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Sample records for achieve cost-effective medical

  1. The Cost Effectiveness of 22 Approaches for Raising Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Stuart S.

    2010-01-01

    Review of cost-effectiveness studies suggests that rapid assessment is more cost effective with regard to student achievement than comprehensive school reform (CSR), cross-age tutoring, computer-assisted instruction, a longer school day, increases in teacher education, teacher experience or teacher salaries, summer school, more rigorous math…

  2. Cost effectiveness of a medical digital library.

    PubMed

    Roussel, F; Darmoni, S J; Thirion, B

    2001-01-01

    The rapid increase in the price of electronic journals has made the optimization of collection management an urgent task. As there is currently no standard procedure for the evaluation of this problem, we applied the Reading Factor (RF), an electronically computed indicator used for consultation of individual articles. The aim of our study was to assess the cost effective impact of modifications in our digital library (i.e. change of access from the Intranet to the Internet or change in editorial policy). The digital OVID library at Rouen University Hospital continues to be cost-effective in comparison with the interlibrary loan costs. Moreover, when electronic versions are offered alongside a limited amount of interlibrary loans, a reduction in library costs was observed.

  3. Biobanks and Electronic Medical Records: Enabling Cost-Effective Research

    PubMed Central

    Bowton, Erica; Field, Julie R.; Wang, Sunny; Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Van Driest, Sara L.; Delaney, Jessica T.; Cowan, James; Weeke, Peter; Mosley, Jonathan D.; Wells, Quinn S.; Karnes, Jason H.; Shaffer, Christian; Peterson, Josh F.; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.; Pulley, Jill M.

    2014-01-01

    The use of electronic medical record data linked to biological specimens in health care settings is expected to enable cost-effective and rapid genomic analyses. Here, we present a model that highlights potential advantages for genomic discovery and describe the operational infrastructure that facilitated multiple simultaneous discovery efforts. PMID:24786321

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of Comprehensive School Reform in Low Achieving Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, John A.; Scott, Garth; Sibbald, Tim M.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of Struggling Schools, a user-generated approach to Comprehensive School Reform implemented in 100 low achieving schools serving disadvantaged students in a Canadian province. The results show that while Struggling Schools had a statistically significant positive effect on Grade 3 Reading achievement, d = 0.48…

  5. Fibromyalgia: disease synopsis, medication cost effectiveness and economic burden.

    PubMed

    Skaer, Tracy L

    2014-05-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) primarily affects women, and it is increasingly recognized by health care providers as more patients seek assistance for their chronic pain conditions. FM patients suffer from reduced quality of life, daily functioning and productivity. A single FM patient can cost society tens of thousands of dollars each year, with the overall expense increasing alongside disease severity. Indirect costs account for the majority of total expenditures and involve losses in productivity, reduced work hours, absenteeism, disability, unemployment, early retirement, informal care and other out-of-pocket costs. Health care utilization increases in concert with the severity of illness. Moreover, FM patients often have several comorbid illnesses (e.g. depression, anxiety and sleep disturbances), resulting in extreme escalation of overall health care expenditures. Medications with the best efficacy in the treatment of FM include the tricyclic antidepressants amitriptyline and nortriptyline, cyclobenzaprine (a skeletal muscle relaxant), tramadol, duloxetine, milnacipran, pregabalin and gabapentin. Corticosteroids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, benzodiazepines and opioid analgesics, with the exception of tramadol, are not considered efficacious. Medication selection should be individualized and influenced by the severity of illness and the presence of comorbidities and functional disabilities. PMID:24504852

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of a Computerized Provider Order Entry System in Improving Medication Safety Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Sara H.; Hepp, Zsolt; Roth, Joshua A.; Wirtz, Heidi S.; Devine, Emily Beth

    2014-01-01

    Background Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) is the process of entering physician orders directly into an electronic health record. Although CPOE has been shown to improve medication safety and reduce health care costs, these improvements have been demonstrated largely in the inpatient setting; the cost-effectiveness in the ambulatory setting remains uncertain. Objective The objective was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of CPOE in reducing medication errors and adverse drug events (ADEs) in the ambulatory setting. Methods We created a decision-analytic model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of CPOE in a midsized (400 providers) multidisciplinary medical group over a 5-year time horizon— 2010 to 2014— the time frame during which health systems are implementing CPOE to meet Meaningful Use criteria. We adopted the medical group’s perspective and utilized their costs, changes in efficiency, and actual number of medication errors and ADEs. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. Scenario analyses were explored. Results In the base case, CPOE dominated paper prescribing, that is, CPOE cost $18 million less than paper prescribing, and was associated with 1.5 million and 14,500 fewer medication errors and ADEs, respectively, over 5 years. In the scenario that reflected a practice group of five providers, CPOE cost $265,000 less than paper prescribing, was associated with 3875 and 39 fewer medication errors and ADEs, respectively, over 5 years, and was dominant in 80% of the simulations. Conclusions Our model suggests that the adoption of CPOE in the ambulatory setting provides excellent value for the investment, and is a cost-effective strategy to improve medication safety over a wide range of practice sizes. PMID:24968993

  7. Enhancing Respiratory Medication Adherence: The Role of Health Care Professionals and Cost-Effectiveness Considerations.

    PubMed

    van Boven, Job F M; Ryan, Dermot; Eakin, Michelle N; Canonica, Giorgio W; Barot, Aji; Foster, Juliet M

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to medication comprises a multiphased temporal process involving (1) initiation of prescribed therapy, (2) implementation as prescribed, and (3) subsequent persistence. Medication adherence remains suboptimal in most patients with long-term respiratory conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Interventions have been shown to effectively improve treatment initiation, implementation, and persistence when delivered at the health care professional level or the system level, but demonstration of the cost-effectiveness of these interventions is necessary to ensure their widespread use. This review summarizes how health care professionals can intervene to improve medication adherence in patients with asthma and COPD, provides some examples of effective primary care interventions, and illustrates some of the challenges to optimal implementation arising from cost-effectiveness modeling. Improving adherence is shown to be an economically viable treatment option for patients with asthma and COPD, but there are differences in the health economics pertaining to each condition and setting that can affect whether an intervention is considered cost-effective. Targeting adherence interventions at patients with the greatest to gain, and tailoring them to individual patient needs, may help to optimize cost-effectiveness ratios and improve the probability of positive reimbursement decisions, systemwide implementation, and resultant health benefits. PMID:27587317

  8. Cost effectiveness of a computer-delivered intervention to improve HIV medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High levels of adherence to medications for HIV infection are essential for optimal clinical outcomes and to reduce viral transmission, but many patients do not achieve required levels. Clinician-delivered interventions can improve patients’ adherence, but usually require substantial effort by trained individuals and may not be widely available. Computer-delivered interventions can address this problem by reducing required staff time for delivery and by making the interventions widely available via the Internet. We previously developed a computer-delivered intervention designed to improve patients’ level of health literacy as a strategy to improve their HIV medication adherence. The intervention was shown to increase patients’ adherence, but it was not clear that the benefits resulting from the increase in adherence could justify the costs of developing and deploying the intervention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relation of development and deployment costs to the effectiveness of the intervention. Methods Costs of intervention development were drawn from accounting reports for the grant under which its development was supported, adjusted for costs primarily resulting from the project’s research purpose. Effectiveness of the intervention was drawn from results of the parent study. The relation of the intervention’s effects to changes in health status, expressed as utilities, was also evaluated in order to assess the net cost of the intervention in terms of quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Sensitivity analyses evaluated ranges of possible intervention effectiveness and durations of its effects, and costs were evaluated over several deployment scenarios. Results The intervention’s cost effectiveness depends largely on the number of persons using it and the duration of its effectiveness. Even with modest effects for a small number of patients the intervention was associated with net cost savings in some scenarios and for

  9. Cost-effectiveness analysis: problems and promise for evaluating medical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juday, Timothy R.

    1994-12-01

    Although using limited financial resources in the most beneficial way, in principle, a laudable goal, actually developing standards for measuring the cost-effectiveness of medical technologies and incorporating them into the coverage process is a much more difficult proposition. Important methodological difficulties include determining how to compare a technology to its leading alternative, defining costs, incorporating patient preferences, and defining health outcomes. In addition, more practical questions must be addressed. These questions include: who does the analysis? who makes the decisions? which technologies to evaluate? what resources are required? what is the political and legal environment? how much is a health outcome worth? The ultimate question that must be answered is what is a health outcome worth? Cost-effectiveness analysis cannot answer this question; it only enables comparison of cost-effectiveness ratios across technologies. In order to determine whether a technology should be covered, society or individual insurers must determine how much they are willing to pay for the health benefits. Conducting cost-effectiveness analysis will not remove the need to make difficult resource allocation decisions; however, explicitly examining the tradeoffs involved in these decisions should help to improve the process.

  10. Type 2 diabetes: cost-effectiveness of medication adherence and lifestyle interventions

    PubMed Central

    Nerat, Tomaž; Locatelli, Igor; Kos, Mitja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type 2 diabetes is a major burden for the payer, however, with proper medication adherence, diet and exercise regime, complication occurrence rates, and consequently costs can be altered. Aims The aim of this study was to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis on real patient data and evaluate which medication adherence or lifestyle intervention is less cost demanding for the payer. Methods Medline was searched systematically for published type 2 diabetes interventions regarding medication adherence and lifestyle in order to determine their efficacies, that were then used in the cost-effectiveness analysis. For cost-effectiveness analysis-required disease progression simulation, United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Outcomes model 2.0 and Slovenian type 2 diabetes patient cohort were used. The intervention duration was set to 1, 2, 5, and 10 years. Complications and drug costs in euro (EUR) were based on previously published type 2 diabetes costs from the Health Care payer perspective in Slovenia. Results Literature search proved the following interventions to be effective in type 2 diabetes patients: medication adherence, the Mediterranean diet, aerobic, resistance, and combined exercise. The long-term simulation resulted in no payer net savings. The model predicted following quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) gained and incremental costs for QALY gained (EUR/QALYg) after 10 years of intervention: high-efficacy medication adherence (0.245 QALY; 9,984 EUR/QALYg), combined exercise (0.119 QALY; 46,411 EUR/QALYg), low-efficacy medication adherence (0.075 QALY; 30,967 EUR/QALYg), aerobic exercise (0.069 QALY; 80,798 EUR/QALYg), the Mediterranean diet (0.057 QALY; 27,246 EUR/QALYg), and resistance exercise (0.050 QALY; 111,847 EUR/QALYg). Conclusion The results suggest that medication adherence intervention is, regarding cost-effectiveness, superior to diet and exercise interventions from the payer perspective. However, the latter could also be utilized

  11. A cost-effectiveness analysis of an in-house corporate occupational medical department.

    PubMed

    Fitko, J; Kalina, C M; Fisher, A M; Mitchell, J H

    1994-02-01

    There is a current trend for corporations to switch from in-house medical departments to outside contract organizations for provision of occupational health services. Although this may be driven by a desire to reduce expenses, there is little objective data on which to base this decision. This study compares the costs to a corporation of an in-house medical department with the costs for the same services if rendered by outside providers. Costs of the in-house department were obtained from company records. Prevailing charges for outside provider services were determined by an invoice survey and from other sources. We found that the cost for the in-house medical department was 42% less than that of the outside providers at the prevailing rates. Thus, the in-house medical department is more cost-effective than the outside providers. We also discuss other advantages of an in-house department that are more difficult to quantify. PMID:8176514

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of an Electronic Medical Record Based Clinical Decision Support System

    PubMed Central

    Gilmer, Todd P; O'Connor, Patrick J; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn M; Rush, William A; Johnson, Paul E; Amundson, Gerald H; Asche, Stephen E; Ekstrom, Heidi L

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective Medical groups have invested billions of dollars in electronic medical records (EMRs), but few studies have examined the cost-effectiveness of EMR-based clinical decision support (CDS). This study examined the cost-effectiveness of EMR-based CDS for adults with diabetes from the perspective of the health care system. Data Sources/Setting Clinical outcome and cost data from a randomized clinical trial of EMR-based CDS were used as inputs into a diabetes simulation model. The simulation cohort included 1,092 patients with diabetes with A1c above goal at baseline. Study Design The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Outcomes Model, a validated simulation model of diabetes, was used to evaluate remaining life years, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and health care costs over patient lifetimes (40-year time horizon) from the health system perspective. Principal Findings Patients in the intervention group had significantly lowered A1c (0.26 percent, p = .014) relative to patients in the control arm. Intervention costs were $120 (SE = 45) per patient in the first year and $76 (SE = 45) per patient in the following years. In the base case analysis, EMR-based CDS increased lifetime QALYs by 0.04 (SE = 0.01) and increased lifetime costs by $112 (SE = 660), resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $3,017 per QALY. The cost-effectiveness of EMR-based CDS persisted in one-way, two-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Widespread adoption of sophisticated EMR-based CDS has the potential to modestly improve the quality of care for patients with chronic conditions without substantially increasing costs to the health care system. PMID:22578085

  13. [Threshold values for cost-effectiveness ratio and public funding of medical technologies].

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, Mordechai; Greenberg, Dan; Shemer, Joshua

    2007-06-01

    Rising healthcare costs, together with the rapid emergence of new and expensive medical technologies, have facilitated the use of economic analyses for making coverage decisions. The use of cost-effectiveness studies requires an external criterion (threshold value) for the cost-effectiveness ratio, below which funding would be recommended. Although such a threshold reflects the societal value of a full-quality life-year, currently accepted thresholds have been determined arbitrarily. Studies that screened hundreds of cost-effectiveness analyses have found that the most commonly used threshold is $US 50,000 for an additional QALY (Quality Adjusted Life-Year). This figure reflects the estimated cost per QALY to the US Medicare plan for funding a dialysis treatment for patients with chronic renal failure. While healthcare systems throughout the world, as in Israel, have not explicitly declared using a specific threshold for coverage decisions, some countries use an implicit threshold, above which the decision would usually be negative. In the UK and Australia, for instance, the implicit threshold is $US 50,000 to $US 60,000 per QALY. There are several suggestions to set a differential threshold value between countries, associated with their relative wealth, or between diverse disease and treatment characteristics, e.g. higher thresholds for life-saving treatments. Advantages of setting an explicit threshold include improved transparency and consistency of decisions, improved social equity and enhanced public credibility. Draw-backs might be the creation of an excessively mechanical decision-making process, without consideration of other relevant variables, such as severity of disease, existence of alternatives, or the economic burden to the patient. Adoption of a "flexible threshold" approach, in which the threshold is not the exclusive criterion for decision-making, might resolve these weaknesses. Utilization of the threshold concept is likely to expand in the coming

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of Helicopter Versus Ground Emergency Medical Services for Trauma Scene Transport in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, M. Kit; Staudenmayer, Kristan L.; Wang, N. Ewen; Spain, David A.; Weir, Sharada; Owens, Douglas K.; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We determined the minimum mortality reduction that helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) should provide relative to ground EMS for the scene transport of trauma victims to offset higher costs, inherent transport risks, and inevitable overtriage of minor injury patients. Methods We developed a decision-analytic model to compare the costs and outcomes of helicopter versus ground EMS transport to a trauma center from a societal perspective over a patient's lifetime. We determined the mortality reduction needed to make helicopter transport cost less than $100,000 and $50,000 per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained compared to ground EMS. Model inputs were derived from the National Study on the Costs and Outcomes of Trauma (NSCOT), National Trauma Data Bank, Medicare reimbursements, and literature. We assessed robustness with probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Results HEMS must provide a minimum of a 17% relative risk reduction in mortality (1.6 lives saved/100 patients with the mean characteristics of the NSCOT cohort) to cost less than $100,000 per QALY gained and a reduction of at least 33% (3.7 lives saved/100 patients) to cost less than $50,000 per QALY. HEMS becomes more cost-effective with significant reductions in minor injury patients triaged to air transport or if long-term disability outcomes are improved. Conclusions HEMS needs to provide at least a 17% mortality reduction or a measurable improvement in long-term disability to compare favorably to other interventions considered cost-effective. Given current evidence, it is not clear that HEMS achieves this mortality or disability reduction. Reducing overtriage of minor injury patients to HEMS would improve its cost-effectiveness. PMID:23582619

  15. Achievement motivation in medical students.

    PubMed

    Robbins, L; Robbins, E S; Katz, S E; Geliebter, B; Stern, M

    1983-11-01

    Medical students were assessed by questionnaire in their third and fourth years regarding attitudes about sex role, medical school, and career plans and in the third year about fear of success. Nine percent of each sex were judged to fear success. Stereotypical responses were reported by the students. Males, anticipating that they would work more than 60 hours per week, looked forward to academic careers, while females more often desired the sharing of financial and child care responsibilities with spouses. Attitudes toward chores were egalitarian, but in reality women performed most routine household activities. Both sexes agreed upon the characteristics that are necessary to be a good student as well as to succeed in later life. Women were more inclined toward artistic and domestic interests and helping others, while men were more interested in scientific investigation, athletics, and adventure. The implications of these similarities and differences for the students' future careers are discussed. PMID:6631923

  16. The Cost-Effectiveness of 22 Approaches for Raising Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Stuart S.

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of the federal "No Child Left Behind" (NCLB) law, there is tremendous pressure on school principals, teachers, school superintendents, district staff, state departments of education and governors to maximize the increase in student achievement that is obtained with every dollar of expenditure. Currently, teachers are forced to…

  17. Cost effectiveness of intensive care in a low resource setting: A prospective cohort of medical critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cubro, Hajrunisa; Somun-Kapetanovic, Rabija; Thiery, Guillaume; Talmor, Daniel; Gajic, Ognjen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To calculate cost effectiveness of the treatment of critically ill patients in a medical intensive care unit (ICU) of a middle income country with limited access to ICU resources. METHODS: A prospective cohort study and economic evaluation of consecutive patients treated in a recently established medical ICU in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. A cost utility analysis of the intensive care of critically ill patients compared to the hospital ward treatment from the perspective of the health care system was subsequently performed. Incremental cost effectiveness was calculated using estimates of ICU vs non-ICU treatment effectiveness based on a formal systematic review of published studies. Decision analytic modeling was used to compare treatment alternatives. Sensitivity analyses of the key model parameters were performed. RESULTS: Out of 148 patients, seventy patients (47.2%) survived to one year after critical illness with a median quality of life index 0.64 [interquartile range(IQR) 0.49-0.76]. Median number of life years gained per patient was 30 (IQR 16-40) or 18 quality adjusted life years (QALYs) (IQR 7-28). The cost of treatment of critically ill patients varied between 1820 dollar and 20109 dollar per hospital survivor and between 100 dollar and 2514 dollar per QALY saved. Mean factors that influenced costs were: Age, diagnostic category, ICU and hospital length of stay and number and type of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio for ICU treatment was estimated at 3254 dollar per QALY corresponding to 35% of per capita GDP or a Very Cost Effective category according to World Health Organization criteria. CONCLUSION: The ICU treatment of critically ill medical patients in a resource poor country is cost effective and compares favorably with other medical interventions. Public health authorities in low and middle income countries should encourage development of critical care services. PMID:27152258

  18. Medical Abortion Provided by Nurse-Midwives or Physicians in a High Resource Setting: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kopp Kallner, Helena; Simeonova, Emilia; Madestam, Andreas; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present study is to calculate the cost-effectiveness of early medical abortion performed by nurse-midwifes in comparison to physicians in a high resource setting where ultrasound dating is part of the protocol. Non-physician health care professionals have previously been shown to provide medical abortion as effectively and safely as physicians, but the cost-effectiveness of such task shifting remains to be established. Study design A cost effectiveness analysis was conducted based on data from a previously published randomized-controlled equivalence study including 1180 healthy women randomized to the standard procedure, early medical abortion provided by physicians, or the intervention, provision by nurse-midwifes. A 1.6% risk difference for efficacy defined as complete abortion without surgical interventions in favor of midwife provision was established which means that for every 100 procedures, the intervention treatment resulted in 1.6 fewer incomplete abortions needing surgical intervention than the standard treatment. The average direct and indirect costs and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) were calculated. The study was conducted at a university hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. Results The average direct costs per procedure were EUR 45 for the intervention compared to EUR 58.3 for the standard procedure. Both the cost and the efficacy of the intervention were superior to the standard treatment resulting in a negative ICER at EUR -831 based on direct costs and EUR -1769 considering total costs per surgical intervention avoided. Conclusion Early medical abortion provided by nurse-midwives is more cost-effective than provision by physicians. This evidence provides clinicians and decision makers with an important tool that may influence policy and clinical practice and eventually increase numbers of abortion providers and reduce one barrier to women’s access to safe abortion. PMID:27362270

  19. Cost-effectiveness of raloxifene in the treatment of osteoporosis in Chinese postmenopausal women: impact of medication persistence and adherence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingsheng; Si, Lei; Winzenberg, Tania M; Gu, Jieruo; Jiang, Qicheng; Palmer, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Aims Raloxifene treatment of osteoporotic fractures is clinically effective, but economic evidence in support of raloxifene reimbursement is lacking in the People’s Republic of China. We aimed at evaluating the cost-effectiveness of raloxifene in the treatment of osteoporotic fractures using an osteoporosis health economic model. We also assessed the impact of medication persistence and adherence on clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of raloxifene. Methods We used a previously developed and validated osteoporosis state-transition microsimulation model to compare treatment with raloxifene with current practices of osteoporotic fracture treatment (conventional treatment) from the health care payer’s perspective. A Monte Carlo probabilistic sensitivity analysis with microsimulations was conducted. The impact of medication persistence and adherence on clinical outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of raloxifene was addressed in sensitivity analyses. The simulated patients used in the model’s initial state were 65-year-old postmenopausal Chinese women with osteoporosis (but without previous fractures), simulated using a 1-year cycle length until all patients had died. Costs were presented in 2015 US dollars (USD), and costs and effectiveness were discounted at 3% annually. The willingness-to-pay threshold was set at USD 20,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Results Treatment with raloxifene improved clinical effectiveness by 0.006 QALY, with additional costs of USD 221 compared with conventional treatment. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was USD 36,891 per QALY gained. The cost-effectiveness decision did not change in most of the one-way sensitivity analyses. With full raloxifene persistence and adherence, average effectiveness improved compared with the real-world scenario, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was USD 40,948 per QALY gained compared with conventional treatment. Conclusion Given the willingness-to-pay threshold

  20. The Growth Patterns of General Medical Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Linjun

    This longitudinal study investigates the growth of medical achievement as a multilevel process and emphasizes the structure of the growth. Subjects were students in all 15 U.S. osteopathic medical schools, a total of 1,060 (78 percent of the 1987 osteopathic cohort). Students took appropriate portions of the National Board of Osteopathic Medical…

  1. Toward a treaty on safety and cost-effectiveness of pharmaceuticals and medical devices: enhancing an endangered global public good

    PubMed Central

    Faunce, Thomas Alured

    2006-01-01

    • Expert evaluations of the safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of pharmaceutical and medical devices, prior to marketing approval or reimbursement listing, collectively represent a globally important public good. The scientific processes involved play a major role in protecting the public from product risks such as unintended or adverse events, sub-standard production and unnecessary burdens on individual and governmental healthcare budgets. • Most States now have an increasing policy interest in this area, though institutional arrangements, particularly in the area of cost-effectiveness analysis of medical devices, are not uniformly advanced and are fragile in the face of opposing multinational industry pressure to recoup investment and maintain profit margins. • This paper examines the possibility, in this context, of States commencing negotiations toward bilateral trade agreement provisions, and ultimately perhaps a multilateral Treaty, on safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness analysis of pharmaceuticals and medical devices. Such obligations may robustly facilitate a conceptually interlinked, but endangered, global public good, without compromising the capacity of intellectual property laws to facilitate local product innovations. PMID:16569240

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of Financial Incentives to Promote Adherence to Depot Antipsychotic Medication: Economic Evaluation of a Cluster-Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Catherine; Knapp, Martin; Yeeles, Ksenija; Bremner, Stephen; Eldridge, Sandra; David, Anthony S.; O’Connell, Nicola; Burns, Tom; Priebe, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Offering a modest financial incentive to people with psychosis can promote adherence to depot antipsychotic medication, but the cost-effectiveness of this approach has not been examined. Methods Economic evaluation within a pragmatic cluster-randomised controlled trial. 141 patients under the care of 73 teams (clusters) were randomised to intervention or control; 138 patients with diagnoses of schizophrenia, schizo-affective disorder or bipolar disorder participated. Intervention participants received £15 per depot injection over 12 months, additional to usual acute, mental and community primary health services. The control group received usual health services. Main outcome measures: incremental cost per 20% increase in adherence to depot antipsychotic medication; incremental cost of ‘good’ adherence (defined as taking at least 95% of the prescribed number of depot medications over the intervention period). Findings Economic and outcome data for baseline and 12-month follow-up were available for 117 participants. The adjusted difference in adherence between groups was 12.2% (73.4% control vs. 85.6% intervention); the adjusted costs difference was £598 (95% CI -£4 533, £5 730). The extra cost per patient to increase adherence to depot medications by 20% was £982 (95% CI -£8 020, £14 000). The extra cost per patient of achieving 'good' adherence was £2 950 (CI -£19 400, £27 800). Probability of cost-effectiveness exceeded 97.5% at willingness-to-pay values of £14 000 for a 20% increase in adherence and £27 800 for good adherence. Interpretation Offering a modest financial incentive to people with psychosis is cost-effective in promoting adherence to depot antipsychotic medication. Direct healthcare costs (including costs of the financial incentive) are unlikely to be increased by this intervention. Trial Registration ISRCTN.com 77769281 PMID:26448540

  3. Motivation and academic achievement in medical students

    PubMed Central

    Yousefy, Alireza; Ghassemi, Gholamreza; Firouznia, Samaneh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Despite their ascribed intellectual ability and achieved academic pursuits, medical students’ academic achievement is influenced by motivation. This study is an endeavor to examine the role of motivation in the academic achievement of medical students. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional correlational study, out of the total 422 medical students, from 4th to final year during the academic year 2007–2008, at School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, 344 participated in completion of the Inventory of School Motivation (ISM), comprising 43 items and measuring eight aspects of motivation. The gold standard for academic achievement was their average academic marks at pre-clinical and clinical levels. Data were computer analyzed by running a couple of descriptive and analytical tests including Pearson Correlation and Student's t-student. Results: Higher motivation scores in areas of competition, effort, social concern, and task were accompanied by higher average marks at pre-clinical as well as clinical levels. However, the latter ones showed greater motivation for social power as compared to the former group. Task and competition motivation for boys was higher than for girls. Conclusion: In view of our observations, students’ academic achievement requires coordination and interaction between different aspects of motivation. PMID:23555107

  4. Multimedia OC12 parallel interface using VCSEL array to achieve high-performance cost-effective optical interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Edward S.

    1996-09-01

    The multimedia communication needs high-performance, cost- effective communication techniques to transport data for the fast-growing multimedia traffic resulting from the recent deployment of World Wide Web (WWW), media-on-demand , and other multimedia applications. To transport a large volume, of multimedia data, high-performance servers are required to perform media processing and transfer. Typically, the high- performance multimedia server is a massively parallel processor with a high number of I/O ports, high storage capacity, fast signal processing, and excellent cost- performance. The parallel I/O ports of the server are connected to multiple clients through a network switch which uses parallel links in both switch-to-server and switch-to- client connections. In addition to media processing and storage, media communication is also a major function of the multimedia system. Without a high-performance communication network, a high-performance server can not deliver its full capacity of service to clients. Fortunately, there are many advanced communication technologies developed for networking, which can be adopted by the multimedia communication to economically deliver the full capacity of a high-performance multimedia service to clients. The VCSEL array technology has been developed for gigabit-rate parallel optical interconnections because of its high bandwidth, small-size, and easy-fabrication advantages. Several firms are developing multifiber, low-skew, low-cost ribbon cables to transfer signals form a VCSEL array. The OC12 SONET data-rate is widely used by high-performance multimedia communications for its high-data-rate and cost- effectiveness. Therefore, the OC12 VCSEL parallel optical interconnection is the ideal technology to meet the high- performance low-cost requirements for delivering affordable multimedia services to mass users. This paper describes a multimedia OC12 parallel optical interconnection using a VCSEL array transceiver, a multifiber

  5. Cost effectiveness of percutaneous closure versus medical therapy for cryptogenic stroke in patients with a patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Pickett, Christopher A; Villines, Todd C; Ferguson, Michael A; Hulten, Edward A

    2014-11-15

    In patients with patent foramen ovales (PFOs) and cryptogenic stroke, observational studies have demonstrated reductions in recurrent neurologic events with transcatheter PFO closure compared with medical therapy. Randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses have shown a trend toward benefit with device closure. The cost-effectiveness of PFO closure has not been described. Therefore, a detailed cost analysis was performed using pooled weighted outcome and complication rates from published randomized controlled trials, Medicare cost tables, and wholesale medication prices. Incremental cost per life-year gained and per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained by PFO closure was calculated. The commonly accepted cost-effectiveness threshold of <$50,000/quality-adjusted life-year gained was used. At 2.6 years (the mean duration of randomized controlled trial follow-up), PFO closure was more costly ($16,213, 95% confidence interval [CI] $15,753 to $16,749) per patient, with a cost of $103,607 (95% CI $5,826 to $2,544,750) per life-year gained. The expenditure to prevent 1 combined end point (transient ischemic attack, stroke, and death) at 2.6 years was $1.09 million (95% CI $1.04 million to $1.20 million). Modeling the costs of medical treatment prospectively, PFO closure reached cost-effectiveness (<$50,000/quality-adjusted life-year gained) at 2.6 years (95% CI 1.5 to 44.2). At 30.2 years (95% CI 28.2 to 36.2), the per patient mean cost of medical therapy exceeded that of PFO closure. In conclusion, PFO closure is associated with higher expenditures related to procedural costs; however, this increase may be offset over time by reduced event rates and costs of long-term medical treatment in patients who undergo transcatheter PFO closure. In younger patients typical of cryptogenic stroke, PFO closure may be cost effective in the long term.

  6. Cost effectiveness of percutaneous closure versus medical therapy for cryptogenic stroke in patients with a patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Pickett, Christopher A; Villines, Todd C; Ferguson, Michael A; Hulten, Edward A

    2014-11-15

    In patients with patent foramen ovales (PFOs) and cryptogenic stroke, observational studies have demonstrated reductions in recurrent neurologic events with transcatheter PFO closure compared with medical therapy. Randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses have shown a trend toward benefit with device closure. The cost-effectiveness of PFO closure has not been described. Therefore, a detailed cost analysis was performed using pooled weighted outcome and complication rates from published randomized controlled trials, Medicare cost tables, and wholesale medication prices. Incremental cost per life-year gained and per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained by PFO closure was calculated. The commonly accepted cost-effectiveness threshold of <$50,000/quality-adjusted life-year gained was used. At 2.6 years (the mean duration of randomized controlled trial follow-up), PFO closure was more costly ($16,213, 95% confidence interval [CI] $15,753 to $16,749) per patient, with a cost of $103,607 (95% CI $5,826 to $2,544,750) per life-year gained. The expenditure to prevent 1 combined end point (transient ischemic attack, stroke, and death) at 2.6 years was $1.09 million (95% CI $1.04 million to $1.20 million). Modeling the costs of medical treatment prospectively, PFO closure reached cost-effectiveness (<$50,000/quality-adjusted life-year gained) at 2.6 years (95% CI 1.5 to 44.2). At 30.2 years (95% CI 28.2 to 36.2), the per patient mean cost of medical therapy exceeded that of PFO closure. In conclusion, PFO closure is associated with higher expenditures related to procedural costs; however, this increase may be offset over time by reduced event rates and costs of long-term medical treatment in patients who undergo transcatheter PFO closure. In younger patients typical of cryptogenic stroke, PFO closure may be cost effective in the long term. PMID:25248812

  7. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Blended Versus Face-to-Face Delivery of Evidence-Based Medicine to Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Nicklen, Peter; Rivers, George; Foo, Jonathan; Ooi, Ying Ying; Reeves, Scott; Walsh, Kieran; Ilic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Background Blended learning describes a combination of teaching methods, often utilizing digital technologies. Research suggests that learner outcomes can be improved through some blended learning formats. However, the cost-effectiveness of delivering blended learning is unclear. Objective This study aimed to determine the cost-effectiveness of a face-to-face learning and blended learning approach for evidence-based medicine training within a medical program. Methods The economic evaluation was conducted as part of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing the evidence-based medicine (EBM) competency of medical students who participated in two different modes of education delivery. In the traditional face-to-face method, students received ten 2-hour classes. In the blended learning approach, students received the same total face-to-face hours but with different activities and additional online and mobile learning. Online activities utilized YouTube and a library guide indexing electronic databases, guides, and books. Mobile learning involved self-directed interactions with patients in their regular clinical placements. The attribution and differentiation of costs between the interventions within the RCT was measured in conjunction with measured outcomes of effectiveness. An incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated comparing the ongoing operation costs of each method with the level of EBM proficiency achieved. Present value analysis was used to calculate the break-even point considering the transition cost and the difference in ongoing operation cost. Results The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio indicated that it costs 24% less to educate a student to the same level of EBM competency via the blended learning approach used in the study, when excluding transition costs. The sunk cost of approximately AUD $40,000 to transition to the blended model exceeds any savings from using the approach within the first year of its implementation; however, a

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a hospital electronic medication management system

    PubMed Central

    Gospodarevskaya, Elena; Li, Ling; Richardson, Katrina L; Roffe, David; Heywood, Maureen; Day, Richard O; Graves, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Objective To conduct a cost–effectiveness analysis of a hospital electronic medication management system (eMMS). Methods We compared costs and benefits of paper-based prescribing with a commercial eMMS (CSC MedChart) on one cardiology ward in a major 326-bed teaching hospital, assuming a 15-year time horizon and a health system perspective. The eMMS implementation and operating costs were obtained from the study site. We used data on eMMS effectiveness in reducing potential adverse drug events (ADEs), and potential ADEs intercepted, based on review of 1 202 patient charts before (n = 801) and after (n = 401) eMMS. These were combined with published estimates of actual ADEs and their costs. Results The rate of potential ADEs following eMMS fell from 0.17 per admission to 0.05; a reduction of 71%. The annualized eMMS implementation, maintenance, and operating costs for the cardiology ward were A$61 741 (US$55 296). The estimated reduction in ADEs post eMMS was approximately 80 actual ADEs per year. The reduced costs associated with these ADEs were more than sufficient to offset the costs of the eMMS. Estimated savings resulting from eMMS implementation were A$63–66 (US$56–59) per admission (A$97 740–$102 000 per annum for this ward). Sensitivity analyses demonstrated results were robust when both eMMS effectiveness and costs of actual ADEs were varied substantially. Conclusion The eMMS within this setting was more effective and less expensive than paper-based prescribing. Comparison with the few previous full economic evaluations available suggests a marked improvement in the cost–effectiveness of eMMS, largely driven by increased effectiveness of contemporary eMMs in reducing medication errors. PMID:25670756

  9. [Cost-effective medical therapy of hepatitis C employing novel compensation models - pay for cure].

    PubMed

    Foerster, F; Wörns, M A; Galle, P R; Schattenberg, J M

    2015-12-01

    Direct acting antivirals (DAAs) have increased cure rates for chronic hepatitis C infection up to nearly 100 %. At the same time treatment costs have risen significantly. Treating all HCV infected patients in Germany with DAAs would generate medication costs ranging between 19 and 37 billion EUR depending on the drug regimen used. Expenses in patients who fail to respond to treatment would amount to approximately 0.9 to 2.15 billion EUR. In difficult to treat patient populations that are characterized by prior failure to treatment or advanced liver disease, lost drug expenses are particularly high due to lower cure rates and longer treatment duration. Outcome-based reimbursement schemes are used to improve the quality of care and to reduce costs in the health care system. In Germany, disease management programs have been implemented for defined chronic diseases. However, drug reimbursement is still based on packages sold (pay for pill). In this context, it would be appealing to link reimbursement and treatment success (pay for cure) in order to reward successful treatment, limit lost drug spending and develop a shared risk environment that would involve all concerned parties. Under the assumption that 20,000 patients with HCV are treated each year in Germany and that cure rates are 95.4 %, the saved treatment costs would amount up to 45 and 107 million EUR per year. By this approach, economic incentives to withhold therapy from difficult to treat patients could be avoided. PMID:26666278

  10. Medical biotechnology trends and achievements in iran.

    PubMed

    Mahboudi, Fereidoun; Hamedifar, Haleh; Aghajani, Hamideh

    2012-10-01

    A healthcare system has been the most important priority for all governments worldwide. Biotechnology products have affected the promotion of health care over the last thirty years. During the last several decades, Iran has achieved significant success in extending healthcare to the rural areas and in reducing the rates of infant mortality and increasing population growth. Biomedical technology as a converging technology is considered a helpful tool to fulfill the Iranian healthcare missions. The number of biotechnology products has reached 148 in 2012. The total sales have increased to 98 billion USD without considering vaccines and plasma derived proteins in 2012. Iran is one of the leading countries in the Middle East and North Africa in the area of Medical biotechnology. The number of biotechnology medicines launched in Iran is 13 products until 2012. More than 15 products are in pipelines now. Manufacturers are expecting to receive the market release for more than 8 products by the end of 2012. Considering this information, Iran will lead the biotechnology products especially in area of biosimilars in Asia after India in next three years. The present review will discuss leading policy, decision makers' role, human resource developing system and industry development in medical biotechnology.

  11. Medical Biotechnology Trends and Achievements in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mahboudi, Fereidoun; Hamedifar, Haleh; Aghajani, Hamideh

    2012-01-01

    A healthcare system has been the most important priority for all governments worldwide. Biotechnology products have affected the promotion of health care over the last thirty years. During the last several decades, Iran has achieved significant success in extending healthcare to the rural areas and in reducing the rates of infant mortality and increasing population growth. Biomedical technology as a converging technology is considered a helpful tool to fulfill the Iranian healthcare missions. The number of biotechnology products has reached 148 in 2012. The total sales have increased to 98 billion USD without considering vaccines and plasma derived proteins in 2012. Iran is one of the leading countries in the Middle East and North Africa in the area of Medical biotechnology. The number of biotechnology medicines launched in Iran is 13 products until 2012. More than 15 products are in pipelines now. Manufacturers are expecting to receive the market release for more than 8 products by the end of 2012. Considering this information, Iran will lead the biotechnology products especially in area of biosimilars in Asia after India in next three years. The present review will discuss leading policy, decision makers’ role, human resource developing system and industry development in medical biotechnology. PMID:23407888

  12. Modeling Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of Increased Efforts to Attract Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision Clients Ages 20–29 in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Kripke, Katharine; Hatzold, Karin; Mugurungi, Owen; Ncube, Gertrude; Xaba, Sinokuthemba; Gold, Elizabeth; Ahanda, Kim Seifert; Kruse-Levy, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Background Zimbabwe aims to increase circumcision coverage to 80% among 13- to 29-year-olds. However, implementation data suggest that high coverage among men ages 20 and older may not be achievable without efforts specifically targeted to these men, incurring additional costs per circumcision. Scale-up scenarios were created based on trends in implementation data in Zimbabwe, and the cost-effectiveness of increasing efforts to recruit clients ages 20–29 was examined. Methods Zimbabwe voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) program data were used to project trends in male circumcision coverage by age into the future. The projection informed a base scenario in which, by 2018, the country achieves 80% circumcision coverage among males ages 10–19 and lower levels of coverage among men above age 20. The Zimbabwe DMPPT 2.0 model was used to project costs and impacts, assuming a US$109 VMMC unit cost in the base scenario and a 3% discount rate. Two other scenarios assumed that the program could increase coverage among clients ages 20–29 with a corresponding increase in unit cost for these age groups. Results When circumcision coverage among men ages 20–29 is increased compared with a base scenario reflecting current implementation trends, fewer VMMCs are required to avert one infection. If more than 50% additional effort (reflected as multiplying the unit cost by >1.5) is required to double the increase in coverage among this age group compared with the base scenario, the cost per HIV infection averted is higher than in the base scenario. Conclusions Although increased investment in recruiting VMMC clients ages 20–29 may lead to greater overall impact if recruitment efforts are successful, it may also lead to lower cost-effectiveness, depending on the cost of increasing recruitment. Programs should measure the relationship between increased effort and increased ability to attract this age group. PMID:27783637

  13. Cost-effectiveness in orthopedics: providing essential information to both physicians and health care policy makers for appropriate allocation of medical resources.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Christopher P; Howard, Timothy

    2013-09-01

    Cost-effective analysis has become an important tool in helping determine what procedures are both cost-effective and appropriate in today's cost control health care. The quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) is a standard measure for health-related quality-of-life in medical cost-effectiveness research. It can be used to compare different interventions to determine the cost-effectiveness of each procedure. Use of QALY to compare health care interventions has become the new gold standard. The key words arthroscopy, cost-effectiveness analysis, QALY, shoulder, hip, knee, ankle, elbow, wrist, and pubic symphysis were searched utilizing PubMed and an internet search engine. Cost/QALY ratios were determined and compared with other surgical procedures using techniques other than arthroscopy. Cost/QALYs were found for the shoulder, hip, knee, and elbow. The QALY for the shoulder was $13,092, for a simple knee was $5783, for a hip $21,700, and for an elbow $2031. General costs were found for the ankle, wrist, and pubic symphysis, that could be used to estimate QALYs without the complex formal calculation. On the basis of our findings, arthroscopy is an extremely cost-effective allocation of health care resources.

  14. Year-Round Education in a Reform Environment: The Impact on Student Achievement and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dossett, Dena; Munoz, Marco

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of year-round scheduling on student achievement and attendance and to conduct a cost-efficiency analysis associated with year-round education. Participants were students who attended year-round school in the fourth and fifth grades (N=95) and students who attended schools with traditional…

  15. Kickbacks, courtesies or cost-effectiveness?: Application of the Medicare antikickback Law to the marketing and promotional practices of drug and medical device manufacturers.

    PubMed

    Bulleit, T N; Krause, J H

    1999-01-01

    This article summarizes the purposes and history of the antikickback law and describes its evolution into a potent weapon against the corruption of medical decision making in the procurement of prescription drugs and medical devices. The article also details a variety of strategies for reducing risks under the law in several key areas of importance to manufacturers. While the purposes of the law are laudable, its current broad interpretation may impede not only corruption, but also benign forms of customer relations and innovative approaches to cost-effective medical care.

  16. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Radiofrequency Ablation for Medically Inoperable, Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The standard management of medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) conventionally has been fractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). The relatively poor local control rate and inconvenience associated with this therapy have prompted the development of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), a technique that delivers very high doses of irradiation typically over 3 to 5 sessions. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has also been investigated as a less costly, single-day therapy that thermally ablates small, peripheral tumors. The cost-effectiveness of these three techniques has never been compared. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states of 65-year-old men with medically inoperable NSCLC after treatment with 3D-CRT, SBRT, and RFA. Given their frail state, patients were assumed to receive supportive care after recurrence. Utility values, recurrence risks, and costs were adapted from the literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to model uncertainty in these parameters. Results: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over 3D-CRT was $6,000/quality-adjusted life-year, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over RFA was $14,100/quality-adjusted life-year. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that the results were robust across a range of tumor sizes, patient utility values, and costs. This result was confirmed with probabilistic sensitivity analyses that varied local control rates and utilities. Conclusion: In comparison to 3D-CRT and RFA, SBRT was the most cost-effective treatment for medically inoperable NSCLC over a wide range of treatment and disease assumptions. On the basis of efficacy and cost, SBRT should be the primary treatment approach for this disease.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of midwifery services vs. medical services in Quebec. LEquipe dEvaluation des Projets-Pilotes Sages-Femmes.

    PubMed

    Reinharz, D; Blais, R; Fraser, W D; Contandriopoulos, A P

    2000-01-01

    This study compared the cost-effectiveness of midwife services provided in birth centres operating as pilot projects with current hospital-based medical services in the province of Quebec. One thousand midwives' clients were matched with 1,000 physicians' clients on the basis of socio-demographic characteristics and obstetrical risk. Direct costs for the prenatal, intrapartum and postpartum periods were estimated. Effectiveness was assessed on the basis of three clinical indicators and four indices related to the individualization of care as assessed by women. Results show that the costs of midwife services were barely lower than or equal to those of physician services, but cost-effectiveness ratios were to the advantage of the midwife group, except for one clinical indicator (neonatal ventilation). Overall, this study provides rational support for the process of legalizing midwifery in the province.

  18. PPD-QALY-an index for cost-effectiveness in orthopedics: providing essential information to both physicians and health care policy makers for appropriate allocation of medical resources.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Christopher P; Howard, Timothy

    2013-09-01

    Because of the increasing health care costs and the need for proper allocation of resources, it is important to ensure the best use of health benefits for sick and injured people of the population. An index or indicator is needed to help us quantify what is being spent so that comparisons with other options can be implemented. Cost-effective analysis seems to be well suited to provide this essential information to health care policy makers and those charged with distributing disability funds so that the proper allocation of resources can be achieved. There is currently no such index to show whether the benefits paid out are the most cost-effective. By comparing the quality-adjusted life year (QALY) of a treatment method to the disability an individual would experience, on the basis of lost wages as measure of disability, we provide decision makers more information for the basis of cost allocation in health care. To accomplish this, we describe a new term, the PPD-QALY (permanent partial disability-quality of life year). This term was developed to establish an index to which musculoskeletal care can be compared, to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a treatment on the basis of the monetary value of the disability. This term serves to standardize the monetary value of an injury. Cost-effective analysis in arthroscopic surgery may prove to be a valuable asset in this role and to provide decision makers the information needed to determine the societal benefit from new arthroscopic procedures as they are developed and implemented. PMID:23924750

  19. PPD-QALY-an index for cost-effectiveness in orthopedics: providing essential information to both physicians and health care policy makers for appropriate allocation of medical resources.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Christopher P; Howard, Timothy

    2013-09-01

    Because of the increasing health care costs and the need for proper allocation of resources, it is important to ensure the best use of health benefits for sick and injured people of the population. An index or indicator is needed to help us quantify what is being spent so that comparisons with other options can be implemented. Cost-effective analysis seems to be well suited to provide this essential information to health care policy makers and those charged with distributing disability funds so that the proper allocation of resources can be achieved. There is currently no such index to show whether the benefits paid out are the most cost-effective. By comparing the quality-adjusted life year (QALY) of a treatment method to the disability an individual would experience, on the basis of lost wages as measure of disability, we provide decision makers more information for the basis of cost allocation in health care. To accomplish this, we describe a new term, the PPD-QALY (permanent partial disability-quality of life year). This term was developed to establish an index to which musculoskeletal care can be compared, to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a treatment on the basis of the monetary value of the disability. This term serves to standardize the monetary value of an injury. Cost-effective analysis in arthroscopic surgery may prove to be a valuable asset in this role and to provide decision makers the information needed to determine the societal benefit from new arthroscopic procedures as they are developed and implemented.

  20. Pregabalin versus SSRIs and SNRIs in benzodiazepine-refractory outpatients with generalized anxiety disorder: a post hoc cost-effectiveness analysis in usual medical practice in Spain

    PubMed Central

    De Salas-Cansado, Marina; Olivares, José M; Álvarez, Enrique; Carrasco, Jose L; Barrueta, Andoni; Rejas, Javier

    2012-01-01

    dominant 149,430) per quality-adjusted life years gained for health care costs and €25,454 (dominant 124,562) when drug costs were considered alone. Eighty-six percent of resamples fell below the threshold of €30,000 per quality-adjusted life years. Conclusion This evaluation suggests that pregabalin may be cost-effective in comparison with SSRIs/SNRIs in benzodiazepine-refractory outpatients with GAD treated in mental health care settings under usual medical practice in Spain. PMID:22745564

  1. Effects of shared medical appointments on quality of life and cost-effectiveness for patients with a chronic neuromuscular disease. Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Shared medical appointments are a series of one-to-one doctor-patient contacts, in presence of a group of 6-10 fellow patients. This group visits substitute the annual control visits of patients with the neurologist. The same items attended to in a one-to- one appointment are addressed. The possible advantages of a shared medical appointment could be an added value to the present management of neuromuscular patients. The currently problem-focused one-to-one out-patient visits often leave little time for the patient's psychosocial needs, patient education, and patient empowerment. Methods/design A randomized, prospective controlled study (RCT) with a follow up of 6 months will be conducted to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of shared medical appointments compared to usual care for 300 neuromuscular patients and their partners at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center. Every included patient will be randomly allocated to one of the two study arms. This study has been reviewed and approved by the medical ethics committee of the region Arnhem-Nijmegen, the Netherlands. The primary outcome measure is quality of life as measured by the EQ-5D, SF-36 and the Individualized neuromuscular Quality of Life Questionnaire. The primary analysis will be an intention-to-treat analysis on the area under the curve of the quality of life scores. A linear mixed model will be used with random factor group and fixed factors treatment, baseline score and type of neuromuscular disease. For the economic evaluation an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted from a societal perspective, relating differences in costs to difference in health outcome. Results are expected in 2012. Discussion This study will be the first randomized controlled trial which evaluates the effect of shared medical appointments versus usual care for neuromuscular patients. This will enable to determine if there is additional value of shared medical appointments to the

  2. Conduct a Cost Effectiveness Study of Postgraduate Medical Education Programs. Part I, Part II (Appendixes). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Phillip R.; And Others

    To gather data on the effects of different modes of instruction on physician achievement in plotting mean P, O, RS, and T receptiors in electrocardiography, researchers chose a random sample of physicians who had taken a correspondence course on electrocardiography during the previous 5 years from the University of Southern California School of…

  3. A pharmacist-led information technology intervention for medication errors (PINCER): a multicentre, cluster randomised, controlled trial and cost-effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Anthony J; Rodgers, Sarah; Cantrill, Judith A; Armstrong, Sarah; Cresswell, Kathrin; Eden, Martin; Elliott, Rachel A; Howard, Rachel; Kendrick, Denise; Morris, Caroline J; Prescott, Robin J; Swanwick, Glen; Franklin, Matthew; Putman, Koen; Boyd, Matthew; Sheikh, Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Medication errors are common in primary care and are associated with considerable risk of patient harm. We tested whether a pharmacist-led, information technology-based intervention was more effective than simple feedback in reducing the number of patients at risk of measures related to hazardous prescribing and inadequate blood-test monitoring of medicines 6 months after the intervention. Methods In this pragmatic, cluster randomised trial general practices in the UK were stratified by research site and list size, and randomly assigned by a web-based randomisation service in block sizes of two or four to one of two groups. The practices were allocated to either computer-generated simple feedback for at-risk patients (control) or a pharmacist-led information technology intervention (PINCER), composed of feedback, educational outreach, and dedicated support. The allocation was masked to general practices, patients, pharmacists, researchers, and statisticians. Primary outcomes were the proportions of patients at 6 months after the intervention who had had any of three clinically important errors: non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) prescribed to those with a history of peptic ulcer without co-prescription of a proton-pump inhibitor; β blockers prescribed to those with a history of asthma; long-term prescription of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or loop diuretics to those 75 years or older without assessment of urea and electrolytes in the preceding 15 months. The cost per error avoided was estimated by incremental cost-effectiveness analysis. This study is registered with Controlled-Trials.com, number ISRCTN21785299. Findings 72 general practices with a combined list size of 480 942 patients were randomised. At 6 months' follow-up, patients in the PINCER group were significantly less likely to have been prescribed a non-selective NSAID if they had a history of peptic ulcer without gastroprotection (OR 0

  4. Achieving order entry by physicians in a computerized medical record.

    PubMed

    Larson, R L; Blake, J P

    1988-06-01

    When Community Memorial Hospital selected a computerized Medical Information System (MIS), it was recognized that physician use and acceptance was paramount to success. To achieve this, active participation from the medical-dental staff via an advisory committee, system education and emphasis on physician benefits was sought. Advance preparation included selection of light pen technology, field trips by selected physicians to other hospitals with the same system, and strategic placement and availability of terminals. During implementation, training was scheduled at the convenience of the physician. This training continues to be offered immediately to new physicians as they join the staff. System upgrades and added functions prompt scheduling of demonstrations for interested physicians. Many developmental ideas come from physicians using MIS indicating their interest in maintaining the system. New approaches that will make order entry easier for physicians so that everyone can benefit from their cooperation and participation are continually being looked for.

  5. Performance Requirements to Achieve Cost-Effectiveness of Point-of-Care Tests for Sepsis Among Patients with Febrile Illness in Low-Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Penno, Erin C; Crump, John A; Baird, Sarah J

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial sepsis is an important cause of mortality in low- and middle-income countries, yet distinguishing patients with sepsis from those with other illnesses remains a challenge. Currently, management decisions are based on clinical assessment using algorithms such as Integrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illness. Efforts to develop and evaluate point-of-care tests (POCTs) for sepsis to guide decisions on the use of antimicrobials are underway. To establish the minimum performance characteristics of such a test, we varied the characteristics of a hypothetical POCT for sepsis required for it to be cost-effective and applied a decision tree model to a population of febrile patients presenting at the district hospital level in a low-resource setting. We used a case fatality probability of 20% for appropriately treated sepsis and of 50% for inappropriately treated sepsis. On the basis of clinical assessment for sepsis with established sensitivity of 0.83 and specificity of 0.62, we found that a POCT for sepsis with a sensitivity of 0.83 and a specificity of 0.94 was cost-effective, resulting in parity in survival but costing $1.14 less per live saved. A POCT with accuracy equivalent to the best malaria rapid diagnostic test was cheaper and more effective than clinical assessment. PMID:26195467

  6. Performance Requirements to Achieve Cost-Effectiveness of Point-of-Care Tests for Sepsis among Patients with Febrile Illness in Low-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    Penno, Erin C.; Crump, John A.; Baird, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis is an important cause of mortality in low- and middle-income countries, yet distinguishing patients with sepsis from those with other illnesses remains a challenge. Currently, management decisions are based on clinical assessment using algorithms such as Integrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illness. Efforts to develop and evaluate point-of-care tests (POCTs) for sepsis to guide decisions on the use of antimicrobials are underway. To establish the minimum performance characteristics of such a test, we varied the characteristics of a hypothetical POCT for sepsis required for it to be cost-effective and applied a decision tree model to a population of febrile patients presenting at the district hospital level in a low-resource setting. We used a case fatality probability of 20% for appropriately treated sepsis and of 50% for inappropriately treated sepsis. On the basis of clinical assessment for sepsis with established sensitivity of 0.83 and specificity of 0.62, we found that a POCT for sepsis with a sensitivity of 0.83 and a specificity of 0.94 was cost-effective, resulting in parity in survival but costing $1.14 less per live saved. A POCT with accuracy equivalent to the best malaria rapid diagnostic test was cheaper and more effective than clinical assessment. PMID:26195467

  7. Effectiveness of and Financial Returns to Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention in South Africa: An Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haacker, Markus; Gorgens, Marelize

    2016-01-01

    Background Empirical studies and population-level policy simulations show the importance of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) in generalized epidemics. This paper complements available scenario-based studies (projecting costs and outcomes over some policy period, typically spanning decades) by adopting an incremental approach—analyzing the expected consequences of circumcising one male individual with specific characteristics in a specific year. This approach yields more precise estimates of VMMC’s cost-effectiveness and identifies the outcomes of current investments in VMMC (e.g., within a fiscal budget period) rather than of investments spread over the entire policy period. Methods/Findings The model has three components. We adapted the ASSA2008 model, a demographic and epidemiological model of the HIV epidemic in South Africa, to analyze the impact of one VMMC on HIV incidence over time and across the population. A costing module tracked the costs of VMMC and the resulting financial savings owing to reduced HIV incidence over time. Then, we used several financial indicators to assess the cost-effectiveness of and financial return on investments in VMMC. One circumcision of a young man up to age 20 prevents on average over 0.2 HIV infections, but this effect declines steeply with age, e.g., to 0.08 by age 30. Net financial savings from one VMMC at age 20 are estimated at US$617 at a discount rate of 5% and are lower for circumcisions both at younger ages (because the savings occur later and are discounted more) and at older ages (because male circumcision becomes less effective). Investments in male circumcision carry a financial rate of return of up to 14.5% (for circumcisions at age 20). The cost of a male circumcision is refinanced fastest, after 13 y, for circumcisions at ages 20 to 25. Principal limitations of the analysis arise from the long time (decades) over which the effects of VMMC unfold—the results are therefore sensitive to the

  8. Achieving the HIV prevention impact of voluntary medical male circumcision: lessons and challenges for managing programs.

    PubMed

    Sgaier, Sema K; Reed, Jason B; Thomas, Anne; Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    Voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) is capable of reducing the risk of sexual transmission of HIV from females to males by approximately 60%. In 2007, the WHO and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) recommended making VMMC part of a comprehensive HIV prevention package in countries with a generalized HIV epidemic and low rates of male circumcision. Modeling studies undertaken in 2009-2011 estimated that circumcising 80% of adult males in 14 priority countries in Eastern and Southern Africa within five years, and sustaining coverage levels thereafter, could avert 3.4 million HIV infections within 15 years and save US$16.5 billion in treatment costs. In response, WHO/UNAIDS launched the Joint Strategic Action Framework for accelerating the scale-up of VMMC for HIV prevention in Southern and Eastern Africa, calling for 80% coverage of adult male circumcision by 2016. While VMMC programs have grown dramatically since inception, they appear unlikely to reach this goal. This review provides an overview of findings from the PLOS Collection "Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention: Improving Quality, Efficiency, Cost Effectiveness, and Demand for Services during an Accelerated Scale-up." The use of devices for VMMC is also explored. We propose emphasizing management solutions to help VMMC programs in the priority countries achieve the desired impact of averting the greatest possible number of HIV infections. Our recommendations include advocating for prioritization and funding of VMMC, increasing strategic targeting to achieve the goal of reducing HIV incidence, focusing on programmatic efficiency, exploring the role of new technologies, rethinking demand creation, strengthening data use for decision-making, improving governments' program management capacity, strategizing for sustainability, and maintaining a flexible scale-up strategy informed by a strong monitoring, learning, and evaluation platform.

  9. Achieving the HIV prevention impact of voluntary medical male circumcision: lessons and challenges for managing programs.

    PubMed

    Sgaier, Sema K; Reed, Jason B; Thomas, Anne; Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    Voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) is capable of reducing the risk of sexual transmission of HIV from females to males by approximately 60%. In 2007, the WHO and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) recommended making VMMC part of a comprehensive HIV prevention package in countries with a generalized HIV epidemic and low rates of male circumcision. Modeling studies undertaken in 2009-2011 estimated that circumcising 80% of adult males in 14 priority countries in Eastern and Southern Africa within five years, and sustaining coverage levels thereafter, could avert 3.4 million HIV infections within 15 years and save US$16.5 billion in treatment costs. In response, WHO/UNAIDS launched the Joint Strategic Action Framework for accelerating the scale-up of VMMC for HIV prevention in Southern and Eastern Africa, calling for 80% coverage of adult male circumcision by 2016. While VMMC programs have grown dramatically since inception, they appear unlikely to reach this goal. This review provides an overview of findings from the PLOS Collection "Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention: Improving Quality, Efficiency, Cost Effectiveness, and Demand for Services during an Accelerated Scale-up." The use of devices for VMMC is also explored. We propose emphasizing management solutions to help VMMC programs in the priority countries achieve the desired impact of averting the greatest possible number of HIV infections. Our recommendations include advocating for prioritization and funding of VMMC, increasing strategic targeting to achieve the goal of reducing HIV incidence, focusing on programmatic efficiency, exploring the role of new technologies, rethinking demand creation, strengthening data use for decision-making, improving governments' program management capacity, strategizing for sustainability, and maintaining a flexible scale-up strategy informed by a strong monitoring, learning, and evaluation platform. PMID:24800840

  10. Achieving the HIV Prevention Impact of Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision: Lessons and Challenges for Managing Programs

    PubMed Central

    Sgaier, Sema K.; Reed, Jason B.; Thomas, Anne; Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) is capable of reducing the risk of sexual transmission of HIV from females to males by approximately 60%. In 2007, the WHO and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) recommended making VMMC part of a comprehensive HIV prevention package in countries with a generalized HIV epidemic and low rates of male circumcision. Modeling studies undertaken in 2009–2011 estimated that circumcising 80% of adult males in 14 priority countries in Eastern and Southern Africa within five years, and sustaining coverage levels thereafter, could avert 3.4 million HIV infections within 15 years and save US$16.5 billion in treatment costs. In response, WHO/UNAIDS launched the Joint Strategic Action Framework for accelerating the scale-up of VMMC for HIV prevention in Southern and Eastern Africa, calling for 80% coverage of adult male circumcision by 2016. While VMMC programs have grown dramatically since inception, they appear unlikely to reach this goal. This review provides an overview of findings from the PLOS Collection “Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention: Improving Quality, Efficiency, Cost Effectiveness, and Demand for Services during an Accelerated Scale-up.” The use of devices for VMMC is also explored. We propose emphasizing management solutions to help VMMC programs in the priority countries achieve the desired impact of averting the greatest possible number of HIV infections. Our recommendations include advocating for prioritization and funding of VMMC, increasing strategic targeting to achieve the goal of reducing HIV incidence, focusing on programmatic efficiency, exploring the role of new technologies, rethinking demand creation, strengthening data use for decision-making, improving governments' program management capacity, strategizing for sustainability, and maintaining a flexible scale-up strategy informed by a strong monitoring, learning, and evaluation platform. PMID:24800840

  11. Addressing barriers to achieving nursing certification: development of a certification achievement program on a medical-surgical unit.

    PubMed

    Perlstein, Lori; Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Lindberg, Judy; Petras, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Nursing certification is recognized as advanced competency and knowledge beyond basic preparation, thus empowering nurses to contribute to improved outcomes by demonstrating expertise in their specialties. It has been recognized that nurses do not seek certification because of identified barriers. Through a structured Certification Achievement Program that reduced barriers, a cohort of nurses was able to achieve certification in medical-surgical nursing.

  12. Constructing a Measure for Longitudinal Medical Achievement Studies by the Rasch Model One-Step Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Linjun

    As part of a longitudinal study of the growth of general medical knowledge among osteopathic medical students, a simple, convenient, and accurate vertical equating method was developed for constructing a scale for medical achievement. It was believed that Parts 1, 2, and 3 of the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners' (NBOME) examination…

  13. Qualitative medical sociology: what are its crowning achievements?

    PubMed Central

    Chard, J A; Lilford, R J; Court, B V

    1997-01-01

    Doctors and epidemiologists seldom read or cite qualitative medical sociology; it is little published in medical journals. A large number of articles bewail this lack and provide arguments explaining and justifying the subject. Any examples used in such articles are selected ad hoc. We made a systematic search for the literature and used citation analysis to select the world's top 100 articles. We analysed this trawl and provide resumés of a selection from the 'classics'. Mental health and the organization of medicine are the themes within medical sociology with highest impact. Much highly cited work consists of historical and theoretical analysis done 'at the desk' rather than observation or interview 'in the field'. Citation rates, even for the most famous works in medical sociology, are a small fraction of those for high impact biomedical research. PMID:9496271

  14. e-CBT (myCompass), Antidepressant Medication, and Face-to-Face Psychological Treatment for Depression in Australia: A Cost-Effectiveness Comparison

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The economic cost of depression is becoming an ever more important determinant for health policy and decision makers. Internet-based interventions with and without therapist support have been found to be effective options for the treatment of mild to moderate depression. With increasing demands on health resources and shortages of mental health care professionals, the integration of cost-effective treatment options such as Internet-based programs into primary health care could increase efficiency in terms of resource use and costs. Objective Our aim was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an Internet-based intervention (myCompass) for the treatment of mild-to-moderate depression compared to treatment as usual and cognitive behavior therapy in a stepped care model. Methods A decision model was constructed using a cost utility framework to show both costs and health outcomes. In accordance with current treatment guidelines, a stepped care model included myCompass as the first low-intervention step in care for a proportion of the model cohort, with participants beginning from a low-intensity intervention to increasing levels of treatment. Model parameters were based on data from the recent randomized controlled trial of myCompass, which showed that the intervention reduced symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress and improved work and social functioning for people with symptoms in the mild-to-moderate range. Results The average net monetary benefit (NMB) was calculated, identifying myCompass as the strategy with the highest net benefit. The mean incremental NMB per individual for the myCompass group was AUD 1165.88 compared to treatment as usual and AUD 522.58 for the cognitive behavioral therapy model. Conclusions Internet-based interventions can provide cost-effective access to treatment when provided as part of a stepped care model. Widespread dissemination of Internet-based programs can potentially reduce demands on primary and tertiary services

  15. Assessment in Medical Education; What Are We Trying to Achieve?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Helena; O'Flynn, Dermot

    2015-01-01

    Within the arena of medical education, it is generally acknowledged that assessment drives learning. Assessment is one of the most significant influences on a student's experience of higher education and improving assessment has a huge impact on the quality of learning (Liu, N. and Carless, D, 2006). Ideally we want to enhance student's capacity…

  16. Achieving medical stability: Wives' experiences with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hupcey, Judith E; Fenstermacher, Kimberly; Kitko, Lisa; Penrod, Janice

    2010-08-01

    The incidence of heart failure continues to rise as innovative treatments are developed. Despite life-prolonging interventions, morbidity and mortality in patients younger than 65 remain high. Few studies have focused on this younger cohort and/or their family caregivers as they navigate the complex illness trajectories manifested in heart failure. Instrumental case studies were employed to present exemplars for each of the five identified heart failure trajectories. Culling data from a longitudinal study of female spousal caregivers, each case study represents a wife's discussion of caring for a husband (<65 years) in response to the husband's changing heart failure trajectory. The goal of medical stability and the notion of uncertainty permeate throughout the case studies. Suggestions for supporting these wives are presented.

  17. Can achievement emotions be used to better understand motivation, learning, and performance in medical education?

    PubMed

    Artino, Anthony R; Holmboe, Eric S; Durning, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we consider an emergent theory of human emotion. The overarching purpose of the article is to introduce medical education researchers to the notion of achievement emotions and provide a brief overview of how this work can inform the theory, research, and practice of medical education. First, we define achievement emotions and describe one of the leading contemporary theories of achievement emotions, control-value theory (Pekrun R. 2006. The control-value theory of achievement emotions: Assumptions, corollaries, and implications for educational research and practice. Educ Psychol Rev 18:315-341.). Next, we distinguish between different types of achievement emotions, their proximal causes, and their consequences for motivation, learning, and performance, and we discuss several implications for educational practice. Finally, we end with a call for more research on achievement emotions in medical education to facilitate our understanding of emotions and their impact on important educational outcomes.

  18. Severe symptomatic aortic stenosis: medical therapy and transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)—a real-world retrospective cohort analysis of outcomes and cost-effectiveness using national data

    PubMed Central

    Aldalati, Omar; Lacey, Arron; King, William; Anderson, Richard A; Smith, Dave

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Determine the real-world difference between 2 groups of patients with severe aortic stenosis and similar baseline comorbidities: surgical turn down (STD) patients, who were managed medically prior to the availability of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) following formal surgical outpatient assessment, and patients managed with a TAVI implant. Design Retrospective cohort study from real-world data. Setting Electronic patient letters were searched for patients with a diagnosis of severe aortic stenosis and a formal outpatient STD prior to the availability of TAVI (1999–2009). The second group comprised the first 90 cases of TAVI in South Wales (2009 onwards). 2 years prior to and 5 years following TAVI/STD were assessed. Patient data were pseudoanonymised, using the Secure Anonymized Information Linkage (SAIL) databank, and extracted from Office National Statistics (ONS), Patient-Episode Database for Wales (PEDW) and general practitioner databases. Population 90 patients who had undergone TAVI in South Wales, and 65 STD patients who were medically managed. Main outcome measures Survival, hospital admission frequency and length of stay, primary care visits, and cost-effectiveness. Results TAVI patients were significantly older (81.8 vs 79.2), more likely to be male (59.1% vs 49.3%), baseline comorbidities were balanced. Mortality in TAVI versus STD was 28% vs 70% at 1000 days follow-up. There were significantly more hospital admissions per year in the TAVI group prior to TAVI/STD (1.5 (IQR 1.0–2.4) vs 1.0 IQR (0.5–1.5)). Post TAVI/STD, the TAVI group had significantly lower hospital admissions (0.3 (IQR 0.0–1.0) vs 1.2 (IQR 0.7–3.0)) and lengths of stay (0.4 (IQR 0.0–13.8) vs 11.0 (IQR 2.5–28.5), p<0.05). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for TAVI was £10 533 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Conclusions TAVI patients were more likely to survive and avoid hospital admissions compared with the medically

  19. The feasibility of determining the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of medication organisation devices compared with usual care for older people in a community setting: systematic review, stakeholder focus groups and feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Debi; Aldus, Clare F; Barton, Garry; Bond, Christine M; Boonyaprapa, Sathon; Charles, Ian S; Fleetcroft, Robert; Holland, Richard; Jerosch-Herold, Christina; Salter, Charlotte; Shepstone, Lee; Walton, Christine; Watson, Steve; Wright, David J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Medication organisation devices (MODs) provide compartments for a patient's medication to be organised into the days of the week and the recommended times the medication should be taken. AIM To define the optimal trial design for testing the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MODs. DESIGN The feasibility study comprised a systematic review and focus groups to inform a randomised controlled trial (RCT) design. The resulting features were tested on a small scale, using a 2 × 2 factorial design to compare MODs with usual packaging and to compare weekly with monthly supply. The study design was then evaluated. SETTING Potential participants were identified by medical practices. PARTICIPANTS Aged over 75 years, prescribed at least three solid oral dosage form medications, unintentionally non-adherent and self-medicating. Participants were excluded if deemed by their health-care team to be unsuitable. INTERVENTIONS One of three MODs widely used in routine clinical practice supplied either weekly or monthly. OBJECTIVES To identify the most effective method of participant recruitment, to estimate the prevalence of intentional and unintentional non-adherence in an older population, to provide a point estimate of the effect size of MODs relative to usual care and to determine the feasibility and acceptability of trial participation. METHODS The systematic review included MOD studies of any design reporting medication adherence, health and social outcomes, resource utilisation or dispensing or administration errors. Focus groups with patients, carers and health-care professionals supplemented the systematic review to inform the RCT design. The resulting design was implemented and then evaluated through questionnaires and group discussions with participants and health-care professionals involved in trial delivery. RESULTS Studies on MODs are largely of poor quality. The relationship between adherence and health outcomes is unclear. Of the limited

  20. A long-term experimental case study of the ecological effectiveness and cost effectiveness of invasive plant management in achieving conservation goals: bitou bush control in booderee national park in eastern australia.

    PubMed

    Lindenmayer, David B; Wood, Jeff; MacGregor, Christopher; Buckley, Yvonne M; Dexter, Nicholas; Fortescue, Martin; Hobbs, Richard J; Catford, Jane A

    2015-01-01

    Invasive plant management is often justified in terms of conservation goals, yet progress is rarely assessed against these broader goals, instead focussing on short-term reductions of the invader as a measure of success. Key questions commonly remain unanswered including whether invader removal reverses invader impacts and whether management itself has negative ecosystem impacts. We addressed these knowledge gaps using a seven year experimental investigation of Bitou Bush, Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. rotundata. Our case study took advantage of the realities of applied management interventions for Bitou Bush to assess whether it is a driver or passenger of environmental change, and quantified conservation benefits relative to management costs of different treatment regimes. Among treatments examined, spraying with herbicide followed by burning and subsequent re-spraying (spray-fire-spray) proved the most effective for reducing the number of individuals and cover of Bitou Bush. Other treatment regimes (e.g. fire followed by spraying, or two fires in succession) were less effective or even exacerbated Bitou Bush invasion. The spray-fire-spray regime did not increase susceptibility of treated areas to re-invasion by Bitou Bush or other exotic species. This regime significantly reduced plant species richness and cover, but these effects were short-lived. The spray-fire-spray regime was the most cost-effective approach to controlling a highly invasive species and facilitating restoration of native plant species richness to levels characteristic of uninvaded sites. We provide a decision tree to guide management, where recommended actions depend on the outcome of post-treatment monitoring and performance against objectives. Critical to success is avoiding partial treatments and treatment sequences that may exacerbate invasive species impacts. We also show the value of taking advantage of unplanned events, such as wildfires, to achieve management objectives at

  1. A Long-Term Experimental Case Study of the Ecological Effectiveness and Cost Effectiveness of Invasive Plant Management in Achieving Conservation Goals: Bitou Bush Control in Booderee National Park in Eastern Australia

    PubMed Central

    Lindenmayer, David B.; Wood, Jeff; MacGregor, Christopher; Buckley, Yvonne M.; Dexter, Nicholas; Fortescue, Martin; Hobbs, Richard J.; Catford, Jane A.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive plant management is often justified in terms of conservation goals, yet progress is rarely assessed against these broader goals, instead focussing on short-term reductions of the invader as a measure of success. Key questions commonly remain unanswered including whether invader removal reverses invader impacts and whether management itself has negative ecosystem impacts. We addressed these knowledge gaps using a seven year experimental investigation of Bitou Bush, Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. rotundata. Our case study took advantage of the realities of applied management interventions for Bitou Bush to assess whether it is a driver or passenger of environmental change, and quantified conservation benefits relative to management costs of different treatment regimes. Among treatments examined, spraying with herbicide followed by burning and subsequent re-spraying (spray-fire-spray) proved the most effective for reducing the number of individuals and cover of Bitou Bush. Other treatment regimes (e.g. fire followed by spraying, or two fires in succession) were less effective or even exacerbated Bitou Bush invasion. The spray-fire-spray regime did not increase susceptibility of treated areas to re-invasion by Bitou Bush or other exotic species. This regime significantly reduced plant species richness and cover, but these effects were short-lived. The spray-fire-spray regime was the most cost-effective approach to controlling a highly invasive species and facilitating restoration of native plant species richness to levels characteristic of uninvaded sites. We provide a decision tree to guide management, where recommended actions depend on the outcome of post-treatment monitoring and performance against objectives. Critical to success is avoiding partial treatments and treatment sequences that may exacerbate invasive species impacts. We also show the value of taking advantage of unplanned events, such as wildfires, to achieve management objectives at

  2. A long-term experimental case study of the ecological effectiveness and cost effectiveness of invasive plant management in achieving conservation goals: bitou bush control in booderee national park in eastern australia.

    PubMed

    Lindenmayer, David B; Wood, Jeff; MacGregor, Christopher; Buckley, Yvonne M; Dexter, Nicholas; Fortescue, Martin; Hobbs, Richard J; Catford, Jane A

    2015-01-01

    Invasive plant management is often justified in terms of conservation goals, yet progress is rarely assessed against these broader goals, instead focussing on short-term reductions of the invader as a measure of success. Key questions commonly remain unanswered including whether invader removal reverses invader impacts and whether management itself has negative ecosystem impacts. We addressed these knowledge gaps using a seven year experimental investigation of Bitou Bush, Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. rotundata. Our case study took advantage of the realities of applied management interventions for Bitou Bush to assess whether it is a driver or passenger of environmental change, and quantified conservation benefits relative to management costs of different treatment regimes. Among treatments examined, spraying with herbicide followed by burning and subsequent re-spraying (spray-fire-spray) proved the most effective for reducing the number of individuals and cover of Bitou Bush. Other treatment regimes (e.g. fire followed by spraying, or two fires in succession) were less effective or even exacerbated Bitou Bush invasion. The spray-fire-spray regime did not increase susceptibility of treated areas to re-invasion by Bitou Bush or other exotic species. This regime significantly reduced plant species richness and cover, but these effects were short-lived. The spray-fire-spray regime was the most cost-effective approach to controlling a highly invasive species and facilitating restoration of native plant species richness to levels characteristic of uninvaded sites. We provide a decision tree to guide management, where recommended actions depend on the outcome of post-treatment monitoring and performance against objectives. Critical to success is avoiding partial treatments and treatment sequences that may exacerbate invasive species impacts. We also show the value of taking advantage of unplanned events, such as wildfires, to achieve management objectives at

  3. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of medical treatments in acid-related diseases. The Markov chain approach applied to a comparison between intermittent and maintenance treatment of reflux esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Stålhammar, N O

    1993-01-01

    Escalating medical costs have made it increasingly important to carry out economic evaluations of drug therapy. In the area of acid-related diseases, much of the current interest is focused on comparisons between omeprazole and H2 receptor antagonists. After having discussed the basic methodology used in these analyses, viz. the decision-tree analysis, this paper presents an extension of this methodology, the Markov chain approach, which is more appropriate for analyses of longer time periods. Thereafter, this methodology is used to analyze the cost-effectiveness of omeprazole in intermittent versus maintenance treatment of reflux esophagitis. The cost data are from Sweden and the time period studied is one year. It is found that maintenance treatment provides 63 more healthy days per year at an extra direct cost of SEK 40 per day. From a sensitivity analysis it is concluded that the cost-effectiveness of intermittent versus maintenance treatment is mainly determined by the probability of relapse when off treatment, the severity of the symptoms in the case of a relapse and the value to the patient of a healthy day, i.e. a day free from reflux esophagitis. PMID:8171303

  4. The Influence of Achievement before, during and after Medical School on Physician Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmit Jongbloed, Lodewijk J.; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Stewart, Roy E.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2014-01-01

    In this longitudinal study, we investigated the relationship between physicians' prior achievements (before, during and after medical school) and job satisfaction, and tested the two lines of reasoning that prior achievements influence job satisfaction positively or negatively, respectively. The participants were graduates who started their…

  5. Graduate Medical Education: Its Role in Achieving a True Medical Education Continuum.

    PubMed

    Aschenbrener, Carol A; Ast, Cori; Kirch, Darrell G

    2015-09-01

    Nearly half a century ago, Lowell T. Coggeshall recommended, through what has come to be known as the Coggeshall Report, that physician education-medical school (or undergraduate medical education [UME]), residency training (or graduate medical education [GME]), and continuing medical education (CME)-be "planned and provided as a continuum." While the dream of a true continuum remains unfulfilled, recent innovations focused on defining and assessing meaningful outcomes at last offer the anchor for the creation of a seamless, flexible, and ongoing pathway for the preparation of physicians. Recent innovations, including a widely accepted competency framework and entrustable professional activities (EPAs), provide key tools for creating a continuum. The competency framework is being leveraged in UME, GME, and CME and is serving as the foundation for the continuum. Learners and those who assess them are increasingly relying on observable behaviors (e.g., EPAs) to determine progress. The GME community in the United States and Canada has played-and continues to play-a leading role in the creation of these tools and a true medical education continuum. Despite some systemic challenges to implementation (e.g., premedical learner formation, time-in-step requirements), the GME community is already operationalizing these tools as a basis for other innovations that are improving transitions across the continuum (e.g., competency-based progression of residents). The medical education community's greatest responsibility in the years ahead will be to build on these efforts in GME-joining together to learn from one another and develop a continuum that serves the public and the profession. PMID:26177531

  6. Psychological Type and Undergraduate Student Achievement in Pharmacy Course in Military Medical University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Ru; Shan, Shou-qin; Tian, Jian-quan

    2007-01-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was given to 264 students in an undergraduate Pharmacy course at a military medical university. Selected MBTI personality types were compared for achievement in the course using a t-test to compare total points earned. High grades were earned by students stronger in the traits of introversion (I) and judgment…

  7. Cost and Cost-Effectiveness of the COMBINE Study for Alcohol-Dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zarkin, Gary A.; Bray, Jeremy W.; Aldridge, Arnie; Mitra, Debanjali; Couper, David J.; Cisler, Ron A.

    2011-01-01

    Context The COMBINE clinical trial recently evaluated the efficacy of medications, behavioral therapies, and their combinations for the outpatient treatment of alcohol dependence. The costs and cost-effectiveness of these combinations are unknown and of interest to clinicians and policy makers. Objective To evaluate the costs and cost-effectiveness of the COMBINE interventions at the end of 16 weeks of treatment. Design, Setting, and Participants A prospective cost and cost-effectiveness study of patients in COMBINE, a randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) involving 1383 patients with diagnoses of primary alcohol dependence across 11 US clinical sites. Interventions Nine treatment arms, with 4 arms receiving medical management with 16 weeks of naltrexone (100 mg/d) or acamprosate (3 g/d), both, and/or placebo; 4 arms receiving the same options as above but delivered with combined behavioral intervention (CBI); and 1 arm receiving CBI only. Main Outcomes Measures Incremental cost per percentage point increase in percent days abstinent (PDA), incremental cost per patient of avoiding heavy drinking, and incremental cost per patient of achieving a good clinical outcome. Results Based on the mean values of cost and effectiveness, 3 interventions are cost-effective options relative to the other interventions for all three outcomes: medical management (MM) with placebo ($409 cost per patient), MM + naltrexone ($671 cost per patient), and MM + naltrexone + acamprosate ($1003 cost per patient). Conclusions This is only the second prospective RCT-designed cost-effectiveness study that has been performed for the treatment of alcohol dependence. Focusing just on effectiveness, MM + naltrexone + acamprosate is not significantly better than MM + naltrexone. However, looking at cost and effectiveness, MM + naltrexone + acamprosate may be a cost-effective choice, depending on whether the cost of the incremental increase in effectiveness is worth it to the decision maker. PMID

  8. Smoothing out transitions: how pedagogy influences medical students' achievement of self-regulated learning goals.

    PubMed

    White, Casey B

    2007-08-01

    Medical school is an academic and developmental path toward a professional life demanding self-regulation and self-education. Thus, many medical schools include in their goals for medical student education their graduates' ability to self-assess and self-regulate their education upon graduation and throughout their professional lives. This study explores links between medical students' use of self-regulated learning as it relates to motivation, autonomy, and control, and how these influenced their experiences in medical school. Subjects were medical students in two distinct medical school environments, "Problem-based learning" and "Traditional." PBL students described a rough transition into medical school, but once they felt comfortable with the autonomy and control PBL gave them, they embraced the independence and responsibility. They found themselves motivated to learning for learning's sake, and able to channel their motivation into effective transitions from the classrooms into the clerkships. Traditional students had a rougher transition from the classrooms to the clerkships. In the first two years they relied on faculty to direct and control learning, and they channeled their motivation toward achieving the highest grade. In the clerkships, they found faculty expected them to be more independent and self-directed than they felt prepared to be, and they struggled to assume responsibility for their learning. Self-regulated learning can help smooth out the transitions through medical school by preparing first and second year students for expectations in the third and fourth years, which can then maximize learning in the clinical milieu, and prepare medical students for a lifetime of learning.

  9. Future costs in cost effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robert H

    2008-07-01

    This paper resolves several controversies in CEA. Generalizing [Garber, A.M., Phelps, C.E., 1997. Economic foundations of cost-effectiveness analysis. Journal of Health Economics 16 (1), 1-31], the paper shows accounting for unrelated future costs distorts decision making. After replicating [Meltzer, D., 1997. Accounting for future costs in medical cost-effectiveness analysis. Journal of Health Economics 16 (1), 33-64] quite different conclusion that unrelated future costs should be included in CEA, the paper shows that Meltzer's findings result from modeling the budget constraint as an annuity, which is problematic. The paper also shows that related costs should be included in CEA. This holds for a variety of models, including a health maximization model. CEA should treat costs in the manner recommended by Garber and Phelps.

  10. [Bariatric surgery is more efficient than medical treatment in achieving remission in diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Klein, Mads; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2013-04-01

    Observational studies have shown that bariatric surgery can lead to remission of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMII), but randomized controlled trials have been lacking. Recently, randomized controlled trials comparing bariatric surgery with optimal medical treatment in patients suffering from poorly controlled DMII, have been performed. These trials show that bariatric surgery in general, and the malabsorptive procedures in particular, are more effective than medical treatment in achieving remission of DMII. These procedures should therefore be considered in the treatment of patients with DMII and obesity.

  11. Methods of cost-effectiveness analysis in the evaluation of new antipsychotics: implications for schizophrenia treatment.

    PubMed

    Neumann, P J

    1999-01-01

    Because health care payers are increasingly interested in learning whether new treatments offer value for money, there has been an abundance of research into the cost-effectiveness of pharmacologic therapies in the United States. In the past few years, a number of studies comparing the cost-effectiveness of the conventional neuroleptics with that of the atypical antipsychotics have been published. Cost-effectiveness analyses show the relationship between the resources used (costs) and the health benefits achieved (effects) for a health or medical intervention compared with an alternative strategy. Ideally, the analyses can help decision makers improve the health of the population by better allocating society's limited health care resources. However, the extent to which cost-effectiveness data are actually used in decision making is unclear. The analyses are sometimes viewed with skepticism, in part because studies differ in their methodological approaches. Recently, the U.S. Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine offered recommendations for standard methodological practices, which may help improve the quality of studies and the acceptability of the approach in the future. The issue is particularly important in light of new legislation governing how the Food and Drug Administration will regulate promotional claims made by drug companies regarding health economic information. PMID:10073371

  12. Relationship between the learning style preferences of medical students and academic achievement

    PubMed Central

    Almigbal, Turky H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between the learning style preferences of Saudi medical students and their academic achievements. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 600 medical students at King Saud University in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from October 2012 to July 2013. The Visual, Aural, Read/Write, and Kinesthetic questionnaire (VARK) questionnaire was used to categorize learning style preferences. Descriptive and analytical statistics were used to identify the learning style preferences of medical students and their relationship to academic achievement, gender, marital status, residency, different teaching curricula, and study resources (for example, teachers’ PowerPoint slides, textbooks, and journals). Results: The results indicated that 261 students (43%) preferred to learn using all VARK modalities. There was a significant difference in learning style preferences between genders (p=0.028). The relationship between learning style preferences and students in different teaching curricula was also statistically significant (p=0.047). However, learning style preferences are not related to a student’s academic achievements, marital status, residency, or study resources (for example, teachers’ PowerPoint slides, textbooks, and journals). Also, after being adjusted to other studies’ variables, the learning style preferences were not related to GPA. Conclusion: Our findings can be used to improve the quality of teaching in Saudi Arabia; students would be advantaged if teachers understood the factors that can be related to students’ learning styles. PMID:25737179

  13. Clinical importance of achieving biochemical control with medical therapy in adult patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Elena A

    2016-01-01

    In acromegaly, achieving biochemical control (growth hormone [GH] level <1.0 ng/mL and age- and sex-normalized levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1]) through timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment provides an opportunity to improve patient outcomes. Diagnosis of acromegaly is challenging because it is rooted in observing subtle clinical manifestations, and it is typical for acromegaly to evolve for up to 10 years before it is recognized. This results in chronic exposure to elevated levels of GH and IGF-1 and delay in patients receiving appropriate treatment, which consequently increases mortality risk. In this review, the clinical impact of elevated GH and IGF-1 levels, the effectiveness of current therapies, and the potential role of novel treatments for acromegaly will be discussed. Clinical burden of acromegaly and benefits associated with management of GH and IGF-1 levels will be reviewed. Major treatment paradigms in acromegaly include surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy. With medical therapies, such as somatostatin analogs, dopamine agonists, and GH receptor antagonists, a substantial proportion of patients achieve reduced GH and normalized IGF-1 levels. In addition, signs and symptoms, quality of life, and comorbidities have also been reported to improve to varying degrees in patients who achieve biochemical control. Currently, there are several innovative therapies in development to improve patient outcomes, patient use, and access. Timely biochemical control of acromegaly ensures that the patient can ultimately improve morbidity and mortality from this disease and its extensive consequences. PMID:27471378

  14. Clinical importance of achieving biochemical control with medical therapy in adult patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Christofides, Elena A

    2016-01-01

    In acromegaly, achieving biochemical control (growth hormone [GH] level <1.0 ng/mL and age- and sex-normalized levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1]) through timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment provides an opportunity to improve patient outcomes. Diagnosis of acromegaly is challenging because it is rooted in observing subtle clinical manifestations, and it is typical for acromegaly to evolve for up to 10 years before it is recognized. This results in chronic exposure to elevated levels of GH and IGF-1 and delay in patients receiving appropriate treatment, which consequently increases mortality risk. In this review, the clinical impact of elevated GH and IGF-1 levels, the effectiveness of current therapies, and the potential role of novel treatments for acromegaly will be discussed. Clinical burden of acromegaly and benefits associated with management of GH and IGF-1 levels will be reviewed. Major treatment paradigms in acromegaly include surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy. With medical therapies, such as somatostatin analogs, dopamine agonists, and GH receptor antagonists, a substantial proportion of patients achieve reduced GH and normalized IGF-1 levels. In addition, signs and symptoms, quality of life, and comorbidities have also been reported to improve to varying degrees in patients who achieve biochemical control. Currently, there are several innovative therapies in development to improve patient outcomes, patient use, and access. Timely biochemical control of acromegaly ensures that the patient can ultimately improve morbidity and mortality from this disease and its extensive consequences. PMID:27471378

  15. Costs and cost-effectiveness of periviable care.

    PubMed

    Caughey, Aaron B; Burchfield, David J

    2014-02-01

    With increasing concerns regarding rapidly expanding healthcare costs, cost-effectiveness analysis allows assessment of whether marginal gains from new technology are worth the increased costs. Particular methodologic issues related to cost and cost-effectiveness analysis in the area of neonatal and periviable care include how costs are estimated, such as the use of charges and whether long-term costs are included; the challenges of measuring utilities; and whether to use a maternal, neonatal, or dual perspective in such analyses. A number of studies over the past three decades have examined the costs and the cost-effectiveness of neonatal and periviable care. Broadly, while neonatal care is costly, it is also cost effective as it produces both life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). However, as the gestational age of the neonate decreases, the costs increase and the cost-effectiveness threshold is harder to achieve. In the periviable range of gestational age (22-24 weeks of gestation), whether the care is cost effective is questionable and is dependent on the perspective. Understanding the methodology and salient issues of cost-effectiveness analysis is critical for researchers, editors, and clinicians to accurately interpret results of the growing body of cost-effectiveness studies related to the care of periviable pregnancies and neonates.

  16. Economics of urolithiasis: cost-effectiveness of therapies.

    PubMed

    Chandhoke, P S

    2001-07-01

    The cost of treating urolithiasis with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and endoscopic surgery continues to be a significant burden on a nation's healthcare economy. Cost-effectiveness evaluations of various medical and surgical treatment options for urolithiasis is a practical method of developing rational allocation strategies for limited economic resources. In this review, the cost-effectiveness of shockwave lithotripsy and that of endoscopic surgery in the management of kidney and ureteral stones are compared. This is followed by a discussion of the cost of the medical management of urolithiasis in comparison with repeated surgical treatment.

  17. Cost Effectiveness Ratio: Evaluation Tool for Comparing the Effectiveness of Similar Extension Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayaratne, K. S. U.

    2015-01-01

    Extension educators have been challenged to be cost effective in their educational programming. The cost effectiveness ratio is a versatile evaluation indicator for Extension educators to compare the cost of achieving a unit of outcomes or educating a client in similar educational programs. This article describes the cost effectiveness ratio and…

  18. College Students with and without ADHD: Comparison of Self-Report of Medication Usage, Study Habits, and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advokat, Claire; Lane, Sean M.; Luo, Chunqiao

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between ADHD medications, study habits, and academic achievement of ADHD-diagnosed undergraduates. Method: A total of 92 students with a self-reported ADHD diagnosis and a current prescription for ADHD medication were compared with 143 control students in a survey of academic performance. Results: Most ADHD…

  19. The relationship between medical students’ epistemological beliefs and achievement on a clinical performance examination

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sun-A; Chung, Eun-Kyung; Han, Eui-Ryoung; Woo, Young-Jong; Kevin, Deiter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study was to explore the relationship between clinical performance examination (CPX) achievement and epistemological beliefs to investigate the potentials of epistemological beliefs in ill-structured medical problem solving tasks. Methods: We administered the epistemological beliefs questionnaire (EBQ) to fourth-year medical students and correlated the results with their CPX scores. The EBQ comprised 61 items reflecting five belief systems: certainty of knowledge, source of knowledge, rigidity of learning, ability to learn, and speed of knowledge acquisition. The CPX included scores for history taking, physical examination, and patient-physician interaction. Results: The higher epistemological beliefs group obtained significantly higher scores on the CPX with regard to history taking and patient-physician interaction. The epistemological beliefs scores on certainty of knowledge and source of knowledge were significantly positively correlated with patient-physician interaction. The epistemological beliefs scores for ability to learn were significantly positively correlated with those for history taking, physical examination, and patient-physician interaction. Conclusion: Students with more sophisticated and advanced epistemological beliefs stances used more comprehensive and varied approaches in the patient-physician interaction. Therefore, educational efforts that encourage discussions pertaining to epistemological views should be considered to improve clinical reasoning and problem-solving competence in the clinic setting. PMID:26838566

  20. Cost-effectiveness of adherence-enhancing interventions: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Simon-Tuval, Tzahit; Neumann, Peter J; Greenberg, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Low patient adherence to health-related interventions is a major barrier to achieving healthcare goals and is associated with very high avoidable costs. Although several studies suggest that adherence-enhancing interventions can improve health outcomes, economic evaluations of these interventions are scarce. Systematic reviews published to date are limited to interventions to enhance adherence to pharmaceuticals or to specific diseases and interventions. The authors' objective was to examine the evidence regarding the cost-effectiveness of adherence-enhancing interventions in healthcare and what conclusion could be drawn about these interventions. The present systematic review included 43 original studies and assessed the current evidence regarding the cost-effectiveness of a broad array of interventions aimed at enhancing adherence to medications, medical devices, screening tests and lifestyle behaviors. The authors found that although the majority of adherence-enhancing interventions were cost-effective or cost-saving, variation exists within different intervention types. Further research on the sustainability of adherence improvements is needed in order to accurately evaluate interventions' long-term benefits.

  1. Principles and practices for keeping occupational radiation exposures at medical institutions as low as reasonably achievable

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, A.

    1982-10-01

    This report is a companion document to Regulatory Guide 8.18, Information Relevant to Ensuring that Occupational Radiation Exposures at Medical Institutions Will Be As Low As Reasonably Achievable. Both documents have now been revised to incorporate many good suggestions received after the original documents were published for comment. This report is a compendium of good practices and helpful information derived from the experience of the radiological and health physics professions and is not be construed in any way as additional regulatory requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The information presented, including comprehensive checklists of facilities, equipment, and procedures that should be considered for working with NRC-licensed materials in all types of hospital activities, is intended to aid the NRC licensee in fulfilling the philosophy of maintaining radiation exposures of employees, patients, visitors, and the public as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Each subsection of this report is designed to include the major radiation safety considerations pertaining to the respective hospital function. Thus, the busy health professional will neeed to read only a few pages of this document at any one time to obtain the information needed.

  2. Cost effective energy conservation measures

    SciTech Connect

    Mashburn, W.H.

    1997-06-01

    Determining the cost effectiveness of energy conservation measures (ECM`s) consists of more than determining simple payback or life cycle costing. If strategic energy planning is involved, then establishment of an energy management program is of major importance. Training incorporated into the energy auditing process enhances the audit by involving knowledgeable employees, as well an increasing the chance of implementation of measures identified and reported. Involving employees in the process gives them ownership, and greatly improves the implementation rate. Once a company gets turned on to saving energy, it spreads like wildfire through the plant. Consultants who incorporate training as part of their audit will enhance their marketability. This paper discusses training techniques as a part of the auditing process, and lists major potential ECM`s that the author has found to have a high priority.

  3. Analyses of Blood Bank Efficiency, Cost-Effectiveness and Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Hwai-Tai Chen

    In view of the increasing costs of hospital care, it is essential to investigate methods to improve the labor efficiency and the cost-effectiveness of the hospital technical core in order to control costs while maintaining the quality of care. This study was conducted to develop indices to measure efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and the quality of blood banks; to identify factors associated with efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and quality; and to generate strategies to improve blood bank labor efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Indices developed in this study for labor efficiency and cost-effectiveness were not affected by patient case mix and illness severity. Factors that were associated with labor efficiency were identified as managerial styles, and organizational designs that balance workload and labor resources. Medical directors' managerial involvement was not associated with labor efficiency, but their continuing education and specialty in blood bank were found to reduce the performance of unnecessary tests. Surprisingly, performing unnecessary tests had no association with labor efficiency. This suggested the existence of labor slack in blood banks. Cost -effectiveness was associated with workers' benefits, wages, and the production of high-end transfusion products by hospital-based donor rooms. Quality indices used in this study included autologous transfusion rates, platelet transfusion rates, and the check points available in an error-control system. Because the autologous transfusion rate was related to patient case mix, severity of illness, and possible inappropriate transfusion, it was not recommended to be used for quality index. Platelet-pheresis transfusion rates were associated with the transfusion preferences of the blood bank medical directors. The total number of check points in an error -control system was negatively associated with government ownership and workers' experience. Recommendations for improving labor efficiency and cost-effectiveness

  4. Cost-effectiveness analysis of sandhill crane habitat management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kessler, Andrew C.; Merchant, James W.; Shultz, Steven D.; Allen, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species often threaten native wildlife populations and strain the budgets of agencies charged with wildlife management. We demonstrate the potential of cost-effectiveness analysis to improve the efficiency and value of efforts to enhance sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) roosting habitat. We focus on the central Platte River in Nebraska (USA), a region of international ecological importance for migrating avian species including sandhill cranes. Cost-effectiveness analysis is a valuation process designed to compare alternative actions based on the cost of achieving a pre-determined objective. We estimated costs for removal of invasive vegetation using geographic information system simulations and calculated benefits as the increase in area of sandhill crane roosting habitat. We generated cost effectiveness values for removing invasive vegetation on 7 land parcels and for the entire central Platte River to compare the cost-effectiveness of management at specific sites and for the central Platte River landscape. Median cost effectiveness values for the 7 land parcels evaluated suggest that costs for creating 1 additional hectare of sandhill crane roosting habitat totaled US $1,595. By contrast, we found that creating an additional hectare of sandhill crane roosting habitat could cost as much as US $12,010 for some areas in the central Platte River, indicating substantial cost savings can be achieved by using a cost effectiveness analysis to target specific land parcels for management. Cost-effectiveness analysis, used in conjunction with geographic information systems, can provide decision-makers with a new tool for identifying the most economically efficient allocation of resources to achieve habitat management goals.

  5. Achievement motivation level in students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences and its influential factors

    PubMed Central

    KAVOUSIPOUR, SOMAYEH; NOORAFSHAN, ALI; POURAHMAD, SAEEDEH; DEHGHANI-NAZHVANI, ALI

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Many studies have investigated the relationship between motivation and educational outcomes. The present study was conducted to determine whether the students’ motivation in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS) decreases during educational years. Methods: 770 students in SUMS were selected by multi-stage stratified random sampling from each field and entrance year. The first questionnaire contained 57 questions on the effect of economic, social, educational, geographical and personality factors on the students’ motivation. The second one was based on 50 incomplete sentences. The validity and reliability of these questionnaires were approved by the experts and Cronbach's Alpha coefficients (85% and 90%, respectively). In this cross-sectional study, ANOVA, t-test and Chi-square tests were applied for data analysis at the 0.05 significance level. Results: Six factors with the most effect on academic motivation were "family attitudes", "getting good jobs in future", "respect for themselves", " the ability to learn", "believing their role in victory and defeat" and "the tendency toward optimism about themselves". In addition, comparing professional doctorate and basic sciences’ results revealed no significant relationship between academic motivation and educational years (F=0.819, p=0.397). But comparing field by field showed that Dentistry and Hospital Management and Medical Information (HMMI) had a significant decrease in motivation score by increase in educational years (F=3.991, p=0.015). Conclusion: Achievement motivation level in SUMS students was higher than average and did not decrease during educational years. Also, the results showed that personal, social and educational related factors affected motivation level more than economic and environmental factors. PMID:25587552

  6. Measuring the cost-effectiveness of midwife-led versus physician-led intrapartum teams in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Howard S; Liang, Mengjia; Banks, Jamie L

    2015-07-01

    International agencies have advocated scaling-up of midwifery resources as an important method for improving maternal health and reducing maternal mortality rates (MMR). The cost-effectiveness of midwife-led versus physician-led intrapartum care is an important consideration in the human resource planning required to reduce MMR. Studies suggest that midwife-led teams can achieve comparable effectiveness and outcomes using less medically intensive care compared with physician-led teams. In the absence of adequate medical cost data, decision makers should consider the substantially lower average costs for three main drivers: salaries, benefits and incentives (≥two-times lower); preservice training (three-times lower) and attrition (two-times lower) necessary to deliver intrapartum care at the level of midwife competencies. This suggests that scale-up of midwifery resources is a less expensive and more cost-effective way to reduce MMRs and could potentially increase access to skilled intrapartum care.

  7. Cost-effective conservation of an endangered frog under uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Rose, Lucy E; Heard, Geoffrey W; Chee, Yung En; Wintle, Brendan A

    2016-04-01

    How should managers choose among conservation options when resources are scarce and there is uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of actions? Well-developed tools exist for prioritizing areas for one-time and binary actions (e.g., protect vs. not protect), but methods for prioritizing incremental or ongoing actions (such as habitat creation and maintenance) remain uncommon. We devised an approach that combines metapopulation viability and cost-effectiveness analyses to select among alternative conservation actions while accounting for uncertainty. In our study, cost-effectiveness is the ratio between the benefit of an action and its economic cost, where benefit is the change in metapopulation viability. We applied the approach to the case of the endangered growling grass frog (Litoria raniformis), which is threatened by urban development. We extended a Bayesian model to predict metapopulation viability under 9 urbanization and management scenarios and incorporated the full probability distribution of possible outcomes for each scenario into the cost-effectiveness analysis. This allowed us to discern between cost-effective alternatives that were robust to uncertainty and those with a relatively high risk of failure. We found a relatively high risk of extinction following urbanization if the only action was reservation of core habitat; habitat creation actions performed better than enhancement actions; and cost-effectiveness ranking changed depending on the consideration of uncertainty. Our results suggest that creation and maintenance of wetlands dedicated to L. raniformis is the only cost-effective action likely to result in a sufficiently low risk of extinction. To our knowledge we are the first study to use Bayesian metapopulation viability analysis to explicitly incorporate parametric and demographic uncertainty into a cost-effective evaluation of conservation actions. The approach offers guidance to decision makers aiming to achieve cost-effective

  8. Cost-effective conservation of an endangered frog under uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Rose, Lucy E; Heard, Geoffrey W; Chee, Yung En; Wintle, Brendan A

    2016-04-01

    How should managers choose among conservation options when resources are scarce and there is uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of actions? Well-developed tools exist for prioritizing areas for one-time and binary actions (e.g., protect vs. not protect), but methods for prioritizing incremental or ongoing actions (such as habitat creation and maintenance) remain uncommon. We devised an approach that combines metapopulation viability and cost-effectiveness analyses to select among alternative conservation actions while accounting for uncertainty. In our study, cost-effectiveness is the ratio between the benefit of an action and its economic cost, where benefit is the change in metapopulation viability. We applied the approach to the case of the endangered growling grass frog (Litoria raniformis), which is threatened by urban development. We extended a Bayesian model to predict metapopulation viability under 9 urbanization and management scenarios and incorporated the full probability distribution of possible outcomes for each scenario into the cost-effectiveness analysis. This allowed us to discern between cost-effective alternatives that were robust to uncertainty and those with a relatively high risk of failure. We found a relatively high risk of extinction following urbanization if the only action was reservation of core habitat; habitat creation actions performed better than enhancement actions; and cost-effectiveness ranking changed depending on the consideration of uncertainty. Our results suggest that creation and maintenance of wetlands dedicated to L. raniformis is the only cost-effective action likely to result in a sufficiently low risk of extinction. To our knowledge we are the first study to use Bayesian metapopulation viability analysis to explicitly incorporate parametric and demographic uncertainty into a cost-effective evaluation of conservation actions. The approach offers guidance to decision makers aiming to achieve cost-effective

  9. Screening strategies for active tuberculosis: focus on cost-effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Dobler, Claudia Caroline

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been renewed interest in screening for active tuberculosis (TB), also called active case-finding (ACF), as a possible means to achieve control of the global TB epidemic. ACF aims to increase the detection of TB, in order to diagnose and treat patients with TB earlier than if they had been diagnosed and treated only at the time when they sought health care because of symptoms. This will reduce or avoid secondary transmission of TB to other people, with the long-term goal of reducing the incidence of TB. Here, the history of screening for active TB, current screening practices, and the role of TB-diagnostic tools are summarized and the literature on cost-effectiveness of screening for active TB reviewed. Cost-effectiveness analyses indicate that community-wide ACF can be cost-effective in settings with a high incidence of TB. ACF among close TB contacts is cost-effective in settings with a low as well as a high incidence of TB. The evidence for cost-effectiveness of screening among HIV-infected persons is not as strong as for TB contacts, but the reviewed studies suggest that the intervention can be cost-effective depending on the background prevalence of TB and test volume. None of the cost-effectiveness analyses were informed by data from randomized controlled trials. As the results of randomized controlled trials evaluating different ACF strategies will become available in future, we will hopefully gain a better understanding of the role that ACF can play in achieving global TB control. PMID:27418848

  10. Evaluating cost-effectiveness using episodes of care.

    PubMed

    Lasdon, G S; Sigmann, P

    1977-03-01

    To test the feasibility of defining episodes of care as a cost-effectiveness measure, a pilot study was carried out in conjunction with an ongoing quality assessment program which involved abstracting prospective data from charts of patients treated for hypertension in the Primary Care Clinic of Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital. For comparison, data were abstracted retrospectively on hypertensive patients treated by faculty general internists in a fee-for-service private practice. The 12-month course of each patient was divided into controlled and uncontrolled episodes for which visit frequency rate and mean laboratory test utilization was calculated. Patient cost for each type of episode in each setting was calculated using standard charges. Results indicate that the episode definition is feasible and provides a measure for comparing the cost-effectiveness of different delivery systems treating the same health care problem. Factors omitted from the study that could affect cost-effectiveness are also discussed.

  11. Study on personality dimension negative emotionality affecting academic achievement among Malaysian medical students studying in Malaysia and overseas.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Vidya; Haque, Mainul; Simbak, Nordin Bin; Jaalam, Kamarudin

    2016-01-01

    Personality dimension negative emotionality is known to be associated with academic achievement. The present study focuses on the influence of negative emotionality (neuroticism) on the medical students' academic achievements. The main objective of this study was to ascertain the negative emotionality scores among the first year Malaysian medical students studying in Malaysia and India, further to find out the association between negative emotionality and their academic achievements. The current study sample includes 60 first year Malaysian medical students from Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia, and USM-KLE IMP, Belgaum, India. They were selected by convenient sampling technique. The Medico-Psychological questionnaire was used to find out the negative emotionality scores among the students and these scores were compared with academic scores. The data were analyzed using SPSS- 20. Thus, the study result goes with the prediction that there is a significant correlation between academic achievement and negative emotionality. We concluded that negative emotionality has a negative impact on medical student's academic achievement regardless of the fact whether they study in their own country or overseas.

  12. Study on personality dimension negative emotionality affecting academic achievement among Malaysian medical students studying in Malaysia and overseas

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Vidya; Haque, Mainul; Simbak, Nordin Bin; Jaalam, Kamarudin

    2016-01-01

    Personality dimension negative emotionality is known to be associated with academic achievement. The present study focuses on the influence of negative emotionality (neuroticism) on the medical students’ academic achievements. The main objective of this study was to ascertain the negative emotionality scores among the first year Malaysian medical students studying in Malaysia and India, further to find out the association between negative emotionality and their academic achievements. The current study sample includes 60 first year Malaysian medical students from Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia, and USM-KLE IMP, Belgaum, India. They were selected by convenient sampling technique. The Medico-Psychological questionnaire was used to find out the negative emotionality scores among the students and these scores were compared with academic scores. The data were analyzed using SPSS- 20. Thus, the study result goes with the prediction that there is a significant correlation between academic achievement and negative emotionality. We concluded that negative emotionality has a negative impact on medical student’s academic achievement regardless of the fact whether they study in their own country or overseas. PMID:27354836

  13. The essential role of medical ethics education in achieving professionalism: the Romanell Report.

    PubMed

    Carrese, Joseph A; Malek, Janet; Watson, Katie; Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani; Green, Michael J; McCullough, Laurence B; Geller, Gail; Braddock, Clarence H; Doukas, David J

    2015-06-01

    This article-the Romanell Report-offers an analysis of the current state of medical ethics education in the United States, focusing in particular on its essential role in cultivating professionalism among medical learners. Education in ethics has become an integral part of medical education and training over the past three decades and has received particular attention in recent years because of the increasing emphasis placed on professional formation by accrediting bodies such as the Liaison Committee on Medical Education and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Yet, despite the development of standards, milestones, and competencies related to professionalism, there is no consensus about the specific goals of medical ethics education, the essential knowledge and skills expected of learners, the best pedagogical methods and processes for implementation, and optimal strategies for assessment. Moreover, the quality, extent, and focus of medical ethics instruction vary, particularly at the graduate medical education level. Although variation in methods of instruction and assessment may be appropriate, ultimately medical ethics education must address the overarching articulated expectations of the major accrediting organizations. With the aim of aiding medical ethics educators in meeting these expectations, the Romanell Report describes current practices in ethics education and offers guidance in several areas: educational goals and objectives, teaching methods, assessment strategies, and other challenges and opportunities (including course structure and faculty development). The report concludes by proposing an agenda for future research.

  14. How to Achieve Synergy between Medical Education and Cognitive Neuroscience? An Exercise on Prior Knowledge in Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiter, Dirk J.; van Kesteren, Marlieke T. R.; Fernandez, Guillen

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge in contemporary research is how to connect medical education and cognitive neuroscience and achieve synergy between these domains. Based on this starting point we discuss how this may result in a common language about learning, more educationally focused scientific inquiry, and multidisciplinary research projects. As the topic of…

  15. [The introduction of the achievements of medical science in public health practice with using modern information technologies].

    PubMed

    Horban', A Ie

    2012-01-01

    The article analyzes some factors that complicate the availability of scholarly communication professionals of health of Ukraine to introduce the achievements of medical science into practice. Improved access will help the implementation created by the Ministry of Health of Ukraine United e-data-processing system.

  16. The Effect of Mastery Learning Model with Reflective Thinking Activities on Medical Students' Academic Achievement: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elaldi, Senel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of mastery learning model supported with reflective thinking activities on the fifth grade medical students' academic achievement. Mixed methods approach was applied in two samples (n = 64 and n = 6). Quantitative part of the study was based on a pre-test-post-test control group design with an experiment…

  17. Can Learning Style Predict Student Satisfaction with Different Instruction Methods and Academic Achievement in Medical Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurpinar, Erol; Alimoglu, Mustafa Kemal; Mamakli, Sumer; Aktekin, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    The curriculum of our medical school has a hybrid structure including both traditional training (lectures) and problem-based learning (PBL) applications. The purpose of this study was to determine the learning styles of our medical students and investigate the relation of learning styles with each of satisfaction with different instruction methods…

  18. WE-G-19A-01: Radiologists and Medical Physicists: Working Together to Achieve Common Goals

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A; Ma, J; Steele, J; Choi, H

    2014-06-15

    It is vitally important that medical physicists understand the clinical questions that radiologists are trying to answer with patient images. Knowledge of the types of information the radiologist needs helps medical physicists configure imaging protocols that appropriately balance radiation dose, time, and image quality. The ability to communicate with radiologists and understand medical terminology, anatomy, and physiology is key to creating such imaging protocols. In this session, radiologists will present clinical cases and describe the information they are seeking in the clinical images. Medical physicists will then discuss how imaging protocols are configured. Learning Objectives: Understand the types of information that radiologists seek in medical images. Apply this understanding in configuring the imaging equipment to deliver this information. Develop strategies for working with physician colleagues.

  19. Cost effective dynamic design and test requirements for Shuttle payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahle, C. V.; Gongloff, H. R.; Bangs, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study examining current spacecraft dynamic design and test requirements for the cost effective design and development of Shuttle payloads are presented. Dynamic environments, payload configurations, design/test requirements, test levels, assembly level of testing, simulation methods, prototype role, load limiting, test facilities, and flight measurements are discussed as they relate to the development of a cost effective design and test philosophy for Shuttle Spacelab payloads. It is concluded that changes to current design/test practices will minimize long range payload costs. However, changes to current practices need be quantitatively evaluated before an orderly progression to more cost effective methods can be achieved without undue risk of mission failures. Of major importance is optimization of test levels and plans for payloads and payload subsystems which will result in minimum project costs.

  20. Cost-effective conservation planning: lessons from economics.

    PubMed

    Duke, Joshua M; Dundas, Steven J; Messer, Kent D

    2013-08-15

    Economists advocate that the billions of public dollars spent on conservation be allocated to achieve the largest possible social benefit. This is "cost-effective conservation"-a process that incorporates both monetized benefits and costs. Though controversial, cost-effective conservation is poorly understood and rarely implemented by planners. Drawing from the largest publicly financed conservation programs in the United States, this paper seeks to improve the communication from economists to planners and to overcome resistance to cost-effective conservation. Fifteen practical lessons are distilled, including the negative implications of limiting selection with political constraints, using nonmonetized benefit measures or benefit indices, ignoring development risk, using incomplete cost measures, employing cost measures sequentially, and using benefit indices to capture costs. The paper highlights interrelationships between benefits and complications such as capitalization and intertemporal planning. The paper concludes by identifying the challenges at the research frontier, including incentive problems associated with adverse selection, additionality, and slippage.

  1. The State of Cost-Benefit and Cost-Effectiveness Analyses in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel-Rossi, Barbara; Ashdown, Jane

    2002-01-01

    Examines the state of cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis in education, first examining the progress that has been made in these fields in the health and medical sectors. Explores one outstanding example of cost-benefit analysis and critiques four other educational evaluations. Synthesizes strengths of cost-effectiveness analysis in…

  2. The cost-effectiveness of exercise referral schemes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Exercise referral schemes (ERS) aim to identify inactive adults in the primary care setting. The primary care professional refers the patient to a third party service, with this service taking responsibility for prescribing and monitoring an exercise programme tailored to the needs of the patient. This paper examines the cost-effectiveness of ERS in promoting physical activity compared with usual care in primary care setting. Methods A decision analytic model was developed to estimate the cost-effectiveness of ERS from a UK NHS perspective. The costs and outcomes of ERS were modelled over the patient's lifetime. Data were derived from a systematic review of the literature on the clinical and cost-effectiveness of ERS, and on parameter inputs in the modelling framework. Outcomes were expressed as incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses investigated the impact of varying ERS cost and effectiveness assumptions. Sub-group analyses explored the cost-effectiveness of ERS in sedentary people with an underlying condition. Results Compared with usual care, the mean incremental lifetime cost per patient for ERS was £169 and the mean incremental QALY was 0.008, generating a base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for ERS at £20,876 per QALY in sedentary individuals without a diagnosed medical condition. There was a 51% probability that ERS was cost-effective at £20,000 per QALY and 88% probability that ERS was cost-effective at £30,000 per QALY. In sub-group analyses, cost per QALY for ERS in sedentary obese individuals was £14,618, and in sedentary hypertensives and sedentary individuals with depression the estimated cost per QALY was £12,834 and £8,414 respectively. Incremental lifetime costs and benefits associated with ERS were small, reflecting the preventative public health context of the intervention, with this resulting in estimates of cost-effectiveness that are

  3. The Academic Backbone: longitudinal continuities in educational achievement from secondary school and medical school to MRCP(UK) and the specialist register in UK medical students and doctors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Selection of medical students in the UK is still largely based on prior academic achievement, although doubts have been expressed as to whether performance in earlier life is predictive of outcomes later in medical school or post-graduate education. This study analyses data from five longitudinal studies of UK medical students and doctors from the early 1970s until the early 2000s. Two of the studies used the AH5, a group test of general intelligence (that is, intellectual aptitude). Sex and ethnic differences were also analyzed in light of the changing demographics of medical students over the past decades. Methods Data from five cohort studies were available: the Westminster Study (began clinical studies from 1975 to 1982), the 1980, 1985, and 1990 cohort studies (entered medical school in 1981, 1986, and 1991), and the University College London Medical School (UCLMS) Cohort Study (entered clinical studies in 2005 and 2006). Different studies had different outcome measures, but most had performance on basic medical sciences and clinical examinations at medical school, performance in Membership of the Royal Colleges of Physicians (MRCP(UK)) examinations, and being on the General Medical Council Specialist Register. Results Correlation matrices and path analyses are presented. There were robust correlations across different years at medical school, and medical school performance also predicted MRCP(UK) performance and being on the GMC Specialist Register. A-levels correlated somewhat less with undergraduate and post-graduate performance, but there was restriction of range in entrants. General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE)/O-level results also predicted undergraduate and post-graduate outcomes, but less so than did A-level results, but there may be incremental validity for clinical and post-graduate performance. The AH5 had some significant correlations with outcome, but they were inconsistent. Sex and ethnicity also had predictive effects on

  4. In Search of Cost-Effective Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raywid, Mary Anne; Shaheen, Thomas A.

    1994-01-01

    Examines major cost-effectiveness proposals, describing developments that highlight concerns over making schools cost effective. The article discusses ways to blend the concerns of educational quality, equity, and costs (district consolidations, shared service and facilities arrangements, new accountability strategies, new information systems,…

  5. The polypill: at what price would it become cost effective?

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Oscar H; Steyerberg, Ewout W

    2006-01-01

    Introduction A promising concept in cardiovascular disease prevention (the polypill) was introduced in 2003. Although the polypill may seem as an effective intervention, data on its costs and cost effectiveness remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the maximum price of the polypill for it to be a cost effective alternative in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Methods Data on the hypothetical effects of the polypill were taken from the literature. Using data from the Framingham heart study and the Framingham offspring study, life tables were built to model the assumed benefits of the polypill. Using a third party payer perspective and a 10 years time horizon, the authors calculated what should be the maximum drug cost of the polypill for it to be cost effective (using a €20 000/year of life saved threshold) in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease among populations at different levels of absolute risk of coronary heart disease and age. Results To be cost effective among populations at levels of 10 year coronary heart disease risk over 20% (high risk), the annual cost of medication for the polypill therapy should be no more than €302 or €410 for men at age 50 and 60 years respectively. For cost effective prevention in populations at levels of coronary heart disease risk between 10% and 20% the costs should be two to three times lower. Conclusion Although the polypill could theoretically be a highly effective intervention, the costs of the medication could be its caveat for implementation in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:16476750

  6. The Cost-Effectiveness of Replacing the Bottom Quartile of Novice Teachers through Value-Added Teacher Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Stuart S.; Ritter, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted of Gordon, Kane, and Staiger's (2006) proposal to raise student achievement by identifying and replacing the bottom quartile of novice teachers, using value-added assessment of teacher performance. The cost effectiveness of this proposal was compared to the cost effectiveness of voucher programs, charter…

  7. Different Grounds for Admission: Its Effects on Recruitment and Achievement in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliffordson, Christina; Askling, Berit

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine effects of the admission system to higher education on background diversity of students and study efficiency. By using data from a longitudinal project, the students admitted to medical education on different admission grounds are compared. The results indicate that admissions based on upper secondary grades…

  8. Low cost space operations - Empty promise or future reality. [cost effectiveness problems of NASA programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bader, M.

    1976-01-01

    Organizational obstacles to the achievement of a cost-effective Space Shuttle service are examined. Among the factors considered are the difficulties of fostering concern for cost-effectiveness among the NASA research and development team and elimination of unnecessary systems and personnel. The effect of foreign or commercial competition and the extent to which governmental funding and control should be implemented are considered.

  9. Class Size Reduction or Rapid Formative Assessment?: A Comparison of Cost-Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Stuart S.

    2009-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of class size reduction (CSR) was compared with the cost-effectiveness of rapid formative assessment, a promising alternative for raising student achievement. Drawing upon existing meta-analyses of the effects of student-teacher ratio, evaluations of CSR in Tennessee, California, and Wisconsin, and RAND cost estimates, CSR…

  10. The Learning Curve Model for Analysing the Cost-Effectiveness of a Training System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offir, Baruch; Katz, Yaacov J.

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of industrial-educational cooperation focuses on the Learning Curve model, which can be used to evaluate the cost effectiveness of learning programs. Cost effectiveness for homogeneous and heterogeneous groups is discussed, and the use of computers to gather information about learning achievement is considered. (Six references) (LRW)

  11. The Cost-Effectiveness of Comprehensive School Reform and Rapid Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Stuart S.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the cost-effectiveness of 29 Comprehensive School Reform (CSR) models suggests that all 29 models are less cost-effective than an alternative approach for raising student achievement, involving rapid assessment systems that test students 2 to 5 times per week in math and reading and provide rapid feedback of the results to students and…

  12. Cost-Effective Stress Management Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Gordon F.

    1980-01-01

    Stress management training can be a cost effective way to improve productivity and job performance. Among many relaxation techniques, the most effective in terms of teachability, participant motivation, and profitability are self-hypnosis, progressive relaxation, and transcendental meditation. (SK)

  13. Cost-Effectiveness and Educational Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Henry M.

    1988-01-01

    Techniques of cost-effectiveness analysis and their applications to educational policy are discussed. Recommendations are made to increase the capacity of evaluators, policy analysts, and decision makers to use these tools appropriately for resource allocation. (SLD)

  14. How to achieve synergy between medical education and cognitive neuroscience? An exercise on prior knowledge in understanding.

    PubMed

    Ruiter, Dirk J; van Kesteren, Marlieke T R; Fernandez, Guillen

    2012-05-01

    A major challenge in contemporary research is how to connect medical education and cognitive neuroscience and achieve synergy between these domains. Based on this starting point we discuss how this may result in a common language about learning, more educationally focused scientific inquiry, and multidisciplinary research projects. As the topic of prior knowledge in understanding plays a strategic role in both medical education and cognitive neuroscience it is used as a central element in our discussion. A critical condition for the acquisition of new knowledge is the existence of prior knowledge, which can be built in a mental model or schema. Formation of schemas is a central event in student-centered active learning, by which mental models are constructed and reconstructed. These theoretical considerations from cognitive psychology foster scientific discussions that may lead to salient issues and questions for research with cognitive neuroscience. Cognitive neuroscience attempts to understand how knowledge, insight and experience are established in the brain and to clarify their neural correlates. Recently, evidence has been obtained that new information processed by the hippocampus can be consolidated into a stable, neocortical network more rapidly if this new information fits readily into a schema. Opportunities for medical education and medical education research can be created in a fruitful dialogue within an educational multidisciplinary platform. In this synergetic setting many questions can be raised by educational scholars interested in evidence-based education that may be highly relevant for integrative research and the further development of medical education.

  15. Cost effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging in the neurosciences.

    PubMed Central

    Szczepura, A K; Fletcher, J; Fitz-Patrick, J D

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To measure, in a service setting, the effect of magnetic resonance imaging on diagnosis, diagnostic certainty, and patient management in the neurosciences; to measure the cost per patient scanned; to estimate the marginal cost of imaging and compare this with its diagnostic impact; to measure changes in patients' quality of life; and to record the diagnostic pathway leading to magnetic resonance imaging. DESIGN--Controlled observational study using questionnaires on diagnosis and patient management before and after imaging. Detailed costing study. Quality of life questionnaires at the time of imaging and six months later. Diagnostic pathways extracted from medical records for a representative sample. SETTING--Regional superconducting 1.5 T magnetic resonance service. SUBJECTS--782 consecutive neuroscience patients referred by consultants for magnetic resonance imaging during June 1988-9; diagnostic pathways recorded for 158 cases. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Costs of magnetic resonance imaging and preliminary investigations; changes in planned management and resulting savings; changes in principal diagnosis and diagnostic certainty; changes in patients' quality of life. RESULTS--Average cost of magnetic resonance imaging was estimated at 206.20/patient pounds (throughput 2250 patients/year, 1989-90 prices including contrast and upgrading). Before magnetic resonance imaging diagnostic procedures cost 164.40/patient pounds (including inpatient stays). Management changed after imaging in 208 (27%) cases; saving an estimated 80.90/patient pounds. Confidence in planned management increased in a further 226 (29%) referrals. Consultants' principal diagnosis changed in 159 of 782 (20%) referrals; marginal cost per diagnostic change was 626 pounds. Confidence in diagnosis increased in 236 (30%) referrals. No improvement in patients' quality of life at six month assessment. CONCLUSIONS--Any improvement in diagnosis with magnetic resonance imaging is achieved at a

  16. Independent medical review: expanding legal remedies to achieve managed care accountability.

    PubMed

    Berman-Sandler, Leatrice

    2004-01-01

    Author Leatrice Berman-Sandler reports on independent medical review (IMR), a state-based statutory remedy used to resolve disputes over coverage between patients and their health plans. Ms. Berman-Sandler explores the connection between ERISA preemption and IMR, and opines that in light of recent Supreme Court decisions, the stage has been set for expansion of IMR. Accordingly, Ms. Berman-Sandler concludes that there are strong legal and policy reasons for state legislatures to broaden the application of IMR and for the Court to continue to narrow ERISA preemption in order to increase accountability in the managed care arena.

  17. Poorer verbal working memory for a second language selectively impacts academic achievement in university medical students

    PubMed Central

    Canny, Benedict J.; Reser, David H.; Rajan, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is often poorer for a second language (L2). In low noise conditions, people listening to a language other than their first language (L1) may have similar auditory perception skills for that L2 as native listeners, but do worse in high noise conditions, and this has been attributed to the poorer WM for L2. Given that WM is critical for academic success in children and young adults, these speech in noise effects have implications for academic performance where the language of instruction is L2 for a student. We used a well-established Speech-in-Noise task as a verbal WM (vWM) test, and developed a model correlating vWM and measures of English proficiency and/or usage to scholastic outcomes in a multi-faceted assessment medical education program. Significant differences in Speech-Noise Ratio (SNR50 ) values were observed between medical undergraduates who had learned English before or after five years of age, with the latter group doing worse in the ability to extract whole connected speech in the presence of background multi-talker babble (Student-t tests, p < 0.001). Significant negative correlations were observed between the SNR50 and seven of the nine variables of English usage, learning styles, stress, and musical abilities in a questionnaire administered to the students previously. The remaining two variables, Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Age of Acquisition of English (AoAoE) were significantly positively correlated with the SNR50 , showing that those with a poorer capacity to discriminate simple English sentences from noise had learnt English later in life and had higher levels of stress – all characteristics of the international students. Local students exhibited significantly lower SNR50 scores and were significantly younger when they first learnt English. No significant correlation was detected between the SNR50 and the students’ Visual/Verbal Learning Style (r = −0.023). Standard multiple regression was carried out to

  18. Poorer verbal working memory for a second language selectively impacts academic achievement in university medical students.

    PubMed

    Mann, Collette; Canny, Benedict J; Reser, David H; Rajan, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is often poorer for a second language (L2). In low noise conditions, people listening to a language other than their first language (L1) may have similar auditory perception skills for that L2 as native listeners, but do worse in high noise conditions, and this has been attributed to the poorer WM for L2. Given that WM is critical for academic success in children and young adults, these speech in noise effects have implications for academic performance where the language of instruction is L2 for a student. We used a well-established Speech-in-Noise task as a verbal WM (vWM) test, and developed a model correlating vWM and measures of English proficiency and/or usage to scholastic outcomes in a multi-faceted assessment medical education program. Significant differences in Speech-Noise Ratio (SNR50) values were observed between medical undergraduates who had learned English before or after five years of age, with the latter group doing worse in the ability to extract whole connected speech in the presence of background multi-talker babble (Student-t tests, p < 0.001). Significant negative correlations were observed between the SNR50 and seven of the nine variables of English usage, learning styles, stress, and musical abilities in a questionnaire administered to the students previously. The remaining two variables, Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Age of Acquisition of English (AoAoE) were significantly positively correlated with the SNR50, showing that those with a poorer capacity to discriminate simple English sentences from noise had learnt English later in life and had higher levels of stress - all characteristics of the international students. Local students exhibited significantly lower SNR50 scores and were significantly younger when they first learnt English. No significant correlation was detected between the SNR50 and the students' Visual/Verbal Learning Style (r = -0.023). Standard multiple regression was carried out to assess

  19. Poorer verbal working memory for a second language selectively impacts academic achievement in university medical students.

    PubMed

    Mann, Collette; Canny, Benedict J; Reser, David H; Rajan, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is often poorer for a second language (L2). In low noise conditions, people listening to a language other than their first language (L1) may have similar auditory perception skills for that L2 as native listeners, but do worse in high noise conditions, and this has been attributed to the poorer WM for L2. Given that WM is critical for academic success in children and young adults, these speech in noise effects have implications for academic performance where the language of instruction is L2 for a student. We used a well-established Speech-in-Noise task as a verbal WM (vWM) test, and developed a model correlating vWM and measures of English proficiency and/or usage to scholastic outcomes in a multi-faceted assessment medical education program. Significant differences in Speech-Noise Ratio (SNR50) values were observed between medical undergraduates who had learned English before or after five years of age, with the latter group doing worse in the ability to extract whole connected speech in the presence of background multi-talker babble (Student-t tests, p < 0.001). Significant negative correlations were observed between the SNR50 and seven of the nine variables of English usage, learning styles, stress, and musical abilities in a questionnaire administered to the students previously. The remaining two variables, Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Age of Acquisition of English (AoAoE) were significantly positively correlated with the SNR50, showing that those with a poorer capacity to discriminate simple English sentences from noise had learnt English later in life and had higher levels of stress - all characteristics of the international students. Local students exhibited significantly lower SNR50 scores and were significantly younger when they first learnt English. No significant correlation was detected between the SNR50 and the students' Visual/Verbal Learning Style (r = -0.023). Standard multiple regression was carried out to assess

  20. Designing to cost effectiveness - Enhancing quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, James R.; Stracener, Jerrell T.

    The authors present a practical application of cost-effectiveness analysis techniques through the definition and solution of a representative design tradeoff study using cost-effectiveness as a figure of merit for quality. They also describe a decision process based on the results of tradeoff studies to provide a method of integrating the 'ilities' with design and manufacturing engineering to help accomplish integrated product development (IPD). While the approach is demonstrated in an aircraft application, the method is equally applicable in almost any product and any operational scenario, military or commercial.

  1. Preliminary report on the cost effectiveness of ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Takura, Tomoyuki; Kyo, Shunei; Ono, Minoru; Tominaga, Ryuji; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Tanoue, Yoshihisa; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of ventricular assist devices (VAD) implantation surgery in the Japanese medical reimbursement system. The study group consisted of thirty-seven patients who had undergone VAD implantation surgery for dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 25; 67.6 %) or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 4; 10.8 %), and others (n = 8; 21.6 %). Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were calculated using the utility score and years of life. Medical reimbursement bills were chosen as cost indices. The observation period was the 12-month period after surgery. Then, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated according to the VAD type. In addition, the prognosis after 36 months was estimated on the basis of the results obtained using the Markov chain model. The mean preoperative INTERMACS profile score was 2.35 ± 0.77. Our results showed that the utility score, which indicates the effectiveness of VAD implantation surgery, improved by 0.279 ± 0.188 (ΔQALY, p < 0.05). The cost of VAD implantation surgery was 313,282 ± 25,275 (ΔUS$/year) on the basis of medical reimbursement bills associated with therapeutic interventions. The calculated result of CEA was 364,501 ± 190,599 (ΔUS$/QALY). The improvement in the utility score was greater for implantable versus extracorporeal VADs (0.233 ± 0.534 vs. 0.371 ± 0.238) and ICER was 303,104 (ΔUS$/ΔQALY). Furthermore, when we estimated CEA for 36 months, the expected baseline value was 102,712 (US$/QALY). Therefore, VAD implantation surgery was cost effective considering the disease specificities. PMID:26242357

  2. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy with ceftriaxone for acute tonsillopharyngitis: efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety

    PubMed Central

    Al Alawi, Samah; Abdulkarim, Somaya; Elhennawy, Hazem; Al-Mansoor, Anwar; Al Ansari, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is the administration of intravenous antimicrobial therapy to patients in an outpatient setting. It may be used for patients who have infections that require parenteral treatment but who are otherwise stable enough to not require admission as inpatients. Objective We aimed to review the treatment of patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis at the OPAT health care clinic in the Bahrain Defense Force Royal Medical Services (BDF-RMS), with regard to efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety. Methods A retrospective case notes review was conducted for all patients admitted to the OPAT clinic in the BDF-RMS with acute tonsillopharyngitis treated with ceftriaxone, between March 2012 and March 2014. Results In the period between March 2012 and March 2014, 97 patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis were treated with ceftriaxone for a minimum of 3 days at the OPAT clinic. In total, 94.8% of patients completed the prescribed course of ceftriaxone. Total cure was achieved in 89.7% of patients. Usage of the OPAT clinic led to cost savings of 10,693 BD, while total bed days saved were 301 over the 2-year period examined by this study. Participants in the program expressed high satisfaction rates, and the average (± standard deviation) score on a patient satisfaction survey was 4.41 (± 0.31) out of a total of 5. This study highlights the efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety of the OPAT clinic service for the treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone. We found a 45.5% drop in admission rate for acute tonsillopharyngitis after starting the OPAT service clinic and that 301 bed days were saved through this treatment. Conclusion This study showed that the management of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone in the OPAT clinic is safe, clinically effective, and cost effective, with low rates of complications/readmissions and high levels of patient

  3. Cost-effectiveness of immediate specimen adequacy assessment of thyroid fine-needle aspirations.

    PubMed

    Eedes, Christopher R; Wang, Helen H

    2004-01-01

    Pathologists and cytotechnologists often provide immediate specimen adequacy evaluation of thyroid fine-needle aspirations (FNAs) to ensure that diagnostic material is obtained. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of this practice. All patients who had a thyroid FNA specimen accessioned at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, during a 6-month period were included and divided into 2 groups: (1) with or (2) without immediate adequacy assessment. Specimen adequacy from each group was compared. The time spent to perform the adequacy assessment was recorded. Compared with group 2, group 1 had more specimens with diagnostic cellular material (67.2% vs 47.0%) and fewer specimens with suboptimal (23.3% vs 38.1%) or nondiagnostic cellular material (9.5% vs 14.9%) (P = .002). At the time of adequacy assessment, 98% (60/61) of the adequate specimens were obtained with 3 or fewer passes. The improved rate of diagnostic material was achieved at a cost of 220 minutes of cytologists' time per additional diagnostic specimen compared with group 2. It may be most cost-effective to routinely obtain 3 passes and to perform immediate adequacy assessment under special circumstances such as repeated procedures.

  4. Cost-effective x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roltsch, Tom J.

    1991-08-01

    The push towards faster, denser VLSI device structures and eventually to ULSI devices means ever-decreasing design rules for IC manufacturers. In order to define patterns on silicon and gallium arsenide substrates with feature sizes of 0.25 microns, lithography, metallization, and electronic materials processing techniques will be pushed beyond current limitations. Of these technologies, lithography in the sub-0.5 micron region appears to be the main obstacle yet to be overcome. As deep-UV optical systems become more expensive and the useful field sized decrease in the attempt to achieve finer resolutions, the question of whether to switch to an alternate lithographic method becomes imminent. X-ray lithography is the leading candidate. In this paper, the question of whether x-ray lithography is economically superior to optical lithography and the cost-effectiveness of x-ray lithography are addressed. Also, the question of how x-ray lithography can be performed in a production environment is considered. First shown is that more elaborate optical systems are simply not going to match x-ray proximity system in terms of resolution because of the need to use exotic lens materials or complicated and ever finer reflection systems, none of which can correct for diffraction effects, yet must be corrected for every other aberration. The economic superiority of a synchrotron-based x- ray lithography beamline is demonstrated in a production facility using a processing-cost model based on Shinji Okazaki's cost-per-bit model. Considered, as well, is the strong possibility that exists for the use of an optically based production line which would use an anode or plasma x-ray stepper to define only the smallest geometries, such as the gate level on a DRAM chip. It is shown that it is unlikely, even pushing the limits of materials and optics, that deep-UV systems will be able to define patterns below 0.35 microns in a production environment. X-ray lithography systems could define 0

  5. Cost-effectiveness of bupropion, nortriptyline, and psychological intervention in smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Sharon M; Lightwood, James M; Humfleet, Gary L; Bostrom, Alan; Reus, Victor I; Muñoz, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    Sustained-release bupropion and nortriptyline have been shown to be efficacious in treating cigarette smoking. Psychological intervention is also recognized as efficacious. The cost and cost-effectiveness of the 2 drug therapies have not been estimated. It was hypothesized that nortriptyline would be more cost-effective than bupropion. Hypotheses were not originally proposed concerning the cost-effectiveness of psychological versus drug treatment, but the 2 were compared using exploratory analyses. This was a 3 (bupropion versus nortriptyline versus placebo) by 2 (medical management alone versus medical management plus psychological intervention) randomized trial. Participants were 220 cigarette smokers. Outcome measures were cost and cost-effectiveness computed at week 52. Nortriptyline cost less than bupropion. Nortriptyline was more cost-effective than bupropion; the difference was not statistically significant. Psychological intervention cost less than the 2 drug treatments, and was more cost-effective, but not significantly so. Prospective investigations of the cost and cost-effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological intervention, using adequate sample sizes, are warranted. PMID:16215448

  6. Cost-Effective School Nurse Practitioner Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobolewski, Susan D.

    1981-01-01

    A broader utilization of school nurse practitioners by school districts represents a cost-effective approach in meeting educational goals. School nurse practitioners provide extended nursing services to high risk children, assist in coordinating health services between the school and the child's parents, participate in classroom presentations on…

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of Interactive Courseware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, J. D.

    What is known about the cost effectiveness of interactive courseware (ICW) is reviewed, and issues that remain are summarized. Effect size is used for reporting the effectiveness of ICW programs. Two ICW media are considered: computer-based instruction and interactive videodisc instruction. Effect sizes for computer-based instruction have been…

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of Online Teacher Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Insung

    2005-01-01

    This study aims to compare the cost-effectiveness of an online teacher training method with a face-to-face training method in teaching "ICT integration in the school curriculum". In addition, the study explores the possibilities of a school-based voluntary training method in supporting other approaches to ICT teacher training. The analyses of…

  9. Cost Effectiveness of CBI in Defense Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, J. D.; Orlansky, Jesse

    This presentation provides an in-process review of researching efforts at the U.S. Army Research Institute and the Institute for Defense Analysis to update their earlier studies of Computer Based Instruction (CBI) cost-effectiveness. In the presentation five topics are addressed: (1) the differences between education and training, and why they…

  10. Cost-Effective Analysis of Teletraining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shatzer, Linda

    1987-01-01

    Presents case study on personal computer teleconferencing to compare its cost effectiveness with that of on-site training. A model is described that uses a checklist for decision making in three areas: (1) initial considerations, (2) planning considerations, i.e., design elements, and (3) technical considerations, i.e., review and selection…

  11. Cost-effective strategies for rural community outreach, Hawaii, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Pellegrin, Karen L; Barbato, Anna; Holuby, R Scott; Ciarleglio, Anita E; Taniguchi, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Three strategies designed to maximize attendance at educational sessions on chronic disease medication safety in older adults in rural areas were implemented sequentially and compared for cost-effectiveness: 1) existing community groups and events, 2) formal advertisement, and 3) employer-based outreach. Cost-effectiveness was measured by comparing overall cost per attendee recruited and number of attendees per event. The overall cost per attendee was substantially higher for the formal advertising strategy, which produced the lowest number of attendees per event. Leveraging existing community events and employers in rural areas was more cost-effective than formal advertisement for recruiting rural community members. PMID:25496555

  12. Cost-Effective Strategies for Rural Community Outreach, Hawaii, 2010–2011

    PubMed Central

    Barbato, Anna; Holuby, R. Scott; Ciarleglio, Anita E.; Taniguchi, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Three strategies designed to maximize attendance at educational sessions on chronic disease medication safety in older adults in rural areas were implemented sequentially and compared for cost-effectiveness: 1) existing community groups and events, 2) formal advertisement, and 3) employer-based outreach. Cost-effectiveness was measured by comparing overall cost per attendee recruited and number of attendees per event. The overall cost per attendee was substantially higher for the formal advertising strategy, which produced the lowest number of attendees per event. Leveraging existing community events and employers in rural areas was more cost-effective than formal advertisement for recruiting rural community members. PMID:25496555

  13. Cost-effective strategies for rural community outreach, Hawaii, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Pellegrin, Karen L; Barbato, Anna; Holuby, R Scott; Ciarleglio, Anita E; Taniguchi, Ronald

    2014-12-11

    Three strategies designed to maximize attendance at educational sessions on chronic disease medication safety in older adults in rural areas were implemented sequentially and compared for cost-effectiveness: 1) existing community groups and events, 2) formal advertisement, and 3) employer-based outreach. Cost-effectiveness was measured by comparing overall cost per attendee recruited and number of attendees per event. The overall cost per attendee was substantially higher for the formal advertising strategy, which produced the lowest number of attendees per event. Leveraging existing community events and employers in rural areas was more cost-effective than formal advertisement for recruiting rural community members.

  14. The cost-effectiveness of harm reduction.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David P; Donald, Braedon; Shattock, Andrew J; Wilson, David; Fraser-Hurt, Nicole

    2015-02-01

    HIV prevalence worldwide among people who inject drugs (PWID) is around 19%. Harm reduction for PWID includes needle-syringe programs (NSPs) and opioid substitution therapy (OST) but often coupled with antiretroviral therapy (ART) for people living with HIV. Numerous studies have examined the effectiveness of each harm reduction strategy. This commentary discusses the evidence of effectiveness of the packages of harm reduction services and their cost-effectiveness with respect to HIV-related outcomes as well as estimate resources required to meet global and regional coverage targets. NSPs have been shown to be safe and very effective in reducing HIV transmission in diverse settings; there are many historical and very recent examples in diverse settings where the absence of, or reduction in, NSPs have resulted in exploding HIV epidemics compared to controlled epidemics with NSP implementation. NSPs are relatively inexpensive to implement and highly cost-effective according to commonly used willingness-to-pay thresholds. There is strong evidence that substitution therapy is effective, reducing the risk of HIV acquisition by 54% on average among PWID. OST is relatively expensive to implement when only HIV outcomes are considered; other societal benefits substantially improve the cost-effectiveness ratios to be highly favourable. Many studies have shown that ART is cost-effective for keeping people alive but there is only weak supportive, but growing evidence, of the additional effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ART as prevention among PWID. Packages of combined harm reduction approaches are highly likely to be more effective and cost-effective than partial approaches. The coverage of harm reduction programs remains extremely low across the world. The total annual costs of scaling up each of the harm reduction strategies from current coverage levels, by region, to meet WHO guideline coverage targets are high with ART greatest, followed by OST and then NSPs. But

  15. Cost effective fabrication method for large sapphire sensor windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Mark; Gould, Alan; Bartlett, Kevin; Brophy, Matthew R.; DeGroote Nelson, Jessica

    2013-09-01

    Sapphire poses very difficult challenges to optical manufacturers due to its high hardness and anisotropic properties. These challenges can result in long lead times and high prices. Large optical sensor windows demand much higher precision surfaces compared to transparent armor (windshields) to achieve acceptable image quality. Optimax is developing a high speed, cost effective process to produce such windows. The Optimax high speed process is a two-step process that combines precision fixed abrasive grinding and high speed polishing. In-house studies have demonstrated cycle time reduction of up to 6X as compared to conventional processing.

  16. Identification and Analysis of Labor Productivity Components Based on ACHIEVE Model (Case Study: Staff of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences)

    PubMed Central

    Ziapour, Arash; Khatony, Alireza; Kianipour, Neda; Jafary, Faranak

    2015-01-01

    Identification and analysis of the components of labor productivity based on ACHIEVE model was performed among employees in different parts of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2014. This was a descriptive correlational study in which the population consisted of 270 working personnel in different administrative groups (contractual, fixed- term and regular) at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (872 people) that were selected among 872 people through stratified random sampling method based on Krejcie and Morgan sampling table. The survey tool included labor productivity questionnaire of ACHIEVE. Questionnaires were confirmed in terms of content and face validity, and their reliability was calculated using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient. The data were analyzed by SPSS-18 software using descriptive and inferential statistics. The mean scores for labor productivity dimensions of the employees, including environment (environmental fit), evaluation (training and performance feedback), validity (valid and legal exercise of personnel), incentive (motivation or desire), help (organizational support), clarity (role perception or understanding), ability (knowledge and skills) variables and total labor productivity were 4.10±0.630, 3.99±0.568, 3.97±0.607, 3.76±0.701, 3.63±0.746, 3.59±0.777, 3.49±0.882 and 26.54±4.347, respectively. Also, the results indicated that the seven factors of environment, performance assessment, validity, motivation, organizational support, clarity, and ability were effective in increasing labor productivity. The analysis of the current status of university staff in the employees’ viewpoint suggested that the two factors of environment and evaluation, which had the greatest impact on labor productivity in the viewpoint of the staff, were in a favorable condition and needed to be further taken into consideration by authorities. PMID:25560364

  17. Cost effective management of space venture risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giuntini, Ronald E.; Storm, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a model for the cost-effective management of space venture risks is discussed. The risk assessment and control program of insurance companies is examined. A simplified system development cycle which consists of a conceptual design phase, a preliminary design phase, a final design phase, a construction phase, and a system operations and maintenance phase is described. The model incorporates insurance safety risk methods and reliability engineering, and testing practices used in the development of large aerospace and defense systems.

  18. Theater SBI cost-effectiveness ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1993-11-01

    To address M missiles spaced at intervals longer than the constillation reconstitution time t, the defense needs at the absentee ratio N{sub a} of SBIs to fill the belt plus the M SBIs needed for the intercepts; the resulting cost effectiveness scales as M/(M + N{sub a}). N{sub a} is large and CER small for small ranges and numbers of missiles. For several-hundred missile threats, CERs are greater than unity for ranges of interest.

  19. [Cost effectiveness and health sector reform].

    PubMed

    Musgrove, P

    1995-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of a health intervention is an estimate of the relation between what it costs to be provided, and the improvement in health which results from such intervention. Health may improve because the incidence of illness or injury is reduced, because death is avoided or delayed, or because the duration or severity of disability is limited. The calculation of this health benefit combines objective factors, such as the age at incidence and whether or not the outcome is death, with subjective factors such as the severity of disability, the judgement as to the value of life lived at different ages, and the rate at which the future is discounted. The construction and interpretation of the estimate are explained. Also, the paper examines whether the concept of cost-effectiveness is consistent with ethical norms such as equity, and concludes that they are not in conflict. Finally, it addresses the question of how to incorporate cost-effectiveness into a health sector reform, and possible ways to implement it.

  20. Nonparametric inference for time-dependent incremental cost-effectiveness ratios.

    PubMed

    Yee, Laura M; Gary Chan, Kwun Chuen

    2015-12-30

    As the costs of medical care increase, more studies are evaluating cost in addition to effectiveness of treatments. Cost-effectiveness analyses in randomized clinical trials have typically been conducted only at the end of follow-up. However, cost-effectiveness may change over time. We therefore propose a nonparametric estimator to assess the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio over time. We also derive the asymptotic variance of our estimator and present formulation of Fieller-based simultaneous confidence bands. Simulation studies demonstrate the performance of our point estimators, variance estimators, and confidence bands. We also illustrate our methods using data from a randomized clinical trial, the second Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial. This trial studied the effects of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators on patients at high risk for cardiac arrhythmia. Results show that our estimator performs well in large samples, indicating promising future directions in the field of cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Cost-Effectiveness of Maintenance Hemodialysis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Takura, Tomoyuki; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Kawanishi, Hideki; Nitta, Kosaku; Akizawa, Tadao; Hiramatsu, Makoto; Kawasaki, Tadayuki; Kukita, Kazutaka; Soejima, Hidehisa; Hirakata, Hideki; Yoshida, Toyohiko; Miyamoto, Takashi; Takahashi, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    The cost-effectiveness according to primary disease or dialysis duration has never been analyzed with respect to maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). Study candidates were > 20 years of age and had received hemodialysis for at least 6 months. Hemodialysis patients were prospectively observed for 36 months, and patient utility was assessed based on the Euro-QOL 5-dimensions (EQ-5D), from which the quality adjusted life years (QALYs) were estimated. Medical costs were calculated based on medical service fees. The cost-effectiveness defined as the incremental cost utility ratio (ICUR) was analyzed from a social perspective. A total of 29 patients (mean age; 59.9 ± 13.1 years) undergoing 437 dialysis sessions were analyzed. Utility based upon the EQ-5D score was 0.75 ± 0.21, and the estimated total medical cost for one year of MHD treatment was 4.52 ± 0.88 US$10 000. ICUR was 6.88 ± 4.47 US$10 000/QALY on average, and when comparing ICUR based on the causes of kidney failure, the value for diabetic nephropathy was found to be higher than that for glomerulonephritis (8.17 ± 6.28 vs. 6.82 ± 4.07). ICUR after 36 months observation increased mainly in the patients below 65 years of age (All; P < 0.05, <65; P < 0.01, 65≤; not significant). MHD is a treatment that could improve the socioeconomic state of elderly patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), but the ICUR for diabetic nephropathy was higher than that for glomerulonephritis. PMID:26387878

  2. The cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in Armenia.

    PubMed

    Jit, Mark; Yuzbashyan, Ruzanna; Sahakyan, Gayane; Avagyan, Tigran; Mosina, Liudmila

    2011-11-01

    The cost-effectiveness of introducing infant rotavirus vaccination in Armenia in 2012 using Rotarix(R) was evaluated using a multiple birth cohort model. The model considered the cost and health implications of hospitalisations, primary health care consultations and episodes not leading to medical care in children under five years old. Rotavirus vaccination is expected to cost the Ministry of Health $220,000 in 2012, rising to $830,000 in 2016 following termination of GAVI co-financing, then declining to $260,000 in 2025 due to vaccine price maturity. It may reduce health care costs by $34,000 in the first year, rising to $180,000 by 2019. By 2025, vaccination may be close to cost saving to the Ministry of Health if the vaccine purchase price declines as expected. Once coverage has reached high levels, vaccination may prevent 25,000 cases, 3000 primary care consultations, 1000 hospitalisations and 8 deaths per birth cohort vaccinated. The cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) saved is estimated to be about $650 from the perspective of the Ministry of Health, $850 including costs accrued to both the Ministry and to GAVI, $820 from a societal perspective excluding indirect costs and $44 from a societal perspective including indirect costs. Since the gross domestic product per capita of Armenia in 2008 was $3800, rotavirus vaccination is likely to be regarded as "very cost-effective" from a WHO standpoint. Vaccination may still be "very cost-effective" if less favourable assumptions are used regarding vaccine price and disease incidence, as long as DALYs are not age-weighted.

  3. Cost-effectiveness as a price control.

    PubMed

    Jena, Anupam B; Philipson, Tomas

    2007-01-01

    After a technology is developed, cost-effectiveness analysis can offer an economically sound approach to adoption decisions. Little attention has been paid, however, to the incentives these criteria induce for getting technologies to market in the first place. We argue that technology adoption procedures more fully take into account the key trade-off inherent in research and development: the decreased welfare of current patients as a result of higher prices versus the increased welfare of future patients as a result of the incentives for innovation that such prices provide. Empirical evidence from a case study of HIV/AIDS provides an illustration of our conclusions.

  4. The cost-effectiveness of health communication programs: what do we know?

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Paul; Wheeler, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    While a considerable body of evidence has emerged supporting the effectiveness of communication programs in augmenting health, only a very small subset of studies has examined also whether these programs are cost-effective, that is, whether they achieve greater health gains for available financial resources than alternative interventions. In this article, we examine the available literature on the cost-effectiveness of health behavior change communication programs, focusing on communication interventions involving mass media, and, to a lesser extent, community mobilization and interpersonal communication or counseling. Our objective is to identify the state of past and current research efforts of the cost-effectiveness of behavior change communication programs. This review makes three principal conclusions. First, the analysis of the cost-effectiveness of health communication programs commonly has not been performed. Second, the studies reviewed here have utilized a considerable diversity of methods and have reflected varying levels of quality and adherence to standard cost-effectiveness methodologies. This leads to problems of transparency, comparability, and generalizability. Third, while the available studies generally are indicative of the cost-effectiveness of communication interventions relative to alternatives, the evidence base clearly needs to be expanded by additional rigorous cost-effectiveness analyses.

  5. Strengthening Cost-Effectiveness Analysis for Public Health Policy.

    PubMed

    Russell, Louise B; Sinha, Anushua

    2016-05-01

    Although the U.S. spends more on medical care than any country in the world, Americans live shorter lives than the citizens of other high-income countries. Many important opportunities to improve this record lie outside the health sector and involve improving the conditions in which Americans live and work: safe design and maintenance of roads, bridges, train tracks, and airports; control of environmental pollutants; occupational safety; healthy buildings; a safe and healthy food supply; safe manufacture of consumer products; a healthy social environment; and others. Faced with the overwhelming array of possibilities, U.S. decision makers need help identifying those that can contribute the most to health. Cost-effectiveness analysis is designed to serve that purpose, but has mainly been used to assess interventions within the health sector. This paper briefly reviews the objective of cost-effectiveness analysis and its methodologic evolution and discusses the issues that arise when it is used to evaluate interventions that fall outside the health sector under three headings: structuring the analysis, quantifying/measuring benefits and costs, and valuing benefits and costs.

  6. Cost effective data acquisition for small developments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    A cost effective method for obtaining reservoir fata to define the depletion mechanism in the small Odin gas field is described. The addition of a simple work program to the drilling plan for the first development well provided basic reservoir and aquifer data, and the well completion scheme provided for continuing reservoir surveillance. Cost effective methods for reservoir data acquisition are particularly relevant for marginal developments. This discussion should be of interest for operators of gas fields where the depletion mechanism is not defined, and where early acquisition of additional data can provide an indication of the mechanism. A brief development history of Odin field illustrates the need for good reservoir data. Initially there was some uncertainty surrounding the amount of bottom water influx into the Odin gas sand and the resulting reservoir depletion mechanism. Conclusions about the expected type of reservoir depletion mechanism were drawn from data including conventional cores analysis, measured pressure gradients, fluid saturation logs, and production well tests. Production history is shown which confirms the conclusions made from the initial data acquisition.

  7. Deregulation and Nuclear Training: Cost Effective Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Richard P. Coe; Patricia A. Lake

    2000-11-12

    Training is crucial to the success of any organization. It is also expensive, with some estimates exceeding $50 billion annually spent on training by U.S. corporations. Nuclear training, like that of many other highly technical organizations, is both crucial and costly. It is unlikely that the amount of training can be significantly reduced. If anything, current trends indicate that training needs will probably increase as the industry and workforce ages and changes. With the advent of energy deregulation in the United States, greater pressures will surface to make the costs of energy more cost-competitive. This in turn will drive businesses to more closely examine existing costs and find ways to do things in a more cost-effective way. The commercial nuclear industry will be no exception, and nuclear training will be equally affected. It is time for nuclear training and indeed the entire nuclear industry to begin using more aggressive techniques to reduce costs. This includes the need for nuclear training to find alternatives to traditional methods for the delivery of cost-effective high-quality training that meets regulatory requirements and produces well-qualified personnel capable of working in an efficient and safe manner. Computer-based and/or Web-based training are leading emerging technologies.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of febuxostat in chronic gout.

    PubMed

    Beard, Stephen M; von Scheele, Birgitta G; Nuki, George; Pearson, Isobel V

    2014-06-01

    Our objective was to evaluate data on the cost-effectiveness of febuxostat compared with standard clinical practice with allopurinol in patients with gout that was presented to the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) in 2010. A Markov health-state model estimated the direct health-related costs and clinical benefits expressed as quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Adults with chronic gout and established hyperuricaemia received treatment sequences of daily doses of allopurinol 300 mg alone or allopurinol 300 mg followed by febuxostat 80 mg/120 mg. The proportion of patients achieving the target serum uric acid (sUA) level of less than 6 mg/dl (0.36 mmol/l) was linked to the utility per sUA level to generate an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Second-line therapy with febuxostat 80 mg/120 mg versus with allopurinol alone resulted in an ICER of £3,578 per QALY over a 5-year time horizon. Additional univariate analyses showed that ICER values were robust and ranged from £2,550 to £7,165 per QALY when different parameters (e.g., low- and high-dose allopurinol titrations and variations in treatment-induced flare rates) were varied. Febuxostat reduces sUA below the European League Against Rheumatism target of 0.36 mmol/l (6 mg/dl) in significantly more patients with gout than allopurinol in its most frequently prescribed dose of 300 mg per day. The SMC accepted febuxostat as cost-effective as a suitable second-line option for urate-lowering therapy for the treatment of patients with chronic hyperuricaemia in conditions where urate deposition has already occurred (including a history or presence of tophus and/or gouty arthritis) when treatment with allopurinol was inadequate, not tolerated, or contraindicated.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator in anemia

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Background Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are the mainstay of anemia therapy. Continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) is a highly effective, long-acting ESA developed for once-monthly dosing. A multitude of clinical studies has evaluated the safety and efficiency of this treatment option for patients with renal anemia. In times of permanent financial pressure on health care systems, the cost-effectiveness of CERA should be of particular importance for payers and clinicians. Objective To critically analyze, from the nephrologists’ point of view, the published literature focusing on the cost-effectiveness of CERA for anemia treatment. Methods The detailed literature search covered electronic databases including MEDLINE, PubMed, and Embase, as well as international conference abstract databases. Results Peer-reviewed literature analyzing the definite cost-effectiveness of CERA is scarce, and most of the available data originate from conference abstracts. Identified data are restricted to the treatment of anemia due to chronic kidney disease. Although the majority of studies suggest a considerable cost advantage for CERA, the published literature cannot easily be compared. While time and motion studies clearly indicate that a switch to CERA could minimize health care staff time in dialysis units, the results of studies comparing direct costs are more ambivalent, potentially reflecting the differences between health care systems and variability between centers. Conclusion Analyzed data are predominantly insufficient; they miss clear evidence and have to thus be interpreted with great caution. In this day and age of financial restraints, results from well-designed, head-to-head studies with clearly defined endpoints have to prove whether CERA therapy can achieve cost savings without compromising anemia management. PMID:25050070

  10. Cost-Effective Fuel Treatment Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitler, J.; Thompson, M.; Vaillant, N.

    2014-12-01

    The cost of fighting large wildland fires in the western United States has grown dramatically over the past decade. This trend will likely continue with growth of the WUI into fire prone ecosystems, dangerous fuel conditions from decades of fire suppression, and a potentially increasing effect from prolonged drought and climate change. Fuel treatments are often considered the primary pre-fire mechanism to reduce the exposure of values at risk to wildland fire, and a growing suite of fire models and tools are employed to prioritize where treatments could mitigate wildland fire damages. Assessments using the likelihood and consequence of fire are critical because funds are insufficient to reduce risk on all lands needing treatment, therefore prioritization is required to maximize the effectiveness of fuel treatment budgets. Cost-effectiveness, doing the most good per dollar, would seem to be an important fuel treatment metric, yet studies or plans that prioritize fuel treatments using costs or cost-effectiveness measures are absent from the literature. Therefore, to explore the effect of using costs in fuel treatment planning we test four prioritization algorithms designed to reduce risk in a case study examining fuel treatments on the Sisters Ranger District of central Oregon. For benefits we model sediment retention and standing biomass, and measure the effectiveness of each algorithm by comparing the differences among treatment and no treat alternative scenarios. Our objective is to maximize the averted loss of net benefits subject to a representative fuel treatment budget. We model costs across the study landscape using the My Fuel Treatment Planner software, tree list data, local mill prices, and GIS-measured site characteristics. We use fire simulations to generate burn probabilities, and estimate fire intensity as conditional flame length at each pixel. Two prioritization algorithms target treatments based on cost-effectiveness and show improvements over those

  11. Addressing medical coding and billing part II: a strategy for achieving compliance. A risk management approach for reducing coding and billing errors.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Diane L.; Norman, Helen; Burroughs, Valentine J.

    2002-01-01

    Medical practice today, more than ever before, places greater demands on physicians to see more patients, provide more complex medical services and adhere to stricter regulatory rules, leaving little time for coding and billing. Yet, the need to adequately document medical records, appropriately apply billing codes and accurately charge insurers for medical services is essential to the medical practice's financial condition. Many physicians rely on office staff and billing companies to process their medical bills without ever reviewing the bills before they are submitted for payment. Some physicians may not be receiving the payment they deserve when they do not sufficiently oversee the medical practice's coding and billing patterns. This article emphasizes the importance of monitoring and auditing medical record documentation and coding application as a strategy for achieving compliance and reducing billing errors. When medical bills are submitted with missing and incorrect information, they may result in unpaid claims and loss of revenue to physicians. Addressing Medical Audits, Part I--A Strategy for Achieving Compliance--CMS, JCAHO, NCQA, published January 2002 in the Journal of the National Medical Association, stressed the importance of preparing the medical practice for audits. The article highlighted steps the medical practice can take to prepare for audits and presented examples of guidelines used by regulatory agencies to conduct both medical and financial audits. The Medicare Integrity Program was cited as an example of guidelines used by regulators to identify coding errors during an audit and deny payment to providers when improper billing occurs. For each denied claim, payments owed to the medical practice are are also denied. Health care is, no doubt, a costly endeavor for health care providers, consumers and insurers. The potential risk to physicians for improper billing may include loss of revenue, fraud investigations, financial sanction

  12. Chemical heat pump cost effectiveness evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Standley, W. R.

    1982-02-01

    The cost-effectiveness and energy-effectiveness of existing chemical heat pump (CHP) concepts is compared with a baseline of conventional energy technologies and a group of near-term emerging energy technologies with which CHPs are expected to compete. The analysis is structured to evaluate these systems functioning as the primary space conditioning unit of both a 'standard' single-family detached home and a 'representative' commercial building. Each HVAC system and application is analyzed in each of two locations in the United States, the southwest (Albuquerque, NM) and the northeast (Boston, MA). In addition, the CHPs are evaluated in a 'representative' industrial waste heat upgrading application, and compared to potentially-competitive technologies for industrial 'heat pumping'.

  13. 23 CFR 635.205 - Finding of cost effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finding of cost effectiveness. 635.205 Section 635.205... CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE Force Account Construction § 635.205 Finding of cost effectiveness. (a) It may be found cost effective for a State transportation department or county to undertake a federally...

  14. 10 CFR 455.63 - Cost-effectiveness testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cost-effectiveness testing. 455.63 Section 455.63 Energy..., Hospitals, Units of Local Government, and Public Care Institutions § 455.63 Cost-effectiveness testing. (a... paragraph (a) of this section, if the State plan requires the cost effectiveness of an energy...

  15. Compare the educational achievement of medical students with different circadian rhythms in difficult courses of basic sciences

    PubMed Central

    Liaghatdar, Mohammad Javad; Ashoorion, Vahid; Avizhgan, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Advantageous times for different people are different to some extent, considering the effective physiological changes during the circadian rhythm, in terms of the peak time of physiological activities. The goal of this study is to compare the educational achievement of students, with different morning–evening habits, in completing difficult and easy courses. Materials and Methods: This research is a retrospective descriptive–analytical study, which has been conducted on students of the fifth semester of General Medicine in the Faculty of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. The morning–evening habits of the students were determined by the Horne-Strauss 19-item questionnaire. The students were asked to determine the courses that were ’difficult’ and ’easy,’ using a researcher-made questionnaire. The students’ scores in the considered courses during the five semesters were obtained from the Education Department of the Faculty and analyzed using the descriptive t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the multivariate regression test in the SPSS software. Results: Sixty-three students (67% girls and 33% boys) participated in this study, of whom 11, 60, and 29% were morning, morning–evening, and evening students, respectively. The mean scores of the difficult courses in all five semesters were reduced in the evening pattern compared to the morning and morning–evening patterns. Reduction of the mean score in the difficult courses, in the evening group, compared with the morning–evening and morning groups was observed in all five semesters among girls, but in three semesters among boys. Conclusion: This study showed that evening students experienced academic failure in difficult courses, which required a more cognitive performance. It is recommended that difficult specialized courses be presented at hours when all student groups have a better cognitive performance PMID:27110555

  16. The cost-effectiveness of psychotherapy for the major psychiatric diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Susan G

    2014-09-01

    Psychotherapy is an effective and often highly cost-effective medical intervention for many serious psychiatric conditions. Psychotherapy can also lead to savings in other medical and societal costs. It is at times the firstline and most important treatment and at other times augments the efficacy of psychotropic medication. Many patients are in need of more prolonged and intensive psychotherapy, including those with personality disorders and those with chronic complex psychiatric conditions often with severe anxiety and depression. Many patients with serious and complex psychiatric illness have experienced severe early life trauma in an atmosphere in which family members or caretakers themselves have serious psychiatric disorders. Children and adolescents with learning disabilities and those with severe psychiatric disorders can also require more than brief treatment. Other diagnostic groups for whom psychotherapy is effective and cost-effective include patients with schizophrenia, anxiety disorders (including posttraumatic stress disorder), depression, and substance abuse. In addition, psychotherapy for the medically ill with concomitant psychiatric illness often lowers medical costs, improves recovery from medical illness, and at times even prolongs life compared to similar patients not given psychotherapy. While "cost-effective" treatments can yield savings in healthcare costs, disability claims, and other societal costs, "cost-effective" by no means translates to "cheap" but instead describes treatments that are clinically effective and provided at a cost that is considered reasonable given the benefit they provide, even if the treatments increase direct expenses. In the current insurance climate in which Mental Health Parity is the law, insurers nonetheless often use their own non-research and non-clinically based medical necessity guidelines to subvert it and limit access to appropriate psychotherapeutic treatments. Many patients, especially those who need

  17. Antenatal Syphilis Screening Using Point-of-Care Testing in Sub-Saharan African Countries: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuznik, Andreas; Lamorde, Mohammed; Nyabigambo, Agnes; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2013-01-01

    avert up to 2.6 million DALYs at an estimated annual direct medical cost of US$20.8 million. Conclusions Use of ICS tests for antenatal syphilis screening is highly cost-effective in SSA. Substantial reduction in DALYs can be achieved at a relatively modest budget impact. In SSA, antenatal programs should expand access to syphilis screening using the ICS test. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:24223524

  18. Cost-effective lightweight mirrors for aerospace and defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodard, Kenneth S.; Comstock, Lovell E.; Wamboldt, Leonard; Roy, Brian P.

    2015-05-01

    The demand for high performance, lightweight mirrors was historically driven by aerospace and defense (A&D) but now we are also seeing similar requirements for commercial applications. These applications range from aerospace-like platforms such as small unmanned aircraft for agricultural, mineral and pollutant aerial mapping to an eye tracking gimbaled mirror for optometry offices. While aerospace and defense businesses can often justify the high cost of exotic, low density materials, commercial products rarely can. Also, to obtain high performance with low overall optical system weight, aspheric surfaces are often prescribed. This may drive the manufacturing process to diamond machining thus requiring the reflective side of the mirror to be a diamond machinable material. This paper summarizes the diamond machined finishing and coating of some high performance, lightweight designs using non-exotic substrates to achieve cost effective mirrors. The results indicate that these processes can meet typical aerospace and defense requirements but may also be competitive in some commercial applications.

  19. Manage leak detection and repair programs cost-effectively

    SciTech Connect

    Stobbe, A.W. )

    1995-01-01

    Because of recently imposed lower fugitive-release limits for pumps and valves, refiners must use innovative, cost-effective ways to find, repair, monitoring, record and report process emissions. New regulations such as SOCMI HON (Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing industry Hazardous Organic NESHAP) and Refinery MACT (Maximum Achievable Control Technology) set performance goals for hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) facilities. To meet these performance standards, HPI facilities must set up stringent LDAR (Leak Detection and Repair) programs. Preparation methods define how to set up a database-management system to monitor/reduce fugitive emissions. The paper describes the database-management system, then discusses the determination of goals, collecting data, analyzing data, and management solutions to minimize costs.

  20. Stimulating cost effective behavior in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Neuhauser, D

    1987-04-01

    Types of influence on the delivery of medical care are divided into monetary and other. These incentives effect care at the system, hospital, care team, physician and patient levels. Selected examples, primarily from the USA, are discussed. PMID:10312075

  1. Using Cost-Effectiveness Tests to Design CHP Incentive Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Tidball, Rick

    2014-11-01

    This paper examines the structure of cost-effectiveness tests to illustrate how they can accurately reflect the costs and benefits of CHP systems. This paper begins with a general background discussion on cost-effectiveness analysis of DER and then describes how cost-effectiveness tests can be applied to CHP. Cost-effectiveness results are then calculated and analyzed for CHP projects in five states: Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Maryland, and North Carolina. Based on the results obtained for these five states, this paper offers four considerations to inform regulators in the application of cost-effectiveness tests in developing CHP programs.

  2. Integrated cost-effectiveness analysis of agri-environmental measures for water quality.

    PubMed

    Balana, Bedru B; Jackson-Blake, Leah; Martin-Ortega, Julia; Dunn, Sarah

    2015-09-15

    This paper presents an application of integrated methodological approach for identifying cost-effective combinations of agri-environmental measures to achieve water quality targets. The methodological approach involves linking hydro-chemical modelling with economic costs of mitigation measures. The utility of the approach was explored for the River Dee catchment in North East Scotland, examining the cost-effectiveness of mitigation measures for nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) pollutants. In-stream nitrate concentration was modelled using the STREAM-N and phosphorus using INCA-P model. Both models were first run for baseline conditions and then their effectiveness for changes in land management was simulated. Costs were based on farm income foregone, capital and operational expenditures. The costs and effects data were integrated using 'Risk Solver Platform' optimization in excel to produce the most cost-effective combination of measures by which target nutrient reductions could be attained at a minimum economic cost. The analysis identified different combination of measures as most cost-effective for the two pollutants. An important aspect of this paper is integration of model-based effectiveness estimates with economic cost of measures for cost-effectiveness analysis of land and water management options. The methodological approach developed is not limited to the two pollutants and the selected agri-environmental measures considered in the paper; the approach can be adapted to the cost-effectiveness analysis of any catchment-scale environmental management options. PMID:26172106

  3. Integrated cost-effectiveness analysis of agri-environmental measures for water quality.

    PubMed

    Balana, Bedru B; Jackson-Blake, Leah; Martin-Ortega, Julia; Dunn, Sarah

    2015-09-15

    This paper presents an application of integrated methodological approach for identifying cost-effective combinations of agri-environmental measures to achieve water quality targets. The methodological approach involves linking hydro-chemical modelling with economic costs of mitigation measures. The utility of the approach was explored for the River Dee catchment in North East Scotland, examining the cost-effectiveness of mitigation measures for nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) pollutants. In-stream nitrate concentration was modelled using the STREAM-N and phosphorus using INCA-P model. Both models were first run for baseline conditions and then their effectiveness for changes in land management was simulated. Costs were based on farm income foregone, capital and operational expenditures. The costs and effects data were integrated using 'Risk Solver Platform' optimization in excel to produce the most cost-effective combination of measures by which target nutrient reductions could be attained at a minimum economic cost. The analysis identified different combination of measures as most cost-effective for the two pollutants. An important aspect of this paper is integration of model-based effectiveness estimates with economic cost of measures for cost-effectiveness analysis of land and water management options. The methodological approach developed is not limited to the two pollutants and the selected agri-environmental measures considered in the paper; the approach can be adapted to the cost-effectiveness analysis of any catchment-scale environmental management options.

  4. Design considerations and implementation of a cost-effective, portable remote monitoring unit using 3G wireless data networks.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shashank; Ganz, Aura

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a light-weight, autonomous, patient-centric, portable medical unit that allows for anytime/anywhere monitoring and can find use in many monitoring scenarios like home-care, hospital wards, emergency help and disaster relief. The proposed unit called "TelePatient" achieves portability by exploiting a PDA and allows mobility through the use of cellular technology, enabling complete ubiquity. The design is based on open standards and is cost-effective. We incorporate transcoding software to fit data to limited bandwidth, as well as conserve energy on the power constrained PDA. We validate our design over real network 3G CDMA conditions and also test its use over WLAN802.11b, which can together cover a number of Telemedicine scenarios. PMID:17270983

  5. Improvement in cost-effectiveness and customer satisfaction by a quality management system according to EN ISO 9001:2000.

    PubMed

    Beholz, Sven; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2005-12-01

    The implementation of a quality management system (QMS) according to EN ISO 9001:2000 has proven to be possible for cardiac surgery departments. However, it remains unclear if a QMS can help to improve quality as indicated by cost-effectiveness and customer satisfaction. To control costs for medical goods and laboratory investigations an internal control system for the allocation of resources was implemented. Laboratory costs and medical goods per open heart procedure were investigated in the years 2000 to 2003. In terms of customer satisfaction, repeated questionnaire-based evaluation of referring physicians was obtained from 2001 to 2003 and the influence of repeated interventions on various aspects of communications was investigated. Costs of medical goods could be reduced by 6.1%, and for laboratory investigations by 35% per operation. Additionally, customer satisfaction could be increased efficiently with respect to accessibility and postoperative communication. By the introduction of a process based QMS, efficient control of the costs of medical goods and laboratory investigations could be achieved. Once a year repeat evaluation of satisfaction of advising physicians has proven to be a valuable tool in the process of continuous improvement.

  6. Spatial Targeting of Agri-Environmental Measures: Cost-Effectiveness and Distributional Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uthes, Sandra; Matzdorf, Bettina; Müller, Klaus; Kaechele, Harald

    2010-09-01

    Agri-environmental measures are payments to farmers to reduce environmental risks or to preserve cultivated landscapes. These measures are codified in European Union regulations. Poor spatial targeting is one of the major causes of low cost-effectiveness in agri-environmental measures. Existing studies on spatial targeting focus primarily on selected individual measures; hence, they do not allow for conclusions at the program level, where the planning and implementing of decisions on a number of different measures has to be made. In this study, we analyzed the impacts of two spatial targeting options (targeting of erosion-reducing measures on erosion vulnerable areas; targeting of grassland extensification on N-pollution vulnerable areas) on the cost-effectiveness of the single measures and the entire agri-environmental program of the federal state of Brandenburg in Germany. The methodological steps included an analysis of empirical data on land use and program participation, an expert-based environmental impact assessment and a spatial allocation procedure based on linear programming. The environmental impact assessment delivered goal-specific index values for each measures-land parcel combination expressing the suitability of the measures for contributing to four regionally relevant program objectives. The cost-effectiveness of the measures and the program were calculated by putting budgetary costs in relation to the achieved environmental index sum. The calculated cost-effectiveness of the program in 2006 was 89.6% of the simulated optimal cost-effectiveness. The spatial targeting of erosion-reducing measures on erosion vulnerable areas caused an increase in the cost-effectiveness at the measures level and almost no changes at the program level. The spatial targeting of grassland extensification on N-pollution vulnerable areas, despite also improving the cost-effectiveness of this measure, had negative effects on the cost-effectiveness of the program.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of percutaneous vertebroplasty in osteoporotic vertebral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Masala, Salvatore; Ciarrapico, Anna Micaela; Vinicola, Vincenzo; Mammucari, Matteo; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted in 179 consecutive patients (48 males, 131 females; mean age: 72.0 ± 8.59 years; range: 51–93) with single symptomatic acute amyelic osteoporotic vertebral fracture presenting between September 2004 and September 2005 to the Santa Lucia Foundation in Rome, Italy. Vertebral fractures usually become manifest due to pain which can be debilitating. Treatment depends on the presence or absence of spinal cord involvement. In the first case, surgical stabilization is mandatory. In the second case, treatment may be performed either by conservative medical therapy (CMT) or percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness, costs and cost-effectiveness of percutaneous vertebroplasty. After 2 weeks of analgesic therapy, 153 patients presented refractory pain and were offered treatment by PVT. A total of 58 patients accepted and underwent PVT (PVT group), while 95 refused and underwent conservative medical therapy (CMT group). Follow-up was performed by specialist consults, spine radiography and MRI and a self-assessment questionnaire evaluating pain using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and function using an ambulation and an Activities of Daily Living (ADL) scale. A 12-month follow-up was obtained in 86 of 95 (90.5%) CMT group patients and 54 of 58 (93.1%) PVT group patients. Significant reduction of VAS and improvement of ambulation and ADL was observed in both groups at 1 week and 3 and 12 months (P < 0.05; Wilcoxon signed rank test), however, these results were significantly superior in the PVT group at 1 week and 3 months (P < 0.05; Mann–Whitney U test). Average cost per patient at 1 week and 3 and 12 months were respectively 755.49 ± 661.96, 3791.95 ± 3341.97 and 4299.55 ± 3211.53 € (CMT group) and 3311.35 ± 0.32, 3745.30 ± 3.59 and 4101.05 ± 755.41 € (PVT group). PVT resulted significantly more cost-effective than CMT with regards to the three scales at

  8. ROV's: The key is cost effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, E.

    1986-10-01

    Although diver-support activities will continue to be required in terms of monitoring and assistance, low-cost, remotely operated vehicles (ROV's) will have an increasing presence in the oil industry and other fields provided there is ongoing improvement in management, preparation, and execution of work. Beyond the safety aspect, the key is cost effectiveness. It is the company's intention wherever possible, and within realistic constraints, to take the man out of the water either by direct ROV replacement of the diver or by assisting him. Shell's exploration and production operations are based in three main areas: the southern, central, and northern North Sea. These developed fields, which consist of 26 various structures (interconnected), are connected to the mainland by over 1,100 km of submarine pipeline. Maintenance and underwater engineering costs in northern operations alone exceed pounds40 million/year (about $60 million/year) where typical support is an estimated 700 ROV days/year. The utilization analysis indicates a major use in ''eyeball'' vehicles for diver monitoring, and a large percentage for pipeline survey with only a limited amount on structural work and other special applications. The ''Bondi initiative'' in the late 1970s was intended to remove the diver from the water by ROV replacement, but due to lack of development, the capability in many areas has not evolved.

  9. Cost effectiveness of recycling: A systems model

    SciTech Connect

    Tonjes, David J.; Mallikarjun, Sreekanth

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Curbside collection of recyclables reduces overall system costs over a range of conditions. • When avoided costs for recyclables are large, even high collection costs are supported. • When avoided costs for recyclables are not great, there are reduced opportunities for savings. • For common waste compositions, maximizing curbside recyclables collection always saves money. - Abstract: Financial analytical models of waste management systems have often found that recycling costs exceed direct benefits, and in order to economically justify recycling activities, externalities such as household expenses or environmental impacts must be invoked. Certain more empirically based studies have also found that recycling is more expensive than disposal. Other work, both through models and surveys, have found differently. Here we present an empirical systems model, largely drawn from a suburban Long Island municipality. The model accounts for changes in distribution of effort as recycling tonnages displace disposal tonnages, and the seven different cases examined all show that curbside collection programs that manage up to between 31% and 37% of the waste stream should result in overall system savings. These savings accrue partially because of assumed cost differences in tip fees for recyclables and disposed wastes, and also because recycling can result in a more efficient, cost-effective collection program. These results imply that increases in recycling are justifiable due to cost-savings alone, not on more difficult to measure factors that may not impact program budgets.

  10. Cost effectiveness of recycling: a systems model.

    PubMed

    Tonjes, David J; Mallikarjun, Sreekanth

    2013-11-01

    Financial analytical models of waste management systems have often found that recycling costs exceed direct benefits, and in order to economically justify recycling activities, externalities such as household expenses or environmental impacts must be invoked. Certain more empirically based studies have also found that recycling is more expensive than disposal. Other work, both through models and surveys, have found differently. Here we present an empirical systems model, largely drawn from a suburban Long Island municipality. The model accounts for changes in distribution of effort as recycling tonnages displace disposal tonnages, and the seven different cases examined all show that curbside collection programs that manage up to between 31% and 37% of the waste stream should result in overall system savings. These savings accrue partially because of assumed cost differences in tip fees for recyclables and disposed wastes, and also because recycling can result in a more efficient, cost-effective collection program. These results imply that increases in recycling are justifiable due to cost-savings alone, not on more difficult to measure factors that may not impact program budgets.

  11. Control-value theory: using achievement emotions to improve understanding of motivation, learning, and performance in medical education: AMEE Guide No. 64.

    PubMed

    Artino, Anthony R; Holmboe, Eric S; Durning, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    In this AMEE Guide, we consider the emergent theoretical and empirical work on human emotion and how this work can inform the theory, research, and practice of medical education. In the Guide, we define emotion, in general, and achievement emotions, more specifically. We describe one of the leading contemporary theories of achievement emotions, control-value theory (Pekrun 2006), and we distinguish between different types of achievement emotions, their proximal antecedents, and their consequences for motivation, learning, and performance. Next, we review the empirical support for control-value theory from non-medical fields and suggest several important implications for educational practice. In this section, we highlight the importance of designing learning environments that foster a high degree of control and value for students. Finally, we end with a discussion of the need for more research on achievement emotions in medical education, and we propose several key research questions we believe will facilitate our understanding of achievement emotions and their impact on important educational outcomes.

  12. Reach and Cost-Effectiveness of the PrePex Device for Safe Male Circumcision in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Kevin; Galukande, Moses; Wooding, Nick; Dea, Monica; Coutinho, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Modelling, supported by the USAID Health Policy Initiative and UNAIDS, performed in 2011, indicated that Uganda would need to perform 4.2 million medical male circumcisions (MMCs) to reach 80% prevalence. Since 2010 Uganda has completed 380,000 circumcisions, and has set a national target of 1 million for 2013. Objective To evaluate the relative reach and cost-effectiveness of PrePex compared to the current surgical SMC method and to determine the effect that this might have in helping to achieve the Uganda national SMC targets. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive cost-analysis study conducted at International Hospital Kampala over ten weeks from August to October 2012. Data collected during the performance of 625 circumcisions using PrePex was compared to data previously collected from 10,000 circumcisions using a surgical circumcision method at the same site. Ethical approval was obtained. Results The moderate adverse events (AE) ratio when using the PrePex device was 2% and no severe adverse events were encountered, which is comparable to the surgical method, thus the AE rate has no effect on the reach or cost-effectiveness of PrePex. The unit cost to perform one circumcision using PrePex is $30.55, 35% ($7.90) higher than the current surgical method, but the PrePex method improves operator efficiency by 60%, meaning that a team can perform 24 completed circumcisions compared to 15 by the surgical method. The cost-effectiveness of PrePex, comparing the cost of performing circumcisions to the future cost savings of potentially averted HIV infections, is just 2% less than the current surgical method, at a device cost price of $20. Conclusion PrePex is a viable SMC tool for scale-up with unrivalled potential for superior reach, however national targets can only be met with effective demand creation and availability of trained human resource. PMID:23717402

  13. Cost effectiveness of cardiovascular disease prevention strategies: a perspective on EU food based dietary guidelines.

    PubMed

    Brunner, E; Cohen, D; Toon, L

    2001-04-01

    For policymakers considering strategy options for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) the distinction between effectiveness and cost effectiveness is critical. When cost limitations apply, an evaluation of cost effectiveness is essential if a rational decision is to be made. Policy changes and resource reallocation have opportunity costs, and therefore it is necessary to compare the cost of health gains achievable by means of different policies. Here the broad question is: How cost effective are diet change strategies compared to other measures aimed at reducing cardiovascular disease in EU member states? An overview of published studies of cost-effectiveness in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease was conducted. Few comprehensive studies were available. Estimated costs per life year gained were as follows: population-based healthy eating Pound Sterling 14-560; smoking cessation Pound Sterling 300-790; nurse screening and life style advice Pound Sterling 900 (minimum); simvastatin (HMGCoA reductase inhibitor) Pound Sterling 6200-11,300. Cost effectiveness is dependent on the underlying level of CVD risk in the target population, and the duration of the achieved alterations in behaviours and risk factors. The limited evidence from these studies tends to support the view that health protection strategies which promote healthy eating are likely to be more cost-effective than strategies involving modern cholesterol-lowering drugs, screening and advice in primary care, and are comparable to or less expensive per year of life saved than anti-smoking strategies. Given the considerable diversity in food habits, health care and public health systems among current and prospective EU member states, careful appraisal of the policy options within each member state is desirable to ensure that health gain is maximised. EU wide food based dietary guidelines are potentially the basis of large health gains in Europe, and cost-effectiveness

  14. A Systematic Review of the Cost-Effectiveness of Biologics for the Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Huoponen, Saara; Blom, Marja

    2015-01-01

    Background Biologics are used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn´s disease and ulcerative colitis refractory to conventional treatment. In order to allocate healthcare spending efficiently, costly biologics for inflammatory bowel diseases are an important target for cost-effectiveness analyses. The aim of this study was to systemically review all published literature on the cost-effectiveness of biologics for inflammatory bowel diseases and to evaluate the methodological quality of cost-effectiveness analyses. Methods A literature search was performed using Medline (Ovid), Cochrane Library, and SCOPUS. All cost-utility analyses comparing biologics with conventional medical treatment, another biologic treatment, placebo, or surgery for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases in adults were included in this review. All costs were converted to the 2014 euro. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed by Drummond’s, Philips’, and the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards checklist. Results Altogether, 25 studies were included in the review. Among the patients refractory to conventional medical treatment, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio ranged from dominance to 549,335 €/Quality-Adjusted Life Year compared to the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio associated with conventional medical treatment. When comparing biologics with another biologic treatment, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio ranged from dominance to 24,012,483 €/Quality-Adjusted Life Year. A study including both direct and indirect costs produced more favorable incremental cost-effectiveness ratios than those produced by studies including only direct costs. Conclusions With a threshold of 35,000 €/Quality-Adjusted Life Year, biologics seem to be cost-effective for the induction treatment of active and severe inflammatory bowel disease. Between biologics, the cost-effectiveness remains unclear. PMID:26675292

  15. Preventing unintended pregnancy: the cost-effectiveness of three methods of emergency contraception.

    PubMed Central

    Trussell, J; Koenig, J; Ellertson, C; Stewart, F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the cost-effectiveness of emergency contraceptive pills, minipills, and the copper-T intrauterine device (IUD) as emergency contraception. METHODS: Cost savings were modeled for both (1) a single contraceptive treatment following unprotected intercourse and (2) emergency contraceptive pills provided in advance. RESULTS: In a managed care (public payer) setting, a single treatment of emergency contraception after unprotected intercourse saves $142 ($54) with emergency contraceptive pills and $119 ($29) with minipills. The copper-T IUD is not cost-effective as an emergency contraceptive alone, but savings quickly accrue as use continues. Advance provision of emergency contraceptive pills to women using barrier contraceptives, spermicides, withdrawal, or periodic abstinence saves from $263 to $498 ($99 to $205) annually. CONCLUSIONS: Emergency contraception is cost-effective whether provided when the emergency arises or in advance to be used as needed. Greater use of emergency contraception could reduce the considerable medical and social costs of unintended pregnancies. PMID:9224172

  16. Accounting for the drug life cycle and future drug prices in cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Zealand are predicted to be more cost effective. It is suggested that the willingness-to-pay threshold should be reduced in the UK and New Zealand. The ranking of cost effectiveness will change with drugs assessed as relatively more cost effective and medical devices and surgical procedures relatively less cost effective than previously thought. The methodology is very simple to implement. It is suggested that the model should be parameterized for other countries.

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of Cetuximab for Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Marco J.; Polinder, Suzanne; Lorenzen, Sylvie; Lordick, Florian; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spaander, Manon C. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Costly biologicals in palliative oncology are emerging at a rapid pace. For example, in patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma addition of cetuximab to a palliative chemotherapy regimen appears to improve survival. However, it simultaneously results in higher costs. We aimed to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of adding cetuximab to first-line chemotherapeutic treatment of patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, based on data from a randomized controlled phase II trial. Methods A cost effectiveness analysis model was applied based on individual patient data. It included only direct medical costs from the health-care perspective. Quality-adjusted life-years and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated. Sensitivity analysis was performed by a Monte Carlo analysis. Results Adding cetuximab to a cisplatin-5-fluorouracil first-line regimen for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma resulted in an the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €252,203 per quality-adjusted life-year. Sensitivity analysis shows that there is a chance of less than 0.001 that the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio will be less than a maximum willingness to pay threshold of €40,000 per quality-adjusted life-year, which is representative for the threshold used in The Netherlands and other developed countries. Conclusions Addition of cetuximab to a cisplatin-5-fluorouracil first-line regimen for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is not cost-effective when appraised according to currently accepted criteria. Cost-effectiveness analyses using outcome data from early clinical trials (i.c. a phase II trial) enable pharmaceutical companies and policy makers to gain early insight into whether a new drug meets the current eligibility standards for reimbursement and thereby potential admittance for use in regular clinical practice. PMID:27100871

  18. The Need for Cost-Effective Neurosurgical Innovation--A Global Surgery Initiative.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Kraus, Kristin L; Riva-Cambrin, Jay K; Kestle, John R

    2015-11-01

    The authors discuss the unmet needs for neurosurgical care around the world and some of the innovative work being done to address this need. The growing demonstration of surgical innovation and cost-effective technology represents an opportunity within neurosurgery to achieve the goal of making surgical care more accessible to the global population.

  19. Cost effectiveness of therapies for atrial fibrillation. A review.

    PubMed

    Teng, M P; Catherwood, L E; Melby, D P

    2000-10-01

    atrial thrombus prior to pharmacological or electrical cardioversion. Further, we discuss the merits and limitations of the cost-effectiveness analyses in the context of overall treatment strategies. Finally, we identify areas that will require additional research to achieve the goal of effective and economically efficient management of atrial fibrillation. PMID:15344302

  20. A Cost Effective System Design Approach for Critical Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Larry Wayne; Cox, Gary; Nguyen, Hai

    2000-01-01

    NASA-JSC required an avionics platform capable of serving a wide range of applications in a cost-effective manner. In part, making the avionics platform cost effective means adhering to open standards and supporting the integration of COTS products with custom products. Inherently, operation in space requires low power, mass, and volume while retaining high performance, reconfigurability, scalability, and upgradability. The Universal Mini-Controller project is based on a modified PC/104-Plus architecture while maintaining full compatibility with standard COTS PC/104 products. The architecture consists of a library of building block modules, which can be mixed and matched to meet a specific application. A set of NASA developed core building blocks, processor card, analog input/output card, and a Mil-Std-1553 card, have been constructed to meet critical functions and unique interfaces. The design for the processor card is based on the PowerPC architecture. This architecture provides an excellent balance between power consumption and performance, and has an upgrade path to the forthcoming radiation hardened PowerPC processor. The processor card, which makes extensive use of surface mount technology, has a 166 MHz PowerPC 603e processor, 32 Mbytes of error detected and corrected RAM, 8 Mbytes of Flash, and I Mbytes of EPROM, on a single PC/104-Plus card. Similar densities have been achieved with the quad channel Mil-Std-1553 card and the analog input/output cards. The power management built into the processor and its peripheral chip allows the power and performance of the system to be adjusted to meet the requirements of the application, allowing another dimension to the flexibility of the Universal Mini-Controller. Unique mechanical packaging allows the Universal Mini-Controller to accommodate standard COTS and custom oversized PC/104-Plus cards. This mechanical packaging also provides thermal management via conductive cooling of COTS boards, which are typically

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of antipsychotics in reducing schizophrenia relapses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is a severe form of mental illness which is associated with significant and long-lasting health, social and financial burdens. The aim of this project is to assess the efficiency of the antipsychotics used in Spain in reducing schizophrenia relapses under the Spanish Health System perspective. Material and methods A decision-analytic model was developed to explore the relative cost-effectiveness of five antipsychotic medications, amisulpride, aripiprazole, olanzapine, paliperidone Extended-Release (ER) and risperidone, compared to haloperidol, over a 1-year treatment period among people living in Spain with schizophrenia. The transition probabilities for assessed therapies were obtained from the systemic review and meta-analysis performed by National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Results Paliperidone ER was the option that yielded more quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained per patient (0.7573). In addition, paliperidone ER was the least costly strategy (€3,062), followed by risperidone (€3,194), haloperidol (€3,322), olanzapine (€3,893), amisulpride (€4,247) and aripiprazole (€4,712). In the incremental cost-effectiveness (ICE) analysis of the assessed antipsychotics compared to haloperidol, paliperidone ER and risperidone were dominant options. ICE ratios for other medications were €23,621/QALY gained, €91,584/QALY gained and €94,558/QALY gained for olanzapine, amisulpride and aripiprazole, respectively. Deterministic sensitivity analysis showed that risperidone is always dominant when compared to haloperidol. Paliperidone ER is also dominant apart from the exception of the scenario with a 20% decrease in the probability of relapses. Conclusions Our findings may be of interest to clinicians and others interested in outcomes and cost of mental health services among patients with schizophrenia. Paliperidone ER and risperidone were shown to be dominant therapies compared to haloperidol in Spain

  2. Cost effectiveness of a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in Oman

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotavirus gastroenteritis (RGE) is the leading cause of diarrhea in young children in Oman, incurring substantial healthcare and economic burden. We propose to formally assess the potential cost effectiveness of implementing universal vaccination with a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) on reducing the health care burden and costs associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis (RGE) in Oman Methods A Markov model was used to compare two birth cohorts, including children who were administered the RV5 vaccination versus those who were not, in a hypothetical group of 65,500 children followed for their first 5 years of life in Oman. The efficacy of the vaccine in reducing RGE-related hospitalizations, emergency department (ED) and office visits, and days of parental work loss for children receiving the vaccine was based on the results of the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST). The outcome of interest was cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained from health care system and societal perspectives. Results A universal RV5 vaccination program is projected to reduce, hospitalizations, ED visits, outpatient visits and parental work days lost due to rotavirus infections by 89%, 80%, 67% and 74%, respectively. In the absence of RV5 vaccination, RGE-related societal costs are projected to be 2,023,038 Omani Rial (OMR) (5,259,899 United States dollars [USD]), including 1,338,977 OMR (3,481,340 USD) in direct medical costs. However, with the introduction of RV5, direct medical costs are projected to be 216,646 OMR (563,280 USD). Costs per QALY saved would be 1,140 OMR (2,964 USD) from the health care payer perspective. An RV5 vaccination program would be considered cost saving, from the societal perspective. Conclusions Universal RV5 vaccination in Oman is likely to significantly reduce the health care burden and costs associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis and may be cost-effective from the payer perspective and cost saving from the societal

  3. Cost-effective learning aids for a variety of learning styles

    SciTech Connect

    Wyckoff, D.J.

    1993-11-01

    Some people learn easily while others find learning difficult. Trainers need to provide a variety of cost-effective learning experiences to meet the needs of all individuals. There are four techniques that can be used individually, in small groups, or in a large group to achieve the required cost effectiveness and aid the learning process. The first is flash cards, the second in a simple computer board that lights up when correct matches are made. The third technique uses popular game show format wherein objectives are used as answers and trainees come up with the questions. Demonstrating the expected learning behavior is the fourth technique, accomplished by guided practice.

  4. Acceptance of health technology assessment submissions with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios above the cost-effectiveness threshold

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Elizabeth A; Hendrich, Janek K; Stoddart, Samuel DR; Walsh, Sean CM

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In health technology assessment (HTA) agencies where cost-effectiveness plays a role in decision-making, an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) threshold is often used to inform reimbursement decisions. The acceptance of submissions with ICERs higher than the threshold was assessed across different agencies and across indications, in order to inform future reimbursement submissions. Methods All HTA appraisals from May 2000 to May 2014 from National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC), Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC), and Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) were assessed. Multiple technology appraisals, resubmissions, vaccination programs, and requests for advice were excluded. Submissions not reporting an ICER, or for which an ICER could not be determined were also excluded. The remaining appraisals were reviewed, and the submitted ICER, recommendation, and reasoning behind the recommendation were extracted. Results NICE recommended the highest proportion of submissions with ICERs higher than the threshold (34% accepted without restrictions; 20% with restrictions), followed by PBAC (16% accepted without restrictions; 4% with restrictions), SMC (11% accepted without restrictions; 14% accepted with restrictions), and CADTH (0% accepted without restrictions; 26% with restrictions). Overall, the majority of higher-than-threshold ICER submissions were classified into the “malignant disease and immunosuppression” therapeutic category; however, there was no notable variation in acceptance rates by disease area. Reasons for accepting submissions reporting ICERs above the threshold included high clinical benefit over the standard of care, and addressing an unmet therapeutic need. Conclusion Acceptance of submissions with higher-than-threshold ICERs varied by HTA agency and was not significantly influenced by disease category. Such submissions must be

  5. Cost Effectiveness of Home Energy Retrofits in Pre-Code Vintage Homes in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Fairey, Philip

    2012-11-01

    This analytical study examines the opportunities for cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofits in residential archetypes constructed prior to 1980 (Pre-Code) in fourteen U.S. cities. These fourteen cities are representative of each of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) climate zones in the contiguous United States. The analysis is conducted using an in-house version of EnergyGauge USA v.2.8.05 named CostOpt that has been programmed to perform iterative, incremental economic optimization on a large list of residential energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofit measures. The principle objectives of the study are to determine the opportunities for cost effective source energy reductions in this large cohort of existing residential building stock as a function of local climate and energy costs; and to examine how retrofit financing alternatives impact the source energy reductions that are cost effectively achievable.

  6. Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Diabetes Prevention among Adherent Participants

    PubMed Central

    Herman, William H.; Edelstein, Sharon L.; Ratner, Robert E.; Montez, Maria G.; Ackermann, Ronald T.; Orchard, Trevor J.; Foulkes, Mary A.; Zhang, Ping; Saudek, Christopher D.; Brown, Morton B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We report the 10 year effectiveness and within-trial cost-effectiveness of the The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and its Outcomes Study (DPPOS) interventions among participants who were adherent to the interventions. STUDY DESIGN DPP was a 3-year randomized clinical trial followed by 7-years of open-label modified intervention followup. METHODS Data on resource utilization, cost, and quality-of-life were collected prospectively. Economic analyses were performed from health system and societal perspectives. Lifestyle adherence was defined as achieving and maintaining a 5% reduction in initial body weight and metformin adherence as taking metformin at 80% of study visits. RESULTS The relative risk reduction was 49.4% among adherent lifestyle participants and 20.8% among adherent metformin participants compared to placebo. Over 10 years, the cumulative, undiscounted, per capita direct medical costs of the interventions, as implemented during the DPP, were greater for adherent lifestyle participants ($4,810) than adherent metformin participants ($2,934) or placebo ($768). Over 10 years, the cumulative, per capita non-intervention-related direct medical costs were $4,250 greater for placebo participants compared to adherent lifestyle participants and $3,251 greater compared to adherent metformin participants. The cumulative quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) accrued over 10 years were greater for lifestyle (6.80) than metformin (6.74) or placebo (6.67). Without discounting, from both a modified societal perspective (excluding participant time), lifestyle cost <$5,000 per QALY-gained and metformin was cost-saving compared to placebo. CONCLUSIONS Over 10 years, lifestyle intervention and metformin were cost-saving compared to placebo. These analyses confirm that lifestyle and metformin represent a good value for money. PMID:23544761

  7. Comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness analyses frequently agree on value.

    PubMed

    Glick, Henry A; McElligott, Sean; Pauly, Mark V; Willke, Richard J; Bergquist, Henry; Doshi, Jalpa; Fleisher, Lee A; Kinosian, Bruce; Perfetto, Eleanor; Polsky, Daniel E; Schwartz, J Sanford

    2015-05-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, known as PCORI, was established by Congress as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to promote evidence-based treatment. Provisions of the ACA prohibit the use of a cost-effectiveness analysis threshold and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) in PCORI comparative effectiveness studies, which has been understood as a prohibition on support for PCORI's conducting conventional cost-effectiveness analyses. This constraint complicates evidence-based choices where incremental improvements in outcomes are achieved at increased costs of care. How frequently this limitation inhibits efficient cost containment, also a goal of the ACA, depends on how often more effective treatment is not cost-effective relative to less effective treatment. We examined the largest database of studies of comparisons of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness to see how often there is disagreement between the more effective treatment and the cost-effective treatment, for various thresholds that may define good value. We found that under the benchmark assumption, disagreement between the two types of analyses occurs in 19 percent of cases. Disagreement is more likely to occur if a treatment intervention is musculoskeletal and less likely to occur if it is surgical or involves secondary prevention, or if the study was funded by a pharmaceutical company. PMID:25941282

  8. Comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness analyses frequently agree on value.

    PubMed

    Glick, Henry A; McElligott, Sean; Pauly, Mark V; Willke, Richard J; Bergquist, Henry; Doshi, Jalpa; Fleisher, Lee A; Kinosian, Bruce; Perfetto, Eleanor; Polsky, Daniel E; Schwartz, J Sanford

    2015-05-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, known as PCORI, was established by Congress as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to promote evidence-based treatment. Provisions of the ACA prohibit the use of a cost-effectiveness analysis threshold and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) in PCORI comparative effectiveness studies, which has been understood as a prohibition on support for PCORI's conducting conventional cost-effectiveness analyses. This constraint complicates evidence-based choices where incremental improvements in outcomes are achieved at increased costs of care. How frequently this limitation inhibits efficient cost containment, also a goal of the ACA, depends on how often more effective treatment is not cost-effective relative to less effective treatment. We examined the largest database of studies of comparisons of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness to see how often there is disagreement between the more effective treatment and the cost-effective treatment, for various thresholds that may define good value. We found that under the benchmark assumption, disagreement between the two types of analyses occurs in 19 percent of cases. Disagreement is more likely to occur if a treatment intervention is musculoskeletal and less likely to occur if it is surgical or involves secondary prevention, or if the study was funded by a pharmaceutical company.

  9. An Assessment of the Expected Cost-Effectiveness of Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccines in Ontario, Canada Using a Static Model

    PubMed Central

    Chit, Ayman; Roiz, Julie; Aballea, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Ontario, Canada, immunizes against influenza using a trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) under a Universal Influenza Immunization Program (UIIP). The UIIP offers IIV3 free-of-charge to all Ontarians over 6 months of age. A newly approved quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV4) offers wider protection against influenza B disease. We explored the expected cost-utility and budget impact of replacing IIV3 with IIV4, within the context of Ontario’s UIIP, using a probabilistic and static cost-utility model. Wherever possible, epidemiological and cost data were obtained from Ontario sources. Canadian or U.S. sources were used when Ontario data were not available. Vaccine efficacy for IIV3 was obtained from the literature. IIV4 efficacy was derived from meta-analysis of strain-specific vaccine efficacy. Conservatively, herd protection was not considered. In the base case, we used IIV3 and IIV4 prices of $5.5/dose and $7/dose, respectively. We conducted a sensitivity analysis on the price of IIV4, as well as standard univariate and multivariate statistical uncertainty analyses. Over a typical influenza season, relative to IIV3, IIV4 is expected to avert an additional 2,516 influenza cases, 1,683 influenza-associated medical visits, 27 influenza-associated hospitalizations, and 5 influenza-associated deaths. From a societal perspective, IIV4 would generate 76 more Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) and a net societal budget impact of $4,784,112. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio for this comparison was $63,773/QALY. IIV4 remains cost-effective up to a 53% price premium over IIV3. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that IIV4 was cost-effective with a probability of 65% for a threshold of $100,000/QALY gained. IIV4 is expected to achieve reductions in influenza-related morbidity and mortality compared to IIV3. Despite not accounting for herd protection, IIV4 is still expected to be a cost-effective alternative to IIV3 up to a price

  10. An Assessment of the Expected Cost-Effectiveness of Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccines in Ontario, Canada Using a Static Model.

    PubMed

    Chit, Ayman; Roiz, Julie; Aballea, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Ontario, Canada, immunizes against influenza using a trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) under a Universal Influenza Immunization Program (UIIP). The UIIP offers IIV3 free-of-charge to all Ontarians over 6 months of age. A newly approved quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV4) offers wider protection against influenza B disease. We explored the expected cost-utility and budget impact of replacing IIV3 with IIV4, within the context of Ontario's UIIP, using a probabilistic and static cost-utility model. Wherever possible, epidemiological and cost data were obtained from Ontario sources. Canadian or U.S. sources were used when Ontario data were not available. Vaccine efficacy for IIV3 was obtained from the literature. IIV4 efficacy was derived from meta-analysis of strain-specific vaccine efficacy. Conservatively, herd protection was not considered. In the base case, we used IIV3 and IIV4 prices of $5.5/dose and $7/dose, respectively. We conducted a sensitivity analysis on the price of IIV4, as well as standard univariate and multivariate statistical uncertainty analyses. Over a typical influenza season, relative to IIV3, IIV4 is expected to avert an additional 2,516 influenza cases, 1,683 influenza-associated medical visits, 27 influenza-associated hospitalizations, and 5 influenza-associated deaths. From a societal perspective, IIV4 would generate 76 more Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) and a net societal budget impact of $4,784,112. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio for this comparison was $63,773/QALY. IIV4 remains cost-effective up to a 53% price premium over IIV3. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that IIV4 was cost-effective with a probability of 65% for a threshold of $100,000/QALY gained. IIV4 is expected to achieve reductions in influenza-related morbidity and mortality compared to IIV3. Despite not accounting for herd protection, IIV4 is still expected to be a cost-effective alternative to IIV3 up to a price premium

  11. Cost-effective alternatives for mitigating Cryptosporidium risk in drinking water and enhancing ecosystem services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, B. A.; Kandulu, J. M.

    2009-08-01

    Under the multibarrier paradigm, water quality management barriers that mitigate risk to consumers are required at multiple points from the catchment to the tap. We present a cost-effectiveness analysis of 13 catchment- and treatment-based management alternatives for mitigating Cryptosporidium risk in the Myponga water supply catchment, South Australia. A broad range of costs and benefits are identified and valued, including setup, operation and maintenance, and opportunity costs, and benefits for ecosystem services including water quality, biodiversity, carbon sequestration, and farm production services. The results suggest that the cost-effectiveness of investment in water quality management can be substantially enhanced by considering the costs of management and the benefits for ecosystem services, in addition to Cryptosporidium removal effectiveness. Cost-effectiveness of investment in management alternatives is dependent upon the desired level of Cryptosporidium removal effectiveness by both the catchment and treatment barriers. The combination of a spatially targeted 25% restriction in water course access of nondairy cattle and treatment by enhanced coagulation provides the most (net) cost-effective Cryptosporidium risk mitigation strategy. This combination may achieve 0.614 log removal at a net cost of A0.7 million and (net) cost-effectiveness of A1.14 million per log removal. Additional risk mitigation can be achieved through the addition of ultraviolet irradiation treatment, higher levels of water course access restriction for cattle, and the adoption of dung beetles in the catchment. Economic valuation of a range of costs and benefits of management priorities can support cost-effective water quality management investment decisions and inform elements of policy design such as cost-sharing arrangements and spatial targeting.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of a Multicondition Collaborative Care Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Katon, Wayne; Russo, Joan; Lin, Elizabeth H. B.; Schmittdiel, Julie; Ciechanowski, Paul; Ludman, Evette; Peterson, Do; Young, Bessie; Von Korff, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Context Patients with depression and poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease (CHD), or both have higher medical complication rates and higher health care costs, suggesting that more effective care management of psychiatric and medical disease control might also reduce medical service use and enhance quality of life. Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a multicondition collaborative treatment program (TEAM-care) compared with usual primary care (UC) in outpatients with depression and poorly controlled diabetes or CHD. Design Randomized controlled trial of a systematic care management program aimed at improving depression scores and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Setting Fourteen primary care clinics of an integrated health care system. Patients Population-based screening identified 214 adults with depressive disorder and poorly controlled diabetes or CHD. Intervention Physician-supervised nurses collaborated with primary care physicians to provide treatment of multiple disease risk factors. Main Outcome Measures Blinded assessments evaluated depressive symptoms, SBP, and HbA1c at baseline and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Fasting LDL-C concentration was assessed at baseline and at 12 and 24 months. Health plan accounting records were used to assess medical service costs. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were assessed using a previously developed regression model based on intervention vs UC differences in HbA1c, LDL-C, and SBP levels over 24 months. Results Over 24 months, compared with UC controls, intervention patients had a mean of 114 (95% CI, 79 to 149) additional depression-free days and an estimated 0.335 (95% CI, −0.18 to 0.85) additional QALYs. Intervention patients also had lower mean outpatient health costs of $594 per patient (95% CI, −$3241 to $2053) relative to UC patients. Conclusions For adults with depression and poorly controlled

  13. Cost-effectiveness of vaccination against herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Pieter T; Wilschut, Jan C; Postma, Maarten J

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is a common disease among elderly, which may develop into a severe pain syndrome labeled postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). A live-attenuated varicella zoster virus vaccine has been shown to be effective in reducing the incidence and burden of illness of HZ and PHN, providing the opportunity to prevent significant health-related and financial consequences of HZ. In this review, we summarize the available literature on cost-effectiveness of HZ vaccination and discuss critical parameters for cost-effectiveness results. A search in PubMed and EMBASE was performed to identify full cost-effectiveness studies published before April 2013. Fourteen cost-effectiveness studies were included, all performed in western countries. All studies evaluated cost-effectiveness among elderly above 50 years and used costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained as primary outcome. The vast majority of studies showed vaccination of 60- to 75-year-old individuals to be cost-effective, when duration of vaccine efficacy was longer than 10 years. Duration of vaccine efficacy, vaccine price, HZ incidence, HZ incidence and discount rates were influential to the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). HZ vaccination may be a worthwhile intervention from a cost-effectiveness point of view. More extensive reporting on methodology and more detailed results of sensitivity analyses would be desirable to address uncertainty and to guarantee optimal comparability between studies, for example regarding model structure, discounting, vaccine characteristics and loss of quality of life due to HZ and PHN.

  14. 10 CFR 436.13 - Presuming cost-effectiveness results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Methodology and Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.13 Presuming cost-effectiveness results. (a) If... life cycle cost-effective without further analysis. (b) A Federal agency may presume that an investment in an energy or water conservation measure retrofit to an existing Federal building is not life...

  15. 42 CFR 457.1015 - Cost-effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cost-effectiveness. 457.1015 Section 457.1015... Waivers: General Provisions § 457.1015 Cost-effectiveness. (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart, “cost-effective” means that the State's cost of purchasing family coverage that includes coverage...

  16. The Sunk Cost Effect in Pigeons and Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarro, Anton D.; Fantino, Edmund

    2005-01-01

    The sunk cost effect is the increased tendency to persist in an endeavor once an investment of money, effort, or time has been made. To date, humans are the only animal in which this effect has been observed unambiguously. We developed a behavior-analytic model of the sunk cost effect to explore the potential for this behavior in pigeons as well…

  17. Cost-effectiveness of pazopanib compared with sunitinib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Amdahl, J.; Diaz, J.; Park, J.; Nakhaipour, H.R.; Delea, T.E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Canada and elsewhere, pazopanib and sunitinib—tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors—are recommended as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mrcc). A large randomized noninferiority trial of pazopanib versus sunitinib (comparz) demonstrated that the two drugs have similar efficacy; however, patients randomized to pazopanib experienced better health-related quality of life (hrqol) and nominally lower rates of non-study medical resource utilization. Methods The cost-effectiveness of pazopanib compared with sunitinib for first-line treatment of mrcc from a Canadian health care system perspective was evaluated using a partitioned-survival model that incorporated data from comparz and other secondary sources. The time horizon of 5 years was based on the maximum duration of follow-up in the final analysis of overall survival from the comparz trial. Analyses were conducted first using list prices for pazopanib and sunitinib and then by assuming that the prices of sunitinib and pazopanib would be equivalent. Results Based on list prices, expected costs were CA$10,293 less with pazopanib than with sunitinib. Pazopanib was estimated to yield 0.059 more quality-adjusted life-years (qalys). Pazopanib was therefore dominant (more qalys and lower costs) compared with sunitinib in the base case. In probabilistic sensitivity analyses, pazopanib was dominant in 79% of simulations and was cost-effective in 90%–100% of simulations at a threshold cost-effectiveness ratio of CA$100,000. Assuming equivalent pricing, pazopanib yielded CA$917 in savings in the base case, was dominant in 36% of probabilistic sensitivity analysis simulations, and was cost-effective in 89% of simulations at a threshold cost-effectiveness ratio of CA$100,000. Conclusions Compared with sunitinib, pazopanib is likely to be a cost-effective option for first-line treatment of mrcc from a Canadian health care

  18. Cost-effectiveness of SHINE: A Telephone Translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Hollenbeak, Christopher S.; Weinstock, Ruth S.; Cibula, Donald; Delahanty, Linda M.; Trief, Paula M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Support, Health Information, Nutrition, and Exercise (SHINE) trial recently showed that a telephone adaptation of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle intervention was effective in reducing weight among patients with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine whether a conference call (CC) adaptation was cost effective relative to an individual call (IC) adaptation of the DPP lifestyle intervention in the primary care setting. METHODS We performed a stochastic cost-effectiveness analysis alongside a clinical trial comparing two telephone adaptations of the DPP lifestyle intervention. The primary outcomes were incremental cost-effectiveness ratios estimated for weight loss, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Costs were estimated from the perspective of society and included direct medical costs, indirect costs, and intervention costs. RESULTS After one year, participants receiving the CC intervention accumulated fewer costs ($2,831 vs. $2,933) than the IC group, lost more weight (6.2 kg vs. 5.1 kg), had greater reduction in BMI (2.1 vs. 1.9), and had greater reduction in waist circumference (6.5 cm vs. 5.9 cm). However, participants in the CC group had fewer QALYs than those in the IC group (0.635 vs. 0.646). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for CC vs. IC was $9,250/QALY, with a 48% probability of being cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay of $100,000/QALY. CONCLUSIONS CC delivery of the DPP was cost effective relative to IC delivery in the first year in terms of cost per clinical measure (weight lost, BMI, and waist circumference) but not in terms of cost per QALY, most likely because of the short time horizon. PMID:27429556

  19. Cost-Effectiveness of Increasing Influenza Vaccination Coverage in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Akın, Levent; Macabéo, Bérengère; Caliskan, Zafer; Altinel, Serdar; Satman, Ilhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective In Turkey, the prevalence of diabetes is high but the influenza vaccination coverage rate (VCR) is low (9.1% in 2014), despite vaccination being recommended and reimbursed. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of increasing the influenza VCR of adults with type 2 diabetes in Turkey to 20%. Methods A decision-analytic model was adapted to Turkey using data derived from published sources. Direct medical costs and indirect costs due to productivity loss were included in the societal perspective. The time horizon was set at 1 year to reflect the seasonality of influenza. Results Increasing the VCR for adults with type 2 diabetes to 20% is predicted to avert an additional 19,777 influenza cases, 2376 hospitalizations, and 236 deaths. Associated influenza costs avoided were estimated at more than 8.3 million Turkish Lira (TRY), while the cost of vaccination would be more than TRY 8.4 million. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was estimated at TRY 64/quality-adjusted life years, which is below the per capita gross domestic product of TRY 21,511 and therefore very cost-effective according to World Health Organization guidelines. Factors most influencing the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio were the excess hospitalization rate, inpatient cost, vaccine effectiveness against hospitalization, and influenza attack rate. Increasing the VCR to >20% was also estimated to be very cost-effective. Conclusions Increasing the VCR for adults with type 2 diabetes in Turkey to ≥20% would be very cost-effective. PMID:27322384

  20. Cost-effectiveness analysis of neonatal hearing screening program in china: should universal screening be prioritized?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neonatal hearing screening (NHS) has been routinely offered as a vital component of early childhood care in developed countries, whereas such a screening program is still at the pilot or preliminary stage as regards its nationwide implementation in developing countries. To provide significant evidence for health policy making in China, this study aims to determine the cost-effectiveness of NHS program implementation in case of eight provinces of China. Methods A cost-effectiveness model was conducted and all neonates annually born from 2007 to 2009 in eight provinces of China were simulated in this model. The model parameters were estimated from the established databases in the general hospitals or maternal and child health hospitals of these eight provinces, supplemented from the published literature. The model estimated changes in program implementation costs, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), average cost-effectiveness ratio (ACER), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for universal screening compared to targeted screening in eight provinces. Results and discussion A multivariate sensitivity analysis was performed to determine uncertainty in health effect estimates and cost-effectiveness ratios using a probabilistic modeling technique. Targeted strategy trended to be cost-effective in Guangxi, Jiangxi, Henan, Guangdong, Zhejiang, Hebei, Shandong, and Beijing from the level of 9%, 9%, 8%, 4%, 3%, 7%, 5%, and 2%, respectively; while universal strategy trended to be cost-effective in those provinces from the level of 70%, 70%, 48%, 10%, 8%, 28%, 15%, 4%, respectively. This study showed although there was a huge disparity in the implementation of the NHS program in the surveyed provinces, both universal strategy and targeted strategy showed cost-effectiveness in those relatively developed provinces, while neither of the screening strategy showed cost-effectiveness in those relatively developing provinces. This study also showed that both

  1. Endogenous patient responses and the consistency principle in cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liqun; Rettenmaier, Andrew J; Saving, Thomas R

    2012-01-01

    In addition to incurring direct treatment costs and generating direct health benefits that improve longevity and/or health-related quality of life, medical interventions often have further or "unrelated" financial and health impacts, raising the issue of what costs and effects should be included in calculating the cost-effectiveness ratio of an intervention. The "consistency principle" in medical cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) requires that one include both the cost and the utility benefit of a change (in medical expenditures, consumption, or leisure) caused by an intervention or neither of them. By distinguishing between exogenous changes directly brought about by an intervention and endogenous patient responses to the exogenous changes, and within a lifetime utility maximization framework, this article addresses 2 questions related to the consistency principle: 1) how to choose among alternative internally consistent exclusion/inclusion rules, and 2) what to do with survival consumption costs and earnings. It finds that, for an endogenous change, excluding or including both the cost and the utility benefit of the change does not alter cost-effectiveness results. Further, in agreement with the consistency principle, welfare maximization implies that consumption costs and earnings during the extended life directly caused by an intervention should be included in CEA. PMID:22101019

  2. Future Costs, Fixed Healthcare Budgets, and the Decision Rules of Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    PubMed

    van Baal, Pieter; Meltzer, David; Brouwer, Werner

    2016-02-01

    Life-saving medical technologies result in additional demand for health care due to increased life expectancy. However, most economic evaluations do not include all medical costs that may result from this additional demand in health care and include only future costs of related illnesses. Although there has been much debate regarding the question to which extent future costs should be included from a societal perspective, the appropriate role of future medical costs in the widely adopted but more narrow healthcare perspective has been neglected. Using a theoretical model, we demonstrate that optimal decision rules for cost-effectiveness analyses assuming fixed healthcare budgets dictate that future costs of both related and unrelated medical care should be included. Practical relevance of including the costs of future unrelated medical care is illustrated using the example of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Our findings suggest that guidelines should prescribe inclusion of these costs. PMID:25533778

  3. Cost-effectiveness of SDWA regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Raucher, R.S.; Dixon, A.M.; Trabka, E. ); Drago, J.A. )

    1994-08-01

    This article examines the extent to which the federal drinking water program is meeting its public health protection goals and reviews the costs regulations imposed on society at a time when the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) is under review for reauthorization by Congress. Under the 1986 amendments, USEPA has promulgated seven significant rule-making packages covering more than 70 contaminants. The regulatory record reveals a high degree of variability in costs and risk reductions associated with these rules. For example, nearly 99% of the program's total carcinogenic risk reduction is attained for about 60% of the total regulatory costs for carcinogens because of the maximum contaminant levels established for 10 contaminants. This means about 40% of carcinogen-related regulatory costs are achieving an insignificant 1% of cancer risk reduction. If the regulations were focused on systems serving more than 500 people, almost 90% of total carcinogenic health risk reduction benefits could be realized at only 43% of the costs.

  4. Phycoremediation: key issues for cost-effective nutrient removal processes.

    PubMed

    Olguín, Eugenia J

    2003-12-01

    Phycoremediation applied to the removal of nutrients from animal wastewater and other high organic content wastewater is a field with a great potential and demand considering that surface and underground water bodies in several regions of the world are suffering of eutrophication. However, the development of more efficient nutrient removal algal systems requires further research in key areas. Algae growth rate controls directly and indirectly the nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiency. Thus, maximum algae productivity is required for effective nutrient removal and must be considered as a key area of research. Likewise, low harvesting costs are also required for a cost-effective nutrient removal system. The use of filamentous microalgae with a high autoflocculation capacity and the use of immobilized cells have been investigated in this respect. Another key area of research is the use of algae strains with special attributes such as tolerance to extreme temperature, chemical composition with predominance of high added value products, a quick sedimentation behavior, or a capacity for growing mixotrophically. Finally, to combine most of the achievements from key areas and to design integrated recycling systems (IRS) should be an ultimate and rewarding goal. PMID:14623045

  5. Cost-Effective Hyperspectral Transmissometers for Oceanographic Applications: Performance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Pérez, Marta; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Torrecilla, Elena; Piera, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    The recent development of inexpensive, compact hyperspectral transmissometers broadens the research capabilities of oceanographic applications. These developments have been achieved by incorporating technologies such as micro-spectrometers as detectors as well as light emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources. In this study, we evaluate the performance of the new commercial LED-based hyperspectral transmissometer VIPER (TriOS GmbH, Rastede, Germany), which combines different LEDs to emulate the visible light spectrum, aiming at the determination of attenuation coefficients in coastal environments. For this purpose, experimental uncertainties related to the instrument stability, the effect of ambient light and derived temperature, and salinity correction factors are analyzed. Our results identify some issues related to the thermal management of the LEDs and the contamination of ambient light. Furthermore, the performance of VIPER is validated against other transmissometers through simultaneous field measurements. It is demonstrated that VIPER provides a compact and cost-effective alternative for beam attenuation measurements in coastal waters, but it requires the consideration of several optimizations. PMID:26343652

  6. Cost-effectiveness of a Primary Care Depression Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, Jeffrey M; Rost, Kathryn M; Zhang, Mingliang; Williams, D Keith; Smith, Jeffrey; Fortney, John

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the incremental cost-effectiveness of a quality improvement depression intervention (enhanced care) in primary care settings relative to usual care. DESIGN Following stratification, we randomized 12 primary care practices to enhanced or usual care conditions and followed patients for 12 months. SETTING Primary care practices located in 10 states across the United States. PATIENTS/PARTICIPANTS Two hundred eleven patients beginning a new treatment episode for major depression. INTERVENTIONS Training the primary care team to assess, educate, and monitor depressed patients during the acute and continuation stages of their depression treatment episode over 1 year. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Cost-effectiveness was measured by calculating incremental (enhanced minus usual care) costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) derived from SF-36 data. The mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratio in the main analysis was $15,463 per QALY. The mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for the sensitivity analyses ranged from $11,341 (using geographic block variables to control for pre-intervention service utilization) to $19,976 (increasing the cost estimates by 50%) per QALY. CONCLUSIONS This quality improvement depression intervention was cost-effective relative to usual care compared to cost-effectiveness ratios for common primary care interventions and commonly cited cost-effectiveness ratio thresholds for intervention implementation. PMID:12823650

  7. Thresholds for the cost-effectiveness of interventions: alternative approaches.

    PubMed

    Marseille, Elliot; Larson, Bruce; Kazi, Dhruv S; Kahn, James G; Rosen, Sydney

    2015-02-01

    Many countries use the cost-effectiveness thresholds recommended by the World Health Organization's Choosing Interventions that are Cost-Effective project (WHO-CHOICE) when evaluating health interventions. This project sets the threshold for cost-effectiveness as the cost of the intervention per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) averted less than three times the country's annual gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. Highly cost-effective interventions are defined as meeting a threshold per DALY averted of once the annual GDP per capita. We argue that reliance on these thresholds reduces the value of cost-effectiveness analyses and makes such analyses too blunt to be useful for most decision-making in the field of public health. Use of these thresholds has little theoretical justification, skirts the difficult but necessary ranking of the relative values of locally-applicable interventions and omits any consideration of what is truly affordable. The WHO-CHOICE thresholds set such a low bar for cost-effectiveness that very few interventions with evidence of efficacy can be ruled out. The thresholds have little value in assessing the trade-offs that decision-makers must confront. We present alternative approaches for applying cost-effectiveness criteria to choices in the allocation of health-care resources.

  8. Critical Research for Cost-Effective Photoelectrochemical Production of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei; Deng, Xunming; Abken, Anka; Cao, Xinmin; Du, Wenhui; Vijh, Aarohi; Ingler, William; Chen, Changyong; Fan, Qihua; Collins, Robert; Compaan, Alvin; Yan, Yanfa; Giolando, Dean; Turner, John

    2014-10-29

    The objective of this project is to develop critical technologies required for cost-effective production of hydrogen from sunlight and water using a-Si triple junction solar cell based photo-electrodes. In this project, Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE) and its collaborating organizations utilize triple junction a-Si thin film solar cells as the core element to fabricate photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. Triple junction a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe solar cell is an ideal material for making cost-effective PEC system which uses sun light to split water and generate hydrogen. It has the following key features: 1) It has an open circuit voltage (Voc ) of ~ 2.3V and has an operating voltage around 1.6V. This is ideal for water splitting. There is no need to add a bias voltage or to inter-connect more than one solar cell. 2) It is made by depositing a-Si/a-SiGe/aSi-Ge thin films on a conducting stainless steel substrate which can serve as an electrode. When we immerse the triple junction solar cells in an electrolyte and illuminate it under sunlight, the voltage is large enough to split the water, generating oxygen at the Si solar cell side (for SS/n-i-p/sunlight structure) and hydrogen at the back, which is stainless steel side. There is no need to use a counter electrode or to make any wire connection. 3) It is being produced in large rolls of 3ft wide and up to 5000 ft long stainless steel web in a 25MW roll-to-roll production machine. Therefore it can be produced at a very low cost. After several years of research with many different kinds of material, we have developed promising transparent, conducting and corrosion resistant (TCCR) coating material; we carried out extensive research on oxygen and hydrogen generation catalysts, developed methods to make PEC electrode from production-grade a-Si solar cells; we have designed and tested various PEC module cases and carried out extensive outdoor testing; we were able to obtain a solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency (STH

  9. Controlling Reactive Nitrogen: Attaining Cost Effectiveness and Institutional Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, O.

    2012-12-01

    The fact that reactive nitrogen (Nr) cascades by changing form and moving between air, land and water makes its management and control especially difficult. The cascade means that excess Nr's negative impacts may initially occur, flow through, or linger in air, land or water. The critical question becomes where and how to interdict, not only in terms of technical capacity but also in terms of cost effectiveness and institutional capacity. The nature of Nr also needs to inform the questions that need to be asked to be able to deal with Nr. For much of the world, agriculture is the major contributor to Nr.The stark trade-off often involves excess Nr that is the product of increased food production. As it is often the largest source of excess Nr, agriculture has to be a focus for Nr control and management efforts. This paper will start with the Nr balance sheet for the US and outline some of the trade-offs and opportunities for controlling Nr.The institutional responsibility and capacity to take effective action will be assessed on the basis of US institutions and their history. This will involve illustrating some of the difficulties posed by the cascading nature of Nr as it movesfrom one regulatory jurisdiction to another. Within the US agricultural sector. the history and politics of dealing with such problems will be traced as they relate to the willingness and capacity of the sector to more effectively control or manage problems like Nr. The institutional history of the sector has a strong influence onwhat can be accomplished in a cost effective way - one that is very different from the history and practice in Australia or Europe. The EPA Science Advisory Boards' suggestion that a twenty five percent reduction in excess Nr should be achievable will be traced through for agriculture and allied situations illustrating some of the possibilities and dilemmas. Finally, the issue of metrics will be addressed. As a caution to policy makers, one can obtain very different

  10. Cost-effectiveness and cost utility analysis of three pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in children of Peru

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The clinical and economic burden associated with invasive and non-invasive pneumococcal and non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) diseases is substantial in the Latin America and Caribbean region, where pneumococcal vaccines have only been introduced to a few countries. This study analyzed the cost-effectiveness and cost utility of three different pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) for Peru. Methods A Markov model that simulated the disease processes in a birth cohort over a lifetime, within 1,128 month cycles was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of 10-valent pneumococcal NTHi protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) and 7- and 13-valent PCVs (PCV-7 and PCV-13). Expected quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), cost-savings and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated. Results Without vaccination, pneumonia was associated with the greatest health economic burden (90% of QALYs lost and 63% of lifetime direct medical costs); while acute otitis media (AOM) was responsible for 1% of QALYs lost and 25% of direct medical costs. All vaccines were predicted to be cost-effective for Peru, with PHiD-CV being most cost-effective. PHiD-CV was predicted to generate 50 more QALYs gained and required a reduced investment (−US$ 3.4 million) versus PCV-13 (discounted data), and was therefore dominant and cost saving. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that PHiD-CV generated more QALYs gained at a reduced cost than PCV-13 in 84% of the simulations and less QALYs gains at a reduced cost in 16%. Additional scenarios using different assumptions on vaccine efficacies based on previous evidence were explored, but no significant change in the overall cost-effective results were observed. Conclusions The results of this modeling study predict that PCVs are likely to be a cost-effective strategy to help relieve the epidemiological and economic burden associated with pediatric pneumococcal and NTHi diseases for Peru. PHiD-CV is likely

  11. Cost-effectiveness of introducing a rotavirus vaccine in developing countries: The case of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Mendoza, Atanacio; Bertozzi, Stefano M; Gutierrez, Juan-Pablo; Itzler, Robbin

    2008-01-01

    Background In developing countries rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhoea and diarrhoeal deaths in children under 5. Vaccination could greatly alleviate that burden, but in Mexico as in most low- and middle-income countries the decision to add rotavirus vaccine to the national immunisation program will depend heavily on its cost-effectiveness and affordability. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of including the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in Mexico's national immunisation program. Methods A cost-effectiveness model was developed from the perspective of the health system, modelling the vaccination of a hypothetical birth cohort of 2 million children monitored from birth through 60 months of age. It compares the cost and disease burden of rotavirus in an unvaccinated cohort of children with one vaccinated as recommended at 2, 4, and 6 months. Results Including the pentavalent vaccine in the national immunisation program could prevent 71,464 medical visits (59%), 5,040 hospital admissions (66%), and 612 deaths from rotavirus gastroenteritis (70%). At US$10 per dose and a cost of administration of US$13.70 per 3-dose regimen, vaccination would cost US$122,058 per death prevented, US$4,383 per discounted life-year saved, at a total net cost of US$74.7 million dollars to the health care system. Key variables influencing the results were, in order of importance, case fatality, vaccine price, vaccine efficacy, serotype prevalence, and annual loss of efficacy. The results are also very sensitive to the discount rate assumed when calculated per life-year saved. Conclusion At prices below US $15 per dose, the cost per life-year saved is estimated to be lower than one GNP per capita and hence highly cost effective by the WHO Commission on Macroeconomics and Health criteria. The cost-effectiveness estimates are highly dependent upon the mortality in the absence of the vaccine, which suggests that the vaccine is likely to be

  12. Scaling up integrated prevention campaigns for global health: costs and cost-effectiveness in 70 countries

    PubMed Central

    Marseille, Elliot; Jiwani, Aliya; Raut, Abhishek; Verguet, Stéphane; Walson, Judd; Kahn, James G

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study estimated the health impact, cost and cost-effectiveness of an integrated prevention campaign (IPC) focused on diarrhoea, malaria and HIV in 70 countries ranked by per capita disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) burden for the three diseases. Methods We constructed a deterministic cost-effectiveness model portraying an IPC combining counselling and testing, cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, referral to treatment and condom distribution for HIV prevention; bed nets for malaria prevention; and provision of household water filters for diarrhoea prevention. We developed a mix of empirical and modelled cost and health impact estimates applied to all 70 countries. One-way, multiway and scenario sensitivity analyses were conducted to document the strength of our findings. We used a healthcare payer's perspective, discounted costs and DALYs at 3% per year and denominated cost in 2012 US dollars. Primary and secondary outcomes The primary outcome was cost-effectiveness expressed as net cost per DALY averted. Other outcomes included cost of the IPC; net IPC costs adjusted for averted and additional medical costs and DALYs averted. Results Implementation of the IPC in the 10 most cost-effective countries at 15% population coverage would cost US$583 million over 3 years (adjusted costs of US$398 million), averting 8.0 million DALYs. Extending IPC programmes to all 70 of the identified high-burden countries at 15% coverage would cost an adjusted US$51.3 billion and avert 78.7 million DALYs. Incremental cost-effectiveness ranged from US$49 per DALY averted for the 10 countries with the most favourable cost-effectiveness to US$119, US$181, US$335, US$1692 and US$8340 per DALY averted as each successive group of 10 countries is added ordered by decreasing cost-effectiveness. Conclusions IPC appears cost-effective in many settings, and has the potential to substantially reduce the burden of disease in resource-poor countries. This study increases confidence that IPC

  13. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in the Netherlands; the results of a consensus model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Each year rotavirus gastroenteritis results in thousands of paediatric hospitalisations and primary care visits in the Netherlands. While two vaccines against rotavirus are registered, routine immunisation of infants has not yet been implemented. Existing cost-effectiveness studies showed inconsistent results for these vaccines because of lack of consensus on the impact. We aimed to investigate which factors had a major impact on cost-effectiveness and were primarily responsible for the large differences in previously estimated cost-effectiveness ratios. Methods Based on updated data on health outcomes and cost estimates, we re-assessed the cost-effectiveness of routine paediatric rotavirus vaccination within the National Immunization Program for the Netherlands. Two consensus meetings were organised with national and international experts in the field to achieve consensus and resolve potential controversies. Results It was estimated that rotavirus vaccination in the Netherlands could avert 34,214 cases of rotavirus gastroenteritis in children aged less than 5 years. Notably, 2,779 hospitalisations were averted of which 315 were extensions of existing hospital stays due to nosocomial rotavirus infection. With a threshold varying from 20K€ - 50K€ per QALY and according to the base-case scenario, the full vaccination costs per child leading to cost-effectiveness was €57.76 -€77.71. Results were sensitive to the inclusion of potential vaccine induced herd protection, QALY losses and number of deaths associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis. Conclusions Our economic analysis indicates that inclusion of rotavirus vaccination in the Dutch National Immunization Program might be cost-effective depending on the cost of the vaccine and the impact of rotavirus gastroenteritis on children's quality of life. PMID:21663620

  14. The Potential Cost-Effectiveness of Amblyopia Screening Programs

    PubMed Central

    Rein, David B.; Wittenborn, John S.; Zhang, Xinzhi; Song, Michael; Saaddine, Jinan B.

    2013-01-01

    Background To estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness of amblyopia screening at preschool and kindergarten, we compared the costs and benefits of 3 amblyopia screening scenarios to no screening and to each other: (1) acuity/stereopsis (A/S) screening at kindergarten, (2) A/S screening at preschool and kindergarten, and (3) photoscreening at preschool and A/S screening at kindergarten. Methods We programmed a probabilistic microsimulation model of amblyopia natural history and response to treatment with screening costs and outcomes estimated from 2 state programs. We calculated the probability that no screening and each of the 3 interventions were most cost-effective per incremental quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained and case avoided. Results Assuming a minimal 0.01 utility loss from monocular vision loss, no screening was most cost-effective with a willingness to pay (WTP) of less than $16,000 per QALY gained. A/S screening at kindergarten alone was most cost-effective between a WTP of $17,000 and $21,000. A/S screening at preschool and kindergarten was most cost-effective between a WTP of $22,000 and $75,000, and photoscreening at preschool and A/S screening at kindergarten was most cost-effective at a WTP greater than $75,000. Cost-effectiveness substantially improved when assuming a greater utility loss. All scenarios were cost-effective when assuming a WTP of $10,500 per case of amblyopia cured. Conclusions All 3 screening interventions evaluated are likely to be considered cost-effective relative to many other potential public health programs. The choice of screening option depends on budgetary resources and the value placed on monocular vision loss prevention by funding agencies. PMID:21877675

  15. The cost-effectiveness of a school-based smoking prevention program in India.

    PubMed

    Brown, H Shelton; Stigler, Melissa; Perry, Cheryl; Dhavan, Poonam; Arora, Monika; Reddy, K Srinath

    2013-06-01

    Intervention programs aimed at preventing tobacco use among youth have been shown to be effective in curbing tobacco use onset and progression. However, the effects of even very successful tobacco prevention programs may not always impress policy-makers and lay audiences. Economic analysis potentially strengthens the case. In this paper, we evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a youth tobacco use prevention program which has been translated and implemented in India, a developing country. Although programs like these are inexpensive to implement in the USA, they are even less expensive in India due to low labor costs. Our results show that the costs per quality-adjusted life-year added, due to averted smoking, was $2057, even without including averted medical costs. If we ignore student time, cost-effectiveness improves by roughly 10%. To put the cost-effectiveness of this smoking prevention program into context, it is over 24 times more cost-effective than dialysis in the USA, which costs $50,000 for a life-year. PMID:22271928

  16. Cost-effectiveness modelling of percutaneous coronary interventions in stable coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Beresniak, Ariel; Caruba, Thibaut; Sabatier, Brigitte; Juillière, Yves; Dubourg, Olivier; Danchin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a cost-effectiveness model comparing drug eluting stents (DES) vs bare metal stent (BMS) in patients suffering of stable coronary artery disease. Using a 2-years time horizon, two simulation models have been developed: BMS first line strategy and DES first line strategy. Direct medical costs were estimated considering ambulatory and hospital costs. The effectiveness endpoint was defined as treatment success, which is the absence of major adverse cardiac events. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were carried out using 10000 Monte-Carlo simulations. DES appeared slightly more efficacious over 2 years (60% of success) when compared to BMS (58% of success). Total costs over 2 years were estimated at 9303 € for the DES and at 8926 € for bare metal stent. Hence, corresponding mean cost-effectiveness ratios showed slightly lower costs (P < 0.05) per success for the BMS strategy (15520 €/success), as compared to the DES strategy (15588 €/success). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is 18850 € for one additional percent of success. The sequential strategy including BMS as the first option appears to be slightly less efficacious but more cost-effective compared to the strategy including DES as first option. Future modelling approaches should confirm these results as further comparative data in stable coronary artery disease and long-term evidence become available. PMID:26516413

  17. The cost-effectiveness of periodic safety update reports for biologicals in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bouvy, J C; Ebbers, H C; Schellekens, H; Koopmanschap, M A

    2013-05-01

    We analyzed the cost-effectiveness of all Periodic Safety Update Reports (PSURs) submitted for biologicals in Europe from 1995 to 2009 by comparing two regulatory scenarios: full regulation (PSUR reporting) and limited regulation (no PSUR reporting, but all other parts of the pharmacovigilance framework remain in place). During this period, PSUR reporting resulted in the detection of 2 out of a total of 24 urgent safety issues for biologicals: (i) distant spread of botulinum toxin and (ii) edema/fluid collection associated with off-label use of dibotermin-alfa. We used Markov-chain life tables to calculate costs and health effects of PSURs. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of full regulation (PSUR reporting) vs. limited regulation (no PSUR reporting) for the base-case scenario was \\[euro]342,110 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. It is possible to assess the cost-effectiveness of regulatory requirements using the same methods as those used in assessing the cost-effectiveness of medical interventions. PMID:23549148

  18. Evaluation of the relative cost-effectiveness of treatments for infertility in the UK.

    PubMed

    Philips, Z; Barraza-Llorens, M; Posnett, J

    2000-01-01

    This paper aims to complement existing clinical guidelines by providing evidence of the relative cost-effectiveness of treatments for infertility in the UK. A series of decision-analytical models have been developed to reflect current diagnostic and treatment pathways for the five main causes of infertility. Data to populate the models are derived from a systematic review and routine National Health Service activity data, and are augmented with expert opinion. Costs are derived from an analysis of extra-contractual referral tariffs and private sector data. Sensitivity analysis has been carried out to take account of the uncertainty of model parameters and to allow results to be interpreted in the light of local circumstances. Results of the modelling exercise suggest in-vitro fertilization is the most cost-effective treatment option for severe tubal factors and endometriosis, with surgery the most cost-effective in the case of mild or moderate disease. Ovulatory factors should be treated medically with the addition of laparoscopic ovarian diathermy in the presence of polycystic ovarian syndrome. For other causes, stimulated intrauterine insemination (unexplained and moderate male factor) and stimulated donor intrauterine insemination (severe male) are cost-effective.

  19. Value of innovation in hematologic malignancies: a systematic review of published cost-effectiveness analyses

    PubMed Central

    Saret, Cayla J.; Winn, Aaron N.; Shah, Gunjan; Parsons, Susan K.; Lin, Pei-Jung; Cohen, Joshua T.

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed cost-effectiveness studies related to hematologic malignancies from the Tufts Medical Center Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry (www.cearegistry.org), focusing on studies of innovative therapies. Studies that met inclusion criteria were categorized by 4 cancer types (chronic myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma) and 9 treatment agents (interferon-α, alemtuzumab, bendamustine, bortezomib, dasatinib, imatinib, lenalidomide, rituximab alone or in combination, and thalidomide). We examined study characteristics and stratified cost-effectiveness ratios by type of cancer, treatment, funder, and year of study publication. Twenty-nine studies published in the years 1996-2012 (including 44 cost-effectiveness ratios) met inclusion criteria, 22 (76%) of which were industry funded. Most ratios fell below $50 000 per quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) (73%) and $100 000/QALY (86%). Industry-funded studies (n = 22) reported a lower median ratio ($26 000/QALY) than others (n = 7; $33 000/QALY), although the difference was not statistically significant. Published data suggest that innovative treatments for hematologic malignancies may provide reasonable value for money. PMID:25655601

  20. Achieving standardized medication data in clinical research studies: two approaches and applications for implementing RxNorm.

    PubMed

    Richesson, Rachel L; Smith, Susan B; Malloy, Jamie; Krischer, Jeffrey P

    2010-08-01

    The National Institutes of Health has proposed a roadmap for clinical research. Test projects of this roadmap include centralized data management for distributed research, the harmonization of clinical and research data, and the use of data standards throughout the research process. In 2003, RxNorm was named as a standard for codifying clinical drugs. Clinical researchers looking to implement RxNorm have few template implementation plans. Epidemiological studies and clinical trials (types of clinical research) have different requirements for model standards and best implementation tools. This paper highlights two different (epidemiological and intervention) clinical research projects, their unique requirements for a medication standard, the suitability of RxNorm as a standard for each, and application and process requirements for implementation. It is hoped that our experience of selecting and implementing the RxNorm standard to address varying study requirements in both domestic and international settings will be of value to other efforts. PMID:20703919

  1. Achieving standardized medication data in clinical research studies: two approaches and applications for implementing RxNorm.

    PubMed

    Richesson, Rachel L; Smith, Susan B; Malloy, Jamie; Krischer, Jeffrey P

    2010-08-01

    The National Institutes of Health has proposed a roadmap for clinical research. Test projects of this roadmap include centralized data management for distributed research, the harmonization of clinical and research data, and the use of data standards throughout the research process. In 2003, RxNorm was named as a standard for codifying clinical drugs. Clinical researchers looking to implement RxNorm have few template implementation plans. Epidemiological studies and clinical trials (types of clinical research) have different requirements for model standards and best implementation tools. This paper highlights two different (epidemiological and intervention) clinical research projects, their unique requirements for a medication standard, the suitability of RxNorm as a standard for each, and application and process requirements for implementation. It is hoped that our experience of selecting and implementing the RxNorm standard to address varying study requirements in both domestic and international settings will be of value to other efforts.

  2. A cost-effective target supply for inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodin, D. T.; Alexander, N. B.; Brown, L. C.; Frey, D. T.; Gallix, R.; Gibson, C. R.; Maxwell, J. L.; Nobile, A.; Olson, C.; Petzoldt, R. W.; Raffray, R.; Rochau, G.; Schroen, D. G.; Tillack, M.; Rickman, W. S.; Vermillion, B.

    2004-12-01

    A central feature of an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant is a target that has been compressed and heated to fusion conditions by the energy input of the driver. This is true whether the driver is a laser system, heavy ion beams or Z-pinch system. The IFE target fabrication, injection and tracking programmes are focusing on methods that will scale to mass production. We are working closely with target designers, and power plant systems specialists, to make specifications and material selections that will satisfy a wide range of required and desirable target characteristics. One-of-a-kind capsules produced for today's inertial confinement fusion experiments are estimated to cost about US2500 each. Design studies of cost-effective power production from laser and heavy-ion driven IFE have suggested a cost goal of about 0.25-0.30 for each injected target (corresponding to ~10% of the 'electricity value' in a target). While a four orders of magnitude cost reduction may seem at first to be nearly impossible, there are many factors that suggest this is achievable. This paper summarizes the design, specifications, requirements and proposed manufacturing processes for the future for laser fusion, heavy ion fusion and Z-pinch driven targets. These target manufacturing processes have been developed—and are proposed—based on the unique materials science and technology programmes that are ongoing for each of the target concepts. We describe the paradigm shifts in target manufacturing methodologies that will be needed to achieve orders of magnitude reductions in target costs, and summarize the results of 'nth-of-a-kind' plant layouts and cost estimates for future IFE power plant fuelling. These engineering studies estimate the cost of the target supply in a fusion economy, and show that costs are within the range of commercial feasibility for electricity production.

  3. Cost effects of hospital mergers in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Helda; Mateus, Céu

    2014-12-01

    The Portuguese hospital sector has been restructured by wide-ranging hospital mergers, following a conviction among policy makers that bigger hospitals lead to lower average costs. Since the effects of mergers have not been systematically evaluated, the purpose of this article is to contribute to this area of knowledge by assessing potential economies of scale to explore and compare these results with realized cost savings after mergers. Considering the period 2003-2009, we estimate the translog cost function to examine economies of scale in the years preceding restructuring. Additionally, we use the difference-in-differences approach to evaluate hospital centres (HC) that occurred between 2004 and 2007, comparing the years after and before mergers. Our findings suggest that economies of scale are present in the pre-merger configuration with an optimum hospital size of around 230 beds. However, the mergers between two or more hospitals led to statistically significant post-merger cost increases, of about 8 %. This result indicates that some HC become too large to explore economies of scale and suggests the difficulty of achieving efficiencies through combining operations and service specialization.

  4. Cost effects of hospital mergers in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Helda; Mateus, Céu

    2014-12-01

    The Portuguese hospital sector has been restructured by wide-ranging hospital mergers, following a conviction among policy makers that bigger hospitals lead to lower average costs. Since the effects of mergers have not been systematically evaluated, the purpose of this article is to contribute to this area of knowledge by assessing potential economies of scale to explore and compare these results with realized cost savings after mergers. Considering the period 2003-2009, we estimate the translog cost function to examine economies of scale in the years preceding restructuring. Additionally, we use the difference-in-differences approach to evaluate hospital centres (HC) that occurred between 2004 and 2007, comparing the years after and before mergers. Our findings suggest that economies of scale are present in the pre-merger configuration with an optimum hospital size of around 230 beds. However, the mergers between two or more hospitals led to statistically significant post-merger cost increases, of about 8 %. This result indicates that some HC become too large to explore economies of scale and suggests the difficulty of achieving efficiencies through combining operations and service specialization. PMID:24379130

  5. Incentives for cost-effective physician behavior.

    PubMed

    Maynard, A

    1987-04-01

    The objective of the National Health Service is to maximise improvements in the health status of patients regardless of their willingness and ability to pay. To achieve this objective it is necessary to identify those procedures which maximise improvements in health or quality adjusted life years (QALYs) and direct scarce resources to those therapies with the best cost-QALY characteristics. Unfortunately in the NHS and elsewhere cost-QALY characteristics are largely unknown and the structure of the health service and its provider remuneration systems are such that objectives are vague, behavior perverse due to the haphazard construction of incentive systems, and health status outcomes often unknown due to the failure to evaluate input-outcome relationships. To reform the NHS, in particular ensure more efficient practice by physicians, existing perverse incentives will have to be replaced by the use of buyer (NHS) power and by budgeting mechanisms which induce economizing behavior. It is not clear which type of incentive mechanism will produce outcomes consistent with NHS goals. To remedy this ignorance experimentation with careful evaluation would seem appropriate. PMID:10312074

  6. [Considerations of screening and brief intervention among high-risk drinkers in Japan: from the perspectives of feasibility and cost-effectiveness].

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yurie; Yoshimoto, Hisashi; Ikeda, Shunya

    2016-02-01

    One of the alcohol-related goals in Japan's health promotion campaign called Health Japan 21 (secondary term) is to reduce the number of high-risk drinkers (20 years old or above) who consume 40g or more pure alcohol/day in men and 20g or more in women by year 2022. To achieve this goal, a further expansion of screening and brief intervention (SBI) in the medical setting is essential. In this research, realistic and cost-effective SBI scenarios in Japan were investigated based on international systematic review and clinicians' opinions from a semi-structured interview. Several SBI scenarios were built with 2 levels of intervention based on the AUDIT scores of 8-15 (brief advice) and 16-19 (brief advice and counseling, continuous intervention), and a simulation was conducted by applying different probabilities and success rates into the scenarios. Information associated with preparation and implementation of SBI at the 2 levels was also estimated and annual costs of SBI per drinker were calculated. It was found that approximately 2,390,000 and 530,000 high-risk drinkers require brief and extensive interventions, respectively. Furthermore, incremental costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained were calculated at 723,415 yen for brief intervention and 944,762 yen for extensive intervention, suggesting cost-effectiveness of SBI in Japan. Given the limited national healthcare budget and operational challenges such as time to provide SBI especially in the primary care setting in Japan, roles of healthcare providers and wider use of information technology were discussed with some suggestions. Furthermore, lighter and more frequent interventions at various levels and not only at the medical setting but also at multiple social settings (such as workplace and among family and friends) were discussed to increase the cost-effectiveness of SBI and to keep the number of high-risk drinkers who have successfully reduced their alcohol consumption.

  7. [Considerations of screening and brief intervention among high-risk drinkers in Japan: from the perspectives of feasibility and cost-effectiveness].

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yurie; Yoshimoto, Hisashi; Ikeda, Shunya

    2016-02-01

    One of the alcohol-related goals in Japan's health promotion campaign called Health Japan 21 (secondary term) is to reduce the number of high-risk drinkers (20 years old or above) who consume 40g or more pure alcohol/day in men and 20g or more in women by year 2022. To achieve this goal, a further expansion of screening and brief intervention (SBI) in the medical setting is essential. In this research, realistic and cost-effective SBI scenarios in Japan were investigated based on international systematic review and clinicians' opinions from a semi-structured interview. Several SBI scenarios were built with 2 levels of intervention based on the AUDIT scores of 8-15 (brief advice) and 16-19 (brief advice and counseling, continuous intervention), and a simulation was conducted by applying different probabilities and success rates into the scenarios. Information associated with preparation and implementation of SBI at the 2 levels was also estimated and annual costs of SBI per drinker were calculated. It was found that approximately 2,390,000 and 530,000 high-risk drinkers require brief and extensive interventions, respectively. Furthermore, incremental costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained were calculated at 723,415 yen for brief intervention and 944,762 yen for extensive intervention, suggesting cost-effectiveness of SBI in Japan. Given the limited national healthcare budget and operational challenges such as time to provide SBI especially in the primary care setting in Japan, roles of healthcare providers and wider use of information technology were discussed with some suggestions. Furthermore, lighter and more frequent interventions at various levels and not only at the medical setting but also at multiple social settings (such as workplace and among family and friends) were discussed to increase the cost-effectiveness of SBI and to keep the number of high-risk drinkers who have successfully reduced their alcohol consumption. PMID:27295821

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of Rotavirus Vaccination in Bolivia from the State Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily R.; Rowlinson, Emily E.; Iniguez, Volga; Etienne, Kizee A.; Rivera, Rosario; Mamani, Nataniel; Rheingans, Rick; Patzi, Maritza; Halkyer, Percy; Leon, Juan S.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND In Bolivia, in 2008, the under-five mortality rate is 54 per 1000 live births. Diarrhea causes 15% of these deaths, and 40% of pediatric diarrhea-related hospitalizations are caused by rotavirus illness (RI). Rotavirus vaccination (RV), subsidized by international donors, is expected to reduce morbidity, mortality, and economic burden to the Bolivian state. Estimates of illness and economic burden of RI and their reduction by RV are essential to the Bolivian state’s policies on RV program financing. The goal of this report is to estimate the economic burden of RI and the cost-effectiveness of the RV program. METHODS To assess treatment costs incurred by the healthcare system, we abstracted medical records from 287 inpatients and 6,751 outpatients with acute diarrhea between 2005 and 2006 at 5 sentinel hospitals in 4 geographic regions. RI prevalence rates were estimated from 4 years of national hospital surveillance. We used a decision-analytic model to assess the potential cost-effectiveness of universal RV in Bolivia. RESULTS Our model estimates that, in a 5-year birth cohort, Bolivia will incur over US$3 million in direct medical costs due to RI. RV reduces, by at least 60%, outpatient visits, hospitalizations, deaths, and total direct medical costs associated with rotavirus diarrhea. Further, RV was cost-savings below a price of US$3.81 per dose and cost-effective below a price of US$194.10 per dose. Diarrheal mortality and hospitalization inputs were the most important drivers of rotavirus vaccine cost-effectiveness. DISCUSSION Our data will guide Bolivia’s funding allocation for RV as international subsidies change. PMID:21624421

  9. Information-seeking Behavior During Residency Is Associated With Quality of Theoretical Learning, Academic Career Achievements, and Evidence-based Medical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Braun, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Data regarding knowledge acquisition during residency training are sparse. Predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements and evidence-based medical practice during residency are unknown. We performed a cross-sectional study on residents and attending physicians across several residency programs in 2 French faculties of medicine. We comprehensively evaluated the information-seeking behavior (I-SB) during residency using a standardized questionnaire and looked for independent predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements, and evidence-based medical practice among I-SB components using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Between February 2013 and May 2013, 338 fellows and attending physicians were included in the study. Textbooks and international medical journals were reported to be used on a regular basis by 24% and 57% of the respondents, respectively. Among the respondents, 47% refer systematically (4.4%) or frequently (42.6%) to published guidelines from scientific societies upon their publication. The median self-reported theoretical learning quality score was 5/10 (interquartile range, 3–6; range, 1–10). A high theoretical learning quality score (upper quartile) was independently and strongly associated with the following I-SB components: systematic reading of clinical guidelines upon their publication (odds ratio [OR], 5.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77–17.44); having access to a library that offers the leading textbooks of the specialty in the medical department (OR, 2.45, 95% CI, 1.33–4.52); knowledge of the specialty leading textbooks (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.09–4.10); and PubMed search skill score ≥5/10 (OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.01–3.73). Research Master (M2) and/or PhD thesis enrolment were independently and strongly associated with the following predictors: PubMed search skill score ≥5/10 (OR, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.46–11.53); knowledge of the leading medical journals of the

  10. Achieving quality in cardiovascular imaging: proceedings from the American College of Cardiology-Duke University Medical Center Think Tank on Quality in Cardiovascular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela; Iskandrian, Ami E; Krumholz, Harlan M; Gillam, Linda; Hendel, Robert; Jollis, James; Peterson, Eric; Chen, Jersey; Masoudi, Frederick; Mohler, Emile; McNamara, Robert L; Patel, Manesh R; Spertus, John

    2006-11-21

    Cardiovascular imaging has enjoyed both rapid technological advances and sustained growth, yet less attention has been focused on quality than in other areas of cardiovascular medicine. To address this deficit, representatives from cardiovascular imaging societies, private payers, government agencies, the medical imaging industry, and experts in quality measurement met, and this report provides an overview of the discussions. A consensus definition of quality in imaging and a convergence of opinion on quality measures across imaging modalities was achieved and are intended to be the start of a process culminating in the development, dissemination, and adoption of quality measures for all cardiovascular imaging modalities.

  11. Mediated learning experience and concept maps: a pedagogical tool for achieving meaningful learning in medical physiology students.

    PubMed

    González, Hilda Leonor; Palencia, Alberto Pardo; Umaña, Luis Alfredo; Galindo, Leonor; Villafrade M, Luz Adriana

    2008-12-01

    Even though comprehension of human physiology is crucial in the clinical setting, students frequently learn part of this subject using rote memory and then are unable to transfer knowledge to other contexts or to solve clinical problems. This study evaluated the impact of articulating the concept map strategy with the mediated learning experience on meaningful learning during the cardiovascular module of a medical physiology course at Universidad Autónoma de Bucaramanga. This research was based on the ideas of David Ausubel (meaningful learning), Joseph Novak (concept maps), and Reuven Feuerstein (mediated learning experience). Students were randomly allocated to either an intervention group (mediated learning experience articulated with concept mapping) or a control group (traditional methodology). The intervention group constructed concept maps related to cardiovascular physiology and used them to solve problems related to this subject. The control group attended traditional discussion sessions and problem-solving sessions. All students were evaluated with two types of exams: problem-solving and multiple-choice exams. The intervention group performed significantly better on the problem-solving exams, but the difference was not significant in the multiple-choice exam. It was concluded that intervention promoted meaningful learning that allowed the students to transfer this knowledge to solve problems. The implemented strategy had a greater impact on the students who came into the study with the lowest cognitive competence, possibly because they were empowered by the intervention.

  12. Applications of Cost Effectiveness to Counseling Center Retention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Steven J.; Giddan, Norman S.

    1986-01-01

    Provides a framework for considering cost-benefit analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis of college counseling centers and retention activities. Results indicated that careful evaluation techniques can improve the efficiency and effectiveness of student retention programs. (Author/BL)

  13. Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening - an overview.

    PubMed

    Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Knudsen, Amy B; Brenner, Hermann

    2010-08-01

    There are several modalities available for a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program. When determining which CRC screening program to implement, the costs of such programs should be considered in comparison to the health benefits they are expected to provide. Cost-effectiveness analysis provides a tool to do this. In this paper we review the evidence on the cost-effectiveness of CRC screening. Published studies universally indicate that when compared with no CRC screening, all screening modalities provide additional years of life at a cost that is deemed acceptable by most industrialized nations. Many recent studies even find CRC screening to be cost-saving. However, when the alternative CRC screening strategies are compared against each other in an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis, no single optimal strategy emerges across the studies. There is consensus that the new technologies of stool DNA testing, computed tomographic colonography and capsule endoscopy are not yet cost-effective compared with the established CRC screening tests.

  14. Antimicrobial stewardship programs - cost-minimizing or cost-effective?

    PubMed

    You, Joyce

    2015-02-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) are aimed to improve patient care and health care outcomes. It is encouraging to find ASP interventions to be cost-saving in many cost-minimization analyses in literature. Nevertheless, the cost-effectiveness of ASP interventions, measured in cost per quality-adjusted life-years, is less well-established. This Editorial aims to explore the barriers in assessing clinical effectiveness of ASPs and provide suggestions to conduct cost-effectiveness analysis of ASPs. PMID:25331093

  15. Denosumab for Elderly Men with Osteoporosis: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis from the US Payer Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Stuart; Agodoa, Irene; Kruse, Morgan; Parthan, Anju; Orwoll, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of denosumab versus other osteoporotic treatments in older men with osteoporosis from a US payer perspective. Methods. A lifetime cohort Markov model previously developed for postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) was used. Men in the model were 78 years old, with a BMD T-score of −2.12 and a vertebral fracture prevalence of 23%. During each 6-month Markov cycle, patients could have experienced a hip, vertebral or nonhip, nonvertebral (NHNV) osteoporotic fracture, remained in a nonfracture state, remained in a postfracture state, or died. Background fracture risks, mortality rates, persistence rates, health utilities, and medical and drug costs were derived from published sources. Previous PMO studies were used for drug efficacy in reducing fracture risk. Lifetime expected costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were estimated for denosumab, generic alendronate, risedronate, ibandronate, teriparatide, and zoledronate. Results. Denosumab had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $16,888 compared to generic alendronate and dominated all other treatments. Results were most sensitive to changes in costs of denosumab and the relative risk of hip fracture. Conclusion. Despite a higher annual treatment cost compared to other medications, denosumab is cost-effective compared to other osteoporotic treatments in older osteoporotic US men. PMID:26783494

  16. Cost-effectiveness analysis of using antiretroviral drug resistance testing.

    PubMed

    Lauria, Francesco Nicola; Angeletti, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients failing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have a substantially lower chance of clinical success than naive patients given their first antiretroviral therapy. This suggests that HAART failure is a determinant for an increase in the cost of treatment. A review of the literature regarding cost and impact of antiretroviral drug-resistance testing was performed. Examination of existing methods to execute a cost-effectiveness analysis on the use of these tests in clinical practice was also undertaken. The cost of treatment failure in HIV-infected patients has been quantified in several retrospective studies. The cost of care for patients with virological suppression was significantly lower than those with a single virological failure. Moreover, the latter group had lower costs than patients with multiple failures. The result of the cost-effective analysis based on a specific model application using genotypic resistance assays to guide the choice of a subsequent therapy in HIV disease, is cost-effective under a wide range of assumptions regarding effectiveness and costs. The available studies on the cost-effective evaluation of genotypic tests are limited, and the respective studies supply important indications on cost-effective evaluations. Despite its demonstrated benefits, antiretroviral drug resistance testing presents features and limitations that also restrict the cost-effectiveness analysis. PMID:15000585

  17. Use of Lipid-Lowering Medications and the Likelihood of Achieving Optimal LDL-Cholesterol Goals in Coronary Artery Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Karalis, Dean G; Victor, Brett; Ahedor, Lilian; Liu, Longjian

    2012-01-01

    Background. In clinical practice, most coronary artery disease patients are not achieving their recommend LDL-cholesterol goal of <70 mg/dL. Methods. We conducted a retrospective analysis of outpatient electronic health records and the most recent lipid profile, lipid-lowering medications and doses were collected. Results. We identified 9950 coronary artery disease patients. Only 37% on a statin alone achieved an LDL-cholesterol of <70 mg/dL, and most were on moderate-to-high-potency statins. The intensity of statin therapy did not improve LDL-cholesterol goal attainment. Among patients on combination therapy, 41% on statin plus ezetimibe and 46% on statin plus niacin achieved an LDL-cholesterol of <70 mg/dL (P = 0.01 and <0.0001 versus statin alone). If patients were switched to a high-potency statin LDL-cholesterol goal attainment of <70 mg/dL would increase to 46% and would increase up to 72% with combination therapy. Conclusions. Most coronary artery disease patients in clinical practice do not attain an LDL-cholesterol of <70 mg/dL, even among patients on high potency statins. The combination of statin plus either ezetimibe or niacin is the most effective regimen to achieve an LDL-cholesterol of <70 mg/dL, however, these drug combinations are used infrequently in clinical practice.

  18. Is antenatal syphilis screening still cost effective in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Terris-Prestholt, F; Watson-Jones, D; Mugeye, K; Kumaranayake, L; Ndeki, L; Weiss, H; Changalucha, J; Todd, J; Lisekie, F; Gumodoka, B; Mabey, D; Hayes, R

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the cost effectiveness of on-site antenatal syphilis screening and treatment in Mwanza, Tanzania. To compare this intervention with other antenatal and child health interventions, specifically the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). Methods: The economic costs of adding the intervention to routine antenatal care were assessed. Cost effectiveness (CE) ratios of the intervention were obtained for low birth weight (LBW) live births and stillbirths averted and cost per DALY saved. Cost per DALY saved was also estimated for previous CE studies of syphilis screening. The CE of the intervention at different syphilis prevalence rates was modelled. Results: The economic cost of the intervention is $1.44 per woman screened, $20 per woman treated, and $187 per adverse birth outcome averted. The cost per DALY saved is $110 with LBW as the only adverse outcome. When including stillbirth, this estimate improves 10-fold to $10.56 per DALY saved. The cost per DALY saved from all syphilis screening studies ranged from $3.97 to $18.73. Conclusions: Syphilis screening is shown to be at least as cost effective as PMTCT and more cost effective than many widely implemented interventions. There is urgent need for scaling up syphilis screening and treatment in high prevalence areas. The CE of screening interventions is highly dependent on disease prevalence. In combination, PMTCT and syphilis screening and treatment interventions may achieve economies of scope and thus improved efficiency. PMID:14573832

  19. Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: an exploratory cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, P; Saccardi, R; Confavreux, C; Sharrack, B; Muraro, P A; Mancardi, G L; Kozak, T; Farge-Bancel, D; Madan, J; Rafia, R; Akehurst, R; Snowden, J

    2010-06-01

    Treatment options for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) are limited. Mitoxantrone is routinely used to stabilize disease progression; however, evolving evidence suggests clinical benefit from intensive treatment with autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Given differences in cost and outcomes, preliminary cost-effectiveness studies are warranted if this approach is to be developed for more widespread application in SPMS. We developed a decision-analytic Markov model to explore the potential cost-effectiveness of autologous HSCT versus mitoxantrone in SPMS, using patient-level data from registry sources. The model evaluates the lifetime costs and health outcomes associated with disability progression and relapse. Sensitivity analyses were undertaken to examine the uncertainty surrounding cost-effectiveness outcomes. In the absence of randomised controlled trial (RCT) evidence, conditions for comparative analysis were not ideal. Under optimistic assumptions, HSCT is estimated to cost below pound3000 per quality adjusted life year gained. However, when a strict 6-month sustained progression rule is adopted, HSCT may be less effective and more expensive than mitoxantrone. The model results were sensitive to reducing procedural costs and HSCT-related mortality. We conclude that HSCT could potentially achieve an acceptable level of cost-effectiveness. However, caution should be exercised as large, high-quality RCTs comparing HSCT versus mitoxantrone are necessary to validate these findings.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of varenicline and three different behavioral treatment formats for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Javitz, Harold S; Zbikowski, Susan M; Deprey, Mona; McAfee, Timothy A; McClure, Jennifer B; Richards, Julie; Catz, Sheryl L; Jack, Lisa M; Swan, Gary E

    2011-03-01

    There is a lack of evidence of the relative cost-effectiveness of proactive telephone counseling (PTC) and Web-based delivery of smoking cessation services in conjunction with pharmacotherapy. We calculated the differential cost-effectiveness of three behavioral smoking cessation modalities with varenicline treatment in a randomized trial of current smokers from a large health system. Eligible participants were randomized to one of three smoking cessation interventions: Web-based counseling (n=401), PTC (n=402), or combined PTC-Web counseling (n=399). All participants received a standard 12-week course of varenicline. The primary outcome was a 7-day point prevalent nonsmoking at the 6month follow-up. The Web intervention was the least expensive followed by the PTC and PTC-Web groups. Costs per additional 6-month nonsmoker and per additional lifetime quitter were $1,278 and $2,601 for Web, $1,472 and $2,995 for PTC, and $1,617 and $3,291 for PTC-Web. Cost per life-year (LY) and quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) saved were $1,148 and $1,136 for Web, $1,320 and $1,308 for PTC, and $1,450 and $1,437 for PTC-Web. Based on the cost per LY and QALY saved, these interventions are among the most cost-effective life-saving medical treatments. Web, PTC, and combined PTC-Web treatments were all highly cost-effective, with the Web treatment being marginally more cost-effective than the PTC or combined PTC-Web treatments. PMID:21731592

  1. Cost-effectiveness of varenicline and three different behavioral treatment formats for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Javitz, Harold S; Zbikowski, Susan M; Deprey, Mona; McAfee, Timothy A; McClure, Jennifer B; Richards, Julie; Catz, Sheryl L; Jack, Lisa M; Swan, Gary E

    2011-03-01

    There is a lack of evidence of the relative cost-effectiveness of proactive telephone counseling (PTC) and Web-based delivery of smoking cessation services in conjunction with pharmacotherapy. We calculated the differential cost-effectiveness of three behavioral smoking cessation modalities with varenicline treatment in a randomized trial of current smokers from a large health system. Eligible participants were randomized to one of three smoking cessation interventions: Web-based counseling (n=401), PTC (n=402), or combined PTC-Web counseling (n=399). All participants received a standard 12-week course of varenicline. The primary outcome was a 7-day point prevalent nonsmoking at the 6month follow-up. The Web intervention was the least expensive followed by the PTC and PTC-Web groups. Costs per additional 6-month nonsmoker and per additional lifetime quitter were $1,278 and $2,601 for Web, $1,472 and $2,995 for PTC, and $1,617 and $3,291 for PTC-Web. Cost per life-year (LY) and quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) saved were $1,148 and $1,136 for Web, $1,320 and $1,308 for PTC, and $1,450 and $1,437 for PTC-Web. Based on the cost per LY and QALY saved, these interventions are among the most cost-effective life-saving medical treatments. Web, PTC, and combined PTC-Web treatments were all highly cost-effective, with the Web treatment being marginally more cost-effective than the PTC or combined PTC-Web treatments.

  2. The Clinical Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of Routine, Voluntary HIV Screening in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Walensky, Rochelle P.; Wood, Robin; Fofana, Mariam O.; Martinson, Neil A.; Losina, Elena; April, Michael D.; Bassett, Ingrid V.; Morris, Bethany L.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Paltiel, A. David

    2010-01-01

    Background Although 900,000 HIV-infected South Africans receive antiretroviral therapy (ART), the majority of South Africans with HIV remain undiagnosed. Methods We use a published simulation model of HIV case detection and treatment to examine three HIV screening scenarios, in addition to current practice: 1) one-time; 2) every five years; and 3) annually. South African model input data include: 16.9% HIV prevalence, 1.3% annual incidence, 49% test acceptance rate, HIV testing costs of $6.49/patient, and a 47% linkage-to-care rate (including two sequential ART regimens) for identified cases. Outcomes include life expectancy, direct medical costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness. Results HIV screening one-time, every five years, and annually increase HIV-infected quality-adjusted life expectancy (mean age 33 years) from 180.6 months (current practice) to 184.9, 187.6 and 197.2 months. The incremental cost-effectiveness of one-time screening is dominated by screening every five years. Screening every five years and annually each have incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of $1,570/quality-adjusted life year (QALY) and $1,720/QALY. Screening annually is very cost-effective even in settings with the lowest incidence/prevalence, with test acceptance and linkage rates both as low as 20%, or when accounting for a stigma impact at least four-fold that of the base case. Conclusions In South Africa, annual voluntary HIV screening offers substantial clinical benefit and is very cost-effective, even with highly constrained access to care and treatment. PMID:21068674

  3. Mobile HIV Screening in Cape Town, South Africa: Clinical Impact, Cost and Cost-Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Ingrid V.; Govindasamy, Darshini; Erlwanger, Alison S.; Hyle, Emily P.; Kranzer, Katharina; van Schaik, Nienke; Noubary, Farzad; Paltiel, A. David; Wood, Robin; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Losina, Elena; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Freedberg, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mobile HIV screening may facilitate early HIV diagnosis. Our objective was to examine the cost-effectiveness of adding a mobile screening unit to current medical facility-based HIV testing in Cape Town, South Africa. Methods and Findings We used the Cost Effectiveness of Preventing AIDS Complications International (CEPAC-I) computer simulation model to evaluate two HIV screening strategies in Cape Town: 1) medical facility-based testing (the current standard of care) and 2) addition of a mobile HIV-testing unit intervention in the same community. Baseline input parameters were derived from a Cape Town-based mobile unit that tested 18,870 individuals over 2 years: prevalence of previously undiagnosed HIV (6.6%), mean CD4 count at diagnosis (males 423/µL, females 516/µL), CD4 count-dependent linkage to care rates (males 31%–58%, females 49%–58%), mobile unit intervention cost (includes acquisition, operation and HIV test costs, $29.30 per negative result and $31.30 per positive result). We conducted extensive sensitivity analyses to evaluate input uncertainty. Model outcomes included site of HIV diagnosis, life expectancy, medical costs, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of the intervention compared to medical facility-based testing. We considered the intervention to be “very cost-effective” when the ICER was less than South Africa's annual per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) ($8,200 in 2012). We projected that, with medical facility-based testing, the discounted (undiscounted) HIV-infected population life expectancy was 132.2 (197.7) months; this increased to 140.7 (211.7) months with the addition of the mobile unit. The ICER for the mobile unit was $2,400/year of life saved (YLS). Results were most sensitive to the previously undiagnosed HIV prevalence, linkage to care rates, and frequency of HIV testing at medical facilities. Conclusion The addition of mobile HIV screening to current testing programs can improve survival

  4. Cost-effective electric vehicle charging infrastructure siting for Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Gopal, Anand R.; Harris, Andrew; Jacobson, Arne

    2016-06-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) represent a substantial opportunity for governments to reduce emissions of both air pollutants and greenhouse gases. The Government of India has set a goal of deploying 6-7 million hybrid and PEVs on Indian roads by the year 2020. The uptake of PEVs will depend on, among other factors like high cost, how effectively range anxiety is mitigated through the deployment of adequate electric vehicle charging stations (EVCS) throughout a region. The Indian Government therefore views EVCS deployment as a central part of their electric mobility mission. The plug-in electric vehicle infrastructure (PEVI) model—an agent-based simulation modeling platform—was used to explore the cost-effective siting of EVCS throughout the National Capital Territory (NCT) of Delhi, India. At 1% penetration in the passenger car fleet, or ˜10 000 battery electric vehicles (BEVs), charging services can be provided to drivers for an investment of 4.4 M (or 440/BEV) by siting 2764 chargers throughout the NCT of Delhi with an emphasis on the more densely populated and frequented regions of the city. The majority of chargers sited by this analysis were low power, Level 1 chargers, which have the added benefit of being simpler to deploy than higher power alternatives. The amount of public infrastructure needed depends on the access that drivers have to EVCS at home, with 83% more charging capacity required to provide the same level of service to a population of drivers without home chargers compared to a scenario with home chargers. Results also depend on the battery capacity of the BEVs adopted, with approximately 60% more charging capacity needed to achieve the same level of service when vehicles are assumed to have 57 km versus 96 km of range.

  5. Cost-effective electric vehicle charging infrastructure siting for Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Gopal, Anand R.; Harris, Andrew; Jacobson, Arne

    2016-06-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) represent a substantial opportunity for governments to reduce emissions of both air pollutants and greenhouse gases. The Government of India has set a goal of deploying 6–7 million hybrid and PEVs on Indian roads by the year 2020. The uptake of PEVs will depend on, among other factors like high cost, how effectively range anxiety is mitigated through the deployment of adequate electric vehicle charging stations (EVCS) throughout a region. The Indian Government therefore views EVCS deployment as a central part of their electric mobility mission. The plug-in electric vehicle infrastructure (PEVI) model—an agent-based simulation modeling platform—was used to explore the cost-effective siting of EVCS throughout the National Capital Territory (NCT) of Delhi, India. At 1% penetration in the passenger car fleet, or ∼10 000 battery electric vehicles (BEVs), charging services can be provided to drivers for an investment of 4.4 M (or 440/BEV) by siting 2764 chargers throughout the NCT of Delhi with an emphasis on the more densely populated and frequented regions of the city. The majority of chargers sited by this analysis were low power, Level 1 chargers, which have the added benefit of being simpler to deploy than higher power alternatives. The amount of public infrastructure needed depends on the access that drivers have to EVCS at home, with 83% more charging capacity required to provide the same level of service to a population of drivers without home chargers compared to a scenario with home chargers. Results also depend on the battery capacity of the BEVs adopted, with approximately 60% more charging capacity needed to achieve the same level of service when vehicles are assumed to have 57 km versus 96 km of range.

  6. Manufactured Homes Simulated Thermal Analysis and Cost Effectiveness Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Baylon, David

    1990-05-17

    In 1988 and 1989, 150 manufactured homes were built to comply with Super Good Cents (SGC) specifications adapted from the existing specifications for site-built homes under the Residential Construction Demonstration Project (RCDP). Engineering calculations and computer simulations were used to estimate the effects of the SGC specifications on the thermal performance of the homes. These results were compared with consumer costs to establish the cost-effectiveness of individual measures. Heat loss U-factors for windows, walls, floors and ceilings were established using the standard ASHRAE parallel heat flow method. Adjustments resulted in higher U-factors for ceilings and floors than assumed at the time the homes were approved as meeting the SGC specifications. Except for those homes which included heat pumps, most of the homes did not meet the SGC compliance standards. Nonetheless these homes achieved substantial reductions in overall heat loss rate (UA) compared to UAs estimated for the same homes using the standard insulation packages provided by the manufacturers in the absence of the RCDP program. Homes with conventional electric furnaces showed a 35% reduction in total UA while homes with heat pumps had a 25% reduction. A regression analysis showed no significant relationship between climate zone, manufacturer and UA. A modified version of SUNDAY building simulation program which simulates duct and heat pump performance was used to model the thermal performance of each RCDP home as built and the same home as it would have been built without SGC specifications (base case). Standard assumptions were used for thermostat setpoint, thermal mass, internal gains and infiltration rates. 11 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Bridging the osteoporosis treatment gap: performance and cost-effectiveness of a fracture liaison service.

    PubMed

    Yates, Christopher J; Chauchard, Marie-Anne; Liew, Danny; Bucknill, Andrew; Wark, John D

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who sustain fragility fractures are at high risk of refracture. However, osteoporosis treatment rates remain low for these patients. Therefore, we aimed to assess the performance and cost-effectiveness of introducing a fracture liaison service (FLS) into a tertiary hospital. In "nonhospitalized" ambulatory patients who had sustained fragility fractures, we assessed baseline osteoporosis investigation and treatment rates, and subsequently, the impact of introducing an orthopedic osteoporosis policy and an FLS. Outcomes measured were uptake of osteoporosis intervention, patient satisfaction, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. QALYs were calculated over 5 years using predicted fracture risks without intervention and estimated fracture risk reduction with intervention. At baseline (n = 49), 2% of ambulatory patients who had sustained fragility fractures underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and 6% received osteoporosis-specific medication. After introduction of an osteoporosis policy (n = 58), 28% were investigated with DXA (p < 0.0001). However, treatment rates were unchanged. An FLS was introduced, reviewing 203 new patients over the inaugural 2 years (mean age [standard deviation], 67 (11) years; 77% female). All underwent DXA, and criteria for osteoporosis and osteopenia were identified in 44% and 40%, respectively. Osteoporosis medications were prescribed to 61% patients (risedronate: 22%, alendronate: 16%, strontium ranelate: 13%, zoledronic acid: 8%, other: 2%). Eighty-five of 90 questionnaire respondents were very satisfied or satisfied with the FLS. With the treatment prescribed over 5 years, we conservatively estimated that this FLS would reduce nonvertebral refractures from 59 to 50, improving QALYs by 0.054 and costing $1716 per patient (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio: $31749). This FLS model improves uptake of osteoporosis intervention guidelines, is popular among patients, and improves cost-effectiveness. Thus, it

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of Bariatric Surgery for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qi; Sun, Zhipeng; Zhang, Nengwei; Xu, Guangzhong; Song, Peipei; Xu, Lingzhong; Tang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To compare the remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) through treatment with laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) or laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB), and to analyze the cost-effectiveness of medical treatment, LSG, and LRYGB in T2DM patients (BMI ≥ 28). A 2-group randomized controlled trial was conducted at Diabetes Surgery Centre, Beijing Shijitan Hospital in Beijing, China. Subjects were 80 patients ages 16 to 65 years with a body mass index of 28 kg/m2 or more and duration of T2DM no more than 15 years. Subjects were randomly assigned (1:1) to undergo either LSG (n = 40) or LRYGB (n = 40) between February 3, 2011 and October 31, 2013. Of those patients, 72 (90%) were available at follow-up at 2 years. These patients included 34 (85%) who underwent LSG and 38 (95%) who underwent LRYGB. This study presents the follow-up data at 2 years, which compared LSG and LRYGB in T2DM patients. Partial remission and complete remission were determined, and weight loss, BMI, changes in abdominal circumference, cholesterol, and triglycerides were measured. The cost-effectiveness of each type of bariatric surgery was analyzed with a Markov simulation model that yielded quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and costs. From our analysis results, LSG and LRYGB are both have taken a great effect on the reduction of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and bodyweight in patients with T2DM. The cost-effectiveness ratios of medical treatment, LSG, and LRYGB respectively are 1589.02, 1028.97, and 1197.44 dollars per QALY. Our analysis indicates that LSG appear to provide a cost-effective method of T2DM treatment for the patients. PMID:27196454

  9. Cost-effectiveness analysis of baclofen and chlordiazepoxide in uncomplicated alcohol-withdrawal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Vikram K.; Girish, K.; Lakshmi, Pandit; Vijendra, R.; Kumar, Ajay; Harsha, R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Benzodiazepines (BZDs) are the first-line drugs in alcohol-withdrawal syndrome (AWS). Baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) agonist, controls withdrawal symptoms without causing significant adverse effects. The objective of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of baclofen and chlordiazepoxide in the management of uncomplicated AWS. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized, open label, standard controlled, parallel group study of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of baclofen and chlordiazepoxide in 60 participants with uncomplicated AWS. Clinical efficacy was measured by the Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for alcohol (CIWA-Ar) scores. Lorazepam was used as supplement medication if withdrawal symptoms could not be controlled effectively by the study drugs alone. Both direct and indirect medical costs were considered and the CEA was analyzed in both patient's perspective and third-party perspective. Results: The average cost-effectiveness ratio (ACER) in patient's perspective of baclofen and chlordiazepoxide was Rs. 5,308.61 and Rs. 2,951.95 per symptom-free day, respectively. The ACER in third-party perspective of baclofen and chlordiazepoxide was Rs. 895.01 and Rs. 476.29 per symptom-free day, respectively. Participants on chlordiazepoxide had more number of symptom-free days when compared with the baclofen group on analysis by Mann-Whitney test (U = 253.50, P = 0.03). Conclusion: Both study drugs provided relief of withdrawal symptoms. Chlordiazepoxide was more cost-effective than baclofen. Baclofen was relatively less effective and more expensive than chlordiazepoxide. PMID:25097273

  10. Cost effectiveness of ramipril treatment for cardiovascular risk reduction

    PubMed Central

    Malik, I; Bhatia, V; Kooner, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the cost effectiveness of ramipril treatment in patients at low, medium, and high risk of cardiovascular death.
DESIGN—Population based cost effectiveness analysis from the perspective of the health care provider in the UK. Effectiveness was modelled using data from the HOPE (heart outcome prevention evaluation) trial. The life table method was used to predict mortality in a medium risk cohort, as in the HOPE trial (2.44% annual mortality), and in low and high risk groups (1% and 4.5% annual mortality, respectively).
SETTING—UK population using 1998 government actuary department data.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE—Cost per life year gained at five years and lifetime treatment with ramipril.
RESULTS—Cost effectiveness was £36 600, £13 600, and £4000 per life year gained at five years and £5300, £1900, and £100 per life year gained at 20 years (lifetime treatment) in low, medium, and high risk groups, respectively. Cost effectiveness at 20 years remained well below that of haemodialysis (£25 000 per life year gained) over a range of potential drug costs and savings. Treatment of the HOPE population would cost the UK National Health Service (NHS) an additional £360 million but would prevent 12 000 deaths per annum.
CONCLUSIONS—Ramipril is cost effective treatment for cardiovascular risk reduction in patients at medium, high, and low pretreatment risk, with a cost effectiveness comparable with the use of statins. Implementation of ramipril treatment in a medium risk population would result in a major reduction in cardiovascular deaths but would increase annual NHS spending by £360 million.


Keywords: angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor; cardiovascular risk; cost effectiveness; ramipril PMID:11303006

  11. Cost-effective management alternatives for Snake River Chinook salmon: a biological-economic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Halsing, David L; Moore, Michael R

    2008-04-01

    The mandate to increase endangered salmon populations in the Columbia River Basin of North America has created a complex, controversial resource-management issue. We constructed an integrated assessment model as a tool for analyzing biological-economic trade-offs in recovery of Snake River spring- and summer-run chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). We merged 3 frameworks: a salmon-passage model to predict migration and survival of smolts; an age-structured matrix model to predict long-term population growth rates of salmon stocks; and a cost-effectiveness analysis to determine a set of least-cost management alternatives for achieving particular population growth rates. We assessed 6 individual salmon-management measures and 76 management alternatives composed of one or more measures. To reflect uncertainty, results were derived for different assumptions of effectiveness of smolt transport around dams. Removal of an estuarine predator, the Caspian Tern (Sterna caspia), was cost-effective and generally increased long-term population growth rates regardless of transport effectiveness. Elimination of adult salmon harvest had a similar effect over a range of its cost estimates. The specific management alternatives in the cost-effective set depended on assumptions about transport effectiveness. On the basis of recent estimates of smolt transport effectiveness, alternatives that discontinued transportation or breached dams were prevalent in the cost-effective set, whereas alternatives that maximized transportation dominated if transport effectiveness was relatively high. More generally, the analysis eliminated 80-90% of management alternatives from the cost-effective set. Application of our results to salmon management is limited by data availability and model assumptions, but these limitations can help guide research that addresses critical uncertainties and information. Our results thus demonstrate that linking biology and economics through integrated models can

  12. Cost-effectiveness analysis of establishing a distance-education programme for health personnel in Swaziland.

    PubMed

    Kirigia, Joses M; Sambo, Luis G; Phiri, Margaret; Matsembula, Gladys; Awases, Magda

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing conviction among policy-makers that the availability of adequate numbers of well-trained and motivated human resources is a key determinant of health system' s capacity to achieve their health, responsiveness and fairness-improving goals. The objective of this study was to estimate the cost, effectiveness and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of various distance-education strategies for the health sector in Swaziland; and recommend the most cost-effective option. The distance-education strategies evaluated included: Mobile library services (MLS); micro-resources centers WITHOUT video conferencing in five health centers and four regional hospitals (MRC-VC); micro-resources centers WITH video conferencing in five health centers and four regional hospitals (MRC+VC); centralized resource center WITHOUT video conferencing (CRC-VC); centralized resource center WITH video conferencing (CRC+VC); and status quo (SQ). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for MLS was Emalangeni (E) 41,846; MRC-VC was E42,696; MRC+VC was E45,569; CRC-VC was E43,578; CRC+VC was E40,827; the latter being the most cost-effective distance-education strategy. According to policy-makers, this study served to clarify the various distance-education strategies, their costs and their benefits/effectiveness. There is a need for developing in Africa a culture of basing policy and management decisions of such kind on systematic analyses. Of course, economic evaluation will, at most, be a guide to policy- and decision-making, and thus, the onus of decision-making will always be on policy-makers and health-care managers.

  13. Cost-effective management alternatives for Snake River Chinook salmon: a biological-economic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Halsing, David L; Moore, Michael R

    2008-04-01

    The mandate to increase endangered salmon populations in the Columbia River Basin of North America has created a complex, controversial resource-management issue. We constructed an integrated assessment model as a tool for analyzing biological-economic trade-offs in recovery of Snake River spring- and summer-run chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). We merged 3 frameworks: a salmon-passage model to predict migration and survival of smolts; an age-structured matrix model to predict long-term population growth rates of salmon stocks; and a cost-effectiveness analysis to determine a set of least-cost management alternatives for achieving particular population growth rates. We assessed 6 individual salmon-management measures and 76 management alternatives composed of one or more measures. To reflect uncertainty, results were derived for different assumptions of effectiveness of smolt transport around dams. Removal of an estuarine predator, the Caspian Tern (Sterna caspia), was cost-effective and generally increased long-term population growth rates regardless of transport effectiveness. Elimination of adult salmon harvest had a similar effect over a range of its cost estimates. The specific management alternatives in the cost-effective set depended on assumptions about transport effectiveness. On the basis of recent estimates of smolt transport effectiveness, alternatives that discontinued transportation or breached dams were prevalent in the cost-effective set, whereas alternatives that maximized transportation dominated if transport effectiveness was relatively high. More generally, the analysis eliminated 80-90% of management alternatives from the cost-effective set. Application of our results to salmon management is limited by data availability and model assumptions, but these limitations can help guide research that addresses critical uncertainties and information. Our results thus demonstrate that linking biology and economics through integrated models can

  14. Cost-effectiveness of alternative conservation strategies with application to the Pacific leatherback turtle.

    PubMed

    Gjertsen, Heidi; Squires, Dale; Dutton, Peter H; Eguchi, Tomoharu

    2014-02-01

    Although holistic conservation addressing all sources of mortality for endangered species or stocks is the preferred conservation strategy, limited budgets require a criterion to prioritize conservation investments. We compared the cost-effectiveness of nesting site and at-sea conservation strategies for Pacific leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea). We sought to determine which conservation strategy or mix of strategies would produce the largest increase in population growth rate per dollar. Alternative strategies included protection of nesters and their eggs at nesting beaches in Indonesia, gear changes, effort restrictions, and caps on turtle takes in the Hawaiian (U.S.A.) longline swordfish fishery, and temporal and area closures in the California (U.S.A.) drift gill net fishery. We used a population model with a biological metric to measure the effects of conservation alternatives. We normalized all effects by cost to prioritize those strategies with the greatest biological effect relative to its economic cost. We used Monte Carlo simulation to address uncertainty in the main variables and to calculate probability distributions for cost-effectiveness measures. Nesting beach protection was the most cost-effective means of achieving increases in leatherback populations. This result creates the possibility of noncompensatory bycatch mitigation, where high-bycatch fisheries invest in protecting nesting beaches. An example of this practice is U.S. processors of longline tuna and California drift gill net fishers that tax themselves to finance low-cost nesting site protection. Under certain conditions, fisheries interventions, such as technologies that reduce leatherback bycatch without substantially decreasing target species catch, can be cost-effective. Reducing bycatch in coastal areas where bycatch is high, particularly adjacent to nesting beaches, may be cost-effective, particularly, if fisheries in the area are small and of little commercial value.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of alternative conservation strategies with application to the Pacific leatherback turtle.

    PubMed

    Gjertsen, Heidi; Squires, Dale; Dutton, Peter H; Eguchi, Tomoharu

    2014-02-01

    Although holistic conservation addressing all sources of mortality for endangered species or stocks is the preferred conservation strategy, limited budgets require a criterion to prioritize conservation investments. We compared the cost-effectiveness of nesting site and at-sea conservation strategies for Pacific leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea). We sought to determine which conservation strategy or mix of strategies would produce the largest increase in population growth rate per dollar. Alternative strategies included protection of nesters and their eggs at nesting beaches in Indonesia, gear changes, effort restrictions, and caps on turtle takes in the Hawaiian (U.S.A.) longline swordfish fishery, and temporal and area closures in the California (U.S.A.) drift gill net fishery. We used a population model with a biological metric to measure the effects of conservation alternatives. We normalized all effects by cost to prioritize those strategies with the greatest biological effect relative to its economic cost. We used Monte Carlo simulation to address uncertainty in the main variables and to calculate probability distributions for cost-effectiveness measures. Nesting beach protection was the most cost-effective means of achieving increases in leatherback populations. This result creates the possibility of noncompensatory bycatch mitigation, where high-bycatch fisheries invest in protecting nesting beaches. An example of this practice is U.S. processors of longline tuna and California drift gill net fishers that tax themselves to finance low-cost nesting site protection. Under certain conditions, fisheries interventions, such as technologies that reduce leatherback bycatch without substantially decreasing target species catch, can be cost-effective. Reducing bycatch in coastal areas where bycatch is high, particularly adjacent to nesting beaches, may be cost-effective, particularly, if fisheries in the area are small and of little commercial value. PMID

  16. Cost-effective management alternatives for Snake river chinook salmon: A biological-economic synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halsing, D.L.; Moore, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    The mandate to increase endangered salmon populations in the Columbia River Basin of North America has created a complex, controversial resource-management issue. We constructed an integrated assessment model as a tool for analyzing biological-economic trade-offs in recovery of Snake River spring- and summer-run chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). We merged 3 frameworks: a salmon-passage model to predict migration and survival of smolts; an age-structured matrix model to predict long-term population growth rates of salmon stocks; and a cost-effectiveness analysis to determine a set of least-cost management alternatives for achieving particular population growth rates. We assessed 6 individual salmon-management measures and 76 management alternatives composed of one or more measures. To reflect uncertainty, results were derived for different assumptions of effectiveness of smolt transport around dams. Removal of an estuarine predator, the Caspian Tern (Sterna caspia), was cost-effective and generally increased long-term population growth rates regardless of transport effectiveness. Elimination of adult salmon harvest had a similar effect over a range of its cost estimates. The specific management alternatives in the cost-effective set depended on assumptions about transport effectiveness. On the basis of recent estimates of smolt transport effectiveness, alternatives that discontinued transportation or breached dams were prevalent in the cost-effective set, whereas alternatives that maximized transportation dominated if transport effectiveness was relatively high. More generally, the analysis eliminated 80-90% of management alternatives from the cost-effective set. Application of our results to salmon management is limited by data availability and model assumptions, but these limitations can help guide research that addresses critical uncertainties and information. Our results thus demonstrate that linking biology and economics through integrated models can

  17. Cost-effectiveness of Prostate Cancer Screening: A Simulation Study Based on ERSPC Data

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, T. M.; Auvinen, A.; Zappa, M.; Nelen, V.; Kwiatkowski, M.; Villers, A.; Páez, A.; Moss, S. M.; Tammela, T. L. J.; Recker, F.; Denis, L.; Carlsson, S.V.; Wever, E. M.; Bangma, C. H.; Schröder, F. H.; Roobol, M. J.; Hugosson, J.; de Koning, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The results of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) trial showed a statistically significant 29% prostate cancer mortality reduction for the men screened in the intervention arm and a 23% negative impact on the life-years gained because of quality of life. However, alternative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening strategies for the population may exist, optimizing the effects on mortality reduction, quality of life, overdiagnosis, and costs. Methods: Based on data of the ERSPC trial, we predicted the numbers of prostate cancers diagnosed, prostate cancer deaths averted, life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) gained, and cost-effectiveness of 68 screening strategies starting at age 55 years, with a PSA threshold of 3, using microsimulation modeling. The screening strategies varied by age to stop screening and screening interval (one to 14 years or once in a lifetime screens), and therefore number of tests. Results: Screening at short intervals of three years or less was more cost-effective than using longer intervals. Screening at ages 55 to 59 years with two-year intervals had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $73000 per QALY gained and was considered optimal. With this strategy, lifetime prostate cancer mortality reduction was predicted as 13%, and 33% of the screen-detected cancers were overdiagnosed. When better quality of life for the post-treatment period could be achieved, an older age of 65 to 72 years for ending screening was obtained. Conclusion: Prostate cancer screening can be cost-effective when it is limited to two or three screens between ages 55 to 59 years. Screening above age 63 years is less cost-effective because of loss of QALYs because of overdiagnosis. PMID:25505238

  18. Cost-effectiveness and Pricing of Antibacterial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Verhoef, Talitha I; Morris, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Growing resistance to antibacterial agents has increased the need for the development of new drugs to treat bacterial infections. Given increasing pressure on limited health budgets, it is important to study the cost-effectiveness of these drugs, as well as their safety and efficacy, to find out whether or not they provide value for money and should be reimbursed. In this article, we systematically reviewed 38 cost-effectiveness analyses of new antibacterial agents. Most studies showed the new antibacterial drugs were cost-effective compared to older generation drugs. Drug pricing is a complicated process, involving different stakeholders, and has a large influence on cost-effectiveness. Value-based pricing is a method to determine the price of a drug at which it can be cost-effective. It is currently unclear what the influence of value-based pricing will be on the prices of new antibacterial agents, but an important factor will be the definition of ‘value’, which as well as the impact of the drug on patient health might also include other factors such as wider social impact and the health impact of disease. PMID:25521641

  19. Cost effectiveness of type 2 diabetes screening: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Behzad; Farzadfar, Farshad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Hadian, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although studies reported diabetes mellitus screening cost effective, the mass screening for type2 diabetes remains controversial. In this study we reviewed the recently evidence about the cost effectiveness of mass screening systematically. Methods: We reviewed the MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science (WOS), and Cochrane library databases by MeSH terms to identify relevant studies from 2000 to 2013. We had 4 inclusion and 6 exclusion criteria and used the Drummond’s checklist for appraising the quality of studies. Results: The initial search yielded 358 potentially related studies from selected databases. 6 studies met our inclusion and exclusion criteria and included in final review. 3 and 2 of them were conducted in Europe and America and only one of them in Asia. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) was the main outcome to appraise the effectiveness in the studies. Incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) was computed in range from $516.33 to $126,238 per QALY in the studies. Conclusion: A review of previous diabetes screening cost effectiveness analysis showed that the studies varied in some aspects but reached similar conclusions. They concluded that the screening may be cost effective, however further studies is required to support the diabetes mass screening. PMID:27390696

  20. Groundwater remediation and the cost effectiveness of phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Compernolle, T; Van Passel, S; Weyens, N; Vangronsveld, J; Lebbe, L; Thewys, T

    2012-10-01

    In 1999, phytoremediation was applied at the site of a Belgian car factory to contain two BTEX plumes. This case study evaluates the cost effectiveness of phytoremediation compared to other remediation options, applying a tailored approach for economic evaluation. Generally, when phytoremediation is addressed as being cost effective, the cost effectiveness is only determined on an average basis. This study however, demonstrates that an incremental analysis may provide a more nuanced conclusion. When the cost effectiveness is calculated on an average basis, in this particular case, the no containment strategy (natural attenuation) has the lowest cost per unit mass removed and hence, should be preferred. However, when the cost effectiveness is determined incrementally, no containment should only be preferred if the value of removing an extra gram of contaminant mass is lower than 320 euros. Otherwise, a permeable reactive barrier should be adopted. A similar analysis is provided for the effect determined on the basis of remediation time. Phytoremediation is preferred compared to 'no containment' if reaching the objective one year earlier is worth 7 000 euros.

  1. Neuropathic pain: quality-of-life impact, costs and cost effectiveness of therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Alec B

    2009-01-01

    A number of different diseases or injuries can damage the central or peripheral nervous system and produce neuropathic pain (NP), which seems to be more difficult to treat than many other types of chronic pain. As a group, patients with NP have greater medical co-morbidity burden than age- and sex-adjusted controls, which makes determining the humanistic and economic burden attributable to NP challenging. Health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) is substantially impaired among patients with NP. Patients describe pain-related interference in multiple HR-QOL and functional domains, as well as reduced ability to work and reduced mobility due to their pain. In addition, the spouses of NP patients have been shown to experience adverse social consequences related to NP. In randomized controlled trials, several medications have been shown to improve various measures of HR-QOL. Changes in HR-QOL appear to be tightly linked to pain relief, but not to the development of adverse effects. However, in cross-sectional studies, many patients continue to have moderate or severe pain and markedly impaired HR-QOL, despite taking medications prescribed for NP. The quality of NP treatment appears to be poor, with few patients receiving recommended medications in efficacious dosages. The substantial costs to society of NP derive from direct medical costs, loss of the ability to work, loss of caregivers' ability to work and possibly greater need for institutionalization or other living assistance. No single study has measured all of these costs to society for chronic NP. The cost effectiveness of various interventions for the treatment or prevention of different types of NP has been assessed in several different studies. The most-studied diseases are post-herpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic neuropathy, for which tricyclic antidepressants (both amitriptyline and desipramine) have been found to be either cost effective or dominant relative to other strategies. Increasing the use of

  2. Environmental cost-effectiveness analysis in intertemporal natural resource policy: evaluation of selective fishing gear.

    PubMed

    Kronbak, Lone Grønbæk; Vestergaard, Niels

    2013-12-15

    In most decision-making involving natural resources, the achievements of a given policy (e.g., improved ecosystem or biodiversity) are rather difficult to measure in monetary units. To address this problem, the current paper develops an environmental cost-effectiveness analysis (ECEA) to include intangible benefits in intertemporal natural resource problems. This approach can assist managers in prioritizing management actions as least cost solutions to achieve quantitative policy targets. The ECEA framework is applied to a selective gear policy case in Danish mixed trawl fisheries in Kattegat and Skagerrak. The empirical analysis demonstrates how a policy with large negative net benefits might be justified if the intangible benefits are included.

  3. Health Aid Is Allocated Efficiently, But Not Optimally: Insights From A Review Of Cost-Effectiveness Studies.

    PubMed

    Bendavid, Eran; Duong, Andrew; Sagan, Charlotte; Raikes, Gillian

    2015-07-01

    Development assistance from high-income countries to the health sectors of low- and middle-income countries (health aid) is an important source of funding for health in low- and middle-income countries. However, the relationship between health aid and the expected health improvements from those expenditures--the cost-effectiveness of targeted interventions--remains unknown. We reviewed the literature for cost-effectiveness of interventions targeting five disease categories: HIV; malaria; tuberculosis; noncommunicable diseases; and maternal, newborn, and child health. We measured the alignment between health aid and cost-effectiveness, and we examined the possibility of better alignment by simulating health aid reallocation. The relationship between health aid and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios is negative and significant: More health aid is going to disease categories with more cost-effective interventions. Changing the allocation of health aid earmarked funding could lead to greater health gains even without expanding overall disbursements. The greatest improvements in the alignment would be achieved by reallocating some aid from HIV or maternal, newborn, and child health to malaria or TB. We conclude that health aid is generally aligned with cost-effectiveness considerations, but in some countries this alignment could be improved.

  4. Informing mental health policies and services in the EMR: cost-effective deployment of human resources to deliver integrated community-based care.

    PubMed

    Ivbijaro, G; Patel, V; Chisholm, D; Goldberg, D; Khoja, T A M; Edwards, T M; Enum, Y; Kolkiewic, L A

    2015-09-28

    For EMR countries to deliver the expectations of the Global Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020 & the ongoing move towards universal health coverage, all health & social care providers need to innovate and transform their services to provide evidence-based health care that is accessible, cost-effective & with the best patient outcomes. For the primary and community workforce, this includes general medical practitioners, practice & community nurses, community social workers, housing officers, lay health workers, nongovernmental organizations & civil society, including community spiritual leaders/healers. This paper brings together the current best evidence to support transformation & discusses key approaches to achieve this, including skill mix and/or task shifting and integrated care. The important factors that need to be in place to support skill mix/task shifting and good integrated care are outlined with reference to EMR countries.

  5. Informing mental health policies and services in the EMR: cost-effective deployment of human resources to deliver integrated community-based care.

    PubMed

    Ivbijaro, G; Patel, V; Chisholm, D; Goldberg, D; Khoja, T A M; Edwards, T M; Enum, Y; Kolkiewic, L A

    2015-07-01

    For EMR countries to deliver the expectations of the Global Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020 & the ongoing move towards universal health coverage, all health & social care providers need to innovate and transform their services to provide evidence-based health care that is accessible, cost-effective & with the best patient outcomes. For the primary and community workforce, this includes general medical practitioners, practice & community nurses, community social workers, housing officers, lay health workers, nongovernmental organizations & civil society, including community spiritual leaders/healers. This paper brings together the current best evidence to support transformation & discusses key approaches to achieve this, including skill mix and/or task shifting and integrated care. The important factors that need to be in place to support skill mix/task shifting and good integrated care are outlined with reference to EMR countries. PMID:26442888

  6. The role of cognition in cost-effectiveness analyses of behavioral interventions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Behavioral interventions typically focus on objective behavioral endpoints like weight loss and smoking cessation. In reality, though, achieving full behavior change is a complex process in which several steps towards success are taken. Any progress in this process may also be considered as a beneficial outcome of the intervention, assuming that this increases the likelihood to achieve successful behavior change eventually. Until recently, there has been little consideration about whether partial behavior change at follow-up should be incorporated in cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs). The aim of this explorative review is to identify CEAs of behavioral interventions in which cognitive outcome measures of behavior change are analyzed. Methods Data sources were searched for publications before May 2011. Results Twelve studies were found eligible for inclusion. Two different approaches were found: three studies calculated separate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for cognitive outcome measures, and one study modeled partial behavior change into the final outcome. Both approaches rely on the assumption, be it implicitly or explicitly, that changes in cognitive outcome measures are predictive of future behavior change and may affect CEA outcomes. Conclusion Potential value of cognitive states in CEA, as a way to account for partial behavior change, is to some extent recognized but not (yet) integrated in the field. In conclusion, CEAs should consider, and where appropriate incorporate measures of partial behavior change when reporting effectiveness and hence cost-effectiveness. PMID:22380627

  7. A Layered Decision Model for Cost-Effective System Security

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Huaqiang; Alves-Foss, James; Soule, Terry; Pforsich, Hugh; Zhang, Du; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2008-10-01

    System security involves decisions in at least three areas: identification of well-defined security policies, selection of cost-effective defence strategies, and implementation of real-time defence tactics. Although choices made in each of these areas affect the others, existing decision models typically handle these three decision areas in isolation. There is no comprehensive tool that can integrate them to provide a single efficient model for safeguarding a network. In addition, there is no clear way to determine which particular combinations of defence decisions result in cost-effective solutions. To address these problems, this paper introduces a Layered Decision Model (LDM) for use in deciding how to address defence decisions based on their cost-effectiveness. To validate the LDM and illustrate how it is used, we used simulation to test model rationality and applied the LDM to the design of system security for an e-commercial business case.

  8. Money Matters: Cost Effectiveness of Juvenile Drug Court with and without Evidence-Based Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sheidow, Ashli J; Jayawardhana, Jayani; Bradford, W David; Henggeler, Scott W; Shapiro, Steven B

    2012-01-01

    The 12-month cost effectiveness of juvenile drug court and evidence-based treatments within Court were compared with traditional Family Court for 128 substance abusing/dependent juvenile offenders participating in a four-condition randomized trial. Intervention conditions included Family Court with community services (FC), Drug Court with community services (DC), Drug Court with Multisystemic Therapy (DC/MST), and Drug Court with MST enhanced with a contingency management program (DC/MST/CM). Average cost effectiveness ratios for substance use and criminal behavior outcomes revealed that economic efficiency in achieving outcomes generally improved from FC to DC, with the addition of evidence-based treatments improving efficiency in obtaining substance use outcomes.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of Extended Cessation Treatment for Older Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Paul G.; Wong, Wynnie; Jeffers, Abra; Munoz, Ricardo; Humfleet, Gary; Hall, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Aims To examine the cost-effectiveness of extended smoking cessation treatment in older smokers. Design Participants who completed a 12 week smoking cessation program were factorial randomized to extended cognitive behavioral treatment and extended nicotine replacement therapy. Setting A free-standing smoking cessation clinic in the United States. Participants 402 smokers aged 50 years and older were recruited from the community. Measurements The trial measured biochemically-verified abstinence from cigarettes after 24 months and the quantity of smoking cessation services used. Trial findings were combined with literature on changes in smoking status and the age and gender adjusted effect of smoking on health care cost, mortality, and qualify of life over the long-term in a Markov model of cost-effectiveness over a lifetime horizon. Findings The addition of extended cognitive behavioral therapy added $83 in smoking cessation services cost (p =.012, CI $21-$212). At the end of follow-up, cigarette abstinence rates were 50.0% with extended cognitive behavioral therapy and 37.2% without this therapy (p <.05, odds ratio 1.69, CI 1.18-2.54). The model-based incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $6,324 per Quality Adjusted Life Year (QALY). Probabilistic sensitivity analysis found that the additional $947 in lifetime cost of the intervention had a 95% confidence interval of –$331 – $2,081; the 0.150 additional QALYs had a confidence interval of 0.035- 0.280, and that the intervention was cost-effective against a $50,000/QALY acceptance criterion in 99.6% of the replicates. Extended nicotine replacement therapy was not cost-effective. Conclusions Adding extended cognitive behavior therapy to standard smoking cessation treatment can be cost-effective. PMID:24329972

  10. Cost effective use of liquid nitrogen in cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, Glen E.; Lombard, David S.; Martindale, David L.; Dunn, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    A method of reliquefying from 12 to 19% of the nitrogen exhaust gas from a cryogenic wind tunnel has been developed. Technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of the system depends on performance of an innovative positive displacement expander which requires scale model testing to confirm design studies. The existing cryogenic system at the 0.3-m transonic cryogenic tunnel has been surveyed and extensive upgrades proposed. Upgrades are generally cost effective and may be implemented immediately since they are based on established technology.

  11. Evaluating the cost effectiveness of national program for control of blindness in Jorhat district, India

    PubMed Central

    Laskar, Nasrin B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the cost of different components of the national program for control of blindness (NPCB) and assess the cost effectiveness of this program. Materials and Methods: An observational study was conducted in Jorhat District of Assam, India from July 2009 to June 2010 for assessing the cost effectiveness of the NPCB. Four broad categories of cost inputs, that is, capital costs, recurrent costs, prime/variable costs, and fixed costs were considered. The cost incurred by the provider was taken as the actual cost of delivery of different component of services to the patients, which was calculated from the costs of labor, material, and capital costs using the time utilization pattern recommended by WHO. Result: The District Blindness Control Society, Jorhat had spent 58.93% of total expense on fixed heads of which 65.86% had been spent for cataract surgery. The medical care cost was found to be Indian rupee (INR) 425 for intracapsular cataract extraction (ICCE), INR 675 for extracapsular cataract extraction + intraocular lens (ECCE + IOL) and INR 225 for refractive error correction. The patient-wise provider cost was estimated to be INR 519 for ICCE, INR 769 for ECCE + IOL implantation and INR 319 for spectacle correction of refractive error. Conclusion: National program for control of blindness is a cost effective means of controlling and treating blindness. PMID:26283841

  12. Presidential address. Endoscopic surgery, cost effectiveness, and the quality of life.

    PubMed

    Hasson, H M

    1995-02-01

    One measure of mitigating escalating costs of health care is to create an economic market-based system that connects value to cost. Cost-effectiveness analysis compares treatments that produce different benefits and require different costs, and ranks them by the amount of net treatment benefit divided by cost. Evaluation of the impact of illness and treatment on the medical condition, quality of life, and productivity of individual patients is essential for capturing all dimensions of treatment outcome. When performed by efficient teams, laparoscopic surgery compared with conventional open surgery, adds value through reduced operative morbidity, earlier returns to work, and improved quality of life. These advantages have to be confirmed by cost-effectiveness analysis, however. Endoscopic surgery will be consistently more cost effective than conventional surgery only when performed by a dedicated team of surgeons, nurses, and technicians. The need for a specialized team arises from the fact that endoscopic surgery requires different skills, including the ability to develop a two-dimensional concept for tissue manipulation, perform major surgery through small incisions using a different type of hand-eye coordination, and operate and maintain highly sophisticated and sensitive equipment and instrumentation. Reusable instruments will contribute to lower costs.

  13. A cost-effectiveness framework for profiling the value of hospital care.

    PubMed

    Timbie, Justin W; Newhouse, Joseph P; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Normand, Sharon-Lise T

    2008-01-01

    Provider profiling and performance-based incentive programs have expanded in recent years but need a theoretical framework for measuring and comparing the "value'' of clinical care across medical providers. Cost-effectiveness analysis provides such a framework but has rarely been used outside of the treatment choice context. The authors present a profiling framework based on cost-effectiveness methods and illustrate their approach using data on in-hospital survival and the cost of care for a heart attack from a sample of Massachusetts hospitals during fiscal year 2003. They model each outcome using hierarchical models that allow performance to vary across hospitals as a function of a latent quality effect and an effect of case mix. They also estimate incremental outcomes by conditioning on each hospital's pair of random effects, using indirect standardization to estimate "expected'' outcomes, and then taking their difference. Incremental cost and effectiveness outcomes are combined using incremental net monetary benefits. Using cost-effectiveness methods to profile hospital "value'' permits the comparison of the benefit of a service relative to the cost using existing societal weights. PMID:18480038

  14. Cost-effectiveness of sofosbuvir in the treatment of patients with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Leleu, H; Blachier, M; Rosa, I

    2015-04-01

    In France, 190,306 patients were suffering from chronic hepatitis C in 2012. These patients have a decreased life expectancy and are susceptible to complications associated with chronic hepatitis. Current treatments are poorly tolerated and their effectiveness varies depending on the genotype of the virus. Sofosbuvir, a new class of treatment, has demonstrated in five phase III trials sustained viral response (SVR) rates of over 90% across genotypes, higher than current treatments and has a tolerance profile similar to placebo. The objective was to determine the cost-effectiveness of using sofosbuvir in the treatment of chronic HCV infection. A Markov model was used to compare treatment strategies with and without sofosbuvir. The model simulated the natural history of HCV infection. SVR rates were based on data from clinical trials. Utilities associated with different stages of disease were based on data from the literature. French direct medical costs were used. Price for sofosbuvir was the price used in the early access program for severe fibrosis stages. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for sofosbuvir versus current reference treatments was € 16,278/QALY and varied from 40,000 €/QALY for F0 stages to 12,080 €/QALY for F4 stages. The sensitivity analyses carried out confirmed the robustness of this result. Sofosbuvir is a cost-effective treatment option for patients with hepatitis C.

  15. Cyclosporine versus tacrolimus: cost-effectiveness analysis for renal transplantation in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Silva, Grazielle Dias; Andrade, Eli Iola Gurgel; Cherchiglia, Mariângela Leal; Costa, Juliana de Oliveira; Almeida, Alessandra Maciel; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the cost-effectiveness of treatment regimens with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, five years after renal transplantation. METHODS This cost-effectiveness analysis was based on historical cohort data obtained between 2000 and 2004 and involved 2,022 patients treated with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, matched 1:1 for gender, age, and type and year of transplantation. Graft survival and the direct costs of medical care obtained from the National Health System (SUS) databases were used as outcome results. RESULTS Most of the patients were women, with a mean age of 36.6 years. The most frequent diagnosis of chronic renal failure was glomerulonephritis/nephritis (27.7%). In five years, the tacrolimus group had an average life expectancy gain of 3.96 years at an annual cost of R$78,360.57 compared with the cyclosporine group with a gain of 4.05 years and an annual cost of R$61,350.44. CONCLUSIONS After matching, the study indicated better survival of patients treated with regimens using tacrolimus. However, regimens containing cyclosporine were more cost-effective. PMID:25741648

  16. Cost-effectiveness of pazopanib in advanced soft tissue sarcoma in the United kingdom.

    PubMed

    Amdahl, Jordan; Manson, Stephanie C; Isbell, Robert; Chit, Ayman; Diaz, Jose; Lewis, Lily; Delea, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    In the phase III PALETTE trial, pazopanib improved progression-free survival (PFS) compared with placebo in patients with advanced/metastatic soft tissue sarcomas (mSTS) who had received prior chemotherapy. We used a multistate model to estimate expected PFS, overall survival (OS), lifetime STS treatment costs, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) for patients receiving pazopanib, placebo, trabectedin, ifosfamide, or gemcitabine plus docetaxel as second-line mSTS therapies. The cost-effectiveness of pazopanib was expressed as the incremental costs per QALY gained. Estimates of PFS/OS, adverse events, and utilities for pazopanib and placebo were from the PALETTE trial. Estimates of relative effectiveness of the other comparators were from an unadjusted indirect comparison versus pazopanib. Costs were from published sources. Pazopanib is estimated to increase QALYs by 0.128 and costs by £7,976 versus placebo; cost per QALY gained with pazopanib versus placebo is estimated to be £62,000. Compared with the other chemotherapies, pazopanib provides similar QALYs at a lower cost. Pazopanib may not be cost-effective versus placebo but may be cost-effective versus the most commonly used active treatments, although this conclusion is uncertain. Given the unmet need for effective treatments for mSTS, pazopanib may be an appropriate alternative to some currently used medications in the United Kingdom. PMID:25024640

  17. Cost-effectiveness of organ donation: evaluating investment into donor action and other donor initiatives.

    PubMed

    Whiting, James F; Kiberd, Bryce; Kalo, Zoltan; Keown, Paul; Roels, Leo; Kjerulf, Maria

    2004-04-01

    Initiatives aimed at increasing organ donation can be considered health care interventions, and will compete with other health care interventions for limited resources. We have developed a model capable of calculating the cost-utility of organ donor initiatives and applied it to Donor Action, a successful international program designed to optimize donor practices. The perspective of the payer in the Canadian health care system was chosen. A Markov model was developed to estimate the net present value incremental lifetime direct medical costs and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) as a consequence of increased kidney transplantation rates. Cost-saving and cost-effectiveness thresholds were calculated. The effects of changing the success rate and time frame of the intervention was examined as a sensitivity analysis. Transplantation results in a gain of 1.99 QALYs and a cost savings of Can$104,000 over the 20-year time frame compared with waiting on dialysis. Implementation of an intervention such as Donor Action, which produced as few as three extra donors per million population, would be cost-effective at a cost of Can$1.0 million per million population. The cost-effectiveness of Donor Action and other organ donor initiatives compare favorably to other health care interventions. Organ donation may be underfunded in North America.

  18. Cyclosporine versus tacrolimus: cost-effectiveness analysis for renal transplantation in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Guerra Júnior, Augusto Afonso; Silva, Grazielle Dias; Andrade, Eli Iola Gurgel; Cherchiglia, Mariângela Leal; Costa, Juliana de Oliveira; Almeida, Alessandra Maciel; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the cost-effectiveness of treatment regimens with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, five years after renal transplantation. METHODS This cost-effectiveness analysis was based on historical cohort data obtained between 2000 and 2004 and involved 2,022 patients treated with cyclosporine or tacrolimus, matched 1:1 for gender, age, and type and year of transplantation. Graft survival and the direct costs of medical care obtained from the National Health System (SUS) databases were used as outcome results. RESULTS Most of the patients were women, with a mean age of 36.6 years. The most frequent diagnosis of chronic renal failure was glomerulonephritis/nephritis (27.7%). In five years, the tacrolimus group had an average life expectancy gain of 3.96 years at an annual cost of R$78,360.57 compared with the cyclosporine group with a gain of 4.05 years and an annual cost of R$61,350.44. CONCLUSIONS After matching, the study indicated better survival of patients treated with regimens using tacrolimus. Moreover, regimens containing cyclosporine were more cost-effective [corrected].

  19. Cost-effectiveness of Out-of-Hospital Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective We determine the cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with standard care for adults presenting to emergency medical services with acute respiratory failure. Methods We developed an economic model using a United Kingdom health care system perspective to compare the costs and health outcomes of out-of-hospital CPAP to standard care (inhospital noninvasive ventilation) when applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. The model assigned each patient a probability of intubation or death, depending on the patient’s characteristics and whether he or she had out-of-hospital CPAP or standard care. The patients who survived accrued lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and health care costs according to their age and sex. Costs were accrued through intervention and hospital treatment costs, which depended on patient outcomes. All results were converted into US dollars, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development purchasing power parities rates. Results Out-of-hospital CPAP was more effective than standard care but was also more expensive, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £20,514 per QALY ($29,720/QALY) and a 49.5% probability of being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold. The probability of out-of-hospital CPAP’s being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold depended on the incidence of eligible patients and varied from 35.4% when a low estimate of incidence was used to 93.8% with a high estimate. Variation in the incidence of eligible patients also had a marked influence on the expected value of sample information for a future randomized trial. Conclusion The cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital CPAP is uncertain. The incidence of patients eligible for out-of-hospital CPAP appears to be the key determinant of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25737210

  20. Cost-Effectiveness of Eszopiclone for the Treatment of Adults with Primary Chronic Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Snedecor, Sonya J.; Botteman, Marc F.; Bojke, Chris; Schaefer, Kendyl; Barry, Nadine; Pickard, A. Simon

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: To assess the cost-effectiveness of treatment with eszopiclone for chronic primary insomnia in adults. Methods: A model using patient-level data from a 6-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial (n = 824), combined with data from a claims database and published literature, was used to assess the quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained and costs associated with eszopiclone versus placebo in adults with primary insomnia. Quality of life data were collected during the trial via the SF-36, from which preference-based utility scores were derived using published algorithms. Medical and absenteeism costs, estimated via a retrospective analysis of a claims and absenteeism database, were assigned to patients based on the degree of severity of their insomnia, assessed via the Insomnia Severity Index collected in the clinical trial. Presenteeism costs (lost productivity while at work) were estimated from responses to the Work Limitation Questionnaire collected during the trial. Six-month gains in QALYs and costs for each treatment group were calculated to derive cost-effectiveness ratios. Uncertainty was addressed via univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses. Results: Over the 6-month period, eszopiclone use resulted in a net gain of 0.0137 QALYs over placebo at an additional cost of $67, resulting in an incremental cost per QALY gained of slightly less than $5,000. When absenteeism and presenteeism costs were excluded, the cost-effectiveness ratio increased to approximately $33,000 per QALY gained, which is below the commonly used threshold of $50,000 used to define cost-effectiveness. Extensive sensitivity analyses indicate the results are generally robust. Conclusion: Our model, based on efficacy data from a clinical trial, demonstrated eszopiclone was cost-effective for the treatment of primary insomnia in adults, especially when lost productivity costs were included. Citation: Snedecor SJ; Botteman MF; Bojke C; Schaefer K; Barry

  1. A conceptual model to estimate cost effectiveness of the indoor environment improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.

    2003-06-01

    Macroeconomic analyses indicate a high cost to society of a deteriorated indoor climate. The few example calculations performed to date indicate that measures taken to improve IEQ are highly cost-effective when health and productivity benefits are considered. We believe that cost-benefit analyses of building designs and operations should routinely incorporate health and productivity impacts. As an initial step, we developed a conceptual model that shows the links between improvements in IEQ and the financial gains from reductions in medical care and sick leave, improved work performance, lower employee turn over, and reduced maintenance due to fewer complaints.

  2. [Studies of cost/effectiveness of pharmacological and psychological treatment of anxiety disorders: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Poirier-Bisson, Joannie; Roberge, Pasquale; Marchand, André; Grégoire, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on economic studies of evidence-based cognitive-behavioral treatment and pharmacotherapy for anxiety disorders. Articles were identified through electronic search of medical and psychological databases between 1980 and 2008. Seven studies were identified and included panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia and social phobia. Results show that evidence-based cognitive-behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy are cost-effective, usually more than usual care. Although the evidence base needs to be strengthened, it appears beneficial in increasing access to evidence-based treatments for anxiety disorders from a societal perspective.

  3. Biogeologic Carbon Sequestration - a Cost-Effective Proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, G. H.; Kuhns, R.

    2009-05-01

    Carbon sequestration has been proposed as a strategy for reducing the impact of carbon dioxide emissions from burning of fossil fuels. There are two main routes: 1) capture CO2 emissions from power plants or other large point sources followed by some form of "burial/sequestration", and 2) extraction of CO2 from the ambient atmosphere (involving substantial concentration relative to atmospheric levels) also followed by burial/sequestration. In either case the goal is to achieve significant long-term isolation of CO2 at an economically sustainable price, perhaps measured by some "market price" for CO2, such as the European carbon futures market, where the price is now (2/3/09) about 14-15/tonne of CO2. The second approach, removal of CO2 from the atmosphere, has the potential benefit of reversing the previous buildup of atmospheric CO2, and perhaps even providing a means to "adjust" terrestrial climate by regulating atmospheric CO2 concentrations. For the present, ideas of planetary "geo-engineering" are not as popular as reducing the impact of continued CO2 emissions. In fact, the energy and capital costs of extraction from a dilute atmosphere appear to make this approach uneconomical. Proposals to fertilize the open ocean suffer from concerns about long term ecosystem effects, to say nothing of a lack of verifiability. There is, however, an approach using biological systems that can not only extract significant amounts of CO2, but can do so cost-effectively. Lakes are known in which primary productivity approaches or exceeds 1gm C/cm2-yr. This equates to removal of 35,000 tonnes of CO2 per km2 per year, with a "market value" of about 500,000/yr. Such productivity only occurs under highly eutrophic conditions, and presumably requires significant nutrient additions. As such it would be unthinkable to pursue this technique on a large scale in extant lakes. If, however, it is possible to produce one or more large artificial lakes under acceptable conditions it is

  4. Cost-effectiveness of simvastatin in the secondary prevention of coronary artery disease in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, M; Wang, S; Leclerc, C; Fitzsimon, C; Tretiak, R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the cost-effectiveness of simvastatin in the secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD) in Canada. DESIGN: Cost-effectiveness model based on results from the Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study (45 study) and cost and resource utilization data from Canadian sources to simulate the economic impact of long-term simvastatin treatment (15 years). PATIENTS: Subjects with mean age of 59.4 years at recruitment into 4S study. OUTCOME MEASURES: Overall death rate and incidence of 5 major nonfatal events associated with CAD: myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, stroke and transient ischemic attack. Direct medical costs associated with CAD were assessed from the perspective of provincial ministries of health (i.e., costs borne by the ministries); the impact of simvastatin treatment on these costs was determined. RESULTS: The 4S study, with a median follow-up of 5.4 years, showed significantly reduced mortality and morbidity among the patients given simvastatin compared with the control subjects. Three premises were designed to predict the consequences of simvastatin treatment of CAD in Canada over 15 years, 10 years beyond the end of the 4S study. The 2 most probable premises, which assumed that the clinical benefits of simvastatin would be cumulative for either the first 10 years or the full 15 years of the model, had incremental costs per year of life gained (cost-effectiveness ratio) of $9867 and $6108 respectively. CONCLUSION: This model suggests that simvastatin provides a cost-effective approach to the long-term prevention of secondary CAD in Canada. PMID:9099167

  5. Cost effectiveness analysis of early zidovudine treatment of HIV infected patients.

    PubMed

    Oddone, E Z; Cowper, P; Hamilton, J D; Matchar, D B; Hartigan, P; Samsa, G; Simberkoff, M; Feussner, J R

    1993-11-20

    OBJECTIVE--To compare cost effectiveness of early and later treatment with zidovudine for patients infected with HIV. DESIGN--Markov chain analysis of cost effectiveness based on results of use of health care and efficacy from a trial of zidovudine treatment. SETTING--Seven Veterans Affairs medical centres in the United States. SUBJECTS--338 patients with symptomatic HIV infection and a lymphocyte count of 200 x 10(6) to 500 x 10(6) CD4 cells/l. INTERVENTIONS--Zidovudine 1500 mg/day started either at recruitment to the trial or when CD4 cell count fell below 200 x 10(6)/l. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Health care costs and rates of disease progression between six clinical states of HIV infection. RESULTS--Patients given early treatment with zidovudine remained without AIDS for an extra two months at a cost of $10,750 for each extra month without AIDS (at 1991 costs). Cost effectiveness ratio was most sensitive to the cost of zidovudine and to the quality of life of patients receiving early treatment. At treatment of 500 mg/day the cost effectiveness ratio for early treatment was $5432 for each extra month without AIDS. Patients given early treatment experienced more side effects, and if their quality of life was devalued by 8% compared with patients treated later the two treatments were equivalent in terms of quality adjusted months of life without AIDS. CONCLUSIONS--Early treatment with zidovudine is expensive and is very sensitive to the cost of zidovudine and to potential reductions in quality of life of patients who experience side effects. Doctors should reconsider early treatment with zidovudine for patients who experience side effects that substantially compromise their quality of life. PMID:8257887

  6. Cost-effectiveness of screening for hepatitis C virus: a systematic review of economic evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Coward, Stephanie; Leggett, Laura; Kaplan, Gilaad G; Clement, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Objectives With the developments of near-cures for hepatitis C virus (HCV), who to screen has become a high-priority policy issue in many western countries. Cost-effectiveness of screening programmes should be one consideration when developing policy. The objective of this work is to synthesise the cost-effectiveness of HCV screening programmes. Setting A systematic review was completed. 5 databases were searched until May 2016 (NHSEED, MEDLINE, the HTA Health Technology Assessment Database, EMBASE, EconLit). Participants Any study reporting an economic evaluation (any type) of screening compared with opportunistic or no screening for HCV was included. Exclusion criteria were: (1) abstracts or commentaries, (2) economic evaluations of other interventions for HCV, including blood donors screening, diagnosis tests for HCV, screening for concurrent disease or medications for treatment. Primary and secondary outcome measures Data extraction included type of model, target population, perspective, comparators, time horizon, discount rate, clinical inputs, cost inputs and outcome. Quality was evaluated using the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards checklist. Data are summarised using narrative synthesis by population. Results 2305 abstracts were identified with 52 undergoing full-text review. 30 papers met inclusion criteria addressing 7 populations: drug users (n=6), high risk (n=5), pregnant (n=4), prison (n=3), birth cohort (n=8), general population (n=5) and other (n=6). The majority (77%) of the studies were high quality. Drug users, birth cohort and high-risk populations were associated with cost-effectiveness ratios of under £30 000 per quality-adjusted-life-year (QALY). The remaining populations were associated with cost-effectiveness ratios that exceeded £30 000 per QALY. Conclusions Economic evidence for screening populations is robust. If a cost per QALY of £30 000 is considered reasonable value for money, then screening birth

  7. The Cost-Effectiveness of Anemia Treatment for Persons with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yarnoff, Benjamin O.; Hoerger, Thomas J.; Simpson, Siobhan A.; Pavkov, Meda E.; Burrows, Nilka R.; Shrestha, Sundar S.; Williams, Desmond E.; Zhuo, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Background Although major guidelines uniformly recommend iron supplementation and erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESAs) for managing chronic anemia in persons with chronic kidney disease (CKD), there are differences in the recommended hemoglobin (Hb) treatment target and no guidelines consider the costs or cost-effectiveness of treatment. In this study, we explored the most cost-effective Hb target for anemia treatment in persons with CKD stages 3–4. Methods and Findings The CKD Health Policy Model was populated with a synthetic cohort of persons over age 30 with prevalent CKD stages 3–4 (i.e., not on dialysis) and anemia created from the 1999–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), computed as incremental cost divided by incremental quality adjusted life years (QALYs), were assessed for Hb targets of 10 g/dl to 13 g/dl at 0.5 g/dl increments. Targeting a Hb of 10 g/dl resulted in an ICER of $32,111 compared with no treatment and targeting a Hb of 10.5 g/dl resulted in an ICER of $32,475 compared with a Hb target of 10 g/dl. QALYs increased to 4.63 for a Hb target of 10 g/dl and to 4.75 for a target of 10.5 g/dl or 11 g/dl. Any treatment target above 11 g/dl increased medical costs and decreased QALYs. Conclusions In persons over age 30 with CKD stages 3–4, anemia treatment is most cost-effective when targeting a Hb level of 10.5 g/dl. This study provides important information for framing guidelines related to treatment of anemia in persons with CKD. PMID:27404556

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of Rotavirus Vaccination for Under-Five Children in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shakerian, Sareh; Moradi Lakeh, Maziar; Esteghamati, Abdoulreza; Zahraei, Mohsen; Yaghoubi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rotavirus diarrhea is one of the most important causes of death among under-five children. Anti-rotavirus vaccination of these children may have a reducing effect on the disease. Objectives: this study is intended to contribute to health policy-makers of the country about the optimal decision and policy development in this area, by performing cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis on anti-rotavirus vaccination for under-5 children. Patients and Methods: A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using a decision tree model to analyze rotavirus vaccination, which was compared with no vaccination with Iran’s ministry of health perspective in a 5-year time horizon. Epidemiological data were collected from published and unpublished sources. Four different assumptions were considered to the extent of the disease episode. To analyze costs, the costs of implementing the vaccination program were calculated with 98% coverage and the cost of USD 7 per dose. Medical and social costs of the disease were evaluated by sampling patients with rotavirus diarrhea, and sensitivity analysis was also performed for different episode rates and vaccine price per dose. Results: For the most optimistic assumption for the episode of illness (10.2 per year), the cost per DALY averted is 12,760 and 7,404 for RotaTeq and Rotarix vaccines, respectively, while assuming the episode of illness is 300%, they will be equal to 2,395 and 354, respectively, which will be highly cost-effective. Number of life-years gained is equal to 3,533 years. Conclusions: Assuming that the illness episodes are 100% and 300% for Rotarix and 300% for Rota Teq, the ratio of cost per DALY averted is highly cost-effective, based on the threshold of the world health organization (< 1 GDP per capita = 4526 USD). The implementation of a national rotavirus vaccination program is suggested. PMID:26396704

  9. Cost effectiveness studies of environmental technologies: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, E.M.; Booth, S.R.

    1994-02-01

    This paper examines cost effectiveness studies of environmental technologies including the following: (1) In Situ Air Stripping, (2) Surface Towed Ordinance Locator System, (3) Ditch Witch Horizontal Boring Technology, (4) Direct Sampling Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer, (5) In Situ Vitrification, (6) Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System, (7) In Situ Bioremediation, and (8) SEAMIST Membrane System Technology.

  10. Cost Effectiveness of Current Awareness Sources in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmole, R. F.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The cost effectiveness of several commercial data bases, journal scanning by information scientists, and the impact of private communication are compared in this study. A previously developed technique for measuring the usefulness of commercial data bases is utilized. (21 references) (Author/KE)

  11. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of School Desegregation Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossell, Christine H.

    Cost-effectiveness analysis provides a useful tool for choosing between alternative desegregation plans or justifying one particular plan. Previous analyses of school desegregation effects on white enrollment, which focus only upon costs, have had limited use for policy. Traditional cost-benefit analysis poses problems because of the difficulty of…

  12. Cost-Effective Applications of Computer-Based Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avner, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    Cost effective applications of CBE do exist; however, they demand detailed cost information for all appropriate alternatives to CAI, a thorough understanding of instructional design, and an expert knowledge of the relative capabilities of alternative media in supporting particular instructional approaches. (Author/RAO)

  13. Neural mechanisms and personality correlates of the sunk cost effect.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Junya; Fujimoto, Shinsuke; Kodaka, Fumitoshi; Camerer, Colin F; Kawada, Ryosaku; Tsurumi, Kosuke; Tei, Shisei; Isobe, Masanori; Miyata, Jun; Sugihara, Genichi; Yamada, Makiko; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    The sunk cost effect, an interesting and well-known maladaptive behavior, is pervasive in real life, and thus has been studied in various disciplines, including economics, psychology, organizational behavior, politics, and biology. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the sunk cost effect have not been clearly established, nor have their association with differences in individual susceptibility to the effect. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated neural responses induced by sunk costs along with measures of core human personality. We found that individuals who tend to adhere to social rules and regulations (who are high in measured agreeableness and conscientiousness) are more susceptible to the sunk cost effect. Furthermore, this behavioral observation was strongly mediated by insula activity during sunk cost decision-making. Tight coupling between the insula and lateral prefrontal cortex was also observed during decision-making under sunk costs. Our findings reveal how individual differences can affect decision-making under sunk costs, thereby contributing to a better understanding of the psychological and neural mechanisms of the sunk cost effect. PMID:27611212

  14. [Cost-effectiveness analysis of professional oral hygiene].

    PubMed

    Olesov, E E; Shaĭmieva, N I; Kononenko, V I; Bersanov, R U; Monakova, N E

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal status and oral hygiene indexes were studied in 125 young employee of Kurchatov Institute. Oral hygiene values dynamic was assessed after professional oral hygiene in persons with unsatisfactory oral hygiene at baseline examination. When compared with the same values in the absence of professional oral hygiene procedures the results allowed calculating cost-effectiveness rate for biannual professional oral hygiene.

  15. 42 CFR 457.1015 - Cost-effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cost-effectiveness. 457.1015 Section 457.1015 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND GRANTS TO STATES...

  16. 42 CFR 457.1015 - Cost-effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost-effectiveness. 457.1015 Section 457.1015 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND GRANTS TO STATES...

  17. 10 CFR 436.13 - Presuming cost-effectiveness results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... in an energy or water conservation measure retrofit to an existing Federal building is not life cycle... Methodology and Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.13 Presuming cost-effectiveness results. (a) If the investment and other costs for an energy or water conservation measure considered for retrofit...

  18. 10 CFR 436.18 - Measuring cost-effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.18 Measuring cost-effectiveness. (a) In accordance with this...) Federal agencies performing LCC analysis on computers shall use either the Federal Buildings Life Cycle... building energy or water system with an energy or water conservation measure by retrofit to an...

  19. 10 CFR 436.18 - Measuring cost-effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.18 Measuring cost-effectiveness. (a) In accordance with this...) Federal agencies performing LCC analysis on computers shall use either the Federal Buildings Life Cycle... building energy or water system with an energy or water conservation measure by retrofit to an...

  20. 10 CFR 436.13 - Presuming cost-effectiveness results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... in an energy or water conservation measure retrofit to an existing Federal building is not life cycle... Methodology and Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.13 Presuming cost-effectiveness results. (a) If the investment and other costs for an energy or water conservation measure considered for retrofit...

  1. 10 CFR 436.13 - Presuming cost-effectiveness results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Presuming cost-effectiveness results. 436.13 Section 436.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS... the investment and other costs for an energy or water conservation measure considered for retrofit...

  2. 10 CFR 436.13 - Presuming cost-effectiveness results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Presuming cost-effectiveness results. 436.13 Section 436.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS... the investment and other costs for an energy or water conservation measure considered for retrofit...

  3. Research Report: Cost-Effectiveness of Curriculum Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Evaluation of the cost effectiveness of a revised curriculum using computer-based training (CBT) in the Dutch postal service found cost savings and satisfactory training results, implying that CBT is an effective strategy for complex work organizations training considerable numbers of employees. (SK)

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of Case Management in Substance Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleh, Shadi S.; Vaughn, Thomas; Levey, Samuel; Fuortes, Laurence; Uden-Holmen, Tanya; Hall, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study, which is part of a larger clinical trial, was to examine the cost-effectiveness of case management for individuals treated for substance abuse in a residential setting. Method: Clients who agreed to participate were randomly assigned to one of four study groups. Two groups received face-to-face case management…

  5. The Political Arithmetic of Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Henry M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Responding to a critique of their earlier article, authors Levin and Meister, joined by Glass, attempt to clarify some of the issues and to correct implicit misunderstandings in the critique, while detailing the application of cost-effectiveness to educational interventions. Twenty footnotes are appended. (IW)

  6. Systems Analysis for Program Planning and Cost Effectiveness. (An Application).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Gigch, John P.; Hill, Richard E.

    This paper describes an effort to implement a cost-effectiveness program using systems analysis in an elementary school district, the Rio Linda Union School District in California. The systems design cycle employed has three phases, policy-making evaluation, and action-implementation. During the first phase, the general philosophy or mission of…

  7. Cost-effectiveness of hysteroscopy screening for infertile women.

    PubMed

    Kasius, Jenneke C; Eijkemans, René J C; Mol, Ben W J; Fauser, Bart C J M; Fatemi, Human M; Broekmans, Frank J M

    2013-06-01

    This study assessed the cost-effectiveness of office hysteroscopy screening prior to IVF. Therefore, the cost-effectiveness of two distinct strategies - hysteroscopy after two failed IVF cycles (Failedhyst) and routine hysteroscopy prior to IVF (Routinehyst) - was compared with the reference strategy of no hysteroscopy (Nohyst). When present, intrauterine pathology was treated during hysteroscopy. Two models were constructed and evaluated in a decision analysis. In model I, all patients had an increase in pregnancy rate after screening hysteroscopy prior to IVF; in model II, only patients with intrauterine pathology would benefit. For each strategy, the total costs and live birth rates after a total of three IVF cycles were assessed. For model I (all patients benefit from hysteroscopy), Routinehyst was always cost-effective compared with Nohyst or Failedhyst. For the Routinehyst strategy, a monetary profit would be obtained in the case where hysteroscopy would increase the live birth rate after IVF by ≥ 2.8%. In model II (only patients with pathology benefit from hysteroscopy), Routinehyst also dominated Failedhyst. However, hysteroscopy performance resulted in considerable costs. In conclusion, the application of a routine hysteroscopy prior to IVF could be cost-effective. However, randomized trials confirming the effectiveness of hysteroscopy are needed.

  8. A Cost Effectiveness Model for Comparing Various Circulation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Thomas K.

    1973-01-01

    Two models for circulation systems (manual and automated) costing are presented. Validation tests for the model assumptions are devised and explained. Use of the models for cost effectiveness comparison and for cost prediction are discussed and examples are given showing their application. (10 references) (Author/SJ)

  9. Evaluating the Cost-Effectiveness of Instructional Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkin, Marvin C.

    A model of cost-effectiveness is outlined which enables consideration of some non-financial, as well as financial, elements of educational systems at school or district levels. The model enables the decision-maker to compare educational outcomes of different units, to assess the impact of alternative levels of financial input, and to select…

  10. Cost-effectiveness of Anterior Implants versus Fixed Dental Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Zitzmann, N.U.; Krastl, G.; Weiger, R.; Kühl, S.; Sendi, P.

    2013-01-01

    For the restoration of an anterior missing tooth, implant-supported single crowns (ISCs) or fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) are indicated, but it is not clear which type of restoration is more cost-effective. A self-selected trial was performed with 15 patients with ISCs and 11 with FDPs. Patient preferences were recorded with visual analog scales before treatment, 1 month following restoration, and then annually. Quality-adjusted tooth years (QATYs) were estimated by considering the type of reconstruction for replacing the missing tooth and its effect on the adjacent teeth. A stochastic cost-effectiveness model was developed using Monte Carlo simulation. The expected costs and QATYs were summarized in cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. ISC was the dominant strategy, with a QATY increase of 0.01 over 3 years and 0.04 over 10 years with a higher probability of being cost-effective. While both treatment options provided satisfactory long-term results from the patient’s perspective, the lower initial costs, particularly laboratory fees, were responsible for the dominance of ISCs over FDPs. PMID:24158338

  11. 10 CFR 455.63 - Cost-effectiveness testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... pursuant to § 455.20(u)(3). (2) The simple payback period of each renewable resource energy conservation... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cost-effectiveness testing. 455.63 Section 455.63 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS AND BUILDINGS OWNED...

  12. 10 CFR 455.63 - Cost-effectiveness testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... pursuant to § 455.20(u)(3). (2) The simple payback period of each renewable resource energy conservation... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cost-effectiveness testing. 455.63 Section 455.63 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS AND BUILDINGS OWNED...

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of Evaluating the New Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Theodore A.

    1997-01-01

    This commentary on a study comparing use of the brand name drug Depakene with generic valproic acid to control seizures in people with mental retardation focuses on issues of cost-effectiveness. It notes existing guidelines for pharmacoeconomic evaluation and suggests a possible model to include a threshold price (per quality-adjusted life year)…

  14. Neural mechanisms and personality correlates of the sunk cost effect

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Junya; Fujimoto, Shinsuke; Kodaka, Fumitoshi; Camerer, Colin F.; Kawada, Ryosaku; Tsurumi, Kosuke; Tei, Shisei; Isobe, Masanori; Miyata, Jun; Sugihara, Genichi; Yamada, Makiko; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    The sunk cost effect, an interesting and well-known maladaptive behavior, is pervasive in real life, and thus has been studied in various disciplines, including economics, psychology, organizational behavior, politics, and biology. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the sunk cost effect have not been clearly established, nor have their association with differences in individual susceptibility to the effect. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated neural responses induced by sunk costs along with measures of core human personality. We found that individuals who tend to adhere to social rules and regulations (who are high in measured agreeableness and conscientiousness) are more susceptible to the sunk cost effect. Furthermore, this behavioral observation was strongly mediated by insula activity during sunk cost decision-making. Tight coupling between the insula and lateral prefrontal cortex was also observed during decision-making under sunk costs. Our findings reveal how individual differences can affect decision-making under sunk costs, thereby contributing to a better understanding of the psychological and neural mechanisms of the sunk cost effect. PMID:27611212

  15. 10 CFR 436.18 - Measuring cost-effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... water system, considered in determining such matters as the optimal size of a solar energy system, the... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Measuring cost-effectiveness. 436.18 Section 436.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Methodology...

  16. 10 CFR 436.18 - Measuring cost-effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... water system, considered in determining such matters as the optimal size of a solar energy system, the... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Measuring cost-effectiveness. 436.18 Section 436.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Methodology...

  17. 10 CFR 436.18 - Measuring cost-effectiveness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.18 Measuring cost-effectiveness. (a) In accordance with this...) Federal agencies performing LCC analysis on computers shall use either the Federal Buildings Life Cycle...-effective if— (1) Life cycle costs, as described by § 436.19, are estimated to be lower; or (2) Net...

  18. Energy Submetering: The Key to Cost-Effective Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, W. D.; McBride, John R.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the monitoring results from two large-scale metering and energy information projects: Texas LoanSTAR Program; and the Texas A & M Campus Project. Data suggest implementing an energy metering system is cost effective, particularly if the system can be coupled with skilled engineering applications such as energy cost allocation and building…

  19. The Cost Effectiveness of Hepatitis Immunization for US College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, R. Jake; Saab, Sammy; Meyerhoff, Allen S.

    2003-01-01

    Hepatitis B immunization is recommended for all American children, and hepatitis A immunization is recommended for children who live in areas with elevated disease rates. Because hepatitis A and B occur most commonly in young adults, the authors examined the cost effectiveness of college-based vaccination. They developed epidemiologic models to…

  20. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Early Literacy Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Success in early literacy activities is associated with improved educational outcomes, including reduced dropout risk, in-grade retention, and special education referrals. When considering programs that will work for a particular school and context; cost-effectiveness analysis may provide useful information for decision makers. The study…

  1. Cost-Effective School Alarm Systems. Security Topics Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufer, Steve

    This document outlines considerations in the selection of a cost-effective school-alarm system. Steps in the planning process include: conducting a district needs assessment; gathering input from all staff levels; consulting technical expertise; and selecting a security system that can be integrated with other site needs. It further describes the…

  2. Cost-effectiveness of anterior implants versus fixed dental prostheses.

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, N U; Krastl, G; Weiger, R; Kühl, S; Sendi, P

    2013-12-01

    For the restoration of an anterior missing tooth, implant-supported single crowns (ISCs) or fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) are indicated, but it is not clear which type of restoration is more cost-effective. A self-selected trial was performed with 15 patients with ISCs and 11 with FDPs. Patient preferences were recorded with visual analog scales before treatment, 1 month following restoration, and then annually. Quality-adjusted tooth years (QATYs) were estimated by considering the type of reconstruction for replacing the missing tooth and its effect on the adjacent teeth. A stochastic cost-effectiveness model was developed using Monte Carlo simulation. The expected costs and QATYs were summarized in cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. ISC was the dominant strategy, with a QATY increase of 0.01 over 3 years and 0.04 over 10 years with a higher probability of being cost-effective. While both treatment options provided satisfactory long-term results from the patient's perspective, the lower initial costs, particularly laboratory fees, were responsible for the dominance of ISCs over FDPs.

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis and insurance coverage: solving a puzzle.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The conventional model for the use of cost-effectiveness analysis for health programs involves determining whether the cost per unit of effectiveness of the program is lower than some socially determined maximum acceptable cost per unit of effectiveness. If a program is better by this criterion, the policy implication is that it should be implemented by full coverage of its cost by insurance; if not, the program should not be implemented. This paper examines the unanswered question of how cost-effectiveness analysis should be performed and interpreted when insurance coverage may involve cost sharing. It explores the question of how cost sharing should be related to the magnitude of a cost-effectiveness ratio. A common view that cost sharing should vary inversely with program cost-effectiveness is shown to be incorrect. A key issue in correct analysis is whether there is heterogeneity in marginal effectiveness of care that cannot be perceived by the social planner but is known by the demander. It is possible that some programs that would fail the social efficiency test at full coverage will be acceptable with positive cost sharing. Combining individual and social preferences affects both the choice of programs and the extent of cost sharing.

  4. Flipping the Calculus Classroom: A Cost-Effective Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses a cost-effective approach to flipping the calculus classroom. In particular, the emphasis is on low-cost choices, both monetarily and with regards to faculty time, that make the daunting task of flipping a course manageable for a single instructor. Student feedback and overall impressions are also presented.

  5. Cost Effectiveness of Premium Versus Regular Gasoline in MCPS Buses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baacke, Clifford M.; Frankel, Steven M.

    The primary question posed in this study is whether premium or regular gasoline is more cost effective for the Montgomery County Public School (MCPS) bus fleet, as a whole, when miles-per-gallon, cost-per-gallon, and repair costs associated with mileage are considered. On average, both miles-per-gallon, and repair costs-per-mile favor premium…

  6. Cost-Effectiveness Affirmative Reading Skills Program, 1984-85.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Michael P.

    The 1984-85 cost-effects study represents the third annual analysis of the components of Cleveland's Affirmative Reading Skills Plan, which offers three instructional strands--developmental (regular reading/language arts), support (additional enrichment, corrective or remedial), and compensatory (instruction for students having reading scores in…

  7. Final report: Compiled MPI. Cost-Effective Exascale Application Development

    SciTech Connect

    Gropp, William Douglas

    2015-12-21

    This is the final report on Compiled MPI: Cost-Effective Exascale Application Development, and summarizes the results under this project. The project investigated runtime enviroments that improve the performance of MPI (Message-Passing Interface) programs; work at Illinois in the last period of this project looked at optimizing data access optimizations expressed with MPI datatypes.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of a worksite hypertension treatment program.

    PubMed

    Logan, A G; Milne, B J; Achber, C; Campbell, W P; Haynes, R B

    1981-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of treating hypertension at the patient's place of work was compared in a randomized controlled trial with care delivered in a community. The average total cost per patient for worksite care in this 12-month study was not significantly different from that for regular care ($242.86 +/- 6.94 vs $211.34 +/- 18.66, mean +/- SEM). The worksite health system cost was significantly more expensive ($197.36 +/- 4.99 vs $129.33 +/- 13.34, p less than 0.001) but the patient cost was significantly less ($45.40 +/- 3.23 vs $82.00 +/- 6.20, p less than 0.01). The mean reduction in diastolic blood pressure (BP) at the year-end assessment was significantly greater in the worksite group (12.1 +/- 0.6 vs 6.5 +/- 0.6 mm Hg, p less than 0.001). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $5.63 per mm Hg for worksite care was less than the base cost-effectiveness ratio of $32.51 per mm Hg for regular care, indicating that the worksite program was substantially more cost-effective. Our findings support health policies that favor allocating resources to work-based hypertension treatment programs for the target group identified in this study. PMID:6783519

  9. Assessing the Cost-Effectiveness of Family Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePanfilis, Diane; Dubowitz, Howard; Kunz, James

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the cost-effectiveness of two alternate forms of Family Connections (FC), a child neglect prevention program, in relation to changes in risk and protective factors and improvements in child safety and behavioral outcomes. Methods: In the original FC study, a sample of 154 families (473 children) in a poor, urban neighborhood,…

  10. Intervention Costs and Cost-Effectiveness of a Successful Telephonic Intervention to Promote Diabetes Control

    PubMed Central

    Schechter, Clyde B.; Cohen, Hillel W.; Shmukler, Celia; Walker, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the costs and cost-effectiveness of a telephonic behavioral intervention to promote glycemic control in the Improving Diabetes Outcomes study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Using the provider perspective and a time horizon to the end of the 1-year intervention, we calculate the costs of a telephonic intervention by health educators compared with an active control (print) intervention to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. We calculate the cost-effectiveness ratios for a reduction of one percentage point in hemoglobin A1c (A1C), as well as for one participant to achieve an A1C <7%. Base-case and sensitivity analysis results are presented. RESULTS The intervention cost $176.61 per person randomized to the telephone group to achieve a mean 0.36 percentage point of A1C improvement. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $490.58 per incremental percentage point of A1C improvement and $2,617.35 per person over a 1-year intervention in achieving the A1C goal. In probabilistic sensitivity analysis, the median (interquartile range) of per capita cost, cost per percentage point reduction in A1C, and cost per person achieving the A1C goal of <7% are $175.82 (147.32–203.56), $487.75 (356.50–718.32), and $2,312.88 (1,785.58–3,220.78), respectively. CONCLUSIONS The costs of a telephonic intervention for diabetes self-management support are moderate and commensurate to the modest associated improvement in glycemic control. PMID:22851599

  11. Hepatocellular carcinoma: cost-effectiveness of screening. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common tumors worldwide. HCC is a potential target for cancer surveillance (or screening) as it occurs in well-defined, at-risk populations. Curative therapy is possible only for small tumors and screening strategy has been recommended by the US, Italian, and other international liver societies and is practiced widely, but its benefits are not clearly established. The objective of this study was to review the available evidence with respect to the cost-effectiveness of key technologies in the prevention HCC. The literature search was conducted with the support of PubMed. Firstly we selected articles by reading the abstracts. Secondly, we read the articles and the revision was further restricted, with the following as inclusion criteria: (1) full economic evaluation of HCC screening programs; (2) comparison between HCC techniques; (3) outcome measures expressed in terms of quality adjusted life years (QALY); (4) full text availability. The initial review of the literature yielded 346 articles. Of those, 288 were excluded at the first stage. Of those excluded, 108 did not meet the target, 106 did not present the cost analysis, 33 did not analyze the treatment of the disease, and in 41 the abstract was not available. Of the 58 included in the first step, seven examined the cost-effectiveness of different HCC screening techniques, seven investigated the cost-effectiveness of HCC screening versus no screening, and one looked at the cost-effectiveness of timing for HCC surveillance and monitoring, while 43 were about HBV vaccination and screening. We included only the seven articles examining the cost-effectiveness of different HCC screening techniques. In general, incidence is the key parameter which determines the cost-effectiveness of HCC screening. Discrepancies in the results exist when determining the type of technology to be used. Ultrasound (US) alone or in association with alpha fetoprotein (AFP) technology is

  12. Direct PCR of indigenous and invasive mosquito species: a time- and cost-effective technique of mosquito barcoding.

    PubMed

    Werblow, A; Flechl, E; Klimpel, S; Zittra, C; Lebl, K; Kieser, K; Laciny, A; Silbermayr, K; Melaun, C; Fuehrer, H-P

    2016-03-01

    Millions of people die each year as a result of pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes. However, the morphological identification of mosquito species can be difficult even for experts. The identification of morphologically indistinguishable species, such as members of the Anopheles maculipennis complex (Diptera: Culicidae), and possible hybrids, such as Culex pipiens pipiens/Culex pipiens molestus (Diptera: Culicidae), presents a major problem. In addition, the detection and discrimination of newly introduced species can be challenging, particularly to researchers without previous experience. Because of their medical importance, the clear identification of all relevant mosquito species is essential. Using the direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method described here, DNA amplification without prior DNA extraction is possible and thus species identification after sequencing can be achieved. Different amounts of tissue (leg, head; larvae or adult) as well as different storage conditions (dry, ethanol, -20 and -80 °C) and storage times were successfully applied and showed positive results after amplification and gel electrophoresis. Overall, 28 different indigenous and non-indigenous mosquito species were analysed using a gene fragment of the COX1 gene for species differentiation and identification by sequencing this 658-bp fragment. Compared with standard PCR, this method is time- and cost-effective and could thus improve existing surveillance and control programmes. PMID:26663040

  13. Direct PCR of indigenous and invasive mosquito species: a time- and cost-effective technique of mosquito barcoding.

    PubMed

    Werblow, A; Flechl, E; Klimpel, S; Zittra, C; Lebl, K; Kieser, K; Laciny, A; Silbermayr, K; Melaun, C; Fuehrer, H-P

    2016-03-01

    Millions of people die each year as a result of pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes. However, the morphological identification of mosquito species can be difficult even for experts. The identification of morphologically indistinguishable species, such as members of the Anopheles maculipennis complex (Diptera: Culicidae), and possible hybrids, such as Culex pipiens pipiens/Culex pipiens molestus (Diptera: Culicidae), presents a major problem. In addition, the detection and discrimination of newly introduced species can be challenging, particularly to researchers without previous experience. Because of their medical importance, the clear identification of all relevant mosquito species is essential. Using the direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method described here, DNA amplification without prior DNA extraction is possible and thus species identification after sequencing can be achieved. Different amounts of tissue (leg, head; larvae or adult) as well as different storage conditions (dry, ethanol, -20 and -80 °C) and storage times were successfully applied and showed positive results after amplification and gel electrophoresis. Overall, 28 different indigenous and non-indigenous mosquito species were analysed using a gene fragment of the COX1 gene for species differentiation and identification by sequencing this 658-bp fragment. Compared with standard PCR, this method is time- and cost-effective and could thus improve existing surveillance and control programmes.

  14. Health interventions for the metal working industry: which is the most cost-effective? A study from a developing country.

    PubMed

    Salinas, A M; Villarreal, E; Nuñez, G M; Garza, M E; Briones, H; Navarro, O

    2002-05-01

    This study ranked the cost-effectiveness of health interventions in the metal working industry in a developing country. Data were based on 82 034 workers of the Northern region of Mexico. Effectiveness was measured through 'healthy life years' (HeaLYs) gained. Costs were estimated per worker according to type and appropriate inputs from selected health interventions. 'Hand' was the anatomical region that yielded the most gain of HeaLYs and amputation was the injury that yielded the most gain of HeaLYs. The most effective health intervention corresponded to training, followed by medical care, education, helmets, safety shoes, lumbar supports, safety goggles, gloves and safety aprons. In dollar terms, education presented the best cost-effectiveness ratio (US$637) and safety aprons presented the worst cost-effectiveness ratio (US$1 147 770). Training proved to be a very expensive intervention, but presented the best effectiveness outcome and the second best cost-effectiveness ratio (US$2084). Cost-effectiveness analyses in developing countries are critical. Corporations might not have the same funds and technology as those in developed countries or multinational companies.

  15. Cost effectiveness analysis of larval therapy for leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Cynthia P; Bland, J Martin; Cullum, Nicky; Dumville, Jo C; Nelson, E Andrea; Torgerson, David J; Worthy, Gill

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the cost effectiveness of larval therapy compared with hydrogel in the management of leg ulcers. Design Cost effectiveness and cost utility analyses carried out alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised, open trial with equal randomisation. Population Intention to treat population comprising 267 patients with a venous or mixed venous and arterial ulcers with at least 25% coverage of slough or necrotic tissue. Interventions Patients were randomly allocated to debridement with bagged larvae, loose larvae, or hydrogel. Main outcome measure The time horizon was 12 months and costs were estimated from the UK National Health Service perspective. Cost effectiveness outcomes are expressed in terms of incremental costs per ulcer-free day (cost effectiveness analysis) and incremental costs per quality adjusted life years (cost utility analysis). Results The larvae arms were pooled for the main analysis. Treatment with larval therapy cost, on average, £96.70 (€109.61; $140.57) more per participant per year (95% confidence interval −£491.9 to £685.8) than treatment with hydrogel. Participants treated with larval therapy healed, on average, 2.42 days before those in the hydrogel arm (95% confidence interval −0.95 to 31.91 days) and had a slightly better health related quality of life, as the annual difference in QALYs was 0.011 (95% confidence interval −0.067 to 0.071). However, none of these differences was statistically significant. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio for the base case analysis was estimated at £8826 per QALY gained and £40 per ulcer-free day. Considerable uncertainty surrounds the outcome estimates. Conclusions Debridement of sloughy or necrotic leg ulcers with larval therapy is likely to produce similar health benefits and have similar costs to treatment with hydrogel. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN55114812 and National Research Register N0484123692. PMID:19304578

  16. The Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Teleglaucoma Screening Device.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sera; Hodge, William; Malvankar-Mehta, Monali

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss and costs the American economy $2.9 billion. Teleglaucoma remotely detects glaucoma improving access to ophthalmic care in rural areas. It helps manage glaucoma more efficiently to preserve vision and reduce healthcare costs. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using healthcare provider or third-party payer perspective within rural Canada. The study population were patients at-risk of glaucoma which includes those with diabetes and/or hypertension, family history of glaucoma, adults older than 50 years, and concurrent ocular conditions in rural Alberta. Markov modelling was used to model glaucoma health states. Effectiveness was measured in Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) and costs were used in Canadian dollars. Using TreeAge Pro 2009, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) were developed in dollars per QALYs. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the factors affecting cost-effectiveness. Teleglaucoma had a 20% increase in ophthalmologist-referral rate; it reduced patient travel times by 61 hours and physician wait times by 30% in comparison to in-person examination (standard of care). Teleglaucoma costs $872 per patient screened which was 80% less than in-person examination. Teleglaucoma had a greater incremental effectiveness providing an additional 0.12 QALY per patient examination. It was more sensitive (86.5%) and less specific (78.6%) than in-person examination. Teleglaucoma was more cost-effective than in-person examination with an ICER of-$27,460/QALY. This indicated that teleglaucoma will save $27, 460 for each additional QALY gained. Long term benefits showed teleglaucoma prevents 24% cases of glaucoma blindness after 30 years. Teleglaucoma demonstrated improved health outcomes, as well as, cost benefits. It increases access to ophthalmic care and improves healthcare service efficiency, specifically in rural areas. Teleglaucoma is more cost-effective

  17. Cost-effective means of reducing ammonia emissions from UK agriculture using the NARSES model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, J.; Ryan, M.; Anthony, S. G.; Brewer, A.; Laws, J.; Aller, M. F.; Misselbrook, T. H.

    To comply with International agreements to improve air quality, signatory states need to reduce emissions of ammonia (NH 3). Since the majority of NH 3 emissions come from agriculture, measures may need to be implemented by the farming industry. Member states of the EU will, by 2010, require large pig and poultry production units to reduce NH 3 emissions to comply with the integrated pollution prevention and control directive (IPPC). The NARSES model uses a mass-flow method to estimate NH 3 emission from UK agriculture and to identify the most cost-effective means of reducing NH 3 emissions. Model runs were carried out to assess the likely impact of the IPPC Directive on UK NH 3 emissions and the sensitivity of model output to input data on the costs and abatement efficiencies of proposed abatement measures. The impact of the IPPC Directive is likely to be small, offering a reduction of c. 8700 t, 3.5% of total UK agricultural NH 3 emissions. Even large (30%) changes in our estimates of cost or changes of 10% in our estimates of abatement efficiency will make little difference to the ranking of abatement techniques according to cost-effectiveness. The most cost-effective reductions may be achieved by replacing urea fertilizer with ammonium nitrate, immediate incorporation of manures and slurries to tillage land by discs, storing all FYM and poultry manures before spreading to land and applying slurries to grassland by trailing shoe.

  18. Cost-Effectiveness of Payments for Ecosystem Services with Dual Goals of Environment and Poverty Alleviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauvin, Crystal; Uchida, Emi; Rozelle, Scott; Xu, Jintao; Zhan, Jinyan

    2010-03-01

    The goal of this article is to understand strategies by which both the environmental and poverty alleviation objectives of PES programs can be achieved cost effectively. To meet this goal, we first create a conceptual framework to understand the implications of alternative targeting when policy makers have both environmental and poverty alleviation goals. We then use the Grain for Green program in China, the largest PES program in the developing world, as a case study. We also use a data set from a survey that we designed and implemented to evaluate the program. Using the data set we first evaluate what factors determined selection of program areas for the Grain for Green program. We then demonstrate the heterogeneity of parcels and households and examine the correlations across households and their parcels in terms of their potential environmental benefits, opportunity costs of participating, and the asset levels of households as an indicator of poverty. Finally, we compare five alternative targeting criteria and simulate their performance in terms of cost effectiveness in meeting both the environmental and poverty alleviation goals when given a fixed budget. Based on our simulations, we find that there is a substantial gain in the cost effectiveness of the program by targeting parcels based on the “gold standard,” i.e., targeting parcels with low opportunity cost and high environmental benefit managed by poorer households.

  19. A review of the methodological challenges in assessing the cost effectiveness of pharmacist interventions.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Rachel A; Putman, Koen; Davies, James; Annemans, Lieven

    2014-12-01

    Pharmacists' roles are shifting away from medicines supply and the provision of patient education involving acute medications towards consultation-type services for chronic medications. Determining the cost effectiveness of pharmacist interventions has been complicated by methodological challenges. A critique of 31 economic evaluations carried out alongside comparative studies of pharmacist interventions published between 2003 and 2013 (12 from the UK, six from the USA) found a range of disease-specific and cross-therapeutic interventions targeting both patients and prescribers in a range of settings evaluated through a variety of study designs. Only ten were full economic evaluations, five of which were based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The intervention was usually quite well described, but the comparator was not always clearly described, and some interventions are very context specific due to the variability in pharmacist services available in different countries and practice settings. Complex multidirectional aims of most pharmacist interventions have led to many process, intermediate and longer-term outcomes being included in any one study. Quality of resource use and cost data varied. Most incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were generated from process indicators such as errors and adherence, with only four studies reporting cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). Very few studies examined the effect of uncertainty, and methods used were not very clear in some cases. The principal finding from our critique is that poor RCT study design or analysis precludes many studies from finding pharmacist interventions effective or cost effective. We conclude with a set of recommendations for future study design. PMID:25145799

  20. Cost-effectiveness of combination therapy umeclidinium/vilanterol versus tiotropium in symptomatic COPD Spanish patients

    PubMed Central

    Miravitlles, Marc; Gáldiz, Juan B; Huerta, Alicia; Villacampa, Alba; Carcedo, David; Garcia-Rio, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Umeclidinium/vilanterol (UMEC/VI) is a novel fixed dose combination of a long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonist (LAMA) and a long-acting beta 2 receptor antagonist (LABA) agent. This analysis evaluated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of UMEC/VI compared with tiotropium (TIO), from the Spanish National Health System (NHS) perspective. Methods A previously published linked equations cohort model based on the epidemiological longitudinal study ECLIPSE (Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate End-points) was used. Patients included were COPD patients with a post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) ≤70% and the presence of respiratory symptoms measured with the modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale (modified Medical Research Council ≥2). Treatment effect, expressed as change in FEV1 from baseline, was estimated from a 24-week head-to-head phase III clinical trial comparing once-daily UMEC/VI with once-daily TIO and was assumed to last 52 weeks following treatment initiation (maximum duration of UMEC/VI clinical trials). Spanish utility values were derived from a published local observational study. Unitary health care costs (€2015) were obtained from local sources. A 3-year time horizon was selected, and 3% discount was applied to effects and costs. Results were expressed as cost/quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) was performed. Results UMEC/VI produced additional 0.03 QALY and €590 vs TIO, leading to an ICER of €21,475/QALY. According to PSA, the probability of UMEC/VI being cost-effective was 80.3% at a willingness-to-pay of €30,000/QALY. Conclusion UMEC/VI could be considered as a cost-effective treatment alternative compared with TIO in symptomatic COPD patients from the Spanish NHS perspective. PMID:26848262

  1. Cost-effectiveness model comparing olanzapine and other oral atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Furiak, Nicolas M; Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Klein, Robert W; Smolen, Lee J; Lawson, Anthony H; Conley, Robert R; Culler, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is often a persistent and costly illness that requires continued treatment with antipsychotics. Differences among antipsychotics on efficacy, safety, tolerability, adherence, and cost have cost-effectiveness implications for treating schizophrenia. This study compares the cost-effectiveness of oral olanzapine, oral risperidone (at generic cost, primary comparator), quetiapine, ziprasidone, and aripiprazole in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia from the perspective of third-party payers in the U.S. health care system. Methods A 1-year microsimulation economic decision model, with quarterly cycles, was developed to simulate the dynamic nature of usual care of schizophrenia patients who switch, continue, discontinue, and restart their medications. The model captures clinical and cost parameters including adherence levels, relapse with and without hospitalization, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), treatment discontinuation by reason, treatment-emergent adverse events, suicide, health care resource utilization, and direct medical care costs. Published medical literature and a clinical expert panel were used to develop baseline model assumptions. Key model outcomes included mean annual total direct cost per treatment, cost per stable patient, and incremental cost-effectiveness values per QALY gained. Results The results of the microsimulation model indicated that olanzapine had the lowest mean annual direct health care cost ($8,544) followed by generic risperidone ($9,080). In addition, olanzapine resulted in more QALYs than risperidone (0.733 vs. 0.719). The base case and multiple sensitivity analyses found olanzapine to be the dominant choice in terms of incremental cost-effectiveness per QALY gained. Conclusion The utilization of olanzapine is predicted in this model to result in better clinical outcomes and lower total direct health care costs compared to generic risperidone, quetiapine, ziprasidone, and aripiprazole. Olanzapine

  2. Present and future of cervical cancer prevention in Spain: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Georgalis, Leonidas; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Esnaola, Mikel; Bosch, F Xavier; Diaz, Mireia

    2016-09-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination within a nonorganized setting creates a poor cost-effectiveness scenario. However, framed within an organized screening including primary HPV DNA testing with lengthening intervals may provide the best health value for invested money. To compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different cervical cancer (CC) prevention strategies, including current status and new proposed screening practices, to inform health decision-makers in Spain, a Markov model was developed to simulate the natural history of HPV and CC. Outcomes included cases averted, life expectancy, reduction in the lifetime risk of CC, life years saved, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), net health benefits, lifetime costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. The willingness-to-pay threshold is defined at 20 000&OV0556;/QALY. Both costs and health outcomes were discounted at an annual rate of 3%. A strategy of 5-year organized HPV testing has similar effectiveness, but higher efficiency than 3-year cytology. Screening alone and vaccination combined with cytology are dominated by vaccination followed by 5-year HPV testing with cytology triage (12 214&OV0556;/QALY). The optimal age for both ending screening and switching age from cytology to HPV testing in older women is 5 years later for unvaccinated than for vaccinated women. Net health benefits decrease faster with diminishing vaccination coverage than screening coverage. Primary HPV DNA testing is more effective and cost-effective than current cytological screening. Vaccination uptake improvements and a gradual change toward an organized screening practice are critical components for achieving higher effectiveness and efficiency in the prevention of CC in Spain.

  3. Assessing Cost-effectiveness of Green Infrastructures in response to Large Storm Events at Household Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, T. F. M.; Liu, X.; Zhan, W.

    2015-12-01

    Green infrastructures (GI) are becoming more important for urban stormwater control worldwide. However, relatively few studies focus on researching the specific designs of GI at household scale. This study assesses the hydrological performance and cost-effectiveness of different GI designs, namely green roofs, bioretention systems and porous pavements. It aims to generate generic insights by comparing the optimal designs of each GI in 2-year and 50-year storms of Hong Kong, China and Seattle, US. EPA SWMM is first used to simulate the hydrologic performance, in particular, the peak runoff reduction of thousands of GI designs. Then, life cycle costs of the designs are computed and their effectiveness, in terms of peak runoff reduction percentage per thousand dollars, is compared. The peak runoff reduction increases almost linearly with costs for green roofs. However, for bioretention systems and porous pavements, peak runoff reduction only increases significantly with costs in the mid values. For achieving the same peak runoff reduction percentage, the optimal soil depth of green roofs increases with the design storm, while surface area does not change significantly. On the other hand, for bioretention systems and porous pavements, the optimal surface area increases with the design storm, while thickness does not change significantly. In general, the cost effectiveness of porous pavements is highest, followed by bioretention systems and then green roofs. The cost effectiveness is higher for a smaller storm, and is thus higher for 2-year storm than 50-year storm, and is also higher for Seattle when compared to Hong Kong. This study allows us to better understand the hydrological performance and cost-effectiveness of different GI designs. It facilitates the implementation of optimal choice and design of each specific GI for stormwater mitigation.

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of Norovirus Vaccination in Children in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Mirelman, Andrew; Ballard, Sarah-Blythe; Saito, Mayuko; Kosek, Margaret; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Background With candidate norovirus (NV) vaccines in a rapid phase of development, assessment of the potential economic value of vaccine implementation will be necessary to aid health officials in vaccine implementation decisions. To date, no evaluations have been performed to evaluate the benefit of adopting NV vaccines for use in the childhood immunization programs of low- and middle-income countries. Methods We used a Markov decision model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of adding a two-dose NV vaccine to Peru’s routine childhood immunization schedule using two recent estimates of NV incidence, one for a peri-urban region and one for a jungle region of the country. Results Using the peri-urban NV incidence estimate, the annual cost of vaccination would be $13.0 million, offset by $2.6 million in treatment savings. Overall, this would result in 473 total DALYs averted; 526,245 diarrhea cases averted;153,735 outpatient visits averted; and 414 hospitalizations averted between birth and the fifth year of life. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio would be $21,415 per DALY averted; $19.86 per diarrhea case; $68.23 per outpatient visit; and $26,298 per hospitalization. Using the higher jungle NV incidence rates provided a lower cost per DALY of $10,135. The incremental cost per DALY with per-urban NV incidence is greater than three times the 2012 GDP per capita of Peru but the estimate drops below this threshold using the incidence from the jungle setting. In addition to the impact of incidence, sensitivity analysis showed that vaccine price and efficacy play a strong role in determining the level of cost-effectiveness. Conclusions The introduction of a NV vaccine would prevent many healthcare outcomes in the Peru and potentially be cost-effective in scenarios with high NV incidence. The vaccine cost-effectiveness model could also be applied to the evaluation of NV vaccine cost-effectiveness in other countries. In resource-poor settings, where NV incidence

  5. Examining the cost-effectiveness of cancer screening promotion.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M Robyn; Urban, Nicole; Ramsey, Scott; Briss, Peter A

    2004-09-01

    Cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) can help to quantify the contribution of the promotion of a screening program to increased participation in screening. The cost-effectiveness (C/E) of screening promotion depends in large part on the endpoints of interest. At the most fundamental level, the C/E of a strategy for promoting screening would focus on the attendance rate, or cost per person screened, and the C/E would be influenced by the costs of promotion, as well as by the size and responsiveness of the target population. In addition, the costs of screening promotion (measured as the cost per additional participant in screening) can be included in a CEA estimate of the screening technology. In this case, depending on the efficacy of the screening test and the costs and influence of the promotion, the C/E of screening may improve or become poorer. In the current study, the authors reviewed the literature on the C/E of cancer screening promotion. The following lessons were learned regarding the C/E of screening and its promotion: 1) high-quality information on the C/E of screening is increasingly available; 2) cost-effective promotion of screening is dependent on cost-effective screening strategies; 3) quality-of-life effects may be important in assessing the overall C/E of screening programs; 4) research efforts aimed at identifying cost-effective approaches to screening promotion are useful but sparse; 5) C/E studies should be better incorporated into well designed effectiveness research efforts; 6) variations in C/E according to intervention characteristics, population characteristics, and context should be evaluated in greater depth; 7) the long-term effects of screening promotion are critical to assessing C/E; 8) the effects of promotion on costs of screening must be better understood; and 9) CEA must be interpreted in light of other information. The authors showed that CEA can be a valuable tool for understanding the merits of health promotion interventions and

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of Home Energy Retrofits in Pre-Code Vintage Homes in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Fairey, P.; Parker, D.

    2012-11-01

    This analytical study examines the opportunities for cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofits in residential archetypes constructed prior to 1980 (Pre-Code) in fourteen U.S. cities. These fourteen cities are representative of each of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) climate zones in the contiguous U.S. The analysis is conducted using an in-house version of EnergyGauge USA v.2.8.05 named CostOpt that has been programmed to perform iterative, incremental economic optimization on a large list of residential energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofit measures. The principle objectives of the study are as follows: to determine the opportunities for cost effective source energy reductions in this large cohort of existing residential building stock as a function of local climate and energy costs; and to examine how retrofit financing alternatives impact the source energy reductions that are cost effectively achievable.

  7. An fMRI study on sunk cost effect.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianmin; Zhang, Qinglin; Chen, Changming; Yu, Rongjun; Gong, Qiyong

    2013-06-26

    Sunk cost effect (also called escalation of commitment, etc) is a pervasive, interesting and famous decision bias, which has been intensively discussed in psychology, economics, management, political science, zoology, etc. To date, little has been known about the neural basis of this phenomenon. We investigated it by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to monitor healthy subjects' brain activities when they made decisions in a task wherein sunk cost and incremental cost were systematically manipulated. Higher sunk cost only increased activity of some brain areas (mainly lateral frontal and parietal cortices, which are involved in risk-taking), whereas lower incremental cost mainly increased activity of some brain areas (including striatum and medial prefrontal cortex, which are sensitive to rewards). No overlapping brain areas were found to respond to both sunk cost and incremental cost. These results favor certainty effect over self-justification or diminishing sensitivity as account of sunk cost effect.

  8. Above Bonneville Passage and Propagation Cost Effectiveness Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, C.M.; Hyman, J.B.; Wernstedt, K.

    1993-05-01

    We have developed several models to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of alternative strategies to mitigate hydrosystem impacts on salmon and steelhead, and applied these models to areas of the Columbia River Basin. Our latest application evaluates the cost-effectiveness of proposed strategies that target mainstem survival (e.g., predator control, increases in water velocity) and subbasin propagation (e.g., habitat improvements, screening, hatchery production increases) for chinook salmon and steelhead stocks, in the portion of the Columbia Basin bounded by Bonneville, Chief Joseph, Dworshak, and Hells Canyon darns. At its core the analysis primarily considers financial cost and biological effectiveness, but we have included other attributes which may be of concern to the region.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of Different Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Modalities.

    PubMed

    Pasquel, Francisco J; Hendrick, Andrew M; Ryan, Martha; Cason, Emily; Ali, Mohammed K; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2016-03-01

    Current screening strategies aimed at detection of diabetic retinopathy (DR) historically have poor compliance, but advancements in technology can enable improved access to care. Nearly 80% of all persons with diabetes live in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), highlighting the importance of a cost effective screening program. Establishing mechanisms to reach populations with geographic and financial barriers to access is essential to prevent visual disability. Teleretinal programs leverage technology to improve access and reduce cost. The quality of currently employed screening modalities depends on many variables including the instrument used, use of pupillary mydriasis, number of photographic fields, and the qualifications of the photographer and image interpreter. Recent telemedicine and newer technological approaches have been introduced, but data for these technologies is yet limited. We present results of a systematic review of studies evaluating cost-effectiveness of DR screening, and discuss potential relevance for LMICs. PMID:26719134

  10. Selecting cost-effective areas for restoration of ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Adame, M F; Hermoso, V; Perhans, K; Lovelock, C E; Herrera-Silveira, J A

    2015-04-01

    Selection of areas for restoration should be based on cost-effectiveness analysis to attain the maximum benefit with a limited budget and overcome the traditional ad hoc allocation of funds for restoration projects. Restoration projects need to be planned on the basis of ecological knowledge and economic and social constraints. We devised a novel approach for selecting cost-effective areas for restoration on the basis of biodiversity and potential provision of 3 ecosystem services: carbon storage, water depuration, and coastal protection. We used Marxan, a spatial prioritization tool, to balance the provision of ecosystem services against the cost of restoration. We tested this approach in a mangrove ecosystem in the Caribbean. Our approach efficiently selected restoration areas that at low cost were compatible with biodiversity targets and that maximized the provision of one or more ecosystem services. Choosing areas for restoration of mangroves on the basis carbon storage potential, largely guaranteed the restoration of biodiversity and other ecosystem services.

  11. Cost-Effective TiAl based Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moxson, V. S.; Sun, Fusheng; Draper, Susan L.; Froes, F. H.; Duz, V.

    2003-01-01

    Because of their inherent low ductility, TiAl-based materials are difficult to fabricate, especially thin gage titanium gamma aluminide (TiAl) sheet and foil. In this paper, an innovative powder metallurgy approach for producing cost-effective thin gage TiAl sheets (with 356 mm long and 235 mm wide, and a thickness of 0.74, 1.09, 1.55, and 2.34 mm, respectively) is presented. The microstructures and tensile properties at room and elevated temperatures of the thin gage TiAl are studied. Results show that these TiAl sheets have a relatively homogenous chemistry, uniform microstructure, and acceptable mechanical properties. This work demonstrates a cost-effective method for producing both flat products (sheet/foil) and complex chunky parts of TiAl for various advanced applications including aerospace and automotive industries.

  12. Cost-effective network design for groundwater flow monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andricevic, R.

    1990-03-01

    The extensive use of groundwater resources has increased the need for developing cost-effective monitoring networks to provide an indication of the degree to which the subsurface environment has been affected by human activities. This study presents a cost-effective approach to the design of groundwater flow monitoring networks. The groundwater network design is formulated with two problem formats: maximizing the statistical monitoring power for specified budget constraint and minimizing monitoring cost for statistical power requirement. The statistical monitoring power constraint is introduced with an information reliability threshold value. A branch and bound technique is employed to select the optimal solution from a discrete set of possible network alternatives. The method is tested to the design of groundwater flow monitoring problem in the Pomona County, California.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of Antivenoms for Snakebite Envenoming in 16 Countries in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Muhammad; Idris, Maryam A.; Maiyaki, Musa B.; Lamorde, Mohammed; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe; Warrell, David A.; Kuznik, Andreas; Habib, Abdulrazaq G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Snakebite poisoning is a significant medical problem in agricultural societies in Sub Saharan Africa. Antivenom (AV) is the standard treatment, and we assessed the cost-effectiveness of making it available in 16 countries in West Africa. Methods We determined the cost-effectiveness of AV based on a decision-tree model from a public payer perspective. Specific AVs included in the model were Antivipmyn, FAV Afrique, EchiTab-G and EchiTab-Plus. We derived inputs from the literature which included: type of snakes causing bites (carpet viper (Echis species)/non-carpet viper), AV effectiveness against death, mortality without AV, probability of Early Adverse Reactions (EAR), likelihood of death from EAR, average age at envenomation in years, anticipated remaining life span and likelihood of amputation. Costs incurred by the victims include: costs of confirming and evaluating envenomation, AV acquisition, routine care, AV transportation logistics, hospital admission and related transportation costs, management of AV EAR compared to the alternative of free snakebite care with ineffective or no AV. Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratios (ICERs) were assessed as the cost per death averted and the cost per Disability-Adjusted-Life-Years (DALY) averted. Probabilistic Sensitivity Analyses (PSA) using Monte Carlo simulations were used to obtain 95% Confidence Intervals of ICERs. Results The cost/death averted for the 16 countries of interest ranged from $1,997 in Guinea Bissau to $6,205 for Liberia and Sierra Leone. The cost/DALY averted ranged from $83 (95% Confidence Interval: $36-$240) for Benin Republic to $281 ($159–457) for Sierra-Leone. In all cases, the base-case cost/DALY averted estimate fell below the commonly accepted threshold of one time per capita GDP, suggesting that AV is highly cost-effective for the treatment of snakebite in all 16 WA countries. The findings were consistent even with variations of inputs in 1—way sensitivity analyses. In addition

  14. A Cost-Effectiveness Tool for Informing Policies on Zika Virus Control

    PubMed Central

    Tamagnan, Jules A.; Medlock, Jan; Ndeffo-Mbah, Martial L.; Fish, Durland; Ávila-Agüero, María L.; Marín, Rodrigo; Ko, Albert I.; Galvani, Alison P.

    2016-01-01

    Background As Zika virus continues to spread, decisions regarding resource allocations to control the outbreak underscore the need for a tool to weigh policies according to their cost and the health burden they could avert. For example, to combat the current Zika outbreak the US President requested the allocation of $1.8 billion from Congress in February 2016. Methodology/Principal Findings Illustrated through an interactive tool, we evaluated how the number of Zika cases averted, the period during pregnancy in which Zika infection poses a risk of microcephaly, and probabilities of microcephaly and Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) impact the cost at which an intervention is cost-effective. From Northeast Brazilian microcephaly incidence data, we estimated the probability of microcephaly in infants born to Zika-infected women (0.49% to 2.10%). We also estimated the probability of GBS arising from Zika infections in Brazil (0.02% to 0.06%) and Colombia (0.08%). We calculated that each microcephaly and GBS case incurs the loss of 29.95 DALYs and 1.25 DALYs per case, as well as direct medical costs for Latin America and the Caribbean of $91,102 and $28,818, respectively. We demonstrated the utility of our cost-effectiveness tool with examples evaluating funding commitments by Costa Rica and Brazil, the US presidential proposal, and the novel approach of genetically modified mosquitoes. Our analyses indicate that the commitments and the proposal are likely to be cost-effective, whereas the cost-effectiveness of genetically modified mosquitoes depends on the country of implementation. Conclusions/Significance Current estimates from our tool suggest that the health burden from microcephaly and GBS warrants substantial expenditures focused on Zika virus control. Our results justify the funding committed in Costa Rica and Brazil and many aspects of the budget outlined in the US president’s proposal. As data continue to be collected, new parameter estimates can be customized

  15. A cost-effectiveness worksheet for patient-education programs.

    PubMed

    Welch, Janet L; Fisher, Mary L; Dayhoff, Nancy E

    2002-07-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of a worksheet used by nursing faculty in a graduate clinical nurse specialist course to assist students in learning to estimate the cost-effectiveness of patient-education programs.1 The worksheet was found to be a satisfactory method of facilitating student learning and could also be used in the service arena to evaluate the cost aspects of patient-education programs.

  16. Development and Manufacture of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    James C. Leslie; James C. Leslie, II; Lee Truong; James T. Heard

    2006-09-29

    This technical report presents the engineering research, process development and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents progress made from October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006 and contains the following discussions: Qualification Testing; Prototype Development and Testing of ''Smart Design'' Configuration; Field Test Demonstration; Development of Ultra-Short Radius Composite Drill Pipe (USR-CDP); and Development of Smart USR-CDP.

  17. Cost effectiveness of routine duodenal biopsies in iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Broide, Efrat; Matalon, Shay; Kriger-Sharabi, Ofra; Richter, Vered; Shirin, Haim; Leshno, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the cost effectiveness of routine small bowel biopsies (SBBs) in patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) independent of their celiac disease (CD) serology test results. METHODS We used a state transition Markov model. Two strategies were compared: routine SBBs during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in all patients with IDA regardless their celiac serology status (strategy A) vs SBBs only in IDA patients with positive serology (strategy B). The main outcomes were quality adjusted life years (QALY), average cost and the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER). One way sensitivity analysis was performed on all variables and two way sensitivity analysis on selected variables were done. In order to validate the results, a Monte Carlo simulation of 100 sample trials with 10, and an acceptability curve were performed. RESULTS Strategy A of routine SBBs yielded 19.888 QALYs with a cost of $218.10 compared to 19.887 QALYs and $234.17 in strategy B. In terms of cost-effectiveness, strategy A was the dominant strategy, as long as the cost of SBBs stayed less than $67. In addition, the ICER of strategy A was preferable, providing the cost of biopsy stays under $77. Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated that strategy A yielded the same QALY but with lower costs than strategy B. CONCLUSION Our model suggests that EGD with routine SBBs is a cost-effective approach with improved QALYs in patients with IDA when the prevalence of CD is 5% or greater. SBBs should be a routine screening tool for CD among patients with IDA, regardless of their celiac antibody status. PMID:27678365

  18. Cost effectiveness of routine duodenal biopsies in iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Broide, Efrat; Matalon, Shay; Kriger-Sharabi, Ofra; Richter, Vered; Shirin, Haim; Leshno, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the cost effectiveness of routine small bowel biopsies (SBBs) in patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) independent of their celiac disease (CD) serology test results. METHODS We used a state transition Markov model. Two strategies were compared: routine SBBs during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in all patients with IDA regardless their celiac serology status (strategy A) vs SBBs only in IDA patients with positive serology (strategy B). The main outcomes were quality adjusted life years (QALY), average cost and the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER). One way sensitivity analysis was performed on all variables and two way sensitivity analysis on selected variables were done. In order to validate the results, a Monte Carlo simulation of 100 sample trials with 10, and an acceptability curve were performed. RESULTS Strategy A of routine SBBs yielded 19.888 QALYs with a cost of $218.10 compared to 19.887 QALYs and $234.17 in strategy B. In terms of cost-effectiveness, strategy A was the dominant strategy, as long as the cost of SBBs stayed less than $67. In addition, the ICER of strategy A was preferable, providing the cost of biopsy stays under $77. Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated that strategy A yielded the same QALY but with lower costs than strategy B. CONCLUSION Our model suggests that EGD with routine SBBs is a cost-effective approach with improved QALYs in patients with IDA when the prevalence of CD is 5% or greater. SBBs should be a routine screening tool for CD among patients with IDA, regardless of their celiac antibody status.

  19. Modified Transverse Thoracosternotomy and Cost-Effective Reinforced Sternal Closure.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joseph; Sonett, Joshua R; D'Ovidio, Frank

    2015-12-01

    The bilateral transverse thoracosternotomy clamshell incision provides excellent exposure to the mediastinal structures in double lung transplantation. The use of a modified transverse sternotomy and a figure of 8 configuration with one monofilament metal wire, along with two longitudinal wires across the sternal division, results in greater stability and equally distributed oblique tension. Our described technique was more cost effective and resulted in no incidence of dehiscence. We present our experience using a modified transverse sternotomy and reinforced sternal closure method.

  20. The cost effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi Jarrahi, Yasaman; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Sadigh, Nader; Esmaeelpoor Langeroudy, Keyhan; Khodadost, Mahmoud; Ranjbaran, Mehdi; Sanjari Moghaddam, Ali; Besharat, Mehdi; Mosavi Jarrahi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea leading to hospitalization or disease-specific death among young children. Effective vaccines have recently been approved and successful vaccination program implemented. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost effectiveness of mass rotavirus vaccination program in Iran. We developed a Markov model that reflects key features of rotavirus natural history. Parameters of the model were assessed by field study or developed through literature search and published data. We applied the model to the 2009 Iranian birth cohort and evaluated the cost-effectiveness of including the rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix®) into Iranian expanded immunization program (EPI). With an estimated hospitalization rate of 0.05 and outpatient rate of 0.23 cases per person-year, vaccinating cohort of 1231735 infants in Iran with 2 doses of (Rotarix®), would prevent 32092 hospitalizations, 158750 outpatient visits, and 1591 deaths during 5 y of follow-up. Under base-case assumption of $10 cost per course of vaccine, the vaccination would incur an extra cost of $1,019,192 from health care perspective and would avert 54680 DALYs. From societal perspective, there would be $15,192,568 saving for the society with the same averted DALYs. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio showed a cost of $19 US dollars per averted DALY from health care perspective and a saving of $278 US dollars for each averted DALY from societal perspective. Introducing rotavirus vaccine into EPI program would be highly cost-effective public health intervention in Iran. PMID:26360331

  1. Invisible Cost Effective Mechanics for Anterior Space Closure.

    PubMed

    Jumle, Aatish Vinod; Bagrecha, Saurabh; Gharat, Ninad; Misal, Abhijit; Toshniwal, N G

    2015-01-01

    The shifting paradigm towards invisible orthodontic treatment and also awareness in patients has allured their focus towards the most esthetic treatment approach. Also the lingual treatment is proved successful and is very well accepted by the patients. The problem that persist is its high expenses, which is not affordable by all patients. This article is a effort to treat a simple Class I malocclusion with anterior spacing using a simple, esthetic, Cost effective approach with acceptable results when esthetics plays a priority role.

  2. Cost-effectiveness analysis for health communication programs.

    PubMed

    Guilkey, David K; Hutchinson, Paul; Lance, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This article describes methods for analyzing the cost-effectiveness of health communication programs, focusing in particular on estimating program effectiveness with econometric methods that address experimental and quasi-experimental designs (and their absence), national or subnational program coverage, and endogenously targeting of programs. Experimental designs provide a gold standard for assessing effectiveness but are seldom feasible for large-scale health communication programs. Even in the absence of such designs, however, fairly simple methods can be used to examine intermediate objectives, such as program reach, which in turn can be linked to program costs to estimate cost effectiveness. When moving beyond program reach to behavioral or other outcome measures, such as contraceptive use or fertility, or when faced with full-coverage national programs, more elaborate data and methods are required. We discuss data requirements and assumptions necessary in each case, focusing on single-equation multiple regression models, structural equations models, and fixed effects estimators for use with longitudinal data, and then describing how cost information can be incorporated into econometric models so as to get measures of the cost-effectiveness of communication interventions.

  3. Cost-effectiveness in Clostridium difficile treatment decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Nuijten, Mark JC; Keller, Josbert J; Visser, Caroline E; Redekop, Ken; Claassen, Eric; Speelman, Peter; Pronk, Marja H

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To develop a framework for the clinical and health economic assessment for management of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). METHODS: CDI has vast economic consequences emphasizing the need for innovative and cost effective solutions, which were aim of this study. A guidance model was developed for coverage decisions and guideline development in CDI. The model included pharmacotherapy with oral metronidazole or oral vancomycin, which is the mainstay for pharmacological treatment of CDI and is recommended by most treatment guidelines. RESULTS: A design for a patient-based cost-effectiveness model was developed, which can be used to estimate the cost-effectiveness of current and future treatment strategies in CDI. Patient-based outcomes were extrapolated to the population by including factors like, e.g., person-to-person transmission, isolation precautions and closing and cleaning wards of hospitals. CONCLUSION: The proposed framework for a population-based CDI model may be used for clinical and health economic assessments of CDI guidelines and coverage decisions for emerging treatments for CDI. PMID:26601096

  4. Cost-effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy expansion strategies in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tran, Dam Anh; Wilson, David P; Shakeshaft, Anthony; Ngo, Anh Duc; Reyes, Josephine; Doran, Christopher; Zhang, Lei

    2014-07-01

    This study determines an optimal strategy for scaling up ART in Vietnam by examining three initiation thresholds [350 cells/mm(3), 500 cells/mm(3), and treat all people living with HIV (PLHIV) regardless of CD4 cell counts] and treatment commencement rates among treatment-eligible PLHIV ranging from 5% to 100% within 12 months of diagnosis. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated using a Markov model, based on data from a cohort of 3449 patients who initiated ART between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2009 in 13 outpatient clinics across six provinces in Vietnam. Our analyses indicated that raising treatment eligibility criteria, in line with WHO guidelines (CD4 ≤500 cells/mm(3)) or removing CD4-based criteria would both be cost-effective in Vietnam. However, the cost-effective strategy from an economic viewpoint is first to increase coverage substantially among those with lowest CD4 levels, and only when coverage increases towards saturation should initiation criteria be lifted. Universal coverage under current guidelines would cost an additional $85 million and $96 million per year if the treatment threshold was 500 cells/mm(3). These scenarios would avert 15,000 and 22,000 HIV-related deaths in 2010-2019, with ICERs of $500-$660 per QALY gained. It is imperative to increase treatment coverage for newly diagnosed PLHIV in Vietnam according to the current guidelines prior to increasing the CD4 threshold for ART initiation.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of Chlamydia Vaccination Programs for Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Chesson, Harrell W.; Gift, Thomas L.; Brunham, Robert C.; Bolan, Gail

    2015-01-01

    We explored potential cost-effectiveness of a chlamydia vaccine for young women in the United States by using a compartmental heterosexual transmission model. We tracked health outcomes (acute infections and sequelae measured in quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs]) and determined incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) over a 50-year analytic horizon. We assessed vaccination of 14-year-old girls and catch-up vaccination for 15–24-year-old women in the context of an existing chlamydia screening program and assumed 2 prevaccination prevalences of 3.2% by main analysis and 3.7% by additional analysis. Estimated ICERs of vaccinating 14-year-old girls were $35,300/QALY by main analysis and $16,200/QALY by additional analysis compared with only screening. Catch-up vaccination for 15–24-year-old women resulted in estimated ICERs of $53,200/QALY by main analysis and $26,300/QALY by additional analysis. The ICER was most sensitive to prevaccination prevalence for women, followed by cost of vaccination, duration of vaccine-conferred immunity, and vaccine efficacy. Our results suggest that a successful chlamydia vaccine could be cost-effective. PMID:25989525

  6. Cost-effectiveness of assisted conception for male subfertility.

    PubMed

    Moolenaar, Lobke M; Cissen, Maarje; de Bruin, Jan Peter; Hompes, Peter G A; Repping, Sjoerd; van der Veen, Fulco; Mol, Ben Willem J

    2015-06-01

    Intrauterine insemination (IUI), with or without ovarian stimulation, IVF and intracytoplasmatic sperm injection (ICSI) are frequently used treatments for couples with male subfertility. No consensus has been reached on specific cut-off values for semen parameters, at which IVF would be advocated over IUI and ICSI over IVF. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of interventions for male subfertility according to total motile sperm count (TMSC). A computer-simulated cohort of subfertile women aged 30 years with a partner was analysed with a pre-wash TMSC of 0 to 10 million. Three treatments were evaluated: IUI with and without controlled ovarian stimulation; IVF; and ICSI. Main outcome was expected live birth; secondary outcomes were cost per couple and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. The choice of IVF over IUI with ovarian stimulation and ICSI over IVF depends on the willingness to pay for an extra live birth. If only cost per live birth is considered for each treatment, above a pre-wash TMSC of 3 million, IUI is less costly than IVF and, below a pre-wash, TMSC of 3 million ICSI is less costly. Effectiveness needs to be confirmed in a large randomized controlled trial.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of assisted conception for male subfertility.

    PubMed

    Moolenaar, Lobke M; Cissen, Maarje; de Bruin, Jan Peter; Hompes, Peter G A; Repping, Sjoerd; van der Veen, Fulco; Mol, Ben Willem J

    2015-06-01

    Intrauterine insemination (IUI), with or without ovarian stimulation, IVF and intracytoplasmatic sperm injection (ICSI) are frequently used treatments for couples with male subfertility. No consensus has been reached on specific cut-off values for semen parameters, at which IVF would be advocated over IUI and ICSI over IVF. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of interventions for male subfertility according to total motile sperm count (TMSC). A computer-simulated cohort of subfertile women aged 30 years with a partner was analysed with a pre-wash TMSC of 0 to 10 million. Three treatments were evaluated: IUI with and without controlled ovarian stimulation; IVF; and ICSI. Main outcome was expected live birth; secondary outcomes were cost per couple and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. The choice of IVF over IUI with ovarian stimulation and ICSI over IVF depends on the willingness to pay for an extra live birth. If only cost per live birth is considered for each treatment, above a pre-wash TMSC of 3 million, IUI is less costly than IVF and, below a pre-wash, TMSC of 3 million ICSI is less costly. Effectiveness needs to be confirmed in a large randomized controlled trial. PMID:25900905

  8. Cost-effectiveness of primary tetanus vaccination among elderly Canadians.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, B G; Stoddart, G L

    1988-12-15

    Although tetanus is now rare, vaccination is currently recommended for the entire population. Most elderly North Americans have never received tetanus vaccination. We evaluated the expected cost-effectiveness of using mailed reminders from family physicians to increase primary tetanus vaccination coverage among elderly Canadians. We estimated that over 10 years the program would prevent five cases of tetanus and one death from tetanus, resulting in a gain of 13 life-years. There would be 16,700 adverse reactions to tetanus toxoid, 17% in people already immune to tetanus. The net cost of the program (in 1984 Canadian dollars) would be $1.9 million per case of tetanus prevented, $7.1 million per death prevented and $810,000 per life-year gained. These high cost-effectiveness ratios are largely attributable to the very low risk of tetanus, even among nonimmune elderly people. Tetanus toxoid and physicians' services for vaccination would account for 86% of the program costs. Because the mailed reminders would be responsible for only 13% of the program costs, other possible programs to increase primary tetanus vaccination coverage could not be expected to have substantially lower cost-effectiveness ratios. We conclude that efforts to increase primary tetanus vaccination coverage among elderly Canadians would be a questionable use of health care resources.

  9. Supported employment: cost-effectiveness across six European sites.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Martin; Patel, Anita; Curran, Claire; Latimer, Eric; Catty, Jocelyn; Becker, Thomas; Drake, Robert E; Fioritti, Angelo; Kilian, Reinhold; Lauber, Christoph; Rössler, Wulf; Tomov, Toma; van Busschbach, Jooske; Comas-Herrera, Adelina; White, Sarah; Wiersma, Durk; Burns, Tom

    2013-02-01

    A high proportion of people with severe mental health problems are unemployed but would like to work. Individual Placement and Support (IPS) offers a promising approach to establishing people in paid employment. In a randomized controlled trial across six European countries, we investigated the economic case for IPS for people with severe mental health problems compared to standard vocational rehabilitation. Individuals (n=312) were randomized to receive either IPS or standard vocational services and followed for 18 months. Service use and outcome data were collected. Cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted with two primary outcomes: additional days worked in competitive settings and additional percentage of individuals who worked at least 1 day. Analyses distinguished country effects. A partial cost-benefit analysis was also conducted. IPS produced better outcomes than alternative vocational services at lower cost overall to the health and social care systems. This pattern also held in disaggregated analyses for five of the six European sites. The inclusion of imputed values for missing cost data supported these findings. IPS would be viewed as more cost-effective than standard vocational services. Further analysis demonstrated cost-benefit arguments for IPS. Compared to standard vocational rehabilitation services, IPS is, therefore, probably cost-saving and almost certainly more cost-effective as a way to help people with severe mental health problems into competitive employment. PMID:23471803

  10. Cost effectiveness of detritiating water with resin columns

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.H.; Williams, D.S.

    1997-10-01

    There are technologies in use for cleaning up concentrated tritiated process water. These are not cost effective for tritiated water with low concentrations of tritium. There are currently no cost-effective technologies for cleaning up low-tritium-concentration tritiated water, such as most tritiated groundwater, spent fuel storage basin water, or underground storage tank water. Resin removal of tritium from tritiated water at low concentrations (near the order of magnitude of drinking water standard maximums) is being tested on TA-SO (Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Liquid Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility) waste streams. There are good theoretical and test indications that this may be a technologically effective means of removing tritium from tritiated water. Because of likely engineering design similarity, it is reasonable to anticipate that a resin column system`s costs will be similar to some common commercial water treatment systems. Thus, the potential cost effectiveness of a resin treatment system offers hope for treating tritiated water at affordable costs. The TA-50 resin treatment cost projection of $18 per 1,000 gallons is within the same order of magnitude as cost data for typical commercial groundwater cleanup projects. The prospective Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) resin treatment system at $18 per 1,000 gallons appears to have a likely cost advantage of at least an order of magnitude over the competing, developmental, water detritiation technologies.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of voluntary HIV screening in Russia.

    PubMed

    Tole, S P; Sanders, G D; Bayoumi, A M; Galvin, C M; Vinichenko, T N; Brandeau, M L; Owens, D K

    2009-01-01

    Russia has one of the world's fastest growing HIV epidemics, and HIV screening has been widespread. Whether such screening is an effective use of resources is unclear. We used epidemiologic and economic data from Russia to develop a Markov model to estimate costs, quality of life and survival associated with a voluntary HIV screening programme compared with no screening in Russia. We measured discounted lifetime health-care costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. We varied our inputs in sensitivity analysis. Early identification of HIV through screening provided a substantial benefit to persons with HIV, increasing life expectancy by 2.1 years and 1.7 QALYs. At a base-case prevalence of 1.2%, once-per-lifetime screening cost $13,396 per QALY gained, exclusive of benefit from reduced transmission. Cost-effectiveness of screening remained favourable until prevalence dropped below 0.04%. When HIV-transmission-related costs and benefits were included, once-per-lifetime screening cost $6910 per QALY gained and screening every two years cost $27,696 per QALY gained. An important determinant of the cost-effectiveness of screening was effectiveness of counselling about risk reduction. Early identification of HIV infection through screening in Russia is effective and cost-effective in all but the lowest prevalence groups.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Bevacizumab and Ranibizumab for Newly Diagnosed Neovascular Macular Degeneration (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Joshua D.; Newman-Casey, Paula Anne; Mrinalini, Tavag; Lee, Paul P.; Hutton, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the most cost-effective treatment for patients with newly diagnosed neovascular macular degeneration: monthly or as-needed bevacizumab injections, or monthly or as-needed ranibizumab injections. Methods: Using a Markov model with a 20-year time horizon, we compared the incremental cost-effectiveness of treating a hypothetical cohort of 80-year-old patients with newly diagnosed neovascular macular degeneration using monthly bevacizumab, as-needed bevacizumab, monthly ranibizumab, or as-needed ranibizumab. Data came from the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatment Trial (CATT), the Medicare Fee Schedules, and the medical literature. Results: Compared with as-needed bevacizumab, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of monthly bevacizumab is $242,357 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Monthly ranibizumab gains an additional 0.02 QALYs vs monthly bevacizumab at an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of more than $10 million per QALY. As-needed ranibizumab was dominated by monthly bevacizumab. In sensitivity analyses assuming a willingness to pay of $100,000 per QALY, the annual risk of serious vascular events would have to be at least 2.5 times higher with bevacizumab than that observed in the CATT trial for as-needed ranibizumab to have an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of <$100,000 per QALY. In another sensitivity analysis, even if every patient receiving bevacizumab experienced declining vision by one category (eg, from 20/25–20/40 to 20/50–20/80) after 2 years but all patients receiving ranibizumab retained their vision level, as-needed ranibizumab would have an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $97,340 per QALY. Conclusion: Even after considering the potential for differences in risks of serious adverse events and therapeutic effectiveness, bevacizumab confers considerably greater value than ranibizumab for the treatment of neovascular macular degeneration. PMID:24167325

  13. Applying risk adjusted cost-effectiveness (RAC-E) analysis to hospitals: estimating the costs and consequences of variation in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Karnon, Jonathan; Caffrey, Orla; Pham, Clarabelle; Grieve, Richard; Ben-Tovim, David; Hakendorf, Paul; Crotty, Maria

    2013-06-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis is well established for pharmaceuticals and medical technologies but not for evaluating variations in clinical practice. This paper describes a novel methodology--risk adjusted cost-effectiveness (RAC-E)--that facilitates the comparative evaluation of applied clinical practice processes. In this application, risk adjustment is undertaken with a multivariate matching algorithm that balances the baseline characteristics of patients attending different settings (e.g., hospitals). Linked, routinely collected data are used to analyse patient-level costs and outcomes over a 2-year period, as well as to extrapolate costs and survival over patient lifetimes. The study reports the relative cost-effectiveness of alternative forms of clinical practice, including a full representation of the statistical uncertainty around the mean estimates. The methodology is illustrated by a case study that evaluates the relative cost-effectiveness of services for patients presenting with acute chest pain across the four main public hospitals in South Australia. The evaluation finds that services provided at two hospitals were dominated, and of the remaining services, the more effective hospital gained life years at a low mean additional cost and had an 80% probability of being the most cost-effective hospital at realistic cost-effectiveness thresholds. Potential determinants of the estimated variation in costs and effects were identified, although more detailed analyses to identify specific areas of variation in clinical practice are required to inform improvements at the less cost-effective institutions.

  14. Integration of medical and information technology in U.S. health care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, William H.; Pollack, Marc M.; Rosenthal, David S.

    1994-12-01

    One of the most powerful forces affecting the success of health reform in the United States is information technology (IT). The integration of medical technology (such as imaging) with IT (such as the electronic medical record, guidelines, care paths and outcomes research) provides the opportunity to simultaneously improve the quality of health care and control health care cost inflation. The effective integration of medical technology with IT has the potential to achieve clinically appropriate and cost effective medical care in the appropriate location with the support of technologically delivered guidelines and using telemedicine applications such as telediagnosis, teleradiology, and telemonitoring. These savings will provide the investment and research funding to enable the United States to continue as the world's leader in medical technology and telemedicine. This paper validates the potential for these benefits from the effective integration of clinical IT and medical technology with a case study of the progress achieved at Harvard University Health Services.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of Extended Buprenorphine-Naloxone Treatment for Opioid-Dependent Youth: Data from a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Polsky, Daniel; Glick, Henry A.; Yang, Jianing; Subramaniam, Geetha A.; Poole, Sabrina A.; Woody, George E.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The objective is to estimate cost, net social cost, and cost-effectiveness in a clinical trial of extended buprenorphine-naloxone treatment versus brief detoxification treatment in opioid-dependent youth. Methods Economic evaluation of a clinical trial conducted at 6 community outpatient treatment programs from July 2003 to December 2006 including 152 patients aged 15 to 21 years who were randomized to 12 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP) or a 14-day taper (DETOX). BUP patients were prescribed up to 24 mg per day for 9 weeks and then tapered to zero at the end of week 12. DETOX patients were prescribed up to 14 mg per day and then tapered to zero on day 14. All were offered twice weekly drug counseling. Data were collected prospectively during the 12-week treatment and at follow-up interviews at months 6, 9, and 12. Results The 12-week outpatient study treatment cost was $1514 (p<0.001) higher for BUP relative to DETOX. One-year total direct medical cost was only $83 higher for BUP (p=0.97). The cost-effectiveness ratio of BUP relative to DETOX was $1,376 in terms of 1-year direct medical cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) and $25,049 in terms of outpatient treatment program cost per QALY. The acceptability curve suggests that the cost-effectiveness ratio of BUP relative to DETOX has an 86% chance of being accepted as cost-effective for a threshold of $100,000 per QALY. Conclusions Extended buprenorphine-naloxone treatment relative to brief detoxification is cost effective in the U.S. health care system for the outpatient treatment of opioid-dependent youth. PMID:20626379

  16. Real-Life Treatment Paradigms Show Adalimumab Is Cost-Effective for the Management of Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ung, Victoria; Kroeker, Karen I.; Lee, Thomas; Wang, Haili; Jacobs, Phil; Halloran, Brendan P.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Adalimumab is effective for the maintenance of remission in patients with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis (UC). Currently, biologic therapies are used in cases where patients fail conventional medical therapies. If biologic therapies are not available, patients often choose to remain in an unwell state rather than undergo colectomy. Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of adalimumab in patients with UC where adalimumab was readily available compared to not available. Methods. A previously validated Markov model was used to simulate disease progression of patients with UC who are corticosteroid-dependent and/or did not respond to thiopurine therapy. Utility scores and transition probabilities between health states were determined by using data from randomized controlled trials and real-life observational studies. Costs were obtained from the Ontario Case Costing Initiative and the Alberta Health Schedule of Medical Benefits. Results. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for readily available adalimumab treatment of UC were $40,000 and $59,000 per quality-adjusted life year, compared with ongoing medical therapy in an unwell state, at 5-year and 10-year treatment time horizons, respectively. Conclusion. Considering real-life patient preferences to avoid colectomy, adalimumab is cost-effective according to a willingness-to-pay threshold of $80,000 for treatment of UC. PMID:27781203

  17. Cost-effectiveness of telehealth for patients with depression: evidence from the Healthlines randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hollinghurst, Sandra; Edwards, Louisa; Thomas, Clare; Foster, Alexis; Davies, Ben; Gaunt, Daisy; Montgomery, Alan A.; Salisbury, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is a prevalent long-term condition that is associated with substantial resource use. Telehealth may offer a cost-effective means of supporting the management of people with depression. Aims To investigate the cost-effectiveness of a telehealth intervention (‘Healthlines') for patients with depression. Method A prospective patient-level economic evaluation conducted alongside a randomised controlled trial. Patients were recruited through primary care, and the intervention was delivered via a telehealth service. Participants with a confirmed diagnosis of depression and PHQ-9 score ≥10 were recruited from 43 English general practices. A series of up to 10 scripted, theory-led, telephone encounters with health information advisers supported participants to effect a behaviour change, use online resources, optimise medication and improve adherence. The intervention was delivered alongside usual care and was designed to support rather than duplicate primary care. Cost-effectiveness from a combined health and social care perspective was measured by net monetary benefit at the end of 12 months of follow-up, calculated from incremental cost and incremental quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Cost–consequence analysis included cost of lost productivity, participant out-of-pocket expenditure and the clinical outcome. Results A total of 609 participants were randomised – 307 to receive the Healthlines intervention plus usual care and 302 to receive usual care alone. Forty-five per cent of participants had missing quality of life data, 41% had missing cost data and 51% of participants had missing data on either cost or utility, or both. Multiple imputation was used for the base-case analysis. The intervention was associated with incremental mean per-patient National Health Service/personal social services cost of £168 (95% CI £43 to £294) and an incremental QALY gain of 0.001 (95% CI −0.023 to 0.026). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio

  18. A participatory approach for selecting cost-effective measures in the WFD context: the Mar Menor (SE Spain).

    PubMed

    Perni, Angel; Martínez-Paz, José M

    2013-08-01

    Achieving a good ecological status in water bodies by 2015 is one of the objectives established in the European Water Framework Directive. Cost-effective analysis (CEA) has been applied for selecting measures to achieve this goal, but this appraisal technique requires technical and economic information that is not always available. In addition, there are often local insights that can only be identified by engaging multiple stakeholders in a participatory process. This paper proposes to combine CEA with the active involvement of stakeholders for selecting cost-effective measures. This approach has been applied to the case study of one of the main coastal lagoons in the European Mediterranean Sea, the Mar Menor, which presents eutrophication problems. Firstly, face-to-face interviews were conducted to estimate relative effectiveness and relative impacts of a set of measures by means of the pairwise comparison technique. Secondly, relative effectiveness was used to estimate cost-effectiveness ratios. The most cost-effective measures were the restoration of watercourses that drain into the lagoon and the treatment of polluted groundwater. Although in general the stakeholders approved the former, most of them stated that the latter involved some uncertainties, which must be addressed before implementing it. Stakeholders pointed out that the PoM would have a positive impact not only on water quality, but also on fishing, agriculture and tourism in the area. This approach can be useful to evaluate other programmes, plans or projects related to other European environmental strategies.

  19. [Contribution of leflunomide to the cost effectiveness of sequential DMARD therapy of rheumatoid arthritis in Germany].

    PubMed

    Schädlich, P K; Zeidler, H; Zink, A; Gromnica-Ihle, E; Schneider, M; Straub, C; Brecht, J G; Huppertz, E

    2004-02-01

    Since November 1999, leflunomide (LEF), an innovative disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), is available in Germany for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). LEF slows radiographic disease progression and improves functional capacity as well as healthrelated quality of life of RA patients. Resources for health care of the patients are limited in Germany as in all other countries. The purpose of the analysis therefore was to compare the cost effectiveness of the following alternatives: LEF in sequential monotherapy with other DMARDs versus sequential monotherapy of other DMARDs. The target variables of this cost-effectiveness comparison were additional direct costs per ACR20-response year (ACR20RY) gained and per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained, respectively, each after three years of treatment. The cost-effectiveness comparison was carried out using a modeling study after secondary analysis of relevant data. Oral methotrexate (MTX), sulphasalazine (SSZ), antimalarials (CQ/HCQ), intramuscular gold (IMG), and azathioprine (AZA) were selected as "other" DMARDs representing the current status of sequential monotherapy. Based on health care regulation in Germany-Guidelines on the Prescription of Drugs amended by the Federal Commission of Medical Practitioners and Health Insurance Funds on 10 December 1999-LEF was exclusively considered second within a DMARD sequence. Direct costs were given by outpatient and inpatient treatment, long-term care, and rehabilitation treatment. Prices relate to the period of 1998 to 2001 and were converted to Euro (euro), according to the official exchange rate of 1 euro = 1.95583 DM (1 euro approximately 0.90 US dollars; 2001 values). The comparative cost-effectiveness analysis covered a treatment period of more than one year. To estimate the net present value of future costs and effectiveness, a discount rate of 5% per year was applied. In the case of DMARD-naïve patients with RA, the sequence MTX, LEF, SSZ, IMG, AZA

  20. The 10-Year Cost-Effectiveness of Lifestyle Intervention or Metformin for Diabetes Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and its Outcomes Study (DPPOS) demonstrated that either intensive lifestyle intervention or metformin could prevent type 2 diabetes in high-risk adults for at least 10 years after randomization. We report the 10-year within-trial cost-effectiveness of the interventions. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data on resource utilization, cost, and quality of life were collected prospectively. Economic analyses were performed from health system and societal perspectives. RESULTS Over 10 years, the cumulative, undiscounted per capita direct medical costs of the interventions, as implemented during the DPP, were greater for lifestyle ($4,601) than metformin ($2,300) or placebo ($769). The cumulative direct medical costs of care outside the DPP/DPPOS were least for lifestyle ($24,563 lifestyle vs. $25,616 metformin vs. $27,468 placebo). The cumulative, combined total direct medical costs were greatest for lifestyle and least for metformin ($29,164 lifestyle vs. $27,915 metformin vs. $28,236 placebo). The cumulative quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) accrued over 10 years were greater for lifestyle (6.81) than metformin (6.69) or placebo (6.67). When costs and outcomes were discounted at 3%, lifestyle cost $10,037 per QALY, and metformin had slightly lower costs and nearly the same QALYs as placebo. CONCLUSIONS Over 10 years, from a payer perspective, lifestyle was cost-effective and metformin was marginally cost-saving compared with placebo. Investment in lifestyle and metformin interventions for diabetes prevention in high-risk adults provides good value for the money spent. PMID:22442395

  1. Is Taurolidine-citrate an effective and cost-effective hemodialysis catheter lock solution? A systematic review and cost- effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kavosi, Zahra; Sarikhani Khorrami, Maryam; Keshavarz, Khosro; Jafari, Abdosaleh; Hashemi Meshkini, Amir; Safaei, Hamid Reza; Nikfar, Shekoufeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prevention of catheter-related infection is of prime importance,. However, because of the risks caused by the leakage of circulating antibiotics and development of resistance to antibiotics, they are replaced by lock solutions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and cost- effectiveness of taurolidine-citrate as a hemodialysis catheter lock solution compared to other common alternatives in Iran. Methods: To evaluate the efficacy of taurolidine-citrate, a systematic review was conducted by searching electronic databases. The outcomes of interest for cost-effectiveness analysis were as follows: "Catheter-related bacteremia episodes"; "catheter-related bacteremia-free survival"; "catheter thrombosis rate" for efficacy evaluation and "reduction of catheter-related infection". For evidence synthesis, a meta-analysis was conducted on the extracted efficacy data. To evaluate the cost of treatments, direct medical costs were included, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated for each comparison. The payers’ (patients and insurance companies) perspectives were used for cost analysis. Results: After carrying out the systematic process, three articles were included in the analysis. Considering 95% confidence interval, the relative difference was -0.16 (-0.25 to -0.07) for catheterrelated bacteremia episode, indicating that the rate of catheter-related infections in hemodialysis patients who used taurolidine-citrate was 16% less than in those hemodialysis patients who received heparin. Considering 95% confidence interval, the relative difference was 0.13 (-0.06 0.32) for catheter thrombosis, showing that the rate of catheter-related thrombosis in hemodialysis patients who used taurolidine-citrate was 13% more than in hemodialysis patients who received heparin. The results of this analysis indicated that taurolidine-citrate, compared to heparin, was more effective in preventing catheter-related infection; therefore, it could be

  2. Cost-effectiveness of Pharmaceutical Interventions to Prevent Osteoporotic Fractures in Postmenopausal Women with Osteopenia

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jin-Won; Park, Hae-Young; Kim, Ye Jee; Moon, Seong-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the cost-effectiveness of drug therapy to prevent osteoporotic fractures in postmenopausal women with osteopenia in Korea. Methods A Markov cohort simulation was conducted for lifetime with a hypothetical cohort of postmenopausal women with osteopenia and without prior fractures. They were assumed to receive calcium/vitamin D supplements only or drug therapy (i.e., raloxifene or risedronate) along with calcium/vitamin D for 5 years. The Markov model includes fracture-specific and non-fracture specific health states (i.e. breast cancer and venous thromboembolism), and all-cause death. Published literature was used to determine the model parameters. Local data were used to estimate the baseline incidence rates of fracture in those with osteopenia and the costs associated with each health state. Results From a societal perspective, the estimated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for the base cases that had T-scores between -2.0 and -2.4 and began drug therapy at the age of 55, 60, or 65 years were $16,472, $6,741, and -$13,982 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained, respectively. Sensitivity analyses for medication compliance, risk of death following vertebral fracture, and relaxing definition of osteopenia resulted in ICERs reached to $24,227 per QALY gained. Conclusions ICERs for the base case and sensitivity analyses remained within the World Health Organization's willingness-to-pay threshold, which is less than per-capita gross domestic product in Korea (about $25,700). Thus, we conclude that drug therapy for osteopenia would be a cost-effective intervention, and we recommend that the Korean National Health Insurance expand its coverage to include drug therapy for osteopenia. PMID:27294078

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of universal influenza vaccination with quadrivalent inactivated vaccine in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Karen M; Meier, Genevieve; McGarry, Lisa J; Pruttivarasin, Narin; Misurski, Derek A

    2014-01-01

    To address influenza B lineage mismatch and co-circulation, several quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccines (IIV4s) containing two type A strains and both type B lineages have recently been approved in the United States. Currently available trivalent inactivated vaccines (IIV3s) or trivalent live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV3s) comprise two influenza A strains and one of the two influenza B lineages that have co-circulated in the United States since 2001. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a policy of universal vaccination with IIV4 vs. IIV3/LAIV3 during 1 year in the United States. On average per influenza season, IIV4 was predicted to result in 30 251 fewer influenza cases, 3512 fewer hospitalizations, 722 fewer deaths, 4812 fewer life-years lost, and 3596 fewer quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) lost vs. IIV3/LAIV3. Using the Fluarix QuadrivalentTM (GlaxoSmithKline) prices and the weighted average IIV3/LAIV3 prices, the model predicts that the vaccination program costs would increase by $452.2 million, while direct medical and indirect costs would decrease by $111.6 million and $218.7 million, respectively, with IIV4. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) comparing IIV4 to IIV3/LAIV3 is predicted to be $90 301/QALY gained. Deterministic sensitivity analyses found that influenza B vaccine-matched and mismatched efficacies among adults aged ≥65 years had the greatest impact on the ICER. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that the cost per QALY remained below $100 000 for 61% of iterations. In conclusion, vaccination with IIV4 in the US is predicted to reduce morbidity and mortality. This strategy is also predicted to be cost-effective vs. IIV3/LAIV3 at conventional willingness-to-pay thresholds. PMID:24609063

  4. Prevention of retained surgical sponges: a decision-analytic model predicting relative cost-effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Regenbogen, Scott E; Greenberg, Caprice C; Resch, Stephen C; Kollengode, Anantha; Cima, Robert R; Zinner, Michael J; Gawande, Atul A

    2009-01-01

    Background New technologies are available to reduce or prevent retained surgical sponges (RSS), but their relative cost-effectiveness are unknown. We developed an empirically-calibrated decision-analytic model comparing standard counting against alternative strategies: universal or selective X-ray, bar-coded sponges (BCS), and radiofrequency-tagged (RF) sponges. Methods Key model parameters were obtained from field observations during a randomized-controlled BCS trial (N=298), an observational study of RSS (N=191,168), and clinical experience with BCS (N~60,000). Since no comparable data exist for RF, we modeled its performance under two alternative assumptions. Only incremental sponge-tracking costs, excluding those common to all strategies, were considered. Main outcomes were RSS incidence and cost-effectiveness ratios for each strategy, from the institutional decision-maker’s perspective. Results Standard counting detects 82% of RSS. Bar-coding prevents at least 97.5% for an additional $95,000 per RSS averted. If RF is as effective as bar-coding, it would cost $720,000 per additional RSS averted (versus standard counting). Universal X-ray and selective X-ray for high-risk operations are more costly, but less effective than BCS—$1.1–1.4 million per RSS event prevented. In sensitivity analyses, results were robust over the plausible range of effectiveness assumptions, but sensitive to cost. Conclusions Using currently available data, this analysis provides a useful model for comparing the relative cost-effectiveness of existing sponge-tracking strategies. Selecting the best method for an institution will depend on its priorities: ease-of-use, cost-reduction or ensuring RSS are truly “never-events”. Given medical and liability costs exceeding $200,000 per incident, novel technologies can substantially reduce the incidence of RSS, at acceptable cost. PMID:19375612

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Tenofovir as First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in India

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Melissa A.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Wang, Bingxia; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Flanigan, Timothy; Schackman, Bruce R.; Scott, Callie A.; Lu, Zhigang; Freedberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    Background World Health Organization guidelines for antiretroviral treatment (ART) in resource-limited settings recommend either stavudine or tenofovir as part of initial therapy. We evaluated the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of first-line ART using tenofovir in India, compared to current practice using stavudine or zidovudine. Methods We used a state-transition model of HIV disease to examine strategies using different nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, combined with lamivudine and nevirapine, compared to no ART: 1) stavudine; 2) stavudine, with substitution by zidovudine after six months; 3) zidovudine; 4) tenofovir. Data were from the Y.R. Gaitonde Centre for AIDS Research and Education in Chennai, India and published studies. Results Discounted mean per person survival was 36.9 months (40.1 months undiscounted) with no ART, 115.5 months (145.3) with stavudine-containing ART, 115.6 months (145.5) with stavudine and six-month zidovudine substitution, 115.7 months (145.6) with zidovudine-containing ART, and 125.9 months (162.2) with initial tenofovir. Discounted lifetime medical costs were $610 with no ART and ranged from $5,560 with stavudine-containing ART to $5,720 with zidovudine-containing ART. Initial tenofovir had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $670/year of life saved compared to no ART and was more economically efficient than the other regimens. Results were most sensitive to variations in the costs of first-line tenofovir, access to additional ART after failure, mean initial CD4 count, and quality of life adjustment. Conclusions Using tenofovir as part of first-line ART in India will improve survival, is cost-effective by international standards, and should be considered for initial therapy for HIV-infected patients in India. PMID:20043752

  6. Daniel John Cunningham (1850-1909): anatomist and textbook author, whose sons achieved distinction in the Army, Navy and Indian Medical Service.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Matthew H

    2008-02-01

    Daniel John Cunningham was a son of the manse. His father John (1819-93) was the parish priest at Crieff, Perthshire from 1845 and was to remain there for 41 years. In 1886 he was appointed Principal of St Mary's College of the University of St Andrews and Moderator of the Church of Scotland. Daniel was educated at Crieff Academy before he progressed to the University of Edinburgh. He graduated MB CM with First-class Honours in 1874 and then proceeded MD in 1876 when he was awarded a Gold Medal for his thesis. He acted as Demonstrator to Professor Turner (1832-1916) in Edinburgh for eight years until 1882 and was then appointed to the Chair of Anatomy at the Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland, in Dublin. After only one year there, he transferred to Trinity College, Dublin, where he occupied a similar position for 20 years. In 1903, on the appointment of Sir William Turner to the post of Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh, Daniel was invited to succeed him as Professor of Anatomy in Edinburgh. Daniel held this post until his premature death in 1909. He had three sons and two daughters. Each of his three sons achieved distinction in different fields - one in the Army, another in the Navy and the third in the Indian Medical Service. One of Daniel's daughters married Dr Edwin Bramwell (1873-1952), who was later to occupy the Moncrieff Arnott Chair of Clinical Medicine in the University of Edinburgh.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of hormone replacement therapy after the menopause.

    PubMed

    Tosteson, A N; Weinstein, M C

    1991-12-01

    The net resource costs and net health benefits of treating perimenopausal women with hormone replacement therapy were evaluated within the framework of cost-effectiveness analysis. Data from the epidemiological literature were used to estimate changes in discounted life expectancy from hip fracture, ischaemic heart disease and breast cancer that are associated with hormone replacement therapy under a variety of assumptions. Economic data were used to estimate changes in total discounted costs that result from the use of hormone replacement therapy. For women with a previous hysterectomy, 10- and 15-year courses of unopposed oestrogen were evaluated. The baseline assumptions for unopposed oestrogen were that breast cancer incidence would be increased for current users by 36% and that deaths from ischaemic heart disease would be reduced by 50% relative to non-users. Under these assumptions, oestrogen replacement therapy was found to be cost-effective, with ratios ranging from $9130 to $12,620 per additional year of life saved. For women who have not had a hysterectomy, 10- and 15-year courses of oestrogen combined with progestin were evaluated. The baseline assumptions for combined therapy were that breast cancer incidence and ischaemic heart disease deaths were unaffected. Under these assumptions, combined therapy was more costly, with ratios ranging from $86,100 to $88,500. Unless combined therapy is found to confer protection against ischaemic heart disease, the most cost-effective strategies for women with no prior hysterectomy may involve screening perimenopausal women to detect women at highest risk of hip fracture followed by selective treatment.

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of quadrivalent influenza vaccine in Spain.

    PubMed

    García, Amos; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl; Reina, Jordi; Callejo, Daniel; Cuervo, Jesús; Morano Larragueta, Raúl

    2016-09-01

    Influenza has a major impact on healthcare systems and society, but can be prevented using vaccination. The World Health Organization (WHO) currently recommends that influenza vaccines should include at least two virus A and one virus B lineage (trivalent vaccine; TIV). A new quadrivalent vaccine (QIV), which includes an additional B virus strain, received regulatory approval and is now recommended by several countries. The present study estimates the cost-effectiveness of replacing TIVs with QIV for risk groups and elderly population in Spain. A static, lifetime, multi-cohort Markov model with a one-year cycle time was adapted to assess the costs and health outcomes associated with a switch from TIV to QIV. The model followed a cohort vaccinated each year according to health authority recommendations, for the duration of their lives. National epidemiological data allowed the determination of whether the B strain included in TIVs matched the circulating one. Societal perspective was considered, costs and outcomes were discounted at 3% and one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Compared to TIVs, QIV reduced more influenza cases and influenza-related complications and deaths during periods of B-mismatch strains in the TIV. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was 8,748€/quality-adjusted life year (QALY). One-way sensitivity analysis showed mismatch with the B lineage included in the TIV was the main driver for ICER. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis shows ICER below 30,000€/QALY in 96% of simulations. Replacing TIVs with QIV in Spain could improve influenza prevention by avoiding B virus mismatch and provide a cost-effective healthcare intervention. PMID:27184622

  9. Magnesium sulphate for fetal neuroprotection: a cost-effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of administering magnesium sulphate to patients in whom preterm birth at < 32+0 weeks gestation is either imminent or threatened for the purpose of fetal neuroprotection. Methods Multiple decision tree models and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were used to compare the administration of magnesium sulphate with the alternative of no treatment. Two separate cost perspectives were utilized in this series of analyses: a health system and a societal perspective. In addition, two separate measures of effectiveness were utilized: cases of cerebral palsy (CP) averted and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Results From a health system and a societal perspective, respectively, a savings of $2,242 and $112,602 is obtained for each QALY gained and a savings of $30,942 and $1,554,198 is obtained for each case of CP averted when magnesium sulphate is administered to patients in whom preterm birth is imminent. From a health system perspective and a societal perspective, respectively, a cost of $2,083 is incurred and a savings of $108,277 is obtained for each QALY gained and a cost of $28,755 is incurred and a savings of $1,494,500 is obtained for each case of CP averted when magnesium sulphate is administered to patients in whom preterm birth is threatened. Conclusions Administration of magnesium sulphate to patients in whom preterm birth is imminent is a dominant (i.e. cost-effective) strategy, no matter what cost perspective or measure of effectiveness is used. Administration of magnesium sulphate to patients in whom preterm birth is threatened is a dominant strategy from a societal perspective and is very likely to be cost-effective from a health system perspective. PMID:24350635

  10. DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURE OF COST EFFECTIVE COMPOSITE DRILL PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    James C. Leslie; James C. Leslie II; Lee Truong; James T. Heard; Peter Manekas

    2005-03-18

    This technical report presents the engineering research, process development and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents progress made from October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004 and contains the following discussions: (1) Direct Electrical Connection for Rotary Shoulder Tool Joints; (2) Conductors for inclusion in the pipe wall (ER/DW-CDP); (3) Qualify fibers from Zoltek; (4) Qualify resin from Bakelite; (5) First commercial order for SR-CDP from Integrated Directional Resources (SR-CDP); and (6) Preparation of papers for publication and conference presentations.

  11. Operating Dedicated Data Centers - Is It Cost-Effective?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, M.; Hogue, R.; Hollowell, C.; Strecker-Kellog, W.; Wong, A.; Zaytsev, A.

    2014-06-01

    The advent of cloud computing centres such as Amazon's EC2 and Google's Computing Engine has elicited comparisons with dedicated computing clusters. Discussions on appropriate usage of cloud resources (both academic and commercial) and costs have ensued. This presentation discusses a detailed analysis of the costs of operating and maintaining the RACF (RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility) compute cluster at Brookhaven National Lab and compares them with the cost of cloud computing resources under various usage scenarios. An extrapolation of likely future cost effectiveness of dedicated computing resources is also presented.

  12. High-Energy-Density Cost-Effective Graphene Supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuilov, Vladimir; Ying Mu, Ying; Hedayat, Nader; Solovyov, Vyacheslav; Sensor CAT at Stony Brook Team

    We introduce a cost-effective graphene platelet composite material as a replacement of an expensive reduced graphene oxide for electrodes in high energy density supercapacitors. We have tested a low size supercapacitor prototypes with the graphene platelets electrodes and newly developed polymer-gel Li + ion electrolyte. We discuss the ways how to increase the capacitance and the energy densities of the supercapacitor significantly. A working prototype for testing the concept of the high voltage supercapacitor has been developed as well. The first test done up to 10 V showed excellent performance of the multy-cell multi-layer high voltage test assembly.

  13. Key aspects of cost effective collector and solar field design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Reeken, Finn; Nicodemo, Dario; Keck, Thomas; Weinrebe, Gerhard; Balz, Markus

    2016-05-01

    A study has been performed where different key parameters influencing solar field cost are varied. By using levelised cost of energy as figure of merit it is shown that parameters like GoToStow wind speed, heliostat stiffness or tower height should be adapted to respective site conditions from an economical point of view. The benchmark site Redstone (Northern Cape Province, South Africa) has been compared to an alternate site close to Phoenix (AZ, USA) regarding site conditions and their effect on cost-effective collector and solar field design.

  14. Facilitating Sound, Cost-Effective Federal Energy Management (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Federal Government, as the nation's largest energy consumer, has a tremendous opportunity and acknowledged responsibility to lead by example. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) plays a critical role in this effort. FEMP facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. FEMP does this by focusing on the needs of its Federal customers, delivering an array of services across a variety of program areas.

  15. Prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism: analysis of cost effectiveness.

    PubMed Central

    Salzman, E W; Davies, G C

    1980-01-01

    The rapidly expanding literature regarding prevention of venous thromboembolism is confusing and contradictory, but, when analysed in the aggregate, the collective experience permits a judgment about the relative efficacy of different prophylactic regimens in specific patient populations, who vary in the risk factors predisposing them to thromboembolism. The dollar cost of the several approaches to prevention and their consequences should also be a matter of concern. Efficacy and dollar cost together determine cost effectiveness, which provides a practical guide to selection of the prophylactic approach appropriate to an individual patient. PMID:6767449

  16. A cost effective data management subsystem for the LST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, J. A.; Patterson, T. D.; Cole, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    The paper outlines the approach used in developing DMS (Data Management Subsystem) alternatives for the LST (Large Space Telescope) and in selecting the concept considered to be the most cost effective means of implementing the LST DMS requirements. Two candidate DMS concepts are discussed: a functionally integrated and a functionally separated one. For the single vehicle LST program, separation of the DMS functions best provides high reliability, operations flexibility, minimal interface complexity, and the least complex software development and verification task. The use of available hardware and NASA standard components is stressed.

  17. Cost effectiveness of stream-gaging program in Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    This report documents the results of a study of the cost effectiveness of the stream-gaging program in Michigan. Data uses and funding sources were identified for the 129 continuous gaging stations being operated in Michigan as of 1984. One gaging station was identified as having insufficient reason to continue its operation. Several stations were identified for reactivation, should funds become available, because of insufficiencies in the data network. Alternative methods of developing streamflow information based on routing and regression analyses were investigated for 10 stations. However, no station records were reproduced with sufficient accuracy to replace conventional gaging practices. A cost-effectiveness analysis of the data-collection procedure for the ice-free season was conducted using a Kalman-filter analysis. To define missing-record characteristics, cross-correlation coefficients and coefficients of variation were computed at stations on the basis of daily mean discharge. Discharge-measurement data were used to describe the gage/discharge rating stability at each station. The results of the cost-effectiveness analysis for a 9-month ice-free season show that the current policy of visiting most stations on a fixed servicing schedule once every 6 weeks results in an average standard error of 12.1 percent for the current $718,100 budget. By adopting a flexible servicing schedule, the average standard error could be reduced to 11.1 percent. Alternatively, the budget could be reduced to $700,200 while maintaining the current level of accuracy. A minimum budget of $680,200 is needed to operate the 129-gaging-station program; a budget less than this would not permit proper service and maintenance of stations. At the minimum budget, the average standard error would be 14.4 percent. A budget of $789,900 (the maximum analyzed) would result in a decrease in the average standard error to 9.07 percent. Owing to continual changes in the composition of the network

  18. Soil Gas Surveys: A cost-effective site assessment technique

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, G.W.; Brown, D.R.; Corgan, J.M.

    1995-12-01

    Accurate delineation of the extent of subsurface hydrocarbon contamination in soils and ground water is important when initiating a monitoring plan or considering remediation options at E&P sites. Traditional site-assessment techniques used to delineate subsurface hydrocarbon contaminants (e.g., soil boreholes, excavation, monitor well installation, etc.) can be expensive, time-consuming, and disruptive to local land use or production operations. Soil gas surveys can provide a rapid, cost-effective, nonobtrusive alternative to traditional site-assessment techniques.

  19. Cost-Effectiveness of Comprehensive, Integrated Care for First Episode Psychosis in the NIMH RAISE Early Treatment Program.

    PubMed

    Rosenheck, Robert; Leslie, Douglas; Sint, Kyaw; Lin, Haiqun; Robinson, Delbert G; Schooler, Nina R; Mueser, Kim T; Penn, David L; Addington, Jean; Brunette, Mary F; Correll, Christoph U; Estroff, Sue E; Marcy, Patricia; Robinson, James; Severe, Joanne; Rupp, Agnes; Schoenbaum, Michael; Kane, John M

    2016-07-01

    This study compares the cost-effectiveness of Navigate (NAV), a comprehensive, multidisciplinary, team-based treatment approach for first episode psychosis (FEP) and usual Community Care (CC) in a cluster randomization trial. Patients at 34 community treatment clinics were randomly assigned to either NAV (N = 223) or CC (N = 181) for 2 years. Effectiveness was measured as a one standard deviation change on the Quality of Life Scale (QLS-SD). Incremental cost effectiveness ratios were evaluated with bootstrap distributions. The Net Health Benefits Approach was used to evaluate the probability that the value of NAV benefits exceeded its costs relative to CC from the perspective of the health care system. The NAV group improved significantly more on the QLS and had higher outpatient mental health and antipsychotic medication costs. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $12 081/QLS-SD, with a .94 probability that NAV was more cost-effective than CC at $40 000/QLS-SD. When converted to monetized Quality Adjusted Life Years, NAV benefits exceeded costs, especially at future generic drug prices.

  20. Costs and Cost Effectiveness of a Health Care Provider–Directed Intervention to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Veena; Luu, Thanh Ha; Nonzee, Narissa; Richey, Elizabeth; McKoy, June M.; Graff Zivin, Joshua; Ashford, Alfred; Lantigua, Rafael; Frucht, Harold; Scoppettone, Marc; Bennett, Charles L.; Sheinfeld Gorin, Sherri

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening remains underutilized in the United States. Prior studies reporting the cost effectiveness of randomized interventions to improve CRC screening have not been replicated in the setting of small physician practices. We recently conducted a randomized trial evaluating an academic detailing intervention in 264 small practices in geographically diverse New York City communities. The objective of this secondary analysis is to assess the cost effectiveness of this intervention. Methods A total of 264 physician offices were randomly assigned to usual care or to a series of visits from trained physician educators. CRC screening rates were measured at baseline and 12 months. The intervention costs were measured and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was derived. Sensitivity analyses were based on varying cost and effectiveness estimates. Results Academic detailing was associated with a 7% increase in CRC screening with colonoscopy. The total intervention cost was $147,865, and the ICER was $21,124 per percentage point increase in CRC screening rate. Sensitivity analyses that varied the costs of the intervention and the average medical practice size were associated with ICERs ranging from $13,631 to $36,109 per percentage point increase in CRC screening rates. Conclusion A comprehensive, multicomponent academic detailing intervention conducted in small practices in metropolitan New York was clinically effective in improving CRC screening rates, but was not cost effective. PMID:19826133

  1. Male Circumcision at Different Ages in Rwanda: A Cost-Effectiveness Study

    PubMed Central

    Binagwaho, Agnes; Pegurri, Elisabetta; Muita, Jane; Bertozzi, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    ratio is negative), even though savings from infant circumcision will be realized later in time. The cost per infection averted is US$3,932 for adolescent MC and US$4,949 for adult MC. Results for infant MC appear robust. Infant MC remains highly cost-effective across a reasonable range of variation in the base case scenario. Adolescent MC is highly cost-effective for the base case scenario but this high cost-effectiveness is not robust to small changes in the input variables. Adult MC is neither cost-saving nor highly cost-effective when considering only the direct benefit for the circumcised man. Conclusions The study suggests that Rwanda should be simultaneously scaling up circumcision across a broad range of age groups, with high priority to the very young. Infant MC can be integrated into existing health services (i.e., neonatal visits and vaccination sessions) and over time has better potential than adolescent and adult circumcision to achieve the very high coverage of the population required for maximal reduction of HIV incidence. In the presence of infant MC, adolescent and adult MC would evolve into a “catch-up” campaign that would be needed at the start of the program but would eventually become superfluous. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:20098721

  2. An analysis of the cost-effectiveness of pharyngitis management and acute rheumatic fever prevention.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, R K; Burnes, D C; Cable, W E

    1977-04-01

    The cost-effectivness of preventing primary acute rheumatic fever attacks by oral or benzathine penicillin treatment was analyzed for both epidemic and endemic streptococcal pharyngitis situations. Decision analysis was used: the probabilities and the outcome values were calculated from published data. Three penicillin strategies were compared: (A) treating only patients with group A streptococci-positive throat cultures; (B) treating all patients; (C) treating none of the patients. In the epidemic situation it is medically most effective and least costly to treat all patients with penicillin (Strategy B). In the endemic situation, Strategy B is also most cost-effective when oral penicillin is used in patient populations where the positive throat culture yield is at least 20%. Strategy A is optimal when the yield is between 5% and 20%; below a 5% yield, Strategy C is appropriate. For any individual patient, it is possible that choice of the most cost-effective treatment strategy could be based on the patient's clinical findings.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of pre-participation screening of athletes with ECG in Europe and Algeria.

    PubMed

    Assanelli, Deodato; Levaggi, Rosella; Carré, François; Sharma, Sanjay; Deligiannis, Asterios; Mellwig, Klaus Peter; Tahmi, Mohamed; Vinetti, Giovanni; Aliverti, Paola

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of ECG in combination with family and personal history and physical examination in order to detect cardiovascular diseases that might cause sudden death in athletes. The study was conducted on a cohort of 6,634, mainly young professional and recreational athletes, 1,071 from Algeria and 5,563 from Europe (France, Germany and Greece). Each athlete underwent medical history, physical examination, and resting 12-lead ECG. 293 athletes (4.4 %), 149 in Europe (2.7 %) and 144 in Algeria (13.4 %) required further tests, and 56 were diagnosed with cardiovascular disease and thus disqualified. The cost-effectiveness ratio (CER) was calculated as the ratio between the cost of screening and the number of statistical life-years saved by the intervention. The estimated reduced risk of death deriving from treatment or disqualification resulted in the saving of 79.1 statistical life-years in Europe and 136.3 in Algeria. CER of screening was 4,071 purchasing-power-parity-adjusted US dollars ($PPP) in Europe and 582 $PPP in Algeria. The results of this study strongly support the utilisation of 12-lead ECG in the pre-participation screening of young athletes, especially in countries where secondary preventive care is not highly developed.

  4. Cost-effectiveness analysis for imaging techniques with a focus on cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    With the need for healthcare cost-containment, increased scrutiny will be placed on new medical therapeutic or diagnostic technologies. Several challenges exist for a new diagnostic test to demonstrate cost-effectiveness. New diagnostic tests differ from therapeutic procedures due to the fact that diagnostic tests do not generally directly affect long-term patient outcomes. Instead, the results of diagnostic tests can influence management decisions for patients and by this route, diagnostic tests indirectly affect long-term outcomes. The benefits from a specific diagnostic technology depend therefore not only on its performance characteristics, but also on other factors such as prevalence of disease, and effectiveness of existing treatments for the disease of interest. We review the concepts and theories of cost-effectiveness analyses (CEA) as they apply to diagnostic tests in general. The limitations of CEA across different study designs and geographic regions are discussed, and we also examine the strengths and weakness of the existing publications where CMR was the focus of CEA compared to other diagnostic options. PMID:23767423

  5. Dynamic modeling of cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination, Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Freiesleben de Blasio, Birgitte; Flem, Elmira; Latipov, Renat; Kuatbaeva, Ajnagul; Kristiansen, Ivar Sønbø

    2014-01-01

    The government of Kazakhstan, a middle-income country in Central Asia, is considering the introduction of rotavirus vaccination into its national immunization program. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination spanning 20 years by using a synthesis of dynamic transmission models accounting for herd protection. We found that a vaccination program with 90% coverage would prevent ≈880 rotavirus deaths and save an average of 54,784 life-years for children <5 years of age. Indirect protection accounted for 40% and 60% reduction in severe and mild rotavirus gastroenteritis, respectively. Cost per life year gained was US $18,044 from a societal perspective and US $23,892 from a health care perspective. Comparing the 2 key parameters of cost-effectiveness, mortality rates and vaccine cost at

  6. Cost effectiveness of the stream-gaging program in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flippo, H.N.; Behrendt, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    This report documents a cost-effectiveness study of the stream-gaging program in Pennsylvania. Data uses and funding were identified for 223 continuous-record stream gages operated in 1983; four are planned for discontinuance at the close of water-year 1985; two are suggested for conversion, at the beginning of the 1985 water year, for the collection of only continuous stage records. Two of 11 special-purpose short-term gages are recommended for continuation when the supporting project ends; eight of these gages are to be discontinued and the other will be converted to a partial-record type. Current operation costs for the 212 stations recommended for continued operation is $1,199,000 per year in 1983. The average standard error of estimation for instantaneous streamflow is 15.2%. An overall average standard error of 9.8% could be attained on a budget of $1,271,000, which is 6% greater than the 1983 budget, by adopted cost-effective stream-gaging operations. (USGS)

  7. Cost-effective data acquisition for the Odin Field

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.D. )

    1988-10-01

    This paper describes a cost-effective method for obtaining reservoir data to define the depletion mechanism in the small Odin gas field. The addition of a simple work program to the drilling plan for the first development well provided basic reservoir and aquifer data, and the well completion scheme provided for continuing reservoir surveillance. Cost-effective methods for reservoir data acquisition are particularly relevant for marginal developments. This discussion should be of interest to operators of gas fields where the depletion mechanism is not well defined and where early acquisition of additional data can indicate the mechanism. A brief development history of the Odin field illustrates the need for good reservoir data. Initially, some uncertainty surrounded the amount of bottomwater influx into the Odin gas sand and the resultant depletion mechanism. Conclusions about the expected type of reservoir depletion mechanisms were drawn from data that included conventional core analysis, measured pressure gradients, fluid saturation logs, and production well tests. Production history that confirms the conclusions made from the initial data acquisition is shown.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of growth monitoring and promotion.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R A

    1993-08-01

    50 million children/year are in growth monitoring and promotion (GMP) programs in developing countries and 30 million growth charts are printed annually in India alone. GMP is a simple technology of weighing and charting, but it must be properly implemented under conditions that are conducive to program success. Critics of GMP argue that its effectiveness remains to be proved. If GMP programs lead to improved growth, health, and nutritional status, will it work when expanded to the national level and is it cost-effective? A community intervention trial in South India considered the cost-effectiveness component of these concerns, but yielded only mixed results and the recommendation that replicate studies be conducted in other countries. An observational study of 179 health workers in 100 rural health facilities in 9 developing countries found deficiencies so severe in weighing, plotting, and interpreting that GMP activities simply consumed time and resources which could have been better allocated elsewhere within the health system. GMP is unlikely to succeed in the absence of training and supervision for assessment, analysis, and action. Community involvement in and ownership of GMP are also recommended.

  9. Can Aging in Place Be Cost Effective? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Graybill, Erin M.; McMeekin, Peter; Wildman, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Study To systematically review cost, cost-minimization and cost-effectiveness studies for assisted living technologies (ALTs) that specifically enable older people to ‘age in place’ and highlight what further research is needed to inform decisions regarding aging in place. Design People aged 65+ and their live-in carers (where applicable), using an ALT to age in place at home opposed to a community-dwelling arrangement. Methods Studies were identified using a predefined search strategy on two key economic and cost evaluation databases NHS EED, HEED. Studies were assessed using methods recommended by the Campbell and Cochrane Economic Methods Group and presented in a narrative synthesis style. Results Eight eligible studies were identified from North America spread over a diverse geographical range. The majority of studies reported the ALT intervention group as having lower resource use costs than the control group; though the low methodological quality and heterogeneity of the individual costs and outcomes reported across studies must be considered. Implications The studies suggest that in some cases ALTs may reduce costs, though little data were identified and what there were was of poor quality. Methods to capture quality of life gains were not used, therefore potential effects on health and wellbeing may be missed. Further research is required using newer developments such as the capabilities approach. High quality studies assessing the cost-effectiveness of ALTs for ageing in place are required before robust conclusion on their use can be drawn. PMID:25058505

  10. Dynamic modeling of cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination, Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Freiesleben de Blasio, Birgitte; Flem, Elmira; Latipov, Renat; Kuatbaeva, Ajnagul; Kristiansen, Ivar Sønbø

    2014-01-01

    The government of Kazakhstan, a middle-income country in Central Asia, is considering the introduction of rotavirus vaccination into its national immunization program. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination spanning 20 years by using a synthesis of dynamic transmission models accounting for herd protection. We found that a vaccination program with 90% coverage would prevent ≈880 rotavirus deaths and save an average of 54,784 life-years for children <5 years of age. Indirect protection accounted for 40% and 60% reduction in severe and mild rotavirus gastroenteritis, respectively. Cost per life year gained was US $18,044 from a societal perspective and US $23,892 from a health care perspective. Comparing the 2 key parameters of cost-effectiveness, mortality rates and vaccine cost at

  11. Development and Manufacture of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    James C. Leslie; James C. Leslie II; Lee Truong; James T. Heard; Steve Loya

    2006-02-20

    This technical report presents the engineering research, process development and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents progress made from October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005 and contains the following discussions: (1) Qualification Testing; (2) Prototype Development and Testing of ''Smart Design'' Configuration; (3) Field Test Demonstration; and (4) Commercial order for SR-CDP from Torch International. The objective of this contract is to develop and demonstrate ''cost effective'' Composite Drill Pipe. It is projected that this drill pipe will weigh less than half of its steel counter part. The resultant weight reduction will provide enabling technology that will increase the lateral distance that can be reached from an offshore drilling platform and the depth of water in which drilling and production operations can be carried out. Further, composite drill pipe has the capability to carry real time signal and power transmission within the pipe walls. CDP can also accommodate much shorter drilling radius than is possible with metal drill pipe. As secondary benefits, the lighter weight drill pipe can increase the storage capability of floating off shore drilling platforms and provide substantial operational cost savings.

  12. Cost effectiveness of the 1995 model energy code in Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, R.G.

    1996-02-01

    This report documents an analysis of the cost effectiveness of the Council of American Building Officials` 1995 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal-envelope requirements for single-family houses and multifamily housing units in Massachusetts. The goal was to compare the cost effectiveness of the 1995 MEC to the energy conservation requirements of the Massachusetts State Building Code-based on a comparison of the costs and benefits associated with complying with each.. This comparison was performed for three cities representing three geographical regions of Massachusetts--Boston, Worcester, and Pittsfield. The analysis was done for two different scenarios: a ``move-up`` home buyer purchasing a single-family house and a ``first-time`` financially limited home buyer purchasing a multifamily condominium unit. Natural gas, oil, and electric resistance heating were examined. The Massachusetts state code has much more stringent requirements if electric resistance heating is used rather than other heating fuels and/or equipment types. The MEC requirements do not vary by fuel type. For single-family homes, the 1995 MEC has requirements that are more energy-efficient than the non-electric resistance requirements of the current state code. For multifamily housing, the 1995 MEC has requirements that are approximately equally energy-efficient to the non-electric resistance requirements of the current state code. The 1995 MEC is generally not more stringent than the electric resistance requirements of the state code, in fact; for multifamily buildings the 1995 MEC is much less stringent.

  13. Cost effectiveness of the stream-gaging program in Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arteaga, F.E.

    1990-01-01

    The stream-gaging network in Nevada was evaluated as part of a nationwide effort by the U.S. Geological Survey to define and document the most cost-effective means of furnishing streamflow information. Specifically, the study dealt with 79 streamflow gages and 2 canal-flow gages that were under the direct operation of Nevada personnel as of 1983. Cost-effective allocations of resources, including budget and operational criteria, were studied using statistical procedures known as Kalman-filtering techniques. The possibility of developing streamflow data at ungaged sites was evaluated using flow-routing and statistical regression analyses. Neither of these methods provided sufficiently accurate results to warrant their use in place of stream gaging. The 81 gaging stations were being operated in 1983 with a budget of $465,500. As a result of this study, all existing stations were determined to be necessary components of the program for the foreseeable future. At the 1983 funding level, the average standard error of streamflow records was nearly 28%. This same overall level of accuracy could have been maintained with a budget of approximately $445,000 if the funds were redistributed more equitably among the gages. The maximum budget analyzed, $1,164 ,000 would have resulted in an average standard error of 11%. The study indicates that a major source of error is lost data. If perfectly operating equipment were available, the standard error for the 1983 program and budget could have been reduced to 21%. (Thacker-USGS, WRD)

  14. The Value of Heterogeneity for Cost-Effectiveness Subgroup Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Manca, Andrea; Claxton, Karl; Sculpher, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    This article develops a general framework to guide the use of subgroup cost-effectiveness analysis for decision making in a collectively funded health system. In doing so, it addresses 2 key policy questions, namely, the identification and selection of subgroups, while distinguishing 2 sources of potential value associated with heterogeneity. These are 1) the value of revealing the factors associated with heterogeneity in costs and outcomes using existing evidence (static value) and 2) the value of acquiring further subgroup-related evidence to resolve the uncertainty given the current understanding of heterogeneity (dynamic value). Consideration of these 2 sources of value can guide subgroup-specific treatment decisions and inform whether further research should be conducted to resolve uncertainty to explain variability in costs and outcomes. We apply the proposed methods to a cost-effectiveness analysis for the management of patients with acute coronary syndrome. This study presents the expected net benefits under current and perfect information when subgroups are defined based on the use and combination of 6 binary covariates. The results of the case study confirm the theoretical expectations. As more subgroups are considered, the marginal net benefit gains obtained under the current information show diminishing marginal returns, and the expected value of perfect information shows a decreasing trend. We present a suggested algorithm that synthesizes the results to guide policy. PMID:24944196

  15. Staging of lung cancer. A cost-effectiveness analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, G.A.; Sanders, J.A.; Little, D.D.; Griffith, J.E.; Clericuzio, C.; Balducci, L.

    1985-06-01

    Previous reports found the WXGa scan highly accurate in staging lung cancer. In the present study the cost-effectiveness of the WXGa scan was measured and compared with that of routine tests (radionuclide liver and bone scans, brain CT scan) used to stage lung cancer. In 160 patients, the WXGa scan had a lower sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value than the combination of routine tests in detecting metastatic disease. The WXGa scan was less accurate than the appropriate routine test in establishing the presence of liver, bone, and brain metastases. In the mediastinum the WXGa scan was not more accurate than the chest radiograph. The average cost to accurately stage a patient by WXGa scan was $812.12 and by routine tests was $737.60. The cost for metastatic disease was $1,417.70 by WXGa scan and $1,287.70 by routine tests. It is concluded that at our institution the use of WXGa scan to stage lung cancer is not cost-effective.

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Old and New Technologies for Aneuploidy Screening.

    PubMed

    Sinkey, Rachel G; Odibo, Anthony O

    2016-06-01

    Cost-effectiveness analyses allow assessment of whether marginal gains from new technology are worth increased costs. Several studies have examined cost-effectiveness of Down syndrome (DS) screening and found it to be cost-effective. Noninvasive prenatal screening also appears to be cost-effective among high-risk women with respect to DS screening, but not for the general population. Chromosomal microarray (CMA) is a genetic sequencing method superior to but more expensive than karyotype. In light of CMAs greater ability to detect genetic abnormalities, it is cost-effective when used for prenatal diagnosis of an anomalous fetus. This article covers methodology and salient issues of cost-effectiveness.

  17. Medication reviews

    PubMed Central

    Blenkinsopp, Alison; Bond, Christine; Raynor, David K

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen a formalization of medication review by pharmacists in all settings of care. This article describes the different types of medication review provided in primary care in the UK National Health Service (NHS), summarizes the evidence of effectiveness and considers how such reviews might develop in the future. Medication review is, at heart, a diagnostic intervention which aims to identify problems for action by the prescriber, the clinican conducting the review, the patient or all three but can also be regarded as an educational intervention to support patient knowledge and adherence. There is good evidence that medication review improves process outcomes of prescribing including reduced polypharmacy, use of more appropriate medicines formulation and more appropriate choice of medicine. When ‘harder’ outcome measures have been included, such as hospitalizations or mortality in elderly patients, available evidence indicates that whilst interventions could improve knowledge and adherence they did not reduce mortality or hospital admissions with one study showing an increase in hospital admissions. Robust health economic studies of medication reviews remain rare. However a review of cost-effectiveness analyses of medication reviews found no studies in which the cost of the intervention was greater than the benefit. The value of medication reviews is now generally accepted despite lack of robust research evidence consistently demonstrating cost or clinical effectiveness compared with traditional care. Medication reviews can be more effectively deployed in the future by targeting, multi-professional involvement and paying greater attention to medicines which could be safely stopped. PMID:22607195

  18. Magnetic dipolar coupling and collective effects for binary information codification in cost-effective logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiolerio, Alessandro; Allia, Paolo; Graziano, Mariagrazia

    2012-09-01

    Physical limitations foreshadow the eventual end to traditional Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) scaling. Therefore, interest has turned to various materials and technologies aimed to succeed to traditional CMOS. Magnetic Quantum dot Cellular Automata (MQCA) are one of these technologies. Working MQCA arrays require very complex techniques and an excellent control on the geometry of the nanomagnets and on the quality of the magnetic thin film, thus limiting the possibility for MQCA of representing a definite solution to cost-effective, high density and low power consumption device demand. Counter-intuitively, moving towards bigger sizes and lighter technologies it is still possible to develop multi-state logic devices, as we demonstrated, whose main advantage is cost-effectiveness. Applications may be seen in low cost logic devices where integration and computational power are not the main issue, eventually using flexible substrates and taking advantage of the intrinsic mechanical toughness of systems where long range interactions do not need wirings. We realized cobalt micrometric MQCA arrays by means of Electron Beam Lithography, exploiting cost-effective processes such as lift-off and RF sputtering that usually are avoided due to their low control on array geometry and film roughness. Information relative to the magnetic configuration of MQCA elements including their eventual magnetic interactions was obtained from Magnetic Force Microscope (MFM) images, enhanced by means of a numerical procedure and presented in differential maps. We report the existence of bi-stable magnetic patterns, as detected by MFM while sampling the z-component of magnetic induction field, arising from dipolar inter-element magnetostatic coupling, able to store and propagate binary information. This is achieved despite the array quality and element magnetic state, which are low and multi-domain, respectively. We discuss in detail shape, inter-element spacing and dot profile

  19. The Impact of Outliers on Net-Benefit Regression Model in Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Wu, David Bin-Chia; Chen, Pei-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Ordinary least square (OLS) in regression has been widely used to analyze patient-level data in cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA). However, the estimates, inference and decision making in the economic evaluation based on OLS estimation may be biased by the presence of outliers. Instead, robust estimation can remain unaffected and provide result which is resistant to outliers. The objective of this study is to explore the impact of outliers on net-benefit regression (NBR) in CEA using OLS and to propose a potential solution by using robust estimations, i.e. Huber M-estimation, Hampel M-estimation, Tukey's bisquare M-estimation, MM-estimation and least trimming square estimation. Simulations under different outlier-generating scenarios and an empirical example were used to obtain the regression estimates of NBR by OLS and five robust estimations. Empirical size and empirical power of both OLS and robust estimations were then compared in the context of hypothesis testing. Simulations showed that the five robust approaches compared with OLS estimation led to lower empirical sizes and achieved higher empirical powers in testing cost-effectiveness. Using real example of antiplatelet therapy, the estimated incremental net-benefit by OLS estimation was lower than those by robust approaches because of outliers in cost data. Robust estimations demonstrated higher probability of cost-effectiveness compared to OLS estimation. The presence of outliers can bias the results of NBR and its interpretations. It is recommended that the use of robust estimation in NBR can be an appropriate method to avoid such biased decision making. PMID:23840378

  20. A 5-Year Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Silicone Metacarpophalangeal Arthroplasty in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Squitieri, Lee; Chung, Kevin C.; Hutton, David W.; Burns, Patricia B.; Kim, H. Myra; Mahmoudi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of research evaluating the cost-effectiveness of surgical interventions for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Previous reports have challenged the sustainability of improved outcomes after silicone metacarpophalangeal arthroplasty (SMPA). The objective of this study is to conduct an economic evaluation of the long-term health outcomes after SMPA. Methods We performed a five-year prospective cohort study of 170 patients with RA (73 surgical, 97 non-surgical). Objective functional measurements and patient- rated outcomes using the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ), and the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale 2(AIMS2) were collected at three and five years. A cost-effectiveness analysis using direct costs from Medicare outpatient claims data (2006-2010) was performed to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for both MHQ and AIMS2 measurements. Results At five years, we observed a statistically significant difference in upper extremity outcomes (MHQ) between the two groups, with surgical patients having higher outcomes. The cost associated with improved outcomes five years after surgery was $787-$1,150 when measured by MHQ and $49,843-$149,530 when measured by AIMS2. We found that the ICERs did not substantially increase with our observed surgical revision rate of 5.5% (approximately 4% increase in ICER) or with previously published long-term revision rates of 6.2% (approximately 6% increase in ICER). Conclusion Short term improvements in upper extremity outcomes after SMPA are maintained over the 5 year follow-up period. Given this information, these outcomes are achieved at a relatively low cost, even with the addition of potential surgical complications. PMID:25909303

  1. Benefit-cost and cost-effectiveness analysis: theory and application.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, N J

    1979-01-01

    Benefit-cost analysis and cost-effectivensss analysis are terms used with increasing frequency by health planners and those concerned with review and evaluation of specific programs. The economic bases for these formal techniques are however often obscured by adaptations of convenience or misapplications of the concepts by biological scientists (and others). This paper reviews briefly the theory of benefit-cost analysis and its potential as a tool in choosing programs of optimum size, of maximum economic efficiency as a given size, and in choosing amongst worthwhile alternative projects. Because of the difficulties of quantification of necessary data and the political nature of many policy decisions, the technique of benefit-cost analysis seldom finds application but cost-effectiveness emerges as a calculus of more practical use and acceptability. Examples are drawn from WHO papers and the medical literature to illustrate the "benefits and risks" of these techniques.

  2. Cost - effectiveness analysis of the antiplatelet treatment administered on ischemic stroke patients using goal programming approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Rasvini; Zainuddin, Zaitul Marlizawati; Idris, Badrisyah

    2014-09-01

    There are numerous ways to prevent or treat ischemic stroke and each of these competing alternatives is associated with a different effectiveness and a cost. In circumstances where health funds are budgeted and thus fixed, cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) can provide information on how to comprehend the largest health gains with that limited fund as CEA is used to compare different strategies for preventing or treating a single disease. The most common medications for ischemic stroke are the anti-platelet drugs. While some drugs are more effective than others, they are also more expensive. This paper will thus assess the CEA of anti-platelet drug available for ischemic stroke patients using goal programming (GP) approach subject to in-patients days and patients' quality-of-life. GP presents a way of striving towards several objectives simultaneously whereby in this case we will consider minimizing the cost and maximizing the effectiveness.

  3. Clinical technology assessment, cost-effective adoption, and quality management by hospitals in the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Veluchamy, S; Saver, C L

    1990-06-01

    Technology assessment in the 1990s must become an integral part of a hospital's strategic priority goals, with active participation of physicians and top management. Technology assessment should involve a wide range of criteria and health care consumer expectations, so that the appropriateness, effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and quality improvement aspects of new technologies are all considered. Mount Carmel Health's Advanced Treatment and Bionics Institute (ATBI), established in 1986, monitors significant developments in new technologies and performs technology and outcomes assessments. ATBI activities, which have facilitated adoption of 35 treatment-based projects, are integrated into the existing QA structure of Mount Carmel hospitals. Through resolution of identified problems, quality care can be promoted, while providing patients innovative medical treatments.

  4. The Cost-Effectiveness of New York City’s Safe Routes to School Program

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Michael; DiMaggio, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Objective. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of a package of roadway modifications in New York City funded under the Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program. Methods. We used a Markov model to estimate long-term impacts of SRTS on injury reduction and the associated savings in medical costs, lifelong disability, and death. Model inputs included societal costs (in 2013 US dollars) and observed spatiotemporal changes in injury rates associated with New York City’s implementation of SRTS relative to control intersections. Structural changes to roadways were assumed to last 50 years before further investment is required. Therefore, costs were discounted over 50 consecutive cohorts of modified roadway users under SRTS. Results. SRTS was associated with an overall net societal benefit of $230 million and 2055 quality-adjusted life years gained in New York City. Conclusions. SRTS reduces injuries and saves money over the long run. PMID:24832430

  5. When is cancer care cost-effective? A systematic overview of cost-utility analyses in oncology.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Dan; Earle, Craig; Fang, Chi-Hui; Eldar-Lissai, Adi; Neumann, Peter J

    2010-01-20

    New cancer treatments pose a substantial financial burden on health-care systems, insurers, patients, and society. Cost-utility analyses (CUAs) of cancer-related interventions have received increased attention in the medical literature and are being used to inform reimbursement decisions in many health-care systems. We identified and reviewed 242 cancer-related CUAs published through 2007 and included in the Tufts Medical Center Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry (www.cearegistry.org). Leading cancer types studied were breast (36% of studies), colorectal (12%), and hematologic cancers (10%). Studies have examined interventions for tertiary prevention (73% of studies), secondary prevention (19%), and primary prevention (8%). We present league tables by disease categories that consist of a description of the intervention, its comparator, the target population, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. The median reported incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (in 2008 US $) were $27,000 for breast cancer, $22,000 for colorectal cancer, $34,500 for prostate cancer, $32,000 for lung cancer, and $48,000 for hematologic cancers. The results highlight the many opportunities for efficient investment in cancer care across different cancer types and interventions and the many investments that are inefficient. Because we found only modest improvement in the quality of studies, we suggest that journals provide specific guidance for reporting CUA and assure that authors adhere to guidelines for conducting and reporting economic evaluations.

  6. Priority-setting, rationing and cost-effectiveness in the German health care system.

    PubMed

    Oduncu, Fuat S

    2013-08-01

    Germany has just started a public debate on priority-setting, rationing and cost-effectiveness due to the cost explosion within the German health care system. To date, the costs for German health care run at 11,6% of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP, 278,3 billion €) that represents a significant increase from the 5,9 % levels present in 1970. In response, the German Parliament has enacted several major and minor legal reforms over the last three decades for the sake of cost containment and maintaining stability of the health care system. The Statutory Health Insurance--SHI (Gesetzliche Krankenversicherung--GKV) is based on the fundamental principle of solidarity and provides an ethical and legal framework for implementing equity, comprehensiveness and setting the principles and rules for financing and providing health care services and benefits. Within the SHI system, several major actors can be identified: the Federal Ministry of Health, the 16 state ministries of health, the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA), the physicians (with their associations) and the hospitals (with their organizations) on the provider side, and the sickness funds with their associations on the purchasers' side. This article reviews the structure and complexities of the German health care system with its major players and participants. The focus will be put on relevant ethical, legal and economic aspects for prioritization, rationalization, rationing and cost-effectiveness of medical benefits and services. In conclusion, this article pleads for open discussion on the challenging subject of priority-setting instead of accepting the implicit and non-transparent rationing of medical services that currently occurs at many different levels within the health care system, as it stands today.

  7. The cost effectiveness of a nurse-led shared-care prostate assessment clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, P.; Drudge-Coates, L.; Smith, K.; Booth, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Nurse-led prostate clinics (NPCs) have proved to be a highly effective method of assessing patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and most urology units now run such clinics. However, it was not known whether they are cost-effective and this analysis ansWers that question. PATIENTS AND METHODS: During one year, a trained urology nurse assessed 1,080 patients in our NPC following GP referral using a standard pro forma. Costs included those incurred for the salary of a grade D nurse at 30 min per patient, all investigations, indirect charges and overheads. This was compared to the cost of seeing all patients in clinic directly, either by a consultant, staff grade urologist or registrar. Of these 1,080 patients, 350 were sent back to their GPs after NPC assessment. RESULTS: The NPC cost of 44.25 pounds per patient compared favourably with an average medical out-patient clinic cost of 50.46 pounds per patient, yielding an actual annual saving of 6,706.80 pounds. Since a third of the patients assessed in the NPC were sent directly back to primary care, saving the cost of a medical follow-up appointment, the true savings in secondary care were 17,661.00 pounds (50.46 x 350pounds), giving a total annual saving of 24,367.80 pounds. CONCLUSIONS: A nurse-led shared-care prostate clinic is a cost effective, thorough and speedy method of assessing men presenting with suspected bladder outflow obstruction. The approach used has a wider generic, cost-benefit potential for the NHS. PMID:12398125

  8. [Dr. Michiharu Matsuoka, founder of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyoto University, and his achievements. Part 4: Prof. M. Matsuoka's lecture to medical and civic communities].

    PubMed

    Hirotani, Hayato

    2010-03-01

    Dr. M. Matsuoka gave many lectures to physicians at the Postdoctoral Course Lectures sponsored by the Kyoto Eisei Kensasho (Kyoto Bacterial and Biochemical Laboratory) run by the Kyoto Medical Association, and the Postdoctoral Course Lectures of the Kyoto Medical School, Kyoto Imperial University. He was also invited to give lectures at several regional medical associations. He also was a speaker at the Kyoto Imperial University Extension course and he lectured at the Enryakuji Temple on Mt. Hiei, sponsored by a newspaper company. It is remarkable that these activities were carried out in addition to his other notable academic work previously reported.

  9. The STAIRRS project, work package 1: a cost-effectiveness analysis of railway noise reduction on a European scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oertli, J.

    2003-10-01

    Noise control is a major economic factor for the railways as national and European Union environmental legislation is being enacted. In an effort to determine optimal strategies on a European level, the EU fifth framework programme has co-financed the Strategies and Tools to Assess and Implement noise Reducing measures for Railway Systems (STAIRRS) project. Work package 1 developed the necessary software to undertake large-scale cost-effectiveness analyses. The acoustically relevant geographic, traffic and track data were collected for 11 000 km of lines in seven European countries. Standard cost-benefit methodologies were adapted to fit the requirements of the project. An extrapolation mechanism allowed studies on Europe as a whole and, in an approximate manner, also on individual countries. Major conclusions are that the highest cost-effectiveness can be achieved by combining measures; freight rolling stock has a high cost-effectiveness on its own as well as in combination with other measures, especially when combined with track measures; noise barriers, in particular high ones, have a low cost-effectiveness. The conclusions for Europe as a whole are also true for individual countries. The STAIRRS project co-ordinator is the European Rail Research Institute, the work package leader is the Swiss Federal Railways with the participation of AEAT Technology (NL), German Railways, French Railways, PSI-Akustik (A), the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and the Free University of Brussels.

  10. The cost effectiveness of reducing public exposure to carcinogens in Harris County by a abating chemical plant emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.H. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The work examines the engineering reasonableness and the cost effectiveness of reducing public exposure to carcinogens n ambient air by abating emissions of organic chemicals in waste gas streams from chemical plants in Harris County, Texas, which contains the large chemical manufacturing complex in the Houston ship channel areas. The work also examined the cost effectiveness of reducing public exposure through changing the way vent streams are released to the atmosphere. The achievable exposure reductions are estimated by use of 1980 census data and of ambient concentration estimates. The ambient concentration estimates are calculated using the Texas Climatological Model Version 2 (TCM-2) and publicly available emissions inventory collected by the Texas Air Control Board. The TCM-2 is based on the steady state Gaussian plume hypothesis, Briggs plume rise formations, Pasquill-Gifford dispersion coefficient approximations, and first order pollutant decay. The cost estimates rely on published studies and on the waste gas stream parameters of the chemical plant vents. The cost effectiveness results are compared with the cost effectiveness of controls typically applied to new sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are controlled because of their contribution to ozone air pollution, not because of the carcinogenicity of their emissions.

  11. Cost effectiveness of stream-gaging program in Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Data uses and funding sources were identified for the 129 continuous gaging stations being operated in Michigan as of 1984. One gaging station was identified as having insufficient reason to continue its operation. Several stations were identified for reactivation, should funds become available, because of insufficiencies in the data network. Alternative methods of developing streamflow information based on routing and regression analyses were investigated for 10 stations. However, no station records were reproduced with sufficient accuracy to replace conventional gaging practices. A cost-effectiveness analysis of the data collection procedure for the ice-free season was conducted using a Kalman-filter analysis. To define missing record characteristics, cross-correlation coefficients and coefficients of variation were computed at stations on the basis of daily mean discharge. Discharge measurement data were used to describe the gage/discharge rating stability at each station. The results of the cost-effectiveness analysis for a 9-month ice-free season show that the current policy of visiting most stations on a fixed servicing schedule once every 6 weeks results in an average standard error of 12.1% for the current $718,100 budget. By adopting a flexible servicing schedule, the average standard error could be reduced to 11.1%. Alternatively, the budget could be reduced to $700,200 while maintaining the current level of accuracy. A minimum budget of $680,200 is needed to operate the 129-gaging-station program; a budget less than this would not permit proper service and maintenance of stations. At the minimum budget, the average standard error would be 14.4%. A budget of $789,900 (the maximum analyzed) would result in a decrease in the average standard error to 9.07%. Owing to continual changes in the composition of the network and the changes in the uncertainties of streamflow accuracy at individual stations, the cost-effectiveness analysis will need to be updated

  12. Cost-Effective Icy Bodies Exploration using Small Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Jonas; Mauro, David; Stupl, Jan; Nayak, Michael; Aziz, Jonathan; Cohen, Aaron; Colaprete, Anthony; Dono-Perez, Andres; Frost, Chad; Klamm, Benjamin; McCafferty, Julian; McKay, Chris; Sears, Derek; Soulage, Michael; Swenson, Jason; Weston, Sasha; Yang Yang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that Saturn's moon Enceladus is expelling water-rich plumes into space, providing passing spacecraft with a window into what is hidden underneath its frozen crust. Recent discoveries indicate that similar events could also occur on other bodies in the solar system, such as Jupiter's moon Europa and the dwarf planet Ceres in the asteroid belt. These plumes provide a possible giant leap forward in the search for organics and assessing habitability beyond Earth, stepping stones toward the long-term goal of finding extraterrestrial life. The United States Congress recently requested mission designs to Europa, to fit within a cost cap of $1B, much less than previous mission designs' estimates. Here, innovative cost-effective small spacecraft designs for the deep-space exploration of these icy worlds, using new and emerging enabling technologies, and how to explore the outer solar system on a budget below the cost horizon of a flagship mission, are investigated. Science requirements, instruments selection, rendezvous trajectories, and spacecraft designs are some topics detailed. The mission concepts revolve around a comparably small-sized and low-cost Plume Chaser spacecraft, instrumented to characterize the vapor constituents encountered on its trajectory. In the event that a plume is not encountered, an ejecta plume can be artificially created by a companion spacecraft, the Plume Maker, on the target body at a location timed with the passage of the Plume Chaser spacecraft. Especially in the case of Ceres, such a mission could be a great complimentary mission to Dawn, as well as a possible future Europa Clipper mission. The comparably small volume of the spacecraft enables a launch to GTO as a secondary payload, providing multiple launch opportunities per year. Plume Maker's design is nearly identical to the Plume Chaser, and fits within the constraints for a secondary payload launch. The cost-effectiveness of small spacecraft missions enables the

  13. Cost-Effective NEO Characterization Using Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissly, R. W.; Reinert, R.; Mitchell, S.

    2003-05-01

    We present a cost-effective multiple NEO rendezvous mission design optimized around the capabilities of Ball's 200-kg NEOX Solar Electric Propelled microsatellite. The NEOX spacecraft is 3-axis stabilized with better-than 1 milliradian pointing accuracy to serve as an excellent imaging platform; its DSN compatible telecommunications subsystem can support a 6.4-kbps downlink rate at 3 AU earth range. The spacecraft mass is <200kg at launch to allow launch as a cost-effective secondary payload. It uses proven SEP technology to provide 12km/s of Delta-V, which enables multiple rendezvous' in a single mission. Cost-effectiveness is optimized by launch as a secondary payload (e.g., Ariane-5 ASAP) or as a multiple manifest on a single dedicated launch vehicle (e.g., 4 on a Delta-II 2925). Following separation from the LV, we describe a candidate mission profile that minimizes cost by using the spacecraft's 12km/s of SEP Delta-V to allow orbiting up to 4 separate NEO's. Orbiting as opposed to flying by augments the mission's science return by providing the NEO mass and by allowing multiple phase angle imaging. The NEOX Spacecraft has the capability to support a 20kg payload drawing 100W average during SEP cruise, with >1kW available during the NEO orbital phase when the SEP thrusters are not powered. We will present a candidate payload suite that includes a visible/NIR imager, a laser altimeter, and a set of small, self-righting surface probes that can be used to assess the geophysical state of the object surface and near-surface environments. The surface probe payload notionally includes a set of cameras for imaging the body surface at mm-scale resolution, an accelerometer package to measure surface mechanical properties upon probe impact, a Langmuir probe to measure the electrostatic gradient immediately above the object surface, and an explosive charge that can be remotely detonated at the end of the surface mission to excavate an artificial crater that can be remotely

  14. Systematic review of cost effectiveness studies of telemedicine interventions

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, Pamela S; Mair, Frances S; Haycox, Alan; May, Carl R; Williams, Tracy L; Hellmich, Seth

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To systematically review cost benefit studies of telemedicine. Design Systematic review of English language, peer reviewed journal articles. Data sources Searches of Medline, Embase, ISI citation indexes, and database of Telemedicine Information Exchange. Studies selected 55 of 612 identified articles that presented actual cost benefit data. Main outcome measures Scientific quality of reports assessed by use of an established instrument for adjudicating on the quality of economic analyses. Results 557 articles without cost data categorised by topic. 55 articles with data initially categorised by cost variables employed in the study and conclusions. Only 24/55 (44%) studies met quality criteria justifying inclusion in a quality review. 20/24 (83%) restricted to simple cost comparisons. No study used cost utility analysis, the conventional means of establishing the “value for money” that a therapeutic intervention represents. Only 7/24 (29%) studies attempted to explore the level of utilisation that would be needed for telemedicine services to compare favourably with traditionally organised health care. None addressed this question in sufficient detail to adequately answer it. 15/24 (62.5%) of articles reviewed here provided no details of sensitivity analysis, a method all economic analyses should incorporate. Conclusion There is no good evidence that telemedicine is a cost effective means of delivering health care. What is already known on this topicThe use of telemedicine has garnered much attention in the past decadeHundreds of articles have been published claiming that telemedicine is cost effectiveHowever, missing from the literature is a synthesis or meta-analysis of these publicationsWhat this study addsA comprehensive literature search of cost related articles on telemedicine identified more than 600 articles, but only 9% contained any cost benefit dataOnly 4% of these articles met quality criteria justifying inclusion in a formalised quality

  15. Cost-effectiveness of Antivenoms for Snakebite Envenoming in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Abdulrazaq G.; Lamorde, Mohammed; Dalhat, Mahmood M.; Habib, Zaiyad G.; Kuznik, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background Snakebite envenoming is a major public health problem throughout the rural tropics. Antivenom is effective in reducing mortality and remains the mainstay of therapy. This study aimed to determine the cost-effectiveness of using effective antivenoms for Snakebite envenoming in Nigeria. Methodology Economic analysis was conducted from a public healthcare system perspective. Estimates of model inputs were obtained from the literature. Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratios (ICERs) were quantified as deaths and Disability-Adjusted-Life-Years (DALY) averted from antivenom therapy. A decision analytic model was developed and analyzed with the following model base-case parameter estimates: type of snakes causing bites, antivenom effectiveness to prevent death, untreated mortality, risk of Early Adverse Reactions (EAR), mortality risk from EAR, mean age at bite and remaining life expectancy, and disability risk (amputation). End-user costs applied included: costs of diagnosing and monitoring envenoming, antivenom drug cost, supportive care, shipping/freezing antivenom, transportation to-and-from hospital and feeding costs while on admission, management of antivenom EAR and free alternative snakebite care for ineffective antivenom. Principal Findings We calculated a cost/death averted of ($2330.16) and cost/DALY averted of $99.61 discounted and $56.88 undiscounted. Varying antivenom effectiveness through the 95% confidence interval from 55% to 86% yield a cost/DALY averted of $137.02 to $86.61 respectively. Similarly, varying the prevalence of envenoming caused by carpet viper from 0% to 96% yield a cost/DALY averted of $254.18 to $78.25 respectively. More effective antivenoms and carpet viper envenoming rather than non-carpet viper envenoming were associated with lower cost/DALY averted. Conclusions/Significance Treatment of snakebite envenoming in Nigeria is cost-effective with a cost/death averted of $2330.16 and cost/DALY averted of $99.61 discounted, lower

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Cardiac Radiosurgery for Atrial Fibrillation: Implications for Reducing Health Care Morbidity, Utilization, and Costs

    PubMed Central

    Turakhia, Mintu; Fogarty, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States (U.S.), atrial fibrillation (AF) is the second-most common cardiovascular condition after hypertension, affecting four million Americans each year. Individuals with AF are three times more likely to be hospitalized over the span of a year when compared to medically matched control groups. The considerably large clinical population of individuals with AF mandates that the cost-effectiveness and efficacy of current treatment regimens for AF have egregious implications for health care spending and public health. Unfortunately, catheter ablation for AF treatment has been shown to make only modest gains in quality-adjusted life years, has yet to demonstrate cost-utility advantages over conventional therapies for AF, and has a reported rate of recurrence for AF that is notably high. Thus, there is a major unmet clinical need for a therapeutic option to treat AF that produces more consistent and efficacious results that are cost-effective. Cardiac radiosurgery as a therapy for AF has the potential to be remarkably cost-effective and produce robust patient outcomes. CyberHeart Inc. has developed the world’s first-ever cardiac radiosurgery (CRS) system designed to ablate the heart non-invasively. Procedures that ablate the heart utilizing the Cyberheart CRS system are anticipated to allow higher efficacy and more consistent results than current techniques such as catheter ablation. The aim of this study is to present the current healthcare utilization and expenditures in AF treatment, report the cost-effectiveness of catheter ablation for AF, and project the potential cost-effectiveness of cardiac radiosurgery for the treatment of AF. PMID:27625906

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of Cardiac Radiosurgery for Atrial Fibrillation: Implications for Reducing Health Care Morbidity, Utilization, and Costs.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Nikhilesh; Turakhia, Mintu; Fogarty, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    In the United States (U.S.), atrial fibrillation (AF) is the second-most common cardiovascular condition after hypertension, affecting four million Americans each year. Individuals with AF are three times more likely to be hospitalized over the span of a year when compared to medically matched control groups. The considerably large clinical population of individuals with AF mandates that the cost-effectiveness and efficacy of current treatment regimens for AF have egregious implications for health care spending and public health. Unfortunately, catheter ablation for AF treatment has been shown to make only modest gains in quality-adjusted life years, has yet to demonstrate cost-utility advantages over conventional therapies for AF, and has a reported rate of recurrence for AF that is notably high. Thus, there is a major unmet clinical need for a therapeutic option to treat AF that produces more consistent and efficacious results that are cost-effective. Cardiac radiosurgery as a therapy for AF has the potential to be remarkably cost-effective and produce robust patient outcomes. CyberHeart Inc. has developed the world's first-ever cardiac radiosurgery (CRS) system designed to ablate the heart non-invasively. Procedures that ablate the heart utilizing the Cyberheart CRS system are anticipated to allow higher efficacy and more consistent results than current techniques such as catheter ablation. The aim of this study is to present the current healthcare utilization and expenditures in AF treatment, report the cost-effectiveness of catheter ablation for AF, and project the potential cost-effectiveness of cardiac radiosurgery for the treatment of AF. PMID:27625906

  18. Cost-Effectiveness of Cardiac Radiosurgery for Atrial Fibrillation: Implications for Reducing Health Care Morbidity, Utilization, and Costs

    PubMed Central

    Turakhia, Mintu; Fogarty, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States (U.S.), atrial fibrillation (AF) is the second-most common cardiovascular condition after hypertension, affecting four million Americans each year. Individuals with AF are three times more likely to be hospitalized over the span of a year when compared to medically matched control groups. The considerably large clinical population of individuals with AF mandates that the cost-effectiveness and efficacy of current treatment regimens for AF have egregious implications for health care spending and public health. Unfortunately, catheter ablation for AF treatment has been shown to make only modest gains in quality-adjusted life years, has yet to demonstrate cost-utility advantages over conventional therapies for AF, and has a reported rate of recurrence for AF that is notably high. Thus, there is a major unmet clinical need for a therapeutic option to treat AF that produces more consistent and efficacious results that are cost-effective. Cardiac radiosurgery as a therapy for AF has the potential to be remarkably cost-effective and produce robust patient outcomes. CyberHeart Inc. has developed the world’s first-ever cardiac radiosurgery (CRS) system designed to ablate the heart non-invasively. Procedures that ablate the heart utilizing the Cyberheart CRS system are anticipated to allow higher efficacy and more consistent results than current techniques such as catheter ablation. The aim of this study is to present the current healthcare utilization and expenditures in AF treatment, report the cost-effectiveness of catheter ablation for AF, and project the potential cost-effectiveness of cardiac radiosurgery for the treatment of AF.

  19. Cost-Effectiveness of a Diabetes Pay-For-Performance Program in Diabetes Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hui-Min; Gu, Song-Mao; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Kao, Hao-Yun; Lin, Yi-Chieh; Chiu, Herng-Chia

    2015-01-01

    Pay for performance (P4P) has been used as a strategy to improve quality for patients with chronic illness. Little was known whether care provided to individuals with multiple chronic conditions in a P4P program were cost-effective. This study investigated cost effectiveness of a diabetes P4P program for caring patients with diabetes alone (DM alone) and diabetes with comorbid hypertension and hyperlipidemia (DMHH) from a single payer perspective in Taiwan. Analyzing data using population-based longitudinal databases, we compared costs and effectiveness between P4P and non-P4P diabetes patient groups in two cohorts. Propensity score matching (PSM) was used to match comparable control groups for intervention groups. Outcomes included life-years, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), program intervention costs, cost-savings and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). QALYs for P4P patients and non-P4P patients were 2.80 and 2.71 for the DM alone cohort and 2.74 and 2.66 for the DMHH patient cohort. The average incremental intervention costs per QALYs was TWD$167,251 in the DM alone cohort and TWD$145,474 in the DMHH cohort. The average incremental all-cause medical costs saved by the P4P program per QALYs were TWD$434,815 in DM alone cohort and TWD$506,199 in the DMHH cohort. The findings indicated that the P4P program for both cohorts were cost-effective and the resulting return on investment (ROI) was 2.60:1 in the DM alone cohort and 3.48:1 in the DMHH cohort. We conclude that the diabetes P4P program in both cohorts enabled the long-term cost-effective use of resources and cost-savings, especially for patients with multiple comorbid conditions.

  20. Cost effective, robust, and reliable coupled separation techniques for the identification and quantification of phospholipids in complex biological matrices: application to insects.

    PubMed

    Zahradníčková, Helena; Tomčala, Aleš; Berková, Petra; Schneedorferová, Ivana; Okrouhlík, Jan; Simek, Petr; Hodková, Magdalena

    2014-08-01

    The quantification of phospholipid classes and the determination of their molecular structures are crucial in physiological and medical studies. This paper's target analytes are cell membrane phospholipids, which play an important role in the seasonal acclimation processes of poikilothermic organisms. We introduce a set of simple and cost-effective analytical methods that enable efficient characterization and quantification of particular phospholipid classes and the identification and relative distribution of the individual phospholipid species. The analytical approach involves solid-phase extraction and high-performance thin-layer chromatography, which facilitate the separation of particular lipid classes. The obtained fractions are further transesterified to fatty acid methyl esters and subjected to gas chromatography coupled to flame ionization detection, which enables the determination of the position of double bonds. Phospholipid species separation is achieved by high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, which gives information about the headgroup moiety and attached fatty acids. The total content of each phospholipids class is assessed by phosphorus determination by UV spectrophotometry. The simultaneous analysis of phosphorus, fatty acid residues, and phospholipid species provides detailed information about phospholipid composition. Evaluation of these coupled methods was achieved by application to an insect model, Pyrrhocoris apterus. High correlation was observed between fatty acid compositions as determined by gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. PMID:24799084

  1. Comprehensive overview: efficacy, tolerability, and cost-effectiveness of clobazam in Lennox–Gastaut syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Michele A

    2015-01-01

    Clobazam is the newest medication approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS) in patients at least 2 years of age, although the medication has been available in countries around the world to treat epilepsy and anxiety disorders for many years. Though classified as a benzodiazepine, the drug differs structurally from other drugs in the class as it possesses nitrogen atoms at the 1 and 5 positions within the heterocyclic ring rather than at the 1 and 4 positions. This difference and the classification of clobazam as a partial agonist are believed to be responsible for the decreased incidence of sedative effects compared to other benzodiazepines. Adverse events associated with clobazam use in clinical trials have generally been mild to moderate in nature. Data from an open-label extension trial have confirmed that clobazam is efficacious for the treatment of seizures associated with LGS, particularly atonic seizures (drop seizures), over the long term. Tolerance to the drug’s antiepileptic effects does not seem to be a common occurrence. The drug has proven to be a cost-effective option for therapy, particularly due to its ability to decrease the number of seizures that require medical treatment. Clobazam represents a welcome addition to the treatment options for LGS. PMID:26089675

  2. Cost-effectiveness of epoetin alfa therapy for anemia of end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Moran, L J; Carey, P; Johnson, C A

    1992-06-01

    The cost-effectiveness of epoetin alfa therapy for anemia in 20 patients with end-stage renal disease was retrospectively studied. Ten patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) were given subcutaneous epoetin alfa as part of a multicenter, protocol-controlled study of the efficacy of epoetin alfa. Ten patients on in-center hemodialysis were given intravenous epoetin alfa as part of their routine clinical care. Change in hematocrit was used as the measure of effectiveness of epoetin alfa. Medication, laboratory, and transfusion costs were monitored for the six months preceding the initiation of epoetin alfa and the first six months of treatment. The cost of therapy increased for all patients by an average of $2722 +/- 1118; transfusion costs decreased, whereas medication and laboratory costs increased. Laboratory costs were significantly greater in CAPD patients than in hemodialysis patients during epoetin alfa therapy; no significant differences in medication costs or transfusion costs were noted between the groups. The mean increase in hematocrit for all patients was 7.4 volume percent. Following the initial change in hematocrit, further therapeutic response did not appear to be determined by increasing expenditures. Epoetin alfa was shown to be effective in treating anemia in patients with end-stage renal disease, but it was associated with higher costs of therapy.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of community health workers in tuberculosis control in Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md Akramul; Wakai, Susumu; Ishikawa, Nobukatsu; Chowdhury, A. M. R.; Vaughan, J. Patrick

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the cost-effectiveness of the tuberculosis (TB) programme run by the Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC), which uses community health workers (CHWs), with that of the government TB programme which does not use CHWs. METHODS: TB control statistics and cost data for July 1996 - June 1997 were collected from both government and BRAC thanas (subdistricts) in rural Bangladesh. To measure the cost per patient cured, total costs were divided by the total number of patients cured. FINDINGS: In the BRAC and government areas, respectively, a total of 186 and 185 TB patients were identified over one year, with cure rates among sputum-positive patients of 84% and 82%. However, the cost per patient cured was US$ 64 in the BRAC area compared to US$ 96 in the government area. CONCLUSION: The government programme was 50% more expensive for similar outcomes. Although both the BRAC and government TB control programmes appeared to achieve satisfactory cure rates using DOTS (a five-point strategy), the involvement of CHWs was found to be more cost-effective in rural Bangladesh. With the same budget, the BRAC programme could cure three TB patients for every two in the government programme. PMID:12132000

  4. Film-free efficiency systems: a new cost-effective approach.

    PubMed

    Reicher, M A

    1998-01-01

    Pressure is on healthcare providers to make their services more affordable. Streamlining operations to improve efficiency is one means of achieving that goal. PACS has been touted as the technology to improve radiologic services. Sold as a way to eliminate lost records and lower operations costs, in reality, PACS has raised costs and slowed work flow in many cases. Perhaps PACS that raise operations costs are more properly named digital overhead generating systems (DOGS). There is an alternative solution--film-free efficiency systems (FFES), defined as the technological tools required to lower radiologic costs and improve services. A new type of image and information management technology and distinct from traditional PACS in a number of ways, film-free efficiency systems are immediately cost effective. They improve personnel efficiency, reduce costs per RVU, provide an alternative to film and exclude the use of any technology that is not cost effective. Implementation of these systems must begin with a clearly stated mission, a leadership statement and financial accountability. To guarantee an immediate financial gain in your department, you'll want to finance the system through material cost savings. Implementation should start with the digital modalities. The next step is to retrain staff and reengineer the workplace, followed by creating the necessary infrastructure of PCs in referring physicians' offices. Lastly, implement CR or digital radiography as prices drop and technologies improve in speed. PMID:10186419

  5. Machine learning-based method for personalized and cost-effective detection of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Javier; Ifeachor, Emmanuel; Zajicek, John P; Green, Colin; Shearer, James; Pearson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is often difficult, especially early in the disease process at the stage of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Yet, it is at this stage that treatment is most likely to be effective, so there would be great advantages in improving the diagnosis process. We describe and test a machine learning approach for personalized and cost-effective diagnosis of AD. It uses locally weighted learning to tailor a classifier model to each patient and computes the sequence of biomarkers most informative or cost-effective to diagnose patients. Using ADNI data, we classified AD versus controls and MCI patients who progressed to AD within a year, against those who did not. The approach performed similarly to considering all data at once, while significantly reducing the number (and cost) of the biomarkers needed to achieve a confident diagnosis for each patient. Thus, it may contribute to a personalized and effective detection of AD, and may prove useful in clinical settings. PMID:22893371

  6. Which test is best for Helicobacter pylori? A cost-effectiveness model using decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Elwyn, Glyn; Taubert, Mark; Davies, Shan; Brown, Ginevra; Allison, Miles; Phillips, Ceri

    2007-05-01

    GPs face a potential dilemma in deciding which test to use for detection of Helicobacter pylori. For patients with dyspepsia, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) advises primary care practitioners to adopt a 'test and treat' policy before considering a referral for gastroscopy. There are many ways of testing: serology, urea breath test, and faecal antigen test. NICE does not advocate any preferred single test for detecting H. pylori. In the current study a multi-stakeholder 2-day workshop was established to agree and populate a cost-effectiveness decision analysis model. The aim was to analyse the three types of tests available for H. pylori and to determine which is the most practical and cost effective. Agreement on the costs and diagnostic values to be entered into the decision-analytic model was achieved. Results indicate that the faecal antigen test was the most effective in terms of true outcomes and cost. One thousand virtual patients were allocated to each of the three tests. Serology had 903, urea breath test had 961, and the faecal antigen test had 968 true positive outcomes. Data indicate that the faecal antigen test is the preferable strategy for diagnosis of H. pylori in primary care. This has implications for implementing new testing processes and for commissioning new diagnostic pathways for use in primary care.

  7. Film-free efficiency systems: a new cost-effective approach.

    PubMed

    Reicher, M A

    1998-01-01

    Pressure is on healthcare providers to make their services more affordable. Streamlining operations to improve efficiency is one means of achieving that goal. PACS has been touted as the technology to improve radiologic services. Sold as a way to eliminate lost records and lower operations costs, in reality, PACS has raised costs and slowed work flow in many cases. Perhaps PACS that raise operations costs are more properly named digital overhead generating systems (DOGS). There is an alternative solution--film-free efficiency systems (FFES), defined as the technological tools required to lower radiologic costs and improve services. A new type of image and information management technology and distinct from traditional PACS in a number of ways, film-free efficiency systems are immediately cost effective. They improve personnel efficiency, reduce costs per RVU, provide an alternative to film and exclude the use of any technology that is not cost effective. Implementation of these systems must begin with a clearly stated mission, a leadership statement and financial accountability. To guarantee an immediate financial gain in your department, you'll want to finance the system through material cost savings. Implementation should start with the digital modalities. The next step is to retrain staff and reengineer the workplace, followed by creating the necessary infrastructure of PCs in referring physicians' offices. Lastly, implement CR or digital radiography as prices drop and technologies improve in speed.

  8. [Challenges and Outcomes of the Process for Achieving Certification].

    PubMed

    Kadosaka, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Reiko; Yoshika, Masamichi; Tsuta, Koji

    2016-02-01

    Clinical laboratory tests have been indispensable for medical services in recent years, and such a situation is associated with the offering of accurate test results by clinical laboratory units. A large number of facilities wishing to achieve ISO 15189 Certification follow preparatory procedures with support from consulting companies. However, in our facility, a limited budget did not allow us to use such services. As a solution, we participated in the Future Lab Session in OSAKA (FLS), a support group for the achievement of ISO 15189 Certification, when it was organized. Aiming to extensively cover and fulfill its responsibility for all processes, including clinical interpretations of the results obtained through patient preparation, in order to continuously offer high-quality test results to clinicians, our clinical laboratory unit underwent examination for certification, and consequently realized the necessity of third-party evaluation. The provision of laboratory services, fully complying with these standards, contributes to medical safety, in addition to accuracy improvement. Although the certification and its maintenance are costly, it is sufficiently cost-effective to achieve it, when focusing on improved efficiency and the enhanced quality and safety of medical services after work standardization. PMID:27311281

  9. Cost-effectiveness modelling of telehealth for patients with raised cardiovascular disease risk: evidence from a cohort simulation conducted alongside the Healthlines randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Padraig; Ara, Roberta; Edwards, Louisa; Foster, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the long-term cost-effectiveness (measured as the ratio of incremental NHS cost to incremental quality-adjusted life years) of a telehealth intervention for patients with raised cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Design A cohort simulation model developed as part of the economic evaluation conducted alongside the Healthlines randomised controlled trial. Setting Patients recruited through primary care, and intervention delivered via telehealth service. Participants Participants with a 10-year CVD risk ≥20%, as measured by the QRISK2 algorithm, and with at least 1 modifiable risk factor, individually randomised from 42 general practices in England. Intervention A telehealth service delivered over a 12-month period. The intervention involved a series of responsive, theory-led encounters between patients and trained health information advisors who provided access to information resources and supported medication adherence and coordination of care. Primary and secondary outcome measures Cost-effectiveness measured by net monetary benefit over the simulated lifetime of trial participants from a UK National Health Service perspective. Results The probability that the intervention was cost-effective depended on the duration of the effect of the intervention. The intervention was cost-effective with high probability if effects persisted over the lifetime of intervention recipients. The probability of cost-effectiveness was lower for shorter durations of effect. Conclusions The intervention was likely to be cost-effective under a lifetime perspective. Trial registration number ISRCTN27508731; Results. PMID:27670521

  10. Novel cost-effective method of laparoscopic feeding-jejunostomy

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Rajesh C; Mehta, Sanket S; Karimundackal, George; Pramesh, C S

    2009-01-01

    A feeding jejunostomy tube placement is required for entral feeding in a variety of clinical scenarios. It offers an advantage over gastrostomies by eliminating the risk of aspiration. Standard described laparoscopic methods require special instrumentation and expensive custom-made tubes. We describe a simple cost-effective method of feeding jejunostomy using regular laparoscopic instruments and an inexpensive readily available tube. The average operating time was 35 min. We had no intra-operative complications and only one post-operative complication in the form of extra-peritoneal leakage of feeds due to a damaged tube. No complications were encountered while pulling out the tubes after an average period of 5–6 weeks. PMID:19727379

  11. Comprehensive evaluation of cost effectiveness of solar electric power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimov, D. Y.; Filatov, A. I.

    1984-02-01

    The cost effectiveness of constructing a solar heating and electric power plant is evaluated on the basis of a compatibility analysis of its combination with a thermal electric power plant and a boiler-type heating plant, taking into account comprehensively economic factors as well as power requirements. Two variants of such a combination are considered and compared, assuming equal heating power and equal electric power respectively. Equations are set up for each variant covering fixed and variable costs of generating electric power and generating heat, as basis for comparing the two variants and optimizing them with respect to normalized annual total cost. Nomograms plotted for convenient numerical calculation of maximum economically worthwhile capital investment in a solar heating and electric power plant, depending on changes in various operating parameters, reveal that, as the time for constructing such a plant becomes longer, this maximum worthwhile investment in it increases for variant 1 and decreases for variant 2.

  12. Cost-effectiveness analysis of optimal control measures for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Paula; Silva, Cristiana J; Torres, Delfim F M

    2014-10-01

    We propose and analyze an optimal control problem where the control system is a mathematical model for tuberculosis that considers reinfection. The control functions represent the fraction of early latent and persistent latent individuals that are treated. Our aim was to study how these control measures should be implemented, for a certain time period, in order to reduce the number of active infected individuals, while minimizing the interventions implementation costs. The optimal intervention is compared along different epidemiological scenarios, by varying the transmission coefficient. The impact of variation of the risk of reinfection, as a result of acquired immunity to a previous infection for treated individuals on the optimal controls and associated solutions, is analyzed. A cost-effectiveness analysis is done, to compare the application of each one of the control measures, separately or in combination.

  13. Development of a cost effective microscope heater stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugre, Joshua; Prayaga, Chandra; Wade, Aaron

    Utilizing 3D printing technology, a heater stage has been developed and implemented for microscopic systems. Due to the flexibility of 3D printing,the heater stage can be easily modified to fit any sample size with only slight modifications to the heating element being required. The sample in contact with the heating element can also easily be secured in a thermal insulator, such as aluminum foil. The thermal gradient of the heater stage has been recorded to be less than 1°C and has been compared to more expensive designs, and the cost effectiveness of the system has been determined. The system has been tested with a sample of the liquid crystal 8CB in order to determine the exact temperatures of the phase transitions of the crystal to verify that the system is applicable to a wide range of experimental physics. UWF Quality Enhancement Plan Award.

  14. RTM: Cost-effective processing of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasko, Greg; Dexter, H. Benson

    1991-01-01

    Resin transfer molding (RTM) is a promising method for cost effective fabrication of high strength, low weight composite structures from textile preforms. In this process, dry fibers are placed in a mold, resin is introduced either by vacuum infusion or pressure, and the part is cured. RTM has been used in many industries, including automotive, recreation, and aerospace. Each of the industries has different requirements of material strength, weight, reliability, environmental resistance, cost, and production rate. These requirements drive the selection of fibers and resins, fiber volume fractions, fiber orientations, mold design, and processing equipment. Research is made into applying RTM to primary aircraft structures which require high strength and stiffness at low density. The material requirements are discussed of various industries, along with methods of orienting and distributing fibers, mold configurations, and processing parameters. Processing and material parameters such as resin viscosity, perform compaction and permeability, and tool design concepts are discussed. Experimental methods to measure preform compaction and permeability are presented.

  15. Cost effectiveness of ergonomic redesign of electronic motherboard.

    PubMed

    Sen, Rabindra Nath; Yeow, Paul H P

    2003-09-01

    A case study to illustrate the cost effectiveness of ergonomic redesign of electronic motherboard was presented. The factory was running at a loss due to the high costs of rejects and poor quality and productivity. Subjective assessments and direct observations were made on the factory. Investigation revealed that due to motherboard design errors, the machine had difficulty in placing integrated circuits onto the pads, the operators had much difficulty in manual soldering certain components and much unproductive manual cleaning (MC) was required. Consequently, there were high rejects and occupational health and safety (OHS) problems, such as, boredom and work discomfort. Also, much labour and machine costs were spent on repairs. The motherboard was redesigned to correct the design errors, to allow more components to be machine soldered and to reduce MC. This eliminated rejects, reduced repairs, saved US dollars 581495/year and improved operators' OHS. The customer also saved US dollars 142105/year on loss of business. PMID:12963331

  16. Cost-effectiveness of an immunization programme in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, H. N.; Tarantola, D.; Setiady, I. F.

    1980-01-01

    The economic analysis reported below, based on hypothetical estimates of the programme impact, indicates that an expanded programme of immunization for diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, and tuberculosis can be expected to be highly cost-effective in comparison with treatment. Sensitivity tests illustrate that this conclusion remains valid even when costs are increased by 20% and benefits reduced by 50%. A separate analysis was made of the DPT—tetanus toxoid and BCG components of the programme. The analysis revealed that although the BCG programme may not be justifiable when operated independently, its inclusion in a joint immunization programme is strongly justifiable on economic grounds (assuming a vaccine efficacy of 0.5). This result confirms one of the basic arguments advanced for the WHO programmes of expanded immunization and illustrates that other immunizations, such as for poliomyelitis and measles, which may not be cost-efficient by themselves may be economically justifiable when included as part of a larger immunization programme. PMID:6774826

  17. DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURE OF COST EFFECTIVE COMPOSITE DRILL PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    James C. Leslie; James C. Leslie II; Lee Truong; James T. Heard

    2003-03-30

    This technical report presents the engineering research and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents accomplishments made from October 1, 2002 through September 30, 2003. The following have been accomplished and are reported in detail herein: Metal-to-Composite Interface (MCI) redesign and testing; Successful demonstration of MCI connection for both SR and ER/DW CDP; Specifications for a 127mm (5 inch) ID by 152.4 mm (6 inch) OD composite drill pipe have been finalized for Extended Reach/Deep Water applications (ER/DW); Field testing of Short Radius CDP (SR); Sealing composite laminate to contain high pressure; Amendments; Amendment for ''Smart'' feature added to ER/DW development along with time and funding to complete battery of qualification tests with option for field demonstration; and Preparation of papers for publication and conference presentations.

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of rheumatic heart disease prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Manji, Rizwan A; Witt, Julia; Tappia, Paramjit S; Jung, Young; Menkis, Alan H; Ramjiawan, Bram

    2013-12-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD), secondary to group A streptococcal infection is endemic in the developing as well as parts of the developed world with significant costs to the patient, and to the healthcare system. We briefly review the prevalence and cost of RHD in developed and developing nations. We subsequently develop a Markov model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of three strategies (vs standard no prevention) for preventing RHD in a developing world country: primary prophylaxis (throat swab to detect and subsequently treat group A streptococci as needed); primary prophylaxis (antibiotic prophylaxis for all) with benzathine penicillin G once monthly to all patients (ages 5-21 years) regardless of evidence of infection; and secondary prophylaxis with monthly only to those with echocardiographic evidence of early RHD. Our model suggests that echocardiographic screening and secondary prophylaxis is the best strategy although the strategies change depending on parameters used.

  19. Mechanical impedance measurements for improved cost-effective process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clopet, Caroline R.; Pullen, Deborah A.; Badcock, Rodney A.; Ralph, Brian; Fernando, Gerard F.; Mahon, Steve W.

    1999-06-01

    The aerospace industry has seen a considerably growth in composite usage over the past ten years, especially with the development of cost effective manufacturing techniques such as Resin Transfer Molding and Resin Infusion under Flexible Tooling. The relatively high cost of raw material and conservative processing schedules has limited their growth further in non-aerospace technologies. In-situ process monitoring has been explored for some time as a means to improving the cost efficiency of manufacturing with dielectric spectroscopy and optical fiber sensors being the two primary techniques developed to date. A new emerging technique is discussed here making use of piezoelectric wafers with the ability to sense not only aspects of resin flow but also to detect the change in properties of the resin as it cures. Experimental investigations to date have shown a correlation between mechanical impedance measurements and the mechanical properties of cured epoxy systems with potential for full process monitoring.

  20. Subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy for allergic disease: examining efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of current and novel formulations.

    PubMed

    Cox, Linda; Calderón, Moisés; Pfaar, Oliver

    2012-06-01

    Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) is a unique therapy for allergic disease because it provides symptomatic relief while modifying the allergic disease by targeting the underlying immunological mechanism. Its efficacy and safety have been established in the treatment of asthma, allergic rhinitis/rhinoconjunctivitis and stinging insect hypersensitivity in numerous controlled clinical trials. This review evaluates a spectrum of clinical factors, ranging from efficacy to cost-effectiveness, which should be considered in evaluating SCIT. The evidence for SCIT safety and efficacy for these conditions is reviewed in an evaluation of the systematic reviews and meta-analyses. The evidence for the persistent and preventive effects of SCIT is also examined. An overview of the SCIT outcomes measures utilized in clinical trials is presented. The cost-effectiveness of SCIT compared with conventional medication treatment, novel indications and formulations for SCIT are also explored in this review. PMID:22788128

  1. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Screening for and Managing Identified Hypertension for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi-Phuong-Lan; Wright, E. Pamela; Nguyen, Thanh-Trung; Schuiling-Veninga, C. C. M.; Bijlsma, M. J.; Nguyen, Thi-Bach-Yen; Postma, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To inform development of guidelines for hypertension management in Vietnam, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different strategies on screening for hypertension in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods A decision tree was combined with a Markov model to measure incremental cost-effectiveness of different approaches to hypertension screening. Values used as input parameters for the model were taken from different sources. Various screening intervals (one-off, annually, biannually) and starting ages to screen (35, 45 or 55 years) and coverage of treatment were analysed. We ran both a ten-year and a lifetime horizon. Input parameters for the models were extracted from local and regional data. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was used to evaluate parameter uncertainty. A threshold of three times GDP per capita was applied. Results Cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained varied in different screening scenarios. In a ten-year horizon, the cost-effectiveness of screening for hypertension ranged from cost saving to Int$ 758,695 per QALY gained. For screening of men starting at 55 years, all screening scenarios gave a high probability of being cost-effective. For screening of females starting at 55 years, the probability of favourable cost-effectiveness was 90% with one-off screening. In a lifetime horizon, cost per QALY gained was lower than the threshold of Int$ 15,883 in all screening scenarios among males. Similar results were found in females when starting screening at 55 years. Starting screening in females at 45 years had a high probability of being cost-effective if screening biannually was combined with increasing coverage of treatment by 20% or even if sole biannual screening was considered. Conclusion From a health economic perspective, integrating screening for hypertension into routine medical examination and related coverage by health insurance could be recommended. Screening for hypertension has a high probability of

  2. Detecting Proximal Secondary Caries Lesions: A Cost-effectiveness Analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, F; Brouwer, F; Paris, S; Stolpe, M

    2016-02-01

    When choosing detection methods for secondary caries lesions, dentists need to weigh sensitivity, allowing early initiation of retreatments to avoid lesion progression, against specificity, aiming to reduce risks of false-positive diagnoses and invasive overtreatments. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of different detection methods for proximal secondary lesions using Monte Carlo microsimulations. A vital permanent molar with an occlusal-proximal restoration was simulated over the lifetime of an initially 20-y-old. Three methods were compared: biannual tactile detection, radiographic detection every 2 y, and biannual laser fluorescence detection. Methods were employed either on their own or in pairwise combinations at sensitive and specific thresholds estimated with systematically collected data. A mixed public-private payer perspective in the context of German health care was applied. Effectiveness was calculated as years of tooth retention. Net-benefit analyses were used to evaluate cost-effectiveness acceptability at different willingness-to-pay thresholds. Radiographic detection verified by tactile assessment (both at specific thresholds) was least costly (mean, 1,060 euros) but had limited effectiveness (mean retention time, 50 y). The most effective but also more costly combination was laser fluorescence detection verified by radiography, again at specific thresholds (1157 euros, 53 y, acceptable if willingness to pay >32 euro/y). In the majority of simulations, not combining detection methods or applying them at sensitive thresholds was less effective and more costly. Net benefits were not greatly altered by applying different discounting rates or using different baseline prevalence of secondary lesions. Current detection methods for secondary lesions should best be used in combination, not on their own, at specific thresholds to avoid false-positive diagnoses leading to costly and invasive overtreatment. The relevant characteristics, such as predictive

  3. Reducing Wildlife Damage with Cost-Effective Management Programmes.

    PubMed

    Krull, Cheryl R; Stanley, Margaret C; Burns, Bruce R; Choquenot, David; Etherington, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Limiting the impact of wildlife damage in a cost effective manner requires an understanding of how control inputs change the occurrence of damage through their effect on animal density. Despite this, there are few studies linking wildlife management (control), with changes in animal abundance and prevailing levels of wildlife damage. We use the impact and management of wild pigs as a case study to demonstrate this linkage. Ground disturbance by wild pigs has become a conservation issue of global concern because of its potential effects on successional changes in vegetation structure and composition, habitat for other species, and functional soil properties. In this study, we used a 3-year pig control programme (ground hunting) undertaken in a temperate rainforest area of northern New Zealand to evaluate effects on pig abundance, and patterns and rates of ground disturbance and ground disturbance recovery and the cost effectiveness of differing control strategies. Control reduced pig densities by over a third of the estimated carrying capacity, but more than halved average prevailing ground disturbance. Rates of new ground disturbance accelerated with increasing pig density, while rates of ground disturbance recovery were not related to prevailing pig density. Stochastic simulation models based on the measured relationships between control, pig density and rate of ground disturbance and recovery indicated that control could reduce ground disturbance substantially. However, the rate at which prevailing ground disturbance was reduced diminished rapidly as more intense, and hence expensive, pig control regimes were simulated. The model produced in this study provides a framework that links conservation of indigenous ecological communities to control inputs through the reduction of wildlife damage and suggests that managers should consider carefully the marginal cost of higher investment in wildlife damage control, relative to its marginal conservation return. PMID

  4. Reducing Wildlife Damage with Cost-Effective Management Programmes

    PubMed Central

    Krull, Cheryl R.; Stanley, Margaret C.; Burns, Bruce R.; Choquenot, David; Etherington, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Limiting the impact of wildlife damage in a cost effective manner requires an understanding of how control inputs change the occurrence of damage through their effect on animal density. Despite this, there are few studies linking wildlife management (control), with changes in animal abundance and prevailing levels of wildlife damage. We use the impact and management of wild pigs as a case study to demonstrate this linkage. Ground disturbance by wild pigs has become a conservation issue of global concern because of its potential effects on successional changes in vegetation structure and composition, habitat for other species, and functional soil properties. In this study, we used a 3-year pig control programme (ground hunting) undertaken in a temperate rainforest area of northern New Zealand to evaluate effects on pig abundance, and patterns and rates of ground disturbance and ground disturbance recovery and the cost effectiveness of differing control strategies. Control reduced pig densities by over a third of the estimated carrying capacity, but more than halved average prevailing ground disturbance. Rates of new ground disturbance accelerated with increasing pig density, while rates of ground disturbance recovery were not related to prevailing pig density. Stochastic simulation models based on the measured relationships between control, pig density and rate of ground disturbance and recovery indicated that control could reduce ground disturbance substantially. However, the rate at which prevailing ground disturbance was reduced diminished rapidly as more intense, and hence expensive, pig control regimes were simulated. The model produced in this study provides a framework that links conservation of indigenous ecological communities to control inputs through the reduction of wildlife damage and suggests that managers should consider carefully the marginal cost of higher investment in wildlife damage control, relative to its marginal conservation return. PMID

  5. Reducing Wildlife Damage with Cost-Effective Management Programmes.

    PubMed

    Krull, Cheryl R; Stanley, Margaret C; Burns, Bruce R; Choquenot, David; Etherington, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Limiting the impact of wildlife damage in a cost effective manner requires an understanding of how control inputs change the occurrence of damage through their effect on animal density. Despite this, there are few studies linking wildlife management (control), with changes in animal abundance and prevailing levels of wildlife damage. We use the impact and management of wild pigs as a case study to demonstrate this linkage. Ground disturbance by wild pigs has become a conservation issue of global concern because of its potential effects on successional changes in vegetation structure and composition, habitat for other species, and functional soil properties. In this study, we used a 3-year pig control programme (ground hunting) undertaken in a temperate rainforest area of northern New Zealand to evaluate effects on pig abundance, and patterns and rates of ground disturbance and ground disturbance recovery and the cost effectiveness of differing control strategies. Control reduced pig densities by over a third of the estimated carrying capacity, but more than halved average prevailing ground disturbance. Rates of new ground disturbance accelerated with increasing pig density, while rates of ground disturbance recovery were not related to prevailing pig density. Stochastic simulation models based on the measured relationships between control, pig density and rate of ground disturbance and recovery indicated that control could reduce ground disturbance substantially. However, the rate at which prevailing ground disturbance was reduced diminished rapidly as more intense, and hence expensive, pig control regimes were simulated. The model produced in this study provides a framework that links conservation of indigenous ecological communities to control inputs through the reduction of wildlife damage and suggests that managers should consider carefully the marginal cost of higher investment in wildlife damage control, relative to its marginal conservation return.

  6. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in Practice: Interventions to Improve High School Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollands, Fiona; Bowden, A. Brooks; Belfield, Clive; Levin, Henry M.; Cheng, Henan; Shand, Robert; Pan, Yilin; Hanisch-Cerda, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we perform cost-effectiveness analysis on interventions that improve the rate of high school completion. Using the What Works Clearinghouse to select effective interventions, we calculate cost-effectiveness ratios for five youth interventions. We document wide variation in cost-effectiveness ratios between programs and between…

  7. Comparing the Cost-Effectiveness of Simulation Modalities: A Case Study of Peripheral Intravenous Catheterization Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Brydges, Ryan; Carnahan, Heather; Backstein, David; Dubrowski, Adam

    2014-01-01

    While the ultimate goal of simulation training is to enhance learning, cost-effectiveness is a critical factor. Research that compares simulation training in terms of educational- and cost-effectiveness will lead to better-informed curricular decisions. Using previously published data we conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis of three…

  8. [Clinical study using activity-based costing to assess cost-effectiveness of a wound management system utilizing modern dressings in comparison with traditional wound care].

    PubMed

    Ohura, Takehiko; Sanada, Hiromi; Mino, Yoshio

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of cost-effectiveness, including medical delivery and health service fee systems, has become widespread in Japanese health care. In the field of pressure ulcer management, the recent introduction of penalty subtraction in the care fee system emphasizes the need for prevention and cost-effective care of pressure ulcer. Previous cost-effectiveness research on pressure ulcer management tended to focus only on "hardware" costs such as those for pharmaceuticals and medical supplies, while neglecting other cost aspects, particularly those involving the cost of labor. Thus, cost-effectiveness in pressure ulcer care has not yet been fully established. To provide true cost effectiveness data, a comparative prospective study was initiated in patients with stage II and III pressure ulcers. Considering the potential impact of the pressure reduction mattress on clinical outcome, in particular, the same type of pressure reduction mattresses are utilized in all the cases in the study. The cost analysis method used was Activity-Based Costing, which measures material and labor cost aspects on a daily basis. A reduction in the Pressure Sore Status Tool (PSST) score was used to measure clinical effectiveness. Patients were divided into three groups based on the treatment method and on the use of a consistent algorithm of wound care: 1. MC/A group, modern dressings with a treatment algorithm (control cohort). 2. TC/A group, traditional care (ointment and gauze) with a treatment algorithm. 3. TC/NA group, traditional care (ointment and gauze) without a treatment algorithm. The results revealed that MC/A is more cost-effective than both TC/A and TC/NA. This suggests that appropriate utilization of modern dressing materials and a pressure ulcer care algorithm would contribute to reducing health care costs, improved clinical results, and, ultimately, greater cost-effectiveness. PMID:14999922

  9. [Clinical study using activity-based costing to assess cost-effectiveness of a wound management system utilizing modern dressings in comparison with traditional wound care].

    PubMed

    Ohura, Takehiko; Sanada, Hiromi; Mino, Yoshio

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of cost-effectiveness, including medical delivery and health service fee systems, has become widespread in Japanese health care. In the field of pressure ulcer management, the recent introduction of penalty subtraction in the care fee system emphasizes the need for prevention and cost-effective care of pressure ulcer. Previous cost-effectiveness research on pressure ulcer management tended to focus only on "hardware" costs such as those for pharmaceuticals and medical supplies, while neglecting other cost aspects, particularly those involving the cost of labor. Thus, cost-effectiveness in pressure ulcer care has not yet been fully established. To provide true cost effectiveness data, a comparative prospective study was initiated in patients with stage II and III pressure ulcers. Considering the potential impact of the pressure reduction mattress on clinical outcome, in particular, the same type of pressure reduction mattresses are utilized in all the cases in the study. The cost analysis method used was Activity-Based Costing, which measures material and labor cost aspects on a daily basis. A reduction in the Pressure Sore Status Tool (PSST) score was used to measure clinical effectiveness. Patients were divided into three groups based on the treatment method and on the use of a consistent algorithm of wound care: 1. MC/A group, modern dressings with a treatment algorithm (control cohort). 2. TC/A group, traditional care (ointment and gauze) with a treatment algorithm. 3. TC/NA group, traditional care (ointment and gauze) without a treatment algorithm. The results revealed that MC/A is more cost-effective than both TC/A and TC/NA. This suggests that appropriate utilization of modern dressing materials and a pressure ulcer care algorithm would contribute to reducing health care costs, improved clinical results, and, ultimately, greater cost-effectiveness.

  10. Will Sofosbuvir/Ledipasvir (Harvoni) Be Cost-Effective and Affordable for Chinese Patients Infected with Hepatitis C Virus? An Economic Analysis Using Real-World Data

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhong-Ping; Dou, Xiao-Guang; Xie, Qing; Zhang, Wen-Hong; Lu, Lun-Gen; Fan, Jian-Gao; Cheng, Jun; Wang, Gui-Qiang; Ren, Hong; Wang, Jiu-Ping; Yang, Xing-Xiang; Jia, Zhan-Sheng; Fu, Qing-Chun; Wang, Xiao-Jin; Shang, Jia; Zhang, Yue-Xin; Han, Ying; Du, Ning; Shao, Qing; Ji, Dong; Li, Fan; Li, Bing; Liu, Jia-Liang; Niu, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Vanessa; Wong, April; Wang, Yu-Dong; Hou, Jin-Lin; Jia, Ji-Dong; Zhuang, Hui; Lau, George

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known on the cost-effectiveness of novel regimens for hepatitis C virus (HCV) compared with standard-of-care with pegylated interferon (pegIFN) and ribavirin (RBV) therapy in developing countries. We evaluated cost-effectiveness of sofosbuvir/ledipasvir for 12 weeks compared with a 48-week pegIFN-RBV regimen in Chinese patients with genotype 1b HCV infection by economic regions. Methods A decision analytic Markov model was developed to estimate quality-adjusted-life-years, lifetime cost of HCV infection and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). SVR rates and direct medical costs were obtained from real-world data. Parameter uncertainty was assessed by one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Threshold analysis was conducted to estimate the price which can make the regimen cost-effective and affordable. Results Sofosbuvir/ledipasvir was cost-effective in treatment-experienced patients with an ICER of US$21,612. It varied by economic regions. The probability of cost-effectiveness was 18% and 47% for treatment-naive and experienced patients, and it ranged from 15% in treatment-naïve patients in Central-China to 64% in treatment-experienced patients in Eastern-China. The price of 12-week sofosbuvir/ledipasvir treatment needs to be reduced by at least 81% to US$18,185 to make the regimen cost-effective in all patients at WTP of one time GDP per capita. The price has to be US$105 to make the regimen affordable in average patients in China. Conclusion Sofosbuvir/ledipasvir regimen is not cost-effective in most Chinese patients with genotype 1b HCV infection. The results vary by economic regions. Drug price of sofosbuvir/ledipasvir needs to be substantially reduced when entering the market in China to ensure the widest accessibility. PMID:27276081

  11. Comparative Cost-Effectiveness of Conservative or Intensive Blood Pressure Treatment Guidelines in Adults Aged 35-74 Years: The Cardiovascular Disease Policy Model.

    PubMed

    Moise, Nathalie; Huang, Chen; Rodgers, Anthony; Kohli-Lynch, Ciaran N; Tzong, Keane Y; Coxson, Pamela G; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Goldman, Lee; Moran, Andrew E

    2016-07-01

    The population health effect and cost-effectiveness of implementing intensive blood pressure goals in high-cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk adults have not been described. Using the CVD Policy Model, CVD events, treatment costs, quality-adjusted life years, and drug and monitoring costs were simulated over 2016 to 2026 for hypertensive patients aged 35 to 74 years. We projected the effectiveness and costs of hypertension treatment according to the 2003 Joint National Committee (JNC)-7 or 2014 JNC8 guidelines, and then for adults aged ≥50 years, we assessed the cost-effectiveness of adding an intensive goal of systolic blood pressure <120 mm Hg for patients with CVD, chronic kidney disease, or 10-year CVD risk ≥15%. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios <$50 000 per quality-adjusted life years gained were considered cost-effective. JNC7 strategies treat more patients and are more costly to implement compared with JNC8 strategies. Adding intensive systolic blood pressure goals for high-risk patients prevents an estimated 43 000 and 35 000 annual CVD events incremental to JNC8 and JNC7, respectively. Intensive strategies save costs in men and are cost-effective in women compared with JNC8 alone. At a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50 000 per quality-adjusted life years gained, JNC8+intensive had the highest probability of cost-effectiveness in women (82%) and JNC7+intensive the highest probability of cost-effectiveness in men (100%). Assuming higher drug and monitoring costs, adding intensive goals for high-risk patients remained consistently cost-effective in men, but not always in women. Among patients aged 35 to 74 years, adding intensive blood pressure goals for high-risk groups to current national hypertension treatment guidelines prevents additional CVD deaths while saving costs provided that medication costs are controlled.

  12. Cost-effectiveness analysis should continually assess competing health care options especially in high volume environments like cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ashiya; Amitava, Abadan Khan; Rizvi, Syed Ali Raza; Siddiqui, Ziya; Kumari, Namita; Grover, Shivani

    2015-01-01

    Context: Cost-effectiveness analysis should continually assess competing health care options especially in high volume environments like cataract surgery. Aims: To compare the cost effectiveness of phacoemulsification (PE) versus manual small-incision cataract surgery (MSICS). Settings and Design: Prospective randomized controlled trial. Tertiary care hospital setting. Subjects and Methods: A total of 52 consenting patients with age-related cataracts, were prospectively recruited, and block randomized to PE or MSICS group. Preoperative and postoperative LogMAR visual acuity (VA), visual function-14 (VF-14) score and their quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were obtained, and the change in their values calculated. These were divided by the total cost incurred in the surgery to calculate and compare the cost effectiveness and cost utility. Surgery duration was also compared. Statistical Analysis Used: Two group comparison with Student's t-test. Significance set at P < 0.05; 95% confidence interval (CI) quoted where appropriate. Results: Both the MSICS and PE groups achieved comparative outcomes in terms of change (difference in mean [95% CI]) in LogMAR VA (0.03 [−0.05−0.11]), VF-14 score (7.92 [−1.03−16.86]) and QALYs (1.14 [−0.89−3.16]). However, with significantly lower costs (INR 3228 [2700–3756]), MSICS was more cost effective, with superior cost utility value. MSICS was also significantly quicker (10.58 min [6.85–14.30]) than PE. Conclusions: MSICS provides comparable visual and QALY improvement, yet takes less time, and is significantly more cost-effective, compared with PE. Greater push and penetration of MSICS, by the government, is justifiably warranted in our country. PMID:26265639

  13. Cost-effective retrofit technology for reducing peak power demand in small and medium commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James J.; Fugate, David L.; Kuruganti, Teja; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Starke, Michael R.

    2015-05-27

    We describe a cost-effective retrofit technology that uses collective control of multiple rooftop air conditioning units to reduce the peak power consumption of small and medium commercial buildings. The proposed control uses a model of the building and air conditioning units to select an operating schedule for the air conditioning units that maintains a temperature set point subject to a constraint on the number of units that may operate simultaneously. A prototype of this new control system was built and deployed in a large gymnasium to coordinate four rooftop air conditioning units. Based on data collected while operating this prototype, we estimate that the cost savings achieved by reducing peak power consumption is sufficient to repay the cost of the prototype within a year.

  14. Cost-effective retrofit technology for reducing peak power demand in small and medium commercial buildings

    DOE PAGES

    Nutaro, James J.; Fugate, David L.; Kuruganti, Teja; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Starke, Michael R.

    2015-05-27

    We describe a cost-effective retrofit technology that uses collective control of multiple rooftop air conditioning units to reduce the peak power consumption of small and medium commercial buildings. The proposed control uses a model of the building and air conditioning units to select an operating schedule for the air conditioning units that maintains a temperature set point subject to a constraint on the number of units that may operate simultaneously. A prototype of this new control system was built and deployed in a large gymnasium to coordinate four rooftop air conditioning units. Based on data collected while operating this prototype,more » we estimate that the cost savings achieved by reducing peak power consumption is sufficient to repay the cost of the prototype within a year.« less

  15. A cost-effective high-flux source of cold ytterbium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Zou, Yueyang; Zhang, Shanchao; Cho, Chang-woo; Jo, Gyu-Boong

    2016-10-01

    We report a cost-effective way to prepare high-flux slow ytterbium atoms with extremely low-power 399-nm light suitable for the production of quantum degenerate ytterbium gases. By collimating an atomic beam through an array of micro-capillary tubes, we obtain a bright atomic beam through the Zeeman slower operating at low light power of only 15 mW for the source. We achieve the loading rate of 2 × 107 s-1 into the intercombination magneto-optical trap (MOT) and a sufficient steady-state MOT atom number of 2 × 108 for 174Yb atoms. Our apparatus highlights an efficient method to obtain slow ytterbium atoms using a simple low-power 399-nm laser system.

  16. Case management in an acute-care hospital: collaborating for quality, cost-effective patient care.

    PubMed

    Grootveld, Kim; Wen, Victoria; Bather, Michelle; Park, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Case management has recently been advanced as a valuable component in achieving quality patient care that is also cost-effective. At St. Michael's Hospital, in Toronto, Ontario, case managers from a variety of professional backgrounds are central to a new care initiative--Rapid Assessment and Planning to Inform Disposition (RAPID)--in the General Internal Medicine (GIM) Unit that is designed to improve patient care and reconcile high emergency department volumes through "smart bed spacing." Involved in both planning and RAPID, GIM's case managers are the link between patient care and utilization management. These stewards of finite resources strive to make the best use of dollars spent while maintaining a commitment to quality care. Collaborating closely with physicians and others across the hospital, GIM's case managers have been instrumental in bringing about significant improvements in care coordination, utilization management and process redesign. PMID:24844723

  17. Cost-effective and rapid blood analysis on a cell-phone.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Sencan, Ikbal; Wong, Justin; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Tseng, Derek; Nagashima, Keita; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate a compact and cost-effective imaging cytometry platform installed on a cell-phone for the measurement of the density of red and white blood cells as well as hemoglobin concentration in human blood samples. Fluorescent and bright-field images of blood samples are captured using separate optical attachments to the cell-phone and are rapidly processed through a custom-developed smart application running on the phone for counting of blood cells and determining hemoglobin density. We evaluated the performance of this cell-phone based blood analysis platform using anonymous human blood samples and achieved comparable results to a standard bench-top hematology analyser. Test results can either be stored on the cell-phone memory or be transmitted to a central server, providing remote diagnosis opportunities even in field settings.

  18. Emotional intelligence as a predictor of self-efficacy among students with different levels of academic achievement at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    GHARETEPEH, AMENEH; SAFARI, YAHYA; PASHAEI, TAHEREH; RAZAEI, MANSOUR; BAGHER KAJBAF, MOHAMMAD

    2015-01-01

    Introduction studies have indicated that emotional intelligence is positively related to self-efficacy and can predict the academic achievement. The present study aimed to investigate the role of emotional intelligence in identifying self-efficacy among the students of Public Health School with different levels of academic achievement. Methods This correlational study was conducted on all the students of Public Health School. 129 students were included in the study through census method. Data were collected using Emotional Intelligence and self-efficacy questionnaires and analyzed using descriptive statistics and regression analysis by SPSS 14. Results The average score of students with high academic achievement was higher in self-efficacy (39.78±5.82) and emotional intelligence (117.07±10.33) variables and their components than that of students with low academic achievement (39.17±5.91, 112.07±13.23). The overall emotional intelligence score to predict self-efficacy explanation was different among students with different levels of academic achievement (p<0.001). Self-efficacy structure was explained through self-awareness and self-motivation components in students with low academic achievement (r=0.571). In students with high academic achievement, self-awareness, self-motivation and social consciousness played an effective role in explaining self-efficacy (r=0.677, p<0.001). Conclusion Emotional intelligence and self-efficacy play an important role in achieving academic success and emotional intelligence can explain self-efficacy. Therefore, it is recommended to teach emotional intelligence skills to students with low academic achievement through training workshops. PMID:25927067

  19. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Infrapopliteal Drug-Eluting Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Katsanos, Konstantinos Karnabatidis, Dimitris; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Siablis, Dimitris

    2013-02-15

    IntroductionThere are no cost-utility data about below-the-knee placement of drug-eluting stents. The authors determined the cost-effectiveness of infrapopliteal drug-eluting stents for critical limb ischemia (CLI) treatment. The event-free individual survival outcomes defined by the absence of any major events, including death, major amputation, and target limb repeat procedures, were reconstructed on the basis of two published infrapopliteal series. The first included spot Bail-out use of Sirolimus-eluting stents versus bare metal stents after suboptimal balloon angioplasty (Bail-out SES).The second was full-lesion Primary Everolimus-eluting stenting versus plain balloon angioplasty and bail-out bare metal stenting as necessary (primary EES). The number-needed-to-treat (NNT) to avoid one major event and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated for a 3-year postprocedural period for both strategies. Overall event-free survival was significantly improved in both strategies (hazard ratio (HR) [confidence interval (CI)]: 0.68 [0.41-1.12] in Bail-out SES and HR [CI]: 0.53 [0.29-0.99] in Primary EES). Event-free survival gain per patient was 0.89 (range, 0.11-3.0) years in Bail-out SES with an NNT of 4.6 (CI: 2.5-25.6) and a corresponding ICER of 6,518 Euro-Sign (range 1,685-10,112 Euro-Sign ). Survival gain was 0.91 (range 0.25-3.0) years in Primary EES with an NNT of 2.7 (CI: 1.7-5.8) and an ICER of 11,581 Euro-Sign (range, 4,945-21,428 Euro-Sign ) per event-free life-year gained. Two-way sensitivity analysis showed that stented lesion length >10 cm and/or DES list price >1000 Euro-Sign were associated with the least economically favorable scenario in both strategies. Both strategies of bail-out SES and primary EES placement in the infrapopliteal arteries for CLI treatment exhibit single-digit NNT and relatively low corresponding ICERs.

  20. HIV prevention cost-effectiveness: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background After more than 25 years, public health programs have not been able to sufficiently reduce the number of new HIV infections. Over 7,000 people become infected with HIV every day. Lack of convincing evidence of cost-effectiveness (CE) may be one of the reasons why implementation of effective programs is not occurring at sufficient scale. This paper identifies, summarizes and critiques the CE literature related to HIV-prevention interventions in low- and middle-income countries during 2005-2008. Methods Systematic identification of publications was conducted through several methods: electronic databases, internet search of international organizations and major funding/implementing agencies, and journal browsing. Inclusion criteria included: HIV prevention intervention, year for publication (2005-2008), setting (low- and middle-income countries), and CE estimation (empirical or modeling) using outcomes in terms of cost per HIV infection averted and/or cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) or quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Results We found 21 distinct studies analyzing the CE of HIV-prevention interventions published in the past four years (2005-2008). Seventeen CE studies analyzed biomedical interventions; only a few dealt with behavioral and environmental/structural interventions. Sixteen studies focused on sub-Saharan Africa, and only a handful on Asia, Latin America and Eastern Europe. Many HIV-prevention interventions are very cost effective in absolute terms (using costs per DALY averted), and also in country-specific relative terms (in cost per DALY measured as percentage of GDP per capita). Conclusion There are several types of interventions for which CE studies are still not available or insufficient, including surveillance, abstinence, school-based education, universal precautions, prevention for positives and most structural interventions. The sparse CE evidence available is not easily comparable; thus, not very useful for decision

  1. Model VESL Program Guide, Office Information Systems, International: One Semester Intensive Training Certificate of Achievement Programs in General, Medical, and Legal Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Irma J.

    The Office Information Systems-International Program at Southwestern College, in California, was designed to provide Hispanic students with training for entry-level office employment. This model program guide stems from a project to improve curricula and delivery and focuses on changes in three intensive bilingual programs in general, medical, and…

  2. Cost effectiveness of the stream-gaging program in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shindel, H.L.; Bartlett, W.P.

    1986-01-01

    This report documents the results of the cost effectiveness of the stream-gaging program in Ohio. Data uses and funding sources were identified for 107 continuous stream gages currently being operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in Ohio with a budget of $682,000; this budget includes field work for other projects and excludes stations jointly operated with the Miami Conservancy District. No stream gage were identified as having insufficient reason to continue their operation; nor were any station identified as having uses specifically only for short-term studies. All 107 station should be maintained in the program for the foreseeable future. The average standard error of estimation of stream flow records is 29.2 percent at its present level of funding. A minimum budget of $679,000 is required to operate the 107-gage program; a budget less than this does no permit proper service and maintenance of the gages and recorders. At the minimum budget, the average standard error is 31.1 percent The maximum budget analyzed was $1,282,000, which resulted in an average standard error of 11.1 percent. A need for additional gages has been identified by the other agencies that cooperate in the program. It is suggested that these gage be installed as funds can be made available.

  3. Cost effectiveness of in situ bioremediation at Savannah River

    SciTech Connect

    Saaty, R.P.; Showalter, W.E.; Booth, S.R.

    1995-09-01

    In situ bioremediation (ISBR) is an innovative new remediation technology for the removal of chlorinated solvents from contaminated soils and groundwater. The principal contaminant at the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration is tricloroethylene (TCE) a volatile organic compound (VOC). A 384-day test run at Savannah River, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Technology Development (EM-50), furnished information about the performance and applications of ISBR. In situ bioremediation, as tested, is based on two distinct processes occurring simultaneously; the physical process of in situ air stripping and the biological process of bioremediation. Both processes have the potential to remediate some amount of contamination. A quantity of VOCs, directly measured from the extracted airstream, was removed from the test area by the physical process of air stripping. The biological process is difficult to examine. However, the results of several tests performed at the SRID and independent numerical modeling determined that the biological process remediated an additional 40% above the physical process. Given these data, the cost effectiveness of this new technology can be evaluated.

  4. Rockot - a new cost effective launcher for small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosenkis, Regina

    1996-01-01

    Daimler-Benz Aerospace of Germany and the Russian Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center have formed a jointly owned EUROCKOT Launch Services GmbH to offer worldwide cost effective launch services for the ROCKOT launch vehicle. ROCKOT, produced by Khrunichev, builder of the famous PROTON launcher, aims at the market of small and medium size satellites ranging from 300 to 1800 kg to be launched into low earth or sunsynchronous orbits. These comprize scientific, earth observation and polar meteorological satellites as well as the new generation of small communication satellites in low earth orbits, known as the ``Constellations''. ROCKOT is a three stage liquid propellant launch vehicle, composed of a former Russian SS 19 strategic missile, which has been withdrawn from military use, and a highly sophisticated, flight-proven upper stage named Breeze, which is particularly suited for a variety of civic and commercial space applications. Usable payload envelope has a length of 4.75 meters and a maximum diameter of 2.26 meters for accomodating the payload within the payload fairing. ROCKOT can also accomodate multiple payloads which can be deployed into the same or different orbits. So far ROCKOT has been successfully launched three times from Baikonur. The commercial launch services on ROCKOT from the Plesetsk launch site, Russia, will begin in 1997 and will be available worldwide at a highly competitive price.

  5. Cost-Effective Marine Protection--A Pragmatic Approach.

    PubMed

    Oinonen, Soile; Hyytiäinen, Kari; Ahlvik, Lassi; Laamanen, Maria; Lehtoranta, Virpi; Salojärvi, Joona; Virtanen, Jarno

    2016-01-01

    This paper puts forward a framework for probabilistic and holistic cost-effectiveness analysis to provide support in selecting the least-cost set of measures to reach a multidimensional environmental objective. Following the principles of ecosystem-based management, the framework includes a flexible methodology for deriving and populating criteria for effectiveness and costs and analyzing complex ecological-economic trade-offs under uncertainty. The framework is applied in the development of the Finnish Programme of Measures (PoM) for reaching the targets of the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). The numerical results demonstrate that substantial cost savings can be realized from careful consideration of the costs and multiple effects of management measures. If adopted, the proposed PoM would yield improvements in the state of the Baltic Sea, but the overall objective of the MSFD would not be reached by the target year of 2020; for various environmental and administrative reasons, it would take longer for most measures to take full effect. PMID:26751965

  6. Repairing an offshore jacket structure proves cost effective

    SciTech Connect

    Still, J.R.; Blackwood, V.

    2000-05-01

    During inclement weather in the southern North Sea, an off-shore supply boat collided with a 25-year-old gas production platform. The impact occurred just over 2 m (5.56 ft) from the lowest annual tide and was sufficient to buckle, then shear, one end of a horizontal bracing from the jacket leg and to cause further damage at a node joint. Inspection personnel performed an initial examination of the damage to the eight-leg jacket structure using rope access techniques (abseiling), which offered substantial cost saving over erecting scaffolding. A structural analysis confirmed the jacket's integrity was not impaired and loss of the horizontal bracing would not significantly affect the structure. The analysis also confirmed repair of the node weld cracks and of the sheared area on the leg should be performed as soon as practical. In the end, the repair went smoothly. The repair area was above the waterline, and the weather cooperated perfectly. The repairs were done using rope access techniques, and using austenitic electrodes reduced the possibility of HAZ hydrogen cracking. Nondestructive examination confirmed no cracking had been experienced and no other defects existed. Indeed, this methodology is considered extremely practical, cost effective and ideal for use on offshore structures--with damage close to the waterline, and with the need to execute immediate repairs.

  7. Cost-Effectiveness in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Shillcutt, Samuel D.; Walker, Damian G.; Goodman, Catherine A.; Mills, Anne J.

    2010-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) is increasingly important in public health decision making, including in low- and middle-income countries. The decision makers' valuation of a unit of health gain, or ceiling ratio (λ), is important in CEA as the relative value against which acceptability is defined, although values are usually chosen arbitrarily in practice. Reference case estimates for λ are useful to promote consistency, facilitate new developments in decision analysis, compare estimates against benefit-cost ratios from other economic sectors, and explicitly inform decisions about equity in global health budgets. The aim of this article is to discuss values for λ used in practice, including derivation based on affordability expectations (such as $US150 per disability-adjusted life-year [DALY]), some multiple of gross national income or gross domestic product, and preference-elicitation methods, and explore the implications associated with each approach. The background to the debate is introduced, the theoretical bases of current values are reviewed, and examples are given of their application in practice. Advantages and disadvantages of each method for defining λ are outlined, followed by an exploration of methodological and policy implications. PMID:19888791

  8. Cost-Effective Marine Protection - A Pragmatic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Oinonen, Soile; Hyytiäinen, Kari; Ahlvik, Lassi; Laamanen, Maria; Lehtoranta, Virpi; Salojärvi, Joona; Virtanen, Jarno

    2016-01-01

    This paper puts forward a framework for probabilistic and holistic cost-effectiveness analysis to provide support in selecting the least-cost set of measures to reach a multidimensional environmental objective. Following the principles of ecosystem-based management, the framework includes a flexible methodology for deriving and populating criteria for effectiveness and costs and analyzing complex ecological-economic trade-offs under uncertainty. The framework is applied in the development of the Finnish Programme of Measures (PoM) for reaching the targets of the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). The numerical results demonstrate that substantial cost savings can be realized from careful consideration of the costs and multiple effects of management measures. If adopted, the proposed PoM would yield improvements in the state of the Baltic Sea, but the overall objective of the MSFD would not be reached by the target year of 2020; for various environmental and administrative reasons, it would take longer for most measures to take full effect. PMID:26751965

  9. Deactivating a major nuclear fuels reprocessing facility cost effectively

    SciTech Connect

    LeBaron, G.J.

    1997-08-15

    This paper describes three key processes used in deactivating the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility, a large, complex nuclear reprocessing facility, 15 months ahead of schedule and $77 million under budget. The organization was reengineered to refine its business processes and more effectively organize around the deactivation work scope. Multi-disciplined work teams were formed to be self-sufficient and empowered to make decisions and perform work. A number of benefits were realized by reengineering. A comprehensive process to develop end points which clearly identified specific results and the post-project facility configuration was developed so all areas of a facility were addressed. Clear and specific end points allowed teams to focus on completing deactivation activities and helped ensure there were no unfulfilled end-of-project expectations. The RCRA regulations require closure of permitted facilities within 180 days after cessation of operations which may essentially necessitate decommissioning. A more cost effective approach was adopted which significantly reduced risk to human health and the environment by taking the facility to a passive, safe, inexpensive-to-maintain surveillance and maintenance condition (deactivation) prior to disposition. PUREX thus became the first large reprocessing facility with active TSD [treatment, storage, and disposal] units to be deactivated under the RCRA regulations.

  10. DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURE OF COST EFFECTIVE COMPOSITE DRILL PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    James C. Leslie; Jeffrey R. Jean; Hans Neubert; Lee Truong

    2001-10-30

    This technical report presents the engineering research and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report discusses and illustrates all progress in the first two years of this NETL/DOE supported program. The following have been accomplished and are reported in detail herein: (1) Specifications for both 5 5/16 inch and 3 3/8 inch composite drill pipe have been finalized. (2) All basic laboratory testing has been completed and has provide sufficient data for the selection of materials for the composite tubing, adhesives, and abrasion coatings. (3) Successful demonstration of composite/metal joint interfacial connection. (4) Upgrade of facilities to provide a functional pilot plant manufacturing facility. (5) Arrangements to have the 3 3/8 inch CDP used in a drilling operation early in C.Y. 2002. (6) Arrangements to have the 5 5/16 inch CDP marketed and produced by a major drill pipe manufacturer.

  11. Development and Manufacture of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    James C. Leslie; Jeffrey R. Jean; Hans Neubert; Lee Truong; James T. Heard

    2002-09-29

    This technical report presents the engineering research and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report reiterates the presentation made to DOE/NETL in Morgantown, WV on August 1st, 2002 with the addition of accomplishments made from that time forward until the issue date. The following have been accomplished and are reported in detail herein: {sm_bullet} Specifications for both 5-1/2'' and 1-5/8'' composite drill pipe have been finalized. {sm_bullet} Full scale testing of Short Radius (SR) CDP has been conducted. {sm_bullet} Successful demonstration of metal to composite interface (MCI) connection. {sm_bullet} Preparations for full scale manufacturing of ER/DW CDP have begun. {sm_bullet} Manufacturing facility rearranged to accommodate CDP process flow through plant. {sm_bullet} Arrangements to have the 3 3/8'' CDP used in 4 separate drilling applications in Oman, Oklahoma, and Texas.

  12. Cost effectiveness of the stream-gaging program in Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbert, R.A.; Carlson, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report documents the results of a study of the cost effectiveness of the stream-gaging program in Louisiana. Data uses and funding sources were identified for the 68 continuous-record stream gages currently (1984) in operation with a budget of $408,700. Three stream gages have uses specific to a short-term study with no need for continued data collection beyond the study. The remaining 65 stations should be maintained in the program for the foreseeable future. In addition to the current operation of continuous-record stations, a number of wells, flood-profile gages, crest-stage gages, and stage stations, are serviced on the continuous-record station routes; thus, increasing the current budget to $423,000. The average standard error of estimate for data collected at the stations is 34.6%. Standard errors computed in this study are one measure of streamflow errors, and can be used as guidelines in comparing the effectiveness of alternative networks. By using the routes and number of measurements prescribed by the ' Traveling Hydrographer Program, ' the standard error could be reduced to 31.5% with the current budget of $423,000. If the gaging resources are redistributed, the 34.6% overall level of accuracy at the 68 continuous-record sites and the servicing of the additional wells or gages could be maintained with a budget of approximately $410,000. (USGS)

  13. Climate targets and cost-effective climate stabilization pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, H.

    2015-08-01

    Climate economics has developed two main tools to derive an economically adequate response to the climate problem. Cost benefit analysis weighs in any available information on mitigation costs and benefits and thereby derives an "optimal" global mean temperature. Quite the contrary, cost effectiveness analysis allows deriving costs of potential policy targets and the corresponding cost- minimizing investment paths. The article highlights pros and cons of both approaches and then focusses on the implications of a policy that strives at limiting global warming to 2 °C compared to pre-industrial values. The related mitigation costs and changes in the energy sector are summarized according to the IPCC report of 2014. The article then points to conceptual difficulties when internalizing uncertainty in these types of analyses and suggests pragmatic solutions. Key statements on mitigation economics remain valid under uncertainty when being given the adequate interpretation. Furthermore, the expected economic value of perfect climate information is found to be on the order of hundreds of billions of Euro per year if a 2°-policy were requested. Finally, the prospects of climate policy are sketched.

  14. A cost-effective strategy for nonoscillatory convection without clipping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.; Niknafs, H. S.

    1990-01-01

    Clipping of narrow extrema and distortion of smooth profiles is a well known problem associated with so-called high resolution nonoscillatory convection schemes. A strategy is presented for accurately simulating highly convective flows containing discontinuities such as density fronts or shock waves, without distorting smooth profiles or clipping narrow local extrema. The convection algorithm is based on non-artificially diffusive third-order upwinding in smooth regions, with automatic adaptive stencil expansion to (in principle, arbitrarily) higher order upwinding locally, in regions of rapidly changing gradients. This is highly cost effective because the wider stencil is used only where needed-in isolated narrow regions. A recently developed universal limiter assures sharp monotonic resolution of discontinuities without introducing artificial diffusion or numerical compression. An adaptive discriminator is constructed to distinguish between spurious overshoots and physical peaks; this automatically relaxes the limiter near local turning points, thereby avoiding loss of resolution in narrow extrema. Examples are given for one-dimensional pure convection of scalar profiles at constant velocity.

  15. Cost effective waste management through composting in Africa.

    PubMed

    Couth, R; Trois, C

    2012-12-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per person from urban waste management activities are greater in sub-Saharan African countries than in other developing countries, and are increasing as the population becomes more urbanised. Waste from urban areas across Africa is essentially dumped on the ground and there is little control over the resulting gas emissions. The clean development mechanism (CDM), from the 1997 Kyoto Protocol has been the vehicle to initiate projects to control GHG emissions in Africa. However, very few of these projects have been implemented and properly registered. A much more efficient and cost effective way to control GHG emissions from waste is to stabilise the waste via composting and to use the composted material as a soil improver/organic fertiliser or as a component of growing media. Compost can be produced by open windrow or in-vessel composting plants. This paper shows that passively aerated open windrows constitute an appropriate low-cost option for African countries. However, to provide an usable compost material it is recommended that waste is processed through a materials recovery facility (MRF) before being composted. The paper demonstrates that material and biological treatment (MBT) are viable in Africa where they are funded, e.g. CDM. However, they are unlikely to be instigated unless there is a replacement to the Kyoto Protocol, which ceases for Registration in December 2012.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of Crohn’s disease post-operative care

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Emily K; Kamm, Michael A; Dr Cruz, Peter; Hamilton, Amy L; Ritchie, Kathryn J; Bell, Sally J; Brown, Steven J; Connell, William R; Desmond, Paul V; Liew, Danny

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To define the cost-effectiveness of strategies, including endoscopy and immunosuppression, to prevent endoscopic recurrence of Crohn’s disease following intestinal resection. METHODS: In the “POCER” study patients undergoing intestinal resection were treated with post-operative drug therapy. Two thirds were randomized to active care (6 mo colonoscopy and drug intensification for endoscopic recurrence) and one third to drug therapy without early endoscopy. Colonoscopy at 18 mo and faecal calprotectin (FC) measurement were used to assess disease recurrence. Administrative data, chart review and patient questionnaires were collected prospectively over 18 mo. RESULTS: Sixty patients (active care n = 43, standard care n = 17) were included from one health service. Median total health care cost was $6440 per patient. Active care cost $4824 more than standard care over 18 mo. Medication accounted for 78% of total cost, of which 90% was for adalimumab. Median health care cost was higher for those with endoscopic recurrence compared to those in remission [$26347 (IQR 25045-27485) vs $2729 (IQR 1182-5215), P < 0.001]. FC to select patients for colonoscopy could reduce cost by $1010 per patient over 18 mo. Active care was associated with 18% decreased endoscopic recurrence, costing $861 for each recurrence prevented. CONCLUSION: Post-operative management strategies are associated with high cost, primarily medication related. Calprotectin use reduces costs. The long term cost-benefit of these strategies remains to be evaluated. PMID:27076772

  17. A model to estimate the cost effectiveness of the indoorenvironment improvements in office work

    SciTech Connect

    Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.

    2004-06-01

    Deteriorated indoor climate is commonly related to increases in sick building syndrome symptoms, respiratory illnesses, sick leave, reduced comfort and losses in productivity. The cost of deteriorated indoor climate for the society is high. Some calculations show that the cost is higher than the heating energy costs of the same buildings. Also building-level calculations have shown that many measures taken to improve indoor air quality and climate are cost-effective when the potential monetary savings resulting from an improved indoor climate are included as benefits gained. As an initial step towards systemizing these building level calculations we have developed a conceptual model to estimate the cost-effectiveness o