Science.gov

Sample records for achievable depth resolution

  1. Oxygen depth profiling with subnanometre depth resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmata, Marcel; Munnik, Frans; Hanf, Daniel; Grötzschel, Rainer; Crocoll, Sonja; Möller, Wolfhard

    2014-10-01

    A High-depth Resolution Elastic Recoil Detection (HR-ERD) set-up using a magnetic spectrometer has been taken into operation at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf for the first time. This instrument allows the investigation of light elements in ultra-thin layers and their interfaces with a depth resolution of less than 1 nm near the surface. As the depth resolution is highly influenced by the experimental measurement parameters, sophisticated optimisation procedures have been implemented. Effects of surface roughness and sample damage caused by high fluences need to be quantified for each kind of material. Also corrections are essential for non-equilibrium charge state distributions that exist very close to the surface. Using the example of a high-k multilayer SiO2/Si3N4Ox/SiO2/Si it is demonstrated that oxygen in ultra-thin films of a few nanometres thickness can be investigated by HR-ERD.

  2. Spatial resolution of MFM measurements of penetration depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanton, Eric; Luan, Lan; Kirtley, John; Moler, Kathryn

    2012-02-01

    The penetration depth and its temperature dependence are key ways to characterize superconductors. Measurements of the local Meissner response of a superconductor can determine the local penetration depth. To quantify the spatial resolution of such measurements, we seek to characterize the point spread function of magnetic force microscope (MFM) measurements of the penetration depth both numerically and experimentally. Modeling various geometries of MFM tips (pyramid, dipole, and long thin cylinder) in the presence of various geometries of spatial variation in the penetration depth (point variation, columnar defects, and planar defects or twin boundaries) shows the importance of the MFM tip geometry to achieving both excellent spatial resolution and quantitatively interpretable results. We compare these models to experimental data on pnictides and cuprates to set upper limits on the sub-micron-scale variation of the penetration depth. These results demonstrate both the feasibility and the technical challenges of submicron penetration depth mapping.

  3. Nanometric depth resolution from multi-focal images in microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dalgarno, Heather I. C.; Dalgarno, Paul A.; Dada, Adetunmise C.; Towers, Catherine E.; Gibson, Gavin J.; Parton, Richard M.; Davis, Ilan; Warburton, Richard J.; Greenaway, Alan H.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for tracking the position of small features in three dimensions from images recorded on a standard microscope with an inexpensive attachment between the microscope and the camera. The depth-measurement accuracy of this method is tested experimentally on a wide-field, inverted microscope and is shown to give approximately 8 nm depth resolution, over a specimen depth of approximately 6 µm, when using a 12-bit charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and very bright but unresolved particles. To assess low-flux limitations a theoretical model is used to derive an analytical expression for the minimum variance bound. The approximations used in the analytical treatment are tested using numerical simulations. It is concluded that approximately 14 nm depth resolution is achievable with flux levels available when tracking fluorescent sources in three dimensions in live-cell biology and that the method is suitable for three-dimensional photo-activated localization microscopy resolution. Sub-nanometre resolution could be achieved with photon-counting techniques at high flux levels. PMID:21247948

  4. Effect of fundamental depth resolution and cardboard effect to perceived depth resolution on multi-view display.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Hyun; Yeom, Jiwoon; Hong, Jisoo; Hong, Keehoon; Min, Sung-Wook; Lee, Byoungho

    2011-10-10

    In three-dimensional television (3D TV) broadcasting, we find the effect of fundamental depth resolution and the cardboard effect to the perceived depth resolution on multi-view display is important. The observer distance and the specification of multi-view display quantize the expressible depth range, which affect the perception of depth resolution of the observer. In addition, the multi-view 3D TV needs the view synthesis process using depth image-based rendering which induces the cardboard effect from the relation among the stereo pickup, the multi-view synthesis and the multi-view display. In this paper, we analyze the fundamental depth resolution and the cardboard effect from the synthesis process in the multi-view 3D TV broadcasting. After the analysis, the numerical comparison and subjective tests with 20 participants are performed to find the effect of fundamental depth resolution and the cardboard effect to the perceived depth resolution. PMID:21997055

  5. Coherent diffractive imaging: towards achieving atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Dietze, S H; Shpyrko, O G

    2015-11-01

    The next generation of X-ray sources will feature highly brilliant X-ray beams that will enable the imaging of local nanoscale structures with unprecedented resolution. A general formalism to predict the achievable spatial resolution in coherent diffractive imaging, based solely on diffracted intensities, is provided. The coherent dose necessary to reach atomic resolution depends significantly on the atomic scale structure, where disordered or amorphous materials require roughly three orders of magnitude lower dose compared with the expected scaling of uniform density materials. Additionally, dose reduction for crystalline materials are predicted at certain resolutions based only on their unit-cell dimensions and structure factors. PMID:26524315

  6. Analytical and numerical depth resolution functions in sputter profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, S.; Liu, Y.; Wang, J. Y.; Kovac, J.

    2014-09-01

    Quantification of sputter depth profiles is frequently done by fitting the convolution integral over concentration and depth resolution function to the experimental results. For a thin delta layer, there exist analytical solutions. The analytical depth resolution functions of two popular approaches, that of the Mixing-Roughness-Information depth (MRI) model and that of Dowsett and coworkers are compared. It is concluded that the analytical depth resolution function of the MRI model gives the correct location of a buried delta layer with respect to the measured profile, and a clear description of the information depth in AES, XPS and SIMS. Both analytical solutions can be extended to larger layer thickness. But they are less flexible with respect to physical parameters which are not constant with concentration or sputtered depth, such as detection sensitivity, atomic mixing or preferential sputtering. For these cases, numerical solutions have to be used.

  7. Higher resolution stimulus facilitates depth perception: MT+ plays a significant role in monocular depth perception.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Yoshiaki; Komine, Kazuteru; Sawahata, Yasuhito; Hiruma, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Today, we human beings are facing with high-quality virtual world of a completely new nature. For example, we have a digital display consisting of a high enough resolution that we cannot distinguish from the real world. However, little is known how such high-quality representation contributes to the sense of realness, especially to depth perception. What is the neural mechanism of processing such fine but virtual representation? Here, we psychophysically and physiologically examined the relationship between stimulus resolution and depth perception, with using luminance-contrast (shading) as a monocular depth cue. As a result, we found that a higher resolution stimulus facilitates depth perception even when the stimulus resolution difference is undetectable. This finding is against the traditional cognitive hierarchy of visual information processing that visual input is processed continuously in a bottom-up cascade of cortical regions that analyze increasingly complex information such as depth information. In addition, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results reveal that the human middle temporal (MT+) plays a significant role in monocular depth perception. These results might provide us with not only the new insight of our neural mechanism of depth perception but also the future progress of our neural system accompanied by state-of- the-art technologies. PMID:25327168

  8. Hydrogen depth profiling with sub-nm resolution in high-resolution ERD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Kenji; Nakajima, Kaoru; Imura, Hideki

    1998-05-01

    A depth resolution of 0.28 nm is obtained in a depth profile of hydrogen in silicon using a newly developed high-resolution elastic recoil detection (ERD) system. The system consists of a standard 90° sector magnetic spectrometer (energy resolution ˜0.1%) for high-resolution measurement and an electrostatic deflector for blocking scattered incident ions without disturbing the energy resolution. The system is very simple as compared with other high-resolution ERD systems and the data acquisition time is reasonably short.

  9. Sampling Depths, Depth Shifts, and Depth Resolutions for Bi(n)(+) Ion Analysis in Argon Gas Cluster Depth Profiles.

    PubMed

    Havelund, R; Seah, M P; Gilmore, I S

    2016-03-10

    Gas cluster sputter depth profiling is increasingly used for the spatially resolved chemical analysis and imaging of organic materials. Here, a study is reported of the sampling depth in secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling. It is shown that effects of the sampling depth leads to apparent shifts in depth profiles of Irganox 3114 delta layers in Irganox 1010 sputtered, in the dual beam mode, using 5 keV Ar₂₀₀₀⁺ ions and analyzed with Bi(q+), Bi₃(q+) and Bi₅(q+) ions (q = 1 or 2) with energies between 13 and 50 keV. The profiles show sharp delta layers, broadened from their intrinsic 1 nm thickness to full widths at half-maxima (fwhm's) of 8-12 nm. For different secondary ions, the centroids of the measured delta layers are shifted deeper or shallower by up to 3 nm from the position measured for the large, 564.36 Da (C₃₃H₄₆N₃O₅⁻) characteristic ion for Irganox 3114 used to define a reference position. The shifts are linear with the Bi(n)(q+) beam energy and are greatest for Bi₃(q+), slightly less for Bi₅(q+) with its wider or less deep craters, and significantly less for Bi(q+) where the sputtering yield is very low and the primary ion penetrates more deeply. The shifts increase the fwhm’s of the delta layers in a manner consistent with a linearly falling generation and escape depth distribution function (GEDDF) for the emitted secondary ions, relevant for a paraboloid shaped crater. The total depth of this GEDDF is 3.7 times the delta layer shifts. The greatest effect is for the peaks with the greatest shifts, i.e. Bi₃(q+) at the highest energy, and for the smaller fragments. It is recommended that low energies be used for the analysis beam and that carefully selected, large, secondary ion fragments are used for measuring depth distributions, or that the analysis be made in the single beam mode using the sputtering Ar cluster ions also for analysis. PMID:26883085

  10. High-resolution spectrometer: solution to the axial resolution and ranging depth trade-off of SD-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvdashti, Tahereh; Lee, Hee Yoon; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a cross-dispersed spectrometer for Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT). The resolution of a conventional SD-OCT spectrometer is limited by the available sizes of the linear array detectors. The adverse consequences of this finite resolution is a trade-off between achieving practical field of view (i.e. ranging depth) and maintaining high axial resolution. Inspired by spectrometer designs for astronomy, we take advantage of very high pixel-density 2D CCD arrays to map a single-shot 2D spectrum to an OCT A-scan. The basic system can be implemented using a high-resolution Echelle grating crossed with a prism in a direction orthogonal to the dispersion axis. In this geometry, the interferometric light returning from the OCT system is dispersed in two dimensions; the resulting spectrum can achieve more pixels than a traditional OCT spectrometer (which increases the ranging depth) and maintains impressive axial resolution because of the broad bandwidth of the detected OCT light. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first demonstration of OCT data using an Echelle-based cross-dispersed spectrometer. Potential applications for such a system include high-resolution imaging of the retina or the anterior segment of the eye over extended imaging depths and small animal imaging.

  11. Subpixel Resolution In Depth Perceived Via 3-D Television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B.; Von Sydow, Marika; Fender, Derek H.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiment in which two black vertical bars on featureless white background placed near intersection of optical axes of two charge-coupled-device video cameras positioned to give stereoscopic views. Trained human observers found to perceive depths at subpixel resolutions in stereoscopic television images. This finding significant for remote stereoscopic monitoring, expecially during precise maneuvers of remotely controlled manipulators. Also significant for research in processing of visual information by human brain.

  12. Ripple depth and density resolution of rippled noise.

    PubMed

    Supin AYa; Popov, V V; Milekhina, O N; Tarakanov, M B

    1999-11-01

    Depth resolution of spectral ripples was measured in normal humans using a phase-reversal test. The principle of the test was to find the lowest ripple depth at which an interchange of peak and trough position (the phase reversal) in the rippled spectrum is detectable. Using this test, ripple-depth thresholds were measured as a function of ripple density of octave-band rippled noise at center frequencies from 0.5 to 8 kHz. The ripple-depth threshold in the power domain was around 0.2 at low ripple densities of 4-5 relative units (center-frequency-to-ripple-spacing ratio) or 3-3.5 ripples/oct. The threshold increased with the ripple density increase. It reached the highest possible level of 1.0 at ripple density from 7.5 relative units at 0.5 kHz center frequency to 14.3 relative units at 8 kHz (5.2 to 10.0 ripple/oct, respectively). The interrelation between the ripple depth threshold and ripple density can be satisfactorily described by transfer of the signal by frequency-tuned auditory filters. PMID:10573895

  13. Resonant nuclear reaction analysis with high depth resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kul'ment'ev, A. I.; Storizhko, V. E.; Zabashta, O. I.

    1994-03-01

    This paper discusses the potential of the resonant NRA technique for measuring the impurity depth profiles. An integrated program package is developed for analysis of the experimental data with high depth resolution. The input information for the package consists of the experimental yield from the impurity reaction selected. The impurity profile can be obtained by solving either a direct or an inverse problem. In the former case the simulated yield from the assigned profile is fitted to the experimental yield. In the latter case the depth profile is obtained by solving the theoretical yield equation. Since the latter procedure is an incorrect problem, we used Tikhonov's regularization method. This approach allows a correct inclusion of the experimental yield errors as well as of the assumptions made in the model describing the incident ion beam interaction with the material. The equation for the yield is derived taking into account the energy distribution of the initial beam, energy loss straggling, resonance width and Doppler effect. The package of programs is menu-driven with a friendly user interface and possibilities of visual representation, which makes the spectrum processing procedure simple and easy even to an unexperienced user. The computational system permits convenient selection of a certain reaction with an arbitrary shape of the resonance, selection of the beam-material interaction and energy loss straggling model and allows the processing of the spectra from a single or several simultaneously excited resonances.

  14. RBS with high depth resolution using small magnetic spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grötzschel, Rainer; Klein, Christoph; Mäder, Michael

    2004-06-01

    The increasing importance of ultra-thin layers for novel technologies demands quantitative analysis techniques with a depth resolution of atomic monolayers, which can be obtained for RBS and ERDA by magnetic spectrometers. We operate at the 3 MV Tandetron accelerator a magnetic spectrometer consisting of an UHV scattering chamber and a simple dipole magnet with circular field boundaries (Browne-Buechner spectrometer). Since in many cases of high resolution ion beam analysis the samples must be prepared in situ in UHV, the chamber with a base vacuum of 4 × 10 -10 mbar is equipped with an ion sputter gun and two low rate e-beam evaporators for in situ layer deposition. A RHEED system is used to check the surface reconstruction and monitor the layer growth. Samples are transferred, together with a BN heater, to the precision 5-axes channelling goniometer. The magnet with a mean radius of 0.65 m is mounted vertically and can be positioned either at 35.5° or 144.5°. The backward position offers the advantage of a high mass resolution, but the Rutherford cross sections are a factor of about 100 lower than at the forward angle, which is the preferred position if kinematically possible. At the 5 MV tandem accelerator a QQDS magnetic spectrometer is being installed. The facilities for in situ sample preparation in UHV are similar. These spectrometers are described in detail and recent applications are discussed.

  15. Wavefront engineering: selective aperture illumination for increased depth of focus and super-resolution for photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, Rishi

    2015-08-01

    Photolithography has been and is the driving force behind enhancement and miniaturization of computers and their peripherals. Advances in photolithographic processes have enabled modern integrated circuits to have millions of electrical devices on a single, small circuit chip. Diffraction optics plays a central role in the photolithographic process, as during etching, the incoming light passes through a moderate-aperture focusing lens and converges on every point on the chip. Thus, the structure of the electromagnetic field in the focal region is of considerable interest. While techniques such as implantation and deposition processes control the vertical architecture of the integrated circuit chip, the lateral dimensions are defined solely by diffraction optics. The conventional imaging approach has a severe restriction because depth of focus shortens with an increase in resolution. Even though using shorter wavelength light such as deep ultraviolet is helpful, it too is reaching a point where further increase in resolution is necessary while, at the same time, preserving or increasing the depth of focus. Shortening of depth of focus with increase resolution is nonetheless the most severe limitation of photolithography. Thus, reduction in wavelength and increase in numerical aperture are viable options, but this approach has tremendous difficulties. In this study, we present a novel approach to achieve both super-resolution and increased depth of focus through a technique called selective aperture illumination (SAI). In SAI, the incoming light is redistributed by means of an optical element, phase, and attenuation masks. It is shown that both the increased depth focus and super-resolution are achieved by selectively choosing appropriate phase and amplitude at the entrance pupil.

  16. Undetectable Changes in Image Resolution of Luminance-Contrast Gradients Affect Depth Perception

    PubMed Central

    Tsushima, Yoshiaki; Komine, Kazuteru; Sawahata, Yasuhito; Morita, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    A great number of studies have suggested a variety of ways to get depth information from two dimensional images such as binocular disparity, shape-from-shading, size gradient/foreshortening, aerial perspective, and so on. Are there any other new factors affecting depth perception? A recent psychophysical study has investigated the correlation between image resolution and depth sensation of Cylinder images (A rectangle contains gradual luminance-contrast changes.). It was reported that higher resolution images facilitate depth perception. However, it is still not clear whether or not the finding generalizes to other kinds of visual stimuli, because there are more appropriate visual stimuli for exploration of depth perception of luminance-contrast changes, such as Gabor patch. Here, we further examined the relationship between image resolution and depth perception by conducting a series of psychophysical experiments with not only Cylinders but also Gabor patches having smoother luminance-contrast gradients. As a result, higher resolution images produced stronger depth sensation with both images. This finding suggests that image resolution affects depth perception of simple luminance-contrast differences (Gabor patch) as well as shape-from-shading (Cylinder). In addition, this phenomenon was found even when the resolution difference was undetectable. This indicates the existence of consciously available and unavailable information in our visual system. These findings further support the view that image resolution is a cue for depth perception that was previously ignored. It partially explains the unparalleled viewing experience of novel high resolution displays. PMID:26941693

  17. Using ultrahigh sensitive optical microangiography to achieve comprehensive depth resolved microvasculature mapping for human retina.

    PubMed

    An, Lin; Shen, Tueng T; Wang, Ruikang K

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents comprehensive and depth-resolved retinal microvasculature images within human retina achieved by a newly developed ultrahigh sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) system. Due to its high flow sensitivity, UHS-OMAG is much more sensitive to tissue motion due to the involuntary movement of the human eye and head compared to the traditional OMAG system. To mitigate these motion artifacts on final imaging results, we propose a new phase compensation algorithm in which the traditional phase-compensation algorithm is repeatedly used to efficiently minimize the motion artifacts. Comparatively, this new algorithm demonstrates at least 8 to 25 times higher motion tolerability, critical for the UHS-OMAG system to achieve retinal microvasculature images with high quality. Furthermore, the new UHS-OMAG system employs a high speed line scan CMOS camera (240 kHz A-line scan rate) to capture 500 A-lines for one B-frame at a 400 Hz frame rate. With this system, we performed a series of in vivo experiments to visualize the retinal microvasculature in humans. Two featured imaging protocols are utilized. The first is of the low lateral resolution (16 μm) and a wide field of view (4 × 3 mm(2) with single scan and 7 × 8 mm(2) for multiple scans), while the second is of the high lateral resolution (5 μm) and a narrow field of view (1.5 × 1.2 mm(2) with single scan). The great imaging performance delivered by our system suggests that UHS-OMAG can be a promising noninvasive alternative to the current clinical retinal microvasculature imaging techniques for the diagnosis of eye diseases with significant vascular involvement, such as diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. PMID:22029360

  18. Using ultrahigh sensitive optical microangiography to achieve comprehensive depth resolved microvasculature mapping for human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Lin; Shen, Tueng T.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents comprehensive and depth-resolved retinal microvasculature images within human retina achieved by a newly developed ultrahigh sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) system. Due to its high flow sensitivity, UHS-OMAG is much more sensitive to tissue motion due to the involuntary movement of the human eye and head compared to the traditional OMAG system. To mitigate these motion artifacts on final imaging results, we propose a new phase compensation algorithm in which the traditional phase-compensation algorithm is repeatedly used to efficiently minimize the motion artifacts. Comparatively, this new algorithm demonstrates at least 8 to 25 times higher motion tolerability, critical for the UHS-OMAG system to achieve retinal microvasculature images with high quality. Furthermore, the new UHS-OMAG system employs a high speed line scan CMOS camera (240 kHz A-line scan rate) to capture 500 A-lines for one B-frame at a 400 Hz frame rate. With this system, we performed a series of in vivo experiments to visualize the retinal microvasculature in humans. Two featured imaging protocols are utilized. The first is of the low lateral resolution (16 μm) and a wide field of view (4 × 3 mm2 with single scan and 7 × 8 mm2 for multiple scans), while the second is of the high lateral resolution (5 μm) and a narrow field of view (1.5 × 1.2 mm2 with single scan). The great imaging performance delivered by our system suggests that UHS-OMAG can be a promising noninvasive alternative to the current clinical retinal microvasculature imaging techniques for the diagnosis of eye diseases with significant vascular involvement, such as diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration.

  19. Structure-aware depth super-resolution using Gaussian mixture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunok; Oh, Changjae; Kim, Youngjung; Sohn, Kwanghoon

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a probabilistic optimization approach to enhance the resolution of a depth map. Conventionally, a high-resolution color image is considered as a cue for depth super-resolution under the assumption that the pixels with similar color likely belong to similar depth. This assumption might induce a texture transferring from the color image into the depth map and an edge blurring artifact to the depth boundaries. In order to alleviate these problems, we propose an efficient depth prior exploiting a Gaussian mixture model in which an estimated depth map is considered to a feature for computing affinity between two pixels. Furthermore, a fixed-point iteration scheme is adopted to address the non-linearity of a constraint derived from the proposed prior. The experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms state-of-the-art methods both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  20. Techniques for Improving SIMS Depth Resolution: C{sub 60}{sup +} Primary Ions and Backside Depth Profile Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Windsor, Eric; Gillen, Greg; Bright, David; Chi, Peter; Fahey, Albert; Batteas, James

    2005-09-09

    We are evaluating methods to improve depth resolution for SIMS analyses of semiconductors. Two methods that show promise are: (1) backside depth profile analysis and (2) the use of cluster primary ion beams. Backside analysis improves depth resolution by eliminating sample-induced artifacts caused by sputtering through processing layers on the front side of the wafer. Mechanical backside sample preparation however, also introduces artifacts. The most troublesome artifact is inclined (non-planar) polishing. Using a combination of both secondary ion image depth profiling and image analysis techniques, the effects of inclined polishing are minimized. A Buckminsterfullerene C{sub 60}{sup +} primary ion source has been interfaced to a magnetic sector SIMS instrument for the purpose of depth profile analysis. Application of this source to NIST SRM 2135a (nickel/ chromium multilayer depth profile standard) demonstrated that all layers of this standard were completely resolved. Initial applications of C{sub 60}{sup +} to silicon have produced some unexpected results that are not completely understood at this time. Research is underway to evaluate the application of C{sub 60}{sup +} primary ions to silicon semiconductors and other materials of interest.

  1. Wavelength Shifting Phoswich Detectors for Superior Depth-of-Interaction Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, Charles L; Eriksson, Lars

    2012-10-25

    In order to simultaneously achieve both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity in small Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems, scintillation detectors must be long in the radial direction as well as able to provide depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. DOI information is typically provided by constructing detectors from two or more layers of scintillators that are identifiable due to their different decay times. This approach has worked well in tomographs such as the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT, CTI PET Systems, Inc.) in which the emission and excitation bands of the scintillator layers do not overlap each other. However, many potentially important pairs of scintillator crystals exist in which the emission of one crystal is, in fact, absorbed and re-emitted by the second crystal, thus impacting the pulse shape discrimination process used to identify the scintillator layers. These potentially useful pairs of scintillators are unlikely to be implemented in phoswich detectors without a comprehensive understanding of the complex emission that results when the light of one crystal is absorbed by the second crystal and then reemitted. Our objective is to develop a fundamental understanding of the optical phenomena that occur in phoswich detectors and to exploit these phenomena to achieve improved spatial resolution in small high sensitivity PET scanners.

  2. Achieving High Resolution Timer Events in Virtualized Environment.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Blazej; Chydzinski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Virtual Machine Monitors (VMM) have become popular in different application areas. Some applications may require to generate the timer events with high resolution and precision. This however may be challenging due to the complexity of VMMs. In this paper we focus on the timer functionality provided by five different VMMs-Xen, KVM, Qemu, VirtualBox and VMWare. Firstly, we evaluate resolutions and precisions of their timer events. Apparently, provided resolutions and precisions are far too low for some applications (e.g. networking applications with the quality of service). Then, using Xen virtualization we demonstrate the improved timer design that greatly enhances both the resolution and precision of achieved timer events. PMID:26177366

  3. Achieving High Resolution Timer Events in Virtualized Environment

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Blazej; Chydzinski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Virtual Machine Monitors (VMM) have become popular in different application areas. Some applications may require to generate the timer events with high resolution and precision. This however may be challenging due to the complexity of VMMs. In this paper we focus on the timer functionality provided by five different VMMs—Xen, KVM, Qemu, VirtualBox and VMWare. Firstly, we evaluate resolutions and precisions of their timer events. Apparently, provided resolutions and precisions are far too low for some applications (e.g. networking applications with the quality of service). Then, using Xen virtualization we demonstrate the improved timer design that greatly enhances both the resolution and precision of achieved timer events. PMID:26177366

  4. Depth resolution improvement in secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis using metal cluster complex ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, M.; Kinno, T.; Koike, M.; Tanaka, H.; Takeno, S.; Fujiwara, Y.; Kondou, K.; Teranishi, Y.; Nonaka, H.; Fujimoto, T.; Kurokawa, A.; Ichimura, S.

    2006-07-31

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses were carried out using a metal cluster complex ion of Ir{sub 4}(CO){sub 7}{sup +} as a primary ion beam. Depth resolution was evaluated as a function of primary ion species, energy, and incident angle. The depth resolution obtained using cluster ion bombardment was considerably better than that obtained by oxygen ion bombardment under the same experimental condition due to reduction of atomic mixing in the depth. The authors obtained a depth resolution of {approx}1 nm under 5 keV, 45 deg. condition. Depth resolution was degraded by ion-bombardment-induced surface roughness at 5 keV with higher incident angles.

  5. Two-photon instant structured illumination microscopy improves the depth penetration of super-resolution imaging in thick scattering samples

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Peter W.; York, Andrew G.; Nogare, Damian Dalle; Ingaramo, Maria; Christensen, Ryan; Chitnis, Ajay; Patterson, George H.; Shroff, Hari

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging methods that achieve spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit (super-resolution) are of great interest in biology. We describe a super-resolution method that combines two-photon excitation with structured illumination microscopy (SIM), enabling three-dimensional interrogation of live organisms with ~150 nm lateral and ~400 nm axial resolution, at frame rates of ~1 Hz. By performing optical rather than digital processing operations to improve resolution, our microscope permits super-resolution imaging with no additional cost in acquisition time or phototoxicity relative to the point-scanning two-photon microscope upon which it is based. Our method provides better depth penetration and inherent optical sectioning than all previously reported super-resolution SIM implementations, enabling super-resolution imaging at depths exceeding 100 μm from the coverslip surface. The capability of our system for interrogating thick live specimens at high resolution is demonstrated by imaging whole nematode embryos and larvae, and tissues and organs inside zebrafish embryos. PMID:25485291

  6. Development of a micro PET system with improved spatial resolution through depth-of-interaction measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, P. M. M.; Castro, I. F. C.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2014-08-01

    In small diameter positron emission tomography (PET) systems, the determination of the depth-of-interaction (DOI) of 511 keV gamma photons in scintillator crystals is of great importance, in order to achieve high DOI resolution with good uniformity within the entire field-of-view. In this work, we propose a new method for DOI determination, in which a single layer of LYSO crystals is read out on both ends through the use of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), but using wavelength-shifting fibers and a reduced number of SiPMs on one end. This design results in a simpler and less expensive readout when compared to the typical dual-ended readout method, which requires two photodetectors per crystal and corresponding readout electronics. GATE simulation of the system was carried out and experimental proof-of-concept studies were performed on a single detector cell (composed of two LYSO crystals operating in coincidence), to evaluate the amount of light detected on each side of the crystal and the achievable DOI resolution with this method, taking into account the attenuation of the light signal on the fiber side with crystal-SiPM distance. The feasibility of applying this new method in full detector rings for a small animal PET system is evaluated and discussed, considering different alternatives for position readout electronics.

  7. Effects of the "Auditory Discrimination in Depth Program" on Auditory Conceptualization and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Timothy Gerald

    Statistically significant differences were not found between the treatment and non-treatment groups in a study designed to investigate the effectiveness of the Auditory Discrimination in Depth (A.D.D.) Program. The treatment group involved thirty-nine normally achieving and educationally handicapped students who were given the A.D.D. Program…

  8. Influence of relative abundance of isotopes on depth resolution for depth profiling of metal coatings by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fariñas, Juan C; Coedo, Aurora G; Dorado, Teresa

    2010-04-15

    A systematic study on the influence of relative abundance of isotopes of elements in the coating (A(c)) and in the substrate (A(s)) on both shape of time-resolved signals and depth resolution (Delta z) was performed for depth profile analysis of metal coatings on metal substrates by ultraviolet (266 nm) nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry. Five coated samples with coating thicknesses of the same order of magnitude (20-30 microm) were tested: nickel coating on aluminium, chromium and copper, and steel coated with copper and zinc. A laser repetition rate of 1 Hz and a laser fluence of 21 J cm(-2) were used. Five different depth profile types were established, which showed a clear dependence on A(c)/A(s) ratio. In general, depth profiles obtained for ratios above 1-10 could not be used to determine Delta z. We found that Delta z increased non-linearly with A(c)/A(s) ratio. The best depth profile types, leading to highest depth resolution and reproducibility, were attained in all cases by using the isotopes with low/medium A(c) values and with the highest A(s) values. In these conditions, an improvement of up to 4 times in Delta z values was achieved. The average ablation rates were in the range from 0.55 microm pulse(-1) for copper coating on steel to 0.83 microm pulse(-1) for zinc coating on steel, and the Delta z values were between 2.74 microm for nickel coating on chromium and 5.91 microm for nickel coating on copper, with RSD values about 5-8%. PMID:20188923

  9. Achieving 50 nm lateral-resolution quantitative EDX SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, G.; Lozano-Perez, S.

    2015-10-01

    Low Voltage Scanning Electron Microscopy (LV-SEM) has become a very promising approach to perform Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) chemical mapping with high- lateral resolution [1]. Using voltages as low as 1.5keV, sub-10nm resolutions can be achieved. In this work, we try to take advantage of the small interaction volume in order to simplify the otherwise more complex SEM quantitative methodology. This way, phenomena such as absorption and fluorescence can be ignored and, effectively treat the quantification as with the Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)-based Cliff-Lorimer method. Experimental k- factors have been obtained from a series of standards and used to quantify complex oxide phases in steels.

  10. Convective gas flow development and the maximum depths achieved by helophyte vegetation in lakes

    PubMed Central

    Sorrell, Brian K.; Hawes, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Convective gas flow in helophytes (emergent aquatic plants) is thought to be an important adaptation for the ability to colonize deep water. In this study, the maximum depths achieved by seven helophytes were compared in 17 lakes differing in nutrient enrichment, light attenuation, shoreline exposure and sediment characteristics to establish the importance of convective flow for their ability to form the deepest helophyte vegetation in different environments. Methods Convective gas flow development was compared amongst the seven species, and species were allocated to ‘flow absent’, ‘low flow’ and ‘high flow’ categories. Regression tree analysis and quantile regression analysis were used to determine the roles of flow category, lake water quality, light attenuation and shoreline exposure on maximum helophyte depths. Key Results Two ‘flow absent’ species were restricted to very shallow water in all lakes and their depths were not affected by any environmental parameters. Three ‘low flow’ and two ‘high flow’ species had wide depth ranges, but ‘high flow’ species formed the deepest vegetation far more frequently than ‘low flow’ species. The ‘low flow’ species formed the deepest vegetation most commonly in oligotrophic lakes where oxygen demands in sediments were low, especially on exposed shorelines. The ‘high flow’ species were almost always those forming the deepest vegetation in eutrophic lakes, with Eleocharis sphacelata predominant when light attenuation was low, and Typha orientalis when light attenuation was high. Depths achieved by all five species with convective flow were limited by shoreline exposure, but T. orientalis was the least exposure-sensitive species. Conclusions Development of convective flow appears to be essential for dominance of helophyte species in >0·5 m depth, especially under eutrophic conditions. Exposure, sediment characteristics and light attenuation frequently constrain them

  11. Color Depth Modulation and Resolution in Phase-Change Material Nanodisplays.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Carlos; Hosseini, Peiman; Taylor, Robert A; Bhaskaran, Harish

    2016-06-01

    The demonstration of non-volatile color-depth modulation in novel phase change nanodisplays allowing for continuous "grayscale" images with ultrahigh resolution and low dimensionality is described. These results hold promise for a new generation of bistable, ultrahigh-resolution, and flexible display technologies, while allowing for other potential applications in nanophotonics and optoelectronics. PMID:27028767

  12. Correction of a Depth-Dependent Lateral Distortion in 3D Super-Resolution Imaging.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Lina; Holden, Seamus J; Douglass, Kyle M; Manley, Suliana

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) localization-based super-resolution microscopy (SR) requires correction of aberrations to accurately represent 3D structure. Here we show how a depth-dependent lateral shift in the apparent position of a fluorescent point source, which we term `wobble`, results in warped 3D SR images and provide a software tool to correct this distortion. This system-specific, lateral shift is typically > 80 nm across an axial range of ~ 1 μm. A theoretical analysis based on phase retrieval data from our microscope suggests that the wobble is caused by non-rotationally symmetric phase and amplitude aberrations in the microscope's pupil function. We then apply our correction to the bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ in live bacteria and demonstrate that the corrected data more accurately represent the true shape of this vertically-oriented ring-like structure. We also include this correction method in a registration procedure for dual-color, 3D SR data and show that it improves target registration error (TRE) at the axial limits over an imaging depth of 1 μm, yielding TRE values of < 20 nm. This work highlights the importance of correcting aberrations in 3D SR to achieve high fidelity between the measurements and the sample. PMID:26600467

  13. Correction of a Depth-Dependent Lateral Distortion in 3D Super-Resolution Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Suliana

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) localization-based super-resolution microscopy (SR) requires correction of aberrations to accurately represent 3D structure. Here we show how a depth-dependent lateral shift in the apparent position of a fluorescent point source, which we term `wobble`, results in warped 3D SR images and provide a software tool to correct this distortion. This system-specific, lateral shift is typically > 80 nm across an axial range of ~ 1 μm. A theoretical analysis based on phase retrieval data from our microscope suggests that the wobble is caused by non-rotationally symmetric phase and amplitude aberrations in the microscope’s pupil function. We then apply our correction to the bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ in live bacteria and demonstrate that the corrected data more accurately represent the true shape of this vertically-oriented ring-like structure. We also include this correction method in a registration procedure for dual-color, 3D SR data and show that it improves target registration error (TRE) at the axial limits over an imaging depth of 1 μm, yielding TRE values of < 20 nm. This work highlights the importance of correcting aberrations in 3D SR to achieve high fidelity between the measurements and the sample. PMID:26600467

  14. Depth

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan J; van Doorn, Andrea J; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Depth is the feeling of remoteness, or separateness, that accompanies awareness in human modalities like vision and audition. In specific cases depths can be graded on an ordinal scale, or even measured quantitatively on an interval scale. In the case of pictorial vision this is complicated by the fact that human observers often appear to apply mental transformations that involve depths in distinct visual directions. This implies that a comparison of empirically determined depths between observers involves pictorial space as an integral entity, whereas comparing pictorial depths as such is meaningless. We describe the formal structure of pictorial space purely in the phenomenological domain, without taking recourse to the theories of optics which properly apply to physical space—a distinct ontological domain. We introduce a number of general ways to design and implement methods of geodesy in pictorial space, and discuss some basic problems associated with such measurements. We deal mainly with conceptual issues. PMID:23145244

  15. Accuracy and Resolution of Kinect Depth Data for Indoor Mapping Applications

    PubMed Central

    Khoshelham, Kourosh; Elberink, Sander Oude

    2012-01-01

    Consumer-grade range cameras such as the Kinect sensor have the potential to be used in mapping applications where accuracy requirements are less strict. To realize this potential insight into the geometric quality of the data acquired by the sensor is essential. In this paper we discuss the calibration of the Kinect sensor, and provide an analysis of the accuracy and resolution of its depth data. Based on a mathematical model of depth measurement from disparity a theoretical error analysis is presented, which provides an insight into the factors influencing the accuracy of the data. Experimental results show that the random error of depth measurement increases with increasing distance to the sensor, and ranges from a few millimeters up to about 4 cm at the maximum range of the sensor. The quality of the data is also found to be influenced by the low resolution of the depth measurements. PMID:22438718

  16. Television monitor field shifter and an opto-electronic method for obtaining a stereo image of optimal depth resolution and reduced depth distortion on a single screen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus is developed for obtaining a stereo image with reduced depth distortion and optimum depth resolution. Static and dynamic depth distortion and depth resolution tradeoff is provided. Cameras obtaining the images for a stereo view are converged at a convergence point behind the object to be presented in the image, and the collection-surface-to-object distance, the camera separation distance, and the focal lengths of zoom lenses for the cameras are all increased. Doubling the distances cuts the static depth distortion in half while maintaining image size and depth resolution. Dynamic depth distortion is minimized by panning a stereo view-collecting camera system about a circle which passes through the convergence point and the camera's first nodal points. Horizontal field shifting of the television fields on a television monitor brings both the monitor and the stereo views within the viewer's limit of binocular fusion.

  17. High resolution TOF - SIMS depth profiling of nano-film multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bhushan, K. G.; Mukundhan, R.; Gupta, S. K.

    2013-02-05

    We present the results of depth profiling studies conducted using an indigenously developed dual-beam high resolution Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (TOF-SIMS) on thinfilm W-C-W multilayer structure grown on Si substrate. Opto 8 layers could be clearly identified. Mixing of layers is seen which from analysis using roughness model calculations indicate a mixing thickness of about 2nm that correspond to the escape depth of secondary ions from the sample.

  18. Evaluation of the variable depth resolution of active dynamic thermography on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prindeze, Nicholas J.; Hoffman, Hilary A.; Carney, Bonnie C.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Loew, Murray H.; Shupp, Jeffrey W.

    2015-06-01

    Active dynamic thermography (ADT) is an imaging technique capable of characterizing the non-homogenous thermal conductance of damaged tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine optimal stimulation parameters and quantify the optical resolution of ADT through various depths of human skin. Excised tissue from plastic surgery operations was collected immediately following excision. A total of 12 thin to thick split-thickness grafts were harvested from 3 patients. Grafts were placed on top of a 3D printed resolution chart and thermal stimulation was applied from a 300W halogen lamp array for between 0.5-10 seconds to determine optimal parameters. Video was captured with a thermal camera, and analysis was performed by reconstructing an image from thermal gradients. In this study ADT resolved 0.445+/-0 lp/mm at a depth of 0.010", 0.356+/-0.048 lp/mm at a depth of 0.015", 0.334+/-0.027 lp/mm at a depth of 0.020" and 0.265+/-0.022 lp/mm at a depth of 0.025". The stimulus energy required for maximum resolution at each depth was 3- 4s, 8s, 12s and 12s respectively. ADT is a sensitive technique for imaging dermal structure, capable of resolving detail as fine as 1124 μm, 1427 μm, 1502 μm and 1893 μm in thin to thick split-thickness skin grafts respectively. This study has characterized a correlation between stimulus input and maximal resolution at differing depths of skin. It has also defined the functional imaging depth of ADT to below the sub-cutis, well below conventional spectrophotometric techniques.

  19. Improving Resolution and Depth of Astronomical Observations via Modern Mathematical Methods for Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M.; Ottaviani, D.; Fontana, A.; Merlin, E.; Pilo, S.; Falcone, M.

    2015-09-01

    In the past years modern mathematical methods for image analysis have led to a revolution in many fields, from computer vision to scientific imaging. However, some recently developed image processing techniques successfully exploited by other sectors have been rarely, if ever, experimented on astronomical observations. We present here tests of two classes of variational image enhancement techniques: "structure-texture decomposition" and "super-resolution" showing that they are effective in improving the quality of observations. Structure-texture decomposition allows to recover faint sources previously hidden by the background noise, effectively increasing the depth of available observations. Super-resolution yields an higher-resolution and a better sampled image out of a set of low resolution frames, thus mitigating problematics in data analysis arising from the difference in resolution/sampling between different instruments, as in the case of EUCLID VIS and NIR imagers.

  20. Depth Filters Containing Diatomite Achieve More Efficient Particle Retention than Filters Solely Containing Cellulose Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Buyel, Johannes F.; Gruchow, Hannah M.; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    The clarification of biological feed stocks during the production of biopharmaceutical proteins is challenging when large quantities of particles must be removed, e.g., when processing crude plant extracts. Single-use depth filters are often preferred for clarification because they are simple to integrate and have a good safety profile. However, the combination of filter layers must be optimized in terms of nominal retention ratings to account for the unique particle size distribution in each feed stock. We have recently shown that predictive models can facilitate filter screening and the selection of appropriate filter layers. Here we expand our previous study by testing several filters with different retention ratings. The filters typically contain diatomite to facilitate the removal of fine particles. However, diatomite can interfere with the recovery of large biopharmaceutical molecules such as virus-like particles and aggregated proteins. Therefore, we also tested filtration devices composed solely of cellulose fibers and cohesive resin. The capacities of both filter types varied from 10 to 50 L m−2 when challenged with tobacco leaf extracts, but the filtrate turbidity was ~500-fold lower (~3.5 NTU) when diatomite filters were used. We also tested pre–coat filtration with dispersed diatomite, which achieved capacities of up to 120 L m−2 with turbidities of ~100 NTU using bulk plant extracts, and in contrast to the other depth filters did not require an upstream bag filter. Single pre-coat filtration devices can thus replace combinations of bag and depth filters to simplify the processing of plant extracts, potentially saving on time, labor and consumables. The protein concentrations of TSP, DsRed and antibody 2G12 were not affected by pre-coat filtration, indicating its general applicability during the manufacture of plant-derived biopharmaceutical proteins. PMID:26734037

  1. Improving depth resolution in digital breast tomosynthesis by iterative image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Erin G.; Kraemer, David N.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Reiser, Ingrid S.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is currently enjoying tremendous growth in its application to screening for breast cancer. This is because it addresses a major weakness of mammographic projection imaging; namely, a cancer can be hidden by overlapping fibroglandular tissue structures or the same normal structures can mimic a malignant mass. DBT addresses these issues by acquiring few projections over a limited angle scanning arc that provides some depth resolution. As DBT is a relatively new device, there is potential to improve its performance significantly with improved image reconstruction algorithms. Previously, we reported a variation of adaptive steepest descent - projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS) for DBT, which employed a finite differencing filter to enhance edges for improving visibility of tissue structures and to allow for volume-of-interest reconstruction. In the present work we present a singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis to demonstrate the gain in depth resolution for DBT afforded by use of the finite differencing filter.

  2. High resolution digital holographic synthetic aperture applied to deformation measurement and extended depth of field method.

    PubMed

    Claus, Daniel

    2010-06-01

    This paper discusses the potential of the synthetic-aperture method in digital holography to increase the resolution, to perform high accuracy deformation measurement, and to obtain a three-dimensional topology map. The synthetic aperture method is realized by moving the camera with a motorized x-y stage. In this way a greater sensor area can be obtained resulting in a larger numerical aperture (NA). A larger NA enables a more detailed reconstruction combined with a smaller depth of field. The depth of field can be increased by applying the extended depth of field method, which yields an in-focus reconstruction of all longitudinal object regions. Moreover, a topology map of the object can be obtained. PMID:20517390

  3. Extended Depth of Field for High-Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hovden, Robert; Xin, Huolin L.; Muller, David A.

    2010-12-02

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) provide sub-Angstrom lateral resolution; however, the large convergence angle greatly reduces the depth of field. For microscopes with a small depth of field, information outside of the focal plane quickly becomes blurred and less defined. It may not be possible to image some samples entirely in focus. Extended depth-of-field techniques, however, allow a single image, with all areas in focus, to be extracted from a series of images focused at a range of depths. In recent years, a variety of algorithmic approaches have been employed for bright-field optical microscopy. Here, we demonstrate that some established optical microscopy methods can also be applied to extend the ~6 nm depth of focus of a 100 kV 5th-order aberration-corrected STEM (α{sub max} = 33 mrad) to image Pt-Co nanoparticles on a thick vulcanized carbon support. These techniques allow us to automatically obtain a single image with all the particles in focus as well as a complimentary topography map.

  4. Extended depth of field for high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hovden, Robert; Xin, Huolin L; Muller, David A

    2011-02-01

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) provide sub-Angstrom lateral resolution; however, the large convergence angle greatly reduces the depth of field. For microscopes with a small depth of field, information outside of the focal plane quickly becomes blurred and less defined. It may not be possible to image some samples entirely in focus. Extended depth-of-field techniques, however, allow a single image, with all areas in focus, to be extracted from a series of images focused at a range of depths. In recent years, a variety of algorithmic approaches have been employed for bright-field optical microscopy. Here, we demonstrate that some established optical microscopy methods can also be applied to extend the ∼ 6 nm depth of focus of a 100 kV 5th-order aberration-corrected STEM (α max = 33 mrad) to image Pt-Co nanoparticles on a thick vulcanized carbon support. These techniques allow us to automatically obtain a single image with all the particles in focus as well as a complimentary topography map. PMID:21122192

  5. Ultrahigh resolution optical coherence elastography using a Bessel beam for extended depth of field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curatolo, Andrea; Villiger, Martin; Lorenser, Dirk; Wijesinghe, Philip; Fritz, Alexander; Kennedy, Brendan F.; Sampson, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Visualizing stiffness within the local tissue environment at the cellular and sub-cellular level promises to provide insight into the genesis and progression of disease. In this paper, we propose ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence elastography, and demonstrate three-dimensional imaging of local axial strain of tissues undergoing compressive loading. The technique employs a dual-arm extended focus optical coherence microscope to measure tissue displacement under compression. The system uses a broad bandwidth supercontinuum source for ultrahigh axial resolution, Bessel beam illumination and Gaussian beam detection, maintaining sub-2 μm transverse resolution over nearly 100 μm depth of field, and spectral-domain detection allowing high displacement sensitivity. The system produces strain elastograms with a record resolution (x,y,z) of 2×2×15 μm. We benchmark the advances in terms of resolution and strain sensitivity by imaging a suitable inclusion phantom. We also demonstrate this performance on freshly excised mouse aorta and reveal the mechanical heterogeneity of vascular smooth muscle cells and elastin sheets, otherwise unresolved in a typical, lower resolution optical coherence elastography system.

  6. Study of satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth spatial resolution effect on particulate matter concentration prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandgren, J.; Mei, L.; Vountas, M.; Burrows, J. P.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.

    2014-10-01

    The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) spatial resolution effect is investigated for the linear correlation between satellite retrieved AOD and ground level particulate matter concentrations (PM2.5). The Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm was developed for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for obtaining AOD with a high spatial resolution of 1 km and provides a good dataset for the study of the AOD spatial resolution effect on the particulate matter concentration prediction. 946 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground monitoring stations across the contiguous US have been used to investigate the linear correlation between AOD and PM2.5 using AOD at different spatial resolutions (1, 3 and 10 km) and for different spatial scales (urban scale, meso-scale and continental scale). The main conclusions are: (1) for both urban, meso- and continental scale the correlation between PM2.5 and AOD increased significantly with increasing spatial resolution of the AOD, (2) the correlation between AOD and PM2.5 decreased significantly as the scale of study region increased for the eastern part of the US while vice versa for the western part of the US, (3) the correlation between PM2.5 and AOD is much more stable and better over the eastern part of the US compared to western part due to the surface characteristics and atmospheric conditions like the fine mode fraction.

  7. Spatio-temporal evaluation of resolution enhancement for passive microwave soil moisture and vegetation optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevaert, A. I.; Parinussa, R. M.; Renzullo, L. J.; van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; de Jeu, R. A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Space-borne passive microwave radiometers are used to derive land surface parameters such as surface soil moisture and vegetation optical depth (VOD). However, the value of such products in regional hydrology is limited by their coarse resolution. In this study, the land parameter retrieval model (LPRM) is used to derive enhanced resolution (∼10 km) soil moisture and VOD from advanced microwave scanning radiometer (AMSR-E) brightness temperatures sharpened by a modulation technique based on high-frequency observations. A precipitation mask based on brightness temperatures was applied to remove precipitation artefacts in the sharpened LPRM products. The spatial and temporal patterns in the resulting products are evaluated against field-measured and modeled soil moisture as well as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) over mainland Australia. Results show that resolution enhancement accurately sharpens the boundaries of different vegetation types, lakes and wetlands. Significant changes in temporal agreement between LPRM products and related datasets are limited to specific areas, such as lakes and coastal areas. Spatial correlations, on the other hand, increase over most of Australia. In addition, hydrological signals from irrigation and water bodies that were absent in the low-resolution soil moisture product become clearly visible after resolution enhancement. The increased information detail in the high-resolution LPRM products should benefit hydrological studies at regional scales.

  8. Quantitative comparison of wavelength dependence on penetration depth and imaging contrast for ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography using supercontinuum sources at five wavelength regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, S.; Nishizawa, N.

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non invasive optical imaging technology for micron-scale cross-sectional imaging of biological tissue and materials. We have been investigating ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) using fiber based supercontinuum sources. Although ultrahigh longitudinal resolution was achieved in several center wavelength regions, its low penetration depth is a serious limitation for other applications. To realize ultrahigh resolution and deep penetration depth simultaneously, it is necessary to choose the proper wavelength to maximize the light penetration and enhance the image contrast at deeper depths. Recently, we have demonstrated the wavelength dependence of penetration depth and imaging contrast for ultrahigh resolution OCT at 0.8 μm, 1.3 μm, and 1.7 μm wavelength ranges. In this paper, additionally we used SC sources at 1.06 μm and 1.55 μm, and we have investigated the wavelength dependence of UHR-OCT at five wavelength regions. The image contrast and penetration depth have been discussed in terms of the scattering coefficient and water absorption of samples. Almost the same optical characteristics in longitudinal and lateral resolution, sensitivity, and incident optical power at all wavelength regions were demonstrated. We confirmed the enhancement of image contrast and decreased ambiguity of deeper epithelioid structure at longer wavelength region.

  9. Aerosol Optical Depth Model Assessment With High-Resolution Multiple Angle Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. S.; Nielsen, K. E.; Vincent, D. A.; Durkee, P. A.; Reid, J. S.

    2005-12-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School Aerosol Optical Depth (NPS AOD) model has been used successfully to retrieve aerosol optical depths over water using Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery. In this work, the NPS AOD model is applied to the QuickBird high-resolution commercial satellite imagery collected at multiple zenith angles around Sir Bu Nuair Island, United Arab Emirates in September 2004 during the Unified Aerosol Experiment, United Arab Emirates (UAE2) Campaign. The QuickBird-retrieved aerosol optical depths are compared to other satellite and ground-based optical depth retrievals, including those from the Aeerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET), the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and AVHRR. Adapting the NPS AOD model to the nominally 2.4-meter resolution imagery from QuickBird required using modal radiances determined over an area that matched the lower resolution imagers (~ 275 meters to 1 kilometer). Additionally, the NPS AOD model was originally developed for the AVHRR imager on the NOAA-14 satellite. The NPS AOD model selects a modeled aerosol size distribution and scattering phase function based on the ratio the red and near-infrared channels of the AVHRR and the scattering angle derived from solar-sensor geometry. As such, the LUT that relates the ratio of red and near-infrared radiances was based on the center effective wavelengths of the NOAA-14 channels. The AOD retrievals from the other imagers must be adjusted to account for the changes in center effective wavelengths of the red and near-IR channels. Results show that the application of the NPS AOD model to QuickBird data yields findings that are consistent with other satellite and ground-based retrievals. In general, the NPS AOD model works well for nadir and near-nadir view angles, but not for zenith angles greater than 50 degrees. A non-linearized single scattering model and additional scattering streams will be

  10. SU-E-J-197: Investigation of Microsoft Kinect 2.0 Depth Resolution for Patient Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, E; Snyder, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Investigate the use of the Kinect 2.0 for patient motion tracking during radiotherapy by studying spatial and depth resolution capabilities. Methods: Using code written in C#, depth map data was abstracted from the Kinect to create an initial depth map template indicative of the initial position of an object to be compared to the depth map of the object over time. To test this process, simple setup was created in which two objects were imaged: a 40 cm × 40 cm board covered in non reflective material and a 15 cm × 26 cm textbook with a slightly reflective, glossy cover. Each object, imaged and measured separately, was placed on a movable platform with object to camera distance measured. The object was then moved a specified amount to ascertain whether the Kinect’s depth camera would visualize the difference in position of the object. Results: Initial investigations have shown the Kinect depth resolution is dependent on the object to camera distance. Measurements indicate that movements as small as 1 mm can be visualized for objects as close as 50 cm away. This depth resolution decreases linearly with object to camera distance. At 4 m, the depth resolution had decreased to observe a minimum movement of 1 cm. Conclusion: The improved resolution and advanced hardware of the Kinect 2.0 allows for increase of depth resolution over the Kinect 1.0. Although obvious that the depth resolution should decrease with increasing distance from an object given the decrease in number of pixels representing said object, the depth resolution at large distances indicates its usefulness in a clinical setting.

  11. Depth of field and improved resolution of slit-scan flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, Michael; Crone, Martin; Cremer, Christoph G.

    1996-12-01

    In a slit-scan flow cytometer particles specifically labelled by fluorochromes (e.g., cells, chromosomes) are aligned coaxially in a flow stream. One by another they pass a ribbon-like shaped laser beam with a diameter smaller than the particle length. Although several slit-scan flow systems have been developed during the last two decades, a complete description of the theory of optical resolution under the real experimental conditions used as well as a description how to overcome experimental limitations are missing. Often, resolution values are estimated under the assumption of ideal Gaussian beam propagation. These estimates suffer from a discrepancy to practical implementation, Here, some of these effects in slit-scan optics are discussed from a more theoretical point of view. In order to obtain an acceptable depth of field, a focal width around 2 micrometer appears to be an optimum under the regime of Gaussian beam propagation. However, in practice, effects due to thick lenses, finite apertures, chromatic aberrations, or the ellipticity of the laser beam overshadow this result and influence the laser beam shape. To further improve the resolution with a high depth of field, new concepts are required. Therefore, a combination of an interference fringe pattern of two coherent laser beams for excitation (fringe-scanning) with a slit-scan detection of the incoherent fluorescence light is introduced. Preliminary experiences of the first experimental realization are discussed.

  12. Concept for a high-resolution thermometer utilizing the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, P. J.; Dipirro, M. J.

    1993-03-01

    A thermometer using the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth in superconductors is described which has the potential for temperature resolution, when using a dc SQUID readout, on the order of 1 pK. One such device has been fabricated and characterized to demonstrate proof of concept. It consists of primary and secondary coils of NbTi wire wound on a copper toroidal core on which a thin layer of In (Tc = 3.4 K) has been deposited. The temperature dependence of the mutual inductance, M(T), or self-inductance, is used to detect changes in temperature. Measurements of M(T) have been made with an ac excitation of the primary for various frequencies and peak magnetic field strengths. Estimates of ultimate temperature resolution are given.

  13. Concept for a high-resolution thermometer utilizing the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, P. J.; Dipirro, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    A thermometer using the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth in superconductors is described which has the potential for temperature resolution, when using a dc SQUID readout, on the order of 1 pK. One such device has been fabricated and characterized to demonstrate proof of concept. It consists of primary and secondary coils of NbTi wire wound on a copper toroidal core on which a thin layer of In (Tc = 3.4 K) has been deposited. The temperature dependence of the mutual inductance, M(T), or self-inductance, is used to detect changes in temperature. Measurements of M(T) have been made with an ac excitation of the primary for various frequencies and peak magnetic field strengths. Estimates of ultimate temperature resolution are given.

  14. High-resolution in-depth imaging of optically cleared thick samples using an adaptive SPIM

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Aurore; Escande, Paul; Frongia, Céline; Clouvel, Grégory; Ducommun, Bernard; Lorenzo, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Today, Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) makes it possible to image fluorescent samples through depths of several hundreds of microns. However, LSFM also suffers from scattering, absorption and optical aberrations. Spatial variations in the refractive index inside the samples cause major changes to the light path resulting in loss of signal and contrast in the deepest regions, thus impairing in-depth imaging capability. These effects are particularly marked when inhomogeneous, complex biological samples are under study. Recently, chemical treatments have been developed to render a sample transparent by homogenizing its refractive index (RI), consequently enabling a reduction of scattering phenomena and a simplification of optical aberration patterns. One drawback of these methods is that the resulting RI of cleared samples does not match the working RI medium generally used for LSFM lenses. This RI mismatch leads to the presence of low-order aberrations and therefore to a significant degradation of image quality. In this paper, we introduce an original optical-chemical combined method based on an adaptive SPIM and a water-based clearing protocol enabling compensation for aberrations arising from RI mismatches induced by optical clearing methods and acquisition of high-resolution in-depth images of optically cleared complex thick samples such as Multi-Cellular Tumour Spheroids. PMID:26576666

  15. High-resolution in-depth imaging of optically cleared thick samples using an adaptive SPIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Aurore; Escande, Paul; Frongia, Céline; Clouvel, Grégory; Ducommun, Bernard; Lorenzo, Corinne

    2015-11-01

    Today, Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) makes it possible to image fluorescent samples through depths of several hundreds of microns. However, LSFM also suffers from scattering, absorption and optical aberrations. Spatial variations in the refractive index inside the samples cause major changes to the light path resulting in loss of signal and contrast in the deepest regions, thus impairing in-depth imaging capability. These effects are particularly marked when inhomogeneous, complex biological samples are under study. Recently, chemical treatments have been developed to render a sample transparent by homogenizing its refractive index (RI), consequently enabling a reduction of scattering phenomena and a simplification of optical aberration patterns. One drawback of these methods is that the resulting RI of cleared samples does not match the working RI medium generally used for LSFM lenses. This RI mismatch leads to the presence of low-order aberrations and therefore to a significant degradation of image quality. In this paper, we introduce an original optical-chemical combined method based on an adaptive SPIM and a water-based clearing protocol enabling compensation for aberrations arising from RI mismatches induced by optical clearing methods and acquisition of high-resolution in-depth images of optically cleared complex thick samples such as Multi-Cellular Tumour Spheroids.

  16. The Effects of Multimedia Learning on Thai Primary Pupils' Achievement in Size and Depth of Vocabulary Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jingjit, Mathukorn

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to obtain more insight regarding the effect of multimedia learning on third grade of Thai primary pupils' achievement in Size and Depth Vocabulary of English. A quasi-experiment is applied using "one group pretest-posttest design" combined with "time series design," as well as data triangulation. The sample…

  17. A high-resolution time-depth view of dimethylsulphide cycling in the surface sea

    PubMed Central

    Royer, S.-J.; Galí, M.; Mahajan, A. S.; Ross, O. N.; Pérez, G. L.; Saltzman, E. S.; Simó, R.

    2016-01-01

    Emission of the trace gas dimethylsulphide (DMS) from the ocean influences the chemical and optical properties of the atmosphere, and the olfactory landscape for foraging marine birds, turtles and mammals. DMS concentration has been seen to vary across seasons and latitudes with plankton taxonomy and activity, and following the seascape of ocean’s physics. However, whether and how does it vary at the time scales of meteorology and day-night cycles is largely unknown. Here we used high-resolution measurements over time and depth within coherent water patches in the open sea to show that DMS concentration responded rapidly but resiliently to mesoscale meteorological perturbation. Further, it varied over diel cycles in conjunction with rhythmic photobiological indicators in phytoplankton. Combining data and modelling, we show that sunlight switches and tunes the balance between net biological production and abiotic losses. This is an outstanding example of how biological diel rhythms affect biogeochemical processes. PMID:27578300

  18. A high-resolution time-depth view of dimethylsulphide cycling in the surface sea.

    PubMed

    Royer, S-J; Galí, M; Mahajan, A S; Ross, O N; Pérez, G L; Saltzman, E S; Simó, R

    2016-01-01

    Emission of the trace gas dimethylsulphide (DMS) from the ocean influences the chemical and optical properties of the atmosphere, and the olfactory landscape for foraging marine birds, turtles and mammals. DMS concentration has been seen to vary across seasons and latitudes with plankton taxonomy and activity, and following the seascape of ocean's physics. However, whether and how does it vary at the time scales of meteorology and day-night cycles is largely unknown. Here we used high-resolution measurements over time and depth within coherent water patches in the open sea to show that DMS concentration responded rapidly but resiliently to mesoscale meteorological perturbation. Further, it varied over diel cycles in conjunction with rhythmic photobiological indicators in phytoplankton. Combining data and modelling, we show that sunlight switches and tunes the balance between net biological production and abiotic losses. This is an outstanding example of how biological diel rhythms affect biogeochemical processes. PMID:27578300

  19. Optimizing penetration depth, contrast, and resolution in 3D dermatologic OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aneesh, Alex; Považay, Boris; Hofer, Bernd; Zhang, Edward Z.; Kendall, Catherine; Laufer, Jan; Popov, Sergei; Glittenberg, Carl; Binder, Susanne; Stone, Nicholas; Beard, Paul C.; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2010-02-01

    High speed, three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D OCT) at 800nm, 1060nm and 1300nm with approximately 4μm, 7μm and 6μm axial and less than 15μm transverse resolution is demonstrated to investigate the optimum wavelength region for in vivo human skin imaging in terms of contrast, dynamic range and penetration depth. 3D OCT at 1300nm provides deeper penetration, while images obtained at 800nm were better in terms of contrast and speckle noise. 1060nm region was a compromise between 800nm and 1300nm in terms of penetration depth and image contrast. Optimizing sensitivity, penetration and contrast enabled unprecedented visualization of micro-structural morphology underneath the glabrous skin, hairy skin and in scar tissue. Higher contrast obtained at 800 nm appears to be critical in the in vitro tumor study. A multimodal approach combining OCT and PA helped to obtain morphological as well as vascular information from deeper regions of skin.

  20. Comparison of Curricular Breadth, Depth, and Recurrence and Physics Achievement of TIMSS Population 3 Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, John

    2008-01-01

    This study is a secondary analysis of data from the 1995 administration of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). The purpose is to compare the breadth, depth, and recurrence of the typical physics curriculum in the United States with the typical curricula in different countries and to determine whether there are…

  1. Deriving High Resolution UV Aerosol Optical Depth over East Asia using CAI-OMI Joint Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, S.; Kim, J.; KIM, M.; Lee, S.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring aerosols using near UV spectral region have been successfully performed over decades by Ozong Monitoring Instruments (OMI) with benefit of strong aerosol signal over continuous dark surface reflectance, both land and ocean. However, because of big foot print of OMI, the cloud contamination error was a big issue in the UV aerosol algorithm. In the present study, high resolution UV aerosol optical depth (AOD) over East Asia was derived by collaborating the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite/Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (GOSAT/TANSO)-Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI) and OMI together. AOD of 0.1 degree grid resolution was retrieved using CAI band 1 (380nm) by bring OMI lv.2 aerosol type, single scattering albedo, and aerosol layer peak height in 1 degree grid resolution. Collocation of the two dataset within the 0.5 degree grid with time difference of OMI and CAI less than 5 minute was selected. Selected region becomes wider as it goes to the higher latitude. Also, calculated degradation factor of 1.57 was applied to CAI band1 (380nm) by comparing normalized radiance and Lambertian Equivalent Reflectivity (LER) of both sensors. The calculated degradation factor was reasonable over dark scene, but inconsistent over cirrus cloud and bright area. Then, surface reflectance was developed by compositing CAI LER minimum data over three month period, since the infrequent sampling rate associated with the three-day recursion period of GOSAT and the narrow CAI swath of 1000 km. To retrieve AOD, look up table (LUT) was generated using radiative transfer model VLIDORT NGST. Finally, the retrieved AOD was validated with AERONET ground based measurement data during the Dragon-NE Asia campaign in 2012.

  2. Depth and resolution characterization of two-photon photoacoustic spectroscopy for noninvasive subsurface chemical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Sudhir; Kiser, John B.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2011-05-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy is a powerful optical biopsy technique that enables rapid tumor diagnosis in situ. It has also been reported that photoacoustic spectroscopy can be used to diagnose pre-malignant tissue based on the chemical differences between healthy and pre-malignant tissues. Since the acoustic signals obtained from tissues in these analyses suffer from minimum damping, photoacoustic spectroscopy can be highly sensitive. This paper focuses on the characterization of a novel multiphoton excited photoacoustic methodology for margining of malignant and pre-malignant tissues. The two-photon excitation process in tissues using nanosecond laser pulses produces ultrasonic signals that transmit through tissue with minimal attenuation. Additionally, the two-photon excitation process is highly localized since only ballistic photons contribute to the excitation process; thereby eliminating potential absorption events in tissue not of interest (i.e., along the beam path) and increasing the spatial resolution of the diagnostic technique to that achievable via optics. This work characterizes the two-photon excitation process for photoacoustic signal measurements on a model dye. Using gelatin phantoms to mimic real tissues, tissue penetration studies were performed, revealing chemical species as deep as 1.3 cm in the tissue can easily be detected using this methodology. Furthermore, the resolution of this multiphoton excitation process was determined to be as great as 50 μm (near cellular level resolution).

  3. Wavelength scanning achieves pixel super-resolution in holographic on-chip microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Göröcs, Zoltan; Zhang, Yibo; Feizi, Alborz; Greenbaum, Alon; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    Lensfree holographic on-chip imaging is a potent solution for high-resolution and field-portable bright-field imaging over a wide field-of-view. Previous lensfree imaging approaches utilize a pixel super-resolution technique, which relies on sub-pixel lateral displacements between the lensfree diffraction patterns and the image sensor's pixel-array, to achieve sub-micron resolution under unit magnification using state-of-the-art CMOS imager chips, commonly used in e.g., mobile-phones. Here we report, for the first time, a wavelength scanning based pixel super-resolution technique in lensfree holographic imaging. We developed an iterative super-resolution algorithm, which generates high-resolution reconstructions of the specimen from low-resolution (i.e., under-sampled) diffraction patterns recorded at multiple wavelengths within a narrow spectral range (e.g., 10-30 nm). Compared with lateral shift-based pixel super-resolution, this wavelength scanning approach does not require any physical shifts in the imaging setup, and the resolution improvement is uniform in all directions across the sensor-array. Our wavelength scanning super-resolution approach can also be integrated with multi-height and/or multi-angle on-chip imaging techniques to obtain even higher resolution reconstructions. For example, using wavelength scanning together with multi-angle illumination, we achieved a halfpitch resolution of 250 nm, corresponding to a numerical aperture of 1. In addition to pixel super-resolution, the small scanning steps in wavelength also enable us to robustly unwrap phase, revealing the specimen's optical path length in our reconstructed images. We believe that this new wavelength scanning based pixel super-resolution approach can provide competitive microscopy solutions for high-resolution and field-portable imaging needs, potentially impacting tele-pathology applications in resource-limited-settings.

  4. Monte Carlo optimization of depth-of-interaction resolution in PET crystals

    SciTech Connect

    DeVol, T.A. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E. )

    1991-11-01

    The light distribution along one edge of a PET scintillation crystal was investigated with a Monte Carlo simulation. This position-dependent light can be used to measure the 511 keV photon interaction position in the crystal on an event by event basis, thus reducing radial elongation. The expected full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the light distribution on the 3 {times} 30 mm{sup 2} surface of a 3 {times} 10 {times} 30 mm{sup 3} bismuth germanate (BGO) crystal surrounded by a diffuse reflector was determined to be 3.0 mm. This light distribution does not change as the width (originally 3 mm) is varied from 1 to 6 mm, but decreases monotonically from 3.0 to 1.8 mm FWHM as the height (originally 10 mm) is reduced to 3 mm. Other geometrical modifications were simulated, including numerous corner reflectors on the opposing 3 {times} 30 mm{sup 2} surface, which reduced the FWHM to 2.4 mm. The response of a dual wedge photodiode combined with the predicted light distribution for the 3 {times} 10 {times} 30 mm{sup 3} BGO simulation crystal results in an expected depth of interaction resolution of 7.5 mm FWHM.

  5. Depth Probing Soft X-ray Microprobe (DPSXRM) for High Resolution Probing of Earth's Microstructural Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikedi, P. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Cambrian explosion; occurrence of landslides in very dry weather conditions; rockslides; dead, shriveled-up and crumbled leaves possessing fossil records with the semblance of well preserved, flat leaves; abundance of trilobite tracks in lower and higher rock layers; and sailing stones are enigmas demanding demystifications. These enigmas could be elucidated when data on soil structure, texture and strength are provided by some device with submicrometre accuracy; for these and other reasons, the design of a Depth Probing Soft X-ray Microprobe (DPSXRM), is being proposed; it is expected to deliver soft X-rays, at spatial resolution, ϛ≥600nm and to probe at the depth of 0.5m in 17s. The microprobe is portable compared to a synchrotron radiation facility (Diamond Light Source has land size of 43,300m2); spatial resolution,ϛ , of the DPSXRM surpasses those of the X-ray Fluorescence microanalysis (10µm), electron microprobe (1-3µm) and ion microprobe (5->30µm); the DPSXRM has allowance for multiple targets. Vanadium and Manganese membranes are proposed owing to respective 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV MnKα1 X-rays emitted, which best suits micro-probing of Earth's microstructural samples. Compound systems like the Kirk-Patrick and Baez and Wolter optics, aspheric mirrors like elliptical and parabolic optics, small apertures and Abbe sine condition are employed to reduce or remove astigmatism, obliquity, comatic and spherical aberrations—leading to good image quality. Results show that 5.899KeV MnKα1 and 4.952KeV VKα1 soft X-rays will travel a distance of 2.75mm to form circular patches of radii 2.2mm and 2.95mm respectively. Zone plate with nth zone radius of 1.5mm must be positioned 1.5mm and 2mm from the electron gun if circular patches must be formed from 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV MnKα1 soft X-rays respectively. The focal lengths of 0.25μm≤ƒ≤1.50μm and 0.04μm≤ƒ≤0.2μm covered by 4.952KeV VKα1 and 5.899KeV Mn Kα1 soft X-Rays, will

  6. Axial resolution improvement in spectral domain optical coherence tomography using a depth-adaptive maximum-a-posterior framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroomand, Ameneh; Tan, Bingyao; Wong, Alexander; Bizheva, Kostadinka

    2015-03-01

    The axial resolution of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) images degrades with scanning depth due to the limited number of pixels and the pixel size of the camera, any aberrations in the spectrometer optics and wavelength dependent scattering and absorption in the imaged object [1]. Here we propose a novel algorithm which compensates for the blurring effect of these factors of the depth-dependent axial Point Spread Function (PSF) in SDOCT images. The proposed method is based on a Maximum A Posteriori (MAP) reconstruction framework which takes advantage of a Stochastic Fully Connected Conditional Random Field (SFCRF) model. The aim is to compensate for the depth-dependent axial blur in SD-OCT images and simultaneously suppress the speckle noise which is inherent to all OCT images. Applying the proposed depth-dependent axial resolution enhancement technique to an OCT image of cucumber considerably improved the axial resolution of the image especially at higher imaging depths and allowed for better visualization of cellular membrane and nuclei. Comparing the result of our proposed method with the conventional Lucy-Richardson deconvolution algorithm clearly demonstrates the efficiency of our proposed technique in better visualization and preservation of fine details and structures in the imaged sample, as well as better speckle noise suppression. This illustrates the potential usefulness of our proposed technique as a suitable replacement for the hardware approaches which are often very costly and complicated.

  7. Evaluation of Multi-Resolution Satellite Sensors for Assessing Water Quality and Bottom Depth of Lake Garda

    PubMed Central

    Giardino, Claudia; Bresciani, Mariano; Cazzaniga, Ilaria; Schenk, Karin; Rieger, Patrizia; Braga, Federica; Matta, Erica; Brando, Vittorio E.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the capabilities of three satellite sensors for assessing water composition and bottom depth in Lake Garda, Italy. A consistent physics-based processing chain was applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) and RapidEye. Images gathered on 10 June 2014 were corrected for the atmospheric effects with the 6SV code. The computed remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) from MODIS and OLI were converted into water quality parameters by adopting a spectral inversion procedure based on a bio-optical model calibrated with optical properties of the lake. The same spectral inversion procedure was applied to RapidEye and to OLI data to map bottom depth. In situ measurements of Rrs and of concentrations of water quality parameters collected in five locations were used to evaluate the models. The bottom depth maps from OLI and RapidEye showed similar gradients up to 7 m (r = 0.72). The results indicate that: (1) the spatial and radiometric resolutions of OLI enabled mapping water constituents and bottom properties; (2) MODIS was appropriate for assessing water quality in the pelagic areas at a coarser spatial resolution; and (3) RapidEye had the capability to retrieve bottom depth at high spatial resolution. Future work should evaluate the performance of the three sensors in different bio-optical conditions. PMID:25517691

  8. Evaluation of multi-resolution satellite sensors for assessing water quality and bottom depth of Lake Garda.

    PubMed

    Giardino, Claudia; Bresciani, Mariano; Cazzaniga, Ilaria; Schenk, Karin; Rieger, Patrizia; Braga, Federica; Matta, Erica; Brando, Vittorio E

    2014-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the capabilities of three satellite sensors for assessing water composition and bottom depth in Lake Garda, Italy. A consistent physics-based processing chain was applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) and RapidEye. Images gathered on 10 June 2014 were corrected for the atmospheric effects with the 6SV code. The computed remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) from MODIS and OLI were converted into water quality parameters by adopting a spectral inversion procedure based on a bio-optical model calibrated with optical properties of the lake. The same spectral inversion procedure was applied to RapidEye and to OLI data to map bottom depth. In situ measurements of Rrs and of concentrations of water quality parameters collected in five locations were used to evaluate the models. The bottom depth maps from OLI and RapidEye showed similar gradients up to 7 m (r = 0.72). The results indicate that: (1) the spatial and radiometric resolutions of OLI enabled mapping water constituents and bottom properties; (2) MODIS was appropriate for assessing water quality in the pelagic areas at a coarser spatial resolution; and (3) RapidEye had the capability to retrieve bottom depth at high spatial resolution. Future work should evaluate the performance of the three sensors in different bio-optical conditions. PMID:25517691

  9. Depth resolution at organic interfaces sputtered by argon gas cluster ions: the effect of energy, angle and cluster size.

    PubMed

    Seah, M P; Spencer, S J; Havelund, R; Gilmore, I S; Shard, A G

    2015-10-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of experimental parameters such as energy, angle and cluster size on the depth resolution in depth profiling organic materials using Ar gas cluster ions. The first results are presented of the incident ion angle dependence of the depth resolution, obtained at the Irganox 1010 to silicon interface, from profiles by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). By analysis of all relevant published depth profile data, it is shown that such data, from delta layers in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), correlate with the XPS data from interfaces if it is assumed that the monolayers of the Irganox 1010 adjacent to the wafer substrate surface have an enhanced sputtering rate. SIMS data confirm this enhancement. These results show that the traditional relation for the depth resolution, FWHM = 2.1Y(1/3) or slightly better, FWHM = P(X)Y(1/3)/n(0.2), where n is the argon gas cluster size, and P(X) is a parameter for each material are valid both at the 45° incidence angle of the argon gas cluster sputtering ions used in most studies and at all angles from 0° to 80°. This implies that, for optimal depth profile resolution, 0° or >75° incidence may be significantly better than the 45° traditionally used, especially for the low energy per atom settings required for the best resolved profiles in organic materials. A detailed analysis, however, shows that the FWHM requires a constant contribution added in quadrature to the above such that there are minimal improvements at 0° or greater than 75°. A critical test at 75° confirms the presence of this constant contribution. PMID:26325511

  10. Determination of water depth with high-resolution satellite imagery over variable bottom types

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumpf, Richard P.; Holderied, Kristine; Sinclair, Mark

    2003-01-01

    A standard algorithm for determining depth in clear water from passive sensors exists; but it requires tuning of five parameters and does not retrieve depths where the bottom has an extremely low albedo. To address these issues, we developed an empirical solution using a ratio of reflectances that has only two tunable parameters and can be applied to low-albedo features. The two algorithms--the standard linear transform and the new ratio transform--were compared through analysis of IKONOS satellite imagery against lidar bathymetry. The coefficients for the ratio algorithm were tuned manually to a few depths from a nautical chart, yet performed as well as the linear algorithm tuned using multiple linear regression against the lidar. Both algorithms compensate for variable bottom type and albedo (sand, pavement, algae, coral) and retrieve bathymetry in water depths of less than 10-15 m. However, the linear transform does not distinguish depths >15 m and is more subject to variability across the studied atolls. The ratio transform can, in clear water, retrieve depths in >25 m of water and shows greater stability between different areas. It also performs slightly better in scattering turbidity than the linear transform. The ratio algorithm is somewhat noisier and cannot always adequately resolve fine morphology (structures smaller than 4-5 pixels) in water depths >15-20 m. In general, the ratio transform is more robust than the linear transform.

  11. Improved depth resolution in near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy using obliquely oriented fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilwind, Rachel Estelle; 't Hooft, Gert; Uzunbajakava, Natallia E.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate a significant improvement of depth selectivity when using obliquely oriented fibers for near-infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. This is confirmed by diffuse reflectance measurements of a two-layer tissue-mimicking phantom across the spectral range from 1000 to 1940 nm. The experimental proof is supported by Monte Carlo simulations. The results reveal up to fourfold reduction in the mean optical penetration depth, twofold reduction in its variation, and a decrease in the number of scattering events when a single fiber is oriented at an angle of 60 deg. The effect of reducing the mean optical penetration depth is enhanced by orienting both fibers inwardly. Using outwardly oriented fibers enables more selective probing of deeper layers, while reducing the contribution from surface layers. We further demonstrate that the effect of an inward oblique arrangement can be approximated to a decrease in fiber-to-fiber separation in the case of a perpendicular fiber arrangement. This approximation is valid in the weak- or absorption-free regime. Our results assert the advantages of using obliquely oriented fibers when attempting to specifically address superficial tissue layers, for example, for skin cancer detection, or in noninvasive glucose monitoring. Such flexibility could be further advantageous in a range of minimally invasive applications, including catheter-based interventions.

  12. High-resolution chemical depth profiling of solid material using a miniature laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike B; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2015-02-17

    High-resolution chemical depth profiling measurements of copper films are presented. The 10 μm thick copper test samples were electrodeposited on a Si-supported Cu seed under galvanostatic conditions in the presence of particular plating additives (SPS, Imep, PEI, and PAG) used in the semiconductor industry for the on-chip metallization of interconnects. To probe the trend of these plating additives toward inclusion into the deposit upon growth, quantitative elemental mass spectrometric measurements at trace level concentration were conducted by using a sensitive miniature laser ablation ionization mass spectrometer (LIMS), originally designed and developed for in situ space exploration. An ultrashort pulsed laser system (τ ∼ 190 fs, λ = 775 nm) was used for ablation and ionization of sample material. We show that with our LIMS system, quantitative chemical mass spectrometric analysis with an ablation rate at the subnanometer level per single laser shot can be conducted. The measurement capabilities of our instrument, including the high vertical depth resolution coupled with high detection sensitivity of ∼10 ppb, high dynamic range ≥10(8), measurement accuracy and precision, is of considerable interest in various fields of application, where investigations with high lateral and vertical resolution of the chemical composition of solid materials are required, these include, e.g., wafers from semiconductor industry or studies on space weathered samples in space research. PMID:25642789

  13. Fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy: Achieving sub-cycle time resolution.

    PubMed

    Karatay, Durmus U; Harrison, Jeffrey S; Glaz, Micah S; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Ginger, David S

    2016-05-01

    The ability to measure microsecond- and nanosecond-scale local dynamics below the diffraction limit with widely available atomic force microscopy hardware would enable new scientific studies in fields ranging from biology to semiconductor physics. However, commercially available scanning-probe instruments typically offer the ability to measure dynamics only on time scales of milliseconds to seconds. Here, we describe in detail the implementation of fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy using an oscillating cantilever as a means to measure fast local dynamics following a perturbation to a sample. We show how the phase of the oscillating cantilever relative to the perturbation event is critical to achieving reliable sub-cycle time resolution. We explore how noise affects the achievable time resolution and present empirical guidelines for reducing noise and optimizing experimental parameters. Specifically, we show that reducing the noise on the cantilever by using photothermal excitation instead of piezoacoustic excitation further improves time resolution. We demonstrate the discrimination of signal rise times with time constants as fast as 10 ns, and simultaneous data acquisition and analysis for dramatically improved image acquisition times. PMID:27250430

  14. Fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy: Achieving sub-cycle time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatay, Durmus U.; Harrison, Jeffrey S.; Glaz, Micah S.; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Ginger, David S.

    2016-05-01

    The ability to measure microsecond- and nanosecond-scale local dynamics below the diffraction limit with widely available atomic force microscopy hardware would enable new scientific studies in fields ranging from biology to semiconductor physics. However, commercially available scanning-probe instruments typically offer the ability to measure dynamics only on time scales of milliseconds to seconds. Here, we describe in detail the implementation of fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy using an oscillating cantilever as a means to measure fast local dynamics following a perturbation to a sample. We show how the phase of the oscillating cantilever relative to the perturbation event is critical to achieving reliable sub-cycle time resolution. We explore how noise affects the achievable time resolution and present empirical guidelines for reducing noise and optimizing experimental parameters. Specifically, we show that reducing the noise on the cantilever by using photothermal excitation instead of piezoacoustic excitation further improves time resolution. We demonstrate the discrimination of signal rise times with time constants as fast as 10 ns, and simultaneous data acquisition and analysis for dramatically improved image acquisition times.

  15. Diffuse Optical Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Human Breast for Quantitative Oximetry with Depth Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang

    Near-infrared spectral imaging for breast cancer diagnostics and monitoring has been a hot research topic for the past decade. Here we present instrumentation for diffuse optical imaging of breast tissue with tandem scan of a single source-detector pair with broadband light in transmission geometry for tissue oximetry. The efforts to develop the continuous-wave (CW) domain instrument have been described, and a frequency-domain (FD) system is also used to measure the bulk tissue optical properties and the breast thickness distribution. We also describe the efforts to improve the data processing codes in the 2D spatial domain for better noise suppression, contrast enhancement, and spectral analysis. We developed a paired-wavelength approach, which is based on finding pairs of wavelength that feature the same optical contrast, to quantify the tissue oxygenation for the absorption structures detected in the 2D structural image. A total of eighteen subjects, two of whom were bearing breast cancer on their right breasts, were measured with this hybrid CW/FD instrument and processed with the improved algorithms. We obtained an average tissue oxygenation value of 87% +/- 6% from the healthy breasts, significantly higher than that measured in the diseased breasts (69% +/- 14%) (p < 0.01). For the two diseased breasts, the tumor areas bear hypoxia signatures versus the remainder of the breast, with oxygenation values of 49 +/- 11% (diseased region) vs. 61 +/- 16% (healthy regions) for the breast with invasive ductal carcinoma, and 58 +/- 8% (diseased region) vs 77 +/- 11% (healthy regions) for ductal carcinoma in situ. Our subjects came from various ethnical/racial backgrounds, and two-thirds of our subjects were less than thirty years old, indicating a potential to apply the optical mammography to a broad population. The second part of this thesis covers the topic of depth discrimination, which is lacking with our single source-detector scan system. Based on an off

  16. Thermal-wave radar: a novel subsurface imaging modality with extended depth-resolution dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, Nima; Mandelis, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    Combining the ideas behind linear frequency modulated continuous wave radars and frequency domain photothermal radiometry (PTR), a novel PTR method is introduced. Analytical solutions to the heat diffusion problem for both opaque and transparent solids are provided. Simulations and experimental results suggest a significant improvement in the dynamic range when using the thermal-wave radar (TWR) instead of conventional PTR. A practical TWR image resolution augmentation method is proposed. PMID:19334943

  17. Achieving selective interrogation and sub-wavelength resolution in thin plates with embedded metamaterial acoustic lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Semperlotti, F. Zhu, H.

    2014-08-07

    In this study, we present an approach to ultrasonic beam-forming and high resolution identification of acoustic sources having critical implications for applications such as structural health monitoring. The proposed concept is based on the design of dynamically tailored structural elements via embedded acoustic metamaterial lenses. This approach provides a completely new alternative to conventional phased-array technology enabling the formation of steerable and collimated (or focused) ultrasonic beams by exploiting a single transducer. Numerical results show that the ultrasonic beam can be steered by simply tuning the frequency of the excitation. Also, the embedded lens can be designed to achieve sub-wavelength resolution to clustered acoustic sources, which is a typical scenario encountered in incipient structural damage.

  18. Achieving λ/10 Resolution CW STED Nanoscopy with a Ti:Sapphire Oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yujia; Ding, Yichen; Alonas, Eric; Zhao, Wenli; Santangelo, Philip J.; Jin, Dayong; Piper, James A.; Teng, Junlin; Ren, Qiushi; Xi, Peng

    2012-01-01

    In this report, a Ti:Sapphire oscillator was utilized to realize synchronization-free stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. With pump power of 4.6 W and sample irradiance of 310 mW, we achieved super-resolution as high as 71 nm. With synchronization-free STED, we imaged 200 nm nanospheres as well as all three cytoskeletal elements (microtubules, intermediate filaments, and actin filaments), clearly demonstrating the resolving power of synchronization-free STED over conventional diffraction limited imaging. It also allowed us to discover that, Dylight 650, exhibits improved performance over ATTO647N, a fluorophore frequently used in STED. Furthermore, we applied synchronization-free STED to image fluorescently-labeled intracellular viral RNA granules, which otherwise cannot be differentiated by confocal microscopy. Thanks to the widely available Ti:Sapphire oscillators in multiphoton imaging system, this work suggests easier access to setup super-resolution microscope via the synchronization-free STED. PMID:22761944

  19. 3D silicon sensors with variable electrode depth for radiation hard high resolution particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Vià, C.; Borri, M.; Dalla Betta, G.; Haughton, I.; Hasi, J.; Kenney, C.; Povoli, M.; Mendicino, R.

    2015-04-01

    3D sensors, with electrodes micro-processed inside the silicon bulk using Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technology, were industrialized in 2012 and were installed in the first detector upgrade at the LHC, the ATLAS IBL in 2014. They are the radiation hardest sensors ever made. A new idea is now being explored to enhance the three-dimensional nature of 3D sensors by processing collecting electrodes at different depths inside the silicon bulk. This technique uses the electric field strength to suppress the charge collection effectiveness of the regions outside the p-n electrodes' overlap. Evidence of this property is supported by test beam data of irradiated and non-irradiated devices bump-bonded with pixel readout electronics and simulations. Applications include High-Luminosity Tracking in the high multiplicity LHC forward regions. This paper will describe the technical advantages of this idea and the tracking application rationale.

  20. Stacking autocorrelograms to map Moho depth with high spatial resolution in southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennett, B. L. N.; Saygin, E.; Salmon, M.

    2015-09-01

    Current estimates of Moho depth in southeastern Australia are based on sparse sampling. The results are augmented with 180 new Moho estimates constructed from spatial stacks of crustal P wave reflectivity derived from autocorrelograms at over 750 stations. The spatial stacks of reflectivity are constructed using a Gaussian with half width 0.5°. Picks of the base of crustal reflectivity are made with the aid of the previous Moho model, based on the sparser data, and knowledge of the variation in the character of the crust-mantle boundary across the region. Good ties can be made to previous results from deep reflection profiling. The new information fills in many holes in coverage and provides a Moho map with closer ties to geological provinces. The procedure exploits the continuous records at the stations and just the vertical components and so can be applied to older data for which receiver function techniques cannot be used.

  1. Testing peatland water-table depth transfer functions using high-resolution hydrological monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindles, Graeme T.; Holden, Joseph; Raby, Cassandra L.; Turner, T. Edward; Blundell, Antony; Charman, Dan J.; Menberu, Meseret Walle; Kløve, Bjørn

    2015-07-01

    Transfer functions are now commonly used to reconstruct past environmental variability from palaeoecological data. However, such approaches need to be critically appraised. Testate amoeba-based transfer functions are an established method for the quantitative reconstruction of past water-table variations in peatlands, and have been applied to research questions in palaeoclimatology, peatland ecohydrology and archaeology. We analysed automatically-logged peatland water-table data from dipwells located in England, Wales and Finland and a suite of three year, one year and summer water-table statistics were calculated from each location. Surface moss samples were extracted from beside each dipwell and the testate amoebae community composition was determined. Two published transfer functions were applied to the testate-amoeba data for prediction of water-table depth (England and Europe). Our results show that estimated water-table depths based on the testate amoeba community reflect directional changes, but that they are poor representations of the real mean or median water-table magnitudes for the study sites. We suggest that although testate amoeba-based reconstructions can be used to identify past shifts in peat hydrology, they cannot currently be used to establish precise hydrological baselines such as those needed to inform management and restoration of peatlands. One approach to avoid confusion with contemporary water-table determinations is to use residuals or standardised values for peatland water-table reconstructions. We contend that our test of transfer functions against independent instrumental data sets may be more powerful than relying on statistical testing alone.

  2. In-depth study of single photon time resolution for the Philips digital silicon photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Gundacker, S.; Pizzichemi, M.; Ghezzi, A.; Auffray, E.; Lecoq, P.; Paganoni, M.

    2016-06-01

    The digital silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) has been commercialised by Philips as an innovative technology compared to analog silicon photomultiplier devices. The Philips digital SiPM, has a pair of time to digital converters (TDCs) connected to 12800 single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs). Detailed measurements were performed to understand the low photon time response of the Philips digital SiPM. The single photon time resolution (SPTR) of every single SPAD in a pixel consisting of 3200 SPADs was measured and an average value of 85 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) was observed. Each SPAD sends the signal to the TDC with different signal propagation time, resulting in a so called trigger network skew. This distribution of the trigger network skew for a pixel (3200 SPADs) has been measured and a variation of 50 ps FWHM was extracted. The SPTR of the whole pixel is the combination of SPAD jitter, trigger network skew, and the SPAD non-uniformity. The SPTR of a complete pixel was 103 ps FWHM at 3.3 V above breakdown voltage. Further, the effect of the crosstalk at a low photon level has been studied, with the two photon time resolution degrading if the events are a combination of detected (true) photons and crosstalk events. Finally, the time response to multiple photons was investigated.

  3. Common-path depth-filtered digital holography for high resolution imaging of buried semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkeldey, Markus; Schellenberg, Falk; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Paar, Christof; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate digital holographic microscopy (DHM) in reflection geometry for non-destructive 3D imaging of semiconductor devices. This technique provides high resolution information of the inner structure of a sample while maintaining its integrity. To illustrate the performance of the DHM, we use our setup to localize the precise spots for laser fault injection, in the security related field of side-channel attacks. While digital holographic microscopy techniques easily offer high resolution phase images of surface structures in reflection geometry, they are typically incapable to provide high quality phase images of buried structures due to the interference of reflected waves from different interfaces inside the structure. Our setup includes a sCMOS camera for image capture, arranged in a common-path interferometer to provide very high phase stability. As a proof of principle, we show sample images of the inner structure of a modern microcontroller. Finally, we compare our holographic method to classic optical beam induced current (OBIC) imaging to demonstrate its benefits.

  4. Fine Particulate Matter Predictions Using High Resolution Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, Alexandra A.; Koutrakis, Petros; Kloog, Itai; Melly, Steven; Nordio, Francesco; Lyapustin, Alexei; Wang, Jujie; Schwartz, Joel

    2014-01-01

    To date, spatial-temporal patterns of particulate matter (PM) within urban areas have primarily been examined using models. On the other hand, satellites extend spatial coverage but their spatial resolution is too coarse. In order to address this issue, here we report on spatial variability in PM levels derived from high 1 km resolution AOD product of Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm developed for MODIS satellite. We apply day-specific calibrations of AOD data to predict PM(sub 2.5) concentrations within the New England area of the United States. To improve the accuracy of our model, land use and meteorological variables were incorporated. We used inverse probability weighting (IPW) to account for nonrandom missingness of AOD and nested regions within days to capture spatial variation. With this approach we can control for the inherent day-to-day variability in the AOD-PM(sub 2.5) relationship, which depends on time-varying parameters such as particle optical properties, vertical and diurnal concentration profiles and ground surface reflectance among others. Out-of-sample "ten-fold" cross-validation was used to quantify the accuracy of model predictions. Our results show that the model-predicted PM(sub 2.5) mass concentrations are highly correlated with the actual observations, with out-of- sample R(sub 2) of 0.89. Furthermore, our study shows that the model captures the pollution levels along highways and many urban locations thereby extending our ability to investigate the spatial patterns of urban air quality, such as examining exposures in areas with high traffic. Our results also show high accuracy within the cities of Boston and New Haven thereby indicating that MAIAC data can be used to examine intra-urban exposure contrasts in PM(sub 2.5) levels.

  5. Multimodal adaptive optics for depth-enhanced high-resolution ophthalmic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Mujat, Mircea; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Lue, Niyom; Ferguson, R. Daniel

    2010-02-01

    We developed a multimodal adaptive optics (AO) retinal imager for diagnosis of retinal diseases, including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The development represents the first ever high performance AO system constructed that combines AO-corrected scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and swept source Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) imaging modes in a single compact clinical prototype platform. The SSOCT channel operates at a wavelength of 1 μm for increased penetration and visualization of the choriocapillaris and choroid, sites of major disease activity for DR and wet AMD. The system is designed to operate on a broad clinical population with a dual deformable mirror (DM) configuration that allows simultaneous low- and high-order aberration correction. The system also includes a wide field line scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) for initial screening, target identification, and global orientation; an integrated retinal tracker (RT) to stabilize the SLO, OCT, and LSO imaging fields in the presence of rotational eye motion; and a high-resolution LCD-based fixation target for presentation to the subject of stimuli and other visual cues. The system was tested in a limited number of human subjects without retinal disease for performance optimization and validation. The system was able to resolve and quantify cone photoreceptors across the macula to within ~0.5 deg (~100-150 μm) of the fovea, image and delineate ten retinal layers, and penetrate to resolve targets deep into the choroid. In addition to instrument hardware development, analysis algorithms were developed for efficient information extraction from clinical imaging sessions, with functionality including automated image registration, photoreceptor counting, strip and montage stitching, and segmentation. The system provides clinicians and researchers with high-resolution, high performance adaptive optics imaging to help

  6. Soil depth map definition on a terraced slope for a following distributed, high resolution, numerical modelling analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camera, C.; Apuani, T.; Mele, M.; Kuriakose, S. L.; Giudici, M.

    2012-04-01

    The soil thickness represents a key data for every environmental analysis involving soil, but its determination is not always simple. In this particular case, the study area is represented by a small terraced slope (0.6 km2) of Valtellina (Northern Italy), and the soil depth map is necessary for a coupled hydrogeological-stability analysis in a raster environment. During this work geometrical/morphological and geostatistical interpolation techniques were tested to obtain a satisfying soil depth map. At the end, the final product has been validated with geo-electrical resistivity inverse models. In this particular context, the presence of dry-stone retaining walls is of primary importance, since they have an influence on the morphology of the entire area as well as on the physical processes of water infiltration and slope stability. In order to consider the dry-stone walls in the analysis, it is necessary to have base maps with an adequate resolution (cells 1 m x 1 m). Assuming that the walls might be founded on bedrock or in its proximity, it was decided to use the heights of walls and the distribution of rock outcrops as soil depth input data. It was impossible to obtain direct measures with the knocking pole method, being pebbles frequently presents in the backfill soil . Except zero depth values, 682 measures were performed. The initial data set was divided into two subsets in order to use one as training points (76 % of the total) and the second as test points (24 %). Various techniques were tested, from linear multiple regressions with environmental predictors, to ordinary kriging, regression kriging with the same environmental variables, and Gaussian stochastic simulations. At the end, the best result was obtained with co-kriging, using a soil depth class map drawn from the field measures as co-variable. The result is a little bit guided but it was the only solution to obtain a map that partially takes into account the morphology of the slope. To verify the

  7. High Resolution Aerosol Optical Depth Mapping of Beijing Using LANSAT8 Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Liu, Yuanliang; Wu, Jianliang

    2016-06-01

    Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is one of the most important parameters in the atmospheric correction of remote sensing images. We present a new method of per pixel AOD retrieval using the imagery of Landsat8. It is based on Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S). General dark target method takes dense vegetation pixels as dark targets and derives their 550nm AODs directly from the LUT, and interpolates the AODs of other pixels according to spatial neighbourhood using those of dark target pixels. This method will down estimate the AOD levels for urban areas. We propose an innovative method to retrieval the AODs using multiple temporal data. For a pixel which has nothing change between the associated time, there must exists an intersection of surface albedo. When there are enough data to find the intersection it ought to be a value that meet the error tolerance. In this paper, we present an example of using three temporal Landsat ETM+ image to retrieve AOD taking Beijing as the testing area. The result is compared to the commonly employed dark target algorithm to show the effectiveness of the methods.

  8. Techniques for mass resolution improvement achieved by typical plasma mass analyzers: Modeling and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaou, Georgios; Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Wieser, Martin; Barabash, Stas; Fedorov, Andrei

    2016-04-01

    Mass separation and particularly distinction between atomic ions and molecular ions are essential in understanding a wide range of plasma environments, with each consisted of different species with various properties. In this study we present the optimization results of light-weight (about 2 kg) magnetic mass analyzers with high g-factor for Rosetta (Ion Composition Analyser: ICA) and for Mars Express and Venus Express (Ion Mass Analyser: IMA). For the instrument's optimization we use SIMION, a 3D ion tracing software in which we can trace particle beams of several energies and directions, passing through the instrument's units. We first reproduced ICA and IMA results, which turned out to be different from simple models for low energy (< 100 eV). We then change the mechanical structure of several units of the instrument and we quantify the new mass resolution achieved with each change. Our goal is to find the optimal instrument's structure, which will allow us to achieve a proper mass resolution to distinguish atomic nitrogen from atomic oxygen for the purposes of a future magnetospheric mission.

  9. A method of extending the depth of focus of the high-resolution X-ray imaging system employing optical lens and scintillator: a phantom study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The high-resolution X-ray imaging system employing synchrotron radiation source, thin scintillator, optical lens and advanced CCD camera can achieve a resolution in the range of tens of nanometers to sub-micrometer. Based on this advantage, it can effectively image tissues, cells and many other small samples, especially the calcification in the vascular or in the glomerulus. In general, the thickness of the scintillator should be several micrometers or even within nanometers because it has a big relationship with the resolution. However, it is difficult to make the scintillator so thin, and additionally thin scintillator may greatly reduce the efficiency of collecting photons. Methods In this paper, we propose an approach to extend the depth of focus (DOF) to solve these problems. We develop equation sets by deducing the relationship between the high-resolution image generated by the scintillator and the degraded blur image due to defect of focus first, and then we adopt projection onto convex sets (POCS) and total variation algorithm to get the solution of the equation sets and to recover the blur image. Results By using a 20 μm thick unmatching scintillator to replace the 1 μm thick matching one, we simulated a high-resolution X-ray imaging system and got a degraded blur image. Based on the algorithm proposed, we recovered the blur image and the result in the experiment showed that the proposed algorithm has good performance on the recovery of image blur caused by unmatching thickness of scintillator. Conclusions The method proposed is testified to be able to efficiently recover the degraded image due to defect of focus. But, the quality of the recovery image especially of the low contrast image depends on the noise level of the degraded blur image, so there is room for improving and the corresponding denoising algorithm is worthy for further study and discussion. PMID:25602532

  10. Single-pixel three-dimensional imaging with time-based depth resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming-Jie; Edgar, Matthew P.; Gibson, Graham M.; Sun, Baoqing; Radwell, Neal; Lamb, Robert; Padgett, Miles J.

    2016-07-01

    Time-of-flight three-dimensional imaging is an important tool for applications such as object recognition and remote sensing. Conventional time-of-flight three-dimensional imaging systems frequently use a raster scanned laser to measure the range of each pixel in the scene sequentially. Here we show a modified time-of-flight three-dimensional imaging system, which can use compressed sensing techniques to reduce acquisition times, whilst distributing the optical illumination over the full field of view. Our system is based on a single-pixel camera using short-pulsed structured illumination and a high-speed photodiode, and is capable of reconstructing 128 × 128-pixel resolution three-dimensional scenes to an accuracy of ~3 mm at a range of ~5 m. Furthermore, by using a compressive sampling strategy, we demonstrate continuous real-time three-dimensional video with a frame-rate up to 12 Hz. The simplicity of the system hardware could enable low-cost three-dimensional imaging devices for precision ranging at wavelengths beyond the visible spectrum.

  11. Single-pixel three-dimensional imaging with time-based depth resolution.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Jie; Edgar, Matthew P; Gibson, Graham M; Sun, Baoqing; Radwell, Neal; Lamb, Robert; Padgett, Miles J

    2016-01-01

    Time-of-flight three-dimensional imaging is an important tool for applications such as object recognition and remote sensing. Conventional time-of-flight three-dimensional imaging systems frequently use a raster scanned laser to measure the range of each pixel in the scene sequentially. Here we show a modified time-of-flight three-dimensional imaging system, which can use compressed sensing techniques to reduce acquisition times, whilst distributing the optical illumination over the full field of view. Our system is based on a single-pixel camera using short-pulsed structured illumination and a high-speed photodiode, and is capable of reconstructing 128 × 128-pixel resolution three-dimensional scenes to an accuracy of ∼3 mm at a range of ∼5 m. Furthermore, by using a compressive sampling strategy, we demonstrate continuous real-time three-dimensional video with a frame-rate up to 12 Hz. The simplicity of the system hardware could enable low-cost three-dimensional imaging devices for precision ranging at wavelengths beyond the visible spectrum. PMID:27377197

  12. High-Resolution Velocity-Depth Functions From a BSR Field at the Yaquina Basin off Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobys, J. W.; Huebscher, C. P.; Gajewski, D.; Bialas, J.

    2002-12-01

    In high-resolution MCS data from Yaquina Basin off Peru we observed various intricate reflection patterns related to gas and gas-hydrate. The BSR variations classify the profile into five areas: Where the BSR follows stratigraphy, it is disrupted by several faults but strong in amplitude. Reflection amplitudes from the overburden are reduced. Blanking occurs beneath the BSR. Continuing down slope where the BSR crosses stratigraphy the BSR amplitude decreases, reflections from above and beneath have regular strength. Further down slope BSR continuity dissolves into a patchy occurrence with blanking beneath. Up slope the BSR continues with reduced reflection amplitude and touches the sea floor. Towards coastline the BSR disappears completely. One of the most important tools to unravel the origin of the reflections is the high resolution velocity analysis of OBS data. On top of the MCS line a OBS/OBH profile has been shot. Sources were two 1.7 l GI-guns (Sodera) with a peak frequency of 80 - 100 Hz. Eleven OBS/OBH of the GEOMAR type recorded with a sampling rate of 1 ms. This data set allows a high resolution velocity analysis. Two different processing flows have been applied to the data. The data have undergone a Kirchhoff wave-equation datuming and adjacent coherence filtering to eliminate the one sided travel path through the water column. Both datumed and not datumed seismograms have been examined with a semblance supported interactive velocity analysis. Data have also been analyzed with high and low resolution in depth in order to find an optimum trade-off between vertical resolution and minimization of errors caused by sensitivity of the DIX' formula regarding velocity variations at thin layers. The data help to understand the reflection pattern in terms of gas-hydrate occurrence and dissociation, fluid migration and anisotropic permeability of sediments.

  13. Achieving accurate simulations of urban impacts on ozone at high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Georgescu, M.; Hyde, P.; Mahalov, A.; Moustaoui, M.

    2014-11-01

    The effects of urbanization on ozone levels have been widely investigated over cities primarily located in temperate and/or humid regions. In this study, nested WRF-Chem simulations with a finest grid resolution of 1 km are conducted to investigate ozone concentrations [O3] due to urbanization within cities in arid/semi-arid environments. First, a method based on a shape preserving Monotonic Cubic Interpolation (MCI) is developed and used to downscale anthropogenic emissions from the 4 km resolution 2005 National Emissions Inventory (NEI05) to the finest model resolution of 1 km. Using the rapidly expanding Phoenix metropolitan region as the area of focus, we demonstrate the proposed MCI method achieves ozone simulation results with appreciably improved correspondence to observations relative to the default interpolation method of the WRF-Chem system. Next, two additional sets of experiments are conducted, with the recommended MCI approach, to examine impacts of urbanization on ozone production: (1) the urban land cover is included (i.e., urbanization experiments) and, (2) the urban land cover is replaced with the region’s native shrubland. Impacts due to the presence of the built environment on [O3] are highly heterogeneous across the metropolitan area. Increased near surface [O3] due to urbanization of 10-20 ppb is predominantly a nighttime phenomenon while simulated impacts during daytime are negligible. Urbanization narrows the daily [O3] range (by virtue of increasing nighttime minima), an impact largely due to the region’s urban heat island. Our results demonstrate the importance of the MCI method for accurate representation of the diurnal profile of ozone, and highlight its utility for high-resolution air quality simulations for urban areas.

  14. In-Depth Glycoproteomic Characterization of γ-Conglutin by High-Resolution Accurate Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Schiarea, Silvia; Arnoldi, Lolita; Fanelli, Roberto; De Combarieu, Eric; Chiabrando, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    The molecular characterization of bioactive food components is necessary for understanding the mechanisms of their beneficial or detrimental effects on human health. This study focused on γ-conglutin, a well-known lupin seed N-glycoprotein with health-promoting properties and controversial allergenic potential. Given the importance of N-glycosylation for the functional and structural characteristics of proteins, we studied the purified protein by a mass spectrometry-based glycoproteomic approach able to identify the structure, micro-heterogeneity and attachment site of the bound N-glycan(s), and to provide extensive coverage of the protein sequence. The peptide/N-glycopeptide mixtures generated by enzymatic digestion (with or without N-deglycosylation) were analyzed by high-resolution accurate mass liquid chromatography–multi-stage mass spectrometry. The four main micro-heterogeneous variants of the single N-glycan bound to γ-conglutin were identified as Man2(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2, Man3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2, GlcNAcMan3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2 and GlcNAc 2Man3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2. These carry both core β1,2-xylose and core α1-3-fucose (well known Cross-Reactive Carbohydrate Determinants), but corresponding fucose-free variants were also identified as minor components. The N-glycan was proven to reside on Asn131, one of the two potential N-glycosylation sites. The extensive coverage of the γ-conglutin amino acid sequence suggested three alternative N-termini of the small subunit, that were later confirmed by direct-infusion Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis of the intact subunit. PMID:24069245

  15. Mapping snow-depth from manned-aircraft on landscape scales at centimeter resolution using Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, M.; Larsen, C. F.; Sturm, M.

    2015-01-01

    Airborne photogrammetry is undergoing a renaissance: lower-cost equipment, more powerful software, and simplified methods have significantly lowered the barriers-to-entry and now allow repeat-mapping of cryospheric dynamics at spatial resolutions and temporal frequencies that were previously too expensive to consider. Here we apply these techniques to the measurement of snow depth from manned aircraft. The main airborne hardware consists of a consumer-grade digital camera coupled to a dual-frequency GPS. The photogrammetric processing is done using a commercially-available implementation of the Structure from Motion (SfM) algorithm. The system hardware and software, exclusive of aircraft, costs less than USD 30 000. The technique creates directly-georeferenced maps without ground control, further reducing costs. To map snow depth, we made digital elevation models (DEMs) during snow-free and snow-covered conditions, then subtracted these to create difference DEMs (dDEMs). We assessed the accuracy (geolocation) and precision (repeatability) of our DEMs through comparisons to ground control points and to time-series of our own DEMs. We validated these assessments through comparisons to DEMs made by airborne lidar and by another photogrammetric system. We empirically determined an accuracy of ± 30 cm and a precision of ± 8 cm (both 95% confidence) for our methods. We then validated our dDEMs against more than 6000 hand-probed snow depth measurements at 3 test areas in Alaska covering a wide-variety of terrain and snow types. These areas ranged from 5 to 40 km2 and had ground sample distances of 6 to 20 cm. We found that depths produced from the dDEMs matched probe depths with a 10 cm standard deviation, and these depth distributions were statistically identical at 95% confidence. Due to the precision of this technique, other real changes on the ground such as frost heave, vegetative compaction by snow, and even footprints become sources of error in the measurement of

  16. Multistep joint bilateral depth upsampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemens, A. K.; Gangwal, O. P.; Barenbrug, B.; Berretty, R.-P. M.

    2009-01-01

    Depth maps are used in many applications, e.g. 3D television, stereo matching, segmentation, etc. Often, depth maps are available at a lower resolution compared to the corresponding image data. For these applications, depth maps must be upsampled to the image resolution. Recently, joint bilateral filters are proposed to upsample depth maps in a single step. In this solution, a high-resolution output depth is computed as a weighted average of surrounding low-resolution depth values, where the weight calculation depends on spatial distance function and intensity range function on the related image data. Compared to that, we present two novel ideas. Firstly, we apply anti-alias prefiltering on the high-resolution image to derive an image at the same low resolution as the input depth map. The upsample filter uses samples from both the high-resolution and the low-resolution images in the range term of the bilateral filter. Secondly, we propose to perform the upsampling in multiple stages, refining the resolution by a factor of 2×2 at each stage. We show experimental results on the consequences of the aliasing issue, and we apply our method to two use cases: a high quality ground-truth depth map and a real-time generated depth map of lower quality. For the first use case a relatively small filter footprint is applied; the second use case benefits from a substantially larger footprint. These experiments show that the dual image resolution range function alleviates the aliasing artifacts and therefore improves the temporal stability of the output depth map. On both use cases, we achieved comparable or better image quality with respect to upsampling with the joint bilateral filter in a single step. On the former use case, we feature a reduction of a factor of 5 in computational cost, whereas on the latter use case, the cost saving is a factor of 50.

  17. Vertical and Horizontal Corneal Epithelial Thickness Profile Using Ultra-High Resolution and Long Scan Depth Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Xu, Zhe; Perez, Victor; Wang, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the vertical and horizontal thickness profiles of the corneal epithelium in vivo using ultra-long scan depth and ultra-high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods A SD-OCT was developed with an axial resolution of ∼3.3 µm in tissue and an extended scan depth. Forty-two eyes of 21 subjects were imaged twice. The entire horizontal and vertical corneal epithelial thickness profiles were evaluated. The coefficient of repeatability (CoR) and intraclass correlation (ICC) of the tests and interobserver variability were analyzed. Results The full width of the horizontal epithelium was detected, whereas part of the superior epithelium was not shown for the covered super eyelid. The mean central epithelial corneal thickness was 52.0±3.2 µm for the first measurement and 52.3±3.4 µm for the second measurement (P>.05). In the central zone (0–3.0 mm), the paracentral zones (3.0–6.0 mm) and the peripheral zones (6.0–10.0 mm), the mean epithelial thickness ranged from 51 to 53 µm, 52 to 57 µm, and 58 to 72 µm, respectively. There was no difference between the two tests at both meridians and in the right and left eyes (P>.05). The ICCs of the two tests ranged from 0.70 to 0.97 and the CoRs ranged from 2.5 µm to 7.8 µm from the center to the periphery, corresponding to 5.6% to 10.6% (CoR%). The ICCs of the two observers ranged from 0.72 to 0.93 and the CoRs ranged from 4.5 µm to 10.4 µm from the center to the periphery, corresponding to 8.7% to 15.2% (CoR%). Conclusions This study demonstrated good repeatability of ultra-high resolution and long scan depth SD-OCT to evaluate the entire thickness profiles of the corneal epithelium. The epithelial thickness increases from the center toward the limbus. PMID:24844566

  18. Mapping snow depth from manned aircraft on landscape scales at centimeter resolution using structure-from-motion photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, M.; Larsen, C.; Sturm, M.

    2015-08-01

    Airborne photogrammetry is undergoing a renaissance: lower-cost equipment, more powerful software, and simplified methods have significantly lowered the barriers to entry and now allow repeat mapping of cryospheric dynamics at spatial resolutions and temporal frequencies that were previously too expensive to consider. Here we apply these advancements to the measurement of snow depth from manned aircraft. Our main airborne hardware consists of a consumer-grade digital camera directly coupled to a dual-frequency GPS; no inertial motion unit (IMU) or on-board computer is required, such that system hardware and software costs less than USD 30 000, exclusive of aircraft. The photogrammetric processing is done using a commercially available implementation of the structure from motion (SfM) algorithm. The system is simple enough that it can be operated by the pilot without additional assistance and the technique creates directly georeferenced maps without ground control, further reducing overall costs. To map snow depth, we made digital elevation models (DEMs) during snow-free and snow-covered conditions, then subtracted these to create difference DEMs (dDEMs). We assessed the accuracy (real-world geolocation) and precision (repeatability) of our DEMs through comparisons to ground control points and to time series of our own DEMs. We validated these assessments through comparisons to DEMs made by airborne lidar and by a similar photogrammetric system. We empirically determined that our DEMs have a geolocation accuracy of ±30 cm and a repeatability of ±8 cm (both 95 % confidence). We then validated our dDEMs against more than 6000 hand-probed snow depth measurements at 3 separate test areas in Alaska covering a wide-variety of terrain and snow types. These areas ranged from 5 to 40 km2 and had ground sample distances of 6 to 20 cm. We found that depths produced from the dDEMs matched probe depths with a 10 cm standard deviation, and were statistically identical at 95

  19. Detection in the ppm range and high-resolution depth profiling with the new SNMS instrument INA-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorzick, J.; Lösch, J.; Kopnarski, M.; Oechsner, H.

    The design and the specification of the newly developed INA-X instrument for the electron-gas version of a secondary neutral mass spectrometer (SNMS) are described. A modified plasma chamber inside a UHV vessel in combination with optimized r.f. coupling enable a high plasma density at low power input. The ionization efficiency and the current density for sample sputtering are significantly improved compared to those of previous SNMS instruments. A novel detection optics allows us to define an energy window of 1-2 eV. The secondary neutral particle flux is collected under an oblique take-off angle against the surface normal, improving the quantifiability of the obtained SNMS spectra. The variable sputtering rate can be adjusted from some nm per min up to 1-2 μm per min, depending on the operator's need, either to obtain high depth resolution or short analysis time. Examples for depth profiling of conducting and insulating films and coatings on the nano- and micrometer scales are presented.

  20. A NEW ALGORITHM FOR TRABECULAR BONE THICKNESS COMPUTATION AT LOW RESOLUTION ACHIEVED UNDER IN VIVO CONDITION

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yinxiao; Jin, Dakai; Saha, Punam K.

    2015-01-01

    Adult bone diseases, especially osteoporosis, lead to increased risk of fracture associated with substantial morbidity, mortality, and financial costs. Clinically, osteoporosis is defined by low bone mineral density (BMD); however, increasing evidence suggests that the micro-architectural quality of trabecular bone (TB) is an important determinant of bone strength and fracture risk. Accurate measurement of trabecular thickness and marrow spacing is of significant interest for early diagnosis of osteoporosis or treatment effects. Here, we present a new robust algorithm for computing TB thickness and marrow spacing at a low resolution achievable in vivo. The method uses a star-line tracing technique that effectively deals with partial voluming effects of in vivo imaging where voxel size is comparable to TB thickness. Experimental results on cadaveric ankle specimens have demonstrated the algorithm’s robustness (ICC>0.98) under repeat scans of multi-row detector computed tomography (MD-CT) imaging. It has been observed in experimental results that TB thickness and marrow spacing measures as computed by the new algorithm have strong association (R2 ∈{0.85, 0.87}) with TB’s experimental mechanical strength measures. PMID:27330678

  1. Time-resolved photoemission apparatus achieving sub-20-meV energy resolution and high stability

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Y.; Togashi, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Tanaka, M.; Kiss, T.; Otsu, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Shin, S.

    2014-12-15

    The paper describes a time- and angle-resolved photoemission apparatus consisting of a hemispherical analyzer and a pulsed laser source. We demonstrate 1.48-eV pump and 5.92-eV probe measurements at the ⩾10.5-meV and ⩾240-fs resolutions by use of fairly monochromatic 170-fs pulses delivered from a regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire laser system operating typically at 250 kHz. The apparatus is capable to resolve the optically filled superconducting peak in the unoccupied states of a cuprate superconductor, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ}. A dataset recorded on Bi(111) surface is also presented. Technical descriptions include the followings: A simple procedure to fine-tune the spatio-temporal overlap of the pump-and-probe beams and their diameters; achieving a long-term stability of the system that enables a normalization-free dataset acquisition; changing the repetition rate by utilizing acoustic optical modulator and frequency-division circuit.

  2. Bias Correction of high resolution MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth in urban areas using the Dragon AERONET Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakar, N. K.; Atia, A.; Gross, B.; Moshary, F.; Ahmed, S. A.; Lary, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is widely used parameter used to quantify aerosol abundance. Satellite retrievals of aerosols over land is fundamentally more complex than aerosol retrieval over oceans. Due to wide coverage and the extensive validation the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), on board the Terra and Aqua satellites is the workhorse instrument used to retrieve AOD from space. However, satellite algorithms of AOD are extremely complex and depends strongly on sun/view geometry, spectral surface albedo, aerosol model assumptions and surface heterogeneity. This issue becomes even more severe when considering the new MODIS 3 km aerosol retrieval products within version 6. To assess satellite retrievals of these high resolution 3 km products, we use the summer 2011 Dragon AERONET data to assess accuracy as well as major retrieval bias that can occur in MODIS measurements. In this study, we explore in detail the factors that can drive these biases statistically. As discussed above, our considers multiple conditions such as surface reflectivity at various wavelengths, solar and sensor zenith angles, the solar and sensor azimuth, scattering angles as well as meteorological factors and aerosol type (angstrom coefficient) etc which are used inputs are used to train neural network in regression mode to compensate for biases against the Dragon AERONET AOD values. In particular, we confirm the results of previous studies where the land cover (urban fraction) appears to be a strong factor in AOD bias and develop a NN estimator which includes land cover directly. The algorithm will be tested not only in the Baltimore/Washington area but assessed in the general North East US where urban biases in the NYC area have been previously identified.

  3. Using high-resolution satellite aerosol optical depth to estimate daily PM2.5 geographical distribution in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Just, Allan C.; Wright, Robert O.; Schwartz, Joel; Coull, Brent A.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Tellez-Rojo, Martha María; Moody, Emily; Wang, Yujie; Lyapustin, Alexei; Kloog, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in estimating fine particle (PM2.5) ambient concentrations use daily satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) for spatially and temporally resolved exposure estimates. Mexico City is a dense megacity that differs from other previously modeled regions in several ways: it has bright land surfaces, a distinctive climatological cycle, and an elevated semi-enclosed air basin with a unique planetary boundary layer dynamic. We extend our previous satellite methodology to the Mexico City area, a region with higher PM2.5 than most US and European urban areas. Using a novel 1 km resolution AOD product from the MODIS instrument, we constructed daily predictions across the greater Mexico City area for 2004–2014. We calibrated the association of AOD to PM2.5 daily using municipal ground monitors, land use, and meteorological features. Predictions used spatial and temporal smoothing to estimate AOD when satellite data were missing. Our model performed well, resulting in an out-of-sample cross validation R2 of 0.724. Cross-validated root mean squared prediction error (RMSPE) of the model was 5.55 μg/m3. This novel model reconstructs long- and short-term spatially resolved exposure to PM2.5 for epidemiological studies in Mexico City. PMID:26061488

  4. Using High-Resolution Satellite Aerosol Optical Depth To Estimate Daily PM2.5 Geographical Distribution in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Just, Allan C; Wright, Robert O; Schwartz, Joel; Coull, Brent A; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Tellez-Rojo, Martha María; Moody, Emily; Wang, Yujie; Lyapustin, Alexei; Kloog, Itai

    2015-07-21

    Recent advances in estimating fine particle (PM2.5) ambient concentrations use daily satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) for spatially and temporally resolved exposure estimates. Mexico City is a dense megacity that differs from other previously modeled regions in several ways: it has bright land surfaces, a distinctive climatological cycle, and an elevated semi-enclosed air basin with a unique planetary boundary layer dynamic. We extend our previous satellite methodology to the Mexico City area, a region with higher PM2.5 than most U.S. and European urban areas. Using a novel 1 km resolution AOD product from the MODIS instrument, we constructed daily predictions across the greater Mexico City area for 2004-2014. We calibrated the association of AOD to PM2.5 daily using municipal ground monitors, land use, and meteorological features. Predictions used spatial and temporal smoothing to estimate AOD when satellite data were missing. Our model performed well, resulting in an out-of-sample cross-validation R(2) of 0.724. Cross-validated root-mean-squared prediction error (RMSPE) of the model was 5.55 μg/m(3). This novel model reconstructs long- and short-term spatially resolved exposure to PM2.5 for epidemiological studies in Mexico City. PMID:26061488

  5. Gender classification in low-resolution surveillance video: in-depth comparison of random forests and SVMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geelen, Christopher D.; Wijnhoven, Rob G. J.; Dubbelman, Gijs; de With, Peter H. N.

    2015-03-01

    This research considers gender classification in surveillance environments, typically involving low-resolution images and a large amount of viewpoint variations and occlusions. Gender classification is inherently difficult due to the large intra-class variation and interclass correlation. We have developed a gender classification system, which is successfully evaluated on two novel datasets, which realistically consider the above conditions, typical for surveillance. The system reaches a mean accuracy of up to 90% and approaches our human baseline of 92.6%, proving a high-quality gender classification system. We also present an in-depth discussion of the fundamental differences between SVM and RF classifiers. We conclude that balancing the degree of randomization in any classifier is required for the highest classification accuracy. For our problem, an RF-SVM hybrid classifier exploiting the combination of HSV and LBP features results in the highest classification accuracy of 89.9 0.2%, while classification computation time is negligible compared to the detection time of pedestrians.

  6. Nanometer depth resolution in 3D topographic analysis of drug-loaded nanofibrous mats without sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Paaver, Urve; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Kassamakov, Ivan; Hæggström, Edward; Ylitalo, Tuomo; Nolvi, Anton; Kozlova, Jekaterina; Laidmäe, Ivo; Kogermann, Karin; Veski, Peep

    2014-02-28

    We showed that scanning white light interferometry (SWLI) can provide nanometer depth resolution in 3D topographic analysis of electrospun drug-loaded nanofibrous mats without sample preparation. The method permits rapidly investigating geometric properties (e.g. fiber diameter, orientation and morphology) and surface topography of drug-loaded nanofibers and nanomats. Electrospun nanofibers of a model drug, piroxicam (PRX), and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were imaged. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) served as a reference method. SWLI 3D images featuring 29 nm by 29 nm active pixel size were obtained of a 55 μm × 40 μm area. The thickness of the drug-loaded non-woven nanomats was uniform, ranging from 2.0 μm to 3.0 μm (SWLI), and independent of the ratio between HPMC and PRX. The average diameters (n=100, SEM) for drug-loaded nanofibers were 387 ± 125 nm (HPMC and PRX 1:1), 407 ± 144 nm (HPMC and PRX 1:2), and 290 ± 100 nm (HPMC and PRX 1:4). We found advantages and limitations in both techniques. SWLI permits rapid non-contacting and non-destructive characterization of layer orientation, layer thickness, porosity, and surface morphology of electrospun drug-loaded nanofibers and nanomats. Such analysis is important because the surface topography affects the performance of nanomats in pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. PMID:24378328

  7. Spin-flip resolution achieved with a one-proton self-excited oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guise, Nicholas Damien Sun-Wo

    In a Penning trap with an extremely large magnetic gradient, the axial frequency of a one-proton self-excited oscillator is resolved at the level of the shift from a proton spin flip. This sensitivity opens a possible path towards detection of single-proton spin flips, novel measurements of the proton and antiproton g-factors, and a stringent test of CPT invariance by comparing proton and antiproton magnetic moments at precision likely to be a million times higher than achieved to date. The central challenge of extending similar electron magnetic moment measurements to one proton is overcoming the substantially larger mass and weaker magnetic moment, which conspire to greatly reduce the frequency shift that signals a spin flip. Within a magnetic bottle gradient 50 times larger than used in the recent electron g-factor measurements, the proton spin-flip shift is still only 60 mHz out of a 553 kHz axial frequency. In such a large gradient, standard application of sideband cooling to reduce the magnetron radius changes the axial frequency by an amount greater than this spin-flip shift on average. Proton axial frequency resolution at the 60 mHz level is enabled by feedback techniques realized previously only with one electron. Self-excitation produces a narrow feature with large signal-to-noise, ideal for rapid frequency measurements at high precision. Unwanted effects of the strong magnetic gradient are minimized by axial and radial cooling. Feedback cooling is used to reduce the proton axial motion below the temperature of a damping resistor. Axial-magnetron sideband cooling of the undamped radial motion is then demonstrated to reach a 14 mK theoretical limit.

  8. The Impact of New York's School Libraries on Student Achievement and Motivation: Phase II--In-Depth Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Ruth V.; Snyder, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of the second phase of a three-phase study on the impact of the New York State's school libraries' services and resources on student achievement and motivation. A representative sample of more than 1,600 classroom teachers, students, and school library media specialists (SMLSs) from 47 schools throughout New York…

  9. Achieving planar plasmonic subwavelength resolution using alternately arranged insulator-metal and insulator-insulator-metal composite structures.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bo Han; Chang, Kai Jiun; Lan, Yung-Chiang; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-01-01

    This work develops and analyzes a planar subwavelength device with the ability of one-dimensional resolution at visible frequencies that is based on alternately arranged insulator-metal (IM) and insulator-insulator-metal (IIM) composite structures. The mechanism for the proposed device to accomplish subwavelength resolution is elucidated by analyzing the dispersion relations of the IM-IIM composite structures. Electromagnetic simulations based on the finite element method (FEM) are performed to verify that the design of the device has subwavelength resolution. The ability of subwavelength resolution of the proposed device at various visible frequencies is achieved by slightly varying the constituent materials and geometric parameters. The proposed devices have potential applications in multi-functional material, real-time super-resolution imaging, and high-density photonic components. PMID:25613463

  10. Achieving planar plasmonic subwavelength resolution using alternately arranged insulator-metal and insulator-insulator-metal composite structures

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bo Han; Chang, Kai Jiun; Lan, Yung-Chiang; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-01-01

    This work develops and analyzes a planar subwavelength device with the ability of one-dimensional resolution at visible frequencies that is based on alternately arranged insulator-metal (IM) and insulator-insulator-metal (IIM) composite structures. The mechanism for the proposed device to accomplish subwavelength resolution is elucidated by analyzing the dispersion relations of the IM-IIM composite structures. Electromagnetic simulations based on the finite element method (FEM) are performed to verify that the design of the device has subwavelength resolution. The ability of subwavelength resolution of the proposed device at various visible frequencies is achieved by slightly varying the constituent materials and geometric parameters. The proposed devices have potential applications in multi-functional material, real-time super-resolution imaging, and high-density photonic components. PMID:25613463

  11. Four-layer depth-of-interaction PET detector for high resolution PET using a multi-pixel S8550 avalanche photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Oda, Ichiro; Shibuya, Kengo; Yoshida, Eiji; Yamaya, Taiga; Kitamura, Keishi; Murayama, Hideo

    2010-09-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are being used as photodetectors in positron emission tomography (PET) because they have many advantages over photomultipliers (PMTs) typically used in PET detectors. We have developed a PET detector that consists of a multi-pixel APD and a 6×6×4 array of 1.46×1.46 mm 2×4.5 m LYSO crystals for a small animal PET scanner. The detector can identify four-layer depth of interaction (DOI) with a position-sensitive APD coupled to the backside of a crystal array by just an optimized reflector arrangement. Since scintillation lights are shared among many pixels by the method, weaker signals in APD pixels far from the interacting crystals are affected by noise. To evaluate the performance of the four-layer DOI detector with the APD and the influence of electrical noise on our method, we constructed a prototype DOI detector and tested its performance. We found, except for crystal elements on the edge of the crystal array, all crystal elements could be identified from the 2D position histogram. An energy resolution of 16.9% was obtained for the whole crystal array of the APD detector. The results of noise dependence of detector performances indicated that the DOI detector using the APD could achieve sufficient performance even when using application-specific integrated circuits.

  12. Improvement of depth resolution and detection efficiency by control of secondary-electrons in single-event three-dimensional time-of-flight Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo, Satoshi; Hamada, Yasuhisa; Seidl, Albert; Wakaya, Fujio; Takai, Mikio

    2015-04-01

    An improvement of a depth resolution and a detection efficiency in single-event three-dimensional time-of-flight (TOF) Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) is discussed on both simulation and experiment by control of secondary electron trajectories using sample bias voltage. The secondary electron, used for a start signal in single-event TOF-RBS, flies more directly to a secondary electron detector with the positive sample bias voltage of several tens of volt than that without sample bias voltage in the simulation. The simulated collection efficiency of the secondary electrons also increases with the positive sample bias voltage of several tens of volt. These simulation results indicate the possibility of a smaller depth resolution and a shorter measurement time in single-event TOF-RBS with positive sample bias voltage. The measurement time for the Pt-stripe sample using single-event three-dimensional TOF-RBS with the sample bias voltage of +100 V is 65% shorter than that without sample bias voltage, resulting in a less sample damage by a probe beam. The depth resolution for the Pt stripes under the 50-nm-thick SiO2 cover-layer with the sample bias voltage of +100 V is 4 nm smaller than that without sample bias voltage. Positive sample bias voltage improves the depth resolution and the detection efficiency in single-event three-dimensional TOF-RBS without an influence on the beam focusing.

  13. Point stability at shallow depths: experience from tilt measurements in the Lower Rhine Embayment, Germany, and implications for high-resolution GPS and gravity recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kümpel, H.-J.; Lehmann, K.; Fabian, M.; Mentes, Gy.

    2001-09-01

    From 1996 to 1999, we have studied ground tilts at depths of between 2m and 5m at three sites in the Lower Rhine Embayment (LRE), western Germany. The LRE is a tectonically active extensional sedimentary basin roughly 50km×100km. The purpose of the tilt measurements was (a) to provide insight into the magnitude, nature and variability of background tilts and (b) to assess possible limitations of high-resolution GPS campaigns and microgravity surveys due to natural ground deformation. The tilt readings, sensed by biaxial borehole tiltmeters of baselength 0.85m, cover a frequency range from 10-8Hz to 10-2Hz (periods from minutes to years). Assuming that the tilt signals represent ground displacements on a scale typically not larger than several times the tiltmeters' baselength, and that tilt signals at shallow depth could in a simple geometric way be related to changes in surface elevation and gravity, we try to estimate the magnitude level of point movements and corresponding Bouguer gravity effects that is generally not surpassed. The largest tilt signals observed were some +/-50µradyr-1. If they were observable over a ground section of extension, e.g. 10m, the converted rates may correspond to about +/-0.5mm per 10myr-1 in vertical ground displacement, and +/-0.1µgalyr-1 in Bouguer gravity effect, respectively. Large signals are mostly related to seasonal effects, probably linked to thermomechanical strain. Other causes of ground deformation identified include seepage effects after rainfalls (order of +/-10µrad) and diurnal strains due to thermal heating and/or fluctuations in the water consumption of nearby trees (order of +/-1µrad). Episodic step-like tilt anomalies with amplitudes up to 22µrad at one of the observation sites might reflect creep events associated to a nearby active fault. Except for short-term ground deformation caused by the passage of seismic waves from distant earthquakes, amplitudes of non-identified tilt signals in the studied

  14. Ablation depth control with 40 nm resolution on ITO thin films using a square, flat top beam shaped femtosecond NIR laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hoon-Young; Yoon, Ji-Wook; Choi, Won-Suk; Kim, Kwang-Ryul; Cho, Sung-Hak

    2016-09-01

    We reported on the ablation depth control with a resolution of 40 nm on indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film using a square beam shaped femtosecond (190 fs) laser (λp=1030 nm). A slit is used to make the square, flat top beam shaped from the Gaussian spatial profile of the femtosecond laser. An ablation depth of 40 nm was obtained using the single pulse irradiation at a peak intensity of 2.8 TW/cm2. The morphologies of the ablated area were characterized using an optical microscope, atomic force microscope (AFM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Ablations with square and rectangular types with various sizes were demonstrated on ITO thin film using slits with varying x-y axes. The stereo structure of the ablation with the depth resolution of approximately 40 nm was also fabricated successfully using the irradiation of single pulses with different shaped sizes of femtosecond laser.

  15. Teachers, Technology and Training: A New Year's Resolution for 2006: Closing the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donlevy, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Recognizing the glaring discrepancies in outcomes for many poor and minority children, the New York State Regents hosted an Education Summit in November 2005 with the theme of Closing the Achievement Gap. Leaders in business, government and education were in attendance and rallied to more thoroughly understand the achievement gap and produce…

  16. Retrieving dust aerosols properties (optical depth and altitude) from very high resolution infrared sounders : from AIRS to IASI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyridieu, S.; Chédin, A.; Capelle, V.; Pierangelo, C.; Lamquin, N.; Armante, R.

    2009-04-01

    Observation from space, being global and quasi-continuous, is a first importance tool for aerosol studies. Remote sensing in the visible domain has been widely used to obtain better characterization of these particles and their effect on solar radiation. On the opposite, remote sensing of aerosols in the thermal infrared domain still remains marginal. However, knowledge of the effect of aerosols on terrestrial radiation is needed for the evaluation of their total radiative forcing. Infrared remote sensing provides a way to retrieve other aerosol characteristics, including their mean altitude. Moreover, observations are possible at night and day, over ocean and over land. In this context, six years (2003-2008) of the 2nd generation vertical sounder AIRS observations have been processed over the tropical belt (30°N-30°S). Aerosol properties (10 µm infrared optical depth and mean layer altitude) are retrieved using a Look-Up Table (LUT) approach. The forward radiative transfer model 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) coupled with the DISORT algorithm accounting for atmospheric diffusion is used to feed the LUTs with simulations of the brightness temperatures of AIRS channels selected for their sensitivity to dust aerosols. LUTs degrees of freedom are : instrument viewing angle, surface pressure and surface emissivity, a parameter particularly important for dust retrieval over bright surfaces, such as deserts. AODs (resp. altitude) are sampled over the range 0.0-0.8 (resp. 0-5800 m). The retrieval algorithm follows two main steps : (i) retrieval of the atmospheric situation observed (temperature and water vapour profiles) ; (ii) retrieval of aerosol properties. Results have been compared to instruments commonly used in aerosol studies and also part of the Aqua Train : MODIS/Aqua and CALIOP/CALIPSO. The agreement obtained from these comparisons is quite satisfactory, demonstrating that our algorithm effectively allows the simultaneous retrieval of dust AOD

  17. Making the Library Management Systems Acquisition: Achieving Resolution of a Tough Decision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Steven J.; Cronin-Kardon, Cynthia

    1998-01-01

    Offers exploratory research on the automation decision process for library administrators who are considering a new library management system (LMS) and those factors that lead to decision difficulty. Using the Garbage Can Model of Organizational Choice as a theoretical framework for LMS, this study uses decision resolution as a criterion of…

  18. Application and Refinement of a Method to Achieve Uniform Convective Response on Variable-Resolution Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walko, R. L.; Medvigy, D.; Avissar, R.

    2013-12-01

    Variable-resolution computational grids can substantially improve the benefit-to-cost ratio in many environmental modeling applications, but they can also introduce unwanted and unrealistic numerical anomalies if not properly utilized. For example, we showed in previous studies that resolved (non-parameterized) atmospheric convection develops more quickly as resolution increases. Furthermore, on variable grids that transition from resolved to parameterized convection, timing and intensity of the convection in both regimes is generally disparate unless special care is taken to tune the parameterization. In both cases, the convection that develops first (due to purely numerical reasons) tends to suppress convection elsewhere by inducing subsidence in the surrounding environment. This highly nonlinear competition, while desirable when induced by natural causes such as surface inhomogeneity, is highly undesirable when it is a numerical artifact of variable grid resolution and/or selective application of convective parameterization. Our current research is aimed at leveling the playing field for convection across a variable resolution grid so that the above problems are avoided. The underlying idea is to apply the same or very similar 'convective machinery' to all areas of the grid. For convection-resolving regions of the grid, this machinery is simply the model grid itself, along with explicit representation of dynamics and a bulk microphysics parameterization. For coarser regions of the grid, the local environment is sampled from one or more grid columns (depending on local resolution) and fed to a separate 'convective processor', which determines the convective response to that environment and feeds the result back to the host grid. The convective processor chooses to either (1) explicitly resolve convective activity in the given environment on a separate (independent) limited-area 3D computational grid of comparable resolution to the convection-resolving part of the

  19. Achieving atomic resolution magnetic dichroism by controlling the phase symmetry of an electron probe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rusz, Jan; Idrobo, Juan -Carlos; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2014-09-30

    The calculations presented here reveal that an electron probe carrying orbital angular momentum is just a particular case of a wider class of electron beams that can be used to measure electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) with atomic resolution. It is possible to obtain an EMCD signal with atomic resolution by simply breaking the symmetry of the electron probe phase front using the aberration-corrected optics of a scanning transmission electron microscope. The probe’s required phase distribution depends on the sample’s magnetic symmetry and crystal structure. The calculations indicate that EMCD signals that use the electron probe’s phase are as strongmore » as those obtained by nanodiffraction methods.« less

  20. Achieving atomic resolution magnetic dichroism by controlling the phase symmetry of an electron probe

    SciTech Connect

    Rusz, Jan; Idrobo, Juan -Carlos; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2014-09-30

    The calculations presented here reveal that an electron probe carrying orbital angular momentum is just a particular case of a wider class of electron beams that can be used to measure electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) with atomic resolution. It is possible to obtain an EMCD signal with atomic resolution by simply breaking the symmetry of the electron probe phase front using the aberration-corrected optics of a scanning transmission electron microscope. The probe’s required phase distribution depends on the sample’s magnetic symmetry and crystal structure. The calculations indicate that EMCD signals that use the electron probe’s phase are as strong as those obtained by nanodiffraction methods.

  1. Use of step scan FT-IR and multivariate curve resolution to understand aging of propellant binder as a function of depth into the polymer material.

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Dion Arledge; Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    A sample of polymeric propellant binder was aged from 0 to 60 days at 95 C and analyzed using FT-IR step scan photoacoustic spectroscopy. This technique has the ability of to obtain spectra of the polymer as a function of depth into the polymer material. Multivariate curve resolution was applied to the spectra data obtained to extract the contributions of the aged and un-aged spectral components from the spectra. It was found that multivariate curve resolution could efficiently separate highly overlapped spectra and yielded insights into the aging process.

  2. Estimation of Basal Depth of Magnetic Sources from High Resolution Aeromagnetic Data of Middle Niger Basin, Nigeria using Adapted Centroid Technique for Fractal Distribution of Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, L.

    2015-12-01

    An estimate of depths to the bottom of magnetic sources in the Middle Niger Basin, north-central Nigeria has been made from a recently acquired high-resolution aeromagnetic data using adapted centroid technique for fractal distribution of sources. The result shows that the depth varies between 11.71 and 26.53 km. Deeper values are found in northern and central regions while values as low as 12 km were observed in the southern part. The shallower depths to the bottom of magnetic sources may be representing the thermal/petrological boundaries in the basin. This study is therefore crucial for quantitative understanding of the geo-processes and geothermal parameters in the study area.

  3. Examining Lake Michigan Spring Euphotic Depth (Zeu) Anomalies: Utilizing 10 Years of MODIS-Aqua Data at 4 Kilometer Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Examination of ten years of euphotic depth anomalies in Lake Michigan during the months of March-June indicates the following: The well-known and frequently observed occurrence of a turbidity feature in the southern part of Lake Michigan during the spring season has become less common during the period 2003-2012. Overall, the clarity of Lake Michigan water in the southern end of the lake appears to have increased spring season over the period 2003-2012. Euphotic depth can be used as a primary indicator of changes in Lake Michigan lacustrine optics, and for other large lakes. Unique events, such as the heavy rains in June 2008, can have a distinct signature in the euphotic depth anomaly distribution in Lake Michigan.

  4. The design of an animal PET: flexible geometry for achieving optimal spatial resolution or high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Weber, S; Terstegge, A; Herzog, H; Reinartz, R; Reinhart, P; Rongen, F; Müller-Gärtner, H W; Halling, H

    1997-10-01

    We present the design of a positron emission tomograph (PET) with flexible geometry dedicated to in vivo studies of small animals (TierPET). The scanner uses two pairs of detectors. Each detector consists of 400 small individual yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) scintillator crystals of dimensions 2 x 2 x 15 mm3, optically isolated and glued together, which are coupled to position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT's). The detector modules can be moved in a radial direction so that the detector-to-detector spacing can be varied. Special hardware has been built for coincidence detection, position detection, and real-time data acquisition, which is performed by a PC. The single-event data are transferred to workstations where the radioactivity distribution is reconstructed. The dimensions of the crystals and the detector layout are the result of extensive simulations which are described in this report, taking into account sensitivity, spatial resolution and additional parameters like parallax error or scatter effects. For the three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction a genuine 3-D expectation-maximization (EM)-algorithm which can include the characteristics of the detector system has been implemented. The reconstruction software is flexible and matches the different detector configurations. The main advantage of the proposed animal PET scanner is its high flexibility, allowing the realization of various detector-system configurations. By changing the detector-to-detector spacing, the system is capable of either providing good spatial resolution or high sensitivity for dynamic studies of pharmacokinetics. PMID:9368124

  5. Breaking the Crowther limit: combining depth-sectioning and tilt tomography for high-resolution, wide-field 3D reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Hovden, Robert; Ercius, Peter; Jiang, Yi; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Héctor D; Elser, Veit; Muller, David A

    2014-05-01

    To date, high-resolution (<1 nm) imaging of extended objects in three-dimensions (3D) has not been possible. A restriction known as the Crowther criterion forces a tradeoff between object size and resolution for 3D reconstructions by tomography. Further, the sub-Angstrom resolution of aberration-corrected electron microscopes is accompanied by a greatly diminished depth of field, causing regions of larger specimens (>6 nm) to appear blurred or missing. Here we demonstrate a three-dimensional imaging method that overcomes both these limits by combining through-focal depth sectioning and traditional tilt-series tomography to reconstruct extended objects, with high-resolution, in all three dimensions. The large convergence angle in aberration corrected instruments now becomes a benefit and not a hindrance to higher quality reconstructions. A through-focal reconstruction over a 390 nm 3D carbon support containing over 100 dealloyed and nanoporous PtCu catalyst particles revealed with sub-nanometer detail the extensive and connected interior pore structure that is created by the dealloying instability. PMID:24636875

  6. Apparatus and method to achieve high-resolution microscopy with non-diffracting or refracting radiation

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W.; Bingham, Philip R.; Hawari, Ayman I.

    2012-11-06

    An imaging system employing a coded aperture mask having multiple pinholes is provided. The coded aperture mask is placed at a radiation source to pass the radiation through. The radiation impinges on, and passes through an object, which alters the radiation by absorption and/or scattering. Upon passing through the object, the radiation is detected at a detector plane to form an encoded image, which includes information on the absorption and/or scattering caused by the material and structural attributes of the object. The encoded image is decoded to provide a reconstructed image of the object. Because the coded aperture mask includes multiple pinholes, the radiation intensity is greater than a comparable system employing a single pinhole, thereby enabling a higher resolution. Further, the decoding of the encoded image can be performed to generate multiple images of the object at different distances from the detector plane. Methods and programs for operating the imaging system are also disclosed.

  7. Effect of taxonomic resolution on ecological and palaeoecological inference - a test using testate amoeba water table depth transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Edward A. D.; Lamentowicz, Mariusz; Payne, Richard J.; Mazei, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    Sound taxonomy is a major requirement for quantitative environmental reconstruction using biological data. Transfer function performance should theoretically be expected to decrease with reduced taxonomic resolution. However for many groups of organisms taxonomy is imperfect and species level identification not always possible. We conducted numerical experiments on five testate amoeba water table (DWT) transfer function data sets. We sequentially reduced the number of taxonomic groups by successively merging morphologically similar species and removing inconspicuous species. We then assessed how these changes affected model performance and palaeoenvironmental reconstruction using two fossil data sets. Model performance decreased with decreasing taxonomic resolution, but this had only limited effects on patterns of inferred DWT, at least to detect major dry/wet shifts. Higher-resolution taxonomy may however still be useful to detect more subtle changes, or for reconstructed shifts to be significant.

  8. Interpreting 16S metagenomic data without clustering to achieve sub-OTU resolution.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Mikhail; Leach, Robert W; Wingreen, Ned S

    2015-01-01

    The standard approach to analyzing 16S tag sequence data, which relies on clustering reads by sequence similarity into Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs), underexploits the accuracy of modern sequencing technology. We present a clustering-free approach to multi-sample Illumina data sets that can identify independent bacterial subpopulations regardless of the similarity of their 16S tag sequences. Using published data from a longitudinal time-series study of human tongue microbiota, we are able to resolve within standard 97% similarity OTUs up to 20 distinct subpopulations, all ecologically distinct but with 16S tags differing by as little as one nucleotide (99.2% similarity). A comparative analysis of oral communities of two cohabiting individuals reveals that most such subpopulations are shared between the two communities at 100% sequence identity, and that dynamical similarity between subpopulations in one host is strongly predictive of dynamical similarity between the same subpopulations in the other host. Our method can also be applied to samples collected in cross-sectional studies and can be used with the 454 sequencing platform. We discuss how the sub-OTU resolution of our approach can provide new insight into factors shaping community assembly. PMID:25012900

  9. High resolution anoscopy may be useful in achieving reductions in anal cancer local disease failure rates.

    PubMed

    Goon, P; Morrison, V; Fearnhead, N; Davies, J; Wilson, C; Jephcott, C; Sterling, J; Crawford, R

    2015-05-01

    Anal cancer is uncommon, with an incidence rate of 0.5-1.0 per 100,000 of the population but incidence rates have been steadily increasing over the last 3 decades. Biological and epidemiological evidence have been mounting and demonstrate that anal cancer has many similarities to cervical cancer, especially in regard to its aetiology. High-resolution anoscopy (HRA) of the anal region – analogous to colposcopy of the cervix, is a technique that is not well-known in the medical and surgical fraternity. Evidence to support the use of HRA for detection and treatment in the surveillance of AIN exists and strongly suggests that it is beneficial, resulting in reduced rates of cancer progression. Pilot data from our study showed a local disease failure rate of 1.73 per 1000 patient-months compared with a published rate of 9.89 per 1000 patient-months. This demonstrates a 5.72-fold reduction in local disease failure rates of patients with T1-T3 tumours; the data therefore suggests that use of HRA for detection and treatment in surveillance of anal cancer patients will help prevent local regional relapse at the anal site. There is an urgent need for a large, randomised controlled clinical trial to definitively test this hypothesis. PMID:24373061

  10. Chemical analysis of solids with sub-nm depth resolution by using a miniature LIMS system designed for in situ space research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, Andreas; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Sensitive elemental and isotope analysis of solid samples are of considerable interest in nowadays in situ space research. For context in situ analysis, high spatial resolution is also of substantial importance. While the measurements conducted with high lateral resolution can provide compositional details of the surface of highly heterogeneous materials, depth profiling measurements yield information on compositional details of surface and subsurface. The mass spectrometric analysis with the vertical resolution at sub-µm levels is of special consideration and can deliver important information on processes, which may have modified the surface. Information on space weathering effects can be readily determined when the sample composition of the surface and sub-surface is studied with high vertical resolution. In this contribution we will present vertical depth resolution measurements conducted by our sensitive miniature laser ablation ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (160mm x Ø 60mm) designed for in situ space research [1-3]. The mass spectrometer is equipped with a fs-laser system (~190fs pulse width, λ = 775nm), which is used for ablation and ionization of the sample material [2]. Laser radiation is focussed on the target material to a spot size of about 10-20 µm in diameter. Mass spectrometric measurements are conducted with a mass resolution (m/Δm) of about 400-500 (at 56Fe mass peak) and with a superior dynamic range of more than eight orders of magnitude. The depth profiling performance studies were conducted on 10µm thick Cu films that were deposited by an additive-assisted electrochemical procedure on Si-wafers. The presented measurement study will show that the current instrument prototype is able to conduct quantitative chemical (elemental and isotope) analysis of solids with a vertical resolution at sub-nm level. Contaminants, incorporated by using additives (polymers containing e.g. C, N, O, S) and with layer thickness of a few nanometres

  11. Age depth model construction of the upper section of ICDP Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project based on the high-resolution 14C dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, H.; Nakamura, T.; Neugebauer, I.; Schwab, M. J.; Brauer, A.; Goldstein, S. L.; Stein, M.

    2014-12-01

    To reconstruct environmental, climatic and tectonic histories of the Levant, a deep drilling has been accomplished in the northern basin of the Dead Sea during the fall winter of 2010-2011 by the Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project (DSDDP) in the framework of the ICDP program. The sediment cores from site 5017-1 (water depth of ~300 m) recorded the paleoenvironmental and paleohydrological changes in the Dead Sea and the Levant during the last two glacial-interglacial cycles (Neugebauer et al., QSR in press). To provide precise timing of sedimentological - limnological events in the lake and its watershed, and more critically the relative timing of these events, radiocarbon dating of >70 well-preserved terrestrial plants and some carbonate deposits from the upper 150 m long section of the sediment core were performed. Based on the high-resolution radiocarbon dating, a statistical age-depth model was constructed with assumptions on the deposition condition and the radiocarbon age offset of carbonate samples. We discuss the practicality and the limitation of the age-depth model toward interpreting the high-resolution records of environmental, climatic and tectonic events recorded in the long sediment cores from site 5017-1.

  12. Evaluation of Curie-point depths, geothermal gradients and near-surface heat flow from high-resolution aeromagnetic (HRAM) data of the entire Sokoto Basin, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, Levi I.; Shehu, Amada T.

    2015-10-01

    An evaluation of Curie-point depths, geothermal gradients and near-surface heat flow has been carried out from the spectral analysis of the recently acquired high resolution aeromagnetic (HRAM) data of the entire Sokoto Basin in northwestern Nigeria. The HRAM data was divided into twenty two (22) overlapping blocks and each block analyzed using the spectral centroid method to obtain depth to the top, centroid and bottom of magnetic sources. The depth values were subsequently used to evaluate the Curie-point depth (CPD), geothermal gradient and near-surface heat flow in the study area. The result shows that the CPD varies between 11.13 and 27.83 km with an average of 18.57 km, the geothermal gradient varies between 20.84 and 52.11 °C/km with an average of 33.99 °C/km, and the resulting heat flow varies between 52.11 and 130.28 mW m- 2 with an average of 84.97 mW m- 2. Such heat flow values are suggestive of anomalous geothermal conditions and are recommended for detailed geothermal exploration in the basin.

  13. Comparison of Coincident Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aerosol Optical Depths over Land and Ocean Scenes Containing Aerosol Robotic Network Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdou, Wedad A.; Diner, David J.; Martonchik, John V.; Bruegge, Carol J.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Gaitley, Barbara J.; Crean, Kathleen A.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Holben, Brent

    2005-01-01

    The Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), launched on 18 December 1999 aboard the Terra spacecraft, are making global observations of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances. Aerosol optical depths and particle properties are independently retrieved from these radiances using methodologies and algorithms that make use of the instruments corresponding designs. This paper compares instantaneous optical depths retrieved from simultaneous and collocated radiances measured by the two instruments at locations containing sites within the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). A set of 318 MISR and MODIS images, obtained during the months of March, June, and September 2002 at 62 AERONET sites, were used in this study. The results show that over land, MODIS aerosol optical depths at 470 and 660 nm are larger than those retrieved from MISR by about 35% and 10% on average, respectively, when all land surface types are included in the regression. The differences decrease when coastal and desert areas are excluded. For optical depths retrieved over ocean, MISR is on average about 0.1 and 0.05 higher than MODIS in the 470 and 660 nm bands, respectively. Part of this difference is due to radiometric calibration and is reduced to about 0.01 and 0.03 when recently derived band-to-band adjustments in the MISR radiometry are incorporated. Comparisons with AERONET data show similar patterns.

  14. Toward improved prediction of the bedrock depth underneath hillslopes: Bayesian inference of the bottom-up control hypothesis using high-resolution topographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Guilherme J. C.; Vrugt, Jasper A.; Vargas, Eurípedes A.

    2016-04-01

    The depth to bedrock controls a myriad of processes by influencing subsurface flow paths, erosion rates, soil moisture, and water uptake by plant roots. As hillslope interiors are very difficult and costly to illuminate and access, the topography of the bedrock surface is largely unknown. This essay is concerned with the prediction of spatial patterns in the depth to bedrock (DTB) using high-resolution topographic data, numerical modeling, and Bayesian analysis. Our DTB model builds on the bottom-up control on fresh-bedrock topography hypothesis of Rempe and Dietrich (2014) and includes a mass movement and bedrock-valley morphology term to extent the usefulness and general applicability of the model. We reconcile the DTB model with field observations using Bayesian analysis with the DREAM algorithm. We investigate explicitly the benefits of using spatially distributed parameter values to account implicitly, and in a relatively simple way, for rock mass heterogeneities that are very difficult, if not impossible, to characterize adequately in the field. We illustrate our method using an artificial data set of bedrock depth observations and then evaluate our DTB model with real-world data collected at the Papagaio river basin in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Our results demonstrate that the DTB model predicts accurately the observed bedrock depth data. The posterior mean DTB simulation is shown to be in good agreement with the measured data. The posterior prediction uncertainty of the DTB model can be propagated forward through hydromechanical models to derive probabilistic estimates of factors of safety.

  15. A BGO/GSO position sensitive block detector for a high resolution positron emission tomography with depth of interaction detection capability

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.

    1996-12-31

    We developed a position sensitive block detector with depth of interaction detection capability for positron emission tomography (PET). The detector consists of 6 x 8 array of GSO scintillators, 6 x 8 array of BGO scintillators and two dual photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The GSO scintillators are optically coupled to front surface of the BGO scintillators. The position of 6 x 8 scintillators are determined by the Anger principle and depth of interaction position is determined by using the pulse shape analysis of GSOs and BGOs. Performance of the block detector was measured. Position distribution of the developed BGO/GSO block detector was little distorted. However the separation of the spots was still enough to distinguish the scintillators in transaxial and axial directions. Since pulse shape distribution using a developed simple pulse shape analyzer had two peaks, it is possible to separate the GSOs and BGOs for depth of interaction detection. With these results, a high resolution PET with depth of interaction detection capability will be possible using the developed BGO/GSO block detectors.

  16. Blood microcirculation monitoring by use of spatial filtering of time-integrated speckle patterns: potentialities to improve the depth resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnyakov, Dmitry A.; Misnin, Alexander B.

    2001-06-01

    Statistical analysis of images of time-integrated dynamic speckle patterns is considered as the tool for diagnostics and imaging of in vivo tissue dynamics such as blood microcirculation in superficial layers of human tissues and organs. Basic approach for blood microcirculation monitoring using the contrast analysis of time-averaged speckle images is known as LASCA (Laser Speckle Contrast Analysis) technique. This paper presents the modified version of LASCA, which is based on application of the localized probe light source and the spatial filtration of analyzed speckle pattern in the object plane. Being compared with classical LASCA technique, this method has the certain disadvantage as the necessity of scanning procedure to provide the reconstruction of maps of blood microcirculation parameters, but it gives the additional possibilities for the analysis of depth distributions of these parameters. Theoretical background for the depth-resolved analysis of blood microcirculation parameters on the basis of the concept of effective optical path distributions for multiply scattered probe light is considered. The effect of non-zero residual contrast even in the case of large integration times is also discussed.

  17. A comparative study of the energy resolution achievable with digital signal processors in x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, A.; Zambusi, M.; Ripamonti, G.

    1996-04-01

    Interest for digital processing of signals from radiation detectors is subject to a growing attention due to its intrinsic adaptivity, easiness of calibration, etc. This work compares two digital processing methods: a multiple-delay-line (DL){sup N} filter and a least-mean-squares (LMS) adaptive filter for applications in high resolution X-ray spectroscopy. The signal pulse, as appears at the output of a proper analog conditioning circuit, is digitized; the samples undergo a digital filtering procedure. Both digital filters take advantage of the possibility of synthesizing the best possible weighting function with respect to the actual noise conditions. A noticeable improvement of more than 10% in energy resolution has been achieved with both systems with respect to state-of-the-art systems based on analog circuitry. In particular, the two digital processors are shown to be the best choice respectively; for on-line use with critical ballistic deficit conditions and for very-high-resolution spectroscopy systems, ultimately limited by 1/f noise.

  18. An in-depth look at the lunar crater Copernicus: Exposed mineralogy by high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugiolacchi, Roberto; Mall, Urs; Bhatt, Megha; McKenna-Lawlor, Susan; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Brønstad, Kjell; Nathues, Andreas; Søraas, Finn; Ullaland, Kjetil; Pedersen, Rolf B.

    2011-05-01

    Newly acquired, sequentially spaced, high-resolution near-infrared spectra across the central section of crater Copernicus' interior have been analyzed using a range of complementary techniques and indexes. We have developed a new interpretative method based on a multiple stage normalization process that appears to both confirm and expand on previous mineralogical estimations and mapping. In broad terms, the interpreted distribution of the principle mafic species suggests an overall composition of surface materials dominated by calcium-poor pyroxenes and minor olivine but with notable exceptions: the southern rim displays strong ca-rich pyroxene absorption features and five other locations, the uppermost northern crater wall, opposite rim sections facing the crater floor, and the central peak Pk1 and at the foot of Pk3, show instead strong olivine signatures. We also propose impact glass an alternative interpretation to the source of the weak but widespread olivine-like spectral signature found in low-reflectance samples, since it probably represents a major regolith constituent and component in large craters such as Copernicus. The high quality and performance of the SIR-2 data allows for the detection of diagnostic key mineral species even when investigating spectral samples with very subdued absorption features, confirming the intrinsic high-quality value of the returned data.

  19. Construction of high-resolution earthquake fault plane geometry at shallow depth: a detailed analysis from city planning benchmarks measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Chan, Y.; Hu, J.; Lee, J.

    2006-12-01

    In the past decade, improvements in geodesy allow geologists to measure the surface displacement of the hanging wall of a fault more precisely. The improved geodetic observations provide opportunities to better characterize the deformational behaviors of the hanging wall block due to earthquake fault slip. In the case of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake, the hanging wall block of the earthquake fault showed complex deformation pattern at the kilometer scale. Because previous studies mainly characterize on the fault at the regional scale, it is of interest and also challenge to characterize the fault at a smaller scale with a higher resolution. In this study we reconstructed the geometry of a kilometer-scale patch of the fault plane using the displacement data collected from the densely distributed city planning benchmarks. The study area is approximately 4 km by 8 km in size, and contains as many as 924 benchmarks. Among the benchmarks, 62 have both horizontal and vertical displacement data, and the rest of the benchmarks have the horizontal displacement data. Based on the assumption of rigid block motion, we established the earthquake fault geometry using the 62 slip vectors. We then use fault parallel flow method to test the derived fault geometry model with satisfied results. The derived fault geometry model is rather consistent with the borehole data from the nearby 450 m well.

  20. Real-time visual sensing system achieving high-speed 3D particle tracking with nanometer resolution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Peng; Jhiang, Sissy M; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a real-time visual sensing system, which is created to achieve high-speed three-dimensional (3D) motion tracking of microscopic spherical particles in aqueous solutions with nanometer resolution. The system comprises a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) camera, a field programmable gate array (FPGA), and real-time image processing programs. The CMOS camera has high photosensitivity and superior SNR. It acquires images of 128×120 pixels at a frame rate of up to 10,000 frames per second (fps) under the white light illumination from a standard 100 W halogen lamp. The real-time image stream is downloaded from the camera directly to the FPGA, wherein a 3D particle-tracking algorithm is implemented to calculate the 3D positions of the target particle in real time. Two important objectives, i.e., real-time estimation of the 3D position matches the maximum frame rate of the camera and the timing of the output data stream of the system is precisely controlled, are achieved. Two sets of experiments were conducted to demonstrate the performance of the system. First, the visual sensing system was used to track the motion of a 2 μm polystyrene bead, whose motion was controlled by a three-axis piezo motion stage. The ability to track long-range motion with nanometer resolution in all three axes is demonstrated. Second, it was used to measure the Brownian motion of the 2 μm polystyrene bead, which was stabilized in aqueous solution by a laser trapping system. PMID:24216655

  1. A High-Spatial-Resolution, Localized MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Product for Use in Air Quality Exposure Assessment During Large Wildfire Smoke Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, M. C.; Raffuse, S. M.; DeWinter, J. L.; Craig, K. J.; Jumbam, L. K.; Fruin, S.; Lurmann, F.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) has potential use for determining the intra-urban variability of airborne particulate matter exposure during wildfire events; however, the standard Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD products have limitations for this application. Specifically, the 10x10 km resolution is too coarse for intra-urban population exposure assessments, the assumed aerosol optical properties are not representative of biomass burning aerosol, and the cloud masking algorithm misinterprets heavy smoke as clouds. We developed a localized MODIS AOD product at 1.5 and 2.5 km resolutions and tested the performance in northern California during the 2008 wildfires. The localized product's algorithm uses local biomass burning aerosol optical properties, local surface reflectance data, and a relaxed cloud filter. During the 2008 season, persistent heavy smoke was produced over northern California and the San Joaquin Valley for over two months. As California is both highly populated and covered with a relatively dense network of ground-based aerosol monitoring stations, this event provided an excellent opportunity to develop the AOD product and test its ability to predict aerosol concentrations on the ground to assess population exposure. We will present our methodology and discuss its potential for air quality and public health applications.

  2. Quantitative comparison of contrast and imaging depth of ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography images in 800–1700 nm wavelength region

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Shutaro; Nishizawa, Norihiko

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the wavelength dependence of imaging depth and clearness of structure in ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography over a wide wavelength range. We quantitatively compared the optical properties of samples using supercontinuum sources at five wavelengths, 800 nm, 1060 nm, 1300 nm, 1550 nm, and 1700 nm, with the same system architecture. For samples of industrially used homogeneous materials with low water absorption, the attenuation coefficients of the samples were fitted using Rayleigh scattering theory. We confirmed that the systems with the longer-wavelength sources had lower scattering coefficients and less dependence on the sample materials. For a biomedical sample, we observed wavelength dependence of the attenuation coefficient, which can be explained by absorption by water and hemoglobin. PMID:22312581

  3. Improved stratigraphic dating at a low accumulation Alpine ice core through laser ablation trace element profiling at sub-mm depth resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohleber, Pascal; Spaulding, Nicole; Mayewski, Paul; Sneed, Sharon; Handley, Mike; Erhardt, Tobias; Wagenbach, Dietmar

    2015-04-01

    The small scale Colle Gnifetti glacier saddle (4450 m asl, Monte Rosa region) is the only ice core drilling site in the European Alps with a net accumulation low enough to offer multi-millennia climate records. However, a robust interpretation of such long term records (i.e. mineral dust, stable water isotopes) at the Colle Gnifetti (CG) multi core array is strongly challenged by depositional noise associated with a highly irregular annual layer stratigraphy. In combination with a relatively large vertical strain rate and rapid layer thinning, annual layer counting gets increasingly ambiguous as of approximately 100 years. In addition, this prevents clear attribution of likely volcanic horizons to historical eruption dates. To improve stratigraphic dating under such intricate conditions, we deployed laser ablation (LA) ICP-MS at sub-mm sample resolution. We present here the first LA impurity profiles from a new Colle Gnifetti ice core drilled 73 m to bedrock in 2013 at a site where the net snow accumulation is around 20 cm w.e. per year. We contrast the LA signal variability (including Ca, Fe, Na) to continuous flow analyses (CFA) records at cm-resolution (Ca, Na, melt water conductivity, micro- particle) recorded over the whole core length. Of special concern are the lower 28 m to bedrock, which have been continuously profiled in LA Ca, thus offering the direct comparison of Ca-signals between CFA and LA. By this means, we first validate at upper depths LA based annual layer identification through agreement with CFA based counting efforts before demonstrating the LA based counting still works at depths where CFA derived annual layers become spurious since embedded in strong, multi-year cycles. Finally, LA ice core profiling of our CG core has potential for not only dating improvement but also reveals benefits in resolving highly thinned basal ice sections including accounting for micro-structural features such as grain boundaries.

  4. A New Hybrid Spatio-temporal Model for Estimating Daily Multi-year PM2.5 Concentrations Across Northeastern USA Using High Resolution Aerosol Optical Depth Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloog, Itai; Chudnovsky, Alexandra A.; Just, Allan C.; Nordio, Francesco; Koutrakis, Petros; Coull, Brent A.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Wang, Yujie; Schwartz, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The use of satellite-based aerosol optical depth (AOD) to estimate fine particulate matter PM(sub 2.5) for epidemiology studies has increased substantially over the past few years. These recent studies often report moderate predictive power, which can generate downward bias in effect estimates. In addition, AOD measurements have only moderate spatial resolution, and have substantial missing data. We make use of recent advances in MODIS satellite data processing algorithms (Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC), which allow us to use 1 km (versus currently available 10 km) resolution AOD data.We developed and cross validated models to predict daily PM(sub 2.5) at a 1X 1 km resolution across the northeastern USA (New England, New York and New Jersey) for the years 2003-2011, allowing us to better differentiate daily and long term exposure between urban, suburban, and rural areas. Additionally, we developed an approach that allows us to generate daily high-resolution 200 m localized predictions representing deviations from the area 1 X 1 km grid predictions. We used mixed models regressing PM(sub 2.5) measurements against day-specific random intercepts, and fixed and random AOD and temperature slopes. We then use generalized additive mixed models with spatial smoothing to generate grid cell predictions when AOD was missing. Finally, to get 200 m localized predictions, we regressed the residuals from the final model for each monitor against the local spatial and temporal variables at each monitoring site. Our model performance was excellent (mean out-of-sample R(sup 2) = 0.88). The spatial and temporal components of the out-of-sample results also presented very good fits to the withheld data (R(sup 2) = 0.87, R(sup)2 = 0.87). In addition, our results revealed very little bias in the predicted concentrations (Slope of predictions versus withheld observations = 0.99). Our daily model results show high predictive accuracy at high spatial resolutions

  5. Neutron depth profiling by large angle coincidence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vacik, J.; Cervena, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Havranek, V.; Fink, D.

    1995-12-31

    Extremely low concentrations of several technologically important elements (mainly lithium and boron) have been studied by a modified neutron depth profiling technique. Large angle coincidence spectroscopy using neutrons to probe solids with a thickness not exceeding several micrometers has proved to be a powerful analytical method with an excellent detection sensitivity. Depth profiles in the ppb atomic range are accessible for any solid material. A depth resolution of about 20 nanometers can be achieved.

  6. Tracking Achievement Gaps and Assessing the Impact of NCLB on the Gaps: An In-Depth Look into National and State Reading and Math Outcome Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jaekyung

    2006-01-01

    This study offers systematic trend analyses of NAEP national and state-level public school fourth and eighth graders' reading and math achievement results during pre-NCLB (1990-2001) and post-NCLB (2002-2005) periods. It compares post-NCLB trends in reading and math achievement with pre-NCLB trends among different racial and socioeconomic groups…

  7. Climatology of the aerosol optical depth by components from the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and a high-resolution chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Suzuki, K.; Braverman, A.; Garay, M. J.; Kahn, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Joint Aerosol (JOINT_AS) Level 3 product provides a global, descriptive summary of MISR Level 2 aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol type information for each month between March 2000 and the present. Using Version 1 of JOINT_AS, which is based on the operational (Version 22) MISR Level 2 aerosol product, this study analyzes, for the first time, characteristics of observed and simulated distributions of AOD for three broad classes of aerosols: non-absorbing, absorbing, and non-spherical - near or downwind of their major source regions. The statistical moments (means, standard deviations, and skewnesses) and distributions of AOD by components derived from the JOINT_AS are compared with results from the SPectral RadIatioN-TrAnSport (SPRINTARS) model, a chemistry transport model (CTM) with very high spatial and temporal resolution. Overall, the AOD distributions of combined MISR aerosol types show good agreement with those from SPRINTARS. Marginal distributions of AOD for each aerosol type in both MISR and SPRINTARS show considerable high positive skewness, which indicates the importance of including extreme AOD events when comparing satellite retrievals with models. The MISR JOINT_AS product will greatly facilitate comparisons between satellite observations and model simulations of aerosols by type.

  8. High-resolution 1050 nm spectral domain retinal optical coherence tomography at 120 kHz A-scan rate with 6.1 mm imaging depth

    PubMed Central

    An, Lin; Li, Peng; Lan, Gongpu; Malchow, Doug; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2013-01-01

    We report a newly developed high speed 1050nm spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system for imaging posterior segment of human eye. The system is capable of an axial resolution at ~10 µm in air, an imaging depth of 6.1 mm in air, a system sensitivity fall-off at ~6 dB/3mm and an imaging speed of 120,000 A-scans per second. We experimentally demonstrate the system’s capability to perform phase-resolved imaging of dynamic blood flow within retina, indicating high phase stability of the SDOCT system. Finally, we show an example that uses this newly developed system to image posterior segment of human eye with a large view of view (10 × 9 mm2), providing detailed visualization of microstructural features from anterior retina to posterior choroid. The demonstrated system parameters and imaging performances are comparable to those that a typical 1 µm swept source OCT would deliver for retinal imaging. PMID:23411636

  9. Advanced Covariance-Based Stochastic Inversion and Neuro-Genetic Optimization for Rosetta CONSERT Radar Data to Improve Spatial Resolution of Multi-Fractal Depth Profiles for Cometary Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edenhofer, Peter; Ulamec, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The paper is devoted to results of doctoral research work at University of Bochum as applied to the radar transmission experiment CONSERT of the ESA cometary mission Rosetta. This research aims at achieving the limits of optimum spatial (and temporal) resolution for radar remote sensing by implementation of covariance informations concerned with error-balanced control as well as coherence of wave propagation effects through random composite media involved (based on Joel Franklin's approach of extended stochastic inversion). As a consequence the well-known inherent numerical instabilities of remote sensing are significantly reduced in a robust way by increasing the weight of main diagonal elements of the resulting composite matrix to be inverted with respect to off-diagonal elements following synergy relations as to the principle of correlation receiver in wireless telecommunications. It is shown that the enhancement of resolution for remote sensing holds for an integral and differential equation approach of inversion as well. In addition to that the paper presents a discussion on how the efficiency of inversion for radar data gets achieved by an overall optimization of inversion due to a novel neuro-genetic approach. Such kind of approach is in synergy with the priority research program "Organic Computing" of DFG / German Research Organization. This Neuro-Genetic Optimization (NGO) turns out, firstly, to take into account more detailed physical informations supporting further improved resolution such as the process of accretion for cometary nucleus, wave propagation effects from rough surfaces, ground clutter, nonlinear focusing, etc. as well as, secondly, to accelerate the computing process of inversion in a really significantly enhanced and fast way, e.g., enabling online-control of autonomous processes such as detection of unknown objects, navigation, etc. The paper describes in some detail how this neuro-genetic approach of optimization is incorporated into the

  10. Characterization of Soft Contact Lens Edge Fitting Using Ultra-High Resolution and Ultra-Long Scan Depth Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Meixiao; Cui, Lele; Riley, Colleen; Wang, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize the edge fitting of soft contact lenses using ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) and ultra-long scan depth optical coherence tomography (UL-OCT). Methods. A total of 20 participants (11 men, 9 women; mean age, 32.3 years) were recruited. Four different types of soft contact lenses were randomly fitted to both eyes of each subject on two separate visits. After 30 minutes, the horizontal meridians of the corneal center, midperiphery, and limbus were imaged by UHR-OCT. UL-OCT imaged each lens in vitro and the ocular surface of a physical model eye. Results. Angle-edged lenses had significantly less conjunctival buildup than did round-edged lenses (P = 0.008). Limbal post-lens tear film gaps were present in 42% of the eyes, with the round-edged lenses having the most at 68%. Similarly, post-lens tear film gaps at the corneal mid-periphery were present in 47% of all eyes, with the round-edged lens having the most at 75%. Mismatches between the lens and the ocular surface were simulated based on UL-OCT images of the in vitro lenses and the model eye. The existence of tear film gaps and touching points were predicted in the simulation. Conclusions. The soft contact lens edge fitting was characterized by the conjunctival buildup and tear film gaps. Different types of contact lenses presented different levels of conjunctival buildup as well as different frequencies of tear film gaps. The findings by UHR-OCT were predicted in the simulation by UL-OCT. The application of these new technologies may open new ways of designing lenses and evaluating their fit. PMID:21372023

  11. Glider and satellite high resolution monitoring of a mesoscale eddy in the Algerian basin: effects on the mixed layer depth and biochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotroneo, Yuri; Aulicino, Giuseppe; Ruiz, Simón; Pascual, Ananda; Budillon, Giorgio; Fusco, Giannetta; Tintoré, Joaquin

    2016-04-01

    Despite of the extensive bibliography about the circulation of the Mediterranean Sea and its sub-basins, the debate on mesoscale dynamics and its impacts on biochemical processes is still open because of their intrinsic time scales and of the difficulties in sampling. In order to clarify some of these processes, the "Algerian BAsin Circulation Unmanned Survey - ABACUS" project was proposed and realized through access to JERICO Trans National Access (TNA) infrastructures between September and December 2014. In this framework, a deep glider cruise was carried out in the area between Balearic Islands and Algerian coasts to establish an endurance line for monitoring the basin circulation. During the mission, a mesoscale eddy, identified on satellite altimetry maps, was sampled at high-spatial horizontal resolution (4 km) along its main axes and from surface to 1000 m depth. Data were collected by a Slocum glider equipped with a pumped CTD and biochemical sensors that collected about 100 complete casts inside the eddy. In order to describe the structure of the eddy, in situ data were merged with new generation remotely sensed data as daily synoptic sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll concentration (Chl-a) images from MODIS satellites as well as sea surface height and geostrophic velocities from AVISO. From its origin along the Algerian coast in the eastern part of the basin, the eddy propagated to north-west at a mean speed of about 4 km/day with a mean diameter of 112/130 km, a mean elevation of 15.7 cm and clearly distinguished by the surrounding waters thanks to its higher SST and Chl-a values. Temperature and salinity values along the water column confirm the origin of the eddy from the AC showing the presence of recent Atlantic water in the surface layer and Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW) in the deeper layer. Eddy footprint is clearly evident in the multiparametric vertical sections conducted along its main axes. Deepening of temperature, salinity and

  12. Depth image enhancement using perceptual texture priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Duhyeon; Shim, Hyunjung

    2015-03-01

    A depth camera is widely used in various applications because it provides a depth image of the scene in real time. However, due to the limited power consumption, the depth camera presents severe noises, incapable of providing the high quality 3D data. Although the smoothness prior is often employed to subside the depth noise, it discards the geometric details so to degrade the distance resolution and hinder achieving the realism in 3D contents. In this paper, we propose a perceptual-based depth image enhancement technique that automatically recovers the depth details of various textures, using a statistical framework inspired by human mechanism of perceiving surface details by texture priors. We construct the database composed of the high quality normals. Based on the recent studies in human visual perception (HVP), we select the pattern density as a primary feature to classify textures. Upon the classification results, we match and substitute the noisy input normals with high quality normals in the database. As a result, our method provides the high quality depth image preserving the surface details. We expect that our work is effective to enhance the details of depth image from 3D sensors and to provide a high-fidelity virtual reality experience.

  13. PSF engineering in multifocus microscopy for increased depth volumetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Hajj, Bassam; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Dahan, Maxime

    2016-03-01

    Imaging and localizing single molecules with high accuracy in a 3D volume is a challenging task. Here we combine multifocal microscopy, a recently developed volumetric imaging technique, with point spread function engineering to achieve an increased depth for single molecule imaging. Applications in 3D single molecule localization-based super-resolution imaging is shown over an axial depth of 4 µm as well as for the tracking of diffusing beads in a fluid environment over 8 µm. PMID:27231584

  14. PSF engineering in multifocus microscopy for increased depth volumetric imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hajj, Bassam; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Dahan, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    Imaging and localizing single molecules with high accuracy in a 3D volume is a challenging task. Here we combine multifocal microscopy, a recently developed volumetric imaging technique, with point spread function engineering to achieve an increased depth for single molecule imaging. Applications in 3D single molecule localization-based super-resolution imaging is shown over an axial depth of 4 µm as well as for the tracking of diffusing beads in a fluid environment over 8 µm. PMID:27231584

  15. High resolution depth distribution of Bacteria, Archaea, methanotrophs, and methanogens in the bulk and rhizosphere soils of a flooded rice paddy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo Jung; Jeong, Sang Eun; Kim, Pil Joo; Madsen, Eugene L.; Jeon, Che Ok

    2015-01-01

    The communities and abundances of methanotrophs and methanogens, along with the oxygen, methane, and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations, were investigated along a depth gradient in a flooded rice paddy. Broad patterns in vertical profiles of oxygen, methane, TOC, and microbial abundances were similar in the bulk and rhizosphere soils, though methane and TOC concentrations and 16S rRNA gene copies were clearly higher in the rhizosphere soil than in the bulk soil. Oxygen concentrations decreased sharply to below detection limits at 8 mm depth. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that bacterial and archaeal communities varied according to the oxic, oxic-anoxic, and anoxic zones, indicating that oxygen is a determining factor for the distribution of bacterial and archaeal communities. Aerobic methanotrophs were maximally observed near the oxic-anoxic interface, while methane, TOC, and methanogens were highest in the rhizosphere soil at 30–200 mm depth, suggesting that methane is produced mainly from organic carbon derived from rice plants and is metabolized aerobically. The relative abundances of type I methanotrophs such as Methylococcus, Methylomonas, and Methylocaldum decreased more drastically than those of type II methanotrophs (such as Methylocystis and Methylosinus) with increasing depth. Methanosaeta and Methanoregula were predominant methanogens at all depths, and the relative abundances of Methanosaeta, Methanoregula, and Methanosphaerula, and GOM_Arc_I increased with increasing depth. Based on contrasts between absolute abundances of methanogens and methanotrophs at depths sampled across rhizosphere and bulk soils (especially millimeter-scale slices at the surface), we have identified populations of methanogens (Methanosaeta, Methanoregula, Methanocella, Methanobacterium, and Methanosphaerula), and methanotrophs (Methylosarcina, Methylococcus, Methylosinus, and unclassified Methylocystaceae) that are likely physiologically active in situ. PMID

  16. High resolution depth distribution of Bacteria, Archaea, methanotrophs, and methanogens in the bulk and rhizosphere soils of a flooded rice paddy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo Jung; Jeong, Sang Eun; Kim, Pil Joo; Madsen, Eugene L; Jeon, Che Ok

    2015-01-01

    The communities and abundances of methanotrophs and methanogens, along with the oxygen, methane, and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations, were investigated along a depth gradient in a flooded rice paddy. Broad patterns in vertical profiles of oxygen, methane, TOC, and microbial abundances were similar in the bulk and rhizosphere soils, though methane and TOC concentrations and 16S rRNA gene copies were clearly higher in the rhizosphere soil than in the bulk soil. Oxygen concentrations decreased sharply to below detection limits at 8 mm depth. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that bacterial and archaeal communities varied according to the oxic, oxic-anoxic, and anoxic zones, indicating that oxygen is a determining factor for the distribution of bacterial and archaeal communities. Aerobic methanotrophs were maximally observed near the oxic-anoxic interface, while methane, TOC, and methanogens were highest in the rhizosphere soil at 30-200 mm depth, suggesting that methane is produced mainly from organic carbon derived from rice plants and is metabolized aerobically. The relative abundances of type I methanotrophs such as Methylococcus, Methylomonas, and Methylocaldum decreased more drastically than those of type II methanotrophs (such as Methylocystis and Methylosinus) with increasing depth. Methanosaeta and Methanoregula were predominant methanogens at all depths, and the relative abundances of Methanosaeta, Methanoregula, and Methanosphaerula, and GOM_Arc_I increased with increasing depth. Based on contrasts between absolute abundances of methanogens and methanotrophs at depths sampled across rhizosphere and bulk soils (especially millimeter-scale slices at the surface), we have identified populations of methanogens (Methanosaeta, Methanoregula, Methanocella, Methanobacterium, and Methanosphaerula), and methanotrophs (Methylosarcina, Methylococcus, Methylosinus, and unclassified Methylocystaceae) that are likely physiologically active in situ. PMID

  17. Testing the limits of Paleozoic chronostratigraphic correlation via high-resolution (13Ccarb) biochemostratigraphy across the Llandovery–Wenlock (Silurian) boundary: Is a unified Phanerozoic time scale achievable?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cramer, Bradley D.; Loydell, David K.; Samtleben, Christian; Munnecke, Axel; Kaljo, Dimitri; Mannik, Peep; Martma, Tonu; Jeppsson, Lennart; Kleffner, Mark A.; Barrick, James E.; Johnson, Craig A.; Emsbo, Poul; Joachimski, Michael M.; Bickert, Torsten; Saltzman, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    The resolution and fidelity of global chronostratigraphic correlation are direct functions of the time period under consideration. By virtue of deep-ocean cores and astrochronology, the Cenozoic and Mesozoic time scales carry error bars of a few thousand years (k.y.) to a few hundred k.y. In contrast, most of the Paleozoic time scale carries error bars of plus or minus a few million years (m.y.), and chronostratigraphic control better than ??1 m.y. is considered "high resolution." The general lack of Paleozoic abyssal sediments and paucity of orbitally tuned Paleozoic data series combined with the relative incompleteness of the Paleozoic stratigraphic record have proven historically to be such an obstacle to intercontinental chronostratigraphic correlation that resolving the Paleozoic time scale to the level achieved during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic was viewed as impractical, impossible, or both. Here, we utilize integrated graptolite, conodont, and carbonate carbon isotope (??13Ccarb) data from three paleocontinents (Baltica, Avalonia, and Laurentia) to demonstrate chronostratigraphic control for upper Llando very through middle Wenlock (Telychian-Sheinwoodian, ~436-426 Ma) strata with a resolution of a few hundred k.y. The interval surrounding the base of the Wenlock Series can now be correlated globally with precision approaching 100 k.y., but some intervals (e.g., uppermost Telychian and upper Shein-woodian) are either yet to be studied in sufficient detail or do not show sufficient biologic speciation and/or extinction or carbon isotopic features to delineate such small time slices. Although producing such resolution during the Paleozoic presents an array of challenges unique to the era, we have begun to demonstrate that erecting a Paleozoic time scale comparable to that of younger eras is achievable. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  18. SU-E-J-126: Respiratory Gating Quality Assurance: A Simple Method to Achieve Millisecond Temporal Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, B; Wiersma, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Low temporal latency between a gating on/off signal and a linac beam on/off during respiratory gating is critical for patient safety. Although, a measurement of temporal lag is recommended by AAPM Task Group 142 for commissioning and annual quality assurance, there currently exists no published method. Here we describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to precisely measure gating lag at millisecond resolutions. Methods: A Varian Real-time Position Management™ (RPM) gating simulator with rotating disk was modified with a resistive flex sensor (Spectra Symbol) attached to the gating box platform. A photon diode was placed at machine isocenter. Output signals of the flex sensor and diode were monitored with a multichannel oscilloscope (Tektronix™ DPO3014). Qualitative inspection of the gating window/beam on synchronicity were made by setting the linac to beam on/off at end-expiration, and the oscilloscope's temporal window to 100 ms to visually examine if the on/off timing was within the recommended 100-ms tolerance. Quantitative measurements were made by saving the signal traces and analyzing in MatLab™. The on and off of the beam signal were located and compared to the expected gating window (e.g. 40% to 60%). Four gating cycles were measured and compared. Results: On a Varian TrueBeam™ STx linac with RPM gating software, the average difference in synchronicity at beam on and off for four cycles was 14 ms (3 to 30 ms) and 11 ms (2 to 32 ms), respectively. For a Varian Clinac™ 21EX the average difference at beam on and off was 127 ms (122 to 133 ms) and 46 ms (42 to 49 ms), respectively. The uncertainty in the synchrony difference was estimated at ±6 ms. Conclusion: This new gating QA method is easy to implement and allows for fast qualitative inspection and quantitative measurements for commissioning and TG-142 annual QA measurements.

  19. Depth profiles of D and T in Metal-hydride films up to large depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, HongLiang; Ding, Wei; Su, Ranran; Zhang, Yang; Shi, Liqun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a method combining D(3He, p) 4He nuclear reaction and proton backscattering (PBS) was adopted to detect the depth profile of both D and T in TiDxTy/Mo film with thickness more than 5 μm. Different energies of 3He and proton beam, varied from 1.0 to 3.0 MeV and 1.5 to 3.8 MeV respectively, were used in order to achieve better depth resolution. With carefully varying incident energies, an optimum resolution of less than 0.5 μm for D and T distribution throughout the whole analyzed range could be achieved.

  20. Development and Applications of Time of Flight Neutron Depth Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham Cady; Kenan Unlu

    2005-03-17

    The depth profiles of intentional or intrinsic constituents of a sample provide valuable information for the characterization of materials. For example, the subtle differences in spatial distribution and composition of many chemical species in the near surface region and across interfacial boundaries can significantly alter the electronic and optical properties of materials. A number of analytical techniques for depth profiling have been developed during the last two decades. neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) is one of the leading analytical techniques. The NDP is a nondestructive near surface technique that utilizes thermal/cold neutron beam to measure the concentration of specific light elements versus their depth in materials. The depth is obtained from the energy loss of protons, alphas or recoil atoms in substrate materials. Since the charged particle energy determination using surface barrier detector is used for NDP, the depth resolution is highly dependent on the detectors an d detection instruments. The depth resolutions of a few tens of nm are achieved with available NDP facilities in the world. However, the performance of NDP needs to be improved in order to obtain a few A depth resolutions.

  1. Apparent Depth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassar, Antonio B.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses a well-known optical refraction problem where the depth of an object in a liquid is determined. Proposes that many texts incorrectly solve the problem. Provides theory, equations, and diagrams. (MVL)

  2. Static stereo vision depth distortions in teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, D. B.; Von Sydow, M.

    1988-01-01

    A major problem in high-precision teleoperation is the high-resolution presentation of depth information. Stereo television has so far proved to be only a partial solution, due to an inherent trade-off among depth resolution, depth distortion and the alignment of the stereo image pair. Converged cameras can guarantee image alignment but suffer significant depth distortion when configured for high depth resolution. Moving the stereo camera rig to scan the work space further distorts depth. The 'dynamic' (camera-motion induced) depth distortion problem was solved by Diner and Von Sydow (1987), who have quantified the 'static' (camera-configuration induced) depth distortion. In this paper, a stereo image presentation technique which yields aligned images, high depth resolution and low depth distortion is demonstrated, thus solving the trade-off problem.

  3. Depth measurement using structured light and spatial frequency.

    PubMed

    Chan, Shih-Yu; Shih, Hsi-Fu; Chen, Jenq-Shyong

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel design of an optical system for depth measurement, adopting a computer-generated hologram to project a periodic line pattern from which a coaxial triangulation is performed. The spatial periodicity of diffraction images captured in the system is converted to the frequency domain, and the relative depth of the plane of interest is acquired. The experimental results show that the system could achieve resolution in the range of 1 mm over a relative depth range of ∼300-600  mm from the camera. The standard deviations are 0.71 and 0.46 mm for two experiments. PMID:27409192

  4. Depth sensitive oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy of oral epithelial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Maria K.; Lam, Sylvia; Poh, Catherine; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2014-05-01

    Identifying depth-dependent alterations associated with epithelial cancerous lesions can be challenging in the oral cavity where variable epithelial thicknesses and troublesome keratin growths are prominent. Spectroscopic methods with enhanced depth resolution would immensely aid in isolating optical properties associated with malignant transformation. Combining multiple beveled fibers, oblique collection geometry, and polarization gating, oblique polarized reflectance spectroscopy (OPRS) achieves depth sensitive detection. We report promising results from a clinical trial of patients with oral lesions suspected of dysplasia or carcinoma demonstrating the potential of OPRS for the analysis of morphological and architectural changes in the context of multilayer, epithelial oral tissue.

  5. Optimal arrangements of fiber optic probes to enhance the spatial resolution in depth for 3D reflectance diffuse optical tomography with time-resolved measurements performed with fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puszka, Agathe; Di Sieno, Laura; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Hervé, Lionel; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Koenig, Anne; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2014-02-01

    Fiber optic probes with a width limited to a few centimeters can enable diffuse optical tomography (DOT) in intern organs like the prostate or facilitate the measurements on extern organs like the breast or the brain. We have recently shown on 2D tomographic images that time-resolved measurements with a large dynamic range obtained with fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) could push forward the imaged depth range in a diffusive medium at short source-detector separation compared with conventional non-gated approaches. In this work, we confirm these performances with the first 3D tomographic images reconstructed with such a setup and processed with the Mellin- Laplace transform. More precisely, we investigate the performance of hand-held probes with short interfiber distances in terms of spatial resolution and specifically demonstrate the interest of having a compact probe design featuring small source-detector separations. We compare the spatial resolution obtained with two probes having the same design but different scale factors, the first one featuring only interfiber distances of 15 mm and the second one, 10 mm. We evaluate experimentally the spatial resolution obtained with each probe on the setup with fast-gated SPADs for optical phantoms featuring two absorbing inclusions positioned at different depths and conclude on the potential of short source-detector separations for DOT.

  6. High-resolution delineation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a dipping, fractured mudstone: depth- and strata-dependent spatial variability from rock-core sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goode, Daniel J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Lacombe, Pierre J.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of rock-core sampling and chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) analysis at five coreholes, with hydraulic and water-quality monitoring and a detailed hydrogeologic framework, was used to characterize the fine-scale distribution of CVOCs in dipping, fractured mudstones of the Lockatong Formation of Triassic age, of the Newark Basin in West Trenton, New Jersey. From these results, a refined conceptual model for more than 55 years of migration of CVOCs and depth- and strata-dependent rock-matrix contamination was developed. Industrial use of trichloroethene (TCE) at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) from 1953 to 1995 resulted in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE and dissolved TCE and related breakdown products, including other CVOCs, in underlying mudstones. Shallow highly weathered and fractured strata overlie unweathered, gently dipping, fractured strata that become progressively less fractured with depth. The unweathered lithology includes black highly fractured (fissile) carbon-rich strata, gray mildly fractured thinly layered (laminated) strata, and light-gray weakly fractured massive strata. CVOC concentrations in water samples pumped from the shallow weathered and highly fractured strata remain elevated near residual DNAPL TCE, but dilution by uncontaminated recharge, and other natural and engineered attenuation processes, have substantially reduced concentrations along flow paths removed from sources and residual DNAPL. CVOCs also were detected in most rock-core samples in source areas in shallow wells. In many locations, lower aqueous concentrations, compared to rock core concentrations, suggest that CVOCs are presently back-diffusing from the rock matrix. Below the weathered and highly fractured strata, and to depths of at least 50 meters (m), groundwater flow and contaminant transport is primarily in bedding-plane-oriented fractures in thin fissile high-carbon strata, and in fractured, laminated strata of the gently

  7. High-resolution delineation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a dipping, fractured mudstone: Depth- and strata-dependent spatial variability from rock-core sampling.

    PubMed

    Goode, Daniel J; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E; Lacombe, Pierre J

    2014-12-15

    Synthesis of rock-core sampling and chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) analysis at five coreholes, with hydraulic and water-quality monitoring and a detailed hydrogeologic framework, was used to characterize the fine-scale distribution of CVOCs in dipping, fractured mudstones of the Lockatong Formation of Triassic age, of the Newark Basin in West Trenton, New Jersey. From these results, a refined conceptual model for more than 55years of migration of CVOCs and depth- and strata-dependent rock-matrix contamination was developed. Industrial use of trichloroethene (TCE) at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) from 1953 to 1995 resulted in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE and dissolved TCE and related breakdown products, including other CVOCs, in underlying mudstones. Shallow highly weathered and fractured strata overlie unweathered, gently dipping, fractured strata that become progressively less fractured with depth. The unweathered lithology includes black highly fractured (fissile) carbon-rich strata, gray mildly fractured thinly layered (laminated) strata, and light-gray weakly fractured massive strata. CVOC concentrations in water samples pumped from the shallow weathered and highly fractured strata remain elevated near residual DNAPL TCE, but dilution by uncontaminated recharge, and other natural and engineered attenuation processes, have substantially reduced concentrations along flow paths removed from sources and residual DNAPL. CVOCs also were detected in most rock-core samples in source areas in shallow wells. In many locations, lower aqueous concentrations, compared to rock core concentrations, suggest that CVOCs are presently back-diffusing from the rock matrix. Below the weathered and highly fractured strata, and to depths of at least 50 meters (m), groundwater flow and contaminant transport is primarily in bedding-plane-oriented fractures in thin fissile high-carbon strata, and in fractured, laminated strata of the gently

  8. High-resolution delineation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a dipping, fractured mudstone: Depth- and strata-dependent spatial variability from rock-core sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goode, Daniel J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Lacombe, Pierre J.

    2014-12-01

    Synthesis of rock-core sampling and chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) analysis at five coreholes, with hydraulic and water-quality monitoring and a detailed hydrogeologic framework, was used to characterize the fine-scale distribution of CVOCs in dipping, fractured mudstones of the Lockatong Formation of Triassic age, of the Newark Basin in West Trenton, New Jersey. From these results, a refined conceptual model for more than 55 years of migration of CVOCs and depth- and strata-dependent rock-matrix contamination was developed. Industrial use of trichloroethene (TCE) at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) from 1953 to 1995 resulted in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE and dissolved TCE and related breakdown products, including other CVOCs, in underlying mudstones. Shallow highly weathered and fractured strata overlie unweathered, gently dipping, fractured strata that become progressively less fractured with depth. The unweathered lithology includes black highly fractured (fissile) carbon-rich strata, gray mildly fractured thinly layered (laminated) strata, and light-gray weakly fractured massive strata. CVOC concentrations in water samples pumped from the shallow weathered and highly fractured strata remain elevated near residual DNAPL TCE, but dilution by uncontaminated recharge, and other natural and engineered attenuation processes, have substantially reduced concentrations along flow paths removed from sources and residual DNAPL. CVOCs also were detected in most rock-core samples in source areas in shallow wells. In many locations, lower aqueous concentrations, compared to rock core concentrations, suggest that CVOCs are presently back-diffusing from the rock matrix. Below the weathered and highly fractured strata, and to depths of at least 50 meters (m), groundwater flow and contaminant transport is primarily in bedding-plane-oriented fractures in thin fissile high-carbon strata, and in fractured, laminated strata of the gently

  9. Experimental study of the maximum resolution and packing density achievable in sintered and non-sintered binder-jet 3D printed steel microchannels

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Amy M; Mehdizadeh Momen, Ayyoub; Benedict, Michael; Kiggans Jr, James O

    2015-01-01

    Developing high resolution 3D printed metallic microchannels is a challenge especially when there is an essential need for high packing density of the primary material. While high packing density could be achieved by heating the structure to the sintering temperature, some heat sensitive applications require other strategies to improve the packing density of primary materials. In this study the goal is to develop high green or pack densities microchannels on the scale of 2-300 microns which have a robust mechanical structure. Binder-jet 3D printing is an additive manufacturing process in which droplets of binder are deposited via inkjet into a bed of powder. By repeatedly spreading thin layers of powder and depositing binder into the appropriate 2D profiles, complex 3D objects can be created one layer at time. Microchannels with features on the order of 500 microns were fabricated via binder jetting of steel powder and then sintered and/or infiltrated with a secondary material. The average particle size of the steel powder was varied along with the droplet volume of the inkjet-deposited binder. The resolution of the process, packing density of the primary material, the subsequent features sizes of the microchannels, and the overall microchannel quality were characterized as a function of particle size distribution, droplet sizes and heat treatment temperatures.

  10. Stereo depth distortions in teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B.; Vonsydow, Marika

    1988-01-01

    In teleoperation, a typical application of stereo vision is to view a work space located short distances (1 to 3m) in front of the cameras. The work presented here treats converged camera placement and studies the effects of intercamera distance, camera-to-object viewing distance, and focal length of the camera lenses on both stereo depth resolution and stereo depth distortion. While viewing the fronto-parallel plane 1.4 m in front of the cameras, depth errors are measured on the order of 2cm. A geometric analysis was made of the distortion of the fronto-parallel plane of divergence for stereo TV viewing. The results of the analysis were then verified experimentally. The objective was to determine the optimal camera configuration which gave high stereo depth resolution while minimizing stereo depth distortion. It is found that for converged cameras at a fixed camera-to-object viewing distance, larger intercamera distances allow higher depth resolutions, but cause greater depth distortions. Thus with larger intercamera distances, operators will make greater depth errors (because of the greater distortions), but will be more certain that they are not errors (because of the higher resolution).

  11. Invariant high resolution optical skin imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Supraja; Rolland, Jannick

    2007-02-01

    Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) is a bio-medical low coherence interferometric imaging technique that has become a topic of active research because of its ability to provide accurate, non-invasive cross-sectional images of biological tissue with much greater resolution than the current common technique ultrasound. OCM is a derivative of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) that enables greater resolution imposed by the implementation of an optical confocal design involving high numerical aperture (NA) focusing in the sample. The primary setback of OCM, however is the depth dependence of the lateral resolution obtained that arises from the smaller depth of focus of the high NA beam. We propose to overcome this limitation using a dynamic focusing lens design that can achieve quasi-invariant lateral resolution up to 1.5mm depth of skin tissue.

  12. Hybrid optical and acoustic resolution optoacoustic endoscopy.

    PubMed

    He, Hailong; Wissmeyer, Georg; Ovsepian, Saak V; Buehler, Andreas; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-06-15

    We propose the implementation of hybrid optical and acoustic resolution optoacoustic endoscopy. Laser light is transmitted to tissue by two types of illumination for achieving optical and acoustic resolution imaging. A 20 MHz ultrasound detector is used for recording optoacoustic signals. The endoscopy probe attains a 3.6 mm diameter and is fully encapsulated into a catheter system. We validate the imaging performance of the hybrid endoscope on phantoms and ex vivo, and discuss the necessity for the extended resolution and depth range of endoscopy achieved. PMID:27304269

  13. Depth keying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvili, Ronen; Kaplan, Amir; Ofek, Eyal; Yahav, Giora

    2003-05-01

    We present a new solution to the known problem of video keying in a natural environment. We segment foreground objects from background objects using their relative distance from the camera, which makes it possible to do away with the use of color for keying. To do so, we developed and built a novel depth video camera, capable of producing RGB and D signals, where D stands for the distance to each pixel. The new RGBD camera enables the creation of a whole new gallery of effects and applications such as multi-layer background substitutions. This new modality makes the production of real time mixed reality video possible, as well as post-production manipulation of recorded video. We address the problem of color spill -- in which the color of the foreground object is mixed, along its boundary, with the background color. This problem prevents an accurate separation of the foreground object from its background, and it is most visible when compositing the foreground objects to a new background. Most existing techniques are limited to the use of a constant background color. We offer a novel general approach to the problem with enabling the use of the natural background, based upon the D channel generated by the camera.

  14. Intermediate depth seismicity - a reflection seismic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberland, C.; Rietbrock, A.

    2004-12-01

    During subduction the descending oceanic lithosphere is subject to metamorphic reactions, some of them associated with the release of fluids. It is now widely accepted, that these reactions and associated dehydration processes are directly related with the generation of intermediate depth earthquakes (dehydration embrittlement). However, the structure of the layered oceanic plate at depth and the location of the earthquakes relative to structural units of the subducting plate (sources within the oceanic crust and/or in the upper oceanic mantle lithosphere?) are still not resolved yet. This is in mainly due to the fact that the observational resolution needed to address these topics (in the range of only a few kilometers) is hardly achieved in field experiments and related studies. Here we study the wavefields of intermediate depth earthquakes typically observed by temporary networks in order to assess their high-resolution potential in resolving structure of the down going slab and locus of seismicity. In particular we study whether the subducted oceanic Moho can be detected by the analysis of secondary phases of local earthquakes (near vertical reflection). Due to the irregular geometry of sources and receivers we apply an imaging technique similar to diffraction stack migration. The method is tested using synthetic data both based on 2-D finite difference simulations and 3-D kinematic ray tracing. The accuracy of the hypocenter location and onset times crucial for the successful application of stacking techniques (coherency) was achieved by the use of relatively relocated intermediate depth seismicity. Additionally, we simulate the propagation of the wavefields at larger distance (wide angle) indicating the development of guided waves traveling in the low-velocity waveguide associated with the modeled oceanic crust. We also present application on local earthquake data from the South American subduction zone.

  15. Extended depth of field imaging for high speed object analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortyn, William (Inventor); Basiji, David (Inventor); Frost, Keith (Inventor); Liang, Luchuan (Inventor); Bauer, Richard (Inventor); Hall, Brian (Inventor); Perry, David (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high speed, high-resolution flow imaging system is modified to achieve extended depth of field imaging. An optical distortion element is introduced into the flow imaging system. Light from an object, such as a cell, is distorted by the distortion element, such that a point spread function (PSF) of the imaging system is invariant across an extended depth of field. The distorted light is spectrally dispersed, and the dispersed light is used to simultaneously generate a plurality of images. The images are detected, and image processing is used to enhance the detected images by compensating for the distortion, to achieve extended depth of field images of the object. The post image processing preferably involves de-convolution, and requires knowledge of the PSF of the imaging system, as modified by the optical distortion element.

  16. Demonstration of ultra high resolution soft x-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, W. S.; McNulty, I.; Trebes, J. E.; Anderson, E. H.; Yang, L.; Brase, J. M.

    1995-05-01

    Ultra high resolution three dimensional images of a microscopic test object were made with soft x-rays using a scanning transmission x-ray microscope. The test object consisted of two different patterns of gold bars on silicon nitride windows which were separated by ˜ 5μm. Depth resolution comparable to the transverse resolution was achieved by recording nine 2-D images of the object at angles between -50 to +55 degrees with respect to the beam axis. The projections were then combined tomographically to form a 3-D image using an algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) algorithm. We observed a transverse resolution of ˜1000 Å. Artifacts in the reconstruction limited the overall depth resolution to ˜6000 Å, however some features were clearly reconstructed with a depth resolution of ˜1000 Å.

  17. Depth perception in autostereograms: 1/f noise is best

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankelevsky, Yael; Shvartz, Ishai; Avraham, Tamar; Bruckstein, Alfred M.

    2016-02-01

    An autostereogram is a single image that encodes depth information that pops out when looking at it. The trick is achieved by replicating a vertical strip that sets a basic two-dimensional pattern with disparity shifts that encode a three-dimensional scene. It is of interest to explore the dependency between the ease of perceiving depth in autostereograms and the choice of the basic pattern used for generating them. In this work we confirm a theory proposed by Bruckstein et al. to explain the process of autostereographic depth perception, providing a measure for the ease of "locking into" the depth profile, based on the spectral properties of the basic pattern used. We report the results of three sets of psychophysical experiments using autostereograms generated from two-dimensional random noise patterns having power spectra of the form $1/f^\\beta$. The experiments were designed to test the ability of human subjects to identify smooth, low resolution surfaces, as well as detail, in the form of higher resolution objects in the depth profile, and to determine limits in identifying small objects as a function of their size. In accordance with the theory, we discover a significant advantage of the $1/f$ noise pattern (pink noise) for fast depth lock-in and fine detail detection, showing that such patterns are optimal choices for autostereogram design. Validating the theoretical model predictions strengthens its underlying assumptions, and contributes to a better understanding of the visual system's binocular disparity mechanisms.

  18. Molecular sputter depth profiling using carbon cluster beams

    PubMed Central

    Winograd, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Sputter depth profiling of organic films while maintaining the molecular integrity of the sample has long been deemed impossible because of the accumulation of ion bombardment-induced chemical damage. Only recently, it was found that this problem can be greatly reduced if cluster ion beams are used for sputter erosion. For organic samples, carbon cluster ions appear to be particularly well suited for such a task. Analysis of available data reveals that a projectile appears to be more effective as the number of carbon atoms in the cluster is increased, leaving fullerene ions as the most promising candidates to date. Using a commercially available, highly focused C60q+ cluster ion beam, we demonstrate the versatility of the technique for depth profiling various organic films deposited on a silicon substrate and elucidate the dependence of the results on properties such as projectile ion impact energy and angle, and sample temperature. Moreover, examples are shown where the technique is applied to organic multilayer structures in order to investigate the depth resolution across film-film interfaces. These model experiments allow collection of valuable information on how cluster impact molecular depth profiling works and how to understand and optimize the depth resolution achieved using this technique. PMID:19649771

  19. Learning Sparse Representations of Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosic, Ivana; Olshausen, Bruno A.; Culpepper, Benjamin J.

    2011-09-01

    This paper introduces a new method for learning and inferring sparse representations of depth (disparity) maps. The proposed algorithm relaxes the usual assumption of the stationary noise model in sparse coding. This enables learning from data corrupted with spatially varying noise or uncertainty, typically obtained by laser range scanners or structured light depth cameras. Sparse representations are learned from the Middlebury database disparity maps and then exploited in a two-layer graphical model for inferring depth from stereo, by including a sparsity prior on the learned features. Since they capture higher-order dependencies in the depth structure, these priors can complement smoothness priors commonly used in depth inference based on Markov Random Field (MRF) models. Inference on the proposed graph is achieved using an alternating iterative optimization technique, where the first layer is solved using an existing MRF-based stereo matching algorithm, then held fixed as the second layer is solved using the proposed non-stationary sparse coding algorithm. This leads to a general method for improving solutions of state of the art MRF-based depth estimation algorithms. Our experimental results first show that depth inference using learned representations leads to state of the art denoising of depth maps obtained from laser range scanners and a time of flight camera. Furthermore, we show that adding sparse priors improves the results of two depth estimation methods: the classical graph cut algorithm by Boykov et al. and the more recent algorithm of Woodford et al.

  20. Fast planar segmentation of depth images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javan Hemmat, Hani; Pourtaherian, Arash; Bondarev, Egor; de With, Peter H. N.

    2015-03-01

    One of the major challenges for applications dealing with the 3D concept is the real-time execution of the algorithms. Besides this, for the indoor environments, perceiving the geometry of surrounding structures plays a prominent role in terms of application performance. Since indoor structures mainly consist of planar surfaces, fast and accurate detection of such features has a crucial impact on quality and functionality of the 3D applications, e.g. decreasing model size (decimation), enhancing localization, mapping, and semantic reconstruction. The available planar-segmentation algorithms are mostly developed using surface normals and/or curvatures. Therefore, they are computationally expensive and challenging for real-time performance. In this paper, we introduce a fast planar-segmentation method for depth images avoiding surface normal calculations. Firstly, the proposed method searches for 3D edges in a depth image and finds the lines between identified edges. Secondly, it merges all the points on each pair of intersecting lines into a plane. Finally, various enhancements (e.g. filtering) are applied to improve the segmentation quality. The proposed algorithm is capable of handling VGA-resolution depth images at a 6 FPS frame-rate with a single-thread implementation. Furthermore, due to the multi-threaded design of the algorithm, we achieve a factor of 10 speedup by deploying a GPU implementation.

  1. Validation of MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval Over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Ichoku, C.; Remer, L. A.; Tanre, D.; Holben, B. N.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Aerosol optical depths are derived operationally for the first time over land in the visible wavelengths by MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) onboard the EOSTerra spacecraft. More than 300 Sun photometer data points from more than 30 AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sites globally were used in validating the aerosol optical depths obtained during July - September 2000. Excellent agreement is found with retrieval errors within (Delta)tau=+/- 0.05 +/- 0.20 tau, as predicted, over (partially) vegetated surfaces, consistent with pre-launch theoretical analysis and aircraft field experiments. In coastal and semi-arid regions larger errors are caused predominantly by the uncertainty in evaluating the surface reflectance. The excellent fit was achieved despite the ongoing improvements in instrument characterization and calibration. This results show that MODIS-derived aerosol optical depths can be used quantitatively in many applications with cautions for residual clouds, snow/ice, and water contamination.

  2. A resolution commending the achievements and recognizing the importance of the Alliance to Save Energy on the 35th anniversary of the incorporation of the Alliance.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Warner, Mark R. [D-VA

    2012-03-26

    04/18/2012 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (text: CR S2517) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Magnetic depths to basalts: extension of spectral depths method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifton, Roger

    2015-11-01

    Although spectral depth determination has played a role in magnetic interpretation for over four decades, automating the procedure has been inhibited by the need for manual intervention. This paper introduces the concept of a slope spectrum of an equivalent layer, to be used in an automated depth interpretation algorithm suitable for application to very large datasets such as the complete Northern Territory aeromagnetic grid. In order to trace the extensive basalts across the Northern Territory, profiles of spectral depths have been obtained at 5 km intervals across the NT stitched grid of total magnetic intensity (TMI). Each profile is a graph from 0 to 1000 m of the probability of a magnetic layer occurring at each depth. Automating the collection of the 50 000 profiles required the development of a formula that relates slopes along the power spectrum to depths to an equivalent magnetic layer. Model slabs were populated with a large number of randomly located dipoles and their power spectra correlated with modelled depth to provide the formula. Depth profiles are too noisy to be used singly, but when a series of depth profiles are lined up side-by-side as a transect, significant magnetic layers can be traced for large distances. Transects frequently show a second layer. The formula is quite general in its derivation and would apply to any mid-latitude area where significant magnetic bodies can be modelled as extensive layers. Because the method requires a radial power spectrum, it fails to provide signal at depths much shallower than the flight line spacing. The method is convenient for a fast first pass at depth estimation, but its horizontal resolution is rather coarse and errors can be quite large.

  4. Depth reconstruction from sparse samples: representation, algorithm, and sampling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lee-Kang; Chan, Stanley H; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2015-06-01

    The rapid development of 3D technology and computer vision applications has motivated a thrust of methodologies for depth acquisition and estimation. However, existing hardware and software acquisition methods have limited performance due to poor depth precision, low resolution, and high computational cost. In this paper, we present a computationally efficient method to estimate dense depth maps from sparse measurements. There are three main contributions. First, we provide empirical evidence that depth maps can be encoded much more sparsely than natural images using common dictionaries, such as wavelets and contourlets. We also show that a combined wavelet-contourlet dictionary achieves better performance than using either dictionary alone. Second, we propose an alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) for depth map reconstruction. A multiscale warm start procedure is proposed to speed up the convergence. Third, we propose a two-stage randomized sampling scheme to optimally choose the sampling locations, thus maximizing the reconstruction performance for a given sampling budget. Experimental results show that the proposed method produces high-quality dense depth estimates, and is robust to noisy measurements. Applications to real data in stereo matching are demonstrated. PMID:25769151

  5. Ultra-high resolution Fourier domain optical coherence tomography for resolving thin layers in painted works of art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, C. S.; Liang, Haida

    2013-05-01

    While OCT has been applied to the non-invasive examination of the stratigraphy of paint layers in recent years, it has been recognized that the resolutions of commercially available OCT cannot compete in depth resolution with conventional microscopic examination of cross-sections of paint samples. It is necessary to achieve resolutions better than 3 microns to resolve the thinnest layers of paint and varnish. In this paper, we demonstrate a Fourier domain ultrahigh resolution OCT at 810nm with depth resolution of 1.8 μm in air (or 1.2μm in varnish or paint).

  6. Modeling the Nucleus Laminaris of the Barn Owl: Achieving 20 ps Resolution on a 85-MHz-Clocked Digital Device.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Ralf; Heinrich, Enrico; Joost, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus laminaris of the barn owl auditory system is quite impressive, since its underlying time estimation is much better than the processing speed of the involved neurons. Since precise localization is also very important in many technical applications, this paper explores to what extent the main principles of the nucleus laminaris can be implemented in digital hardware. The first prototypical implementation yields a time resolution of about 20 ps, even though the chosen standard, low-cost device is clocked at only 85 MHz, which leads to an internal duty cycle of approximately 12 ns. In addition, this paper also explores the utility of an advanced sampling scheme, known as unfolding-in-time. It turns out that with this sampling method, the prototype can easily process input signals of up to 300 MHz, which is almost four times higher than the sampling rate. PMID:22347179

  7. Modeling the Nucleus Laminaris of the Barn Owl: Achieving 20 ps Resolution on a 85-MHz-Clocked Digital Device

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Ralf; Heinrich, Enrico; Joost, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus laminaris of the barn owl auditory system is quite impressive, since its underlying time estimation is much better than the processing speed of the involved neurons. Since precise localization is also very important in many technical applications, this paper explores to what extent the main principles of the nucleus laminaris can be implemented in digital hardware. The first prototypical implementation yields a time resolution of about 20 ps, even though the chosen standard, low-cost device is clocked at only 85 MHz, which leads to an internal duty cycle of approximately 12 ns. In addition, this paper also explores the utility of an advanced sampling scheme, known as unfolding-in-time. It turns out that with this sampling method, the prototype can easily process input signals of up to 300 MHz, which is almost four times higher than the sampling rate. PMID:22347179

  8. Empirical reflection travel time versus depth and velocity versus depth functions for the deep-sea sediment column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, R. L.; Gangi, A. F.; Snow, K. R.

    1986-07-01

    Numerous correlations of one-way reflection travel times and depths to reflecting horizons have been proposed in the Initial Reports of the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP). Having carefully reviewed proposed correlations, we selected 233 correlated depths (ranging from 27 m to 1.4 km) and one-way travel times (ranging from 0.02 to 0.7 s) from 154 DSDP sites worldwide. Assuming that the velocity/depth function for deep-sea sediments can be approximated by an exponential form, we have used these data to establish statistically well-constrained global models relating depth to travel time and velocity to depth. There is remarkably little scatter in the data. Based on nonlinear least squares fits, the best depth/time function is Z (km) = -3.03 1n[1 - 0.52T(s)]; the rms error in depth is 26 m. The corresponding average velocity/depth function is V(km/s) = 1.59exp(0.33Z). We estimate that the real site-to-site variability of velocities at depth is less than 0.20 km/s. Any dependence of velocity on composition is below the resolution of the data, and available evidence suggests that age has no significant effect. These results imply that to a depth of 1.4 km the physical state of sediments depends on in situ overburden pressure and temperature, which are related to depth of burial, and that chemical and mechanical equilibrium is achieved in a period of time that is geologically short. Our results are consistent with laboratory measurements of P wave velocities in deep-sea sediments, but velocity/depth functions for terrigenous and calcareous sections derived from sonobuoy wide-angle reflection surveys are incompatible with the time and depth data, and overestimate velocities by as much as 10% and 30%, respectively. These systematic errors may result from the fact that the marked anisotropy of deep-sea sediments is neglected in the interpretation of reflection data.

  9. On evaluation of depth accuracy in consumer depth sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Aziz, Azim Zaliha; Wei, Hong; Ferryman, James

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of different depth sensors. The aim is to answer the question, whether these sensors give accurate data for general depth image analysis. The study examines the depth accuracy between three popularly used depth sensors; ASUS Xtion Prolive, Kinect Xbox 360 and Kinect for Windows v2. The main attention is to study on the stability of pixels in the depth image captured at several different sensor-object distances by measuring the depth returned by the sensors within specified time intervals. The experimental results show that the fluctuation (mm) of the random selected pixels within the target area, increases with increasing distance to the sensor, especially on the Kinect for Xbox 360 and the Asus Xtion Prolive. Both of these sensors provide pixels fluctuation between 20mm and 30mm at a sensor-object distance beyond 1500mm. However, the pixel's stability of the Kinect for Windows v2 not affected much with the distance between the sensor and the object. The maximum fluctuation for all the selected pixels of Kinect for Windows v2 is approximately 5mm at sensor-object distance of between 800mm and 3000mm. Therefore, in the optimal distance, the best stability achieved.

  10. Phosphene vision of depth and boundary from segmentation-based associative MRFs.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yiran; Liu, Nianjun; Barnes, Nick

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel low-resolution phosphene visualization of depth and boundary computed by a two-layer Associative Markov Random Fields. Unlike conventional methods modeling the depth and boundary as an individual MRF respectively, our algorithm proposed a two-layer associative MRFs framework by combining the depth with geometry-based surface boundary estimation, in which both variables are inferred globally and simultaneously. With surface boundary integration, the experiments demonstrates three significant improvements as: 1) eliminating depth ambiguities and increasing the accuracy, 2) providing comprehensive information of depth and boundary for human navigation under low-resolution phosphene vision, 3) when integrating the boundary clues into downsampling process, the foreground obstacle has been clearly enhanced and discriminated from the surrounding background. In order to gain higher efficiency and lower computational cost, the work is initialized on segmentation based depth plane fitting and labeling, and then applying the latest projected graph cut for global optimization. The proposed approach has been tested on both Middlebury and indoor real-scene data set, and achieves a much better performance with significant accuracy than other popular methods in both regular and low resolutions. PMID:23367129

  11. Achieving quasi-adiabatic thermal environment to maximize resolution power in very high-pressure liquid chromatography: Theory, models, and experiments.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Gilar, Martin; Jarrell, Joseph A

    2016-04-29

    A cylindrical vacuum chamber (inner diameter 5 cm) housing a narrow-bore 2.1 mm×100 mm column packed with 1.8 μm HSS-T3 fully porous particles was built in order to isolate thermally the chromatographic column from the external air environment. Consistent with statistical physics and the mean free path of air molecules, the experimental results show that natural air convection and conduction are fully eliminated for housing air pressures smaller than 10(-4) Torr. Heat radiation is minimized by wrapping up the column with low-emissivity aluminum-tape (emissivity coefficient ϵ=0.03 vs. 0.28 for polished stainless steel 316). Overall, the heat flux at the column wall is reduced by 96% with respect to standard still-air ovens. From a practical viewpoint, the efficiency of the column run at a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min at a constant 13,000 psi pressure drop (the viscous heat power is around 9 W/m) is improved by up to 35% irrespective of the analyte retention. Models of heat and mass transfer reveal that (1) the amplitude of the radial temperature gradient is significantly reduced from 0.30 to 0.01 K and (2) the observed improvement in resolution power stems from a more uniform distribution of the flow velocity across the column diameter. The eddy dispersion term in the van Deemter equation is reduced by 0.8±0.1 reduced plate height unit, a significant gain in column performance. PMID:27040511

  12. Depth-resolved soft x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy in nanostructures via standing-wave excited photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Kronast, F.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Kaiser, A.; Wiemann, C.; Yang, S.-H.; Locatelli, A.; Burgler, D.E.; Schreiber, R.; Salmassi, F.; Fischer, P.; Durr, H.A.; Schneider, C.M.; Eberhardt, W.; Fadley, C.S.

    2008-11-24

    We present an extension of conventional laterally resolved soft x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy. A depth resolution along the surface normal down to a few {angstrom} can be achieved by setting up standing x-ray wave fields in a multilayer substrate. The sample is an Ag/Co/Au trilayer, whose first layer has a wedge profile, grown on a Si/MoSi2 multilayer mirror. Tuning the incident x-ray to the mirror Bragg angle we set up standing x-ray wave fields. We demonstrate the resulting depth resolution by imaging the standing wave fields as they move through the trilayer wedge structure.

  13. Depth Perception In Remote Stereoscopic Viewing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B.; Von Sydow, Marika

    1989-01-01

    Report describes theoretical and experimental studies of perception of depth by human operators through stereoscopic video systems. Purpose of such studies to optimize dual-camera configurations used to view workspaces of remote manipulators at distances of 1 to 3 m from cameras. According to analysis, static stereoscopic depth distortion decreased, without decreasing stereoscopitc depth resolution, by increasing camera-to-object and intercamera distances and camera focal length. Further predicts dynamic stereoscopic depth distortion reduced by rotating cameras around center of circle passing through point of convergence of viewing axes and first nodal points of two camera lenses.

  14. A depth-of-interaction PET detector using mutual gain-equalized silicon photomultiplier

    SciTech Connect

    W. Xi, A.G, Weisenberger, H. Dong, Brian Kross, S. Lee, J. McKisson, Carl Zorn

    2012-02-01

    We developed a prototype high resolution, high efficiency depth-encoding detector for PET applications based on dual-ended readout of LYSO array with two silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Flood images, energy resolution, and depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolution were measured for a LYSO array - 0.7 mm in crystal pitch and 10 mm in thickness - with four unpolished parallel sides. Flood images were obtained such that individual crystal element in the array is resolved. The energy resolution of the entire array was measured to be 33%, while individual crystal pixel elements utilizing the signal from both sides ranged from 23.3% to 27%. By applying a mutual-gain equalization method, a DOI resolution of 2 mm for the crystal array was obtained in the experiments while simulations indicate {approx}1 mm DOI resolution could possibly be achieved. The experimental DOI resolution can be further improved by obtaining revised detector supporting electronics with better energy resolutions. This study provides a detailed detector calibration and DOI response characterization of the dual-ended readout SiPM-based PET detectors, which will be important in the design and calibration of a PET scanner in the future.

  15. Conflicts and Communication between High-Achieving Chinese American Adolescents and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qin, Desiree Baolian; Chang, Tzu-Fen; Han, Eun-Jin; Chee, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on in-depth interview data collected on 18 high-achieving Chinese American students, the authors examine domains of acculturation-based conflicts, parent and child internal conflicts, and conflict resolution in their families. Their analyses show that well-established negative communication patterns in educational expectations, divergent…

  16. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy on excised human skin: uncertainties in depth profiling and mathematical correction applied to dermatological drug permeation.

    PubMed

    Tfayli, A; Piot, O; Manfait, M

    2008-05-01

    Confocal Raman microspectroscopy represents the advantage of giving structural and conformational information on samples without any destructive treatment. Recently, several studies were achieved to study the skin hydration, endogenous and exogenous molecules repartition in the skin using the confocal feature of this technique. Meanwhile, when working through a material boundary with a different refractive index, the main limitation remains the spatial precision, especially the distortion in the depth and the depth resolution. Recently, several authors described mathematical models to correct the depth and the resolution values. In this study, we combined theoretical approaches, proposed by different authors with experimental measurements to try to find out the most appropriate approach for correction. We then applied the corrections on in-depth profiles tracking the penetration of Metronidazole, a drug produced by Galderma for rosacea treatment, through excised human skin. PMID:19343645

  17. Quantification of resolution for a dynamic focusing OCM microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Supraja; Lee, Kye-Sung; Meemon, Panomsak; Kuhn, William P.; Thompson, Kevin P.; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2009-02-01

    Achieving high lateral resolution still remains a challenge for in vivo Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) biological imaging. While to address this challenge, the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective in the sample arm of the OCM interferometer may be increased, it introduces trade-offs in terms of loss in the depth of focus over which lateral resolution can still be maintained. As a critical step to offset this problem, we recently presented the optical system design of a dynamic focusing (DF) optical coherence microscope with a built-in liquid lens for re-focusing through the sample depth with no moving parts at in vivo speeds. We present experimental measurements of the modulation transfer function (MTF) acquired from the fabricated research prototype. The measurements were obtained though the edge detection method as a function of the voltage applied and at various positions in the field of view (FOV) within a 2mm cubic sample. Results demonstrate a resolution of 2 µm across the voltage range and the FOV, which validates the expectation by design of a quasi-invariant resolution of less than 3μm over a 2mm×2mm lateral cross-section across the 2mm depth of skin-equivalent tissue. Images of a tadpole sample acquired with the probe at different focal depths are also shown to demonstrate gain in resolution with focusing through different depth zones.

  18. Characterization of a scintillating mini-detector for time-of-flight positron emission tomography with depth-of-interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio; Garibaldi, Franco

    2012-08-01

    By exploiting a suitable treatment of the scintillator surfaces, along with silicon photomultiplier photodetectors and specific algorithms for raw data analysis, we achieved a remarkable tradeoff between energy, time, and depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolution, thus supporting the feasibility of a prostate time-of-flight positron emission tomography probe, magnetic resonance imaging compatible, with the required features and performance. In numbers this means a detector element of 1.5 mm × 1.5 mm × 10 mm, promising to achieve at the same time energy resolution around 11.5%, coincidence resolving time around 300 ps corresponding to a space resolution <5 cm along the line of response, and DOI resolution even below 1 mm. We stress that such a time resolution allows to increase significantly the noise equivalent counting rate, and consequently improve the image quality and the lesion detection capability.

  19. Characterization of a scintillating mini-detector for time-of-flight positron emission tomography with depth-of-interaction.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio; Garibaldi, Franco

    2012-08-01

    By exploiting a suitable treatment of the scintillator surfaces, along with silicon photomultiplier photodetectors and specific algorithms for raw data analysis, we achieved a remarkable tradeoff between energy, time, and depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolution, thus supporting the feasibility of a prostate time-of-flight positron emission tomography probe, magnetic resonance imaging compatible, with the required features and performance. In numbers this means a detector element of 1.5 mm × 1.5 mm × 10 mm, promising to achieve at the same time energy resolution around 11.5%, coincidence resolving time around 300 ps corresponding to a space resolution <5 cm along the line of response, and DOI resolution even below 1 mm. We stress that such a time resolution allows to increase significantly the noise equivalent counting rate, and consequently improve the image quality and the lesion detection capability. PMID:22938315

  20. Photon counting compressive depth mapping.

    PubMed

    Howland, Gregory A; Lum, Daniel J; Ware, Matthew R; Howell, John C

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate a compressed sensing, photon counting lidar system based on the single-pixel camera. Our technique recovers both depth and intensity maps from a single under-sampled set of incoherent, linear projections of a scene of interest at ultra-low light levels around 0.5 picowatts. Only two-dimensional reconstructions are required to image a three-dimensional scene. We demonstrate intensity imaging and depth mapping at 256 × 256 pixel transverse resolution with acquisition times as short as 3 seconds. We also show novelty filtering, reconstructing only the difference between two instances of a scene. Finally, we acquire 32 × 32 pixel real-time video for three-dimensional object tracking at 14 frames-per-second. PMID:24104293

  1. Remote sensing of stream depths with hydraulically assisted bathymetry (HAB) models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonstad, Mark A.; Marcus, W. Andrew

    2005-12-01

    This article introduces a technique for using a combination of remote sensing imagery and open-channel flow principles to estimate depths for each pixel in an imaged river. This technique, which we term hydraulically assisted bathymetry (HAB), uses a combination of local stream gage information on discharge, image brightness data, and Manning-based estimates of stream resistance to calculate water depth. The HAB technique does not require ground-truth depth information at the time of flight. HAB can be accomplished with multispectral or hyperspectral data, and therefore can be applied over entire watersheds using standard high spatial resolution satellite or aerial images. HAB also has the potential to be applied retroactively to historic imagery, allowing researchers to map temporal changes in depth. We present two versions of the technique, HAB-1 and HAB-2. HAB-1 is based primarily on the geometry, discharge and velocity relationships of river channels. Manning's equation (assuming average depth approximates the hydraulic radius), the discharge equation, and the assumption that the frequency distribution of depths within a cross-section approximates that of a triangle are combined with discharge data from a local station, width measurements from imagery, and slope measurements from maps to estimate minimum, average and maximum depths at a multiple cross-sections. These depths are assigned to pixels of maximum, average, and minimum brightness within the cross-sections to develop a brightness-depth relation to estimate depths throughout the remainder of the river. HAB-2 is similar to HAB-1 in operation, but the assumption that the distribution of depths approximates that of a triangle is replaced by an optical Beer-Lambert law of light absorbance. In this case, the flow equations and the optical equations are used to iteratively scale the river pixel values until their depths produce a discharge that matches that of a nearby gage. R2 values for measured depths

  2. Molecular Depth Profiling by Wedged Crater Beveling

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Dan; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas; Wucher, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy are employed to characterize a wedge-shaped crater eroded by a 40keV C60+ cluster ion beam on an organic film of Irganox 1010 doped with Irganox 3114 delta layers. From an examination of the resulting surface, the information about depth resolution, topography and erosion rate can be obtained as a function of crater depth for every depth in a single experiment. It is shown that when measurements are performed at liquid nitrogen temperature, a constant erosion rate and reduced bombardment induced surface roughness is observed. At room temperature, however, the erosion rate drops by ~1/3 during the removal of the 400 nm Irganox film and the roughness gradually increased to from 1 nm ~4 nm. From SIMS lateral images of the beveled crater and AFM topography results, depth resolution was further improved by employing glancing angles of incidence and lower primary ion beam energy. Sub-10 nm depth resolution was observed under the optimized conditions on a routine basis. In general, we show that the wedge-crater beveling is an important tool for elucidating the factors that are important for molecular depth profiling experiments. PMID:21744861

  3. Learning the missing values in depth maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xuanwu; Wang, Guijin; Zhang, Chun; Liao, Qingmin

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we consider the task of hole filling in depth maps, with the help of an associated color image. We take a supervised learning approach to solve this problem. The model is learnt from the training set, which contain pixels that have depth values. Then we apply supervised learning to predict the depth values in the holes. Our model uses a regional Markov Random Field (MRF) that incorporates multiscale absolute and relative features (computed from the color image), and models depths not only at individual points but also between adjacent points. The experiments show that the proposed approach is able to recover fairly accurate depth values and achieve a high quality depth map.

  4. Temporal and Spatial Denoising of Depth Maps

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bor-Shing; Su, Mei-Ju; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Tseng, Po-Jui; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a procedure for refining depth maps acquired using RGB-D (depth) cameras. With numerous new structured-light RGB-D cameras, acquiring high-resolution depth maps has become easy. However, there are problems such as undesired occlusion, inaccurate depth values, and temporal variation of pixel values when using these cameras. In this paper, a proposed method based on an exemplar-based inpainting method is proposed to remove artefacts in depth maps obtained using RGB-D cameras. Exemplar-based inpainting has been used to repair an object-removed image. The concept underlying this inpainting method is similar to that underlying the procedure for padding the occlusions in the depth data obtained using RGB-D cameras. Therefore, our proposed method enhances and modifies the inpainting method for application in and the refinement of RGB-D depth data image quality. For evaluating the experimental results of the proposed method, our proposed method was tested on the Tsukuba Stereo Dataset, which contains a 3D video with the ground truths of depth maps, occlusion maps, RGB images, the peak signal-to-noise ratio, and the computational time as the evaluation metrics. Moreover, a set of self-recorded RGB-D depth maps and their refined versions are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26230696

  5. Temporal and Spatial Denoising of Depth Maps.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bor-Shing; Su, Mei-Ju; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Tseng, Po-Jui; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a procedure for refining depth maps acquired using RGB-D (depth) cameras. With numerous new structured-light RGB-D cameras, acquiring high-resolution depth maps has become easy. However, there are problems such as undesired occlusion, inaccurate depth values, and temporal variation of pixel values when using these cameras. In this paper, a proposed method based on an exemplar-based inpainting method is proposed to remove artefacts in depth maps obtained using RGB-D cameras. Exemplar-based inpainting has been used to repair an object-removed image. The concept underlying this inpainting method is similar to that underlying the procedure for padding the occlusions in the depth data obtained using RGB-D cameras. Therefore, our proposed method enhances and modifies the inpainting method for application in and the refinement of RGB-D depth data image quality. For evaluating the experimental results of the proposed method, our proposed method was tested on the Tsukuba Stereo Dataset, which contains a 3D video with the ground truths of depth maps, occlusion maps, RGB images, the peak signal-to-noise ratio, and the computational time as the evaluation metrics. Moreover, a set of self-recorded RGB-D depth maps and their refined versions are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26230696

  6. Resolution limits of ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Desailly, Yann; Pierre, Juliette; Couture, Olivier; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-11-21

    As in other imaging methods based on waves, the resolution of ultrasound imaging is limited by the wavelength. However, the diffraction-limit can be overcome by super-localizing single events from isolated sources. In recent years, we developed plane-wave ultrasound allowing frame rates up to 20,000 fps. Ultrafast processes such as rapid movement or disruption of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) can thus be monitored, providing us with distinct punctual sources that could be localized beyond the diffraction limit. We previously showed experimentally that resolutions beyond λ/10 can be reached in ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy (uULM) using a 128 transducer matrix in reception. Higher resolutions are theoretically achievable and the aim of this study is to predict the maximum resolution in uULM with respect to acquisition parameters (frequency, transducer geometry, sampling electronics). The accuracy of uULM is the error on the localization of a bubble, considered a point-source in a homogeneous medium. The proposed model consists in two steps: determining the timing accuracy of the microbubble echo in radiofrequency data, then transferring this time accuracy into spatial accuracy. The simplified model predicts a maximum resolution of 40 μm for a 1.75 MHz transducer matrix composed of two rows of 64 elements. Experimental confirmation of the model was performed by flowing microbubbles within a 60 μm microfluidic channel and localizing their blinking under ultrafast imaging (500 Hz frame rate). The experimental resolution, determined as the standard deviation in the positioning of the microbubbles, was predicted within 6 μm (13%) of the theoretical values and followed the analytical relationship with respect to the number of elements and depth. Understanding the underlying physical principles determining the resolution of superlocalization will allow the optimization of the imaging setup for each organ. Ultimately, accuracies better than the size of

  7. Depth and orientational dependencies of MRI T2 and T1ρ sensitivities towards trypsin degradation and Gd-DPTA2− presence in articular cartilage at microscopic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nian; Xia, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Depth and orientational dependencies of microscopic MRI T2 and T1ρ sensitivities were studied in native and trypsin-degraded articular cartilage, before and after being soaked in 1 mM Gd-DTPA2− solution. When the cartilage surface was perpendicular to B0, a typical laminar appearance was visible in T2 weighted images but not in T1ρ weighted images, especially when the spin-lock field was high (2 kHz). At the magic angle (55°) orientation, neither T2 nor T1ρ weighted image had a laminar appearance. Trypsin degradation caused a depth and orientational dependent T2 increase (4–64%) and a more uniform T1ρ increase at a sufficiently high spin-lock field (55–81%). The presence of the Gd ions caused both T2 and T1ρ to decrease significantly in the degraded tissue (6–38% and 44–49% respectively) but less notably in the native tissue (5–10% and 16–28% respectively). A quantity Sensitivity was introduced that combined both the percentage change and the absolute change in the relaxation analysis. An MRI experimental protocol based on two T1ρ measurements (without and with the presence of the Gd ions) was proposed to be a new imaging marker for cartilage degradation. PMID:22244543

  8. Stereoscopic depth constancy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Phillip; Banks, Martin S

    2016-06-19

    Depth constancy is the ability to perceive a fixed depth interval in the world as constant despite changes in viewing distance and the spatial scale of depth variation. It is well known that the spatial frequency of depth variation has a large effect on threshold. In the first experiment, we determined that the visual system compensates for this differential sensitivity when the change in disparity is suprathreshold, thereby attaining constancy similar to contrast constancy in the luminance domain. In a second experiment, we examined the ability to perceive constant depth when the spatial frequency and viewing distance both changed. To attain constancy in this situation, the visual system has to estimate distance. We investigated this ability when vergence, accommodation and vertical disparity are all presented accurately and therefore provided veridical information about viewing distance. We found that constancy is nearly complete across changes in viewing distance. Depth constancy is most complete when the scale of the depth relief is constant in the world rather than when it is constant in angular units at the retina. These results bear on the efficacy of algorithms for creating stereo content.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'. PMID:27269596

  9. Stereoscopic depth constancy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Depth constancy is the ability to perceive a fixed depth interval in the world as constant despite changes in viewing distance and the spatial scale of depth variation. It is well known that the spatial frequency of depth variation has a large effect on threshold. In the first experiment, we determined that the visual system compensates for this differential sensitivity when the change in disparity is suprathreshold, thereby attaining constancy similar to contrast constancy in the luminance domain. In a second experiment, we examined the ability to perceive constant depth when the spatial frequency and viewing distance both changed. To attain constancy in this situation, the visual system has to estimate distance. We investigated this ability when vergence, accommodation and vertical disparity are all presented accurately and therefore provided veridical information about viewing distance. We found that constancy is nearly complete across changes in viewing distance. Depth constancy is most complete when the scale of the depth relief is constant in the world rather than when it is constant in angular units at the retina. These results bear on the efficacy of algorithms for creating stereo content. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269596

  10. Real-time depth monitoring and control of laser machining through scanning beam delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yang; Grindal, Alexander W.; Webster, Paul J. L.; Fraser, James M.

    2015-04-01

    Scanning optics enable many laser applications in manufacturing because their low inertia allows rapid movement of the process beam across the sample. We describe our method of inline coherent imaging for real-time (up to 230 kHz) micron-scale (7-8 µm axial resolution) tracking and control of laser machining depth through a scanning galvo-telecentric beam delivery system. For 1 cm trench etching in stainless steel, we collect high speed intrapulse and interpulse morphology which is useful for further understanding underlying mechanisms or comparison with numerical models. We also collect overall sweep-to-sweep depth penetration which can be used for feedback depth control. For trench etching in silicon, we show the relationship of etch rate with average power and scan speed by computer processing of depth information without destructive sample post-processing. We also achieve three-dimensional infrared continuous wave (modulated) laser machining of a 3.96 × 3.96 × 0.5 mm3 (length × width × maximum depth) pattern on steel with depth feedback. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful demonstration of direct real-time depth monitoring and control of laser machining with scanning optics.

  11. Deep depth undex simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, R. R.; Malakhoff, A.

    1985-01-29

    A deep depth underwater simulator is illustrated for determining the dual effects of nuclear type underwater explosion shockwaves and hydrostatic pressures on a test vessel while simulating, hydrostatically, that the test vessel is located at deep depths. The test vessel is positioned within a specially designed pressure vessel followed by pressurizing a fluid contained between the test and pressure vessels. The pressure vessel, with the test vessel suspended therein, is then placed in a body of water at a relatively shallow depth, and an explosive charge is detonated at a predetermined distance from the pressure vessel. The resulting shockwave is transmitted through the pressure vessel wall so that the shockwave impinging on the test vessel is representative of nuclear type explosive shockwaves transmitted to an underwater structure at great depths.

  12. Depth Optimization Study

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kawase, Mitsuhiro

    2009-11-22

    The zipped file contains a directory of data and routines used in the NNMREC turbine depth optimization study (Kawase et al., 2011), and calculation results thereof. For further info, please contact Mitsuhiro Kawase at kawase@uw.edu. Reference: Mitsuhiro Kawase, Patricia Beba, and Brian Fabien (2011), Finding an Optimal Placement Depth for a Tidal In-Stream Conversion Device in an Energetic, Baroclinic Tidal Channel, NNMREC Technical Report.

  13. Hydrologic controls on the development of equilibrium soil depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicotina, L.; Tarboton, D. G.; Tesfa, T. K.; Rinaldo, A.

    2010-12-01

    The object of the present work was the study of the coevolution of runoff production and geomorphological processes and its effects on the formation of equilibrium soil depth by focusing on their mutual feedbacks. The primary goal of this work is to describe spatial patterns of soil depth resulting, under the hypothesis of dynamic equilibrium, from long-term interactions between hydrologic forcings and soil production, erosion and sediment transport processes. These processes dominate the formation of actual soil depth patterns that represent the boundary condition for water redistribution, thus this paper also proposes and attempt to set the premises for decoding their individual role and mutual interactions in shaping the hydrologic response of a catchment. The relevance of the study stems from the massive improvement in hydrologic predictions for ungauged basins that would be achieved by using directly soil depths derived from geomorphic features remotely measured and objectively manipulated. Moreover the setup of a coupled hydrologic-geomorphologic approach represents a first step into the study of such interactions and in particular of the effects of soil moisture in determining soil production functions. Hydrological processes are here described by explicitly accounting for local soil depths and detailed catchment topography from high resolution digital terrain models (DTM). Geomorphological processes are described by means of well-studied geomorphic transport laws. Soil depth is assumed, in the exponential soil production function, as a proxy for all the mechanisms that induce mechanical disruption of bedrock and it’s conversion into soil. This formulation, although empirical, has been widely used in the literature and is currently accepted. The modeling approach is applied to the semi-arid Dry Creek Experimental Watershed, located near Boise, Idaho, USA. Modeled soil depths are compared with field data obtained from an extensive survey of the catchment

  14. Underwater camera with depth measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Lin, Keng-Ren; Tsui, Chi L.; Schipf, David; Leang, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an RGB-D (video + depth) camera that provides three-dimensional image data for use in the haptic feedback of a robotic underwater ordnance recovery system. Two camera systems were developed and studied. The first depth camera relies on structured light (as used by the Microsoft Kinect), where the displacement of an object is determined by variations of the geometry of a projected pattern. The other camera system is based on a Time of Flight (ToF) depth camera. The results of the structural light camera system shows that the camera system requires a stronger light source with a similar operating wavelength and bandwidth to achieve a desirable working distance in water. This approach might not be robust enough for our proposed underwater RGB-D camera system, as it will require a complete re-design of the light source component. The ToF camera system instead, allows an arbitrary placement of light source and camera. The intensity output of the broadband LED light source in the ToF camera system can be increased by putting them into an array configuration and the LEDs can be modulated comfortably with any waveform and frequencies required by the ToF camera. In this paper, both camera were evaluated and experiments were conducted to demonstrate the versatility of the ToF camera.

  15. Depth Sensing for Improved Control of Lower Limb Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Nili Eliana; Lenzi, Tommaso; Hargrove, Levi J

    2015-11-01

    Powered lower limb prostheses have potential to improve the quality of life of individuals with amputations by enabling all daily activities. However, seamless ambulation mode recognition is necessary to achieve this goal and is not yet a clinical reality. Current intent recognition systems use mechanical and EMG sensors to estimate prosthesis and user status. We propose to complement these systems by integrating information about the environment obtained through the depth sensing. This paper presents the design, characterization, and the early validation of a novel stair segmentation system based on Microsoft Kinect. Static and dynamic tests were performed. A first experiment showed how the resolution of the depth camera affects the speed and the accuracy of segmentation. A second test proved the robustness of the algorithm to different staircases. Finally, we performed an online walking test with the stair segmentation and related measures recorded online at >5 frames/s. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm allows for an accurate estimate of distance, angle of intersection, number of steps, stair height, and stair depth for a set of stairs in the environment. The online test produced an estimate of whether the individual was approaching stairs in real time with approximately 98.8% accuracy. PMID:26111386

  16. In-depth qualitative and quantitative analysis of composite glycosylation profiles and other micro-heterogeneity on intact monoclonal antibodies by high-resolution native mass spectrometry using a modified Orbitrap

    PubMed Central

    Rosati, Sara; van den Bremer, Ewald TJ; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul WHI; Kamerling, Johannis P; Heck, Albert JR

    2013-01-01

    Here, we describe a fast, easy-to-use, and sensitive method to profile in-depth structural micro-heterogeneity, including intricate N-glycosylation profiles, of monoclonal antibodies at the native intact protein level by means of mass spectrometry using a recently introduced modified Orbitrap Exactive Plus mass spectrometer. We demonstrate the versatility of our method to probe structural micro-heterogeneity by describing the analysis of three types of molecules: (1) a non-covalently bound IgG4 hinge deleted full-antibody in equilibrium with its half-antibody, (2) IgG4 mutants exhibiting highly complex glycosylation profiles, and (3) antibody-drug conjugates. Using the modified instrument, we obtain baseline separation and accurate mass determination of all different proteoforms that may be induced, for example, by glycosylation, drug loading and partial peptide backbone-truncation. We show that our method can handle highly complex glycosylation profiles, identifying more than 20 different glycoforms per monoclonal antibody preparation and more than 30 proteoforms on a single highly purified antibody. In analyzing antibody-drug conjugates, our method also easily identifies and quantifies more than 15 structurally different proteoforms that may result from the collective differences in drug loading and glycosylation. The method presented here will aid in the comprehensive analytical and functional characterization of protein micro-heterogeneity, which is crucial for successful development and manufacturing of therapeutic antibodies PMID:23995615

  17. Jupiter Clouds in Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 619 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 727 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 890 nm

    Images from NASA's Cassini spacecraft using three different filters reveal cloud structures and movements at different depths in the atmosphere around Jupiter's south pole.

    Cassini's cameras come equipped with filters that sample three wavelengths where methane gas absorbs light. These are in the red at 619 nanometer (nm) wavelength and in the near-infrared at 727 nm and 890 nm. Absorption in the 619 nm filter is weak. It is stronger in the 727 nm band and very strong in the 890 nm band where 90 percent of the light is absorbed by methane gas. Light in the weakest band can penetrate the deepest into Jupiter's atmosphere. It is sensitive to the amount of cloud and haze down to the pressure of the water cloud, which lies at a depth where pressure is about 6 times the atmospheric pressure at sea level on the Earth). Light in the strongest methane band is absorbed at high altitude and is sensitive only to the ammonia cloud level and higher (pressures less than about one-half of Earth's atmospheric pressure) and the middle methane band is sensitive to the ammonia and ammonium hydrosulfide cloud layers as deep as two times Earth's atmospheric pressure.

    The images shown here demonstrate the power of these filters in studies of cloud stratigraphy. The images cover latitudes from about 15 degrees north at the top down to the southern polar region at the bottom. The left and middle images are ratios, the image in the methane filter divided by the image at a nearby wavelength outside the methane band. Using ratios emphasizes where contrast is due to methane absorption and not to other factors, such as the absorptive properties of the cloud particles, which influence contrast at all wavelengths.

    The most prominent feature seen in all three filters is the polar stratospheric haze that makes Jupiter

  18. Imaginative resonance training (IRT) achieves elimination of amputees' phantom pain (PLP) coupled with a spontaneous in-depth proprioception of a restored limb as a marker for permanence and supported by pre-post functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

    PubMed

    Meyer, Paul; Matthes, Christoph; Kusche, Karl Erwin; Maurer, Konrad

    2012-05-31

    Non-pharmacological approaches such as mirror therapy and graded motor imagery often provide amelioration of amputees' phantom limb pain (PLP), but elimination has proved difficult to achieve. Proprioception of the amputated limb has been noted in studies to be defective and/or distorted in the presence of PLP, but has not, apparently, been researched for various stages of amelioration up to the absence of PLP. Previous studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) suggested that pathological cortical reorganisation after amputation may be the underlying neurobiological correlate of PLP. We report two cases of permanent elimination of PLP after application of imaginative resonance training. The patients, 69 years and 84 years old, reported freedom from PLP together with in-depth achievement of proprioception of a restored limb at the end of the treatment, which may thus be taken as an indication of permanence. Pre/post fMRI for the first case showed, against a group of healthy controls, analogous changes of activation in the sensorimotor cortex. PMID:22748628

  19. Mesoscale oceanic response to wind events off central California in spring 1989: CTD surveys and AVHRR imagery. [Conductivity/temperature/depth surveys; Selected Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer satellite imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schwing, F.B.; Husby, D.M. ); Garfield, N.; Tracy, D.E. )

    1991-11-01

    Analysis of hydrographic data obtained during juvenile groundfish surveys, in relation to local wind forcing and AVHRR sea-surface temperature imagery, reveals that the oceanic region off central California between Point Reyes and Point Sur in spring 1989 was characterized by complex circulation patterns and considerable temporal and mesoscale variability. The 'spring transition' to upwelling-favorable winds is most clearly evidenced by rapid, large decreases in SST (up to 4-5C) measured at four meteorological buoys. Daily-averaged winds are spatially coherent and oscillate between upwelling-favorable and relaxation conditions at 3-10-day intervals. Persistent upwelling centers near Point Reyes and Point Ano Nuevo were characterized by relatively cool, salty (8-10C, 33.6-34.0 psu) water in the upper 50 m, which is derived from offshore water at depths of 50-100 m. Water-mass analysis reveals that upwelled water is advected equatorward from its source. Some upwelled water is transported into shallow coastal areas and warmed. Alongshelf fronts between relatively warm, low-salinity ([gt]13C, [lt]33.5 psu) offshore water and cool, higher-salinity upwelled water are advected onshore in response to wind relaxation or reversal events: frontal gradients intensify at these times. AVHRR imagery verifies the spatial patterns and complex mesoscale variability of the near-surface patterns observed in the CTD survey data. Eddylike hydrographic features are noted with horizontal scales on the order of the station spacing (10 km). How the complex circulation patterns and intense mesoscale spatial and temporal variability affect the survival and subsequent recruitment of juvenile groundfish is discussed.

  20. Radon depth migration

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, S.T. ); Carroll, R.J. )

    1993-02-01

    A depth migration method is presented that used Radon-transformed common-source seismograms as input. It is shown that the Radon depth migration method can be extended to spatially varying velocity depth models by using asymptotic ray theory (ART) to construct wavefield continuation operators. These operators downward continue an incident receiver-array plane wave and an assumed point-source wavefield into the subsurface. The migration velocity model is constrain to have longer characteristic wavelengths than the dominant source wavelength such that the ART approximations for the continuation operators are valid. This method is used successfully to migrate two synthetic data examples: (1) a point diffractor, and (2) a dipping layer and syncline interface model. It is shown that the Radon migration method has a computational advantage over the standard Kirchhoff migration method in that fewer rays are computed in a main memory implementation.

  1. Depth from water reflection.

    PubMed

    Linjie Yang; Jianzhuang Liu; Xiaoou Tang

    2015-04-01

    The scene in a water reflection image often exhibits bilateral symmetry. In this paper, we design a framework to reconstruct the depth from a single water reflection image. This problem can be regarded as a special case of two-view stereo vision. It is challenging to obtain correspondences from the real scene and the mirror scene due to their large appearance difference. We first propose an appearance adaptation method to transform the appearance of the mirror scene so that it is much closer to the real scene. We then present a stereo matching algorithm to obtain the disparity map of the real scene. Compared with other depth-from-symmetry work that deals with man-made objects, our algorithm can recover the depth maps of a variety of scenes, where both natural and man-made objects may exist. PMID:25643408

  2. Depth of field in modern thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Norbert; Franks, John

    2015-05-01

    Modern thermal imaging lenses for uncooled detectors are high aperture systems. Very often, their aperture based fnumber is faster than 1.2. The impact of this on the depth of field is dramatic, especially for narrow field lenses. The users would like to know how the image quality changes with and without refocusing for objects at different distances from the camera core. The Depth of Field approach presented here is based on the lens specific Through Focus MTF. It will be averaged for the detector area. The lens specific Through Focus MTF will be determined at the detector Nyquist frequency, which is defined by the pixel pitch. In this way, the specific lens and the specific FPA-geometry (pixel pitch, detector area) are considered. The condition, that the Through Focus MTF at full Nyquist must be higher than 0.25, defines a certain symmetrical depth of focus. This criterion provides a good discrimination for reasonable lens/detector combinations. The examples chosen reflect the actual development of uncooled camera cores. The symmetrical depth of focus is transferred to object space using paraxial relations. This defines a typical depth of field diagram containing three functions: Hyperfocal distance, nearest and furthest distance versus sharp distance (best focus). Pictures taken with an IR Camera illustrate the effect in the depth of field and its dependence on focal length. These pictures confirm the methodology. A separate problem is the acceptable drop of resolution in combination with a specific camera core and specific object scenes. We propose to evaluate the MTF-graph at half Nyquist frequency. This quantifies the resolution loss without refocus in accordance with the IR-picture degradation at the limits of the Depth of Field. The approach is applied to different commercially available lenses. Pictures illustrate the Depth of Field for different pixel pitches and pixel counts.

  3. Polarization lidar for shallow water depth measurement.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Steven; Thayer, Jeffrey P; Hayman, Matthew

    2010-12-20

    A bathymetric, polarization lidar system transmitting at 532 nm and using a single photomultiplier tube is employed for applications of shallow water depth measurement. The technique exploits polarization attributes of the probed water body to isolate surface and floor returns, enabling constant fraction detection schemes to determine depth. The minimum resolvable water depth is no longer dictated by the system's laser or detector pulse width and can achieve better than 1 order of magnitude improvement over current water depth determination techniques. In laboratory tests, an Nd:YAG microchip laser coupled with polarization optics, a photomultiplier tube, a constant fraction discriminator, and a time-to-digital converter are used to target various water depths with an ice floor to simulate a glacial meltpond. Measurement of 1 cm water depths with an uncertainty of ±3 mm are demonstrated using the technique. This novel approach enables new approaches to designing laser bathymetry systems for shallow depth determination from remote platforms while not compromising deep water depth measurement. PMID:21173834

  4. Improving depth maps with limited user input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewalle, Patrick; Klein Gunnewiek, René; Varekamp, Chris

    2010-02-01

    A vastly growing number of productions from the entertainment industry are aiming at 3D movie theaters. These productions use a two-view format, primarily intended for eye-wear assisted viewing in a well defined environment. To get this 3D content into the home environment, where a large variety of 3D viewing conditions exists (e.g. different display sizes, display types, viewing distances), we need a flexible 3D format that can adjust the depth effect. This can be provided by the image plus depth format, in which a video frame is enriched with depth information for all pixels in the video frame. This format can be extended with additional layers, such as an occlusion layer or a transparency layer. The occlusion layer contains information on the data that is behind objects, and is also referred to as occluded video. The transparency layer, on the other hand, contains information on the opacity of the foreground layer. This allows rendering of semi-transparencies such as haze, smoke, windows, etc., as well as transitions from foreground to background. These additional layers are only beneficial if the quality of the depth information is high. High quality depth information can currently only be achieved with user assistance. In this paper, we discuss an interactive method for depth map enhancement that allows adjustments during the propagation over time. Furthermore, we will elaborate on the automatic generation of the transparency layer, using the depth maps generated with an interactive depth map generation tool.

  5. Depth remapping using seam carving for depth image based rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubaki, Ikuko; Iwauchi, Kenichi

    2015-03-01

    Depth remapping is a technique to control depth range of stereo images. Conventional remapping which uses a transform function in the whole image has a stable characteristic, however it sometimes reduces the 3D appearance too much. To cope with this problem, a depth remapping method which preserves the details of depth structure is proposed. We apply seam carving, which is an effective technique for image retargeting, to depth remapping. An extended depth map is defined as a space-depth volume, and a seam surface which is a 2D monotonic and connected manifold is introduced. The depth range is reduced by removing depth values on the seam surface from the space-depth volume. Finally a stereo image pair is synthesized from the corrected depth map and an input color image by depth image based rendering.

  6. Efficient subwavelength focusing of light with a long focal depth.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Li, Qing; Fu, Jian; Wu, James; Lin, Feng; Wu, Xingkun

    2015-10-21

    We demonstrate an efficient method for far-field subwavelength focusing by a novel two-component axicon structure. Annular beams generated by a fiber axicon are focused using a micro-cone reflector, creating a quasi-Bessel beam with a high convergence angle of up to 40°. A center focal spot diameter of 0.41λ was achieved at a power efficiency of over 40%, with a focal depth of 9λ and a working distance as long as 35 μm. We further demonstrate that experimental knife-edge measurements mapping the beam focal intensity agree with numerical simulations of the structure. This method shows demonstrable promise in overcoming the optical focusing limit of single-element axicons and great potential for use in high tolerance, high-resolution applications in optical systems. PMID:26395150

  7. Super Spatial Resolution (SSR) method for scintigraphic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinci, G.; Massari, R.; Scandellari, M.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2011-01-01

    This work describes an innovative patented Super Spatial Resolution (SSR) method applied to scintigraphic devices. The aim of Super Resolution (SR) techniques is to enhance the resolution of an imaging system, using information from several images. SR reconstruction may be considered as a second generation problem of Image Restoration. It combines several slightly different Low Resolution (LR) images to obtain a High Resolution (HR) image. SR techniques are, widely, described in scientific literature mainly for applications in video communication, object recognition and image compression. In this paper we focus to apply the SR task to the scintigraphic imaging. Specifically, it is described as a patented method that uses a High Resolution Scintigraphic Camera (HRSC) to collect and process a set of scintigraphic images, in view of obtaining a very high resolution image. The HRSC device, which is currently used in Medical Imaging, is based on a parallel square holes collimator and on a Hamamatsu H8500 Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes (PSPMT). The SSR method is applied to the synthetic images of three different phantoms, to verify the effective spatial resolution values. The results confirm that it is possible to achieve optimal spatial resolution values at different depths, useful in small object and small animal imaging. Our study confirms the feasibility of a very high resolution system in scintigraphic imaging and the possibility to have gamma cameras using the SSR method, to perform clinical applications on patients.

  8. Integrated optical- and acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy based on an optical fiber bundle

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM), whose spatial resolution and maximum imaging depth are both scalable, has made great progress in recent years. However, each PAM system currently achieves only one resolution with an associated maximum imaging depth. Here, we present an integrated optical-resolution (OR) and acoustic-resolution (AR) PAM system implemented by delivering light via an optical fiber bundle. A single fiber core is used to deliver light for OR illumination in order to achieve a small spot size and hence high lateral resolution, whereas all the fiber cores are used to deliver more energy for AR illumination. Most other components are shared by the OR and AR imaging. The lateral resolution can be seamlessly switched between 2.2 μm and 40 μm as the maximum imaging depth is switched between 1.3 mm and 3.0 mm. The system enables automatically co-registered higher-resolution OR and deeper AR photoacoustic imaging. PMID:23282835

  9. Quantification of AES depth profiles by the MRI model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovač, Janez; Zalar, Anton; Praček, Borut

    2003-02-01

    The main physical effects that contribute to interface broadening in the sputter depth profiles of polycrystalline metallic multilayer structures were studied by comparison of measured and simulated AES depth profiles. An algorithm based on the so-called mixing-roughness-information depth (MRI) model was used to simulate AES depth profiles of Ni/Cr multilayer structures with different roughnesses of the initial surfaces. The simulated depth profiles were compared with measurements performed at two different depth profiling parameters on the Ni/Cr and Al/Ni/Cr multilayer structures with an initial surface roughness of about 1.0 and 21.5 nm, respectively. The comparison of simulated and measured depth profiles enabled us to separate and estimate different contributions to the interface broadening, as well as their dependence on the sputter depth. We found that roughness was the dominant factor related to depth resolution with respect to the information depth and atomic mixing contribution. The values of roughness introduced into the simulation algorithm coincided well with the values measured by AFM at the initial surface and after depth profiling. The results showed the capability of the simulation procedure based on the MRI model to separate and evaluate different contributions to the depth resolution.

  10. Depth profiling of gold nanoparticles and characterization of point spread functions in reconstructed and human skin using multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Labouta, Hagar I; Hampel, Martina; Thude, Sibylle; Reutlinger, Katharina; Kostka, Karl-Heinz; Schneider, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become popular in studying dermal nanoparticle penetration. This necessitates studying the imaging parameters of multiphoton microscopy in skin as an imaging medium, in terms of achievable detection depths and the resolution limit. This would simulate real-case scenarios rather than depending on theoretical values determined under ideal conditions. This study has focused on depth profiling of sub-resolution gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in reconstructed (fixed and unfixed) and human skin using multiphoton microscopy. Point spread functions (PSF) were determined for the used water-immersion objective of 63×/NA = 1.2. Factors such as skin-tissue compactness and the presence of wrinkles were found to deteriorate the accuracy of depth profiling. A broad range of AuNP detectable depths (20-100 μm) in reconstructed skin was observed. AuNP could only be detected up to ∼14 μm depth in human skin. Lateral (0.5 ± 0.1 μm) and axial (1.0 ± 0.3 μm) PSF in reconstructed and human specimens were determined. Skin cells and intercellular components didn't degrade the PSF with depth. In summary, the imaging parameters of multiphoton microscopy in skin and practical limitations encountered in tracking nanoparticle penetration using this approach were investigated. PMID:22147676

  11. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, Peter M.; Reger, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  12. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  13. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the companyused technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications.

  14. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the company used technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications

  15. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the company used technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications.

  16. Variable depth core sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates to a sampling means, more particularly to a device to sample hard surfaces at varying depths. Often it is desirable to take samples of a hard surface wherein the samples are of the same diameter but of varying depths. Current practice requires that a full top-to-bottom sample of the material be taken, using a hole saw, and boring a hole from one end of the material to the other. The sample thus taken is removed from the hole saw and the middle of said sample is then subjected to further investigation. This paper describes a variable depth core sampler comprimising a circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapse to form a point and capture a sample, and a second saw member residing inside the first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of the first member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside the the first hole saw member.

  17. Modeling depth distributions of overland flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mark W.; Cox, Nicholas J.; Bracken, Louise J.

    2011-02-01

    Hydrological and erosion models use water depth to estimate routing velocity and resultant erosion at each spatial element. Yet the shear stress distribution imposed on the soil surface and any resulting flow detachment and rill incision is controlled by the full probability distribution of depths of overland flow. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) is used in conjunction with simple field-flume experiments to provide high-resolution measures of overland flow depth-distributions for three semi-arid hillslope transects with differing soil properties. A two-parameter gamma distribution is proposed as the optimum model for depths of both interrill and rill flows. The shape and scale parameters are shown to vary consistently with distance downslope reflecting the morphological signature of runoff processes. The scale parameter is related to the general increase of depths with discharge ( P < 0.0001) as flows gradually concentrate; the shape parameter is more related to the soil surface roughness and potentially provides a control on the rate of depth, but also velocity increase with discharge. Such interactions between surface roughness and overland flows are of crucial importance for flow hydraulics and modeling sediment transport.

  18. Effect of image bit depth on target acquisition modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teaney, Brian P.; Reynolds, Joseph P.

    2008-04-01

    The impact of bit depth on human in the loop recognition and identification performance is of particular importance when considering trade-offs between resolution and band-width of sensor systems. This paper presents the results from two perception studies designed to measure the effects of quantization and finite bit depth on target acquisition performance. The results in this paper allow for the inclusion of limited bit depth and quantization as an additional noise term in NVESD sensor performance models.

  19. Broadband superluminescent diode-based ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography for ophthalmic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dexi; Shen, Meixiao; Jiang, Hong; Li, Ming; Wang, Michael R.; Wang, Yuhong; Ge, Lili; Qu, Jia; Wang, Jianhua

    2011-12-01

    Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with ultrahigh resolution can be used to measure precise structures in the context of ophthalmic imaging. We designed an ultrahigh resolution SD-OCT system based on broadband superluminescent diode (SLD) as the light source. An axial resolution of 2.2 μm in tissue, a scan depth of 1.48 mm, and a high sensitivity of 93 dB were achieved by the spectrometer designed. The ultrahigh-resolution SD-OCT system was employed to image the human cornea and retina with a cross-section image of 2048 × 2048 pixels. Our research demonstrated that ultrahigh -resolution SD-OCT can be achieved using broadband SLD in a simple way.

  20. In vivo deconvolution acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy in three dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Cai, De; Li, Zhongfei; Chen, Sung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ARPAM) provides a spatial resolution on the order of tens of micrometers, and is becoming an essential tool for imaging fine structures, such as the subcutaneous microvasculature. High lateral resolution of ARPAM is achieved using high numerical aperture (NA) of acoustic transducer; however, the depth of focus and working distance will be deteriorated correspondingly, thus sacrificing the imaging range and accessible depth. The axial resolution of ARPAM is limited by the transducer’s bandwidth. In this work, we develop deconvolution ARPAM (D-ARPAM) in three dimensions that can improve the lateral resolution by 1.8 and 3.7 times and the axial resolution by 1.7 and 2.7 times, depending on the adopted criteria, using a 20-MHz focused transducer without physically increasing its NA and bandwidth. The resolution enhancement in three dimensions by D-ARPAM is also demonstrated by in vivo imaging of the microvasculature of a chick embryo. The proposed D-ARPAM has potential for biomedical imaging that simultaneously requires high spatial resolution, extended imaging range, and long accessible depth. PMID:26977346

  1. Volumetric retinal fluorescence microscopic imaging with extended depth of field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zengzhuo; Fischer, Andrew; Li, Wei; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-03-01

    Wavefront-engineered microscope with greatly extended depth of field (EDoF) is designed and demonstrated for volumetric imaging with near-diffraction limited optical performance. A bright field infinity-corrected transmissive/reflective light microscope is built with Kohler illumination. A home-made phase mask is placed in between the objective lens and the tube lens for ease of use. General polynomial function is adopted in the design of the phase plate for robustness and custom merit function is used in Zemax for optimization. The resulting EDoF system achieves an engineered point spread function (PSF) that is much less sensitive to object depth variation than conventional systems and therefore 3D volumetric information can be acquired in a single frame with expanded tolerance of defocus. In Zemax simulation for a setup using 32X objective (NA = 0.6), the EDoF is 20μm whereas a conventional one has a DoF of 1.5μm, indicating a 13 times increase. In experiment, a 20X objective lens with NA = 0.4 was used and the corresponding phase plate was designed and fabricated. Retinal fluorescence images of the EDoF microscope using passive adaptive optical phase element illustrate a DoF around 100μm and it is able to recover the volumetric fluorescence images that are almost identical to in-focus images after post processing. The image obtained from the EDoF microscope is also better in resolution and contrast, and the retinal structure is better defined. Hence, due to its high tolerance of defocus and fine restored image quality, EDoF optical systems have promising potential in consumer portable medical imaging devices where user's ability to achieve focus is not optimal, and other medical imaging equipment where achieving best focus is not a necessary.

  2. Depth-encoded synthetic aperture optical coherence tomography of biological tissues with extended focal depth.

    PubMed

    Mo, Jianhua; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F

    2015-02-23

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be able to provide three-dimensional (3D) volumetric images of scattering biological tissues for in vivo medical diagnostics. Unlike conventional optical microscopy, its depth-resolving ability (axial resolution) is exclusively determined by the laser source and therefore invariant over the full imaging depth. In contrast, its transverse resolution is determined by the objective's numerical aperture and the wavelength which is only approximately maintained over twice the Rayleigh range. However, the prevailing laser sources for OCT allow image depths of more than 5 mm which is considerably longer than the Rayleigh range. This limits high transverse resolution imaging with OCT. Previously, we reported a novel method to extend the depth-of-focus (DOF) of OCT imaging in Mo et al.Opt. Express 21, 10048 (2013)]. The approach is to create three different optical apertures via pupil segmentation with an annular phase plate. These three optical apertures produce three OCT images from the same sample, which are encoded to different depth positions in a single OCT B-scan. This allows for correcting the defocus-induced curvature of wave front in the pupil so as to improve the focus. As a consequence, the three images originating from those three optical apertures can be used to reconstruct a new image with an extended DOF. In this study, we successfully applied this method for the first time to both an artificial phantom and biological tissues over a four times larger depth range. The results demonstrate a significant DOF improvement, paving the way for 3D high resolution OCT imaging beyond the conventional Rayleigh range. PMID:25836528

  3. Breaking the resolution limit: an exciting experimental result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonetti, Francesco

    2006-03-01

    For more than a century the possibility of imaging the structure of a medium with diffracting wavefields has been limited by the tradeoff between resolution and imaging depth. While long wavelengths can penetrate deep into a medium, the resolution limit precludes the possibility of observing subwavelength structures. Recent progress in microscopy has shown that by exploiting the super-oscillatory properties of evanescent fields, resolution several orders of magnitude smaller than the wavelength can be achieved so leading to Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy. Based on a similar argument, this paper investigates the possibility of obtaining super resolution in the far-field (here far-field refers to a distance greater than λ, which would enable high resolution imaging at relatively large depth. The theoretical principles which result in the resolution limit are reviewed and a new strategy to overcome it is proposed. An advanced imaging algorithm for linear and two-dimensional array probing systems is presented and its capability of resolving targets as close as λ/3 is demonstrated experimentally, the targets being at several wavelength distance from the array. The results show that the method is superior to conventional techniques such as Synthetic Aperture Focusing, Synthetic Phased Arrays and Time Reversal.

  4. High-Resolution Intravital Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Volker; Pollok, Karolin; Rinnenthal, Jan-Leo; Oehme, Laura; Günther, Robert; Spiecker, Heinrich; Radbruch, Helena; Gerhard, Jenny; Sporbert, Anje; Cseresnyes, Zoltan; Hauser, Anja E.; Niesner, Raluca

    2012-01-01

    Cellular communication constitutes a fundamental mechanism of life, for instance by permitting transfer of information through synapses in the nervous system and by leading to activation of cells during the course of immune responses. Monitoring cell-cell interactions within living adult organisms is crucial in order to draw conclusions on their behavior with respect to the fate of cells, tissues and organs. Until now, there is no technology available that enables dynamic imaging deep within the tissue of living adult organisms at sub-cellular resolution, i.e. detection at the level of few protein molecules. Here we present a novel approach called multi-beam striped-illumination which applies for the first time the principle and advantages of structured-illumination, spatial modulation of the excitation pattern, to laser-scanning-microscopy. We use this approach in two-photon-microscopy - the most adequate optical deep-tissue imaging-technique. As compared to standard two-photon-microscopy, it achieves significant contrast enhancement and up to 3-fold improved axial resolution (optical sectioning) while photobleaching, photodamage and acquisition speed are similar. Its imaging depth is comparable to multifocal two-photon-microscopy and only slightly less than in standard single-beam two-photon-microscopy. Precisely, our studies within mouse lymph nodes demonstrated 216% improved axial and 23% improved lateral resolutions at a depth of 80 µm below the surface. Thus, we are for the first time able to visualize the dynamic interactions between B cells and immune complex deposits on follicular dendritic cells within germinal centers (GCs) of live mice. These interactions play a decisive role in the process of clonal selection, leading to affinity maturation of the humoral immune response. This novel high-resolution intravital microscopy method has a huge potential for numerous applications in neurosciences, immunology, cancer research and developmental biology

  5. Optimization of Variable-Depth Liner Configurations for Increased Broadband Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; Nark, D. M.; Schiller, N. H.; Born, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper employs three acoustic propagation codes to explore variable-depth liner configurations for the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube (GFIT). The initial study demonstrates that a variable impedance can acceptably be treated as a uniform impedance if the spatial extent over which this variable impedance occurs is less than one-third of a wavelength of the incident sound. A constrained optimization study is used to design a variable-depth liner and to select an optimization metric. It also provides insight regarding how much attenuation can be achieved with variable-depth liners. Another optimization study is used to design a liner with much finer chamber depth resolution for the Mach 0.0 and 0.3 test conditions. Two liners are designed based on spatial rearrangement of chambers from this liner to determine whether the order is critical. Propagation code predictions suggest this is not the case. Both liners are fabricated via additive manufacturing and tested in the GFIT for the Mach 0.0 condition. Predicted and measured attenuations compare favorably across the full frequency range. These results clearly suggest that the chambers can be arranged in any order, thus offering the potential for innovative liner designs to minimize depth and weight.

  6. An iterative trilateral filter algorithm for depth map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kai; Piao, Yan; Zhang, Jing-he

    2015-03-01

    Depth map is critical in Free-viewpoint television (FTV) system, and the quality of reconstructed depth map impacts the quality of rendering view. Depth map obtained from TOF camera, not only appears with large flat area and sharp edges, but also contains lots of noises. In order to achieve the aim of decreasing the noise and keeping the accurate of edges in the depth map, an iterative trilateral filter is proposed by combining bilateral filter and the introduced factor of illumination normal in this paper. The experimental results show that the proposed method can reduce the noise obviously - and keep the edge of the depth map from TOF camera well.

  7. Depth-aware image seam carving.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianbing; Wang, Dapeng; Li, Xuelong

    2013-10-01

    Image seam carving algorithm should preserve important and salient objects as much as possible when changing the image size, while not removing the secondary objects in the scene. However, it is still difficult to determine the important and salient objects that avoid the distortion of these objects after resizing the input image. In this paper, we develop a novel depth-aware single image seam carving approach by taking advantage of the modern depth cameras such as the Kinect sensor, which captures the RGB color image and its corresponding depth map simultaneously. By considering both the depth information and the just noticeable difference (JND) model, we develop an efficient JND-based significant computation approach using the multiscale graph cut based energy optimization. Our method achieves the better seam carving performance by cutting the near objects less seams while removing distant objects more seams. To the best of our knowledge, our algorithm is the first work to use the true depth map captured by Kinect depth camera for single image seam carving. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach produces better seam carving results than previous content-aware seam carving methods. PMID:23893762

  8. USGS aerial resolution targets.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salamonowicz, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    It is necessary to measure the achievable resolution of any airborne sensor that is to be used for metric purposes. Laboratory calibration facilities may be inadequate or inappropriate for determining the resolution of non-photographic sensors such as optical-mechanical scanners, television imaging tubes, and linear arrays. However, large target arrays imaged in the field can be used in testing such systems. The USGS has constructed an array of resolution targets in order to permit field testing of a variety of airborne sensing systems. The target array permits any interested organization with an airborne sensing system to accurately determine the operational resolution of its system. -from Author

  9. Depth profiling of tritium in materials for fusion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sawicki, J.A.

    1988-09-01

    The paper outlines recent progress in depth profiling of tritium distribution near the surface of materials by two ion beam techniques; elastic recoil detection (ERD) and T(d,/alpha/)n nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). The sensitivity and depth-resolution of both methods are examined for a series of tritiated titanium films. Calculated depth profiles and ranges of implanted tritium ions in selected candidate materials for thermonuclear fusion devices are also given. Depth profiles of tritium implanted into specimens of graphite and lithium oxides as a function of temperature are discussed as the examples of applications.

  10. High resolution multiplexed functional imaging in live embyros (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongli; Peng, Leilei

    2016-03-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) creates isotropic 3D imaging of tissue. Two approaches exist today: Wide-field OPT illuminates the entire sample and acquires projection images with a camera; Scanning-laser optical tomography (SLOT) generates the projection with a moving laser beam and point detector. SLOT has superior light collecting efficiency than wide-field optical tomography, making it ideal for tissue fluorescence imaging. Regardless the approach, traditional OPT has to compromise between the resolution and the depth of view. In traditional SLOT, the focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focused plane, making it impossible to achieve high resolution imaging through a large volume specimen. We report using Bessel beam instead of Gaussian beam to perform SLOT. By illuminating samples with a narrow Bessel beam throughout an extended depth, high-resolution projection images can be measured in large volume. Under Bessel illumination, the projection image contains signal from annular-rings of the Bessel beam. Traditional inverse Radon transform of these projections will result in ringing artifacts in reconstructed imaging. Thus a modified 3D filtered back projection algorithm is developed to perform tomography reconstructing of Bessel-illuminated projection images. The resulting 3D imaging is free of artifact and achieved cellular resolution in extended sample volume. The system is applied to in-vivo imaging of transgenic Zebrafish embryos. Results prove Bessel SLOT a promising imaging method in development biology research.

  11. Ultra-long scan depth optical coherence tomography for imaging the anterior segment of human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dexi; Shen, Meixiao; Leng, Lin

    2012-12-01

    Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was developed in order to image the anterior segment of human eye. The optical path at reference arm was switched to compensate the sensitivity drop in OCT images. An scan depth of 12.28 mm and an axial resolution of 12.8 μm in air were achieved. The anterior segment from cornea to posterior surface of crystalline lens was clearly imaged and measured using this system. A custom designed Badal optometer was coupled into the sample arm to induce the accommodation, and the movement of crystalline lens was traced after the image registration. Our research demonstrates that SD-OCT with ultra-long scan depth can be used to image the human eye for accommodation research.

  12. Depth inpainting by tensor voting.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Mandar; Rajagopalan, Ambasamudram N

    2013-06-01

    Depth maps captured by range scanning devices or by using optical cameras often suffer from missing regions due to occlusions, reflectivity, limited scanning area, sensor imperfections, etc. In this paper, we propose a fast and reliable algorithm for depth map inpainting using the tensor voting (TV) framework. For less complex missing regions, local edge and depth information is utilized for synthesizing missing values. The depth variations are modeled by local planes using 3D TV, and missing values are estimated using plane equations. For large and complex missing regions, we collect and evaluate depth estimates from self-similar (training) datasets. We align the depth maps of the training set with the target (defective) depth map and evaluate the goodness of depth estimates among candidate values using 3D TV. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches on real as well as synthetic data. PMID:24323102

  13. Electron spectra derived from depth dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Faddegon, B A; Blevis, I

    2000-03-01

    The technique of extracting electron energy spectra from measured distributions of dose along the central axis of clinical electron beams is explored in detail. Clinical spectra measured with this simple spectroscopy tool are shown to be sufficient in accuracy and resolution for use in Monte Carlo treatment planning. A set of monoenergetic depth dose curves of appropriate energy spacing, precalculated with Monte Carlo for a simple beam model, are unfolded from the measured depth dose curve. The beam model is comprised of a point electron and photon source placed in vacuum with a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm. Systematic error introduced by this model affects the calculated depth dose curve by no more than 2%/2 mm. The component of the dose due to treatment head bremsstrahlung, subtracted prior to unfolding, is estimated from the thin-target Schiff spectrum within 0.3% of the maximum total dose (from electrons and photons) on the beam axis. Optimal unfolding parameters are chosen, based on physical principles. Unfolding is done with the public-domain code FERDO. Comparisons were made to previously published spectra measured with magnetic spectroscopy and to spectra we calculated with Monte Carlo treatment head simulation. The approach gives smooth spectra with an average resolution for the 27 beams studied of 16+/-3% of the mean peak energy. The mean peak energy of the magnetic spectrometer spectra was calculated within 2% for the AECL T20 scanning beam accelerators, 3% for the Philips SL25 scattering foil based machine. The number of low energy electrons in Monte Carlo spectra is estimated by unfolding with an accuracy of 2%, relative to the total number of electrons in the beam. Central axis depth dose curves calculated from unfolded spectra are within 0.5%/0.5 mm of measured and simulated depth dose curves, except near the practical range, where 1%/1 mm errors are evident. PMID:10757603

  14. DEPTH: a web server to compute depth and predict small-molecule binding cavities in proteins.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kuan Pern; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Madhusudhan, M S

    2011-07-01

    Depth measures the extent of atom/residue burial within a protein. It correlates with properties such as protein stability, hydrogen exchange rate, protein-protein interaction hot spots, post-translational modification sites and sequence variability. Our server, DEPTH, accurately computes depth and solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) values. We show that depth can be used to predict small molecule ligand binding cavities in proteins. Often, some of the residues lining a ligand binding cavity are both deep and solvent exposed. Using the depth-SASA pair values for a residue, its likelihood to form part of a small molecule binding cavity is estimated. The parameters of the method were calibrated over a training set of 900 high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of single-domain proteins bound to small molecules (molecular weight <1.5  KDa). The prediction accuracy of DEPTH is comparable to that of other geometry-based prediction methods including LIGSITE, SURFNET and Pocket-Finder (all with Matthew's correlation coefficient of ∼0.4) over a testing set of 225 single and multi-chain protein structures. Users have the option of tuning several parameters to detect cavities of different sizes, for example, geometrically flat binding sites. The input to the server is a protein 3D structure in PDB format. The users have the option of tuning the values of four parameters associated with the computation of residue depth and the prediction of binding cavities. The computed depths, SASA and binding cavity predictions are displayed in 2D plots and mapped onto 3D representations of the protein structure using Jmol. Links are provided to download the outputs. Our server is useful for all structural analysis based on residue depth and SASA, such as guiding site-directed mutagenesis experiments and small molecule docking exercises, in the context of protein functional annotation and drug discovery. PMID:21576233

  15. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 A ring TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron registered accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  16. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M.

    2011-06-01

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 Å TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron® accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  17. Whole-animal imaging with high spatio-temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhetri, Raghav; Amat, Fernando; Wan, Yinan; Höckendorf, Burkhard; Lemon, William C.; Keller, Philipp J.

    2016-03-01

    We developed isotropic multiview (IsoView) light-sheet microscopy in order to image fast cellular dynamics, such as cell movements in an entire developing embryo or neuronal activity throughput an entire brain or nervous system, with high resolution in all dimensions, high imaging speeds, good physical coverage and low photo-damage. To achieve high temporal resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time, IsoView microscopy rapidly images large specimens via simultaneous light-sheet illumination and fluorescence detection along four orthogonal directions. In a post-processing step, these four views are then combined by means of high-throughput multiview deconvolution to yield images with a system resolution of ≤ 450 nm in all three dimensions. Using IsoView microscopy, we performed whole-animal functional imaging of Drosophila embryos and larvae at a spatial resolution of 1.1-2.5 μm and at a temporal resolution of 2 Hz for up to 9 hours. We also performed whole-brain functional imaging in larval zebrafish and multicolor imaging of fast cellular dynamics across entire, gastrulating Drosophila embryos with isotropic, sub-cellular resolution. Compared with conventional (spatially anisotropic) light-sheet microscopy, IsoView microscopy improves spatial resolution at least sevenfold and decreases resolution anisotropy at least threefold. Compared with existing high-resolution light-sheet techniques, such as lattice lightsheet microscopy or diSPIM, IsoView microscopy effectively doubles the penetration depth and provides subsecond temporal resolution for specimens 400-fold larger than could previously be imaged.

  18. Flux maximization techniques for compton backscatter depth profilometry.

    PubMed

    Lawson, L

    1993-01-01

    Resolution in x-ray backscatter imaging has often been hampered by low fluxes. But, for a given set of resolution requirements and geometric constraints, it is possible to define a maximization problem in the geometric parameters for which the solution is the maximum flux possible in those circumstances. In this way, resolution in noncritical directions can be traded for improved resolution in a desired direction. Making this the thickness, or surface normal direction, makes practicable the depth profiling of layered structures. Such techniques were applied to the problem of imaging the layered structure of corroding aircraft sheet metal joints using Compton backscatter. PMID:21307450

  19. Animated Depth Images for Interactive Remote Visualization of Time-Varying Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Ma, Zhiqiang; Popescu, Voicu

    2014-11-01

    Remote visualization has become both a necessity, as data set sizes have grown faster than computer network performance, and an opportunity, as laptop, tablet, and smartphone mobile computing platforms have become ubiquitous. However, the conventional remote visualization (CRV) approach of sending a new image from the server to the client for every view parameter change suffers from reduced interactivity. One problem is high latency, as the network has to be traversed twice, once to communicate the view parameters to the server and once to transmit the new image to the client. A second problem is reduced image quality due to aggressive compression or low resolution. We address these problems by constructing and transmitting enhanced images that are sufficient for quality output frame reconstruction at the client for a range of view parameter values. The client reconstructs thousands of frames locally, without any additional data from the server, which avoids latency and aggressive compression. We introduce animated depth images, which not only store a color and depth sample at every pixel, but also store the trajectory of the samples for a given time interval. Sample trajectories are stored compactly by partitioning the image into semi-rigid sample clusters and by storing one sequence of rigid body transformations per cluster. Animated depth images leverage sample trajectory coherence to achieve a good compression of animation data, with a small and user-controllable approximation error. We demonstrate animated depth images in the context of finite element analysis and SPH data sets. PMID:26355328

  20. Depth profilometry via multiplexed optical high-coherence interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander; Behr, Bradford B; Hajian, Arsen R

    2015-01-01

    Depth Profilometry involves the measurement of the depth profile of objects, and has significant potential for various industrial applications that benefit from non-destructive sub-surface profiling such as defect detection, corrosion assessment, and dental assessment to name a few. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of depth profilometry using an Multiplexed Optical High-coherence Interferometry MOHI instrument. The MOHI instrument utilizes the spatial coherence of a laser and the interferometric properties of light to probe the reflectivity as a function of depth of a sample. The axial and lateral resolutions, as well as imaging depth, are decoupled in the MOHI instrument. The MOHI instrument is capable of multiplexing interferometric measurements into 480 one-dimensional interferograms at a location on the sample and is built with axial and lateral resolutions of 40 μm at a maximum imaging depth of 700 μm. Preliminary results, where a piece of sand-blasted aluminum, an NBK7 glass piece, and an optical phantom were successfully probed using the MOHI instrument to produce depth profiles, demonstrate the feasibility of such an instrument for performing depth profilometry. PMID:25803289

  1. Depth Profilometry via Multiplexed Optical High-Coherence Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander; Behr, Bradford B.; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2015-01-01

    Depth Profilometry involves the measurement of the depth profile of objects, and has significant potential for various industrial applications that benefit from non-destructive sub-surface profiling such as defect detection, corrosion assessment, and dental assessment to name a few. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of depth profilometry using an Multiplexed Optical High-coherence Interferometry MOHI instrument. The MOHI instrument utilizes the spatial coherence of a laser and the interferometric properties of light to probe the reflectivity as a function of depth of a sample. The axial and lateral resolutions, as well as imaging depth, are decoupled in the MOHI instrument. The MOHI instrument is capable of multiplexing interferometric measurements into 480 one-dimensional interferograms at a location on the sample and is built with axial and lateral resolutions of 40 μm at a maximum imaging depth of 700 μm. Preliminary results, where a piece of sand-blasted aluminum, an NBK7 glass piece, and an optical phantom were successfully probed using the MOHI instrument to produce depth profiles, demonstrate the feasibility of such an instrument for performing depth profilometry. PMID:25803289

  2. THEMIS Observations of Atmospheric Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Christensen, Philip R.; Richardson, Mark I.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Odyssey spacecraft entered into Martian orbit in October 2001 and after successful aerobraking began mapping in February 2002 (approximately Ls=330 deg.). Images taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on-board the Odyssey spacecraft allow the quantitative retrieval of atmospheric dust and water-ice aerosol optical depth. Atmospheric quantities retrieved from THEMIS build upon existing datasets returned by Mariner 9, Viking, and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). Data from THEMIS complements the concurrent MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data by offering a later local time (approx. 2:00 for TES vs. approx. 4:00 - 5:30 for THEMIS) and much higher spatial resolution.

  3. A practical block detector for a depth encoding PET camera

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.G.; Moisan, C.; Hoskinson, E.M.; Andreaco, M.S.; Williams, C.W.; Nutt, A.

    1995-10-01

    The depth-of-interaction effect in block detectors degrades the image resolution in commercial PET cameras and impedes the natural evolution of smaller, less expensive cameras. A method for correcting the measured position of each detected gamma ray by measuring its depth-of-interaction was tested and found to recover 38% of the lost resolution in a table-top 50 cm diameter camera. To obtain the desired depth sensitivity, standard commercial detectors were modified by a simple and practical process, which is suitable for mass production of the detectors. The impact of the detector modifications on central image resolution and on the ability of the camera to correct for object scatter were also measured.

  4. Bessel beam Grueneisen photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junhui; Wang, Lidai; Noordam, Cedric; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    The short focal depth of a Gaussian beam limits the volumetric imaging speed of optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM). A Bessel beam, which is diffraction-free, provides a long focal depth, but its side-lobes may deteriorate image quality when the Bessel beam is directly employed to excite photoacoustic signals in ORPAM. Here, we present a nonlinear approach based on the Grueneisen relaxation effect to suppress the side-lobe artifacts in photoacoustic imaging. This method extends the focal depth of OR-PAM and speeds up volumetric imaging. We experimentally demonstrated a 1-mm focal depth with a 7-μm lateral resolution and volumetrically imaged a carbon fiber and red blood cell samples.

  5. In-line three-dimensional holography of nanocrystalline objects at atomic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.-R.; van Dyck, D.; Kisielowski, C.

    2016-02-01

    Resolution and sensitivity of the latest generation aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopes allow the vast majority of single atoms to be imaged with sub-Ångstrom resolution and their locations determined in an image plane with a precision that exceeds the 1.9-pm wavelength of 300 kV electrons. Such unprecedented performance allows expansion of electron microscopic investigations with atomic resolution into the third dimension. Here we report a general tomographic method to recover the three-dimensional shape of a crystalline particle from high-resolution images of a single projection without the need for sample rotation. The method is compatible with low dose rate electron microscopy, which improves on signal quality, while minimizing electron beam-induced structure modifications even for small particles or surfaces. We apply it to germanium, gold and magnesium oxide particles, and achieve a depth resolution of 1-2 Å, which is smaller than inter-atomic distances.

  6. Toward improving streamflow prediction in the Upper Colorado River Basin via assimilating bias-adjusted satellite snow depth retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Kumar, S.; Arsenault, K. R.; Mocko, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    In snowmelt-driven river systems, it is critical to enable reliable predictions of the spatiotemporal variability in the seasonal snowpack in order to support local and regional water management. Previous studies have shown that improved snow predictions can be achieved by assimilating bias corrected snow depth retrievals from satellite-based passive microwave (PMW) sensors. However, improved snow predictions do not necessarily always translate into improved predictions of streamflow on which water management heavily relies. In this presentation, we explore how the existing bias correction strategy based on the optimal interpolation algorithm can be enhanced to produce an improved satellite-gauge blended snow depth product, which, when assimilated into a distributed snowmelt-runoff model, can lead to consistently improved streamflow predictions. The methodology is applied to the bias reduction of the snow depth estimates from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), which is then assimilated into the Noah land surface model via an ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) for streamflow prediction in the Upper Colorado River Basin. Our results indicate that using observations from high-elevation stations (e.g., the Snow Telemetry (SNOTEL) stations) and terrain aspect information in the bias correction process is critically important in achieving desirable streamflow predictions. Incorporating snow cover information (e.g., from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)) into bias correction can further improve the streamflow results. However, increasing the spatial resolution of bias correction tends to have mixed results on streamflow prediction.

  7. Application of femtosecond laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometry to in-depth multilayer analysis.

    PubMed

    Margetic, Vanja; Niemax, Kay; Hergenröder, Roland

    2003-07-15

    A femtosecond laser system was used in combination with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) for in-depth profiling of semiconductor and metal samples. The semiconductor sample was a Co-implanted (10(17) ions/cm3) silicon wafer that had been carefully characterized by other established techniques. The total depth of the shallow implanted layer was 150 nm. As a second sample, a thin film metal standard had been used (NIST 2135c). This standard consisted of a silicon wafer with nine alternating Cr and Ni layers, each having a thickness of 56 and 57 nm, respectively. An orthogonal TOF-MS setup was implemented. This configuration was optimized until a sufficient mass resolution of 300 (m/delta m) and sensitivity was achieved. The experiments revealed that femtosecond-laser ablation TOF-MS is capable of resolving the depth profiles of these demanding samples. The poor precision of the measurements is discussed, and it is shown that this is due to pulse-to-pulse stability of the current laser system. Femtosecond-laser ablation TOF-MS is shown to be a promising technique for rapid in-depth profiling with a good lateral resolution of various multilayer thin film samples. PMID:14570194

  8. Design of high-performance adaptive objective lens with large optical depth scanning range for ultrabroad near infrared microscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Gongpu; Mauger, Thomas F.; Li, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    We report on the theory and design of adaptive objective lens for ultra broadband near infrared light imaging with large dynamic optical depth scanning range by using an embedded tunable lens, which can find wide applications in deep tissue biomedical imaging systems, such as confocal microscope, optical coherence tomography (OCT), two-photon microscopy, etc., both in vivo and ex vivo. This design is based on, but not limited to, a home-made prototype of liquid-filled membrane lens with a clear aperture of 8mm and the thickness of 2.55mm ~3.18mm. It is beneficial to have an adaptive objective lens which allows an extended depth scanning range larger than the focal length zoom range, since this will keep the magnification of the whole system, numerical aperture (NA), field of view (FOV), and resolution more consistent. To achieve this goal, a systematic theory is presented, for the first time to our acknowledgment, by inserting the varifocal lens in between a front and a back solid lens group. The designed objective has a compact size (10mm-diameter and 15mm-length), ultrabroad working bandwidth (760nm - 920nm), a large depth scanning range (7.36mm in air) — 1.533 times of focal length zoom range (4.8mm in air), and a FOV around 1mm × 1mm. Diffraction-limited performance can be achieved within this ultrabroad bandwidth through all the scanning depth (the resolution is 2.22 μm - 2.81 μm, calculated at the wavelength of 800nm with the NA of 0.214 - 0.171). The chromatic focal shift value is within the depth of focus (field). The chromatic difference in distortion is nearly zero and the maximum distortion is less than 0.05%. PMID:26417508

  9. Depth-based computational photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ziwei; Xu, Tingfa; Liu, Jingdan; Li, Xiangmin; Zhao, Peng

    2015-05-01

    A depth-based computational photography model is proposed for all-in-focus image capture. A decomposition function, a defocus matrix, and a depth matrix are introduced to construct the photography model. The original image acquired from a camera can be decomposed into several sub-images on the basis of depth information. The defocus matrix can be deduced from the depth matrix according to the sensor defocus geometry for a thin lens model. And the depth matrix is reconstructed using the axial binocular stereo vision algorithm. This photography model adopts an energy functional minimization method to acquire the sharpest image pieces separately. The implementation of the photography method is described in detail. Experimental results for an actual scene demonstrate that our model is effective.

  10. Microphysical and Dynamical Influences on Cirrus Cloud Optical Depth Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, J.; Baker, M.; Hegg, D.

    2005-03-18

    Cirrus cloud inhomogeneity occurs at scales greater than the cirrus radiative smoothing scale ({approx}100 m), but less than typical global climate model (GCM) resolutions ({approx}300 km). Therefore, calculating cirrus radiative impacts in GCMs requires an optical depth distribution parameterization. Radiative transfer calculations are sensitive to optical depth distribution assumptions (Fu et al. 2000; Carlin et al. 2002). Using raman lidar observations, we quantify cirrus timescales and optical depth distributions at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Lamont, OK (USA). We demonstrate the sensitivity of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) calculations to assumed optical depth distributions and to the temporal resolution of optical depth measurements. Recent work has highlighted the importance of dynamics and nucleation for cirrus evolution (Haag and Karcher 2004; Karcher and Strom 2003). We need to understand the main controls on cirrus optical depth distributions to incorporate cirrus variability into model radiative transfer calculations. With an explicit ice microphysics parcel model, we aim to understand the influence of ice nucleation mechanism and imposed dynamics on cirrus optical depth distributions.

  11. High resolution drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 ..mu..m resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Curie Depth Analysis of the Salton Sea Region, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickus, Kevin; Hussein, Musa

    2016-02-01

    Aeromagnetic data were analyzed to determine the bottom of magnetic bodies that might be related to the Curie point depth (CPD) by 2D spectral and 3D inversion methods within the Salton Trough and the surrounding region in southern California. The bottom of the magnetic bodies for 55 × 55 km windows varied in depth between 11 and 23 km in depth using 2D spectral methods. Since the 55 × 55 km square window may include both shallow and deep source, a 3D inversion method was used to provide better resolution of the bottom of the magnetic bodies. The 3D models indicate the depth to the bottom of the magnetic bodies varied between 5 and 23 km. Even though both methods produced similar results, the 3D inversion method produced higher resolution of the CPD depths. The shallowest depths (5-8 km) occur along and west of the Brawley Seismic Zone and the southwestern portion of the Imperial Valley. The source of these shallow CPD values may be related to geothermal systems including hydrothermal circulation and/or partially molten material. Additionally, shallow CPD depths (7-12 km) were found in a northwest-trending zone in the center of the Salton Trough. These depths coincide with previous seismic analyses that indicated a lower crustal low velocity region which is believed to be caused by partially molten material. Lower velocity zones in several regions may be related to fracturing and/or hydrothermal fluids. If the majority of these shallow depths are related to temperature, they are likely associated with the CPD, and the partially molten material extends over a wider zone than previously known. Greater depths within the Salton Trough coincide with the base of basaltic material and/or regions of intense metamorphism intruded by mafic material in the middle/lower crust.

  13. Plumbing the depths of Ligeia: considerations for depth sounding in Titan's hydrocarbon seas.

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Juan; Lorenz, Ralph

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's moon Titan is the only satellite in this solar system with a dense atmosphere and hydrocarbon seas. The Titan Mare Explorer (TiME) mission would splashdown a capsule to float for 3 months on Ligeia Mare, a several-hundred-kilometer wide sea near Titan's north pole. Among TiME's scientific goals is the determination of the depth of Ligeia, to be achieved with an acoustic depth sounder. Since Titan's surface temperature is known to vary around 92 K, all instruments must be ruggedized to operate at cryogenic temperatures. This paper's contributions include an approach to infer key acoustic properties of this remote environment and the extraterrestrial environment's influence on the development of a cryogenic depth sounder. Additionally, an approach is formulated to infer the transducer's response, sensitivity, and performance when in situ calibration is impossible or when replicating key environmental conditions is too costly. PMID:25669245

  14. Conflicts and communication between high-achieving Chinese American adolescents and their parents.

    PubMed

    Qin, Desiree Baolian; Chang, Tzu-Fen; Han, Eun-Jin; Chee, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on in-depth interview data collected on 18 high-achieving Chinese American students, the authors examine domains of acculturation-based conflicts, parent and child internal conflicts, and conflict resolution in their families. Their analyses show that well-established negative communication patterns in educational expectations, divergent attitudes toward other races and country of origin, and cultural and language barriers contributed to parent-child conflicts. Their findings also illustrate important internal conflicts both adolescents and parents had along the cultural tightrope of autonomy and relatedness. Finally, the vertical in-group conflict resolution style that was evidenced in youths' accounts raises questions about cultural differences in constructive versus destructive conflict resolution styles. PMID:22407881

  15. Mechanistic evaluation of virus clearance by depth filtration.

    PubMed

    Venkiteshwaran, Adith; Fogle, Jace; Patnaik, Purbasa; Kowle, Ron; Chen, Dayue

    2015-01-01

    Virus clearance by depth filtration has not been well-understood mechanistically due to lack of quantitative data on filter charge characteristics and absence of systematic studies. It is generally believed that both electrostatic interactions and sized based mechanical entrapment contribute to virus clearance by depth filtration. In order to establish whether the effectiveness of virus clearance correlates with the charge characteristics of a given depth filter, a counter-ion displacement technique was employed to determine the ionic capacity for several depth filters. Two depth filters (Millipore B1HC and X0HC) with significant differences in ionic capacities were selected and evaluated for their ability to eliminate viruses. The high ionic capacity X0HC filter showed complete porcine parvovirus (PPV) clearance (eliminating the spiked viruses to below the limit of detection) under low conductivity conditions (≤2.5 mS/cm), achieving a log10 reduction factor (LRF) of > 4.8. On the other hand, the low ionic capacity B1HC filter achieved only ∼2.1-3.0 LRF of PPV clearance under the same conditions. These results indicate that parvovirus clearance by these two depth filters are mainly achieved via electrostatic interactions between the filters and PPV. When much larger xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMuLV) was used as the model virus, complete retrovirus clearance was obtained under all conditions evaluated for both depth filters, suggesting the involvement of mechanisms other than just electrostatic interactions in XMuLV clearance. PMID:25683459

  16. A new method for depth of interaction determination in PET detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzichemi, M.; Stringhini, G.; Niknejad, T.; Liu, Z.; Lecoq, P.; Tavernier, S.; Varela, J.; Paganoni, M.; Auffray, E.

    2016-06-01

    A new method for obtaining depth of interaction (DOI) information in PET detectors is presented in this study, based on sharing and redirection of scintillation light among multiple detectors, together with attenuation of light over the length of the crystals. The aim is to obtain continuous DOI encoding with single side readout, and at the same time without the need for one-to-one coupling between scintillators and detectors, allowing the development of a PET scanner with good spatial, energy and timing resolutions while keeping the complexity of the system low. A prototype module has been produced and characterized to test the proposed method, coupling a LYSO scintillator matrix to a commercial SiPMs array. Excellent crystal separation is obtained for all the scintillators in the array, light loss due to depolishing is found to be negligible, energy resolution is shown to be on average 12.7% FWHM. The mean DOI resolution achieved is 4.1 mm FWHM on a 15 mm long crystal and preliminary coincidence time resolution was estimated in 353 ps FWHM.

  17. A new method for depth of interaction determination in PET detectors.

    PubMed

    Pizzichemi, M; Stringhini, G; Niknejad, T; Liu, Z; Lecoq, P; Tavernier, S; Varela, J; Paganoni, M; Auffray, E

    2016-06-21

    A new method for obtaining depth of interaction (DOI) information in PET detectors is presented in this study, based on sharing and redirection of scintillation light among multiple detectors, together with attenuation of light over the length of the crystals. The aim is to obtain continuous DOI encoding with single side readout, and at the same time without the need for one-to-one coupling between scintillators and detectors, allowing the development of a PET scanner with good spatial, energy and timing resolutions while keeping the complexity of the system low. A prototype module has been produced and characterized to test the proposed method, coupling a LYSO scintillator matrix to a commercial SiPMs array. Excellent crystal separation is obtained for all the scintillators in the array, light loss due to depolishing is found to be negligible, energy resolution is shown to be on average 12.7% FWHM. The mean DOI resolution achieved is 4.1 mm FWHM on a 15 mm long crystal and preliminary coincidence time resolution was estimated in 353 ps FWHM. PMID:27245174

  18. Laser self-mixing sensor to monitor in situ the penetration depth during short pulse laser drilling of metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzapesa, Francesco P.; Ancona, Antonio; Sibillano, Teresa; De Lucia, Francesco; Dabbicco, Maurizio; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Scamarcio, Gaetano

    2011-05-01

    Direct real-time measurements of the penetration depth during laser micromachining has been demonstrated by developing a novel ablation sensor based on laser diode feedback interferometry. Percussion drilling experiments have been performed by focusing a 120-ps pulsed fiber laser onto metallic targets with different thermal conductivity. In-situ monitoring of the material removal rate was achieved by coaxially aligning the beam probe with the ablating laser. The displacement of the ablation front was revealed with sub-micrometric resolution by analyzing the sawtooth-like induced modulation of the interferometric signal out of the detector system.

  19. High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Eloranta, Ed

    2004-12-01

    The HSRL provided calibrated vertical profiles of optical depth, backscatter cross section and depoloarization at a wavelength of 532 nm. Profiles were acquired at 2.5 second intervals with 7.5 meter resolution. Profiles extended from an altitude of 100 m to 30 km in clear air. The lidar penetrated to a maximum optical depth of ~ 4 under cloudy conditions. Our data contributed directly to the aims of the M-PACE experiment, providing calibrated optical depth and optical backscatter measurements which were not available from any other instrument.

  20. Snow Depth Spatial Distribution Using Microwave Remote Sensing at the Puna Tsang River Basin in Bhutan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran-Ballen, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Koike, T.

    2012-12-01

    Spatial distribution of snow amount derived from satellite observations has been previously achieved for flat region. But for mountainous regions, spatial distribution of snow amount has not been addressed because remote sensing instruments are very sensitive to the effect of the terrain slope; and because there is no available data for validation. This study focuses on the estimation of snow amount using a microwave radiative transfer model (RTM) in mountain region. AMSR-E satellite observations of brightness temperature (Tb) at 18.7GHz and 36.5GHz frequencies are compared to calculated values of Tb in Lookup Tables generated by the RTM model. The model uses a snow algorithm to derive the snow depth and temperature spatial distribution over the target region. This snow algorithm has been previously validated in a flat region using in-situ recorded snow-depth data. In this study, the local slope in mountainous terrain, where the local incidence angle is different than the 55 degree incidence angle from the satellite, is taken into account. The local incidence angle is calculated from the scalar product between the radiometer scanning vector and the surface normal vector of the local slope. The terrain DEM is used to calculate the slope and aspect of each terrain grid. Then, with the geolocation of the satellite as it passes over, the local incidence angle is computed. AMSR-E data resolution is about 25x25 km but at this resolution we can not meaningfully express the topographic terrain. Therefore, a DEM resolution of 1x1 km is used. To overcome the difference of spatial resolution between the satellite observation and the terrain grid, the approach is to estimate the Tb for the 18.7GHz and 36.5GHz frequencies with the local incidence angle for each terrain grid. Then, an averaged Tb for each footprint is computed from the weighted average of the Tb of each terrain grid based on the count of occurrence of the same local incidence angle. Then, the averaged Tb is

  1. Divorce therapy: an in-depth survey of therapists' views.

    PubMed

    Kressel, K; Deutsch, M

    1977-12-01

    In-depth interviews were conducted with 21 highly experienced therapists on the criteria of a constructive divorce, the obstacles to achieving such a divorce, and the strategies and tactics of divorce therapy. The primary criterion of a constructive divorce was the successful completion of the process of psychic separation and the protection of the welfare of minor children. Therapy may focus on the decision to get divorced and/or the negotiation of the terms of a divorce settlement. Three types of therapeutic strategies were identified: reflexive intervention by which the therapist orients himself to the marital problems and attempts to gain the trust and confidence of the partners; contextual interventions by which he tries to promote a climate conducive to decision-making; and substantive interventions intended to produce resolution on terms the therapist has come to believe are inevitable or necessary. The nascent state of divorce therapy as an area of therapeutic specialization is noted. The problem of diagnostic criteria for divorce, the relationship between therapists and lawyers, the nature and consequence of therapist impartiality, and the degree to which therapists should mediate the terms of divorce are considered central issues meriting further study. PMID:590472

  2. Cluster SIMS and the Temperature Dependence of Molecular Depth Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Dan; Wucher, Andreas; Brenes, Daniel A; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    The quality of molecular depth profiles created by erosion of organic materials by cluster ion beams exhibits a strong dependence upon temperature. To elucidate the fundamental nature of this dependence, we employ the Irganox 3114/1010 organic delta layer reference material as a model system. This delta-layer system is interrogated using a 40 keV C60+ primary ion beam. Parameters associated with the depth profile such as depth resolution, uniformity of sputtering yield and topography are evaluated between 90 K and 300 K using a unique wedge-crater beveling strategy that allows these parameters to be determined as a function of erosion depth from atomic force microscope measurements. The results show that the erosion rate calibration performed using the known Δ-layer depth in connection with the fluence needed to reach the peak of the corresponding SIMS signal response is misleading. Moreover, we show that the degradation of depth resolution is linked to a decrease of the average erosion rate and the buildup of surface topography in a thermally activated manner. This underlying process starts to influence the depth profile above a threshold temperature between 210 and 250 K for the system studied here. Below that threshold, the process is inhibited and steady-state conditions are reached with constant erosion rate, depth resolution and molecular secondary ion signals from both the matrix and the Δ-layers. In particular, the results indicate that further reduction of the temperature below 90 K does not lead to further improvement of the depth profile. Above the threshold, the process becomes stronger at higher temperature, leading to an immediate decrease of the molecular secondary ion signals. This signal decay is most pronounced for the highest m/z ions but is less for the smaller m/z ions, indicating a shift toward small fragments by accumulation of chemical damage. The erosion rate decay and surface roughness buildup, on the other hand, exhibit a rather sudden

  3. [Dispute Resolutions].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Claudia L.; Cooks, Leda M.

    1994-01-01

    Focusing on the teaching of alternative dispute resolutions at universities, Claudia L. Hale and Leda M. Cooks argue that mediation should be taught primarily as a communication process that involves the joint efforts of mediator and disputants. Teachers of mediation should begin by distinguishing mediation from other forms of dispute resolution,…

  4. Medium-depth chemical peels.

    PubMed

    Monheit, G D

    2001-07-01

    The combination medium-depth chemical peel (Jessner's solution +35% TCA) has been accepted as a safe, reliable, and effective method for the treatment of moderate photoaging skin. This article discusses the procedure in detail, including postoperative considerations. PMID:11599398

  5. Teaching Depth of Field Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Frederick C.; Smith, Rodney J.

    1978-01-01

    This activity utilizes an overhead projector, a wax pencil, and a petri-dish to demonstrate the depth of field concept to students learning the use of the microscope. Illustrations and directions are included. (MA)

  6. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  7. Evaluation of efficient high quality depth upsampling methods for 3DTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosters, L. P. J.; Varekamp, C.; de Haan, G.

    2013-03-01

    High quality 3D content generation requires high quality depth maps. In practice, depth maps generated by stereo-matching, depth sensingcameras, or decoders, have a low resolution and suffer from unreliable estimates and noise. Therefore depth post-processing is necessary. In this paper we benchmark state-of-the-art filter based depth upsampling methods on depth accuracy and interpolation quality by conducting a parameter space search to find the optimum set of parameters for various upscale factors and noise levels. Additionally, we analyze each method's computational complexity with the big O notation and we measure the runtime of the GPU implementation that we built for each method.

  8. Depth resolved hyperspectral imaging spectrometer based on structured light illumination and Fourier transform interferometry.

    PubMed

    Choi, Heejin; Wadduwage, Dushan; Matsudaira, Paul T; So, Peter T C

    2014-10-01

    A depth resolved hyperspectral imaging spectrometer can provide depth resolved imaging both in the spatial and the spectral domain. Images acquired through a standard imaging Fourier transform spectrometer do not have the depth-resolution. By post processing the spectral cubes (x, y, λ) obtained through a Sagnac interferometer under uniform illumination and structured illumination, spectrally resolved images with depth resolution can be recovered using structured light illumination algorithms such as the HiLo method. The proposed scheme is validated with in vitro specimens including fluorescent solution and fluorescent beads with known spectra. The system is further demonstrated in quantifying spectra from 3D resolved features in biological specimens. The system has demonstrated depth resolution of 1.8 μm and spectral resolution of 7 nm respectively. PMID:25360367

  9. Depth resolved hyperspectral imaging spectrometer based on structured light illumination and Fourier transform interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Heejin; Wadduwage, Dushan; Matsudaira, Paul T.; So, Peter T.C.

    2014-01-01

    A depth resolved hyperspectral imaging spectrometer can provide depth resolved imaging both in the spatial and the spectral domain. Images acquired through a standard imaging Fourier transform spectrometer do not have the depth-resolution. By post processing the spectral cubes (x, y, λ) obtained through a Sagnac interferometer under uniform illumination and structured illumination, spectrally resolved images with depth resolution can be recovered using structured light illumination algorithms such as the HiLo method. The proposed scheme is validated with in vitro specimens including fluorescent solution and fluorescent beads with known spectra. The system is further demonstrated in quantifying spectra from 3D resolved features in biological specimens. The system has demonstrated depth resolution of 1.8 μm and spectral resolution of 7 nm respectively. PMID:25360367

  10. Focal depth measurement of scanning helium ion microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hongxuan; Itoh, Hiroshi; Wang, Chunmei; Zhang, Han; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-07-14

    When facing the challenges of critical dimension measurement of complicated nanostructures, such as of the three dimension integrated circuit, characterization of the focal depth of microscopes is important. In this Letter, we developed a method for characterizing the focal depth of a scanning helium ion microscope (HIM) by using an atomic force microscope tip characterizer (ATC). The ATC was tilted in a sample chamber at an angle to the scanning plan. Secondary electron images (SEIs) were obtained at different positions of the ATC. The edge resolution of the SEIs shows the nominal diameters of the helium ion beam at different focal levels. With this method, the nominal shapes of the helium ion beams were obtained with different apertures. Our results show that a small aperture is necessary to get a high spatial resolution and high depth of field images with HIM. This work provides a method for characterizing and improving the performance of HIM.

  11. Human machine interface by using stereo-based depth extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chao-Kang; Wu, Chi-Hao; Lin, Hsueh-Yi; Chang, Ting-Ting; Lin, Tung-Yang; Huang, Po-Kuan

    2014-03-01

    The ongoing success of three-dimensional (3D) cinema fuels increasing efforts to spread the commercial success of 3D to new markets. The possibilities of a convincing 3D experience at home, such as three-dimensional television (3DTV), has generated a great deal of interest within the research and standardization community. A central issue for 3DTV is the creation and representation of 3D content. Acquiring scene depth information is a fundamental task in computer vision, yet complex and error-prone. Dedicated range sensors, such as the Time­ of-Flight camera (ToF), can simplify the scene depth capture process and overcome shortcomings of traditional solutions, such as active or passive stereo analysis. Admittedly, currently available ToF sensors deliver only a limited spatial resolution. However, sophisticated depth upscaling approaches use texture information to match depth and video resolution. At Electronic Imaging 2012 we proposed an upscaling routine based on error energy minimization, weighted with edge information from an accompanying video source. In this article we develop our algorithm further. By adding temporal consistency constraints to the upscaling process, we reduce disturbing depth jumps and flickering artifacts in the final 3DTV content. Temporal consistency in depth maps enhances the 3D experience, leading to a wider acceptance of 3D media content. More content in better quality can boost the commercial success of 3DTV.

  12. Temporal consistent depth map upscaling for 3DTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Sebastian; Sjöström, Mârten; Olsson, Roger

    2014-03-01

    The ongoing success of three-dimensional (3D) cinema fuels increasing efforts to spread the commercial success of 3D to new markets. The possibilities of a convincing 3D experience at home, such as three-dimensional television (3DTV), has generated a great deal of interest within the research and standardization community. A central issue for 3DTV is the creation and representation of 3D content. Acquiring scene depth information is a fundamental task in computer vision, yet complex and error-prone. Dedicated range sensors, such as the Time­ of-Flight camera (ToF), can simplify the scene depth capture process and overcome shortcomings of traditional solutions, such as active or passive stereo analysis. Admittedly, currently available ToF sensors deliver only a limited spatial resolution. However, sophisticated depth upscaling approaches use texture information to match depth and video resolution. At Electronic Imaging 2012 we proposed an upscaling routine based on error energy minimization, weighted with edge information from an accompanying video source. In this article we develop our algorithm further. By adding temporal consistency constraints to the upscaling process, we reduce disturbing depth jumps and flickering artifacts in the final 3DTV content. Temporal consistency in depth maps enhances the 3D experience, leading to a wider acceptance of 3D media content. More content in better quality can boost the commercial success of 3DTV.

  13. Noncontact depth-resolved micro-scale optical coherence elastography of the cornea

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution elastographic assessment of the cornea can greatly assist clinical diagnosis and treatment of various ocular diseases. Here, we report on the first noncontact depth-resolved micro-scale optical coherence elastography of the cornea achieved using shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (SWI-OCT) combined with the spectral analysis of the corneal Lamb wave propagation. This imaging method relies on a focused air-puff device to load the cornea with highly-localized low-pressure short-duration air stream and applies phase-resolved OCT detection to capture the low-amplitude deformation with nano-scale sensitivity. The SWI-OCT system is used here to image the corneal Lamb wave propagation with the frame rate the same as the OCT A-line acquisition speed. Based on the spectral analysis of the corneal temporal deformation profiles, the phase velocity of the Lamb wave is obtained at different depths for the major frequency components, which shows the depthwise distribution of the corneal stiffness related to its structural features. Our pilot experiments on ex vivo rabbit eyes demonstrate the feasibility of this method in depth-resolved micro-scale elastography of the cornea. The assessment of the Lamb wave dispersion is also presented, suggesting the potential for the quantitative measurement of corneal viscoelasticity. PMID:25426312

  14. Large viewing angle three-dimensional display with smooth motion parallax and accurate depth cues.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xunbo; Sang, Xinzhu; Gao, Xin; Chen, Zhidong; Chen, Duo; Duan, Wei; Yan, Binbin; Yu, Chongxiu; Xu, Daxiong

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) display with smooth motion parallax and large viewing angle is demonstrated, which is based on a microlens array and a coded two-dimensional (2D) image on a 50 inch liquid crystal device (LCD) panel with the resolution of 3840 × 2160. Combining with accurate depth cues expressing, the flipping images of the traditional integral imaging (II) are eliminated, and smooth motion parallax can be achieved. The image on the LCD panel is coded as an elemental image packed repeatedly, and the depth cue is determined by the repeated period of elemental image. To construct the 3D image with complex depth structure, the varying period of elemental image is required. Here, the detailed principle and coding method are presented. The shape and the texture of a target 3D image are designed by a structure image and an elemental image, respectively. In the experiment, two groups of structure images and their corresponding elemental images are utilized to construct a 3D scene with a football in a green net. The constructed 3D image exhibits obviously enhanced 3D perception and smooth motion parallax. The viewing angle is 60°, which is much larger than that of the traditional II. PMID:26480110

  15. Temporal resolution enhancement from motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollason, M. P.; Watson, G. H.; Strens, M. J. A.

    2009-09-01

    We describe progress in the third year of the EMRS DTC TEP theme project entitled "Temporal Resolution Enhancement from Motion". The aim is to develop algorithms that combine evidence over time from a sequence of images in order to improve spatial resolution and reduce unwanted artefacts. Years one and two of this project developed and demonstrated an efficient algorithm that provided good resolution enhancement of a scene viewed in the far field (approximately flat) [1]. This paper reports a new algorithm which is applicable to a three dimensional scene where substantial depth variation causes parallax within the imagery. The new algorithm is demonstrated using airborne infra-red imagery.

  16. Lensfree on-chip high-resolution imaging using two-way lighting, and its limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Yasuhiko; Tamaki, Tokuhiko; Motomura, Hideto; Kato, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    A high-magnification image of a biological sample can generally be obtained by an optical microscope with an objective lens, moving the image sensor with a sub-pixel shift and the subsequent image processing for super-resolution. However, to obtain a high-resolution image, a large number of images will be required for the super-resolution, and thus it is difficult to achieve real-time operation, and the field-of-view (FOV) is not sufficiently wide. The currently proposed digital holography technique places a sample on the image sensor and captures the interference fringe (hologram) to reconstruct a 3D high-resolution image in a computer. This technique ensures the features of a wide FOV, whereas the high resolution obtained by image processing cannot ensure real-time operation, because it requires recursive calculations of light propagation and adequate computer resources. To realize wide FOV and the real-time operation at the same time, we have developed a new technique: Lensfree on-chip high-resolution imaging using two-way lighting. High-resolution image is immediately obtained by image processing of the low-resolution images of the samples. This makes it possible to ensure a wide FOV, a deep depth of focus without the need for focus adjustment, and a continuously expanding operation. We also discuss the limitations of the high resolution.

  17. High Spatio-Temporal Resolution Bathymetry Estimation and Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsma, E. W. J.; Conley, D. C.; Davidson, M. A.; O'Hare, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, bathymetry estimates using video images have become increasingly accurate. With the cBathy code (Holman et al., 2013) fully operational, bathymetry results with 0.5 metres accuracy have been regularly obtained at Duck, USA. cBathy is based on observations of the dominant frequencies and wavelengths of surface wave motions and estimates the depth (and hence allows inference of bathymetry profiles) based on linear wave theory. Despite the good performance at Duck, large discrepancies were found related to tidal elevation and camera height (Bergsma et al., 2014) and on the camera boundaries. A tide dependent floating pixel and camera boundary solution have been proposed to overcome these issues (Bergsma et al., under review). The video-data collection is set estimate depths hourly on a grid with resolution in the order of 10x25 meters. Here, the application of the cBathy at Porthtowan in the South-West of England is presented. Hourly depth estimates are combined and analysed over a period of 1.5 years (2013-2014). In this work the focus is on the sub-tidal region, where the best cBathy results are achieved. The morphology of the sub-tidal bar is tracked with high spatio-temporal resolution on short and longer time scales. Furthermore, the impact of the storm and reset (sudden and large changes in bathymetry) of the sub-tidal area is clearly captured with the depth estimations. This application shows that the high spatio-temporal resolution of cBathy makes it a powerful tool for coastal research and coastal zone management.

  18. Composite hull for full-ocean depth

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, R.E.; Hawkes, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    A lightweight and economical modular design concept for a manned submersible is proposed to give two passengers repeated access to the deepest parts of the ocean in a safe, comfortable, and efficient manner. This versatile craft will allow work and exploration to be accomplished at moderate to maximum depths without any compromise in terms of capabilities or operating cost. Its design follows the experience acquired from the numerous existing minimum volume'' pressure hull submersible, and represents a radical departure from conventional designs. This paper addresses issues of gaining effective, safe working access for full ocean depth. Cylindrical composite hulls have the potential to achieve positive buoyancy sufficient to carry personnel and equipment swiftly back to the surface after completing exploration of the deepest ocean. Buoyancy for a submersible is similar to lift for an airplane, except that without lift, the airplane remains on the surface, but without buoyancy, the submersible never returns to the surface. There are two means of achieving buoyancy. The traditional method used to steel, titanium, or aluminium alloy deep-ocean vehicles is to add a very large buoy to compensate for the negative buoyancy of the hull. The alternate method is for the hull to displace more than its weight in water. This requires at least twice compression strength per unit mass of hull than steel, titanium, or aluminum alloys can provide. Properly constructed organic-matrix composites are light and strong enough to form a dry, 1-atm cabin with buoyancy to carry research staff and equipment to any depth in the ocean. Three different composite hull configurations are presented. Each is capable of serving as a cabin for a two-person crew. None would displace more than 4 tons of seawater. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Bevel Depth Profiling SIMS for Analysis of Layer Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, Greg; Wight, Scott; Chi, Peter; Fahey, Albert; Verkouteren, Jennifer; Windsor, Eric; Fenner, D. B.

    2003-09-01

    We are evaluating the use of bevel depth profiling Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) for the characterization of layered semiconductor materials. In this procedure, a sub-degree angle bevel is cut into the analytical sample with an oxygen or cesium primary ion beam in a commercial SIMS instrument. The elemental distribution of the resulting bevel surface is then imaged with a focused ion beam in the same instrument. This approach offers maximum flexibility for depth profiling analysis. The primary beam energy, incident angle and species used to cut the bevel can be optimized to minimize ion beam mixing and surface topography independent of the conditions used for secondary ion analysis. In some cases, depth resolution can be greater than available from conventional depth profiling. Removal of residual surface damage/topography created during beveling has also been investigated by the cleaning of the bevel surfaces using gas-cluster ion beam sputtering before imaging analysis.

  20. Monitoring the Depth of Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Musizza, Bojan; Ribaric, Samo

    2010-01-01

    One of the current challenges in medicine is monitoring the patients’ depth of general anaesthesia (DGA). Accurate assessment of the depth of anaesthesia contributes to tailoring drug administration to the individual patient, thus preventing awareness or excessive anaesthetic depth and improving patients’ outcomes. In the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of studies on the development, comparison and validation of commercial devices that estimate the DGA by analyzing electrical activity of the brain (i.e., evoked potentials or brain waves). In this paper we review the most frequently used sensors and mathematical methods for monitoring the DGA, their validation in clinical practice and discuss the central question of whether these approaches can, compared to other conventional methods, reduce the risk of patient awareness during surgical procedures. PMID:22163504

  1. Flexible depth of field photography.

    PubMed

    Kuthirummal, Sujit; Nagahara, Hajime; Zhou, Changyin; Nayar, Shree K

    2011-01-01

    The range of scene depths that appear focused in an image is known as the depth of field (DOF). Conventional cameras are limited by a fundamental trade-off between depth of field and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). For a dark scene, the aperture of the lens must be opened up to maintain SNR, which causes the DOF to reduce. Also, today's cameras have DOFs that correspond to a single slab that is perpendicular to the optical axis. In this paper, we present an imaging system that enables one to control the DOF in new and powerful ways. Our approach is to vary the position and/or orientation of the image detector during the integration time of a single photograph. Even when the detector motion is very small (tens of microns), a large range of scene depths (several meters) is captured, both in and out of focus. Our prototype camera uses a micro-actuator to translate the detector along the optical axis during image integration. Using this device, we demonstrate four applications of flexible DOF. First, we describe extended DOF where a large depth range is captured with a very wide aperture (low noise) but with nearly depth-independent defocus blur. Deconvolving a captured image with a single blur kernel gives an image with extended DOF and high SNR. Next, we show the capture of images with discontinuous DOFs. For instance, near and far objects can be imaged with sharpness, while objects in between are severely blurred. Third, we show that our camera can capture images with tilted DOFs (Scheimpflug imaging) without tilting the image detector. Finally, we demonstrate how our camera can be used to realize nonplanar DOFs. We believe flexible DOF imaging can open a new creative dimension in photography and lead to new capabilities in scientific imaging, vision, and graphics. PMID:21088319

  2. Sedimentary basins reconnaissance using the magnetic Tilt-Depth method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salem, A.; Williams, S.; Samson, E.; Fairhead, D.; Ravat, D.; Blakely, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    We compute the depth to the top of magnetic basement using the Tilt-Depth method from the best available magnetic anomaly grids covering the continental USA and Australia. For the USA, the Tilt-Depth estimates were compared with sediment thicknesses based on drilling data and show a correlation of 0.86 between the datasets. If random data were used then the correlation value goes to virtually zero. There is little to no lateral offset of the depth of basinal features although there is a tendency for the Tilt-Depth results to be slightly shallower than the drill depths. We also applied the Tilt-Depth method to a local-scale, relatively high-resolution aeromagnetic survey over the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State. The Tilt-Depth method successfully identified a variety of important tectonic elements known from geological mapping. Of particular interest, the Tilt-Depth method illuminated deep (3km) contacts within the non-magnetic sedimentary core of the Olympic Mountains, where magnetic anomalies are subdued and low in amplitude. For Australia, the Tilt-Depth estimates also give a good correlation with known areas of shallow basement and sedimentary basins. Our estimates of basement depth are not restricted to regional analysis but work equally well at the micro scale (basin scale) with depth estimates agreeing well with drill hole and seismic data. We focus on the eastern Officer Basin as an example of basin scale studies and find a good level of agreement between previously-derived basin models. However, our study potentially reveals depocentres not previously mapped due to the sparse distribution of well data. This example thus shows the potential additional advantage of the method in geological interpretation. The success of this study suggests that the Tilt-Depth method is useful in estimating the depth to crystalline basement when appropriate quality aeromagnetic anomaly data are used (i.e. line spacing on the order of or less than the expected depth to

  3. Sedimentary basins reconnaissance using the magnetic Tilt-Depth method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Ahmed; Williams, Simon; Samson, Esuene; Fairhead, Derek; Ravat, Dhananjay; Blakely, Richard J.

    2010-09-01

    We compute the depth to the top of magnetic basement using the Tilt-Depth method from the best available magnetic anomaly grids covering the continental USA and Australia. For the USA, the Tilt-Depth estimates were compared with sediment thicknesses based on drilling data and show a correlation of 0.86 between the datasets. If random data were used then the correlation value goes to virtually zero. There is little to no lateral offset of the depth of basinal features although there is a tendency for the Tilt-Depth results to be slightly shallower than the drill depths. We also applied the Tilt-Depth method to a local-scale, relatively high-resolution aeromagnetic survey over the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State. The Tilt-Depth method successfully identified a variety of important tectonic elements known from geological mapping. Of particular interest, the Tilt-Depth method illuminated deep (3km) contacts within the non-magnetic sedimentary core of the Olympic Mountains, where magnetic anomalies are subdued and low in amplitude. For Australia, the Tilt-Depth estimates also give a good correlation with known areas of shallow basement and sedimentary basins. Our estimates of basement depth are not restricted to regional analysis but work equally well at the micro scale (basin scale) with depth estimates agreeing well with drill hole and seismic data. We focus on the eastern Officer Basin as an example of basin scale studies and find a good level of agreement between previously-derived basin models. However, our study potentially reveals depocentres not previously mapped due to the sparse distribution of well data. This example thus shows the potential additional advantage of the method in geological interpretation. The success of this study suggests that the Tilt-Depth method is useful in estimating the depth to crystalline basement when appropriate quality aeromagnetic anomaly data are used (i.e. line spacing on the order of or less than the expected depth to

  4. Ultra-high resolution Fourier domain optical coherence tomography for old master paintings.

    PubMed

    Cheung, C S; Spring, M; Liang, H

    2015-04-20

    In the last 10 years, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has been successfully applied to art conservation, history and archaeology. OCT has the potential to become a routine non-invasive tool in museums allowing cross-section imaging anywhere on an intact object where there are no other methods of obtaining subsurface information. While current commercial OCTs have shown potential in this field, they are still limited in depth resolution (> 4 μm in paint and varnish) compared to conventional microscopic examination of sampled paint cross-sections (~1 μm). An ultra-high resolution fiber-based Fourier domain optical coherence tomography system with a constant axial resolution of 1.2 μm in varnish or paint throughout a depth range of 1.5 mm has been developed. While Fourier domain OCT of similar resolution has been demonstrated recently, the sensitivity roll-off of some of these systems are still significant. In contrast, this current system achieved a sensitivity roll-off that is less than 2 dB over a 1.2 mm depth range with an incident power of ~1 mW on the sample. The high resolution and sensitivity of the system makes it convenient to image thin varnish and glaze layers with unprecedented contrast. The non-invasive 'virtual' cross-section images obtained with the system show the thin varnish layers with similar resolution in the depth direction but superior clarity in the layer interfaces when compared with conventional optical microscope images of actual paint sample cross-sections obtained micro-destructively. PMID:25969057

  5. Fast Mode Decision for 3D-HEVC Depth Intracoding

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nana; Wu, Qinggang

    2014-01-01

    The emerging international standard of high efficiency video coding based 3D video coding (3D-HEVC) is a successor to multiview video coding (MVC). In 3D-HEVC depth intracoding, depth modeling mode (DMM) and high efficiency video coding (HEVC) intraprediction mode are both employed to select the best coding mode for each coding unit (CU). This technique achieves the highest possible coding efficiency, but it results in extremely large encoding time which obstructs the 3D-HEVC from practical application. In this paper, a fast mode decision algorithm based on the correlation between texture video and depth map is proposed to reduce 3D-HEVC depth intracoding computational complexity. Since the texture video and its associated depth map represent the same scene, there is a high correlation among the prediction mode from texture video and depth map. Therefore, we can skip some specific depth intraprediction modes rarely used in related texture CU. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce computational complexity of 3D-HEVC depth intracoding while maintaining coding efficiency. PMID:24963512

  6. Mobility and low contrast trip hazard avoidance using augmented depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Chris; Walker, Janine G.; Lieby, Paulette; Scott, Adele; Barnes, Nick

    2015-02-01

    Objective. We evaluated a novel visual representation for current and near-term prosthetic vision. Augmented depth emphasizes ground obstacles and floor-wall boundaries in a depth-based visual representation. This is achieved by artificially increasing contrast between obstacles and the ground surface via a novel ground plane extraction algorithm specifically designed to preserve low-contrast ground-surface boundaries. Approach. The effectiveness of augmented depth was examined in human mobility trials compared against standard intensity-based (Intensity), depth-based (Depth) and random (Random) visual representations. Eight participants with normal vision used simulated prosthetic vision with 20 phosphenes and eight perceivable brightness levels to traverse a course with randomly placed small and low-contrast obstacles on the ground. Main results. The number of collisions was significantly reduced using augmented depth, compared with intensity, depth and random representations (48%, 44% and 72% less collisions, respectively). Significance. These results indicate that augmented depth may enable safe mobility in the presence of low-contrast obstacles with current and near-term implants. This is the first demonstration that an augmentation of the scene ensuring key objects are visible may provide better outcomes for prosthetic vision.

  7. Multiwavelength phase unwrapping and aberration correction using depth filtered digital holography.

    PubMed

    Jaedicke, Volker; Goebel, Sebastian; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Gerhardt, Nils C; Welp, Hubert; Hofmann, Martin R

    2014-07-15

    In this Letter, we present a new approach to processing data from a standard spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system using depth filtered digital holography (DFDH). Intensity-based OCT processing has an axial resolution of the order of a few micrometers. When the phase information is used to obtain optical path length differences, subwavelength accuracy can be achieved, but this limits the resolvable step heights to half of the wavelength of the system. Thus there is a metrology gap between phase- and intensity-based methods. Our concept addresses this metrology gap by combining DFHD with multiwavelength phase unwrapping. Additionally, the measurements are corrected for aberrations. Here, we present proof of concept measurements of a structured semiconductor sample. PMID:25121676

  8. In vivo photoacoustic flowmetry at depths of the diffusive regime based on saline injection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Poudel, Joemini; Li, Guo; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We propose a saline injection-based method to quantify blood flow velocity in vivo with acoustic-resolution photoacoustic tomography. By monitoring the saline–blood interface propagating in the blood vessel, the flow velocity can be resolved. We first demonstrated our method in phantom experiments, where a root mean square error of prediction of 0.29  mm/s was achieved. By injecting saline into a mouse tail vein covered with 1 mm chicken tissue, we showed that the flow velocity in the tail vein could be measured at depths, which is especially pertinent to monitoring blood flow velocity in patients undergoing intravenous infusion. PMID:26267364

  9. Rotating drum variable depth sampler

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.; Steeper, Timothy J.

    2008-07-01

    A sampling device for collecting depth-specific samples in silt, sludge and granular media has three chambers separated by a pair of iris valves. Rotation of the middle chamber closes the valves and isolates a sample in a middle chamber.

  10. Perceived depth from shading boundaries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juno; Anstis, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Shading is well known to provide information the visual system uses to recover the three-dimensional shape of objects. We examined conditions under which patterns in shading promote the experience of a change in depth at contour boundaries, rather than a change in reflectance. In Experiment 1, we used image manipulation to illuminate different regions of a smooth surface from different directions. This manipulation imposed local differences in shading direction across edge contours (delta shading). We found that increasing the angle of delta shading, from 0° to 180°, monotonically increased perceived depth across the edge. Experiment 2 found that the perceptual splitting of shading into separate foreground and background surfaces depended on an assumed light source from above prior. Image regions perceived as foreground structures in upright images appeared farther in depth when the same images were inverted. We also found that the experienced break in surface continuity could promote the experience of amodal completion of colored contours that were ambiguous as to their depth order (Experiment 3). These findings suggest that the visual system can identify occlusion relationships based on monocular variations in local shading direction, but interprets this information according to a light source from above prior of midlevel visual processing. PMID:27271807

  11. Estimating spatial distribution of daily snow depth with kriging methods: combination of MODIS snow cover area data and ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. L.; Wang, H. W.; Hou, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    Accurately measuring the spatial distribution of the snow depth is difficult because stations are sparse, particularly in western China. In this study, we develop a novel scheme that produces a reasonable spatial distribution of the daily snow depth using kriging interpolation methods. These methods combine the effects of elevation with information from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow cover area (SCA) products. The scheme uses snow-free pixels in MODIS SCA images with clouds removed to identify virtual stations, or areas with zero snow depth, to compensate for the scarcity and uneven distribution of stations. Four types of kriging methods are tested: ordinary kriging (OK), universal kriging (UK), ordinary co-kriging (OCK), and universal co-kriging (UCK). These methods are applied to daily snow depth observations at 50 meteorological stations in northern Xinjiang Province, China. The results show that the spatial distribution of snow depth can be accurately reconstructed using these kriging methods. The added virtual stations improve the distribution of the snow depth and reduce the smoothing effects of the kriging process. The best performance is achieved by the OK method in cases with shallow snow cover and by the UCK method when snow cover is widespread.

  12. Molecular Depth Profiling of Buried Lipid Bilayers Using C60-SIMS

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Caiyan; Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    An organic delta layer system made of alternating Langmuir Blodgett multilayers of barium arachidate (AA) and barium dimyristoyl phosphatidate (DMPA) was constructed to elucidate the factors that control depth resolution in molecular depth profile experiments. More specifically, one or several bilayers of DMPA (4.4 nm) were embedded in relatively thick (51 to 105 nm) multilayer stacks of AA, resulting in a well-defined delta-layer model system closely resembling a biological membrane. 3-D imaging ToF-SIMS depth profile analysis was performed on this system using a focused buckminsterfullerene (C60) cluster ion beam. The delta layer depth response function measured in these experiments exhibits similar features as those determined in inorganic depth profiling, namely an asymmetric shape with quasi-exponential leading and trailing edges and a central Gaussian peak. The effects of sample temperature, primary ion kinetic energy and incident angle on the depth resolution were investigated. While the information depth of the acquired SIMS spectra was found to be temperature independent, the depth resolution was found to be significantly improved at low temperature. Ion induced mixing is proposed to be largely responsible for the broadening, rather than topography, as determined by AFM, therefore depth resolution can be optimized using lower kinetic energy, glancing angle and liquid nitrogen temperature. PMID:21121691

  13. High-resolution extended source optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojun; Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Luo, Yuemei; Wang, Xianghong; Liu, Linbo

    2015-10-01

    High resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) is capable of providing detailed tissue microstructures that are critical for disease diagnosis, yet its sensitivity is usually degraded since the system key components are typically not working at their respective center wavelengths. We developed a novel imaging system that achieves enhanced sensitivity without axial resolution degradation by the use of a spectrally encoded extended source (SEES) technique; it allows larger sample power without exceeding the maximum permissible exposure (MPE). In this study, we demonstrate a high-resolution extended source (HRES) OCT system, which is capable of providing a transverse resolution of 4.4 µm and an axial resolution of 2.1 µm in air with the SEES technique. We first theoretically show a sensitivity advantage of 6-dB of the HRES-OCT over that of its point source counterpart using numerical simulations, and then experimentally validate the applicability of the SEES technique to high-resolution OCT (HR-OCT) by comparing the HRES-OCT with an equivalent point-source system. In the HRES-OCT system, a dispersive prism was placed in the infinity space of the sample arm optics to spectrally extend the visual angle (angular subtense) of the light source to 10.3 mrad. This extended source allowed ~4 times larger MPE than its point source counterpart, which results in an enhancement of ~6 dB in sensitivity. Specifically, to solve the unbalanced dispersion between the sample and the reference arm optics, we proposed easy and efficient methods for system calibration and dispersion correction, respectively. With a maximum scanning speed reaching up to 60K A-lines/s, we further conducted imaging experiments with HRES-OCT using the human fingertip in vivo and the swine eye tissues ex vivo. Results demonstrate that the HRES-OCT is able to achieve significantly larger penetration depth than its conventional point source OCT counterpart. PMID:26480153

  14. Shallow depth subsurface imaging with microwave holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravlev, Andrei; Ivashov, Sergey; Razevig, Vladimir; Vasiliev, Igor; Bechtel, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, microwave holography is considered as a tool to obtain high resolution images of shallowly buried objects. Signal acquisition is performed at multiple frequencies on a grid using a two-dimensional mechanical scanner moving a single transceiver over an area of interest in close proximity to the surface. The described FFT-based reconstruction technique is used to obtain a stack of plan view images each using only one selected frequency from the operating waveband of the radar. The extent of a synthetically-formed aperture and the signal wavelength define the plan view resolution, which at sounding frequencies near 7 GHz amounts to 2 cm. The system has a short depth of focus which allows easy selection of proper focusing plane. The small distance from the buried objects to the antenna does not prevent recording of clean images due to multiple reflections (as happens with impulse radars). The description of the system hardware and signal processing technique is illustrated using experiments conducted in dry sand. The microwave images of inert anti-personnel mines are demonstrated as examples. The images allow target discrimination based on the same visually-discernible small features that a human observer would employ. The demonstrated technology shows promise for modification to meet the specific practical needs required for humanitarian demining or in multi-sensor survey systems.

  15. Depth-resolved monitoring of analytes diffusion in ocular tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Kirill V.; Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging technique with high in-depth resolution. We employed OCT technique for monitoring and quantification of analyte and drug diffusion in cornea and sclera of rabbit eyes in vitro. Different analytes and drugs such as metronidazole, dexamethasone, ciprofloxacin, mannitol, and glucose solution were studied and whose permeability coefficients were calculated. Drug diffusion monitoring was performed as a function of time and as a function of depth. Obtained results suggest that OCT technique might be used for analyte diffusion studies in connective and epithelial tissues.

  16. Depth Sectioning with the Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Borisevich, Albina Y; Lupini, Andrew R; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    The ability to correct the aberrations of the probe-forming lens in the scanning transmission electron microscope provides not only a significant improvement in transverse resolution but in addition brings depth resolution at the nanometer scale. Aberration correction therefore opens up the possibility of 3D imaging by optical sectioning. Here we develop a definition for the depth resolution for scanning transmission electron microscope depth sectioning and present initial results from this method. Objects such as catalytic metal clusters and single atoms on various support materials are imaged in three dimensions with a resolution of several nanometers. Effective focal depth is determined by statistical analysis and the contributing factors are discussed. Finally, current challenges and future capabilities available through new instruments are discussed.

  17. Design of an optical system with large depth of field using in the micro-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rong; Chang, Jun; Zhang, Zhi-jing; Ye, Xin; Zheng, Hai-jing

    2013-08-01

    Micro system currently is the mainstream of application and demand of the field of micro fabrication of civilian and national defense. Compared with the macro assembly, the requirements on location accuracy of the micro-assembly system are much higher. Usually the dimensions of the components of the micro-assembly are mostly between a few microns to several hundred microns. The general assembly precision requires for the sub-micron level. Micro system assembly is the bottleneck of micro fabrication currently. The optical stereo microscope used in the field of micro assembly technology can achieve high-resolution imaging, but the depth of field of the optical imaging system is too small. Thus it's not conducive to the three-dimensional observation process of the micro-assembly. This paper summarizes the development of micro system assembly at home and abroad firstly. Based on the study of the core features of the technology, a program is proposed which uses wave front coding technology to increase the depth of field of the optical imaging system. In the wave front coding technology, by combining traditional optical design with digital image processing creatively, the depth of field can be greatly increased, moreover, all defocus-related aberrations, such as spherical aberration, chromatic aberration, astigmatism, Ptzvel(field) curvature, distortion, and other defocus induced by the error of assembling and temperature change, can be corrected or minimized. In this paper, based on the study of theory, a set of optical microscopy imaging system is designed. This system is designed and optimized by optical design software CODE V and ZEMAX. At last, the imaging results of the traditional optical stereo microscope and the optical stereo microscope applied wave front coding technology are compared. The results show that: the method has a practical operability and the phase plate obtained by optimized has a good effect on improving the imaging quality and increasing the

  18. NEXAFS Depth Profiling of Surface Segregation in Block Copolymer Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, S.; Paik, M; Ober, C; Martinelli, E; Galli, G; Sohn, K; Kramer, E; Fischer, D

    2010-01-01

    NEXAFS spectroscopy was used to probe the surface composition and under-water surface reconstruction of thin films of comb-like diblock copolymers with cylindrical and spherical microphases. The polymers consisted of a polystyrene block, and a second block prepared from a styrenic monomer grafted with fluoroalkyl-tagged poly(ethylene glycol) side chains. Compositional depth profiling of the microphase separated block copolymer films, in the top 1-3 nm of the film, was performed to understand the role of block copolymer microstructure and self-assembly on surface composition. Using experimentally determined concentration profiles, the surface concentration of phenyl ring carbon atoms was quantified and compared with those of homopolymer and random copolymer controls. The carbon atoms from the relatively high surface energy phenyl groups were depleted or excluded from the surface, in favor of the low surface-energy fluoroalkyl groups. While it is expected that block copolymer surfaces will be completely covered by a wetting lamellar layer of the lower surface energy block, a significant amount of the higher surface energy polystyrene block was found to be present in the surface region of the cylinder-forming block copolymer. Evidently, the spontaneous formation of the cylindrical polystyrene microdomains in the near-surface region compensated for the lowering of the free energy that could have been achieved by completely covering the surfaces with a lamellar layer of the lower surface energy fluorinated block. All surfaces underwent molecular reconstruction after immersion in water. The experimental concentration depth profiles indicated an increased surface depletion of phenyl ring carbon atoms in the water-immersed thin films, due to the tendency of hydrophilic PEG side groups to be present at the polymer-water interface. Such a detailed characterization of the outermost layers of the block copolymer surfaces was possible because of the exceptional depth resolution

  19. Development of Extended-Depth Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography for Applications in Ophthalmic Imaging of the Anterior and Posterior Eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhalla, Al-Hafeez Zahir

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive optical imaging modality that provides micron-scale resolution of tissue micro-structure over depth ranges of several millimeters. This imaging technique has had a profound effect on the field of ophthalmology, wherein it has become the standard of care for the diagnosis of many retinal pathologies. Applications of OCT in the anterior eye, as well as for imaging of coronary arteries and the gastro-intestinal tract, have also shown promise, but have not yet achieved widespread clinical use. The usable imaging depth of OCT systems is most often limited by one of three factors: optical attenuation, inherent imaging range, or depth-of-focus. The first of these, optical attenuation, stems from the limitation that OCT only detects singly-scattered light. Thus, beyond a certain penetration depth into turbid media, essentially all of the incident light will have been multiply scattered, and can no longer be used for OCT imaging. For many applications (especially retinal imaging), optical attenuation is the most restrictive of the three imaging depth limitations. However, for some applications, especially anterior segment, cardiovascular (catheter-based) and GI (endoscopic) imaging, the usable imaging depth is often not limited by optical attenuation, but rather by the inherent imaging depth of the OCT systems. This inherent imaging depth, which is specific to only Fourier Domain OCT, arises due to two factors: sensitivity fall-off and the complex conjugate ambiguity. Finally, due to the trade-off between lateral resolution and axial depth-of-focus inherent in diffractive optical systems, additional depth limitations sometimes arises in either high lateral resolution or extended depth OCT imaging systems. The depth-of-focus limitation is most apparent in applications such as adaptive optics (AO-) OCT imaging of the retina, and extended depth imaging of the ocular anterior segment. In this dissertation, techniques for

  20. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOEpatents

    Good, M.S.; Schuster, G.J.; Skorpik, J.R.

    1997-07-08

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part. 12 figs.

  1. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOEpatents

    Good, Morris S.; Schuster, George J.; Skorpik, James R.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Defense-in-Depth Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Edward G. Wallace; Karl N. Fleming; Edward M. Burns

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to (1) document the definition of defense-in-depth and the pproach that will be used to assure that its principles are satisfied for the NGNP project and (2) identify the specific questions proposed for preapplication discussions with the NRC. Defense-in-depth is a safety philosophy in which multiple lines of defense and conservative design and evaluation methods are applied to assure the safety of the public. The philosophy is also intended to deliver a design that is tolerant to uncertainties in knowledge of plant behavior, component reliability or operator performance that might compromise safety. This paper includes a review of the regulatory foundation for defense-in-depth, a definition of defense-in-depth that is appropriate for advanced reactor designs based on High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology, and an explanation of how this safety philosophy is achieved in the NGNP.

  3. High numerical aperture tabletop soft x-ray diffraction microscopy with 70-nm resolution

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Richard L.; Song, Changyong; Wachulak, Przemyslaw W.; Raymondson, Daisy A.; Paul, Ariel; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Lee, Edwin; Sakdinawat, Anne E.; La-O-Vorakiat, Chan; Marconi, Mario C.; Menoni, Carmen S.; Murnane, Margaret M.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Miao, Jianwei

    2008-01-01

    Light microscopy has greatly advanced our understanding of nature. The achievable resolution, however, is limited by optical wavelengths to ≈200 nm. By using imaging and labeling technologies, resolutions beyond the diffraction limit can be achieved for specialized specimens with techniques such as near-field scanning optical microscopy, stimulated emission depletion microscopy, and photoactivated localization microscopy. Here, we report a versatile soft x-ray diffraction microscope with 70- to 90-nm resolution by using two different tabletop coherent soft x-ray sources—a soft x-ray laser and a high-harmonic source. We also use field curvature correction that allows high numerical aperture imaging and near-diffraction-limited resolution of 1.5λ. A tabletop soft x-ray diffraction microscope should find broad applications in biology, nanoscience, and materials science because of its simple optical design, high resolution, large depth of field, 3D imaging capability, scalability to shorter wavelengths, and ultrafast temporal resolution. PMID:18162534

  4. A resolution honoring the lifetime achievements of E. Thom Rumberger.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Nelson, Bill [D-FL

    2011-09-13

    09/13/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S5584-5585; text as passed Senate: CR S5585; text of measure as introduced: CR S5583) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. A resolution honoring the achievements of E. Thom Rumberger.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Nelson, Bill [D-FL

    2011-08-01

    08/01/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S5196) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Measurement sampling and scaling for deep montane snow depth data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassnacht, S. R.; Deems, J. S.

    2006-03-01

    The resolution of snow depth measurements was scaled from a nominal horizontal resolution of approximately 1.5 m to 3, 5, 10, 20, and 30 m using averaging (AVG) and resampling with a uniform random stratified sampling (RSS) scheme. The raw snow depth values were computed from airborne light detection and ranging data by differencing summer elevation measurements from winter snow surface elevations. Three montane study sites from the NASA Cold Lands Processes Experiment, each covering an 1100 m × 1100 m area, were used.To examine scaling, log-log semi-variograms with 50 log-width bins were created for both of the different subsetting methods, i.e. RSS and AVG. From the raw data, a scale break, going from a structured to a nearly spatially random system, was observed in each of the log-log variograms. For each site, the scale break was still detectable at slightly greater than the resampling resolution for the RSS scheme, but at approximately twice the subsetting resolution for the AVG scheme. The resolution required to identify the scale break was still from 5 to 10 m, depending upon the location and sampling method.

  7. A depth video processing algorithm for high encoding and rendering performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mingsong; Chen, Fen; Sheng, Chengkai; Peng, Zongju; Jiang, Gangyi

    2014-11-01

    In free viewpoint video system, the color and the corresponding depth video are utilized to synthesize the virtual views by depth image based rendering (DIBR) technique. Hence, high quality of depth videos is a prerequisite for high quality of virtual views. However, depth variation, caused by scene variance and limited depth capturing technologies, may increase the encoding bitrate of depth videos and decrease the quality of virtual views. To tackle these problems, a depth preprocess method based on smoothing the texture and abrupt changes of depth videos is proposed to increase the accuracy of depth videos in this paper. Firstly, a bilateral filter is adopted to smooth the whole depth videos and protect the edge of depth videos at the same time. Secondly, abrupt variation is detected by a threshold calculated according to the camera parameter of each video sequence. Holes of virtual views occur when the depth values of left view change obviously from low to high in horizontal direction or the depth values of right view change obviously from high to low. So for the left view, depth value difference in left side gradually becomes smaller where it is greater than the thresholds. And then, in right side of right view is processed likewise. Experimental results show that the proposed method can averagely reduce the encoding bitrate by 25% while the quality of the synthesized virtual views can be improve by 0.39dB on average compared with using original depth videos. The subjective quality improvement is also achieved.

  8. Probabilistically Constraining Age-Depth-Models of Glaciogenic Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, J.; van der Bilt, W.; Tingley, M.

    2015-12-01

    Reconstructions of the late-Holocene climate rely heavily upon proxies that are assumed to be accurately dated by layer counting. All of these proxies, such as measurements of tree rings, ice cores, and varved lake sediments do carry some inherent dating uncertainty that is not always fully accounted for. Considerable advances could be achieved if time uncertainties were recognized and correctly modeled, also for proxies commonly treated as free of age model errors. Current approaches for accounting for time uncertainty are generally limited to repeating the reconstruction using each one of an ensemble of age models, thereby inflating the final estimated uncertainty - in effect, each possible age model is given equal weighting. Uncertainties can be reduced by exploiting the inferred space-time covariance structure of the climate to re-weight the possible age models. Werner and Tingley (2015) demonstrated how Bayesian hierarchical climate reconstruction models can be augmented to account for time-uncertain proxies. In their method, probabilities associated with the age models are formally updated within the Bayesian framework, thereby reducing uncertainties. Numerical experiments (Werner and Tingley 2015) show that updating the age model probabilities decreases uncertainty in the resulting reconstructions, as compared with the current de facto standard of sampling over all age models, provided there is sufficient information from other data sources in the spatial region of the time-uncertain proxy. We show how this novel method can be applied to high resolution, sub-annually sampled lacustrine sediment records to constrain their respective age depth models. The results help to quantify the signal content and extract the regionally representative signal. The single time series can then be used as the basis for a reconstruction of glacial activity. van der Bilt et al. in prep. Werner, J.P. and Tingley, M.P. Clim. Past (2015)

  9. Monocular catadioptric panoramic depth estimation via caustics-based virtual scene transition.

    PubMed

    He, Yu; Wang, Lingxue; Cai, Yi; Xue, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Existing catadioptric panoramic depth estimation systems usually require two panoramic imaging subsystems to achieve binocular disparity. The system structures are complicated and only sparse depth maps can be obtained. We present a novel monocular catadioptric panoramic depth estimation method that achieves dense depth maps of panoramic scenes using a single unmodified conventional catadioptric panoramic imaging system. Caustics model the reflection of the curved mirror and establish the distance relationship between the virtual and real panoramic scenes to overcome the nonlinear problem of the curved mirror. Virtual scene depth is then obtained by applying our structure classification regularization to depth from defocus. Finally, real panoramic scene depth is recovered using the distance relationship. Our method's effectiveness is demonstrated in experiments. PMID:27607512

  10. Focus cues affect perceived depth

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Simon J.; Akeley, Kurt; Ernst, Marc O.; Banks, Martin S.

    2007-01-01

    Depth information from focus cues—accommodation and the gradient of retinal blur—is typically incorrect in three-dimensional (3-D) displays because the light comes from a planar display surface. If the visual system incorporates information from focus cues into its calculation of 3-D scene parameters, this could cause distortions in perceived depth even when the 2-D retinal images are geometrically correct. In Experiment 1 we measured the direct contribution of focus cues to perceived slant by varying independently the physical slant of the display surface and the slant of a simulated surface specified by binocular disparity (binocular viewing) or perspective/texture (monocular viewing). In the binocular condition, slant estimates were unaffected by display slant. In the monocular condition, display slant had a systematic effect on slant estimates. Estimates were consistent with a weighted average of slant from focus cues and slant from disparity/texture, where the cue weights are determined by the reliability of each cue. In Experiment 2, we examined whether focus cues also have an indirect effect on perceived slant via the distance estimate used in disparity scaling. We varied independently the simulated distance and the focal distance to a disparity-defined 3-D stimulus. Perceived slant was systematically affected by changes in focal distance. Accordingly, depth constancy (with respect to simulated distance) was significantly reduced when focal distance was held constant compared to when it varied appropriately with the simulated distance to the stimulus. The results of both experiments show that focus cues can contribute to estimates of 3-D scene parameters. Inappropriate focus cues in typical 3-D displays may therefore contribute to distortions in perceived space. PMID:16441189

  11. Assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verver, Gé; Henzing, Bas

    Climate predictions are hampered by the large uncertainties involved in the estima- tion of the effects of atmospheric aerosol (IPCC,2001). These uncertainties are caused partly because sources and sinks as well as atmospheric processing of the different types of aerosol are not accurately known. Moreover, the climate impact (especially the indirect effect) of a certain distribution of aerosol is hard to quantify. There have been different approaches to reduce these uncertainties. In recent years intensive ob- servational campaigns such as ACE and INDOEX have been carried out, aiming to in- crease our knowledge of atmospheric processes that determine the fate of atmospheric aerosols and to quantify the radiation effects. With the new satellite instruments such as SCIAMACHY and OMI it will be possible in the near future to derive the ge- ographical distribution of the aerosol optical depths (AOD) and perhaps additional information on the occurrence of different aerosol types. The goal of the ARIA project (started in 2001) is to assimilate global satellite de- rived aerosol optical depth (AOD) in an off-line chemistry/transport model TM3. The TM3 model (Jeuken et al. 2001) describes sources, sinks, transformation and transport processes of different types of aerosol (mineral dust, carbon, sulfate, nitrate) that are relevant to radiative forcing. All meteorological input is provided by ECMWF. The assimilation procedure constrains the aerosol distribution produced by the model on the basis of aerosol optical depths observed by satellite. The product, i.e. an optimal estimation of global aerosol distribution, is then available for the calculation of radia- tive forcing. Error analyses may provide valuable information on deficiencies of the model. In the ARIA project it is tried to extract additional information on the type of aerosol present in the atmosphere by assimilating AOD at multiple wavelengths. First results of the ARIA project will be presented. The values

  12. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  13. Depth Estimation of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Clear Water Streams Using Low-Altitude Optical Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Fleur; Buis, Kerst; Verschoren, Veerle; Meire, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    UAVs and other low-altitude remote sensing platforms are proving very useful tools for remote sensing of river systems. Currently consumer grade cameras are still the most commonly used sensors for this purpose. In particular, progress is being made to obtain river bathymetry from the optical image data collected with such cameras, using the strong attenuation of light in water. No studies have yet applied this method to map submergence depth of aquatic vegetation, which has rather different reflectance characteristics from river bed substrate. This study therefore looked at the possibilities to use the optical image data to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) depth in shallow clear water streams. We first applied the Optimal Band Ratio Analysis method (OBRA) of Legleiter et al. (2009) to a dataset of spectral signatures from three macrophyte species in a clear water stream. The results showed that for each species the ratio of certain wavelengths were strongly associated with depth. A combined assessment of all species resulted in equally strong associations, indicating that the effect of spectral variation in vegetation is subsidiary to spectral variation due to depth changes. Strongest associations (R2-values ranging from 0.67 to 0.90 for different species) were found for combinations including one band in the near infrared (NIR) region between 825 and 925 nm and one band in the visible light region. Currently data of both high spatial and spectral resolution is not commonly available to apply the OBRA results directly to image data for SAV depth mapping. Instead a novel, low-cost data acquisition method was used to obtain six-band high spatial resolution image composites using a NIR sensitive DSLR camera. A field dataset of SAV submergence depths was used to develop regression models for the mapping of submergence depth from image pixel values. Band (combinations) providing the best performing models (R2-values up to 0.77) corresponded with the OBRA findings

  14. Depth Estimation of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Clear Water Streams Using Low-Altitude Optical Remote Sensing.

    PubMed

    Visser, Fleur; Buis, Kerst; Verschoren, Veerle; Meire, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    UAVs and other low-altitude remote sensing platforms are proving very useful tools for remote sensing of river systems. Currently consumer grade cameras are still the most commonly used sensors for this purpose. In particular, progress is being made to obtain river bathymetry from the optical image data collected with such cameras, using the strong attenuation of light in water. No studies have yet applied this method to map submergence depth of aquatic vegetation, which has rather different reflectance characteristics from river bed substrate. This study therefore looked at the possibilities to use the optical image data to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) depth in shallow clear water streams. We first applied the Optimal Band Ratio Analysis method (OBRA) of Legleiter et al. (2009) to a dataset of spectral signatures from three macrophyte species in a clear water stream. The results showed that for each species the ratio of certain wavelengths were strongly associated with depth. A combined assessment of all species resulted in equally strong associations, indicating that the effect of spectral variation in vegetation is subsidiary to spectral variation due to depth changes. Strongest associations (R²-values ranging from 0.67 to 0.90 for different species) were found for combinations including one band in the near infrared (NIR) region between 825 and 925 nm and one band in the visible light region. Currently data of both high spatial and spectral resolution is not commonly available to apply the OBRA results directly to image data for SAV depth mapping. Instead a novel, low-cost data acquisition method was used to obtain six-band high spatial resolution image composites using a NIR sensitive DSLR camera. A field dataset of SAV submergence depths was used to develop regression models for the mapping of submergence depth from image pixel values. Band (combinations) providing the best performing models (R²-values up to 0.77) corresponded with the OBRA

  15. Framework of a Contour Based Depth Map Coding Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minghui; He, Xun; Jin, Xin; Goto, Satoshi

    Stereo-view and multi-view video formats are heavily investigated topics given their vast application potential. Depth Image Based Rendering (DIBR) system has been developed to improve Multiview Video Coding (MVC). Depth image is introduced to synthesize virtual views on the decoder side in this system. Depth image is a piecewise image, which is filled with sharp contours and smooth interior. Contours in a depth image show more importance than interior in view synthesis process. In order to improve the quality of the synthesized views and reduce the bitrate of depth image, a contour based coding strategy is proposed. First, depth image is divided into layers by different depth value intervals. Then regions, which are defined as the basic coding unit in this work, are segmented from each layer. The region is further divided into the contour and the interior. Two different procedures are employed to code contours and interiors respectively. A vector-based strategy is applied to code the contour lines. Straight lines in contours cost few of bits since they are regarded as vectors. Pixels, which are out of straight lines, are coded one by one. Depth values in the interior of a region are modeled by a linear or nonlinear formula. Coefficients in the formula are retrieved by regression. This process is called interior painting. Unlike conventional block based coding method, the residue between original frame and reconstructed frame (by contour rebuilt and interior painting) is not sent to decoder. In this proposal, contour is coded in a lossless way whereas interior is coded in a lossy way. Experimental results show that the proposed Contour Based Depth map Coding (CBDC) achieves a better performance than JMVC (reference software of MVC) in the high quality scenarios.

  16. Varieties of Achievement Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukla, Andre; Scher, Hal

    1986-01-01

    A recent article by Nicholls on achievement motivation is criticized on three points: (1) definitions of achievement motives are ambiguous; (2) behavioral consequences predicted do not follow from explicit theoretical assumptions; and (3) Nicholls's account of the relation between his theory and other achievement theories is factually incorrect.…

  17. Motivation and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maehr, Martin L.; Archer, Jennifer

    Addressing the question, "What can be done to promote school achievement?", this paper summarizes the literature on motivation relating to classroom achievement and school effectiveness. Particular attention is given to how values, ideology, and various cultural patterns impinge on classroom performance and serve to enhance motivation to achieve.…

  18. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  19. PASS and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, John R.

    Two studies examined the effectiveness of the PASS (Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, and Successive cognitive processes) theory of intelligence in predicting reading achievement scores of normally achieving children and distinguishing children with reading disabilities from normally achieving children. The first study dealt with predicting…

  20. Multi-depth photoacoustic microscopy with a focus tunable lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kiri; Chung, Euiheon; Eom, Tae Joong

    2015-03-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has been studied to improve its imaging resolution and functional imaging modality without labeling on biology sample. However the use of high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens confines the field of view or the axial imaging range of OR-PAM. In order to obtain images at different layers, one needs to change either the sample position or the focusing position by mechanical scanning. This mechanical movement of the sample or the objective lens limits the scanning speed and the positioning precision. In this study, we propose a multi-depth PAM with a focus tunable lens. We electrically adjusted the focal length in the depth direction of the sample, and twice extended the axial imaging range up to 660 μm with the objective lens (20X, NA 0.4). The proposed approach can increase scanning speed and avoid step motor induced distortions during PA signal acquisitions without mechanical scanning in the depth direction. To investigate the performance of the multi-depth PAM system, we scanned a black human hair and the ear of a living nude mouse (BALB/c Nude). The obtained PAM images presented the volumetric rendering of black hair and the vasculature of the nude mouse.

  1. Calibration of a PEM detector with depth of interactionmeasurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.-C.; Huber, J.S.; Moses, W.W.; Choong, W.-S.; Maltz, J.S.

    2004-06-03

    We present an in situ calibration technique for the LBNL positron emission mammography (PEM) detector module that is capable of measuring depth of interaction (DOI). The detector module consists of 64LSO crystals coupled on one end to a single photomultiplier tube (PMT) and on the opposite end to a 64 pixel array of silicon photodiodes (PD). The PMT provides an accurate timing pulse, the PDs identify the crystal of interaction, the sum provides a total energy signal and the /splGamma/=PD/(PD+PMT) ratio determines the depth of interaction. We calibrate using the /sup 176/Lu natural background radiation of the LSO crystals. We determine the relative gain (K) of the PMT and PD by minimizing the asymmetry of the /spl Gamma/ distribution. We determine the depth dependence from the width of the /spl Gamma/ distribution with optimal K. The performance of calibrated detector modules is evaluated by averaging results from 12 modules. The energy resolution is a function of depth ranging from 24 percent FWHM at the PD end to 51 percent FWHM at the PMT end, and the DOI resolution ranges from 6 mm FWHM at the PD end to 11 mm FWHM at the PMT end.

  2. High-Resolution UV Relay Lens for Particle Size Distribution Measurements Using Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Robert M.; Capelle, Gene A.; Frogget, Brent C.; Grover, Mike; Kaufman, Morris I.; Pazuchanics, Peter; Sorenson, Danny S.; Stevens, Gerald D.; Tibbits, Aric; Turley, William D.

    2008-08-29

    Shock waves passing through a metal sample can produce ejecta particulates at a metal-vacuum interface. Holography records particle size distributions by using a high-power, short-pulse laser to freeze particle motion. The sizes of the ejecta particles are recorded using an in-line Fraunhofer holography technique. Because the holographic plate would be destroyed in an energetic environment, a high-resolution lens has been designed to relay the interference fringes to a safe environment. Particle sizes within a 12-mm-diameter, 5-mm-thick volume are recorded onto holographic film. To achieve resolution down to 0.5 μm, ultraviolet laser (UV) light is needed. The design and assembly of a nine-element lens that achieves >2000 lp/mm resolution and operates at f/0.89 will be described. To set up this lens system, a doublet lens is temporarily attached that enables operation with 532-nm laser light and 1100 lp/mm resolution. Thus, the setup and alignment are performed with green light, but the dynamic recording is done with UV light. During setup, the 532-nm beam provides enough focus shift to accommodate the placement of a resolution target outside the ejecta volume; this resolution target does not interfere with the calibrated wires and pegs surrounding the ejecta volume. A television microscope archives images of resolution patterns that prove that the calibration wires, interference filter, holographic plate, and relay lenses are in their correct positions. Part of this lens is under vacuum, at the point where the laser illumination passes through a focus. Alignment and tolerancing of this high-resolution lens will be presented, and resolution variation through the 5-mm depth of field will be discussed.

  3. High-Resolution UV Relay Lens for Particle Size Distribution Measurements Using Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Malone, Brent C. Frogget, Morris I. Kaufman, Aric Tibbits, Gene A. Capelle, Mike Grover, Gerald D. Stevens, William D. Turley

    2008-03-01

    Shock waves passing through a metal sample can produce ejecta particulates at a metal-vacuum interface. Holography records particle size distributions by using a highpower, short-pulse laser to freeze particle motion. The sizes of the ejecta particles are recorded using an in-line Fraunhofer holography technique. Because the holographic plate would be destroyed in this energetic environment, a high-resolution lens has been designed to relay the interference fringes to a safe environment. Particle sizes within a 12-mm-diameter, 5-mm-thick volume are recorded on holographic film. To achieve resolution down to 0.5 microns, ultraviolet (UV) light (in this case supplied by a tripled Nd:YAG laser) is needed. The design and assembly of a nine-element lens that achieves >2000 lp/mm resolution and operates at f/0.85 will be described. To set up this lens system, a doublet lens is temporarily attached that enables operation with 532-nm (green) light and 1100 lp/mm resolution. Thus, the setup and alignment is performed with green light, but the dynamic recording is done with UV light. During setup, the 532-nm beam provides enough focus shift to accommodate the placement of a resolution pattern outside the ejecta volume; this resolution pattern does not interfere with the calibrated wires and pegs surrounding the ejecta volume. A television microscope archives images of resolution patterns that prove that the calibration wires, interference filter, holographic plate, and relay lenses are in their correct positions. Part of this lens is under vacuum, at the point where the laser illumination passes through a focus. Alignment and tolerancing of this high-resolution lens will be presented, and resolution variation through the 5-mm depth of field will be discussed.

  4. Preliminary evaluation of a monolithic detector module for integrated PET/MRI scanner with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Gonzalez, A. J.; Bettiol, M.; Fabbri, A.; Cinti, M. N.; Preziosi, E.; Borrazzo, C.; Conde, P.; Pellegrini, R.; Di Castro, E.; Majewski, S.

    2015-06-01

    The proposal of Mindview European Project concerns with the development of a very high resolution and high efficiency brain dedicated PET scanner simultaneously working with a Magnetic Resonance scanner, that expects to visualize neurotransmitter pathways and their disruptions in the quest to better diagnose schizophrenia. On behalf of this project, we propose a low cost PET module for the first prototype, based on monolithic crystals, suitable to be integrated with a head Radio Frequency (RF) coil. The aim of the suggested module is to achieve high performances in terms of efficiency, planar spatial resolution (expected about 1 mm) and discrimination of gamma Depth Of Interaction (DOI) in order to reduce the parallax error. Our preliminary results are very promising: a DOI resolution of about 3 mm, a spatial resolution ranging from about 1 to 1.5 mm and a good position linearity.

  5. Total variation based image deconvolution for extended depth-of-field microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausser, F.; Beckers, I.; Gierlak, M.; Kahraman, O.

    2015-03-01

    One approach for a detailed understanding of dynamical cellular processes during drug delivery is the use of functionalized biocompatible nanoparticles and fluorescent markers. An appropriate imaging system has to detect these moving particles so as whole cell volumes in real time with high lateral resolution in a range of a few 100 nm. In a previous study Extended depth-of-field microscopy (EDF-microscopy) has been applied to fluorescent beads and tradiscantia stamen hair cells and the concept of real-time imaging has been proved in different microscopic modes. In principle a phase retardation system like a programmable space light modulator or a static waveplate is incorporated in the light path and modulates the wavefront of light. Hence the focal ellipsoid is smeared out and images seem to be blurred in a first step. An image restoration by deconvolution using the known point-spread-function (PSF) of the optical system is necessary to achieve sharp microscopic images of an extended depth-of-field. This work is focused on the investigation and optimization of deconvolution algorithms to solve this restoration problem satisfactorily. This inverse problem is challenging due to presence of Poisson distributed noise and Gaussian noise, and since the PSF used for deconvolution exactly fits in just one plane within the object. We use non-linear Total Variation based image restoration techniques, where different types of noise can be treated properly. Various algorithms are evaluated for artificially generated 3D images as well as for fluorescence measurements of BPAE cells.

  6. Impact of high energy resolution detectors on the performance of a PET system dedicated to breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Levin, Craig S; Foudray, Angela M K; Habte, Frezghi

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a high resolution, high sensitivity PET camera dedicated to breast cancer imaging. We are studying two novel detector technologies for this imaging system: a scintillation detector comprising layers of small lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystals coupled to new position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs), and a pure semiconductor detector comprising cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystal slabs with thin anode and cathode strips deposited in orthogonal directions on either side of each slab. Both detectors achieve 1 mm spatial resolution with 3-5 mm directly measured photon interaction depth resolution, which promotes uniform reconstructed spatial resolution throughout a compact, breast-size field of view. Both detector types also achieve outstanding energy resolution (<3% and <12%, respectively for LSO-PSAPD and CZT at 511 keV). This paper studies the effects that this excellent energy resolution has on the expected system performance. Results indicate the importance that high energy resolution and narrow energy window settings have in reducing background random as well as scatter coincidences without compromising statistical quality of the dedicated breast PET data. Simulations predict that using either detector type the excellent performance and novel arrangement of these detectors proposed for the system facilitate approximately 20% instrument sensitivity at the system center and a peak noise-equivalent count rate of >4 kcps for 200 microCi in a simulated breast phantom. PMID:17645990

  7. Joint geodesic depth propagation for two-dimensional-to-three-dimensional video conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Cheolkon; Cai, Jiji

    2016-01-01

    We propose joint geodesic depth propagation (JGDP) for two-dimensional-to-three-dimensional video conversion. To save substantial human effort and produce high-quality depth maps, we adopt a key-frame depth propagation strategy based on a geodesic distance. First, we perform block matching between current and reference frames to estimate motion vectors (MVs). Second, we conduct depth compensation from the reference depth map for obtaining the current depth map based on MVs. Finally, we refine the depth map using joint geodesic filtering. Experimental results demonstrate that JGDP achieves an average 2.4-dB gain in peak-signal-to-noise ratio and 0.019 gain in structure similarity over state-of-the-art depth propagation methods.

  8. Feasibility of high-resolution one-dimensional relaxation imaging at low magnetic field using a single-sided NMR scanner applied to articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Erik; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2015-02-01

    Low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance increases the contrast of the longitudinal relaxation rate in many biological tissues; one prominent example is hyaline articular cartilage. In order to take advantage of this increased contrast and to profile the depth-dependent variations, high resolution parameter measurements are carried out which can be of critical importance in an early diagnosis of cartilage diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the maximum achievable spatial resolution of parameter profiles is limited by factors such as sensor geometry, sample curvature, and diffusion limitation. In this work, we report on high-resolution single-sided NMR scanner measurements with a commercial device, and quantify these limitations. The highest achievable spatial resolution on the used profiler, and the lateral dimension of the sensitive volume were determined. Since articular cartilage samples are usually bent, we also focus on averaging effects inside the horizontally aligned sensitive volume and their impact on the relaxation profiles. Taking these critical parameters into consideration, depth-dependent relaxation time profiles with the maximum achievable vertical resolution of 20 μm are discussed, and are correlated with diffusion coefficient profiles in hyaline articular cartilage in order to reconstruct T2 maps from the diffusion-weighted CPMG decays of apparent relaxation rates.

  9. Exploration Depth of Multi-frequency Helicopter EM Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, C.; Hodges, G.

    2004-05-01

    Due to the high resolution of hilicopter electromagnetic (HEM) systems, they are being widely used for shallow earth resistivity mapping problems. The traditional investigation of the exploration depth of a HEM system is based on the model of a single-frequency coil array over a layered earth. In this paper we extend the study to the multi-frequency HEM systems. We first determine for each frequency channel of a HEM system the maximal depth of a target, beyond which it cannot be identified from the EM signal. This is mathemically realized by assuming that the abnormal signal from the target is three times larger than the noise level of the HEM channel. Since each frequency channel of an HEM system has a different noise level and for different frequency channel the EM field has different penetration depth, we choose the biggest value of these depths as the depth of exploration. Different models are implemented in the study of this paper, including a layered earth model, a dipping plate or a dyke, a 3D ore body, etc. We use as example the Fugro DIGHEM system with three horizontal coplanar (HCP) coils (380 or 900, 7200, 56kHz) and two vertical coaxial (VCX) coils (900, 5500Hz). The following conclusions are obtained: 1. Except for a steeply dipping sheet, the HCP coil array has a larger depth of exploration than the VCX coil array; 2. The depth of exploration may be obtained from different frequency channels for different target geometries and different conductivity contrasts between the target and host rocks. This means that for a specific target geometry and conductivity contrast, we need to search such a frequency channel that offers the maximal value for depth of exploration; 3. Among the factors that influence the depth of exploration, the noise level of the HEM system is the key. The other factors include the geometry of the target and the conductivity contrast between the target and the host rocks, and the relative location between the HEM system and the target

  10. Predefined Redundant Dictionary for Effective Depth Maps Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebai, Dorsaf; Chaieb, Faten; Ghorbel, Faouzi

    2016-01-01

    The multi-view video plus depth (MVD) video format consists of two components: texture and depth map, where a combination of these components enables a receiver to generate arbitrary virtual views. However, MVD presents a very voluminous video format that requires a compression process for storage and especially for transmission. Conventional codecs are perfectly efficient for texture images compression but not for intrinsic depth maps properties. Depth images indeed are characterized by areas of smoothly varying grey levels separated by sharp discontinuities at the position of object boundaries. Preserving these characteristics is important to enable high quality view synthesis at the receiver side. In this paper, sparse representation of depth maps is discussed. It is shown that a significant gain in sparsity is achieved when particular mixed dictionaries are used for approximating these types of images with greedy selection strategies. Experiments are conducted to confirm the effectiveness at producing sparse representations, and competitiveness, with respect to candidate state-of-art dictionaries. Finally, the resulting method is shown to be effective for depth maps compression and represents an advantage over the ongoing 3D high efficiency video coding compression standard, particularly at medium and high bitrates.

  11. Multi-sensor super-resolution for hybrid range imaging with application to 3-D endoscopy and open surgery.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Thomas; Haase, Sven; Bauer, Sebastian; Wasza, Jakob; Kilgus, Thomas; Maier-Hein, Lena; Stock, Christian; Hornegger, Joachim; Feußner, Hubertus

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-sensor super-resolution framework for hybrid imaging to super-resolve data from one modality by taking advantage of additional guidance images of a complementary modality. This concept is applied to hybrid 3-D range imaging in image-guided surgery, where high-quality photometric data is exploited to enhance range images of low spatial resolution. We formulate super-resolution based on the maximum a-posteriori (MAP) principle and reconstruct high-resolution range data from multiple low-resolution frames and complementary photometric information. Robust motion estimation as required for super-resolution is performed on photometric data to derive displacement fields of subpixel accuracy for the associated range images. For improved reconstruction of depth discontinuities, a novel adaptive regularizer exploiting correlations between both modalities is embedded to MAP estimation. We evaluated our method on synthetic data as well as ex-vivo images in open surgery and endoscopy. The proposed multi-sensor framework improves the peak signal-to-noise ratio by 2 dB and structural similarity by 0.03 on average compared to conventional single-sensor approaches. In ex-vivo experiments on porcine organs, our method achieves substantial improvements in terms of depth discontinuity reconstruction. PMID:26201876

  12. Aeration equipment for small depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluše, Jan; Pochylý, František

    2015-05-01

    Deficit of air in water causes complications with cyanobacteria mainly in the summer months. Cyanobacteria is a bacteria that produces poison called cyanotoxin. When the concentration of cyanobacteria increases, the phenomena "algal bloom" appears, which is very toxic and may kill all the organisms. This article describes new equipment for aeration of water in dams, ponds and reservoirs with small depth. This equipment is mobile and it is able to work without any human factor because its control is provided by a GPS module. The main part of this equipment consists of a floating pump which pumps water from the surface. Another important part of this equipment is an aerator where water and air are blended. Final aeration process runs in the nozzles which provide movement of all this equipment and aeration of the water. Simulations of the flow are solved by multiphase flow with diffusion in open source program called OpenFOAM. Results will be verified by an experiment.

  13. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  14. Potential for Using Satellite Lidar for Seasonal Snow Depth Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, M. F.; Stoll, J.; Harding, D. J.; Fassnacht, S. R.; Carabajal, C. C.; Markus, T.

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluates the potential for estimating snow depth in complex mountainous terrain using high resolution satellite lidar. For over three decades, satellite remote sensing of snow depth and water equivalent has relied primarily on passive microwave sensors with an approximately 25 km footprint. While successfully employed in many global water balance analyses, their large footprints, necessary to capture the natural emission of the surface, are too coarse to define the spatial heterogeneity of mountain watershed-scale snow due to variable topography and vegetation. In this study, the capability of satellite lidar altimetry for estimating snow depth was evaluated primarily using surface elevations observed by the Geoscience Laser Altimeter Sensor (GLAS) flown on board the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite from 2003-2009, with a footprint size of ~70m. The evaluation includes the analysis of GLAS waveforms at near-repeat locations during snow-off and snow on conditions, using several snow depth estimation approaches, focusing on the Uinta Mountains of NE Utah. Also presented is the concept for the ICESat-2 Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), currently set to launch in July 2016, and its potential capability for characterizing snow depth. The opportunity for partnering through NASA's Early Adopter Program using prototype aircraft observations also is presented.

  15. Airway surface liquid depth imaged by surface laser reflectance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajah, Jay R; Song, Yuanlin; Derichs, Nico; Verkman, A S

    2010-09-01

    The thin layer of liquid at the surface of airway epithelium, the airway surface liquid (ASL), is important in normal airway physiology and in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis. At present, the best method to measure ASL depth involves scanning confocal microscopy after staining with an aqueous-phase fluorescent dye. We describe here a simple, noninvasive imaging method to measure ASL depth by reflectance imaging of an epithelial mucosa in which the surface is illuminated at a 45-degree angle by an elongated 13-microm wide rectangular beam produced by a 670-nm micro-focus laser. The principle of the method is that air-liquid, liquid-liquid, and liquid-cell interfaces produce distinct specular or diffuse reflections that can be imaged to give a micron-resolution replica of the mucosal surface. The method was validated using fluid layers of specified thicknesses and applied to measure ASL depth in cell cultures and ex vivo fragments of pig trachea. In addition, the method was adapted to measure transepithelial fluid transport from the dynamics of fluid layer depth. Compared with confocal imaging, ASL depth measurement by surface laser reflectance microscopy does not require dye staining or costly instrumentation, and can potentially be adapted for in vivo measurements using fiberoptics. PMID:20713545

  16. Submicron-resolution photoacoustic microscopy of endogenous light-absorbing biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi

    Photoacoustic imaging in biomedicine has the unique advantage of probing endogenous light absorbers at various length scales with a 100% relative sensitivity. Among the several modalities of photoacoustic imaging, optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) can achieve high spatial resolution, on the order of optical wavelength, at <1 mm depth in biological tissue (the optical ballistic regime). OR-PAM has been applied successfully to structural and functional imaging of blood vasculature and red blood cells in vivo. Any molecules which absorb sufficient light at certain wavelengths can potentially be imaged by PAM. Compared with pure optical imaging, which typically targets fluorescent markers, label-free PAM avoids the major concerns that the fluorescent labeling probes may disturb the function of biomolecules and may have an insufficient density. This dissertation aims to advance label-free OR-PAM to the subcellular scale. The first part of this dissertation describes the technological advancement of PAM yielding high spatial resolution in 3D. The lateral resolution was improved by using optical objectives with high numerical apertures for optical focusing. The axial resolution was improved by using broadband ultrasonic transducers for ultrasound detection. We achieved 220 nm lateral resolution in transmission mode, 0.43 microm lateral resolution in reflection mode, 7.6 microm axial resolution in normal tissue, and 5.8 microm axial resolution with silicone oil immersion/injection. The achieved lateral resolution and axial resolution were the finest reported at the time. With high-resolution in 3D, PAM was demonstrated to resolve cellular and subcellular structures in vivo, such as red blood cells and melanosomes in melanoma cells. Compared with previous PAM systems, our high-resolution PAM could resolve capillaries in mouse ears more clearly. As an example application, we demonstrated intracellular temperature imaging, assisted by fluorescence signal

  17. Case depth verification of hardened samples with Barkhausen noise sweeps

    SciTech Connect

    Santa-aho, Suvi; Vippola, Minnamari; Lepistö, Toivo; Hakanen, Merja; Sorsa, Aki; Leiviskä, Kauko

    2014-02-18

    An interesting topic of recent Barkhausen noise (BN) method studies is the application of the method to case depth evaluation of hardened components. The utilization of BN method for this purpose is based on the difference in the magnetic properties between the hardened case and the soft core. Thus, the detection of case depth with BN can be achieved. The measurements typically have been carried out by using low magnetizing frequencies which have deeper penetration to the ferromagnetic samples than the conventional BN measurement. However, the penetration depth is limited due to eddy current damping of the signal. We introduce here a newly found sweep measurement concept for the case depth evaluation. In this study sweep measurements were carried out with various magnetizing frequencies and magnetizing voltages to detect the effect of different frequency and voltage and their correspondence to the actual case depth values verified from destructive characterization. Also a BN measurement device that has an implemented sweep analysis option was utilised. The samples were either induction or case-hardened samples and sample geometry contained both rod samples and gear axle samples with different case depth values. Samples were also further characterized with Xray diffraction to study the residual stress state of the surface. The detailed data processing revealed that also other calculated features than the maximum slope division of the 1st derivative of the BN signal could hold the information about the case depth value of the samples. The sweep method was able to arrange the axles into correct order according to the case depth value even though the axles were used.

  18. Case depth verification of hardened samples with Barkhausen noise sweeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santa-aho, Suvi; Hakanen, Merja; Sorsa, Aki; Vippola, Minnamari; Leiviskä, Kauko; Lepistö, Toivo

    2014-02-01

    An interesting topic of recent Barkhausen noise (BN) method studies is the application of the method to case depth evaluation of hardened components. The utilization of BN method for this purpose is based on the difference in the magnetic properties between the hardened case and the soft core. Thus, the detection of case depth with BN can be achieved. The measurements typically have been carried out by using low magnetizing frequencies which have deeper penetration to the ferromagnetic samples than the conventional BN measurement. However, the penetration depth is limited due to eddy current damping of the signal. We introduce here a newly found sweep measurement concept for the case depth evaluation. In this study sweep measurements were carried out with various magnetizing frequencies and magnetizing voltages to detect the effect of different frequency and voltage and their correspondence to the actual case depth values verified from destructive characterization. Also a BN measurement device that has an implemented sweep analysis option was utilised. The samples were either induction or case-hardened samples and sample geometry contained both rod samples and gear axle samples with different case depth values. Samples were also further characterized with Xray diffraction to study the residual stress state of the surface. The detailed data processing revealed that also other calculated features than the maximum slope division of the 1st derivative of the BN signal could hold the information about the case depth value of the samples. The sweep method was able to arrange the axles into correct order according to the case depth value even though the axles were used.

  19. Spatial resolution recovery utilizing multi-ray tracing and graphic processing unit in PET image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yicheng; Peng, Hao

    2015-02-01

    Depth-of-interaction (DOI) poses a major challenge for a PET system to achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view, particularly for small animal and organ-dedicated PET systems. In this work, we implemented an analytical method to model system matrix for resolution recovery, which was then incorporated in PET image reconstruction on a graphical processing unit platform, due to its parallel processing capacity. The method utilizes the concepts of virtual DOI layers and multi-ray tracing to calculate the coincidence detection response function for a given line-of-response. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated for a small-bore PET insert to be used for simultaneous PET/MR breast imaging. In addition, the performance comparisons were studied among the following three cases: 1) no physical DOI and no resolution modeling; 2) two physical DOI layers and no resolution modeling; and 3) no physical DOI design but with a different number of virtual DOI layers. The image quality was quantitatively evaluated in terms of spatial resolution (full-width-half-maximum and position offset), contrast recovery coefficient and noise. The results indicate that the proposed method has the potential to be used as an alternative to other physical DOI designs and achieve comparable imaging performances, while reducing detector/system design cost and complexity.

  20. Spatial resolution recovery utilizing multi-ray tracing and graphic processing unit in PET image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yicheng; Peng, Hao

    2015-02-01

    Depth-of-interaction (DOI) poses a major challenge for a PET system to achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view, particularly for small animal and organ-dedicated PET systems. In this work, we implemented an analytical method to model system matrix for resolution recovery, which was then incorporated in PET image reconstruction on a graphical processing unit platform, due to its parallel processing capacity. The method utilizes the concepts of virtual DOI layers and multi-ray tracing to calculate the coincidence detection response function for a given line-of-response. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated for a small-bore PET insert to be used for simultaneous PET/MR breast imaging. In addition, the performance comparisons were studied among the following three cases: 1) no physical DOI and no resolution modeling; 2) two physical DOI layers and no resolution modeling; and 3) no physical DOI design but with a different number of virtual DOI layers. The image quality was quantitatively evaluated in terms of spatial resolution (full-width-half-maximum and position offset), contrast recovery coefficient and noise. The results indicate that the proposed method has the potential to be used as an alternative to other physical DOI designs and achieve comparable imaging performances, while reducing detector/system design cost and complexity. PMID:25591118

  1. Relations between heat flow, topography and Moho depth for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Majorowicz, Jacek; Grad, Marek

    2013-04-01

    The relation between heat flow, topography and Moho depth for recent maps of Europe is presented. New heat flow map of Europe (Majorowicz and Wybraniec, 2010) is based on updated database of uncorrected heat flow values to which paleoclimatic correction is applied across the continental Europe. Correction is depth dependent due to a diffusive thermal transfer of the surface temperature forcing of which glacial-interglacial history has the largest impact. This explains some very low uncorrected heat flow values 20-30 mW/m2 in the shields, shallow basin areas of the cratons, and in other areas including orogenic belts were heat flow was likely underestimated. New integrated map of the European Moho depth (Grad et al., 2009) is the first high resolution digital map for European plate understand as an area from Ural Mountains in the east to mid-Atlantic ridge in the west, and Mediterranean Sea in the south to Spitsbergen and Barents Sea in Arctic in the north. For correlation we used: onshore heat flow density data with palaeoclimatic correction (5318 locations), topography map (30 x 30 arc seconds; Danielson and Gesch, 2011) and Moho map (longitude, latitude and Moho depth, each 0.1 degree). Analysis was done in areas where data from all three datasets were available. Continental Europe area could be divided into two large domains related with Precambrian East European craton and Palaeozoic Platform. Next two smaller areas correspond to Scandinavian Caledonides and Anatolia. Presented results show different correlations between Moho depth, elevation and heat flow for all discussed regions. For each region more detailed analysis of these relation in different elevation ranges is presented. In general it is observed that Moho depth is more significant to HF then elevation. Depending on region and elevation range HF value in mW/m2 is up to two times larger than Moho depth in km, while HF relation to elevation varies much more.

  2. Airborne Surveys of Snow Depth over Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, R.; Panzer, B.; Leuschen, C.; Pang, S.; Markus, T.; Holt, B.; Gogineni, S.

    2011-01-01

    During the spring of 2009, an ultrawideband microwave radar was deployed as part of Operation IceBridge to provide the first cross-basin surveys of snow thickness over Arctic sea ice. In this paper, we analyze data from three approx 2000 km transects to examine detection issues, the limitations of the current instrument, and the regional variability of the retrieved snow depth. Snow depth is the vertical distance between the air \\snow and snow-ice interfaces detected in the radar echograms. Under ideal conditions, the per echogram uncertainty in snow depth retrieval is approx 4 - 5 cm. The finite range resolution of the radar (approx 5 cm) and the relative amplitude of backscatter from the two interfaces limit the direct retrieval of snow depths much below approx 8 cm. Well-defined interfaces are observed over only relatively smooth surfaces within the radar footprint of approx 6.5 m. Sampling is thus restricted to undeformed, level ice. In early April, mean snow depths are 28.5 +/- 16.6 cm and 41.0 +/- 22.2 cm over first-year and multiyear sea ice (MYI), respectively. Regionally, snow thickness is thinner and quite uniform over the large expanse of seasonal ice in the Beaufort Sea, and gets progressively thicker toward the MYI cover north of Ellesmere Island, Greenland, and the Fram Strait. Snow depth over MYI is comparable to that reported in the climatology by Warren et al. Ongoing improvements to the radar system and the utility of these snow depth measurements are discussed.

  3. School Community Relations and Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, John E., Jr.

    This research examined the relationship between effective school-community relations and student achievement. The purpose of the study was to determine how the five variables of access, communication, involvement, participation, and resolution interact with a measure of effective school-community relations, how the five variables related to…

  4. Blending satellite-based snow depth products with in situ observations for streamflow predictions in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuqiong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Arsenault, Kristi R.; Mocko, David M.

    2015-02-01

    In snowmelt-driven river systems, it is critical to enable reliable predictions of the spatiotemporal variability in seasonal snowpack to support local and regional water management. Previous studies have shown that assimilating satellite-station blended snow depth data sets can lead to improved snow predictions, which however do not always translate into improved streamflow predictions, especially in complex mountain regions. In this study, we explore how an existing optimal interpolation-based blending strategy can be enhanced to reduce biases in satellite snow depth products for improving streamflow predictions. Two major new considerations are explored, including: (1) incorporating terrain aspect and (2) incorporating areal snow coverage information. The methodology is applied to the bias reduction of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) snow depth estimates, which are then assimilated into the Noah land surface model via the ensemble Kalman Filtering (EnKF) for streamflow predictions in the Upper Colorado River Basin. Our results indicate that using only observations from low-elevation stations such as the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) in the bias correction can lead to underestimation in streamflow, while using observations from high-elevation stations (e.g., the Snow Telemetry (SNOTEL) network) along with terrain aspect is critically important for achieving reliable streamflow predictions. Additionally incorporating areal snow coverage information from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) can slightly improve the streamflow results further.

  5. Improving lateral resolution of optical coherence tomography for imaging of skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Kai; Lu, Hui; Wang, Michael R.

    2016-03-01

    We report on improving lateral resolution of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for imaging of skins using multiframe superresolution technique. Through introduction of suitable slight transverse positional shifts among a series of C-scans, the superresolution processing of the lateral low resolution images at each axial depth reconstructs a high resolution image. Superresolution processing of all depth layers yields a high resolution 3D image. Using known resolution photomasks, 3 times lateral resolution improvement has been confirmed for both low and high numerical aperture OCT imaging. The superresolution processed OCT 3D skin image provides much more feature details for all subsurface depth layers within the OCT axial imaging range.

  6. Resolution in forensic microbial genotyping

    SciTech Connect

    Velsko, S P

    2005-08-30

    Resolution is a key parameter for differentiating among the large number of strain typing methods that could be applied to pathogens involved in bioterror events or biocrimes. In this report we develop a first-principles analysis of strain typing resolution using a simple mathematical model to provide a basis for the rational design of microbial typing systems for forensic applications. We derive two figures of merit that describe the resolving power and phylogenetic depth of a strain typing system. Rough estimates of these figures-of-merit for MLVA, MLST, IS element, AFLP, hybridization microarrays, and other bacterial typing methods are derived from mutation rate data reported in the literature. We also discuss the general problem of how to construct a ''universal'' practical typing system that has the highest possible resolution short of whole-genome sequencing, and that is applicable with minimal modification to a wide range of pathogens.

  7. Visual Cues for Enhancing Depth Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, L. M.; Smith, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the physiological mechanisms involved in three-dimensional depth perception and presents a variety of distance and depth cues and strategies for detecting and estimating curbs and steps for individuals with impaired vision. (Author/DB)

  8. Objective, comparative assessment of the penetration depth of temporal-focusing microscopy for imaging various organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, Christopher J.; Bruns, Oliver T.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; So, Peter T. C.

    2015-06-01

    Temporal focusing is a technique for performing axially resolved widefield multiphoton microscopy with a large field of view. Despite significant advantages over conventional point-scanning multiphoton microscopy in terms of imaging speed, the need to collect the whole image simultaneously means that it is expected to achieve a lower penetration depth in common biological samples compared to point-scanning. We assess the penetration depth using a rigorous objective criterion based on the modulation transfer function, comparing it to point-scanning multiphoton microscopy. Measurements are performed in a variety of mouse organs in order to provide practical guidance as to the achievable penetration depth for both imaging techniques. It is found that two-photon scanning microscopy has approximately twice the penetration depth of temporal-focusing microscopy, and that penetration depth is organ-specific; the heart has the lowest penetration depth, followed by the liver, lungs, and kidneys, then the spleen, and finally white adipose tissue.

  9. Objective, comparative assessment of the penetration depth of temporal-focusing microscopy for imaging various organs

    PubMed Central

    Rowlands, Christopher J.; Bruns, Oliver T.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; So, Peter T. C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Temporal focusing is a technique for performing axially resolved widefield multiphoton microscopy with a large field of view. Despite significant advantages over conventional point-scanning multiphoton microscopy in terms of imaging speed, the need to collect the whole image simultaneously means that it is expected to achieve a lower penetration depth in common biological samples compared to point-scanning. We assess the penetration depth using a rigorous objective criterion based on the modulation transfer function, comparing it to point-scanning multiphoton microscopy. Measurements are performed in a variety of mouse organs in order to provide practical guidance as to the achievable penetration depth for both imaging techniques. It is found that two-photon scanning microscopy has approximately twice the penetration depth of temporal-focusing microscopy, and that penetration depth is organ-specific; the heart has the lowest penetration depth, followed by the liver, lungs, and kidneys, then the spleen, and finally white adipose tissue. PMID:25844509

  10. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  11. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  12. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  13. Wechsler Individual Achievement Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ronald L.

    1999-01-01

    This article describes the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, a comprehensive measure of achievement for individuals in grades K-12. Eight subtests assess mathematics reasoning, spelling, reading comprehension, numerical operations, listening comprehension, oral expression, and written expression. Its administration, standardization,…

  14. Inverting the Achievement Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White-Hood, Marian; Shindel, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Attempting to invert the pyramid to improve student achievement and increase all students' chances for success is not a new endeavor. For decades, educators have strategized, formed think tanks, and developed school improvement teams to find better ways to improve the achievement of all students. Currently, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is…

  15. Achievement Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    The Ohio Trade and Industrial Education Achievement Test battery is comprised of seven basic achievement tests: Machine Trades, Automotive Mechanics, Basic Electricity, Basic Electronics, Mechanical Drafting, Printing, and Sheet Metal. The tests were developed by subject matter committees and specialists in testing and research. The Ohio Trade and…

  16. General Achievement Trends: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  17. General Achievement Trends: Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  18. General Achievement Trends: Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  19. General Achievement Trends: Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  20. General Achievement Trends: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  1. General Achievement Trends: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  2. General Achievement Trends: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  3. General Achievement Trends: Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  4. General Achievement Trends: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  5. General Achievement Trends: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  6. General Achievement Trends: Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  7. General Achievement Trends: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  8. Honoring Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Is the concept of "honor roll" obsolete? The honor roll has always been a way for schools to recognize the academic achievement of their students. But does it motivate students? In this article, several elementary school principals share their views about honoring student achievement. Among others, Virginia principal Nancy Moga said that students…

  9. Aiming at Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Paul

    The Raising Quality and Achievement Program is a 3-year initiative to support further education (FE) colleges in the United Kingdom in their drive to improve students' achievement and the quality of provision. The program offers the following: (1) quality information and advice; (2) onsite support for individual colleges; (3) help with…

  10. Achieving Perspective Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Jens

    Perspective transformation is a consciously achieved state in which the individual's perspective on life is transformed. The new perspective serves as a vantage point for life's actions and interactions, affecting the way life is lived. Three conditions are basic to achieving perspective transformation: (1) "feeling" experience, i.e., getting in…

  11. Achieving Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight

    2011-01-01

    Public schools are functionally provided through structural arrangements such as government funding, but public schools are achieved in substance, in part, through local governance. In this essay, Kathleen Knight Abowitz explains the bifocal nature of achieving public schools; that is, that schools are both subject to the unitary Public compact of…

  12. General Achievement Trends: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  13. Achievement-Based Resourcing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Mike; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This collection of seven articles examines achievement-based resourcing (ABR), the concept that the funding of educational institutions should be linked to their success in promoting student achievement, with a focus on the application of ABR to postsecondary education in the United Kingdom. The articles include: (1) "Introduction" (Mick…

  14. Uterine caliper and depth gauge

    DOEpatents

    King, Loyd L.; Wheeler, Robert G.; Fish, Thomas M.

    1977-01-01

    A uterine caliper and sound consisting of an elongated body having outwardly biased resilient caliper wings and a spring-loaded slidable cervical stop. A slide on the body is operatively connected to the wings by a monofilament and operates with respect to a first scale on the body as a width indicator. A rod extending longitudinally on the body is connected to the cervical stop and cooperates with a second scale on the body as a depth indicator. The instrument can be positioned to measure the distance from the outer cervical ostium to the fundus, as read on said second scale. The wings may be allowed to open by moving the slide, and when the wings engage the utero-tubal junctions, the width may be read on said first scale. By adjustment of the caliper wings the instrument may be retracted until the resistance of the inner ostium of the cervix is felt, enabling the length of the cervical canal to be read directly by the position of the longitudinal indicator rod with respect to said second scale. The instrument may be employed to measure the width of the uterine cavity at any position between the inner ostium of the cervix and the fundus.

  15. High resolution telescope

    DOEpatents

    Massie, Norbert A.; Oster, Yale

    1992-01-01

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employs speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by an electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activites. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes.

  16. High resolution telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, N.A.; Oster, Y.

    1990-01-01

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employs speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by an electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  17. High resolution telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, N.A.; Oster, Y.

    1990-12-31

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employs speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by an electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. [Achievement of therapeutic objectives].

    PubMed

    Mantilla, Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Therapeutic objectives for patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia are achieved by improving patient compliance and adherence. Clinical practice guidelines address the importance of treatment compliance for achieving objectives. The combination of a fixed dose of pravastatin and fenofibrate increases the adherence by simplifying the drug regimen and reducing the number of daily doses. The good tolerance, the cost of the combination and the possibility of adjusting the administration to the patient's lifestyle helps achieve the objectives for these patients with high cardiovascular risk. PMID:25043543

  19. Depth map generation from geometry and motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qianmin; Ge, Chenyang; Ren, Pengju; Yao, Huimin

    2013-07-01

    As the demand for 3DTV keep increasing these years, the conversion from exist 2D videos to 3D ones becomes a new area of research. Depth map generation plays a key point in the process. Two most important clues of depth are geometry of the scene and motion vector. This paper presents an algorithm of depth map generation, which intends to get the depth map combines two aspects of information. Compared to the previous work, our method is improved in finding vanishing point, detect motion vectors, and depth map generation.

  20. Nonextensive statistics and skin depth of transverse wave in collisional plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemzadeh, M.

    2016-05-01

    Skin depth of transverse wave in a collisional plasma is studied taking into account the nonextensive electron distribution function. Considering the kinetic theory for charge particles and using the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision model, a generalized transverse dielectric permittivity is obtained. The transverse dispersion relation in different frequency ranges is investigated. Obtaining the imaginary part of the wave vector from the dispersion relation, the skin depth for these frequency ranges is also achieved. Profiles of the skin depth show that by increasing the q parameter, the penetration depth decreases. In addition, the skin depth increases by increasing the electron temperature. Finally, it is found that in the high frequency range and high electron temperature, the penetration depth decreases by increasing the collision frequency. In contrast, by increasing the collision frequency in a highly collisional frequency range, the skin depth of transverse wave increases.

  1. Measuring stress variation with depth using Barkhausen signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kypris, O.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Jiles, D. C.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen noise analysis (BNA) is an established technique for the characterization of stress in ferromagnetic materials. An important application is the evaluation of residual stress in aerospace components, where shot-peening is used to strengthen the part by inducing compressive residual stresses on its surface. However, the evaluation of the resulting stress-depth gradients cannot be achieved by conventional BNA methods, where signals are interpreted in the time domain. The immediate alternative of using x-ray diffraction stress analysis is less than ideal, as the use of electropolishing to remove surface layers renders the part useless after inspection. Thus, a need for advancing the current BNA techniques prevails. In this work, it is shown how a parametric model for the frequency spectrum of Barkhausen emissions can be used to detect variations of stress along depth in ferromagnetic materials. Proof of concept is demonstrated by inducing linear stress-depth gradients using four-point bending, and fitting the model to the frequency spectra of measured Barkhausen signals, using a simulated annealing algorithm to extract the model parameters. Validation of our model suggests that in bulk samples the Barkhausen frequency spectrum can be expressed by a multi-exponential function with a dependence on stress and depth. One practical application of this spectroscopy method is the non-destructive evaluation of residual stress-depth profiles in aerospace components, thus helping to prevent catastrophic failures.

  2. Predicting Achievement and Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uguroglu, Margaret; Walberg, Herbert J.

    1986-01-01

    Motivation and nine other factors were measured for 970 students in grades five through eight in a study of factors predicting achievement and predicting motivation. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  3. Attractiveness and School Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvia, John; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the relationship between rated attractiveness and two measures of school performance. Attractive children received significantly higher report cards and, to some degree, higher achievement test scores than their unattractive peers. (Author)

  4. Student Achievement and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Gordon H.; Mecham, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    Compares the lecture and self-paced methods of instruction on the basis of student motivation and achieveme nt, comparing motivating and demotivating factors in each, and their potential for motivation and achievement. (Authors/JR)

  5. Performance Metrics for Depth-based Signal Separation Using Deep Vertical Line Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, John K.

    Vertical line arrays (VLAs) deployed below the critical depth in the deep ocean can exploit reliable acoustic path (RAP) propagation, which provides low transmission loss (TL) for targets at moderate ranges, and increased TL for distant interferers. However, sound from nearby surface interferers also undergoes RAP propagation, and without horizontal aperture, a VLA cannot separate these interferers from submerged targets. A recent publication by McCargar and Zurk (2013) addressed this issue, presenting a transform-based method for passive, depth-based separation of signals received on deep VLAs based on the depth-dependent modulation caused by the interference between the direct and surface-reflected acoustic arrivals. This thesis expands on that work by quantifying the transform-based depth estimation method performance in terms of the resolution and ambiguity in the depth estimate. Then, the depth discrimination performance is quantified in terms of the number of VLA elements.

  6. Classified-edge guided depth resampling for multi-view coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yu; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Hua-hua

    2016-01-01

    A new depth resampling for multi-view coding is proposed in this paper. At first, the depth video is downsampled by median filtering before encoding. After decoding, the classified edges, including credible edge and probable edge from the aligned texture image and the depth image, are interpolated by the selected diagonal pair, whose intensity difference is the minimum among four diagonal pairs around edge pixel. According to different category of edge, the intensity difference is measured by either real depth or percentage depth without any parameter setting. Finally, the resampled depth video and the decoded full-resolution texture video are synthesized into virtual views for the performance evaluation. Experiments on the platform of multi-view high efficiency video coding (HEVC) demonstrate that the proposed method is superior to the contrastive methods in terms of visual quality and rate distortion (RD) performance.

  7. A novel super-resolution camera model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Yi; Xu, Jie; Wang, Lin; Liu, Fei; Luo, Qiuhua; Chen, Xiaodong; Bi, Xiangli

    2015-05-01

    Aiming to realize super resolution(SR) to single image and video reconstruction, a super resolution camera model is proposed for the problem that the resolution of the images obtained by traditional cameras behave comparatively low. To achieve this function we put a certain driving device such as piezoelectric ceramics in the camera. By controlling the driving device, a set of continuous low resolution(LR) images can be obtained and stored instantaneity, which reflect the randomness of the displacements and the real-time performance of the storage very well. The low resolution image sequences have different redundant information and some particular priori information, thus it is possible to restore super resolution image factually and effectively. The sample method is used to derive the reconstruction principle of super resolution, which analyzes the possible improvement degree of the resolution in theory. The super resolution algorithm based on learning is used to reconstruct single image and the variational Bayesian algorithm is simulated to reconstruct the low resolution images with random displacements, which models the unknown high resolution image, motion parameters and unknown model parameters in one hierarchical Bayesian framework. Utilizing sub-pixel registration method, a super resolution image of the scene can be reconstructed. The results of 16 images reconstruction show that this camera model can increase the image resolution to 2 times, obtaining images with higher resolution in currently available hardware levels.

  8. Measuring layer-specific depth-of-focus requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liegl, Bernhard; Gabor, Allen; Brodsky, Colin; Cotte, John; Krishnan, Mahadevaiyer

    2008-03-01

    As the Rayleigh equations already tell us, improvements in imaging resolution often come at the price of a depth-offocus loss. Often we balance the resolution versus DoF dilemma without regard of the imaging layers location in the overall film stack. E.g. often several via or metal layers are processed with the same optical settings despite facing different amount of depth-of-focus requirements. In actuality, however, substrate induced focus variation can vary greatly from layers at the bottom of a film stack to the layers higher up in the film stack. In the age of super-low k1 lithography this variance needs to be taken into account on a layer specific basis when evaluating the resolution versus DoF tradeoff. We have studied substrate induced focus variation for a 45nm technology test-site as function of film stack sequence and spatial frequency, combining various measurement techniques into an overall topography spectrum. These techniques include data extraction from the exposure tools optical leveling sensor, a mechanical air gauge to calibrate the former and interferometric profiling tools. As a result, we can quantify our DoF requirement for a given layer and product and use this information to optimize our process design on a layer-by-layer basis. This work was performed by the Research Alliance Teams at various IBM Research and Development Facilities

  9. Optical coherence microscopy in 1700 nm spectral band for high-resolution label-free deep-tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Masahito; Teranishi, Tatsuhiro; Kawagoe, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Norihiko

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a label-free, high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal microscopy. Here, we report that the 1700-nm spectral band has the great potential to improve the imaging depth in high-resolution OCM imaging of animal tissues. Recent studies to improve the imaging depth in OCT revealed that the 1700-nm spectral band is a promising choice for imaging turbid scattering tissues due to the low attenuation of light in the wavelength region. In this study, we developed high-resolution OCM by using a high-power supercontinuum source in the 1700-nm spectral band, and compared the attenuation of signal-to-noise ratio between the 1700-nm and 1300-nm OCM imaging of a mouse brain under the condition of the same sensitivity. The comparison clearly showed that the 1700-nm OCM provides larger imaging depth than the 1300-nm OCM. In this 1700-nm OCM, the lateral resolution of 1.3 μm and the axial resolution of 2.8 μm, when a refractive index was assumed to be 1.38, was achieved. PMID:27546517

  10. Optical coherence microscopy in 1700 nm spectral band for high-resolution label-free deep-tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Masahito; Teranishi, Tatsuhiro; Kawagoe, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Norihiko

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a label-free, high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal microscopy. Here, we report that the 1700-nm spectral band has the great potential to improve the imaging depth in high-resolution OCM imaging of animal tissues. Recent studies to improve the imaging depth in OCT revealed that the 1700-nm spectral band is a promising choice for imaging turbid scattering tissues due to the low attenuation of light in the wavelength region. In this study, we developed high-resolution OCM by using a high-power supercontinuum source in the 1700-nm spectral band, and compared the attenuation of signal-to-noise ratio between the 1700-nm and 1300-nm OCM imaging of a mouse brain under the condition of the same sensitivity. The comparison clearly showed that the 1700-nm OCM provides larger imaging depth than the 1300-nm OCM. In this 1700-nm OCM, the lateral resolution of 1.3 μm and the axial resolution of 2.8 μm, when a refractive index was assumed to be 1.38, was achieved. PMID:27546517

  11. Increase of penetration depth in real-time clinical epi-optoacoustic imaging: clutter reduction and aberration correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Michael; Gashi, Kujtim; Peeters, Sara; Held, Gerrit; Preisser, Stefan; Gruenig, Michael; Frenz, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) imaging will experience broadest clinical application if implemented in epi-style with the irradiation optics and the acoustic probe integrated in a single probe. This will allow most flexible imaging of the human body in a combined system together with echo ultrasound (US). In such a multimodal combination, the OA signal could provide functional information within the anatomical context shown in the US image, similar to what is already done with colour flow imaging. Up to date, successful deep epi-OA imaging was difficult to achieve, owing to clutter and acoustic aberrations. Clutter signals arise from strong optical absorption in the region of tissue irradiation and strongly reduce contrast and imaging depth. Acoustic aberrations are caused by the inhomogeneous speed of sound and degrade the spatial resolution of deep tissue structures, further reducing contrast and thus imaging depth. In past years we have developed displacement-compensated averaging (DCA) for clutter reduction based on the clutter decorrelation that occurs when palpating the tissue using the ultrasound probe. We have now implemented real-time DCA on a research ultrasound system to evaluate its clutter reduction performance in freehand scanning of human volunteers. Our results confirm that DCA significantly improves image contrast and imaging depth, making clutter reduction a basic requirement for a clinically successful combination of epi-OA and US imaging. In addition we propose a novel technique which allows automatic full aberration correction of OA images, based on measuring the effect of aberration spatially resolved using echo US. Phantom results demonstrate that this technique allows spatially invariant diffraction-limited resolution in presence of a strong aberrator.

  12. Optical resolution of rotenoids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    Optical resolution of selected rotenoids containing 1-3 asymmetric centers in dihydrobenzopyranofuroben-zopyranone and dihydrobisbenzopyranopyranone series has been achieved on two chiral high-performance liquid chromatographic (hplc) stationary phases. In most cases, the absolute stereochemistry at the cis-B/C ring junction of the rotenoidal antipodes can be related to their elution order. Generally, the 6aα,12aα-enantiomers were more strongly retained by the chiral substrate than their corresponding optical antipodes. The elution-configuration relationship provides potential utility for predicting the absolute configuration of related rotenoidal compounds. Chiral phase hplc on amino-acid-bonded-silica yielded results explicable in terms of Pirkle's bonding schemes for chiral recognition. Resolution data for 12a-hydroxy-, 12a-methoxy-, and 12-hydroxyiminorotenoids further corroborate the mechanistic rationale, and demonstrate that nonpolar π-π interactions appeared to be important for enantiomeric separation on helic poly-triphenylmethylacryl-ate-silica (CPOT). In the latter system, steric effects and conformational factors in association with the modification of E-ring structures might play significant roles in the chiral separation process in view of the reversal to the elution order observed for all methoxylated rotenoids and elliptone derivatives including the parent deguelin. The unique separability (α = 1.44) of 12a-hydroxyelliptone on CPOT was suggestive of structural effects of the 5-side chain on the resolution of the rotenoids having a five-membered-E-ring. The results obtained with two different types of chiral phases are complementary and useful for optical resolution of a wide variety of natural and synthetic rotenoidal compounds.

  13. True amplitude prestack depth migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Feng

    Reliable analysis of amplitude variation with offset (or with angle) requires accurate amplitudes from prestack migration. In routine seismic data processing, amplitude balancing and automatic gain control are often used to reduce amplitude lateral variations. However, these methods are empirical and lack a solid physical basis; thus, there are uncertainties that might produce erroneous conclusions, and hence cause economic loss. During wavefield propagation, geometrical spreading, intrinsic attenuation, transmission losses and the energy conversion significantly distort the wavefield amplitude. Most current true-amplitude migrations usually compensate only for geometrical spreading. A new prestack depth migration based on the framework of reverse-time migration in the time-space domain was developed in this dissertation with the aim of compensating all of the propagation effects in one integrated algorithm. Geometrical spreading is automatically included because of the use of full two-way wave extrapolation. Viscoelastic wave equations are solved to handle the intrinsic attenuation with a priori quality factor. Transmission losses for both up- and down-going waves are compensated using a two-pass, recursive procedure based on extracting the angle-dependent reflection/transmission coefficients from prestack migration. The losses caused by the conversion of energy from one elastic model to another are accounted for through elastic wave extrapolation; the influence of the S wave velocity contrast on the P wave reflection coefficient is implicitly included by using the Zoeppritz equations to describe the reflection and transmission at an elastic interface. Only smooth background models are assumed to be known. The contrasts/ratios of the model parameters can be estimated by fitting the compensated angle-dependent reflection coefficients obtained from data for multiple sources. This is one useful by-product of the algorithm. Numerical tests on both 2D and 3D scalar

  14. Ultrasonic bath depth control and regulation in single cell recordings.

    PubMed

    Duong Dinh, Thien An; Jüngling, Eberhard; Strotmann, Karl-Heinz; Westhofen, Martin; Lückhoff, Andreas

    2006-09-01

    Control of the bath depth is critical in many applications of the patch-clamp technique, particularly when the capacitance of cells is determined to assess secretion or transmitter release or in studies of ion currents sensitive to small changes in the hydrostatic pressure. We describe an inexpensive technique for tight control of the bath depth with the aid of a commercially available ultrasound sensor. The sensor continuously determines changes in the distance to the bath surface with a resolution of about 10 mum. The signal from the sensor is digitized in a microcontroller card and used to send on or off signals at 100 Hz to a peristaltic pump that removes volume from the bath. The inflow into the bath can be realized in a versatile way. The capacitance of Sylgard-coated patch-clamp glass electrodes, demonstrated to be extremely sensitive to small changes in the area moistened by bath solution, is constant within the noise level of +/-3 fF when immersed into a depth-controlled bath, even during exchange of the bath medium. Thus, when small changes in the cell capacitance are measured in patch-clamp experiments, errors due to alterations in the pipette capacitance caused by bath depth fluctuations are eliminated. PMID:16721611

  15. Development of a large-angle pinhole gamma camera with depth-of-interaction capability for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, C.-H.; An, S. J.; Kim, H.-I.; Choi, Y.; Chung, Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    A large-angle gamma camera was developed for imaging small animal models used in medical and biological research. The simulation study shows that a large field of view (FOV) system provides higher sensitivity with respect to a typical pinhole gamma cameras by reducing the distance between the pinhole and the object. However, this gamma camera suffers from the degradation of the spatial resolution at the periphery region due to parallax error by obliquely incident photons. We propose a new method to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) using three layers of monolithic scintillators to reduce the parallax error. The detector module consists of three layers of monolithic CsI(Tl) crystals with dimensions of 50.0 × 50.0 × 2.0 mm3, a Hamamatsu H8500 PSPMT and a large-angle pinhole collimator with an acceptance angle of 120°. The 3-dimensional event positions were determined by the maximum-likelihood position-estimation (MLPE) algorithm and the pre-generated look up table (LUT). The spatial resolution (FWHM) of a Co-57 point-like source was measured at different source position with the conventional method (Anger logic) and with DOI information. We proved that high sensitivity can be achieved without degradation of spatial resolution using a large-angle pinhole gamma camera: this system can be used as a small animal imaging tool.

  16. Estimation of Sea Ice Thickness Distributions through the Combination of Snow Depth and Satellite Laser Altimetry Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Nathan T.; Markus, Thorsten; Cavalieri, Donald J.; Sparling, Lynn C.; Krabill, William B.; Gasiewski, Albin J.; Sonntag, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Combinations of sea ice freeboard and snow depth measurements from satellite data have the potential to provide a means to derive global sea ice thickness values. However, large differences in spatial coverage and resolution between the measurements lead to uncertainties when combining the data. High resolution airborne laser altimeter retrievals of snow-ice freeboard and passive microwave retrievals of snow depth taken in March 2006 provide insight into the spatial variability of these quantities as well as optimal methods for combining high resolution satellite altimeter measurements with low resolution snow depth data. The aircraft measurements show a relationship between freeboard and snow depth for thin ice allowing the development of a method for estimating sea ice thickness from satellite laser altimetry data at their full spatial resolution. This method is used to estimate snow and ice thicknesses for the Arctic basin through the combination of freeboard data from ICESat, snow depth data over first-year ice from AMSR-E, and snow depth over multiyear ice from climatological data. Due to the non-linear dependence of heat flux on ice thickness, the impact on heat flux calculations when maintaining the full resolution of the ICESat data for ice thickness estimates is explored for typical winter conditions. Calculations of the basin-wide mean heat flux and ice growth rate using snow and ice thickness values at the 70 m spatial resolution of ICESat are found to be approximately one-third higher than those calculated from 25 km mean ice thickness values.

  17. Extended depth of focus for transmission x-ray microscope.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yijin; Wang, Junyue; Hong, Youli; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Kai; Williams, Phillip A; Zhu, Peiping; Andrews, Joy C; Pianetta, Piero; Wu, Ziyu

    2012-09-01

    A fast discrete curvelet transform based focus-stacking algorithm for extending the depth of focus of a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) is presented. By analyzing an image stack of a sample taken in a Z-scan, a fully in-focus image can be generated by the proposed scheme. With the extended depth of focus, it is possible to obtain 3D structural information over a large volume at nanometer resolution. The focus-stacking method has been demonstrated using a dataset taken with a laboratory x-ray source based TXM system. The possibility and limitations of generalizing this method to a synchrotron based TXM are also discussed. We expect the proposed method to be of important impact in 3D x-ray microscopy. PMID:22940998

  18. Temperature dependence of penetration depth in thin film niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    More, N.; Muhlfelder, B.; Lockhart, J.

    1989-01-01

    A novel technique is presented which should allow precise determination of the temperature dependence of the inductance, and hence of the penetration depth, of superconducting niobium thin-film structures. Four niobium thin-film stripline inductors are arranged in a bridge configuration, and inductance differences are measured using a potentiometric technique with a SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the null detector. Numerical simulations of the stripline inductances are presented which allow the performance of the measurement technique to be evaluated. The prediction of the two-fluid model for the penetration-depth temperature dependence is given for reduced temperatures of 0.3 to 0.9. The experimental apparatus and its resolution and accuracy are discussed.

  19. Porosity estimation based on seismic wave velocity at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Sub; Yoon, Hyung-Koo

    2014-06-01

    Seismic wave velocity and porosity are used for the estimation of dynamic behaviors in the Earth, including seismicity and liquefaction. To increase the resolution of subsurface observations, seismic wave velocity and porosity can be combined in a compound method. To this end, in this paper, we utilize and rearrange the Wood, Gassmann, and Foti methods - three techniques commonly used to estimate porosity based on seismic wave velocity at shallow depths. Seismic wave velocity is obtained by a field velocity probe using the horizontal transmission technique. Porosity calculated using the Gassmann method shows the highest reliability considering observed porosity criteria. The sensitivities of each method are compared using the error norm. Results show that the Gassmann method has low sensitivity for calculating porosity, whereas the Wood and Foti methods have high sensitivity. Consequently, the Gassmann method is recommended for estimating porosity at shallow depths when using measured elastic wave velocity.

  20. Using a fixed-wing UAS to map snow depth distribution: an evaluation at peak accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Michele, Carlo; Avanzi, Francesco; Passoni, Daniele; Barzaghi, Riccardo; Pinto, Livio; Dosso, Paolo; Ghezzi, Antonio; Gianatti, Roberto; Della Vedova, Giacomo

    2016-03-01

    We investigate snow depth distribution at peak accumulation over a small Alpine area ( ˜ 0.3 km2) using photogrammetry-based surveys with a fixed-wing unmanned aerial system (UAS). These devices are growing in popularity as inexpensive alternatives to existing techniques within the field of remote sensing, but the assessment of their performance in Alpine areas to map snow depth distribution is still an open issue. Moreover, several existing attempts to map snow depth using UASs have used multi-rotor systems, since they guarantee higher stability than fixed-wing systems. We designed two field campaigns: during the first survey, performed at the beginning of the accumulation season, the digital elevation model of the ground was obtained. A second survey, at peak accumulation, enabled us to estimate the snow depth distribution as a difference with respect to the previous aerial survey. Moreover, the spatial integration of UAS snow depth measurements enabled us to estimate the snow volume accumulated over the area. On the same day, we collected 12 probe measurements of snow depth at random positions within the case study to perform a preliminary evaluation of UAS-based snow depth. Results reveal that UAS estimations of point snow depth present an average difference with reference to manual measurements equal to -0.073 m and a RMSE equal to 0.14 m. We have also explored how some basic snow depth statistics (e.g., mean, standard deviation, minima and maxima) change with sampling resolution (from 5 cm up to ˜ 100 m): for this case study, snow depth standard deviation (hence coefficient of variation) increases with decreasing cell size, but it stabilizes for resolutions smaller than 1 m. This provides a possible indication of sampling resolution in similar conditions.

  1. An automated method for depth-dependent crustal anisotropy detection with receiver function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licciardi, Andrea; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Crustal seismic anisotropy can be generated by a variety of geological factors (e.g. alignment of minerals/cracks, presence of fluids etc...). In the case of transversely isotropic media approximation, information about strength and orientation of the anisotropic symmetry axis (including dip) can be extracted from the analysis of P-to-S conversions by means of teleseismic receiver functions (RF). Classically this has been achieved through probabilistic inversion encoding a forward solver for anisotropic media. This approach strongly relies on apriori choices regarding Earth's crust parameterization and velocity structure, requires an extensive knowledge of the RF method and involves time consuming trial and error steps. We present an automated method for reducing the non-uniqueness in this kind of inversions and for retrieving depth-dependent seismic anisotropy parameters in the crust with a resolution of some hundreds of meters. The method involves a multi-frequency approach (for better absolute Vs determination) and the decomposition of the RF data-set in its azimuthal harmonics (to separate the effects of isotropic and anisotropic component). A first inversion of the isotropic component (Zero-order harmonics) by means of a Reversible jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo (RjMCMC) provides the posterior probability distribution for the position of the velocity jumps at depth, from which information on the number of layers and the S-wave velocity structure below a broadband seismic station can be extracted. This information together with that encoded in the first order harmonic is jointly used in an automated way to: (1) determine the number of anisotropic layers and their approximate position at depth, and (2) narrow the search boundaries for layer thickness and S-wave velocity. Finaly, an inversion is carried out with a Neighbourhood Algorithm (NA), where the free parameters are represented by the anisotropic structure beneath the seismic station. We tested the method

  2. Bit-depth extension using spatiotemporal microdither based on models of the equivalent input noise of the visual system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Scott J.; Feng, Xiaofan

    2003-01-01

    Continuous tone, or "contone", imagery usually has 24 bits/pixel as a minimum, with eight bits each for the three primaries in typical displays. However, lower-cost displays constrain this number because of various system limitations. Conversely, high quality displays seek to achieve 9-10 bits/pixel/color, though there may be system bottlenecks limited at 8. The two main artifacts from reduced bit-depth are contouring and loss of amplitude detail; these can be prevented by dithering the image prior to these bit-depth losses. Early work in this area includes Roberts" noise modulation technique, Mista"s blue noise mask, Tyler"s technique of bit-stealing, and Mulligan"s use of the visual system"s spatiotemporal properties for spatiotemporal dithering. However, most halftoning/dithering work was primarily directed to displays at the lower end of bits/pixel (e.g., 1 bit as in halftoning) and higher ppi. Like Tyler, we approach the problem from the higher end of bits/pixel/color, say 6-8, and use available high frequency color content to generate even higher luminance amplitude resolution. Bit-depth extension with a high starting bit-depth (and often lower spatial resolution) changes the game substantially from halftoning experience. For example, complex algorithms like error diffusion and annealing are not needed, just the simple addition of noise. Instead of a spatial dither, it is better to use an amplitude dither, termed microdither by Pappas. We have looked at methods of generating the highest invisible opponent color spatiotemporal noise and other patterns, and have used Ahumada"s concept of equivalent input noise to guide our work. This paper will report on techniques and observations made in achieving contone quality on ~100 ppi 6 bits/pixel/color LCD displays with no visible dither patterns, noise, contours, or loss of amplitude detail at viewing distances as close as the near focus limit (~120 mm). These include the interaction of display nonlinearities and

  3. Snow Depth Mapping at a Basin-Wide Scale in the Western Arctic Using UAS Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, T.; Marsh, P.; Mann, P.; Walker, B.

    2015-12-01

    Assessing snow depths across the Arctic has proven to be extremely difficult due to the variability of snow depths at scales from metres to 100's of metres. New Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) technology provides the possibility to obtain centimeter level resolution imagery (~3cm), and to create Digital Surface Models (DSM) based on the Structure from Motion method. However, there is an ongoing need to quantify the accuracy of this method over different terrain and vegetation types across the Arctic. In this study, we used a small UAS equipped with a high resolution RGB camera to create DSMs over a 1 km2 watershed in the western Canadian Arctic during snow (end of winter) and snow-free periods. To improve the image georeferencing, 15 Ground Control Points were marked across the watershed and incorporated into the DSM processing. The summer DSM was subtracted from the snowcovered DSM to deliver snow depth measurements across the entire watershed. These snow depth measurements were validated by over 2000 snow depth measurements. This technique has the potential to improve larger scale snow depth mapping across watersheds by providing snow depth measurements at a ~3 cm . The ability of mapping both shallow snow (less than 75cm) covering much of the basin and snow patches (up to 5 m in depth) that cover less than 10% of the basin, but contain a significant portion of total basin snowcover, is important for both water resource applications, as well as for testing snow models.

  4. Image inpainting strategy for Kinect depth maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huimin; Chen, Yan; Ge, Chenyang

    2013-07-01

    The great advantage of Microsoft Kinect makes the depth acquisition real-time and inexpensive. But the depth maps directly obtained with the Microsoft Kinect device have absent regions and holes caused by optical factors. The noisy depth maps affect lots of complex tasks in computer vision. In order to improve the quality of the depth maps, this paper presents an efficient image inpainting strategy which is based on watershed segmentation and region merging framework of the corresponding color images. The primitive regions produced by watershed transform are merged into lager regions according to color similarity and edge among regions. Finally, mean filter operator to the adjacent pixels is used to fill up missing depth values and deblocking filter is applied for smoothing depth maps.

  5. The stochastic variability of asteroidal regolith depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    Modeling the depth of regolith on asteroids is approached from a statistical point of view. It is demonstrated that average values are not good descriptors of regolith depth on asteroids. Large deviations from the average can be expected to occur due to both large variations in depth over the surface of a body and to the fact that each asteroid has a unique regolith. The utility of the average depth is not significantly increased by excluding the parts of a surface which are occupied by large craters; a procedure adopted in existing regolith models. Although an asteroid's surface may be 'smoothed out' by movement of debris into gravitationally low spots, the regolith depth retains its variability because of variations in topography at the bottom of the regolith layer. The large variability associated with regolith depth severely limits the power of regolith models in predicting parent body size for the brecciated meteorites.

  6. A comparison of observed and analytically derived remote sensing penetration depths for turbid water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, W. D.; Usry, J. W.; Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Guraus, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The depth to which sunlight will penetrate in turbid waters was investigated. The tests were conducted in water with a single scattering albedo range, and over a range of solar elevation angles. Two different techniques were used to determine the depth of light penetration. It showed little change in the depth of sunlight penetration with changing solar elevation angle. A comparison of the penetration depths indicates that the best agreement between the two methods was achieved when the quasisingle scattering relationship was not corrected for solar angle. It is concluded that sunlight penetration is dependent on inherent water properties only.

  7. Bessel-beam Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junhui; Wang, Lidai; Noordam, Cedric; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-11-01

    The short focal depth of a Gaussian beam limits the volumetric imaging speed of optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM). A Bessel beam, which is diffraction free, provides a long focal depth, but its side lobes deteriorate image quality when the Bessel beam is directly employed to excite photoacoustic (PA) signals in OR-PAM. We present a nonlinear approach based on the Grueneisen relaxation effect to suppress the side-lobe artifacts in PA imaging. This method extends the focal depth of OR-PAM and speeds up volumetric imaging. We experimentally demonstrated a 1-mm focal depth with a 7-μm lateral resolution and volumetrically imaged a carbon fiber and red blood cell samples.

  8. Comparison of Cirrus height and optical depth derived from satellite and aircraft measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, M.; Kriebel, K.T.; Meerkoetter, R.; Renger, W.; Ruppersberg, G.H.; Wendling, P. )

    1993-10-01

    During the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE'89) simultaneous measurements of cirrus cloud-top height and optical depth by satellite and aircraft have been taken. Data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the NOAA polar-orbiting meteorological satellite system have been used together with the algorithm package AVHRR processing scheme over clouds, land and ocean (APOLLO) to derive optical depth. NOAA High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) data have been used together with a bispectral technique to derive cloud-top height. Also, the optical depth of some contrails could be estimated. Airborne measurements have been performed simultaneously by using the Airborne Lidar Experiment (ALEX), a backscatter lidar. Comparison of satellite data with airborne data showed agreement of the top heights to about 500 m and of the optical depths to about 30%. These uncertainties are within the limits obtained from error estimates. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Bessel-beam Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of field.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junhui; Wang, Lidai; Noordam, Cedric; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-11-01

    The short focal depth of a Gaussian beam limits the volumetric imaging speed of optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM). A Bessel beam, which is diffraction free, provides a long focal depth, but its side lobes deteriorate image quality when the Bessel beam is directly employed to excite photoacoustic (PA) signals in OR-PAM. We present a nonlinear approach based on the Grueneisen relaxation effect to suppress the side-lobe artifacts in PA imaging. This method extends the focal depth of OR-PAM and speeds up volumetric imaging. We experimentally demonstrated a 1-mm focal depth with a 7-μm lateral resolution and volumetrically imaged a carbon fiber and red blood cell samples. PMID:26524679

  10. Student academic achievement in college chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabibzadeh, Kiana S.

    General Chemistry is required for variety of baccalaureate degrees, including all medical related fields, engineering, and science majors. Depending on the institution, the prerequisite requirement for college level General Chemistry varies. The success rate for this course is low. The purpose of this study is to examine the factors influencing student academic achievement and retention in General Chemistry at the college level. In this study student achievement is defined by those students who earned grades of "C" or better. The dissertation contains in-depth studies on influence of Intermediate Algebra as a prerequisite compared to Fundamental Chemistry for student academic achievement and student retention in college General Chemistry. In addition the study examined the extent and manner in which student self-efficacy influences student academic achievement in college level General Chemistry. The sample for this part of the study is 144 students enrolled in first semester college level General Chemistry. Student surveys determined student self-efficacy level. The statistical analyses of study demonstrated that Fundamental Chemistry is a better prerequisite for student academic achievement and student retention. The study also found that student self-efficacy has no influence on student academic achievement. The significance of this study will be to provide data for the purpose of establishing a uniform and most suitable prerequisite for college level General Chemistry. Finally the variables identified to influence student academic achievement and enhance student retention will support educators' mission to maximize the students' ability to complete their educational goal at institutions of higher education.

  11. Estimation of river depth from remotely sensed hydraulic relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mersel, Matthew K.; Smith, Laurence C.; Andreadis, Konstantinos M.; Durand, Michael T.

    2013-06-01

    modeling, the Upper Mississippi and Rio Grande rivers experience adequate channel exposures at least ˜60% and ˜42% of the time, respectively. For the Upper Mississippi, so-called "reach-averaging" (spatial averaging along some predetermined river length) of native-resolution h and We values reduces both RMSE and longitudinal variability in the derived depth estimates, especially at reach-averaging lengths of ˜1000-2000 m. These findings have positive implications for SWOT and other sensors attempting to estimate river flow depth and/or discharge solely from incomplete, remotely sensed hydraulic variables, and suggest that useful depth retrievals can be obtained within the spatial and temporal constraints of satellite observations.

  12. Rank order scaling of pictorial depth

    PubMed Central

    van Doorn, Andrea; Koenderink, Jan; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    We address the topic of “pictorial depth” in cases of pictures that are unlike photographic renderings. The most basic measure of “depth” is no doubt that of depth order. We establish depth order through the pairwise depth-comparison method, involving all pairs from a set of 49 fiducial points. The pictorial space for this study was evoked by a capriccio (imaginary landscape) by Francesco Guardi (1712–1793). In such a drawing pictorial space is suggested by the artist through a small set of conventional depth cues. As a result typical Western observers tend to agree largely in their visual awareness when looking at such art. We rank depths for locations that are not on a single surface and far apart in pictorial space. We find that observers resolve about 40 distinct depth layers and agree largely in this. From a previous experiment we have metrical data for the same observers. The rank correlations between the results are high. Perhaps surprisingly, we find no correlation between the number of distinct depth layers and the total metrical depth range. Thus, the relation between subjective magnitude and discrimination threshold fails to hold for pictorial depth. PMID:23145256

  13. Clutter depth discrimination using the wavenumber spectrum.

    PubMed

    Benjamin Reeder, D

    2014-01-01

    Clutter depth is a key parameter in mid-frequency active sonar systems to discriminate between sources of clutter and targets of interest. A method is needed to remotely discriminate clutter depth by information contained in the backscattered signal-without a priori knowledge of that depth. Presented here is an efficient approach for clutter depth estimation using the structure in the wavenumber spectrum. Based on numerical simulations for a simple test case in a shallow water waveguide, this technique demonstrates the potential capability to discriminate between a clutter source in the water column vs one on the seabed. PMID:24437850

  14. Directional Joint Bilateral Filter for Depth Images

    PubMed Central

    Le, Anh Vu; Jung, Seung-Won; Won, Chee Sun

    2014-01-01

    Depth maps taken by the low cost Kinect sensor are often noisy and incomplete. Thus, post-processing for obtaining reliable depth maps is necessary for advanced image and video applications such as object recognition and multi-view rendering. In this paper, we propose adaptive directional filters that fill the holes and suppress the noise in depth maps. Specifically, novel filters whose window shapes are adaptively adjusted based on the edge direction of the color image are presented. Experimental results show that our method yields higher quality filtered depth maps than other existing methods, especially at the edge boundaries. PMID:24971470

  15. Are face representations depth cue invariant?

    PubMed

    Dehmoobadsharifabadi, Armita; Farivar, Reza

    2016-06-01

    The visual system can process three-dimensional depth cues defining surfaces of objects, but it is unclear whether such information contributes to complex object recognition, including face recognition. The processing of different depth cues involves both dorsal and ventral visual pathways. We investigated whether facial surfaces defined by individual depth cues resulted in meaningful face representations-representations that maintain the relationship between the population of faces as defined in a multidimensional face space. We measured face identity aftereffects for facial surfaces defined by individual depth cues (Experiments 1 and 2) and tested whether the aftereffect transfers across depth cues (Experiments 3 and 4). Facial surfaces and their morphs to the average face were defined purely by one of shading, texture, motion, or binocular disparity. We obtained identification thresholds for matched (matched identity between adapting and test stimuli), non-matched (non-matched identity between adapting and test stimuli), and no-adaptation (showing only the test stimuli) conditions for each cue and across different depth cues. We found robust face identity aftereffect in both experiments. Our results suggest that depth cues do contribute to forming meaningful face representations that are depth cue invariant. Depth cue invariance would require integration of information across different areas and different pathways for object recognition, and this in turn has important implications for cortical models of visual object recognition. PMID:27271993

  16. Directional joint bilateral filter for depth images.

    PubMed

    Le, Anh Vu; Jung, Seung-Won; Won, Chee Sun

    2014-01-01

    Depth maps taken by the low cost Kinect sensor are often noisy and incomplete. Thus, post-processing for obtaining reliable depth maps is necessary for advanced image and video applications such as object recognition and multi-view rendering. In this paper, we propose adaptive directional filters that fill the holes and suppress the noise in depth maps. Specifically, novel filters whose window shapes are adaptively adjusted based on the edge direction of the color image are presented. Experimental results show that our method yields higher quality filtered depth maps than other existing methods, especially at the edge boundaries. PMID:24971470

  17. Prescription of land-surface boundary conditions in GISS GCM 2: A simple method based on high-resolution vegetation data bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, E.

    1984-01-01

    A simple method was developed for improved prescription of seasonal surface characteristics and parameterization of land-surface processes in climate models. This method, developed for the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model II (GISS GCM II), maintains the spatial variability of fine-resolution land-cover data while restricting to 8 the number of vegetation types handled in the model. This was achieved by: redefining the large number of vegetation classes in the 1 deg x 1 deg resolution Matthews (1983) vegetation data base as percentages of 8 simple types; deriving roughness length, field capacity, masking depth and seasonal, spectral reflectivity for the 8 types; and aggregating these surface features from the 1 deg x 1 deg resolution to coarser model resolutions, e.g., 8 deg latitude x 10 deg longitude or 4 deg latitude x 5 deg longitude.

  18. An Exploration of the Needling Depth in Acupuncture: The Safe Needling Depth and the Needling Depth of Clinical Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chou, Pei-Chi; Chu, Heng-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To explore the existing scientific information regarding safe needling depth of acupuncture points and the needling depth of clinical efficacy. Methods. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED), The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases to identify relevant monographs and related references from 1991 to 2013. Chinese journals and theses/dissertations were hand searched. Results. 47 studies were recruited and divided into 6 groups by measuring tools, that is, MRI, in vivo evaluation, CT, ultrasound, dissected specimen of cadavers, and another group with clinical efficacy. Each research was analyzed for study design, definition of safe depth, and factors that would affect the measured depths. Depths of clinical efficacy were discussed from the perspective of de-qi and other clinical observations. Conclusions. Great inconsistency in depth of each point measured from different subject groups and tools exists. The definition of safe depth should be established through standardization. There is also lack of researches to compare the clinical efficacy. A well-designed clinical trial selecting proper measuring tools to decide the actual and advisable needling depth for each point, to avoid adverse effects or complications and promote optimal clinical efficacy, is a top priority. PMID:23935678

  19. Explorations in achievement motivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research on the nature of achievement motivation is reviewed. A three-factor model of intrinsic motives is presented and related to various criteria of performance, job satisfaction and leisure activities. The relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motives are discussed. Needed areas for future research are described.

  20. Achieving health care affordability.

    PubMed

    Payson, Norman C

    2002-10-01

    Not all plans are jumping headlong into the consumer-centric arena. In this article, the CEO of Oxford Health Plans discusses how advanced managed care can achieve what other consumer-centric programs seek to do--provide affordable, quality health care. PMID:12391815

  1. Issues in Achievement Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L.

    This booklet is intended to help school personnel, parents, students, and members of the community understand concepts and research relating to achievement testing in public schools. The paper's sections include: (1) test use with direct effects on students (test of certification, selection, and placement); (2) test use with indirect effects on…

  2. Achieving Peace through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    While it is generally agreed that peace is desirable, there are barriers to achieving a peaceful world. These barriers are classified into three major areas: (1) an erroneous view of human nature; (2) injustice; and (3) fear of world unity. In a discussion of these barriers, it is noted that although the consciousness and conscience of the world…

  3. Achieving All Our Ambitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    National learning and skills policy aims both to build economic prosperity and to achieve social justice. Participation in higher education (HE) has the potential to contribute substantially to both aims. That is why the Campaign for Learning has supported the ambition to increase the proportion of the working-age population with a Level 4…

  4. Intelligence and Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deary, Ian J.; Strand, Steve; Smith, Pauline; Fernandes, Cres

    2007-01-01

    This 5-year prospective longitudinal study of 70,000+ English children examined the association between psychometric intelligence at age 11 years and educational achievement in national examinations in 25 academic subjects at age 16. The correlation between a latent intelligence trait (Spearman's "g"from CAT2E) and a latent trait of educational…

  5. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  6. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the potential "Robin Hood…

  7. INTELLIGENCE, PERSONALITY AND ACHIEVEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MUIR, R.C.; AND OTHERS

    A LONGITUDINAL DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY OF A GROUP OF MIDDLE CLASS CHILDREN IS DESCRIBED, WITH EMPHASIS ON A SEGMENT OF THE RESEARCH INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP OF ACHIEVEMENT, INTELLIGENCE, AND EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE. THE SUBJECTS WERE 105 CHILDREN AGED FIVE TO 6.3 ATTENDING TWO SCHOOLS IN MONTREAL. EACH CHILD WAS ASSESSED IN THE AREAS OF…

  8. School Students' Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shymansky, James; Wang, Tzu-Ling; Annetta, Leonard; Everett, Susan; Yore, Larry D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a report of the impact of an externally funded, multiyear systemic reform project on students' science achievement on a modified version of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) test in 33 small, rural school districts in two Midwest states. The systemic reform effort utilized a cascading leadership strategy…

  9. Advancing Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walberg, Herbert J.

    2010-01-01

    For the last half century, higher spending and many modern reforms have failed to raise the achievement of students in the United States to the levels of other economically advanced countries. A possible explanation, says Herbert Walberg, is that much current education theory is ill informed about scientific psychology, often drawing on fads and…

  10. Essays on Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ampaabeng, Samuel Kofi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the determinants of student outcomes--achievement, attainment, occupational choices and earnings--in three different contexts. The first two chapters focus on Ghana while the final chapter focuses on the US state of Massachusetts. In the first chapter, I exploit the incidence of famine and malnutrition that resulted to…

  11. Increasing Male Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Barbara Talbert

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation has brought greater attention to the academic performance of American youth. Its emphasis on student achievement requires a closer analysis of assessment data by school districts. To address the findings, educators must seek strategies to remedy failing results. In a mid-Atlantic district of the Unites States,…

  12. Setting and Achieving Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoop, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Provides basic guidelines which school officials and school boards may find helpful in negotiating, establishing, and managing objectives. Discusses characteristics of good objectives, specific and directional objectives, multiple objectives, participation in setting objectives, feedback on goal process and achievement, and managing a school…

  13. Schools Achieving Gender Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revis, Emma

    This guide is designed to assist teachers presenting the Schools Achieving Gender Equity (SAGE) curriculum for vocational education students, which was developed to align gender equity concepts with the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA). Included in the guide are lesson plans for classes on the following topics: legal issues of gender equity,…

  14. Iowa Women of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Goldfinch highlights some of Iowa's 20th century women of achievement. These women have devoted their lives to working for human rights, education, equality, and individual rights. They come from the worlds of politics, art, music, education, sports, business, entertainment, and social work. They represent Native Americans,…

  15. Achievements or Disasters?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, MacArthur

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on policy issues that have affected arts education in the twentieth century, such as: interest in discipline-based arts education, influence of national arts associations, and national standards and coordinated assessment. States that whether the policy decisions are viewed as achievements or disasters are for future determination. (CMK)

  16. Minority Achievement Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince George's Community Coll., Largo, MD. Office of Institutional Research and Analysis.

    This report summarizes the achievements of Prince George's Community College (PGCC) with regard to minority outcomes. Table 1 summarizes the undergraduate enrollment trends for African Americans as well as total minorities from fall 1994 through fall 1998. Both the headcount number of African American students and the proportion of African…

  17. Appraising Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    To determine quality sequence in pupil progress, evaluation approaches need to be used which guide the teacher to assist learners to attain optimally. Teachers must use a variety of procedures to appraise student achievement in reading, because no one approach is adequate. Appraisal approaches might include: (1) observation and subsequent…

  18. Instantaneous three-dimensional sensing using spatial light modulator illumination with extended depth of field imaging

    PubMed Central

    Quirin, Sean; Peterka, Darcy S.; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Imaging three-dimensional structures represents a major challenge for conventional microscopies. Here we describe a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) microscope that can simultaneously address and image multiple targets in three dimensions. A wavefront coding element and computational image processing enables extended depth-of-field imaging. High-resolution, multi-site three-dimensional targeting and sensing is demonstrated in both transparent and scattering media over a depth range of 300-1,000 microns. PMID:23842387

  19. High resolution lunar mascon three dimensional density structure revealed by GRAIL gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianguo, Yan; Yi, Zhang

    2016-07-01

    In the history of the moon exploration, the most amazing achievement is that some mass concentrated areas were found on the near side of the moon1, 2. These mass concentrated areas, which are referred to mascons, are usually covered with a positive gravity anomaly peak, and surrounded by negative gravity anomalies with low geographical elevation1-7. Here we proposed a gravity inverse method including geological constraint to obtain density structure of the lunar mascons. The method was implemented in spherical coordinates and validated with simulation test. Using this method we obtained high resolution density anomaly structure of lunar near side maria mascons basins and far side highland mascons. The high resolution depth information and density anomalies structure of the lunar mascons are presented for the first time. By comparing the near side maria mascons with far side mascons, we found all the mascons have an annulus density structures in their shallow stratums; the mascon depth information also indicates that the mascon depth on lunar far side is much deeper than that on the near side. These results indicate various origination mechanism between nearside and farside mascons.

  20. Alchemical hermeneutics of the Vesica Piscis: Symbol of depth psychology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Linda Kay

    The purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of the Vesica Piscis as the symbolic frame for depth psychology and the therapeutic relationship. The method of inquiry was hermeneutics and alchemical hermeneutics, informed theoretically by depth psychology. A theoretical description of the nature of the Vesica Piscis as a dynamic template and symbol for depth psychology and the therapeutic relationship resulted. Gathering the components of the therapeutic relationship into the shape of the Vesica Piscis, gave opportunity to explore what might be happening while treatment is taking place: somatically, psychologically, and emotionally. An investigation into the study of Soul placed the work of psychology within the central, innermost sacred space between—known symbolically as the Vesica Piscis. Imbued with a connectedness and relational welcoming, this symbol images the Greek goddess Hekate (Soul), as mediatrix between mind and matter. Psyche (soul), namesake of "psychology," continues her journey of finding meaning making, restitution, and solace in the therapeutic space as imaged by the Vesica Piscis. Her journey, moving through the generations, becomes the journey of the therapeutic process—one that finds resolution in relationship. Psyche is sought out in the macrocosmic archetypal realm of pure energy, the prima material that forms and coalesces both in response and likewise, creates a response through symbols, images, and imagination. The field was explored from the depth psychological perspective as: the unconscious, consciousness, and archetypal, and in physics as: the quantum field, morphic resonance, and the holographic field. Gaining an understanding of the underlying qualities of the field placed the symbol in its embedded context, allowing for further definition as to how the symbol potentially was either an extension of the field, or served as a constellating factor. Depth psychology, as a scientific discipline, is in need of a symbol that

  1. Hydrogen analysis depth calibration by CORTEO Monte-Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, M.; Reichart, P.; Bergmaier, A.; Greubel, C.; Schiettekatte, F.; Dollinger, G.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen imaging with sub-μm lateral resolution and sub-ppm sensitivity has become possible with coincident proton-proton (pp) scattering analysis (Reichart et al., 2004). Depth information is evaluated from the energy sum signal with respect to energy loss of both protons on their path through the sample. In first order, there is no angular dependence due to elastic scattering. In second order, a path length effect due to different energy loss on the paths of the protons causes an angular dependence of the energy sum. Therefore, the energy sum signal has to be de-convoluted depending on the matrix composition, i.e. mainly the atomic number Z, in order to get a depth calibrated hydrogen profile. Although the path effect can be calculated analytically in first order, multiple scattering effects lead to significant deviations in the depth profile. Hence, in our new approach, we use the CORTEO Monte-Carlo code (Schiettekatte, 2008) in order to calculate the depth of a coincidence event depending on the scattering angle. The code takes individual detector geometry into account. In this paper we show, that the code correctly reproduces measured pp-scattering energy spectra with roughness effects considered. With more than 100 μm thick Mylar-sandwich targets (Si, Fe, Ge) we demonstrate the deconvolution of the energy spectra on our current multistrip detector at the microprobe SNAKE at the Munich tandem accelerator lab. As a result, hydrogen profiles can be evaluated with an accuracy in depth of about 1% of the sample thickness.

  2. Mapping the structure and depth to magnetic basement in the United States using the magnetic tilt-depth method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, A.; Williams, S.; Fairhead, J.; Ravat, D.; Blakely, R.

    2008-05-01

    We provide a rationale for rapidly assessing the depth and structure of sedimentary basins from magnetic anomaly data. Our methodology is based on "tilt-depth" calculated strictly from first-order derivatives of the total magnetic field. We assume a simple buried vertical contact model such that the 0 degree contour of the tilt derivative closely follows the edge of the vertical contact, while the distance between the 0 and +/-45 degree contours provides an estimate of the depth to the top of the buried contact. We have applied the tilt-depth method to two magnetic databases with very different scales. In the first application, we used the Magnetic Anomaly Map of North America covering the continental United States, gridded at a sample interval of 1 km. Calculated depths show a strong correlation with known areas of shallow basement and sedimentary basins. To quantitatively evaluate the results, we low-pass filtered the calculated depths, desampled the grid to a 1-degree sample interval, and compared with a grid of sediment thickness based on drilling data (Laske and Masters, 1997). In visual comparisons, these two datasets show a striking correlation between basement highs and lows, and, quantitatively, the overall correlation coefficient between the two grids is 0.87. We also applied the tilt-depth methodology to high-resolution aeromagnetic data from the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State. To first order, the Olympic Peninsula is a massive east-plunging anticline consisting of two distinct subduction-related terranes: An essentially nonmagnetic core of highly deformed Tertiary sedimentary rocks, and a periphery of highly magnetic, early Eocene volcanic rocks. The tilt-depth method successfully identified a number of important tectonic elements known from geologic mapping. The steeply dipping thrust contact between core and periphery rocks was clearly delineated, and other more subtle magnetic anomalies within the periphery volcanic rocks and even within the

  3. Depth-resolved holographic optical coherence imaging using a high-sensitivity photorefractive polymer device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, M.; Prauzner, J.; Köber, S.; Meerholz, K.; Jeong, K.; Nolte, D. D.

    2008-12-01

    We present coherence-gated holographic imaging using a highly sensitive photorefractive (PR) polymer composite as the recording medium. Due to the high sensitivity of the composite holographic recording at intensities as low as 5 mW/cm2 allowed for a frame exposure time of only 500ms. Motivated by regenerative medical applications, we demonstrate optical depth sectioning of a polymer foam for use as a cell culture matrix. An axial resolution of 18 μm and a transverse resolution of 30 μm up to a depth of 600 μm was obtained using an off-axis recording geometry.

  4. Depth-sensitive subsurface imaging of polymer nanocomposites using second harmonic Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Uribe, Octavio Alejandro; Reifenberger, Ronald; Raman, Arvind; Avila, Alba

    2015-03-24

    We study the depth sensitivity and spatial resolution of subsurface imaging of polymer nanocomposites using second harmonic mapping in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM). This method allows the visualization of the clustering and percolation of buried Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) via capacitance gradient (∂C/∂z) maps. We develop a multilayered sample where thin layers of neat Polyimide (PI) (∼80 nm per layer) are sequentially spin-coated on well-dispersed SWCNT/Polyimide (PI) nanocomposite films. The multilayer nanocomposite system allows the acquisition of ∂C/∂z images of three-dimensional percolating networks of SWCNTs at different depths in the same region of the sample. We detect CNTs at a depth of ∼430 nm, and notice that the spatial resolution progressively deteriorates with increasing depth of the buried CNTs. Computational trends of ∂C/∂z vs CNT depth correlate the sensitivity and depth resolution with field penetration and spreading, and enable a possible approach to three-dimensional subsurface structure reconstruction. The results open the door to nondestructive, three-dimensional tomography and nanometrology techniques for nanocomposite applications. PMID:25591106

  5. Dense Depth Map Reconstruction Using Special Purpose Hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distante, A.; Mugnuolo, R.; Stella, E.; Attolico, G.

    1989-02-01

    The advancements in machine vision technology have been substantial in recent years with the introduction of faster processors and the improvements in sensor technology. A depth map can be obtained with both direct and indirect methods. The first ones recover depth directly from ranging devices. The second ones recover 3-D information by means of shape from xxx and stereopsis. Our idea consists of integration of information from two different source: local shading analysis and stereo vision. At present this alternate method has been tested with satisfactory results on conventional hardware but it's impracticable for computing time. The use of advanced parallel hardware is surely suitable to achieve the real time response, but it is not justified for some application fields (where response time is not very critical) because of its cost. An alternate choice can fall on low-cost and simple architectures that allow a configuration to achieve the required speed/cost ratio for a particular vision application by using a combination of standard modules. In this paper our method for depth recover is analyzed in order to enhance the critical steps for computing time. They are expressed in terms of computation suitable for standard and special purpose modules.

  6. Repeated 1-cm Resolution Topographic and 2.5-mm Resolution Photomosiac Surveys of Benthic Communities and Fine Scale Bedforms in Monterey Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caress, D. W.; Hobson, B.; Thomas, H. J.; Henthorn, R.; Martin, E. J.; Bird, L.; Risi, M.; Troni, G.; Paull, C. K.; Rock, S.; Padial, J. A.; Hammond, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute has developed a low altitude, ROV-based seafloor mapping system that combines lidar laser ranging, multibeam sonar, and stereo photographic imagery. When operated at a 3-m altitude, this system maps seafloor topography with a 1-cm lateral resolution and simultaneously collects 2.5-mm resolution color photography. We have twice mapped an 80-m by 80-m area of a chemosynthetic clam community located at 2850-m depth in the Monterey Canyon axis. Both the topography and the photomosaics resolve changes in the clam community over a six-month interval. Many individual animals have moved, and tracks of those animals are visible in the lidar topography. No other changes in the seafloor at this site can be discerned. We have also performed single surveys of bedforms and scours at both 1850-m and 2850-m depths in Monterey Canyon. The highest resolution bathymetry data are collected using a 3DatDepth SL1 lidar laser scanner. This system has a 30° field of view and ranges continuously, achieving a 1 cm sounding spacing at a 3 m altitude and 0.3 m/s speed. Bathymetry data are also collected using a 400-kHz Reson 7125 multibeam sonar. This configuration produces 512 beams across a 135° wide swath; each beam has a 0.5° acrosstrack by 1.0° alongtrack angular width. At a 3-m altitude, the nadir beams have a 2.5 cm acrosstrack and 5 cm alongtrack footprint. Dual Prosilica GX1920 2.4 Mpixel color cameras provide color stereo photography of the seafloor. Illumination is provided by dual xenon strobes. The camera housings have been fitted with corrective optics achieving a 90° field of view with less than 1% distortion. At a 3-m altitude the raw image pixels have a 2.5 mm resolution. Position and attitude data are provided by a Kearfott SeaDevil Inertial Navigation System (INS) integrated with a 300 kHz Teledyne RD Instruments Doppler velocity log (DVL). A separate Paroscientific pressure sensor is mounted adjacent to the INS. The INS

  7. Monocular depth perception using image processing and machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hombali, Apoorv; Gorde, Vaibhav; Deshpande, Abhishek

    2011-10-01

    This paper primarily exploits some of the more obscure, but inherent properties of camera and image to propose a simpler and more efficient way of perceiving depth. The proposed method involves the use of a single stationary camera at an unknown perspective and an unknown height to determine depth of an object on unknown terrain. In achieving so a direct correlation between a pixel in an image and the corresponding location in real space has to be formulated. First, a calibration step is undertaken whereby the equation of the plane visible in the field of view is calculated along with the relative distance between camera and plane by using a set of derived spatial geometrical relations coupled with a few intrinsic properties of the system. The depth of an unknown object is then perceived by first extracting the object under observation using a series of image processing steps followed by exploiting the aforementioned mapping of pixel and real space coordinate. The performance of the algorithm is greatly enhanced by the introduction of reinforced learning making the system independent of hardware and environment. Furthermore the depth calculation function is modified with a supervised learning algorithm giving consistent improvement in results. Thus, the system uses the experience in past and optimizes the current run successively. Using the above procedure a series of experiments and trials are carried out to prove the concept and its efficacy.

  8. A comparison of hydrographically and optically derived mixed layer depths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zawada, D.G.; Zaneveld, J.R.V.; Boss, E.; Gardner, W.D.; Richardson, M.J.; Mishonov, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    Efforts to understand and model the dynamics of the upper ocean would be significantly advanced given the ability to rapidly determine mixed layer depths (MLDs) over large regions. Remote sensing technologies are an ideal choice for achieving this goal. This study addresses the feasibility of estimating MLDs from optical properties. These properties are strongly influenced by suspended particle concentrations, which generally reach a maximum at pycnoclines. The premise therefore is to use a gradient in beam attenuation at 660 nm (c660) as a proxy for the depth of a particle-scattering layer. Using a global data set collected during World Ocean Circulation Experiment cruises from 1988-1997, six algorithms were employed to compute MLDs from either density or temperature profiles. Given the absence of published optically based MLD algorithms, two new methods were developed that use c660 profiles to estimate the MLD. Intercomparison of the six hydrographically based algorithms revealed some significant disparities among the resulting MLD values. Comparisons between the hydrographical and optical approaches indicated a first-order agreement between the MLDs based on the depths of gradient maxima for density and c660. When comparing various hydrographically based algorithms, other investigators reported that inherent fluctuations of the mixed layer depth limit the accuracy of its determination to 20 m. Using this benchmark, we found a ???70% agreement between the best hydrographical-optical algorithm pairings. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. The High Resolution Hurricane Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripoli, G. J.

    2009-09-01

    It has been suggested that an answer to the hurricane intensity forecast problem is to use very high cloud-resolving resolution in operational forecast models. In consideration of this hypothesis, the United States National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration commissioned a major study to take place over the past 1.5 years whereby the hypothesis would be tested with 6 different hurricane models featuring different dynamics cores and different physics. These models included the GFDL hurricane, Navy COAMPS, the WRF-ARW, WRF-AHW, WRF-NMM, and the UW-NMS. The experiment design was to choose and optimal mix of historic hurricanes where good observations of intensity at land fall existed and run 5 day model forecasts with 3 different resolutions of about 9-12 km (low resolution), 3-4 km (medium resolution) and 1-1.5 km (high resolution) and document how much the forecast improved in each case. The project focused on 10 storms over 2-12, 1-5 day forecast periods, for a total of 67 simulations. Not all groups completed all 67 simulations, but there were sufficient results to reach a stunning conclusion. The results of these tests suggested that little or no improvement in intensity prediction was achieved with high resolution.

  10. Resolution in Electromagnetic Prospecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Bartel, L. C.; Knox, H. A.; Schramm, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Low-frequency electromagnetic (EM) signals are commonly used in geophysical exploration of the shallow subsurface. Sensitivity to conductivity implies they are particularly useful for inferring fluid content of porous media. However, low-frequency EM wavefields are diffusive, and have significantly larger wavelengths compared to seismic signals of equal frequency. The wavelength of a 30 Hz sinusoid propagating with seismic velocity 3000 m/s is 100 m, whereas an analogous EM signal diffusing through a conductive body of 0.1 S/m (clayey shale) has wavelength 1825 m. The larger wavelength has implications for resolution of the EM prospecting method. We are investigating resolving power of the EM method via theoretical and numerical experiments. Normal incidence plane wave reflection/transmission by a thin geologic bed is amenable to analytic solution. Responses are calculated for beds that are conductive or resistive relative to the host rock. Preliminary results indicate the classic seismic resolution/detection limit of bed thickness ~1/8 wavelength is not achieved. EM responses for point or line current sources recorded by general acquisition geometries are calculated with a 3D finite-difference algorithm. These exhibit greater variability which may allow inference of bed thickness. We also examine composite responses of two point scatterers with separation when illuminated by an incident EM field. This is analogous to the Rayleigh resolution problem of estimating angular separation between two light sources. The First Born Approximation implies that perturbations in permittivity, permeability, and conductivity have different scattering patterns, which may be indicators of EM medium properties. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. High-resolution high-efficiency multilayer Fresnel zone plates for soft and hard x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanli, Umut T.; Keskinbora, Kahraman; Gregorczyk, Keith; Leister, Jonas; Teeny, Nicolas; Grévent, Corinne; Knez, Mato; Schütz, Gisela

    2015-09-01

    X-ray microscopy enables high spatial resolutions, high penetration depths and characterization of a broad range of materials. Calculations show that nanometer range resolution is achievable in the hard X-ray regime by using Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) if certain conditions are satisfied. However, this requires, among other things, aspect ratios of several thousands. The multilayer (ML) type FZPs, having virtually unlimited aspect ratios, are strong candidates to achieve single nanometer resolutions. Our research is focused on the fabrication of ML-FZPs which encompasses deposition of multilayers over a glass fiber via the atomic layer deposition (ALD), which is subsequently sliced in the optimum thickness for the X-ray energy by a focused ion beam (FIB). We recently achieved aberration free imaging by resolving 21 nm features with an efficiency of up to 12.5 %, the highest imaging resolution achieved by an ML-FZP. We also showed efficient focusing of 7.9 keV X-rays down to 30 nm focal spot size (FWHM). For resolutions below ~10 nm, efficiencies would decrease significantly due to wave coupling effects. To compensate this effect high efficiency, low stress materials have to be researched, as lower intrinsic stresses will allow fabrication of larger FZPs with higher number of zones, leading to high light intensity at the focus. As a first step we fabricated an ML-FZP with a diameter of 62 μm, an outermost zone width of 12 nm and 452 active zones. Further strategies for fabrication of high resolution high efficiency multilayer FZPs will also be discussed.

  12. Learning in Depth: Students as Experts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Kieran; Madej, Krystina

    2009-01-01

    Nearly everyone who has tried to describe an image of the educated person, from Plato to the present, includes at least two requirements: first, educated people must be widely knowledgeable and, second, they must know something in depth. The authors would like to advocate a somewhat novel approach to "learning in depth" (LiD) that seems likely to…

  13. Improved Boundary Layer Depth Retrievals from MPLNET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Jasper R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Molod, Andrea M.; Joseph, Everette

    2013-01-01

    Continuous lidar observations of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) depth have been made at the Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) site in Greenbelt, MD since April 2001. However, because of issues with the operational PBL depth algorithm, the data is not reliable for determining seasonal and diurnal trends. Therefore, an improved PBL depth algorithm has been developed which uses a combination of the wavelet technique and image processing. The new algorithm is less susceptible to contamination by clouds and residual layers, and in general, produces lower PBL depths. A 2010 comparison shows the operational algorithm overestimates the daily mean PBL depth when compared to the improved algorithm (1.85 and 1.07 km, respectively). The improved MPLNET PBL depths are validated using radiosonde comparisons which suggests the algorithm performs well to determine the depth of a fully developed PBL. A comparison with the Goddard Earth Observing System-version 5 (GEOS-5) model suggests that the model may underestimate the maximum daytime PBL depth by 410 m during the spring and summer. The best agreement between MPLNET and GEOS-5 occurred during the fall and they diered the most in the winter.

  14. Predicting Maximum Lake Depth from Surrounding Topography

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, Jeffrey W.; Milstead, W. Bryan; Urrutia, M. Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Information about lake morphometry (e.g., depth, volume, size, etc.) aids understanding of the physical and ecological dynamics of lakes, yet is often not readily available. The data needed to calculate measures of lake morphometry, particularly lake depth, are usually collected on a lake-by-lake basis and are difficult to obtain across broad regions. To span the gap between studies of individual lakes where detailed data exist and regional studies where access to useful data on lake depth is unavailable, we developed a method to predict maximum lake depth from the slope of the topography surrounding a lake. We use the National Elevation Dataset and the National Hydrography Dataset – Plus to estimate the percent slope of surrounding lakes and use this information to predict maximum lake depth. We also use field measured maximum lake depths from the US EPA's National Lakes Assessment to empirically adjust and cross-validate our predictions. We were able to predict maximum depth for ∼28,000 lakes in the Northeastern United States with an average cross-validated RMSE of 5.95 m and 5.09 m and average correlation of 0.82 and 0.69 for Hydrological Unit Code Regions 01 and 02, respectively. The depth predictions and the scripts are openly available as supplements to this manuscript. PMID:21984945

  15. Differential Cognitive Cues in Pictorial Depth Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omari, Issa M.; Cook, Harold

    The experiment described in this report investigates the effects of various cognitive cues in questions asked regarding the relationship of elements in pictorial depth perception. The subjects of this study are 40 third grade Black and Puerto Rican children. They are confronted with four pictures from the Hudson Depth Perception Tests and asked to…

  16. Evaluating approaches for estimating peat depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, L. E.; West, L. J.; Holden, J.; Chapman, P. J.

    2014-04-01

    Estimates of peat depth are required to inform understanding of peatland development, functioning, and ecosystem services such as carbon storage. However, there is a considerable lack of peat depth data at local, national, and global scales. Recent studies have attempted to address this knowledge deficit by using manual probing and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to estimate depth. Despite increasing application, little consideration has been given to the accuracy of either of these techniques. This study examines the accuracy of probing and GPR for measuring peat depth. Corresponding GPR and probing surveys were carried out at a catchment scale in a blanket peatland. GPR depth estimations, calibrated using common midpoint (CMP) surveys, were found to be on average 35% greater than probe measurements. The source of disagreement was found to be predominantly caused by depth probes becoming obstructed by artifacts within the peat body, although occasionally probing rods also penetrated sediments underlying the peat. Using the Complex Refractive Index Model, it was found that applying a single velocity of 0.036 m ns-1 across a single site may also result in -8 to +17% error in estimation of peat depth due to spatial variability in water content and porosity. It is suggested that GPR calibrated at each site using CMP surveys may provide a more accurate method for measuring peat depth.

  17. Resolution limits in imaging LADAR systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, Jed; Woods, Charles L.; Lorenzo, Joseph P.; Kierstead, John; Pyburn, Dana; Sengupta, S. K.

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new design concept of laser radar systems that combines both phase comparison and time-of-flight methods. We show from signal to noise ration considerations that there is a fundamental limit to the overall resolution in 3-D imaging range laser radar (LADAR). We introduce a new metric, volume of resolution (VOR), and we show from quantum noise considerations, that there is a maximum resolution volume, that can be achieved, for a given set of system parameters. Consequently, there is a direct tradeoff between range resolution and spatial resolution. Thus in a LADAR system, range resolution may be maximized at the expense of spatial image resolution and vice versa. We introduce resolution efficiency, ηr, as a new figure of merit for LADAR, that describes system resolution under the constraints of a specific design, compared to its optimal resolution performance derived from quantum noise considerations. We analyze how the resolution efficiency could be utilized to improve the resolution performance of a LADAR system. Our analysis could be extended to all LADAR systems, regardless of whether they are flash imaging or scanning laser systems.

  18. In-line three-dimensional holography of nanocrystalline objects at atomic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Chen, F.-R.; Van Dyck, D.; Kisielowski, C.

    2016-01-01

    Resolution and sensitivity of the latest generation aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopes allow the vast majority of single atoms to be imaged with sub-Ångstrom resolution and their locations determined in an image plane with a precision that exceeds the 1.9-pm wavelength of 300 kV electrons. Such unprecedented performance allows expansion of electron microscopic investigations with atomic resolution into the third dimension. Here we report a general tomographic method to recover the three-dimensional shape of a crystalline particle from high-resolution images of a single projection without the need for sample rotation. The method is compatible with low dose rate electron microscopy, which improves on signal quality, while minimizing electron beam-induced structure modifications even for small particles or surfaces. We apply it to germanium, gold and magnesium oxide particles, and achieve a depth resolution of 1–2 Å, which is smaller than inter-atomic distances. PMID:26887849

  19. In-line three-dimensional holography of nanocrystalline objects at atomic resolution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, F. -R.; Van Dyck, D.; Kisielowski, C.

    2016-02-18

    We report that resolution and sensitivity of the latest generation aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopes allow the vast majority of single atoms to be imaged with sub-Ångstrom resolution and their locations determined in an image plane with a precision that exceeds the 1.9-pm wavelength of 300 kV electrons. Such unprecedented performance allows expansion of electron microscopic investigations with atomic resolution into the third dimension. Here we show a general tomographic method to recover the three-dimensional shape of a crystalline particle from high-resolution images of a single projection without the need for sample rotation. The method is compatible with low dose ratemore » electron microscopy, which improves on signal quality, while minimizing electron beam-induced structure modifications even for small particles or surfaces. Lastly, we apply it to germanium, gold and magnesium oxide particles, and achieve a depth resolution of 1–2 Å, which is smaller than inter-atomic distances.« less

  20. In-line three-dimensional holography of nanocrystalline objects at atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Chen, F-R; Van Dyck, D; Kisielowski, C

    2016-01-01

    Resolution and sensitivity of the latest generation aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopes allow the vast majority of single atoms to be imaged with sub-Ångstrom resolution and their locations determined in an image plane with a precision that exceeds the 1.9-pm wavelength of 300 kV electrons. Such unprecedented performance allows expansion of electron microscopic investigations with atomic resolution into the third dimension. Here we report a general tomographic method to recover the three-dimensional shape of a crystalline particle from high-resolution images of a single projection without the need for sample rotation. The method is compatible with low dose rate electron microscopy, which improves on signal quality, while minimizing electron beam-induced structure modifications even for small particles or surfaces. We apply it to germanium, gold and magnesium oxide particles, and achieve a depth resolution of 1-2 Å, which is smaller than inter-atomic distances. PMID:26887849

  1. Synchronous scanning of reference mirror and objective lens for high-resolution full-field interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwagi, Ken; Kasuya, Yosuke; Kojima, Shuto; Kurokawa, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    We realized a long-scanning-range and high-resolution interferometry in a time-domain full-field microscopic scheme by adopting a simple configuration. A reference mirror was synchronously scanned with an objective lens, which was installed in a common path, to prevent lateral resolution degradation due to defocus at the mirror. High axial resolution was obtained using a broadband supercontinuum (SC) generated by a 1.55 µm pump. The SC was generated by propagating a femtosecond pulse at 1.55 µm through a highly nonlinear dispersion shifted fiber with a small dispersion slope. We designed and constructed an interferometer carefully to utilize the entire bandwidth. The broad bandwidth of the interferometer achieved an axial resolution of 2.50 µm in air. The synchronous scanning maintained a lateral resolution longer than 1 mm. The system successfully yielded a cross-sectional image of two layers of scotch tape along the 400-µm-depth and 90-nm-step surface profiles.

  2. Ultra-high resolution polarization-sensitive optical coherence microscopy for brain imaging at 6 um, 3.4 um and 1.3 um resolution (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Akkin, Taner; Magnain, Caroline V.; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Cramer, Avilash; Wang, Ruopeng; Sakadžic, Sava; Boas, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Neuroanatomical pathways form the basis for functional activity of brain circuits. In the past, we developed a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography with serial scanning to achieve large-scale brain imaging. The system was able to visualize 3D fiber tracts of ~20 um in diameter. To investigate the neuroanatomical pathways at finer scales, we have now built a polarization-maintaining fiber based ultra-high resolution polarization-sensitive optical coherence microscope (PS-OCM) at 1300 nm. The PS-OCM has an axial resolution of 3.5 um in tissue. The detection setup consists of two spectrometers, acquiring spectral interference on orthogonal polarization channels. With a single measurement, the setup generates four contrasts: reflectivity, cross-polarization, retardance and optic axis orientation. To investigate the capability of PS-OCM at different resolutions, we used three microscope objectives that yield lateral resolutions of 6.0 um, 3.4 um and 1.3 um. Blocks of formalin fixed mouse brain and human brain were scanned. The cross-polarization and retardance images clearly depict the neuronal fiber structures, which are comparable with that generated by the maximum projection of volumetric reflectivity data. The optic axis orientation quantifies the in-plane fiber orientation. With the lateral resolution of 1.3 um, the retardance contrast is weak in white matter due to the shallow depth of focus. Overall, the ultra-high resolution PS-OCM provides a new tool to reveal neuroanatomical maps in the brain at cellular resolution.

  3. Project ACHIEVE final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-13

    Project ACHIEVE was a math/science academic enhancement program aimed at first year high school Hispanic American students. Four high schools -- two in El Paso, Texas and two in Bakersfield, California -- participated in this Department of Energy-funded program during the spring and summer of 1996. Over 50 students, many of whom felt they were facing a nightmare future, were given the opportunity to work closely with personal computers and software, sophisticated calculators, and computer-based laboratories -- an experience which their regular academic curriculum did not provide. Math and science projects, exercises, and experiments were completed that emphasized independent and creative applications of scientific and mathematical theories to real world problems. The most important outcome was the exposure Project ACHIEVE provided to students concerning the college and technical-field career possibilities available to them.

  4. Achieving Goal Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Stéphane

    2015-07-01

    Both monotherapy and combination therapy options are appropriate for antihypertensive therapy according to the 2013 European Society of Hypertension (ESH)/European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines. Most patients require more than one agent to achieve blood pressure (BP) control, and adding a second agent is more effective than doubling the dose of existing therapy. The addition of a third agent may be required to achieve adequate BP reductions in some patients. Single-pill fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) allow multiple-drug regimens to be delivered without any negative impact on patient compliance or persistence with therapy. FDCs also have documented beneficial clinical effects and use of FDCs containing two or three agents is recommended by the 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines. PMID:26002423

  5. Depth of origin of magma in eruptions.

    PubMed

    Becerril, Laura; Galindo, Ines; Gudmundsson, Agust; Morales, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    Many volcanic hazard factors--such as the likelihood and duration of an eruption, the eruption style, and the probability of its triggering large landslides or caldera collapses--relate to the depth of the magma source. Yet, the magma source depths are commonly poorly known, even in frequently erupting volcanoes such as Hekla in Iceland and Etna in Italy. Here we show how the length-thickness ratios of feeder dykes can be used to estimate the depth to the source magma chamber. Using this method, accurately measured volcanic fissures/feeder-dykes in El Hierro (Canary Islands) indicate a source depth of 11-15 km, which coincides with the main cloud of earthquake foci surrounding the magma chamber associated with the 2011-2012 eruption of El Hierro. The method can be used on widely available GPS and InSAR data to calculate the depths to the source magma chambers of active volcanoes worldwide. PMID:24067336

  6. Depth of origin of magma in eruptions

    PubMed Central

    Becerril, Laura; Galindo, Ines; Gudmundsson, Agust; Morales, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    Many volcanic hazard factors - such as the likelihood and duration of an eruption, the eruption style, and the probability of its triggering large landslides or caldera collapses - relate to the depth of the magma source. Yet, the magma source depths are commonly poorly known, even in frequently erupting volcanoes such as Hekla in Iceland and Etna in Italy. Here we show how the length-thickness ratios of feeder dykes can be used to estimate the depth to the source magma chamber. Using this method, accurately measured volcanic fissures/feeder-dykes in El Hierro (Canary Islands) indicate a source depth of 11–15 km, which coincides with the main cloud of earthquake foci surrounding the magma chamber associated with the 2011–2012 eruption of El Hierro. The method can be used on widely available GPS and InSAR data to calculate the depths to the source magma chambers of active volcanoes worldwide. PMID:24067336

  7. Axial resolution of laser opto-acoustic imaging: influence of acoustic attenuation and diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Alma, Herve; Tittel, Frank K.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    1998-05-01

    Laser optoacoustic imaging can be applied for characterization of layered and heterogeneous tissue structures in vivo. Accurate tissue characterization may provide: (1) means for medical diagnoses, and (2) pretreatment tissue properties important for therapeutic laser procedures. Axial resolution of the optoacoustic imaging is higher than that of optical imaging. However, the resolution may degrade due to either attenuation of high-frequency ultrasonic waves in tissue, or/and diffraction of low-frequency acoustic waves. The goal of this study was to determine the axial resolution as a function of acoustic attenuation and diffraction upon propagation of laser-induced pressure waves in water with absorbing layer, in breast phantoms, and in biological tissues. Acoustic pressure measurements were performed in absolute values using piezoelectric transducers. A layer or a small sphere of absorbing medium was placed within a medium with lower optical absorption. The distance between the acoustic transducer and the absorbing object was varied, so that the effects of acoustic attenuation and diffraction could be observed. The location of layers or spheres was measured from recorded optoacoustic pressure profiles and compared with real values measured with a micrometer. The experimental results were analyzed using theoretical models for spherical and planar acoustic waves. Our studies demonstrated that despite strong acoustic attenuation of high-frequency ultrasonic waves, the axial resolution of laser optoacoustic imaging may be as high as 20 micrometers for tissue layers located at a 5-mm depth. An axial resolution of 10 micrometers to 20 micrometers was demonstrated for an absorbing layer at a distance of 5 cm in water, when the resolution is affected only by diffraction. Acoustic transducers employed in optoacoustic imaging can have either high sensitivity or fast temporal response. Therefore, a high resolution may not be achieved with sensitive transducers utilized in

  8. The extended depth of field microscope imaging system with the phase pupil mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Qinghua; Zhai, Zhongsheng; Sharp, Martin; French, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A `0/π' phase pupil mask was developed to extend the depth of field of a circularly symmetric optical microscope imaging system. The modulation transfer function curves, the normalized point spread function figures and the spot diagrams of the imaging system with the optimal mask were analyzed and simulated. The results show that the large depth of field imaging system with the `0/π' phase pupil mask has a high resolution in a long frequency band and can obtain clear images without any post-processing. The experimental results also demonstrate that the depth of field of the imaging system is extended successfully.

  9. Investigation of depth-resolved nanoscale structural changes in regulated cell proliferation and chromatin decondensation

    PubMed Central

    Uttam, Shikhar; Bista, Rajan K.; Staton, Kevin; Alexandrov, Sergey; Choi, Serah; Bakkenist, Christopher J.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Brand, Randall E.; Liu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    We present depth-resolved spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy, a simple approach that utilizes coherence gating to construct a depth-resolved structural feature vector quantifying sub-resolution axial structural changes at different optical depths within the sample. We show that this feature vector is independent of sample thickness variation, and identifies nanoscale structural changes in clinically prepared samples. We present numerical simulations and experimental validation to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. We also perform experiments using unstained cells to investigate the nanoscale structural changes in regulated cell proliferation through cell cycle and chromatin decondensation induced by histone acetylation. PMID:23577294

  10. Quantitative depth profiling by laser-ionization sputtered neutral mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Yasuhiro

    1999-01-01

    Depth profiling by laser-ionization sputtered neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) is reviewed. The matrix effects, including surface and interface effects, in laser-ionization SNMS and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are compared with each other and discussed. Laser-ionization SNMS can provide depth profiles with much smaller matrix effects than conventional SIMS. Depth resolution can effectively be improved by using grazing incidence for the primary ion beam with little interfacial effect. The quantification method in laser-ionization SNMS is also mentioned.

  11. Enhanced optical clearing of skin in vivo and optical coherence tomography in-depth imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiang; Jacques, Steven L.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Zhu, Dan

    2012-06-01

    The strong optical scattering of skin tissue makes it very difficult for optical coherence tomography (OCT) to achieve deep imaging in skin. Significant optical clearing of in vivo rat skin sites was achieved within 15 min by topical application of an optical clearing agent PEG-400, a chemical enhancer (thiazone or propanediol), and physical massage. Only when all three components were applied together could a 15 min treatment achieve a three fold increase in the OCT reflectance from a 300 μm depth and 31% enhancement in image depth Zthreshold.

  12. Depth-variant azimuthal anisotropy in Tibet revealed by surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Shantanu; Yuan, Xiaohui; Debayle, Eric; Tilmann, Frederik; Priestley, Keith; Li, Xueqing

    2015-06-01

    Azimuthal anisotropy derived from multimode Rayleigh wave tomography in China exhibits depth-dependent variations in Tibet, which can be explained as induced by the Cenozoic India-Eurasian collision. In west Tibet, the E-W fast polarization direction at depths <100 km is consistent with the accumulated shear strain in the Tibetan lithosphere, whereas the N-S fast direction at greater depths is aligned with Indian Plate motion. In northeast Tibet, depth-consistent NW-SE directions imply coupled deformation throughout the whole lithosphere, possibly also involving the underlying asthenosphere. Significant anisotropy at depths of 225 km in southeast Tibet reflects sublithospheric deformation induced by northward and eastward lithospheric subduction beneath the Himalaya and Burma, respectively. The multilayer anisotropic surface wave model can explain some features of SKS splitting measurements in Tibet, with differences probably attributable to the limited back azimuthal coverage of most SKS studies in Tibet and the limited horizontal resolution of the surface wave results.

  13. Depth Analogy: Data-Driven Approach for Single Image Depth Estimation Using Gradient Samples.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunghwan; Min, Dongbo; Ham, Bumsub; Kim, Youngjung; Oh, Changjae; Sohn, Kwanghoon

    2015-12-01

    Inferring scene depth from a single monocular image is a highly ill-posed problem in computer vision. This paper presents a new gradient-domain approach, called depth analogy, that makes use of analogy as a means for synthesizing a target depth field, when a collection of RGB-D image pairs is given as training data. Specifically, the proposed method employs a non-parametric learning process that creates an analogous depth field by sampling reliable depth gradients using visual correspondence established on training image pairs. Unlike existing data-driven approaches that directly select depth values from training data, our framework transfers depth gradients as reconstruction cues, which are then integrated by the Poisson reconstruction. The performance of most conventional approaches relies heavily on the training RGB-D data used in the process, and such a dependency severely degenerates the quality of reconstructed depth maps when the desired depth distribution of an input image is quite different from that of the training data, e.g., outdoor versus indoor scenes. Our key observation is that using depth gradients in the reconstruction is less sensitive to scene characteristics, providing better cues for depth recovery. Thus, our gradient-domain approach can support a great variety of training range datasets that involve substantial appearance and geometric variations. The experimental results demonstrate that our (depth) gradient-domain approach outperforms existing data-driven approaches directly working on depth domain, even when only uncorrelated training datasets are available. PMID:26529766

  14. Mapping Soil Depth with Topographic and Land Cover Attributes from Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng-Ru; Chen, Chi-Farn; Son, Nguyen-Thanh; Lau, Va-Khin

    2016-04-01

    Soil depth is an important parameter for identification of the overused slope land in Taiwan. The retrieval of high resolution soil depth at a large scale is costly and time-consuming. The main objective of this study is to develop an approach to estimate soil depths using satellite data with the aid of field survey data in Taiwan. The data were processed using the soil-landscape regression kriging model. The predictor variables, including elevation, slope, aspect, curvature, topographic wetness, spectral indices, and land use, derived from remotely sensed data were used as model inputs for the soil depth estimation. In this study, topographic attributes were derived from an 5-m resolution digital elevation model, and the land-use map and spectral indices were obtained through interpretation of Landsat-8 data. The absolute mean and root mean-square errors were used to access the reliability of the prediction, indicating a goodness-of-fit of the estimation model. The results of soil depth estimation compared with the field survey data indicated close relationship between these two datasets. The results obtained from this study could spatially provide quantitative information of soil depths, which is an important indicator for assessing the overused slope land. The methods were thus proposed for retrieval of soil depths in Taiwan.

  15. Anterior Lamina Cribrosa Surface Depth, Age, and Visual Field Sensitivity in the Portland Progression Project

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ruojin; Yang, Hongli; Gardiner, Stuart K.; Fortune, Brad; Hardin, Christy; Demirel, Shaban; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the effect of age on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT)-detected lamina cribrosa depth while controlling for visual field (VF) status and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) in 221 high-risk ocular hypertension and glaucoma patients enrolled in the Portland Progression Project. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, each participant underwent 870-nm SDOCT to obtain high-resolution radial B-scans centered on the optic nerve head (ONH) and a standardized ophthalmologic examination, including automated perimetry, on the same day. For each ONH, an anterior lamina cribrosa surface depth (ALCSD) parameter was generated as the average perpendicular distance from each anterior lamina cribrosa surface point relative to Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) reference plane within all 24 delineated B-scans. The relative effects of age, age-corrected VF status (mean deviation [MD]), and RNFLT on ALCSD were analyzed. Results. The mean age ± SD of participants was 64 ± 11 years (range, 33–90 years). The relationship between ALCSD and MD was age-dependent. ALCSD = 407.68 − 67.13 × MD − 0.08 × Age + 0.89 × MD × Age (MD, P = 0.001; MD × Age, P = 0.004). The relationship between ALCSD and RNFLT may also be age-dependent but did not achieve significance (interaction term, P = 0.067). ALCSD increased with worse VF status in younger eyes but not in older eyes. In older eyes, the anterior lamina was shallower than in younger eyes for the same VF status and RNFLT. Conclusions. These data are consistent with the concept that structure/structure and structure/function relationships change with age. PMID:24474264

  16. Interactive projection for aerial dance using depth sensing camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubnov, Tammuz; Seldess, Zachary; Dubnov, Shlomo

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes an interactive performance system for oor and Aerial Dance that controls visual and sonic aspects of the presentation via a depth sensing camera (MS Kinect). In order to detect, measure and track free movement in space, 3 degree of freedom (3-DOF) tracking in space (on the ground and in the air) is performed using IR markers. Gesture tracking and recognition is performed using a simpli ed HMM model that allows robust mapping of the actor's actions to graphics and sound. Additional visual e ects are achieved by segmentation of the actor body based on depth information, allowing projection of separate imagery on the performer and the backdrop. Artistic use of augmented reality performance relative to more traditional concepts of stage design and dramaturgy are discussed.

  17. Depth-resolved image mapping spectrometer (IMS) with structured illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang; Bedard, Noah; Hagen, Nathan; Kester, Robert T.; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2011-08-01

    We present a depth-resolved Image Mapping Spectrometer (IMS) which is capable of acquiring 4D (x, y, z, λ) datacubes. Optical sectioning is implemented by structured illumination. The device's spectral imaging performance is demonstrated in a multispectral microsphere and mouse kidney tissue fluorescence imaging experiment. We also compare quantitatively the depth-resolved IMS with a hyperspectral confocal microscope (HCM) in a standard fluorescent bead imaging experiment. The comparison results show that despite the use of a light source with four orders of magnitude lower intensity in the IMS than that in the HCM, the image signal-to-noise ratio acquired by the IMS is 2.6 times higher than that achieved by the equivalent confocal approach.

  18. Three-dimensional anterior segment imaging in patients with type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis with switchable full depth range swept source optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Raju; Cortés, Dennis E.; Werner, John S.; Mannis, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. A high-speed (100 kHz A-scans/s) complex conjugate resolved 1 μm swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system using coherence revival of the light source is suitable for dense three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of the anterior segment. The short acquisition time helps to minimize the influence of motion artifacts. The extended depth range of the SS-OCT system allows topographic analysis of clinically relevant images of the entire depth of the anterior segment of the eye. Patients with the type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis (KPro) require evaluation of the full anterior segment depth. Current commercially available OCT systems are not suitable for this application due to limited acquisition speed, resolution, and axial imaging range. Moreover, most commonly used research grade and some clinical OCT systems implement a commercially available SS (Axsun) that offers only 3.7 mm imaging range (in air) in its standard configuration. We describe implementation of a common swept laser with built-in k-clock to allow phase stable imaging in both low range and high range, 3.7 and 11.5 mm in air, respectively, without the need to build an external MZI k-clock. As a result, 3-D morphology of the KPro position with respect to the surrounding tissue could be investigated in vivo both at high resolution and with large depth range to achieve noninvasive and precise evaluation of success of the surgical procedure. PMID:23912759

  19. Introducing the depth transfer curve for 3D capture system characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goma, Sergio R.; Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas

    2011-03-01

    3D technology has recently made a transition from movie theaters to consumer electronic devices such as 3D cameras and camcorders. In addition to what 2D imaging conveys, 3D content also contains information regarding the scene depth. Scene depth is simulated through the strongest brain depth cue, namely retinal disparity. This can be achieved by capturing an image by horizontally separated cameras. Objects at different depths will be projected with different horizontal displacement on the left and right camera images. These images, when fed separately to either eye, leads to retinal disparity. Since the perception of depth is the single most important 3D imaging capability, an evaluation procedure is needed to quantify the depth capture characteristics. Evaluating depth capture characteristics subjectively is a very difficult task since the intended and/or unintended side effects from 3D image fusion (depth interpretation) by the brain are not immediately perceived by the observer, nor do such effects lend themselves easily to objective quantification. Objective evaluation of 3D camera depth characteristics is an important tool that can be used for "black box" characterization of 3D cameras. In this paper we propose a methodology to evaluate the 3D cameras' depth capture capabilities.

  20. High resolution optical DNA mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baday, Murat

    Many types of diseases including cancer and autism are associated with copy-number variations in the genome. Most of these variations could not be identified with existing sequencing and optical DNA mapping methods. We have developed Multi-color Super-resolution technique, with potential for high throughput and low cost, which can allow us to recognize more of these variations. Our technique has made 10--fold improvement in the resolution of optical DNA mapping. Using a 180 kb BAC clone as a model system, we resolved dense patterns from 108 fluorescent labels of two different colors representing two different sequence-motifs. Overall, a detailed DNA map with 100 bp resolution was achieved, which has the potential to reveal detailed information about genetic variance and to facilitate medical diagnosis of genetic disease.