channel transport of different species of particles is viewed usually only in terms of competition and selectivity. In this paper we show that transport of one species may be promoted by the presence of another and that both may even mutually cooperate. We investigate a discretized Markovian model of nanochannel transport via in-channel sites, allowing for the simultaneous transport of several different species of particles; interaction between transported particles is included via the condition of single occupancy on a channel site. By numerically solving the model exactly, particularly an analysis of situations of crowding in the channel is possible and we observe three situations: mutual cooperation, promotion of one species at the cost of the other, and mutual competition. The physical situation has a strong nonequilibrium character as Onsager's relations on coupled flows do not hold.

  17. Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Stieger, Bruno; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides or OATPs are central transporters in the disposition of drugs and other xenobiotics. In addition, they mediate transport of a wide variety of endogenous substrates. The critical role of OATPs in drug disposition has spurred research both in academia and in the pharmaceutical industry. Translational aspects with clinical questions are the focus in academia, while the pharmaceutical industry tries to define and understand the role these transporters play in pharmacotherapy. The present overview summarizes our knowledge on the interaction of food constituents with OATPs, and on the OATP transport mechanisms. Further, it gives an update on the available information on the structure-function relationship of the OATPs, and finally, covers the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of OATPs. PMID:24745984

  18. Undulator Transportation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary; Horton, Nick; Kharakh, David; Levashov, Yurii; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Poling, Ben; Reese, Ed; /SLAC

    2010-11-17

    A test was performed to determine whether transporting and handling the undulators makes any changes to their properties. This note documents the test. No significant changes to the test undulator were observed. After the LCLS undulators are tuned and fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF), they must be transported to storage buildings and transported to the tunnel. It has been established that the undulators are sensitive to temperature. We wish to know whether the undulators are also sensitive to the vibrations and shocks of transportation. To study this issue, we performed a test in which an undulator was measured in the MMF, transported to the tunnel, brought back to the MMF, and re-measured. This note documents the test and the results.

  19. Protection from the toxicity of diisopropylfluorophosphate by adeno-associated virus expressing acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bin; Duysen, Ellen G.; Poluektova, Larisa Y.; Murrin, L. Charles . E-mail: cmurrin@unmc.edu; Lockridge, Oksana . E-mail: olockrid@unmc.edu

    2006-07-15

    Organophosphorus esters (OP) are highly toxic chemicals used as pesticides and nerve agents. Their acute toxicity is attributed to inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7) in nerve synapses. Our goal was to find a new therapeutic for protection against OP toxicity. We used a gene therapy vector, adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV-2), to deliver murine AChE to AChE-/- mice that have no endogenous AChE activity. The vector encoded the most abundant form of AChE: exons 2, 3, 4, and 6. Two-day old animals, with an immature immune system, were injected. AChE delivered intravenously was expressed up to 5 months in plasma, liver, heart, and lung, at 5-15% of the level in untreated wild-type mice. A few mice formed antibodies, but antibodies did not block AChE activity. The plasma AChE was a mixture of dimers and tetramers. AChE delivered intramuscularly had 40-fold higher activity levels than in wild-type muscle. None of the AChE was collagen-tailed. No retrograde transport through the motor neurons to the central nervous system was detected. AChE delivered intrastriatally assembled into tetramers. In brain, the AAV-2 vector transduced neurons, but not astrocytes and microglia. Vector-treated AChE-/- mice lived longer than saline-treated controls. AChE-/- mice were protected from diisopropylfluorophosphate-induced respiratory failure when the vector was delivered intravenously, but not intrastriatally. Since vector-treated animals had no AChE activity in diaphragm muscle, protection from respiratory failure came from AChE in other tissues. We conclude that AChE scavenged OP and in this way protected the activity of butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, EC 3.1.1.8) in motor endplates.

  20. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of macromolecules.

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, A H; Silver, P A

    1997-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport is a complex process that consists of the movement of numerous macromolecules back and forth across the nuclear envelope. All macromolecules that move in and out of the nucleus do so via nuclear pore complexes that form large proteinaceous channels in the nuclear envelope. In addition to nuclear pores, nuclear transport of macromolecules requires a number of soluble factors that are found both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. A combination of biochemical, genetic, and cell biological approaches have been used to identify and characterize the various components of the nuclear transport machinery. Recent studies have shown that both import to and export from the nucleus are mediated by signals found within the transport substrates. Several studies have demonstrated that these signals are recognized by soluble factors that target these substrates to the nuclear pore. Once substrates have been directed to the pore, most transport events depend on a cycle of GTP hydrolysis mediated by the small Ras-like GTPase, Ran, as well as other proteins that regulate the guanine nucleotide-bound state of Ran. Many of the essential factors have been identified, and the challenge that remains is to determine the exact mechanism by which transport occurs. This review attempts to present an integrated view of our current understanding of nuclear transport while highlighting the contributions that have been made through studies with genetic organisms such as the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:9184010

  1. Bile acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers. PMID:19498215

  2. SLC4A Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inyeong

    2016-01-01

    SLC4A gene family proteins include bicarbonate transporters that move HCO3− across the plasma membrane and regulate intracellular pH and transepithelial movement of acid–base equivalents. These transporters are Cl/HCO3 exchangers, electrogenic Na/HCO3 cotransporters, electroneutral Na/HCO3 cotransporters, and Na+-driven Cl/HCO3 exchanger. Studies of the bicarbonate transporters in vitro and in vivo have demonstrated their physiological importance for acid–base homeostasis at the cellular and systemic levels. Recent advances in structure/function analysis have also provided valuable information on domains or motifs critical for regulation, ion translocation, and protein topology. This chapter focuses on the molecular mechanisms of ion transport along with associated structural aspects from mutagenesis of particular residues and from chimeric constructs. Structure/function studies have helped to understand the mechanism by which ion substrates are moved via the transporters. This chapter also describes some insights into the structure of SLC4A1 (AE1) and SLC4A4 (NBCe1) transporters. Finally, as some SLC4A transporters exist in concert with other proteins in the cells, the structural features associated with protein–protein interactions are briefly discussed. PMID:23177984

  3. Legal Aspects of Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    The legal aspects of pupil transportation are examined, including the liability of various factions for transportation decisions and the duty of school districts to provide adequate transportation. Discussed are court decisions dealing with such complex topics as transportation of special education students, transportation for purpose of…

  4. VIEW OF CRAWLER TRANSPORTER NO. 1 (LEFT) AND CRAWLER TRANSPORTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF CRAWLER TRANSPORTER NO. 1 (LEFT) AND CRAWLER TRANSPORTER NO. 2 (RIGHT) AT PARKING/MAINTENANCE SITE. - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Crawler Transporters, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  5. Inositol transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Sabine

    2015-04-28

    The cyclic polyol myo-inositol is a key molecule in many different metabolic pathways among all organisms; in addition, it is fundamental for osmotic balance in the mammalian brain. This review sums up inositol transporters from eukaryotic organisms, elucidating their vital role in regulating the intracellular distribution and uptake of inositol. They can be divided into two groups according to their transport mechanisms: (1) sodium ion coupled inositol transporters that belong to the Solute Carrier Families 5 and 6-like Superfamily and, (2) proton coupled inositol symporters that are members of the Major Facilitator Superfamily. Intriguingly members of both families offer promising targets for medical treatment of a variety of diseases.

  6. Fuels for transportation.

    PubMed

    Fredholm, Bertil B; Nordén, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    There is a need to reduce the amount of fossil energy used for transport, both because of the easily available fossil fuel is becoming sparser and because of climate concerns. In this article, the concept of "peak oil" is briefly presented. Second, a practical approach to reduction of fossil fuel use for transport elaborated by two British commissions is presented. A key feature is the introduction of electric cars. This raises the third issue covered in this article: namely, how battery technology is going to meet the increasing needs posed by the transport sector. PMID:20873684

  7. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers

  8. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.A.; Cole, K.K.

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  9. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, John A.; Cole, James K.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  10. Crew Transportation Operations Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mango, Edward J.; Pearson, Don J. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Crew Transportation Operations Standards contains descriptions of ground and flight operations processes and specifications and the criteria which will be used to evaluate the acceptability of Commercial Providers' proposed processes and specifications.

  11. Rotorcraft air transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    Intermodal relationships and the particular ways in which they affect public transportation applications of rotorcraft are addressed. Some aspects of integrated services and general comparisons with other transportation modes are reviewed. Two potential application scenarios are discussed: down-to-downtown rotorcraft service and urban public transport rotorcraft service. It is concluded that to integrate well with ground access modes community rotorcraft service should be limited stop service with published schedules, and operate on a few specific routes between a few specific destinations. For downtown-to-downtown service, time savings favorable to rotorcraft are benefits that reflect its more direct access, relatively higher line-haul travel speeds, and less circuitous travel. For the scenario of public transport within urban areas, first, improving cruise speeds has a limited potential due to allowing for a ""station spacing'' effect. Secondly, public acceptance of higher acceleration/deceleration rates may be just as effective as a technological innovation as achieving higher cruise speeds.

  12. Biofuel Ethanol Transport Risk

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol production has increased rapidly over the last 10 years and many communities lack awareness of the increased and growing extent of biofuel transportation through their jurisdictions. These communities and their emergency responders may not have the information and resour...

  13. Transportation Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kramer, George Leroy Jr.

    1999-12-01

    The National Transportation Program 1999 Transportation Baseline Report presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste and materials transportation. In addition, this Report provides a summary overview of DOE’s projected quantities of waste and materials for transportation. Data presented in this report were gathered as a part of the IPABS Spring 1999 update of the EM Corporate Database and are current as of July 30, 1999. These data were input and compiled using the Analysis and Visualization System (AVS) which is used to update all stream-level components of the EM Corporate Database, as well as TSD System and programmatic risk (disposition barrier) information. Project (PBS) and site-level IPABS data are being collected through the Interim Data Management System (IDMS). The data are presented in appendices to this report.

  14. Air transportation energy efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The energy efficiency of air transportation, results of the recently completed RECAT studies on improvement alternatives, and the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Research Program to develop the technology for significant improvements in future aircraft were reviewed.

  15. Animal transportation networks.

    PubMed

    Perna, Andrea; Latty, Tanya

    2014-11-01

    Many group-living animals construct transportation networks of trails, galleries and burrows by modifying the environment to facilitate faster, safer or more efficient movement. Animal transportation networks can have direct influences on the fitness of individuals, whereas the shape and structure of transportation networks can influence community dynamics by facilitating contacts between different individuals and species. In this review, we discuss three key areas in the study of animal transportation networks: the topological properties of networks, network morphogenesis and growth, and the behaviour of network users. We present a brief primer on elements of network theory, and then discuss the different ways in which animal groups deal with the fundamental trade-off between the competing network properties of travel efficiency, robustness and infrastructure cost. We consider how the behaviour of network users can impact network efficiency, and call for studies that integrate both network topology and user behaviour. We finish with a prospectus for future research.

  16. Commercial jet transport crashworthiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widmayer, E.; Brende, O. B.

    1982-01-01

    The results of a study to identify areas of research and approaches that may result in improved occupant survivability and crashworthiness of transport aircraft are given. The study defines areas of structural crashworthiness for transport aircraft which might form the basis for a research program. A 10-year research and development program to improve the structural impact resistance of general aviation and commercial jet transport aircraft is planned. As part of this program parallel studies were conducted to review the accident experience of commercial transport aircraft, assess the accident performance of structural components and the status of impact resistance technology, and recommend areas of research and development for that 10-year plan. The results of that study are also given.

  17. Transportation Network Topologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalia (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    The existing U.S. hub-and-spoke air transportation system is reaching saturation. Major aspects of the current system, such as capacity, safety, mobility, customer satisfaction, security, communications, and ecological effects, require improvements. The changing dynamics - increased presence of general aviation, unmanned autonomous vehicles, military aircraft in civil airspace as part of homeland defense - contributes to growing complexity of airspace. The system has proven remarkably resistant to change. NASA Langley Research Center and the National Institute of Aerospace conducted a workshop on Transportation Network Topologies on 9-10 December 2003 in Williamsburg, Virginia. The workshop aimed to examine the feasibility of traditional methods for complex system analysis and design as well as potential novel alternatives in application to transportation systems, identify state-of-the-art models and methods, conduct gap analysis, and thus to lay a foundation for establishing a focused research program in complex systems applied to air transportation.

  18. Animal transportation networks

    PubMed Central

    Perna, Andrea; Latty, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Many group-living animals construct transportation networks of trails, galleries and burrows by modifying the environment to facilitate faster, safer or more efficient movement. Animal transportation networks can have direct influences on the fitness of individuals, whereas the shape and structure of transportation networks can influence community dynamics by facilitating contacts between different individuals and species. In this review, we discuss three key areas in the study of animal transportation networks: the topological properties of networks, network morphogenesis and growth, and the behaviour of network users. We present a brief primer on elements of network theory, and then discuss the different ways in which animal groups deal with the fundamental trade-off between the competing network properties of travel efficiency, robustness and infrastructure cost. We consider how the behaviour of network users can impact network efficiency, and call for studies that integrate both network topology and user behaviour. We finish with a prospectus for future research. PMID:25165598

  19. Transportation Security Administration

    MedlinePlus

    ... content Official website of the Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration A - Z Index What Can I Bring? Search form Apples Main menu Administrator Travel Security Screening Special Procedures TSA Pre✓® Passenger Support Travel ...

  20. Transportation Network Topologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Scott, John M.

    2004-01-01

    A discomforting reality has materialized on the transportation scene: our existing air and ground infrastructures will not scale to meet our nation's 21st century demands and expectations for mobility, commerce, safety, and security. The consequence of inaction is diminished quality of life and economic opportunity in the 21st century. Clearly, new thinking is required for transportation that can scale to meet to the realities of a networked, knowledge-based economy in which the value of time is a new coin of the realm. This paper proposes a framework, or topology, for thinking about the problem of scalability of the system of networks that comprise the aviation system. This framework highlights the role of integrated communication-navigation-surveillance systems in enabling scalability of future air transportation networks. Scalability, in this vein, is a goal of the recently formed Joint Planning and Development Office for the Next Generation Air Transportation System. New foundations for 21PstP thinking about air transportation are underpinned by several technological developments in the traditional aircraft disciplines as well as in communication, navigation, surveillance and information systems. Complexity science and modern network theory give rise to one of the technological developments of importance. Scale-free (i.e., scalable) networks represent a promising concept space for modeling airspace system architectures, and for assessing network performance in terms of scalability, efficiency, robustness, resilience, and other metrics. The paper offers an air transportation system topology as framework for transportation system innovation. Successful outcomes of innovation in air transportation could lay the foundations for new paradigms for aircraft and their operating capabilities, air transportation system architectures, and airspace architectures and procedural concepts. The topology proposed considers air transportation as a system of networks, within

  1. Transportation Network Topologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Scott, John

    2004-01-01

    A discomforting reality has materialized on the transportation scene: our existing air and ground infrastructures will not scale to meet our nation's 21st century demands and expectations for mobility, commerce, safety, and security. The consequence of inaction is diminished quality of life and economic opportunity in the 21st century. Clearly, new thinking is required for transportation that can scale to meet to the realities of a networked, knowledge-based economy in which the value of time is a new coin of the realm. This paper proposes a framework, or topology, for thinking about the problem of scalability of the system of networks that comprise the aviation system. This framework highlights the role of integrated communication-navigation-surveillance systems in enabling scalability of future air transportation networks. Scalability, in this vein, is a goal of the recently formed Joint Planning and Development Office for the Next Generation Air Transportation System. New foundations for 21st thinking about air transportation are underpinned by several technological developments in the traditional aircraft disciplines as well as in communication, navigation, surveillance and information systems. Complexity science and modern network theory give rise to one of the technological developments of importance. Scale-free (i.e., scalable) networks represent a promising concept space for modeling airspace system architectures, and for assessing network performance in terms of scalability, efficiency, robustness, resilience, and other metrics. The paper offers an air transportation system topology as framework for transportation system innovation. Successful outcomes of innovation in air transportation could lay the foundations for new paradigms for aircraft and their operating capabilities, air transportation system architectures, and airspace architectures and procedural concepts. The topology proposed considers air transportation as a system of networks, within which

  2. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, Bradley G.; Downing, Jr., John P.; Neal, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitment for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container.

  3. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  4. Tape transport mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Groh, Edward F.; McDowell, William; Modjeski, Norbert S.; Keefe, Donald J.; Groer, Peter

    1979-01-01

    A device is provided for transporting, in a stepwise manner, tape between a feed reel and takeup reel. An indexer moves across the normal path of the tape displacing it while the tape on the takeup reel side of the indexer is braked. After displacement, the takeup reel takes up the displaced tape while the tape on the feed reel side of the indexer is braked, providing stepwise tape transport in precise intervals determined by the amount of displacement caused by the indexer.

  5. [Recommendations for neonatal transport].

    PubMed

    Moreno Hernando, J; Thió Lluch, M; Salguero García, E; Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is not always possible to identify maternal or foetal risk factors. Infants requiring specialised medical care are not always born in centres providing intensive care and will need to be transferred to a referral centre where intensive care can be provided. Therefore Neonatal Transport needs to be considered as part of the organisation of perinatal health care. The aim of Neonatal Transport is to transfer a newborn infant requiring intensive care to a centre where specialised resources and experience can be provided for the appropriate assessment and continuing treatment of a sick newborn infant. Intrauterine transfer is the ideal mode of transport when the birth of an infant with risk factors is diagnosed. Unfortunately, not all problems can be detected in advance with enough time to safely transfer a pregnant woman. Around 30- 50% of risk factors will be diagnosed during labour or soon after birth. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and resources to resuscitate and stabilise a newborn infant, as well as a specialised neonatal transport system. With this specialised transport it is possible to transfer newly born infants with the same level of care that they would receive if they had been born in a referral hospital, without increasing their risks or affecting the wellbeing of the newborn. The Standards Committee of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviewed and updated recommendations for intrauterine transport and indications for neonatal transfer. They also reviewed organisational and logistic factors involved with performing neonatal transport. The Committee review included the type of personnel who should be involved; communication between referral and receiving hospitals; documentation; mode of transport; equipment to stabilise newly born infants; management during transfer, and admission at the referral hospital.

  6. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1997-01-01

    The third semi-annual period of the MTP project has been involved with performing experiments using the Membrane Transport Apparatus (MTA), development of analysis techniques for the experiment results, analytical modeling of the osmotic transport phenomena, and completion of a DC-9 microgravity flight to test candidate fluid cell geometries. Preparations were also made for the MTP Science Concept Review (SCR), held on 13 June 1997 at Lockheed Martin Astronautics in Denver. These activities are detailed in the report.

  7. Transporting Forensic Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Dike, Charles C; Nicholson, Elizabeth; Young, John L

    2015-12-01

    Patients in a forensic psychiatric facility often require escorted transport to medical facilities for investigations or treatments of physical health ailments. Transporting these patients presents significant safety and custody challenges because of the nature of patients housed in forensic psychiatric facilities. A significant proportion of these patients may be transfers from the Department of Corrections (DOC) under legal mandates for psychiatric evaluation and treatment better provided in a hospital setting, and most of them will return to the DOC. Although departments of correction have protocols for escorting these potentially dangerous individuals, it is unclear whether receiving psychiatric hospitals have established procedures for maintaining the safety of others and custody of these individuals during transportation outside the hospital facility. The literature is sparse on precautions to be observed when transporting dangerous forensic psychiatric patients, including those with high escape risk. In this article, we describe one forensic inpatient facility's procedure for determining the appropriate level needed to transport these individuals outside of the forensic facility. We also describe the risk assessment procedure for determining level of transport. These are quality improvement measures resulting from a critical review of an incident of escape from the forensic facility several years ago.

  8. Organellar Channels and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haoxing; Martinoia, Enrico; Szabo, Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Decades of intensive research has led to the discovery of most plasma membrane ion channels and transporters and the characterization of their physiological functions. In contrast, although over 80% of transport processes occur inside the cells, the ion flux mechanisms across intracellular membranes (the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, endosomes, lysosomes, mitochondria, chloroplasts, and vacuoles) are difficult to investigate and remain poorly understood. Recent technical advances in super-resolution microscopy, organellar electrophysiology, organelle-targeted fluorescence imaging, and organelle proteomics have pushed a large step forward in the research of intracellular ion transport. Many new organellar channels are molecularly identified and electrophysiologically characterized. Additionally, molecular identification of many of these ion channels/transporters has made it possible to study their physiological functions by genetic and pharmacological means. For example, organellar channels have been shown to regulate important cellular processes such as programmed cell death and photosynthesis, and are involved in many different pathologies. This Special Issue (SI) on Organellar Channels and Transporters aims to provide a forum to discuss the recent advances and to define the standard and open questions in this exciting and rapidly-developing field. Along this line, a new Gordon Research Conference dedicated to the multidisciplinary study of intracellular membrane transport proteins will be launched this coming summer. PMID:25795199

  9. Ion transport in pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W.; Oancea, Elena V.

    2014-01-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system,, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis. PMID:25034214

  10. Moss hair water transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhao; Wu, Nan; Hurd, Randy; Thomson, Scott; Pitt, William; Truscott, Tadd

    2013-11-01

    We present an investigation of water transportation on a moss (Syntrichia caninervis) indigenous to temperate deserts. The moss typically appears to be in a dry, brown state, but is rehydrated by water during the wet season, making the desert green. Small hairs (500-2000 μm in length, and 40 μm in diameter, d) growing out from the tip of the moss leaves transport water back to the leaves. Through high speed observations and mathematical modeling it appears that this transportation is driven by two different mechanisms. 1) Droplet transport is achieved in three ways: i) A large (10d) droplet attached between two intersecting fibers will move toward the bases of the leaves by the changing angle between the two hairs. ii) The shape of the moss hair is conical, thicker at the base, producing a gradient that moves fluid (5d) toward the leaf similar to cactus spines. iii) We also observe that in some cases a Plateau-Rayleigh instability trigger a series of droplets moving toward the base. 2) Micro-grooves on the moss hair transport a film of water along the moss hair when larger droplets are not available. These various water transportation strategies combine to help the moss to survive in the desert and provide valuable insight.

  11. Transporting Forensic Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Dike, Charles C; Nicholson, Elizabeth; Young, John L

    2015-12-01

    Patients in a forensic psychiatric facility often require escorted transport to medical facilities for investigations or treatments of physical health ailments. Transporting these patients presents significant safety and custody challenges because of the nature of patients housed in forensic psychiatric facilities. A significant proportion of these patients may be transfers from the Department of Corrections (DOC) under legal mandates for psychiatric evaluation and treatment better provided in a hospital setting, and most of them will return to the DOC. Although departments of correction have protocols for escorting these potentially dangerous individuals, it is unclear whether receiving psychiatric hospitals have established procedures for maintaining the safety of others and custody of these individuals during transportation outside the hospital facility. The literature is sparse on precautions to be observed when transporting dangerous forensic psychiatric patients, including those with high escape risk. In this article, we describe one forensic inpatient facility's procedure for determining the appropriate level needed to transport these individuals outside of the forensic facility. We also describe the risk assessment procedure for determining level of transport. These are quality improvement measures resulting from a critical review of an incident of escape from the forensic facility several years ago. PMID:26668224

  12. Ion transport in pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Oancea, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis.

  13. Transportation Anslysis Simulation System

    SciTech Connect

    2004-08-23

    TRANSIMS version 3.1 is an integrated set of analytical and simulation models and supporting databases. The system is designed to create a virtual metropolitan region with representation of each of the region’s individuals, their activities and the transportation infrastructure they use. TRANSIMS puts into practice a new, disaggregate approach to travel demand modeling using agent-based micro-simulation technology. TRANSIMS methodology creates a virtual metropolitan region with representation of the transportation infrastructure and the population, at the level of households and individual travelers. Trips a planned to satisfy the population’s activity pattems at the individual traveler level. TRANSIMS then simulates the movement of travelers and vehicles across the transportation network using multiple modes, including car, transit, bike and walk, on a second-by-second basis. Metropolitan planners must plan growth of their cities according to the stringent transportation system planning requirements of the Interniodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and other similar laws and regulations. These require each state and its metropotitan regions to work together to develop short and long term transportation improvement plans. The plans must (1) estimate the future transportation needs for travelers and goods movements, (2) evaluate ways to manage and reduce congestion, (3) examine the effectiveness of building new roads and transit systems, and (4) limit the environmental impact of the various strategies. The needed consistent and accurate transportation improvement plans require an analytical capability that properly accounts for travel demand, human behavior, traffic and transit operations, major investments, and environmental effects. Other existing planning tools use aggregated information and representative behavior to predict average response and average use of transportation facilities. They do not account

  14. Transportation Anslysis Simulation System

    2004-08-23

    TRANSIMS version 3.1 is an integrated set of analytical and simulation models and supporting databases. The system is designed to create a virtual metropolitan region with representation of each of the region’s individuals, their activities and the transportation infrastructure they use. TRANSIMS puts into practice a new, disaggregate approach to travel demand modeling using agent-based micro-simulation technology. TRANSIMS methodology creates a virtual metropolitan region with representation of the transportation infrastructure and the population, at themore » level of households and individual travelers. Trips a planned to satisfy the population’s activity pattems at the individual traveler level. TRANSIMS then simulates the movement of travelers and vehicles across the transportation network using multiple modes, including car, transit, bike and walk, on a second-by-second basis. Metropolitan planners must plan growth of their cities according to the stringent transportation system planning requirements of the Interniodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and other similar laws and regulations. These require each state and its metropotitan regions to work together to develop short and long term transportation improvement plans. The plans must (1) estimate the future transportation needs for travelers and goods movements, (2) evaluate ways to manage and reduce congestion, (3) examine the effectiveness of building new roads and transit systems, and (4) limit the environmental impact of the various strategies. The needed consistent and accurate transportation improvement plans require an analytical capability that properly accounts for travel demand, human behavior, traffic and transit operations, major investments, and environmental effects. Other existing planning tools use aggregated information and representative behavior to predict average response and average use of transportation facilities. They do not

  15. Bioreactor Mass Transport Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Begley, Cynthia M.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the proposed research efforts were to develop both a simulation tool and a series of experiments to provide a quantitative assessment of mass transport in the NASA rotating wall perfused vessel (RWPV) bioreactor to be flown on EDU#2. This effort consisted of a literature review of bioreactor mass transport studies, the extension of an existing scalar transport computer simulation to include production and utilization of the scalar, and the evaluation of experimental techniques for determining mass transport in these vessels. Since mass transport at the cell surface is determined primarily by the relative motion of the cell assemblage and the surrounding fluid, a detailed assessment of the relative motion was conducted. Results of the simulations of the motion of spheres in the RWPV under microgravity conditions are compared with flight data from EDU#1 flown on STS-70. The mass transport across the cell membrane depends upon the environment, the cell type, and the biological state of the cell. Results from a literature review of cell requirements of several scalars are presented. As a first approximation, a model with a uniform spatial distribution of utilization or production was developed and results from these simulations are presented. There were two candidate processes considered for the experimental mass transport evaluations. The first was to measure the dissolution rate of solid or gel beads. The second was to measure the induced fluorescence of beads as a stimulant (for example hydrogen peroxide) is infused into the vessel. Either technique would use video taped images of the process for recording the quantitative results. Results of preliminary tests of these techniques are discussed.

  16. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Lei Zhou

    2000-01-30

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between Oct 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 2: Addition of a foam generation and breaker system), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Research on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), and Foam properties while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), (h) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members. The tasks Completed During This Quarter are Task 7 and Task 8.

  17. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  18. Pyrophosphate Transport and Stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, John A.; Carr, Georgina; Moochhala, Shabbir H.; Simmons, Nicholas L.

    2008-09-01

    Since the 1960's, inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) has been known to inhibit apatite precipitation. Recent findings suggest that PPi plays a central role in the control of normal bone mineralization. Knockout mice have established the functional importance of PPi transmembrane transport, via the pyrophosphate transporter ANKH. The molecular nature and transport function of ANKH are reviewed. PPi is present in urine and ANKH is expressed in the cortical collecting duct where PPi transport to both the tubular lumen and renal interstitium may occur. Arginine vasopressin stimulation of cortical collecting duct cells grown on semi-permeable supports appears to upregulate apical ANKH expression, which we postulate may be a mechanism of stone inhibition during urinary concentration and supersaturation of calcium salts. Hypopyrophosphaturia may be a forgotten metabolic risk factor for stone formation and polymorphisms of the ANKH gene may underlie this defect. The physiological importance and clinical significance of PPi generation and transport in preventing idiopathic renal stone disease and nephrocalcinosis now needs to be established.

  19. The High Cost of Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasicot, Julie

    1996-01-01

    Describes how school districts, faced with shrinking resources, have cut costs for student transportation. To combat rising transportation costs, districts have charged fees for student transportation, entered into private contracts, cut transportation services, used alternative fuels, and streamlined bus routes and schedules. (LMI)

  20. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Len Volk; Mark Pickell; Evren Ozbayoglu; Barkim Demirdal; Paco Vieira; Affonso Lourenco

    1999-10-15

    This report includes a review of the progress made in ACTF Flow Loop development and research during 90 days pre-award period (May 15-July 14, 1999) and the following three months after the project approval date (July15-October 15, 1999) The report presents information on the following specific subjects; (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development, (b) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Progress report on the instrumentation tasks (Tasks 11 and 12) (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with oil and service company members.

  1. Transportation Institutional Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    This Institutional Plan is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 provides background information, discusses the purposes of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system, and describes the projected system and the plans for its integrated development. Chapter 2 discusses the major participants who must interact to build the system. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will foster wide participation in program planning and implementation and provides a framework for managing and resolving the issues related to development and operation of the transportation system. A list of acronyms and a glossary are included for the reader's convenience. Also included in this Plan are four appendices. Of particular importance is Appendix A, which includes detailed discussion of specific transportation issues. Appendices B, C, and D provide supporting material to assist the reader in understanding the roles of the involved institutions.

  2. Lunar material transport vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Charles D.; Lyons, Douglas; Wilkins, W. Allen, Jr.; Whitehead, Harry C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The proposed vehicle, the Lunar Material Transport Vehicle (LMTV), has a mission objective of efficient lunar soil material transport. The LMTV was designed to meet a required set of performance specifications while operating under a given set of constraints. The LMTV is essentially an articulated steering, double-ended dump truck. The vehicle moves on four wheels and has two identical chassis halves. Each half consists of a chassis frame, a material bucket, two wheels with integral curvilinear synchronous motors, a fuel cell and battery arrangement, an electromechanically actuated dumping mechanism, and a powerful microprocessor. The vehicle, as designed, is capable of transporting up to 200 cu ft of material over a one mile round trip per hour. The LMTV is capable of being operated from a variety of sources. The vehicle has been designed as simply as possible with attention also given to secondary usage of components.

  3. Preface: Nonclassical Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Bolshov, L.; Kondratenko, P.; Pruess, K.

    2008-09-01

    Transport phenomena in highly heterogeneous media can be dramatically different from those in homogeneous media and therefore are of great fundamental and practical interest. Anomalous transport occurs in semiconductor physics, plasma physics, astrophysics, biology, and other areas. It plays an especially important role in hydrogeology because it may govern the rate of migration and degree of dispersion of groundwater contaminants from hazardous waste sites. The series of four articles in this special section of Vadose Zone Journal is devoted to transport phenomena in heterogeneous media in the context of geologic disposal of radioactive waste. It contains the results of joint investigations performed at the Nuclear Safety Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. The work was supported by the U.S. DOE (under Contract No. DEAC02-05CH11231). The problems addressed in this research involve a broad range of space and time scales and were approached using modern methods of theoretical and computational physics, such as scaling analysis and diagrammatic techniques used before in critical phenomena theory. Special attention is paid to the asymptotics of concentration behavior (concentration tails). This issue is exceptionally important for the reliability assessments of radioactive waste disposal because, depending on the structure of the tails, concentrations at large distances from the source can differ by many orders of magnitude. In the first paper of this special section, Bolshov et al. (2008b) present an overview of field and laboratory observations that demonstrate nonclassical flow and transport behavior in geologic media. It is recognized that natural fracture networks as a rule have fractal geometry and can be classified as percolation systems. This is one of the main factors giving rise to anomalous transport in geologic media. Another important factor is the presence of contaminant traps provided by

  4. Intermodal Transportation, USACE Style

    SciTech Connect

    Grumski, K. M.; Coutts, P. W.

    2002-02-27

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has developed project management techniques with a proven track record for safe and successful results for constructing large scale and massive projects such as improving our nations water transportation systems, flood control, bridges and dams. Applying many of these techniques to the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) managed by USACE to remediate the environment is achieving the same safe and successful results as their construction projects. This paper examines the additional economics and improved safety results of using intermodal containers and a combination of rail and truck transportation conveyances to transport the contaminated soil and debris from the Linde FUSRAP site, located in Tonawanda, New York.

  5. Solute transport in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, David E.

    Continued research interest in transport in the subsurface was demonstrated at the “Solute Transport in Groundwater” session held at the 1985 AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore. This session, following on the heels of the very successful special symposium on “Coupling Geochemical and Hydrologic Models for Subsurface Solute Transport,” was organized by Lenny Konikow of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS, Reston, Va.) and copresided by Steve Gorelick (USGS, Menlo Park, Calif.) and David Dougherty (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.). Participation was strong, with 12 contributed papers and about 150 attendees. The papers addressed a wide variety of topics, ranging from the theoretical to the applied, from physics to numerical methods.

  6. Payload transportation at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Cargo ground processing at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) involves either a horizointal or vertical mode of assembly and processing of the STS payloads. Consequently, cargos are commonly referred to as horizontal or vertical payloads. The process flow for each mode requires different facilities and transportation requirements. Occasionally, a mixed mission cargo containing both horizontal and vertical payload elements will require a combination of horizontal and vertical transportation between facilities. Some of the engineering challenges and innovative solutions to satisy the unique on-site payload transportation requirements at KSC. In particular, some of the more demanding design requirements of the multiuse mission support equipment are presented, and the resulting engineering designs and unique solutions are outlined.

  7. Prioritized Contact Transport Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Walter Lee, Jr. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A detection process, contact recognition process, classification process, and identification process are applied to raw sensor data to produce an identified contact record set containing one or more identified contact records. A prioritization process is applied to the identified contact record set to assign a contact priority to each contact record in the identified contact record set. Data are removed from the contact records in the identified contact record set based on the contact priorities assigned to those contact records. A first contact stream is produced from the resulting contact records. The first contact stream is streamed in a contact transport stream. The contact transport stream may include and stream additional contact streams. The contact transport stream may be varied dynamically over time based on parameters such as available bandwidth, contact priority, presence/absence of contacts, system state, and configuration parameters.

  8. Chemical coding and chemosensory properties of cholinergic brush cells in the mouse gastrointestinal and biliary tract

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Burkhard; Jurastow, Innokentij; Bader, Sandra; Ringer, Cornelia; von Engelhardt, Jakob; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Diener, Martin; Kummer, Wolfgang; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Weihe, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    The mouse gastro-intestinal and biliary tract mucosal epithelia harbor choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive brush cells with taste cell-like traits. With the aid of two transgenic mouse lines that express green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the ChAT promoter (EGFPChAT) and by using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we found that EGFPChAT cells were clustered in the epithelium lining the gastric groove. EGFPChAT cells were numerous in the gall bladder and bile duct, and found scattered as solitary cells along the small and large intestine. While all EGFPChAT cells were also ChAT-positive, expression of the high-affinity choline transporter (ChT1) was never detected. Except for the proximal colon, EGFPChAT cells also lacked detectable expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). EGFPChAT cells were found to be separate from enteroendocrine cells, however they were all immunoreactive for cytokeratin 18 (CK18), transient receptor potential melastatin-like subtype 5 channel (TRPM5), and for cyclooxygenases 1 (COX1) and 2 (COX2). The ex vivo stimulation of colonic EGFPChAT cells with the bitter substance denatonium resulted in a strong increase in intracellular calcium, while in other epithelial cells such an increase was significantly weaker and also timely delayed. Subsequent stimulation with cycloheximide was ineffective in both cell populations. Given their chemical coding and chemosensory properties, EGFPChAT brush cells thus may have integrative functions and participate in induction of protective reflexes and inflammatory events by utilizing ACh and prostaglandins for paracrine signaling. PMID:25852573

  9. Chemical coding and chemosensory properties of cholinergic brush cells in the mouse gastrointestinal and biliary tract.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Burkhard; Jurastow, Innokentij; Bader, Sandra; Ringer, Cornelia; von Engelhardt, Jakob; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Diener, Martin; Kummer, Wolfgang; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Weihe, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    The mouse gastro-intestinal and biliary tract mucosal epithelia harbor choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive brush cells with taste cell-like traits. With the aid of two transgenic mouse lines that express green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the ChAT promoter (EGFP (ChAT) ) and by using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we found that EGFP (ChAT) cells were clustered in the epithelium lining the gastric groove. EGFP (ChAT) cells were numerous in the gall bladder and bile duct, and found scattered as solitary cells along the small and large intestine. While all EGFP (ChAT) cells were also ChAT-positive, expression of the high-affinity choline transporter (ChT1) was never detected. Except for the proximal colon, EGFP (ChAT) cells also lacked detectable expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). EGFP (ChAT) cells were found to be separate from enteroendocrine cells, however they were all immunoreactive for cytokeratin 18 (CK18), transient receptor potential melastatin-like subtype 5 channel (TRPM5), and for cyclooxygenases 1 (COX1) and 2 (COX2). The ex vivo stimulation of colonic EGFP (ChAT) cells with the bitter substance denatonium resulted in a strong increase in intracellular calcium, while in other epithelial cells such an increase was significantly weaker and also timely delayed. Subsequent stimulation with cycloheximide was ineffective in both cell populations. Given their chemical coding and chemosensory properties, EGFP (ChAT) brush cells thus may have integrative functions and participate in induction of protective reflexes and inflammatory events by utilizing ACh and prostaglandins for paracrine signaling. PMID:25852573

  10. Mars surface transportation options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitner, Jeffrey M.; Alred, John W.

    1986-01-01

    As the number of scientific experiments for the surface of Mars grows, the need for effective surface transportation becomes critical. Because of the diversity of the experiments proposed, as well as the desire to explore Mars from the equator to the poles, the optimum surface vehicle configuration is not obvious. Five candidate vehicles are described, with an estimate of their size and performance. In order to maximize the success of a manned Mars mission, it appears that two vehicles should be designed for surface transportation: an advanced long-range rover, and a remotely-piloted airplane.

  11. Design objectives - Air transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    The mainline of air transportation is expected to continue to be based on the medium to long haul turbine powered subsonic aircraft. With greater emphasis on energy conservation, there will be considerable interest in making additional progress in propulsion system efficiency. Continued improvement in turbofan engines is expected to occur, but there may be a less conventional approach in the background. Opportunities for expanding short haul air services will certainly materialize. The outlook for supersonic air transport is less clear because of complex political and economic factors.

  12. FAA Smoke Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Domino, Stefan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay; Gallegos, Carlos

    2006-10-27

    FAA Smoke Transport Code, a physics-based Computational Fluid Dynamics tool, which couples heat, mass, and momentum transfer, has been developed to provide information on smoke transport in cargo compartments with various geometries and flight conditions. The software package contains a graphical user interface for specification of geometry and boundary conditions, analysis module for solving the governing equations, and a post-processing tool. The current code was produced by making substantial improvements and additions to a code obtained from a university. The original code was able to compute steady, uniform, isothermal turbulent pressurization. In addition, a preprocessor and postprocessor were added to arrive at the current software package.

  13. Mobile transporter path planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baffes, Paul; Wang, Lui

    1990-01-01

    The use of a genetic algorithm (GA) for solving the mobile transporter path planning problem is investigated. The mobile transporter is a traveling robotic vehicle proposed for the space station which must be able to reach any point of the structure autonomously. Elements of the genetic algorithm are explored in both a theoretical and experimental sense. Specifically, double crossover, greedy crossover, and tournament selection techniques are examined. Additionally, the use of local optimization techniques working in concert with the GA are also explored. Recent developments in genetic algorithm theory are shown to be particularly effective in a path planning problem domain, though problem areas can be cited which require more research.

  14. The Trojan. [supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Trojan is the culmination of thousands of engineering person-hours by the Cones of Silence Design Team. The goal was to design an economically and technologically viable supersonic transport. The Trojan is the embodiment of the latest engineering tools and technology necessary for such an advanced aircraft. The efficient design of the Trojan allows for supersonic cruise of Mach 2.0 for 5,200 nautical miles, carrying 250 passengers. The per aircraft price is placed at $200 million, making the Trojan a very realistic solution for tomorrows transportation needs. The following is a detailed study of the driving factors that determined the Trojan's super design.

  15. Coupled transport protein systems.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2013-04-16

    This set of animated lessons provides examples of how transport proteins interact in coupled systems to produce physiologic effects. The gastric pumps animation depicts the secretion of hydrochloric acid into the gastric lumen. The animation called glucose absorption depicts glucose absorption by intestinal epithelial cells. The CFTR animation explains how the cystic fibrosis conductance transmembrane regulator (CFTR) functions as a key component of a coupled system of transport proteins that clears the pulmonary system of mucus and inhaled particulates. These animations serve as valuable resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these processes. Courses that might use them include introductory biology, biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, pharmacology, and physiology.

  16. Automated transportable mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echo, M. W.

    1981-09-01

    The need was identified for a mass spectrometer (MS) which can be conveniently transported among several facilities for rapid verification of the isotopic composition of special nuclear material. This requirement for a light weight, transportable MS for U and Pu mass analysis was met by deleting the gas chromograph (GC) portions of a Hewlett-Packard Model 5992 Quadrupole GCMS and substituting a vacuum lock sample entry system. A programmable power supply and vacuum gauge were added and circuitry modifications were made to enable use of the supplied software.

  17. Introduction to radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.L.

    1998-12-31

    This lecture will present time-dependent radiation transport where the radiation is coupled to a static medium, i.e., the material is not in motion. In reality, radiation exerts a pressure on the materials it propagates through and will accelerate the material in the direction of the radiation flow. This fully coupled problem with radiation transport and materials in motion is referred to as radiation-hydrodynamics (or in a shorthand notation: rad-hydro) and is beyond the scope of this lecture.

  18. Smart vehicular transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Little, C.Q.; Wilson, C.W.

    1997-05-01

    This work builds upon established Sandia intelligent systems technology to develop a unique approach for the integration of intelligent system control into the US Highway and urban transportation systems. The Sandia developed concept of the COPILOT controller integrates a human driver with computer control to increase human performance while reducing reliance on detailed driver attention. This research extends Sandia expertise in sensor based, real-time control of robotics systems to high speed transportation systems. Knowledge in the form of maps and performance characteristics of vehicles provides the automatic decision making intelligence needed to plan optimum routes, maintain safe driving speeds and distances, avoid collisions, and conserve fuel.

  19. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  20. Orbit to orbit transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, R. P.

    1980-07-01

    Orbital transfer vehicle propulsion options for SPS include both chemical (COTV) and electrical (EOTV) options. The proposed EOTV construction method is similar to that of the SPS and, by the addition of a transmitting antenna, may serve as a demonstration or precursor satellite option. The results of the studies led to the selection of a single stage COTV for crew and priority cargo transfer. An EOTV concept is favored for cargo transfer because of the more favorable orbital burden factor over chemical systems. The gallium arsenide solar array is favored over the silicon array because of its self annealing characteristics of radiation damage encountered during multiple transitions through the Van Allen radiation belt. Transportation system operations are depicted. A heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) delivers cargo and propellants to LEO, which are transferred to a dedicated EOTV by means of an intraorbit transfer vehicle (IOTV) for subsequent transfer to GEO. The space shuttle is used for crew transfer from Earth to LEO. At the LEO base, the crew module is removed from the shuttle cargo bay and mated to a COTV for transfer to GEO. Upon arrival at GEO, the SPS construction cargo is transferred from the EOTV to the SPS construction base by IOTV. Crew consumables and resupply propellants are transported to GEO by the EOTV. Transportation requirements are dominated by the vast quantity of materials to be transported to LEO and GEO.

  1. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

    2002-01-30

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year 3 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between Oct 1, 2001 and Dec. 31, 2001. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Collection System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), and Foam properties while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  2. Neoclassical transport in stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, D.D.M.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1985-09-01

    The stellarator neoclassical transport due to particles trapped in local helical wells is calculated in the low-collisionality regime using a systematic expansion. The behavior of electron transport is found to be the same over a wide range of energies, but the behavior of ion transport for low energy ions is found to be different than that for high energy ions. Furthermore, the electron fluxes do not vary with the change in the radial ambipolar electric field nearly as much as do the ion fluxes. Thus, the particle diffusion is controlled by the electrons. A nonradial ambipolar electric field is induced by ion drift. This electric field enhances the transport by about 15 to 20%. A convenient graphical method that allows one to determine the magnitude of the radial ambipolar field for machines with different parameters is presented. Numerical examples show that electron energy confinement time is comparable to the ion energy confinement time for all the different size stellarators studied. Although the neoclassical losses are large, it is shown that ignition can be achieved in a reasonably sized stellarator reactor. Finally, from the standpoint of reactor economics, the confinement scaling law shows that in order to increase n tau, it is better to increase the aspect ratio than the overall dimensions of the reactor.

  3. Slurry transport medium

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, W.; Schiffman, L.

    1980-06-03

    This invention provides for an improvement in slurry transport systems, especially coal slurry lines. Instead of the usual use of fresh water resources which, in some geographic areas, are scarce for slurry transport, concentrated brine is used which is prepared from abundant salt water resources. Because of the higher density of this concentrated brine, it is a superior carrier of pulverized material. It diminishes the separation and settling tendency of slurry components during transport and particularly during shutdown. Other advantages in the use of concentrated brine include: freezing point depression which permits ease of transport during winter and at lower temperatures; dust suppression of stored coal; avoidance of spontaneous combustion of stored coal; inhibit freeze packing of dewatered pipeline coal; and diminished extent of corrosion in ferrous metal pipelines as compared to that which might occur with lower concentration brines. Important in the economy of the process is that the concentrated brine can be recycled. An inexpensive method for producing the concentrated brine is given.

  4. Mixing and Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditmars, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of longitudinal dispersion, mixing and transport in streams, rivers, lakes, reservoirs, estuaries, and oceans. This review covers also: (1) fluid-solid mixtures and (2) oil spill behavior. A list of 189 references published in 1976 and 1977 is presented. (HM)

  5. TRANSPORTATION LONG AGO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC.

    THIS HISTORICAL REVIEW OF TRANSPORTATION REPRESENTS AN EXPERIMENTAL BOOKLET OF ILLUSTRATIONS AND SINGLE TEXT FOR USE BY TEACHERS TO STIMULATE INTEREST IN READING AND IN RELATED MECHANICAL SUBJECT MATTER AREAS. IT AIMS TO HELP YOUNG PEOPLE LEARN BASIC PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS OF MECHANICS AND TECHNOLOGY. PHOTOGRAPHS AND ILLUSTRATIONS, SELECTED FROM…

  6. Charging up Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen R.

    1994-01-01

    In Antelope Valley, California, a regional transportation consortium, cooperatively run by six adjacent school districts, is operating an electric-powered school bus as a pilot project. Although the prototype bus cost nearly six times more than a traditional school bus, lower operating and maintenance expenses and safety factors appeal to many…

  7. Training Guide: Road Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan Page, Ltd., London (England).

    The third in a series of guides to British industrial training, this publication begins with a survey of training issues and tasks confronting the Road Transport Industry Training Board (RTITB). This is followed by information on RTITB policies and provisions; RTITB members, officers, and committees; apprenticeships and other training schemes;…

  8. School Transportation: Administrator's Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Pupil transportation is an essential part of the overall school program, which requires constant supervision and direction. Perhaps no other phase of the school program is more closely observed by the public or has a greater tendency to mold public opinion about the schools than the school bus system. The success of any school district pupil…

  9. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

    2002-04-30

    This is the third quarterly progress report for Year 3 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between Jan. 1, 2002 and Mar. 31, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 9b): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b); (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop, progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S); and (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  10. Technology transfer-transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyos, T.; Lizak, R.; Wilhelm, J.; Hirschberg, K.

    1974-01-01

    The application of aerospace technology to the solution of urban public transportation problems is considered. Data are given on highway and railway systems with particular attention given to safety devices, fuel economy, and measures for profiling railways and highways. The development of streamlined truck bodies, to reduce air drag, and efficient brake systems for light trucks and other vehicles was also dealt with.

  11. Transportation and platforms perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology; space research and technology (R&T); space R&T mission statement; Space R&T program development; R&T strategy; Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) technology needs; transportation technology; and space platforms technology.

  12. Platelet transport in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyssat, Mathilde; Le Goff, Anne; Blin, Antoine; Pujos, Justine; Magniez, Aurélie; Baruch, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    Blood platelets are small enucleated cells responsible for the arrest of bleeding. These cells have the ability to tether and translocate on injured vascular endothelium, thanks to a specific interaction between a receptor of their membrane and a protein expressed by the cells composing the inner wall of the vessel, the von Willebrand factor (VWF). Others cells have such abilities of rolling. Leucocytes, for example, translocate on surface due to a specific interaction between selectin molecules and their respective glycoprotein ligands. These kinds of cells present two modes of transport: they can either be advected by the flux, or translocate on surfaces due to specific ligand-receptor interactions. Our work consists first in studying experimentally the transport of platelets along a microchannel and then in modeling this particular cell transport. Due to these two modes of transport along a channel, platelets adhering to the surface are not equally distributed along the channel axis. We describe the evolution of the density of platelets with time and distance.

  13. Child Transportation Safety Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document presents nine tips regarding safe infant and child transportation, each tip explained in one to two pages. The tips are as follows: (1) quick safety seat checkup; (2) where should your child ride? (3) how to protect your new baby in the car; (4) what safety seat to use for a big baby or toddler? (5) how should preschool and school…

  14. Technology transfer-transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyos, T.; Lizak, R.; Wilhelm, J.

    1974-01-01

    Problems in the public transportation industry and refining methods for decreasing the time gap between the development and the marketing of new technology are considered. Eight NASA innovations are either being adapted for use on highways, railways, or rapid transit, or are already entering the marketplace. Chronologies for three of these programs are provided.

  15. Alternate Transportation Routes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Since last school year, the St. Lucie County (Florida) Public Schools reduced the number of buses it operates from 399 to 362, despite opening two new schools. Add in some other smart changes in policy, and the district lowered its annual transportation costs by more than $3 million over last year. Saving $3 million a year does not come easily,…

  16. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira

    2000-10-30

    This is the first quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between July 14, 2000 and September 30, 2000. This report presents information on the following specific tasks: (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development (Task 2), (b) Progress on research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress on research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress on research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress on research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Initiate research on project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Progress on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution (Tasks 11), and Foam properties (Task 12), (h) Initiate a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. Since the previous Task 1 has been completed, we will now designate this new task as: (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  17. A corporate supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Randall; Seebass, Richard

    1996-01-01

    This talk address the market and technology for a corporate supersonic transport. It describes a candidate configuration. There seems to be a sufficient market for such an aircraft, even if restricted to supersonic operation over water. The candidate configuration's sonic boom overpressure may be small enough to allow overland operation as well.

  18. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-01-30

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between October 1, 2002 and December 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks. (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System. (b) New research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions''. (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) New Research project (Task 13): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (g) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (h) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  19. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

    2002-07-30

    This is the fourth quarterly progress report for Year-3 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between April 1, 2002 and June 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)''; (c) Research project (Task 9b): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions''; (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''; (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b); (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S); (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  20. Transportation: Destination Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eoff, Bill

    1998-01-01

    As the agency space transportation lead center, Marshall Space Flight Center has been conducting transportation assessments for future robotic and human Mars missions to identify critical technologies. Five human Mars options are currently under assessment with each option including all transportation requirements from Earth to Mars and return. The primary difference for each option is the propulsion source from Earth to Mars. In case any of the options require heavy launch capability that is not currently projected as available, an in-house study has been initiated to determine the most cost effective means of providing such launch capability. This assessment is only considering launch architectures that support the overall human Mars mission cost goal of $25B. The guidelines for the launch capability study included delivery of 80 metric ton (176 KLB) payloads, 25 feet diameter x 92 feet long, to 220 nmi orbits at 28.5 degrees. The launch vehicle concept of the study was designated "Magnum" to differentiate from prior heavy launch vehicle assessments. This assessment along with the assessment of options for all transportation phases of a Mars mission are on-going.

  1. School Planning Safe Transporting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton. Bureau of Pupil Transportation.

    Prepared for boards of education and municipal planning authorities, school site selection is related to school bus safety. Consideration of direction and density of traffic flow, street crossings, curbing, drainage, road width, parking areas, number of pupils and personnel, number of buses, method of transportation, schedules and extra-curricular…

  2. TRANSPORTATION TODAY AND TOMORROW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DAILEY, JOHN T.; NEYMAN, CLINTON A., JR.

    THIS READING TEXT WAS DEVELOPED IN A CURRICULUM PROJECT, DESCRIBED IN VT 004 454, ALONG WITH OTHER MATERIALS TO STIMULATE READING ABOUT MECHANICAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL TOPICS AND TO TEACH BASIC VOCATIONAL TALENTS. THE ORGANIZING THEME OF THE TEXT IS TRANSPORTATION AND POWER. MAJOR PORTIONS OF THE BOOK ARE DEVOTED TO PICTURES AND EASY-READING…

  3. Pipeline transport of biomass.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Cameron, Jay B; Flynn, Peter C

    2004-01-01

    The cost of transporting wood chips by truck and by pipeline as a water slurry was determined. In a practical application of field delivery by truck of biomass to a pipeline inlet, the pipeline will only be economical at large capacity ( >0.5 million dry t/yr for a one-way pipeline, and >1.25 million dry t/yr for a two-way pipeline that returns the carrier fluid to the pipeline inlet), and at medium to long distances ( >75 km [one-way] and >470 km [two-way] at a capacity of 2 million dry t/yr). Mixed hardwood and softwood chips in western Canada rise in moisture level from about 50% to 67% when transported in water; the loss in lower heating value (LHV) would preclude the use of water slurry pipelines for direct combustion applications. The same chips, when transported in a heavy gas oil, take up as much as 50% oil by weight and result in a fuel that is >30% oil on mass basis and is about two-thirds oil on a thermal basis. Uptake of water by straw during slurry transport is so extreme that it has effectively no LHV. Pipeline-delivered biomass could be used in processes that do not produce contained water as a vapor, such as supercritical water gasification.

  4. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the design and marketability of a next generation supersonic transport. Apogee Aeronautics Corporation has designated its High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT): Supercruiser HS-8. Since the beginning of the Concorde era, the general consensus has been that the proper time for the introduction of a next generation Supersonic Transport (SST) would depend upon the technical advances made in the areas of propulsion (reduction in emissions) and material composites (stronger, lighter materials). It is believed by many in the aerospace industry that these beforementioned technical advances lie on the horizon. With this being the case, this is the proper time to begin the design phase for the next generation HSCT. The design objective for a HSCT was to develop an aircraft that would be capable of transporting at least 250 passengers with baggage at a distance of 5500 nmi. The supersonic Mach number is currently unspecified. In addition, the design had to be marketable, cost effective, and certifiable. To achieve this goal, technical advances in the current SST's must be made, especially in the areas of aerodynamics and propulsion. As a result of these required aerodynamic advances, several different supersonic design concepts were reviewed.

  5. Space station mobile transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renshall, James; Marks, Geoff W.; Young, Grant L.

    1988-01-01

    The first quarter of the next century will see an operational space station that will provide a permanently manned base for satellite servicing, multiple strategic scientific and commercial payload deployment, and Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle/Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OMV/OTV) retrieval replenishment and deployment. The space station, as conceived, is constructed in orbit and will be maintained in orbit. The construction, servicing, maintenance and deployment tasks, when coupled with the size of the station, dictate that some form of transportation and manipulation device be conceived. The Transporter described will work in conjunction with the Orbiter and an Assembly Work Platform (AWP) to construct the Work Station. The Transporter will also work in conjunction with the Mobile Remote Servicer to service and install payloads, retrieve, service and deploy satellites, and service and maintain the station itself. The Transporter involved in station construction when mounted on the AWP and later supporting a maintenance or inspection task with the Mobile Remote Servicer and the Flight Telerobotic Servicer is shown.

  6. Cutting Transportation Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Barbara

    1982-01-01

    Beginning on the front cover, this article tells how school districts are reducing their transportation costs. Particularly effective measures include the use of computers for bus maintenance and scheduling, school board ownership of buses, and the conversion of gasoline-powered buses to alternative fuels. (Author/MLF)

  7. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    The design requirements of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) are discussed. The following design concerns are presented: (1) environmental impact (emissions and noise); (2) critical components (the high temperature combustor and the lightweight exhaust nozzle); and (3) advanced materials (high temperature ceramic matrix composites (CMC's)/intermetallic matrix composites (IMC's)/metal matrix composites (MMC's)).

  8. Urban Mass Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mervine, K. E.

    This bibliography is part of a series of Environmental Resource Packets prepared under a grant from EXXON Education Foundation. The most authoritative and accessible references in the urban transportation field are reviewed. The authors, publisher, point of view, level, and summary are given for each reference. The references are categorized…

  9. Storing and transporting energy

    DOEpatents

    McClaine, Andrew W.; Brown, Kenneth

    2010-09-07

    Among other things, hydrogen is released from water at a first location using energy from a first energy source; the released hydrogen is stored in a metal hydride slurry; and the metal hydride slurry is transported to a second location remote from the first location.

  10. A lunar transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Due to large amounts of oxygen required for space travel, a method of mining, transporting, and storing this oxygen in space would facilitate further space exploration. The following project deals specifically with the methods for transporting liquid oxygen from the lunar surface to the Lunar Orbit (LO) space station, and then to the Lower Earth Orbit (LEO) space station. Two vehicles were designed for operation between the LEO and LO space stations. The first of these vehicles is an aerobraked design vehicle. The Aerobrake Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) is capable of transporting 5000 lbm of payload to LO while returning to LEO with 60,000 lbm of liquid oxygen, and thus meet mission requirements. The second vehicle can deliver 18,000 lbm of payload to LO and is capable of bringing 60,000 lbm of liquid oxygen back to LEO. A lunar landing vehicle was also designed for operation between LO and the established moon base. The use of an electromagnetic railgun as a method for launching the lunar lander was also investigated. The feasibility of the railgun is doubtful at this time. A system of spheres was also designed for proper storing and transporting of the liquid oxygen. The system assumes a safe means for transferring the liquid oxygen from tank to tank is operational. A sophisticated life support system was developed for both the OTV and the lunar lander. This system focuses on such factors as the vehicle environment, waste management, water requirements, food requirements, and oxygen requirements.

  11. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    DOEpatents

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  12. Draft Transportation Institutional Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The Department of Energy recognizes that the success of its program to develop and implement a national system for nuclear waste management and disposal depends on broad-based public understanding and acceptance. While each program element has its particular sensitivity, the transportation of the waste may potentially affect the greatest number of people, and accordingly is highly visible and potentially issue-laden. Therefore, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has developed this Transportation Institutional Plan to lay the foundation for interaction among all interested parties for the purpose of identifying and resolving issues of concern. The Plan is divided into four chapters. Chapter 1 provides bachground information and discusses the purpose of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system. Chapter 2 introduces the major participants who must interact to build both the system itself and the consensus philosophy that is essential for effective operations. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will ensure wide participation in program planning and implementation. And, finally, Chapter 4 suggests a framework for managing and resolving the i