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Sample records for ache activity inhibition

  1. AChE inhibition: one dominant factor for swimming behavior changes of Daphnia magna under DDVP exposure.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zongming; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Xiaoguang; Qi, Pingping; Zhang, Biao; Zeng, Yang; Fu, Rongshu; Miao, Mingsheng

    2015-02-01

    As a key enzyme that hydrolyzes the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in cholinergic synapses of both vertebrates and invertebrates, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is strongly inhibited by organophosphates. AChE inhibition may induce the decrease of swimming ability. According to previous research, swimming behavior of different aquatic organisms could be affected by different chemicals, and there is a shortage of research on direct correlation analysis between swimming behavior and biochemical indicators. Therefore, swimming behavior and whole-body AChE activity of Daphnia magna under dichlorvos (DDVP) exposure were identified in order to clarify the relationship between behavioral responses and AChE inhibition in this study. In the beginning, AChE activity was similar in all treatments with the control. During all exposures, the tendency of AChE activity inhibition was the same as the behavioral responses of D. magna. The AChE activity of individuals without movement would decrease to about zero in several minutes. The correlation analysis between swimming behavior of D. magna and AChE activity showed that the stepwise behavioral response was mainly decided by AChE activity. All of these results suggested that the toxicity characteristics of DDVP as an inhibitor of AChE on the swimming behavior of organisms were the same, and the AChE activity inhibition could induce loss of the nerve conduction ability, causing hyperactivity, loss of coordination, convulsions, paralysis and other kinds of behavioral changes, which was illustrated by the stepwise behavioral responses under different environmental stresses.

  2. Selective activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRα7) inhibits muscular degeneration in mdx dystrophic mice.

    PubMed

    Leite, Paulo Emílio Correa; Gandía, Luís; de Pascual, Ricardo; Nanclares, Carmen; Colmena, Inés; Santos, Wilson C; Lagrota-Candido, Jussara; Quirico-Santos, Thereza

    2014-07-21

    Amount evidence indicates that α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRα7) activation reduces production of inflammatory mediators. This work aimed to verify the influence of endogenous nAChRα7 activation on the regulation of full-blown muscular inflammation in mdx mouse with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We used mdx mice with 3 weeks-old at the height myonecrosis, and C57 nAChRα7(+/+) wild-type and nAChRα7(-/-) knockout mice with muscular injury induced with 60µL 0.5% bupivacaine (bp) in the gastrocnemius muscle. Pharmacological treatment included selective nAChRα7 agonist PNU282987 (0.3mg/kg and 1.0mg/kg) and the antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA at 1.0mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally for 7 days. Selective nAChRα7 activation of mdx mice with PNU282987 reduced circulating levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, a marker of cell death by necrosis) and the area of perivascular inflammatory infiltrate, and production of inflammatory mediators TNFα and metalloprotease MMP-9 activity. Conversely, PNU282987 treatment increased MMP-2 activity, an indication of muscular tissue remodeling associated with regeneration, in both mdx mice and WTα7 mice with bp-induced muscular lesion. Treatment with PNU282987 had no effect on α7KO, and MLA abolished the nAChRα7 agonist-induced anti-inflammatory effect in both mdx and WT. In conclusion, nAChRα7 activation inhibits muscular inflammation and activates tissue remodeling by increasing muscular regeneration. These effects were not accompanied with fibrosis and/or deposition of non-functional collagen. The nAChRα7 activation may be considered as a potential target for pharmacological strategies to reduce inflammation and activate mechanisms of muscular regeneration. PMID:24833065

  3. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition aggravates fasting-induced triglyceride accumulation in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shin-Ichi; Nakamura, Kaai; Ando, Midori; Kamei, Hiroyasu; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Although fasting induces hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation in both rodents and humans, little is known about the underlying mechanism. Because parasympathetic nervous system activity tends to attenuate the secretion of very-low-density-lipoprotein-triglyceride (VLDL-TG) and increase TG stores in the liver, and serum cholinesterase activity is elevated in fatty liver disease, the inhibition of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter acetylcholinesterase (AChE) may have some influence on hepatic lipid metabolism. To assess the influence of AChE inhibition on lipid metabolism, the effect of physostigmine, an AChE inhibitor, on fasting-induced increase in liver TG was investigated in mice. In comparison with ad libitum-fed mice, 30 h fasting increased liver TG accumulation accompanied by a downregulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP-1) and liver-fatty acid binding-protein (L-FABP). Physostigmine promoted the 30 h fasting-induced increase in liver TG levels in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by a significant fall in plasma insulin levels, without a fall in plasma TG. Furthermore, physostigmine significantly attenuated the fasting-induced decrease of both mRNA and protein levels of SREBP-1 and L-FABP, and increased IRS-2 protein levels in the liver. The muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine blocked these effects of physostigmine on liver TG, serum insulin, and hepatic protein levels of SREBP-1 and L-FABP. These results demonstrate that AChE inhibition facilitated fasting-induced TG accumulation with up regulation of the hepatic L-FABP and SREBP-1 in mice, at least in part via the activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Our studies highlight the crucial role of parasympathetic regulation in fasting-induced TG accumulation, and may be an important source of information on the mechanism of hepatic disorders of lipid metabolism. PMID:25383314

  4. An in vitro AChE inhibition assay combined with UF-HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF/MS approach for screening and characterizing of AChE inhibitors from roots of Coptis chinensis Franch.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hengqiang; Zhou, Siduo; Zhang, Minmin; Feng, Jinhong; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Daijie; Geng, Yanling; Wang, Xiao

    2016-02-20

    In this study, an in vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition assay based on microplate reader combined with ultrafiltration high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray quadrupole time of flight mass (UF-HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF/MS) was developed for the rapid screening and identification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEI) from roots of Coptis chinensis Franch. Incubation conditions such as enzyme concentration, incubation time, incubation temperature and co-solvent was optimized so as to get better screening results. Five alkaloids including columbamine, jatrorrhizine, coptisine, palmatine and berberine were found with AChE inhibition activity in the 80% ethanol extract of C. chinensis Franch. The screened compounds were identified by HPLC-DAD-ESI-Q-TOF/MS compared with the reference stands and literatures. The screened results were verified by in vitro AChE inhibition assays, palmatine showed the best AChE inhibitory activities with IC50 values of 36.6μM among the five compounds. Results of the present study indicated that the combinative method using in vitro AChE inhibition assay and UF-HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF/MS could be widely applied for rapid screening and identification of AChEI from complex TCM extract.

  5. Effect of pharmaceuticals exposure on acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity and on the expression of AchE gene in the monogonont rotifer, Brachionus koreanus.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jae-Sung; Kim, Bo-Mi; Jeong, Chang-Bum; Park, Heum Gi; Leung, Kenneth Mei Yee; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2013-11-01

    Pharmaceuticals are widely used in human and veterinary medicine. However, they are emerging as a significant contaminant in aquatic environments through wastewater. Due to the persistent and accumulated properties of pharmaceuticals via the food web, their potential harmful effects on aquatic animals are a great concern. In this study, we investigated the effects of six pharmaceuticals: acetaminophen, ATP; atenolol, ATN; carbamazepine, CBZ; oxytetracycline, OTC; sulfamethoxazole, SMX; and trimethoprim, TMP on acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7) activity and its transcript expression with chlorpyrifos (as a positive control) in the monogonont rotifer, Brachionus koreanus. ATP, CBZ, and TMP exposure also remarkably inhibited Bk-AChE activity at 100 μg/L (24 h) and 1000 μg/L (12 h and 24 h). ATP, CBZ, and TMP exposure showed a significant decrease in the Bk-AChE mRNA level in a concentration-dependent manner. However, in the case of OTC and SMX, a slight decrease in Bk-AChE mRNA expression was found but only at the highest concentration. The time-course experiments showed that ATP positively induced Bk-AChE mRNA 12 h after exposure at both 100 and 1000 μg/L, while the Bk-AChE mRNA expression was significantly downregulated over 6 to 24 h after exposure to 1000 μg/L of CBZ, OTC, SMX, and TMP. Our findings suggest that Bk-AChE would be a useful biomarker for risk assessment of pharmaceutical compounds as an early signal of their toxicity in aquatic environments. Particularly, ATP, CBZ, and TMP may have a toxic cholinergic effect on rotifer B. koreanus by inhibiting AChE activity. PMID:24028855

  6. Circannual rhythms of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the freshwater fish Cnesterodon decemmaculatus.

    PubMed

    Menéndez-Helman, Renata J; Ferreyroa, Gisele V; dos Santos Afonso, Maria; Salibián, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The use of biomarkers as a tool to assess responses of organisms exposed to pollutants in toxicity bioassays, as well as in aquatic environmental risk assessment protocols, requires the understanding of the natural fluctuation of the particular biomarker. The aim of this study was to characterize the intrinsic variations of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in tissues of a native freshwater teleost fish to be used as biomarker in toxicity tests, taking into account both seasonal influence and fish size. Specific AChE activity was measured by the method of Ellman et al. (1961) in homogenates of fish anterior section finding a seasonal variability. The highest activity was observed in summer, decreasing significantly below 40% in winter. The annual AChE activity cycle in the anterior section was fitted to a sinusoidal function with a period of 11.2 months. Moreover, an inverse relationship between enzymatic activity and the animal size was established. The results showed that both the fish length and seasonal variability affect AChE activity. AChE activity in fish posterior section showed a similar trend to that in the anterior section, while seasonal variations of the activity in midsection were observed but differences were not statistically significant. In addition, no relationship between AChE and total tissue protein was established in the anterior and posterior sections suggesting that the circannual rhythms observed are AChE-specific responses. Results highlight the importance of considering both the fish size and season variations to reach valid conclusions when AChE activity is employed as neurotoxicity biomarker.

  7. Screening of POP pollution by AChE and EROD activities in Zebra mussels from the Italian Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Binelli, A; Ricciardi, Francesco; Riva, Consuelo; Provini, Alfredo

    2005-12-01

    The increase of ethoxyresorufin dealkylation (EROD) and the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as biomarkers have been commonly used in vertebrates for the persistent organic pollutants (POPs) biomonitoring of aquatic environments, but very few studies have been performed for invertebrates. Previous researches demonstrated the interference due to some chemicals on EROD and AChE activities of the freshwater bivalve Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) in laboratory and field studies, showing its possible use for the screening of POP effects. We investigated the contamination of the Italian sub-alpine great lakes (Maggiore, Lugano, Como, Iseo, Garda) by the biomarker approach on Zebra mussel specimens collected at 17 sampling sites with different morphometric characteristics and anthropization levels. Results showed a homogeneous contamination of AChE inhibitors in Lake Garda, Maggiore, Como and Iseo with values ranging from 0.5 to 3 nmol/min/mg proteins and with an average inhibition of about 66% to controls. The planar compounds pollution, able to activate the EROD activity, seems higher in some sampling stations of Lake Garda, Como and Iseo (2-4 pmol/min/mg proteins) than that measured in Lake Lugano (1.5-3 pmol/min/mg proteins). On the contrary, the enzyme activity in Lake Maggiore showed an interesting opposite effect of AhR-binding compounds and trace metals. Finally, the possible use of Zebra mussel specimens maintained at laboratory conditions as controls against the selection of the less polluted sampling site is discussed.

  8. Selenofuranoside Ameliorates Memory Loss in Alzheimer-Like Sporadic Dementia: AChE Activity, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation Involvement.

    PubMed

    Chiapinotto Spiazzi, Cristiano; Bucco Soares, Melina; Pinto Izaguirry, Aryele; Musacchio Vargas, Laura; Zanchi, Mariane Magalhães; Frasson Pavin, Natasha; Ferreira Affeldt, Ricardo; Seibert Lüdtke, Diogo; Prigol, Marina; Santos, Francielli Weber

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming more common due to the increase in life expectancy. This study evaluated the effect of selenofuranoside (Se) in an Alzheimer-like sporadic dementia animal model. Male mice were divided into 4 groups: control, Aβ, Se, and Aβ + Se. Single administration of Aβ peptide (fragments 25-35; 3 nmol/3 μL) or distilled water was administered via intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection. Selenofuranoside (5 mg/kg) or vehicle (canola oil) was administered orally 30 min before Aβ and for 7 subsequent days. Memory was tested through the Morris water maze (MWM) and step-down passive-avoidance (SDPA) tests. Antioxidant defenses along with reactive species (RS) were assessed. Inflammatory cytokines levels and AChE activity were measured. SOD activity was inhibited in the Aβ group whereas RS were increased. AChE activity, GSH, and IL-6 levels were increased in the Aβ group. These changes were reflected in impaired cognition and memory loss, observed in both behavioral tests. Se compound was able to protect against memory loss in mice in both behavioral tests. SOD and AChE activities as well as RS and IL-6 levels were also protected by Se administration. Therefore, Se is promising for further studies.

  9. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity by essential oil from Citrus paradisi.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, M; Tougo, H; Ishihara, M

    2001-01-01

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity by essential oils of Citrus paradisi (grapefruit pink in USA) was studied. Inhibition of AChE was measured by the colorimetric method. Nootkatone and auraptene were isolated from C. paradisi oil and showed 17-24% inhibition of AChE activity at the concentration of 1.62 microg/mL. PMID:11858553

  10. Cholinesterases in development: AChE as a firewall to inhibit cell proliferation and support differentiation.

    PubMed

    Layer, Paul G; Klaczinski, Janine; Salfelder, Anika; Sperling, Laura E; Thangaraj, Gopenath; Tuschl, Corina; Vogel-Höpker, Astrid

    2013-03-25

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a most remarkable protein, not only because it is one of the fastest enzymes in nature, but also since it appears in many molecular forms and is regulated by elaborate genetic networks. AChE is expressed in many tissues during development and in mature organisms, as well as in healthy and diseased states. In search for alternative, "non-classical" functions of cholinesterases (ChEs), AChE could either work within the frame of classic cholinergic systems, but in non-neural tissues ("non-synaptic function"), or act non-enzymatically. Here, we review briefly some of the major ideas and advances of this field, and report on some recent progress from our own experimental work, e.g. that (i) non-neural ChEs have pronounced, predominantly enzymatic effects on early embryonic (limb) development in chick and mouse, that (ii) retinal R28 cells of the rat overexpressing synaptic AChE present a significantly decreased cell proliferation, and that (iii) in developing chick retina ACh-synthesizing and ACh-degrading cells originate from the same postmitotic precursor cells, which later form two locally opposing cell populations. We suggest that such distinct distributions of ChAT(+) vs. AChE(+) cells in the inner half retina provide graded distributions of ACh, which can direct cell differentiation and network formation. Thus, as corroborated by works from many labs, AChE can be considered a highly co-opting protein, which can combine enzymatic and non-enzymatic functions within one molecule. PMID:23047026

  11. A selective molecularly imprinted polymer for immobilization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE): an active enzyme targeted and efficient method.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Gökhan; Doğaç, Yasemin İspirli; Teke, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we immobilized acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme onto acetylcholine removed imprinted polymer and acetylcholine containing polymer. First, the polymers were produced with acetylcholine, substrate of AChE, by dispersion polymerization. Then, the enzyme was immobilized onto the polymers by using two different methods: In the first method (method A), acetylcholine was removed from the polymer, and then AChE was immobilized onto this polymer (acetylcholine removed imprinted polymer). In the second method (method B), AChE was immobilized onto acetylcholine containing polymer by affinity. In method A, enzyme-specific species (binding sites) occurred by removing acetylcholine from the polymer. The immobilized AChE reached 240% relative specific activity comparison with free AChE because the active enzyme molecules bounded onto the polymer. Transmission electron microscopy results were taken before and after immobilization of AChE for the assessment of morphological structure of polymer. Also, the experiments, which include optimum temperature (25-65 °C), optimum pH (3-10), thermal stability (4-70 °C), kinetic parameters, operational stability and reusability, were performed to determine the characteristic of the immobilized AChE.

  12. Bactericidal activity of ACH-702 against nondividing and biofilm Staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Podos, Steven D; Thanassi, Jane A; Leggio, Melissa; Pucci, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    Many bacterial infections involve slow or nondividing bacterial growth states and localized high cell densities. Antibiotics with demonstrated bactericidal activity rarely remain bactericidal at therapeutic concentrations under these conditions. The isothiazoloquinolone (ITQ) ACH-702 is a potent, bactericidal compound with activity against many antibiotic-resistant pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We evaluated its bactericidal activity under conditions where bacterial cells were not dividing and/or had slowed their growth. Against S. aureus cultures in stationary phase, ACH-702 showed concentration-dependent bactericidal activity and achieved a 3-log-unit reduction in viable cell counts within 6 h of treatment at ≥ 16× MIC values; in comparison, the bactericidal quinolone moxifloxacin and the additional comparator compounds vancomycin, linezolid, and rifampin at 16× to 32× MICs showed little or no bactericidal activity against stationary-phase cells. ACH-702 at 32× MIC retained bactericidal activity against stationary-phase S. aureus across a range of inoculum densities. ACH-702 did not kill cold-arrested cells yet remained bactericidal against cells arrested by protein synthesis inhibitors, suggesting that its bactericidal activity against nondividing cells requires active metabolism but not de novo protein synthesis. ACH-702 also showed a degree of bactericidal activity at 16× MIC against S. epidermidis biofilm cells that was superior to that of moxifloxacin, rifampin, and vancomycin. The bactericidal activity of ACH-702 against stationary-phase staphylococci and biofilms suggests potential clinical utility in infections containing cells in these physiological states. PMID:22547614

  13. mAChRs activation induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition on lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been proposed as a mechanism in the progression of airway diseases and cancer. Here, we explored the role of acetylcholine (ACh) and the pathway involved in the process of EMT, as well as the effects of mAChRs antagonist. Methods Human lung epithelial cells were stimulated with carbachol, an analogue of ACh, and epithelial and mesenchymal marker proteins were evaluated using western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. Results Decreased E-cadherin expression and increased vimentin and α-SMA expression induced by TGF-β1 in alveolar epithelial cell (A549) were significantly abrogated by the non-selective mAChR antagonist atropine and enhanced by the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine. An EMT event also occurred in response to physostigmine alone. Furthermore, ChAT express and ACh release by A549 cells were enhanced by TGF-β1. Interestingly, ACh analogue carbachol also induced EMT in A549 cells as well as in bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, the induction of carbachol was abrogated by selective antagonist of M1 (pirenzepine) and M3 (4-DAMP) mAChRs, but not by M2 (methoctramine) antagonist. Moreover, carbachol induced TGF-β1 production from A549 cells concomitantly with the EMT process. Carbachol-induced EMT occurred through phosphorylation of Smad2/3 and ERK, which was inhibited by pirenzepine and 4-DAMP. Conclusions Our findings for the first time indicated that mAChR activation, perhaps via M1 and M3 mAChR, induced lung epithelial cells to undergo EMT and provided insights into novel therapeutic strategies for airway diseases in which lung remodeling occurs. PMID:24678619

  14. Evaluation of the Toxicity, AChE Activity and DNA Damage Caused by Imidacloprid on Earthworms, Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Qi, Suzhen; Mu, Xiyan; Chai, Tingting; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dandan; Li, Dongzhi; Che, Wunan; Wang, Chengju

    2015-10-01

    Imidacloprid is a well-known pesticide and it is timely to evaluate its toxicity to earthworms (Eisenia fetida). In the present study, the effect of imidacloprid on reproduction, growth, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and DNA damage in earthworms was assessed using an artificial soil medium. The median lethal concentration (LC50) and the median number of hatched cocoons (EC50) of imidacloprid to earthworms was 3.05 and 0.92 mg/kg respectively, the lowest observed effect concentration of imidacloprid about hatchability, growth, AChE activity and DNA damage was 0.02, 0.5, 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg, respectively.

  15. Can hydroxylamine be a more potent nucleophile for the reactivation of tabun-inhibited AChE than prototype oxime drugs? An answer derived from quantum chemical and steered molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2014-07-29

    Organophosphorus nerve agents are highly toxic compounds which strongly inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the blood and in the central nervous system (CNS). Tabun is one of the highly toxic organophosphorus (OP) compounds and is resistant to many oxime drugs formulated for the reactivation of AChE. The reactivation mechanism of tabun-conjugated AChE with various drugs has been examined with density functional theory and ab initio quantum chemical calculations. The presence of a lone-pair located on the amidic group resists the nucleophilic attack at the phosphorus center of the tabun-conjugated AChE. We have shown that the newly designed drug candidate N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine, at the MP2/6-31+G*//M05-2X/6-31G* level in the aqueous phase with the polarizable continuum solvation model (PCM), is more effective in reactivating the tabun-conjugated AChE than typical oxime drugs. The rate determining activation barrier with N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine was found to be ∼1.7 kcal mol(-1), which is 7.2 kcal mol(-1) lower than the charged oxime trimedoxime (one of the most efficient reactivators in tabun poisonings). The greater nucleophilicity index (ω(-)) and higher CHelpG charge of pyridinylhydroxylamine compared to TMB4 support this observation. Furthermore, we have also examined the reactivation process of tabun-inhibited AChE with some other bis-quaternary oxime drug candidates such as methoxime (MMB4) and obidoxime. The docking analysis suggests that charged bis-quaternary pyridinium oximes have greater binding affinity inside the active-site gorge of AChE compared to the neutral pyridinylhydroxylamine. The peripheral ligand attached to the neutral pyridinylhydroxylamine enhanced the binding with the aromatic residues in the active-site gorge of AChE through effective π-π interactions. Steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations have also been performed with the charged oxime (TMB4) and the neutral hydroxylamine. From protein-drug interaction

  16. Activation of nicotinic ACh receptors with α4 subunits induces adenosine release at the rat carotid body

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Sílvia V; Monteiro, Emília C

    2006-01-01

    The effect of ACh on the release of adenosine was studied in rat whole carotid bodies, and the nicotinic ACh receptors involved in the stimulation of this release were characterized. ACh and nicotinic ACh receptor agonists, cytisine, DMPP and nicotine, caused a concentration-dependent increase in adenosine production during normoxia, with nicotine being more potent and efficient in stimulating adenosine release from rat CB than cytisine and DMPP. D-Tubocurarine, mecamylamine, DHβE and α-bungarotoxin, nicotinic ACh receptor antagonists, caused a concentration-dependent reduction in the release of adenosine evoked by hypoxia. The rank order of potency for nicotinic ACh receptor antagonists that inhibit adenosine release was DHβE>mecamylamine>D-tubocurarine>α-bungarotoxin. The effect of the endogenous agonist, ACh, which was mimicked by nicotine, was antagonized by DHβE, a selective nicotinic receptor antagonist. The ecto-5′-nucleotidase inhibitor AOPCP produces a 72% inhibition in the release of adenosine from CB evoked by nicotine. Taken together, these data indicate that ACh induced the production of adenosine, mainly from extracellular ATP catabolism at the CB through a mechanism that involves the activation of nicotinic receptors with α4 and β2 receptor subunits. PMID:16444287

  17. Inhibition of ACh release at an Aplysia synapse by neurotoxic phospholipases A2: specific receptors and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed Central

    Fossier, P; Lambeau, G; Lazdunski, M; Baux, G

    1995-01-01

    1. Monochain (OS2) and multichain (taipoxin) neurotoxic phospholipases A2 (PLA2), purified from taipan snake venom, both inhibited ACh release at a concentration of 20 nM (90% inhibition in 2 h) at an identified synapse from buccal ganglion of Aplysia californica. 2. The Na+ current was unchanged upon application of either OS2 or taipoxin. Conversely, presynaptic K+ currents (IA and IK) were increased by taipoxin but not by OS2. In addition, OS2 induced a significant decrease of the presynaptic Ca2+ current (30%) while taipoxin increased this latter current by 20-30%. 3. Bee venom PLA2, another monochain neurotoxic PLA2, also inhibited ACh release while non-toxic enzymatically active PLA2s like OS1 (also purified from taipan snake venom) or porcine pancreatic PLA2 elicited a much weaker inhibition of ACh release, suggesting a specific action of neurotoxic PLA2s versus non-toxic PLA2s on ACh release. 4. Using iodinated OS2, specific high affinity binding sites with molecular masses of 140 and 18 kDa have been identified on Aplysia ganglia. The maximal binding capacities were 55 and 300-400 fmol (mg protein)-1 for membrane preparations from whole and buccal ganglia, respectively. These binding sites are of high affinity for neurotoxic PLA2s (Kd values, 100-800 pM) and of very low affinity for non-toxic PLA2s (Kd values in the micromolar range), thus indicating that these binding sites are presumably involved in the blockade of ACh release by neurotoxic PLA2s. Images Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8583413

  18. In Vitro Anti-AChE, Anti-BuChE, and Antioxidant Activity of 12 Extracts of Eleutherococcus Species

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are one of the most occurring diseases in developed and developing countries. The aim of this work focused on the screening of the natural inhibitors of AChE and BuChE and antioxidants in Eleutherococcus species. We found that the ethanol extracts of E. setchuenensis and E. sessiliflorus showed the strongest inhibition towards AChE (IC50: 0.3 and 0.3 mg/mL, resp.). Among chloroform extracts, the most active appeared to be E. gracilistylus (IC50: 0.37 mg/mL). In turn, the ethanol extract of E. henryi inhibited the strongest BuChE with IC50 value of 0.13 mg/mL. Among chloroform extracts, E. gracilistylus, E. setchuenensis, and E. sessiliflorus appeared to be the strongest with IC50 values of 0.12, 0.18, and 0.19 mg/mL. HPTLC screening confirmed the presence of inhibitors in extracts. All extracts exhibited anti-DPPH⁎ activity and single antioxidants have been identified. To the best of our knowledge, no information was available on this activity of compounds in Eleutherococcus. These studies provide a biochemical basis for the regulation of AChE and BuChE and encourage us to continue isolation of active compounds. PMID:27803761

  19. Sesquiterpenes and a monoterpenoid with acetylcholinesterase (AchE) inhibitory activity from Valeriana officinalis var. latiofolia in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Heng-Wen; He, Xuan-Hui; Yuan, Rong; Wei, Ben-Jun; Chen, Zhong; Dong, Jun-Xing; Wang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor (AchEI) is the most extensive in all anti-dementia drugs. The extracts and isolated compounds from the Valeriana genus have shown anti-dementia bioactivity. Four new sesquiterpenoids (1-4) and a new monoterpenoid (5) were isolated from the root of Valeriana officinalis var. latiofolia. The acetylcholinesterase (AchE) inhibitory activity of isolates was evaluated by modified Ellman method in vitro. Learning and memory ability of compound 4 on mice was evaluated by the Morris water maze. The contents of acetylcholine (Ach), acetylcholine transferase (ChAT) and AchE in mice brains were determined by colorimetry. The results showed IC50 of compound 4 was 0.161 μM in vitro. Compared with the normal group, the learning and memory ability of mice and the contents of Ach and ChAT decreased in model group mice (P<0.01), while the AchE increased (P<0.01). Compared with the model group, Ach and ChAT in the positive control group, the high-dose group and the medium-dose group increased (P<0.01), while the AchE decreased (P<0.01). Compound 4 can improve the learning and memory abilities of APPswe/PSΔE9 double-transgenic mice, and the mechanism may be related to the regulation of the relative enzyme in the cholinergic system. PMID:26976216

  20. Nicotine Inhibits Cisplatin-Induced Apoptosis via Regulating α5-nAChR/AKT Signaling in Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongqiao; Zhang, Huilin; Zhang, Xiuping; Xiao, Dongjie; Ma, Xiaoli; Wang, Yunshan

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer incidence demonstrates a strong etiologic association with smoking. Nicotine, the major component in tobacco, is a survival agonist that inhibits apoptosis induced by certain chemotherapeutic agents, but the precise mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. Recently studies have indicated that α5-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α5-nAChR) is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. Nevertheless, no information has been available about whether nicotine also affects proliferation of human gastric cancer cells through regulation of α5-nAChR. To evaluate the hypothesis that α5-nAChR may play a role in gastric cancer, we investigated its expression in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines. The expression of α5-nAChR increased in gastric cancer tissue compared with para-carcinoma tissues. In view of the results, we proceeded to investigate whether nicotine inhibits cisplatin-induced apoptosis via regulating α5-nAChR in gastric cancer cell. The results showed that nicotine significantly promoted cell proliferation in a dose and time-dependent manner through α5-nAChR activation in human gastric cells. Furthermore, nicotine inhibited apoptosis induced by cisplatin. Silence of α5-nAChR ablated the protective effects of nicotine. However, when co-administrating LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K/AKT pathway, an increased apoptosis was observed. This effect correlated with the induction of Bcl-2, Bax, Survivin and Caspase-3 by nicotine in gastric cell lines. These results suggest that exposure to nicotine might negatively impact the apoptotic potential of chemotherapeutic drugs and that α5-nAChR/AKT signaling plays a key role in the anti-apoptotic activity of nicotine induced by cisplatin. PMID:26909550

  1. Nicotine Inhibits Cisplatin-Induced Apoptosis via Regulating α5-nAChR/AKT Signaling in Human Gastric Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanfei; Sun, Haiji; Wu, Hongqiao; Zhang, Huilin; Zhang, Xiuping; Xiao, Dongjie; Ma, Xiaoli; Wang, Yunshan

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer incidence demonstrates a strong etiologic association with smoking. Nicotine, the major component in tobacco, is a survival agonist that inhibits apoptosis induced by certain chemotherapeutic agents, but the precise mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. Recently studies have indicated that α5-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α5-nAChR) is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. Nevertheless, no information has been available about whether nicotine also affects proliferation of human gastric cancer cells through regulation of α5-nAChR. To evaluate the hypothesis that α5-nAChR may play a role in gastric cancer, we investigated its expression in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines. The expression of α5-nAChR increased in gastric cancer tissue compared with para-carcinoma tissues. In view of the results, we proceeded to investigate whether nicotine inhibits cisplatin-induced apoptosis via regulating α5-nAChR in gastric cancer cell. The results showed that nicotine significantly promoted cell proliferation in a dose and time-dependent manner through α5-nAChR activation in human gastric cells. Furthermore, nicotine inhibited apoptosis induced by cisplatin. Silence of α5-nAChR ablated the protective effects of nicotine. However, when co-administrating LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K/AKT pathway, an increased apoptosis was observed. This effect correlated with the induction of Bcl-2, Bax, Survivin and Caspase-3 by nicotine in gastric cell lines. These results suggest that exposure to nicotine might negatively impact the apoptotic potential of chemotherapeutic drugs and that α5-nAChR/AKT signaling plays a key role in the anti-apoptotic activity of nicotine induced by cisplatin. PMID:26909550

  2. Nicotine Inhibits Cisplatin-Induced Apoptosis via Regulating α5-nAChR/AKT Signaling in Human Gastric Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanfei; Sun, Haiji; Wu, Hongqiao; Zhang, Huilin; Zhang, Xiuping; Xiao, Dongjie; Ma, Xiaoli; Wang, Yunshan

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer incidence demonstrates a strong etiologic association with smoking. Nicotine, the major component in tobacco, is a survival agonist that inhibits apoptosis induced by certain chemotherapeutic agents, but the precise mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. Recently studies have indicated that α5-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α5-nAChR) is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. Nevertheless, no information has been available about whether nicotine also affects proliferation of human gastric cancer cells through regulation of α5-nAChR. To evaluate the hypothesis that α5-nAChR may play a role in gastric cancer, we investigated its expression in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines. The expression of α5-nAChR increased in gastric cancer tissue compared with para-carcinoma tissues. In view of the results, we proceeded to investigate whether nicotine inhibits cisplatin-induced apoptosis via regulating α5-nAChR in gastric cancer cell. The results showed that nicotine significantly promoted cell proliferation in a dose and time-dependent manner through α5-nAChR activation in human gastric cells. Furthermore, nicotine inhibited apoptosis induced by cisplatin. Silence of α5-nAChR ablated the protective effects of nicotine. However, when co-administrating LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K/AKT pathway, an increased apoptosis was observed. This effect correlated with the induction of Bcl-2, Bax, Survivin and Caspase-3 by nicotine in gastric cell lines. These results suggest that exposure to nicotine might negatively impact the apoptotic potential of chemotherapeutic drugs and that α5-nAChR/AKT signaling plays a key role in the anti-apoptotic activity of nicotine induced by cisplatin.

  3. Kinetic evidence that desensitized nAChR may promote transitions of active nAChR to desensitized states during sustained exposure to agonists in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Manthey, Arthur A

    2006-06-01

    During prolonged exposure of postjunctional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) of skeletal muscle to acetylcholine (ACh), agonist-activated nAChR (nAChRa) gradually fall into a refractory "desensitized" state (nAChRd), which no longer supports the high-conductance channel openings characteristic of the initially active nAChRa. In the present study, the possibility was examined that nAChRd, rather than simply constituting a passive "trap" for nAChRa, may actively promote further conversions of nAChRa to nAChRd in a formally autocatalytic manner. Single-ion whole-cell voltage-clamp currents (Na+ and Li+ in separate trials) were measured using two KCl-filled capillary electrodes (5-10 MOmega) implanted at the postjunctional locus of single frog skeletal muscle fibers (Rana pipiens) equilibrated in 30 mM K+ bath media to eliminate mechanical responses. Various nAChR agonists (carbamylcholine, acetylcholine, suberyldicholine) at different concentrations were delivered focally by positive pressure microjet. It was found that the decline of postmaximal agonist-induced currents under these different conditions (driven by the growth of the subpool of nAChRd) consistently followed an autocatalytic logistic rule modified for population growth of fixed units in a planar array: [Formula: see text] (where y represents the remaining agonist-induced current at time t, A=initial maximum current, and n is a constant). Some further experimental features that might result from a self-promoting growth of nAChRd were also tested, namely, (1) the effect of increased nAChRa and (2) the effect of increased nAChRd. Increase in agonist concentration of the superfusate, by increasing the planar density of active nAChRa at the outset, should enhance the probability of autocatalytic interactions with emerging nAChRd, hence, the rate of decline of agonist-induced current, and this was a consistent finding under all conditions tested. Raising the initial level of desensitized nAChRd by

  4. Mechanism of interaction of novel uncharged, centrally active reactivators with OP-hAChE conjugates.

    PubMed

    Radić, Zoran; Sit, Rakesh K; Garcia, Edzna; Zhang, Limin; Berend, Suzana; Kovarik, Zrinka; Amitai, Gabriel; Fokin, Valery V; Barry Sharpless, K; Taylor, Palmer

    2013-03-25

    A library of more than 200 novel uncharged oxime reactivators was used to select and refine lead reactivators of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) covalently conjugated with sarin, cyclosarin, VX, paraoxon and tabun. N-substituted 2-hydroxyiminoacetamido alkylamines were identified as best reactivators and reactivation kinetics of the lead oximes, RS41A and RS194B, were analyzed in detail. Compared to reference pyridinium reactivators, 2PAM and MMB4, molecular recognition of RS41A reflected in its Kox constant was compromised by an order of magnitude on average for different OP-hAChE conjugates, without significant differences in the first order maximal phosphorylation rate constant k(2). Systematic structural modifications of the RS41A lead resulted in several-fold improvement with reactivator, RS194B. Kinetic analysis indicated K(ox) reduction for RS194B as the main kinetic constant leading to efficient reactivation. Subtle structural modifications of RS194B were used to identify essential determinants for efficient reactivation. Computational molecular modeling of RS41A and RS194B interactions with VX inhibited hAChE, bound reversibly in Michaelis type complex and covalently in the pentacoordinate reaction intermediate suggests that the faster reactivation reaction is a consequence of a tighter RS194B interactions with hAChE peripheral site (PAS) residues, in particular with D74, resulting in lower interaction energies for formation of both the binding and reactivation states. Desirable in vitro reactivation properties of RS194B, when coupled with its in vivo pharmacokinetics and disposition in the body, reveal the potential of this oxime design as promising centrally and peripherally active antidotes for OP toxicity.

  5. Chlorpyrifos and Malathion have opposite effects on behaviors and brain size that are not correlated to changes in AChE activity

    PubMed Central

    Richendrfer, Holly; Creton, Robbert

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphates, a type of neurotoxicant pesticide, are used globally for the treatment of pests on croplands and are therefore found in a large number of conventional foods. These pesticides are harmful and potentially deadly if ingested or inhaled in large quantities by causing a significant reduction in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the central and peripheral nervous system. However, much less is known about the effects of exposure to small quantities of the pesticides on neural systems and behavior during development. In the current study we used zebrafish larvae in order to determine the effects of two of the most widely used organophosphates, chlorpyrifos and malathion, on zebrafish behavior and AChE activity. Embryos and larvae were exposed to the organophosphates during different time points in development and then tested at 5 days post-fertilization for behavioral, neurodevelopmental and AChE abnormalities. The results of the study indicate that chlorpyrifos and malathion cause opposing behaviors in the larvae such as swim speed (hypoactivity vs. hyperactivity) and rest. Additionally, the pesticides affect only certain behaviors, such as thigmotaxis, during specific time points in development that are unrelated to changes in AChE activity. Larvae treated with malathion but not chlorpyrifos also had significantly smaller forebrain and hindbrain regions compared to controls by 5 days post-fertilization. We conclude that exposure to very low concentrations of organophosphate pesticides during development cause abnormalities in behavior and brain size. PMID:25983063

  6. Neuroprotective effect of cellular prion protein (PrPC) is related with activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR)-mediated autophagy flux.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Park, Sang-Youel

    2015-09-22

    Activation of the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR) is regulated by prion protein (PrPC) expression and has a neuroprotective effect by modulating autophagic flux. In this study, we hypothesized that PrPC may regulate α7nAchR activation and that may prevent prion-related neurodegenerative diseases by regulating autophagic flux. PrP(106-126) treatment decreased α7nAchR expression and activation of autophagic flux. In addition, the α7nAchR activator PNU-282987 enhanced autophagic flux and protected neuron cells against PrP(106-126)-induced apoptosis. However, activation of autophagy and the protective effects of PNU-282987 were inhibited in PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells. In addition, PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells showed decreased α7nAchR expression levels. Adenoviral overexpression of PrPC in PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells resulted in activation of autophagic flux and inhibition of prion peptide-mediated cell death via α7nAchR activation. This is the first report demonstrating that activation of α7nAchR-mediated autophagic flux is regulated by PrPC, and that activation of α7nAchR regulated by PrPC expression may play a pivotal role in protection of neuron cells against prion peptide-induced neuron cell death by autophagy. These results suggest that α7nAchR-mediated autophagic flux may be involved in the pathogenesis of prion-related diseases and may be a therapeutic target for prion-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Neuroprotective effect of cellular prion protein (PrPC) is related with activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR)-mediated autophagy flux.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Park, Sang-Youel

    2015-09-22

    Activation of the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR) is regulated by prion protein (PrPC) expression and has a neuroprotective effect by modulating autophagic flux. In this study, we hypothesized that PrPC may regulate α7nAchR activation and that may prevent prion-related neurodegenerative diseases by regulating autophagic flux. PrP(106-126) treatment decreased α7nAchR expression and activation of autophagic flux. In addition, the α7nAchR activator PNU-282987 enhanced autophagic flux and protected neuron cells against PrP(106-126)-induced apoptosis. However, activation of autophagy and the protective effects of PNU-282987 were inhibited in PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells. In addition, PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells showed decreased α7nAchR expression levels. Adenoviral overexpression of PrPC in PrPC knockout hippocampal neuron cells resulted in activation of autophagic flux and inhibition of prion peptide-mediated cell death via α7nAchR activation. This is the first report demonstrating that activation of α7nAchR-mediated autophagic flux is regulated by PrPC, and that activation of α7nAchR regulated by PrPC expression may play a pivotal role in protection of neuron cells against prion peptide-induced neuron cell death by autophagy. These results suggest that α7nAchR-mediated autophagic flux may be involved in the pathogenesis of prion-related diseases and may be a therapeutic target for prion-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26295309

  8. Chlorpyrifos and Chlorpyrifos-Oxon Inhibit Axonal Growth by Interfering with the Morphogenic Activity of Acetylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongren; Howard, Angela; Bruun, Donald; Ajua-Alemanj, Mispa; Pickart, Cecile; Lein, Pamela J.

    2008-01-01

    A primary role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is regulation of cholinergic neurotransmission by hydrolysis of synaptic acetylcholine. In the developing nervous system, however, AChE also functions as a morphogenic factor to promote axonal growth. This raises the question of whether organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) that are known to selectively bind to and inactivate the enzymatic function of AChE also interfere with its morphogenic function to perturb axonogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we exposed primary cultures of sensory neurons derived from embryonic rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) to chlorpyrifos (CPF) or its oxon metabolite (CPFO). Both OPs significantly decreased axonal length at concentrations that had no effect on cell viability, protein synthesis or the enzymatic activity of AChE. Comparative analyses of the effects of CPF and CPFO on axonal growth in DRG neurons cultured from AChE nullizygous (AChE−/−) versus wildtype (AChE+/+) mice indicated that while these OPs inhibited axonal growth in AChE+/+ DRG neurons, they had no effect on axonal growth in AChE−/− DRG neurons. However, transfection of AChE−/− DRG neurons with cDNA encoding full-length AChE restored the wildtype response to the axon inhibitory effects of OPs. These data indicate that inhibition of axonal growth by OPs requires AChE, but the mechanism involves inhibition of the morphogenic rather than enzymatic activity of AChE. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for explaining not only the functional deficits observed in children and animals following developmental exposure to OPs, but also the increased vulnerability of the developing nervous system to OPs. PMID:18076960

  9. Inhibitory effect of ebselen on cerebral acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro: kinetics and reversibility of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Martini, Franciele; Bruning, César Augusto; Soares, Suelen Mendonca; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Zeni, Gilson

    2015-01-01

    Ebselen is a synthetic organoselenium compound that has been considered a potential pharmacological agent with low toxicity, showing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. It is bioavailable, blood-brain barrier permeant and safe based on cellular toxicity and Phase I-III clinical trials. There is evidence that ebselen inhibits acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, an enzyme that plays a key role in the cholinergic system by hydrolyzing acetylcholine (ACh), in vitro and ex vivo. This system has a well-known relationship with cognitive process, and AChE inhibitors, such as donepezil and galantamine, have been used to treat cognitive deficits, mainly in the Alzheimer's Disease (AD). However, these drugs have poor bioavailability and a number of side effects, including gastrointestinal upsets and hepatotoxicity. In this way, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of ebselen on cerebral AChE activity in vitro and to determine the kinetic profile and the reversibility of inhibition by dialysis. Ebselen inhibited the cerebral AChE activity with an IC50 of 29 µM, similar to IC50 found with pure AChE from electric eel, demonstrating a mixed and reversible inhibition of AChE, since it increased Km and decreased Vmax. The AChE activity was recovered within 60 min of dialysis. Therefore, the use of ebselen as a therapeutic agent for treatment of AD should be considered, although memory behavior tasks are needed to support such hypothesis. PMID:25312723

  10. Natural AChE Inhibitors from Plants and their Contribution to Alzheimer’s Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Ana Paula; Faraoni, María Belén; Castro, María Julia; Alza, Natalia Paola; Cavallaro, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    As acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are an important therapeutic strategy in Alzheimer’s disease, efforts are being made in search of new molecules with anti-AChE activity. The fact that naturally-occurring compounds from plants are considered to be a potential source of new inhibitors has led to the discovery of an important number of secondary metabolites and plant extracts with the ability of inhibiting the enzyme AChE, which, according to the cholinergic hypothesis, increases the levels of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the brain, thus improving cholinergic functions in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and alleviating the symptoms of this neurological disorder. This review summarizes a total of 128 studies which correspond to the most relevant research work published during 2006-2012 (1st semester) on plant-derived compounds, plant extracts and essential oils found to elicit AChE inhibition. PMID:24381530

  11. Chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon inhibit axonal growth by interfering with the morphogenic activity of acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Dongren; Howard, Angela; Bruun, Donald; Ajua-Alemanj, Mispa; Pickart, Cecile; Lein, Pamela J.

    2008-04-01

    A primary role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is regulation of cholinergic neurotransmission by hydrolysis of synaptic acetylcholine. In the developing nervous system, however, AChE also functions as a morphogenic factor to promote axonal growth. This raises the question of whether organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) that are known to selectively bind to and inactivate the enzymatic function of AChE also interfere with its morphogenic function to perturb axonogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we exposed primary cultures of sensory neurons derived from embryonic rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) to chlorpyrifos (CPF) or its oxon metabolite (CPFO). Both OPs significantly decreased axonal length at concentrations that had no effect on cell viability, protein synthesis or the enzymatic activity of AChE. Comparative analyses of the effects of CPF and CPFO on axonal growth in DRG neurons cultured from AChE nullizygous (AChE{sup -/-}) versus wild type (AChE{sup +/+}) mice indicated that while these OPs inhibited axonal growth in AChE{sup +/+} DRG neurons, they had no effect on axonal growth in AChE{sup -/-} DRG neurons. However, transfection of AChE{sup -/-} DRG neurons with cDNA encoding full-length AChE restored the wild type response to the axon inhibitory effects of OPs. These data indicate that inhibition of axonal growth by OPs requires AChE, but the mechanism involves inhibition of the morphogenic rather than enzymatic activity of AChE. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for explaining not only the functional deficits observed in children and animals following developmental exposure to OPs, but also the increased vulnerability of the developing nervous system to OPs.

  12. Intracellular activity of tedizolid phosphate and ACH-702 versus Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to the emergency of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is necessary the evaluation of new compounds. Findings Tedizolid, a novel oxazolidinone, and ACH-702, a new isothiazoloquinolone, were tested against M. tuberculosis infected THP-1 macrophages. These two compounds significantly decreased the number of intracellular mycobacteria at 0.25X, 1X, 4X and 16X the MIC value. The drugs were tested either in nanoparticules or in free solution. Conclusion Tedizolid and ACH-702 have a good intracellular killing activity comparable to that of rifampin or moxifloxacin. PMID:24708819

  13. Linarin Inhibits the Acetylcholinesterase Activity In-vitro and Ex-vivo.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinchi; Wang, Xin; Liu, Youping; Di, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Linarin is a flavone glycoside in the plants Flos chrysanthemi indici, Buddleja officinalis, Cirsium setosum, Mentha arvensis and Buddleja davidii, and has been reported to possess analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. In this paper, linarin was investigated for its AChE inhibitory potential both in-vitro and ex-vivo. Ellman's colorimetric method was used for the determination of AChE inhibitory activity in mouse brain. In-vitro assays revealed that linarin inhibited AChE activity with an IC50 of 3.801 ± 1.149 μM. Ex-vivo study showed that the AChE activity was significantly reduced in both the cortex and hippocampus of mice treated intraperitoneally with various doses of linarin (35, 70 and 140 mg/Kg). The inhibition effects produced by high dose of linarin were the same as that obtained after huperzine A treatment (0.5 mg/Kg). Molecular docking study revealed that both 4'-methoxyl group and 7-O-sugar moiety of linarin played important roles in ligand-receptor binding and thus they are mainly responsible for AChE inhibitory activity. In view of its potent AChE inhibitory activity, linarin may be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of some diseases associated with AChE, such as glaucoma, myasthenia gravis, gastric motility and Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Linarin Inhibits the Acetylcholinesterase Activity In-vitro and Ex-vivo

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xinchi; Wang, Xin; Liu, Youping; Di, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Linarin is a flavone glycoside in the plants Flos chrysanthemi indici, Buddleja officinalis, Cirsium setosum, Mentha arvensis and Buddleja davidii, and has been reported to possess analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. In this paper, linarin was investigated for its AChE inhibitory potential both in-vitro and ex-vivo. Ellman’s colorimetric method was used for the determination of AChE inhibitory activity in mouse brain. In-vitro assays revealed that linarin inhibited AChE activity with an IC50 of 3.801 ± 1.149 μM. Ex-vivo study showed that the AChE activity was significantly reduced in both the cortex and hippocampus of mice treated intraperitoneally with various doses of linarin (35, 70 and 140 mg/Kg). The inhibition effects produced by high dose of linarin were the same as that obtained after huperzine A treatment (0.5 mg/Kg). Molecular docking study revealed that both 4’-methoxyl group and 7-O-sugar moiety of linarin played important roles in ligand-receptor binding and thus they are mainly responsible for AChE inhibitory activity. In view of its potent AChE inhibitory activity, linarin may be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of some diseases associated with AChE, such as glaucoma, myasthenia gravis, gastric motility and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26330885

  15. AChE for DNA degradation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Osuna, María; Yuste, Victor J

    2015-06-01

    DNA hydrolysis is a biochemical process often associated with different forms of cell death, including apoptosis. In a recent paper published in Cell Discovery, Du et al. report that synaptic acetylcholinesterase (AChE-S) shows an unexpected enzymatic activity as DNase switched on after cytotoxic insults. PMID:25930710

  16. Nicotine activates YAP1 through nAChRs mediated signaling in esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Zhou, Wei; Xue, Liyan; Zhang, Weimin; Zhan, Qimin

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is an established risk factor for esophageal cancers. Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1), the key transcription factor of the mammalian Hippo pathway, has been reported to be an oncogenic factor for many cancers. In this study, we find nicotine administration can induce nuclear translocation and activation of YAP1 in ESCC. Consistently, we observed nuclear translocation and activation of YAP1 by knockdown of CHRNA3, which is a negative regulator of nicotine signaling in bronchial and esophageal cancer cells. Nicotine administration or CHRNA3 depletion substantially increased proliferation and migration in esophageal cancer cells. Interestingly, we find that YAP1 physically interacts with nAChRs, and nAChRs-signaling dissociates YAP1 from its negative regulatory complex composed with α-catenin, β-catenin and 14-3-3 in the cytoplasm, leading to upregulation and nuclear translocation of YAP1. This process likely requires PKC activation, as PKC specific inhibitor Enzastaurin can block nicotine induced YAP1 activation. In addition, we find nicotine signaling also inhibits the interaction of YAP1 with P63, which contributes to the inhibitory effect of nicotine on apoptosis. Using immunohistochemistry analysis we observed upregulation of YAP1 in a significant portion of esophageal cancer samples. Consistently, we have found a significant association between YAP1 upregulation and cigarette smoking in the clinical esophageal cancer samples. Together, these findings suggest that the nicotine activated nAChRs signaling pathway which further activates YAP1 plays an important role in the development of esophageal cancer, and this mechanism may be of a general significance for the carcinogenesis of smoking related cancers.

  17. AChE biosensor based on zinc oxide sol-gel for the detection of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ravi; Ganesana, Mallikarjunarao; Andreescu, Silvana; Stanciu, Lia

    2010-02-28

    Zinc oxide has been used as a matrix for immobilization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and detection of the pesticide paraoxon. The immobilized enzyme retained its enzymatic activity up to three months when stored in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) at 4 degrees C. An amperometric biosensor for the detection of paraoxon was designed. The biosensor detected paraoxon in the range 0.035-1.38 ppm and can be used to detect other AChE inhibiting organophosphate pesticides. PMID:20113735

  18. PACAP induces plasticity at autonomic synapses by nAChR-dependent NOS1 activation and AKAP-mediated PKA targeting.

    PubMed

    Jayakar, Selwyn S; Pugh, Phyllis C; Dale, Zack; Starr, Eric R; Cole, Samantha; Margiotta, Joseph F

    2014-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a pleiotropic neuropeptide found at synapses throughout the central and autonomic nervous system. We previously found that PACAP engages a selective G-protein coupled receptor (PAC1R) on ciliary ganglion neurons to rapidly enhance quantal acetylcholine (ACh) release from presynaptic terminals via neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) and cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (PKA) dependent processes. Here, we examined how PACAP stimulates NO production and targets resultant outcomes to synapses. Scavenging extracellular NO blocked PACAP-induced plasticity supporting a retrograde (post- to presynaptic) NO action on ACh release. Live-cell imaging revealed that PACAP stimulates NO production by mechanisms requiring NOS1, PKA and Ca(2+) influx. Ca(2+)-permeable nicotinic ACh receptors composed of α7 subunits (α7-nAChRs) are potentiated by PKA-dependent PACAP/PAC1R signaling and were required for PACAP-induced NO production and synaptic plasticity since both outcomes were drastically reduced following their selective inhibition. Co-precipitation experiments showed that NOS1 associates with α7-nAChRs, many of which are perisynaptic, as well as with heteromeric α3*-nAChRs that generate the bulk of synaptic activity. NOS1-nAChR physical association could facilitate NO production at perisynaptic and adjacent postsynaptic sites to enhance focal ACh release from juxtaposed presynaptic terminals. The synaptic outcomes of PACAP/PAC1R signaling are localized by PKA anchoring proteins (AKAPs). PKA regulatory-subunit overlay assays identified five AKAPs in ganglion lysates, including a prominent neuronal subtype. Moreover, PACAP-induced synaptic plasticity was selectively blocked when PKA regulatory-subunit binding to AKAPs was inhibited. Taken together, our findings indicate that PACAP/PAC1R signaling coordinates nAChR, NOS1 and AKAP activities to induce targeted, retrograde plasticity at autonomic synapses. Such

  19. Acetylcholinesterase Regulates Skeletal In Ovo Development of Chicken Limbs by ACh-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Spieker, Janine; Ackermann, Anica; Salfelder, Anika; Vogel-Höpker, Astrid; Layer, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of the vertebrate limb presents an excellent model to analyze a non-neuronal cholinergic system (NNCS). Here, we first analyzed the expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by IHC and of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) by ISH in developing embryonic chicken limbs (stages HH17-37). AChE outlined formation of bones, being strongest at their distal tips, and later also marked areas of cell death. At onset, AChE and ChAT were elevated in two organizing centers of the limb anlage, the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) and zone of polarizing activity (ZPA), respectively. Thereby ChAT was expressed shortly after AChE, thus strongly supporting a leading role of AChE in limb formation. Then, we conducted loss-of-function studies via unilateral implantation of beads into chicken limb anlagen, which were soaked in cholinergic components. After varying periods, the formation of cartilage matrix and of mineralizing bones was followed by Alcian blue (AB) and Alizarin red (AR) stainings, respectively. Both acetylcholine (ACh)- and ChAT-soaked beads accelerated bone formation in ovo. Notably, inhibition of AChE by BW284c51, or by the monoclonal antibody MAB304 delayed cartilage formation. Since bead inhibition of BChE was mostly ineffective, an ACh-independent action during BW284c51 and MAB304 inhibition was indicated, which possibly could be due to an enzymatic side activity of AChE. In conclusion, skeletogenesis in chick is regulated by an ACh-dependent cholinergic system, but to some extent also by an ACh-independent aspect of the AChE protein. PMID:27574787

  20. Acetylcholinesterase Regulates Skeletal In Ovo Development of Chicken Limbs by ACh-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Spieker, Janine; Ackermann, Anica; Salfelder, Anika; Vogel-Höpker, Astrid; Layer, Paul G

    2016-01-01

    Formation of the vertebrate limb presents an excellent model to analyze a non-neuronal cholinergic system (NNCS). Here, we first analyzed the expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by IHC and of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) by ISH in developing embryonic chicken limbs (stages HH17-37). AChE outlined formation of bones, being strongest at their distal tips, and later also marked areas of cell death. At onset, AChE and ChAT were elevated in two organizing centers of the limb anlage, the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) and zone of polarizing activity (ZPA), respectively. Thereby ChAT was expressed shortly after AChE, thus strongly supporting a leading role of AChE in limb formation. Then, we conducted loss-of-function studies via unilateral implantation of beads into chicken limb anlagen, which were soaked in cholinergic components. After varying periods, the formation of cartilage matrix and of mineralizing bones was followed by Alcian blue (AB) and Alizarin red (AR) stainings, respectively. Both acetylcholine (ACh)- and ChAT-soaked beads accelerated bone formation in ovo. Notably, inhibition of AChE by BW284c51, or by the monoclonal antibody MAB304 delayed cartilage formation. Since bead inhibition of BChE was mostly ineffective, an ACh-independent action during BW284c51 and MAB304 inhibition was indicated, which possibly could be due to an enzymatic side activity of AChE. In conclusion, skeletogenesis in chick is regulated by an ACh-dependent cholinergic system, but to some extent also by an ACh-independent aspect of the AChE protein. PMID:27574787

  1. Efforts toward treatments against aging of organophosphorus-inhibited acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Qinggeng; Young, Amneh; Callam, Christopher S; McElroy, Craig A; Ekici, Özlem Dogan; Yoder, Ryan J; Hadad, Christopher M

    2016-06-01

    Aging is a dealkylation reaction of organophosphorus (OP)-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Despite many studies to date, aged AChE cannot be reactivated directly by traditional pyridinium oximes. This review summarizes strategies that are potentially valuable in the treatment against aging in OP poisoning. Among them, retardation of aging seeks to lower the rate of aging through the use of AChE effectors. These drugs should be administered before AChE is completely aged. For postaging treatment, realkylation of aged AChE by appropriate alkylators may pave the way for oxime treatment by neutralizing the oxyanion at the active site of aged AChE. The other two strategies, upregulation of AChE expression and introduction of exogenous AChE, cannot resurrect aged AChE but may compensate for lowered active AChE levels by in situ production or external introduction of active AChE. Upregulation of AChE expression can be triggered by some peptides. Sources of exogenous AChE can be whole blood or purified AChE, either from human or nonhuman species. PMID:27327269

  2. Isolation and characterization of pediocin AcH chimeric protein mutants with altered bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Miller, K W; Schamber, R; Osmanagaoglu, O; Ray, B

    1998-06-01

    A collection of pediocin AcH amino acid substitution mutants was generated by PCR random mutagenesis of DNA encoding the bacteriocin. Mutants were isolated by cloning mutagenized DNA into an Escherichia coli malE plasmid that directs the secretion of maltose binding protein-pediocin AcH chimeric proteins and by screening transformant colonies for bactericidal activity against Lactobacillus plantarum NCDO955 (K. W. Miller, R. Schamber, Y. Chen, and B. Ray, 1998. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:14-20, 1998). In all, 17 substitution mutants were isolated at 14 of the 44 amino acids of pediocin AcH. Seven mutants (N5K, C9R, C14S, C14Y, G37E, G37R, and C44W) were completely inactive against the pediocin AcH-sensitive strains L. plantarum NCDO955, Listeria innocua Lin11, Enterococcus faecalis M1, Pediococcus acidilactici LB42, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides Ly. A C24S substitution mutant constructed by other means also was inactive against these bacteria. Nine other mutants (K1N, W18R, I26T, M31T, A34D, N41K, H42L, K43N, and K43E) retained from <1% to approximately 60% of wild-type activity when assayed against L. innocua Lin11. One mutant, K11E, displayed approximately 2. 8-fold-higher activity against this indicator. About one half of the mutations mapped to amino acids that are conserved in the pediocin-like family of bacteriocins. All four cysteines were found to be required for activity, although only C9 and C14 are conserved among pediocin-like bacteriocins. Several basic amino acids as well as nonpolar amino acids located within the hydrophobic C-terminal region also were found to be important. The mutations are discussed in the context of structural models that have been proposed for the bacteriocin.

  3. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important link in the apoptotic pathway induced by hyperglycemia in Y79 retinoblastoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Masha'our, R. Shehadeh; Heinrich, R.; Garzozi, H. J.; Perlman, I.

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) expression was found to be induced in the mammalian CNS, including the retina, by different types of stress leading to cellular apoptosis. Here, we tested possible involvement of AChE in hyperglycemia-induced apoptosis in a retinal cell line. Y79 retinoblastoma cells were incubated in starvation media (1% FBS and 1 mg/ml glucose) for 16–24 h, and then exposed to hyperglycemic environment by raising extracellular glucose concentrations to a final level of 3.5 mg/ml or 6 mg/ml. Similar levels of mannitol were used as control for hyperosmolarity. Cells were harvested at different time intervals for analysis of apoptosis and AChE protein expression. Apoptosis was detected by the cleavage of Poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) using western blot, and by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. AChE protein expression and activity was detected by western blot and by the Karnovsky and Roots method, respectively. MissionTM shRNA for AChE was used to inhibit AChE protein expression. Treating Y79 cells with 3.5 mg/ml of glucose, but not with 3.5 mg/ml mannitol, induced apoptosis which was confirmed by TUNEL assay and by cleavage of PARP. A part of the signaling pathway accompanying the apoptotic process involved up-regulation of the AChE-R variant and an N-extended AChE variant as verified at the mRNA and protein level. Inhibition of AChE protein expression by shRNA protected Y79 cell from entering the apoptotic pathway. Our data suggest that expression of an N-extended AChE variant, most probably an R isoform, is involved in the apoptotic pathway caused by hyperglycemia in Y79 cells. PMID:22685426

  4. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important link in the apoptotic pathway induced by hyperglycemia in Y79 retinoblastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Masha'our, R Shehadeh; Heinrich, R; Garzozi, H J; Perlman, I

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) expression was found to be induced in the mammalian CNS, including the retina, by different types of stress leading to cellular apoptosis. Here, we tested possible involvement of AChE in hyperglycemia-induced apoptosis in a retinal cell line. Y79 retinoblastoma cells were incubated in starvation media (1% FBS and 1 mg/ml glucose) for 16-24 h, and then exposed to hyperglycemic environment by raising extracellular glucose concentrations to a final level of 3.5 mg/ml or 6 mg/ml. Similar levels of mannitol were used as control for hyperosmolarity. Cells were harvested at different time intervals for analysis of apoptosis and AChE protein expression. Apoptosis was detected by the cleavage of Poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) using western blot, and by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. AChE protein expression and activity was detected by western blot and by the Karnovsky and Roots method, respectively. Mission(TM) shRNA for AChE was used to inhibit AChE protein expression. Treating Y79 cells with 3.5 mg/ml of glucose, but not with 3.5 mg/ml mannitol, induced apoptosis which was confirmed by TUNEL assay and by cleavage of PARP. A part of the signaling pathway accompanying the apoptotic process involved up-regulation of the AChE-R variant and an N-extended AChE variant as verified at the mRNA and protein level. Inhibition of AChE protein expression by shRNA protected Y79 cell from entering the apoptotic pathway. Our data suggest that expression of an N-extended AChE variant, most probably an R isoform, is involved in the apoptotic pathway caused by hyperglycemia in Y79 cells. PMID:22685426

  5. Screening for acetylcholinesterase inhibition and antioxidant activity of selected plants from Croatia.

    PubMed

    Jukic, Mila; Burcul, Franko; Carev, Ivana; Politeo, Olivera; Milos, Mladen

    2012-01-01

    The methanol, ethyl acetate and chloroform extracts of selected Croatian plants were tested for their acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition and antioxidant activity. Assessment of AChE inhibition was carried out using microplate reader at 1 mg mL⁻¹. Antioxidant capacities were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging test and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay (FRAP). Total phenol content (TPC) of extracts were determined using Folin-Ciocalteu colorimetric method. Out of 48 extracts, only methanolic extract of the Salix alba L. cortex exerted modest activity towards AChE, reaching 50.80% inhibition at concentration of 1 mg mL⁻¹. All the other samples tested had activity below 20%. The same extract performed the best antioxidative activity using DPPH and FRAP method, too. In essence, among all extracts used in the screening, methanolic extracts showed the best antioxidative activity as well as highest TPC.

  6. Avarol derivatives as competitive AChE inhibitors, non hepatotoxic and neuroprotective agents for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tommonaro, Giuseppina; García-Font, Nuria; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Pejin, Boris; Iodice, Carmine; Cañadas, Sixta; Marco-Contelles, José; Oset-Gasque, María Jesús

    2016-10-21

    Avarol is a marine sesquiterpenoid hydroquinone, previously isolated from the marine sponge Dysidea avara Schmidt (Dictyoceratida), with antiinflammatory, antitumor, antioxidant, antiplatelet, anti-HIV, and antipsoriatic effects. Recent findings indicate that some thio-avarol derivatives exhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity. The multiple pharmacological properties of avarol, thio-avarol and/or their derivatives prompted us to continue the in vitro screening, focusing on their AChE inhibitory and neuroprotective effects. Due to the complex nature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is a renewed search for new, non hepatotoxic anticholinesterasic compounds. This paper describes the synthesis and in vitro biological evaluation of avarol-3'-thiosalicylate (TAVA) and thiosalycil-prenyl-hydroquinones (TPHs), as non hepatotoxic anticholinesterasic agents, showing a good neuroprotective effect on the decreased viability of SHSY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced by oligomycin A/rotenone and okadaic acid. A molecular modeling study was also undertaken on the most promising molecules within the series to elucidate their AChE binding modes and in particular the role played by the carboxylate group in enzyme inhibition. Among them, TPH4, bearing a geranylgeraniol substituent, is the most significant Electrophorus electricus AChE (EeAChE) inhibitor (IC50 = 6.77 ± 0.24 μM), also endowed with a moderate serum horse butyrylcholinesterase (eqBuChE) inhibitory activity, being also the least hepatotoxic and the best neuroprotective compound of the series. Thus, TPHs represents a new family of synthetic compounds, chemically related to the natural compound avarol, which has been discovered for the potential treatment of AD. Findings prove the relevance of TPHs as a new possible generation of competitive AChE inhibitors pointing out the importance of the salycilic substituents on the hydroquinone ring. Since these compounds do not belong to the class of

  7. Avarol derivatives as competitive AChE inhibitors, non hepatotoxic and neuroprotective agents for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tommonaro, Giuseppina; García-Font, Nuria; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Pejin, Boris; Iodice, Carmine; Cañadas, Sixta; Marco-Contelles, José; Oset-Gasque, María Jesús

    2016-10-21

    Avarol is a marine sesquiterpenoid hydroquinone, previously isolated from the marine sponge Dysidea avara Schmidt (Dictyoceratida), with antiinflammatory, antitumor, antioxidant, antiplatelet, anti-HIV, and antipsoriatic effects. Recent findings indicate that some thio-avarol derivatives exhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity. The multiple pharmacological properties of avarol, thio-avarol and/or their derivatives prompted us to continue the in vitro screening, focusing on their AChE inhibitory and neuroprotective effects. Due to the complex nature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is a renewed search for new, non hepatotoxic anticholinesterasic compounds. This paper describes the synthesis and in vitro biological evaluation of avarol-3'-thiosalicylate (TAVA) and thiosalycil-prenyl-hydroquinones (TPHs), as non hepatotoxic anticholinesterasic agents, showing a good neuroprotective effect on the decreased viability of SHSY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced by oligomycin A/rotenone and okadaic acid. A molecular modeling study was also undertaken on the most promising molecules within the series to elucidate their AChE binding modes and in particular the role played by the carboxylate group in enzyme inhibition. Among them, TPH4, bearing a geranylgeraniol substituent, is the most significant Electrophorus electricus AChE (EeAChE) inhibitor (IC50 = 6.77 ± 0.24 μM), also endowed with a moderate serum horse butyrylcholinesterase (eqBuChE) inhibitory activity, being also the least hepatotoxic and the best neuroprotective compound of the series. Thus, TPHs represents a new family of synthetic compounds, chemically related to the natural compound avarol, which has been discovered for the potential treatment of AD. Findings prove the relevance of TPHs as a new possible generation of competitive AChE inhibitors pointing out the importance of the salycilic substituents on the hydroquinone ring. Since these compounds do not belong to the class of

  8. Searching for the Multi-Target-Directed Ligands against Alzheimer's disease: discovery of quinoxaline-based hybrid compounds with AChE, H₃R and BACE 1 inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenhai; Tang, Li; Shi, Ying; Huang, Shufang; Xu, Lei; Sheng, Rong; Wu, Peng; Li, Jia; Zhou, Naiming; Hu, Yongzhou

    2011-12-01

    A novel series of quinoxaline derivatives, as Multi-Target-Directed Ligands (MTDLs) for AD treatment, were designed by lending the core structural elements required for H(3)R antagonists and hybridizing BACE 1 inhibitor 1 with AChE inhibitor BYYT-25. A virtual database consisting of quinoxaline derivatives was first screened on a pharmacophore model of BACE 1 inhibitors, and then filtered by a molecular docking model of AChE. Seventeen quinoxaline derivatives with high score values were picked out, synthesized and evaluated for their biological activities. Compound 11a, the most effective MTDL, showed the potent activity to H(3)R/AChE/BACE 1 (H(3)R antagonism, IC(50)=280.0 ± 98.0 nM; H(3)R inverse agonism, IC(50)=189.3 ± 95.7 nM; AChE, IC(50)=483 ± 5 nM; BACE 1, 46.64±2.55% inhibitory rate at 20 μM) and high selectivity over H(1)R/H(2)R/H(4)R. Furthermore, the protein binding patterns between 11a and AChE/BACE 1 showed that it makes several essential interactions with the enzymes.

  9. Comparative study on short- and long-term behavioral consequences of organophosphate exposure: relationship to AChE mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    López-Granero, Caridad; Cardona, Diana; Giménez, Estela; Lozano, Rafael; Barril, José; Aschner, Michael; Sánchez-Santed, Fernando; Cañadas, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) affect behavior by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). While the cognitive short-term effects may be directly attributed to this inhibition, the mechanisms that underlie OP's long-term cognitive effects remain controversial and poorly understood. Accordingly, two experiments were designed to assess the effects of OPs on cognition, and to ascertain whether both the short- and long-term effects of are AChE-dependent. A single subcutaneous dose of 250 mg/kg chlorpyrifos (CPF), 1.5mg/kg diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) or 15 mg/kg parathion (PTN) was administered to male Wistar rats. Spatial learning was evaluated 72 h or 23 weeks after exposure, and impulsive choice was tested at 10 and 30 weeks following OPs administration (experiment 1 and 2, respectively). Brain soluble and membrane-bound AChE activity, synaptic AChE-S mRNA, read-through AChE-R mRNA and brain acylpeptide hydrolase (APH) activity (as alternative non-cholinergic target) were analyzed upon completion of the behavioral testing (17 and 37 weeks after OPs exposure). Both short- and long-term CPF treatment caused statistically significant effects on spatial learning, while PTN treatment led only to statistically significant short-term effects. Neither CPF, DFP nor PTN affected the long-term impulsivity response. Long-term exposure to CPF and DFP significantly decreased AChE-S and AChE-R mRNA, while in the PTN treated group only AChE-S mRNA levels were decreased. However, after long-term OP exposure, soluble and membrane-bound AChE activity was indistinguishable from controls. Finally, no changes were noted in brain APH activity in response to OP treatment. Taken together, this study demonstrates long-term effects of OPs on AChE-S and AChE-R mRNA in the absence of changes in AChE soluble and membrane-bound activity. Thus, changes in AChE mRNA expression imply non-catalytic properties of the AChE enzyme.

  10. Activation of the alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR) reverses referred mechanical hyperalgesia induced by colonic inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Costa, Robson; Motta, Emerson M; Manjavachi, Marianne N; Cola, Maíra; Calixto, João B

    2012-10-01

    In the current study, we investigated the effect of the activation of the alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR) on dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis and referred mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. Colitis was induced in CD1 male mice through the intake of 4% DSS in tap water for 7 days. Control mice received unadulterated water. Referred mechanical hyperalgesia was evaluated for 7 days after the beginning of 4% DSS intake. Referred mechanical hyperalgesia started within 1 day after beginning DSS drinking, peaked at 3 days and persisted for 7 days. This time course profile perfectly matched with the appearance of signs of colitis. Both acute and chronic oral treatments with nicotine (0.1-1.0 mg/kg, p.o.) were effective in inhibiting the established referred mechanical hyperalgesia. The antinociceptive effect of nicotine was completely abrogated by cotreatment with the selective α7 nAchR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) (1.0 mg/kg). Consistent with these results, i.p. treatment with the selective α7 nAchR agonist PNU 282987 (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) reduced referred mechanical hyperalgesia at all periods of evaluation. Despite their antinociceptive effects, nicotinic agonists did not affect DSS-induced colonic damage or inflammation. Taken together, the data generated in the present study show the potential relevance of using α7 nAchR agonists to treat referred pain and discomfort associated with inflammatory bowel diseases.

  11. Activity of nAChRs Containing α9 Subunits Modulates Synapse Stabilization via Bidirectional Signaling Programs

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Vidya; Taranda, Julián; Elgoyhen, A. Belén; Vetter, Douglas E.

    2010-01-01

    Although the synaptogenic program for cholinergic synapses of the neuromuscular junction is well known, little is known of the identity or dynamic expression patterns of proteins involved in non-neuromuscular nicotinic synapse development. We have previously demonstrated abnormal presynaptic terminal morphology following loss of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α9 subunit expression in adult cochleae. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes have remained obscure. To better understand synapse formation and the role of cholinergic activity in the synaptogenesis of the inner ear, we exploit the nAChR α9 subunit null mouse. In this mouse, functional acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmission to the hair cells is completely silenced. Results demonstrate a premature, effusive innervation to the synaptic pole of the outer hair cells in α9 null mice coinciding with delayed expression of cell adhesion proteins during the period of effusive contact. Collapse of the ectopic innervation coincides with an age-related hyperexpression pattern in the null mice. In addition, we document changes in expression of presynaptic vesicle recycling/trafficking machinery in the α9 null mice that suggests a bidirectional information flow between the target of the neural innervation (the hair cells) and the presynaptic terminal that is modified by hair cell nAChR activity. Loss of nAChR activity may alter transcriptional activity, as CREB binding protein expression is decreased coincident with the increased expression of N-Cadherin in the adult α9 null mice. Finally, by using mice expressing the nondesensitizing α9 L9′T point mutant nAChR subunit, we show that increased nAChR activity drives synaptic hyperinnervation. PMID:19790106

  12. Biochemical effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content on teleostean fishes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Palas; Pal, Sandipan; Mukherjee, Aloke Kumar; Ghosh, Apurba Ratan

    2014-09-01

    Effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 at a dose of 17.20mg/l on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content were measured in different tissues of two Indian air-breathing teleosts, Anabas testudineus (Bloch) and Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) during an exposure period of 30 days under laboratory condition. AChE activity was significantly increased in all the investigated tissues of both fish species and maximum elevation was observed in brain of H. fossilis, while spinal cord of A. testudineus showed minimum increment. Fishes showed significant increase LPO levels in all the tissues; highest was observed in gill of A. testudineus but lowest LPO level was observed in muscle of H. fossilis. CAT was also enhanced in both the fishes, while GST activity in liver diminished substantially and minimum was observed in liver of A. testudineus. Total protein content showed decreased value in all the tissues, maximum reduction was observed in liver and minimum in brain of A. testudineus and H. fossilis respectively. The results indicated that Excel Mera 71 caused serious alterations in the enzyme activities resulting into severe deterioration of fish health; so, AChE, LPO, CAT and GST can be used as suitable indicators of herbicidal toxicity. PMID:24927388

  13. Biochemical effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content on teleostean fishes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Palas; Pal, Sandipan; Mukherjee, Aloke Kumar; Ghosh, Apurba Ratan

    2014-09-01

    Effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 at a dose of 17.20mg/l on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content were measured in different tissues of two Indian air-breathing teleosts, Anabas testudineus (Bloch) and Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) during an exposure period of 30 days under laboratory condition. AChE activity was significantly increased in all the investigated tissues of both fish species and maximum elevation was observed in brain of H. fossilis, while spinal cord of A. testudineus showed minimum increment. Fishes showed significant increase LPO levels in all the tissues; highest was observed in gill of A. testudineus but lowest LPO level was observed in muscle of H. fossilis. CAT was also enhanced in both the fishes, while GST activity in liver diminished substantially and minimum was observed in liver of A. testudineus. Total protein content showed decreased value in all the tissues, maximum reduction was observed in liver and minimum in brain of A. testudineus and H. fossilis respectively. The results indicated that Excel Mera 71 caused serious alterations in the enzyme activities resulting into severe deterioration of fish health; so, AChE, LPO, CAT and GST can be used as suitable indicators of herbicidal toxicity.

  14. Acetylcholinesterase-inhibiting activity of salicylanilide N-alkylcarbamates and their molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Imramovsky, Ales; Stepankova, Sarka; Vanco, Jan; Pauk, Karel; Monreal-Ferriz, Juana; Vinsova, Jarmila; Jampilek, Josef

    2012-08-24

    A series of twenty-five novel salicylanilide N-alkylcarbamates were investigated as potential acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. The compounds were tested for their ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from electric eel (Electrophorus electricus L.). Experimental lipophilicity was determined, and the structure-activity relationships are discussed. The mode of binding in the active site of AChE was investigated by molecular docking. All the discussed compounds expressed significantly higher AChE inhibitory activity than rivastigmine and slightly lower than galanthamine. Disubstitution by chlorine in C'(₃,₄) of the aniline ring and the optimal length of hexyl-undecyl alkyl chains in the carbamate moiety provided the most active AChE inhibitors. Monochlorination in C'(₄) exhibited slightly more effective AChE inhibitors than in C'(₃). Generally it can be stated that compounds with higher lipophilicity showed higher inhibition, and the activity of the compounds is strongly dependent on the length of the N-alkyl chain.

  15. Concomitant alpha7 and beta2 nicotinic AChR subunit deficiency leads to impaired energy homeostasis and increased physical activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Somm, Emmanuel; Guérardel, Audrey; Maouche, Kamel; Toulotte, Audrey; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Maskos, Uwe; Hüppi, Petra S; Schwitzgebel, Valérie M

    2014-05-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are pentameric ligand-gated cation channels well characterized in neuronal signal transmission. Moreover, recent studies have revealed nAChR expression in nonneuronal cell types throughout the body, including tissues involved in metabolism. In the present study, we screen gene expression of nAChR subunits in pancreatic islets and adipose tissues. Mice pancreatic islets present predominant expression of α7 and β2 nAChR subunits but at a lower level than in central structures. Characterization of glucose and energy homeostasis in α7β2nAChR(-/-) mice revealed no major defect in insulin secretion and sensitivity but decreased glycemia apparently unrelated to gluconeogenesis or glycogenolysis. α7β2nAChR(-/-) mice presented an increase in lean and bone body mass and a decrease in fat storage with normal body weight. These observations were associated with elevated spontaneous physical activity in α7β2nAChR(-/-) mice, mainly due to elevation in fine vertical (rearing) activity while their horizontal (ambulatory) activity remained unchanged. In contrast to α7nAChR(-/-) mice presenting glucose intolerance and insulin resistance associated to excessive inflammation of adipose tissue, the present metabolic phenotyping of α7β2nAChR(-/-) mice revealed a metabolic improvement possibly linked to the increase in spontaneous physical activity related to central β2nAChR deficiency.

  16. Toxicity and mAChRs binding activity of Cassiopea xamachana venom from Puerto Rican coasts.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Faisal F Y; Román, Laura G; Baksi, Krishna; Burnett, Joseph W

    2005-01-01

    A separation of toxic components from the upside down jellyfish Cassiopea xamachana (Cx) was carried out to study their cytotoxic effects and examine whether these effects are combined with a binding activity to cell membrane receptors. Nematocysts containing toxins were isolated from the autolysed tentacles, ruptured by sonication, and the crude venom (CxTX) was separated from the pellets by ultracentrifugation. For identifying its bioactive components, CxTX was fractionated by gel filtration chromatography into six fractions (named fraction I-VI). The toxicity of CxTX and fractions was tested on mice; however, the hemolytic activity was tested on saline washed human erythrocytes. The LD50 of CxTX was 0.75 microg/g of mouse body and for fraction III, IV and VI were 0.28, 0.25 and 0.12 microg/g, respectively. Fractions I, II and V were not lethal at doses equivalent to LD50 1 microg/g. The hemolytic and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activities of most fractions were well correlated with their mice toxicity. However, fraction VI, which contains the low molecular mass protein components (< or =10 kDa), has shown no PLA2 activity but highest toxicity to mice, highest hemolytic activity, and bound significantly to the acetylcholine muscarinic receptors (mAChRs) isolated from rat brain. The results suggested that fraction VI contains proteinaceous components contributing to most of cytolysis as well as membrane binding events. Meanwhile, fraction IV has shown high PLA2 that may contribute to the venom lethality and paralytic effects. PMID:15581689

  17. Impaired terrestrial and arboreal locomotor performance in the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) after exposure to an AChE-inhibiting pesticide.

    PubMed

    DuRant, Sarah E; Hopkins, William A; Talent, Larry G

    2007-09-01

    We examined the effects of a commonly used AChE-inhibiting pesticide on terrestrial and arboreal sprint performance, important traits for predator avoidance and prey capture, in the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis). Lizards were exposed to carbaryl (2.5, 25, and 250 microg/g) and were raced before and 4, 24, and 96 h after dosing. In the terrestrial setting, exposure to low concentrations of carbaryl had stimulatory effects on performance, but exposure to the highest concentration was inhibitory. No stimulatory effects of carbaryl were noted in the arboreal environment and performance in lizards was reduced after exposure to both the medium and highest dose of carbaryl. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to high concentrations of carbaryl can have important sublethal consequences on fitness-related traits in reptiles and that arboreal locomotor performance is a more sensitive indicator of AChE-inhibiting pesticide poisoning than terrestrial locomotor performance. PMID:17360091

  18. Photolabeling a Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) with an (α4)3(β2)2 nAChR-Selective Positive Allosteric Modulator.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Deba, Farah; Wang, Ze-Jun; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2016-05-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs) have potential clinical applications in the treatment of nicotine dependence and many neuropsychiatric conditions associated with decreased brain cholinergic activity, and 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-5-(5-methyl-1-(piperidin-4-yl)-1H-pyrrazol-4-yl)isoxazole (CMPI) has been identified as a PAM selective for neuronal nAChRs containing theα4 subunit. In this report, we compare CMPI interactions with low-sensitivity (α4)3(β2)2 and high-sensitivity (α4)2(β2)3 nAChRs, and with muscle-type nAChRs. In addition, we use the intrinsic reactivity of [(3)H]CMPI upon photolysis at 312 nm to identify its binding sites inTorpedonAChRs. Recording fromXenopusoocytes, we found that CMPI potentiated maximally the responses of (α4)3(β2)2nAChR to 10μM ACh (EC10) by 400% and with anEC50of ∼1µM. CMPI produced a left shift of the ACh concentration-response curve without altering ACh efficacy. In contrast, CMPI inhibited (∼35% at 10µM) ACh responses of (α4)2(β2)3nAChRs and fully inhibited human muscle andTorpedonAChRs with IC50values of ∼0.5µM. Upon irradiation at 312 nm, [(3)H]CMPI photoincorporated into eachTorpedo[(α1)2β1γδ] nAChR subunit. Sequencing of peptide fragments isolated from [(3)H]CMPI-photolabeled nAChR subunits established photolabeling of amino acids contributing to the ACh binding sites (αTyr(190),αTyr(198),γTrp(55),γTyr(111),γTyr(117),δTrp(57)) that was fully inhibitable by agonist and lower-efficiency, state-dependent [(3)H]CMPI photolabeling within the ion channel. Our results establish that CMPI is a potent potentiator of nAChRs containing anα4:α4 subunit interface, and that its intrinsic photoreactivy makes it of potential use to identify its binding sites in the (α4)3(β2)2nAChR. PMID:26976945

  19. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in CSF versus brain assessed by 11C-PMP PET in AD patients treated with galantamine.

    PubMed

    Darreh-Shori, T; Kadir, A; Almkvist, O; Grut, M; Wall, A; Blomquist, G; Eriksson, B; Långström, B; Nordberg, A

    2008-02-01

    The relationship between acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the CSF and brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) was investigated in 18 mild AD patients following galantamine treatment. The first 3 months of the study had a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled design, during which 12 patients received galantamine (16-24 mg/day) and six patients placebo. This was followed by 9 months galantamine treatment in all patients. Activities and protein levels of both the "read-through" AChE (AChE-R) and the synaptic (AChE-S) variants in CSF were assessed in parallel together with the regional brain AChE activity by (11)C-PMP and PET. The AChE-S inhibition was 30-36% in CSF, which correlated well with the in vivo AChE inhibition in the brain. No significant AChE inhibition was observed in the placebo group. The increased level of the AChE-R protein was 16% higher than that of AChE-S. Both the AChE inhibition and the increased level of AChE-R protein positively correlated with the patient's performance in cognitive tests associated with visuospatial ability and attention. In conclusion, AChE levels in CSF closely mirror in vivo brain AChE levels prior to and after treatment with the cholinesterase inhibitors. A positive cognitive response seems to dependent on the AChE inhibition level, which is balanced by an increased protein level of the AChE-R variant in the patients.

  20. Functional Analysis and Molecular Docking studies of Medicinal Compounds for AChE and BChE in Alzheimer’s Disease and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kaladhar, Dowluru SVGK; Yarla, Nagendra Sastry; Anusha, N.

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase share unravelling link with components of metabolic syndromes that’s characterised by low levels of HDL cholesterol, obesity, high fast aldohexose levels, hyper-trigliceridaemia and high blood pressure, by regulation of cholinergic transmission and therefore the enzyme activity within a living system. The phosphomotifs associated with amino acid and tyrosine binding motifs in AChE and BChE were known to be common. Phylogenetic tree was constructed to these proteins usinf UPGMA and Maximum Likelihood methods in MEGA software has shown interaction of AChE and BChE with ageing diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and Diabetes. AChE has shown closely related to BChE, retinol dehydrogenase and β-polypeptide. The present studies is also accomplished that AChE, BChE, COLQ, HAND1, APP, NLGN2 and NGF proteins has interactions with diseases such as Alzheimer’s and D2M using Pathwaylinker and STRING. Medicinal compounds like Ortho-7, Dibucaine and HI-6 are predicted as good targets for modeled AChE and BChE proteins based on docking studies. Hence perceptive studies of cholinesterase structure and the biological mechanisms of inhibition are necessary for effective drug development. PMID:23936743

  1. Cyperus rotundus extract inhibits acetylcholinesterase activity from animal and plants as well as inhibits germination and seedling growth in wheat and tomato.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rashmi; Gupta, Rajendra

    2007-05-30

    Cyperus rotundus (nutgrass) is the world's worst invasive weed through tubers. Its success in dominating natural habitats depends on its ability to prevent herbivory, and to kill or suppress other plants growing in its vicinity. The present study was done to investigate whether chemicals in nutgrass target neuronal and non-neuronal acetylcholinesterases to affect surrounding animals and plants respectively. Methanolic extract of tubers of nutgrass strongly inhibited activity of AChE from electric eel, wheat and tomato. It also inhibited seed germination and seedling growth in wheat and tomato. Our results suggest that inhibitor of AChE in nutgrass possibly acts as agent of plant's war against (a) herbivore animals, and (b) other plants trying to grow in the same habitat. An antiAChE from nutgrass has been purified by employing chromatography and crystallization. The structural determination of the purified inhibitor is in progress.

  2. Novel bis-(−)-nor-meptazinol derivatives act as dual binding site AChE inhibitors with metal-complexing property

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Juan; Qiu, Zhuibai; Xia, Zheng; Li, Wei; Yu, Lining; Chen, Hailin; Chen, Jianxing; Chen, Yan; Hu, Zhuqin; Zhou, Wei; Shao, Biyun; Cui, Yongyao; Xie, Qiong; Chen, Hongzhuan

    2012-10-01

    The strategy of dual binding site acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition along with metal chelation may represent a promising direction for multi-targeted interventions in the pathophysiological processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, two derivatives (ZLA and ZLB) of a potent dual binding site AChE inhibitor bis-(−)-nor-meptazinol (bis-MEP) were designed and synthesized by introducing metal chelating pharmacophores into the middle chain of bis-MEP. They could inhibit human AChE activity with IC{sub 50} values of 9.63 μM (for ZLA) and 8.64 μM (for ZLB), and prevent AChE-induced amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation with IC{sub 50} values of 49.1 μM (for ZLA) and 55.3 μM (for ZLB). In parallel, molecular docking analysis showed that they are capable of interacting with both the catalytic and peripheral anionic sites of AChE. Furthermore, they exhibited abilities to complex metal ions such as Cu(II) and Zn(II), and inhibit Aβ aggregation triggered by these metals. Collectively, these results suggest that ZLA and ZLB may act as dual binding site AChEIs with metal-chelating potency, and may be potential leads of value for further study on disease-modifying treatment of AD. -- Highlights: ► Two novel bis-(−)-nor-meptazinol derivatives are designed and synthesized. ► ZLA and ZLB may act as dual binding site AChEIs with metal-chelating potency. ► They are potential leads for disease-modifying treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Extracts and constituents of Leontopodium alpinum enhance cholinergic transmission: Brain ACh increasing and memory improving properties

    PubMed Central

    Hornick, Ariane; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Vo, Nguyen Phung; Prast, Helmut; Stuppner, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    Leontopodium alpinum (‘Edelweiss’) was phytochemically investigated for constituents that might enhance cholinergic neurotransmission. The potency to increase synaptic availability of acetylcholine (ACh) in rat brain served as key property for the bioguided isolation of cholinergically active compounds using different chromatographic techniques. The dichlormethane (DCM) extract of the root, fractions and isolated constituents were injected i.c.v. and the effect on brain ACh was detected via the push–pull technique. The DCM extract enhanced extracellular ACh concentration in rat brain and inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in vitro. The extracellular level of brain ACh was significantly increased by the isolated sesquiterpenes, isocomene and 14-acetoxyisocomene, while silphiperfolene acetate and silphinene caused a small increasing tendency. Only silphiperfolene acetate showed in vitro AChE inhibitory activity, thus suggesting the other sesquiterpenes to stimulate cholinergic transmission by an alternative mechanism of action. Isocomene was further investigated with behavioural tasks in mice. It restored object recognition in scopolamine-impaired mice and showed nootropic effects in the T-maze alternation task in normal and scopolamine-treated mice. Additionally, this sesquiterpene reduced locomotor activity of untreated mice in the open field task, while the activity induced by scopolamine was abolished. The enhancement of synaptic availability of ACh, the promotion of alternation, and the amelioration of scopolamine-induced deficit are in accordance with a substance that amplifies cholinergic transmission. Whether the mechanism of action is inhibition of AChE or another pro-cholinergic property remains to be elucidated. Taken together, isocomene and related constituents of L. alpinum deserve further interest as potential antidementia agents in brain diseases associated with cholinergic deficits. PMID:18541221

  4. Inhibition of erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase by n-butanol at high concentrations.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran; Zorko, Matjaz; Schara, Milan

    2005-05-01

    Erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is bound to the membrane by a complex glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor, so the effect of alcohol on AChE activity may reflect direct and/or membrane-mediated effects. The indication of a direct interaction between n-butanol and AChE molecules is the activation/inhibition of AChE by occupation of the enzyme's active and/or regulatory sites by alcohol. The activation of AChE can occur only at low concentrations of alcohols, while at high concentrations AChE is inhibited. In this work the mechanism of inhibition of erythrocyte AChE by n-butanol at high concentrations was studied. The values of activity, calculated assuming parabolic competitive inhibition, which implies that one or two molecules of inhibitor bind to the enzyme, fit well to the experimental values. From the values of the inhibition constants it was concluded that at high n-butanol concentrations two alcohol molecules usually interact with AChE. PMID:15820219

  5. Study of Inhibition, Reactivation and Aging Processes of Pesticides Using Graphene Nanosheets/Gold Nanoparticles-Based Acetylcholinesterase Biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lin; Long, Linjuan; Zhang, Weiying; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-09-10

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate pesticides exert their toxicity via attacking the hydroxyl moiety of serine in the 'active site' of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). In this paper we developed a stable AChE biosensor based on self-assembling AChE to graphene nanosheet (GN)-gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) nanocomposite electrode for investigation of inhibition, reactivation and aging processes of different pesticides. It is confirmed that pesticides can inhibit AChE in a short time. OPs poisoning is treatable with oximes while carbarmates exposure is insensitive to oximes. The proposed electrochemical approach thus provides a new simple tool for comparison of pesticide sensitivity and guide of therapeutic intervention.

  6. Synthesis and in vitro reactivation study of isonicotinamide derivatives of 2-(hydroxyimino)-N-(pyridin-3-yl)acetamide as reactivators of Sarin and VX inhibited human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE).

    PubMed

    Karade, Hitendra N; Raviraju, G; Acharya, B N; Valiveti, Aditya Kapil; Bhalerao, Uma; Acharya, Jyotiranjan

    2016-09-15

    Previously (Karade et al., 2014), we have reported the synthesis and in vitro evaluation of bis-pyridinium derivatives of pyridine-3-yl-(2-hydroxyimino acetamide), as reactivators of sarin and VX inhibited hAChE. Few of the molecules showed superior in vivo protection efficacy (mice model) (Kumar et al., 2014; Swami et al., 2016) in comparison to 2-PAM against DFP and sarin poisoning. Encouraged by these results, herein we report the synthesis and in vitro evaluation of isonicotinamide derivatives of pyridine-3-yl-(2-hydroxyimino acetamide) (4a-4d) against sarin and VX inhibited erythrocyte ghost hAChE. Reactivation kinetics of these compounds was studied and the determined kinetic parameters were compared with that of commercial reactivators viz. 2-PAM and obidoxime. In comparison to 2-PAM and obidoxime, oxime 4a and 4b exhibited enhanced reactivation efficacy toward sarin inhibited hAChE while oxime 4c showed far greater reactivation efficacy toward VX inhibited hAChE. The acid dissociation constant and IC50 values of these oximes were determined and correlated with the observed reactivation potential. PMID:27450532

  7. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition, antioxidant activity and toxicity of Peumus boldus water extracts on HeLa and Caco-2 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Falé, P L; Amaral, F; Amorim Madeira, P J; Sousa Silva, M; Florêncio, M H; Frazão, F N; Serralheiro, M L M

    2012-08-01

    This work aimed to study the inhibition on acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE), the antioxidant activity and the toxicity towards Caco-2 and HeLa cells of aqueous extracts of Peumus Boldus. An IC(50) value of 0.93 mg/mL, for AChE inhibition, and EC(50) of 18.7 μg/mL, for the antioxidant activity, was determined. This activity can be attributed to glycosylated flavonoid derivatives detected, which were the main compounds, although boldine and other aporphine derivatives were also present. No changes in the chemical composition or the biochemical activities were found after gastrointestinal digestion. Toxicity of P. boldus decoction gave an IC(50) value 0.66 mg/mL for HeLa cells, which caused significant changes in the cell proteome profile. PMID:22617353

  8. Antioedematogenic activity, acetylcholinesterase inhibition and antimicrobial properties of Jacaranda oxyphylla.

    PubMed

    Pereira, V V; Silva, R R; Dos Santos, M H; Dias, D F; Moreira, M E C; Takahashi, J A

    2016-09-01

    Jacaranda oxyphylla Cham. (Bignoniaceae) is a shrub found in the Brazilian cerrado and used in folk medicine to treat microbial infections. The aim of this study was to carry out a phytochemical screening and evaluate antioedematogenic, antimicrobial and antiacetylcholinesterase properties of J. oxyphylla crude extracts. All extracts analysed showed presence of terpenoids, which are potentially active chemical substances. A high AChE inhibitory activity for hexane extract from leaves and for the extracts from twigs was found. Ethanol extract from leaves of J. oxyphylla showed activity against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. This extract was also effective in inhibiting the stages of inflammation evaluated. Biological investigation and phytochemical screening of J. oxyphylla extracts provided additional evidence of its traditional medicinal value.

  9. Postsynaptic activity reverses the sign of the acetylcholine-induced long-term plasticity of GABAA inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Soledad; Fernández de Sevilla, David; Buño, Washington

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates forms of plasticity that control cognitive functions but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. ACh controls the intrinsic excitability, as well as the synaptic excitation and inhibition of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells (PCs), cells known to participate in circuits involved in cognition and spatial navigation. However, how ACh regulates inhibition in function of postsynaptic activity has not been well studied. Here we show that in rat PCs, a brief pulse of ACh or a brief stimulation of cholinergic septal fibers combined with repeated depolarization induces strong long-term enhancement of GABAA inhibition (GABAA-LTP). Indeed, this enhanced inhibition is due to the increased activation of α5βγ2 subunit-containing GABAA receptors by the GABA released. GABAA-LTP requires the activation of M1-muscarinic receptors and an increase in cytosolic Ca2+. In the absence of PC depolarization ACh triggered a presynaptic depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI), revealing that postsynaptic activity gates the effects of ACh from presynaptic DSI to postsynaptic LTP. These results provide key insights into mechanisms potentially linked with cognitive functions, spatial navigation, and the homeostatic control of abnormal hyperexcitable states. PMID:24938789

  10. Cinnamomum loureirii Extract Inhibits Acetylcholinesterase Activity and Ameliorates Trimethyltin-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cho Rong; Choi, Soo Jung; Kwon, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Jae Kyeom; Kim, Youn-Jung; Park, Gwi Gun; Shin, Dong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been linked to the deficiency of neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) in the brain, and the main treatment strategy for improving AD symptoms is the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. In the present study, we aimed to identify potent AChE inhibitors from Cinnamomum loureirii extract via bioassay-guided fractionation. We demonstrated that the most potent AChE inhibitor present in the C. loureirii extract was 2,4-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)phenol. To confirm the antiamnesic effects of the ethanol extract of C. loureirii, mice were intraperitoneally injected with the neurotoxin trimethyltin (2.5 mg/kg) to induce cognitive dysfunction, and performance in the Y-maze and passive avoidance tests was assessed. Treatment with C. loureirii extract significantly improved performance in both behavioral tests, suggesting that this extract may be neuroprotective and therefore beneficial in preventing or ameliorating the degenerative processes of AD, potentially by restoring cholinergic function. PMID:27374288

  11. Neuroprotective effects of donepezil against Aβ42-induced neuronal toxicity are mediated through not only enhancing PP2A activity but also regulating GSK-3β and nAChRs activity.

    PubMed

    Noh, Min-Young; Koh, Seong H; Kim, Sung-Min; Maurice, Tangui; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kim, Seung H

    2013-11-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate whether donepezil, acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, shown to play a protective role through inhibiting glycogen synthesis kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activity, could also exert neuroprotective effects by stimulating protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity in the amyloid-beta (Aβ)42-induced neuronal toxicity model of Alzheimer's disease. In Aβ42-induced toxic conditions, each PP2A and GSK-3β activity measured at different times showed time-dependent reverse pattern toward the direction of accelerating neuronal deaths with the passage of time. In addition, donepezil pre-treatment showed dose-dependent stepwise increase of neuronal viability and stimulation of PP2A activity. However, such effects on them were significantly reduced through the depletion of PP2A activity with either okadaic acid or PP2Ac siRNA. In spite of blocked PP2A activity in this Aβ42 insult, however, donepezil pretreatment showed additional significant recovering effect on neuronal viability when compared to the value without donepezil. Moreover, donepezil partially recovered its dephosphorylating effect on hyperphosphorylated tau induced by Aβ42. This observation led us to assume that additional mechanisms of donepezil, including its inhibitory effect on GSK-3β activity and/or the activation role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), might be involved. Taken together, our results suggest that the neuroprotective effects of donepezil against Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity are mediated through activation of PP2A, but its additional mechanisms including regulation of GSK-3β and nAChRs activity would partially contribute to its effects. We investigated neuroprotective mechanisms of donepezil against Aβ42 toxicity: Donepezil increased neuronal viability with reduced p-tau by enhancing PP2A activity. Despite of blocked PP2A activity, donepezil showed additional recovering effect on neuronal viability, which findings led us to assume that additional

  12. Design of multi-target compounds as AChE, BACE1, and amyloid-β(1-42) oligomerization inhibitors: in silico and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Maricarmen; Correa-Basurto, José; Martínez-Ramos, Federico; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia Irene; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia G; Mera-Jiménez, Elvia; Rosales-Hernández, Martha Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Despite great efforts to develop new therapeutic strategies against Alzheimer's disease (AD), the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs): donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine, have been used only as a palliative therapeutic approach. However, the pathogenesis of AD includes several factors such as cholinergic hypothesis, amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation, and oxidative stress. For this reason, the design of compounds that target the genesis and progression of AD could offer a therapeutic benefit. We have designed a set of compounds (M-1 to M-5) with pharmacophore moieties to inhibit the release, aggregation, or toxicity of Aβ, act as AChEIs and have antioxidant properties. Once the compounds were designed, we analyzed their physicochemical parameters and performed docking studies to determine their affinity values for AChE, β-site amyloid-protein precursor cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), and the Aβ monomer. The best ligands, M-1 and M-4, were then synthesized, chemically characterized, and evaluated in vitro. The in vitro studies showed that these compounds inhibit AChE (M-1 Ki = 0.12 and M-4 Ki = 0.17 μM) and BACE1 (M-1 IC50 = 15.1 and M-4 IC50 = 15.4 nM). They also inhibit Aβ oligomerization and exhibit antioxidant activity. In addition, these compounds showed low cytotoxicity in microglial cells. For these reasons, they are promising for future use as drugs in AD mice transgenic models.

  13. Design of multi-target compounds as AChE, BACE1, and amyloid-β(1-42) oligomerization inhibitors: in silico and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Maricarmen; Correa-Basurto, José; Martínez-Ramos, Federico; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia Irene; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia G; Mera-Jiménez, Elvia; Rosales-Hernández, Martha Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Despite great efforts to develop new therapeutic strategies against Alzheimer's disease (AD), the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs): donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine, have been used only as a palliative therapeutic approach. However, the pathogenesis of AD includes several factors such as cholinergic hypothesis, amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation, and oxidative stress. For this reason, the design of compounds that target the genesis and progression of AD could offer a therapeutic benefit. We have designed a set of compounds (M-1 to M-5) with pharmacophore moieties to inhibit the release, aggregation, or toxicity of Aβ, act as AChEIs and have antioxidant properties. Once the compounds were designed, we analyzed their physicochemical parameters and performed docking studies to determine their affinity values for AChE, β-site amyloid-protein precursor cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), and the Aβ monomer. The best ligands, M-1 and M-4, were then synthesized, chemically characterized, and evaluated in vitro. The in vitro studies showed that these compounds inhibit AChE (M-1 Ki = 0.12 and M-4 Ki = 0.17 μM) and BACE1 (M-1 IC50 = 15.1 and M-4 IC50 = 15.4 nM). They also inhibit Aβ oligomerization and exhibit antioxidant activity. In addition, these compounds showed low cytotoxicity in microglial cells. For these reasons, they are promising for future use as drugs in AD mice transgenic models. PMID:24762947

  14. Nitric oxide/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway activated by M1-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptor cascade inhibits Na+-activated K+ currents in Kenyon cells.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Masaharu; Yoshino, Masami

    2016-06-01

    The interneurons of the mushroom body, known as Kenyon cells, are essential for the long-term memory of olfactory associative learning in some insects. Some studies have reported that nitric oxide (NO) is strongly related to this long-term memory in Kenyon cells. However, the target molecules and upstream and downstream NO signaling cascades are not completely understood. Here we analyzed the effect of the NO signaling cascade on Na(+)-activated K(+) (KNa) channel activity in Kenyon cells of crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus). We found that two different NO donors, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine (SNAP), strongly suppressed KNa channel currents. Additionally, this inhibitory effect of GSNO on KNa channel activity was diminished by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), and KT5823, an inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG). Next, we analyzed the role of ACh in the NO signaling cascade. ACh strongly suppressed KNa channel currents, similar to NO donors. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of ACh was blocked by pirenzepine, an M1 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist, but not by 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP) and mecamylamine, an M3 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist and a nicotinic ACh receptor antagonist, respectively. The ACh-induced inhibition of KNa channel currents was also diminished by the PLC inhibitor U73122 and the calmodulin antagonist W-7. Finally, we found that ACh inhibition was blocked by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). These results suggested that the ACh signaling cascade promotes NO production by activating NOS and NO inhibits KNa channel currents via the sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling cascade in Kenyon cells. PMID:26984419

  15. Seasonal exposure of fish to neurotoxic pesticides in an intensive agricultural catchment, Uma-oya, Sri Lanka: linking contamination and acetylcholinesterase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sumith, Jayakody A; Hansani, P L Chamila; Weeraratne, Thilini C; Munkittrick, Kelly R

    2012-07-01

    The annual cultivation pattern in the Uma-oya catchment in Sri Lanka is characterized by Yala and Maha rainfall periods and associated cropping. Two cultivation seasons were compared for pesticide residues: base flow, field drainage, and the runoff and supplementary sediment data for three sites in the catchment. Organophosphate and N-methyl carbamate pesticide analysis confirmed a higher concentration in the Yala season with low-flow conditions. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was measured by standard spectrometry in the brain, muscle, and eye tissues of three freshwater cyprinid fishes, Garra ceylonensis, Devario malabaricus, and Rasbora daniconius from three study sites during months overlapping two seasons in 2010 (December) and 2011 (July). Baseline AChE data were measured from fish samples from a forested reserve in the Knuckles. A 73% inhibition in muscle AChE activity in G. ceylonensis was associated with intense pesticide exposure months in the Yala season. The AChE inhibition more than 70% in G. ceylonensis eyes in both Yala (76%) and Maha (72.5%) seasons indicates particular sensitivity of eye tissue to inhibitors. The less dramatic AChE inhibition in the eye tissues in D. malabaricus and R. daniconius in both seasons indicates exemplary protective capacity of muscle AChE in fish. The highest inhibition of AChE (up to 60% in brain and up to 56% in muscle AChE activity in R. daniconius and up to 47.8% in brain and up to 64.6% in muscle AChE activity in D. malabaricus) occurred during the Yala season. Tissue AChE activity and physiological activity in fish were correlated. The results collectively indicate that AChE is a consistent biomarker for diffused contaminant exposure in agricultural catchments.

  16. Cardanol-derived AChE inhibitors: Towards the development of dual binding derivatives for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lemes, Laís Flávia Nunes; de Andrade Ramos, Giselle; de Oliveira, Andressa Souza; da Silva, Fernanda Motta R; de Castro Couto, Gina; da Silva Boni, Marina; Guimarães, Marcos Jorge R; Souza, Isis Nem O; Bartolini, Manuela; Andrisano, Vincenza; do Nascimento Nogueira, Patrícia Coelho; Silveira, Edilberto Rocha; Brand, Guilherme D; Soukup, Ondřej; Korábečný, Jan; Romeiro, Nelilma C; Castro, Newton G; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Romeiro, Luiz Antonio Soares

    2016-01-27

    Cardanol is a phenolic lipid component of cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), obtained as the byproduct of cashew nut food processing. Being a waste product, it has attracted much attention as a precursor for the production of high-value chemicals, including drugs. On the basis of these findings and in connection with our previous studies on cardanol derivatives as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, we designed a novel series of analogues by including a protonable amino moiety belonging to different systems. Properly addressed docking studies suggested that the proposed structural modifications would allow the new molecules to interact with both the catalytic active site (CAS) and the peripheral anionic site (PAS) of AChE, thus being able to act as dual binding inhibitors. To disclose whether the new molecules showed the desired profile, they were first tested for their cholinesterase inhibitory activity towards EeAChE and eqBuChE. Compound 26, bearing an N-ethyl-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)amine moiety, showed the highest inhibitory activity against EeAChE, with a promising IC50 of 6.6 μM, and a similar inhibition profile of the human isoform (IC50 = 5.7 μM). As another positive feature, most of the derivatives did not show appreciable toxicity against HT-29 cells, up to a concentration of 100 μM, which indicates drug-conform behavior. Also, compound 26 is capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as predicted by a PAMPA-BBB assay. Collectively, the data suggest that the approach to obtain potential anti-Alzheimer drugs from CNSL is worth of further pursuit and development. PMID:26735910

  17. Highly sensitive and selective immuno-capture/electrochemical assay of acetylcholinesterase activity in red blood cells: a biomarker of exposure to organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiqiong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity in red blood cells (RBCs) is a useful biomarker for biomonitoring of exposures to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and chemical nerve agents. In this paper, we reported a new method for AChE activity assay based on selective immuno-capture of AChE from biological samples followed by enzyme activity assay of captured AChE using a disposable electrochemical sensor. The electrochemical sensor is based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-gold (MWCNTs-Au) nanocomposites modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE), which is used for the immobilization of AChE specific antibody. Upon the completion of immunoreaction, the target AChE (including active and inhibited) is captured onto the electrode surface and followed by an electrochemical detection of enzymatic activity in the presence of acetylthiocholine. A linear response is obtained over standard AChE concentration range from 0.1 to 10 nM. To demonstrate the capability of this new biomonitoring method, AChE solutions dosed with different concentrations of paraoxon were used to validate the new AChE assay method. AChE inhibition in OP dosed solutions was proportional to OP concentration from 0.2 to 50 nM. The new AChE activity assay method for biomonitoring of OP exposure was further validated with in vitro paraoxon-dosed RBC samples. The established electrochemical sensing platform for AChE activity assay not only avoids the problem of overlapping substrate specificity with esterases by using selective antibody, but also eliminates potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It offers a new approach for sensitive, selective, and rapid AChE activity assay for biomonitoring of exposure to OPs.

  18. Analysis of AchE and LDH in mollusc, Lamellidens marginalis after exposure to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Amanullah, B; Stalin, A; Prabu, P; Dhanapal, S

    2010-07-01

    The enzymes Acetylcholinesterase (AchE) and Lactatedehydrogenase (LDH) are used as biological markers in the present study. Enzymes are highly sensitive and used to evaluate the biological effects of organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos in freshwater mussel Lamellidens marginalis. The test organisms were exposed to sub-lethal concentration (5 ppm) of chlorpyrifos for 30 days and allowed to recover for seven days. A distinct reduction of the enzyme AchE (34 +/- 3.3 U l(-1)) was found in the treated hepatopancreas. A significant increase in LDH activity in gill, hepatopancreas and muscle was observed. There was a significant recovery in AchE and LDH in the different tissues, after seven days recovery period.. Hence, the changes in the enzymes are found as the best biomarkering tool to evaluate the effect of organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos on the aquatic biota.

  19. A comparative study on the relationship between acetylcholinesterase activity and acute toxicity in Daphnia magna exposed to anticholinesterase insecticides.

    PubMed

    Printes, Liane Biehl; Callaghan, Amanda

    2004-05-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was measured in Daphnia magna that had been exposed to four organophosphates (OPs; parathion, chlorpyrifos, malathion, and acephate) and one carbamate (propoxur) for 48 h. These results were related to acute toxicity (median effective concentration [EC50] for immobility). For the four OPs, the EC50s were 7.03 pM, 3.17 pM, 10.56 pM, and 309.82 microM, respectively. The EC50 for propoxur was 449.90 pM. Reduction in AChE activity was directly related to an increase in immobility in all chemicals tested. However, the ratio between the EC50 and the AChE median inhibiting concentration ranged from 0.31 to 0.90. A 50% reduction in AChE activity generally was associated with detrimental effects on mobility. However, for acephate, high levels of AChE inhibition (70%) were observed in very low concentrations and were not associated with immobility. In addition, increasing the concentration of acephate further had a slight negative effect on AChE activity but a strong detrimental effect on mobility. Binding sites other than AChE possibly are involved in acephate toxicity to D. magna. Our findings demonstrate different associations between AChE inhibition and toxicity when different chemicals are compared. Therefore, the value of using AChE activity as a biomarker in D. magna will be dependent on the chemical tested.

  20. Crystal structure, phytochemical study and enzyme inhibition activity of Ajaconine and Delectinine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Shujaat; Ahmad, Hanif; Khan, Hidayat Ullah; Shahzad, Adnan; Khan, Ezzat; Ali Shah, Syed Adnan; Ali, Mumtaz; Wadud, Abdul; Ghufran, Mehreen; Naz, Humera; Ahmad, Manzoor

    2016-11-01

    The Crystal structure, comparative DFT study and phytochemical investigation of atisine type C-20 diterpenoid alkaloid ajaconine (1) and lycoctonine type C-19 diterpenoid alkaloid delectinine (2) is reported here. These compounds were isolated from Delphinium chitralense. Both the natural products 1 and 2 crystallize in orthorhombic crystal system with identical space group of P212121. The geometric parameters of both compounds were calculated with the help of DFT using B3LYP/6-31+G (p) basis set and HOMO-LUMO energies, optimized band gaps, global hardness, ionization potential, electron affinity and global electrophilicity are calculated. The compounds 1 and 2 were screened for acetyl cholinesterase and butyryl cholinesterase inhibition activities in a dose dependent manner followed by molecular docking to explore the possible inhibitory mechanism of ajaconine (1) and delectinine (2). The IC50 values of tested compounds against AChE were observed as 12.61 μM (compound 1) and 5.04 μM (compound 2). The same experiments were performed for inhibition of BChE and IC50 was observed to be 10.18 μM (1) and 9.21 μM (2). Promising inhibition activity was shown by both the compounds against AChE and BChE in comparison with standard drugs available in the market such as allanzanthane and galanthamine. The inhibition efficiency of both the natural products was determined in a dose dependent manner.

  1. Acetylcholine as a signaling system to environmental stimuli in plants. III. Asymmetric solute distribution controlled by ACh in gravistimulated maize seedlings.

    PubMed

    Momonoki, Y S; Hineno, C; Noguchi, K

    1998-01-01

    Asymmetric distribution of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity has previously been demonstrated to occur in the lower side of the gravity-stimulated maize shoot. The localization of immunoreacted IAA-inositol synthase, AChE and safranin was detected in selected organs of gravistimulated dark grown maize seedlings using a light microscope. Immunoreacted IAA-inositol synthase was asymmetrically distributed in the lower side of the stele of coleoptile node and mesocotyl in maize seedlings placed horizontally. The positive AChE spots in the coleoptile node and mesocotyl were apparently localized in the lower half of the gravistimulated seedlings. Safranin was also asymmetrically distributed in the lower half of the endodermis and stele cells of coleoptile node and mesocotyl. Namely, transport of safranin in the upper half of the coleoptile node and mesocotyl was blocked by gravistimulation. Furthermore, the asymmetric distribution of immunoreacted IAA-inositol synthase was inhibited by neostigmine bromide, AChE inhibitor. These results show that an asymmetric environmental stimulus induces changes in AChE activity, affecting IAA-inositol synthase localization and safranin transport. PMID:12162322

  2. Oximes: inhibitors of human recombinant acetylcholinesterase. A structure-activity relationship (SAR) study.

    PubMed

    Sepsova, Vendula; Karasova, Jana Zdarova; Korabecny, Jan; Dolezal, Rafael; Zemek, Filip; Bennion, Brian J; Kuca, Kamil

    2013-08-16

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) reactivators were developed for the treatment of organophosphate intoxication. Standard care involves the use of anticonvulsants (e.g., diazepam), parasympatolytics (e.g., atropine) and oximes that restore AChE activity. However, oximes also bind to the active site of AChE, simultaneously acting as reversible inhibitors. The goal of the present study is to determine how oxime structure influences the inhibition of human recombinant AChE (hrAChE). Therefore, 24 structurally different oximes were tested and the results compared to the previous eel AChE (EeAChE) experiments. Structural factors that were tested included the number of pyridinium rings, the length and structural features of the linker, and the number and position of the oxime group on the pyridinium ring.

  3. Highly sensitive electrochemiluminescenc assay of acetylcholinesterase activity based on dual biomarkers using Pd-Au nanowires as immobilization platform.

    PubMed

    Ye, Cui; Wang, Min-Qiang; Zhong, Xia; Chen, Shihong; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2016-05-15

    One-dimensional Pd-Au nanowires (Pd-Au NWs) were prepared and applied to fabricate an electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for the detection of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Compared with single-component of Pd or Au, the bimetallic nanocomposite of Pd-Au NWs offers a larger surface area for the immobilization of enzyme, and displays superior electrocatalytic activity and efficient electron transport capacity. In the presence of AChE and choline oxidase (ChOx), acetylcholine (ATCl) is hydrolyzed by AChE to generate thiocholine, then thiocholine is catalyzed by ChOx to produce H2O2 in situ, which serves as the coreactant to effectively enhance the ECL intensity in luminol-ECL system. The detection principle is based on the inhibited AChE and reactivated AChE as dual biomarkers, in which AChE was inhibited by organophosphorus (OP) agents, and then reactivated by obidoxime. Such dual biomarkers method can achieve credible evaluation for AChE activity via providing AChE activity before and after reactivation. The liner range for AChE activity detection was from 0.025 U L(-1) to 25 KU L(-1) with a low detection limit down to 0.0083 U L(-1). PMID:26686921

  4. Highly sensitive electrochemiluminescenc assay of acetylcholinesterase activity based on dual biomarkers using Pd-Au nanowires as immobilization platform.

    PubMed

    Ye, Cui; Wang, Min-Qiang; Zhong, Xia; Chen, Shihong; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2016-05-15

    One-dimensional Pd-Au nanowires (Pd-Au NWs) were prepared and applied to fabricate an electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for the detection of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Compared with single-component of Pd or Au, the bimetallic nanocomposite of Pd-Au NWs offers a larger surface area for the immobilization of enzyme, and displays superior electrocatalytic activity and efficient electron transport capacity. In the presence of AChE and choline oxidase (ChOx), acetylcholine (ATCl) is hydrolyzed by AChE to generate thiocholine, then thiocholine is catalyzed by ChOx to produce H2O2 in situ, which serves as the coreactant to effectively enhance the ECL intensity in luminol-ECL system. The detection principle is based on the inhibited AChE and reactivated AChE as dual biomarkers, in which AChE was inhibited by organophosphorus (OP) agents, and then reactivated by obidoxime. Such dual biomarkers method can achieve credible evaluation for AChE activity via providing AChE activity before and after reactivation. The liner range for AChE activity detection was from 0.025 U L(-1) to 25 KU L(-1) with a low detection limit down to 0.0083 U L(-1).

  5. Extracts from Traditional Chinese Medicinal Plants Inhibit Acetylcholinesterase, a Known Alzheimer's Disease Target.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Dorothea; Kaur Dogra, Anudeep; Tahrani, Ahmad; Herrmann, Florian; Wink, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a common treatment for early stages of the most general form of dementia, Alzheimer's Disease (AD). In this study, methanol, dichloromethane and aqueous crude extracts from 80 Traditional Chinese Medical (TCM) plants were tested for their in vitro anti-acetylcholinesterase activity based on Ellman's colorimetric assay. All three extracts of Berberis bealei (formerly Mahonia bealei), Coptis chinensis and Phellodendron chinense, which contain numerous isoquinoline alkaloids, substantially inhibited AChE. The methanol and aqueous extracts of Coptis chinensis showed IC50 values of 0.031 µg/mL and 2.5 µg/mL, therefore having an up to 100-fold stronger AChE inhibitory activity than the already known AChE inhibitor galantamine (IC50 = 4.33 µg/mL). Combinations of individual alkaloids berberine, coptisine and palmatine resulted in a synergistic enhancement of ACh inhibition. Therefore, the mode of AChE inhibition of crude extracts of Coptis chinensis, Berberis bealei and Phellodendron chinense is probably due to of this synergism of isoquinoline alkaloids. All extracts were also tested for their cytotoxicity in COS7 cells and none of the most active extracts was cytotoxic at the concentrations which inhibit AChE. Based on these results it can be stated that some TCM plants inhibit AChE via synergistic interaction of their secondary metabolites. The possibility to isolate pure lead compounds from the crude extracts or to administer these as nutraceuticals or as cheap alternative to drugs in third world countries make TCM plants a versatile source of natural inhibitors of AChE. PMID:27589716

  6. α5-nAChR modulates nicotine-induced cell migration and invasion in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haiji; Ma, Xiaoli

    2015-09-01

    Cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor in the development of human lung cancer. Nicotine, the major component in tobacco, not only contributes to carcinogenesis but also promotes tumor metastasis. By binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), nicotine induces the proliferation and migration of non-small cell lung cancer. Recently studies have indicated that α5-nAChR is highly associated with lung cancer risk and nicotine dependence. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether nicotine promotes the migration and invasion through activation of α5-nAChR in lung cancer. In the present study, A549 cell was exposed to 1μN nicotine for 8, 24 or 48h. Wound-healing assay and transwell assay were used to evaluate the capability of A549 cell migration and cell invasion, respectively. Silencing of α5-nAChR was done by siRNA. Western blotting and PCR were used to detect α5-nAChR expression. Nicotine can induce activation of α5-nAChR in association with increased migration and invasion of human lung cancer A549 cell. Treatment of cells with α5-nAChR specific siRNA blocks nicotine-stimulated activation of α5-nAChR and suppresses A549 cell migration and invasion. Reduction of α5-nAChR resulted in upregulation of E-cadherin, consistent with E-cadherin being inhibitive of cancer cell invasion. These findings suggest that nicotine-induced migration and invasion may occur in a mechanism through activation of α5-nAChR, which can contribute to metastasis or development of human lung cancer.

  7. A novel antifungal is active against Candida albicans biofilms and inhibits mutagenic acetaldehyde production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Mikko T; Novak-Frazer, Lily; Rautemaa, Vilma; Rajendran, Ranjith; Sorsa, Timo; Ramage, Gordon; Bowyer, Paul; Rautemaa, Riina

    2014-01-01

    The ability of C. albicans to form biofilms is a major virulence factor and a challenge for management. This is evident in biofilm-associated chronic oral-oesophageal candidosis, which has been shown to be potentially carcinogenic in vivo. We have previously shown that most Candida spp. can produce significant levels of mutagenic acetaldehyde (ACH). ACH is also an important mediator of candidal biofilm formation. We have also reported that D,L-2-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) significantly inhibits planktonic growth of C. albicans. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of HICA on C. albicans biofilm formation and ACH production in vitro. Inhibition of biofilm formation by HICA, analogous control compounds or caspofungin was measured using XTT to measure biofilm metabolic activity and PicoGreen as a marker of biomass. Biofilms were visualised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). ACH levels were measured by gas chromatography. Transcriptional changes in the genes involved in ACH metabolism were measured using RT-qPCR. The mean metabolic activity and biomass of all pre-grown (4, 24, 48 h) biofilms were significantly reduced after exposure to HICA (p<0.05) with the largest reductions seen at acidic pH. Caspofungin was mainly active against biofilms pre-grown for 4 h at neutral pH. Mutagenic levels (>40 µM) of ACH were detected in 24 and 48 h biofilms at both pHs. Interestingly, no ACH production was detected from D-glucose in the presence of HICA at acidic pH (p<0.05). Expression of genes responsible for ACH catabolism was up-regulated by HICA but down-regulated by caspofungin. SEM showed aberrant hyphae and collapsed hyphal structures during incubation with HICA at acidic pH. We conclude that HICA has potential as an antifungal agent with ability to inhibit C. albicans cell growth and biofilm formation. HICA also significantly reduces the mutagenic potential of C. albicans biofilms, which may be important when treating bacterial-fungal biofilm

  8. Highly Sensitive and Selective Immuno-capture/Electrochemical Assay of Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Red Blood Cells: A Biomarker of Exposure to Organophosphorus Pesticides and Nerve Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Aiqiong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-09

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity in red blood cells (RBCs) is a useful biomarker for biomonitoring of exposures to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and chemical nerve agents. In this paper, we reported a new method for AChE activity assay based on selective immuno-capture of AChE from biological samples followed by enzyme activity assay of captured AChE using a disposable electrochemical sensor. The electrochemical sensor is based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-gold nanocomposites (MWCNTs-Au) modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE). Upon the completion of immunoreaction, the target AChE (including active and inhibited) is captured onto the electrode surface and followed by an electrochemical detection of enzymatic activity in the presence of acetylthiocholine. A linear response is obtained over standard AChE concentration range from 0.1 to 10 nM. To demonstrate the capability of this new biomonitoring method, AChE solutions dosed with different concentration of paraoxon were used to validate the new AChE assay method. AChE inhibition in OP dosed solutions was proportional to its concentration from 0.2 to 50 nM. The new AChE activity assay method for biomonitoring of OP exposure was further validated with in-vitro paraoxon-dosed RBC samples. The established electrochemical sensing platform for AChE activity assay not only avoids the problem of overlapping substrate specificity with esterases by using selective antibody, but also eliminates potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It offers a new approach for sensitive, selective, and rapid AChE activity assay for biomonitoring of exposures to OPs.

  9. Altered GPI modification of insect AChE improves tolerance to organophosphate insecticides.

    PubMed

    Kakani, Evdoxia G; Bon, Suzanne; Massoulié, Jean; Mathiopoulos, Kostas D

    2011-03-01

    The olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae is the most destructive and intractable pest of olives. The management of B. oleae has been based on the use of organophosphate (OP) insecticides, a practice that induced resistance. OP-resistance in the olive fly was previously shown to be associated with two mutations in the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme that, apparently, hinder the entrance of the OP into the active site. The search for additional mutations in the ace gene that encodes AChE revealed a short deletion of three glutamines (Δ3Q) from a stretch of five glutamines, in the C-terminal peptide that is normally cleaved and substituted by a GPI anchor. We verified that AChEs from B. oleae and other Dipterans are actually GPI-anchored, although this is not predicted by the "big-PI" algorithm. The Δ3Q mutation shortens the unusually long hydrophilic spacer that follows the predicted GPI attachment site and may thus improve the efficiency of GPI anchor addition. We expressed the wild type B. oleae AChE, the natural mutant Δ3Q and a constructed mutant lacking all 5 consecutive glutamines (Δ5Q) in COS cells and compared their kinetic properties. All constructs presented identical K(m) and k(cat) values, in agreement with the fact that the mutations did not affect the catalytic domain of the enzyme. In contrast, the mutants produced higher AChE activity, suggesting that a higher proportion of the precursor protein becomes GPI-anchored. An increase in the number of GPI-anchored molecules in the synaptic cleft may reduce the sensitivity to insecticides.

  10. Response and recovery of acetylcholinesterase activity in freshwater shrimp, Paratya australiensis (Decapoda: Atyidae) exposed to selected anti-cholinesterase insecticides.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Doan, H; Barnes, Mary; Chapman, J C; Kookana, R S

    2010-10-01

    The toxicity of carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, dimethoate and profenofos to the freshwater shrimp, Paratya australiensis was assessed by measuring acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition after 96h exposures. Shrimp exposed to these pesticides exhibited significant AChE inhibition, with mortality in shrimp corresponding to 70-90% AChE inhibition. The sensitivity of P. australiensis to the four pesticides based on AChE inhibition can be given as chlorpyrifos > profenofos > carbaryl > dimethoate. Recovery of AChE activity was followed in shrimp after 96 h exposures to carbaryl, chlorpyrifos and dimethoate. Recovery after exposure to the carbamate pesticide carbaryl was more rapid than for the two organophosphorus pesticides, chlorpyrifos and dimethoate. The slow recovery of depressed AChE activity may mean that affected organisms in the natural system are unable to sustain physical activities such as searching for food or eluding predators. To investigate the ecological significance of AChE inhibition, chemotaxis behaviour was assessed in shrimp exposed to profenofos for 24h. Abnormal chemotaxis behaviour in the exposed shrimp was observed at concentrations representing 30-50% AChE inhibition. A clear relationship existed between the depression of AChE activity and observed chemotaxis responses, such as approaching and grasping the chemoattractant source. These results suggest that in vivo toxicity tests based on this specific biomarker are sensitive and present advantages over conventional acute tests based on mortality. Behavioural studies of test organisms conducted in conjunction with measurement of AChE inhibition will provide data to clarify the toxic effects caused by sublethal chemical concentrations of anti-cholinesterase compounds. PMID:20701973

  11. Procaine rapidly inactivates acetylcholine receptors from Torpedo and competes with agonist for inhibition sites

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.; Miller, K.W. )

    1989-02-21

    The relationship between the high-affinity procaine channel inhibition site and the agonist self-inhibition site on acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) from Torpedo electroplaque was investigated by using rapid {sup 86}Rb{sup +} quenched-flux assays at 4 {degree}C in native AChR-rich vesicles on which 50-60% of ACh activation sites were blocked with {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX). In the presence of channel-activating acetylcholine (ACh) concentrations alone, AChR undergoes one phase of inactivation in under a second. Addition of procaine produces two-phase inactivation similar to that seen with self-inhibiting ACh concentrations rapid inactivation complete in 30-75 ms is followed by fast desensitization at the same k{sub d} observed without procaine. The dependence of k{sub r} on (procaine) is consistent with a bimolecular association between procaine and its AChR site. Inhibition of AChR function by mixtures of procaine plus self-inhibiting concentrations of ACh or suberyldicholine was studied by reducing the level of {alpha}-BTX block in vesicles. The data support a mechanism where procaine binds preferentially to the open-channel AChR state, since no procaine-induced inactivation is observed without agonist and k{sub r}'s dependence on (ACh) in channel-activating range closely parallels that of {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux response to ACh.

  12. Discovery of New Classes of Compounds that Reactivate Acetylcholinesterase Inhibited by Organophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Laura; Zhu, Zhengxiang; Ton-That, Long; Luzac, Michal; Zlatanic, Viktor; Damera, Shivani; Macdonald, Joanne; Landry, Donald W.; Tong, Liang; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) that has been covalently inhibited by organophosphate compounds (OPCs), such as nerve agents and pesticides, has traditionally been reactivated by using nucleophilic oximes. There is, however, a clearly recognized need for new classes of compounds with the ability to reactivate inhibited AChE with improved in vivo efficacy. Here we describe our discovery of new functional groups—Mannich phenols and general bases—that are capable of reactivating OPC-inhibited AChE more efficiently than standard oximes and we describe the cooperative mechanism by which these functionalities are delivered to the active site. These discoveries, supported by preliminary in vivo results and crystallographic data, significantly broaden the available approaches for reactivation of AChE. PMID:26350723

  13. Effects of acetylcholinesterase gene silencing on its activity in cultured human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Mis, Katarina; Mars, Tomaz; Golicnik, Marko; Jevsek, Marko; Grubic, Zoran

    2006-01-01

    In spite of several reports demonstrating that acetylcholinesterase (AChE [EC 3.1.1.7]) expression is importantly regulated at the level of its mRNA, we still know little about the relationship between AChE mRNA level and the level of mature, catalytically active enzyme in the cell. Better insight into this relationship is, however, essential for our understanding of the molecular pathways underlying AChE synthesis in living cells. We have approached this problem previously (Grubic et al., 1995; Brank et al., 1998; Mis et al., 2003; Jevsek et al., 2004); however, recently introduced small interfering RNA (siRNA) methodology, which allows blockade of gene expression at the mRNA level, opens new possibilities in approaching the AChE mRNA-AChE activity relationship. With this technique one can eliminate AChE mRNA in the cell, specifically and at selected times, and follow the effects of such treatment at the mature enzyme level. In this study we followed AChE activity in siRNA-treated cultured human myoblasts. Our aim was to find out how the temporal profile of the AChE mRNA decrease is reflected at the level of AChE activity under normal conditions and after inhibition of preexisting AChE by diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate (DFP).AChE activity was determined at selected time intervals after siRNA treatment in both myoblast homogenates and in culture medium to follow the effects of siRNA treatment at the level of intracellular AChE synthesis and at the level of AChE secreted from the cell.

  14. Dose-limiting inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by ladostigil results from the rapid formation and fast hydrolysis of the drug-enzyme complex formed by its major metabolite, R-MCPAI.

    PubMed

    Moradov, Dorit; Finkin-Groner, Efrat; Bejar, Corina; Sunita, Priyashree; Schorer-Apelbaum, Donna; Barasch, Dinorah; Nemirovski, Alina; Cohen, Marganit; Weinstock, Marta

    2015-03-15

    Ladostigil is a pseudo reversible inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) that differs from other carbamates in that the maximal enzyme inhibition obtainable does not exceed 50-55%. This could explain the low incidence of cholinergic adverse effects induced by ladostigil in rats and human subjects. The major metabolite, R-MCPAI is believed to be responsible for AChE inhibition by ladostigil in vivo. Therefore we determined whether the ceiling in AChE inhibition resulted from a limit in the metabolism of ladostigil to R-MCPAI by liver microsomal enzymes, or from the kinetics of enzyme inhibition by R-MCPAI. Ladostigil reduces TNF-α in lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia. In vivo, it may also reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines by inhibiting AChE and increasing the action of ACh on macrophages and splenic lymphocytes. We also assessed the contribution of AChE inhibition in the spleen of LPS-injected mice to the anti-inflammatory effect of ladostigil. As in other species, AChE inhibition by ladostigil in spleen, brain and plasma did not exceed 50-55%. Since levels of R-MCPAI increased with increasing doses of ladostigil we concluded that there was no dose or rate limitation of metabolism. The kinetics of enzyme inhibition by R-MCPAI are characterized by a rapid formation of the drug-enzyme complex and fast hydrolysis which limits the attainable degree of AChE inhibition. Ladostigil and its metabolites (1-100 nM) decreased TNF-α in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages. Ladostigil (5 and 10mg/kg) also reduced TNF-α in the spleen after injection of lipopolysaccharide in mice. However, AChE inhibition contributed to the anti-inflammatory effect only at a dose of 10mg/kg.

  15. Inhibition and Larvicidal Activity of Phenylpropanoids from Piper sarmentosum on Acetylcholinesterase against Mosquito Vectors and Their Binding Mode of Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Hematpoor, Arshia; Liew, Sook Yee; Chong, Wei Lim; Azirun, Mohd Sofian; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Awang, Khalijah

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus are vectors of dengue fever and West Nile virus diseases. This study was conducted to determine the toxicity, mechanism of action and the binding interaction of three active phenylpropanoids from Piper sarmentosum (Piperaceae) toward late 3rd or early 4th larvae of above vectors. A bioassay guided-fractionation on the hexane extract from the roots of Piper sarmentosum led to the isolation and identification of three active phenylpropanoids; asaricin 1, isoasarone 2 and trans-asarone 3. The current study involved evaluation of the toxicity and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition of these compounds against Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 were highly potent against Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae causing up to 100% mortality at ≤ 15 μg/mL concentration. The ovicidal activity of asaricin 1, isoasarone 2 and trans-asarone 3 were evaluated through egg hatching. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 showed potent ovicidal activity. Ovicidal activity for both compounds was up to 95% at 25μg/mL. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 showed strong inhibition on acetylcholinesterase with relative IC50 values of 0.73 to 1.87 μg/mL respectively. These findings coupled with the high AChE inhibition may suggest that asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 are neuron toxic compounds toward Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus. Further computational docking with Autodock Vina elaborates the possible interaction of asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 with three possible binding sites of AChE which includes catalytic triads (CAS: S238, E367, H480), the peripheral sites (PAS: E72, W271) and anionic binding site (W83). The binding affinity of asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 were relatively strong with asaricin 1 showed a higher binding affinity in the anionic pocket. PMID:27152416

  16. Calcium-activated butyrylcholinesterase in human skin protects acetylcholinesterase against suicide inhibition by neurotoxic organophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Schallreuter, Karin U.; University of Bradford ). E-mail: K.Schallreuter@bradford.ac.uk; Gibbons, Nicholas C.J.; Elwary, Souna M.; Parkin, Susan M.; Wood, John M.

    2007-04-20

    The human epidermis holds an autocrine acetylcholine production and degradation including functioning membrane integrated and cytosolic butyrylcholinesterase (BuchE). Here we show that BuchE activities increase 9-fold in the presence of calcium (0.5 x 10{sup -3}M) via a specific EF-hand calcium binding site, whereas acetylcholinesterase (AchE) is not affected. {sup 45}Calcium labelling and computer simulation confirmed the presence of one EF-hand binding site per subunit which is disrupted by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation. Moreover, we confirmed the faster hydrolysis by calcium-activated BuchE using the neurotoxic organophosphate O-ethyl-O-(4-nitrophenyl)-phenylphosphonothioate (EPN). Considering the large size of the human skin with 1.8 m{sup 2} surface area with its calcium gradient in the 10{sup -3}M range, our results implicate calcium-activated BuchE as a major protective mechanism against suicide inhibition of AchE by organophosphates in this non-neuronal tissue.

  17. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and cytochrome oxidase activity in Fasciola gigantica cercaria by phytoconstituents.

    PubMed

    Sunita, Kumari; Habib, Maria; Kumar, P; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Husain, Syed Akhtar; Singh, D K

    2016-02-01

    Fasciolosis is an important cattle and human disease caused by Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. One of the possible methods to control this problem is to interrupt the life cycle of Fasciola by killing its larva (redia and cercaria) in host snail. Molecular identification of cercaria larva of F. gigantica was done by comparing the nucleotide sequencing with adult F. gigantica. It was noted that nucleotide sequencing of cercaria larva and adult F. gigantica were 99% same. Every month during the year 2011-2012, in vivo treatment with 60% of 4 h LC50 of phyto cercaricides citral, ferulic acid, umbelliferone, azadirachtin and allicin caused significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and cytochrome oxidase activity in the treated cercaria larva of F. gigantica. Whereas, activity of both enzymes were not significantly altered in the nervous tissues of vector snail Lymnaea acuminata exposed to same treatments. Maximum reduction in AChE (1.35% of control in month of June) and cytochrome oxidase (3.71% of control in the month of July) activity were noted in the cercaria exposed to 60% of 4 h LC50 of azadirachtin and allicin, respectively. PMID:26536397

  18. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and cytochrome oxidase activity in Fasciola gigantica cercaria by phytoconstituents.

    PubMed

    Sunita, Kumari; Habib, Maria; Kumar, P; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Husain, Syed Akhtar; Singh, D K

    2016-02-01

    Fasciolosis is an important cattle and human disease caused by Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. One of the possible methods to control this problem is to interrupt the life cycle of Fasciola by killing its larva (redia and cercaria) in host snail. Molecular identification of cercaria larva of F. gigantica was done by comparing the nucleotide sequencing with adult F. gigantica. It was noted that nucleotide sequencing of cercaria larva and adult F. gigantica were 99% same. Every month during the year 2011-2012, in vivo treatment with 60% of 4 h LC50 of phyto cercaricides citral, ferulic acid, umbelliferone, azadirachtin and allicin caused significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and cytochrome oxidase activity in the treated cercaria larva of F. gigantica. Whereas, activity of both enzymes were not significantly altered in the nervous tissues of vector snail Lymnaea acuminata exposed to same treatments. Maximum reduction in AChE (1.35% of control in month of June) and cytochrome oxidase (3.71% of control in the month of July) activity were noted in the cercaria exposed to 60% of 4 h LC50 of azadirachtin and allicin, respectively.

  19. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene modification in transgenic animals: functional consequences of selected exon and regulatory region deletion.

    PubMed

    Camp, Shelley; Zhang, Limin; Marquez, Michael; de la Torre, Brian; Long, Jeffery M; Bucht, Goran; Taylor, Palmer

    2005-12-15

    . delaTorre, P. Taylor, Knockout mice with deletions of alternatively spliced exons of Acetylcholinesterase, in: N.C. Inestrosa, E.O. Campus (Eds.), VII International Meeting on Cholinesterases, Pucon-Chile Cholinesterases in the Second Millennium: Biomolecular and Pathological Aspects. P. Universidad Catholica de Chile-FONDAP Biomedicina, 2004, pp. 43-48; R.Y.Y. Chan, C. Boudreau-Larivière, L.A. Angus, F. Mankal, B.J. Jasmin, An intronic enhancer containing an N-box motif is required for synapse- and tissue-specific expression of the acetylcholinesterase gene in skeletal muscle fibers. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96 (1999) 4627-4632], is also presented. The intronic region was floxed and then deleted by mating with Ella-cre transgenic mice. The deletion of this region produced a dramatic phenotype; a mouse with near normal AChE expression in brain and other CNS tissues, but no AChE expression in muscle. Phenotype and AChE tissue activities are compared with the total AChE knockout mouse [W. Xie, J.A. Chatonnet, P.J. Wilder, A. Rizzino, R.D. McComb, P. Taylor, S.H. Hinrichs, O. Lockridge, Postnatal developmental delay and supersensitivity to organophosphate in gene-targeted mice lacking acetylcholinesterase. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 293 (3) (2000) 896-902].

  20. Anti-listeria activity of poly(lactic acid)/sawdust particle biocomposite film impregnated with pediocin PA-1/AcH and its use in raw sliced pork.

    PubMed

    Woraprayote, Weerapong; Kingcha, Yutthana; Amonphanpokin, Pannawit; Kruenate, Jittiporn; Zendo, Takeshi; Sonomoto, Kenji; Benjakul, Soottawat; Visessanguan, Wonnop

    2013-10-15

    A novel poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/sawdust particle (SP) biocomposite film with anti-listeria activity was developed by incorporation of pediocin PA-1/AcH (Ped) using diffusion coating method. Sawdust particle played an important role in embedding pediocin into the hydrophobic PLA film. The anti-listeria activity of the PLA/SP biocomposite film incorporated with Ped (PLA/SP+Ped) was detected, while no activity against the tested pathogen was observed for the control PLA films (without SP and/or Ped). Dry-heat treatment of film before coating with Ped resulted in the highest Ped adsorption (11.63 ± 3.07 μg protein/cm(2)) and the highest anti-listeria activity. A model study of PLA/SP+Ped as a food-contact antimicrobial packaging on raw sliced pork suggests a potential inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes (99% of total listerial population) on raw sliced pork during the chilled storage. This study supports the feasibility of using PLA/SP+Ped film to reduce the initial load of L. monocytogenes on the surface of raw pork.

  1. Enzyme Inhibition by Molluscicidal Components of Myristica fragrans Houtt. in the Nervous Tissue of Snail Lymnaea acuminata.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Preetee; Kumar, Pradeep; Singh, V K; Singh, D K

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of molluscicidal components of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (Myristicaceae) on certain enzymes in the nervous tissue of freshwater snail Lymnaea acuminata Lamarck (Lymnaeidae). In vivo and in vitro treatments of trimyristin and myristicin (active molluscicidal components of Myristica fragrans Houtt.) significantly inhibited the acetylcholinesterase (AChE), acid and alkaline phosphatase (ACP/ALP) activities in the nervous tissue of Lymnaea acuminata. The inhibition kinetics of these enzymes indicates that both the trimyristin and myristicin caused competitive noncompetitive inhibition of AChE. Trimyristin caused uncompetitive and competitive/noncompetitive inhibitions of ACP and ALP, respectively whereas the myristicin caused competitive and uncompetitive inhibition of ACP and ALP, respectively. Thus results from the present study suggest that inhibition of AChE, ACP, and ALP by trimyristin and myristicin in the snail Lymnaea acuminata may be the cause of the molluscicidal activity of Myristica fragrans.

  2. Impacts of oxidative stress on acetylcholinesterase transcription, and activity in embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) following Chlorpyrifos exposure.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Fuentes, Gabriela; Rubio-Escalante, Fernando J; Noreña-Barroso, Elsa; Escalante-Herrera, Karla S; Schlenk, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate pesticides cause irreversible inhibition of AChE which leads to neuronal overstimulation and death. Thus, dogma indicates that the target of OP pesticides is AChE, but many authors postulate that these compounds also disturb cellular redox processes, and change the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Interestingly, it has also been reported that oxidative stress plays also a role in the regulation and activity of AChE. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of the antioxidant, vitamin C (VC), the oxidant, t-butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH) and the organophosphate Chlorpyrifos (CPF), on AChE gene transcription and activity in zebrafish embryos after 72h exposure. In addition, oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring antioxidant enzymes activities and transcription, and quantification of total glutathione. Apical effects on the development of zebrafish embryos were also measured. With the exception of AChE inhibition and enhanced gene expression, limited effects of CPF on oxidative stress and apical endpoints were found at this developmental stage. Addition of VC had little effect on oxidative stress or AChE, but increased pericardial area and heartbeat rate through an unknown mechanism. TBOOH diminished AChE gene expression and activity, and caused oxidative stress when administered alone. However, in combination with CPF, only reductions in AChE activity were observed with no significant changes in oxidative stress suggesting the adverse apical endpoints in the embryos may have been due to AChE inhibition by CPF rather than oxidative stress. These results give additional evidence to support the role of prooxidants in AChE activity and expression.

  3. Gastrointestinal acetylcholinesterase activity following endotracheal microinstillation inhalation exposure to sarin in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Soma; Song, Jian; Rezk, Peter; Sabnekar, Praveena; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Sciuto, Alfred M; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2010-09-01

    The goal of this study was to assess acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition at different regions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract following inhalation exposure to nerve agent sarin. Seven major regions of the GI tract were removed from saline control animals (n=3) and 677.4 mg/m(3) sarin-exposed animals at 4h (n=4) and 24h (n=4) post-exposure. AChE activity was determined in blood and homogenized tissue supernatant by specific Ellman's assay using Iso-OMPA, a BChE inhibitor, and expressed as activity/optical density of hemoglobin for blood and activity/mg protein for tissues. Our data showed that the AChE activity was significantly decreased for groups both 4h and 24h post-sarin exposure. Among the seven chosen regions of the guinea pig GI tract, duodenum showed the highest AChE activity in control animals. The AChE activity was significantly decreased in the stomach (p=0.03), duodenum (p=0.029), jejunum (p=0.006), and ileum (p=0.006) 4h following sarin exposure. At 24h post-sarin exposure the AChE activity of duodenum (p=0.029) and ileum (p=0.006) was significantly inhibited. Esophagus showed no inhibition following sarin exposure at both 4h and 24h groups. These results suggest that the AChE activity is different in different regions of the GI tract and highest levels of AChE inhibition following sarin exposure were seen in regions exhibiting higher overall AChE activity and cholinergic function.

  4. Functional Human α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Generated from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tillman, Tommy S; Alvarez, Frances J D; Reinert, Nathan J; Liu, Chuang; Wang, Dawei; Xu, Yan; Xiao, Kunhong; Zhang, Peijun; Tang, Pei

    2016-08-26

    Human Cys-loop receptors are important therapeutic targets. High-resolution structures are essential for rational drug design, but only a few are available due to difficulties in obtaining sufficient quantities of protein suitable for structural studies. Although expression of proteins in E. coli offers advantages of high yield, low cost, and fast turnover, this approach has not been thoroughly explored for full-length human Cys-loop receptors because of the conventional wisdom that E. coli lacks the specific chaperones and post-translational modifications potentially required for expression of human Cys-loop receptors. Here we report the successful production of full-length wild type human α7nAChR from E. coli Chemically induced chaperones promote high expression levels of well-folded proteins. The choice of detergents, lipids, and ligands during purification determines the final protein quality. The purified α7nAChR not only forms pentamers as imaged by negative-stain electron microscopy, but also retains pharmacological characteristics of native α7nAChR, including binding to bungarotoxin and positive allosteric modulators specific to α7nAChR. Moreover, the purified α7nAChR injected into Xenopus oocytes can be activated by acetylcholine, choline, and nicotine, inhibited by the channel blockers QX-222 and phencyclidine, and potentiated by the α7nAChR specific modulators PNU-120596 and TQS. The successful generation of functional human α7nAChR from E. coli opens a new avenue for producing mammalian Cys-loop receptors to facilitate structure-based rational drug design. PMID:27385587

  5. In Vitro Activity of ACH-702, a New Isothiazoloquinolone, against Nocardia brasiliensis Compared with Econazole and the Carbapenems Imipenem and Meropenem Alone or in Combination with Clavulanic Acid ▿

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Campos-Rivera, Mayra Paola; Escalante-Fuentes, Wendy G.; Pucci, Michael J.; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Welsh, Oliverio

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro activities of ACH-702 and other antimicrobials against 30 Nocardia brasiliensis isolates were tested. The MIC50 (MIC for 50% of the strains tested) and MIC90 values of ACH-702 were 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml. The same values for econazole were 2 and 4 μg/ml. The MIC50 and MIC90 values of imipenem and meropenem were 64 and >64 μg/ml and 2 and 8 μg/ml, respectively; the addition of clavulanic acid to the carbapenems had no effect. PMID:20308390

  6. Toxicological and Biochemical Characterizations of AChE in Phosalone-Susceptible and Resistant Populations of the Common Pistachio Psyllid, Agonoscena pistaciae

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Ali; Talebi-Jahromi, Khalil; Hosseininaveh, Vahid; Ghadamyari, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The toxicological and biochemical characteristics of acetylcholinesterases (AChE) in nine populations of the common pistachio psyllid, Agonoscena pistaciae Burckhardt and Lauterer (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), were investigated in Kerman Province, Iran. Nine A. pistaciae populations were collected from pistachio orchards, Pistacia vera L. (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae), located in Rafsanjan, Anar, Bam, Kerman, Shahrbabak, Herat, Sirjan, Pariz, and Paghaleh regions of Kerman province. The previous bioassay results showed these populations were susceptible or resistant to phosalone, and the Rafsanjan population was most resistant, with a resistance ratio of 11.3. The specific activity of AChE in the Rafsanjan population was significantly higher than in the susceptible population (Bam). The affinity (KM) and hydrolyzing efficiency (Vmax) of AChE on acetylthiocholine iodide, butyrylthiocholine iodide, and propionylthiocholine odide as artificial substrates were clearly lower in the Bam population than that in the Rafsanjan population. These results indicated that the AChE of the Rafsanjan population had lower affinity to these substrates than that of the susceptible population. The higher Vmax value in the Rafsanjan population compared to the susceptible population suggests a possible over expression of AChE in the Rafsanjan population. The in vitro inhibitory effect of several organophosphates and carbamates on AChE of the Rafsanjan and Bam populations was determined. Based on I50, the results showed that the ratios of AChE insensitivity of the resistant to susceptible populations were 23 and 21.7-fold to monocrotophos and phosphamidon, respectively. Whereas, the insensitivity ratios for Rafsanjan population were 0.86, 0.8, 0.78, 0.46, and 0.43 for carbaryl, eserine, propoxur, m-tolyl methyl carbamate, and carbofuran, respectively, suggesting negatively correlated sensitivity to organophosphate-insensitive AChE. Therefore, AChE from the Rafsanjan population showed negatively

  7. Toxicological and biochemical characterizations of AChE in phosalone-susceptible and resistant populations of the common pistachio psyllid, Agonoscena pistaciae.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Ali; Talebi-Jahromi, Khalil; Hosseininaveh, Vahid; Ghadamyari, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The toxicological and biochemical characteristics of acetylcholinesterases (AChE) in nine populations of the common pistachio psyllid, Agonoscena pistaciae Burckhardt and Lauterer (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), were investigated in Kerman Province, Iran. Nine A. pistaciae populations were collected from pistachio orchards, Pistacia vera L. (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae), located in Rafsanjan, Anar, Bam, Kerman, Shahrbabak, Herat, Sirjan, Pariz, and Paghaleh regions of Kerman province. The previous bioassay results showed these populations were susceptible or resistant to phosalone, and the Rafsanjan population was most resistant, with a resistance ratio of 11.3. The specific activity of AChE in the Rafsanjan population was significantly higher than in the susceptible population (Bam). The affinity (K(M)) and hydrolyzing efficiency (Vmax) of AChE on acetylthiocholine iodide, butyrylthiocholine iodide, and propionylthiocholine odide as artificial substrates were clearly lower in the Bam population than that in the Rafsanjan population. These results indicated that the AChE of the Rafsanjan population had lower affinity to these substrates than that of the susceptible population. The higher Vmax value in the Rafsanjan population compared to the susceptible population suggests a possible over expression of AChE in the Rafsanjan population. The in vitro inhibitory effect of several organophosphates and carbamates on AChE of the Rafsanjan and Bam populations was determined. Based on I50, the results showed that the ratios of AChE insensitivity of the resistant to susceptible populations were 23 and 21.7-fold to monocrotophos and phosphamidon, respectively. Whereas, the insensitivity ratios for Rafsanjan population were 0.86, 0.8, 0.78, 0.46, and 0.43 for carbaryl, eserine, propoxur, m-tolyl methyl carbamate, and carbofuran, respectively, suggesting negatively correlated sensitivity to organophosphate-insensitive AChE. Therefore, AChE from the Rafsanjan population showed negatively

  8. Fucoxanthin, a Marine Carotenoid, Reverses Scopolamine-Induced Cognitive Impairments in Mice and Inhibits Acetylcholinesterase in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiajia; Huang, Ling; Yu, Jie; Xiang, Siying; Wang, Jialing; Zhang, Jinrong; Yan, Xiaojun; Cui, Wei; He, Shan; Wang, Qinwen

    2016-01-01

    Fucoxanthin, a natural carotenoid abundant in edible brown seaweeds, has been shown to possess anti-cancer, anti-oxidant, anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects. In this study, we report for the first time that fucoxanthin effectively protects against scopolamine-induced cognitive impairments in mice. In addition, fucoxanthin significantly reversed the scopolamine-induced increase of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and decreased both choline acetyltransferase activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression. Using an in vitro AChE activity assay, we discovered that fucoxanthin directly inhibits AChE with an IC50 value of 81.2 μM. Molecular docking analysis suggests that fucoxanthin likely interacts with the peripheral anionic site within AChE, which is in accordance with enzymatic activity results showing that fucoxanthin inhibits AChE in a non-competitive manner. Based on our current findings, we anticipate that fucoxanthin might exhibit great therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease by acting on multiple targets, including inhibiting AChE and increasing BDNF expression. PMID:27023569

  9. Novel nonquaternary reactivators showing reactivation efficiency for soman-inhibited human acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhao; Liu, Yan-Qin; Wang, Yong-An; Li, Wan-Hua; Zhou, Xin-Bo; Zhao, Jian; Huang, Chun-Qian; Li, Xing-Zhou; Liu, Jia; Zheng, Zhi-Bing; Li, Song

    2016-03-30

    Soman is a highly toxic nerve agent with strong inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but of the few reactivators showing antidotal efficiency for soman-inhibited AChE presently are all permanently charged cationic oximes with poor penetration of the blood-brain barrier. To overcome this problem, uncharged reactivators have been designed and synthesized, but few of them were efficient for treating soman poisoning. Herein, we used a dual site biding strategy to develop more efficient uncharged reactivators. The ortho-hydroxylbenzaldoximes were chosen as reactivation ligands of AChE to prevent the secondary poisoning of AChE, and simple aromatic groups were used as peripheral site ligands of AChE, which were linked to the oximes in a similar way as that found in the reactivator HI-6. The in vitro experiment demonstrated that some of the resulting conjugates have robust activity against soman-inhibited AChE, and oxime 8b was highlighted as the most efficient one. Although not good as HI-6 in vitro, these new compounds hold promise for development of more efficient centrally acting reactivators for soman poisoning due to their novel nonquaternary structures, which are predicted to be able to cross the blood-brain barrier. PMID:26809136

  10. A fluorescence assay for measuring acetylcholinesterase activity in rat blood and a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y).

    PubMed

    Santillo, Michael F; Liu, Yitong

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an enzyme responsible for metabolism of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and inhibition of AChE can have therapeutic applications (e.g., drugs for Alzheimer's disease) or neurotoxic consequences (e.g., pesticides). A common absorbance-based AChE activity assay that uses 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) can have limited sensitivity and be prone to interference. Therefore, an alternative assay was developed, in which AChE activity was determined by measuring fluorescence of resorufin produced from coupled enzyme reactions involving acetylcholine and Amplex Red (10-acetyl-3,7-dihydroxyphenoxazine). The Amplex Red assay was used for two separate applications. First, AChE activity was measured in rat whole blood, which is a biomarker for exposure to AChE inhibitor pesticides. Activity was quantified from a 10(5)-fold dilution of whole blood, and there was a linear correlation between Amplex Red and DTNB assays. For the second application, Amplex Red assay was used to measure AChE inhibition potency in a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y), which is important for assessing pharmacological and toxicological potential of AChE inhibitors including drugs, phytochemicals, and pesticides. Five known reversible inhibitors were evaluated (IC50, 7-225 nM), along with irreversible inhibitors chlorpyrifos-oxon (ki=1.01 nM(-1)h(-1)) and paraoxon (ki=0.16 nM(-1)h(-1)). Lastly, in addition to inhibition, AChE reactivation was measured in SH-SY5Y cells incubated with pralidoxime chloride (2-PAM). The Amplex Red assay is a sensitive, specific, and reliable fluorescence method for measuring AChE activity in both rat whole blood and cultured SH-SY5Y cells. PMID:26165232

  11. Three-dimensional ordered macroporous (3DOM) composite for electrochemical study on acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by endogenous neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yingqiao; Fu, Ying; Xu, Lili; Lin, Bin; Wang, Zhongchuan; Xu, Zhiai; Jin, Litong; Zhang, Wen

    2012-09-13

    In this paper, an electrochemical acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition assay based on three-dimensional ordered macroporous (3DOM) composite was conducted. The 3DOM composite was first fabricated on the glassy carbon electrode by electropolymerization of aniline in the presence of ionic liquid (IL) on a sacrificial silica nanospheres template. After the silica nanospheres were etched, an IL-doped polyaniline (IL-PANI) film with 3DOM morphology was formed. Then, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were decorated on the IL-PANI film by electrodeposition. The immobilized AChE on the 3DOM composite displayed favorable affinity to substrate acetylthiocholine chloride (ATCh), and the 3DOM composite showed excellent electrocatalytic effect on thiocholine, the hydrolysis product of ATCh. The presence of IL and AuNPs could improve the sensitivity by accelerating the electron transfer. The designed AChE biosensor was successfully applied to evaluate the AChE inhibition induced by endogenous neurotoxin 1(R),2N-dimethyl-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline [(R)-NMSal]. The results demonstrate that (R)-NMSal exerts a considerable effect on AChE activity, and the inhibition is reversible. The developed method offers a new approach for AChE inhibition assay, which is of great benefit in understanding the mechanism behind neurotoxin-induced neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Combined 3D-QSAR, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics study of tacrine derivatives as potential acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, An; Hu, Jianping; Wang, Lirong; Zhong, Guochen; Pan, Jian; Wu, Zeyu; Hui, Ailing

    2015-10-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is one of the key targets of drugs for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tacrine is an approved drug with AChE-inhibitory activity. In this paper, 3D-QSAR, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics were carried out in order to study 60 tacrine derivatives and their AChE-inhibitory activities. 3D-QSAR modeling resulted in an optimal CoMFA model with q(2) = 0.552 and r(2) = 0.983 and an optimal CoMSIA model with q(2) = 0.581 and r(2) = 0.989. These QSAR models also showed that the steric and H-bond fields of these compounds are important influences on their activities. The interactions between these inhibitors and AChE were further explored through molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. A few key residues (Tyr70, Trp84, Tyr121, Trp279, and Phe330) at the binding site of AChE were identified. The results of this study improve our understanding of the mechanisms of AChE inhibitors and afford valuable information that should aid the design of novel potential AChE inhibitors. Graphical Abstract Superposition of backbone atoms of the lowest-energy structure obtained from MD simulation (magenta) onto those of the structure of the initial molecular docking model (green).

  13. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Dependent Chorda Tympani Taste Nerve Responses to Nicotine, Ethanol and Acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zuo Jun; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Qian, Jie; Baumgarten, Clive M; DeSimone, John A; Lyall, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine elicits bitter taste by activating TRPM5-dependent and TRPM5-independent but neuronal nAChR-dependent pathways. The nAChRs represent common targets at which acetylcholine, nicotine and ethanol functionally interact in the central nervous system. Here, we investigated if the nAChRs also represent a common pathway through which the bitter taste of nicotine, ethanol and acetylcholine is transduced. To this end, chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve responses were monitored in rats, wild-type mice and TRPM5 knockout (KO) mice following lingual stimulation with nicotine free base, ethanol, and acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of nAChR agonists and antagonists. The nAChR modulators: mecamylamine, dihydro-β-erythroidine, and CP-601932 (a partial agonist of the α3β4* nAChR), inhibited CT responses to nicotine, ethanol, and acetylcholine. CT responses to nicotine and ethanol were also inhibited by topical lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio (CPT)-cAMP and loading taste cells with [Ca2+]i by topical lingual application of ionomycin + CaCl2. In contrast, CT responses to nicotine were enhanced when TRC [Ca2+]i was reduced by topical lingual application of BAPTA-AM. In patch-clamp experiments, only a subset of isolated rat fungiform taste cells exposed to nicotine responded with an increase in mecamylamine-sensitive inward currents. We conclude that nAChRs expressed in a subset of taste cells serve as common receptors for the detection of the TRPM5-independent bitter taste of nicotine, acetylcholine and ethanol.

  14. Ligand Binding at the α4-α4 Agonist-Binding Site of the α4β2 nAChR Triggers Receptor Activation through a Pre-Activated Conformational State

    PubMed Central

    Indurthi, Dinesh C.; Lewis, Trevor M.; Ahring, Philip K.; Balle, Thomas; Chebib, Mary; Absalom, Nathan L.

    2016-01-01

    The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the most abundant subtype in the brain and exists in two functional stoichiometries: (α4)3(β2)2 and (α4)2(β2)3. A distinct feature of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor is the biphasic activation response to the endogenous agonist acetylcholine, where it is activated with high potency and low efficacy when two α4-β2 binding sites are occupied and with low potency/high efficacy when a third α4-α4 binding site is occupied. Further, exogenous ligands can bind to the third α4-α4 binding site and potentiate the activation of the receptor by ACh that is bound at the two α4-β2 sites. We propose that perturbations of the recently described pre-activation step when a third binding site is occupied are a key driver of these distinct activation properties. To investigate this, we used a combination of simple linear kinetic models and voltage clamp electrophysiology to determine whether transitions into the pre-activated state were increased when three binding sites were occupied. We separated the binding at the two different sites with ligands selective for the α4-β2 site (Sazetidine-A and TC-2559) and the α4-α4 site (NS9283) and identified that when a third binding site was occupied, changes in the concentration-response curves were best explained by an increase in transitions into a pre-activated state. We propose that perturbations of transitions into a pre-activated state are essential to explain the activation properties of the (α4)3(β2)2 receptor by acetylcholine and other ligands. Considering the widespread clinical use of benzodiazepines, this discovery of a conserved mechanism that benzodiazepines and ACh potentiate receptor activation via a third binding site can be exploited to develop therapeutics with similar properties at other cys-loop receptors. PMID:27552221

  15. Fetal muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation in TE-671 cells and inhibition of fetal movement in a day 40 pregnant goat model by optical isomers of the piperidine alkaloid coniine.

    PubMed

    Green, Benedict T; Lee, Stephen T; Welch, Kevin D; Pfister, James A; Panter, Kip E

    2013-01-01

    Coniine is an optically active toxic piperidine alkaloid and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist found in poison hemlock (Conium maculatum L.). Coniine teratogenicity is hypothesized to be attributable to the binding, activation, and prolonged desensitization of fetal muscle-type nAChR, which results in the complete inhibition of fetal movement. However, pharmacological evidence of coniine actions at fetal muscle-type nAChR is lacking. The present study compared (-)-coniine, (+)-coniine, and nicotine for the ability to inhibit fetal movement in a day 40 pregnant goat model and in TE-671 cells that express fetal muscle-type nAChR. Furthermore, α-conotoxins (CTx) EI and GI were used to antagonize the actions of (+)- and (-)-coniine in TE-671 cells. (-)-Coniine was more effective at eliciting electrical changes in TE-671 cells and inhibiting fetal movement than was (+)-coniine, suggesting stereoselectivity by the receptor. The pyridine alkaloid nicotine did not inhibit fetal movement in a day 40 pregnant goat model, suggesting agonist specificity for the inhibition of fetal movement. Low concentrations of both CTxs potentiated the TE-671 cell response and higher concentrations of CTx EI, and GI antagonized the actions of both coniine enantiomers demonstrating concentration-dependent coagonism and selective antagonism. These results provide pharmacological evidence that the piperidine alkaloid coniine is acting at fetal muscle-type nAChR in a concentration-dependent manner.

  16. Neurophysiological predictors of long term response to AChE inhibitors in AD patients

    PubMed Central

    Di, L; Oliviero, A; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Marra, C; Ghirlanda, S; Ranieri, F; Gainotti, G; Tonali, P

    2005-01-01

    Background: In vivo evaluation of cholinergic circuits of the human brain has recently been introduced using a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol based on coupling peripheral nerve stimulation with motor cortex TMS (short latency afferent inhibition, SAI). SAI is reduced in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and drugs enhancing cholinergic transmission increase SAI. Methods: We evaluated whether SAI testing, together with SAI test-retest, after a single dose of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor rivastigmine, might be useful in predicting the response after 1 year treatment with rivastigmine in 16 AD patients. Results: Fourteen AD patients had pathologically reduced SAI. SAI was increased after administration of a single oral dose of rivastigmine in AD patients with abnormal baseline SAI, but individual responses to rivastigmine varied widely, with SAI change ranging from an increase in inhibition of ∼50% of test size to no change. Baseline SAI and the increase in SAI after a single dose of rivastigmine were correlated with response to long term treatment. A normal SAI in baseline conditions, or an abnormal SAI in baseline conditions that was not greatly increased by a single oral dose of rivastigmine, were invariably associated with poor response to long term treatment, while an abnormal SAI in baseline conditions in conjunction with a large increase in SAI after a single dose of rivastigmine was associated with good response to long term treatment in most of the patients. Conclusions: Evaluation of SAI may be useful for identifying AD patients likely to respond to treatment with AChE inhibitors. PMID:16024879

  17. Alpha3* and alpha 7 nAChR-mediated Ca2+ transient generation in IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ween, Hilde; Thorin-Hagene, Kirsten; Andersen, Elisabeth; Grønlien, Jens Halvard; Lee, Chih-Hung; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Malysz, John

    2010-10-01

    Alpha3-containing (alpha 3*) and alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed in human IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells and implicated in Ca(2+) signaling. In this study, we investigated the intracellular Ca(2+) transient generation evoked by selective activation of alpha 3* (agonist potency rank order: epibatidine>varenicline>nicotine approximately cytisine) and alpha 7 (rank order in the presence of alpha 7 positive allosteric modulator or PAM: A-795723>NS6784 approximately PNU-282987) using, respectively, varenicline and NS6784 (+alpha 7 PAM) by Ca(2+) imaging. Effects of inhibitors of nAChRs (MLA and mecamylamine), ER Ca(2+) ATPase pump (CPA and thapsigargin), Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (ryanodine and dantrolene), Ca(2+) channels (nitrendipine, diltiazem, and Cd(2+)), and removal of extracellular Ca(2+) were examined. alpha 7 PAMs, when tested in the presence of NS6784, were more active when added first, followed by the agonist, than in the reverse order. Removal of extracellular Ca(2+) - but not CPA, thapsigargin, ryanodine, dantrolene, nitrendipine, diltiazem, or Cd(2+) - diminished the alpha 7 agonist-evoked Ca(2+) transients. In contrast, only diltiazem and nitrendipine and removal of extracellular Ca(2+) inhibited the alpha 3*-mediated Ca(2+) transients. The differential effect of diltiazem and nitrendipine versus Cd(2+) was due to direct inhibition of alpha 3* nAChRs as revealed by Ca(2+) imaging in HEK-293 cells expressing human alpha 3 beta 4 nAChRs and patch clamp in IMR-32 cells. In summary, this study provides evidence that alpha 3* and alpha 7 nAChR agonist-evoked global Ca(2+) transient generation in IMR-32 cells does not primarily involve voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, intracellular Ca(2+) stores, or Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. These mechanisms may, however, be still involved in other forms of nAChR-mediated Ca(2+) signaling.

  18. Russian VX: inhibition and reactivation of acetylcholinesterase compared with VX agent.

    PubMed

    Kuca, Kamil; Jun, Daniel; Cabal, Jiri; Hrabinova, Martina; Bartosova, Lucie; Opletalova, Veronika

    2006-04-01

    Organophosphorus compounds such as nerve agents inhibit, practically irreversibly, cholinesterases by their phosphorylation in the active site of these enzymes. Current antidotal treatment used in the case of acute nerve agent intoxications consists of combined administration of anticholinergic drug (usually atropine) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7) reactivator (HI-6, obidoxime, pralidoxime), which from a chemical view is a derivative from the group of pyridinium or bispyridinium aldoximes (commonly called "oxime"). Oximes counteract acetylcholine increase, resulting from AChE inhibition. In the human body environment these compounds are powerful nucleophiles and are able to break down the bond between AChE and nerve agent molecule. This process leads to renewal of enzyme functionality -- to its reactivation. The usefulness of oxime in the reactivation process depends on its chemical structure and on the nerve agent whereby AChE is inhibited. Due to this fact, selection of suitable reactivator in the treatment of intoxications is very important. In our work, we have compared differences in the in vitro inhibition potency of VX and Russian VX on rat, pig and human brain, and subsequently we have tested reactivation of rat brain cholinesterase inhibited by these agents using oxime HI-6, obidoxime, pralidoxime, trimedoxime and methoxime. The results showed that no major differences in the reactivation process of both VX and Russian VX-inhibited cholinesterase. The similarity in reactivation was caused by analogous chemical structure of either nerve agent; and that oxime HI-6 seems to be the most effective reactivator tested, which confirms that HI-6 is currently the most potent reactivator of AChE inhibited by nerve agents. The results obtained in our study should be considered in the future development of new AChE reactivators.

  19. Individual variability in esterase activity and CYP1A levels in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) exposed to esfenvalerate and chlorpyrifos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheelock, C.E.; Eder, K.J.; Werner, I.; Huang, H.; Jones, P.D.; Brammell, B.F.; Elskus, A.A.; Hammock, B.D.

    2005-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity has traditionally been monitored as a biomarker of organophosphate (OP) and/or carbamate exposure. However, AChE activity may not be the most sensitive endpoint for these agrochemicals, because OPs can cause adverse physiological effects at concentrations that do not affect AChE activity. Carboxylesterases are a related family of enzymes that have higher affinity than AChE for some OPs and carbamates and may be more sensitive indicators of environmental exposure to these pesticides. In this study, carboxylesterase and AChE activity, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) protein levels, and mortality were measured in individual juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) following exposure to an OP (chlorpyrifos) and a pyrethroid (esfenvalerate). As expected, high doses of chlorpyrifos and esfenvalerate were acutely toxic, with nominal concentrations (100 and 1 ??g/l, respectively) causing 100% mortality within 96 h. Exposure to chlorpyrifos at a high dose (7.3 ??g/l), but not a low dose (1.2 ??g/l), significantly inhibited AChE activity in both brain and muscle tissue (85% and 92% inhibition, respectively), while esfenvalerate exposure had no effect. In contrast, liver carboxylesterase activity was significantly inhibited at both the low and high chlorpyrifos dose exposure (56% and 79% inhibition, respectively), while esfenvalerate exposure still had little effect. The inhibition of carboxylesterase activity at levels of chlorpyrifos that did not affect AChE activity suggests that some salmon carboxylesterase isozymes may be more sensitive than AChE to inhibition by OPs. CYP1A protein levels were ???30% suppressed by chlorpyrifos exposure at the high dose, but esfenvalerate had no effect. Three teleost species, Chinook salmon, medaka (Oryzias latipes) and Sacramento splittail (Pogonichthys macrolepidotus), were examined for their ability to hydrolyze a series of pyrethroid surrogate substrates and in all cases hydrolysis activity was

  20. Individual variability in esterase activity and CYP1A levels in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) exposed to esfenvalerate and chlorpyrifos

    PubMed Central

    Wheelock, Craig E.; Eder, Kai J.; Werner, Inge; Huang, Huazhang; Jones, Paul D.; Brammell, Benjamin F.; Elskus, Adria A.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity has traditionally been monitored as a biomarker of organophosphate (OP) and/or carbamate exposure. However, AChE activity may not be the most sensitive endpoint for these agrochemicals, because OPs can cause adverse physiological effects at concentrations that do not affect AChE activity. Carboxylesterases are a related family of enzymes that have higher affinity than AChE for some OPs and carbamates and may be more sensitive indicators of environmental exposure to these pesticides. In this study, carboxylesterase and AChE activity, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) protein levels, and mortality were measured in individual juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) following exposure to an OP (chlorpyrifos) and a pyrethroid (esfenvalerate). As expected, high doses of chlorpyrifos and esfenvalerate were acutely toxic, with nominal concentrations (100 and 1 μg/l, respectively) causing 100% mortality within 96 h. Exposure to chlorpyrifos at a high dose (7.3 μg/l), but not a low dose (1.2 μg/l), significantly inhibited AChE activity in both brain and muscle tissue (85% and 92% inhibition, respectively), while esfenvalerate exposure had no effect. In contrast, liver carboxylesterase activity was significantly inhibited at both the low and high chlorpyrifos dose exposure (56% and 79% inhibition, respectively), while esfenvalerate exposure still had little effect. The inhibition of carboxylesterase activity at levels of chlorpyrifos that did not affect AChE activity suggests that some salmon carboxylesterase isozymes may be more sensitive than AChE to inhibition by OPs. CYP1A protein levels were ∼30% suppressed by chlorpyrifos exposure at the high dose, but esfenvalerate had no effect. Three teleost species, Chinook salmon, medaka (Oryzias latipes) and Sacramento splittail (Pogonichthys macrolepidotus), were examined for their ability to hydrolyze a series of pyrethroid surrogate substrates and in all cases hydrolysis activity was

  1. Aqueous seed extract of Syzygium cumini inhibits the dipeptidyl peptidase IV and adenosine deaminase activities, but it does not change the CD26 expression in lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bellé, Luziane Potrich; Bitencourt, Paula Eliete Rodrigues; Abdalla, Faida Husein; Bona, Karine Santos de; Peres, Alessandra; Maders, Liési Diones Konzen; Moretto, Maria Beatriz

    2013-03-01

    Syzygium cumini (Sc) have been intensively studied in the last years due its beneficial effects including anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory potential. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of aqueous seed extract of Sc (ASc) in the activity of enzymes involved in lymphocyte functions. To perform this study, we isolated lymphocytes from healthy donors. Lymphocytes were exposed to 10, 30, and 100 mg/mL of ASc during 4 and 6 h and adenosine deaminase (ADA), dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities as well as CD26 expression and cellular viability were evaluated. ASc inhibited the ADA and DPP-IV activities without alteration in the CD26 expression (DPP-IV protein). No alterations were observed in the AChE activity or in the cell viability. These results indicate that the inhibition of the DPP-IV and ADA activities was dependent on the time of exposition to ASc. We suggest that ASc exhibits immunomodulatory properties probably via the pathway of DPP-IV-ADA complex, contributing to the understanding of these proceedings in the purinergic signaling. PMID:22798209

  2. Rubus coreanus Miquel Inhibits Acetylcholinesterase Activity and Prevents Cognitive Impairment in a Mouse Model of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Cho Rong; Choi, Soo Jung; Oh, Seung Sang; Kwon, Yoon Kyung; Lee, Na Young; Park, Gwi Gun; Kim, Youn-Jung; Heo, Ho Jin; Jun, Woo Jin; Park, Cheung-Seog; Shin, Dong-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Abstract To find acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors for the prevention of neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, ethanol extracts of promising traditional edible Korean plants were tested. Among them, Rubus coreanus Miquel extract exhibited the most significant AChE inhibitory activity. The effect of R. coreanus extract on trimethyltin-induced memory impairment in mice was investigated using Y-maze and passive avoidance tests. Our results showed that administration of R. coreanus extract significantly improved alternation behavior and step-through latency. In addition, R. coreanus extract was sequentially fractionated, and the purified constituent was determined to be 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid. PMID:24044488

  3. An acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor with enhanced solvent resistance based on chitosan for the detection of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Warner, John; Andreescu, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    Solvent tolerance of immobilized enzymes is important for many biosensing and biotechnological applications. In this paper we report an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor based on chitosan that exhibits high solvent resistance and enables sensitive detection of pesticides in presence of a high content of organic solvents. The solvent effect was established comparatively for the enzyme immobilized in chitosan and covalently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. The activity of the immobilized AChE was dependent on the immobilization method and solvent type. The enzyme entrapped in chitosan fully conserved its activity in up to 25% methanol, 15% acetonitrile and 100% cyclohexane while the enzyme cross-linked with glutaraldehyde gradually lost its activity starting at 5% acetonitrile and methanol, and showed variable levels in cyclohexane. The detection limits of the biosensor for paraoxon were: 7.5 nM in 25% methanol, 100 nM in 15% acetonitrile and 2.5 μM in 100% cyclohexane. This study demonstrates that chitosan provides an excellent immobilization environment for AChE biosensors designed to operate in environments containing high amounts of organic solvents. It also highlights the effect of the immobilization material and solvent type on enzyme stability. These findings can enable future selection of the immobilization matrix and solvent type for the development of organic phase enzyme based systems.

  4. An acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor with enhanced solvent resistance based on chitosan for the detection of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Warner, John; Andreescu, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    Solvent tolerance of immobilized enzymes is important for many biosensing and biotechnological applications. In this paper we report an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor based on chitosan that exhibits high solvent resistance and enables sensitive detection of pesticides in presence of a high content of organic solvents. The solvent effect was established comparatively for the enzyme immobilized in chitosan and covalently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. The activity of the immobilized AChE was dependent on the immobilization method and solvent type. The enzyme entrapped in chitosan fully conserved its activity in up to 25% methanol, 15% acetonitrile and 100% cyclohexane while the enzyme cross-linked with glutaraldehyde gradually lost its activity starting at 5% acetonitrile and methanol, and showed variable levels in cyclohexane. The detection limits of the biosensor for paraoxon were: 7.5 nM in 25% methanol, 100 nM in 15% acetonitrile and 2.5 μM in 100% cyclohexane. This study demonstrates that chitosan provides an excellent immobilization environment for AChE biosensors designed to operate in environments containing high amounts of organic solvents. It also highlights the effect of the immobilization material and solvent type on enzyme stability. These findings can enable future selection of the immobilization matrix and solvent type for the development of organic phase enzyme based systems. PMID:26695264

  5. Evaluation of a Brain Acetylcholinesterase Extraction Method and Kinetic Constants after Methyl-Paraoxon Inhibition in Three Brazilian Fish Species

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, A. P.; Santos, C. R.; Sarcinelli, P. N.; Hauser-Davis, R. A.; Lopes, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important enzyme in the control of the neuronal action potential and sensitive to organophosphate inhibition. Brain fish AChE is less sensitive to organophosphate inhibition than AChE from terrestrial animals, although this sensitivity is variable among species and has not yet been fully evaluated in fish species. In this setting, inhibition kinetic constants for progressive irreversible inhibition of brain acetylcholinesterase due to methyl-paraoxon exposure were determined in three fish species (Mugil liza, Genidens genidens and Lagocephalus laevigatus) and hen (Gallus domesticus). Enzyme extraction using a detergent was shown to be adequate, and samples presented activity inhibition in high substrate concentrations and suppression of inhibition by methyl-paraoxon in the presence of the substrate, similar to kinetic patterns from purified enzyme preparations. Catfish (G. genidens) AChE presented the highest sensitivity among the evaluated fish species (IC50 = 1031.20 nM ± 63.17) in comparison to M. liza and L. laevigatus (IC50: 2878.83 ± 421.94 and 2842.5 ± 144.63 nM respectively). The lower dissociation constant (Kd = 20.3 ± 2.95 μM) of catfish AChE showed greater enzyme affinity for methyl-paraoxon, explaining this species higher sensitivity to organophosphates. Hen AChE presented higher ki (900.57 ± 65.3 mM-1min-1) and, consequently, greater sensitivity to methyl-paraoxon, explained by a lower Kd (0.6 ± 0.13 μM). Furthermore, hen AChE did not differentiate between the propionylthiocholine and acetylthiocholine substrates, indicating easier access of methyl-paraoxon to the hen enzyme activity site. The results obtained herein indicate a suitable extraction of AChE and, despite different inhibition kinetic constants, demonstrate that fish AChE is less sensitive to methyl-paraoxon, probably due to reduced access to the catalytic center which provides greater enzyme substrate selectivity. PMID:27655611

  6. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in the central nervous system of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, by mercury, cadmium, and lead

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, M.; Fingerman, M.

    1995-11-01

    The toxicological, physiological and biochemical responses of aquatic crustaceans to heavy metals have been reported by several investigators. Levels of glucose, lactic acid, sodium, potassium, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in the blood of the crab Scylla serrata increased, while glycogen levels in hepatopancreas and muscle decreased after a four-week exposure to mercuric chloride. In fiddler crab, Uca pugilator, enzyme activity was observed to decrease in the hepatopancreas but increased in abdominal muscle after 48 hr cadmium exposure. In the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, exposed for 96 hr to cadmium, glutahione (GSH) level and GSH S-transferase activity deceased in the midgut. In crayfish Astacus astacus exposed to sublethal concentrations of lead and cadmium, oxidative enzyme (succine dehydrogenase and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase) activities in gills and hepatopancrease decreased. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition by organophosphates and organocarbamates in various crustaceans has bee reported. In vivo cadmium exposure caused increases in esterase activities, but mercury exposure decreases these activities in the hepatopancreas of the shrimp Callianassa tyrrhena. The freshwater crab, Barytelphusa guerini, exposed to 0.6 ppm cadmium showed reduced oxygen consumption throughout the experiment whereas AChE activity increased after 4 days but decreased after 15 days. The authors wanted to determine the effects of cadmium, lead and mercury on AChE activity in central nervous tissue of Procambarus clarkii. This enzyme has the potential for serving both as a biochemical indicator of toxic stress and a sensitive parameter for testing water for the presence of toxicants. These three biologically silent metals have, according to Schweinsberg and Karsa great toxicological significance to humans because their use is widespread. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and heat shock proteins (Hsp70) of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) larvae in response to long-term fluoranthene exposure.

    PubMed

    Mrdaković, Marija; Ilijin, Larisa; Vlahović, Milena; Matić, Dragana; Gavrilović, Anja; Mrkonja, Aleksandra; Perić-Mataruga, Vesna

    2016-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may affect biochemical and physiological processes in living organisms, thus impairing fitness related traits and influencing their populations. This imposes the need for providing early-warning signals of pollution. Our study aimed to examine changes in the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the concentration of heat shock proteins (Hsp70) in homogenates of brain tissues of fifth instar gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) larvae, exposed to the ubiquitous PAH, fluoranthene, supplemented to the rearing diet. Significantly increased activity of AChE in larvae fed on the diets with high fluoranthene concentrations suggests the necessity for elucidation of the role of AChE in these insects when exposed to PAH pollution. Significant induction of Hsp70 in gypsy moth larvae reared on the diets containing low fluoranthene concentrations, indicate that changes in the level of Hsp70 might be useful as an indicator of pollution in this widespread forest species. PMID:27343862

  8. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and heat shock proteins (Hsp70) of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) larvae in response to long-term fluoranthene exposure.

    PubMed

    Mrdaković, Marija; Ilijin, Larisa; Vlahović, Milena; Matić, Dragana; Gavrilović, Anja; Mrkonja, Aleksandra; Perić-Mataruga, Vesna

    2016-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may affect biochemical and physiological processes in living organisms, thus impairing fitness related traits and influencing their populations. This imposes the need for providing early-warning signals of pollution. Our study aimed to examine changes in the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the concentration of heat shock proteins (Hsp70) in homogenates of brain tissues of fifth instar gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) larvae, exposed to the ubiquitous PAH, fluoranthene, supplemented to the rearing diet. Significantly increased activity of AChE in larvae fed on the diets with high fluoranthene concentrations suggests the necessity for elucidation of the role of AChE in these insects when exposed to PAH pollution. Significant induction of Hsp70 in gypsy moth larvae reared on the diets containing low fluoranthene concentrations, indicate that changes in the level of Hsp70 might be useful as an indicator of pollution in this widespread forest species.

  9. Inhibition of cholinesterases by stereoisomers of Huperzine-A

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Qian, N.; Kovach, I.M.; Ashani, Y.; Kozikowski, A.P.

    1993-05-13

    Huperzine-A, a potential drug for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and possible pretreament for nerve agent toxicity, has recently been characterized as a reversible inhibitor of cholinesterases (Ashani et al., BBRC, 184:719-726, 1992). Long-term incubation of purified cholinesterases with Huperzine-A did not show any chemical modification of Huperzine-A. The dissociation constant, K(I), for fetal bovine serum acetylcholinesterase (FBS AChE) was approximately 20 nM, for Torpedo AChE was 215 nM, and for horse serum butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) was 40 micrometers M. Inhibition studies with the two stereoisomers of Huperzine-A have shown that naturally occurring (-)-Huperzine-A inhibited FBS AChE 35-fold more potently than (+)-Huperzine-A, with K(I) values of 6.2 nM and 210 nM, respectively. These results are in agreement with those reported previously using crude preparations of rat cortical AChE (McKinney et al., Eur. J. Pharmacol., 203, 303-305, 1991). (-)-Huperzine-A, on the other hand, was 80-fold more potent than (+)-Huperzine-A in inhibiting Torpedo AChE, with K(I), values of 0.25 micrometers M and 22 micrometer M, respectively. No significant differences in K(I) were observed for the two stereoisomers of Huperzine-A with horse serum BChE, indicating the lack of stereoselectivity of this compound for BChE. Molecular modeling studies involving docking of each of the two stereoisomers of Huperzine-A into the active-site gorge of Torpedo AChE also revealed that (-)-Huperzine-A gave a better fit than (+)-Huperzine-A.

  10. Alkaloid metabolite profiles by GC/MS and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities with binding-mode predictions of five Amaryllidaceae plants.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Natalie; Alvarez, Rafael; Osorio, Edison H; Alzate, Fernando; Berkov, Strahil; Osorio, Edison

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzymatic inhibition is an important target for the management of Alzheimer disease (AD) and AChE inhibitors are the mainstay drugs for its treatment. In order to discover new sources of potent AChE inhibitors, a combined strategy is presented based on AChE-inhibitory activity and chemical profiles by GC/MS, together with in silico studies. The combined strategy was applied on alkaloid extracts of five Amaryllidaceae species that grow in Colombia. Fifty-seven alkaloids were detected using GC/MS, and 21 of them were identified by comparing their mass-spectral fragmentation patterns with standard reference spectra in commercial and private library databases. The alkaloid extracts of Zephyranthes carinata exhibited a high level of inhibitory activity (IC50 = 5.97 ± 0.24 μg/mL). Molecular modeling, which was performed using the structures of some of the alkaloids present in this extract and the three-dimensional crystal structures of AChE derived from Torpedo californica, disclosed their binding configuration in the active site of this AChE. The results suggested that the alkaloids 3-epimacronine and lycoramine might be of interest for AChE inhibition. Although the galanthamine group is known for its potential utility in treating AD, the tazettine-type alkaloids should be evaluated to find more selective compounds of potential benefit for AD. PMID:25305596

  11. Differential acetylcholinesterase inhibition of chlorpyrifos, diazinon and parathion in larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Jerry; Donerly, Sue; Levin, Edward D.; Linney, Elwood A.

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish are increasingly used for developmental neurotoxicity testing because early embryonic events are easy to visualize, exposures are done without affecting the mother and the rapid development of zebrafish allows for high throughput testing. We used zebrafish to examine how exposures to three different organophosphorus pesticides (chlorpyrifos, diazinon and parathion) over the first five days of embryonic and larval development of zebrafish affected their survival, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and behavior. We show that at non-lethal, equimolar concentrations, chlorpyrifos (CPF) is more effective at equimolar concentrations than diazinon (DZN) and parathion (PA) in producing AChE inhibition. As concentrations of DZN and PA are raised, lethality occurs before they can produce the degree of AChE inhibition observed with CPF at 300nM. Because of its availability outside the mother at the time of fertilization, zebrafish provides a complementary model for studying the neurotoxicity of very early developmental exposures. PMID:22036888

  12. Intensified vmPFC surveillance over PTSS under perturbed microRNA-608/AChE interaction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, T; Simchovitz, A; Shenhar-Tsarfaty, S; Vaisvaser, S; Admon, R; Hanin, G; Hanan, M; Kliper, E; Bar-Haim, Y; Shomron, N; Fernandez, G; Lubin, G; Fruchter, E; Hendler, T; Soreq, H

    2016-01-01

    Trauma causes variable risk of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) owing to yet-unknown genome–neuronal interactions. Here, we report co-intensified amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) emotional responses that may overcome PTSS in individuals with the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs17228616 in the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene. We have recently shown that in individuals with the minor rs17228616 allele, this SNP interrupts AChE suppression by microRNA (miRNA)-608, leading to cortical elevation of brain AChE and reduced cortisol and the miRNA-608 target GABAergic modulator CDC42, all stress-associated. To examine whether this SNP has effects on PTSS and threat-related brain circuits, we exposed 76 healthy Israel Defense Forces soldiers who experienced chronic military stress to a functional magnetic resonance imaging task of emotional and neutral visual stimuli. Minor allele individuals predictably reacted to emotional stimuli by hyperactivated amygdala, a hallmark of PTSS and a predisposing factor of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Despite this, minor allele individuals showed no difference in PTSS levels. Mediation analyses indicated that the potentiated amygdala reactivity in minor allele soldiers promoted enhanced vmPFC recruitment that was associated with their limited PTSS. Furthermore, we found interrelated expression levels of several miRNA-608 targets including CD44, CDC42 and interleukin 6 in human amygdala samples (N=7). Our findings suggest that miRNA-608/AChE interaction is involved in the threat circuitry and PTSS and support a model where greater vmPFC regulatory activity compensates for amygdala hyperactivation in minor allele individuals to neutralize their PTSS susceptibility. PMID:27138800

  13. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition in the basolateral amygdala plays a key role in the induction of status epilepticus after soman exposure.

    PubMed

    Prager, Eric M; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Almeida-Suhett, Camila P; Figueiredo, Taiza H; Apland, James P; Braga, Maria F M

    2013-09-01

    Exposure to nerve agents induces intense seizures (status epilepticus, SE), which cause brain damage or death. Identification of the brain regions that are critical for seizure initiation after nerve agent exposure, along with knowledge of the physiology of these regions, can facilitate the development of pretreatments and treatments that will successfully prevent or limit the development of seizures and brain damage. It is well-established that seizure initiation is due to excessive cholinergic activity triggered by the nerve agent-induced irreversible inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Therefore, the reason that when animals are exposed to lethal doses of a nerve agent, a small proportion of these animals do not develop seizures, may have to do with failure of the nerve agent to inhibit AChE in brain areas that play a key role in seizure initiation and propagation. In the present study, we compared AChE activity in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), hippocampus, and piriform cortex of rats that developed SE (SE rats) after administration of the nerve agent soman (154μg/kg) to AChE activity in these brain regions of rats that received the same dose of soman but did not develop SE (no-SE rats). The levels of AChE activity were measured at the onset of SE in SE rats, 30min after soman administration in no-SE rats, as well as in controls which received saline in place of soman. In the control group, AChE activity was significantly higher in the BLA compared to the hippocampus and piriform cortex. Compared to controls, AChE activity was dramatically lower in the hippocampus and the piriform cortex of both the SE rats and the no-SE rats, but AChE activity in the BLA was reduced only in the SE rats. Consistent with the notion that soman-induced neuropathology is due to intense seizures, rather than due to a direct neurotoxic effect of soman, no-SE rats did not present any neuronal loss or degeneration, 7 days after exposure. The results suggest that inhibition of

  14. Inhibition of CDK1 activity by sumoylation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuxuan; Lucas, Benjamin; Molcho, Elana; Schiff, Tania; Vigodner, Margarita

    2016-09-16

    Sumoylation (a covalent modification by Small Ubiquitin-like Modifiers or SUMO proteins) has been implicated in the regulation of various cellular events including cell cycle progression. We have recently identified CDK1, a master regulator of mitosis and meiosis, as a SUMO target both in vivo and in vitro, supporting growing evidence concerning a close cross talk between sumoylation and phosphorylation during cell cycle progression. However, any data regarding the effect of sumoylation upon CDK1 activity have been missing. In this study, we performed a series of in vitro experiments to inhibit sumoylation by three different means (ginkgolic acid, physiological levels of oxidative stress, and using an siRNA approach) and assessed the changes in CDK1 activity using specific antibodies and a kinase assay. We have also tested for an interaction between SUMO and active and/or inactive CDK1 isoforms in addition to having assessed the status of CDK1-interacting sumoylated proteins upon inhibition of sumoylation. Our data suggest that inhibition of sumoylation increases the activity of CDK1 probably through changes in sumoylated status and/or the ability of specific proteins to bind CDK1 and inhibit its activity. PMID:27520372

  15. Comparison of Chlorpyrifos-Oxon and Paraoxon Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition Dynamics: Potential role of a peripheral binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Kousba, Ahmed A.; Sultatos, L G.; Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2004-08-02

    The primary mechanism of action for organophosphorus (OP) insecticides involves the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by oxygenated metabolites (oxons). This inhibition has been attributed to the phosphorylation of the serine hydroxyl group located in the active site of the AChE molecule. The rate of phosphorylation is described by the bimolecular inhibitory rate constant (ki), which has been utilized for quantification of OP inhibitory capacity. It has been previously proposed that a peripheral binding site exists on the AChE molecule, which when occupied, reduces the capacity of additional oxon molecules to phosphorylate the active site. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the interaction of chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) and paraoxon (PO) with rat brain AChE using a modified Ellman assay in conjunction with a pharmacodynamic model to further assess the dynamics of AChE inhibition and the potential role of a peripheral binding site. The ki for AChE inhibition determined at oxon concentrations of 5 x 10{sup -4} 100 nM were 0.212 and 0.0216 nM-1h-1 for CPO and PO, respectively. The spontaneous reactivation rates of the inhibited AChE for CPO and PO were 0.087 and 0.078 h-1, respectively. In contrast, the ki estimated at a low oxon concentration (1 pM) were {approx} 1,000 and 10,000 -fold higher than those determined at high CPO and PO concentrations, respectively. At these low concentrations, the ki estimates were approximately similar for both CPO and PO (180 and 250 nM-1h-1, respectively). This implies that at low exposure concentrations, both oxons exhibited similar inhibitory potency in contrast to the marked difference exhibited at higher concentrations, which is consistent with the presence of a peripheral binding site on the AChE enzyme. These results support the potential importance of a secondary binding site associated with AChE kinetics, particularly at low environmentally relevant concentrations.

  16. AOP description: Acetylcholinesterase inhibition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This adverse outcome pathway (AOP) leverages existing knowledge in the open literature to describe the linkage between inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the subsequent mortality resulting from impacts at cholinergic receptors. The AOP takes a chemical category approa...

  17. Black tea polyphenols inhibit tumor proteasome activity.

    PubMed

    Mujtaba, Taskeen; Dou, Q Ping

    2012-01-01

    Tea is a widely consumed beverage and its constituent polyphenols have been associated with potential health benefits. Although black tea polyphenols have been reported to possess potent anticancer activities, the effect of its polyphenols, theaflavins on the tumor's cellular proteasome function, an important biological target in cancer prevention, has not been carefully studied. Here black tea extract (T5550) enriched in theaflavins inhibited the chymotrypsin-like (CT) activity of the proteasome and proliferation of human multiple myeloma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Also an isolated theaflavin (TF-1) can bind to, and inhibit the purified 20S proteasome, accompanied by suppression of tumor cell proliferation, suggesting that the tumor proteasome is an important target whose inhibition is at least partially responsible for the anticancer effects of black tea.

  18. In Vitro and In Vivo Profiles of ACH-702, an Isothiazoloquinolone, against Bacterial Pathogens▿

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Michael J.; Podos, Steven D.; Thanassi, Jane A.; Leggio, Melissa J.; Bradbury, Barton J.; Deshpande, Milind

    2011-01-01

    ACH-702, a novel isothiazoloquinolone (ITQ), was assessed for antibacterial activity against a panel of Gram-positive and Gram-negative clinical isolates and found to possess broad-spectrum activity, especially against antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive strains, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). For Gram-negative bacteria, ACH-702 showed exceptional potency against Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and a Neisseria sp. but was less active against members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Good antibacterial activity was also evident against several anaerobes as well as Legionella pneumophila and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Excellent bactericidal activity was observed for ACH-702 against several bacterial pathogens in time-kill assays, and postantibiotic effects (PAEs) of >1 h were evident with both laboratory and clinical strains of staphylococci at 10× MIC and similar in most cases to those observed for moxifloxacin at the same MIC multiple. In vivo efficacy was demonstrated against S. aureus with murine sepsis and thigh infection models, with decreases in the number of CFU/thigh equal to or greater than those observed after vancomycin treatment. Macromolecular synthesis assays showed specific dose-dependent inhibition of DNA replication in staphylococci, and biochemical analyses indicated potent dual inhibition of two essential DNA replication enzymes: DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Additional biological data in support of an effective dual targeting mechanism of action include the following: low MIC values (≤0.25 μg/ml) against staphylococcal strains with single mutations in both gyrA and grlA (parC), retention of good antibacterial activity (MICs of ≤0.5 μg/ml) against staphylococcal strains with two mutations in both gyrA and grlA, and low frequencies for the selection of higher-level resistance (<10−10). These promising initial data support further study of isothiazoloquinolones as potential clinical candidates. PMID

  19. Isolation of cholinesterase and β-secretase 1 inhibiting compounds from Lycopodiella cernua.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Thu; To, Dao Cuong; Tran, Manh Hung; Oh, Sang Ho; Kim, Jeong Ah; Ali, Md Yousof; Woo, Mi-Hee; Choi, Jae Sue; Min, Byung Sun

    2015-07-01

    Three new serratene-type triterpenoids (1-3) and a new hydroxy unsaturated fatty acid (13) together with nine known compounds (4-12) were isolated from Lycopodiella cernua. The chemical structures were established using NMR, MS, and Mosher's method. Compound 13 showed the most potent inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with an IC50 value of 0.22μM. For butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activity, 5 showed the most potent activity with an IC50 value of 0.42μM. Compound 2 showed the most potent activity with an IC50 of 0.23μM for BACE-1 inhibitory activity. The kinetic activities were investigated to determine the type of enzyme inhibition involved. The types of AChE inhibition shown by compounds 4, 5, and 13 were mixed; BChE inhibition by 5 was competitive, while 2 and 6 showed mixed-types. In addition, molecular docking studies were performed to investigate the interaction of these compounds with the pocket sites of AChE. The docking results revealed that the tested inhibitors 3, 4, and 13 were stably present in several pocket domains of the AChE residue. PMID:26003344

  20. Assay and Inhibition of Diacylglycerol Lipase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Meghan; Bhatt, Shachi R.; Sikka, Surina; Mercier, Richard W.; West, Jay M.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Gatley, S. John; Duclos, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    A series of N-formyl-α-amino acid esters of β-lactone derivatives structurally related to tetrahydrolipstatin (THL) and O-3841 were synthesized that inhibit human and murine diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) activities. New ether lipid reporter compounds were developed for an in vitro assay to efficiently screen inhibitors of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol hydrolysis and related lipase activities using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). A standardized thin layer chromatography (TLC) radioassay of diacylglycerol lipase activity utilizing the labeled endogenous substrate [1″-14C]1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol with phosphorimaging detection was used to quantify inhibition by following formation of the initial product [1″-14C]2-arachidonoylglycerol and further hydrolysis under the assay conditions to [1-14C]arachidonic acid. PMID:22738638

  1. Tissue distribution, characterization and in vitro inhibition of B-esterases in the earwig Forficula auricularia.

    PubMed

    Malagnoux, Laure; Capowiez, Yvan; Rault, Magali

    2014-10-01

    Earwigs are important natural enemies of numerous pests in pome fruit orchards worldwide. Studying the effects of agricultural practices on these biological control agents is important for understanding its vulnerability in the field. The aim of this study was to characterize the B-esterase activities in the European earwig Forficula auricularia and to evaluate in vitro its sensitivity to organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was mainly measured with 1.5 mM acetylthiocholine as the substrate in the microsomal fraction of earwig heads (70% of total AChE activity). Carboxylesterase (CbE) activities were measured with three substrates [5 mM 4-nitrophenyl acetate (4-NPA), 1mM 4-nitrophenyl valerate (4-NPV), and 2 mM α-naphtyl acetate (α-NA)] to examine different isoenzymes, which were present mainly in the cytosolic fraction (about 70-88% of total activities) of all earwig tissues. CbE activity was higher than AChE activity, especially with α-NA, then 4-NPA and lastly 4-NPV. Chlorpyrifos-oxon an organophosphate, and carbaryl a carbamate pesticide, inhibited AChE and CbE activities in a concentration-dependent manner. Earwig CbE activities showed a stronger sensitivity to organophosphate than AChE, with the strongest effect for chlorpyrifos-oxon on male carboxylesterase activities. CbE and AChE showed about the same sensitivity to carbamate pesticides regardless of sex. These results suggest that B-type esterases in the European earwig F.auricularia are suitable biomarkers of pesticide exposure.

  2. Muscarinic ACh Receptors Contribute to Aversive Olfactory Learning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bryon; Molina-Fernández, Claudia; Ugalde, María Beatriz; Tognarelli, Eduardo I.; Angel, Cristian; Campusano, Jorge M.

    2015-01-01

    The most studied form of associative learning in Drosophila consists in pairing an odorant, the conditioned stimulus (CS), with an unconditioned stimulus (US). The timely arrival of the CS and US information to a specific Drosophila brain association region, the mushroom bodies (MB), can induce new olfactory memories. Thus, the MB is considered a coincidence detector. It has been shown that olfactory information is conveyed to the MB through cholinergic inputs that activate acetylcholine (ACh) receptors, while the US is encoded by biogenic amine (BA) systems. In recent years, we have advanced our understanding on the specific neural BA pathways and receptors involved in olfactory learning and memory. However, little information exists on the contribution of cholinergic receptors to this process. Here we evaluate for the first time the proposition that, as in mammals, muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) contribute to memory formation in Drosophila. Our results show that pharmacological and genetic blockade of mAChRs in MB disrupts olfactory aversive memory in larvae. This effect is not explained by an alteration in the ability of animals to respond to odorants or to execute motor programs. These results show that mAChRs in MB contribute to generating olfactory memories in Drosophila. PMID:26380118

  3. Spongian diterpenoids inhibit androgen receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu Chi; Meimetis, Labros G; Tien, Amy H; Mawji, Nasrin R; Carr, Gavin; Wang, Jun; Andersen, Raymond J; Sadar, Marianne D

    2013-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor and a validated drug target for all stages of prostate cancer. Antiandrogens compete with physiological ligands for AR ligand-binding domain (LBD). High-throughput screening of a marine natural product library for small molecules that inhibit AR transcriptional activity yielded the furanoditerpenoid spongia-13(16),-14-dien-19-oic acid, designated terpene 1 (T1). Characterization of T1 and the structurally related semi-synthetic analogues (T2 and T3) revealed that these diterpenoids have antiandrogen properties that include inhibition of both androgen-dependent proliferation and AR transcriptional activity by a mechanism that involved competing with androgen for AR LBD and blocking essential N/C interactions required for androgen-induced AR transcriptional activity. Structure activity relationship analyses revealed some chemical features of T1 that are associated with activity and yielded T3 as the most potent analogue. In vivo, T3 significantly reduced the weight of seminal vesicles, which are an androgen-dependent tissue, thereby confirming T3’s on-target activity. The ability to create analogues of diterpenoids that have varying antiandrogen activity represents a novel class of chemical compounds for the analysis of AR ligand-binding properties and therapeutic development. PMID:23443807

  4. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber as a biomarker of organophosphorus compounds in food.

    PubMed

    Stanek, Katja; Gabrijelcic, Elizabeta; Drobne, Damjana; Trebse, Polonca

    2003-09-01

    This paper describes the toxicity of organophosphorus pesticide diazinon in juvenile and adult terrestrial isopods Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea). The woodlice were exposed to different concentrations of diazinon added to food (5, 10, 50, and 100 or 150 micrograms/g dry food). Weight change and food assimilation efficiency were determined two and four weeks after the exposure. The activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in surviving animals was measured at the end of the experiment. The results show that woodlice exposed to diazinon do not significantly differ from controls in growth and feeding rate. The reduction of AChE activity was observed at the lowest diazinon exposure (5 and 10 micrograms/g dry food). These results suggest that AChE activity might prove a useful biomarker, indicating low levels of organophosphates in food.

  5. Nicotine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone induce cyclooxygenase-2 activity in human gastric cancer cells: Involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and {beta}-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Vivian Yvonne; Jin, H.C.; Ng, Enders K.O.; Yu Jun; Leung, W.K.; Cho, C.H.; Sung, J.J.Y.

    2008-12-01

    Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) associates with cigarette smoke exposure in many malignancies. Nicotine and its derivative, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), are the two important components in cigarette smoke that contributes to cancer development. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which nicotine or NNK promotes gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We found that nicotine and NNK significantly enhanced cell proliferation in AGS cells that expressed both alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7 nAChR) and {beta}-adrenergic receptors. Treatment of cells with {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX, {alpha}7nAChR antagonist) or propranolol ({beta}-adrenergic receptor antagonist) blocked NNK-induced COX-2/PGE{sub 2} and cell proliferation, while nicotine-mediated cell growth and COX-2/PGE{sub 2} induction can only be suppressed by propranolol, but not {alpha}-BTX. Moreover, in contrast to the dependence of growth promoting effect of nicotine on Erk activation, inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) repressed NNK-induced COX-2 upregulation and resulted in suppression of cell growth. In addition, nicotine and NNK mediated COX-2 induction via different receptors to modulate several G1/S transition regulatory proteins and promote gastric cancer cell growth. Selective COX-2 inhibitor (SC-236) caused G1 arrest and abrogated nicotine/NNK-induced cell proliferation. Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 and other G1 regulatory proteins are reversed by blockade of COX-2. These results pointed to the importance of adrenergic and nicotinic receptors in gastric tumor growth through MAPK/COX-2 activation, which may perhaps provide a chemoprevention strategy for cigarette smoke-related gastric carcinogenesis.

  6. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity by rivastigmine decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-1β expression in the hypothalamus of ewes.

    PubMed

    Herman, A P; Krawczyńska, A; Bochenek, J; Haziak, K; Antushevitch, H; Herman, A; Tomaszewska-Zaremba, D

    2013-04-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effect of subcutaneous rivastigmine treatment on IL-1β expression and IL-1 type I receptor (IL-1R1) gene expression in the hypothalamic structures (preoptic area [POA], anterior hypothalamus [AHA], and medial basal hypothalamus [MBH]) of ewes after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. Endotoxin treatment increased (P ≤ 0.01) both IL-1β and IL-1R1 gene expression in the POA, AHA, and MBH compared with the control group, whereas concomitant rivastigmine and LPS injection abolished this stimulatory effect. It was also found that LPS elevated (P ≤ 0.01) IL-1β concentration in the hypothalamus (71.0 ± 2.3 pg/mg) compared with controls (16.1 ± 3.6 pg/mg). The simultaneous injection of LPS and rivastigmine did not increase IL-1β concentration in the hypothalamus (24.6 ± 13.0 pg/mg). This central change in IL-1β synthesis seems to be an effect of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition by rivastigmine, which decreases (P ≤ 0.01) the activity of this enzyme from 78.5 ± 15.0 μmol · min(-1) · g(-1) of total protein in the control and 68.8 ± 9.8 μmol · min(-1) · g(-1) of total protein in LPS-treated animals to 45.2 ± 5.6 μmol · min(-1) · g(-1) of total protein in the rivastigmine and LPS-treated group. Our study showed that rivastigmine could effectively reverse the stimulatory effect of immune stress induced by LPS injection on IL-1β synthesis through a decrease in AChE activity in the hypothalamic area of sheep. Our results also proved that the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway could directly modulate the central response to endotoxin.

  7. Na+/K+-ATPase: Activity and inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čolović, M.; Krstić, D.; Krinulović, K.; Momić, T.; Savić, J.; Vujačić, A.; Vasić, V.

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to give an overview of the mechanism of inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase activity induced by some specific and non specific inhibitors. For this purpose, the effects of some ouabain like compounds (digoxin, gitoxin), noble metals complexes ([PtCl2DMSO2], [AuCl4]-, [PdCl4]2-, [PdCl(dien)]+, [PdCl(Me4dien)]+), transition metal ions (Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe2+, Co2+), and heavy metal ions (Hg2+, Pb2+, Cd2+) on the activity of Na+/K+-ATPase from rat synaptic plasma membranes (SPM), porcine cerebral cortex and human erythrocytes were discussed.

  8. Molecular Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies that Inhibit Acetylcholinesterase by Targeting the Peripheral Site and Backdoor Region

    PubMed Central

    Essono, Sosthène; Mondielli, Grégoire; Lamourette, Patricia; Boquet, Didier; Grassi, Jacques; Marchot, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The inhibition properties and target sites of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) Elec403, Elec408 and Elec410, generated against Electrophorus electricus acetylcholinesterase (AChE), have been defined previously using biochemical and mutagenesis approaches. Elec403 and Elec410, which bind competitively with each other and with the peptidic toxin inhibitor fasciculin, are directed toward distinctive albeit overlapping epitopes located at the AChE peripheral anionic site, which surrounds the entrance of the active site gorge. Elec408, which is not competitive with the other two mAbs nor fasciculin, targets a second epitope located in the backdoor region, distant from the gorge entrance. To characterize the molecular determinants dictating their binding site specificity, we cloned and sequenced the mAbs; generated antigen-binding fragments (Fab) retaining the parental inhibition properties; and explored their structure-function relationships using complementary x-ray crystallography, homology modeling and flexible docking approaches. Hypermutation of one Elec403 complementarity-determining region suggests occurrence of antigen-driven selection towards recognition of the AChE peripheral site. Comparative analysis of the 1.9Å-resolution structure of Fab408 and of theoretical models of its Fab403 and Fab410 congeners evidences distinctive surface topographies and anisotropic repartitions of charges, consistent with their respective target sites and inhibition properties. Finally, a validated, data-driven docking model of the Fab403-AChE complex suggests a mode of binding at the PAS that fully correlates with the functional data. This comprehensive study documents the molecular peculiarities of Fab403 and Fab410, as the largest peptidic inhibitors directed towards the peripheral site, and those of Fab408, as the first inhibitor directed toward the backdoor region of an AChE and a unique template for the design of new, specific modulators of AChE catalysis. PMID:24146971

  9. A novel isopimarane diterpenoid with acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity from Nepeta sorgerae, an endemic species to the Nemrut Mountain.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Anil; Cağlar, Pinar; Dirmenci, Tuncay; Gören, Nezhun; Topçu, Gülaçti

    2012-06-01

    From the dichloromethane extract of Nepeta sorgerae, the isolation and structure elucidation are now reported of a new isopimarane diterpenoid, named sorgerolone, and two known triterpenoids, oleanolic acid and ursolic acid. Antioxidant activity of the extracts and the isolated terpenoids was determined by the DPPH free radical scavenging and lipid peroxidation inhibition (beta-carotene bleaching) methods. Anticholinesterase activity of the extracts and isolates was investigated by Ellman's method against AChE and BChE enzymes. Although the antioxidant activity results were low, the AChE enzyme inhibition of the extracts and terpenoids was very promising.

  10. A novel isopimarane diterpenoid with acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity from Nepeta sorgerae, an endemic species to the Nemrut Mountain.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Anil; Cağlar, Pinar; Dirmenci, Tuncay; Gören, Nezhun; Topçu, Gülaçti

    2012-06-01

    From the dichloromethane extract of Nepeta sorgerae, the isolation and structure elucidation are now reported of a new isopimarane diterpenoid, named sorgerolone, and two known triterpenoids, oleanolic acid and ursolic acid. Antioxidant activity of the extracts and the isolated terpenoids was determined by the DPPH free radical scavenging and lipid peroxidation inhibition (beta-carotene bleaching) methods. Anticholinesterase activity of the extracts and isolates was investigated by Ellman's method against AChE and BChE enzymes. Although the antioxidant activity results were low, the AChE enzyme inhibition of the extracts and terpenoids was very promising. PMID:22816286

  11. α7nAchR/NMDAR coupling affects NMDAR function and object recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Shupeng; Nai, Qiang; Lipina, Tatiana V; Roder, John C; Liu, Fang

    2013-12-20

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAchR) and NMDA glutamate receptor (NMDAR) are both ligand-gated ion channels permeable to Ca2+ and Na+. Previous studies have demonstrated functional modulation of NMDARs by nAchRs, although the molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. We have previously reported that α7nAchR forms a protein complex with the NMDAR through a protein-protein interaction. We also developed an interfering peptide that is able to disrupt the α7nAchR-NMDAR complex and blocks cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking in rat models of relapse. In the present study, we investigated whether the α7nAchR-NMDAR interaction is responsible for the functional modulation of NMDAR by α7nAchR using both electrophysiological and behavioral tests. We have found that activation of α7nAchR upregulates NMDAR-mediated whole cell currents and LTP of mEPSC in cultured hippocampal neurons, which can be abolished by the interfering peptide that disrupts the α7nAchR-NMDAR interaction. Moreover, administration of the interfering peptide in mice impairs novel object recognition but not Morris water maze performance. Our results suggest that α7nAchR/NMDAR coupling may selectively affect some aspects of learning and memory.

  12. Clinical application of clustered-AChR for the detection of SNMG

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guang; Wang, Xiaoqing; Yu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiutian; Guan, Yangtai; Jiang, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoantibody-mediated disease of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). However, accumulating evidence has indicated that MG patients whose serum anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies are not detectable (serumnegative MG; SNMG) in routine assays share similar clinical features with anti-AChR antibody-positive MG patients. We hypothesized that SNMG patients would have low-affinity antibodies to AChRs that would not be detectable using traditional methods but that might be detected by binding to AChR on the cell membrane, particularly if they were clustered at the high density observed at the NMJ. We expressed AChR subunits with the clustering protein rapsyn (an AChR-associated protein at the synapse) in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells, and we tested the binding of the antibodies using immunofluorescence. With this approach, AChR antibodies to rapsyn-clustered AChR could be detected in the sera from 45.83% (11/24) of SNMG patients, as confirmed with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). This was the first application in China of cell-based AChR antibody detection. More importantly, this sensitive (and specific) approach could significantly increase the diagnosis rate of SNMG. PMID:26068604

  13. Menthol Alone Upregulates Midbrain nAChRs, Alters nAChR Subtype Stoichiometry, Alters Dopamine Neuron Firing Frequency, and Prevents Nicotine Reward.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Brandon J; Wall, Teagan R; Henley, Beverley M; Kim, Charlene H; Nichols, Weston A; Moaddel, Ruin; Xiao, Cheng; Lester, Henry A

    2016-03-01

    Upregulation of β2 subunit-containing (β2*) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is implicated in several aspects of nicotine addiction, and menthol cigarette smokers tend to upregulate β2* nAChRs more than nonmenthol cigarette smokers. We investigated the effect of long-term menthol alone on midbrain neurons containing nAChRs. In midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons from mice containing fluorescent nAChR subunits, menthol alone increased the number of α4 and α6 nAChR subunits, but this upregulation did not occur in midbrain GABAergic neurons. Thus, chronic menthol produces a cell-type-selective upregulation of α4* nAChRs, complementing that of chronic nicotine alone, which upregulates α4 subunit-containing (α4*) nAChRs in GABAergic but not DA neurons. In mouse brain slices and cultured midbrain neurons, menthol reduced DA neuron firing frequency and altered DA neuron excitability following nAChR activation. Furthermore, menthol exposure before nicotine abolished nicotine reward-related behavior in mice. In neuroblastoma cells transfected with fluorescent nAChR subunits, exposure to 500 nm menthol alone also increased nAChR number and favored the formation of (α4)3(β2)2 nAChRs; this contrasts with the action of nicotine itself, which favors (α4)2(β2)3 nAChRs. Menthol alone also increases the number of α6β2 receptors that exclude the β3 subunit. Thus, menthol stabilizes lower-sensitivity α4* and α6 subunit-containing nAChRs, possibly by acting as a chemical chaperone. The abolition of nicotine reward-related behavior may be mediated through menthol's ability to stabilize lower-sensitivity nAChRs and alter DA neuron excitability. We conclude that menthol is more than a tobacco flavorant: administered alone chronically, it alters midbrain DA neurons of the nicotine reward-related pathway.

  14. Inosine induces presynaptic inhibition of acetylcholine release by activation of A3 adenosine receptors at the mouse neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Cinalli, A R; Guarracino, J F; Fernandez, V; Roquel, L I; Losavio, A S

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The role of inosine at the mammalian neuromuscular junction (NMJ) has not been clearly defined. Moreover, inosine was classically considered to be the inactive metabolite of adenosine. Hence, we investigated the effect of inosine on spontaneous and evoked ACh release, the mechanism underlying its modulatory action and the receptor type and signal transduction pathway involved. Experimental Approach End-plate potentials (EPPs) and miniature end-plate potentials (MEPPs) were recorded from the mouse phrenic-nerve diaphragm preparations using conventional intracellular electrophysiological techniques. Key Results Inosine (100 μM) reduced MEPP frequency and the amplitude and quantal content of EPPs; effects inhibited by the selective A3 receptor antagonist MRS-1191. Immunohistochemical assays confirmed the presence of A3 receptors at mammalian NMJ. The voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blocker Cd2+, the removal of extracellular Ca2+ and the L-type and P/Q-type VGCC antagonists, nitrendipine and ω-agatoxin IVA, respectively, all prevented inosine-induced inhibition. In the absence of endogenous adenosine, inosine decreased the hypertonic response. The effects of inosine on ACh release were prevented by the Gi/o protein inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide, PKC antagonist chelerytrine and calmodulin antagonist W-7, but not by PKA antagonists, H-89 and KT-5720, or the inhibitor of CaMKII KN-62. Conclusion and Implications Our results suggest that, at motor nerve terminals, inosine induces presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous and evoked ACh release by activating A3 receptors through a mechanism that involves L-type and P/Q-type VGCCs and the secretory machinery downstream of calcium influx. A3 receptors appear to be coupled to Gi/o protein. PKC and calmodulin may be involved in these effects of inosine. PMID:23731236

  15. Copper, aluminum, iron and calcium inhibit human acetylcholinesterase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important part of cholinergic nerves where it participates in termination of neurotransmission. AChE can be inhibited by e.g. some Alzheimer disease drugs, nerve agents, and secondary metabolites. In this work, metal salts aluminum chloride, calcium chloride, cupric chloride, ferric chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride and sodium chloride were tested for their ability to inhibit AChE. Standard Ellman assay based on human recombinant AChE was done and inhibition was measured using Dixon plot. No inhibition was proved for sodium, potassium and magnesium ions. However, aluminum, cupric, ferric and calcium ions were able to inhibit AChE via noncompetitive mechanism of inhibition. Though the inhibition is much weaker when compared to e.g. drugs with noncompetitive mechanism of action, biological relevance of the findings can be anticipated. PMID:24473150

  16. Suppressing irrelevant information: knowledge activation or inhibition?

    PubMed

    McNamara, Danielle S; McDaniel, Mark A

    2004-03-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors examined the role of knowledge activation in the suppression of contextually irrelevant meanings for ambiguous homographs. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants with greater baseball knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of ambiguous words in baseball-related, but not general-topic, sentences. Experiment 3 demonstrated that participants with greater general knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of the ambiguous words in general-topic sentences. As predicted by D. S. McNamara's (1997) knowledge-based account of suppression, ambiguity effects are influenced by greater activation of knowledge related to the intended meaning of the homograph. These results challenge inhibition (e.g. M. A. Gernsbacher, K. R. Varner. & M. Faust, 1990) as the sole mechanism responsible for the suppression of irrelevant information.

  17. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by two genistein derivatives: kinetic analysis, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiansong; Wu, Ping; Yang, Ranyao; Gao, Li; Li, Chao; Wang, Dongmei; Wu, Song; Liu, Ai-Lin; Du, Guan-Hua

    2014-12-01

    In this study two genistein derivatives (G1 and G2) are reported as inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), and differences in the inhibition of AChE are described. Although they differ in structure by a single methyl group, the inhibitory effect of G1 (IC50=264 nmol/L) on AChE was 80 times stronger than that of G2 (IC50=21,210 nmol/L). Enzyme-kinetic analysis, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to better understand the molecular basis for this difference. The results obtained by kinetic analysis demonstrated that G1 can interact with both the catalytic active site and peripheral anionic site of AChE. The predicted binding free energies of two complexes calculated by the molecular mechanics/generalized born surface area (MM/GBSA) method were consistent with the experimental data. The analysis of the individual energy terms suggested that a difference between the net electrostatic contributions (ΔE ele+ΔG GB) was responsible for the binding affinities of these two inhibitors. Additionally, analysis of the molecular mechanics and MM/GBSA free energy decomposition revealed that the difference between G1 and G2 originated from interactions with Tyr124, Glu292, Val294 and Phe338 of AChE. In conclusion, the results reveal significant differences at the molecular level in the mechanism of inhibition of AChE by these structurally related compounds. PMID:26579414

  18. Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161188.html Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice Treatment might one ... News) -- New research in mice suggests that tiny nanoparticles might one day be a better way to ...

  19. Key active site residues in the inhibition of acetylcholinesterases by soman.

    PubMed

    Qian, N; Kovach, I M

    1993-12-27

    Molecular modeling (GEMM 7.3) and molecular mechanics calculations (YETI V 5.3) using the X-ray coordinates for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from Torpedo californica indicate electrostatic stabilization by the active site, Glu-199, of the developing positive charge on the incipient carbonium ion in the dealkylation in the adducts of AChE with PSCR and PSCS diastereomers of 2-(3,3-dimethylbutyl) methylphosphonofluoridate (soman). His-440 is indispensable as a general acid catalyst of C-O bond breaking in the dealkylation reaction and that of bond breaking to the Ser gamma-O in reactivation. This demand for catalysis seems to be satisfied for the reactivation of enzyme from the PSCS diastereomer of soman, but not from the P(S)C(R) diastereomer.

  20. Ghrelin inhibits sympathetic nervous activity in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rongqian; Zhou, Mian; Das, Padmalaya; Dong, Weifeng; Ji, Youxin; Yang, Derek; Miksa, Michael; Zhang, Fangming; Ravikumar, Thanjavur S; Wang, Ping

    2007-12-01

    Our previous studies have shown that norepinephrine (NE) upregulates proinflammatory cytokines by activating alpha(2)-adrenoceptor. Therefore, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system represents a novel treatment for sepsis. We have also shown that a novel stomach-derived peptide, ghrelin, is downregulated in sepsis and that its intravenous administration decreases proinflammatory cytokines and mitigates organ injury. However, it remains unknown whether ghrelin inhibits sympathetic activity through central ghrelin receptors [i.e., growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR-la)] in sepsis. To study this, sepsis was induced in male rats by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Ghrelin was administered through intravenous or intracerebroventricular injection 30 min before CLP. Our results showed that intravenous administration of ghrelin significantly reduced the elevated NE and TNF-alpha levels at 2 h after CLP. NE administration partially blocked the inhibitory effect of ghrelin on TNF-alpha in sepsis. GHSR-la inhibition by the administration of a GHSR-la antagonist, [d-Arg(1),d-Phe(5), d-Trp(7,9),Leu(11)]substance P, significantly increased both NE and TNF-alpha levels even in normal animals. Markedly elevated circulating levels of NE 2 h after CLP were also significantly decreased by intracerebroventricular administration of ghrelin. Ghrelin's inhibitory effect on NE release was completely blocked by intracerebroventricular injection of the GHSR-1a antagonist or a neuropeptide Y (NPY)/Y(1) receptor antagonist. However, ghrelin's downregulatory effect on TNF-alpha release was only partially diminished by these agents. Thus ghrelin has sympathoinhibitory properties that are mediated by central ghrelin receptors involving a NPY/Y1 receptor-dependent pathway. Ghrelin's inhibitory effect on TNF-alpha production in sepsis is partially because of its modulation of the overstimulated sympathetic nerve activation.

  1. Probing the origins of human acetylcholinesterase inhibition via QSAR modeling and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Saw; Anuwongcharoen, Nuttapat; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E S; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease which leads to the gradual loss of neuronal cells. Several hypotheses for AD exists (e.g., cholinergic, amyloid, tau hypotheses, etc.). As per the cholinergic hypothesis, the deficiency of choline is responsible for AD; therefore, the inhibition of AChE is a lucrative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AD. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine that is essential for cognition and memory. A large non-redundant data set of 2,570 compounds with reported IC50 values against AChE was obtained from ChEMBL and employed in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study so as to gain insights on their origin of bioactivity. AChE inhibitors were described by a set of 12 fingerprint descriptors and predictive models were constructed from 100 different data splits using random forest. Generated models afforded R (2), [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] values in ranges of 0.66-0.93, 0.55-0.79 and 0.56-0.81 for the training set, 10-fold cross-validated set and external set, respectively. The best model built using the substructure count was selected according to the OECD guidelines and it afforded R (2), [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] values of 0.92 ± 0.01, 0.78 ± 0.06 and 0.78 ± 0.05, respectively. Furthermore, Y-scrambling was applied to evaluate the possibility of chance correlation of the predictive model. Subsequently, a thorough analysis of the substructure fingerprint count was conducted to provide informative insights on the inhibitory activity of AChE inhibitors. Moreover, Kennard-Stone sampling of the actives were applied to select 30 diverse compounds for further molecular docking studies in order to gain structural insights on the origin of AChE inhibition. Site-moiety mapping of compounds from the diversity set revealed three binding anchors encompassing both hydrogen bonding and van der Waals

  2. Probing the origins of human acetylcholinesterase inhibition via QSAR modeling and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Saw; Anuwongcharoen, Nuttapat; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E S; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease which leads to the gradual loss of neuronal cells. Several hypotheses for AD exists (e.g., cholinergic, amyloid, tau hypotheses, etc.). As per the cholinergic hypothesis, the deficiency of choline is responsible for AD; therefore, the inhibition of AChE is a lucrative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AD. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine that is essential for cognition and memory. A large non-redundant data set of 2,570 compounds with reported IC50 values against AChE was obtained from ChEMBL and employed in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study so as to gain insights on their origin of bioactivity. AChE inhibitors were described by a set of 12 fingerprint descriptors and predictive models were constructed from 100 different data splits using random forest. Generated models afforded R (2), [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] values in ranges of 0.66-0.93, 0.55-0.79 and 0.56-0.81 for the training set, 10-fold cross-validated set and external set, respectively. The best model built using the substructure count was selected according to the OECD guidelines and it afforded R (2), [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] values of 0.92 ± 0.01, 0.78 ± 0.06 and 0.78 ± 0.05, respectively. Furthermore, Y-scrambling was applied to evaluate the possibility of chance correlation of the predictive model. Subsequently, a thorough analysis of the substructure fingerprint count was conducted to provide informative insights on the inhibitory activity of AChE inhibitors. Moreover, Kennard-Stone sampling of the actives were applied to select 30 diverse compounds for further molecular docking studies in order to gain structural insights on the origin of AChE inhibition. Site-moiety mapping of compounds from the diversity set revealed three binding anchors encompassing both hydrogen bonding and van der Waals

  3. Acetylcholinesterase Activity and Neurodevelopment in Boys and Girls

    PubMed Central

    Himes, John H.; Jacobs, David R.; Alexander, Bruce H.; Gunnar, Megan R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organophosphate exposures can affect children’s neurodevelopment, possibly due to neurotoxicity induced by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, and may affect boys more than girls. We tested the hypothesis that lower AChE activity is associated with lower neurobehavioral development among children living in Ecuadorian floricultural communities. METHODS: In 2008, we examined 307 children (age: 4–9 years; 52% male) and quantified AChE activity and neurodevelopment in 5 domains: attention/executive functioning, language, memory/learning, visuospatial processing, and sensorimotor (NEPSY-II test). Associations were adjusted for demographic and socioeconomic characteristics and height-for-age, flower worker cohabitation, and hemoglobin concentration. RESULTS: Mean ± standard deviation AChE activity was 3.14 ± 0.49 U/mL (similar for both genders). The range of scores among neurodevelopment subtests was 5.9 to 10.7 U (standard deviation: 2.6–4.9 U). Girls had a greater mean attention/executive functioning domain score than boys. In boys only, there were increased odds ratios of low (<9th percentile) neurodevelopment among those in the lowest tertile versus the highest tertile of AChE activity (odds ratios: total neurodevelopment: 5.14 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.84 to 31.48]; attention/executive functioning domain: 4.55 [95% CI: 1.19 to 17.38], memory/learning domain: 6.03 [95% CI: 1.17 to 31.05]) after adjustment for socioeconomic and demographic factors, height-for-age, and hemoglobin. Within these domains, attention, inhibition and long-term memory subtests were most affected. CONCLUSIONS: Low AChE activity was associated with deficits in neurodevelopment, particularly in attention, inhibition, and memory in boys but not in girls. These critical cognitive skills affect learning and academic performance. Added precautions regarding secondary occupational pesticide exposure would be prudent. PMID:24249815

  4. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Mark E; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Within the past several decades, a brigade of dedicated researchers from around the world has provided essential insights into the critical niche of immune-mediated inflammation in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Yet, the question has lingered as to whether disease-initiating events are more or less dependent on isolated immune-related responses, unimpeded inflammation, endogenous pathways of age-related cell senescence and oxidative stress, or any of the other numerous molecular derangements that have been identified in the natural history of AMD. There is now an abundant cache of data signifying immune system activation as an impetus in the pathogenesis of this devastating condition. Furthermore, recent rigorous investigations have revealed multiple inciting factors, including several important complement-activating components, thus creating a new array of disease-modulating targets for the research and development of molecular therapeutic interventions. While the precise in vivo effects of complement activation and inhibition in the progression and treatment of AMD remain to be determined, ongoing clinical trials of the first generation of complement-targeted therapeutics are hoped to yield critical data on the contribution of this pathway to the disease process. PMID:26501209

  5. Stathmin Potentiates Vinflunine and Inhibits Paclitaxel Activity

    PubMed Central

    Malesinski, Soazig; Tsvetkov, Philipp O.; Kruczynski, Anna; Peyrot, Vincent; Devred, François

    2015-01-01

    Cell biology and crystallographic studies have suggested a functional link between stathmin and microtubule targeting agents (MTAs). In a previous study we showed that stathmin increases vinblastine (VLB) binding to tubulin, and that conversely VLB increases stathmin binding to tubulin. This constituted the first biochemical evidence of the direct relationship between stathmin and an antimitotic drug, and revealed a new mechanism of action for VLB. The question remained if the observed interaction was specific for this drug or represented a general phenomenon for all MTAs. In the present study we investigated the binding of recombinant stathmin to purified tubulin in the presence of paclitaxel or another Vinca alkaloid, vinflunine, using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). These experiments revealed that stathmin binding to tubulin is increased in the presence of vinflunine, whereas no signal is observed in the presence of paclitaxel. Further investigation using turbidity and co-sedimentation showed that stathmin inhibited paclitaxel microtubule-stabilizing activity. Taken together with the previous study using vinblastine, our results suggest that stathmin can be seen as a modulator of MTA activity and binding to tubulin, providing molecular explanation for multiple previous cellular and in vivo studies showing that stathmin expression level affects MTAs efficiency. PMID:26030092

  6. Analysis of free ACh and 5-HT in milk from four different species and their bioactivity on 5-HT(3) and nACh receptors.

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Perez, Jose-Luis; Limon, Agenor; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge M; Alshanqeeti, Ali S; Aljohi, Mohammad A; Miledi, Ricardo

    2014-07-25

    Milk is one of the most beneficial aliments and is highly recommended in normal conditions; however, in certain disorders, like irritable bowel syndrome, cow milk and dairy products worsen the gastric symptoms and their use is not recommended. Among the most recognized milk-induced gatrointestinal symptoms are abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, which are processes controlled by cholinergic and serotonergic transmission. Whether the presence of bioavailable ACh and 5-HT in milk may contribute to normal peristalsis, or to the developing of these symptoms, is not known. In this work we attempt to determine whether the content of free ACh and 5-HT is of physiological significance in milk from four different species: cow (bovine), goat, camel and human. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to identify and quantify free ACh and 5-HT in milk, and activation of the serotonergic and cholinergic ionotropic receptors was investigated using electrophysiological experiments. Our principal hypothesis was that milk from these four species had sufficient free ACh and 5-HT to activate their correspondent receptors expressed in a heterologous system. Our results showed a more complex picture, in which free ACh and 5-HT and their ability to activate cholinergic and serotonergic receptors are not correlated. This work is a first step to elucidate whether 5-HT and ACh, at the concentrations present in the milk, can be associated to a direct function in the GI.

  7. Discovery of Highly Potent and Selective α4β2-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Partial Agonists Containing an Isoxazolylpyridine Ether Scaffold that Demonstrate Antidepressant-like Activity. Part II

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li-Fang; Eaton, J. Brek; Fedolak, Allison; Zhang, Han-Kun; Hanania, Taleen; Brunner, Dani; Lukas, Ronald J.; Kozikowski, Alan P.

    2012-01-01

    In our continued efforts to develop α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonists as novel antidepressants having a unique mechanism of action, structure activity relationship (SAR) exploration of certain isoxazolylpyridine ethers is presented. In particular, modifications to both the azetidine ring present in the starting structure 4 and its metabolically liable hydroxyl side chain substituent have been explored to improve compound druggability. The pharmacological characterization of all new compounds has been carried out using [3H]epibatidine binding studies together with functional assays based on 86Rb+ ion flux measurements. We found that the deletion of the metabolically liable hydroxyl group or its replacement by a fluoromethyl group not only maintained potency and selectivity, but also resulted in compounds showing antidepressant-like properties in the mouse forced swim test. These isoxazolylpyridine ethers appear to represent promising lead candidates in the design of innovative chemical tools containing reporter groups for imaging purposes and of possible therapeutics. PMID:23092294

  8. Serum chemotactic inhibitory activity: heat activation of chemotactic inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Epps, D E; Williams, R C

    1976-01-01

    Serum chemotactic inhibitory activity (CIA) was studied in 46 patients with various systemic diseases, using a system consisting of normal human leukocytes as indicator cells and 10% fresh normal serum as a control chemotactic attractant. It was shown, as previously reported, that an association exists between CIA and skin test anergy. Heat treatment of sera at 56 C for 30 min increased both the incidence and the degree of chemotactic inhibition observed in these patients. The effects of heat treatment of sera containing CIA on other chemotactic attractants (C3a, bacteria-derived chemotactic factor (BF), and casein) are shown. Before heat treatment, some sera suppressed chemotaxis mediated by BF in the absence of suppression of normal serum-mediated chemotaxis, indicating the possible involvement of more than one system of inhibition. Multiple systems were further supported by data indicating that room temperature incubation resulted in a loss of CIA as measured by normal serum-mediated chemotoxis with no apparent decrease in the inhibition of BF -mediated chemotaxis. Separation of sera containing CIA by Sephadex G-200 showed chemotactic inhibitory activity to be increased in both the void volume region. Experiments showed that heat treating before separation resulted in similar increases in both peaks, implying the presence of an antagonist to CIA. Experiments demonstrating that sera containing CIA do not suppress casein-mediated chemotaxis by means of an irreversible inactivation of chemotactic factor are included along with experiments demonstrating a cellular mode of action. The possible presence of two systems of chemotactic inhibition, one acting directly upon chemotactic factors and one interacting with the responding cell, are discussed. PMID:773824

  9. Electronic structure calculations toward new potentially AChE inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, A. A. N.; Martins, J. B. L.; Gargano, R.; dos Santos, M. L.; Romeiro, L. A. S.

    2007-10-01

    The main purpose of this study was the use of natural non-isoprenoid phenolic lipid of cashew nut shell liquid from Anacardium occidentale as lead material for generating new potentially candidates of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Therefore, we studied the electronic structure of 15 molecules derivatives from the cardanol using the following groups: methyl, acetyl, N, N-dimethylcarbamoyl, N, N-dimethylamine, N, N-diethylamine, piperidine, pyrrolidine, and N-benzylamine. The calculations were performed at RHF level using 6-31G, 6-31G(d), 6-31+G(d) and 6-311G(d,p) basis functions. Among the proposed compounds we found that the structures with substitution by acetyl, N, N-dimethylcarbamoyl, N, N-dimethylamine, and pyrrolidine groups were better correlated to rivastigmine indicating possible activity.

  10. Characterization of a T-superfamily conotoxin TxVC from Conus textile that selectively targets neuronal nAChR subtypes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Du, Tianpeng; Liu, Zhuguo; Wang, Sheng; Wu, Ying; Ding, Jiuping; Jiang, Ling; Dai, Qiuyun

    2014-11-01

    T-superfamily conotoxins have a typical cysteine pattern of "CC-CC", and are known to mainly target calcium or sodium ion channels. Recently, we screened the targets of a series of T-superfamily conotoxins and found that a new T-superfamily conotoxin TxVC (KPCCSIHDNSCCGL-NH2) from the venom of Conus textile. It selectively targeted the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes α4β2 and α3β2, with IC50 values of 343.4 and 1047.2nM, respectively, but did not exhibit obvious pharmacological effects on voltage-gated potassium, sodium or calcium channel in DRG cells, the BK channels expressed in HEK293 cells, or the Kv channels in LβT2 cells. The changes in the inhibitory activities of its Ala mutants, the NMR structure, and molecular simulation results based on other conotoxins targeting nAChR α4β2, all demonstrated that the residues Ile(6) and Leu(14) were the main hydrophobic pharmacophores. To our best knowledge, this is the first T-superfamily conotoxin that inhibits neuronal nAChRs and possesses high binding affinity to α4β2. This finding will expand the knowledge of the targets of T-superfamily conotoxins and the motif information could help the design of new nAChR inhibitors.

  11. Restitution of defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in diabetic GK rat by acetylcholine uncovers paradoxical stimulatory effect of beta-cell muscarinic receptor activation on cAMP production.

    PubMed

    Dolz, Manuel; Bailbé, Danielle; Giroix, Marie-Hélène; Calderari, Sophie; Gangnerau, Marie-Noelle; Serradas, Patricia; Rickenbach, Katharina; Irminger, Jean-Claude; Portha, Bernard

    2005-11-01

    Because acetylcholine (ACh) is a recognized potentiator of glucose-stimulated insulin release in the normal beta-cell, we have studied ACh's effect on islets of the Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat, a spontaneous model of type 2 diabetes. We first verified that ACh was able to restore the insulin secretory glucose competence of the GK beta-cell. Then, we demonstrated that in GK islets 1) ACh elicited a first-phase insulin release at low glucose, whereas it had no effect in Wistar; 2) total phospholipase C activity, ACh-induced inositol phosphate production, and intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) elevation were normal; 3) ACh triggered insulin release, even in the presence of thapsigargin, which induced a reduction of the ACh-induced [Ca2+]i response (suggesting that ACh produces amplification signals that augment the efficacy of elevated [Ca2+]i on GK exocytosis); 4) inhibition of protein kinase C did not affect [Ca2+]i nor the insulin release responses to ACh; and 5) inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinases (PKAs), adenylyl cyclases, or cAMP generation, while not affecting the [Ca2+]i response, significantly lowered the insulinotropic response to ACh (at low and high glucose). In conclusion, ACh acts mainly through activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway to potently enhance Ca2+-stimulated insulin release in the GK beta-cell and, in doing so, normalizes its defective glucose responsiveness.

  12. Synthesis, cholinesterase inhibition and molecular modelling studies of coumarin linked thiourea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Aamer; Zaib, Sumera; Ashraf, Saba; Iftikhar, Javeria; Muddassar, Muhammad; Zhang, Kam Y J; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is among the most widespread neurodegenerative disorder. Cholinesterases (ChEs) play an indispensable role in the control of cholinergic transmission and thus the acetylcholine level in the brain is enhanced by inhibition of ChEs. Coumarin linked thiourea derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated biologically in order to determine their inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterases (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterases (BChE). The synthesized derivatives of coumarin linked thiourea compounds showed potential inhibitory activity against AChE and BChE. Among all the synthesized compounds, 1-(2-Oxo-2H-chromene-3-carbonyl)-3-(3-chlorophenyl)thiourea (2e) was the most potent inhibitor against AChE with an IC50 value of 0.04±0.01μM, while 1-(2-Oxo-2H-chromene-3-carbonyl)-3-(2-methoxyphenyl)thiourea (2b) showed the most potent inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.06±0.02μM against BChE. Molecular docking simulations were performed using the homology models of both cholinesterases in order to explore the probable binding modes of inhibitors. Results showed that the novel synthesized coumarin linked thiourea derivatives are potential candidates to develop for potent and efficacious acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitors.

  13. Comparison of oxime reactivation and aging of nerve agent-inhibited monkey and human acetylcholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chunyuan; Tong, Min; Maxwell, Donald M; Saxena, Ashima

    2008-09-25

    Non-human primates are valuable animal models that are used for the evaluation of nerve agent toxicity as well as antidotes and results from animal experiments are extrapolated to humans. It has been demonstrated that the efficacy of an oxime primarily depends on its ability to reactivate nerve agent-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE). If the in vitro oxime reactivation of nerve agent-inhibited animal AChE is similar to that of human AChE, it is likely that the results of an in vivo animal study will reliably extrapolate to humans. Therefore, the goal of this study was to compare the aging and reactivation of human and different monkey (Rhesus, Cynomolgus, and African Green) AChEs inhibited by GF, GD, and VR. The oximes examined include the traditional oxime 2-PAM, two H-oximes HI-6 and HLo-7, and the new candidate oxime MMB4. Results indicate that oxime reactivation of all three monkey AChEs was very similar to human AChE. The maximum difference in the second-order reactivation rate constant between human and three monkey AChEs or between AChEs from different monkey species was 5-fold. Aging rate constants of GF-, GD-, and VR-inhibited monkey AChEs were very similar to human AChE except for GF-inhibited monkey AChEs, which aged 2-3 times faster than the human enzyme. The results of this study suggest that all three monkey species are suitable animal models for nerve agent antidote evaluation since monkey AChEs possess similar biochemical/pharmacological properties to human AChE.

  14. Effect of carbaryl (carbamate insecticide) on acetylcholinesterase activity of two strains of Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera).

    PubMed

    Toumi, Hela; Bejaoui, Mustapha; Touaylia, Samir; Burga Perez, Karen F; Ferard, Jean François

    2016-11-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of carbaryl (carbamate insecticide) on the acetylcholinesterase activity in two strains (same clone A) of the crustacean cladoceran Daphnia magna. Four carbaryl concentrations (0.4, 0.9, 1.8 and 3.7 µg L(-1)) were compared against control AChE activity. Our results showed that after 48 h of carbaryl exposure, all treatments induced a significant decrease of AChE activities whatever the two considered strains. However, different responses were registered in terms of lowest observed effect concentrations (LOEC: 0.4 µg L(-1) for strain 1 and 0.9 µg L(-1) for strains 2) revealing differences in sensitivity among the two tested strains of D. magna. These results suggest that after carbaryl exposure, the AChE activity responses can be also used as a biomarker of susceptibility. Moreover, our results show that strain1 is less sensitive than strain 2 in terms of IC50-48 h of AChE activity. Comparing the EC50-48 h of standard ecotoxicity test and IC50-48 h of AChE inhibition, there is the same order of sensitivity with both strains.

  15. Effect of carbaryl (carbamate insecticide) on acetylcholinesterase activity of two strains of Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera).

    PubMed

    Toumi, Hela; Bejaoui, Mustapha; Touaylia, Samir; Burga Perez, Karen F; Ferard, Jean François

    2016-11-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of carbaryl (carbamate insecticide) on the acetylcholinesterase activity in two strains (same clone A) of the crustacean cladoceran Daphnia magna. Four carbaryl concentrations (0.4, 0.9, 1.8 and 3.7 µg L(-1)) were compared against control AChE activity. Our results showed that after 48 h of carbaryl exposure, all treatments induced a significant decrease of AChE activities whatever the two considered strains. However, different responses were registered in terms of lowest observed effect concentrations (LOEC: 0.4 µg L(-1) for strain 1 and 0.9 µg L(-1) for strains 2) revealing differences in sensitivity among the two tested strains of D. magna. These results suggest that after carbaryl exposure, the AChE activity responses can be also used as a biomarker of susceptibility. Moreover, our results show that strain1 is less sensitive than strain 2 in terms of IC50-48 h of AChE activity. Comparing the EC50-48 h of standard ecotoxicity test and IC50-48 h of AChE inhibition, there is the same order of sensitivity with both strains. PMID:27428655

  16. Menthol Alone Upregulates Midbrain nAChRs, Alters nAChR Subtype Stoichiometry, Alters Dopamine Neuron Firing Frequency, and Prevents Nicotine Reward

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Brandon J.; Wall, Teagan R.; Henley, Beverley M.; Kim, Charlene H.; Nichols, Weston A.; Moaddel, Ruin; Xiao, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Upregulation of β2 subunit-containing (β2*) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is implicated in several aspects of nicotine addiction, and menthol cigarette smokers tend to upregulate β2* nAChRs more than nonmenthol cigarette smokers. We investigated the effect of long-term menthol alone on midbrain neurons containing nAChRs. In midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons from mice containing fluorescent nAChR subunits, menthol alone increased the number of α4 and α6 nAChR subunits, but this upregulation did not occur in midbrain GABAergic neurons. Thus, chronic menthol produces a cell-type-selective upregulation of α4* nAChRs, complementing that of chronic nicotine alone, which upregulates α4 subunit-containing (α4*) nAChRs in GABAergic but not DA neurons. In mouse brain slices and cultured midbrain neurons, menthol reduced DA neuron firing frequency and altered DA neuron excitability following nAChR activation. Furthermore, menthol exposure before nicotine abolished nicotine reward-related behavior in mice. In neuroblastoma cells transfected with fluorescent nAChR subunits, exposure to 500 nm menthol alone also increased nAChR number and favored the formation of (α4)3(β2)2 nAChRs; this contrasts with the action of nicotine itself, which favors (α4)2(β2)3 nAChRs. Menthol alone also increases the number of α6β2 receptors that exclude the β3 subunit. Thus, menthol stabilizes lower-sensitivity α4* and α6 subunit-containing nAChRs, possibly by acting as a chemical chaperone. The abolition of nicotine reward-related behavior may be mediated through menthol's ability to stabilize lower-sensitivity nAChRs and alter DA neuron excitability. We conclude that menthol is more than a tobacco flavorant: administered alone chronically, it alters midbrain DA neurons of the nicotine reward-related pathway. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Menthol, the most popular flavorant for tobacco products, has been considered simply a benign flavor additive. However, as we show here

  17. [Inhibition of aromatics on ammonia-oxidizing activity of sediment].

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-hong; Hu, Hong-ying; Wei, Dong-bin; Huang, Xia; Qian, Yi

    2004-03-01

    The inhibition of 24 aromatics on ammonia-oxidizing activity of nitrifying bacteria in sediment was measured. The effects of the kind, number and position of substituted groups on ammonia-oxidizing activity of nitrifying bacteria were discussed. The inhibition of mono-substituted benzenes on ammonia-oxidizing activity of nitrifying bacteria were in order of -OH > -NO2 > -NH2 > -Cl > -CH3 > -H. The position of substituted groups of di-substituted benzenes also affected the inhibition, and the inhibitions of dimethylbenzenes(xylene) were in order of meta-> ortho-> para-. The increase in number of substituted group on benzene-ring enhanced the inhibition of aromatics studied in this study on nitrifying bacteria. There was a linear relationship between inhibition (IC50, mumol.L-1) of aromatics on ammonia-oxidizing activity and total electronegativity (sigma E) of aromatics: lgIC50 = 14.72 - 0.91 sigma E.

  18. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    , spleens were removed and the splenocytes were isolated and kept as individual biological samples. We have also examined transcription factors (JASPAR) and pathways of the immune system to help us understand the mechanism of regulation. Results: Our recent mouse immunology experiment aboard STS-131 suggests that the early T cell immune response was inhibited in animals that have been exposed to spaceflight, even 24 hours after return to earth. Moreover, recent experiments in hyperoxic mice show that many of the same genes involved in early T cell activation were altered. Specifically, expression of IL-2Rα, Cxcl2, TNFα, FGF2, LTA and BCL2 genes are dysregulated in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Conclusions: If these hyperoxia-induced changes of gene expression in early T cell activation are additive to the changes seen in the microgravity of spaceflight, there could be an increased infection risk to EVA astronauts, which should be addressed prior to conducting a Mars or other long-term mission.

  19. Nutritional and Physicochemical Characteristics of the Antidementia Acetylcholinesterase-Inhibiting Methanol Extracts from Umbilicaria esculenta

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Su; Min, Gyung-Hun

    2009-01-01

    To develop new antidementia nutraceuticals, a potent acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-inhibiting extract was screened from various extracts of nutritional mushrooms and lichens nutritional and its physicochemical properties were investigated. Among the several extracts tested, methanol extracts of Umbilicaria esculenta fruiting body showed the highest AChE inhibitory activity of 22.4%. U. esculenta AChE inhibitor was maximally extracted when fruiting bodies were treated with 80% methanol at 40℃ for 18 h. The methanol extracts contained 18.9% crude lipid, 18.8% crude protein, and 11.6% total sugar. In addition, they contained 444 mg/g glutamic acid, 44 mg/g histidine, and 41 mg/g aspartic acid. The methanol extracts were soluble in a solution of methanol and 20% dimethylsulfoxide, insoluble in n-hexane, chloroform, and water, and were stable at 20~60℃ and pH 1.0~5.0 for 1 h. PMID:23983533

  20. Ni nanoparticle catalyzed growth of MWCNTs on Cu NPs @ a-C:H substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodselahi, T.; Solaymani, S.; Akbarzadeh Pasha, M.; Vesaghi, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    NiCu NPs @ a-C:H thin films with different Cu content were prepared by co-deposition by RF-sputtering and RF-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) from acetylene gas and Cu and Ni targets. The prepared samples were used as catalysts for growing multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) from liquid petroleum gas (LPG) at 825 °C by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD). By addition of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer as substrate for Ni NPs catalyst, the density of the grown CNTs is greatly enhanced in comparison to bare Si substrate. Furthermore the average diameter of the grown CNTs decreases by decreasing of Cu content of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer. However Cu NPs @ a-C:H by itself has no catalytic property in MWCNTs growth. Morphology and electrical and optical properties of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer is affected by Cu content and each of them is effective parameter on growth of MWCNTs based on Ni NPs catalyst. Moreover, adding of a low amount of Ni NPs doesn't vary optical, electrical and morphology properties of Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer but it has a profound effect on its catalytic activity. Finally the density and diameter of MWCNTs can be optimized by selection of the Cu NPs @ a-C:H thin layer as substrate of Ni NPs.

  1. Obesity and lipid stress inhibit carnitine acetyltransferase activity[S

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Sarah E.; Martin, Ola J.; Noland, Robert C.; Slentz, Dorothy H.; DeBalsi, Karen L.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; An, Jie; Newgard, Christopher B.; Koves, Timothy R.; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of acetyl-CoA and acetylcarnitine. Emerging evidence suggests that this enzyme functions as a positive regulator of total body glucose tolerance and muscle activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a mitochondrial enzyme complex that promotes glucose oxidation and is feedback inhibited by acetyl-CoA. Here, we used tandem mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling to identify a negative relationship between CrAT activity and muscle content of lipid intermediates. CrAT specific activity was diminished in muscles from obese and diabetic rodents despite increased protein abundance. This reduction in enzyme activity was accompanied by muscle accumulation of long-chain acylcarnitines (LCACs) and acyl-CoAs and a decline in the acetylcarnitine/acetyl-CoA ratio. In vitro assays demonstrated that palmitoyl-CoA acts as a direct mixed-model inhibitor of CrAT. Similarly, in primary human myocytes grown in culture, nutritional and genetic manipulations that promoted mitochondrial influx of fatty acids resulted in accumulation of LCACs but a pronounced decrease of CrAT-derived short-chain acylcarnitines. These results suggest that lipid-induced antagonism of CrAT might contribute to decreased PDH activity and glucose disposal in the context of obesity and diabetes. PMID:24395925

  2. Paper-based fluorescent sensor for rapid naked-eye detection of acetylcholinesterase activity and organophosphorus pesticides with high sensitivity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jiafu; Li, Haiyin; Hou, Ting; Li, Feng

    2016-12-15

    Various strategies have been proposed for the sensing of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). However, the practical application of most methods is restricted by their intrinsic drawbacks such as complexity, long analysis time, and high cost. Thus, it is highly desirable to develop simple, fast and sensitive approaches for AChE activity and OPs detection. Herein, we reported a simple paper-based fluorescent sensor (PFS) based on the aggregation induced emission (AIE) effect of tetraphenylethylene (TPE) and the addition reaction capability of maleimide, which has been used as a powerful tool for rapid naked-eye detection of AChE activity and OPs. The introduction of TPE provides the probe with unique fluorescence property in solid state and is of great importance for improving the sensitivity of PFS. The hydrolysis product of acetylthiocholine catalyzed by AChE induced the maleimide ring destruction and activated the fluorescence performance of TPE. Given that AChE activity can be specifically inhibited by OPs, the as-proposed PFS can also be utilized for sensitive detection of OPs. Meanwhile, the variation of fluorescence signal can be readily detected by naked eyes, and low detection limits of 2.5mUmL(-1) and 0.5ngmL(-1) for AChE activity and OPs are obtained, respectively. Moreover, it has been successfully applied for AChE activity and OPs detection in diluted human serum samples, showing its great potential to be applied in real samples. Thus, this strategy possesses considerable advantages of simplicity, rapid detection, portability, cost efficiency and visualization. PMID:27498323

  3. Paper-based fluorescent sensor for rapid naked-eye detection of acetylcholinesterase activity and organophosphorus pesticides with high sensitivity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jiafu; Li, Haiyin; Hou, Ting; Li, Feng

    2016-12-15

    Various strategies have been proposed for the sensing of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). However, the practical application of most methods is restricted by their intrinsic drawbacks such as complexity, long analysis time, and high cost. Thus, it is highly desirable to develop simple, fast and sensitive approaches for AChE activity and OPs detection. Herein, we reported a simple paper-based fluorescent sensor (PFS) based on the aggregation induced emission (AIE) effect of tetraphenylethylene (TPE) and the addition reaction capability of maleimide, which has been used as a powerful tool for rapid naked-eye detection of AChE activity and OPs. The introduction of TPE provides the probe with unique fluorescence property in solid state and is of great importance for improving the sensitivity of PFS. The hydrolysis product of acetylthiocholine catalyzed by AChE induced the maleimide ring destruction and activated the fluorescence performance of TPE. Given that AChE activity can be specifically inhibited by OPs, the as-proposed PFS can also be utilized for sensitive detection of OPs. Meanwhile, the variation of fluorescence signal can be readily detected by naked eyes, and low detection limits of 2.5mUmL(-1) and 0.5ngmL(-1) for AChE activity and OPs are obtained, respectively. Moreover, it has been successfully applied for AChE activity and OPs detection in diluted human serum samples, showing its great potential to be applied in real samples. Thus, this strategy possesses considerable advantages of simplicity, rapid detection, portability, cost efficiency and visualization.

  4. Gentamicin blocks the ACh-induced BK current in guinea pig type II vestibular hair cells by competing with Ca²⁺ at the L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Guo, Chang-Kai; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Tao; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2014-04-22

    Type II vestibular hair cells (VHCs II) contain big-conductance Ca²⁺-dependent K⁺ channels (BK) and L-type calcium channels. Our previous studies in guinea pig VHCs II indicated that acetylcholine (ACh) evoked the BK current by triggering the influx of Ca²⁺ ions through L-type Ca²⁺ channels, which was mediated by M2 muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChRs). Aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as gentamicin (GM), are known to have vestibulotoxicity, including damaging effects on the efferent nerve endings on VHCs II. This study used the whole-cell patch clamp technique to determine whether GM affects the vestibular efferent system at postsynaptic M2-mAChRs or the membrane ion channels. We found that GM could block the ACh-induced BK current and that inhibition was reversible, voltage-independent, and dose-dependent with an IC₅₀ value of 36.3 ± 7.8 µM. Increasing the ACh concentration had little influence on GM blocking effect, but increasing the extracellular Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺]₀) could antagonize it. Moreover, 50 µM GM potently blocked Ca²⁺ currents activated by (-)-Bay-K8644, but did not block BK currents induced by NS1619. These observations indicate that GM most likely blocks the M2 mAChR-mediated response by competing with Ca²⁺ at the L-type calcium channel. These results provide insights into the vestibulotoxicity of aminoglycoside antibiotics on mammalian VHCs II.

  5. Non-neuronal release of ACh plays a key role in secretory response to luminal propionate in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Takaji; Inoue, Ryo; Matsumoto, Megumi; Yajima, Masako

    2011-02-15

    Colonic chloride secretion is induced by chemical stimuli via the enteric nervous reflex. We have previously demonstrated that propionate stimulates chloride secretion via sensory and cholinergic systems of the mucosa in rat distal colon. In this study, we demonstrate non-neuronal release of ACh in the secretory response to propionate using an Ussing chamber. Mucosa preparations from the colon, not including the myenteric and submucosal plexuses, were used. Luminal addition of propionate and serosal addition of ACh caused biphasic changes in short-circuit current (Isc). TTX (1 μm) had no effects, while atropine (10 μm) significantly inhibited the Isc response to propionate and abolished that to ACh. In response to luminal propionate stimulation, ACh was released into the serosal fluid. A linear relationship was observed between the maximal increase in Isc and the amounts of ACh released 5 min after propionate stimulation. This ACh release induced by propionate was not affected by atropine and bumetanide, although both drugs significantly reduced the Isc responses to propionate. Luminal addition of 3-chloropropionate, an inactive analogue of propionate, abolished both ACh release and Isc response produced by propionate. RT-PCR analysis indicated that isolated crypt cells from the distal colon expressed an enzyme of ACh synthesis (ChAT) and transporters of organic cation (OCTs), but not neuronal CHT1 and VAChT. The isolated crypt cells contained comparable amounts of ACh to the residual muscle tissues including nerve plexuses. In conclusion, the non-neuronal release of ACh from colonocytes coupled with propionate stimulation plays a key role in chloride secretion, via the paracrine action of ACh on muscarinic receptors of colonocytes.

  6. Chemical composition, aroma evaluation, and inhibitory activity towards acetylcholinesterase of essential oils from Gynura bicolor DC.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Nakahashi, Hiroshi; Usami, Atsushi; Matsuda, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    The compositions of the essential oils obtained from leaves and stems of Gynura bicolor DC. were analyzed by GC-MS. One hundred eight components of these oils were identified. (E)-β-caryophyllene (31.42 %), α-pinene (17.11 %), and bicyclogermacrene (8.09 %) were found to be the main components of the leaf oil, while α-pinene (61.42 %), β-pinene (14.39 %), and myrcene (5.10 %) were the major constituents of the stem oil. We found 73 previously unidentified components in these oils from G. bicolor. The oils were also subjected to odor evaluation. Eleven and 12 aroma-active compounds were detected in the leaf and stem oils, respectively. The abilities of these oils to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were determined. The sesquiterpenoids in the oils were found to inhibit AChE activity more strongly than the monoterpenoids in the oils did. It was suggested that the three main components in each essential oil act synergistically against AChE activity. These results show that the essential oils obtained from G. bicolor are a good dietary source of AChE activity inhibition.

  7. Labdane-type diterpenoids from Leonurus heterophyllus and their cholinesterase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tran Manh; Luan, Tran Cong; Vinh, Bui The; Cuong, To Dao; Min, Byung Sun

    2011-04-01

    In the course of screening plants used in natural medicines as memory enhancers, a 70% ethanol extract of the aerial parts of Leonurus heterophyllus showed significant AChE inhibitory activity. Bioassay-guided fractionation and repeated column chromatography led to the isolation of a new labdane-type diterpenoids (1), named leoheteronin F, and six known compounds (2-7). The chemical structures of isolated compounds were elucidated based on extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data. The isolates 1-7 were investigated in vitro for their anticholinesterase activity using mouse cortex AChE enzyme. Leoheteronin A (5) and leopersin G (7), which possess a 15,16-epoxy group at the side chain, were found to be potent in the inhibition of AChE.

  8. Activation of phosphorothionate pesticides based on a cytochrome P450 BM-3 (CYP102 A1) mutant for expanded neurotoxin detection in food using acetylcholinesterase biosensors.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Holger; Schmid, Rolf D; Bachmann, Till T

    2004-03-15

    A novel enzymatic in vitro activation method for phosphorothionates has been developed to allow their detection with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensors. Activation is necessary because this group of insecticides shows nearly no inhibitory effect toward AChE in their pure nonmetabolized form. In contrast, they exert a strong inhibitory effect on AChE after oxidation as it takes place by metabolic activation in higher organisms. Standard chemical methods to oxidize phosphorothionates showed inherent disadvantages that impede their direct use in food analysis. In contrast, a genetically engineered triple mutant of P450 BM-3 (CYP102 A1) could convert the two frequently used insecticides parathion and chlorpyrifos into their oxo variants as was confirmed by GC/MS measurements. The wild-type protein was unable to do so. In the case of chlorpyrifos, the enzymatic activation was as good as the chemical oxidation. In the case of parathion, the P450 activation was more efficient than the oxidation by NBS but neither activation method yielded an AChE inhibition that was as high as with paraoxon. The application of the method to infant food in combination with a disposable AChE biosensor enabled detection of chlorpyrifos and parathion at concentrations down to 20 microg/kg within an overall assay time of 95 min. PMID:15018574

  9. Histamine release inhibition activity of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Tsuchiya, S; Sugimoto, Y; Sugimura, Y; Yamada, Y

    1992-12-01

    Eleven examples of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids (head-to-head; 10, head-to-tail; 1) and one half molecule type (N-methylcoclaurine), were tested by in vitro histamine release inhibition assay. The order of the potency of the inhibitory effect was ranked thus: homoaromoline, aromoline, isotetrandrine, cepharanthine, fangchinoline, obaberine, and tetrandrine. The following substances, cepharanoline, berbamine, oxyacanthine, and cycleanine (head-to-tail structure) had no inhibitory effect. N-Methylcoclaurine showed an inhibitory effect comparable to that of fangchinoline. PMID:1484888

  10. Antipneumococcal activity of neuraminidase inhibiting artocarpin.

    PubMed

    Walther, E; Richter, M; Xu, Z; Kramer, C; von Grafenstein, S; Kirchmair, J; Grienke, U; Rollinger, J M; Liedl, K R; Slevogt, H; Sauerbrei, A; Saluz, H P; Pfister, W; Schmidtke, M

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is a major cause of secondary bacterial pneumonia during influenza epidemics. Neuraminidase (NA) is a virulence factor of both pneumococci and influenza viruses. Bacterial neuraminidases (NAs) are structurally related to viral NA and susceptible to oseltamivir, an inhibitor designed to target viral NA. This prompted us to evaluate the antipneumococcal potential of two NA inhibiting natural compounds, the diarylheptanoid katsumadain A and the isoprenylated flavone artocarpin. Chemiluminescence, fluorescence-, and hemagglutination-based enzyme assays were applied to determine the inhibitory efficiency (IC(50) value) of the tested compounds towards pneumococcal NAs. The mechanism of inhibition was studied via enzyme kinetics with recombinant NanA NA. Unlike oseltamivir, which competes with the natural substrate of NA, artocarpin exhibits a mixed-type inhibition with a Ki value of 9.70 μM. Remarkably, artocarpin was the only NA inhibitor (NAI) for which an inhibitory effect on pneumococcal growth (MIC: 0.99-5.75 μM) and biofilm formation (MBIC: 1.15-2.97 μM) was observable. In addition, we discovered that the bactericidal effect of artocarpin can reduce the viability of pneumococci by a factor of >1000, without obvious harm to lung epithelial cells. This renders artocarpin a promising natural product for further investigations.

  11. Antipneumococcal activity of neuraminidase inhibiting artocarpin.

    PubMed

    Walther, E; Richter, M; Xu, Z; Kramer, C; von Grafenstein, S; Kirchmair, J; Grienke, U; Rollinger, J M; Liedl, K R; Slevogt, H; Sauerbrei, A; Saluz, H P; Pfister, W; Schmidtke, M

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is a major cause of secondary bacterial pneumonia during influenza epidemics. Neuraminidase (NA) is a virulence factor of both pneumococci and influenza viruses. Bacterial neuraminidases (NAs) are structurally related to viral NA and susceptible to oseltamivir, an inhibitor designed to target viral NA. This prompted us to evaluate the antipneumococcal potential of two NA inhibiting natural compounds, the diarylheptanoid katsumadain A and the isoprenylated flavone artocarpin. Chemiluminescence, fluorescence-, and hemagglutination-based enzyme assays were applied to determine the inhibitory efficiency (IC(50) value) of the tested compounds towards pneumococcal NAs. The mechanism of inhibition was studied via enzyme kinetics with recombinant NanA NA. Unlike oseltamivir, which competes with the natural substrate of NA, artocarpin exhibits a mixed-type inhibition with a Ki value of 9.70 μM. Remarkably, artocarpin was the only NA inhibitor (NAI) for which an inhibitory effect on pneumococcal growth (MIC: 0.99-5.75 μM) and biofilm formation (MBIC: 1.15-2.97 μM) was observable. In addition, we discovered that the bactericidal effect of artocarpin can reduce the viability of pneumococci by a factor of >1000, without obvious harm to lung epithelial cells. This renders artocarpin a promising natural product for further investigations. PMID:25592264

  12. Multi-target tacrine-coumarin hybrids: cholinesterase and monoamine oxidase B inhibition properties against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xie, Sai-Sai; Wang, Xiaobing; Jiang, Neng; Yu, Wenying; Wang, Kelvin D G; Lan, Jin-Shuai; Li, Zhong-Rui; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-05-01

    A series of novel tacrine-coumarin hybrids were designed, synthesized and evaluated as multi-target agents against Alzheimer's disease. The biological assays indicated that most of compounds displayed potent inhibitory activity toward AChE and BuChE, and clearly selective inhibition for MAO-B. Among these compounds, 14c exhibited strong inhibitory activity for AChE (IC50 values of 33.63 nM for eeAChE and 16.11 nM for hAChE) and BuChE (IC50 values of 80.72 nM for eqBuChE and 112.72 nM for hBuChE), and the highest inhibitory activity against hMAO-B (IC50 value of 0.24 μM). Kinetic and molecular modeling studies revealed that 14c was a mixed-type inhibitor, binding simultaneously to catalytic, peripheral and mid-gorge sites of AChE. It was also a competitive inhibitor, which covered the substrate and entrance cavities of MAO-B. Moreover, 14c could penetrate the CNS and show low cell toxicity. Overall, these results suggested that 14c might be an excellent multi-target agent for AD treatment. PMID:25812965

  13. Multi-target tacrine-coumarin hybrids: cholinesterase and monoamine oxidase B inhibition properties against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xie, Sai-Sai; Wang, Xiaobing; Jiang, Neng; Yu, Wenying; Wang, Kelvin D G; Lan, Jin-Shuai; Li, Zhong-Rui; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-05-01

    A series of novel tacrine-coumarin hybrids were designed, synthesized and evaluated as multi-target agents against Alzheimer's disease. The biological assays indicated that most of compounds displayed potent inhibitory activity toward AChE and BuChE, and clearly selective inhibition for MAO-B. Among these compounds, 14c exhibited strong inhibitory activity for AChE (IC50 values of 33.63 nM for eeAChE and 16.11 nM for hAChE) and BuChE (IC50 values of 80.72 nM for eqBuChE and 112.72 nM for hBuChE), and the highest inhibitory activity against hMAO-B (IC50 value of 0.24 μM). Kinetic and molecular modeling studies revealed that 14c was a mixed-type inhibitor, binding simultaneously to catalytic, peripheral and mid-gorge sites of AChE. It was also a competitive inhibitor, which covered the substrate and entrance cavities of MAO-B. Moreover, 14c could penetrate the CNS and show low cell toxicity. Overall, these results suggested that 14c might be an excellent multi-target agent for AD treatment.

  14. Inhibition of endocytosis exacerbates TNF-α-induced endothelial dysfunction via enhanced JNK and p38 activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyehun; Nguyen, Hong N; Lamb, Fred S

    2014-04-15

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that causes endothelial dysfunction. Endocytosis of TNF-α receptors (TNFR) precedes endosomal reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which is required for NF-κB activation in vascular smooth muscle cells. It is unknown how endocytosis of TNFRs impacts signaling in endothelial cells. We hypothesized that TNF-α-induced endothelial dysfunction is induced by both endosomal and cell surface events, including NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation, and endocytosis of the TNFR modifies signaling. Mesenteric artery segments from C57BL/6 mice were treated with TNF-α (10 ng/ml) for 22 h in tissue culture, with or without signaling inhibitors (dynasore for endocytosis, SP600125 for JNK, SB203580 for p38, U0126 for ERK), and vascular function was assessed. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh) was impaired by TNF-α, and dynasore exacerbated this, whereas JNK or p38 inhibition prevented these effects. In cultured endothelial cells from murine mesenteric arteries, dynasore potentiated JNK and p38 but not ERK phosphorylation and promoted cell death. NF-κB activation by TNF-α was decreased by dynasore. JNK inhibition dramatically increased both the magnitude and duration of TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation and potentiated intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) activation. Dynasore still inhibited NF-κB activation in the presence of SP600125. Thus TNF-α-induced endothelial dysfunction is both JNK and p38 dependent. Endocytosis modulates the balance of NF-κB and MAPK signaling, and inhibition of NF-κB activation by JNK limits this pro-proliferative signal, which may contribute to endothelial cell death in response to TNF-α.

  15. Scapaundulin C, a novel labdane diterpenoid isolated from Chinese liverwort Scapania undulate, inhibits acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ya-Qi; Zhou, Jin-Chuan; Fan, Pei-Hong; Wang, Shu-Qi; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, scapaundulin C (1), a new labdane diterpenoid, and four related known compounds scapaundulin A (2), 5α, 8α, 9α-trihydroxy-13E-labden-12-one (3), 5α, 8α-dihydroxy-13E-labden-12-one (4), and (13S)-15-hydroxylabd-8 (17)-en-19-oic acid (5), were isolated from the Chinese liverwort Scapania undulate (L.) Dum., using column chromatography. The structures of these compounds were determined on the basis of 1D- and 2D-NMR analyses. The acetylcholinesterase (AchE) inhibitory activity was evaluated using a bioautographic TLC assay and the cytotoxic activity was evaluated by the MTT method. All the compounds were reported for the first time to exhibit moderate AchE inhibitory activity with minimal inhibitory quantities ranging from 250 to 500 ng. All the compounds were tested for their cytotoxicity against five human tumor cell lines, A549, K562, A2780, Hela, and HT29, and compounds 3 and 4 exhibited moderate inhibitory effects on the growth of A2780 cells. PMID:26721712

  16. Effects of the herbicides clomazone, quinclorac, and metsulfuron methyl on acetylcholinesterase activity in the silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) (Heptapteridae).

    PubMed

    dos Santos Miron, Denise; Crestani, Márcia; Rosa Shettinger, Maria; Maria Morsch, Vera; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Angel Tierno, Miguel; Moraes, Gilberto; Vieira, Vania Lucia Pimentel

    2005-07-01

    Fingerlings of the silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) were exposed to three herbicides widely used in rice culture in south Brazil: clomazone, quinclorac, and metsulfuron methyl. LC50 was determined and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was evaluated in brain and muscle tissue of fish exposed to different herbicide concentrations after 96h (short term). The LC50 value (nominal concentration) was 7.32 mg/L for clomazone and 395 mg/L for quinclorac, but was not obtained for metsulfuron-methyl since all fingerlings survived the highest concentration of 1200 mg/L. Brain and muscle AChE activity in unexposed fish were 17.9 and 9.08 micromol/min/g protein, respectively. Clomazone significantly inhibited AChE activity in both tissues, achieving maximal inhibition of about 83% in brain and 89% in muscle tissue. In contrast, quinclorac and metsulfuron methyl caused increases in enzyme activity in the brain (98 and 179%, respectively) and inhibitions in muscle tissue (88 and 56%, respectively). This study demonstrated short-term effects of exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of rice field herbicides on AChE activity in brain and muscle tissue of silver catfish.

  17. Somatostatin inhibits cANP-mediated cholinergic transmission in the myenteric plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.; Owyang, C. )

    1987-11-01

    The mechanism by which somatostatin acts to modulate cholinergic transmission is not clear. In this study the authors investigated the role of the adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) system in mediating cholinergic transmission in the guinea pig myenteric plexus and examined the ability of somatostatin to alter acetylcholine (ACh) release stimulated by various cAMP agonists. Forskolin, 8-bromo-cAMP, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and cholera toxin each stimulated the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh in a dose-related manner. Addition of theophylline enhanced the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh stimulated by these cAMP agonists. The observations suggest that cAMP may serve as a physiological mediator for ACh release from myenteric neurons. Somatostatin inhibited release of ({sup 3}H)ACh evoked by various cAMP agonists in a dose-related manner. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin antagonized the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh evoked by forskolin, VIP, or cholera toxin but had no effect on the inhibitory action of somatostatin on the release of ({sup 3}H)ACh evoked by 8-bromo-cAMP. This suggests that the principal mechanism by which somatostatin inhibits cAMP-mediated cholinergic transmission is via activation of the inhibitory regulatory protein (N{sub i} subunit) of adenyalte cyclase.

  18. Lymphocyte-derived ACh regulates local innate but not adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Colin; Duncan, Gordon S.; Brüstle, Anne; Brenner, Dirk; Tusche, Michael W.; Olofsson, Peder S.; Rosas-Ballina, Mauricio; Tracey, Kevin J.; Mak, Tak W.

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate control of immune responses is a critical determinant of health. Here, we show that choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) is expressed and ACh is produced by B cells and other immune cells that have an impact on innate immunity. ChAT expression occurs in mucosal-associated lymph tissue, subsequent to microbial colonization, and is reduced by antibiotic treatment. MyD88-dependent Toll-like receptor up-regulates ChAT in a transient manner. Unlike the previously described CD4+ T-cell population that is stimulated by norepinephrine to release ACh, ChAT+ B cells release ACh after stimulation with sulfated cholecystokinin but not norepinephrine. ACh-producing B-cells reduce peritoneal neutrophil recruitment during sterile endotoxemia independent of the vagus nerve, without affecting innate immune cell activation. Endothelial cells treated with ACh in vitro reduced endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression in a muscarinic receptor-dependent manner. Despite this ability, ChAT+ B cells were unable to suppress effector T-cell function in vivo. Therefore, ACh produced by lymphocytes has specific functions, with ChAT+ B cells controlling the local recruitment of neutrophils. PMID:23297238

  19. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors with Photoswitchable Inhibition of β-Amyloid Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Photochromic cholinesterase inhibitors were obtained from cis-1,2-α-dithienylethene-based compounds by incorporating one or two aminopolymethylene tacrine groups. All target compounds are potent acetyl- (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitors in the nanomolar concentration range. Compound 11b bearing an octylene linker exhibited interactions with both the catalytic active site (CAS) and the peripheral anionic site (PAS) of AChE. Yet upon irradiation with light, the mechanism of interaction varied from one photochromic form to another, which was investigated by kinetic studies and proved “photoswitchable”. The AChE-induced β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation assay gave further experimental support to this finding: Aβ1–40 aggregation catalyzed by the PAS of AChE might be inhibited by compound 11b in a concentration-dependent manner and seems to occur only with one photochromic form. Computational docking studies provided potential binding modes of the compound. Docking studies and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for the ring-open and -closed form indicate a difference in binding. Although both forms can interact with the PAS, more stable interactions are observed for the ring-open form based upon stabilization of a water molecule network within the enzyme, whereas the ring-closed form lacks the required conformational flexibility for an analogous binding mode. The photoswitchable inhibitor identified might serve as valuable molecular tool to investigate the different biological properties of AChE as well as its role in pathogenesis of AD in in vitro assays. PMID:24628027

  20. Novel Bioactivity of Ellagic Acid in Inhibiting Human Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi; Chen, Wei-Fan; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lin, Li-Jyun; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Chang, Chao-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranates are widely consumed either as fresh fruit or in beverage form as juice and wine. Ellagic acid possesses potent antioxidative properties; it is known to be an effective phytotherapeutic agent with antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic qualities. Ellagic acid (20 to 80 μM) exhibited a potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen; however, it did not inhibit platelet aggregation stimulated by thrombin, arachidonic acid, or U46619. Treatment with ellagic acid (50 and 80 μM) significantly inhibited platelet activation stimulated by collagen; this alteration was accompanied by the inhibition of relative [Ca2+]i mobilization, and the phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and Akt, as well as hydroxyl radical (OH●) formation. In addition, ellagic acid also inhibited p38 MAPK and Akt phosphorylation stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. By contrast, ellagic acid did not significantly affect PKC activation and platelet aggregation stimulated by PDBu. This study is the first to show that, in addition to being considered a possible agent for preventing tumor growth, ellagic acid possesses potent antiplatelet properties. It appears to initially inhibit the PLCγ2-PKC cascade and/or hydroxyl radical formation, followed by decreased phosphorylation of MAPKs and Akt, ultimately inhibiting platelet aggregation. PMID:23533502

  1. Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) autoantibodies suppress the MuSK pathway and ACh receptor retention at the mouse neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Morsch, Marco; Reddel, Stephen W; Liang, Simon X; Phillips, William D

    2014-01-01

    Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) autoantibodies from myasthenia gravis patients can block the activation of MuSK in vitro and/or reduce the postsynaptic localization of MuSK. Here we use a mouse model to examine the effects of MuSK autoantibodies upon some key components of the postsynaptic MuSK pathway and upon the regulation of junctional ACh receptor (AChR) numbers. Mice became weak after 14 daily injections of anti-MuSK-positive patient IgG. The intensity and area of AChR staining at the motor endplate was markedly reduced. Pulse-labelling of AChRs revealed an accelerated loss of pre-existing AChRs from postsynaptic AChR clusters without a compensatory increase in incorporation of (newly synthesized) replacement AChRs. Large, postsynaptic AChR clusters were replaced by a constellation of tiny AChR microaggregates. Puncta of AChR staining also appeared in the cytoplasm beneath the endplate. Endplate staining for MuSK, activated Src, rapsyn and AChR were all reduced in intensity. In the tibialis anterior muscle there was also evidence that phosphorylation of the AChR β-subunit-Y390 was reduced at endplates. In contrast, endplate staining for β-dystroglycan (through which rapsyn couples AChR to the synaptic basement membrane) remained intense. The results suggest that anti-MuSK IgG suppresses the endplate density of MuSK, thereby down-regulating MuSK signalling activity and the retention of junctional AChRs locally within the postsynaptic membrane scaffold. PMID:24860174

  2. Design, synthesis, acetylcholinesterase inhibition and larvicidal activity of girgensohnine analogs on Aedes aegypti, vector of dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Carreño Otero, Aurora L; Vargas Méndez, Leonor Y; Duque L, Jonny E; Kouznetsov, Vladimir V

    2014-05-01

    Girgensohnine alkaloid was used as a natural model in the design and generation of new alkaloid-like α-aminonitrile series that was completed by the use of SSA-catalyzed Strecker reaction between commercial and inexpensive substituted benzaldehydes, piperidine (pyrrolidine, morpholine and N-methylpiperazine) and acetone cyanohydrin. Calculated ADMETox parameters of the designed analogs revealed their good pharmacokinetic profiles indicating lipophilic characteristics. In vitro AChE enzyme test showed that obtained α-aminonitriles could be considered as AChEIs with micromolar IC50 values ranging from 42.0 to 478.0 μM (10.3-124.0 μg/mL). Among this series, the best AChE inhibitor was the pyrrolidine α-aminonitrile 3 (IC50 = 42 μM), followed by the piperidine α-aminonitriles 2 and 6 (IC50 = 45 μM and IC50 = 51 μM, respectively), and the compound 7 (IC50 = 51 μM). In vivo insecticidal activity of more active AChEIs against Aedes aegypti larvae was also performed showing a good larvicidal activity at concentrations less than 140 ppm, highlighting products 2 and 7 that could serve as lead compounds to develop new potent and selective insecticides.

  3. Acetyl cholinesterase activity and muscle contraction in the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus (Lamarck) following chronic phosphate exposure.

    PubMed

    Boettger, S Anne; McClintock, James B

    2012-03-01

    The common shallow-water sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus is capable of surviving inorganic phosphate exposures as high as 3.2 mg L(-1) and organic phosphate exposures of 1000 mg L(-1) . Nonetheless, chronic exposure to low, medium, and high-sublethal concentrations of organic phosphate inhibits the muscle enzyme acetyl cholinesterase (AChE), responsible for the break down of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, as well as inhibiting contractions in the muscles associated with the Aristotle's lantern. AChE activity, measured in both a static enzyme assay and by vesicular staining, displayed concentration-dependent declines of activity in individuals maintained in organic phosphate for 4 weeks. The activity of AChE was not adversely affected by exposure to inorganic phosphate or seawater controls over the same time period. Maximum force of muscle contraction and rates of muscle contraction and relaxation also decreased with chronic exposure to increasing concentrations of organic phosphate. Chronic exposure to inorganic phosphates elicited no response except at the highest concentration, where the maximum force of muscular contraction increased compared to controls. These findings indicate that shallow-water populations of Lytechinus variegatus subjected to organic phosphate pollutants may display impaired muscular activity that is potentially related to the inhibition of the muscle relaxant enzyme AChE, and subsequently muscular overstimulation, and fatigue.

  4. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase: selective inhibition by potent n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates.

    PubMed

    Quistad, Gary B; Fisher, Karl J; Owen, Sarah C; Klintenberg, Rebecka; Casida, John E

    2005-06-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent endogenous phospholipid modulator of diverse biological activities, including inflammation and shock. PAF levels are primarily regulated by PAF acetylhydrolases (PAF-AHs). These enzymes are candidate secondary targets of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and related toxicants. Previously known OP inhibitors of other serine hydrolases were tested with PAF-AH from mouse brain and testes of established functional importance compared with the structurally different human plasma enzyme. Several key OP pesticides and their oxon metabolites were very poor inhibitors of mouse brain and human plasma PAF-AH in vitro but moderately active for mouse brain and blood PAF-AH in vivo (e.g., tribufos defoliant and profenofos insecticide, presumably following oxidative bioactivation). OP compounds were then designed for maximum in vitro potency and selectivity for mouse brain PAF-AH vs. acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Lead compounds were found in a series of benzodioxaphosphorin 2-oxides. Ultrahigh potency and selectivity were achieved with n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates (long-chain sarin analogs): mouse brain and testes IC50 < or = 5 nM for C(8)-C(18) analogs and 0.1-0.6 nM for C(13) and C(14) compounds; human plasma IC50 < or = 2 nM for C(13)-C(18) analogs. AChE inhibitory potency decreased as chain length increased with maximum brain PAF-AH/AChE selectivity (>3000-fold) for C(13)-C(18) compounds. The toxicity of i.p.-administered PAF (LD50 ca. 0.5 mg/kg) was increased less than 2-fold by pretreatment with tribufos or the C(13)n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridate. These studies with a mouse model indicate that PAF-AH is not a major secondary target of OP pesticide poisoning. The optimized PAF-AH inhibitors may facilitate investigations on other aspects of PAF metabolism and action.

  5. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase: selective inhibition by potent n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates.

    PubMed

    Quistad, Gary B; Fisher, Karl J; Owen, Sarah C; Klintenberg, Rebecka; Casida, John E

    2005-06-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent endogenous phospholipid modulator of diverse biological activities, including inflammation and shock. PAF levels are primarily regulated by PAF acetylhydrolases (PAF-AHs). These enzymes are candidate secondary targets of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and related toxicants. Previously known OP inhibitors of other serine hydrolases were tested with PAF-AH from mouse brain and testes of established functional importance compared with the structurally different human plasma enzyme. Several key OP pesticides and their oxon metabolites were very poor inhibitors of mouse brain and human plasma PAF-AH in vitro but moderately active for mouse brain and blood PAF-AH in vivo (e.g., tribufos defoliant and profenofos insecticide, presumably following oxidative bioactivation). OP compounds were then designed for maximum in vitro potency and selectivity for mouse brain PAF-AH vs. acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Lead compounds were found in a series of benzodioxaphosphorin 2-oxides. Ultrahigh potency and selectivity were achieved with n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates (long-chain sarin analogs): mouse brain and testes IC50 < or = 5 nM for C(8)-C(18) analogs and 0.1-0.6 nM for C(13) and C(14) compounds; human plasma IC50 < or = 2 nM for C(13)-C(18) analogs. AChE inhibitory potency decreased as chain length increased with maximum brain PAF-AH/AChE selectivity (>3000-fold) for C(13)-C(18) compounds. The toxicity of i.p.-administered PAF (LD50 ca. 0.5 mg/kg) was increased less than 2-fold by pretreatment with tribufos or the C(13)n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridate. These studies with a mouse model indicate that PAF-AH is not a major secondary target of OP pesticide poisoning. The optimized PAF-AH inhibitors may facilitate investigations on other aspects of PAF metabolism and action. PMID:15893542

  6. Inhibition of PTEN and activation of Akt by menadione.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Kyoko; Nigorikawa, Kiyomi; Tsukamoto, Mariko; Tamura, Namiko; Hazeki, Kaoru; Hazeki, Osamu

    2007-04-01

    Menadione (vitamin K(3)) has been shown to activate Erk in several cell lines. This effect has been shown to be due to the activation of EGF receptors (EGFR) as a result of inhibition of some protein tyrosine phosphatases. In the present study, we examined the effects of menadione on Akt in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The phosphorylation of Akt by menadione was not inhibited by AG1478, an inhibitor of EGFR. Menadione inhibited the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN in a cell-free system. In an intact cell system, menadione inhibited the effect of transfected PTEN on Akt. Thus, one mechanism of its action was considered the accelerated activation of Akt through inhibition of PTEN. This was not the sole mechanism responsible for the EGFR-independent activation of Akt, because menadione attenuated the rate of Akt dephosphorylation even in PTEN-null PC3 cells. The decelerated inactivation of Akt, probably through inhibition of some tyrosine phosphatases, was considered another mechanism of its action.

  7. Inhibition of apple polyphenol oxidase activity by sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shengmin; Luo, Yaguang; Feng, Hao

    2006-05-17

    Sodium chlorite (SC) was shown to have strong efficacy both as a sanitizer to reduce microbial growth on produce and as a browning inhibitor on fresh-cut apples in previous experiments. This study was undertaken to investigate the inhibitory effect of SC on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and the associated mechanisms. The experiment showed that SC had a strong inhibition of apple PPO. The extent of inhibition was influenced by SC concentration and pH. Inhibition was most prominent at pH 4.5, at which approximately 30% of enzyme activity was lost in the presence of 10 mM SC, followed closely by that at pH 4.0 with a 26% reduction in PPO activity. The inhibition mode was determined using Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk plots, which established SC to be a mixed inhibitor of apple PPO for the oxidation of catechol. Preincubation of PPO with 8 mM SC for 8 min caused a maximum of 46% activity reduction compared to noninhibited control. However, preincubation of SC with catechol for 8 min resulted in no additional loss of PPO activity. These findings provide further evidence that the inhibition of PPO activity by SC is due to the inhibition of the enzyme itself rather than removal of the substrate.

  8. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by extracts and constituents from Angelica archangelica and Geranium sylvaticum.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, Steinthor; Gudbjarnason, Sigmundur

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition of several Icelandic medicinal herbs. Ethanolic extracts of Angelica archangelica seeds and the aerial parts of Geranium sylvaticum proved effective, with IC50 values of 2.20 mg/ml and 3.56 mg/ml, respectively. The activity of imperatorin and xanthotoxin from A. archangelica was measured. Xanthotoxin proved much more potent than imperatorin, with an IC50 value of 155 microg/ml (0.72 mM) but that for imperatorin was above 274 microg/ml (1.01 mM). However, furanocoumarins seem to have a minor part in the total activity of this extract. Synergistic interaction was observed between the extracts of A. archangelica and G. sylvaticum. Several medicinal herbs (Achillea millefolium, Filipendula ulmaria, Thymus praecox and Matricaria maritima) did not show AChE inhibitory activity. PMID:18069242

  9. Brain acetycholinesterase activity in botulism-intoxicated mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, T.E.; Samuel, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    Brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in captive-reared mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) that died of botulism was compared with euthanized controls. AChE levels for both groups were within the range reported for normal mallards, and there was no significant difference in mean AChE activity between birds that ingested botulism toxin and died and those that did not.

  10. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors, are under investigation in patients with complement-mediated diseases. Although (pre)clinical research into the effects of these complement inhibitors on wound healing is limited, available data indicate that reduction of complement activation can improve wound healing. Moreover, medicine may take advantage of safe and effective agents that are produced by various microorganisms, symbionts, for example, medicinal maggots, and plants to attenuate complement activation. To conclude, for the development of new wound care strategies, (pre)clinical studies into the roles of complement and the effects of application of complement inhibitors in wound healing are required. PMID:23346185

  11. Inhibition of Naja kaouthia venom activities by plant polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Bavovada, Rapepol; Pakmanee, Narumol; Suttisri, Rutt; Saen-oon, Suwipa

    2005-03-21

    Plant polyphenols from the aqueous extracts of Pentace burmanica, Pithecellobium dulce, Areca catechu and Quercus infectoria were tested for their inhibitory activities against Naja kaouthia (NK) venom by in vitro neutralization method. The first three extracts could completely inhibit the lethality of the venom at 4 LD50 concentration and the venom necrotizing activity at the minimum necrotizing dose while also inhibited up to 90% of the acetylcholinesterase activity of NK venom at much lower tannin concentrations than that of Quercus infectoria. The ED50 of plant tannins in inhibiting NK venom activities varied according to condensed tannins and their content in the extracts. Molecular docking of the complexes between alpha-cobratoxin and either hydrolysable or condensed tannins at their lowest energetic conformations were proposed. The anti-venom activities of these plant polyphenols by selectively blocking the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and non-selectively by precipitation of the venom proteins were suggested.

  12. Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Inhibition of Vasomotor Activity: Evaluation of Single and Combined Treatments With Vitamin A and Insulin in Streptozotocin-Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zobali, Fulya; Besler, Tanju; Ari, Nuray

    2002-01-01

    A positive correlation has been established between increased oxidative stress and cardiovascular diseases in diabetes mellitus. We evaluated the effects of single or combined treatments with vitamin A (retinol acetate, 30 mg/kg/day, for 12-weeks) and insulin (8-10 IU/rat/day for the final 6-week) on vasomotor activity, oxidative stress and retinol metabolism in 12-week streptozotocin diabetic rats. The vasomotor activity was determined by measuring in vitro responsiveness of aorta rings to phenylephrine (PE) and acetylcholine (ACh) in the absence or in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Preincubation with H2O2 (10 μM) produced a significant decrease in PE (1 mM)-induced contraction in untreated-diabetic but not in control rats. Single treatment with insulin counteracted this effect of H2O2 and also reversed the increased contractile response of diabetic aorta to PE, while vitamin A was found to be ineffective. H2O2 (10 μM) also inhibited ACh (1 mM)-stimulated endothelium- dependent relaxation two fold more in diabetic than in control aorta. In the prevention of H2O2-induced inhibition of vascular relaxation to ACh, vitamin A alone was markedly effective while insulin alone was not. The combination of vitamin A plus insulin removed the inhibitory action of H2O2 in diabetic aorta. Diabetic animals displayed an increased level of aorta thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in association with decreased levels of plasma retinol and retinol-binding protein (RBP). Single treatment with insulin, in spite of allowing recovery of normal growth rate and improved glucose and retinol metabolism in diabetic rats, was unable to control TBARS production to the same extent as vitamin A alone. Our findings suggest that the maintenance of ACh-stimulated endothelium-dependent vasorelaxant tone in normal physiological levels depends largely on the prevention and/or inhibition of peroxidative stress, which is achieved by combined treatment with vitamin A plus insulin

  13. Rosemary tea consumption results to anxiolytic- and anti-depressant-like behavior of adult male mice and inhibits all cerebral area and liver cholinesterase activity; phytochemical investigation and in silico studies.

    PubMed

    Ferlemi, Anastasia-Varvara; Katsikoudi, Antigoni; Kontogianni, Vassiliki G; Kellici, Tahsin F; Iatrou, Grigoris; Lamari, Fotini N; Tzakos, Andreas G; Margarity, Marigoula

    2015-07-25

    Our aim was to investigate the possible effects of regular drinking of Rosmarinus officinalis L. leaf infusion on behavior and on AChE activity of mice. Rosemary tea (2% w/w) phytochemical profile was investigated through LC/DAD/ESI-MS(n). Adult male mice were randomly divided into two groups: "Rosemary-treated" that received orally the rosemary tea for 4weeks and "control" that received drinking water. The effects of regular drinking of rosemary tea on behavioral parameters were assessed by passive avoidance, elevated plus maze and forced swimming tests. Moreover, its effects on cerebral and liver cholinesterase (ChE) isoforms activity were examined colorimetricaly. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of diterpenes, flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic derivatives in rosemary tea; the major compounds were quantitatively determined. Its consumption rigorously affected anxiety/fear and depression-like behavior of mice, though memory/learning was unaffected. ChE isoforms activity was significantly decreased in brain and liver of "rosemary treated" mice. In order to explain the tissue ChE inhibition, principal component analysis, pharmacophore alignment and molecular docking were used to explore a possible relationship between main identified compounds of rosemary tea, i.e. rosmarinic acid, luteolin-7-O-glucuronide, caffeic acid and known AChE inhibitors. Results revealed potential common pharmacophores of the phenolic components with the inhibitors. Our findings suggest that rosemary tea administration exerts anxiolytic and antidepressant effects on mice and inhibits ChE activity; its main phytochemicals may function in a similar way as inhibitors.

  14. Suppressing Irrelevant Information: Knowledge Activation or Inhibition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Danielle S.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors examined the role of knowledge activation in the suppression of contextually irrelevant meanings for ambiguous homographs. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants with greater baseball knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of ambiguous words in baseball-related, but not…

  15. Inhibition and activation of porcine squalene epoxidase.

    PubMed

    Bai, M; Prestwich, G D

    1992-03-01

    Pig liver squalene epoxidase (SE) has been partially purified from solubilized microsomes by DEAE-Sephacel and Blue Sepharose 4B chromatography. This stable and reproducible preparation was used to investigate the mechanism of several substrate-like inhibitors of SE and to study the effects of pH, metals, detergents, and cofactors on enzyme activity. Most divalent (1 mM) and trivalent (0.1 mM) metal cations had little effect on SE at pH 7.4; only ferrous and cupric ions showed ca. 50% reduction in SE activity. Interestingly, at pH 8.8, EDTA (10 mM) shows 1.8-fold enhancement of enzyme activity. Among the detergents, Triton X-100 was clearly superior for solubilization and purification of porcine SE; Tween 80, Lubrol-PX, 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]propanesulfonic acid, octyl beta-glucoside, and three different Zwittergents were much less effective for SE solubilization. Partially purified pig liver SE showed maximal activity at pH 8.8-9.0. Trisnorsqualene alcohol and trisnorsqualene cyclopropylamine were noncompetitive inhibitors at pH 8.8, with Ki values of 4 microM and 180 nM, respectively; these two inhibitors were not substrates for SE. In contrast, 26-hydroxysqualene was both a competitive inhibitor with a Ki value of 4 microM at pH 8.8 and a substrate for SE. An unexpected enhancement (up to 350%) of SE activity was observed at pH 7.4 following preincubation with selected nonpolar derivatives of farnesol and farnesoic acid. At pH 8.8, this effect was less dramatic but still evident.

  16. Acetylcholinesterase-Fc Fusion Protein (AChE-Fc): A Novel Potential Organophosphate Bioscavenger with Extended Plasma Half-Life.

    PubMed

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Cohen, Ofer; Ehrlich, Sharon; Epstein, Eyal; Alcalay, Ron; Mazor, Ohad

    2015-08-19

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the physiological target of organophosphate nerve agent compounds. Currently, the development of a formulation for prophylactic administration of cholinesterases as bioscavengers in established risk situations of exposure to nerve agents is the incentive for many efforts. While cholinesterase bioscavengers were found to be highly effective in conferring protection against nerve agent exposure in animal models, their therapeutic use is complicated by short circulatory residence time. To create a bioscavenger with prolonged plasma half-life, compatible with biotechnological production and purification, a chimeric recombinant molecule of HuAChE coupled to the Fc region of human IgG1 was designed. The novel fusion protein, expressed in cultured cells under optimized conditions, maintains its full enzymatic activity, at levels similar to those of the recombinant AChE enzyme. Thus, this novel fusion product retained its binding affinity toward BW284c5 and propidium, and its bioscavenging reactivity toward the organophosphate-AChE inhibitors sarin and VX. Furthermore, when administered to mice, AChE-Fc exhibits exceptional circulatory residence longevity (MRT of 6000 min), superior to any other known cholinesterase-based recombinant bioscavengers. Owing to its optimized pharmacokinetic performance, high reactivity toward nerve agents, and ease of production, AChE-Fc emerges as a promising next-generation organophosphate bioscavenger.

  17. Influence of dimethoate on acetylcholinesterase activity and locomotor function in terrestrial isopods.

    PubMed

    Engenheiro, Elizabeth L; Hankard, Peter K; Sousa, José P; Lemos, Marco F; Weeks, Jason M; Soares, Amadeu M V M

    2005-03-01

    Locomotor behavior in terrestrial organisms is crucial for burrowing, avoiding predators, food seeking, migration, and reproduction; therefore, it is a parameter with ecological relevance. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a nervous system enzyme inhibited by several compounds and widely used as an exposure biomarker in several organisms. Moreover, changes in energy reserves also may indicate an exposure to a stress situation. The aim of this study is to link biomarkers of different levels of biological organization in isopods exposed to increasing doses of dimethoate in semifield conditions. Locomotor parameters, AChE activity, and energy reserves (lipid, glycogen, and protein contents) were evaluated in the isopod Porcellio dilatatus after 48-h and 10-d exposure to dimethoate-contaminated soil. Results showed a clear impairment of both locomotor and AChE activity during the entire study, although effects were more pronounced after 48 h. Most locomotor parameters and AChE activity showed a clear dose-response relationship. By contrast, no clear trend was observed on energetic components. A positive and significant relationship was found between AChE activity and those locomotor parameters indicating activity, and the opposite was observed with those locomotor parameters indicating confusion and disorientation. The results obtained in this study enhance the importance of linking biochemical responses to parameters with ecological relevance at individual level, the value of locomotor behavior as an important marker to assess effects of toxicants, and also the usefulness and the acquisition of ecological relevance by AChE as a biomarker, by linking it with ecologically relevant behavioral parameters.

  18. [Effects of Bt corn straw insecticidal proteins on enzyme activities of Eisenia fetida].

    PubMed

    Shu, Ying-hua; Ma, Hong-hui; Du, Yan; Wang, Jian-wu

    2011-08-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins released from Bt corn can enter soil ecosystem via returning straw into field, root exudation, and pollen fluttering-down. In this study, the straws of Bt corn and its near-isogenic non-Bt line were added into soil with an application rate of 5% and 7.5% to breed Eisenia fetida, and the total protein content and the activities of acetylcholine esterase (AchE), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in E. fetida were determined after 7 and 14 days. Under the same application rate of the straws, the total protein content and GSH-PX activity of E. fetida decreased while the AchE, CAT, and SOD activities increased on the 14th day, compared with those on the 7th day. The Bt corn straw increased the SOD activity and decreased the AchE and GSH-PX activities, but had less effects on the total protein content and CAT activity, compared with non-Bt corn straw. All the results suggested that Bt corn straw had no inhibitory effect on E. fetida total protein but could inhibit the AchE and GSH-PX activities, and could not induce CAT activity but induce SOD activity within a short time.

  19. Effects of carbofuran and deltamethrin on acetylcholinesterase activity in brain and muscle of the common carp.

    PubMed

    Ensibi, Cherif; Hernández-Moreno, David; Míguez Santiyán, M Prado; Daly Yahya, Mohamed Néjib; Rodríguez, Francisco Soler; Pérez-López, Marcos

    2014-04-01

    This work investigated the effect from exposure to insecticides carbofuran and deltamethrin on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the brain and muscle of common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Both pesticides were evaluated through two separate experiments, and carp were exposed in a semi-static system to three different concentrations of carbofuran (10, 50, and 100 μg/L) and deltamethrin (0.08, 0.4, and 0.8 μg/L) during a month with sampling times at 0, 4, 15, and 30 days (n = 7 from each aquarium). AChE activity was significantly inhibited in both organs of carps exposed to carbofuran at all sampling times depending on dose and time, reaching inhibition values of 73.5 and 67.1%, in brain and muscle tissues respectively, after 30 days with the highest concentration. On the contrary, AChE activity was not significantly affected after deltamethrin exposure at all concentrations and times of the assay. This study shows that the measurement of brain and muscle AChE activity in Cyprinus carpio is a useful biomarker of carbamates exposure and/or effects, but has no application with pyrethroids.

  20. Inhibition of existing denitrification enzyme activity by chloramphenicol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, M.H.; Smith, R.L.; Macalady, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Chloramphenicol completely inhibited the activity of existing denitrification enzymes in acetylene-block incubations with (i) sediments from a nitrate-contaminated aquifer and (ii) a continuous culture of denitrifying groundwater bacteria. Control flasks with no antibiotic produced significant amounts of nitrous oxide in the same time period. Amendment with chloramphenicol after nitrous oxide production had begun resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of nitrous oxide production. Chloramphenicol also decreased (>50%) the activity of existing denitrification enzymes in pure cultures of Pseudomonas denitrificans that were harvested during log- phase growth and maintained for 2 weeks in a starvation medium lacking electron donor. Short-term time courses of nitrate consumption and nitrous oxide production in the presence of acetylene with P. denitrificans undergoing carbon starvation were performed under optimal conditions designed to mimic denitrification enzyme activity assays used with soils. Time courses were linear for both chloramphenicol and control flasks, and rate estimates for the two treatments were significantly different at the 95% confidence level. Complete or partial inhibition of existing enzyme activity is not consistent with the current understanding of the mode of action of chloramphenicol or current practice, in which the compound is frequently employed to inhibit de novo protein synthesis during the course of microbial activity assays. The results of this study demonstrate that chloramphenicol amendment can inhibit the activity of existing denitrification enzymes and suggest that caution is needed in the design and interpretation of denitrification activity assays in which chloramphenicol is used to prevent new protein synthesis.

  1. Oxime-mediated in vitro reactivation kinetic analysis of organophosphates-inhibited human and electric eel acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Arvind Kumar; Sharma, Rahul; Gupta, Bhanushree; Musilek, Kamil; Kuca, Kamil; Acharya, Jyotiranjan; Ghosh, Kallol K

    2016-06-01

    Organophosphate (OP)-based pesticides and nerve agents are highly toxic compounds which interrupt the catalytic mechanism of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by phosphorylating the hydroxyl moiety of serine residue. The inhibited enzyme can be reactivated by the nucleophilic action of oxime reactivators. To analyze the effect of different AChE sources on reactivation efficacy of reactivators, several in vivo studies have carried out using variety of AChE sources like pig, rat and monkey. Investigations on species differences provide a better insight for the development of new reactivators. Hence, present study was mainly targeted on comparative analysis of the reactivation of electric eel and human AChE inhibited by different OP. A series of butene-linked bis-pyridinium mono oximes which vary in functional groups present at the second pyridinium ring have been examined against sarin, VX, tabun and ethyl-paraoxon-poisoned AChE. In case of tabun-inhibited AChEs, tested oximes were better than reference oximes. For VX-poisoned human AChE, reactivator K251 (kr2;1.51 mM (-) (1 )min (-) (1)) showed good reactivation efficacy with standard oximes. Studies stipulated that butene-linked oximes consisting of different functional moieties are good reactivators and found to have better efficacy to reactivate nerve agent-inhibited human AChE in comparison to eel AChE. PMID:27101948

  2. Upregulation of M3 muscarinic receptor inhibits cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3-mAChR) is stably expressed in the myocardium, but its pathophysiological role remains largely undefined. This study aimed to investigate the role of M3-mAChR in cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Methods Cardiac-specific M3-mAChR overexpression transgenic (TG) mice and rat H9c2 cardiomyoblasts with ectopic expression of M3-mAChR were established. Models of cardiac hypertrophy were induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or Ang II infusion in the mice in vivo, and by isoproterenol (ISO) or Ang II treatment of H9c2 cells in vitro. Cardiac hypertrophy was evaluated by electrocardiography (ECG) measurement, hemodynamic measurement and histological analysis. mRNA and protein expression were detected by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Results M3-mAChR was upregulated in hypertrophic heart, while M2-mAChR expression did not change significantly. M3-mAChR overexpression significantly attenuated the increased expression of atrial natriuretic peptide and β-myosin heavy chain induced by Ang II both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, M3-mAChR overexpression downregulated AT1 receptor expression and inhibited the activation of MAPK signaling in the heart. Conclusion The upregulation of M3-mAChR during myocardial hypertrophy could relieve the hypertrophic response provoked by Ang II, and the mechanism may involve the inhibition of MAPK signaling through the downregulation of AT1 receptor. PMID:24028210

  3. The stabilization of Au NP-AChE nanocomposites by biosilica encapsulation for the development of a thiocholine biosensor.

    PubMed

    Buiculescu, Raluca; Chaniotakis, Nikos A

    2012-08-01

    We report on the construction of an amperometric biosensor based on the immobilization of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) onto gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The active enzyme is covalently bound directly onto the surface of the Au NPs via a thiol bond. This immobilization provides increased stability and high electron-transfer between the colloidal Au NPs, the catalyst and the transducer surface. To further increase the biosensor stability by protecting the enzyme from denaturation and protease attack, a layer of biosilica was grown around the Au NP enzyme nanocomposite. All steps, i.e., the conjugation of the enzyme to the gold nanoparticles and the encapsulation into biosilica, are monitored and confirmed by ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy. The stabilizing effect of the entrapment was evaluated amperometrically, while the operation of the biosensor was monitored over a period of 4 months. The initial sensitivity of the biosensor was calculated to be 27.58 nA mM(-1) with a linear response to the concentration of the substrate in the range from 0.04 to 0.4 mM. It is thus shown that the biosilica nanocomposites doped with Au NPs-AChE conjugates create a system that provides both signal mediation and significant enzyme stabilization over the existing AChE biosensor. The biosensor had retained all its activity at the end of the 4 months, compared with the normal AChE biosensor whose activity reached 50% after only 42 days of operation.

  4. Residues Responsible for the Selectivity of α-Conotoxins for Ac-AChBP or nAChRs

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bo; Xiang, Shihua; Li, Mengsen

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are targets for developing new drugs to treat severe pain, nicotine addiction, Alzheimer disease, epilepsy, etc. α-Conotoxins are biologically and chemically diverse. With 12–19 residues and two disulfides, they can be specifically selected for different nAChRs. Acetylcholine-binding proteins from Aplysia californica (Ac-AChBP) are homologous to the ligand-binding domains of nAChRs and pharmacologically similar. X-ray structures of the α-conotoxin in complex with Ac-AChBP in addition to computer modeling have helped to determine the binding site of the important residues of α-conotoxin and its affinity for nAChR subtypes. Here, we present the various α-conotoxin residues that are selective for Ac-AChBP or nAChRs by comparing the structures of α-conotoxins in complex with Ac-AChBP and by modeling α-conotoxins in complex with nAChRs. The knowledge of these binding sites will assist in the discovery and design of more potent and selective α-conotoxins as drug leads. PMID:27727162

  5. Fluoxetine Inhibits NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation: Implication in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ren-Hong; Tan, Jun; Sun, Xi-Yang; Lu, Ming; Ding, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emerging evidence indicates that NLRP3 inflammasome-induced inflammation plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of depression. Thus, inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome activation may offer a therapeutic benefit in the treatment of depression. Fluoxetine, a widely used antidepressant, has been shown to have potential antiinflammatory activity, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Methods: We used a chronic mild stress model and cultured primary macrophage/microglia to investigate the effects of fluoxetine on NLRP3 inflammasome and its underlying mechanisms. Results: We demonstrated that fluoxetine significantly suppressed NLRP3 inflammasome activation, subsequent caspase-1 cleavage, and interleukin-1β secretion in both peripheral macrophages and central microglia. We further found that fluoxetine reduced reactive oxygen species production, attenuated the phosphorylation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase, and inhibited the association of protein kinase with NLRP3. These data indicate that fluoxetine inhibits the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome via downregulating reactive oxygen species-protein kinase-NLRP3 signaling pathway. Correspondingly, in vivo data showed that fluoxetine also suppressed NLRP3 inflammasome activation in hippocampus and macrophages of chronic mild stress mice and alleviated chronic mild stress-induced depression-like behavior. Conclusions: Our findings reveal that fluoxetine confers an antidepressant effect partly through inhibition of peripheral and central NLRP3 inflammasome activation and suggest the potential clinical use of fluoxetine in NLRP3 inflammasome-driven inflammatory diseases such as depression. PMID:27207922

  6. Insecticidal and Enzyme Inhibitory Activities of Sparassol and Its Analogues against Drosophila suzukii.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junheon; Jang, Miyeon; Lee, Kyoung-Tae; Yoon, Kyungjae Andrew; Park, Chung Gyoo

    2016-07-13

    Drosophila suzukii is an economically important pest in America and Europe as well as in Asia. Sparassol and methyl orsellinate are naturally produced by the cultivating mushrooms Sparassis cripta and Sparassis latifolia. Fumigant and contact toxicities of synthetic sparassol and its analogues, methyl orsellinate and methyl 2,4-dimethoxy-6-methylbenzoate (DMB), were investigated. Negligible fumigant activity was observed from the tested compounds. However, DMB showed the strongest contact toxicity, followed by sparassol and methyl orsellinate. The possible modes of action of the compounds were assessed for their acetylcholinesterase (AChE)- and glutathione S-transferase (GST)-inhibiting activities. AChE activity was weakly inhibited by methyl orsellinate and DMB, but GST was inhibited by sparassol, methyl orsellinate, and DMB. Thus, DMB could be a promising alternative to common insecticides as it can be easily synthesized from sparassol, which is the natural product of Sparassis species. Sparassis species could be an industrial resource of DMB. PMID:27327201

  7. Ghrelin Inhibits Oligodendrocyte Cell Death by Attenuating Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Youn

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, we reported the antiapoptotic effect of ghrelin in spinal cord injury-induced apoptotic cell death of oligodendrocytes. However, how ghrelin inhibits oligodendrocytes apoptosis, is still unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we examined whether ghrelin inhibits microglia activation and thereby inhibits oligodendrocyte apoptosis. Methods Using total cell extracts prepared from BV-2 cells activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with or without ghrelin, the levels of p-p38 phosphor-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38MAPK), phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (pJNK), p-c-Jun, and pro-nerve growth factor (proNGF) were examined by Western blot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was investigated by using dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. To examine the effect of ghrelin on oligodendrocyte cell death, oligodendrocytes were cocultured in transwell chambers of 24-well plates with LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. After 48 hours incubation, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase 2'-deoxyuridine, 5'-triphosphate nick end labeling staining were assessed. Results Ghrelin treatment significantly decreased levels of p-p38MAPK, p-JNK, p-c-Jun, and proNGF in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. ROS production increased in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells was also significantly inhibited by ghrelin treatment. In addition, ghrelin significantly inhibited oligodendrocyte cell death when cocultured with LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. Conclusion Ghrelin inhibits oligodendrocyte cell death by decreasing proNGF and ROS production as well as p38MAPK and JNK activation in activated microglia as an anti-inflammatory hormone. PMID:25309797

  8. Mesencephalic stimulation elicits inhibition of phrenic nerve activity in cat.

    PubMed

    Gallman, E A; Lawing, W L; Millhorn, D E

    1991-05-01

    1. Previous work from this laboratory has indicated that the mesencephalon is the anatomical substrate for a mechanism capable of inhibiting central respiratory drive in glomectomized cats for periods of up to 1 h or more following brief exposure to systemic hypoxia; phrenic nerve activity was used as an index of central respiratory drive. 2. The present study was undertaken to further localize the region responsible for the observed post-hypoxic inhibition of respiratory drive. We studied the phrenic nerve response to stimulations of the mesencephalon in anaesthetized, paralysed peripherally chemo-denervated cats with end-expired PCO2 and body temperature servo-controlled. 3. Stimulations of two types were employed. Electrical stimulation allowed rapid determination of sites from which phrenic inhibition could be elicited. Microinjections of excitatory amino acids were used subsequently in order to confine excitation to neuronal cell bodies and not axons of passage. 4. Stimulation of discrete regions of the ventromedial aspect of the mesencephalon in the vicinity of the red nucleus produced substantial inhibition of phrenic activity which lasted up to 45 min. Stimulation of other areas of the mesencephalon either produced no phrenic inhibition or resulted in a slight stimulation of phrenic activity. 5. The results are discussed in the context of the central respiratory response to hypoxia. PMID:1676420

  9. Anisotropic a-C:H from Compression of Polyacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, M.; Parrinello, M.; Chiarotti, G. L.; Focher, P.; Tosatti, E.

    1996-03-01

    We have simulated the transformation of crystalline trans-polyacetylene into a-C:H under pressure by constant pressure ab initio molecular dynamics. Polyacetylene undergoes a gradual saturation of C-C bonds via chain interlinks, ending up at ~50 GPa with a-C:H containing 80% sp3 carbon atoms. The sp2-->sp3 conversion is irreversible and does not reverse by returning to zero pressure. The final a-C:H is a wide gap insulator and, at variance with the conventionally generated a-C:H, is highly anisotropic keeping some memory of the original polyacetylene chain axis.

  10. MuSK Myasthenia Gravis IgG4 Disrupts the Interaction of LRP4 with MuSK but Both IgG4 and IgG1-3 Can Disperse Preformed Agrin-Independent AChR Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Koneczny, Inga; Cossins, Judith; Waters, Patrick; Beeson, David; Vincent, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A variable proportion of patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (MG) have autoantibodies to muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). During development agrin, released from the motor nerve, interacts with low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4 (LRP4), which then binds to MuSK; MuSK interaction with the intracellular protein Dok7 results in clustering of the acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on the postsynaptic membrane. In mature muscle, MuSK helps maintain the high density of AChRs at the neuromuscular junction. MuSK antibodies are mainly IgG4 subclass, which does not activate complement and can be monovalent, thus it is not clear how the antibodies cause disruption of AChR numbers or function to cause MG. We hypothesised that MuSK antibodies either reduce surface MuSK expression and/or inhibit the interaction with LRP4. We prepared MuSK IgG, monovalent Fab fragments, IgG1-3 and IgG4 fractions from MuSK-MG plasmas. We asked whether the antibodies caused endocytosis of MuSK in MuSK-transfected cells or if they inhibited binding of LRP4 to MuSK in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. In parallel, we investigated their ability to reduce AChR clusters in C2C12 myotubes induced by a) agrin, reflecting neuromuscular development, and b) by Dok7- overexpression, producing AChR clusters that more closely resemble the adult neuromuscular synapse. Total IgG, IgG4 or IgG1-3 MuSK antibodies were not endocytosed unless cross-linked by divalent anti-human IgG. MuSK IgG, Fab fragments and IgG4 inhibited the binding of LRP4 to MuSK and reduced agrin-induced AChR clustering in C2C12 cells. By contrast, IgG1-3 antibodies did not inhibit LRP4-MuSK binding but, surprisingly, did inhibit agrin-induced clustering. Moreover, both IgG4 and IgG1-3 preparations dispersed agrin-independent AChR clusters in Dok7-overexpressing C2C12 cells. Thus interference by IgG4 antibodies of the LRP4-MuSK interaction will be one pathogenic mechanism of MuSK antibodies, but IgG1-3 Mu

  11. Sympathetic α₃β₂-nAChRs mediate cerebral neurogenic nitrergic vasodilation in the swine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Reggie Hui-Chao; Liu, Yi-Qing; Chen, Po-Yi; Liu, Chin-Hung; Chen, Mei-Fang; Lin, Hung-Wen; Kuo, Jon-Son; Premkumar, Louis S; Lee, Tony Jer-Fu

    2011-08-01

    The α(7)-nicotinic ACh receptor (α(7)-nAChR) on sympathetic neurons innervating basilar arteries of pigs crossed bred between Landrace and Yorkshire (LY) is known to mediate nicotine-induced, β-amyloid (Aβ)-sensitive nitrergic neurogenic vasodilation. Preliminary studies, however, demonstrated that nicotine-induced cerebral vasodilation in pigs crossbred among Landrace, Yorkshire, and Duroc (LYD) was insensitive to Aβ and α-bungarotoxin (α-BGTX). We investigated nAChR subtype on sympathetic neurons innervating LYD basilar arteries. Nicotine-induced relaxation of porcine isolated basilar arteries was examined by tissue bath myography, inward currents on nAChR-expressing oocytes by two-electrode voltage recording, and mRNA and protein expression in the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) and middle cervical ganglion (MCG) by reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine-induced basilar arterial relaxation was not affected by Aβ, α-BGTX, and α-conotoxin IMI (α(7)-nAChR antagonists), or α-conotoxin AuIB (α(3)β(4)-nAChR antagonist) but was inhibited by tropinone and tropane (α(3)-containing nAChR antagonists) and α-conotoxin MII (selective α(3)β(2)-nAChR antagonist). Nicotine-induced inward currents in α(3)β(2)-nAChR-expressing oocytes were inhibited by α-conotoxin MII but not by α-BGTX, Aβ, or α-conotoxin AuIB. mRNAs of α(3)-, α(7)-, β(2)-, and β(4)-subunits were expressed in both SCGs and MCGs with significantly higher mRNAs of α(3)-, β(2)-, and β(4)-subunits than that of α(7)-subunit. The Aβ-insensitive sympathetic α(3)β(2)-nAChR mediates nicotine-induced cerebral nitrergic neurogenic vasodilation in LYD pigs. The different finding from Aβ-sensitive α(7)-nAChR in basilar arteries of LY pigs may offer a partial explanation for different sensitivities of individuals to Aβ in causing diminished cerebral nitrergic vasodilation in diseases involving Aβ.

  12. Antioxidative Properties and Effect of Quercetin and Its Glycosylated Form (Rutin) on Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase Activities.

    PubMed

    Ademosun, Ayokunle O; Oboh, Ganiyu; Bello, Fatai; Ayeni, Peluola O

    2016-10-01

    This study sought to investigate the anticholinesterase and antioxidative properties of quercetin and its glycosylated conjugate, rutin. The in vitro inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activities, inhibition of Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation in rat's brain homogenates, radicals scavenging, and Fe(2+)-chelating abilities of the flavonoids were investigated in vitro with concentrations of the samples ranging from 0.06 to 0.6 mM. Quercetin had significantly higher AChE and BChE inhibitory abilities than rutin. Quercetin also had stronger inhibition of Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation in rat's brain homogenates. Similarly, quercetin had higher radical scavenging abilities than rutin. Quercetin also had stronger Fe(2+)-chelating ability than rutin. The inhibition of cholinesterases and antioxidative properties are possible mechanisms by which the flavonoids can be used in the management of oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration.

  13. Modelling interactions between Loop1 of Fasciculin2 (Fas2) and Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase ( Tc AChE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Jiande; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2006-11-01

    Four interaction models for the binding of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase ( TcAChE) with Loop1 of Fasciculin2 are investigated at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. The total binding energy of three fragments (P1-P3) which belong to the omega loop Cys67-Cys94 of TcAChE contributes almost 67% of the entire binding, suggesting the domination of this omega loop on the interaction between AChE and Loop1 of Fas2. The energy decomposition illustrates that the interactions mainly consist of electrostatic components. The polar solvent which reduces the binding energies of the studied models implies the significant impact of the solvent on the binding of Fas2 and AChE.

  14. Thyrsiferol Inhibits Mitochondrial Respiration and HIF-1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Fakhri; Falkenberg, Miriam; Ioannou, Efstathia; Roussis, Vassilios; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxic marine red algal metabolite thyrsiferol (1) was found to inhibit hypoxia-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activation in T47D human breast tumor cells (66% inhibition at 3 μM). Compound 1 also suppressed hypoxic induction of HIF-1 target genes (VEGF, GLUT-1) at the mRNA level, and displayed tumor cell line-selective time-dependent inhibition of cell viability/proliferation. Mechanistic studies revealed that 1 selectively suppressed mitochondrial respiration at Complex I (IC50 3 μM). Thyrsiferol represents a prototypical, structurally unique electron transport chain inhibitor. The apparent rotenone-like activity may contribute to the observed cytotoxicity of 1 and play an important role in Laurencia chemical defense. PMID:21785662

  15. Conotoxin Interactions with α9α10-nAChRs: Is the α9α10-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor an Important Therapeutic Target for Pain Management?

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Sarasa A.; Christie, MacDonald J.

    2015-01-01

    The α9α10-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated in pain and has been proposed to be a novel target for analgesics. However, the evidence to support the involvement of the α9α10-nAChR in pain is conflicted. This receptor was first implicated in pain with the characterisation of conotoxin Vc1.1, which is highly selective for α9α10-nAChRs and is an efficacious analgesic in chronic pain models with restorative capacities and no reported side effects. Numerous other analgesic conotoxin and non-conotoxin molecules have been subsequently characterised that also inhibit α9α10-nAChRs. However, there is evidence that α9α10-nAChR inhibition is neither necessary nor sufficient for analgesia. α9α10-nAChR-inhibiting analogues of Vc1.1 have no analgesic effects. Genetically-modified α9-nAChR knockout mice have a phenotype that is markedly different from the analgesic profile of Vc1.1 and similar conotoxins, suggesting that the conotoxin effects are largely independent of α9α10-nAChRs. Furthermore, an alternative mechanism of analgesia by Vc1.1 and other similar conotoxins involving non-canonical coupling of GABAB receptors to voltage-gated calcium channels is known. Additional incongruities regarding α9α10-nAChRs in analgesia are discussed. A more comprehensive characterisation of the role of α9α10-nAChRs in pain is crucial for understanding the analgesic action of conotoxins and for improved drug design. PMID:26426047

  16. Inhibition of catalase activity in vitro by diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yoki; Murakami, Sumika; Sagae, Toshiyuki

    1996-02-09

    The effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the activity of catalase, an intracellular anti-oxidant, was investigated because H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is a cytotoxic oxidant, and catalase released from alveolar cells is an important antioxidant in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung. DEP inhibited the activity of bovine liver catalase dose-dependently, to 25-30% of its original value. The inhibition of catalase by DEP was observed only in the presence of anions such as Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, or thiocyanate. Other anions, such as CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}} or SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, and cations such as K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, or Fe{sup 2+}, did not affect the activity of catalase, even in the presence of DEP extract. Catalase from guinea pig alveolar cells and catalase from red blood cells were also inhibited by DEP extracts, as was catalase from bovine liver. These results suggest that DEP taken up in the lung and located on alveolar spaces might cause cell injury by inhibiting the activity of catalase in epithelial lining fluid, enhancing the toxicity of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated from cells in addition to that of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} generated by the chemical reaction of DEP with oxygen. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Cyanate-mediated inhibition of neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, M; Eaton, J W; Wolff, S P

    1997-01-01

    Cyanate (CNO-) forms spontaneously in solutions containing urea, and is present in urine and the body fluids of uraemic patients. We have explored the possibility that CNO- might be one of the unknown substances responsible for the reported impairment, by urine and uraemic plasma, of neutrophil oxidative metabolism (especially as measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence). Luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence generated by human neutrophils derives predominantly from the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) which produces hypochlorous acid from H2O2 and Cl-. We hypothesized that CNO- (which resembles the 'pseudohalide' thiocyanate, an alternative substrate for MPO) might somehow interfere with the activity of MPO. In support of this, we find: (i) CNO- inhibits both peroxidative and halogenating activities of MPO and also inhibits the enzyme within intact human neutrophils; (ii) the inhibition is H2O2-dependent, irreversible, accompanied by covalent addition of [14C]CNO- (or a carbon-containing fragment thereof) to the enzyme; (iii) CNO- also inhibits Cl-/H2O2/MPO-mediated bacterial killing. Impairment of this arm of neutrophil bactericidal activity by CNO- formed from urea may be one factor in the risk of urinary-tract infection associated with urinary stasis and perhaps in the generalized increase in susceptibility to infection in uraemic patients. PMID:9337863

  18. ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENICALS INHIBIT THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES.

    S. Lin1, L. M. Del Razo1, M. Styblo1, C. Wang2, W. R. Cullen2, and D.J. Thomas3. 1Univ. North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 2Univ. British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3National Health and En...

  19. Curcumin directly inhibits the transport activity of GLUT1

    PubMed Central

    Gunnink, Leesha K.; Alabi, Ola D.; Kuiper, Benjamin D.; Gunnink, Stephen M.; Schuiteman, Sam J.; Strohbehn, Lauren E.; Hamilton, Kathryn E.; Wrobel, Kathryn E.; Louters, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a major ingredient in turmeric, has a long history of medicinal applications in a wide array of maladies including treatment for diabetes and cancer. Seemingly counterintuitive to the documented hypoglycemic effects of curcumin, however, a recent report indicates that curcumin directly inhibits glucose uptake in adipocytes. The major glucose transporter in adipocytes is GLUT4. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of curcumin in cell lines where the major transporter is GLUT1. We report that curcumin has an immediate inhibitory effect on basal glucose uptake in L929 fibroblast cells with a maximum inhibition of 80% achieved at 75 μM curcumin. Curcumin also blocks activation of glucose uptake by azide, glucose deprivation, hydroxylamine, or phenylarsine oxide. Inhibition does not increase with exposure time and the inhibitory effects reverse within an hour. Inhibition does not appear to involve a reaction between curcumin and the thiol side chain of a cysteine residue since neither prior treatment of cells with iodoacetamide nor curcumin with cysteine alters curcumin’s inhibitory effects. Curcumin is a mixed inhibitor reducing the Vmax of 2DG transport by about half with little effect on the Km. The inhibitory effects of curcumin are not additive to the effects of cytochalasin B and 75 μM curcumin actually reduces specific cytochalasin B binding by 80%. Taken together, the data suggest that curcumin binds directly to GLUT1 at a site that overlaps with the cytochalasin B binding site and thereby inhibits glucose transport. A direct inhibition of GLUT proteins in intestinal epithelial cells would likely reduce absorption of dietary glucose and contribute to a hypoglycemic effect of curcumin. Also, inhibition of GLUT1 activity might compromise cancer cells that overexpress GLUT1 and be another possible mechanism for the documented anticancer effects of curcumin. PMID:27039889

  20. Irregular activity arises as a natural consequence of synaptic inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Terman, D.; Rubin, J. E.; Diekman, C. O.

    2013-12-15

    Irregular neuronal activity is observed in a variety of brain regions and states. This work illustrates a novel mechanism by which irregular activity naturally emerges in two-cell neuronal networks featuring coupling by synaptic inhibition. We introduce a one-dimensional map that captures the irregular activity occurring in our simulations of conductance-based differential equations and mathematically analyze the instability of fixed points corresponding to synchronous and antiphase spiking for this map. We find that the irregular solutions that arise exhibit expansion, contraction, and folding in phase space, as expected in chaotic dynamics. Our analysis shows that these features are produced from the interplay of synaptic inhibition with sodium, potassium, and leak currents in a conductance-based framework and provides precise conditions on parameters that ensure that irregular activity will occur. In particular, the temporal details of spiking dynamics must be present for a model to exhibit this irregularity mechanism and must be considered analytically to capture these effects.

  1. Erosion of a-C:H films under interaction with nitrous oxide afterglow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalavutdinov, R. Kh.; Gorodetsky, A. E.; Bukhovets, V. L.; Zakharov, A. P.; Mazul, I. V.

    2009-06-01

    Hydrocarbon film removal using chemically active oxygen formed in a direct current glow discharge with a hollow cathode in nitrous oxide was investigated. In the afterglow region sufficiently fast removal of a-C:H films about 500 nm thick during about 8 h was achieved at N 2O pressure of 12 Pa and 370 K. The erosion rate in the afterglow region was directly proportional to the initial pressure and increased two orders of magnitude at temperature rising from 300 to 500 K. The products of a-C:H film plasmolysis were CO, CO 2, H 2O, and H 2. After removal of a-C:H films previously deposited on stainless steel, molybdenum or tungsten 3-30 nm thick oxide films were formed on the substrates. Reactions of oxygen ion neutralization and atomic oxygen recombination suppressed further oxidation of the materials.

  2. Murine cytotoxic activated macrophages inhibit aconitase in tumor cells. Inhibition involves the iron-sulfur prosthetic group and is reversible.

    PubMed

    Drapier, J C; Hibbs, J B

    1986-09-01

    Previous studies show that cytotoxic activated macrophages cause inhibition of DNA synthesis, inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, and loss of intracellular iron from tumor cells. Here we examine aconitase, a citric acid cycle enzyme with a catalytically active iron-sulfur cluster, to determine if iron-sulfur clusters are targets for activated macrophage-induced iron removal. Results show that aconitase activity declines dramatically in target cells after 4 h of co-cultivation with activated macrophages. Aconitase inhibition occurs simultaneously with arrest of DNA synthesis, another early activated macrophage-induced metabolic change in target cells. Dithionite partially prevents activated macrophage induced aconitase inhibition. Furthermore, incubation of injured target cells in medium supplemented with ferrous ion plus a reducing agent causes near-complete reconstitution of aconitase activity. The results show that removal of a labile iron atom from the [4Fe-4S] cluster, by a cytotoxic activated macrophage-mediated mechanism, is causally related to aconitase inhibition. PMID:3745439

  3. Nucleosomes Inhibit Cas9 Endonuclease Activity in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Hinz, John M; Laughery, Marian F; Wyrick, John J

    2015-12-01

    During Cas9 genome editing in eukaryotic cells, the bacterial Cas9 enzyme cleaves DNA targets within chromatin. To understand how chromatin affects Cas9 targeting, we characterized Cas9 activity on nucleosome substrates in vitro. We find that Cas9 endonuclease activity is strongly inhibited when its target site is located within the nucleosome core. In contrast, the nucleosome structure does not affect Cas9 activity at a target site within the adjacent linker DNA. Analysis of target sites that partially overlap with the nucleosome edge indicates that the accessibility of the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) is the critical determinant of Cas9 activity on a nucleosome.

  4. Lead-induced effects on learning/memory and fear/anxiety are correlated with disturbances in specific cholinesterase isoform activity and redox imbalance in adult brain.

    PubMed

    Ferlemi, Anastasia-Varvara; Avgoustatos, Dionisis; Kokkosis, Alexandros G; Protonotarios, Vasilis; Constantinou, Caterina; Margarity, Marigoula

    2014-05-28

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the underlying mechanism of lead (Pb)-induced effects on learning/memory and fear/anxiety behavior involves changes either on AChE G4 (most abundant in brain) or on G1 isoform activity, and/or to a putative local disruption of oxidant/antioxidant balance. Adult male mice were randomly divided into two groups (18 animals/group): a vehicle group [500ppm (mg/L) CH3COONa/day for 4weeks in their drinking water] and a Pb-treated group [500ppm Pb(CH3COO)2/day for 4weeks in their drinking water]. At the end of the treatment period, mice were subjected to the behavioral tasks. Learning/memory was tested by step-through passive avoidance test, whereas fear/anxiety was studied using the elevated plus-maze and thigmotaxis tests. Pb levels in mice brain were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. AChE activity was determined colorimetrically, and GSH and MDA levels fluorometrically in whole brain minus cerebellum, cerebral cortex, midbrain, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum. The possible correlations between learning/memory or fear/anxiety behavior with the AChE activity and/or the lipid peroxidation levels and GSH content were also examined. Pb consumption caused significant deficits on mice learning/memory ability and increased anxiety. The consumption of the Pb solution inhibited the activity of the two AChE isoforms in all brain regions tested. Moreover, Pb exposure increased lipid peroxidation and decreased GSH levels in all brain regions examined. Spearman correlation analysis revealed that the coefficients between the particular behaviors, AChE activity and redox balance were brain region- and AChE isoform-specific. PMID:24768645

  5. Heparin enhances osteoclastic bone resorption by inhibiting osteoprotegerin activity.

    PubMed

    Irie, Atsushi; Takami, Masamichi; Kubo, Hideo; Sekino-Suzuki, Naoko; Kasahara, Kohji; Sanai, Yutaka

    2007-08-01

    Heparin is a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan and has been shown to activate osteoclastic bone resorption though how is not yet clear. Here we investigate the molecule involved in heparin-induced activation of osteoclasts using an in vitro osteoclast culture assay. The formation and activation of osteoclasts are induced by receptor activator of NFkappaB ligand (RANKL) on osteoblasts, and inhibited by osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor of RANKL, which is secreted from osteoblasts. In a coculture of mouse bone marrow cells and osteoblasts treated with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) and prostaglandin E(2) on dentin slices, the bone marrow cells differentiate into osteoclasts, and resorption pits are formed on the dentin slices. Addition of heparin, various glycosaminoglycans, and chemically modified heparins to the coculture reveals that heparin enhances the pit-forming activity of osteoclasts, and this effect of heparin on the activation of osteoclasts is dependent on its sugar chain structure. By contrast, mRNA expression levels of RANKL, RANK, and OPG in the coculture are not altered by heparin treatment. Furthermore, neither RANK nor RANKL binds to heparin, suggesting that heparin does not directly interact with these proteins. Instead, heparin specifically binds to OPG and prevents OPG-mediated inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption in the coculture. Heparin treatment does not enhance osteoclastic bone resorption in a monoculture of osteoclasts derived from bone marrow cells, and in the coculture using osteoblasts from OPG-deficient mice. A (125)I-OPG binding assay showed that OPG binds to osteoblasts and that this binding is inhibited by the addition of heparin, suggesting that OPG binds to RANKL on the osteoblast membrane and that heparin blocks this interaction. These results demonstrate that heparin enhances osteoclastic bone resorption by inhibiting OPG activity.

  6. Linalool inhibits cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation by inhibiting NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianqun; Xu, Hai; Wu, Jun; Qu, Changfa; Sun, Fenglin; Xu, Shidong

    2015-12-01

    Linalool, a natural compound that exists in the essential oils of several aromatic plants species, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effects of linalool on cigarette smoke (CS)-induced acute lung inflammation have not been reported. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of linalool on CS-induced acute lung inflammation in mice. Linalool was given i.p. to mice 2h before CS exposure daily for five consecutive days. The numbers of macrophages and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured. The production of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8 and MCP-1 were detected by ELISA. The expression of NF-κB was detected by Western blotting. Our results showed that treatment of linalool significantly attenuated CS-induced lung inflammation, coupled with inhibited the infiltration of inflammatory cells and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8 and MCP-1 production. Meanwhile, treatment of linalool inhibited CS-induced lung MPO activity and pathological changes. Furthermore, linalool suppressed CS-induced NF-κB activation in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that linalool protected against CS-induced lung inflammation through inhibiting CS-induced NF-κB activation.

  7. Mode of action of triflumezopyrim: A novel mesoionic insecticide which inhibits the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Daniel; Benner, Eric A; Schroeder, Mark E; Holyoke, Caleb W; Zhang, Wenming; Pahutski, Thomas F; Leighty, Robert M; Vincent, Daniel R; Hamm, Jason C

    2016-07-01

    Triflumezopyrim, a newly commercialized molecule from DuPont Crop Protection, belongs to the novel class of mesoionic insecticides. This study characterizes the biochemical and physiological action of this novel insecticide. Using membranes from the aphid, Myzus persicae, triflumezopyrim was found to displace (3)H-imidacloprid with a Ki value of 43 nM with competitive binding results indicating that triflumezopyrim binds to the orthosteric site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). In voltage clamp studies using dissociated Periplaneta americana neurons, triflumezopyrim inhibits nAChR currents with an IC50 of 0.6 nM. Activation of nAChR currents was minimal and required concentrations ≥100 μM. Xenopus oocytes expressing chimeric nAChRs (Drosophila α2/chick β2) showed similar inhibitory effects from triflumezopyrim. In P. americana neurons, co-application experiments with acetylcholine reveal the inhibitory action of triflumezopyrim to be rapid and prolonged in nature. Such physiological action is distinct from other insecticides in IRAC Group 4 in which the toxicological mode of action is attributed to nAChR agonism. Mesoionic insecticides act via inhibition of the orthosteric binding site of the nAChR despite previous beliefs that such action would translate to poor insect control. Triflumezopyrim is the first commercialized insecticide from this class and provides outstanding control of hoppers, including the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, which is already displaying strong resistance to neonicotinoids such as imidacloprid.

  8. [Active components of Ligustrum lucidum inhibiting hepatitis C virus replicase activity].

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui-na; Zhang, Yan-ni; Wang, Jun; Liu, Hao-ju; Kong, Ling-bao

    2013-09-01

    Based on previous report that the Chinese herb Ligustrum lucidum (LL) extract directly inhibited hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicase (NS5B) activity, the active components of LL extract to inhibit HCV NS5B activity and their inhibition mode were investigated in this study. LL extract was separated using ethyl acetate and thin layer chromatography (TLC). The inhibitory activity of separated fractions on HCV NS5B was analyzed by the inhibitory assay of NS5B activity. The results showed that only fractions 1 and 2 inhibited NS5B activity, and fraction 2 possessed higher inhibitory activity than fraction 1. HPLC analysis combined with inhibitory assays indicated that ursolic acid and oleanolic acid are the active components within fractions 1 and 2 to inhibit NS5B activity, separately. Moreover, oleanolic acid possessed higher inhibitory activity than ursolic acid. Further inhibition mode analysis found that both oleanolic acid and ursolic acid suppressed NS5B activity as noncompetitive inhibitors. The Ki values of ursolic acid and oleanolic acid were about 4.7 microg x mL(-1) (10 micromol x kg(-1)) and 2.5 microg x mL(-1) (5.5 micromol x kg(-1)), respectively. Taken together, these results demonstrated that oleanolic acid and ursolic acid suppressed NS5B activity as noncompetitive inhibitors, implying that the two natural products have potential value for HCV therapy. PMID:24358771

  9. Sesquiterpenes inhibiting the microglial activation from Laurus nobilis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongqiang; Xie, Chunfeng; Wang, Hao; Jin, Da-Qing; Li, Shen; Wang, Meicheng; Ren, Quanhui; Xu, Jing; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Guo, Yuanqiang

    2014-05-21

    The inhibitory reagents to inhibit the activation of microglial cells may be potentially useful for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The leaves of the plant Laurus nobilis belonging to the family Lauraceae, namely, bay leaves, have been used as a popular spice, and their extract showed moderate inhibition on microglial activation. A further phytochemical investigation of the leaves led to the isolation of two new (1, 2) and eight known (3-10) sesquiterpenes. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive 1D and 2D NMR (HMQC, HMBC, (1)H-(1)H COSY, and NOESY) spectroscopic data analyses and Chem3D modeling. The following biological studies disclosed that these isolated compounds showed inhibitory activities on LPS-induced microglial activation. The results of our phytochemical investigation, including two new sesquiterpenes (1 and 2) and the first report of two compounds (3 and 4) from this species, further revealed the chemical composition of bay leaves as a popular spice, and the biological studies implied that bay leaves, containing bioactive substances with the inhibition of microglial activation, were potentially beneficial to human health. PMID:24801989

  10. Sesquiterpenes inhibiting the microglial activation from Laurus nobilis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongqiang; Xie, Chunfeng; Wang, Hao; Jin, Da-Qing; Li, Shen; Wang, Meicheng; Ren, Quanhui; Xu, Jing; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Guo, Yuanqiang

    2014-05-21

    The inhibitory reagents to inhibit the activation of microglial cells may be potentially useful for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The leaves of the plant Laurus nobilis belonging to the family Lauraceae, namely, bay leaves, have been used as a popular spice, and their extract showed moderate inhibition on microglial activation. A further phytochemical investigation of the leaves led to the isolation of two new (1, 2) and eight known (3-10) sesquiterpenes. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive 1D and 2D NMR (HMQC, HMBC, (1)H-(1)H COSY, and NOESY) spectroscopic data analyses and Chem3D modeling. The following biological studies disclosed that these isolated compounds showed inhibitory activities on LPS-induced microglial activation. The results of our phytochemical investigation, including two new sesquiterpenes (1 and 2) and the first report of two compounds (3 and 4) from this species, further revealed the chemical composition of bay leaves as a popular spice, and the biological studies implied that bay leaves, containing bioactive substances with the inhibition of microglial activation, were potentially beneficial to human health.

  11. Diagnosis of anticholinesterase poisoning in birds: Effects of environmental temperature and underfeeding on cholinesterase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    Brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity has been used extensively to monitor exposure to organophosphorus (OP) and carbamate (CB) insecticides in wild birds. A series of factorial experiments was conducted to assess the extent to which noncontaminant-related environmental conditions might affect brain ChE activity and thereby confound the diagnosis of OP and CB intoxication. Underfeeding (restricting intake to 50% of control for 21 d or fasting for 1-3 d) or exposure to elevated temperature (36 + 1?C for 1 d) caused only slight reductions (10-17%) in brain AChE activity in adult male Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica). This degree of 'reduction' in brain AChE activity is considerably less than the 50% 'inhibition' criterion employed in the diagnosis of insecticide-induced mortality, but nevertheless approaches the 20% 'inhibition' level used as a conservative estimate of sublethal exposure to a known insecticide application.

  12. Tiagabine Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Neurotoxins by Inhibiting Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Huang, Dongping; Xu, Jing; Tong, Jiabin; Wang, Zishan; Huang, Li; Yang, Yufang; Bai, Xiaochen; Wang, Pan; Suo, Haiyun; Ma, Yuanyuan; Yu, Mei; Fei, Jian; Huang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Microglial activation and inflammation are associated with progressive neuronal apoptosis in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has recently been shown to play an inhibitory role in the immune system. Tiagabine, a piperidine derivative, enhances GABAergic transmission by inhibiting GABA transporter 1 (GAT 1). In the present study, we found that tiagabine pretreatment attenuated microglial activation, provided partial protection to the nigrostriatal axis and improved motor deficits in a methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. The protective function of tiagabine was abolished in GAT 1 knockout mice that were challenged with MPTP. In an alternative PD model, induced by intranigral infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), microglial suppression and subsequent neuroprotective effects of tiagabine were demonstrated. Furthermore, the LPS-induced inflammatory activation of BV-2 microglial cells and the toxicity of conditioned medium toward SH-SY5Y cells were inhibited by pretreatment with GABAergic drugs. The attenuation of the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and the inhibition of the generation of inflammatory mediators were the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggest that tiagabine acts as a brake for nigrostriatal microglial activation and that it might be a novel therapeutic approach for PD. PMID:26499517

  13. Luteolin, a flavonoid, inhibits AP-1 activation by basophils

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Toru; Higa, Shinji; Arimitsu, Junsuke; Naka, Tetsuji; Ogata, Atsushi; Shima, Yoshihito; Fujimoto, Minoru; Yamadori, Tomoki; Ohkawara, Tomoharu; Kuwabara, Yusuke; Kawai, Mari; Matsuda, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Maezaki, Naoyoshi; Tanaka, Tetsuaki; Kawase, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshio . E-mail: ttanak@imed3.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-02-03

    Flavonoids including luteolin, apigenin, and fisetin are inhibitors of IL-4 synthesis and CD40 ligand expression by basophils. This study was done to search for compounds with greater inhibitory activity of IL-4 expression and to clarify the molecular mechanisms through which flavonoids inhibit their expression. Of the 37 flavonoids and related compounds examined, ayanin, luteolin, and apigenin were the strongest inhibitors of IL-4 production by purified basophils in response to anti-IgE antibody plus IL-3. Luteolin did not suppress Syk or Lyn phosphorylation in basophils, nor did suppress p54/46 SAPK/JNK, p38 MAPK, and p44/42 MAPK activation by a basophilic cell line, KU812 cells, stimulated with A23187 and PMA. However, luteolin did inhibit phosphorylation of c-Jun and DNA binding activity of AP-1 in nuclear lysates from stimulated KU812 cells. These results provide a fundamental structure of flavonoids for IL-4 inhibition and demonstrate a novel action of flavonoids that suppresses the activation of AP-1.

  14. Tiagabine Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Neurotoxins by Inhibiting Microglial Activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Huang, Dongping; Xu, Jing; Tong, Jiabin; Wang, Zishan; Huang, Li; Yang, Yufang; Bai, Xiaochen; Wang, Pan; Suo, Haiyun; Ma, Yuanyuan; Yu, Mei; Fei, Jian; Huang, Fang

    2015-10-26

    Microglial activation and inflammation are associated with progressive neuronal apoptosis in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has recently been shown to play an inhibitory role in the immune system. Tiagabine, a piperidine derivative, enhances GABAergic transmission by inhibiting GABA transporter 1 (GAT 1). In the present study, we found that tiagabine pretreatment attenuated microglial activation, provided partial protection to the nigrostriatal axis and improved motor deficits in a methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. The protective function of tiagabine was abolished in GAT 1 knockout mice that were challenged with MPTP. In an alternative PD model, induced by intranigral infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), microglial suppression and subsequent neuroprotective effects of tiagabine were demonstrated. Furthermore, the LPS-induced inflammatory activation of BV-2 microglial cells and the toxicity of conditioned medium toward SH-SY5Y cells were inhibited by pretreatment with GABAergic drugs. The attenuation of the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and the inhibition of the generation of inflammatory mediators were the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggest that tiagabine acts as a brake for nigrostriatal microglial activation and that it might be a novel therapeutic approach for PD.

  15. Inhibition of thrombin activity with DNA-aptamers.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolsky, A B; Titaeva, E V; Khaspekova, S G; Spiridonova, V A; Kopylov, A M; Mazurov, A V

    2009-07-01

    The effects of two DNA aptamers (oligonucleotides) 15TBA and 31TBA (15- and 31-mer thrombin-binding aptamers, respectively) on thrombin activity were studied. Both aptamers added to human plasma dose-dependently increased thrombin time (fibrin formation upon exposure to exogenous thrombin), prothrombin time (clotting activation by the extrinsic pathway), and activated partial thromboplastin time (clotting activation by the intrinsic pathway). At the same time, these aptamers did not modify amidolytic activity of thrombin evaluated by cleavage of synthetic chromogenic substrate. Aptamers also inhibited thrombin-induced human platelet aggregation. The inhibitory effects of 31TBA manifested at lower concentrations than those of 15TBA in all tests. These data indicate that the studied antithrombin DNA aptamers effectively suppress its two key reactions, fibrin formation and stimulation of platelet aggregation, without modifying active center of the thrombin molecule. PMID:19902090

  16. Emergent patterns from probabilistic generalizations of lateral activation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kabla, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The combination of laterally activating and inhibiting feedbacks is well known to spontaneously generate spatial organization. It was introduced by Gierer and Meinhardt as an extension of Turing's great insight that two reacting and diffusing chemicals can spontaneously drive spatial morphogenesis per se. In this study, we develop an accessible nonlinear and discrete probabilistic model to study simple generalizations of lateral activation and inhibition. By doing so, we identify a range of modes of morphogenesis beyond the familiar Turing-type modes; notably, beyond stripes, hexagonal nets, pores and labyrinths, we identify labyrinthine highways, Kagome lattices, gyrating labyrinths and multi-colour travelling waves and spirals. The results are discussed within the context of Turing's original motivating interest: the mechanisms which underpin the morphogenesis of living organisms. PMID:27170648

  17. Intrinsic mechanisms of pain inhibition: activation by stress.

    PubMed

    Terman, G W; Shavit, Y; Lewis, J W; Cannon, J T; Liebeskind, J C

    1984-12-14

    Portions of the brain stem seem normally to inhibit pain. In man and laboratory animals these brain areas and pathways from them to spinal sensory circuits can be activated by focal stimulation. Endogenous opioids appear to be implicated although separate nonopioid mechanisms are also evident. Stress seems to be a natural stimulus triggering pain suppression. Properties of electric footshock have been shown to determine the opioid or nonopioid basis of stress-induced analgesia. Two different opioid systems can be activated by different footshock paradigms. This dissection of stress analgesia has begun to integrate divergent findings concerning pain inhibition and also to account for some of the variance that has obscured the reliable measurement of the effects of stress on tumor growth and immune function.

  18. Cholinergic activation of the murine trachealis muscle via non-vesicular acetylcholine release involving low-affinity choline transporters.

    PubMed

    Nassenstein, Christina; Wiegand, Silke; Lips, Katrin S; Li, Guanfeng; Klein, Jochen; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    In addition to quantal, vesicular release of acetylcholine (ACh), there is also non-quantal release at the motor endplate which is insufficient to evoke postsynaptic responses unless acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is inhibited. We here addressed potential non-quantal release in the mouse trachea by organ bath experiments and (immuno)histochemical methods. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) of nerve terminals elicited tracheal constriction that is largely due to ACh release. Classical enzyme histochemistry demonstrated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in nerve fibers in the muscle and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity in the smooth muscle cells. Acute inhibition of both esterases by eserine significantly raised tracheal tone which was fully sensitive to atropine. This effect was reduced, but not abolished, in AChE, but not in BChE gene-deficient mice. The eserine-induced increase in tracheal tone was unaffected by vesamicol (10(-5)M), an inhibitor of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, and by corticosterone (10(-4)M), an inhibitor of organic cation transporters. Hemicholinium-3, in low concentrations an inhibitor of the high-affinity choline transporter-1 (CHT1), completely abrogated the eserine effects when applied in high concentrations (10(-4)M) pointing towards an involvement of low-affinity choline transporters. To evaluate the cellular sources of non-quantal ACh release in the trachea, expression of low-affinity choline transporter-like family (CTL1-5) was evaluated by RT-PCR analysis. Even though these transporters were largely abundant in the epithelium, denudation of airway epithelial cells had no effect on eserine-induced tracheal contraction, indicating a non-quantal release of ACh from non-epithelial sources in the airways. These data provide evidence for an epithelium-independent non-vesicular, non-quantal ACh release in the mouse trachea involving low-affinity choline transporters. PMID:26278668

  19. Effect of Chlorpyrifos Ethyl on Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Climbing Perch (Anabas testudineus, Bloch, 1972).

    PubMed

    Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Berg, Håkan; Tuyen, Phan Thi Bich; Van Cong, Nguyen

    2015-11-01

    The high use of pesticides in intensive rice farming in the Mekong Delta constitutes a potential hazard to the environment and to people's health. Chlorpyrifos ethyl (CPF) is a commonly used organophosphate (OP) insecticide, but information about its potential negative impacts on the aquatic environment in the Mekong Delta is scarce. Both acute and subacute toxicity tests were performed in a static nonrenewable system to investigate the effects of CPF on brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in native climbing perch fingerlings (Anabas testudineus, Bloch, 1972). Environmental parameters, such as dissolved oxygen, water temperature, and pH, were similar to field conditions in the Mekong Delta. In a 96-h lethal concentration (LC50) test, fingerlings of climbing perch were randomly exposed to five levels of CPF ranging from 0.8 to 4.5 ppm. Five sublethal levels of CPF (1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 % of the 96-h LC50 value) were tested to assess the sensitivity and recovery of the brain AChE activity in climbing perch fingerlings exposed to CPF. The results showed that CPF were moderately toxic to climbing perch with a 96-h median LC50 of 1.73 ppm. CPF also caused long-term AChE inhibition with 70 % inhibition remaining after 96 h for the four highest test concentrations. The recovery of brain AChE activity in fish placed in CPF-free water was very slow, and after 7 days the brain AChE activity was still significant lower in fish from the four highest concentrations compared with the control. The results from this study indicate that OP insecticides, such as CPF, can have long-lasting sublethal effects on aquatic species in the Mekong Delta. PMID:26135300

  20. Resveratrol attenuates hypoxia-induced neurotoxicity through inhibiting microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun; Yuan, Lin; Zhang, Qingrui; Gao, Yan; Liu, Guangheng; Xiu, Meng; Wei, Xiang; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Dexiang

    2015-09-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol enriched in Polygonum cuspidatum and has been found to afford neuroprotective effects against neuroinflammation in the brain. Activated microglia can secrete various pro-inflammatory cytokines and neurotoxic mediators, which may contribute to hypoxic brain injuries. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential role of resveratrol in attenuating hypoxia-induced neurotoxicity via its anti-inflammatory actions through in vitro models of the BV-2 microglial cell line and primary microglia. We found that resveratrol significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced microglial activation and reduced subsequent release of pro-inflammatory factors. In addition, resveratrol inhibited the hypoxia-induced degradation of IκB-alpha and phosphorylation of p65 NF-κB protein. Hypoxia-induced ERK1/2 and JNK phosphorylation was also strongly inhibited by resveratrol, whereas resveratrol had no effect on hypoxia-stimulated p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Importantly, treating primary cortical neurons with conditioned medium (CM) from hypoxia-stimulated microglia induced neuronal apoptosis, which was reversed by CM co-treated with resveratrol. Taken together, resveratrol exerts neuroprotection against hypoxia-induced neurotoxicity through its anti-inflammatory effects in microglia. These effects were mediated, at least in part, by suppressing the activation of NF-ĸB, ERK and JNK MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:26225925

  1. Therapeutic inhibition of the early phase of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Roos, Anja; Ramwadhdoebé, Tamara H; Nauta, Alma J; Hack, C Erik; Daha, Mohamed R

    2002-09-01

    The complement system is a key component of innate immunity against invading pathogens. However, undesired activation of complement is involved in inflammation and associated tissue damage in a number of pathological conditions, such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, autoimmune diseases, and rejection of allo- and xenografts. During recent years, various therapeutically active complement inhibitors have been developed. In vivo studies using these inhibitors underscored the value of complement inhibition in the prevention of tissue damage. The currently available complement inhibitors mainly target the effector phase of the complement system that is common to all three activation pathways. Such a complete block of complement activation breaks the innate anti-microbial barrier, thereby increasing the risk for infection. Therefore, the development of potent complement inhibitors that interfere in the recognition phase of a specific complement activation pathway will generate important novel possibilities for treatment. The present review is focused on molecules that are able to inhibit the function of C1q and MBL, the recognition units of the classical pathway and the lectin pathway of complement, respectively. The potential value of these molecules for the development of therapeutically active complement inhibitors is discussed.

  2. The dual-acting H3 receptor antagonist and AChE inhibitor UW-MD-71 dose-dependently enhances memory retrieval and reverses dizocilpine-induced memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nadia; Saad, Ali; Nurulain, Syed M; Darras, Fouad H; Decker, Michael; Sadek, Bassem

    2016-01-15

    Both the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) and acetylcholine esterase (AChE) are involved in the regulation of release and metabolism of acetylcholine and several other central neurotransmitters. Therefore, dual-active H3R antagonists and AChE inhibitors (AChEIs) have shown in several studies to hold promise to treat cognitive disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). The novel dual-acting H3R antagonist and AChEI 7-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)-1,2,3,9-tetrahydropyrrolo[2,1-b]quinazoline (UW-MD-71) with excellent selectivity profiles over both the three other HRs as well as the AChE's isoenzyme butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) shows high and balanced in vitro affinities at both H3R and AChE with IC50 of 33.9nM and hH3R antagonism with Ki of 76.2nM, respectively. In the present study, the effects of UW-MD-71 (1.25-5mg/kg, i.p.) on acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval in a one-trial inhibitory avoidance task in male rats were investigated applying donepezil (DOZ) and pitolisant (PIT) as reference drugs. Furthermore, the effects of UW-MD-71 on memory deficits induced by the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist dizocilpine (DIZ) were tested. Our results indicate that administration of UW-MD-71 before the test session dose-dependently increased performance and enhanced procognitive effect on retrieval. However neither pre- nor post-training acute systemic administration of UW-MD-71 facilitated acquisition or consolidation. More importantly, UW-MD-71 (2.5mg/kg, i.p.) ameliorated the DIZ-induced amnesic effects. Furthermore, the procognitive activity of UW-MD-71 in retrieval was completely reversed and partly abrogated in DIZ-induced amnesia when rats were pretreated with the centrally-acting H2R antagonist zolantidine (ZOL), but not with the CNS penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR). These results demonstrate the procognitive effects of UW-MD-71 in two in vivo memory models, and are to our knowledge the first demonstration in vivo that a potent dual

  3. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10–8~10–6 mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10–9 mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase.

  4. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10–8~10–6 mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10–9 mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  5. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng; Cui, Jianxiu

    2016-09-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10(-8)~10(-6) mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10(-9) mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  6. The effect of aspartame metabolites on human erythrocyte membrane acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Tsakiris, Stylianos; Giannoulia-Karantana, Aglaia; Simintzi, Irene; Schulpis, Kleopatra H

    2006-01-01

    Studies have implicated aspartame (ASP) with neurological problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in human erythrocyte membranes after incubation with the sum of ASP metabolites, phenylalanine (Phe), methanol (met) and aspartic acid (aspt), or with each one separately. Erythrocyte membranes were obtained from 12 healthy individuals and were incubated with ASP hydrolysis products for 1 h at 37 degrees C. AChE was measured spectrophotometrically. Incubation of membranes with ASP metabolites corresponding with 34 mg/kg, 150 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg of ASP consumption resulted in an enzyme activity reduction by -33%, -41%, and -57%, respectively. Met concentrations 0.14 mM, 0.60 mM, and 0.80 mM decreased the enzyme activity by -20%, -32% or -40%, respectively. Aspt concentrations 2.80 mM, 7.60 mM or 10.0 mM inhibited membrane AChE activity by -20%, -35%, and -47%, respectively. Phe concentrations 0.14 mM, 0.35 mM or 0.50mM reduced the enzyme activity by -11%, -33%, and -35%, respectively. Aspt or Phe concentrations 0.82 mM or 0.07 mM, respectively, did not alter the membrane AChE activity. It is concluded that low concentrations of ASP metabolites had no effect on the membrane enzyme activity, whereas high or toxic concentrations partially or remarkably decreased the membrane AChE activity, respectively. Additionally, neurological symptoms, including learning and memory processes, may be related to the high or toxic concentrations of the sweetener metabolites.

  7. Anthocyanidins inhibit activator protein 1 activity and cell transformation: structure-activity relationship and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hou, De-Xing; Kai, Keiko; Li, Jian-Jian; Lin, Shigang; Terahara, Norihiko; Wakamatsu, Mika; Fujii, Makoto; Young, Mattew R; Colburn, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Anthocyanins are the chemical components that give the intense color to many fruits and vegetables, such as blueberries, red cabbages and purple sweet potatoes. Extensive studies have indicated that anthocyanins have strong antioxidant activities. To investigate the mechanism of anthocyanidins as an anticancer food source, six kinds of anthocyanidins representing the aglycons of most anthocyanins, were used to examine their effects on tumor promotion in mouse JB6 cells, a validated model for screening cancer chemopreventive agents and elucidating the molecular mechanisms. Of the six anthocyanins tested, only those with an ortho-dihydroxyphenyl structure on the B-ring suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced cell transformation and activator protein-1 transactivation, suggesting that the ortho-dihydroxyphenyl may contribute to the inhibitory action. Delphinidin, but not peonidin, blocked the phosphorylation of protein kinases in the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway at early times and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway at later times. p38 kinase was not inhibited by delphinidin. Furthermore, two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitors (SP600125 for JNK and UO126 for ERK) could specifically block the activation of JNK and ERK and cell transformation. Those results demonstrate that anthocyanidins contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis by blocking activation of the MAPK pathway. These findings provide the first molecular basis for the anticarcinogenic action of anthocyanidins. PMID:14514663

  8. Anthocyanidins inhibit activator protein 1 activity and cell transformation: structure-activity relationship and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hou, De-Xing; Kai, Keiko; Li, Jian-Jian; Lin, Shigang; Terahara, Norihiko; Wakamatsu, Mika; Fujii, Makoto; Young, Mattew R; Colburn, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Anthocyanins are the chemical components that give the intense color to many fruits and vegetables, such as blueberries, red cabbages and purple sweet potatoes. Extensive studies have indicated that anthocyanins have strong antioxidant activities. To investigate the mechanism of anthocyanidins as an anticancer food source, six kinds of anthocyanidins representing the aglycons of most anthocyanins, were used to examine their effects on tumor promotion in mouse JB6 cells, a validated model for screening cancer chemopreventive agents and elucidating the molecular mechanisms. Of the six anthocyanins tested, only those with an ortho-dihydroxyphenyl structure on the B-ring suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced cell transformation and activator protein-1 transactivation, suggesting that the ortho-dihydroxyphenyl may contribute to the inhibitory action. Delphinidin, but not peonidin, blocked the phosphorylation of protein kinases in the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway at early times and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway at later times. p38 kinase was not inhibited by delphinidin. Furthermore, two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitors (SP600125 for JNK and UO126 for ERK) could specifically block the activation of JNK and ERK and cell transformation. Those results demonstrate that anthocyanidins contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis by blocking activation of the MAPK pathway. These findings provide the first molecular basis for the anticarcinogenic action of anthocyanidins.

  9. Assessment of acetylcholinesterase activity using indoxylacetate and comparison with the standard Ellman's method.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav; Hrabinova, Martina; Kuca, Kamil; Simonato, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Assay of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity plays an important role in diagnostic, detection of pesticides and nerve agents, in vitro characterization of toxins and drugs including potential treatments for Alzheimer's disease. These experiments were done in order to determine whether indoxylacetate could be an adequate chromogenic reactant for AChE assay evaluation. Moreover, the results were compared to the standard Ellman's method. We calculated Michaelis constant Km (2.06 × 10(-4) mol/L for acetylthiocholine and 3.21 × 10(-3) mol/L for indoxylacetate) maximum reaction velocity V(max) (4.97 × 10(-7) kat for acetylcholine and 7.71 × 10(-8) kat for indoxylacetate) for electric eel AChE. In a second part, inhibition values were plotted for paraoxon, and reactivation efficacy was measured for some standard oxime reactivators: obidoxime, pralidoxime (2-PAM) and HI-6. Though indoxylacetate is split with lower turnover rate, this compound appears as a very attractive reactant since it does not show any chemical reactivity with oxime antidots and thiol used for the Ellman's method. Thus it can be advantageously used for accurate measurement of AChE activity. Suitability of assay for butyrylcholinesterase activity assessment is also discussed.

  10. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of Thai traditional nootropic remedy and its herbal ingredients.

    PubMed

    Tappayuthpijarn, Pimolvan; Itharat, Arunporn; Makchuchit, Sunita

    2011-12-01

    The incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD) is increasing every year in accordance with the increasing of elderly population and could pose significant health problems in the future. The use of medicinal plants as an alternative prevention or even for a possible treatment of the AD is, therefore, becoming an interesting research issue. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are well-known drugs commonly used in the treatment of AD. The aim of the present study was to screen for AChE inhibitory activity of the Thai traditional nootropic recipe and its herbal ingredients. The results showed that ethanolic extracts of four out of twenty-five herbs i.e. Stephania pierrei Diels. Kaempfera parviflora Wall. ex Baker, Stephania venosa (Blume) Spreng, Piper nigrum L at 0.1 mg/mL showed % AChE inhibition of 89, 64, 59, 50; the IC50 were 6, 21, 29, 30 microg/mL respectively. The other herbs as well as combination of the whole recipe had no synergistic inhibitory effect on AChE activity. However some plants revealed antioxidant activity. More research should have be performed on this local wisdom remedy to verify the uses in scientific term. PMID:22619927

  11. Inhibition of rotaviruses by selected antiviral substances: mechanisms of viral inhibition and in vivo activity.

    PubMed Central

    Smee, D F; Sidwell, R W; Clark, S M; Barnett, B B; Spendlove, R S

    1982-01-01

    Several RNA virus inhibitors were evaluated against simian (SA11) rotavirus infections in vitro and murine rotavirus gastroenteritis in vivo. Test compounds included 1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxamide (ribavirin), 3-deazaguanine (3-DG), 3-deazauridine, and 9-(S)-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)adenine [(S)-DHPA]. All drugs inhibited total infectious SA11 virus yields in MA-104 cells. Ribavirin, 3-DG, and (S)-DHPA affected [3H]uridine uptake into uninfected MA-104 cells in both the acid-soluble and -insoluble fractions. All drugs reduced the levels of dense (precursor) and light (complete) SA11 particle yields compared with control but did not alter the relative amounts of dense compared with light particles, suggesting that the agents did not interfere with virus assembly. Ribavirin and 3-DG inhibited SA11 polypeptide synthesis, as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis studies. None of the agents or mono- and triphosphate derivatives of ribavirin inhibited SA11 RNA polymerase activity. In murine rotavirus studies, oral therapy with ribavirin-2',3',5'-triacetate and (S)-DHPA increased mean survival time, but no increase in survivor rate was observed. 3-DG- and (S)-DHPA-treated mice had a more rapid weight gain than controls, suggesting a probable lessening of the severity of the disease. Images PMID:6282209

  12. Inhibition of polyphenol oxidases activity by various dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Girelli, Anna M; Mattei, Enrico; Messina, Antonella; Tarola, Anna M

    2004-05-19

    In an effort to develop natural and nontoxic inhibitors on the activity of mushroom polyphenol oxidase (PPO) the effect of various glycyl-dipeptides (GlyAsp, GlyGly, GlyHis, GlyLeu, GlyLys, GlyPhe, GlyPro, GlyTyr) was investigated. The inhibition study with dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) as substrate is based on separation of the enzymatic reaction components by reversed phase HPLC and the UV detection of the dopachrome formed. The results have evidenced that several of tested dipeptides inhibited PPO activity in the range of 20-40% while GlyPro and GlyLeu had no effect. The study has also permitted the characterization of the following kinetic pattern: a linear-mixed-type mechanism for GlyAsp, GlyGly, GlyLys, and GlyPhe and a hyperbolic-mixed-type for GlyTyr. It was not possible to identify the inhibition mechanism for GlyHis, although it affects PPO activity. In addition the effects of GlyAsp, GlyLys and GlyHis were evaluated for lessening the browning of fresh Golden Delicious apple and Irish White Skinned potato. The effectiveness of such inhibitors was determined by the difference between the colors observed in the dipeptide-treated sample and the controls using the color space CIE-Lab system. The % browning inhibition on potato (20-50%) was greater than of apple (20-30%) by the all tested dipeptides. Only GlyLys presented the significant value of 50%.

  13. Inhibition of polyphenol oxidases activity by various dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Girelli, Anna M; Mattei, Enrico; Messina, Antonella; Tarola, Anna M

    2004-05-19

    In an effort to develop natural and nontoxic inhibitors on the activity of mushroom polyphenol oxidase (PPO) the effect of various glycyl-dipeptides (GlyAsp, GlyGly, GlyHis, GlyLeu, GlyLys, GlyPhe, GlyPro, GlyTyr) was investigated. The inhibition study with dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) as substrate is based on separation of the enzymatic reaction components by reversed phase HPLC and the UV detection of the dopachrome formed. The results have evidenced that several of tested dipeptides inhibited PPO activity in the range of 20-40% while GlyPro and GlyLeu had no effect. The study has also permitted the characterization of the following kinetic pattern: a linear-mixed-type mechanism for GlyAsp, GlyGly, GlyLys, and GlyPhe and a hyperbolic-mixed-type for GlyTyr. It was not possible to identify the inhibition mechanism for GlyHis, although it affects PPO activity. In addition the effects of GlyAsp, GlyLys and GlyHis were evaluated for lessening the browning of fresh Golden Delicious apple and Irish White Skinned potato. The effectiveness of such inhibitors was determined by the difference between the colors observed in the dipeptide-treated sample and the controls using the color space CIE-Lab system. The % browning inhibition on potato (20-50%) was greater than of apple (20-30%) by the all tested dipeptides. Only GlyLys presented the significant value of 50%. PMID:15137808

  14. Isolation, diversity and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of the culturable endophytic fungi harboured in Huperzia serrata from Jinggang Mountain, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya; Lai, Zheng; Li, Xi-Xi; Yan, Ri-Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Yang, Hui-Lin; Zhu, Du

    2016-02-01

    Huperzia serrata has many important medicinal properties with proven pharmacological potential. Some of these properties may be mediated by its endophytic fungi. To test this hypothesis, in the present study, we provided a first insights into evaluating the species composition and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity of the culturable endophytic fungi of H. serrata from the regional at Jinggang Mountain in southeastern China. A total number of 885 fungal isolates distributed across 44 genera and 118 putative species were obtained from 1422 fragments of fine H. serrata roots, stems and leaves base on ITS-rDNA sequences BLAST analysis. The endophytic fungi were phylogenetically diverse and species-rich, with high rate of colonization and isolation. The assemble of endophytic fungi consisted mainly of Ascomycota (97.15%), followed by Basidiomycota (1.92%) and unknown fungal species (0.90%). Colletotrichum (64.29%), Phyllosticta (3.39%), Hypoxylon (2.81%), Xylaria (2.25%) and Nigrospora (2.04%) were the most abundant genera, whereas the remaining genera were infrequent groups. Although, roots yielded low abundance strains, the diverse and species-rich were both higher than that of stems and leaves. In addition, out of the 247 endophytic fungi strains determinated, 221 fungal extracts showed AChE inhibition activities in vitro. Among them, 22 endophytic fungi strains achieved high inhibitory activity (≥50%) on AChE which belongs to 13 genera and five incertae sedis strains. Four endophytic fungi designated as JS4 (Colletotrichum spp.), FL14 (Ascomycota spp.), FL9 (Sarcosomataceae spp.) and FL7 (Dothideomycetes spp.) were displayed highly active (≥80%) against AChE, which the inhibition effects were even more intense than the positive control. Our findings highlight that H. serrata grown in Jinggang Mountain harbors a rich and fascinating endophytic fungus community with potential AChE inhibitory activity, which could further broaden the natural

  15. Reduced brain activation in violent adolescents during response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yi; Mei, Yi; Du, XiaoXia; Xie, Bin; Shao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in inhibitory control have been linked to aggression and violent behaviour. This study aimed to observe whether violent adolescents show different brain activation patterns during response inhibition and to ascertain the roles these brain regions play. A self-report method and modified overt aggression scale (MOAS) were used to evaluate violent behaviour. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 22 violent adolescents and 17 matched healthy subjects aged 12 to 18 years. While scanning, a go/no-go task was performed. Between-group comparisons revealed that activation in the bilateral middle and superior temporal gyrus, hippocampus, and right orbitofrontal area (BA11) regions were significantly reduced in the violent group compared with the control group. Meanwhile, the violent group had more widespread activation in the prefrontal cortex than that observed in the control group. Activation of the prefrontal cortex in the violent group was widespread but lacking in focus, failing to produce intensive activation in some functionally related regions during response inhibition. PMID:26888566

  16. Hypoxia inhibits Moloney murine leukemia virus expression in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Puppo, Maura; Bosco, Maria Carla; Federico, Maurizio; Pastorino, Sandra; Varesio, Luigi

    2007-02-01

    Hypoxia, a local decrease in oxygen tension, occurring in many pathological processes, modifies macrophage (Mphi) gene expression and function. Here, we provide the first evidence that hypoxia inhibits transgene expression driven by the Moloney murine leukemia virus-long terminal repeats (MoMLV-LTR) in IFN-gamma-activated Mphi. Hypoxia silenced the expression of several MoMLV-LTR-driven genes, including v-myc, enhanced green fluorescence protein, and env, and was effective in different mouse Mphi cell lines and on distinct MoMLV backbone-based viruses. Down-regulation of MoMLV mRNA occurred at the transcriptional level and was associated with decreased retrovirus production, as determined by titration experiments, suggesting that hypoxia may control MoMLV retroviral spread through the suppression of LTR activity. In contrast, genes driven by the CMV or the SV40 promoter were up-regulated or unchanged by hypoxia, indicating a selective inhibitory activity on the MoMLV promoter. It is interesting that hypoxia was ineffective in suppressing MoMLV-LTR-controlled gene expression in T or fibroblast cell lines, suggesting a Mphi lineage-selective action. Finally, we found that MoMLV-mediated gene expression in Mphi was also inhibited by picolinic acid, a tryptophan catabolite with hypoxia-like activity and Mphi-activating properties, suggesting a pathophysiological role of this molecule in viral resistance and its possible use as an antiviral agent.

  17. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  18. Expression of APP, BACE1, AChE and ChAT in an AD model in rats and the effect of donepezil hydrochloride treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Chen, Min; Liu, Hongmin; Yang, Liqun; Yang, Guiying

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pathological changes in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the effect of donepezil hydrochloride (HCl) treatment. The rat model of AD was established by the bilateral injection of amyloid β₁₋₄₀ (Aβ₁₋₄₀) into the hippocampus. Changes in spatial learning and memory functions were examined using the Morris water maze test and changes in catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were determined using chemical colorimetry. Moreover, the changes in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) expression were analyzed using immunohistochemical staining. The mRNA expression levels of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and β-secreted enzyme 1 (BACE1) were evaluated using RT-PCR. The effects of donepezil HCl on the aforementioned indices were also observed. The rat memories of the platform quadrants in the blank, sham and donepezil HCl groups were improved compared with those of the rats in the model group. The ratio of swim distance in the fourth platform quadrant (l₄) to the total swim distance (l total) for the model group rats (l₄/l total) was significantly decreased compared with that for the blank and sham group rats. Following donepezil HCl treatment, the ratio of l₄/l total significantly increased. AD modeling caused a significant decrease in the CAT and GSH-Px activities in the brain tissues of the rats. The CAT and GSH-Px activities in the AD model rats significantly increased following donepezil HCl treatment. Moreover, donepezil HCl treatment significantly decreased the AChE, APP and BACE1 mRNA expression levels and increased the ChAT expression levels. Therefore, donepezil HCl was able to significantly decrease learning and memory damage in a rat model of AD.

  19. Oxidative stress inhibition and oxidant activity by fibrous clays.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia

    2015-09-01

    Fibrous clays (sepiolite, palygorskite) are produced at 1.2m tonnes per year and have a wide range of industrial applications needing to replace long-fibre length asbestos. However, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the effect of sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejón El Rubio, Spain) on cell damage via oxidative stress (determined as the progress of lipid peroxidation, LP). The extent of LP was assessed using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances assay. The oxidant activity by fibrous clays was quantified using Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance. Sepiolite and palygorskite inhibited LP, whereby corresponding IC50 values were 6557±1024 and 4250±289μgmL(-1). As evidenced by dose-response experiments LP inhibition by palygorskite was surface-controlled. Fibrous clay surfaces did not stabilize HO species, except for suspensions containing 5000μgmL(-1). A strong oxidant (or weak anti-oxidant) activity favours the inhibition of LP by fibrous clays.

  20. Oxidative stress inhibition and oxidant activity by fibrous clays.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia

    2015-09-01

    Fibrous clays (sepiolite, palygorskite) are produced at 1.2m tonnes per year and have a wide range of industrial applications needing to replace long-fibre length asbestos. However, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the effect of sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejón El Rubio, Spain) on cell damage via oxidative stress (determined as the progress of lipid peroxidation, LP). The extent of LP was assessed using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances assay. The oxidant activity by fibrous clays was quantified using Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance. Sepiolite and palygorskite inhibited LP, whereby corresponding IC50 values were 6557±1024 and 4250±289μgmL(-1). As evidenced by dose-response experiments LP inhibition by palygorskite was surface-controlled. Fibrous clay surfaces did not stabilize HO species, except for suspensions containing 5000μgmL(-1). A strong oxidant (or weak anti-oxidant) activity favours the inhibition of LP by fibrous clays. PMID:26071933

  1. Inhibition of Type III Interferon Activity by Orthopoxvirus Immunomodulatory Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The type III interferon (IFN) family elicits an antiviral response that is nearly identical to that evoked by IFN-α/β. However, these cytokines (known as IFN-λ1, 2, and 3) signal through a distinct receptor, and thus may be resistant to the evasion strategies used by some viruses to avoid the IFN-α/β response. Orthopoxviruses are highly resistant to IFN-α/β because they encode well-characterized immunomodulatory proteins that inhibit IFN activity. These include a secreted receptor (B18R) that neutralizes IFN-α/β, and a cytoplasmic protein (E3L) that blocks IFN-α/β effector functions in infected cells. We therefore determined the ability of these immunomodulators to abrogate the IFN-λ–induced antiviral response. We found that (i) vaccinia virus (VACV) replication is resistant to IFN-λ antiviral activity; (ii) neither VACV B18R nor the variola virus homolog B20R neutralizes IFN-λ; (iii) VACV E3L inhibits the IFN-λ–mediated antiviral response through a PKR-dependent pathway; (iv) VACV infection inhibits IFN-λR–mediated signal transduction and gene expression. These results demonstrate differential sensitivity of IFN-λ to multiple distinct evasion mechanisms employed by a single virus. PMID:20038204

  2. Sensorimotor-independent prefrontal activity during response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weidong; Cannistraci, Christopher J; Gore, John C; Leung, Hoi-Chung

    2014-05-01

    A network of brain regions involving the ventral inferior frontal gyrus/anterior insula (vIFG/AI), presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and basal ganglia has been implicated in stopping impulsive, unwanted responses. However, whether this network plays an equal role in response inhibition under different sensorimotor contexts has not been tested systematically. Here, we conducted an fMRI experiment using the stop signal task, a sensorimotor task requiring occasional withholding of the planned response upon the presentation of a stop signal. We manipulated both the sensory modality of the stop signal (visual versus auditory) and the motor response modality (hand versus eye). Results showed that the vIFG/AI and the preSMA along with the right middle frontal gyrus were commonly activated in response inhibition across the various sensorimotor conditions. Our findings provide direct evidence for a common role of these frontal areas, but not striatal areas in response inhibition independent of the sensorimotor contexts. Nevertheless, these three frontal regions exhibited different activation patterns during successful and unsuccessful stopping. Together with the existing evidence, we suggest that the vIFG/AI is involved in the early stages of stopping such as triggering the stop process while the preSMA may play a role in regulating other cortical and subcortical regions involved in stopping. PMID:23798325

  3. Monoclonal antibodies that inhibit mitogenic activity of Mycoplasma pulmonis.

    PubMed Central

    Lapidot, Z; Siman-Tov, R; Naot, Y

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested a correlation between mitogenic, polyclonal activation of host lymphocytes and the respiratory tract inflammatory diseases induced by Mycoplasma pulmonis. This study describes the generation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to M. pulmonis membrane antigens with different capacities to inhibit stimulation of cultured rat lymphocytes by mycoplasmal membranes and with variable effects on M. pulmonis growth. We show that the inhibitory effects exerted on mitogenesis by purified MAbs are inversely related to the effects of MAbs on M. pulmonis growth. Immunoblotting of electrophoretically separated membrane proteins, with both growth- and mitogenesis-inhibiting antibodies, revealed significant changes in the reactions obtained with both types of MAb following short exposure of membranes to heat. Growth-inhibiting MAbs strongly react with heat-labile antigenic complexes with molecular weights of 65,000 to 75,000. Inhibition of mitogenesis is mainly associated with recognition of membrane complexes of 84 to 113 kDa that exhibit disperse smears and variable heat sensitivities. Following brief heating of membranes, more distinct bands of 103, 90, and 84 kDa are obtained with MAbs that inhibit mitogenesis. Experiments with other mitogenic mycoplasma species and MAb 3.3.10.2, a potent inhibitor of mitogenesis reveal that whereas the antigenic epitope recognized by this antibody is present on unheated membranes from different mycoplasmas, with heated membranes the MAb yields reactions only with M. pulmonis and M. arthritidis. Our studies suggest that M. pulmonis mitogens are unique membrane complexes of variable molecular weights, highly susceptible to heat and less sensitive to reducing agents. PMID:7806349

  4. [Inhibition of glutamine synthetase activity by biologically active derivatives of glutamic acid].

    PubMed

    Firsova, N A; Selivanova, K M; Alekseeva, L V; Evstigneeva, Z G

    1986-05-01

    The inhibition of activity of glutamine synthetase from Chlorella and porcine brain by 4-hydroxy-D-4-fluoro-D,L- and 4-amino-D,L-glutamic acids diastereoisomers was studied. Each compound was shown to exert the same inhibiting effect on glutamine synthetase from both sources. In case of threo-4-hydroxy-D-glutamic acid the inhibition of the Chlorella enzyme was of a competitive and of a completely mixed type. The enzyme inhibition by 4-fluoro-D, L-glutamic acids seemed to be of a completely non-competitive type. The Ki values for all inhibition reactions were determined. A comparison of biochemical parameters and biological activity revealed that the most effective inhibitors of the enzyme exert a most potent antitumour and antiviral action.

  5. MMS 1001 inhibits melanin synthesis via ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-E; Song, Jiho; Kim, Su Yeon; Park, Kyoung-Chan; Min, Kyung Hoon; Kim, Dong-Seok

    2013-03-01

    Melanin plays major a role in pigmentation of hair, eyes, and skin in mammals. In this study, the inhibitory effects of MMS 1001 on alpha-MSH-stimulated melanogenesis were investigated in B16F10 melanoma cells. MMS 1001 did not show cytotoxic effects up to 10 microM. Melanin content and intracellular tyrosinase activity were inhibited by MMS 1001 treatment in a dose-dependent manner. In Western blot analysis, MITF expression was decreased by MMS 1001. In addition, tyrosinase expressions were also reduced after MMS 1001 treatment. Further results showed that the phosphorylation of ERK was induced by MMS 1001. Moreover, a specific MEK inhibitor, PD98059, abrogated the inhibitory effects of MMS 1001 on melanin production and tyrosinase expression. These results indicate that the hypopigmentary effects of MMS 1001 resulted from the inhibition of MITF and tyrosinase expression via phosphorylation of ERK. Thus, MMS 1001 could be developed as a new effective skin-whitening agent.

  6. Metformin Inhibits Glutaminase Activity and Protects against Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ampuero, Javier; Ranchal, Isidora; Nuñez, David; Díaz-Herrero, María del Mar; Maraver, Marta; del Campo, José Antonio; Rojas, Ángela; Camacho, Inés; Figueruela, Blanca; Bautista, Juan D.; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Aim To investigate the influence of metformin use on liver dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy in a retrospective cohort of diabetic cirrhotic patients. To analyze the impact of metformin on glutaminase activity and ammonia production in vitro. Methods Eighty-two cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Forty-one patients were classified as insulin sensitizers experienced (metformin) and 41 as controls (cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without metformin treatment). Baseline analysis included: insulin, glucose, glucagon, leptin, adiponectin, TNFr2, AST, ALT. HOMA-IR was calculated. Baseline HE risk was calculated according to minimal hepatic encephalopathy, oral glutamine challenge and mutations in glutaminase gene. We performed an experimental study in vitro including an enzymatic activity assay where glutaminase inhibition was measured according to different metformin concentrations. In Caco2 cells, glutaminase activity inhibition was evaluated by ammonia production at 24, 48 and 72 hours after metformina treatment. Results Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed during follow-up in 23.2% (19/82): 4.9% (2/41) in patients receiving metformin and 41.5% (17/41) in patients without metformin treatment (logRank 9.81; p = 0.002). In multivariate analysis, metformin use [H.R.11.4 (95% CI: 1.2–108.8); p = 0.034], age at diagnosis [H.R.1.12 (95% CI: 1.04–1.2); p = 0.002], female sex [H.R.10.4 (95% CI: 1.5–71.6); p = 0.017] and HE risk [H.R.21.3 (95% CI: 2.8–163.4); p = 0.003] were found independently associated with hepatic encephalopathy. In the enzymatic assay, glutaminase activity inhibition reached 68% with metformin 100 mM. In Caco2 cells, metformin (20 mM) decreased glutaminase activity up to 24% at 72 hours post-treatment (p<0.05). Conclusions Metformin was found independently related to overt hepatic encephalopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high risk of hepatic encephalopathy. Metformin

  7. Plasma B-esterase activities in European raptors.

    PubMed

    Roy, Claudie; Grolleau, Gérard; Chamoulaud, Serge; Rivière, Jean-Louis

    2005-01-01

    B-esterases are serine hydrolases composed of cholinesterases, including acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and carboxylesterase (CbE). These esterases, found in blood plasma, are inhibited by organophosphorus (OP) and carbamate (CB) insecticides and can be used as nondestructive biomarkers of exposure to anticholinesterase insecticides. Furthermore, B-esterases are involved in detoxification of these insecticides. In order to establish the level of these enzymes and to have reference values for their normal activities, total plasma cholinesterase (ChE), AChE and BChE activities, and plasma CbE activity were determined in 729 European raptors representing 20 species, four families, and two orders. The diurnal families of the Falconiforme order were represented by Accipitridae and Falconidae and the nocturnal families of the Strigiforme order by Tytonidae and Strigidae. Intraspecies differences in cholinesterase activities according to sex and/or age were investigated in buzzards (Buteo buteo), sparrowhawks (Accipiter nisus), kestrels (Falco tinnunculus), barn owls (Tyto alba), and tawny owls (Strix aluco). Sex-related differences affecting ChE and AChE activities were observed in young kestrels (2-3-mo-old) and age-related differences in kestrels (ChE and AChE), sparrowhawks (AChE), and tawny owls (ChE, AChE, and BChE). The interspecies analysis yielded a negative correlation between ChE activity and body mass taking into account the relative contribution of AChE and BChE to ChE activity, with the exception of the honey buzzard (Pernis apivorus). The lowest ChE activities were found in the two largest species, Bonelli's eagle (Hieraaetus fasciatus) and Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus) belonging to the Accipitridae family. The highest ChE activities were found in the relatively small species belonging to the Tytonidae and Strigidae families and in honey buzzard of the Accipitridae family. Species of the Accipitridae, Tytonidae, and

  8. GATA3 inhibits GCM1 activity and trophoblast cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yueh Ho; Chen, Hungwen

    2016-01-01

    Development of human placenta involves the invasion of trophoblast cells from anchoring villi into the maternal decidua. Placental transcription factor GCM1 regulates trophoblast cell invasion via transcriptional activation of HtrA4 gene, which encodes a serine protease enzyme. The GATA3 transcription factor regulates trophoblast cell differentiation and is highly expressed in invasive murine trophoblast giant cells. The regulation of trophoblastic invasion by GCM1 may involve novel cellular factors. Here we show that GATA3 interacts with GCM1 and inhibits its activity to suppress trophoblastic invasion. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that GATA3 and GCM1 are coexpressed in villous cytotrophoblast cells, syncytiotrophoblast layer, and extravillous trophoblast cells of human placenta. Interestingly, GATA3 interacts with GCM1, but not the GCM2 homologue, through the DNA-binding domain and first transcriptional activation domain in GCM1 and the transcriptional activation domains and zinc finger 1 domain in GATA3. While GATA3 did not affect DNA-binding activity of GCM1, it suppressed transcriptional activity of GCM1 and therefore HtrA4 promoter activity. Correspondingly, GATA3 knockdown elevated HtrA4 expression in BeWo and JEG-3 trophoblast cell lines and enhanced the invasion activities of both lines. This study uncovered a new GATA3 function in placenta as a negative regulator of GCM1 activity and trophoblastic invasion. PMID:26899996

  9. Small molecule activation of NOTCH signaling inhibits acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qi; Jiang, Jue; Zhan, Guanqun; Yan, Wanyao; Huang, Liang; Hu, Yufeng; Su, Hexiu; Tong, Qingyi; Yue, Ming; Li, Hua; Yao, Guangmin; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway is crucial for the onset and progression of T cell leukemia. Yet recent studies also suggest a tumor suppressive role of NOTCH signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and reactivation of this pathway offers an attractive opportunity for anti-AML therapies. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid that we previously isolated from Zephyranthes candida, exhibiting inhibitory activities in a variety of cancer cells, particularly those from AML. Here, we report NMHC not only selectively inhibits AML cell proliferation in vitro but also hampers tumor development in a human AML xenograft model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals that NMHC activates the NOTCH signaling. Combination of NMHC and recombinant human NOTCH ligand DLL4 achieves a remarkable synergistic effect on NOTCH activation. Moreover, pre-inhibition of NOTCH by overexpression of dominant negative MAML alleviates NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity in AML. Further mechanistic analysis using structure-based molecular modeling as well as biochemical assays demonstrates that NMHC docks in the hydrophobic cavity within the NOTCH1 negative regulatory region (NRR), thus promoting NOTCH1 proteolytic cleavage. Our findings thus establish NMHC as a potential NOTCH agonist that holds great promises for future development as a novel agent beneficial to patients with AML. PMID:27211848

  10. Small molecule activation of NOTCH signaling inhibits acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Jiang, Jue; Zhan, Guanqun; Yan, Wanyao; Huang, Liang; Hu, Yufeng; Su, Hexiu; Tong, Qingyi; Yue, Ming; Li, Hua; Yao, Guangmin; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway is crucial for the onset and progression of T cell leukemia. Yet recent studies also suggest a tumor suppressive role of NOTCH signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and reactivation of this pathway offers an attractive opportunity for anti-AML therapies. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid that we previously isolated from Zephyranthes candida, exhibiting inhibitory activities in a variety of cancer cells, particularly those from AML. Here, we report NMHC not only selectively inhibits AML cell proliferation in vitro but also hampers tumor development in a human AML xenograft model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals that NMHC activates the NOTCH signaling. Combination of NMHC and recombinant human NOTCH ligand DLL4 achieves a remarkable synergistic effect on NOTCH activation. Moreover, pre-inhibition of NOTCH by overexpression of dominant negative MAML alleviates NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity in AML. Further mechanistic analysis using structure-based molecular modeling as well as biochemical assays demonstrates that NMHC docks in the hydrophobic cavity within the NOTCH1 negative regulatory region (NRR), thus promoting NOTCH1 proteolytic cleavage. Our findings thus establish NMHC as a potential NOTCH agonist that holds great promises for future development as a novel agent beneficial to patients with AML. PMID:27211848

  11. Gripped by Gout: Avoiding the Ache and Agony

    MedlinePlus

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Gripped by Gout Avoiding the Ache and Agony Sudden, painful swelling ... toe is often the first warning sign of gout. It can affect other joints as well. Without ...

  12. Direct Proof of the In Vivo Pathogenic Role of the AChR Autoantibodies from Myasthenia Gravis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kordas, Gregory; Lagoumintzis, George; Sideris, Sotirios; Poulas, Konstantinos; Tzartos, Socrates J.

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that the autoantibodies (autoAbs) against muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients are the main pathogenic factor in MG; however, this belief has not yet been confirmed with direct observations. Although animals immunized with AChR or injected with anti-AChR monoclonal Abs, or with crude human MG Ig fractions exhibit MG symptoms, the pathogenic role of isolated anti-AChR autoAbs, and, more importantly, the absence of pathogenic factor(s) in the autoAb-depleted MG sera has not yet been shown by in vivo studies. Using recombinant extracellular domains of the human AChR α and β subunits, we have isolated autoAbs from the sera of four MG patients. The ability of these isolated anti-subunit Abs and of the Ab-depleted sera to passively transfer experimental autoimmune MG in Lewis rats was investigated. We found that the isolated anti-subunit Abs were at least as efficient as the corresponding whole sera or whole Ig in causing experimental MG. Abs to both α- and β-subunit were pathogenic although the anti-α-subunit were much more efficient than the anti-β-subunit ones. Interestingly, the autoAb-depleted sera were free of pathogenic activity. The later suggests that the myasthenogenic potency of the studied anti-AChR MG sera is totally due to their anti-AChR autoAbs, and therefore selective elimination of the anti-AChR autoAbs from MG patients may be an efficient therapy for MG. PMID:25259739

  13. Effect of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 1 (nAChRα1) peptides on rabies virus infection in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Sajjanar, Basavaraj; Saxena, Shikha; Bisht, Deepika; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Manjunatha Reddy, G B; Singh, Rajendra; Singh, R P; Kumar, Satish

    2016-06-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) is neurotropic and causes acute progressive encephalitis. Herein, we report the interaction of nAChRα1-subunit peptides with RABV and the effect of these peptides on RABV infection in cultured neuronal cells. Peptide sequences derived from torpedo, bovine, human and rats were synthesized and studied for their interactions with RABV using virus capture ELISA and peptide immunofluorescence. The results showed specific binding of the nAChRα1-subunit peptides to the RABV. In the virus adsorption assay, these peptides were found to inhibit the attachment of the RABV to the neuronal cells. The nAChRα1-subunit peptides inhibited the RABV infection and reduced viral gene expression in the cultured neuroblastoma (N2A) cells. Torpedo peptide sequence (T-32) had highest antiviral effect (IC50=14±3.01μM) compared to the other peptides studied. The results of the study indicated that nAChRα1-subunit peptides may act as receptor decoy molecules and inhibit the binding of virus to the native host cell receptors and hence may reduce viral infection. PMID:26656837

  14. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    SciTech Connect

    Asmis, Lars; Tanner, Felix C.; Sudano, Isabella; Luescher, Thomas F.; Camici, Giovanni G.

    2010-01-22

    Background: DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Methods and results: Human venous blood from healthy volunteers was collected in citrated tubes and platelet activation was studied by cone and platelet analyzer (CPA) and rapid-platelet-function-assay (RPFA). CPA analysis showed that DMSO-treated platelets exhibit a lower adherence in response to shear stress (-15.54 {+-} 0.9427%, n = 5, P < 0.0001 versus control). Additionally, aggregometry studies revealed that DMSO-treated, arachidonate-stimulated platelets had an increased lag phase (18.0% {+-} 4.031, n = 9, P = 0.0004 versus control) as well as a decreased maximal aggregation (-6.388 {+-} 2.212%, n = 6, P = 0.0162 versus control). Inhibitory action of DMSO could be rescued by exogenous thromboxane A2 and was mediated, at least in part, by COX-1 inhibition. Conclusions: Clinically relevant concentrations of DMSO impair platelet activation by a thromboxane A2-dependent, COX-1-mediated effect. This finding may be crucial for the previously reported anti-thrombotic property displayed by DMSO. Our findings support a role for DMSO as a novel drug to prevent not only proliferation, but also thrombotic complications of drug eluting stents.

  15. nAChR agonist-induced cognition enhancement: integration of cognitive and neuronal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sarter, Martin; Parikh, Vinay; Howe, William M

    2009-10-01

    The identification and characterization of drugs for the treatment of cognitive disorders has been hampered by the absence of comprehensive hypotheses. Such hypotheses consist of (a) a precisely defined cognitive operation that fundamentally underlies a range of cognitive abilities and capacities and, if impaired, contributes to the manifestation of diverse cognitive symptoms; (b) defined neuronal mechanisms proposed to mediate the cognitive operation of interest; (c) evidence indicating that the putative cognition enhancer facilitates these neuronal mechanisms; (d) and evidence indicating that the cognition enhancer facilitates cognitive performance by modulating these underlying neuronal mechanisms. The evidence on the neuronal and attentional effects of nAChR agonists, specifically agonists selective for alpha4beta2* nAChRs, has begun to support such a hypothesis. nAChR agonists facilitate the detection of signals by augmenting the transient increases in prefrontal cholinergic activity that are necessary for a signal to gain control over behavior in attentional contexts. The prefrontal microcircuitry mediating these effects include alpha4beta2* nAChRs situated on the terminals of thalamic inputs and the glutamatergic stimulation of cholinergic terminals via ionotropic glutamate receptors. Collectively, this evidence forms the basis for hypothesis-guided development and characterization of cognition enhancers.

  16. Probing the origins of human acetylcholinesterase inhibition via QSAR modeling and molecular docking

    PubMed Central

    Shoombuatong, Watshara; Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E.S.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease which leads to the gradual loss of neuronal cells. Several hypotheses for AD exists (e.g., cholinergic, amyloid, tau hypotheses, etc.). As per the cholinergic hypothesis, the deficiency of choline is responsible for AD; therefore, the inhibition of AChE is a lucrative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AD. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine that is essential for cognition and memory. A large non-redundant data set of 2,570 compounds with reported IC50 values against AChE was obtained from ChEMBL and employed in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study so as to gain insights on their origin of bioactivity. AChE inhibitors were described by a set of 12 fingerprint descriptors and predictive models were constructed from 100 different data splits using random forest. Generated models afforded R2, \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${Q}_{\\mathrm{CV }}^{2}$\\end{document}QCV2 and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${Q}_{\\mathrm{Ext}}^{2}$\\end{document}QExt2 values in ranges of 0.66–0.93, 0.55–0.79 and 0.56–0.81 for the training set, 10-fold cross-validated set and external set, respectively. The best model built using the substructure count was selected according to the OECD guidelines and it afforded R2, \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage

  17. Probing the origins of human acetylcholinesterase inhibition via QSAR modeling and molecular docking

    PubMed Central

    Shoombuatong, Watshara; Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E.S.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease which leads to the gradual loss of neuronal cells. Several hypotheses for AD exists (e.g., cholinergic, amyloid, tau hypotheses, etc.). As per the cholinergic hypothesis, the deficiency of choline is responsible for AD; therefore, the inhibition of AChE is a lucrative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AD. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine that is essential for cognition and memory. A large non-redundant data set of 2,570 compounds with reported IC50 values against AChE was obtained from ChEMBL and employed in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study so as to gain insights on their origin of bioactivity. AChE inhibitors were described by a set of 12 fingerprint descriptors and predictive models were constructed from 100 different data splits using random forest. Generated models afforded R2, \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${Q}_{\\mathrm{CV }}^{2}$\\end{document}QCV2 and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${Q}_{\\mathrm{Ext}}^{2}$\\end{document}QExt2 values in ranges of 0.66–0.93, 0.55–0.79 and 0.56–0.81 for the training set, 10-fold cross-validated set and external set, respectively. The best model built using the substructure count was selected according to the OECD guidelines and it afforded R2, \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage

  18. Otilonium: a potent blocker of neuronal nicotinic ACh receptors in bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gandía, L.; Villarroya, M.; Lara, B.; Olmos, V.; Gilabert, J. A.; López, M. G.; Martínez-Sierra, R.; Borges, R.; García, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    1. Otilonium, a clinically useful spasmolytic, behaves as a potent blocker of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) as well as a mild wide-spectrum Ca2+ channel blocker in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. 2. 45Ca2+ uptake into chromaffin cells stimulated with high K+ (70 mM, 1 min) was blocked by otilonium with an IC50 of 7.6 microM. The drug inhibited the 45Ca2+ uptake stimulated by the nicotinic AChR agonist, dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) with a 79 fold higher potency (IC50 = 0.096 microM). 3. Whole-cell Ba2+ currents (IBa) through Ca2+ channels of voltage-clamped chromaffin cells were blocked by otilonium with an IC50 of 6.4 microM, very close to that of K(+)-evoked 45Ca2+ uptake. Blockade developed in 10-20 s, almost as a single step and was rapidly and almost fully reversible. 4. Whole-cell nicotinic AChR-mediated currents (250 ms pulses of 100 microM DMPP) applied at 30 s intervals were blocked by otilonium in a concentration-dependent manner, showing an IC50 of 0.36 microM. Blockade was induced in a step-wise manner. Wash out of otilonium allowed a slow recovery of the current, also in discrete steps. 5. In experiments with recordings in the same cells of whole-cell IDMPP, Na+ currents (INa) and Ca2+ currents (ICa), 1 microM otilonium blocked 87% IDMPP, 7% INa and 13% ICa. 6. Otilonium inhibited the K(+)-evoked catecholamine secretory response of superfused bovine chromaffin cells with an IC50 of 10 microM, very close to the IC50 for blockade of K(+)-induced 45Ca2+ uptake and IBa. 7. Otilonium inhibited the secretory responses induced by 10 s pulses of 50 microM DMPP with an IC50 of 7.4 nM. Hexamethonium blocked the DMPP-evoked responses with an IC50 of 29.8 microM, 4,000 fold higher than that of otilonium. 8. In conclusion, otilonium is a potent blocker of nicotinic AChR-mediated responses. The drugs also blocked various subtypes of neuronal voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels at a considerably lower potency. Na+ channels were unaffected by

  19. Comparison of anti-endotoxin activity of apoE and apoA mimetic derivatives of a model amphipathic peptide 18A.

    PubMed

    Sharifov, Oleg F; Nayyar, Gaurav; Ternovoy, Vladimir V; Palgunachari, Mayakonda N; Garber, David W; Anantharamaiah, Gm; Gupta, Himanshu

    2014-11-01

    Endotoxemia is a major cause of chronic inflammation, and is an important pathogenic factor in the development of metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) and apoA-I are protein components of high-density lipoprotein, which have strong anti-endotoxin activity. Here, we compared anti-endotoxin activity of Ac-hE18A-NH2 and 4F peptides, modified from model amphipathic helical 18A peptide, to mimic, respectively, apoE and apoA-I properties. Ac-hE18A-NH2, stronger than 4F, inhibited endotoxin activity and disaggregated Escherichia coli 055:B5 (wild smooth serotype). Ac-hE18A-NH2 and 4F inhibited endotoxin activity of E. coli 026:B6 (rough-like serotype) to a similar degree. This suggests that Ac-hE18A-NH2 as a dual-domain molecule might interact with both the lipid A and headgroup of smooth LPS, whereas 4F binds lipid A. In C57BL/6 mice, Ac-hE18A-NH2 was superior to 4F in inhibiting the inflammatory responses mediated by E. coli 055:B5, but not E. coli 026:B6. However, in THP-1 cells, isolated human primary leukocytes, and whole human blood, Ac-hE18A-NH2 reduced responses more strongly than 4F to both E. coli serotypes either when peptides were pre-incubated or co-incubated with LPS, indicating that Ac-hE18A-NH2 also has strong anti-inflammatory effects independent of endotoxin-neutralizing properties. In conclusion, Ac-hE18A-NH2 is more effective than 4F in inhibiting LPS-mediated inflammation, which opens prospective clinical applications for Ac-hE18A-NH2.

  20. Synthesis and inhibitory activity of ureidophosphonates, against acetylcholinesterase: pharmacological assay and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Kaboudin, Babak; Arefi, Marzban; Emadi, Saeed; Sheikh-Hasani, Vahid

    2012-01-01

    A novel method has been developed for the synthesis of 1-ureidophosphonates through a three components condensation of aldehyde with amine and diethylphosphite in the presence of sulfanilic acid as catalyst followed by subsequent reaction of the product with isocyanate. This method is easy, rapid, and good yielding. The anticholinesterase (AChE) activities (inhibition potency through IC(50)) of newly synthesized 1-ureidophosphonates were also investigated. The activities of the synthesized compounds toward the enzyme AChE were determined and compared in terms of their molecular structures and it was found, through molecular docking simulations, that the most potent derivative (compound 3i) inhibited the enzyme through binding to the peripheral anionic site (PAS) and not to its acylation site (A site).

  1. A comparative evaluation of biological activities and bioactive compounds of the seagrasses Zostera marina and Zostera noltei from southern Portugal.

    PubMed

    Custódio, Luísa; Laukaityte, Simona; Engelen, Aschwin H; Rodrigues, Maria João; Pereira, Hugo; Vizetto-Duarte, Catarina; Barreira, Luísa; Rodríguez, Hortensia; Alberício, Fernando; Varela, João

    2016-01-01

    This work assessed the antioxidant potential, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition and the in vitro cytotoxic activity of extracts of the seagrasses Zostera marina and Zostera noltei collected from southern Portugal. The total phenolic contents (TPCs), the rosmarinic acid (RA) concentration (HPLC/DAD) and the fatty acid (FA) profile (GC/MS) are also described. Z. marina had the highest TPC, radical scavenging activity against DPPH radicals and copper chelating activity. Z. noltei had metal chelation capacity to copper and iron ions. None of the species was able to inhibit AChE. Both seagrasses had high levels of polyunsaturated FAs. Z. marina significantly and selectively reduced the viability of tumorous neuronal cells. Z. noltei was highly toxic for the three cell lines tested and was selective against hepatocarcinoma cells at the concentration of 100 μg/mL. RA was the main compound identified in Z. marina, but not in Z. noltei.

  2. Inhibition of autophagy enhances the anticancer activity of silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jun; Huang, Zhihai; Wu, Hao; Zhou, Wei; Jin, Peipei; Wei, Pengfei; Zhang, Yunjiao; Zheng, Fang; Zhang, Jiqian; Xu, Jing; Hu, Yi; Wang, Yanhong; Li, Yajuan; Gu, Ning; Wen, Longping

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are cytotoxic to cancer cells and possess excellent potential as an antitumor agent. A variety of nanoparticles have been shown to induce autophagy, a critical cellular degradation process, and the elevated autophagy in most of these situations promotes cell death. Whether Ag NPs can induce autophagy and how it might affect the anticancer activity of Ag NPs has not been reported. Here we show that Ag NPs induced autophagy in cancer cells by activating the PtdIns3K signaling pathway. The autophagy induced by Ag NPs was characterized by enhanced autophagosome formation, normal cargo degradation, and no disruption of lysosomal function. Consistent with these properties, the autophagy induced by Ag NPs promoted cell survival, as inhibition of autophagy by either chemical inhibitors or ATG5 siRNA enhanced Ag NPs-elicited cancer cell killing. We further demonstrated that wortmannin, a widely used inhibitor of autophagy, significantly enhanced the antitumor effect of Ag NPs in the B16 mouse melanoma cell model. Our results revealed a novel biological activity of Ag NPs in inducing cytoprotective autophagy, and inhibition of autophagy may be a useful strategy for improving the efficacy of Ag NPs in anticancer therapy. PMID:25484080

  3. Copper oxide nanoparticles inhibit the metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mashock, Michael J; Kappell, Anthony D; Hallaj, Nadia; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2016-01-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are used increasingly in industrial applications and consumer products and thus may pose risk to human and environmental health. The interaction of CuO NPs with complex media and the impact on cell metabolism when exposed to sublethal concentrations are largely unknown. In the present study, the short-term effects of 2 different sized manufactured CuO NPs on metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. The role of released Cu(2+) during dissolution of NPs in the growth media and the CuO nanostructure were considered. Characterization showed that the 28 nm and 64 nm CuO NPs used in the present study have different primary diameter, similar hydrodynamic diameter, and significantly different concentrations of dissolved Cu(2+) ions in the growth media released from the same initial NP mass. Exposures to CuO NPs or the released Cu(2+) fraction, at doses that do not have impact on cell viability, showed significant inhibition on S. cerevisiae cellular metabolic activity. A greater CuO NP effect on the metabolic activity of S. cerevisiae growth under respiring conditions was observed. Under the tested conditions the observed metabolic inhibition from the NPs was not explained fully by the released Cu ions from the dissolving NPs.

  4. Activation and inhibition of transglutaminase 2 in mice.

    PubMed

    Dafik, Laila; Albertelli, Megan; Stamnaes, Jorunn; Sollid, Ludvig M; Khosla, Chaitan

    2012-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is an allosterically regulated enzyme with transamidating, deamidating and cell signaling activities. It is thought to catalyze sequence-specific deamidation of dietary gluten peptides in the small intestines of celiac disease patients. Because this modification has profound consequences for disease pathogenesis, there is considerable interest in the design of small molecule TG2 inhibitors. Although many classes of TG2 inhibitors have been reported, thus far an animal model for screening them to identify promising celiac drug candidates has remained elusive. Using intraperitoneal administration of the toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I∶C)), we induced rapid TG2 activation in the mouse small intestine. Dose dependence was observed in the activation of TG2 as well as the associated villous atrophy, gross clinical response, and rise in serum concentration of the IL-15/IL-15R complex. TG2 activity was most pronounced in the upper small intestine. No evidence of TG2 activation was observed in the lung mucosa, nor were TLR7/8 ligands able to elicit an analogous response. Introduction of ERW1041E, a small molecule TG2 inhibitor, in this mouse model resulted in TG2 inhibition in the small intestine. TG2 inhibition had no effect on villous atrophy, suggesting that activation of this enzyme is a consequence, rather than a cause, of poly(I∶C) induced enteropathy. Consistent with this finding, administration of poly(I∶C) to TG2 knockout mice also induced villous atrophy. Our findings pave the way for pharmacological evaluation of small molecule TG2 inhibitors as drug candidates for celiac disease. PMID:22319575

  5. Zeno inhibition of polarization rotation in an optically active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalo, Isabel; Porras, Miguel A.; Luis, Alfredo

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experiment in which the rotation of the polarization of light propagating in an optically active water solution of D-fructose tends to be inhibited by frequent monitoring whether the polarization remains unchanged. This is an example of the Zeno effect that has remarkable pedagogical interest because of its conceptual simplicity, easy implementation, low cost, and because the same the Zeno effect holds at classical and quantum levels. An added value is the demonstration of the Zeno effect beyond typical idealized assumptions in a practical setting with real polarizers.

  6. Lipid-induced NOX2 activation inhibits autophagic flux by impairing lysosomal enzyme activity[S

    PubMed Central

    Jaishy, Bharat; Zhang, Quanjiang; Chung, Heaseung S.; Riehle, Christian; Soto, Jamie; Jenkins, Stephen; Abel, Patrick; Cowart, L. Ashley; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Abel, E. Dale

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involved in maintaining energy and organelle homeostasis. The relationship between obesity and the regulation of autophagy is cell type specific. Despite adverse consequences of obesity on cardiac structure and function, the contribution of altered cardiac autophagy in response to fatty acid overload is incompletely understood. Here, we report the suppression of autophagosome clearance and the activation of NADPH oxidase (Nox)2 in both high fat-fed murine hearts and palmitate-treated H9C2 cardiomyocytes (CMs). Defective autophagosome clearance is secondary to superoxide-dependent impairment of lysosomal acidification and enzyme activity in palmitate-treated CMs. Inhibition of Nox2 prevented superoxide overproduction, restored lysosome acidification and enzyme activity, and reduced autophagosome accumulation in palmitate-treated CMs. Palmitate-induced Nox2 activation was dependent on the activation of classical protein kinase Cs (PKCs), specifically PKCβII. These findings reveal a novel mechanism linking lipotoxicity with a PKCβ-Nox2-mediated impairment in pH-dependent lysosomal enzyme activity that diminishes autophagic turnover in CMs. PMID:25529920

  7. Endogenously released ACh and exogenous nicotine differentially facilitate long-term potentiation induction in the hippocampal CA1 region of mice.

    PubMed

    Nakauchi, Sakura; Sumikawa, Katumi

    2012-05-01

    We examined the role of α7- and β2-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS), mimicking the brain's naturally occurring theta rhythm, induced robust LTP in hippocampal slices from α7 and β2 knockout mice. This suggests TBS is capable of inducing LTP without activation of α7- or β2-containing nAChRs. However, when weak TBS was applied, the modulatory effects of nicotinic receptors on LTP induction became visible. We showed that during weak TBS, activation of α7 nAChRs occurs by the release of ACh, contributing to LTP induction. Additionally, bath-application of nicotine activated β2-containing nAChRs to promote LTP induction. Despite predicted nicotine-induced desensitization, synaptically mediated activation of α7 nAChRs still occurs in the presence of nicotine and contributed to LTP induction. Optical recording of single-stimulation-evoked excitatory activity with a voltage-sensitive dye revealed enhanced excitatory activity in the presence of nicotine. This effect of nicotine was robust during high-frequency stimulation, and was accompanied by enhanced burst excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Nicotine-induced enhancement of excitatory activity was observed in slices from α7 knockout mice, but was absent in β2 knockout mice. These results suggest that the nicotine-induced enhancement of excitatory activity is mediated by β2-containing nAChRs, and is related to the nicotine-induced facilitation of LTP induction. Thus, our study demonstrates that the activation of α7- and β2-containing nAChRs differentially facilitates LTP induction via endogenously released ACh and exogenous nicotine, respectively, in the hippocampal CA1 region of mice.

  8. Activation and inhibition of pyruvate carboxylase from Rhizobium etli†

    PubMed Central

    Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Menefee, Ann L.; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Wallace, John C.; Attwood, Paul V.; Maurice, Martin St.; Cleland, W. Wallace

    2011-01-01

    While crystallographic structures of the R. etli pyruvate carboxylase (PC) holoenzyme revealed the location and probable positioning of the essential activator, Mg2+, and non-essential activator, acetyl-CoA, an understanding of how they affect catalysis remains unclear. The current steady-state kinetic investigation indicates that both acetyl-CoA and Mg2+ assist in coupling the MgATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin in the biotin carboxylase (BC) domain with pyruvate carboxylation in the carboxyl transferase (CT) domain. Initial velocity plots of free Mg2+ vs. pyruvate were nonlinear at low concentrations of Mg2+ and a nearly complete loss of coupling between the BC and CT domain reactions was observed in the absence of acetyl-CoA. Increasing concentrations of free Mg2+ also resulted in a decrease in the Ka for acetyl-CoA. Acetyl phosphate was determined to be a suitable phosphoryl donor for the catalytic phosphorylation of MgADP, while phosphonoacetate inhibited both the phosphorylation of MgADP by carbamoyl phosphate (Ki = 0.026 mM) and pyruvate carboxylation (Ki = 2.5 mM). In conjunction with crystal structures of T882A R. etli PC mutant cocrystallized with phosphonoacetate and MgADP, computational docking studies suggest that phosphonoacetate could coordinate to one of two Mg2+ metal centers in the BC domain active site. Based on the pH profiles, inhibition studies and initial velocity patterns, possible mechanisms for the activation, regulation and coordination of catalysis between the two spatially distinct active sites in pyruvate carboxylase from R. etli by acetyl-CoA and Mg2+ are described. PMID:21958066

  9. Sirt5 Deacylation Activities Show Differential Sensitivities to Nicotinamide Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Suenkel, Benjamin; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Schutkowski, Mike; Steegborn, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    Sirtuins are protein deacylases regulating metabolism and aging processes, and the seven human isoforms are considered attractive therapeutic targets. Sirtuins transfer acyl groups from lysine sidechains to ADP-ribose, formed from the cosubstrate NAD+ by release of nicotinamide, which in turn is assumed to be a general Sirtuin inhibitor. Studies on Sirtuin regulation have been hampered, however, by shortcomings of available assays. Here, we describe a mass spectrometry–based, quantitative deacylation assay not requiring any substrate labeling. Using this assay, we show that the deacetylation activity of human Sirt5 features an unusual insensitivity to nicotinamide inhibition. In contrast, we find similar values for Sirt5 and Sirt3 for the intrinsic NAD+ affinity as well as the apparent NAD+ affinity in presence of peptide. Structure comparison and mutagenesis identify an Arg neighboring to the Sirt5 nicotinamide binding pocket as a mediator of nicotinamide resistance, and statistical sequence analyses along with testing further Sirtuins reveal a network of coevolved residues likely defining a nicotinamide-insensitive Sirtuin deacetylase family. The same Arg was recently reported to render Sirt5 a preferential desuccinylase, and we find that this Sirt5 activity is highly sensitive to nicotinamide inhibition. Analysis of Sirt5 structures and activity data suggest that an Arg/succinate interaction is the molecular basis of the differential nicotinamide sensitivities of the two Sirt5 activities. Our results thus indicate a Sirtuin subfamily with nicotinamide-insensitive deacetylase activity and suggest that the molecular features determining nicotinamide sensitivity overlap with those dominating deacylation specificity, possibly suggesting that other subfamily members might also prefer other acylations than acetylations. PMID:23028781

  10. Screening of siddha medicinal plants for its in-vitro acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Kadiyala, Madhuri; Ponnusankar, Sivasankaran; Elango, Kannan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The plants selected for the study were traditionally used in siddha system of medicine in neurological disorders. Aim: The aim of the following study isto screen the plant species for both acetylcholinesterase (AchE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuchE) inhibition by in-vitro Ellman's method and a thin layer chromatography bioautographic assay for newer drug candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Materials and Methods: Ellman's colorimetric method was performed in a 96 well micro plate for cholinesterases inhibition using galantamine as standard drug. Results: Present studies confirmed that out of all the tested extracts Hemidesmus indicus R.Br (HI) showed considerable IC50 values for AchE (28.40 ± 0.92 μg/mL) and BuchE (43.47 ± 0.64 μg/mL) inhibition which indicates that HI extract has considerable specificity toward AchE and BuchE compared with all the tested extracts and the activity was followed by Vernonia anthelmintica (VA) Willd and Saussurea lappa Clarke (SL). The bioautograms also confirmed the activity potent extracts. Conclusion: Besides various bioactivities HI, VA and SL exhibited considerable cholinesterases inhibition making it to consider these species for further investigation of new compounds. PMID:24991106

  11. Anticholinesterase inhibitory activity of quaternary alkaloids from Tinospora crispa.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Mashitah; Hamid, Hazrulrizawati; Houghton, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Quaternary alkaloids are the major alkaloids isolated from Tinospora species. A previous study pointed to the necessary presence of quaternary nitrogens for strong acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity in such alkaloids. Repeated column chromatography of the vine of Tinospora crispa extract led to the isolation of one new protoberberine alkaloid, 4,13-dihydroxy-2,8,9-trimethoxydibenzo[a,g]quinolizinium (1), along with six known alkaloids-dihydrodiscretamine (2), columbamine (3), magnoflorine (4), N-formylannonaine (5), N-formylnornuciferine (6), and N-trans-feruloyltyramine (7). The seven compounds were isolated and structurally elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Two known alkaloids, namely, dihydrodiscretamine and columbamine are reported for the first time for this plant. The compounds were tested for AChE inhibitory activity using Ellman's method. In the AChE inhibition assay, only columbamine (3) showed strong activity with IC50 48.1 µM. The structure-activity relationships derived from these results suggest that the quaternary nitrogen in the skeleton has some effect, but that a high degree of methoxylation is more important for acetylcholinesterase inhibition. PMID:24448061

  12. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition by flavonoids from Agrimonia pilosa.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mankil; Park, Moonso

    2007-09-03

    In a bioassay-guided search for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors from 180 medicinal plants, an ethyl acetate extract of whole plants of Agrimonia pilosa ledeb yielded tiliroside (1), 3-methoxy quercetin (2), quercitrin (3) and quercetin (4). We report herein for the first time that all four flavonol compounds showed significant inhibitory effects on AChE, particularly quercetin (4), which showed twice the activity of dehydroevodiamine (DHED).

  13. Apoptotic cells actively inhibit the expression of CD69 on Con A activated T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, E; Zhang, L; Zeng, Y; Ge, Q; Zhao, M; Gao, W

    2000-03-01

    Although apoptosis is commonly viewed as a silent cell death without damage to adjacent tissues, the effect of apoptosis on immunity has been unclear. We have investigated the influence of apoptotic cells on T-cell activation. The K562 or HL-60 human leukemia cell lines that had been induced apoptosis by FTY720 or cycloheximide (CHX) were added into the culture of mouse spleen cells stimulated with Con A. Six to 20 h later, the expression of CD69, an early T-cell activation antigen, was detected using flowcytometry. Living cells and necrotic cells served as control groups. Apoptotic K562 or HL-60 cells induced by either FTY720 or CHX unanimously inhibited CD69 expression on the CD3+ mouse T cells while living and necrotic cells did not. The inhibition was proportional to the number of apoptotic cells and was different in the T-cell subsets, showing a rapid and transient inhibition on the CD3+CD8+ T-cell activation but with a slow and continuous inhibition on CD3+CD8- T-cell activation. In conclusion, the apoptotic cells actively inhibit a T-cell activation that is independent of the cell lines or the apoptotic inducers, indicating that the apoptotic cells dominantly regulate T-cell immunity. PMID:10736091

  14. Exogenous melatonin inhibits neutrophil migration through suppression of ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Da-Long; Sun, Ai-Ai; Li, Ya-Juan; Chen, Min; Ge, Shu-Chao; Hu, Bing

    2015-10-01

    Neutrophil migration to inflammatory sites is the fundamental process of innate immunity among organisms against pathogen invasion. As a major sleep adjusting hormone, melatonin has also been proved to be involved in various inflammatory events. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of exogenous melatonin on neutrophil migration to the injury site in live zebrafish and further investigate whether ERK signaling is involved in this process. Using the tail fin transection model, the fluorescently labeled neutrophil was in vivo visualized in transgenic Tg(lyz:EGFP), Tg(lyz:DsRed) zebrafish. We found that exogenous melatonin administration dramatically inhibited the injury-induced neutrophil migration in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. The inhibited effect of melatonin on neutrophil migration could be attenuated by melatonin receptor 1, 2, and 3 antagonists. The ERK phosphorylation level was significantly decreased post injury when treated with melatonin. The blocking of ERK activation with inhibitor PD0325901 suppressed the number of migrated neutrophils in response to injury. However, the activation of ERK with the epidermal growth factor could impair the inhibited effect of melatonin on neutrophil migration. We also detected that PD0325901 significantly suppressed the in vivo neutrophils transmigrating over the vessel endothelial cell using the transgenic Tg(flk:EGFP);(lyz:DsRed) line labeled as both vessel and neutrophil. Taking all of these data together, the results indicated that exogenous melatonin had an anti-migratory effect on neutrophils by blocking the ERK phosphorylation signal, and it led to the subsequent adhesion molecule expression. Thus, the crossing of the vessel endothelial cells of neutrophils became difficult.

  15. Acetylcholinesterase-Inhibition and Antibacterial Activity of Mondia whitei Adventitious Roots and Ex vitro-Grown Somatic Embryogenic-Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Ponnusamy; Kumari, Aloka; Ncube, Bhekumthetho; Van Staden, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Mondia whitei (Hook.f.) Skeels is an important endangered medicinal and commercial plant in South Africa. In vitro propagation systems are required for biomass production and bioactivity analysis to supplement wild resources/stocks. Adventitious roots from somatic embryogenic explants using suspension culture and ex vitro-grown plants produced via somatic embryogenesis were established using different plant growth regulator treatments. The adventitious root biomass and different parts of ex vitro-grown and mother plants were used to investigate the potential for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and antibacterial activities. Adventitious roots derived from 2.5 μM indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) treatments and ex vitro-grown plants derived from meta-topolin riboside and IAA treatments gave the best AChE and antibacterial activities. The in vitro-established M. whitei and ex vitro biomass have comparable ability to function as inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and antibacterial agents, and can be used as potent bioresources in traditional medicine. PMID:27752244

  16. Amiloride inhibits rat mucosal ornithine decarboxylase activity and DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich-Baker, M.G.; Wang, P.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Johnson, L.R. )

    1988-03-01

    Refeeding fasted rats induces a dramatic trophic response in gastrointestinal mucosa and is associated with elevations in both rate of DNA synthesis and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity. The signal for these increases is unknown. Amiloride prevents cell alkalinization by blocking Na{sup +}-H{sup +} exchange at apical epithelial cell membranes. In study 1, rats were fasted 48 h, treated with amiloride (0.5 to 500 mg/kg), and refed for 4 h. Refeeding increased ODC activities in the jejunal mucosa (X8) and liver (X19) but not in the oxyntic gland mucosa. In the jejunum, but not the liver, the activation of ODC was completely abolished by 100 mg/kg amiloride. In study 2, the rate of DNA synthesis was determine by measuring the rate of ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation 16 h after refeeding. Refeeding resulted in significantly increased rates of DNA synthesis over fasted levels, and amiloride at 100 mg/kg significantly reduced the elevations in the jejenum and liver. In conclusion, amiloride inhibits the postprandial increases in jejunal ODC activity and DNA synthesis in the jejunum and liver. The results indicate that (1) the Na{sup +}-H{sup +} antiport is essential to the increased ODC activity in the jejunum and liver after a meal and (2) increases in DNA synthesis and their suppression by amiloride are not necessary linked to ODC activity.

  17. 2-Octynoic Acid Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection through Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Darong; Xue, Binbin; Wang, Xiaohong; Yu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Nianli; Gao, Yimin; Liu, Chen; Zhu, Haizhen

    2013-01-01

    Many chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients with current therapy do not clear the virus. It is necessary to find novel treatments. The effect of 2-octynoic acid (2-OA) on HCV infection in human hepatocytes was examined. The mechanism of 2-OA antiviral activity was explored. Our data showed that 2-OA abrogated lipid accumulation in HCV replicon cells and virus-infected hepatocytes. It suppressed HCV RNA replication and infectious virus production with no cytotoxicity to the host cells. 2-OA did not affect hepatitis B virus replication in HepG2.2.15 cells derived from HepG2 cells transfected with full genome of HBV. Further study demonstrated that 2-OA activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase in viral-infected cells. Compound C, a specific inhibitor of AMPK, inhibited AMPK activity and reversed the reduction of intracellular lipid accumulation and the antiviral effect of 2-OA. Knockdown of AMPK expression by RNA interference abolished the activation of AMPK by 2-OA and blocked 2-OA antiviral activity. Interestingly, 2-OA induced interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and inhibited microRNA-122 (miR-122) expression in virus-infected hepatocytes. MiR-122 overexpression reversed the antiviral effect of 2-OA. Furthermore, knockdown of AMPK expression reversed both the induction of ISGs and suppression of miR-122 by 2-OA, implying that activated AMPK induces the intracellular innate response through the induction of ISGs and inhibiting miR-122 expression. 2-OA inhibits HCV infection through regulation of innate immune response by activated AMPK. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which active AMPK inhibits HCV infection. 2-OA and its derivatives hold promise for novel drug development for chronic hepatitis C. PMID:23741428

  18. Calmodulin binds to and inhibits the activity of phosphoglycerate kinase.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2004-09-17

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) functions as a cytoplasmic ATP-generating glycolytic enzyme, a nuclear mediator in DNA replication and repair, a stimulator of Sendai virus transcription and an extracellular disulfide reductase in angiogenesis. Probing of a developmental expression library from Dictyostelium discoideum with radiolabelled calmodulin led to the isolation of a cDNA encoding a putative calmodulin-binding protein (DdPGK) with 68% sequence similarity to human PGK. Dictyostelium, rabbit and yeast PGKs bound to calmodulin-agarose in a calcium-dependent manner while DdPGK constructs lacking the calmodulin-binding domain (209KPFLAILGGAKVSDKIKLIE228) failed to bind. The calmodulin-binding domain shows 80% identity between diverse organisms and is situated beside the hinge and within the ATP binding domain adjacent to nine mutations associated with PGK deficiency. Calmodulin addition inhibits yeast PGK activity in vitro while the calmodulin antagonist W-7 abrogates this inhibition. Together, these data suggest that PGK activity may be negatively regulated by calcium and calmodulin signalling in eukaryotic cells. PMID:15363631

  19. Pterins inhibit nitric oxide synthase activity in rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Jorens, P. G.; van Overveld, F. J.; Bult, H.; Vermeire, P. A.; Herman, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    1. The synthesis of nitrite and citrulline from L-arginine by immune-stimulated rat alveolar macrophages and the modulation of this synthesis were studied. 2,4-Diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine (DAHP), 6R-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH4) and L-sepiapterin were potent inhibitors of the recombinant interferon-gamma induced production of nitrogen oxides in intact cultured cells with I50 values for BH4 and L-sepiapterin of approximately 10 microM. They were equally effective in inhibiting the induced production of citrulline. This inhibitory effect was concentration-dependent for all three modulators investigated. 2. The inhibitory effects were not dependent on incubation times of either 24 or 48 h, on the immune-stimulus used (lipopolysaccharide, interferon-gamma), or whether these stimuli were added during or after the induction period. 3. Pterin-6-carboxylic acid (PCA), which cannot be converted into BH4, and methotrexate (MTX), which inhibits dihydrofolatereductase but not de novo biosynthesis of BH4, did not change the production of nitrite. 4. The data indicate that DAHP, an inhibitor of the de novo biosynthesis of the co-factor BH4, blocks the nitric oxide synthase activity in intact cells. Since the pterins BH4 and L-sepiapterin blocked the L-arginine dependent production of nitrite and citrulline, the activity of nitric oxide synthase in phagocytic cells may be regulated by metabolic endproducts of the de novo biosynthesis of BH4. PMID:1281717

  20. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Inhibits Spontaneous Contractile Activity of Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Lobov, G I; Pan'kova, M N

    2016-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide dose-dependently inhibited spontaneous phase and tonic activity of smooth muscle strips from the capsule of isolated bovine mesenteric lymph nodes. Pretreatment with L-NAME, diclofenac, and methylene blue had practically no effect on the peptide-induced relaxation responses. In contrast, glibenclamide significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of atrial natriuretic peptide. We suppose that the NO-dependent and cyclooxygenase signaling pathways are not involved in implementation of the inhibitory effects of atrial natriuretic peptide. ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels of the smooth muscle cell membrane are the last component in the signaling pathway leading to relaxation of smooth muscles of the lymph node capsule caused by atrial natriuretic peptide; activation of these channels leads to membrane hyperpolarization and smooth muscle relaxation. PMID:27383173

  1. In vitro inhibition of lysine decarboxylase activity by organophosphate esters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sufang; Wan, Bin; Zhang, Lianying; Yang, Yu; Guo, Liang-Hong

    2014-12-01

    Organophosphate esters (OPEs), a major group of organophosphorus flame retardants, are regarded as emerging environmental contaminants of health concern. Amino acid decarboxylases catalyze the conversion of amino acids into polyamines that are essential for cell proliferation, hypertrophy and tissue growth. In this paper, inhibitory effect of twelve OPEs with aromatic, alkyl or chlorinated alkyl substituents on the activity of lysine decarboxylase (LDC) was assessed quantitatively with an economic and label-free fluorescence sensor and cell assay. The sensor comprises a macrocyclic host (cucurbit[7]uril) and a fluorescent dye (acridine orange) reporter. The twelve OPEs were found to vary in their capacity to inhibit LDC activity. Alkyl group substituted OPEs had no inhibitory effect. By contrast, six OPEs substituted with aromatic or chlorinated alkyl groups inhibited LDC activity significantly with IC50 ranging from 1.32 μM to 9.07 μM. Among them, the inhibitory effect of tri-m-cresyl phosphate (TCrP) was even more effective as an inhibitor than guanosine 5'-diphosphate-3'-diphosphate (ppGpp) (1.60 μM), an LDC natural inhibitor in vivo. Moreover, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, these six OPEs showed perceptible inhibitory effects on LDC activity in PC12 living cells, and led to a marked loss in the cadaverine content. Molecular docking analysis of the LDC/OPE complexes revealed that different binding modes contribute to the difference in their inhibitory effect. Our finding suggested that LDC, as a new potential biological target of OPEs, might be implicated in toxicological and pathogenic mechanism of OPEs. PMID:25264276

  2. Inhibition of myeloperoxidase and antioxidative activity of Gentiana lutea extracts.

    PubMed

    Nastasijević, Branislav; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara; Dimitrijević-Branković, Suzana; Pašti, Igor; Vujačić, Ana; Joksić, Gordana; Vasić, Vesna

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory activity of Gentiana lutea extracts on the enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO), as well as the antioxidant activity of these extracts and their correlation with the total polyphenol content. Extracts were prepared using methanol (100%), water and ethanol aqueous solutions (96, 75, 50 and 25%v/v) as solvents for extraction. Also, isovitexin, amarogentin and gentiopicroside, pharmacologically active constituents of G. lutea were tested as potential inhibitors of MPO. Antioxidant activity of extracts was determined using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging test and also using cyclic voltammetry (CV). Among all extracts, the antioxidant capacity of 50% ethanol aqueous extract was the highest, both when measured using the DPPH test, with IC(50)=20.6 μg/ml, and when using CV. Also, 50% ethanol extract, showed the best inhibition of MPO activity in comparison with other extracts. In the group of the selected G. lutea constituents, gentiopicroside has proved to be the strongest inhibitor of MPO, with IC(50)=0.8 μg/ml. Also, the concentration of G. lutea constituents were determined in all extracts, using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC).

  3. Inhibition of Ras oncogenic activity by Ras protooncogenes.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Roberto; Lue, Jeffrey; Mathews, Jeremy; Yoon, Andrew; Ahn, Daniel; Garcia-España, Antonio; Leonardi, Peter; Vargas, Marcelo P; Pellicer, Angel

    2005-01-10

    Point mutations in ras genes have been found in a large number and wide variety of human tumors. These oncogenic Ras mutants are locked in an active GTP-bound state that leads to a constitutive and deregulated activation of Ras function. The dogma that ras oncogenes are dominant, whereby the mutation of a single allele in a cell will predispose the host cell to transformation regardless of the presence of the normal allele, is being challenged. We have seen that increasing amounts of Ras protooncogenes are able to inhibit the activity of the N-Ras oncogene in the activation of Elk in NIH 3T3 cells and in the formation of foci. We have been able to determine that the inhibitory effect is by competition between Ras protooncogenes and the N-Ras oncogene that occurs first at the effector level at the membranes, then at the processing level and lastly at the effector level in the cytosol. In addition, coexpression of the N-Ras protooncogene in thymic lymphomas induced by the N-Ras oncogene is associated with increased levels of p107, p130 and cyclin A and decreased levels of Rb. In the present report, we have shown that the N-Ras oncogene is not truly dominant over Ras protooncogenes and their competing activities might be depending on cellular context.

  4. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Activity of Pigment Echinochrome A from Sea Urchin Scaphechinus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Ryul; Pronto, Julius Ryan D.; Sarankhuu, Bolor-Erdene; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Nari; Mishchenko, Natalia P.; Fedoreyev, Sergey A.; Stonik, Valentin A.; Han, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Echinochrome A (EchA) is a dark-red pigment of the polyhydroxynaphthoquinone class isolated from sea urchin Scaphechinus mirabilis. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are used in the treatment of various neuromuscular disorders, and are considered as strong therapeutic agents for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although EchA is clinically used to treat ophthalmic diseases and limit infarct formation during ischemia/reperfusion injury, anti-AChE effect of EchA is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the anti-AChE effect of EchA in vitro. EchA and its exhausted form which lost anti-oxidant capacity did not show any significant cytotoxicy on the H9c2 and A7r5 cells. EchA inhibited AChE with an irreversible and uncompetitive mode. In addition, EchA showed reactive oxygen species scavenging activity, particularly with nitric oxide. These findings indicate new therapeutic potential for EchA in treating reduced acetylcholine-related diseases including AD and provide an insight into developing new AChE inhibitors. PMID:24918454

  5. PLGA-PEG Nanoparticles Coated with Anti-CD45RO and Loaded with HDAC Plus Protease Inhibitors Activate Latent HIV and Inhibit Viral Spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yong; Liu, Xinkuang; Zhou, Shuping; Liu, Liang; Zhang, Fujina; Xie, Chunmei; Cai, Shuyu; Wei, Jia; Zhu, Yongqiang; Hou, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Activating HIV-1 proviruses in latent reservoirs combined with inhibiting viral spread might be an effective anti-HIV therapeutic strategy. Active specific delivery of therapeutic drugs into cells harboring latent HIV, without the use of viral vectors, is a critical challenge to this objective. In this study, nanoparticles of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol diblock copolymers conjugated with anti-CD45RO antibody and loaded with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and/or protease inhibitor nelfinavir (Nel) were tested for activity against latent virus in vitro. Nanoparticles loaded with SAHA, Nel, and SAHA + Nel were characterized in terms of size, surface morphology, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, drug release, and toxicity to ACH-2 cells. We show that SAHA- and SAHA + Nel-loaded nanoparticles can target latently infected CD4+ T-cells and stimulate virus production. Moreover, nanoparticles loaded with SAHA + NEL were capable of both activating latent virus and inhibiting viral spread. Taken together, these data demonstrate the potential of this novel reagent for targeting and eliminating latent HIV reservoirs.

  6. Quorum Sensing Inhibiting Activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ramadan; Shaaban, Mona I.; Abdel Bar, Fatma M.; El-Mahdy, Areej M.; Shokralla, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1–V6) of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR, and Mass spectrometry), as behenic acid (docosanoic acid), borrelidin, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease, and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA, and pqsR). Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and anti

  7. Quorum Sensing Inhibiting Activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus Isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ramadan; Shaaban, Mona I; Abdel Bar, Fatma M; El-Mahdy, Areej M; Shokralla, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1-V6) of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR, and Mass spectrometry), as behenic acid (docosanoic acid), borrelidin, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease, and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA, and pqsR). Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and anti

  8. Quorum Sensing Inhibiting Activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus Isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ramadan; Shaaban, Mona I; Abdel Bar, Fatma M; El-Mahdy, Areej M; Shokralla, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1-V6) of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR, and Mass spectrometry), as behenic acid (docosanoic acid), borrelidin, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease, and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA, and pqsR). Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and anti

  9. Activated AMPK inhibits PPAR-{alpha} and PPAR-{gamma} transcriptional activity in hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sozio, Margaret S; Lu, Changyue; Zeng, Yan; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David W

    2011-10-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) are critical regulators of short-term and long-term fatty acid oxidation, respectively. We examined whether the activities of these molecules were coordinately regulated. H4IIEC3 cells were transfected with PPAR-α and PPAR-γ expression plasmids and a peroxisome-proliferator-response element (PPRE) luciferase reporter plasmid. The cells were treated with PPAR agonists (WY-14,643 and rosiglitazone), AMPK activators 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) and metformin, and the AMPK inhibitor compound C. Both AICAR and metformin decreased basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity; compound C increased agonist-stimulated reporter activity and partially reversed the effect of the AMPK activators. Similar effects on PPAR-γ were seen, with both AICAR and metformin inhibiting PPRE reporter activity. Compound C increased basal PPAR-γ activity and rosiglitazone-stimulated activity. In contrast, retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α), another nuclear receptor that dimerizes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), was largely unaffected by the AMPK activators. Compound C modestly increased AM580 (an RAR agonist)-stimulated activity. The AMPK activators did not affect PPAR-α binding to DNA, and there was no consistent correlation between effects of the AMPK activators and inhibitor on PPAR and the nuclear localization of AMPK-α subunits. Expression of either a constitutively active or dominant negative AMPK-α inhibited basal and WY-14,643-stimulated PPAR-α activity and basal and rosiglitazone-stimulated PPAR-γ activity. We concluded that the AMPK activators AICAR and metformin inhibited transcriptional activities of PPAR-α and PPAR-γ, whereas inhibition of AMPK with compound C activated both PPARs. The effects of AMPK do not appear to be mediated through effects on RXR or on PPAR/RXR binding to DNA. These effects are independent of kinase activity and instead appear to

  10. Arctigenin, a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, inhibits MAP kinases and AP-1 activation via potent MKK inhibition: the role in TNF-alpha inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Kyung; Jang, Young Pyo; Kim, Young Choong; Kim, Sang Geon

    2004-10-01

    Arctigenin, naturally occurring in Bardanae fructus, Saussurea medusa, Arctium lappa L., Torreya nucifera and Ipomea cairica, is a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Previously, we showed that arctigenin potently inhibited the induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which involved suppression of NF-kappaB activation. In the present study, we examined the effects of arctigenin on mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in Raw264.7 cells and MAP kinase kinase (MKK) activity. The effect of arctigenin on activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation was also studied in association with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression. Immunoblot analysis showed that arctigenin inhibited phosphorylation of MAP kinases ERK1/2, p38 kinase and JNK and their activities in Raw264.7 cells treated with LPS. Arctigenin potently inhibited the activity of MKK1 in vitro with the IC(50) value of 1 nM. Gel shift and reporter gene analyses revealed that arctigenin inhibited LPS-inducible AP-1 binding to the AP-1 consensus oligonucleotide and AP-1-mediated reporter gene expression. In view of the potential role of AP-1 in the induction of TNF-alpha, we next examined the inhibitory effects of arctigenin on the expression of TNF-alpha. Arctigenin blocked TNF-alpha production and decreased the level of TNF-alpha mRNA in the cells exposed to LPS. These results showed that arctigenin inhibited activation of MAP kinases including ERK1/2, p38 kinase and JNK through the inhibition of MKK activities, leading to AP-1 inactivation, which might, at least in part, contribute to the inhibition of TNF-alpha production.

  11. Activation of TRPV1 channels inhibits mechanosensitive Piezo channel activity by depleting membrane phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Borbiro, Istvan; Badheka, Doreen; Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-02-10

    Capsaicin is an activator of the heat-sensitive TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) ion channels and has been used as a local analgesic. We found that activation of TRPV1 channels with capsaicin either in dorsal root ganglion neurons or in a heterologous expression system inhibited the mechanosensitive Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels by depleting phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and its precursor phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] from the plasma membrane through Ca(2+)-induced phospholipase Cδ (PLCδ) activation. Experiments with chemically inducible phosphoinositide phosphatases and receptor-induced activation of PLCβ indicated that inhibition of Piezo channels required depletion of both PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2. The mechanically activated current amplitudes decreased substantially in the excised inside-out configuration, where the membrane patch containing Piezo1 channels is removed from the cell. PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P applied to these excised patches inhibited this decrease. Thus, we concluded that Piezo channel activity requires the presence of phosphoinositides, and the combined depletion of PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P reduces channel activity. In addition to revealing a role for distinct membrane lipids in mechanosensitive ion channel regulation, these data suggest that inhibition of Piezo2 channels may contribute to the analgesic effect of capsaicin.

  12. Agonists with supraphysiological efficacy at the muscarinic M2 ACh receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schrage, R; Seemann, WK; Klöckner, J; Dallanoce, C; Racké, K; Kostenis, E; De Amici, M; Holzgrabe, U; Mohr, K

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Artificial agonists may have higher efficacy for receptor activation than the physiological agonist. Until now, such ‘superagonism’ has rarely been reported for GPCRs. Iperoxo is an extremely potent muscarinic receptor agonist. We hypothesized that iperoxo is a ‘superagonist’. Experimental Approach Signalling of iperoxo and newly synthesized structural analogues was compared with that of ACh at label-free M2 muscarinic receptors applying whole cell dynamic mass redistribution, measurement of G-protein activation, evaluation of cell surface agonist binding and computation of operational efficacies. Key Results In CHO-hM2 cells, iperoxo significantly exceeds ACh in Gi/Gs signalling competence. In the orthosteric loss-of-function mutant M2-Y1043.33A, the maximum effect of iperoxo is hardly compromised in contrast to ACh. ‘Superagonism’ is preserved in the physiological cellular context of MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts. Structure–signalling relationships including iperoxo derivatives with either modified positively charged head group or altered tail suggest that ‘superagonism’ of iperoxo is mechanistically based on parallel activation of the receptor protein via two orthosteric interaction points. Conclusion and Implications Supraphysiological agonist efficacy at muscarinic M2 ACh receptors is demonstrated for the first time. In addition, a possible underlying molecular mechanism of GPCR ‘superagonism’ is provided. We suggest that iperoxo-like orthosteric GPCR activation is a new avenue towards a novel class of receptor activators. Linked Article This article is commented on by Langmead and Christopoulos, pp. 353–356 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.12142 PMID:23062057

  13. Screening of selected Indian medicinal plants for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Vinutha, B; Prashanth, D; Salma, K; Sreeja, S L; Pratiti, D; Padmaja, R; Radhika, S; Amit, A; Venkateshwarlu, K; Deepak, M

    2007-01-19

    Seventy-six plant extracts including methanolic and successive water extracts from 37 Indian medicinal plants were investigated for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity (in vitro). Results indicated that methanolic extracts to be more active than water extracts. The potent AChE inhibiting methanolic plant extracts included Withania somnifera (root), Semecarpus anacardium (stem bark), Embelia ribes (Root), Tinospora cordifolia (stem), Ficus religiosa (stem bark) and Nardostachys jatamansi (rhizome). The IC(50) values obtained for these extracts were 33.38, 16.74, 23.04, 38.36, 73.69 and 47.21mug/ml, respectively. These results partly substantiate the traditional use of these herbs for improvement of cognition. PMID:16950584

  14. Screening the methanol extracts of some Iranian plants for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Gholamhoseinian, A.; Moradi, M.N.; Sharifi-far, F.

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the main enzyme for the breakdown of acetylcholine. Nowadays, usage of the inhibitors of this enzyme is one of the most important types of treatment of mild to moderate neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. Herbal medicines can be a new source of inhibitors of this enzyme. In this study we examined around 100 different plants to evaluate their inhibitory properties for AChE enzyme. Plants were scientifically identified and their extracts were prepared by methanol percolation. Acetylcholinesterase activity was measured using a colorimetric method in the presence or absence of the extracts. Eserine was used as a positive control. Methanol extracts of the Levisticum officinale, Bergeris integrima and Rheum ribes showed more than 50% AChE inhibitory activity. The inhibition kinetics were studied in the presence of the most effective extracts. L. officinale and B. integrima inhibited AChE activity in a non-competitive manner, while R. ribes competitively inhibitied the enzyme as revealed by double-reciprocal Linweaver-Burk plot analysis. Under controlled condition, Km and Vmax values of the enzyme were found to be 9.4 mM and 0.238 mM/min, respectively. However, in the presence of L. officinale, B. integrima, and R. ribes extracts, Vmax values were 0.192, 0.074 and 0.238 mM/min, respectively. Due to the competitive inhibition of the enzyme by R. ribes extract, the Km value of 21.2 mM was obtained. The concentration required for 50% enzyme inhibition (IC50 value) was 0.5, 0.9, and 0.95 mg/ml for the L. officinale, B. integrima and R. ribes extracts, respectively. The IC50 of the eserine was determined to be 0.8 mg/ml. PMID:21589805

  15. Nicotinic ACh receptors as therapeutic targets in CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Dineley, Kelly T; Pandya, Anshul A; Yakel, Jerrel L

    2015-02-01

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) can regulate neuronal excitability by acting on the cys-loop cation-conducting ligand-gated nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) channels. These receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS), being expressed on neurons and non-neuronal cells, where they participate in a variety of physiological responses such as anxiety, the central processing of pain, food intake, nicotine seeking behavior, and cognitive functions. In the mammalian brain, nine different subunits have been found thus far, which assemble into pentameric complexes with much subunit diversity; however, the α7 and α4β2 subtypes predominate in the CNS. Neuronal nAChR dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of many neurological disorders. Here we will briefly discuss the functional makeup and expression of the nAChRs in mammalian brain, and their role as targets in neurodegenerative diseases (in particular Alzheimer's disease, AD), neurodevelopmental disorders (in particular autism and schizophrenia), and neuropathic pain.

  16. Dextromethorphan Inhibits Activations and Functions in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Song, Pei-Shan; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Chu, Ching-Liang; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM), a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF-κB translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases. PMID:23781253

  17. Dextromethorphan inhibits activations and functions in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Song, Pei-Shan; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Chu, Ching-Liang; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM), a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN- γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF- κ B translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases. PMID:23781253

  18. Homocysteine injures vascular endothelial cells by inhibiting mitochondrial activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fengyong; Qi, Xiujing; Gao, Zheng; Yang, Xingju; Zheng, Xingfeng; Duan, Chonghao; Zheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of homocysteine (Hcy) in the pathogenesis of pulmonary embolism (PE) and the associated molecular mechanisms in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Hcy contents were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry using Annexin-V staining. Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity was assessed with an enzyme activity assay, and the expression levels of COX 17 were determined by western blot analysis. Intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were measured using a microplate reader with a fluorescence probe. The results demonstrated that, compared with the control group, the serum Hcy levels were significantly elevated in the PE group, suggesting that Hcy may be an indicator for PE. Following treatment with Hcy, the apoptosis rate was markedly elevated in HUVECs. Moreover, Hcy decreased COX activity and downregulated the expression of COX 17 in HUVECs. Furthermore, Hcy increased the ROS levels in these endothelial cells. However, all the above-mentioned physiopathological changes induced by Hcy in HUVECs could be restored by folic acid. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that Hcy inhibited COX activity, downregulated COX 17 expression, increased intracellular ROS levels and enhanced apoptosis in endothelial cells.

  19. Inhibition of bacterial activity in acid mine drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurdeep; Bhatnagar, Miss Mridula

    1988-12-01

    Acid mine drainage water give rise to rapid growth and activity of an iron- and sulphur- oxidizing bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidians which greatly accelerate acid producing reactions by oxidation of pyrite material associated with coal and adjoining strata. The role of this bacterium in production of acid mine drainage is described. This study presents the data which demonstrate the inhibitory effect of certain organic acids, sodium benzoate, sodium lauryl sulphate, quarternary ammonium compounds on the growth of the acidophilic aerobic autotroph Thiobacillus ferrooxidians. In each experiment, 10 milli-litres of laboratory developed culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidians was added to 250 milli-litres Erlenmeyer flask containing 90 milli-litres of 9-k media supplemented with FeSO4 7H2O and organic compounds at various concentrations. Control experiments were also carried out. The treated and untreated (control) samples analysed at various time intervals for Ferrous Iron and pH levels. Results from this investigation showed that some organic acids, sodium benzoate, sodium lauryl sulphate and quarternary ammonium compounds at low concentration (10-2 M, 10-50 ppm concentration levels) are effective bactericides and able to inhibit and reduce the Ferrous Iron oxidation and acidity formation by inhibiting the growth of Thiobacillus ferrooxidians is also discussed and presented

  20. Effects of procaine on pharmaco-mechanical coupling mechanisms activated by acetylcholine in smooth muscle cells of porcine coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Ueno, H; Sumimoto, K; Hashimoto, T; Hirata, M; Kuriyama, H

    1987-03-01

    The action of procaine on pharmaco-mechanical coupling activated by application of acetylcholine (ACh) was investigated using collagenase-treated dispersed intact and skinned smooth muscle cells and intact muscle tissues of the porcine coronary artery. ACh reduced stored 45Ca2+, and this action was prevented by procaine in intact dispersed cells. The maximum reduction in the level of stored 45Ca induced by caffeine (25 mM) or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3; 3 microM) was also prevented by procaine in the skinned muscle cells in the presence or absence of ATP. However, inhibitions of the latter required higher concentrations of procaine than the former. Release by 10 microM ACh of Ca2+ from its store site in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+ was also inhibited by procaine and was detected using the quin2 fluorescence method. In these smooth muscle tissues, ACh (above 10 nM) reduced the amount of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI-P2) and dose dependently increased the amount of phosphatidic acid. Procaine inhibited the hydrolysis of PI-P2 activated by ACh, thus reducing the amount of InsP3 and the release of Ca2+ from the store site. It is concluded that procaine has multiple actions on the porcine coronary artery, and one of the actions related with pharmacomechanical coupling appears through inhibition of hydrolysis of PI-P2 induced by ACh.

  1. The linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA increases membrane surface localization of the α7 ACh receptor in a protein 4.1N-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Ayako; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2013-03-01

    In yeast two-hybrid screening, protein 4.1N, a scaffolding protein, was identified as a binding partner of the α7 ACh (acetylcholine) receptor. For rat hippocampal slices, the linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA {8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid} increased the association of the α7 ACh receptor with 4.1N, and the effect was inhibited by GF109203X, an inhibitor of PKC (protein kinase C), although DCP-LA did not induce PKC phosphorylation of 4.1N. For PC-12 cells, the presence of the α7 ACh receptor in the plasma membrane fraction was significantly suppressed by knocking down 4.1N. DCP-LA increased the presence of the α7 ACh receptor in the plasma membrane fraction, and the effect was still inhibited by knocking down 4.1N. In the monitoring of α7 ACh receptor mobilization, DCP-LA enhanced signal intensities for the α7 ACh receptor at the membrane surface in PC-12 cells, which was clearly prevented by knocking down 4.1N. Taken together, the results of the present study show that 4.1N interacts with the α7 ACh receptor and participates in the receptor tethering to the plasma membrane. The results also indicate that DCP-LA increases membrane surface localization of the α7 ACh receptor in a 4.1N-dependent manner under the control of PKC, but without phosphorylating 4.1N.

  2. Nicotine regulates activity of lateral habenula neurons via presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wanhong; Xiao, Cheng; Gao, Ming; Hopf, F Woodward; Krnjević, Krešimir; McIntosh, J Michael; Fu, Rao; Wu, Jie; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    There is much interest in brain regions that drive nicotine intake in smokers. Interestingly, both the rewarding and aversive effects of nicotine are probably critical for sustaining nicotine addiction. The medial and lateral habenular (LHb) nuclei play important roles in processing aversion, and recent work has focused on the critical involvement of the LHb in encoding and responding to aversive stimuli. Several neurotransmitter systems are implicated in nicotine's actions, but very little is known about how nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) regulate LHb activity. Here we report in brain slices that activation of nAChRs depolarizes LHb cells and robustly increases firing, and also potentiates glutamate release in LHb. These effects were blocked by selective antagonists of α6-containing (α6*) nAChRs, and were absent in α6*-nAChR knockout mice. In addition, nicotine activates GABAergic inputs to LHb via α4β2-nAChRs, at lower concentrations but with more rapid desensitization relative to α6*-nAChRs. These results demonstrate the existence of diverse functional nAChR subtypes at presynaptic and postsynaptic sites in LHb, through which nicotine could facilitate or inhibit LHb neuronal activity and thus contribute to nicotine aversion or reward. PMID:27596561

  3. Nicotine regulates activity of lateral habenula neurons via presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Wanhong; Xiao, Cheng; Gao, Ming; Hopf, F. Woodward; Krnjević, Krešimir; McIntosh, J. Michael; Fu, Rao; Wu, Jie; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    There is much interest in brain regions that drive nicotine intake in smokers. Interestingly, both the rewarding and aversive effects of nicotine are probably critical for sustaining nicotine addiction. The medial and lateral habenular (LHb) nuclei play important roles in processing aversion, and recent work has focused on the critical involvement of the LHb in encoding and responding to aversive stimuli. Several neurotransmitter systems are implicated in nicotine’s actions, but very little is known about how nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) regulate LHb activity. Here we report in brain slices that activation of nAChRs depolarizes LHb cells and robustly increases firing, and also potentiates glutamate release in LHb. These effects were blocked by selective antagonists of α6-containing (α6*) nAChRs, and were absent in α6*-nAChR knockout mice. In addition, nicotine activates GABAergic inputs to LHb via α4β2-nAChRs, at lower concentrations but with more rapid desensitization relative to α6*-nAChRs. These results demonstrate the existence of diverse functional nAChR subtypes at presynaptic and postsynaptic sites in LHb, through which nicotine could facilitate or inhibit LHb neuronal activity and thus contribute to nicotine aversion or reward. PMID:27596561

  4. The Ability To Activate and Inhibit Speeded Responses: Separate Developmental Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Band, Guido P. H.; van der Molen, Maurits W.; Overtoom, Carin C. E.; Verbaten, Marinus N.

    2000-01-01

    Compared 5-, 8-, and 11-year-olds and young adults on 6 speeded performance tasks, 4 requiring an inhibition of response activation. Analyzed reaction and inhibition times; found support for hypothesis of generalized developmental changes in response activation, but revealed less pronounced development of inhibition. Concluded that a nonselective…

  5. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Darin C.; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K. K.; McElwee, Kevin J.; Cheng, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51 × faster), ostrich oil (1.46 × faster), and rhea oil (1.64 × faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35 × slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  6. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Darin C; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K K; McElwee, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51×faster), ostrich oil (1.46×faster), and rhea oil (1.64×faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35×slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  7. Endogenous inhibition of the trigeminally evoked neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Gorini, C; Philbin, K; Bateman, R; Mendelowitz, D

    2010-10-01

    Stimulation of the nasal mucosa by airborne irritants or water evokes a pronounced bradycardia accompanied by peripheral vasoconstriction and apnea. The dive response, which includes the trigeminocardiac reflex, is among the most powerful autonomic responses. These responses slow the heart rate and reduce myocardial oxygen consumption. Although normally cardioprotective, exaggeration of this reflex can be detrimental and has been implicated in cardiorespiratory diseases, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). An essential component of the diving response and trigeminocardiac reflex is activation of the parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the nucleus ambiguus that control heart rate. This study examined the involvement of cholinergic receptors in trigeminally evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in CVNs in an in vitro preparation from rats. CVNs were identified using a retrograde tracer injected into the fat pads at the base of the heart. Application of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine significantly decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic neurotransmission to CVNs on stimulation of trigeminal fibers. Whereas nicotine did not have any effect on the glutamatergic responses, the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonist bethanechol significantly decreased the excitatory neurotransmission. Atropine, an mAChR antagonist, facilitated these responses indicating this trigeminally evoked brain stem pathway in vitro is endogenously inhibited by mAChRs. Tropicamide, an m4 mAChR antagonist, prevented the inhibitory action of the muscarinic agonist bethanechol. These results indicate that the glutamatergic synaptic neurotransmission in the trigeminally evoked pathway to CVNs is endogenously inhibited in vitro by m4 mAChRs.

  8. Inhibition by quinine of endothelium-dependent relaxation of rabbit aortic strips.

    PubMed Central

    Gebremedhin, D.; Hadházy, P.; Magyar, K.

    1987-01-01

    1 The effects of quinine sulphate, tetramethylammonium chloride (TMA) and tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) (all blockers of the Ca2+-activated K+ channels) on the relaxations induced by acetylcholine (ACh), calcium ionophore A23187 and sodium nitrite were studied in helical strips of rabbit aorta. 2 The strips were contracted to a moderate stable tone with phenylephrine (10(-7) M). ACh (4 X 10(-9) to 10(-6) M) as well as A23187 (10(-8) to 3 X 10(-7) M) reduced this tone in a concentration- and endothelium-dependent manner. 3 Pretreatment of the tissues with quinine (2.5 X 10(-5) to 10(-4) M) for 60 min produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the relaxation induced by ACh. Also 90 min incubation of the strips with TMA (3 X 10(-3) to 6.5 X 10(-2) M) or TEA (10(-3) to 3 X 10(-2) M) inhibited the ACh-evoked relaxation in a manner similar to quinine. 4 Quinine (10(-4) M, 60 min), TMA (6.5 X 10(-2) M, 90 min) or TEA (3 X 10(-2) M, 90 min) produced 5 to 10 fold reductions in the relaxant EC50 values of A23187 and ACh and depressed (by 40 to 95%) the maximal relaxations to the ionophore and ACh. 5 On a molar basis, quinine was more effective than the two tetraalkylammonium ions in reducing the endothelium-dependent relaxations of the aortic strips induced by ACh or A23187. The inhibitory actions were reversible after 60 to 90 min washout.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2827827

  9. Ginkgetin inhibits the growth of DU−145 prostate cancer cells through inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yoon Jung; Jung, Seung-Nam; Yun, Jieun; Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Jiyeon; Lee, Yu-Jin; Han, Dong Cho; Kwon, Byoung-Mog

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is constitutively activated in human cancers. Therefore, STAT3 is a therapeutic target of cancer drug discovery. We previously reported that natural products inhibited constitutively activated STAT3 in human prostate tumor cells. We used a dual-luciferase assay to screen 200 natural products isolated from herbal medicines and we identified ginkgetin obtained from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba L. as a STAT3 inhibitor. Ginkgetin inhibited both inducible and constitutively activated STAT3 and blocked the nuclear translocation of p-STAT3 in DU-145 prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, ginkgetin selectively inhibited the growth of prostate tumor cells stimulated with activated STAT3. Ginkgetin induced STAT3 dephosphorylation at Try705 and inhibited its localization to the nucleus, leading to the inhibition of expression of STAT3 target genes such as cell survival-related genes (cyclin D1 and survivin) and anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL). Therefore, ginkgetin inhibited the growth of STAT3-activated tumor cells. We also found that ginkgetin inhibited tumor growth in xenografted nude mice and downregulated p-STAT3Tyr705 and survivin in tumor tissues. This is the first report that ginkgetin exerts antitumor activity by inhibiting STAT3. Therefore, ginkgetin is a good STAT3 inhibitor and may be a useful lead molecule for development of a therapeutic STAT3 inhibitor. PMID:25611086

  10. Is Peroxiredoxin II's peroxidase activity strongly inhibited in human erythrocytes?

    PubMed

    Benfeitas, Rui; Selvaggio, Gianluca; Antunes, Fernando; Coelho, Pedro; Salvador, Armindo

    2014-10-01

    H2O2 elimination in human erythrocytes is mainly carried out by catalase (Cat), glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) and the more recently discovered peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2). However, the contribution of Prx2 to H2O2 consumption is still unclear. Prx2's high reactivity with H2O2 (kPrx2=10×10(7) M(-1)s(-1), kCat =7×10(7) M(-1)s(-1), kGPx1 =4×10(7) M(-1)s(-1)) and high abundance ([Prx2]= 570µM, [Cat]= 32µM, [GPx1]= 1µM) suggest that under low H2O2 supply rates it should consume >99% of the H2O2. However, extensive evidence indicates that in intact erythrocytes Prx2 contributes no more than Cat to H2O2 consumption. In order for this to be attained, Prx2's effective rate constant with H2O2would have to be just ~10(5) M(-1)s(-1), much lower than that determined in multiple experiments with the purified proteins. Nevertheless, nearly all Prx2 is oxidized within 1min of exposing erythrocytes to a H2O2 bolus, which is inconsistent with an irreversible inhibition. A mathematical model of the H2O2 metabolism in human erythrocytes [Benfeitas et al. (2014) Free Radic. Biol. Med.] where Prx2 either has a low kPrx2 or is subject to a strong (>99%) but readily reversible inhibition achieves quantitative agreement with detailed experimental observations of the responses of the redox status of Prx2 in human erythrocytes and suggests functional advantages of this design (see companion abstract). By contrast, a variant where Prx2 is fully active with kPrx2=10(8) M(-1)s(-1) shows important qualitative discrepancies. Altogether, these results suggest that Prx2's peroxidase activity is strongly inhibited in human erythrocytes. We acknowledge fellowship SFRH/BD/51199/2010, grants PEst-C/SAU/LA0001/2013-2014, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0612/2013, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0313/2014, and FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-020978 (PTDC/QUI-BIQ/119657/2010) co-financed by FEDER through the COMPETE program and by FCT.

  11. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  12. AChR-specific immunosuppressive therapy of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-10-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease characterized by muscle fatigability. In most cases, it is mediated by autoantibodies targeting muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at the neuromuscular junction. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) is an animal model for MG, which is usually induced by immunization with AChR purified from fish electric organ. Pathological autoantibodies to AChRs are directed at the extracellular surface, especially the main immunogenic region (MIR). Current treatments for MG can help many but not all patients. Antigen-specific immunosuppressive therapy for MG that specifically suppresses the autoimmune response without affecting the entire immune system and avoids side effects of general immunosuppression is currently unavailable. Early attempts at antigen-specific immunosuppression for EAMG using AChR extracellular domain sequences that form epitopes for pathological autoantibodies risked provoking autoimmunity rather than suppressing it. We discovered a novel approach to specific immunosuppression of EAMG with a therapeutic vaccine consisting of bacterially-expressed human AChR cytoplasmic domains, which has the potential to specifically suppress MG without danger of causing exacerbation. This approach prevents development of chronic EAMG when initiated immediately after the acute phase of EAMG, and rapidly reverses established chronic EAMG when started during the chronic phase of EAMG. Successfully treated rats exhibited long-term resistance to re-induction of EAMG. In this review we also discuss the current understanding of the mechanisms by which the therapy works. Vaccination with AChR cytoplasmic domains in adjuvant is promising as a safe, antigen-specific, potent, effective, rapidly acting, and long lasting approach to therapy of MG.

  13. Brain regional acetylcholinesterase activity and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in rats after repeated administration of cholinesterase inhibitors and its withdrawal

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Haruo . E-mail: hk1664@iwate-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Tadahiko; Sakamoto, Maki; Hashimoto, Wataru; Kashiwada, Keiko; Sato, Itaru; Akahori, Fumiaki; Satoh, Tetsuo

    2007-03-15

    Activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and specific binding of [{sup 3}H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB), [{sup 3}H]pirenzepine (PZP) and [{sup 3}H]AF-DX 384 to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) preparations in the striatum, hippocampus and cortex of rats were determined 1, 6 and 11 days after the last treatment with an organophosphate DDVP, a carbamate propoxur or a muscarinic agonist oxotremorine as a reference for 7 and 14 days. AChE activity was markedly decreased in the three regions 1 day after the treatment with DDVP for 7 and 14 days with a gradual recovery 6 to 11 days, and much less decreased 1, 6 and 11 days after the treatment with propoxur for 7 days but not for 14 days in the hippocampus and cortex. The binding of [{sup 3}H]-QNB, PZP and AF-DX 384 in the three regions was generally decreased by the treatment with DDVP for 7 and 14 days. Such down-regulations were generally restored 6 or 11 days after the treatment for 7 but not for 14 days. The down-regulation or up-regulation as measured by [{sup 3}H]-QNB, PZP and AF-DX 384 was observed 1, 6 or 11 days after treatment with propoxur for 7 days and/or 14 days. Repeated treatment with oxotremorine produced similar effects except AChE activity to DDVP. These results suggest that repeated inhibition of AChE activity may usually cause down-regulation of mAChRs with some exception in the hippocampus when a reversible antiChE propoxur is injected.

  14. Evaluation of Inhibition Efficiency for the Detection of Captan, 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin, Pentachlorophenol and Carbosulfan in Water: An Electrochemical Approach.

    PubMed

    Nesakumar, Noel; Ramachandra, Bhat Lakshmishri; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Rayappan, John Bosco Balaguru

    2016-02-01

    A novel bio-analytical method has been devised based on the change in catalytic activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme induced by captan, carbosulfan, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) for the investigation of inhibition efficiency and sensitivity using Pt/ZnO/AChE/Chitosan bioelectrode. The inhibition curves of captan, carbosulfan, TCDD and PCP were similar to Michaelis-Menten curve. TCDD held the minimum inhibitor Michaelis-Menten constant ([Formula: see text]) value (10.2 nM) in comparison with PCP (10.9 nM), carbosulfan (14.5 nM) and captan (7.9 × 10(3) nM). The maximum inhibition of AChE enzyme by captan was about 100 %, which was much higher than that of TCDD (72.7 %), PCP (68.1 %) and carbosulfan (47.7 %). The calculated theoretical sensitivity was in the order of TCDD > PCP > carbosulfan > captan. Comparing with TCDD (35.3 %), PCP (47.8 %) and carbosulfan (20.9 %), only the inhibition efficiency of captan (55.0 %) was the maximum. The developed bioelectrode exhibited high recovery and low relative standard deviation in local tap water samples.

  15. Effects of Sequential Applications of Bassa 50EC (Fenobucarb) and Vitashield 40EC (Chlorpyrifos ethyl) on Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Climbing Perch (Anabas testudineus) Cultured in Rice Fields in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tam, Nguyen Thanh; Berg, Håkan; Laureus, Jenny; Cong, Nguyen Van; Tedengren, Michael

    2016-07-01

    This study assesses the effects of sequential applications of the insecticides Bassa 50EC (fenobucarb-F) and Vitashield 40EC (chlorpyrifos ethyl-CPF), sprayed at concentrations used by rice farmers in the Mekong Delta, on the brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in climbing perch fingerlings. After spraying the pesticides on the rice fields, the water concentrations of both insecticides decreased below the detection levels within 3 days. The sequential applications caused significant inhibition on the brain AChE activity in the exposed fish. The inhibition by F was quicker, but less prolonged, than for CPF. The inhibition levels caused by the sequential applications were lower than those caused by only CPF and by a mixture of CPF and F. The results indicate that sequential applications of pesticides could have a negative impact on aquatic organisms and fish yields, with implication for the aquatic biodiversity, local people's livelihood and the aquaculture industry in the Mekong Delta. PMID:27075585

  16. Dual inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase enzymes by allicin

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The brain of mammals contains two major form of cholinesterase enzymes, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE). The dual inhibition of these enzymes is considered as a promising strategy for the treatment of neurological disorder such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), senile dementia, ataxia, and myasthenia gravis. The present study was undertaken to explore the anticholinesterase inhibition property of allicin. Materials and Methods: An assessment of cholinesterase inhibition was carried out by Ellman's assay. Results: The present study demonstrates allicin, a major ingredient of crushed garlic (Allium sativum L.) inhibited both AChE and BuChE enzymes in a concentration-dependent manner. For allicin, the IC50 concentration was 0.01 mg/mL (61.62 μM) for AChE and 0.05 ± 0.018 mg/mL (308.12 μM) for BuChE enzymes. Conclusions: Allicin shows a potential to ameliorate the decline of cognitive function and memory loss associated with AD by inhibiting cholinesterase enzymes and upregulate the levels of acetylcholine (ACh) in the brain. It can be used as a new lead to target AChE and BuChE to upregulate the level of ACh which will be useful in alleviating the symptoms associated with AD. PMID:26288480

  17. Curcumin inhibits activation of TRPM2 channels in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kheradpezhouh, E; Barritt, G J; Rychkov, G Y

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress is a hallmark of many liver diseases including viral and drug-induced hepatitis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. One of the consequences of oxidative stress in the liver is deregulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis, resulting in a sustained elevation of the free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in hepatocytes, which leads to irreversible cellular damage. Recently it has been shown that liver damage induced by paracetamol and subsequent oxidative stress is, in large part, mediated by Ca(2+) entry through Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channels. Involvement of TRPM2 channels in hepatocellular damage induced by oxidative stress makes TRPM2 a potential therapeutic target for treatment of a range of oxidative stress-related liver diseases. We report here the identification of curcumin ((1E,6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione), a natural plant-derived polyphenol in turmeric spice, as a novel inhibitor of TRPM2 channel. Presence of 5µM curcumin in the incubation medium prevented the H2O2- and paracetamol-induced [Ca(2+)]c rise in rat hepatocytes. Furthermore, in patch clamping experiments incubation of hepatocytes with curcumin inhibited activation of TRPM2 current by intracellular ADPR with IC50 of approximately 50nM. These findings enhance understanding of the actions of curcumin and suggest that the known hepatoprotective properties of curcumin are, at least in part, mediated through inhibition of TRPM2 channels.

  18. Curcumin inhibits activation of TRPM2 channels in rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kheradpezhouh, E.; Barritt, G.J.; Rychkov, G.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a hallmark of many liver diseases including viral and drug-induced hepatitis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. One of the consequences of oxidative stress in the liver is deregulation of Ca2+ homeostasis, resulting in a sustained elevation of the free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) in hepatocytes, which leads to irreversible cellular damage. Recently it has been shown that liver damage induced by paracetamol and subsequent oxidative stress is, in large part, mediated by Ca2+ entry through Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channels. Involvement of TRPM2 channels in hepatocellular damage induced by oxidative stress makes TRPM2 a potential therapeutic target for treatment of a range of oxidative stress-related liver diseases. We report here the identification of curcumin ((1E,6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione), a natural plant-derived polyphenol in turmeric spice, as a novel inhibitor of TRPM2 channel. Presence of 5 µM curcumin in the incubation medium prevented the H2O2- and paracetamol-induced [Ca2+]c rise in rat hepatocytes. Furthermore, in patch clamping experiments incubation of hepatocytes with curcumin inhibited activation of TRPM2 current by intracellular ADPR with IC50 of approximately 50 nM. These findings enhance understanding of the actions of curcumin and suggest that the known hepatoprotective properties of curcumin are, at least in part, mediated through inhibition of TRPM2 channels. PMID:26609559

  19. SUMOylation inhibits FOXM1 activity and delays mitotic transition.

    PubMed

    Myatt, S S; Kongsema, M; Man, C W-Y; Kelly, D J; Gomes, A R; Khongkow, P; Karunarathna, U; Zona, S; Langer, J K; Dunsby, C W; Coombes, R C; French, P M; Brosens, J J; Lam, E W-F

    2014-08-21

    The forkhead box transcription factor FOXM1 is an essential effector of G2/M-phase transition, mitosis and the DNA damage response. As such, it is frequently deregulated during tumorigenesis. Here we report that FOXM1 is dynamically modified by SUMO1 but not by SUMO2/3 at multiple sites. We show that FOXM1 SUMOylation is enhanced in MCF-7 breast cancer cells in response to treatment with epirubicin and mitotic inhibitors. Mutation of five consensus conjugation motifs yielded a SUMOylation-deficient mutant FOXM1. Conversely, fusion of the E2 ligase Ubc9 to FOXM1 generated an auto-SUMOylating mutant (FOXM1-Ubc9). Analysis of wild-type FOXM1 and mutants revealed that SUMOylation inhibits FOXM1 activity, promotes translocation to the cytoplasm and enhances APC/Cdh1-mediated ubiquitination and degradation. Further, expression of the SUMOylation-deficient mutant enhanced cell proliferation compared with wild-type FOXM1, whereas the FOXM1-Ubc9 fusion protein resulted in persistent cyclin B1 expression and slowed the time from mitotic entry to exit. In summary, our findings suggest that SUMOylation attenuates FOXM1 activity and causes mitotic delay in cytotoxic drug response.

  20. Inhibition of endothelial lipase activity by sphingomyelin in the lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Belikova, Natalia A; Billheimer, Jeff; Rader, Daniel J; Hill, John S; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2014-10-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is a major determinant of plasma HDL concentration, its activity being inversely proportional to HDL levels. Although it is known that it preferentially acts on HDL compared to LDL and VLDL, the basis for this specificity is not known. Here we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin, a major phospholipid in lipoproteins is a physiological inhibitor of EL, and that the preference of the enzyme for HDL may be due to low sphingomyelin/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) ratio in HDL, compared to other lipoproteins. Using recombinant human EL, we showed that sphingomyelin inhibits the hydrolysis of PtdCho in the liposomes in a concentration-dependent manner. While the enzyme showed lower hydrolysis of LDL PtdCho, compared to HDL PtdCho, this difference disappeared after the degradation of lipoprotein sphingomyelin by bacterial sphingomyelinase. Analysis of molecular species of PtdCho hydrolyzed by EL in the lipoproteins showed that the enzyme preferentially hydrolyzed PtdCho containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as 22:6, 20:5, 20:4 at the sn-2 position, generating the corresponding PUFA-lyso PtdCho. This specificity for PUFA-PtdCho species was not observed after depletion of sphingomyelin by sphingomyelinase. These results show that sphingomyelin not only plays a role in regulating EL activity, but also influences its specificity towards PtdCho species. PMID:25167836

  1. Effects of exposure to oxamyl, carbofuran, dichlorvos, and lindane on acetylcholinesterase activity in the gills of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Anguiano, Gerardo A; Amador, Alejandro; Moreno-Legorreta, Manuel; Arcos-Ortega, Fabiola; Vazquez-Boucard, Celia

    2010-08-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity has been used to test the exposure of mollusk bivalves to pesticides and other pollutants. The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is a species with a worldwide distribution, and it has a high commercial value. The use of this species as a bioindicator in the marine environment, and the use of measurements of AChE activity in tissues of C. gigas require prior evaluation of organisms exposed to several toxic compounds in the laboratory. In our study, the effects of pesticides on AChE activity in the gills and mantle tissues of C. gigas were analyzed by exposing animals to organophosphate (dichlorvos), carbamate (carbofuran and oxamyl), and organochlorine (lindane) pesticides. Adult Pacific oysters were exposed to several concentrations (0.1-200 microM) of dichlorvos, carbofuran, and oxamyl for 96 h, and lindane (1.0 and 2.5 microM) was applied for 12 days. In gill tissues, all pesticides analyzed caused a decrease in AChE activity when compared to the control unexposed group. The mean inhibition concentration (IC(50)) values were determined for dichlorvos, carbofuran, and oxamyl pesticides. Dichlorvos had the highest toxic effect, with an IC(50) of 1.08 microM; lesser effects were caused by oxamyl and carbofuran, with IC(50)s of 1.67 and 3.03 microM, respectively. This study reports the effects of pesticides with several chemical structures and validates measurement of AChE activity in the gill tissues of C. gigas for use in environmental evaluations or food quality tests.

  2. Avoidance behaviour response and esterase inhibition in the earthworm, Lumbricus terrestris, after exposure to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Martínez Morcillo, S; Yela, J L; Capowiez, Y; Mazzia, C; Rault, M; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C

    2013-05-01

    The avoidance response of earthworms to polluted soils has been standardised using a simple and low-cost test, which facilitates soil toxicity screening. In this study, the avoidance response of Lumbricus terrestris was quantified in chlorpyrifos-spiked soils, depending on the pesticide concentration and exposure duration. The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and carboxylesterase (CbE) activities was also determined as indirect measures of pesticide bioavailability. The effects of different chlorpyrifos concentrations were examined in a standardised test (two-chamber system) with 0.6, 3 and 15 mg/kg chlorpyrifos. A modification of the test involved a pre-exposure step (24, 48 or 72 h) in soils spiked with 15 mg/kg. In both protocols, earthworms were unable to avoid the contaminated soils. However, the esterase activities showed that all earthworms were exposed to chlorpyrifos. Acetylcholinesterase activity did not change in earthworms in the standardised behavioural test (0.58 ± 0.20 U/mg protein, mean ± SD; n = 72), whereas the CbE activity was significantly inhibited (62-87 % inhibition) in earthworms exposed to 3 and 15 mg/kg. In the modified test, earthworms had greatly inhibited AChE activity (0.088 ± 0.034 U/mg protein, n = 72), which was supported by reactivation of the inhibited enzyme activity in the presence of pralidoxime (2-PAM). Similarly, the CbE activity was significantly inhibited in earthworms with all treatments. This study suggests that the avoidance behaviour test for organophosphorus-contaminated soils could be supported by specific biomarkers to facilitate a better understanding of pesticide exposure and toxicity during this test. PMID:23435687

  3. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition and locomotor function after motor-sensory cortex impact injury.

    PubMed

    Holschneider, Daniel P; Guo, Yumei; Roch, Margareth; Norman, Keith M; Scremin, Oscar U

    2011-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces transient or persistent dysfunction of gait and balance. Enhancement of cholinergic transmission has been reported to accelerate recovery of cognitive function after TBI, but the effects of this intervention on locomotor activity remain largely unexplored. The hypothesis that enhancement of cholinergic function by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) improves locomotion following TBI was tested in Sprague-Dawley male rats after a unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury of the motor-sensory cortex. Locomotion was tested by time to fall on the constant speed and accelerating Rotarod, placement errors and time to cross while walking through a horizontal ladder, activity monitoring in the home cages, and rearing behavior. Assessments were performed the 1st and 2nd day and the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd week after TBI. The AChE inhibitor physostigmine hemisulfate (PHY) was administered continuously via osmotic minipumps implanted subcutaneously at the rates of 1.6-12.8 μmol/kg/day. All measures of locomotion were impaired by TBI and recovered to initial levels between 1 and 3 weeks post-TBI, with the exception of the maximum speed achievable on the accelerating Rotarod, as well as rearing in the open field. PHY improved performance in the accelerating Rotarod at 1.6 and 3.2 μmol/kg/day (AChE activity 95 and 78% of control, respectively), however, higher doses induced progressive deterioration. No effect or worsening of outcomes was observed at all PHY doses for home cage activity, rearing, and horizontal ladder walking. Potential benefits of cholinesterase inhibition on locomotor function have to be weighed against the evidence of the narrow range of useful doses. PMID:21787180

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ach5.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Yi; Cho, Shu-Ting; Lo, Wen-Sui; Wang, Yi-Chieh; Lai, Erh-Min; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2015-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a phytopathogenic bacterium that causes crown gall disease. The strain Ach5 was isolated from yarrow (Achillea ptarmica L.) and is the wild-type progenitor of other derived strains widely used for plant transformation. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of this bacterium. PMID:26044425

  5. The Ache: Genocide Continues in Paraguay. IWGIA Document No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munzel, Mark

    In 1972, the Paraguayan Roman Catholic Church protested against the massacre of Indians in Paraguay. This was followed by further protests from Paraguayan intellectuals. These protests led to the removal of Jesus de Pereira, one of the executors of the official Ache policy. Thus, the critics were appeased. Since the beginning of 1973, new protests…

  6. A combined molecular docking and charge density analysis is a new approach for medicinal research to understand drug-receptor interaction: curcumin-AChE model.

    PubMed

    Renuga Parameswari, A; Rajalakshmi, G; Kumaradhas, P

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a molecular docking analysis has been performed on diketone form of curcumin molecule with acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The calculated lowest docked energy of curcumin molecule in the active site of AChE is -11.21 kcal/mol; this high negative value indicates that the molecule exhibits large binding affinity towards AChE. When the curcumin molecule present in the active site of AChE, subsequently, its conformation has altered significantly and the molecule adopts a U-shape geometry as it is linear in gas phase (before entering into the active site). This conformational transition facilitates curcumin to form strong interaction with Phe330 of acyl-binding pocket and the choline binding site with indole ring of Trp84 and Asp72. The gas phase and the active site analysis of curcumin allows to understand the conformational geometry, nature of molecular flexibility, charge density redistribution and the variation of electrostatic properties of curcumin in the active site. To obtain the gas phase structure, the curcumin molecule was optimized using Hartree-Fock and density functional methods (B3LYP) with the basis set 6-311G(∗∗). A charge density analysis on both gas phase as well as the molecule lifted from the active site was carried out using Bader's theory of atoms in molecules (AIM). The difference in molecular electrostatic potential between the two forms of curcumin displays the difference in charge distribution. The large dipole moment of curcumin (7.54 D) in the active site reflects the charge redistribution as it is much less in the gas phase (4.34 D).

  7. Activation and inhibition of TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yu-Li; Kuan, Ai-Seon; Chen, Tsung-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCC) encoded by family members of transmembrane proteins of unknown function 16 (TMEM16) have recently been intensely studied for functional properties as well as their physiological roles as chloride channels in various tissues. One technical hurdle in studying these channels is the well-known channel rundown that frequently impairs the precision of electrophysiological measurements for the channels. Using experimental protocols that employ fast-solution exchange, we circumvented the problem of channel rundown by normalizing the Ca(2+)-induced current to the maximally-activated current obtained within a time period in which the channel rundown was negligible. We characterized the activation of the TMEM16A-encoded CaCC (also called ANO1) by Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and Ba(2+), and discovered that Mg(2+) competes with Ca(2+) in binding to the divalent-cation binding site without activating the channel. We also studied the permeability of the ANO1 pore for various anions and found that the anion occupancy in the pore-as revealed by the permeability ratios of these anions-appeared to be inversely correlated with the apparent affinity of the ANO1 inhibition by niflumic acid (NFA). On the other hand, the NFA inhibition was neither affected by the degree of the channel activation nor influenced by the types of divalent cations used for the channel activation. These results suggest that the NFA inhibition of ANO1 is likely mediated by altering the pore function but not through changing the channel gating. Our study provides a precise characterization of ANO1 and documents factors that can affect divalent cation activation and NFA inhibition of ANO1.

  8. Contribution of α4β2 nAChR in nicotine-induced intracellular calcium response and excitability of MSDB neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiangang; Wang, Yali; Wang, Yang; Wang, Ran; Zhang, Yunpeng; Zhang, Qian; Lu, Chengbiao

    2014-12-10

    The neurons of medial septal diagonal band of broca (MSDB) project to hippocampus and play an important role in MSDB-hippocampal synaptic transmission, plasticity and network oscillation. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits, α4β2 and α7 nAChRs, are expressed in MSDB neurons and permeable to calcium ions, which may modulate the function of MSDB neurons. The aims of this study are to determine the roles of selective nAChR activation on the calcium responses and membrane currents in MSDB neurons. Our results showed that nicotine increased calcium responses in the majority of MSDB neurons, pre-treatment of MSDB slices with a α4β2 nAChR antagonist, DhβE but not a α7 nAChR antagonist, MLA prevented nicotine-induced calcium responses. The whole cell patch clamp recordings showed that nicotine-induced inward current and acetylcholine (ACh) induced-firing activity can be largely reduced or prevented by DhβE in MSDB neurons. Surprisingly, post-treatment of α4β2 or α7 nAChR antagonists failed to block nicotine׳s role, they increased calcium responses instead. Application of calcium chelator EGTA reduced calcium responses in all neurons tested. These results suggest that there was a subtype specific modulation of nAChRs on calcium signaling and membrane currents in MSDB neurons and nAChR antagonists were also able to induce calcium responses involving a distinct mechanism.

  9. Central respiratory effects on motor nerve activities after organophosphate exposure in a working heart brainstem preparation of the rat.

    PubMed

    Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Seeger, Thomas; Dutschmann, Mathias; Worek, Franz; Mörschel, Michael

    2011-09-25

    The impact of organophosphorus compound (OP) intoxication on the activity of central respiratory circuitry, causing acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition and accumulation of acetylcholine in the respiratory brainstem circuits, is not understood. We investigated the central effect of the OP Crotylsarin (CRS) on respiratory network activity using the working heart brainstem preparation, which specifically allows for the analysis of central drug effects without changes in brainstem oxygenation possibly caused by drug effects on peripheral cardio-respiratory activity. Respiratory network activity was determined from phrenic and hypoglossal or vagal nerve activities (PNA, HNA, VNA). To investigate combined central and peripheral CRS effects hypo-perfusion was used mimicking additional peripheral cardiovascular collapse. Systemic CRS application induced a brief central apnea and complete AChE-inhibition in the brainstem. Subsequently, respiration was characterised by highly significant reduced PNA minute activity, while HNA showed expiratory related extra bursting indicative for activation of un-specified oro-pharyngeal behaviour. During hypo-perfusion CRS induced significantly prolonged apnoea. In all experiments respiratory activity fully recovered after 1h. We conclude that CRS mediated AChE inhibition causes only transient central breathing disturbance. Apparently intrinsic brainstem mechanisms can compensate for cholinergic over activation. Nevertheless, combination of hypo-perfusion and CRS exposure evoke the characteristic breathing arrests associated with OP poisoning.

  10. Functionality and stability data of detergent purified nAChR from Torpedo using lipidic matrixes and macroscopic electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Morales, Luis F; Colón-Sáez, José O; González-Nieves, Joel E; Quesada-González, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2016-03-01

    The presented data provides additional information about the assessment of affinity purified nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) rich membrane solubilized with long chain (16 saturated carbons) lysophospholipid with glycerol headgroup (LFG-16). The assessment of stability and functionality of solubilized membrane protein is a critical step prior to further crystallization trails. One of the key factors for this task is the appropriate choice of a detergent that can support nAChR activity and stability comparable to the crude membranes. The stability of the nAChR-LFG-16 complex incorporated into lipid cubic phase (LCP) was monitored for a period of 30 days by means of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and the functionality was evaluated after its incorporation into Xenopus oocyte by means of the two electrode voltage clamp technique. PMID:26870753

  11. Protease activity, localization and inhibition in the human hair follicle

    PubMed Central

    Bhogal, R K; Mouser, P E; Higgins, C A; Turner, G A

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Objective In humans, the process of hair shedding, referred to as exogen, is believed to occur independently of the other hair cycle phases. Although the actual mechanisms involved in hair shedding are not fully known, it has been hypothesized that the processes leading to the final step of hair shedding may be driven by proteases and/or protease inhibitor activity. In this study, we investigated the presence of proteases and protease activity in naturally shed human hairs and assessed enzyme inhibition activity of test materials. Methods We measured enzyme activity using a fluorescence-based assay and protein localization by indirect immunohistochemistry (IHC). We also developed an ex vivo skin model for measuring the force required to pull hair fibres from skin. Results Our data demonstrate the presence of protease activity in the tissue material surrounding club roots. We also demonstrated the localization of specific serine protease protein expression in human hair follicle by IHC. These data provide evidence demonstrating the presence of proteases around the hair club roots, which may play a role during exogen. We further tested the hypothesis that a novel protease inhibitor system (combination of Trichogen® and climbazole) could inhibit protease activity in hair fibre club root extracts collected from a range of ethnic groups (UK, Brazil, China, first-generation Mexicans in the USA, Thailand and Turkey) in both males and females. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this combination is capable of increasing the force required to remove hair in an ex vivo skin model system. Conclusion These studies indicate the presence of proteolytic activity in the tissue surrounding the human hair club root and show that it is possible to inhibit this activity with a combination of Trichogen® and climbazole. This technology may have potential to reduce excessive hair shedding. Résumé Objectif Chez l'homme, le processus de perte de cheveux, désigné comme exog

  12. The Role of nAChR and Calcium Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer Initiation and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Schaal, Courtney; Padmanabhan, Jaya; Chellappan, Srikumar

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer shows a strong correlation with smoking and the current therapeutic strategies have been relatively ineffective in improving the survival of patients. Efforts have been made over the past many years to understand the molecular events that drive the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer, especially in the context of smoking. It has become clear that components of tobacco smoke not only initiate these cancers, especially pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) through their mutagenic properties, but can also promote the growth and metastasis of these tumors by stimulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Studies in cell culture systems, animal models and human samples have shown that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activation enhances these tumor-promoting events by channeling signaling through multiple pathways. In this context, signaling through calcium channels appear to facilitate pancreatic cancer growth by itself or downstream of nAChRs. This review article highlights the role of nAChR downstream signaling events and calcium signaling in the growth, metastasis as well as drug resistance of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26264026

  13. Phlorotannins from Alaskan seaweed inhibit carbolytic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Joshua; Grace, Mary H; Lila, Mary Ann

    2014-10-22

    Global incidence of type 2 diabetes has escalated over the past few decades, necessitating a continued search for natural sources of enzyme inhibitors to offset postprandial hyperglycemia. The objective of this study was to evaluate coastal Alaskan seaweed inhibition of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, two carbolytic enzymes involved in serum glucose regulation. Of the six species initially screened, the brown seaweeds Fucus distichus and Alaria marginata possessed the strongest inhibitory effects. F. distichus fractions were potent mixed-mode inhibitors of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, with IC50 values of 0.89 and 13.9 μg/mL, respectively; significantly more efficacious than the pharmaceutical acarbose (IC50 of 112.0 and 137.8 μg/mL, respectively). The activity of F. distichus fractions was associated with phlorotannin oligomers. Normal-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (NPLC-MS) was employed to characterize individual oligomers. Accurate masses and fragmentation patterns confirmed the presence of fucophloroethol structures with degrees of polymerization from 3 to 18 monomer units. These findings suggest that coastal Alaskan seaweeds are sources of α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory phlorotannins, and thus have potential to limit the release of sugar from carbohydrates and thus alleviate postprandial hyperglycemia.

  14. Prepulse inhibition modulation by contextual conditioning of dopaminergic activity.

    PubMed

    Mena, Auxiliadora; De la Casa, Luis G

    2013-09-01

    When a neutral stimulus is repeatedly paired with a drug, an association is established between them that can induce two different responses: either an opponent response that counteracts the effect of the drug, or a response that is similar to that induced by the drug. In this paper, we focus on the analysis of the associations that can be established between the contextual cues and the administration of dopamine agonists or antagonists. Our hypothesis suggests that repeated administration of drugs that modulate dopaminergic activity in the presence of a specific context leads to the establishment of an association that subsequently results in a conditioned response to the context that is similar to that induced by the drug. To test this hypothesis, we conducted two experiments that revealed that contextual cues acquired the property to modulate pre-pulse inhibition by prior pairings of such context with the dopamine antagonist haloperidol (Experiment 1), and with the dopamine agonist d-amphetamine (Experiment 2). The implications of these results are discussed both at a theoretical level, and attending to the possibilities that could involve the use of context cues for the therapeutic administration of dopaminergic drugs.

  15. Phosphoinositide binding inhibits alpha-actinin bundling activity.

    PubMed

    Fraley, Tamara S; Tran, Thuan C; Corgan, Anne Marie; Nash, Coral A; Hao, Jie; Critchley, David R; Greenwood, Jeffrey A

    2003-06-27

    alpha-Actinin is an abundant actin-bundling and adhesion protein that directly links actin filaments to integrin receptors. Previously, in platelet-derived growth factor-treated fibroblasts, we demonstrated that phosphoinositides bind to alpha-actinin, regulating its localization (Greenwood, J. A., Theibert, A. B., Prestwich, G. D., and Murphy-Ullrich, J. E. (2000) J. Cell Biol. 150, 627- 642). In this study, phosphoinositide binding and regulation of alpha-actinin function is further characterized. Phosphoinositide binding specificity, determined using a protein-lipid overlay procedure, suggests that alpha-actinin interacts with phosphates on the 4th and 5th position of the inositol head group. Binding assays and mutational analyses demonstrate that phosphoinositides bind to the calponin homology domain 2 of alpha-actinin. Phosphoinositide binding inhibited the bundling activity of alpha-actinin by blocking the interaction of the actin-binding domain with actin filaments. Consistent with these results, excessive bundling of actin filaments was observed in fibroblasts expressing an alpha-actinin mutant with decreased phosphoinositide affinity. We conclude that the interaction of alpha-actinin with phosphoinositides regulates actin stress fibers in the cell by controlling the extent to which microfilaments are bundled.

  16. The dual-acting AChE inhibitor and H3 receptor antagonist UW-MD-72 reverses amnesia induced by scopolamine or dizocilpine in passive avoidance paradigm in rats.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Khan, Nadia; Darras, Fouad H; Pockes, Steffen; Decker, Michael

    2016-10-15

    Both the acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) are involved in the metabolism and modulation of acetylcholine release and numerous other centrally acting neurotransmitters. Hence, dual-active AChE inhibitors (AChEIs) and H3R antagonists hold potential to treat cognitive disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). The novel dual-acting AChEI and H3R antagonist 7-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)-2,3-dihydropyrrolo[2,1-b]quinazolin-9(1H)-one (UW-MD-72) shows excellent selectivity profiles over the AChE's isoenzyme butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) as well as high and balanced in-vitro affinities at both AChE and hH3R with IC50 of 5.4μM on hAChE and hH3R antagonism with Ki of 2.54μM, respectively. In the current study, the effects of UW-MD-72 (1.25, 2.5, and 5mg/kg, i.p.) on memory deficits induced by the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist scopolamine (SCO) and the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist dizocilpine (DIZ) were investigated in a step-through type passive avoidance paradigm in adult male rats applying donepezil (DOZ) and pitolisant (PIT) as reference drugs. The results observed show that SCO (2mg/kg, i.p.) and DIZ (0.1mg/kg, i.p.) significantly impaired learning and memory in rats. However, acute systemic administration of UW-MD-72 significantly ameliorated the SCO- and DIZ-induced amnesic effects. Furthermore, the ameliorating activity of UW-MD-72 (1.25mg/kg, i.p.) in DIZ-induced amnesia was partly reversed when rats were pretreated with the centrally-acting H2R antagonist zolantidine (ZOL, 10mg/kg, i.p.), but not with the CNS penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR, 10mg/kg, i.p.). Moreover, ameliorative effect of UW-MD-72 (1.25mg/kg, i.p.) in DIZ-induced amnesia was strongly reversed when rats were pretreated with a combination of ZOL (10mg/kg, i.p.) and SCO (1.0mg/kg, i.p.), indicating that these memory enhancing effects were, in addition to other neural circuits, observed through histaminergic H2R as well as

  17. Propoxur-induced acetylcholine esterase inhibition and impairment of cognitive function: attenuation by Withania somnifera.

    PubMed

    Yadav, C S; Kumar, V; Suke, S G; Ahmed, R S; Mediratta, P K; Banerjee, B D

    2010-04-01

    Propoxur (2-isopropoxyphenyl N-methylcarbamate) is widely used as an acaricide in agriculture and public health programs. Studies have shown that sub-chronic exposure to propoxur can cause oxidative stress and immuno-suppression in rats. Carbamates are also known to exhibit inhibitory effect on cholinesterase activity, which is directly related to their cholinergic effects. In the present study, the effect of Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), a widely used herbal drug possessing anti-stress and immunomodulatory properties was studied on propoxur-induced acetylcholine esterase inhibition and impairment of cognitive function in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups. Group I was treated with olive oil and served as control. Group II was administered orally with propoxur (10 mg/kg b.wt.) in olive oil, group III received a combination of propoxur (10 mg/kg b.wt.) and W. somnifera (100 mg/kg b.wt.) suspension and group IV W. somnifera (100 mg/kg b.wt.) only. All animals were treated for 30 days. Cognitive behaviour was assessed by transfer latency using elevated plus maze. Blood and brain acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity was also assessed. Oral administration of propoxur (10 mg/kg b.wt.) resulted in a significant reduction of brain and blood AChE activity. A significant prolongation of the acquisition as well as retention transfer latency was observed in propoxur-treated rats. Oral treatment of W. somnifera exerts protective effect and attenuates AChE inhibition and cognitive impairment caused by sub-chronic exposure to propoxur.

  18. Enhanced synthesis and release of dopamine in transgenic mice with gain-of-function α6* nAChRs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexiang; Lee, Jang-Won; Oh, Gyeon; Grady, Sharon R.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Brunzell, Darlene H.; Cannon, Jason R.; Drenan, Ryan M.

    2014-01-01

    α6β2* nAChRs in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to nucleus accumbens (NAc) pathway are implicated in the response to nicotine, and recent work suggests these receptors play a role in the rewarding action of ethanol. Here, we studied mice expressing gain-of-function α6β2* nAChRs (α6L9’S mice) that are hypersensitive to nicotine and endogenous acetylcholine (ACh). Evoked extracellular dopamine (DA) levels were enhanced in α6L9’S NAc slices compared to control, non-transgenic (nonTg) slices. Extracellular DA levels in both nonTg and α6L9’S slices were further enhanced in the presence of GBR12909, suggesting intact DA transporter function in both mouse strains. Ongoing α6β2* nAChR activation by ACh plays a role in enhancing DA levels, as α-conotoxin MII completely abolished evoked DA release in α6L9’S slices and decreased spontaneous DA release from striatal synaptosomes. In HPLC experiments, α6L9’S NAc tissue contained significantly more DA, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and homovanillic acid (HVA) compared to nonTg NAc tissue. Serotonin (5-HT), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and norepinephrine (NE) were unchanged in α6L9’S compared to nonTg tissue. Western blot analysis revealed increased tyrosine hydroxylase expression in α6L9’S NAc. Overall, these results show that enhanced α6β2* nAChR activity in NAc can stimulate DA production and lead to increased extracellular DA levels. PMID:24266758

  19. Over-inhibition of Corticostriatal Activity following Prenatal Cocaine Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wengang; Nitulescu, Ioana; Lewis, Justin S.; Lemos, Julia C.; Bamford, Ian J.; Posielski, Natasza M.; Storey, Granville P; Phillips, Paul E. M.; Bamford, Nigel S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) can cause persistent neuropsychological and motor abnormalities in affected children, but the physiological consequences of PCE remain unclear. Conclusions drawn from clinical studies can sometimes be confounded by poly-substance abuse and nutritional deprivation. However, existing observations suggest that cocaine exposure in utero, as in adults, increases synaptic dopamine and promotes enduring dopamine-dependent plasticity at striatal synapses, altering behaviors and basal ganglia function. Methods We used a combination of behavioral measures, electrophysiology, optical imaging, and biochemical and electrochemical recordings to examine corticostriatal activity in adolescent mice exposed to cocaine in utero. Results We show that PCE caused abnormal dopamine-dependent behaviors, including heightened excitation following stress and blunted locomotor augmentation to repeated treatment with amphetamine. These abnormal behaviors were consistent with abnormal GABA interneuron function, which promoted a reversible depression in corticostriatal activity. PCE hyperpolarized and reduced tonic GABA currents in both fast-spiking and PLTS-type GABA interneurons to increase tonic inhibition at GABAB receptors on presynaptic corticostriatal terminals. While D2 receptors paradoxically increased glutamate release following PCE, normal corticostriatal modulation by dopamine was reestablished with a GABAAR antagonist. Interpretation The dynamic alterations at corticostriatal synapses that occur in response to PCE parallel the reported effects of repeated psychostimulants in mature animals, but differ in being specifically generated through GABA. Our results indicate that approaches which normalize GABA and D2 receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity may be useful for treating the behavioral effects of PCE and other developmental disorders that are generated through abnormal GABAergic signaling. PMID:23225132

  20. Oligonucleotide facilitators may inhibit or activate a hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Jankowsky, E; Schwenzer, B

    1996-01-01

    Facilitators are oligonucleotides capable of affecting hammerhead ribozyme activity by interacting with the substrate at the termini of the ribozyme. Facilitator effects were determined in vitro using a system consisting of a ribozyme with 7 nucleotides in every stem sequence and two substrates with inverted facilitator binding sequences. The effects of 9mer and 12mer RNA as well as DNA facilitators which bind either adjacent to the 3'- or 5'-end of the ribozyme were investigated. A kinetic model was developed which allows determination of the apparent dissociation constant of the ribozyme-substrate complex from single turnover reactions. We observed a decreased dissociation constant of the ribozyme-substrate complex due to facilitator addition corresponding to an additional stabilization energy of delta delta G=-1.7 kcal/mol with 3'-end facilitators. The cleavage rate constant was increased by 3'-end facilitators and decreased by 5'-end facilitators. Values for Km were slightly lowered by all facilitators and kcat was increased by 3'-end facilitators and decreased by 5'-end facilitators in our system. Generally the facilitator effects increased with the length of the facilitators and RNA provided greater effects than DNA of the same sequence. Results suggest facilitator influences on several steps of the hammerhead reaction, substrate association, cleavage and dissociation of products. Moreover, these effects are dependent in different manners on ribozyme and substrate concentration. This leads to the conclusion that there is a concentration dependence whether activation or inhibition is caused by facilitators. Conclusions are drawn with regard to the design of hammerhead ribozyme facilitator systems. PMID:8602353

  1. Bromotyrosine Alkaloids with Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Activity from the Thai Sponge Acanthodendrilla sp.

    PubMed

    Sirimangkalakitti, Natchanun; Olatunji, Opeyemi J; Changwichit, Kanokwan; Saesong, Tongchai; Chamni, Supakarn; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Plubrukarn, Anuchit; Suwanborirux, Khanit

    2015-11-01

    Twenty bromotyrosine alkaloids, including a new compound, 13-oxosubereamolline D (5), were isolated from the Thai sponge Acanthodendrilla sp. Their structures were determined by analyses of 1D- and 2D-NMR, high-resolution mass, and circular dichroism data. The complete 1H and 13C NMR assignments of 5,7β-dichlorocavernicolin (19) and 5,7α-dichlorocavernicolin (20) are described herein for the first time. The acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity of all isolated compounds was evaluated. Only homoaerothionin (7) and fistularin 1 (10) exhibited inhibitory activity against human recombinant AChE (hrAChE) with IC50s of 4.5 and 47.5 µM, respectively. The hrAChE inhibition kinetics of 7, the most potent alkaloid, showed increased Km and unchanged Vmaxvalues, suggesting its competitive mode of inhibition. The spirocyclohexadienylisoxazole and the length of the alkyl diamine linkage were proposed as the crucial parts for its strong inhibitory activity. This finding indicates a therapeutic potential for 7 in acetylcholine-related diseases, most importantly Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26749833

  2. BF0801, a novel adenine derivative, inhibits platelet activation via phosphodiesterase inhibition and P2Y12 antagonism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si; Hu, Liang; Du, Hongguang; Guo, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Niu, Haixia; Jin, Jianguo; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Junling; Zhang, Xiaohui; Kunapuli, Satya P; Ding, Zhongren

    2010-10-01

    Though antiplatelet drugs are proven beneficial to patients with coronary heart disease and stroke, more effective and safer antiplatelet drugs are still needed. In this study we report the antiplatelet effects and mechanism of BF0801, a novel adenine derivative. BF0801 dramatically inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release induced by ADP, 2MeSADP, AYPGKF, SFLLRN or convulxin without affecting shape change in vitro . It also potentiated the inhibitory effects of adenosine-based P2Y12 antagonist AR-C69931MX or phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor IBMX on platelet aggregation. The cAMP levels in both resting and forskolin-stimulated platelets were increased by BF0801 suggesting its PDE inhibitor activity, which is further confirmed by the concentration-dependent suppression of BF0801 on the native and recombinant PDE. Similar to AR-C69931MX, BF0801 drastically inhibited 2MeSADP- induced adenylyl cyclase inhibition in platelets indicating its P2Y12 antagonism activity, which is substantiated by the inhibition of BF0801 on the interaction between ADP and P2Y12 receptor expressed in CHO-K1 cells measured by atomic force microscopy. Moreover, we confirmed the antiplatelet effects of BF0801 using platelets from rats intravenously given BF0801. In summary, for the first time we developed a novel adenine derivative bearing dual activities of PDE inhibition and P2Y12 antagonism, which may have therapeutic advantage as a potential antithrombotic drug. PMID:20806121

  3. Activation and Desensitization of Peripheral Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors by Selected, Naturally-Occurring Pyridine Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Green, Benedict T; Lee, Stephen T; Welch, Kevin D; Cook, Daniel; Kem, William R

    2016-07-04

    Teratogenic alkaloids can cause developmental defects due to the inhibition of fetal movement that results from desensitization of fetal muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We investigated the ability of two known teratogens, the piperidinyl-pyridine anabasine and its 1,2-dehydropiperidinyl analog anabaseine, to activate and desensitize peripheral nAChRs expressed in TE-671 and SH-SY5Y cells. Activation-concentration response curves for each alkaloid were obtained in the same multi-well plate. To measure rapid desensitization, cells were first exposed to five potentially-desensitizing concentrations of each alkaloid in log10 molar increments from 10 nM to 100 µM and then to a fixed concentration of acetylcholine (ACh), which alone produces near-maximal activation. The fifty percent desensitization concentration (DC50) was calculated from the alkaloid concentration-ACh response curve. Agonist fast desensitization potency was predicted by the agonist potency measured in the initial response. Anabaseine was a more potent desensitizer than anabasine. Relative to anabaseine, nicotine was more potent to autonomic nAChRs, but less potent to the fetal neuromuscular nAChRs. Our experiments have demonstrated that anabaseine is more effective at desensitizing fetal muscle-type nAChRs than anabasine or nicotine and, thus, it is predicted to be more teratogenic.

  4. Activation and Desensitization of Peripheral Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors by Selected, Naturally-Occurring Pyridine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Green, Benedict T.; Lee, Stephen T.; Welch, Kevin D.; Cook, Daniel; Kem, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Teratogenic alkaloids can cause developmental defects due to the inhibition of fetal movement that results from desensitization of fetal muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We investigated the ability of two known teratogens, the piperidinyl-pyridine anabasine and its 1,2-dehydropiperidinyl analog anabaseine, to activate and desensitize peripheral nAChRs expressed in TE-671 and SH-SY5Y cells. Activation-concentration response curves for each alkaloid were obtained in the same multi-well plate. To measure rapid desensitization, cells were first exposed to five potentially-desensitizing concentrations of each alkaloid in log10 molar increments from 10 nM to 100 µM and then to a fixed concentration of acetylcholine (ACh), which alone produces near-maximal activation. The fifty percent desensitization concentration (DC50) was calculated from the alkaloid concentration-ACh response curve. Agonist fast desensitization potency was predicted by the agonist potency measured in the initial response. Anabaseine was a more potent desensitizer than anabasine. Relative to anabaseine, nicotine was more potent to autonomic nAChRs, but less potent to the fetal neuromuscular nAChRs. Our experiments have demonstrated that anabaseine is more effective at desensitizing fetal muscle-type nAChRs than anabasine or nicotine and, thus, it is predicted to be more teratogenic. PMID:27384586

  5. Activation and Desensitization of Peripheral Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors by Selected, Naturally-Occurring Pyridine Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Green, Benedict T; Lee, Stephen T; Welch, Kevin D; Cook, Daniel; Kem, William R

    2016-01-01

    Teratogenic alkaloids can cause developmental defects due to the inhibition of fetal movement that results from desensitization of fetal muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We investigated the ability of two known teratogens, the piperidinyl-pyridine anabasine and its 1,2-dehydropiperidinyl analog anabaseine, to activate and desensitize peripheral nAChRs expressed in TE-671 and SH-SY5Y cells. Activation-concentration response curves for each alkaloid were obtained in the same multi-well plate. To measure rapid desensitization, cells were first exposed to five potentially-desensitizing concentrations of each alkaloid in log10 molar increments from 10 nM to 100 µM and then to a fixed concentration of acetylcholine (ACh), which alone produces near-maximal activation. The fifty percent desensitization concentration (DC50) was calculated from the alkaloid concentration-ACh response curve. Agonist fast desensitization potency was predicted by the agonist potency measured in the initial response. Anabaseine was a more potent desensitizer than anabasine. Relative to anabaseine, nicotine was more potent to autonomic nAChRs, but less potent to the fetal neuromuscular nAChRs. Our experiments have demonstrated that anabaseine is more effective at desensitizing fetal muscle-type nAChRs than anabasine or nicotine and, thus, it is predicted to be more teratogenic. PMID:27384586

  6. Modeling the Interaction between β-Amyloid Aggregates and Choline Acetyltransferase Activity and Its Relation with Cholinergic Dysfunction through Two-Enzyme/Two-Compartment Model.

    PubMed

    Fgaier, Hedia; Mustafa, Ibrahim H I; Awad, Asmaa A R; Elkamel, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The effect of β-amyloid aggregates on activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) which is responsible for synthesizing acetylcholine (ACh) in human brain is investigated through the two-enzyme/two-compartment (2E2C) model where the presynaptic neuron is considered as compartment 1 while both the synaptic cleft and the postsynaptic neuron are considered as compartment 2 through suggesting three different kinetic mechanisms for the inhibition effect. It is found that the incorporation of ChAT inhibition by β-amyloid aggregates into the 2E2C model is able to yield dynamic solutions for concentrations of generated β-amyloid, ACh, choline, acetate, and pH in addition to the rates of ACh synthesis and ACh hydrolysis in compartments 1 and 2. It is observed that ChAT activity needs a high concentration of β-amyloid aggregates production rate. It is found that ChAT activity is reduced significantly when neurons are exposed to high levels of β-amyloid aggregates leading to reduction in levels of ACh which is one of the most significant physiological symptoms of AD. Furthermore, the system of ACh neurocycle is dominated by the oscillatory behavior when ChAT enzyme is completely inhibited by β-amyloid. It is observed that the direct inactivation of ChAT by β-amyloid aggregates may be a probable mechanism contributing to the development of AD.

  7. Modeling the Interaction between β-Amyloid Aggregates and Choline Acetyltransferase Activity and Its Relation with Cholinergic Dysfunction through Two-Enzyme/Two-Compartment Model

    PubMed Central

    Fgaier, Hedia; Mustafa, Ibrahim H. I.; Awad, Asmaa A. R.; Elkamel, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The effect of β-amyloid aggregates on activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) which is responsible for synthesizing acetylcholine (ACh) in human brain is investigated through the two-enzyme/two-compartment (2E2C) model where the presynaptic neuron is considered as compartment 1 while both the synaptic cleft and the postsynaptic neuron are considered as compartment 2 through suggesting three different kinetic mechanisms for the inhibition effect. It is found that the incorporation of ChAT inhibition by β-amyloid aggregates into the 2E2C model is able to yield dynamic solutions for concentrations of generated β-amyloid, ACh, choline, acetate, and pH in addition to the rates of ACh synthesis and ACh hydrolysis in compartments 1 and 2. It is observed that ChAT activity needs a high concentration of β-amyloid aggregates production rate. It is found that ChAT activity is reduced significantly when neurons are exposed to high levels of β-amyloid aggregates leading to reduction in levels of ACh which is one of the most significant physiological symptoms of AD. Furthermore, the system of ACh neurocycle is dominated by the oscillatory behavior when ChAT enzyme is completely inhibited by β-amyloid. It is observed that the direct inactivation of ChAT by β-amyloid aggregates may be a probable mechanism contributing to the development of AD. PMID:26413144

  8. Pranlukast inhibits renal epithelial cyst progression via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Pathomthongtaweechai, Nutthapoom; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2014-02-01

    Cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1 receptor) antagonists were found to inhibit chloride secretion in human airway epithelial cells. Since chloride secretion in renal epithelial cells, which shares common mechanisms with airway epithelial cells, plays important roles in renal cyst progression in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), this study was aimed to investigate effects of drugs acting as CysLT1 receptor antagonists on renal cyst progression and its underlying mechanisms. Effects of CysLT1 receptor antagonists on renal cyst growth and formation were determined using Madine Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cyst models. Mechanisms of actions of CysLT1 receptor antagonists were determined using short-circuit current measurement, assays of cell viability and cell proliferation, and immunoblot analysis of signaling proteins. Of the three drugs acting as CysLT1 receptor antagonists (montelukast, pranlukast and zafirlukast) tested, pranlukast was the most promising drug that inhibited MDCK cyst growth and formation without affecting cell viability. Its effect was independent of the inhibition of CysLT1 receptors. Instead, it reduced cAMP-activated chloride secretion and proliferation of MDCK cells in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent manner and had no effect on CFTR protein expression. Interestingly, pranlukast enhanced AMPK activation via calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase beta (CaMKKβ) with consequent activation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. These results indicate that pranlukast retards renal epithelial cyst progression by inhibiting cAMP-activated chloride secretion and cell proliferation via CaMKKβ-AMPK-mTOR pathway. Therefore, pranlukast represents a class of known drugs that may have potential utility in PKD treatment. PMID:24360935

  9. Nicotinic α7 receptor inhibits the acylation stimulating protein-induced production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine in adipocytes by modulating the p38 kinase and nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Zhou-Yang; Wu, Jing; Liu, Chao; Wen, Bing; Zhao, Wen-Zeng; Du, Xin-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation, which is characterized by increased infiltration of macrophages into adipose tissue. Acylation stimulating protein (ASP) is an adipokine derived from the immune complement system, which constitutes a link between adipocytes and macrophages, and is involved in energy homeostasis and inflammation. The purpose of the present study was to preliminarily investigate in vitro, whether functional α7nAChR in adipocytes may suppress ASP-induced inflammation and determine the possible signaling mechanism. Studies have reported associations between the expression of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) and obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. Additionally, α7nAChRs are important peripheral mediators of chronic inflammation, which is a key contributor to health problems in obesity. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of exogenous ASP and α7nAChR on macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue and to examine the potential underlying molecular mechanism. Western blot analysis revealed that recombinant ASP increased the expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) by 3T3-L1 adipocytes. However, nicotine significantly inhibited the production of ASP-induced cytokines via the stimulation of α7nAChR. It was also found that α7nAChR inhibited the ASP-induced activation of p38 kinase and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and the production of MCP-1 and KC. These data indicated that α7nAChR caused the inhibition of ASP-induced activation of p38 kinase and NF-κB to inhibit the production of MCP-1 and KC. PMID:27572255

  10. Nicotinic α7 receptor inhibits the acylation stimulating protein‑induced production of monocyte chemoattractant protein‑1 and keratinocyte‑derived chemokine in adipocytes by modulating the p38 kinase and nuclear factor‑κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Zhou-Yang; Wu, Jing; Liu, Chao; Wen, Bing; Zhao, Wen-Zeng; Du, Xin-Ling

    2016-10-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic low‑grade inflammation, which is characterized by increased infiltration of macrophages into adipose tissue. Acylation stimulating protein (ASP) is an adipokine derived from the immune complement system, which constitutes a link between adipocytes and macrophages, and is involved in energy homeostasis and inflammation. The purpose of the present study was to preliminarily investigate in vitro, whether functional α7nAChR in adipocytes may suppress ASP‑induced inflammation and determine the possible signaling mechanism. Studies have reported associations between the expression of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) and obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. Additionally, α7nAChRs are important peripheral mediators of chronic inflammation, which is a key contributor to health problems in obesity. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of exogenous ASP and α7nAChR on macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue and to examine the potential underlying molecular mechanism. Western blot analysis revealed that recombinant ASP increased the expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein‑1 (MCP‑1) and keratinocyte‑derived chemokine (KC) by 3T3‑L1 adipocytes. However, nicotine significantly inhibited the production of ASP‑induced cytokines via the stimulation of α7nAChR. It was also found that α7nAChR inhibited the ASP‑induced activation of p38 kinase and nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB), and the production of MCP‑1 and KC. These data indicated that α7nAChR caused the inhibition of ASP‑induced activation of p38 kinase and NF‑κB to inhibit the production of MCP‑1 and KC. PMID:27572255

  11. Nicotinic α7 receptor inhibits the acylation stimulating protein‑induced production of monocyte chemoattractant protein‑1 and keratinocyte‑derived chemokine in adipocytes by modulating the p38 kinase and nuclear factor‑κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Zhou-Yang; Wu, Jing; Liu, Chao; Wen, Bing; Zhao, Wen-Zeng; Du, Xin-Ling

    2016-10-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic low‑grade inflammation, which is characterized by increased infiltration of macrophages into adipose tissue. Acylation stimulating protein (ASP) is an adipokine derived from the immune complement system, which constitutes a link between adipocytes and macrophages, and is involved in energy homeostasis and inflammation. The purpose of the present study was to preliminarily investigate in vitro, whether functional α7nAChR in adipocytes may suppress ASP‑induced inflammation and determine the possible signaling mechanism. Studies have reported associations between the expression of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) and obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. Additionally, α7nAChRs are important peripheral mediators of chronic inflammation, which is a key contributor to health problems in obesity. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of exogenous ASP and α7nAChR on macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue and to examine the potential underlying molecular mechanism. Western blot analysis revealed that recombinant ASP increased the expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein‑1 (MCP‑1) and keratinocyte‑derived chemokine (KC) by 3T3‑L1 adipocytes. However, nicotine significantly inhibited the production of ASP‑induced cytokines via the stimulation of α7nAChR. It was also found that α7nAChR inhibited the ASP‑induced activation of p38 kinase and nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB), and the production of MCP‑1 and KC. These data indicated that α7nAChR caused the inhibition of ASP‑induced activation of p38 kinase and NF‑κB to inhibit the production of MCP‑1 and KC.

  12. Methanandamide allosterically inhibits in vivo the function of peripheral nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing the alpha 7-subunit.

    PubMed

    Baranowska, Urszula; Göthert, Manfred; Rudz, Radoslaw; Malinowska, Barbara

    2008-09-01

    Methanandamide (MAEA), the stable analog of the endocannabinoid anandamide, has been proven in Xenopus oocytes to allosterically inhibit the function of the alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in a cannabinoid (CB) receptor-independent manner. The present study aimed at demonstrating that this mechanism can be activated in vivo. In anesthetized and vagotomized pithed rats treated with atropine, we determined the tachycardic response to electrical stimulation of preganglionic sympathetic nerves via the pithing rod or to i.v. nicotine (0.7 micromol/kg) activating nAChRs on the cardiac postganglionic sympathetic neurons. MAEA (3 and 10 micromol/kg) inhibited the electrically induced tachycardia (maximally by 15-20%; abolished by the CB(1) receptor antagonist AM 251 [N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide]; 3 micromol/kg) in pentobarbitone-anesthetized pithed rats, but not in urethane-anesthetized pithed rats, which, thus, are suitable to study the CB(1) receptor-independent inhibition of nicotine-evoked tachycardia. The subunit-nonselective nAChR antagonist hexamethonium (100 micromol/kg) and the selective alpha7-subunit antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA; 3 and 10 micromol/kg) decreased the nicotine-induced tachycardia by 100 and 40%, respectively (maximal effects), suggesting that nAChRs containing the alpha7-subunit account for 40% of the nicotine-induced tachycardia. MAEA (3 micromol/kg) produced an AM 251-insensitive inhibition (maximum again by 40%) of the nicotine-induced tachycardia. Simultaneous or sequential coadministration of MLA and MAEA inhibited the nicotine-induced tachycardia to the same extent (maximally by 40%) as each of the drugs alone. In conclusion, according to nonadditivity of the effects, MAEA mediates in vivo inhibition by the same receptors as MLA, namely alpha7-subunit-containing nAChRs, although at an allosteric instead of the orthosteric site.

  13. Reactivation of nerve agent-inhibited human acetylcholinesterase by obidoxime, HI-6 and obidoxime+HI-6: Kinetic in vitro study with simulated nerve agent toxicokinetics and oxime pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Worek, Franz; Koller, Marianne; Thiermann, Horst; Wille, Timo

    2016-03-28

    Despite extensive research for decades no effective broad-spectrum oxime for the treatment of poisoning by a broad range of nerve agents is available. Previous in vitro and in vivo data indicate that the combination of in service oximes could be beneficial. To investigate the ability of obidoxime, HI-6 and the combination of both oximes to reactivate inhibited human AChE in the presence of sarin, cyclosarin or tabun we adopted a dynamic in vitro model with real-time and continuous determination of AChE activity to simulate inhalation nerve agent exposure and intramuscular oxime administration. The major findings of this kinetic study are that the extent and velocity of reactivation is dependent on the nerve agent and the oxime-specific reactivating potency. The oxime-induced reactivation of inhibited human AChE in the presence of nerve agents is markedly impaired and the combination of obidoxime and HI-6 had no additive effect but could broaden the spectrum. In conclusion, these data indicate that a combination of obidoxime and HI-6 would be beneficial for the treatment of poisoning by a broad spectrum of nerve agents and could present an interim solution until more effective and broad-spectrum reactivators are available.

  14. Anticholinesterase activities of cold and hot aqueous extracts of F. racemosa stem bark.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Urooj, Asna

    2010-04-01

    The present study evaluated the anticholinesterase activity of cold and hot aqueous extracts of Ficus racemosa stem bark against rat brain acetylcholinesterase in vitro. Both the cold aqueous extract (FRC) and the hot aqueous extract (FRH) exhibited a dose dependent inhibition of rat brain acetylcholinesterase. FRH showed significantly higher (P activity compared to FRC; however, both the extracts did not show 50% inhibition of AChE at the doses tested (200-1000 mug ml(-1)). The IC(50) values of 1813 and 1331 mug ml(-1) were deduced for FRC and FRH, respectively (calculated by extrapolation using Boltzmann's dose response analysis). PMID:20668582

  15. Anticholinesterase activities of cold and hot aqueous extracts of F. racemosa stem bark.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Urooj, Asna

    2010-04-01

    The present study evaluated the anticholinesterase activity of cold and hot aqueous extracts of Ficus racemosa stem bark against rat brain acetylcholinesterase in vitro. Both the cold aqueous extract (FRC) and the hot aqueous extract (FRH) exhibited a dose dependent inhibition of rat brain acetylcholinesterase. FRH showed significantly higher (P activity compared to FRC; however, both the extracts did not show 50% inhibition of AChE at the doses tested (200-1000 mug ml(-1)). The IC(50) values of 1813 and 1331 mug ml(-1) were deduced for FRC and FRH, respectively (calculated by extrapolation using Boltzmann's dose response analysis).

  16. Cation-π and π-π stacking interactions allow selective inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase by modified quinine and cinchonidine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Sarfraz A; Ayaz, Muhammad; Brandt, Wolfgang; Wessjohann, Ludger A; Westermann, Bernhard

    2011-01-28

    Scaffold varied quaternized quinine and cinchonidine alkaloid derivatives were evaluated for their selective butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory potential. K(i) values were between 0.4-260.5μM (non-competitive inhibition) while corresponding K(i)values to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) ranged from 7.0-400μM exhibiting a 250-fold selectivity for BChE. Docking arrangements (GOLD, PLANT) revealed that the extended aromatic moieties and the quaternized nitrogen of the inhibitors were responsible for specific π-π stacking and π-cation interactions with the choline binding site and the peripheral anionic site of BChE's active site.

  17. The satiety signaling neuropeptide perisulfakinin inhibits the activity of central neurons promoting general activity.

    PubMed

    Wicher, Dieter; Derst, Christian; Gautier, Hélène; Lapied, Bruno; Heinemann, Stefan H; Agricola, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic state is one of the determinants of the general activity level. Satiety is related to resting or sleep whereas hunger correlates to wakefulness and activity. The counterpart to the mammalian satiety signal cholecystokinin (CCK) in insects are the sulfakinins. The aim of this study was to resolve the mechanism by which the antifeedant activity of perisulfakinin (PSK) in Periplaneta americana is mediated. We identified the sources of PSK which is used both as hormone and as paracrine messenger. PSK is found in the neurohemal organ of the brain and in nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. To correlate the distributions of PSK and its receptor (PSKR), we cloned the gene coding for PSKR and provide evidence for its expression within the nervous system. It occurs only in a few neurons, among them are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons which release octopamine thereby regulating the general level of activity. Application of PSK to DUM neurons attenuated the spiking frequency (EC(50)=11pM) due to reduction of a pacemaker Ca(2+) current through cAMP-inhibited pTRPgamma channels. PSK increased the intracellular cAMP level while decreasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in DUM neurons. Thus, the satiety signal conferred by PSK acts antagonistically to the hunger signal, provided by the adipokinetic hormone (AKH): PSK depresses the electrical activity of DUM neurons by inhibiting the pTRPgamma channel that is activated by AKH under conditions of food shortage. PMID:18946521

  18. The Satiety Signaling Neuropeptide Perisulfakinin Inhibits the Activity of Central Neurons Promoting General Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wicher, Dieter; Derst, Christian; Gautier, Hélène; Lapied, Bruno; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Agricola, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic state is one of the determinants of the general activity level. Satiety is related to resting or sleep whereas hunger correlates to wakefulness and activity. The counterpart to the mammalian satiety signal cholecystokinin (CCK) in insects are the sulfakinins. The aim of this study was to resolve the mechanism by which the antifeedant activity of perisulfakinin (PSK) in Periplaneta americana is mediated. We identified the sources of PSK which is used both as hormone and as paracrine messenger. PSK is found in the neurohemal organ of the brain and in nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. To correlate the distributions of PSK and its receptor (PSKR), we cloned the gene coding for PSKR and provide evidence for its expression within the nervous system. It occurs only in a few neurons, among them are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons which release octopamine thereby regulating the general level of activity. Application of PSK to DUM neurons attenuated the spiking frequency (EC50=11pM) due to reduction of a pacemaker Ca2+ current through cAMP-inhibited pTRPγ channels. PSK increased the intracellular cAMP level while decreasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in DUM neurons. Thus, the satiety signal conferred by PSK acts antagonistically to the hunger signal, provided by the adipokinetic hormone (AKH): PSK depresses the electrical activity of DUM neurons by inhibiting the pTRPγ channel that is activated by AKH under conditions of food shortage. PMID:18946521

  19. Assessment of the functionality and stability of detergent purified nAChR from Torpedo using lipidic matrixes and macroscopic electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Morales, Luis F; Colón-Sáez, José O; González-Nieves, Joel E; Quesada-González, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study we examined the functionality and stability of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-detergent complexes (nAChR-DCs) from affinity-purified Torpedo californica (Tc) using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) in Lipidic Cubic Phase (LCP) and planar lipid bilayer (PLB) recordings for phospholipid and cholesterol like detergents. In the present study we enhanced the functional characterization of nAChR-DCs by recording macroscopic ion channel currents in Xenopus oocytes using the two electrode voltage clamp (TEVC). The use of TEVC allows for the recording of macroscopic currents elicited by agonist activation of nAChR-DCs that assemble in the oocyte plasma membrane. Furthermore, we examined the stability of nAChR-DCs, which is obligatory for the nAChR crystallization, using a 30 day FRAP assay in LCP for each detergent. The present results indicate a marked difference in the fractional fluorescence recovery (ΔFFR) within the same detergent family during the 30 day period assayed. Within the cholesterol analog family, sodium cholate and CHAPSO displayed a minimum ΔFFR and a mobile fraction (MF) over 80%. In contrast, CHAPS and BigCHAP showed a marked decay in both the mobile fraction and diffusion coefficient. nAChR-DCs containing phospholipid analog detergents with an alkylphosphocholine (FC) and lysofoscholine (LFC) of 16 carbon chains (FC-16, LFC-16) were more effective in maintaining a mobile fraction of over 80% compared to their counterparts with shorter acyl chain (C12, C14). The significant differences in macroscopic current amplitudes, activation and desensitization rates among the different nAChR-DCs evaluated in the present study allow to dissect which detergent preserves both, agonist activation and ion channel function. Functionality assays using TEVC demonstrated that LFC16, LFC14, and cholate were the most effective detergents in preserving macroscopic ion channel function, however, the nAChR-cholate complex

  20. Assessment of the functionality and stability of detergent purified nAChR from Torpedo using lipidic matrixes and macroscopic electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Morales, Luis F; Colón-Sáez, José O; González-Nieves, Joel E; Quesada-González, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study we examined the functionality and stability of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-detergent complexes (nAChR-DCs) from affinity-purified Torpedo californica (Tc) using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) in Lipidic Cubic Phase (LCP) and planar lipid bilayer (PLB) recordings for phospholipid and cholesterol like detergents. In the present study we enhanced the functional characterization of nAChR-DCs by recording macroscopic ion channel currents in Xenopus oocytes using the two electrode voltage clamp (TEVC). The use of TEVC allows for the recording of macroscopic currents elicited by agonist activation of nAChR-DCs that assemble in the oocyte plasma membrane. Furthermore, we examined the stability of nAChR-DCs, which is obligatory for the nAChR crystallization, using a 30 day FRAP assay in LCP for each detergent. The present results indicate a marked difference in the fractional fluorescence recovery (ΔFFR) within the same detergent family during the 30 day period assayed. Within the cholesterol analog family, sodium cholate and CHAPSO displayed a minimum ΔFFR and a mobile fraction (MF) over 80%. In contrast, CHAPS and BigCHAP showed a marked decay in both the mobile fraction and diffusion coefficient. nAChR-DCs containing phospholipid analog detergents with an alkylphosphocholine (FC) and lysofoscholine (LFC) of 16 carbon chains (FC-16, LFC-16) were more effective in maintaining a mobile fraction of over 80% compared to their counterparts with shorter acyl chain (C12, C14). The significant differences in macroscopic current amplitudes, activation and desensitization rates among the different nAChR-DCs evaluated in the present study allow to dissect which detergent preserves both, agonist activation and ion channel function. Functionality assays using TEVC demonstrated that LFC16, LFC14, and cholate were the most effective detergents in preserving macroscopic ion channel function, however, the nAChR-cholate complex

  1. Brain cholinesterase activities of passerine birds in forests sprayed with cholinesterase inhibiting insecticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zinkl, J.G.; Henny, C.J.; Shea, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    Brain cholinesterase activities were determined in passerines collected from northwestern forests that had been sprayed with trichlorfon, acephate, and carbaryl at 0.56, 1.13 and 2.26 kg/ha. Trichlorfon and carbaryl inhibited cholinesterase activity slightly in only a few birds, primarily canopy dwellers. In contrast, acephate caused marked inhibition of cholinesterase activity in nearly all birds collected. The inhibition was present even 33 days after spraying. Some birds from the acephate-sprayed forests exhibited clinical signs compatible with acute acetylcholinesterase inhibition.

  2. Inhibition of UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) Activity by constituents of Schisandra chinensis.

    PubMed

    Song, Jin-Hui; Cui, Li; An, Li-Bin; Li, Wen-Tao; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Dong, Pei-Pei; Wu, Xue; Wang, Li-Xuan; Gonzalez, Frank J; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Zhao, De-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Structure-activity relationship for the inhibition of Schisandra chinensis's ingredients toward (Uridine-Diphosphate) UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) activity was performed in the present study. In vitro incubation system was employed to screen the inhibition capability of S. chinensis's ingredients, and in silico molecular docking method was carried out to explain possible mechanisms. At 100 μM of compounds, the activity of UGTs was inhibited by less than 90% by schisandrol A, schisandrol B, schisandrin, schisandrin C, schisantherin A, gomisin D, and gomisin G. Schisandrin A exerted strong inhibition toward UGT1A1 and UGT1A3, with the residual activity to be 7.9% and 0% of control activity. Schisanhenol exhibited strong inhibition toward UGT2B7, with the residual activity to be 7.9% of control activity. Gomisin J of 100 μM inhibited 91.8% and 93.1% of activity of UGT1A1 and UGT1A9, respectively. Molecular docking prediction indicated different hydrogen bonds interaction resulted in the different inhibition potential induced by subtle structure alteration among schisandrin A, schisandrin, and schisandrin C toward UGT1A1 and UGT1A3: schisandrin A > schisandrin > schisandrin C. The detailed inhibition kinetic evaluation showed the strong inhibition of gomisin J toward UGT1A9 with the inhibition kinetic parameter (Ki ) to be 0.7 μM. Based on the concentrations of gomisin J in the plasma of the rats given with S. chinensis, high herb-drug interaction existed between S. chinensis and drugs mainly undergoing UGT1A9-mediated metabolism. In conclusion, in silico-in vitro method was used to give the inhibition information and possible inhibition mechanism for S. chinensis's components toward UGTs, which guide the clinical application of S. chinensis.

  3. Inhibition of UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) Activity by constituents of Schisandra chinensis.

    PubMed

    Song, Jin-Hui; Cui, Li; An, Li-Bin; Li, Wen-Tao; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Dong, Pei-Pei; Wu, Xue; Wang, Li-Xuan; Gonzalez, Frank J; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Zhao, De-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Structure-activity relationship for the inhibition of Schisandra chinensis's ingredients toward (Uridine-Diphosphate) UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) activity was performed in the present study. In vitro incubation system was employed to screen the inhibition capability of S. chinensis's ingredients, and in silico molecular docking method was carried out to explain possible mechanisms. At 100 μM of compounds, the activity of UGTs was inhibited by less than 90% by schisandrol A, schisandrol B, schisandrin, schisandrin C, schisantherin A, gomisin D, and gomisin G. Schisandrin A exerted strong inhibition toward UGT1A1 and UGT1A3, with the residual activity to be 7.9% and 0% of control activity. Schisanhenol exhibited strong inhibition toward UGT2B7, with the residual activity to be 7.9% of control activity. Gomisin J of 100 μM inhibited 91.8% and 93.1% of activity of UGT1A1 and UGT1A9, respectively. Molecular docking prediction indicated different hydrogen bonds interaction resulted in the different inhibition potential induced by subtle structure alteration among schisandrin A, schisandrin, and schisandrin C toward UGT1A1 and UGT1A3: schisandrin A > schisandrin > schisandrin C. The detailed inhibition kinetic evaluation showed the strong inhibition of gomisin J toward UGT1A9 with the inhibition kinetic parameter (Ki ) to be 0.7 μM. Based on the concentrations of gomisin J in the plasma of the rats given with S. chinensis, high herb-drug interaction existed between S. chinensis and drugs mainly undergoing UGT1A9-mediated metabolism. In conclusion, in silico-in vitro method was used to give the inhibition information and possible inhibition mechanism for S. chinensis's components toward UGTs, which guide the clinical application of S. chinensis. PMID:26084208

  4. Mechanisms of flow and ACh-induced dilation in rat soleus arterioles are altered by hindlimb unweighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrage, William G.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Laughlin, M. Harold

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that endothelium-dependent dilation (flow-induced dilation and ACh-induced dilation) in rat soleus muscle arterioles is impaired by hindlimb unweighting (HLU). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (approximately 300 g) were exposed to HLU or weight-bearing control (Con) conditions for 14 days. Soleus first-order (1A) and second-order (2A) arterioles were isolated, cannulated, and exposed to step increases in luminal flow at constant pressure. Flow-induced dilation was not impaired by HLU in 1A or 2A arterioles. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (Indo; 50 microM) did not alter flow-induced dilation in 1As or 2As. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) with N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA; 300 microM) reduced flow-induced dilation by 65-70% in Con and HLU 1As. In contrast, L-NNA abolished flow-induced dilation in 2As from Con rats but had no effect in HLU 2As. Combined treatment with L-NNA + Indo reduced tone in 1As and 2As from Con rats, but flow-induced dilation in the presence of L-NNA + Indo was not different from responses without inhibitors in either Con or HLU 1As or 2As. HLU also did not impair ACh-induced dilation (10(-9)-10(-4) M) in soleus 2As. L-NNA reduced ACh-induced dilation by approximately 40% in Con 2As but abolished dilation in HLU 2As. Indo did not alter ACh-induced dilation in Con or HLU 2As, whereas combined treatment with L-NNA + Indo abolished ACh-induced dilation in 2As from both groups. We conclude that flow-induced dilation (1As and 2As) was preserved after 2 wk HLU, but HLU decreased the contribution of NOS in mediating flow-induced dilation and increased the contribution of a NOS- and cyclooxygenase-independent mechanism (possibly endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor). In soleus 2As, ACh-induced dilation was preserved after 2-wk HLU but the contribution of NOS in mediating ACh-induced dilation was increased.

  5. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activity by purified human breast milk mucin (MUC1) in an inhibition assay.

    PubMed

    Habte, Habtom H; de Beer, Corena; Lotz, Zoë E; Tyler, Marilyn G; Kahn, Delawir; Mall, Anwar S

    2008-01-01

    It has been reported that breast-feeding is responsible for approximately 40% of the HIV transmissions from HIV-positive mothers to children. Human breast milk, however, is known to contain numerous biologically active components which protect breast-fed infants against bacteria, viruses, and toxins. The purpose of this study was to purify and characterize breast milk mucin and to determine its anti-HIV-1 activity in an HIV inhibition assay. Sepharose CL-4B column chromatography and caesium chloride isopycnic density gradient purification were used to isolate and purify the mucin. Following Western blotting and amino acid analysis, an HIV-1 inhibition assay was carried out to determine the anti-HIV-1 activity of crude breast milk and purified milk mucin (MUC1) by incubating them with HIV-1 prior to infection of the human T lymphoblastoid cell line (CEM SS cells). SDS-PAGE analysis of the mucin, together with its amino acid composition and Western blotting, suggested that this purified mucin from human breast milk was MUC1. The HIV inhibition assay revealed that while the purified milk mucin (MUC1) inhibited the HIV-1 activity by approximately 97%, there was no inhibition of the HIV-1 activity by crude breast milk. Although the reason for this is not clear, it is likely that because the MUC1 in crude milk is enclosed by fat globules, there may not be any physical contact between the mucin and the virus in the crude breast milk. Thus, there is a need to free the mucin from the fat globules for it to be effective against the virus. PMID:17878743

  6. Differences between male and female rhesus monkey erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase and plasma cholinesterase activity before and after exposure to sarin

    SciTech Connect

    Woodard, C.L.; Calamaio, C.A.; Kaminskis, A.; Anderson, D.R.; Harris, L.W.

    1993-05-13

    The female rhesus monkey has a menstrual cycle like the human. Additionally, several differences in enzyme levels between males and females and in the female during the menstrual cycle are present. Therefore we quantitated plasma cholinesterase (ChE/BuChE) and erythrocyte (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity before and after exposure to sarin (GB)(1 5 ug/kg, iv; a 0.75 LD50), in male and female rhesus (Macaca mulatta) monkeys. Twenty-eight-day preexposure baseline plasma ChE and RBC AChE values for six male and six female rhesus monkeys were compared for intra-animal, within sex and between sex differences. After these baseline values were obtained, the organophosphorus (OP) compound/Isopropyl methylphosphono-fluoridate (GB) was administered to atropinized monkeys to determine if there was a significant in vivo difference between the sexes in their response to this intoxication in regard to the rate of BuChE /AChE inhibition, pyridine-2-aldoxime methyl chloride (2-PAM) reactivation of the phosphonylated BuChE and the rate of aging of the phosphonylated:BuChE/AChE. In the pre-exposure portion of the protocol; the intra-animal and intra-group BuChE/AChE variations were found to be minimal; but there were significant differences between the male and female monkeys in both plasma BuChE and RBC AChE levels; although probably clinically insignificant in respect to an OP intoxication. No significant cyclic fluctuations were seen during the 28-day study in either sex.

  7. Kinetics of the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase from desert cobra (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom by local anesthetics: procaine and tetracaine.

    PubMed

    al-Jafari, A A; Kamal, M A; Duhaiman, A S; Alhomida, A S

    1996-10-01

    The kinetic parameters of W. aegyptia venom acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition by procaine and tetracaine hydrochloride were investigated in the present study. Procaine and tetracaine reversibly inhibited the AChE activity in a concentration-dependent manner, the IC50 being about 0.28 and 0.04 mM, respectively. The Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) for the hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine iodide was found to be 0.051 mM with Vmax 10.2 mumole/min/mg protein. Both K(m) and Vmax were affected by procaine while only Vmax decreased with tetracaine. A Lineweaver-Burk plot and its secondary replot indicated that the nature of the inhibition is of the linear mixed type for procaine which is considered to be a mixture of competitive and noncompetitive types while the inhibition was noncompetitive for tetracaine. The values of Ki(slope) and K(intercept were estimated as 0.133 mM and 0.451 mM for procaine and 7.2 x 10(-3) mM for tetracaine, respectively, by the secondary replots of the Lineweaver-Burk plot.

  8. Differential Cytokine Changes in Patients with Myasthenia Gravis with Antibodies against AChR and MuSK

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Vuslat; Oflazer, Piraye; Aysal, Fikret; Durmus, Hacer; Poulas, Kostas; Yentur, Sibel P.; Gulsen-Parman, Yesim; Tzartos, Socrates; Marx, Alexander; Tuzun, Erdem; Deymeer, Feza; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular transmission failure in myasthenia gravis (MG) is most commonly elicited by autoantibodies (ab) to the acetylcholine receptor or the muscle-specific kinase, constituting AChR-MG and MuSK-MG. It is controversial whether these MG subtypes arise through different T helper (Th) 1, Th2 or Th17 polarized immune reactions and how these reactions are blunted by immunosuppression. To address these questions, plasma levels of cytokines related to various Th subtypes were determined in patients with AChR-MG, MuSK-MG and healthy controls (CON). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were activated in vitro by anti-CD3, and cytokines were quantified in supernatants. In purified blood CD4+ T cells, RNA of various cytokines, Th subtype specific transcription factors and the co-stimulatory molecule, CD40L, were quantified by qRT-PCR. Plasma levels of Th1, Th2 and Th17 related cytokines were overall not significantly different between MG subtypes and CON. By contrast, in vitro stimulated PBMC from MuSK-MG but not AChR-MG patients showed significantly increased secretion of the Th1, Th17 and T follicular helper cell related cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-21. Stimulated expression of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13 was not significantly different. At the RNA level, expression of CD40L by CD4+ T cells was reduced in both AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients while expression of Th subset related cytokines and transcription factors were normal. Immunosuppression treatment had two effects: First, it reduced levels of IL12p40 in the plasma of AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients, leaving other cytokine levels unchanged; second, it reduced spontaneous secretion of IFN-γ and increased secretion of IL-6 and IL-10 by cultured PBMC from AChR-MG, but not MuSK-MG patients. We conclude that Th1 and Th17 immune reactions play a role in MuSK-MG. Immunosuppression attenuates the Th1 response in AChR-MG and MuSK-MG, but otherwise modulates immune responses in AChR-MG and MuSK-MG patients

  9. Romidepsin reduces histone deacetylase activity, induces acetylation of histones, inhibits proliferation, and activates apoptosis in immortalized epithelial endometriotic cells.

    PubMed

    Imesch, Patrick; Fink, Daniel; Fedier, André

    2010-12-01

    Romidepsin inhibited HDAC activity, produced acetylation of the histone proteins, up-regulated p21, and down-regulated cyclins B1 and D1, resulting in proliferation inhibition and apoptosis activation in 11z immortalized epithelial endometriotic cells. Our findings provide evidence that endometriotic cells are sensitive to the epigenetic effects of romidepsin and suggest that endometriosis may be therapeutically targeted by romidepsin.

  10. Kinetic equations and mechanisms for activation and inhibition in enzyme systems.

    PubMed

    Laidler, K J

    1983-11-01

    The rates of enzyme reactions that are activated or inhibited by added modifiers can in some cases be expressed as a rational function of the first degree, v = (alpha 0 + alpha 1[Q] )/(beta 0 + beta 1 [Q] ) where [Q] is the concentration of the modifier and alpha 0, alpha 1, beta 0, and beta 1 are functions of rate constants and sometimes of the enzyme and substrate concentrations; the behaviour is then said to be linear. Three simple mechanisms that give rise to linear kinetics are examined, and the conditions under which there is activation or inhibition are determined. Sometimes there is a transition from activation to inhibition as the substrate concentration is varied. Definitions of competitive, uncompetitive, and noncompetitive activation are suggested, by analogy with the generally accepted definitions for inhibition. In second-degree activation or inhibition the rate can be expressed as the ratio of two quadratic polynomials with positive coefficients. Ten patterns are then possible for plots of v against [Q], and they may be classified with respect to (i) overall activation or inhibition, (ii) initial (at [Q] leads to 0) activation or inhibition, (iii) terminal (at [Q] leads to oo) activation or inhibition, and (iv) whether there is an initial inflexion. The general case of an n:n rational function is also discussed.

  11. Bilateral injection of fasciculin into the amygdala of rats: effects on two avoidance tasks, acetylcholinesterase activity, and cholinergic muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Quillfeldt, J; Raskovsky, S; Dalmaz, C; Dias, M; Huang, C; Netto, C A; Schneider, F; Izquierdo, I; Medina, J H; Silveira, R

    1990-11-01

    These experiments examined the effects of the bilateral injection of fasciculin-2 (FAS), a natural acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory peptide, into the amygdala of rats on acquisition and retention of two avoidance behaviors. Intraamygdala injection of FAS (150 ng/amygdala) produced a pronounced and long-lasting inhibition of AChE activity: 85% and 74% on day 2 and day 5, respectively. After 48 hr, FAS-treated animals showed no changes in training or test session performance in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task (training-test interval was 24 hr). In a 2-way shuttle avoidance task, intraamygdala FAS slightly reduced retention test performance without modifying training session scores. Two and five days after FAS injections into the amygdala, the density of muscarinic receptor decreased about 50% as measured by the specific bindings of 3H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and 3H-oxotremorine. No alterations were observed in the apparent dissociation constants. On the other hand, the central-type benzodiazepine receptor population of the amygdala remained unchanged, suggesting that FAS microinjection did not produce damage to neuronal components of these nuclei. In conclusion, the results presented have indicated that a clear-cut and long-lasting inhibition of AChE activity in the amygdala is not accompanied by a facilitation of learning and memory of two different avoidance tasks. Compensation of the increased cholinergic activity by a down-regulation of muscarinic receptors could account for these findings.

  12. The recovery of acetylcholinesterase activity and the progression of neuropathological and pathophysiological alterations in the rat basolateral amygdala after soman-induced status epilepticus: relation to anxiety-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Prager, Eric M; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Almeida-Suhett, Camila P; Figueiredo, Taiza H; Apland, James P; Rossetti, Franco; Olsen, Cara H; Braga, Maria F M

    2014-06-01

    Organophosphorus nerve agents are powerful neurotoxins that irreversibly inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. One of the consequences of AChE inhibition is the generation of seizures and status epilepticus (SE), which cause brain damage, resulting in long-term neurological and behavioral deficits. Increased anxiety is the most common behavioral abnormality after nerve agent exposure. This is not surprising considering that the amygdala, and the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) in particular, plays a central role in anxiety, and this structure suffers severe damage by nerve agent-induced seizures. In the present study, we exposed male rats to the nerve agent soman, at a dose that induce SE, and determined the time course of recovery of AChE activity, along with the progression of neuropathological and pathophysiological alterations in the BLA, during a 30-day period after exposure. Measurements were taken at 24 h, 7 days, 14 days, and 30 days after exposure, and at 14 and 30 days, anxiety-like behavior was also evaluated. We found that more than 90% of AChE is inhibited at the onset of SE, and AChE inhibition remains at this level 24 h later, in the BLA, as well as in the hippocampus, piriform cortex, and prelimbic cortex, which we analyzed for comparison. AChE activity recovered by day 7 in the BLA and day 14 in the other three regions. Significant neuronal loss and neurodegeneration were present in the BLA at 24 h and throughout the 30-day period. There was no significant loss of GABAergic interneurons in the BLA at 24 h post-exposure. However, by day 7, the number of GABAergic interneurons in the BLA was reduced, and at 14 and 30 days after soman, the ratio of GABAergic interneurons to the total number of neurons was lower compared to controls. Anxiety-like behavior in the open-field and the acoustic startle response tests was increased at 14 and 30 days post-exposure. Accompanying pathophysiological alterations in the BLA - studied in in

  13. The recovery of acetylcholinesterase activity and the progression of neuropathological and pathophysiological alterations in the rat basolateral amygdala after soman-induced status epilepticus: relation to anxiety-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Prager, Eric M.; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Almeida-Suhett, Camila P.; Figueiredo, Taiza H.; Apland, James P.; Rossetti, Franco; Olsen, Cara H.; Braga, Maria F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphorus nerve agents are powerful neurotoxins that irreversibly inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. One of the consequences of AChE inhibition is the generation of seizures and status epilepticus (SE), which cause brain damage, resulting in long-term neurological and behavioral deficits. Increased anxiety is the most common behavioral abnormality after nerve agent exposure. This is not surprising considering that the amygdala, and the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) in particular, plays a central role in anxiety, and this structure suffers severe damage by nerve agent-induced seizures. In the present study, we exposed male rats to lethal doses of the nerve agent soman, and determined the time course of recovery of AChE activity, along with the progression of neuropathological and pathophysiological alterations in the BLA, during a 30-day period after exposure. Measurements were taken at 24 hours, 7 days, 14 days, and 30 days after exposure, and at 14 and 30 days, anxiety-like behavior was also evaluated. We found that more than 90% of AChE is inhibited at the onset of SE, and AChE inhibition remains at this level 24 hours later, in the BLA, as well as in the hippocampus, piriform cortex, and prelimbic cortex, which we analyzed for comparison. AChE activity recovered by day 7 in the BLA and day 14 in the other three regions. Significant neuronal loss and neurodegeneration were present in the BLA at 24 hours and throughout the 30-day period. There was no significant loss of GABAergic interneurons in the BLA at 24 hours post-exposure. However, by day 7, the number of GABAergic interneurons in the BLA was reduced, and at 14 and 30 days after soman, the ratio of GABAergic interneurons to the total number of neurons was lower compared to controls. Anxiety-like behavior in the open-field and the acoustic startle response tests was increased at 14 and 30 days post-exposure. Accompanying pathophysiological alterations in the BLA – studied in

  14. A Novel Direct Factor Xa Inhibitory Peptide with Anti-Platelet Aggregation Activity from Agkistrodon acutus Venom Hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meimei; Ye, Xiaohui; Ming, Xin; Chen, Yahui; Wang, Ying; Su, Xingli; Su, Wen; Kong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Snake venom is a natural substance that contains numerous bioactive proteins and peptides, nearly all of which have been identified over the last several decades. In this study, we subjected snake venom to enzymatic hydrolysis to identify previously unreported bioactive peptides. The novel peptide ACH-11 with the sequence LTFPRIVFVLG was identified with both FXa inhibition and anti-platelet aggregation activities. ACH-11 inhibited the catalytic function of FXa towards its substrate S-2222 via a mixed model with a Ki value of 9.02 μM and inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP and U46619 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, ACH-11 exhibited potent antithrombotic activity in vivo. It reduced paralysis and death in an acute pulmonary thrombosis model by 90% and attenuated thrombosis weight in an arterio-venous shunt thrombosis model by 57.91%, both at a dose of 3 mg/kg. Additionally, a tail cutting bleeding time assay revealed that ACH-11 did not prolong bleeding time in mice at a dose of 3 mg/kg. Together, our results reveal that ACH-11 is a novel antithrombotic peptide exhibiting both FXa inhibition and anti-platelet aggregation activities, with a low bleeding risk. We believe that it could be a candidate or lead compound for new antithrombotic drug development. PMID:26035670

  15. Immune-suppressive activity of punicalagin via inhibition of NFAT activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Ik; Kim, Byoung-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Shin; Lee, Samkeun; Shin, Kwang-Soo; Lim, Jong-Soon

    2008-07-11

    Since T cell activation is central to the development of autoimmune diseases, we screened a natural product library comprising 1400 samples of medicinal herbal extracts, to identify compounds that suppress T cell activity. Punicalagin (PCG) isolated from the fruit of Punica granatum was identified as a potent immune suppressant, based on its inhibitory action on the activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). PCG downregulated the mRNA and soluble protein expression of interleukin-2 from anti-CD3/anti-CD28-stimulated murine splenic CD4+ T cells and suppressed mixed leukocytes reaction (MLR) without exhibiting cytotoxicity to the cells. In vivo, the PCG treatment inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced chronic ear edema in mice and decreased CD3+ T cell infiltration of the inflamed tissue. These results suggest that PCG could be a potential candidate for the therapeutics of various immune pathologies.

  16. Real Time Ligand-Induced Motion Mappings of AChBP and nAChR Using X-ray Single Molecule Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Yasuhito; Nishino, Yuri; Kobayashi, Suzuko; Shimoyama, Yoshiko; Cai, Weiyan; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Ohta, Noboru; Yagi, Naoto; Miyazawa, Atsuo; Kubo, Tai; Sasaki, Yuji C.

    2014-01-01

    We observed the dynamic three-dimensional (3D) single molecule behaviour of acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) using a single molecule tracking technique, diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT) with atomic scale and 100 μs time resolution. We found that the combined tilting and twisting motions of the proteins were enhanced upon acetylcholine (ACh) binding. We present the internal motion maps of AChBP and nAChR in the presence of either ACh or α-bungarotoxin (αBtx), with views from two rotational axes. Our findings indicate that specific motion patterns represented as biaxial angular motion maps are associated with channel function in real time and on an atomic scale. PMID:25223459

  17. Peptidomimetic antagonists of alphavbeta3 inhibit bone resorption by inhibiting osteoclast bone resorptive activity, not osteoclast adhesion to bone.

    PubMed

    Carron, C P; Meyer, D M; Engleman, V W; Rico, J G; Ruminski, P G; Ornberg, R L; Westlin, W F; Nickols, G A

    2000-06-01

    Osteoclasts are actively motile on bone surfaces and undergo alternating cycles of migration and resorption. Osteoclast interaction with the extracellular matrix plays a key role in the osteoclast resorptive process and a substantial body of evidence suggests that integrin receptors are important in osteoclast function. These integrin receptors bind to the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence found in a variety of extracellular matrix proteins and it is well established that the interaction of osteoclast alpha v beta 3 integrin with the RGD motif within bone matrix proteins is important in osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. In this study, we characterized the effects of two synthetic peptidomimetic antagonists of alpha v beta 3, SC-56631 and SC-65811, on rabbit osteoclast adhesion to purified matrix proteins and bone, and on bone resorption in vitro. SC-56631 and SC-65811 are potent inhibitors of vitronectin binding to purified alpha v beta 3. Both SC-56631 and SC-65811 inhibited osteoclast adhesion to osteopontin- and vitronectin-coated surfaces and time-lapse video microscopy showed that osteoclasts rapidly retract from osteopontin-coated surfaces when exposed to SC-56631 and SC-65811. SC-56631 and SC-65811 blocked osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in a dose-responsive manner. Further analysis showed that SC-65811 and SC-56631 reduced the number of resorption pits produced per osteoclast and the average pit size. SC-65811 was a more potent inhibitor of bone resorption and the combination of reduced pit number and size led to a 90% inhibition of bone resorption. Surprisingly, however, osteoclasts treated with SC-65811, SC-56631 or the disintegrin echistatin, at concentrations that inhibit bone resorption did not inhibit osteoclast adhesion to bone. These results suggest that alphavbeta3 antagonists inhibited bone resorption by decreasing osteoclast bone resorptive activity or efficiency but not by inhibiting osteoclast adhesion to bone per se.

  18. Effect of local acetylcholinesterase inhibition on sweat rate in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibasaki, M.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    ACh is the neurotransmitter responsible for increasing sweat rate (SR) in humans. Because ACh is rapidly hydrolyzed by acetylcholinesterase (AChE), it is possible that AChE contributes to the modulation of SR. Thus the primary purpose of this project was to identify whether AChE around human sweat glands is capable of modulating SR during local application of various concentrations of ACh in vivo, as well as during a heat stress. In seven subjects, two microdialysis probes were placed in the intradermal space of the forearm. One probe was perfused with the AChE inhibitor neostigmine (10 microM); the adjacent membrane was perfused with the vehicle (Ringer solution). SR over both membranes was monitored via capacitance hygrometry during microdialysis administration of various concentrations of ACh (1 x 10(-7)-2 M) and during whole body heating. SR was significantly greater at the neostigmine-treated site than at the control site during administration of lower concentrations of ACh (1 x 10(-7)-1 x 10(-3) M, P < 0.05), but not during administration of higher concentrations of ACh (1 x 10(-2)-2 M, P > 0.05). Moreover, the core temperature threshold for the onset of sweating at the neostigmine-treated site was significantly reduced relative to that at the control site. However, no differences in SR were observed between sites after 35 min of whole body heating. These results suggest that AChE is capable of modulating SR when ACh concentrations are low to moderate (i.e., when sudomotor activity is low) but is less effective in governing SR after SR has increased substantially.

  19. Iron inhibits activation-induced cytidine deaminase enzymatic activity and modulates immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Li, Guideng; Pone, Egest J; Tran, Daniel C; Patel, Pina J; Dao, Lisa; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2012-06-15

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) are critical for the maturation of the antibody response. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates CSR and SHM by deaminating deoxycytidines (dCs) in switch (S) and V(D)J region DNA, respectively, to generate deoxyuracils (dUs). Processing of dUs by uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) yields abasic sites, which are excised by apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases, eventually generating double strand DNA breaks, the obligatory intermediates of CSR. Here, we found that the bivalent iron ion (Fe(2+), ferrous) suppressed CSR, leading to decreased number of switched B cells, decreased postrecombination Iμ-C(H) transcripts, and reduced titers of secreted class-switched IgG1, IgG3, and IgA antibodies, without alterations in critical CSR factors, such as AID, 14-3-3γ, or PTIP, or in general germline I(H)-S-C(H) transcription. Fe(2+) did not affect B cell proliferation or plasmacytoid differentiation. Rather, it inhibited AID-mediated dC deamination in a dose-dependent fashion. The inhibition of intrinsic AID enzymatic activity by Fe(2+) was specific, as shown by lack of inhibition of AID-mediated dC deamination by other bivalent metal ions, such as Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Mg(2+), or Ni(2+), and the inability of Fe(2+) to inhibit UNG-mediated dU excision. Overall, our findings have outlined a novel role of iron in modulating a B cell differentiation process that is critical to the generation of effective antibody responses to microbial pathogens and tumoral cells. They also suggest a possible role of iron in dampening AID-dependent autoimmunity and neoplastic transformation.

  20. Target site insensitivity mutations in the AChE enzyme confer resistance to organophosphorous insecticides in Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say).

    PubMed

    Malekmohammadi, M; Galehdari, H

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we demonstrated the use and optimization of the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR procedure to detect and analyze the frequency of the R30K and I392T mutations in resistant field populations of CPB. The R30K mutation was detected in 72%, 84%, 52% and 64% of Bahar, Dehpiaz, Aliabad and Yengijeh populations, respectively. Overall frequencies of the I392T mutation were 12%, 8% and 16% of Bahar, Aliabad and Yengijeh populations, respectively. No I392T point mutation was found among samples from Dehpiaz field population. Moreover, only 31% and 2% of samples from the resistant field populations were homozygous for R30K and I392T mutations, respectively. No individual simultaneously had both I392T and S291G/R30K point mutations. The incidence of individuals with both S291G and R30K point mutations in the samples from Bahar, Dehpiaz, Aliabad, and Yengijeh populations were 31.5%, 44.7%, 41.6%, and 27.3% respectively. Genotypes determined by the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR method were consistent with those determined by PCR sequencing. There was no significant correlation between the mutation frequencies and resistance levels in the resistant populations, indicating that other mutations may contribute to this variation. Polymorphism in the partial L. decemlineata cDNA AChE gene Ldace2 of four field populations was identified by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments. Among 45 novel mutations detected in this study, T29P mutation was found across all four field populations that likely contribute to the AChE insensitivity. Site-directed mutagenesis and protein expression experiments are needed for a more complete evaluation. PMID:26778439

  1. The regulation of hippocampal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) after a protracted treatment with selective or nonselective nAChR agonists.

    PubMed

    Auta, J; Longone, P; Guidotti, A; Costa, E

    1999-01-01

    In rats, 1 mg/kg twice daily for 10 d of nicotine, a nonselective agonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), fails to change alpha4 and beta2 nAChR subunit mRNA but significantly decreased alpha7 nAChR subunit mRNA and protein expression, which is associated with a 35-40% decrease in the number of 125I-alpha-Bgtx binding sites in hippocampus. In addition, this schedule of nicotine treatment produced a 40% increase in the number of high- (K(D) 1 nM), but decreased by 25% the number of low-affinity (K(D) 30 nM) binding sites for 3H-epibatidine in hippocampus. In contrast, repeated treatment with lobeline (2.7 mg/kg twice daily for 10 d), which selectively binds to high-affinity binding nAChRs, fails to change the expression of high- or low-affinity nAChRs. These data suggest that a simultaneous upregulation of high-affinity nAChRs and downregulation of low-affinity nAChRs is elicited by ligands that can bind to both low- and high-affinity nAChRs, but not by selective agonists of high-affinity nAChRs. One might infer that in hippocampus, high- and low-affinity nAChRs may be located in the same cells. When these two receptor types are stimulated simultaneously by nonselective ligands for high- and low-affinity nAChRs, they interact, bringing about an increase in binding site density of the high-affinity nAChRs.

  2. Neonicotinoid insecticides inhibit cholinergic neurotransmission in a molluscan (Lymnaea stagnalis) nervous system.

    PubMed

    Vehovszky, Á; Farkas, A; Ács, A; Stoliar, O; Székács, A; Mörtl, M; Győri, J

    2015-10-01

    Neonicotinoids are highly potent and selective systemic insecticides, but their widespread use also has a growing impact on non-target animals and contaminates the environment, including surface waters. We tested the neonicotinoid insecticides commercially available in Hungary (acetamiprid, Mospilan; imidacloprid, Kohinor; thiamethoxam, Actara; clothianidin, Apacs; thiacloprid, Calypso) on cholinergic synapses that exist between the VD4 and RPeD1 neurons in the central nervous system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. In the concentration range used (0.01-1 mg/ml), neither chemical acted as an acetylcholine (ACh) agonist; instead, both displayed antagonist activity, inhibiting the cholinergic excitatory components of the VD4-RPeD1 connection. Thiacloprid (0.01 mg/ml) blocked almost 90% of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), while the less effective thiamethoxam (0.1 mg/ml) reduced the synaptic responses by about 15%. The ACh-evoked membrane responses of the RPeD1 neuron were similarly inhibited by the neonicotinoids, confirming that the same ACh receptor (AChR) target was involved. We conclude that neonicotinoids act on nicotinergic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the snail CNS. This has been established previously in the insect CNS; however, our data indicate differences in the background mechanism or the nAChR binding site in the snail. Here, we provide the first results concerning neonicotinoid-related toxic effects on the neuronal connections in the molluscan nervous system. Aquatic animals, including molluscs, are at direct risk while facing contaminated surface waters, and snails may provide a suitable model for further studies of the behavioral/neuronal consequences of intoxication by neonicotinoids. PMID:26340121

  3. Inhibition of monocyte esterase activity by organophosphate insecticides.

    PubMed

    Lee, M J; Waters, H C

    1977-11-01

    Organophosphate insecticides, such as Vapona, Naled, and Rabon, are highly potent inhibitors of an enzyme found in human monocytes. The enzyme, a specific monocyte esterase, could be inhibited by Vapona in blood samples via airborne contamination at levels easily achieved from commercial slow-release insecticide strips. Fifty percent inhibition (I50)--as measured on the Hemalog D (Technicon Corp.)--occurred at solution concentrations of 0.22, 1.5, and 2.6 X 10(-6) g/liter for Vapona, Rabon, and Naled, respectively. Parathion (a thiophosphate) and Baygon (a carbamate) were less potent, with I50 values of 3.7 X 10(-5) and 1.5 X 10(-4) g/liter, respectively. Dursban (another thiophosphate) and Carbaryl (a carbamate) showed only marginal inhibition. Eserine, malathion, nicotine and pyrethrum had no inhibitory effect up to 0.5 g/liter. The occurrence of this effect in vivo has not yet been shown, nor is it clear what the implications of such an effect would be. The inhibition of this enzyme by airborne contaminants, however, may interfere with the proper functioning of the Hemalog D. PMID:907842

  4. Halofuginone inhibits NF-kappaB and p38 MAPK in activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Leiba, M; Cahalon, L; Shimoni, A; Lider, O; Zanin-Zhorov, A; Hecht, I; Sela, U; Vlodavsky, I; Nagler, A

    2006-08-01

    Halofuginone, a low molecular weight plant alkaloid, inhibits collagen alpha1 (I) gene expression in several animal models and in patients with fibrotic disease, including scleroderma and graft-versus-host disease. In addition, halofuginone has been shown to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor progression. It was demonstrated recently that halofuginone inhibits transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), an important immunomodulator. The present study was undertaken to explore the effects of halofuginone on activated T cells. Peripheral blood T cells were activated by anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies in the absence and presence of halofuginone and assessed for nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activity, production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), T cell apoptosis, chemotaxis, and phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). A delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) model was applied to investigate the effect of halofuginone on T cells in vivo. Preincubation of activated peripheral blood T cells with 10-40 ng/ml halofuginone resulted in a significant dose-dependent decrease in NF-kappaB activity (80% inhibition following incubation with 40 ng halofuginone, P = 0.002). In addition, 40 ng/ml halofuginone inhibited secretion of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-13, and TGF-beta (P < 0.005). Similarly, halofuginone inhibited the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and apoptosis in activated T cells (P = 0.0001 and 0.005, respectively). In contrast, T cell chemotaxis was not affected. Halofuginone inhibited DTH response in mice, indicating suppression of T cell-mediated inflammation in vivo. Halofuginone inhibits activated peripheral blood T cell functions and proinflammatory cytokine production through inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. It also inhibited DTH response in vivo, making it an attractive immunomodulator and anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:16769768

  5. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  6. Inhibition by metals of a canine renal calcium, magnesium-activated adenosinetriphosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.D.; Nechay, B.R.

    1981-06-01

    A number of metals were examined for inhibition of a canine renal calcium, magnesium-activated adenosinetriphosphatase (Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/-ATPase). Of the 27 metals investigated, only compounds of mercury, silver, gold, and uranium demonstrated 50% inhibition of the enzyme at concentrations lower than 10/sup -4/ M. The order of inhibitory potency was Hg > Ag > U > Au. Organic mercury (chlormerodin, mersalyl, p-chloromercuribenzoate) was less potent than inorganic mercuric chloride, but organic gold sodium thiomalate was equipotent with inorganic gold chloride. The inhibition produced by each metal decreased parallel to the decrease in enzyme activity, seen as the source of enzyme moved from the outer cortex inward to the papilla of the kidney. The regions of highest activity showed the greatest inhibition by each metal, and inhibition decreased as the control activity of the tissue decreased. This variability of inhibition was not related to the protein content of the enzyme preparation. As the ATP concentration increased, the inhibition produced by U was reduced; if the Mg (but not the Ca concentration was increased while the ATP concentration remained constant, the inhibition increased. Changes in the Ca, Mg, and ATP concentrations did not alter the inhibition produced by Hg, Ag, and Au.

  7. Caffeine inhibits acetylcholinesterase, but not butyrylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav; Dobes, Petr

    2013-05-08

    Caffeine is an alkaloid with a stimulant effect in the body. It can interfere in transmissions based on acetylcholine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine and glutamate. Clinical studies indicate that it can be involved in the slowing of Alzheimer disease pathology and some other effects. The effects are not well understood. In the present work, we focused on the question whether caffeine can inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and/or, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), the two enzymes participating in cholinergic neurotransmission. A standard Ellman test with human AChE and BChE was done for altering concentrations of caffeine. The test was supported by an in silico examination as well. Donepezil and tacrine were used as standards. In compliance with Dixon's plot, caffeine was proved to be a non-competitive inhibitor of AChE and BChE. However, inhibition of BChE was quite weak, as the inhibition constant, Ki, was 13.9 ± 7.4 mol/L. Inhibition of AChE was more relevant, as Ki was found to be 175 ± 9 µmol/L. The predicted free energy of binding was -6.7 kcal/mol. The proposed binding orientation of caffeine can interact with Trp86, and it can be stabilize by Tyr337 in comparison to the smaller Ala328 in the case of human BChE; thus, it can explain the lower binding affinity of caffeine for BChE with reference to AChE. The biological relevance of the findings is discussed.

  8. Oxidative stress biomarkers and acetylcholinesterase activity in human erythrocytes exposed to clomazone (in vitro).

    PubMed

    Santi, Adriana; Menezes, Charlene; Duarte, Marta Maria F; Leitemperger, Jossiele; Lópes, Thais; Loro, Vania L

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of clomazone herbicide on oxidative stress biomarkers and acetylcholinesterase activity in human erythrocytes in in vitro conditions. The activity of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), as well as the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured in human erythrocytes exposed (in vitro) to clomazone at varying concentrations in the range of 0, 100, 250 and 500 µg/L for 1 h at 37 °C.TBARS levels were significantly higher in erythrocytes incubated with clomazone at 100, 250 and 500 µg/L. However, erythrocyte CAT and AChE activities were decreased at all concentrations tested. SOD activity was increased only at 100 µg/L of clomazone. GSH levels did not change with clomazone exposure. These results clearly showed clomazone to induce oxidative stress and AChE inhibition in human erythrocytes (in vitro). We, thus, suggest a possible role of ROS on toxicity mechanism induced by clomazone in humans.

  9. Oxidative stress biomarkers and acetylcholinesterase activity in human erythrocytes exposed to clomazone (in vitro)

    PubMed Central

    Santi, Adriana; Menezes, Charlene; Duarte, Marta Maria F.; Leitemperger, Jossiele; Lópes, Thais; Loro, Vania L.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of clomazone herbicide on oxidative stress biomarkers and acetylcholinesterase activity in human erythrocytes in in vitro conditions. The activity of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), as well as the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured in human erythrocytes exposed (in vitro) to clomazone at varying concentrations in the range of 0, 100, 250 and 500 µg/L for 1 h at 37 °C.TBARS levels were significantly higher in erythrocytes incubated with clomazone at 100, 250 and 500 µg/L. However, erythrocyte CAT and AChE activities were decreased at all concentrations tested. SOD activity was increased only at 100 µg/L of clomazone. GSH levels did not change with clomazone exposure. These results clearly showed clomazone to induce oxidative stress and AChE inhibition in human erythrocytes (in vitro). We, thus, suggest a possible role of ROS on toxicity mechanism induced by clomazone in humans. PMID:22058656

  10. In vivo and in vitro effects of fructose on rat brain acetylcholinesterase activity: an ontogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Carine A; Biella, Mairis S; Lopes, Abigail; Deroza, Pedro F; Oliveira, Mariana B; Macan, Tamires P; Streck, Emilio L; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Zugno, Alexandra I; Schuck, Patrícia F

    2014-12-01

    Increased fructose concentrations are the biochemical hallmark of fructosemia, a group of inherited disorders on the metabolic pathway of this sugar. The main clinical findings observed in patients affected by fructosemia include neurological abnormalities with developmental delay, whose pathophysiology is still undefined. In the present work we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of fructose on acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity in brain structures of developing rats. For the in vitro experiments, fructose was added at increasing concentrations to the incubation medium. It was observed that fructose provoked an inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in cerebral cortex of 30-day-old-rats, even at low concentrations (0.1 mM). For the in vivo experiments, rats were killed 1 h after a single fructose administration (5 µmol/g). Control group received the same volume of saline solution. We found that AchE activity was increased in cerebral cortex of 30- and 60-day-old rats receiving fructose administration. Finally, we observed that AchE activity was unaffected by acute fructose administration in cerebral cortex, striatum or hippocampus of 15- and 90-day-old rats. The present data suggest that a disruption in cholinergic homeostasis may be involved in the pathophysiology of brain damage observed in young patients affected by fructosemia. PMID:25590728

  11. There Is No Free Won’t: Antecedent Brain Activity Predicts Decisions to Inhibit

    PubMed Central

    Filevich, Elisa; Kühn, Simone; Haggard, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of prepotent action is an important aspect of self-control, particularly in social contexts. Action inhibition and its neural bases have been extensively studied. However, the neural precursors of free decisions to inhibit have hardly been studied. We asked participants to freely choose to either make a rapid key press in response to a visual cue, or to transiently inhibit action, and briefly delay responding. The task required a behavioural response on each trial, so trials involving inhibition could be distinguished from those without inhibition as those showing slower reaction times. We used this criterion to classify free-choice trials as either rapid or inhibited/delayed. For 13 participants, we measured the mean amplitude of the ERP activity at electrode Cz in three subsequent 50 ms time windows prior to the onset of the signal that either instructed to respond or inhibit, or gave participants a free choice. In two of these 50 ms time windows (−150 to −100, and −100 to −50 ms relative to action onset), the amplitude of prestimulus ERP differed between trials where participants ”freely” chose whether to inhibit or to respond rapidly. Larger prestimulus ERP amplitudes were associated with trials in which participants decided to act rapidly as compared to trials in which they decided to delay their responses. Last-moment decisions to inhibit or delay may depend on unconscious preparatory neural activity. PMID:23418420

  12. EPAC activation inhibits acetaldehyde-induced activation and proliferation of hepatic stellate cell via Rap1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Yang, Feng; Wu, Xiaojuan; Lv, Xiongwen; Li, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation represents an essential event during alcoholic liver fibrosis (ALF). Previous studies have demonstrated that the rat HSCs could be significantly activated after exposure to 200 μmol/L acetaldehyde for 48 h, and the cAMP/PKA signaling pathways were also dramatically upregulated in activated HSCs isolated from alcoholic fibrotic rat liver. Exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) is a family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for the small Ras-like GTPases Rap, and is being considered as a vital mediator of cAMP signaling in parallel with the principal cAMP target protein kinase A (PKA). Our data showed that both cAMP/PKA and cAMP/EPAC signaling pathways were involved in acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Acetaldehyde could reduce the expression of EPAC1 while enhancing the expression of EPAC2. The cAMP analog Me-cAMP, which stimulates the EPAC/Rap1 pathway, could significantly decrease the proliferation and collagen synthesis of acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Furthermore, depletion of EPAC2, but not EPAC1, prevented the activation of HSC measured as the production of α-SMA and collagen type I and III, indicating that EPAC1 appears to have protective effects on acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Curiously, activation of PKA or EPAC perhaps has opposite effects on the synthesis of collagen and α-SMA: EPAC activation by Me-cAMP increased the levels of GTP-bound (activated) Rap1 while PKA activation by Phe-cAMP had no significant effects on such binding. These results suggested that EPAC activation could inhibit the activation and proliferation of acetaldehyde-induced HSCs via Rap1. PMID:26854595

  13. Pre- and post-treatment effect of physostigmine on soman-inhibited human erythrocyte and muscle acetylcholinesterase in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Herkert, N.M.; Schulz, S.; Wille, T.; Thiermann, H.; Hatz, R.A.; Worek, F.

    2011-05-15

    Standard treatment of organophosphorus (OP) poisoning includes administration of an antimuscarinic (e.g., atropine) and of an oxime-based reactivator. However, successful oxime treatment in soman poisoning is limited due to rapid aging of phosphylated acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Hence, the inability of standard treatment procedures to counteract the effects of soman poisoning resulted in the search for alternative strategies. Recently, results of an in vivo guinea pig study indicated a therapeutic effect of physostigmine given after soman. The present study was performed to investigate a possible pre- and post-treatment effect of physostigmine on soman-inhibited human AChE given at different time intervals before or after perfusion with soman by using a well-established dynamically working in vitro model for real-time analysis of erythrocyte and muscle AChE. The major findings were that prophylactic physostigmine prevented complete inhibition of AChE by soman and resulted in partial spontaneous recovery of the enzyme by decarbamylation. Physostigmine given as post-treatment resulted in a time-dependent reduction of the protection from soman inhibition and recovery of AChE. Hence, these date indicate that physostigmine given after soman does not protect AChE from irreversible inhibition by the OP and that the observed therapeutic effect of physostigmine in nerve agent poisoning in vivo is probably due to other factors.

  14. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor-γ Activation Inhibits Tumor Metastasis by Antagonizing Smad3 Mediated Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Reka, Ajaya Kumar; Kurapati, Himabindu; Narala, Venkata R; Bommer, Guido; Chen, Jun; Standiford, Theodore J.; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was shown to confer tumor cells with abilities essential for metastasis, including migratory phenotype, invasiveness, and resistance to apoptosis, evading immune surveillance and tumor stem cell traits. Therefore, inhibition of EMT can be an important therapeutic strategy to inhibit tumor metastasis. Here we demonstrate that activation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) -γ inhibits TGF-β-induced EMT in lung cancer cells and prevents metastasis by antagonizing Smad3 function. Activation of PPAR-γ by synthetic ligands (Troglitazone and Rosiglitazone) or by a constitutively-active form of PPAR-γ prevents TGF-β-induced loss of E-cadherin expression and inhibited the induction of mesenchymal markers (vimentin, N-cadherin, fibronectin) and MMPs. Consistently, activation of PPAR-γ also inhibited EMT-induced migration and invasion of lung cancer cells. Furthermore, effects of PPAR-γ ligands were attenuated by siRNA mediated knockdown of PPAR-γ, indicating that the ligand induced responses are PPAR-γ dependent. Selective knockdown of Smad2 and Smad3 by siRNA demonstrated that TGF-β-induced EMT is Smad3 dependent in lung cancer cells. Activation of PPAR-γ inhibits TGF-β-induced Smad transcriptional activity but had no effect on the phosphorylation or nuclear translocation of Smads. Consistently PPAR-γ activation prevented TGF-ß-induced transcriptional repression of E-cadherin promoter and inhibited transcriptional activation of N-cadherin promoter. Finally, treatment of mice with troglitazone or knockdown of Smad3 in tumor cells both significantly inhibited TGF-β-induced experimental metastasis in Scid-Beige mice. Together, with the low toxicity profile of PPAR-γ ligands, our data demonstrates that these ligands may serve as potential therapeutic agents to inhibit metastasis. PMID:21159608

  15. Alpha2A adrenergic receptor activation inhibits epileptiform activity in the rat hippocampal CA3 region.

    PubMed

    Jurgens, Chris W D; Hammad, Hana M; Lichter, Jessica A; Boese, Sarah J; Nelson, Brian W; Goldenstein, Brianna L; Davis, Kylie L; Xu, Ke; Hillman, Kristin L; Porter, James E; Doze, Van A

    2007-06-01

    Norepinephrine has potent antiepileptic properties, the pharmacology of which is unclear. Under conditions in which GABAergic inhibition is blocked, norepinephrine reduces hippocampal cornu ammonis 3 (CA3) epileptiform activity through alpha(2) adrenergic receptor (AR) activation on pyramidal cells. In this study, we investigated which alpha(2)AR subtype(s) mediates this effect. First, alpha(2)AR genomic expression patterns of 25 rat CA3 pyramidal cells were determined using real-time single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, demonstrating that 12 cells expressed alpha(2A)AR transcript; 3 of the 12 cells additionally expressed mRNA for alpha(2C)AR subtype and no cells possessing alpha(2B)AR mRNA. Hippocampal CA3 epileptiform activity was then examined using field potential recordings in brain slices. The selective alphaAR agonist 6-fluoronorepinephrine caused a reduction of CA3 epileptiform activity, as measured by decreased frequency of spontaneous epileptiform bursts. In the presence of betaAR blockade, concentration-response curves for AR agonists suggest that an alpha(2)AR mediates this response, as the rank order of potency was 5-bromo-N-(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-quinoxalinamine (UK-14304) >or= epinephrine >6-fluoronorepinephrine > norepinephrine > phenylephrine. Finally, equilibrium dissociation constants (K(b)) of selective alphaAR antagonists were functionally determined to confirm the specific alpha(2)AR subtype inhibiting CA3 epileptiform activity. Apparent K(b) values calculated for atipamezole (1.7 nM), MK-912 (4.8 nM), BRL-44408 (15 nM), yohimbine (63 nM), ARC-239 (540 nM), prazosin (4900 nM), and terazosin (5000 nM) correlated best with affinities previously determined for the alpha(2A)AR subtype (r = 0.99, slope = 1.0). These results suggest that, under conditions of impaired GABAergic inhibition, activation of alpha(2A)ARs is primarily responsible for the antiepileptic actions of norepinephrine in the rat hippocampal CA3

  16. Hinokitiol inhibits platelet activation ex vivo and thrombus formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan H; Kuo, Jinn R; Lu, Wan J; Chung, Chi L; Chou, Duen S; Huang, Shih Y; Lee, Hsiu C; Sheu, Joen R

    2013-05-15

    Hinokitiol is a tropolone-related bioactive compound that has been used in hair tonics, cosmetics, and food as an antimicrobial agent. Recently, hinokitiol has attracted considerable interest because of its anticancer activities. Platelet activation plays a crucial role in atherothrombotic processes. We examined the effects of hinokitiol treatment on platelet activation using human platelets. In the present study, hinokitiol (1 and 2 μM) inhibited the collagen-induced aggregation of human platelets, but did not inhibit the activation of platelets by other agonists, including thrombin, arachidonic acid, and ADP. Hinokitiol inhibited the phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and Akt in collagen-activated human platelets, and significantly reduced intracellular calcium mobilization and hydroxyl radical (OH·) formation. Hinokitiol also reduced the PKC activation and platelet aggregation stimulated by PDBu. In addition, hinokitiol significantly prolonged thrombogenesis in mice. Hinokitiol did not influence the binding of a fluorescent triflavin probe to the αIIbβ3 integrin on platelet membrane, and neither ODQ nor SQ22536 significantly reversed the hinokitiol-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation. In conclusion, hinokitiol may inhibit platelet activation by inhibiting the PLCγ2-PKC cascade and hydroxyl radical formation, followed by suppressing the activation of MAPKs and Akt. Our study suggests that hinokitiol may represent a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention or treatment of thromboembolic disorders. PMID:23473801

  17. Novel series of tacrine-tianeptine hybrids: Synthesis, cholinesterase inhibitory activity, S100B secretion and a molecular modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Ceschi, Marco Antonio; da Costa, Jessie Sobieski; Lopes, João Paulo Bizarro; Câmara, Viktor Saraiva; Campo, Leandra Franciscato; Borges, Antonio César de Amorim; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto Saraiva; de Souza, Daniela Fraga; Konrath, Eduardo Luis; Karl, Ana Luiza Martins; Guedes, Isabella Alvim; Dardenne, Laurent Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    Tianeptine was linked to various 9-aminoalkylamino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridines using EDC·HCl/HOBt to afford a series of tacrine-tianeptine hybrids. The hybrids were tested for their ability to inhibit AChE and BuChE and IC50 values in the nanomolar concentration scale were obtained. AChE molecular modeling studies of these hybrids indicated that tacrine moiety interacts in the bottom of the gorge with the catalytic active site (CAS) while tianeptine binds to peripheral anionic site (PAS). Furthermore, the compounds 2g and 2e were able to reduce the in vitro basal secretion of S100B, suggesting its therapeutic action in some cases or stages of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Novel series of tacrine-tianeptine hybrids: Synthesis, cholinesterase inhibitory activity, S100B secretion and a molecular modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Ceschi, Marco Antonio; da Costa, Jessie Sobieski; Lopes, João Paulo Bizarro; Câmara, Viktor Saraiva; Campo, Leandra Franciscato; Borges, Antonio César de Amorim; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto Saraiva; de Souza, Daniela Fraga; Konrath, Eduardo Luis; Karl, Ana Luiza Martins; Guedes, Isabella Alvim; Dardenne, Laurent Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    Tianeptine was linked to various 9-aminoalkylamino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridines using EDC·HCl/HOBt to afford a series of tacrine-tianeptine hybrids. The hybrids were tested for their ability to inhibit AChE and BuCh